Science.gov

Sample records for cross-spectrum experimental method

  1. Cross-spectrum measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators.

    PubMed

    Hati, A; Nelson, C W; Howe, D A

    2016-03-01

    Cross-spectrum analysis is a commonly used technique for the detection of phase and amplitude noise of a signal in the presence of interfering uncorrelated noise. Recently, we demonstrated that the phase-inversion (anti-correlation) effect due to amplitude noise leakage can cause complete or partial collapse of the cross-spectral function. In this paper, we discuss the newly discovered effect of anti-correlated thermal noise that originates from the common-mode power divider (splitter), an essential component in a cross-spectrum noise measurement system. We studied this effect for different power splitters and discuss its influence on the measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators. We provide theory, simulation and experimental results. In addition, we expand this study to reveal how the presence of ferrite-isolators and amplifiers at the output ports of the power splitters can affect the oscillator noise measurements. Finally, we discuss a possible solution to overcome this problem. PMID:27036804

  2. Cross-spectrum measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hati, A.; Nelson, C. W.; Howe, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    Cross-spectrum analysis is a commonly used technique for the detection of phase and amplitude noise of a signal in the presence of interfering uncorrelated noise. Recently, we demonstrated that the phase-inversion (anti-correlation) effect due to amplitude noise leakage can cause complete or partial collapse of the cross-spectral function. In this paper, we discuss the newly discovered effect of anti-correlated thermal noise that originates from the common-mode power divider (splitter), an essential component in a cross-spectrum noise measurement system. We studied this effect for different power splitters and discuss its influence on the measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators. We provide theory, simulation and experimental results. In addition, we expand this study to reveal how the presence of ferrite-isolators and amplifiers at the output ports of the power splitters can affect the oscillator noise measurements. Finally, we discuss a possible solution to overcome this problem.

  3. Measurement of the cross spectrum of HF electrostatic waves in an auroral plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottelette, R.; Illiano, J. M.

    1983-06-01

    A method for the metrology of space plasmas, based on the reception of electrostatic waves by a pair of small dipole antennas was tested in PORCUPINE project rocket experiments. Both dipoles received signals from the natural electrostatic microfield in the plasma; the cross spectrum of these random signals was measured. Data obtained during a weak auroral activity are presented. Natural electrostatic emissions were observed around the upper hybrid frequency and also around the three-halves harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. A linear calculation shows that the amplitudes of these emissions are above the thermal noise level of the plasma. To explain the observations, it is necessary to take into account the presence of low-energy precipitating electrons (1 to 20 eV), which are highly anisotropic.

  4. Experimental methods for identifying failure mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental methods for identifying failure mechanisms in fibrous composites are studied. Methods to identify failure in composite materials includes interferometry, holography, fractography and ultrasonics.

  5. Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary

    2013-11-30

    Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature to guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.

  6. Recently approved and experimental methods of contraception.

    PubMed

    Franklin, M

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recently approved two new contraceptive methods, and others are nearing approval. In addition, several innovative approaches to contraception are under investigation. This paper details the latest information on the following methods: Paragard Copper T 380A intrauterine device, cervical cap, NORPLANT, vaginal pouch, long-acting injectables, hormonal vaginal ring, transdermal patch, experimental male methods, inhibin, and contraceptive vaccines. PMID:2286850

  7. A method for experimental modal separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallauer, W. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for the numerical simulation of multiple-shaker modal survey testing using simulated experimental data to optimize the shaker force-amplitude distribution for the purpose of isolating individual modes of vibration. Inertia, damping, stiffness, and model data are stored on magnetic disks, available by direct access to the interactive FORTRAN programs which perform all computations required by this relative force amplitude distribution method.

  8. Using Experimental Methods in Higher Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Steven M.; Morrison, Gary R.; Lowther, Deborah L.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental methods have been used extensively for many years to conduct research in education and psychology. However, applications of experiments to investigate technology and other instructional innovations in higher education settings have been relatively limited. The present paper examines ways in which experiments can be used productively…

  9. Experimental validation of structural optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Howard M.

    1992-01-01

    The topic of validating structural optimization methods by use of experimental results is addressed. The need for validating the methods as a way of effecting a greater and an accelerated acceptance of formal optimization methods by practicing engineering designers is described. The range of validation strategies is defined which includes comparison of optimization results with more traditional design approaches, establishing the accuracy of analyses used, and finally experimental validation of the optimization results. Examples of the use of experimental results to validate optimization techniques are described. The examples include experimental validation of the following: optimum design of a trussed beam; combined control-structure design of a cable-supported beam simulating an actively controlled space structure; minimum weight design of a beam with frequency constraints; minimization of the vibration response of helicopter rotor blade; minimum weight design of a turbine blade disk; aeroelastic optimization of an aircraft vertical fin; airfoil shape optimization for drag minimization; optimization of the shape of a hole in a plate for stress minimization; optimization to minimize beam dynamic response; and structural optimization of a low vibration helicopter rotor.

  10. Experimental test of airplane boarding methods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Steffen, Jason H.; Hotchkiss, Jon

    2011-10-26

    We report the results of an experimental comparison of different airplane boarding methods. This test was conducted in a mock 757 fuselage, located on a Southern California soundstage, with 12 rows of six seats and a single aisle. Five methods were tested using 72 passengers of various ages. We found a significant reduction in the boarding times of optimized methods over traditional methods. These improved methods, if properly implemented, could result in a significant savings to airline companies. The process of boarding an airplane is of interest to a variety of groups. The public is interested both as a curiosity,more » as it is something that they may regularly experience, and as a consumer, as their experiences good or bad can affect their loyalties. Airline companies and their employees also have a stake in an efficient boarding procedure as time saved in the boarding process may result is monetary savings, in the quality of interactions with passengers, and in the application of human resources to the general process of preparing an airplane for departure. A recent study (Nyquist and McFadden, 2008) indicates that the average cost to an airline company for each minute of time spent at the terminal is roughly $30. Thus, each minute saved in the turn-around time of a flight has the potential to generate over $16,000,000 in annual savings (assuming an average of 1500 flights per day). While the boarding process may not be the primary source of delay in returning an airplane to the skies, reducing the boarding time may effectively eliminate passenger boarding as a contributor in any meaningful measure. Consequently, subsequent efforts to streamline the other necessary tasks, such as refueling and maintenance, would be rewarded with a material reduction in time at the gate for each flight.« less

  11. Experimental test of airplane boarding methods

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Hotchkiss, Jon

    2011-10-26

    We report the results of an experimental comparison of different airplane boarding methods. This test was conducted in a mock 757 fuselage, located on a Southern California soundstage, with 12 rows of six seats and a single aisle. Five methods were tested using 72 passengers of various ages. We found a significant reduction in the boarding times of optimized methods over traditional methods. These improved methods, if properly implemented, could result in a significant savings to airline companies. The process of boarding an airplane is of interest to a variety of groups. The public is interested both as a curiosity, as it is something that they may regularly experience, and as a consumer, as their experiences good or bad can affect their loyalties. Airline companies and their employees also have a stake in an efficient boarding procedure as time saved in the boarding process may result is monetary savings, in the quality of interactions with passengers, and in the application of human resources to the general process of preparing an airplane for departure. A recent study (Nyquist and McFadden, 2008) indicates that the average cost to an airline company for each minute of time spent at the terminal is roughly $30. Thus, each minute saved in the turn-around time of a flight has the potential to generate over $16,000,000 in annual savings (assuming an average of 1500 flights per day). While the boarding process may not be the primary source of delay in returning an airplane to the skies, reducing the boarding time may effectively eliminate passenger boarding as a contributor in any meaningful measure. Consequently, subsequent efforts to streamline the other necessary tasks, such as refueling and maintenance, would be rewarded with a material reduction in time at the gate for each flight.

  12. Experimental methods for geological remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    During the past year a two channel IR technique for discrimination among silicate rocks was tested for a second time, a three channel IR method was tested for the first time, and a new visible-reflective IR ratio method was hypothesized and qualitatively tested for iron oxide recognition. Both the two channel and three channel IR ratios methods were capable of discriminating felsic from mafic rock types. The three-channel ratio values measured by the scanner were found to agree, within reasonable limits, with the values of R calculated from laboratory data. The capability of the three channel method to obtain absolute ratios is accompanied by a costly processing routine. The two channel technique is superior for low thermal contrast scenes about which some ground truth is available because of its speed and economy.

  13. Experimental and analysis methods in radiochemical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattadori, C. M.; Pandola, L.

    2016-04-01

    Radiochemical experiments made the history of neutrino physics by achieving the first observation of solar neutrinos (Cl experiment) and the first detection of the fundamental pp solar neutrinos component (Ga experiments). They measured along decades the integral νe charged current interaction rate in the exposed target. The basic operation principle is the chemical separation of the few atoms of the new chemical species produced by the neutrino interactions from the rest of the target, and their individual counting in a low-background counter. The smallness of the expected interaction rate (1 event per day in a ˜ 100 ton target) poses severe experimental challenges on the chemical and on the counting procedures. The main aspects related to the analysis techniques employed in solar neutrino experiments are reviewed and described, with a special focus given to the event selection and the statistical data treatment.

  14. Experimental Mathemataics: Examples, Methods andImplications

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2005-01-31

    Recent years have seen the flowering of ''experimental'' mathematics, namely the utilization of modern computer technology as an active tool in mathematical research. This development is not limited to a handful of researchers, nor to a handful of universities, nor is it limited to one particular field of mathematics. Instead, it involves hundreds of individuals, at many different institutions, who have turned to the remarkable new computational tools now available to assist in their research, whether it be in number theory, algebra, analysis, geometry or even topology. These tools are being used to work out specific examples, generate plots, perform various algebraic and calculus manipulations, test conjectures, and explore routes to formal proof. Using computer tools to test conjectures is by itself a major time saver for mathematicians, as it permits them to quickly rule out false notions.

  15. Clinical experimental stress studies: methods and assessment.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Stress is a state of threatened homeostasis during which a variety of adaptive processes are activated to produce physiological and behavioral changes. Stress induction methods are pivotal for understanding these physiological or pathophysiological changes in the body in response to stress. Furthermore, these methods are also important for the development of novel pharmacological agents for stress management. The well-described methods to induce stress in humans include the cold pressor test, Trier Social Stress Test, Montreal Imaging Stress Task, Maastricht Acute Stress Test, CO2 challenge test, Stroop test, Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task, noise stress, and Mannheim Multicomponent Stress Test. Stress assessment in humans is done by measuring biochemical markers such as cortisol, cortisol awakening response, dexamethasone suppression test, salivary α-amylase, plasma/urinary norepinephrine, norepinephrine spillover rate, and interleukins. Physiological and behavioral changes such as galvanic skin response, heart rate variability, pupil size, and muscle and/or skin sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) and cardiovascular parameters such as heart rate, blood pressure, and self-reported anxiety are also monitored to assess stress response. This present review describes these commonly employed methods to induce stress in humans along with stress assessment methods. PMID:26020552

  16. Acquisition of Psychomotor Skills in Dentistry: An Experimental Teaching Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vann, William F., Jr.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A traditional method of teaching psychomotor skills in a preclinical restorative dentistry laboratory course was compared with an experimental method. The experimental group was taught using a guided systematic approach that relied on detailed checklists and exhaustive faculty feedback. (Author/MLW)

  17. Experimental Methodology in English Teaching and Learning: Method Features, Validity Issues, and Embedded Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jang Ho

    2012-01-01

    Experimental methods have played a significant role in the growth of English teaching and learning studies. The paper presented here outlines basic features of experimental design, including the manipulation of independent variables, the role and practicality of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in educational research, and alternative methods…

  18. Experimental implementation of the modified independent modal space control method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental realization of a modified independent modal space control (MIMSC) method to control the vibration of a flexible cantilevered beam is presented. In its operation the method relies on the use of one piezoelectric actuator to control several vibration modes through a time-sharing strategy. The effectiveness of the MIMSC method in damping out the beam vibration is demonstrated by comparing the results with those obtained by other modal control methods. Two methods are considered, the independent modal space control method and the pseudo-inverse method. The feasibility of the MIMSC method as a viable alternative for controlling large flexible structures with a very small number of actuators is emphasized.

  19. Taguchi method of experimental design in materials education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Martin W.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the advantages and disadvantages of the Taguchi Method of experimental design as applied to Materials Science will be discussed. This is a fractional factorial method that employs the minimum number of experimental trials for the information obtained. The analysis is also very simple to use and teach, which is quite advantageous in the classroom. In addition, the Taguchi loss function can be easily incorporated to emphasize that improvements in reproducibility are often at least as important as optimization of the response. The disadvantages of the Taguchi Method include the fact that factor interactions are normally not accounted for, there are zero degrees of freedom if all of the possible factors are used, and randomization is normally not used to prevent environmental biasing. In spite of these disadvantages it is felt that the Taguchi Method is extremely useful for both teaching experimental design and as a research tool, as will be shown with a number of brief examples.

  20. Experimental design for improved ceramic processing, emphasizing the Taguchi Method

    SciTech Connect

    Weiser, M.W. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.); Fong, K.B. )

    1993-12-01

    Ceramic processing often requires substantial experimentation to produce acceptable product quality and performance. This is a consequence of ceramic processes depending upon a multitude of factors, some of which can be controlled and others that are beyond the control of the manufacturer. Statistical design of experiments is a procedure that allows quick, economical, and accurate evaluation of processes and products that depend upon several variables. Designed experiments are sets of tests in which the variables are adjusted methodically. A well-designed experiment yields unambiguous results at minimal cost. A poorly designed experiment may reveal little information of value even with complex analysis, wasting valuable time and resources. This article will review the most common experimental designs. This will include both nonstatistical designs and the much more powerful statistical experimental designs. The Taguchi Method developed by Grenichi Taguchi will be discussed in some detail. The Taguchi method, based upon fractional factorial experiments, is a powerful tool for optimizing product and process performance.

  1. A soil irrigation method for experimental plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, M. N.; Soran, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    An irrigation method developed in order to ensure periodic wetting of several batches of soil, for experimental plant growth, is proposed. An experimental irrigation installation, intended to perform real-time soil moisturizing, by adding known quantities (preset for a certain batch of soil) of aqueous solutions has been built and tested. The prototype installation comprises six miniature pumps for water dosage, each meant to moisturize a batch of soil. Each pump is actuated from the mains power supply, with zero-crossing synchronization. The administrated quantity of aqueous solution is a multiple of the minimum volume, 0.2±0.01 ml of fluid. Due to its structure, the system allows the administration of different aqueous solutions for each batch of soil. Due to its modular construction the experimental installation can be expanded in order to ensure water disposal over an increased number of soil batches and the method may be suited also for micro irrigation systems.

  2. Using Propensity Score Methods to Approximate Factorial Experimental Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Nianbo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is through Monte Carlo simulation to compare several propensity score methods in approximating factorial experimental design and identify best approaches in reducing bias and mean square error of parameter estimates of the main and interaction effects of two factors. Previous studies focused more on unbiased estimates of…

  3. The contour method: a new approach in experimental mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B

    2009-01-01

    The recently developed contour method can measure complex residual-stress maps in situations where other measurement methods cannot. This talk first describes the principle of the contour method. A part is cut in two using a precise and low-stress cutting technique such as electric discharge machining. The contour of the resulting new surface, which will not be flat if residual stresses are relaxed by the cutting, is then measured. Finally, a conceptually simple finite element analysis determines the original residual stresses from the measured contour. Next, this talk gives several examples of applications. The method is validated by comparing with neutron diffraction measurements in an indented steel disk and in a friction stir weld between dissimilar aluminum alloys. Several applications are shown that demonstrate the power of the contour method: large aluminum forgings, railroad rails, and welds. Finally, this talk discusses why the contour method is significant departure from conventional experimental mechanics. Other relaxation method, for example hole-drilling, can only measure a 1-D profile of residual stresses, and yet they require a complicated inverse calculation to determine the stresses from the strain data. The contour method gives a 2-D stress map over a full cross-section, yet a direct calculation is all that is needed to reduce the data. The reason for these advantages lies in a subtle but fundamental departure from conventional experimental mechanics. Applying new technology to old methods like will not give similar advances, but the new approach also introduces new errors.

  4. [Experimental study on an auditory method for analyzing DNA segments].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shouzhong; Fang, Xianglin

    2002-01-01

    To explore a new method for analyzing biological molecules that have already been sequenced, an experimental study on an auditory method was carried out. The auditory method for analyzing biological molecules includes audible representation of sequence data. Audible representation of sequence data was implemented by using a multimedia computer. Each mononucleotide in a DNA sequence was matched with a corresponding sound, i.e., a DNA sequence was "dubbed" in a sound sequence. When the sound sequence is played, a special cadence can be heard. In the audible representation experiment, special cadences of different exons can be clearly heard. The results show that audible representation of DNA sequence data can be implemented by using a multimedia technique. After a 5-time auditory training, subjects both in internal testing and external testing can obtain 93%-100% of judgment accuracy rate for the difference between two sound sequences of two different exons, thus providing an experimental basis for the practicability of this method. Auditory method for analyzing DNA segments might be beneficial for the research in comparative genomics and functional genomics. This new technology must be robust and be carefully evaluated and improved in a high-throughput environment before its implementation in an application setting. PMID:11951511

  5. Nonlinear feedback method of robot control - A preliminary experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Ganguly, S.; Li, Z.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    The nonlinear feedback method of robot control has been experimentally implemented on two PUMA 560 robot arms. The feasibility of the proposed controller, which was shown viable through simulation results earlier, is stressed. The servomechanism operates in task space, and the nonlinear feedback takes care of the necessary transformations to compute the necessary joint currents. A discussion is presented of the implementation with details of the experiments performed. The performance of the controller is encouraging but was limited to 100-Hz sampling frequency and to derived velocity information at the time of the experimentation. The setup of the lab, the software aspects, results, and the control hardware architecture that has recently been implemented are discussed.

  6. Method of fission heat flux determination from experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, F.A.

    1999-09-28

    A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

  7. Method of fission heat flux determination from experimental data

    DOEpatents

    Paxton, Frank A.

    1999-01-01

    A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

  8. A unique method of neutron flux determination from experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, Frank A.

    1998-12-01

    A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

  9. Current Experimental Methods for Characterizing Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Li, Qing; Wang, Renxiao

    2016-04-19

    Protein molecules often interact with other partner protein molecules in order to execute their vital functions in living organisms. Characterization of protein-protein interactions thus plays a central role in understanding the molecular mechanism of relevant protein molecules, elucidating the cellular processes and pathways relevant to health or disease for drug discovery, and charting large-scale interaction networks in systems biology research. A whole spectrum of methods, based on biophysical, biochemical, or genetic principles, have been developed to detect the time, space, and functional relevance of protein-protein interactions at various degrees of affinity and specificity. This article presents an overview of these experimental methods, outlining the principles, strengths and limitations, and recent developments of each type of method. PMID:26864455

  10. Alternate Methods to Experimentally Investigate Shock Initiation Properties of Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svingala, Forrest; Lee, Richard; Sutherland, Gerrit; Samuels, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Reactive flow models are desired for many new explosives early in the formulation development stage. Traditionally, these models are parameterized by carefully-controlled 1-D shock experiments, including gas-gun testing with embedded gauges and wedge testing with explosive plane wave lenses (PWL). These experiments are easy to interpret, due to their 1-D nature, but are generally expensive to perform, and cannot be performed at all explosive test facilities. We investigate alternative methods to probe shock-initiation behavior of new explosives using widely-available pentolite gap test donors and simple time-of-arrival type diagnostics. These methods can be performed at a low cost at virtually any explosives testing facility, which allows experimental data to parameterize reactive flow models to be collected much earlier in the development of an explosive formulation. However, the fundamentally 2-D nature of these tests may increase the modeling burden in parameterizing these models, and reduce general applicability. Several variations of the so-called modified gap test were investigated and evaluated for suitability as an alternative to established 1-D gas gun and PWL techniques. At least partial agreement with 1-D test methods was observed for the explosives tested, and future work is planned to scope the applicability and limitations of these experimental techniques.

  11. The Assessment of Experimental Methods of Serial Number Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argo, Mackenzie

    Serial number restoration is a common and successful process of revealing obliterated serial numbers on firearms. In a crime laboratory setting, obliterated serial numbers are commonly processed in order to tie a person to a crime scene or provide an investigative lead for officers. Currently serial numbers are restored using a chemical etchant method that can eat away at the metal on the firearm even after the examination is complete. It can also take several hours to complete and only provide an examiner with a partial number. There are other nondestructive options however little to no literature is available. The purpose of this study is to discover new methods for nondestructive serial number restoration and to compare them to the traditional chemical method used. Metal bars of premeasured obliteration depths and different compositions were examined using three proposed experimental methods: near infrared imaging, cold frost, and scanning acoustic microscopy. Results did not indicate significant difference in the median number of visible digits recovered for each of the three proposed methods compared to the traditional chemical method. There were significant results in the median number of composition utilized and depth of obliteration. This indicates that different firearm compositions and depth of obliteration has an effect on serial number restoration.

  12. Experimental evaluation of the certification-trail method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gregory F.; Wilson, Dwight S.; Masson, Gerald M.; Itoh, Mamoru; Smith, Warren W.; Kay, Jonathan S.

    1993-01-01

    Certification trails are a recently introduced and promising approach to fault-detection and fault-tolerance. A comprehensive attempt to assess experimentally the performance and overall value of the method is reported. The method is applied to algorithms for the following problems: huffman tree, shortest path, minimum spanning tree, sorting, and convex hull. Our results reveal many cases in which an approach using certification-trails allows for significantly faster overall program execution time than a basic time redundancy-approach. Algorithms for the answer-validation problem for abstract data types were also examined. This kind of problem provides a basis for applying the certification-trail method to wide classes of algorithms. Answer-validation solutions for two types of priority queues were implemented and analyzed. In both cases, the algorithm which performs answer-validation is substantially faster than the original algorithm for computing the answer. Next, a probabilistic model and analysis which enables comparison between the certification-trail method and the time-redundancy approach were presented. The analysis reveals some substantial and sometimes surprising advantages for ther certification-trail method. Finally, the work our group performed on the design and implementation of fault injection testbeds for experimental analysis of the certification trail technique is discussed. This work employs two distinct methodologies, software fault injection (modification of instruction, data, and stack segments of programs on a Sun Sparcstation ELC and on an IBM 386 PC) and hardware fault injection (control, address, and data lines of a Motorola MC68000-based target system pulsed at logical zero/one values). Our results indicate the viability of the certification trail technique. It is also believed that the tools developed provide a solid base for additional exploration.

  13. Theoretical and experimental physical methods of neutron-capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, G. I.

    2011-09-01

    This review is based to a substantial degree on our priority developments and research at the IR-8 reactor of the Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute. New theoretical and experimental methods of neutron-capture therapy are developed and applied in practice; these are: A general analytical and semi-empiric theory of neutron-capture therapy (NCT) based on classical neutron physics and its main sections (elementary theories of moderation, diffuse, reflection, and absorption of neutrons) rather than on methods of mathematical simulation. The theory is, first of all, intended for practical application by physicists, engineers, biologists, and physicians. This theory can be mastered by anyone with a higher education of almost any kind and minimal experience in operating a personal computer.

  14. Experimental validation of boundary element methods for noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental validation of methods to predict radiated noise is presented. A combined finite element and boundary element model was used to predict the vibration and noise of a rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker. The predicted noise was compared to sound power measured by the acoustic intensity method. Inaccuracies in the finite element model shifted the resonance frequencies by about 5 percent. The predicted and measured sound power levels agree within about 2.5 dB. In a second experiment, measured vibration data was used with a boundary element model to predict noise radiation from the top of an operating gearbox. The predicted and measured sound power for the gearbox agree within about 3 dB.

  15. Detection of interaction articles and experimental methods in biomedical literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This article describes the approaches taken by the OntoGene group at the University of Zurich in dealing with two tasks of the BioCreative III competition: classification of articles which contain curatable protein-protein interactions (PPI-ACT) and extraction of experimental methods (PPI-IMT). Results Two main achievements are described in this paper: (a) a system for document classification which crucially relies on the results of an advanced pipeline of natural language processing tools; (b) a system which is capable of detecting all experimental methods mentioned in scientific literature, and listing them with a competitive ranking (AUC iP/R > 0.5). Conclusions The results of the BioCreative III shared evaluation clearly demonstrate that significant progress has been achieved in the domain of biomedical text mining in the past few years. Our own contribution, together with the results of other participants, provides evidence that natural language processing techniques have become by now an integral part of advanced text mining approaches. PMID:22151872

  16. Experimental methods of molecular matter-wave optics.

    PubMed

    Juffmann, Thomas; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Arndt, Markus

    2013-08-01

    We describe the state of the art in preparing, manipulating and detecting coherent molecular matter. We focus on experimental methods for handling the quantum motion of compound systems from diatomic molecules to clusters or biomolecules.Molecular quantum optics offers many challenges and innovative prospects: already the combination of two atoms into one molecule takes several well-established methods from atomic physics, such as for instance laser cooling, to their limits. The enormous internal complexity that arises when hundreds or thousands of atoms are bound in a single organic molecule, cluster or nanocrystal provides a richness that can only be tackled by combining methods from atomic physics, chemistry, cluster physics, nanotechnology and the life sciences.We review various molecular beam sources and their suitability for matter-wave experiments. We discuss numerous molecular detection schemes and give an overview over diffraction and interference experiments that have already been performed with molecules or clusters.Applications of de Broglie studies with composite systems range from fundamental tests of physics up to quantum-enhanced metrology in physical chemistry, biophysics and the surface sciences.Nanoparticle quantum optics is a growing field, which will intrigue researchers still for many years to come. This review can, therefore, only be a snapshot of a very dynamical process. PMID:23907707

  17. Experimental evaluation of chromatic dispersion estimation method using polynomial fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xin; Wang, Junyi; Pan, Zhongqi

    2014-11-01

    We experimentally validate a non-data-aided, modulation-format independent chromatic dispersion (CD) estimation method based on polynomial fitting algorithm in single-carrier coherent optical system with a 40 Gb/s polarization-division-multiplexed quadrature-phase-shift-keying (PDM-QPSK) system. The non-data-aided CD estimation for arbitrary modulation formats is achieved by measuring the differential phase between frequency f±fs/2 (fs is the symbol rate) in digital coherent receivers. The estimation range for a 40 Gb/s PDM-QPSK signal can be up to 20,000 ps/nm with a measurement accuracy of ±200 ps/nm. The maximum CD measurement is 25,000 ps/nm with a measurement error of 2%.

  18. Theoretical and experimental investigation of multispectral photoacoustic osteoporosis detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Idan; Hershkovich, Hadas Sara; Gannot, Israel; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a widespread disorder, which has a catastrophic impact on patients lives and overwhelming related to healthcare costs. Recently, we proposed a multispectral photoacoustic technique for early detection of osteoporosis. Such technique has great advantages over pure ultrasonic or optical methods as it allows the deduction of both bone functionality from the bone absorption spectrum and bone resistance to fracture from the characteristics of the ultrasound propagation. We demonstrated the propagation of multiple acoustic modes in animal bones in-vitro. To further investigate the effects of multiple wavelength excitations and of induced osteoporosis on the PA signal a multispectral photoacoustic system is presented. The experimental investigation is based on measuring the interference of multiple acoustic modes. The performance of the system is evaluated and a simple two mode theoretical model is fitted to the measured phase signals. The results show that such PA technique is accurate and repeatable. Then a multiple wavelength excitation is tested. It is shown that the PA response due to different excitation wavelengths revels that absorption by the different bone constitutes has a profound effect on the mode generation. The PA response is measured in single wavelength before and after induced osteoporosis. Results show that induced osteoporosis alters the measured amplitude and phase in a consistent manner which allows the detection of the onset of osteoporosis. These results suggest that a complete characterization of the bone over a region of both acoustic and optical frequencies might be used as a powerful tool for in-vivo bone evaluation.

  19. Can We Study Intelligence Using the Experimental Method?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eysenck, Hans J.

    1995-01-01

    It is argued that the study of one important aspect of intelligence, creativity, can be furthered by the introduction of causal theories and their experimental study. Purely correlational investigations are a useful beginning, but psychology can only acquire true scientific stature by combining correlational and experimental approaches. (SLD)

  20. Quasi-Experimental Analysis: A Mixture of Methods and Judgment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordray, David S.

    1986-01-01

    The role of human judgment in the development and synthesis of evidence has not been adequately developed or acknowledged within quasi-experimental analysis. Corrective solutions need to confront the fact that causal analysis within complex environments will require a more active assessment that entails reasoning and statistical modeling.…

  1. Assessing Methods for Generalizing Experimental Impact Estimates to Target Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Holger L.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Hill, Jennifer; Green, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    Randomized experiments are considered the gold standard for causal inference because they can provide unbiased estimates of treatment effects for the experimental participants. However, researchers and policymakers are often interested in using a specific experiment to inform decisions about other target populations. In education research,…

  2. Leveraging the Experimental Method to Inform Solar Cell Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Mary Annette; Ribblett, Jason W.; Hershberger, Heather Nicole

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the underlying logic of experimentation is exemplified within the context of a photoelectrical experiment for students taking a high school engineering, technology, or chemistry class. Students assume the role of photochemists as they plan, fabricate, and experiment with a solar cell made of copper and an aqueous solution of…

  3. Experimental methods of determining thermal properties of granite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of thermal properties of granite using the block method is discussed and compared with other methods. Problems that limit the accuracy of contact method in determining thermal properties of porous media are evaluated. Thermal properties of granite is determined in the laboratory with a...

  4. Multicriteria methods for resource planning: An experimental comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, B.F. . Dept. of Systems Engineering); Meier, P.M. )

    1994-11-01

    Multicriteria decision making (MCDM) methods are widely used for comparing alternatives when there are multiple objectives. For instance, utilities use them for resource bidding, externality quantification, facility siting, and resource planning. There are many alternative methods, differing in their ease of use, validity, results, and appropriateness to resource planning. Several MCDM methods are compared in an experiment involving the choice of resource portfolio for Seattle City Light. Planners and interest group representatives applied direct weight assessment, tradeoff weight assessment, additive value functions, and goal programming. Most of the participants concluded that MCDM methods could promote insight and confidence in decision making. However, they also confirmed the existence of method biases previously identified by psychologists. No single method emerged as best. Thus, application of two or more methods as consistency checks is recommended to guard against bias, and to stimulate insight.

  5. Experimental method for the purification and reconditioning of ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotae, Constantin

    1987-03-01

    The paper presents the theoretical aspects regarding the magnetogravimetric purification of ferrofluids both in the process of preparation and for their reconditioning from impurities. An experimental device used for magnetogravimetric purification is described together with experiments on some samples of oil-based ferrofluid that became impure with non-mixible solid, liquid, magnetic and nonmagnetic ingredients. The experiments resulted in a complete purification of the ferrofluid samples.

  6. Finite element method - A companion in experimental mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    The hybrid experimental-numerical procedure for structural analysis is described by its applications in fracture mechanics. The procedure was first verified by the excellent agreements between the dynamic stress intensity factors obtained directly by dynamic photoelasticity and those generated by the hybrid procedure where a dynamic finite element code was executed in its generation mode. The hybrid procedure was then used to determine the dynamic fracture toughness of reaction bonded silicon nitride.

  7. Sphericity measurements by the radial method: II. Experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecki, D.; Stępień, K.; Adamczak, S.

    2016-01-01

    The new concept of sphericity measurements enables accurate measurement of spherical elements. This concept assumes that measurements can be performed using a typical radial roundness measuring instrument equipped with a special mechanism for controlled positioning of a measured element. The concept requires solving numerous theoretical problems, and this was described in the previous companion paper. This second paper discusses the measuring equipment and the results of the experimental verification of the concept.

  8. Method for experimental determination of flutter speed by parameter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1989-01-01

    A method for flight flutter testing is proposed which enables one to determine the flutter dynamic pressure from flights flown far below the flutter dynamic pressure. The method is based on the identification of the coefficients of the equations of motion at low dynamic pressures, followed by the solution of these equations to compute the flutter dynamic pressure. The initial results of simulated data reported in the present work indicate that the method can accurately predict the flutter dynamic pressure, as described. If no insurmountable difficulties arise in the implementation of this method, it may significantly improve the procedures for flight flutter testing.

  9. Experimental verification of a recursive method to calculate evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, a recursive combination method (RCM) to calculate potential and crop evapotranspiration (ET) was given by Lascano and Van Bavel (Agron. J. 2007, 99:585–590). The RCM differs from the Penman-Monteith (PM) method, the main difference being that the assumptions made regarding the temperature ...

  10. Experimental Investigation of the Momentum Method for Determining Profile Drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goett, Harry J

    1939-01-01

    Report presents the results of an experimental investigation conducted in the full-scale tunnel to determine the accuracy of the Jones and the Betz equations for computing profile drag from total and static pressure surveys in the wake of wings. Surveys were made behind 6 by 8-foot airfoils of the NACA 0009, and 0018 sections at zero lift and behind the NACA 0012 at positive lifts. The surveys were made at various spanwise positions and at distances behind the airfoil ranging from 0.05c to 3.00c.

  11. Experimental Methods in Reduced-gravity Soldering Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettegrew, Richard D.; Struk, Peter M.; Watson, John K.; Haylett, Daniel R.

    2002-01-01

    The National Center for Microgravity Research, NASA Glenn Research Center, and NASA Johnson Space Center are conducting an experimental program to explore the influence of reduced gravity environments on the soldering process. An improved understanding of the effects of the acceleration environment is important to application of soldering during current and future human space missions. Solder joint characteristics that are being considered include solder fillet geometry, porosity, and microstructural features. Both through-hole and surface mounted devices are being investigated. This paper focuses on the experimental methodology employed in this project and the results of macroscopic sample examination. The specific soldering process, sample configurations, materials, and equipment were selected to be consistent with those currently on-orbit. Other apparatus was incorporated to meet requirements imposed by operation onboard NASA's KC-135 research aircraft and instrumentation was provided to monitor both the atmospheric and acceleration environments. The contingent of test operators was selected to include both highly skilled technicians and less skilled individuals to provide a population cross-section that would be representative of the skill mix that might be encountered in space mission crews.

  12. Parametric investigation of Radome analysis methods. Volume 4: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, H. L.; Newton, J. M.; Adams, W.; Ussailis, J. S.; Hadsell, M. J.; Huddleston, G. K.

    1981-02-01

    This Volume 4 of four volumes presents 140 measured far-field patterns and boresight error data for eight combinations of three monopulse antennas and five tangent ogive Rexolite radomes at 35 GHz. The antennas and radomes, all of different sizes, were selected to provide a range of parameters as found in the applications. The measured data serve as true data in the parametric investigation of radome analysis methods to determine the accuracies and ranges of validity of selected methods of analysis.

  13. Experimental validation of a ducted propeller analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. J.; Kinnas, S. A.; Kerwin, J. E.

    1992-06-01

    A ducted propeller model was tested in the MIT water tunnel. A hub apparatus was designed which allowed for the duct and propeller forces to be measured separately. The forces on the duct and propeller were measured over a range of advance coefficients. Velocities were measured upstream and downstream from the duct using a Laser Doppler Velocimetry system. Using these velocities the exprimental values for the spanwise distribution of circulation on the propeller blades were then calculated. The experimental results were compared to the results from a propeller lifting surface/duct and hub surface panel analysis code over the same range of advance coefficients showing very good agreement for the duct and propeller forces and the circulation in the region of attached flow.

  14. Methodical Base of Experimental Studies of Collinear Multibody Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanin, D. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Kondtatyev, N. A.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.; Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Jacobs, N.; Malaza, V.; Mulgin, S. I.

    2013-06-01

    Our recent experiments dedicated to study of the CCT of 252Cf (sf) were carried out at the COMETA setup based on the mosaics of PIN diodes and special array of 3He filled neutron counters. Principal peculiarity of the experiment consists in measuring of the heavy ions masses in the frame of the TOF-E (time-of-flight vs. energy) method in the wide range of masses and energies and almost collinear recession of the decay partners. The methodical questions of such experiment are under discussion here.

  15. Experimental analysis of methods for measuring small mammal populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.

    1946-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Peromyscus leucopus on a 17-acre study area were live-trapped, marked, and released over a seven-day period. On the three following nights intensive snap-trapping was done on the central acre of the study plot. The animals caught by snap traps in the central acre represented the population of the central acre and several surrounding acres. By the currently accepted methods of interpreting snap-trap data, the population per acre would be considered to be 23 adults. The live-trap data show that the true population was between six and seven adults per acre. Modern methods of live-trapping are shown to be valid for population studies. Two methods are presented for the conversion of live-trap data into per acre figures. Errors involved in the current use of snap-trap data are discussed and snap-trap methods are shown to be invalid for determining actual population numbers. It should be practical to use a snap-trap quadrant technique to obtain a relative measure or index figure for small mammal populations.

  16. COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR EVALUATION OF EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED EMPHYSEMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four methods to quantify induced emphysema, in a manner economically applicable to large numbers of animals, are compared by correlation analyses. Lung tissue used was from rats pretreated intratracheally with elastase or saline prior to exposure to air or (NH4)2SO4 or NH4NO3 aer...

  17. An entrepreneurial physics method and its experimental test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert

    2012-02-01

    As faculty in a master's program for entrepreneurial physics and in an applied physics PhD program, I have advised upwards of 40 master and doctoral theses in industrial physics. I have been closely involved with four robust start-up manufacturing companies focused on physics high-technology and I have spent 30 years collaborating with industrial physicists on research and development. Thus I am in a position to reflect on many articles and advice columns centered on entrepreneurship. What about the goals, strategies, resources, skills, and the 10,000 hours needed to be an entrepreneur? What about business plans, partners, financing, patents, networking, salesmanship and regulatory affairs? What about learning new technology, how to solve problems and, in fact, learning innovation itself? At this point, I have my own method to propose to physicists in academia for incorporating entrepreneurship into their research lives. With this method, we do not start with a major invention or discovery, or even with a search for one. The method is based on the training we have, and the teaching we do (even quantum electrodynamics!), as physicists. It is based on the networking we build by 1) providing courses of continuing education for people working in industry and 2) through our undergraduate as well as graduate students who have gone on to work in industry. In fact, if we were to be limited to two words to describe the method, they are ``former students.'' Data from local and international medical imaging manufacturing industry are presented.

  18. An Experimental Method for the Active Learning of Greedy Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez-Iturbide, J. Angel

    2013-01-01

    Greedy algorithms constitute an apparently simple algorithm design technique, but its learning goals are not simple to achieve.We present a didacticmethod aimed at promoting active learning of greedy algorithms. The method is focused on the concept of selection function, and is based on explicit learning goals. It mainly consists of an…

  19. Interleaved Carbon Minibeams: An Experimental Radiosurgery Method With Clinical Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Rusek, Adam; Fois, Giovanna R.; Olschowka, John; Desnoyers, Nicolle R.; Park, Jane Y.; Dioszegi, Istvan; Dane, Bari; Wang Ruiliang; Tomasi, Dardo; Lee, Hedok; Hurley, Sean D.; Coyle, Patricia K.; Meek, Allen G.; O'Banion, M. Kerry

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of 'interleaved carbon minibeams' for ablating a 6.5-mm target in a rabbit brain with little damage to the surrounding brain. The method is based on the well-established tissue-sparing effect of arrays of thin planes of radiation. Methods and Materials: Broad carbon beams from the National Aeronautics and Space Agency Space Radiation Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory were segmented into arrays of parallel, horizontal, 0.3-mm-thick planar beams (minibeams). The minibeams' gradual broadening in tissues resulted in 0.525-mm beam thickness at the target's proximal side in the spread-out Bragg peak. Interleaving was therefore implemented by choosing a 1.05 mm beam spacing on-center. The anesthetized rabbit, positioned vertically on a stage capable of rotating about a vertical axis, was exposed to arrays from four 90 Degree-Sign angles, with the stage moving up by 0.525 mm in between. This produced a solid radiation field at the target while exposing the nontargeted tissues to single minibeam arrays. The target 'physical' absorbed dose was 40.2 Gy. Results: The rabbit behaved normally during the 6-month observation period. Contrast magnetic resonance imaging and hematoxylin and eosin histology at 6 months showed substantial focal target damage with little damage to the surrounding brain. Conclusion: We plan to evaluate the method's therapeutic efficacy by comparing it with broad-beam carbon therapy in animal models. The method's merits would combine those of carbon therapy (i.e., tight target dose because of the carbon's Bragg-peak, sharp dose falloff, and high relative biological effectiveness at the target), together with the method's low impact on the nontargeted tissues. The method's smaller impact on the nontargeted brain might allow carbon therapy at higher target doses and/or lower normal tissue impact, thus leading to a more effective treatment of radioresistant tumors. It should also make the method more amenable to

  20. Prediction of skin sensitizers using alternative methods to animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Henrik; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-07-01

    Regulatory frameworks within the European Union demand that chemical substances are investigated for their ability to induce sensitization, an adverse health effect caused by the human immune system in response to chemical exposure. A recent ban on the use of animal tests within the cosmetics industry has led to an urgent need for alternative animal-free test methods that can be used for assessment of chemical sensitizers. To date, no such alternative assay has yet completed formal validation. However, a number of assays are in development and the understanding of the biological mechanisms of chemical sensitization has greatly increased during the last decade. In this MiniReview, we aim to summarize and give our view on the recent progress of method development for alternative assessment of chemical sensitizers. We propose that integrated testing strategies should comprise complementary assays, providing measurements of a wide range of mechanistic events, to perform well-educated risk assessments based on weight of evidence. PMID:24548737

  1. Comparison of methods for evaluation of experimentally induced emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, R.H.; Buschbom, R.L.; Smith, L.G.

    1984-04-01

    Four methods to quantify induced emphysema, in a manner economically applicable to large numbers of animals, are compared by correlation analyses. Lung tissue used was from rats pretreated intratracheally with elastase or saline prior to exposure to air or (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ aerosols. The most sensitive quantitative evaluation was from mean chord length (MCL) measurements on scanning electron micrographs (SEM). Four-corner and parallel-line grids provided similar results, and reducing sample size to one selected field per lobe yielded a high degree of reliability for MCL measurements. Alveolar-pore perimeter and area (also measured on SEM photographs) were increased by induced emphysema, but were not reliable indicators for degree of pulmonary involvement. Both subjective score (grading the degree of emphysema) and percentage-area-affected determinations indicated the presence of emphysema, but with less sensitivity than MCL measurements. However, these two subgross methods (performed with a dissecting microscope) provided valuable information on the distribution of pulmonary lesions; emphysema was induced in a nonuniform but consistent and progressive pattern in the two lobes of the lung studied. 23 studied.

  2. Experimental analysis of nonlinear problems by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laermann, Karl-Hans

    1994-11-01

    As an example of a geometrical nonlinear problem a thin plate-in-bending under large deflection is considered. To determine the inplane- as well as the bending stress-state the photoelastic reflection method and Ligtenberg's moire method are used; the measured information is evaluated according to the principles of integrated photoelasticity. As yet in photoelasticity it has always been supposed Hooke's law of elasticity is valid and consequently linear relations between birefringent effects and stresses are existing. However, in areas of high stress concentration and with reference to some of the mainly used photoelastic material nonlinear strain-stress relations must be introduced. A proper constitutive equation yields an advanced principal photoelastic equation, the solution of which is performed in an iterative procedure. It should be mentioned that extended material testing is demanded to get the various material parameters. Finally proper algorithms and the respective numerical evaluation procedures are described, to analyze plane stress-states, if the material shows viscoelastic response. Then the mechanical as well as the optical rheological response of material must be considered.

  3. Experimental Validation for Hot Stamping Process by Using Taguchi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawzi Zamri, Mohd; Lim, Syh Kai; Razlan Yusoff, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    Due to the demand for reduction in gas emissions, energy saving and producing safer vehicles has driven the development of Ultra High Strength Steel (UHSS) material. To strengthen UHSS material such as boron steel, it needed to undergo a process of hot stamping for heating at certain temperature and time. In this paper, Taguchi method is applied to determine the appropriate parameter of thickness, heating temperature and heating time to achieve optimum strength of boron steel. The experiment is conducted by using flat square shape of hot stamping tool with tensile dog bone as a blank product. Then, the value of tensile strength and hardness is measured as response. The results showed that the lower thickness, higher heating temperature and heating time give the higher strength and hardness for the final product. In conclusion, boron steel blank are able to achieve up to 1200 MPa tensile strength and 650 HV of hardness.

  4. Superconducting Microstrip Antennas: An Experimental Comparison of Two Feeding Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Mark A.; Claspy, Paul C.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) has generated a substantial amount of interest in microstrip antenna applications. However, the high permittivity of substrates compatible with HTS causes difficulty in feeding such antennas because of the high patch edge impedance. Two methods for feeding HTS microstrip antennas at K- and Ka-band are examined. Superconducting microstrip antennas that are directly coupled and gas-coupled to a microstrip transmission line have been designed and fabricated on lanthanum aluminate substrates using Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting thin films. Measurements from these antennas, including input impedance, bandwidth, efficiency, and patterns, are presented and compared with published models. The measured results demonstrate that usable antennas can be constructed using either of these architectures, although the antennas suffer from narrow bandwidths. In each case, the HTS antenna shows a substantial improvement over an identical antenna made with normal metals

  5. Superconducting microstrip antennas - An experimental comparison of two feeding methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, M. A.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Claspy, Paul C.

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) has generated a substantial amount of interest in microstrip antenna applications. However, the high permittivity of substrates compatible with HTS causes difficulty in feeding such antennas because of the high patch edge impedance. Two methods for feeding HTS microstrip antennas at K- and Ka-band are examined. Superconducting microstrip antennas that are directly coupled and gap-coupled to a microstrip transmission line have been designed and fabricated on lanthanum aluminate substrates using Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting thin films. Measurements from these antennas, including input impedance, bandwidth, efficiency, and patterns, are presented and compared with published models. The measured results demonstrate that usable antennas can be constructed using either of these architectures, although the antennas suffer from narrow bandwidths. In each case, the HTS antenna shows a substantial improvement over an identical antenna made with normal metals.

  6. Superconducting microstrip antennas: An experimental comparison of two feeding methods

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, M.A.; Claspy, P.C. ); Bhasin, K.B. . Lewis Research Center)

    1993-07-01

    The recent discovery of high-temperature superconductors (HTS's) has generated a substantial amount of interest in microstrip antenna applications. However, the high permittivity of substrates compatible with HTS causes difficulty in feeding such antennas because of the high patch edge impedance. In this paper, two methods for feeding HTS microstrip antennas at K and Ka-band are examined. Superconducting microstrip antennas that are directly coupled and gap-coupled to a microstrip transmission line have been designed and fabricated on lanthanum aluminate substrates using Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting thin films. Measurements from these antennas, including input impedance, bandwidth, efficiency, and patterns, are presented and compared with published models. The measured results demonstrate that usable antennas can be constructed using either of these architectures, although the antennas suffer from narrow bandwidths. In each case, the HTS antenna shows a substantial improvement over an identical antenna made with normal metals.

  7. Translocations of amphibians: Proven management method or experimental technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seigel, Richard A.; Dodd, C. Kenneth, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    In an otherwise excellent review of metapopulation dynamics in amphibians, Marsh and Trenham (2001) make the following provocative statements (emphasis added): If isolation effects occur primarily in highly disturbed habitats, species translocations may be necessary to promote local and regional population persistence. Because most amphibians lack parental care, they areprime candidates for egg and larval translocations. Indeed, translocations have already proven successful for several species of amphibians. Where populations are severely isolated, translocations into extinct subpopulations may be the best strategy to promote regional population persistence. We take issue with these statements for a number of reasons. First, the authors fail to cite much of the relevant literature on species translocations in general and for amphibians in particular. Second, to those unfamiliar with current research in amphibian conservation biology, these comments might suggest that translocations are a proven management method. This is not the case, at least in most instances where translocations have been evaluated for an appropriate period of time. Finally, the authors fail to point out some of the negative aspects of species translocation as a management method. We realize that Marsh and Trenham's paper was not concerned primarily with translocations. However, because Marsh and Trenham (2001) made specific recommendations for conservation planners and managers (many of whom are not herpetologists or may not be familiar with the pertinent literature on amphibians), we believe that it is essential to point out that not all amphibian biologists are as comfortable with translocations as these authors appear to be. We especially urge caution about advocating potentially unproven techniques without a thorough review of available options.

  8. Experimentation and scientific method in the classical world: their rise and decline.

    PubMed

    Prioreschi, P

    1994-03-01

    Focusing mostly on medicine, the author discusses evidence of the use of the experimental method in antiquity, particularly in the Western world. Instead of progressing toward a scientific revolution, however, the experimental method was abandoned after Galen. It is concluded that this was due to the shift of emphasis from physical to spiritual concerns fostered by Christianity. PMID:8057968

  9. Teaching Experimental Method Using the Feature-Present/Feature-Absent Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, William R.

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether a classroom experiment improved the learning of experimental method, at the start of the semester 2 introductory psychology classes took a 10-question multiple-choice pretest on experimental method. Two days later, before the instructor covered the relevant material in the course, 1 class took part in a classroom experiment on…

  10. Comparison of Nonoverlap Methods for Identifying Treatment Effect in Single-Subject Experimental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakap, Salih; Snyder, Patricia; Pasia, Cathleen

    2014-01-01

    Debate is occurring about which result interpretation aides focused on examining the experimental effect should be used in single-subject experimental research. In this study, we examined seven nonoverlap methods and compared results using each method to judgments of two visual analysts. The data sources for the present study were 36 studies…

  11. The agencies method for coalition formation in experimental games

    PubMed Central

    Nash, John F.; Nagel, Rosemarie; Ockenfels, Axel; Selten, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    In society, power is often transferred to another person or group. A previous work studied the evolution of cooperation among robot players through a coalition formation game with a non-cooperative procedure of acceptance of an agency of another player. Motivated by this previous work, we conduct a laboratory experiment on finitely repeated three-person coalition formation games. Human players with different strength according to the coalition payoffs can accept a transfer of power to another player, the agent, who then distributes the coalition payoffs. We find that the agencies method for coalition formation is quite successful in promoting efficiency. However, the agent faces a tension between short-term incentives of not equally distributing the coalition payoff and the long-term concern to keep cooperation going. In a given round, the strong player in our experiment often resolves this tension approximately in line with the Shapley value and the nucleolus. Yet aggregated over all rounds, the payoff differences between players are rather small, and the equal division of payoffs predicts about 80% of all groups best. One reason is that the voting procedure appears to induce a balance of power, independent of the individual player's strength: Selfish subjects tend to be voted out of their agency and are further disciplined by reciprocal behaviors. PMID:23175792

  12. Experimental study of ? RF plasma jet by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBenedictis, S.; Dilecce, G.; Simek, M.; Vigliotti, M.

    1998-11-01

    An 0963-0252/7/4/013/img9 jet stream expanding from a radio-frequency discharge has been investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. The axial and lateral profiles of the expansion glow and the jet axial velocity have been measured by optical methods in order to infer the fluid-dynamic properties of the jet. The position of the shock wave is located at about 5 mm from the nozzle, and the stream velocity achieves a maximum of about 2 Mach in the supersonic region. Optical titration of N atoms and the analysis of emitting excited species 0963-0252/7/4/013/img10 and 0963-0252/7/4/013/img11) have been carried out to monitor the active species in the jet stream and their energy content. The titration of N atoms by NO, injected in the subsonic region, monitored by 0963-0252/7/4/013/img9 first positive 0963-0252/7/4/013/img13 band, 0963-0252/7/4/013/img14 NO 0963-0252/7/4/013/img15 and 0963-0252/7/4/013/img16 continuum emissions, has been examined. This latter emission has been found to give a reasonable estimation of the N density, which is in the range of about (0.1-0.2)% 0963-0252/7/4/013/img9 for a discharge power varying from 50 to 80 W. The 0963-0252/7/4/013/img9 first positive emission, NO 0963-0252/7/4/013/img15 and 0963-0252/7/4/013/img20 bands, instead, are largely affected by the presence of the 0963-0252/7/4/013/img21 metastable and by the high velocity of the N stream. The analysis of 0963-0252/7/4/013/img22 and 0963-0252/7/4/013/img11 vibrational distributions shows the presence of a significant density of the 0963-0252/7/4/013/img21 metastable as well as a non-negligible presence in the expansion of hot electrons. A quasi-one-dimensional fluid-dynamic model of the expansion gives a rough account of the measured location of the shock wave and of the velocity and temperature axial profiles.

  13. Scaffolded Instruction Improves Student Understanding of the Scientific Method & Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Costa, Allison R.; Schlueter, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of a guided-inquiry lab in introductory biology classes, along with scaffolded instruction, improved students' understanding of the scientific method, their ability to design an experiment, and their identification of experimental variables. Pre- and postassessments from experimental versus control sections over three semesters…

  14. A new experimental method for the accelerated characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeow, Y. T.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1978-01-01

    The use of composite materials for a variety of practical structural applications is presented and the need for an accelerated characterization procedure is assessed. A new experimental and analytical method is presented which allows the prediction of long term properties from short term tests. Some preliminary experimental results are presented.

  15. Modeling the spatial shape of nondiffracting beams: Experimental generation of Frozen Waves via holographic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Tárcio A.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Gesualdi, Marcos R. R.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we experimentally implement the spatial shape modeling of nondiffracting optical beams via computer generated holograms reconstructed optically by spatial light modulators. The results reported here are an experimental confirmation of the so-called Frozen Wave method, developed a few years ago. Optical beams of this type have potential applications in optical tweezers, medicine, atom guiding, remote sensing, etc.

  16. Analytical methods and experimental approaches for electrophysiological studies of brain oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Brain oscillations are increasingly the subject of electrophysiological studies probing their role in the functioning and dysfunction of the human brain. In recent years this research area has seen rapid and significant changes in the experimental approaches and analysis methods. This article reviews these developments and provides a structured overview of experimental approaches, spectral analysis techniques and methods to establish relationships between brain oscillations and behaviour. PMID:24675051

  17. Gas-generator pressurization system experimental development method of the LV propellant tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinenko, A.

    2009-01-01

    The approved efficient method of experimental development is given in the example of accumulated experience in the gas-generator pressurization system development of the LV propellant tanks. To the present time, acceptable calculated methods has not been created from complexity of thermo-mass-transfer processes. Therefore, under the development of similar systems the main attention is centered to its ground experimental development which requires special benches, corresponding competent structures, great time and material expenditure. The approved method of gas-generator pressurization system experimental development is proposed. It is based on the energy analysis of influenced factors and selection of its limit-possible operation modes. Practical use is allowed to decrease significantly the test volume, to decrease material expenditure and time for pressurization system experimental development under complex assurance of its optimal main characteristics.

  18. Applying computational methods to interpret experimental results in tribology and enantioselective catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Michael T.

    Computational methods are rapidly becoming a mainstay in the field of chemistry. Advances in computational methods (both theory and implementation), increasing availability of computational resources and the advancement of parallel computing are some of the major forces driving this trend. It is now possible to perform density functional theory (DFT) calculations with chemical accuracy for model systems that can be interrogated experimentally. This allows computational methods to supplement or complement experimental methods. There are even cases where DFT calculations can give insight into processes and interactions that cannot be interrogated directly by current experimental methods. This work presents several examples of the application of computational methods to the interpretation and analysis of experimentally obtained results. First, triobological systems were investigated primarily with full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method DFT calculations. Second, small organic molecules adsorbed on Pd(111) were studied using projector-augmented wave (PAW) method DFT calculations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) image simulations to investigate molecular interactions involved in enantioselective heterogeneous catalysis. A method for method for calculating pressure-dependent shear properties of model boundary-layer lubricants is demonstrated. The calculated values are compared with experimentally obtained results. For the case of methyl pyruvate adsorbed on Pd(111), DFT-calculated adsorption energies and structures are used along with STM simulations to identify species observed by STM imaging. A previously unobserved enol species is discovered to be present along with the expected keto species. The information about methyl pyruvate species on Pd(111) is combined with previously published studies of S-alpha-(1-naphthyl)-ethylamine (NEA) to understand the nature of their interaction upon coadsorption on Pd(111). DFT calculated structures and

  19. An Integral Method to Evaluate Wall Heat Flux Suitable For Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, Alireza; Mehdi, Faraz; White, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    An integral method to evaluate wall heat flux in turbulent boundary layers is presented. The method is mathematically exact and has the advantage of having no explicit streamwise gradient terms, thus making it amenable to experimental data. Using existing data sets, the method is shown to work in both zero- and adverse-pressure gradient boundary layers. The method is particularly useful for the latter case where Reynolds analogy does not hold and the wall heat flux must be measured directly.

  20. Choices for Studying Choice: Assessing Charter School Effectiveness Using Two Quasi-Experimental Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Devora H.; Raymond, Margaret E.

    2012-01-01

    Two quasi-experimental methods--fixed effects (FE) and virtual control records (VCR)--were used to measure charter schooling in 14 states and two districts. The new VCR method uses all available observable charter student characteristics and prior performance to create a composite comparison record. A head-to-head comparison of the FE and VCR…

  1. Experimental method research on transverse flexoelectric response of poly(vinylidene fluoride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuwen; Xu, Minglong; Ma, Guoliang; Liang, Xu; Shen, Shengping

    2016-07-01

    Flexoelectricity describes the strain-gradient-induced electric polarization existing in dielectric materials. The coefficient that exists between the strain-gradient and the induced electric polarization defines the flexoelectric coefficient tensor. It is necessary to analyze different experimental methods to evaluate the procedure of measuring the transverse flexoelectric coefficient tensor component. In this work, the transverse flexoelectric coefficient tensor component of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is studied using three different experimental methods and the effects of the mentioned methods are evaluated. The results presented in this work are helpful for the design of experiments of different dielectric materials, including ceramics and polymers on flexoelectricity.

  2. Survey of engineering computational methods and experimental programs for estimating supersonic missile aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, W. C.; Allen, J. M.; Hernandez, G.; Dillenius, M. F. E.; Hemsch, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of engineering computational methods and experimental programs used for estimating the aerodynamic characteristics of missile configurations. Emphasis is placed on those methods which are suitable for preliminary design of conventional and advanced concepts. An analysis of the technical approaches of the various methods is made in order to assess their suitability to estimate longitudinal and/or lateral-directional characteristics for different classes of missile configurations. Some comparisons between the predicted characteristics and experimental data are presented. These comparisons are made for a large variation in flow conditions and model attitude parameters. The paper also presents known experimental research programs developed for the specific purpose of validating analytical methods and extending the capability of data-base programs.

  3. Basic theory and experimental techniques of the strain-gradient method

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, F.W.; Pindera, J.T.

    1987-09-01

    The theories of presently used experimental methods of stress and deformation analysis which employ radiant energy as a detector are based on the assumption that light propagates rectilinearly within both undeformed and deformed bodies which are initially homogeneous and isotropic when diffraction phenomena are negligible. This assumption is not correct: light propagation within deformed bodies is nonrectilinear in a general case. Although this has already been observed and applied practically by some researchers in photoelasticity, it has not so far been generally acknowledged and accepted in experimental mechanics. On the basis of empirical data produced in the period 1948-1983, theories and foundations are presented for a new experimental method which is based on the relations between stress/strain gradients and curvatures of light beams. This method is called the strain-gradient method or, less rigorously, gradient photoelasticity. 39 references.

  4. 75 FR 71155 - Market Test of Experimental Product: “Alternative Postage Payment Method for Greeting Cards”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE Market Test of Experimental Product: ``Alternative Postage Payment Method for Greeting Cards'' AGENCY: Postal... Postage Payment Method for Greeting Cards'' experimental product on January 2, 2011. The Postal...

  5. Experimental and mathematical modeling methods for the investigation of toxicological interactions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Masri, Hisham A.

    2007-09-01

    While procedures have been developed and used for many years to assess risk and determine acceptable exposure levels to individual chemicals, most cases of environmental contamination can result in concurrent or sequential exposure to more than one chemical. Toxicological predictions of such combinations must be based on an understanding of the mechanisms of action and interaction of the components of the mixtures. Statistical and experimental methods test the existence of toxicological interactions in a mixture. However, these methods are limited to experimental data ranges for which they are derived, in addition to limitations caused by response differences from experimental animals to humans. Empirical methods such as isobolograms, median-effect principle and response surface methodology (RSM) are based on statistical experimental design and regression of data. For that reason, the predicted response surfaces can be used for extrapolation across dose regions where interaction mechanisms are not anticipated to change. In general, using these methods for predictions can be problematic without including biologically based mechanistic descriptions that can account for dose and species differences. Mechanistically based models, such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models, include explicit descriptions of interaction mechanisms which are related to target tissues levels. These models include dose-dependent mechanistic hypotheses of toxicological interactions which can be tested by model-directed experimental design and used to identify dose regions where interactions are not significant.

  6. Experimental and mathematical modeling methods for the investigation of toxicological interactions.

    PubMed

    El-Masri, Hisham A

    2007-09-01

    While procedures have been developed and used for many years to assess risk and determine acceptable exposure levels to individual chemicals, most cases of environmental contamination can result in concurrent or sequential exposure to more than one chemical. Toxicological predictions of such combinations must be based on an understanding of the mechanisms of action and interaction of the components of the mixtures. Statistical and experimental methods test the existence of toxicological interactions in a mixture. However, these methods are limited to experimental data ranges for which they are derived, in addition to limitations caused by response differences from experimental animals to humans. Empirical methods such as isobolograms, median-effect principle and response surface methodology (RSM) are based on statistical experimental design and regression of data. For that reason, the predicted response surfaces can be used for extrapolation across dose regions where interaction mechanisms are not anticipated to change. In general, using these methods for predictions can be problematic without including biologically based mechanistic descriptions that can account for dose and species differences. Mechanistically based models, such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models, include explicit descriptions of interaction mechanisms which are related to target tissues levels. These models include dose-dependent mechanistic hypotheses of toxicological interactions which can be tested by model-directed experimental design and used to identify dose regions where interactions are not significant. PMID:16996550

  7. Evaluating the osseointegration of nanostructured titanium implants in animal models: Current experimental methods and perspectives (Review).

    PubMed

    Babuska, Vaclav; Moztarzadeh, Omid; Kubikova, Tereza; Moztarzadeh, Amin; Hrusak, Daniel; Tonar, Zbynek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the experimental methods currently being used to evaluate the osseointegration of nanostructured titanium implants using animal models. The material modifications are linked to the biocompatibility of various types of oral implants, such as laser-treated, acid-etched, plasma-coated, and sand-blasted surface modifications. The types of implants are reviewed according to their implantation site (endoosseous, subperiosteal, and transosseous implants). The animal species and target bones used in experimental implantology are carefully compared in terms of the ratio of compact to spongy bone. The surgical technique in animal experiments is briefly described, and all phases of the histological evaluation of osseointegration are described in detail, including harvesting tissue samples, processing undemineralized ground sections, and qualitative and quantitative histological assessment of the bone-implant interface. The results of histological staining methods used in implantology are illustrated and compared. A standardized and reproducible technique for stereological quantification of bone-implant contact is proposed and demonstrated. In conclusion, histological evaluation of the experimental osseointegration of dental implants requires careful selection of the experimental animals, bones, and implantation sites. It is also advisable to use larger animal models and older animals with a slower growth rate rather than small or growing experimental animals. Bones with a similar ratio of compact to spongy bone, such as the human maxilla and mandible, are preferred. A number of practical recommendations for the experimental procedures, harvesting of samples, tissue processing, and quantitative histological evaluations are provided. PMID:27421518

  8. On the Equivalency of Experimental B(E2) Values Determined by Various Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritychenko, Boris; Birch, Michael; Singh, Balraj; Brookhaven National Laboratory Team; McMaster University Team

    2015-10-01

    Over the last 60 years a variety of experimental methods have been employed to determine reduced transition probabilities in even-even nuclei. Different methods and data analysis techniques imply a strong need for consistency checks of the reported results. To investigate the equivalence of different measurements we have used a recently-developed B(E2) ↑ database. For the first time transition probabilities for Doppler Shift Attenuation (DSA), Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS), Delayed Coincidences (DC), Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) and Coulomb Excitation (CE) methods have been analyzed and compared in the Z = 6-94 region. The analysis of B(E2;01+ -->21+) values of the 100 frequently-studied even-even nuclei indicates these experimental methods produce equivalent results. Possible differences between the DSA and CE values near closed neutron and proton shells could be explained by the experimental deficiencies. Further comparisons of the present data with the inelastic electron scattering (EE') results also show agreement. These findings confirm equivalence of the major experimental methods for a wide range of nuclei. This work was funded by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with Brookhaven Science Associates, LC.

  9. Highly Efficient Design-of-Experiments Methods for Combining CFD Analysis and Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Haller, Harold S.

    2009-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to examine the impact of "highly efficient" Design-of-Experiments (DOE) methods for combining sets of CFD generated analysis data with smaller sets of Experimental test data in order to accurately predict performance results where experimental test data were not obtained. The study examines the impact of micro-ramp flow control on the shock wave boundary layer (SWBL) interaction where a complete paired set of data exist from both CFD analysis and Experimental measurements By combining the complete set of CFD analysis data composed of fifteen (15) cases with a smaller subset of experimental test data containing four/five (4/5) cases, compound data sets (CFD/EXP) were generated which allows the prediction of the complete set of Experimental results No statistical difference were found to exist between the combined (CFD/EXP) generated data sets and the complete Experimental data set composed of fifteen (15) cases. The same optimal micro-ramp configuration was obtained using the (CFD/EXP) generated data as obtained with the complete set of Experimental data, and the DOE response surfaces generated by the two data sets were also not statistically different.

  10. Design and structural verification of locomotive bogies using combined analytical and experimental methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, I.; Popa, G.; Girnita, I.; Prenta, G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents a practical methodology for design and structural verification of the locomotive bogie frames using a modern software package for design, structural verification and validation through combined, analytical and experimental methods. In the initial stage, the bogie geometry is imported from a CAD program into a finite element analysis program, such as Ansys. The analytical model validation is done by experimental modal analysis carried out on a finished bogie frame. The bogie frame own frequencies and own modes by both experimental and analytic methods are determined and the correlation analysis of the two types of models is performed. If the results are unsatisfactory, the structural optimization should be performed. If the results are satisfactory, the qualification procedures follow by static and fatigue tests carried out in a laboratory with international accreditation in the field. This paper presents an application made on bogie frames for the LEMA electric locomotive of 6000 kW.

  11. Experimental method for determination of bending and torsional rigidities of advanced composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Takenori

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental method for the determination of the bending and torsional rigidities of advanced fiber composite laminates with the aid of laser holographic interferometry. The proposed method consists of a four-point bending test and a resonance test. The bending rigidity ratio (D{sub 12}/D{sub 22}) can be determined from the fringe patterns of the four-point bending test. The bending rigidities (D{sub 11} and D{sub 22}) and the torsional rigidity (D{sub 66}) are calculated from the natural frequencies of cantilever plates of the resonance test. The test specimens are carbon/epoxy cross-ply laminates. The adequacy of the experimental method is confirmed by comparing the measured rigidities with the theoretical values obtained from classical lamination theory (CLT) by using the measured tensile properties. The results show that the present method can be used to evaluate the rigidities of orthotropic laminates with reasonably good accuracy.

  12. An Experimental Method for Measuring Mechanical Properties of Rat Pulmonary Arteries Verified With Latex

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, E. S.; Slifka, A. J.; Wright, J. E.; McCowan, C. N.; Finch, D. S.; Quinn, T. P.; McColskey, J. D.; Ivy, D. D.; Shandas, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a test method for measuring the mechanical properties of small, nonlinear membrane samples from a rat model for pulmonary hypertension. The size and nonlinearity of the pulmonary artery samples poses a challenge for developing a test method that will generate quality, reproducible data in the pressure range experienced by the hypertensive pulmonary artery. The experimental method described here has sufficient precision to yield a combined relative standard uncertainty of 4 %. The method is calibrated against 75 µm thick latex and the data agree well with the neo-Hookian model.

  13. Theoretical-experimental method of determining the drag coefficient of a harmonically oscillating thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, A. G.; Kamalutdinov, A. M.; Paimushin, V. N.; Firsov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    A method for determining the drag coefficient of a thin plate harmonically oscillating in a viscous incompressible fluid is proposed. The method is based on measuring the amplitude of deflections of cantilever-fixed thin plates exhibiting damping flexural oscillations with a frequency corresponding to the first mode and on solving an inverse problem of calculating the drag coefficient on the basis of the experimentally found logarithmic decrement of beam oscillations.

  14. Sequential Experimentation: Comparing Stochastic Approximation Methods Which Find the "Right" Value of the Independent Variable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Thomas J.; Johnston, Charles B.

    This research investigates stochastic approximation procedures of the Robbins-Monro type. Following a brief introduction to sequential experimentation, attention is focused on formal methods for selecting successive values of a single independent variable. Empirical results obtained through computer simulation are used to compare several formal…

  15. Estimation of the drift eliminator efficiency using numerical and experimental methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stodůlka, Jiří; Vitkovičová, Rut

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the drift eliminators is to prevent water from escaping in significant amounts the cooling tower. They are designed to catch the droplets dragged by the tower draft and the efficiency given by the shape of the eliminator is the main evaluation criteria. The ability to eliminate the escaping water droplets is studied using CFD and using the experimental IPI method.

  16. An Improved Experimental Method for Simulating Erosion Processes by Concentrated Channel Flow

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Yu; Mo, Bin; Mi, Hong-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Rill erosion is an important process that occurs on hill slopes, including sloped farmland. Laboratory simulations have been vital to understanding rill erosion. Previous experiments obtained sediment yields using rills of various lengths to get the sedimentation process, which disrupted the continuity of the rill erosion process and was time-consuming. In this study, an improved experimental method was used to measure the rill erosion processes by concentrated channel flow. By using this method, a laboratory platform, 12 m long and 3 m wide, was used to construct rills of 0.1 m wide and 12 m long for experiments under five slope gradients (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 degrees) and three flow rates (2, 4, and 8 L min−1). Sediment laden water was simultaneously sampled along the rill at locations 0.5 m, 1 m, 2 m, 3 m, 4 m, 5 m, 6 m, 7 m, 8 m, 10 m, and 12 m from the water inlet to determine the sediment concentration distribution. The rill erosion process measured by the method used in this study and that by previous experimental methods are approximately the same. The experimental data indicated that sediment concentrations increase with slope gradient and flow rate, which highlights the hydraulic impact on rill erosion. Sediment concentration increased rapidly at the initial section of the rill, and the rate of increase in sediment concentration reduced with the rill length. Overall, both experimental methods are feasible and applicable. However, the method proposed in this study is more efficient and easier to operate. This improved method will be useful in related research. PMID:24949621

  17. Methods for determining the internal thrust of scramjet engine modules from experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voland, Randall T.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for calculating zero-fuel internal drag of scramjet engine modules from experimental measurements are presented. These methods include two control-volume approaches, and a pressure and skin-friction integration. The three calculation techniques are applied to experimental data taken during tests of a version of the NASA parametric scramjet. The methods agree to within seven percent of the mean value of zero-fuel internal drag even though several simplifying assumptions are made in the analysis. The mean zero-fuel internal drag coefficient for this particular engine is calculated to be 0.150. The zero-fuel internal drag coefficient when combined with the change in engine axial force with and without fuel defines the internal thrust of an engine.

  18. Design studies for the transmission simulator method of experimental dynamic substructuring.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Randall Lee; Arviso, Michael

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, a successful method for generating experimental dynamic substructures has been developed using an instrumented fixture, the transmission simulator. The transmission simulator method solves many of the problems associated with experimental substructuring. These solutions effectively address: (1) rotation and moment estimation at connection points; (2) providing substructure Ritz vectors that adequately span the connection motion space; and (3) adequately addressing multiple and continuous attachment locations. However, the transmission simulator method may fail if the transmission simulator is poorly designed. Four areas of the design addressed here are: (1) designating response sensor locations; (2) designating force input locations; (3) physical design of the transmission simulator; and (4) modal test design. In addition to the transmission simulator design investigations, a review of the theory with an example problem is presented.

  19. Experimental Method for Characterizing Electrical Steel Sheets in the Normal Direction

    PubMed Central

    Hihat, Nabil; Lecointe, Jean Philippe; Duchesne, Stephane; Napieralska, Ewa; Belgrand, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes an experimental method to characterise magnetic laminations in the direction normal to the sheet plane. The principle, which is based on a static excitation to avoid planar eddy currents, is explained and specific test benches are proposed. Measurements of the flux density are made with a sensor moving in and out of an air-gap. A simple analytical model is derived in order to determine the permeability in the normal direction. The experimental results for grain oriented steel sheets are presented and a comparison is provided with values obtained from literature. PMID:22163394

  20. Experimental comparison and validation of hot-ball method with guarded hot plate method on polyurethane foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, Ján; Glorieux, Christ; Dieška, Peter; Kubičár, Ľudovít

    2016-07-01

    The Hot-ball method is an innovative transient method for measuring thermophysical properties. The principle is based on heating of a small ball, incorporated in measured medium, by constant heating power and simultaneous measuring of the ball's temperature response since the heating was initiated. The shape of the temperature response depends on thermophysical properties of the medium, where the sensor is placed. This method is patented by Institute of Physics, SAS, where the method and sensors based on this method are being developed. At the beginning of the development of sensors for this method we were oriented on monitoring applications, where relative precision is much more important than accuracy. Meanwhile, the quality of sensors was improved good enough to be used for a new application - absolute measuring of thermophysical parameters of low thermally conductive materials. This paper describes experimental verification and validation of measurement by hot-ball method. Thanks to cooperation with Laboratory of Soft Matter and Biophysics of Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium, established Guarded Hot Plate method was used as a reference. Details about measuring setups, description of the experiments and results of the comparison are presented.

  1. Clinical experimentation with aerosol antibiotics: current and future methods of administration

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Kioumis, Ioannis; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Spyratos, Dionysios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Turner, J Francis; Browning, Robert; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Currently almost all antibiotics are administered by the intravenous route. Since several systems and situations require more efficient methods of administration, investigation and experimentation in drug design has produced local treatment modalities. Administration of antibiotics in aerosol form is one of the treatment methods of increasing interest. As the field of drug nanotechnology grows, new molecules have been produced and combined with aerosol production systems. In the current review, we discuss the efficiency of aerosol antibiotic studies along with aerosol production systems. The different parts of the aerosol antibiotic methodology are presented. Additionally, information regarding the drug molecules used is presented and future applications of this method are discussed. PMID:24115836

  2. Experimental Validation of Normalized Uniform Load Surface Curvature Method for Damage Localization

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ho-Yeon; Sung, Seung-Hoon; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we experimentally validated the normalized uniform load surface (NULS) curvature method, which has been developed recently to assess damage localization in beam-type structures. The normalization technique allows for the accurate assessment of damage localization with greater sensitivity irrespective of the damage location. In this study, damage to a simply supported beam was numerically and experimentally investigated on the basis of the changes in the NULS curvatures, which were estimated from the modal flexibility matrices obtained from the acceleration responses under an ambient excitation. Two damage scenarios were considered for the single damage case as well as the multiple damages case by reducing the bending stiffness (EI) of the affected element(s). Numerical simulations were performed using MATLAB as a preliminary step. During the validation experiments, a series of tests were performed. It was found that the damage locations could be identified successfully without any false-positive or false-negative detections using the proposed method. For comparison, the damage detection performances were compared with those of two other well-known methods based on the modal flexibility matrix, namely, the uniform load surface (ULS) method and the ULS curvature method. It was confirmed that the proposed method is more effective for investigating the damage locations of simply supported beams than the two conventional methods in terms of sensitivity to damage under measurement noise. PMID:26501286

  3. Videotaped Feedback Method to Enhance Learning in Preclinical Operative Dentistry: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dipali Yogesh; Dadpe, Ashwini Manish; Kalra, Dheeraj Deepak; Garcha, Vikram P

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a videotaped feedback method enhanced teaching and learning outcomes in a preclinical operative laboratory setting for novice learners. In 2013, 60 dental students at a dental school in India were randomly assigned to two groups: control (n=30) and experimental (n=30). The control group prepared a Class II tooth preparation for amalgam after receiving a video demonstration of the exercise. The experimental group received the same video demonstration as the control group, but they also participated in a discussion and analysis of the control groups' videotaped performance and then performed the same exercise. The self-evaluation scores (SS) and examiner evaluation scores (ES) of the two groups were compared using the unpaired t-test. The experimental group also used a five-point Likert scale to rate each item on the feedback form. The means of SS (13.65±2.43) and ES (14.75±1.97) of the experimental group were statistically higher than the means of SS (11.55±2.09) and ES (11.60±1.82) of the control group. Most students in the experimental group perceived that this technique enhanced their learning experience. Within the limits of this study, the videotaped feedback using both ideal and non-ideal examples enhanced the students' performance. PMID:26632301

  4. Spreading Simulation of Droplet Impact on Solid Surface with CLSVOF Method and Its Experimental Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Li, Ping

    2016-04-01

    A coupled volume-of-fluid and level set (CLSVOF) method is applied for the simulation of droplet impacting on a solid surface. This two-phase flow approach combines the advantages of VOF and level set (LS) methods. Three cases are listed and simulated by CLSVOF method, and the wettability is evaluated by tracking the three-phase contact line (TPCL). Results showed that the change of liquid spreading ratio with time has a good fit with the experimental results of the above three cases and high accuracy is achieved by CLSVOF method compared with VOF method, which indicated that this model is suitable for researching the wetting problem. The spreading speed on good wettability surfaces is faster than that of on poor wettability surfaces significantly, and the recoiling phenomenon appears after the droplet spreading to its maximum.

  5. The investigation of psychoanalytic theory by means of the experimental method.

    PubMed

    Shulman, D G

    1990-01-01

    Psychoanalysis has been criticized for its lack of a quantitative research tradition and its resulting reliance on the case history method for its data. While the in-depth observation of a small group of cases has an important place in the development of science, particularly in the hypothesis generating phase, it is argued that the testing of psychoanalytic hypotheses must depend on research methods that allow for more stringent control and replication. Five studies that utilize a true experimental design and that examine psychoanalytically significant topics are described. Special problems confronting the psychoanalytic experimenter are discussed. It is hoped that this article will stimulate those investigators who have an interest in testing psychoanalytic principles to design future studies that are rigorous in their methodology. PMID:2228447

  6. An Experimental Comparison of Two Methods on Photosynthesis Driving Soil Respiration: Girdling and Defoliation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yanli; Guan, Dexin; Wu, Jiabing; Wang, Anzhi; Jin, Changjie; Yuan, Fenghui

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies with different experimental methods have demonstrated that photosynthesis significantly influences soil respiration (RS). To compare the experimental results of different methods, RS after girdling and defoliation was measured in five-year-old seedlings of Fraxinus mandshurica from June to September. Girdling and defoliation significantly reduced RS by 33% and 25% within 4 days, and 40% and 32% within the entire treatment period, respectively. The differential response of RS to girdling and defoliation was a result of the over-compensation for RS after girdling and redistribution of stored carbon after defoliation. No significant effect on RS was observed between girdling and defoliation treatment, while the soluble sugar content in fine roots was higher in defoliation than in girdling treatment, indicating that defoliation had less compensation effect for RS after interrupting photosynthates supply. We confirm the close coupling of RS with photosynthesis and recommend defoliation for further studies to estimate the effect of photosynthesis on RS. PMID:26177498

  7. Experimental validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, T. W.; Wu, X. F.

    1994-01-01

    This research report is presented in three parts. In the first part, acoustical analyses were performed on modes of vibration of the housing of a transmission of a gear test rig developed by NASA. The modes of vibration of the transmission housing were measured using experimental modal analysis. The boundary element method (BEM) was used to calculate the sound pressure and sound intensity on the surface of the housing and the radiation efficiency of each mode. The radiation efficiency of each of the transmission housing modes was then compared to theoretical results for a finite baffled plate. In the second part, analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise level radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, while the BEM was used to predict the sound intensity and total radiated sound power using surface vibration as the input data. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis; noise predicted by the BEM was validated by measurements of sound intensity. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: sound power predicted by the BEM model using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and sound power measured by an acoustic intensity scan. In the third part, the structure used in part two was modified. A rib was attached to the top plate of the structure. The FEM and BEM were then used to predict structural vibration and radiated noise respectively. The predicted vibration and radiated noise were then validated through experimentation.

  8. Experimental study to explore the 8Be-induced nuclear reaction via the Trojan horse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Qun-Gang; Li, Cheng-Bo; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Irgaziev, Bakhadir; Fu, Yuan-Yong; Spitaleri, Claudio; La Cognata, Marco; Zhou, Jing; Meng, Qiu-Ying; Lamia, Livio; Lattuada, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    To explore a possible indirect method for 8Be induced astrophysical reactions, the 8Be=(8Be+n ) cluster structure has been studied via the Trojan horse method. For the first time a 8Be nucleus having an ultrashort lifetime is studied by the Trojan horse method and a 9Be nucleus in the ground state is used for this purpose. The 9Be nucleus is assumed to have a (8Be+n ) cluster structure and used as a Trojan horse nucleus. The 8Be nucleus acts as a participant, while the neutron is a spectator to the virtual 8Be+d →α +6Li reaction via the 3-body reaction 8Be+d →α +6Li+n . The experimental neutron momentum distribution inside 9Be has been reconstructed. The agreement between the experimental momentum distribution and the theoretical one indicates that a (8Be+n ) cluster structure inside 9Be is very likely. Therefore, the experimental study of 8Be induced reactions, for example, the measurement of the 8Be+α →12C reaction proceeding through the Hoyle state, is possible.

  9. Comparative experimental biomechanical study of different types of stabilization methods of the lower cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Kalff, R; Ulrich, C; Claes, L; Wilke, H J; Grote, W

    1992-01-01

    In a comparative experimental biodynamic study using thirty-two human cervical spines of cadavers the primary stabilization effect of different types of spondylodesis was examined. Whereas in flexion stress all methods showed a sufficient stability, the rotation tests proved, that in case of a dorsal instability of the lower cervical spine, posterior interlaminar wiring or anterior plate stabilization showed no reliable stabilization effect. However, the compression clamps by ROOSEN and TRAUSCHEL as well as the hook-plates by MAGERL are suitable dorsal stabilization methods with excellent rotation stability. In case of dorsal instability of the lower cervical spine a posterior spondylodesis is necessary and sufficient. PMID:1480272

  10. New experimental method of visualizing the electric field due to surface charges on circuit elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Rebecca; de Salazar, Alex; Nassar, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    Although static surface charges on circuit elements are of enormous interest, recent papers and textbooks have only discussed the problem theoretically using analytical or numerical approaches. The only well-known experimental method to visualize the structure of electric fields around circuit elements was reported by Jefimenko almost half a century ago. In our paper, we report on a simple method to visualize the electric field produced by static surface charges on current-carrying circuit elements. Our method uses a mixture of PTFE (Teflon) sealant and mineral oil, a copper wire placed in the mixture's container, and two 6 kV power supplies. We believe that our new method can be used directly in the classroom.

  11. A validated spectrofluorimetric method for the determination of nifuroxazide through coumarin formation using experimental design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nifuroxazide (NF) is an oral nitrofuran antibiotic, having a wide range of bactericidal activity against gram positive and gram negative enteropathogenic organisms. It is formulated either in single form, as intestinal antiseptic or in combination with drotaverine (DV) for the treatment of gastroenteritis accompanied with gastrointestinal spasm. Spectrofluorimetry is a convenient and sensitive technique for pharmaceutical quality control. The new proposed spectrofluorimetric method allows its determination either in single form or in binary mixture with DV. Furthermore, experimental conditions were optimized using the new approach: Experimental design, which has many advantages over the old one, one variable at a time (OVAT approach). Results A novel and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method was designed and validated for the determination of NF in pharmaceutical formulation. The method was based upon the formation of a highly fluorescent coumarin compound by the reaction between NF and ethylacetoacetate (EAA) using sulfuric acid as catalyst. The fluorescence was measured at 390 nm upon excitation at 340 nm. Experimental design was used to optimize experimental conditions. Volumes of EAA and sulfuric acid, temperature and heating time were considered the critical factors to be studied in order to establish an optimum fluorescence. Each two factors were co-tried at three levels. Regression analysis revealed good correlation between fluorescence intensity and concentration over the range 20–400 ng ml-1. The suggested method was successfully applied for the determination of NF in pure and capsule forms. The procedure was validated in terms of linearity, accuracy, precision, limit of detection and limit of quantification. The selectivity of the method was investigated by analysis of NF in presence of the co-mixed drug DV where no interference was observed. The reaction pathway was suggested and the structure of the fluorescent product was proposed

  12. Experimental study of two material decomposition methods using multi-bin photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Kevin C.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Gilat Schmidt, Taly

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting detectors with multi-bin pulse height analysis (PHA) are capable of extracting energy dependent information which can be exploited for material decomposition. Iterative decomposition algorithms have been previously implemented which require prior knowledge of the source spectrum, detector spectral response, and energy threshold settings. We experimentally investigated two material decomposition methods that do not require explicit knowledge of the source spectrum and spectral response. In the first method, the effective spectrum for each energy bin is estimated from calibration transmission measurements, followed by an iterative maximum likelihood decomposition algorithm. The second investigated method, first proposed and tested through simulations by Alvarez, uses a linearized maximum likelihood estimator which requires calibration transmission measurements. The Alvarez method has the advantage of being non-iterative. This study experimentally quantified and compared the material decomposition bias, as a percentage of material thickness, and standard deviation resulting from these two material decomposition estimators. Multi-energy x-ray transmission measurements were acquired through varying thicknesses of Teon, Delrin, and neoprene at two different flux settings and decomposed into PMMA and aluminum thicknesses using the investigated methods. In addition, a series of 200 equally spaced projections of a rod phantom were acquired over 360°. The multi-energy sinograms were decomposed using both empirical methods and then reconstructed using filtered backprojection producing two images representing each basis material. The Alvarez method decomposed Delrin into PMMA with a bias of 0.5-19% and decomposed neoprene into aluminum with a bias of less than 3%. The spectral estimation method decomposed Delrin into PMMA with a bias of 0.6-16% and decomposed neoprene into aluminum with a bias of 0.1-58%. In general, the spectral estimation method resulted in

  13. Application of experimental design methodology in development and optimization of drug release method.

    PubMed

    Kincl, M; Turk, S; Vrecer, F

    2005-03-01

    The aim of our research was to apply experimental design methodology in the development and optimization of drug release methods. Diclofenac sodium (2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino]benzeneacetic acid monosodium salt) was selected as a model drug and Naklofen retard prolonged release tablets, containing 100 mg of diclofenac sodium, were chosen as a model prolonged release system. On the basis of previous results, a three-level three-factorial Box-Behnken experimental design was used to characterize and optimize three physicochemical parameters, i.e. rotation speeds of the stirring elements, pH, and ionic strengths of the dissolution medium, affecting the release of diclofenac sodium from the tablets. The chosen dependent variables (responses) were a cumulative percentage of dissolved diclofenac sodium in 2, 6, 12 and 24 h. For estimation of coefficients in the approximating polynomial function, the least square regression method was applied. Afterwards, the information about the model reliability was verified by using the analysis of variance (ANOVA). The estimation of model factors' significance was performed by Student's t-test. For investigation of the shape of the predicted response surfaces and for model optimization, the canonical analysis was applied. Our study proved that experimental design methodology could efficiently be applied for characterization and optimization of analytical parameters affecting drug release and that it is an economical way of obtaining the maximum amount of information in a short period of time and with the fewest number of experiments. PMID:15707730

  14. Thermophysical properties of medium density fiberboards measured by quasi-stationary method: experimental and numerical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troppová, Eva; Tippner, Jan; Hrčka, Richard

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental measurement of thermal properties of medium density fiberboards with different thicknesses (12, 18 and 25 mm) and sample sizes (50 × 50 mm and 100 × 100 mm) by quasi-stationary method. The quasi-stationary method is a transient method which allows measurement of three thermal parameters (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and heat capacity). The experimentally gained values were used to verify a numerical model and furthermore served as input parameters for the numerical probabilistic analysis. The sensitivity of measured outputs (time course of temperature) to influential factors (density, heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivities) was established and described by the Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. The dependence of thermal properties on density was confirmed by the data measured. Density was also proved to be an important factor for sensitivity analyses as it highly correlated with all output parameters. The accuracy of the measurement method can be improved based on the results of the probabilistic analysis. The relevancy of the experiment is mainly influenced by the choice of a proper ratio between thickness and width of samples.

  15. Study on correlation methods for damage detection: Simulation and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Acqua, D.; Di Maio, D.

    2014-05-01

    In the current days there is an increment of interest in damage detection methods, aimed to assure the operating status of existing structures or for intensifier quality control on production line. These are only some of the applications whereby damage detection methods have been dev eloped. In the past several researches have been addressed towards damage detection using vibration analysis, especially through mode shape and natural frequencies changes. In the preset study correlation methods based on ODSs have been developed. The structure was taken under consideration is steel plate. The correlation methods presented are based on the comparison of the ODSs generated by two FEM models of the plate, one defined as pristine and the other as damaged. The latter has been modelled adding a single node mass element to the model surface. This mass element was chosen to simulate a magnet attached to the surface plate in the experimental case. Several simulations have been performed using combinations of mass and positions, for a total of 16 cases. Studying the correlations between a ODSs pair, given by the same excitation frequency and position, is possible to identify the presence of damage in the structure. The experimental model validation has been performed using the best excitation condition obtained by simulation, which can point out large differences between the damaged ODS and undamaged ODS.

  16. A new method of measuring hydrogen diffusivity by hydrogen permeation technique. 2: Experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y.P.; Zhang, T.Y.

    1998-12-31

    In order to verify the results predicted by the model in Part 1 of this work, permeation experiments were conducted at room and high temperatures on fully-annealed-commercially-pure iron with two kinds of surface treatment, one group with plasma cleaning and presputtering and the other without it. The experimental results show that the diffusivity evaluated by the new model is independent of sample thickness and surface treatment, while the diffusivity evaluated by the time-lag model varies two orders of magnitude. The experimental results confirm that a fine surface treatment yields a low energy barrier for desorption. The energy barrier for either group is higher than the activation energy of diffusion. Consequently, the ratio of drift velocity through surface to that in bulk increases with increasing temperature and makes the time-lag method appropriate at elevated temperatures.

  17. Direction and Integration of Experimental Ground Test Capabilities and Computational Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper groups and summarizes the salient points and findings from two AIAA conference panels targeted at defining the direction, with associated key issues and recommendations, for the integration of experimental ground testing and computational methods. Each panel session utilized rapporteurs to capture comments from both the panel members and the audience. Additionally, a virtual panel of several experts were consulted between the two sessions and their comments were also captured. The information is organized into three time-based groupings, as well as by subject area. These panel sessions were designed to provide guidance to both researchers/developers and experimental/computational service providers in defining the future of ground testing, which will be inextricably integrated with the advancement of computational tools.

  18. A New Experimental Method for in Situ Corrosion Monitoring Under Alternate Wet-Dry Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xinxin; Dong, Junhua; Han, Enhou; Ke, Wei

    2009-01-01

    A new experimental method was applied in in situ corrosion monitoring of mild steel Q235 under alternate wet-dry conditions. The thickness of the electrolyte film during the wet cycle was monitored by a high-precision balance with a sensibility of 0.1 mg. At the same time, an electrochemical impedance technique was employed to study the effect of film thickness on corrosion rates. Experimental results showed that there was a critical electrolyte film condition for which the corrosion rate reached a maximum during wet-dry cycles. For the substrate, the critical condition could be described by a film thickness of about 17 μm. For the rusted specimen, the critical condition could be described by an electrolyte amount of about 0.038 g, which is equivalent to a film thickness of 38 μm. This monitoring system was very useful for studying atmospheric corrosion of metals covered by corrosion products. PMID:22303180

  19. A new experimental method for in situ corrosion monitoring under alternate wet-dry conditions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xinxin; Dong, Junhua; Han, Enhou; Ke, Wei

    2009-01-01

    A new experimental method was applied in in situ corrosion monitoring of mild steel Q235 under alternate wet-dry conditions. The thickness of the electrolyte film during the wet cycle was monitored by a high-precision balance with a sensibility of 0.1 mg. At the same time, an electrochemical impedance technique was employed to study the effect of film thickness on corrosion rates. Experimental results showed that there was a critical electrolyte film condition for which the corrosion rate reached a maximum during wet-dry cycles. For the substrate, the critical condition could be described by a film thickness of about 17 μm. For the rusted specimen, the critical condition could be described by an electrolyte amount of about 0.038 g, which is equivalent to a film thickness of 38 μm. This monitoring system was very useful for studying atmospheric corrosion of metals covered by corrosion products. PMID:22303180

  20. Method of computer generation and projection recording of microholograms for holographic memory systems: mathematical modelling and experimental implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Betin, A Yu; Bobrinev, V I; Evtikhiev, N N; Zherdev, A Yu; Zlokazov, E Yu; Lushnikov, D S; Markin, V V; Odinokov, S B; Starikov, S N; Starikov, R S

    2013-01-31

    A method of computer generation and projection recording of microholograms for holographic memory systems is presented; the results of mathematical modelling and experimental implementation of the method are demonstrated. (holographic memory)

  1. Air cooling : an experimental method of evaluating the cooling effect of air streams on air-cooled cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, J F

    1927-01-01

    In this report is described an experimental method which the writer has evolved for dealing with air-cooled engines, and some of the data obtained by its means. Methods of temperature measurement and cooling are provided.

  2. The experimental determination of the moments of inertia of airplanes by a simplified compound-pendulum method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracey, William

    1948-01-01

    A simplified compound-pendulum method for the experimental determination of the moments of inertia of airplanes about the x and y axes is described. The method is developed as a modification of the standard pendulum method reported previously in NACA report, NACA-467. A brief review of the older method is included to form a basis for discussion of the simplified method. (author)

  3. Effect Sizes as Result Interpretation Aids in Single-Subject Experimental Research: Description and Application of Four Nonoverlap Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakap, Salih

    2015-01-01

    Single-subject experimental research (SSER), one of the most commonly used research methods in special education and applied behaviour analysis, is a scientific, rigorous and valid method to evaluate the effectiveness of behavioural, educational and psychological treatments. However, studies using single-subject experimental research designs are…

  4. Experimental method for characterizing CVOC removal from fractured clays during boiling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoling; Tan, Tianwu; Falta, Ronald W; Murdoch, Lawrence C

    2013-09-01

    Conventional remediation methods that rely on contact with contaminants can be ineffective in fractured media, but thermal methods of remediation involving CVOC stripping at boiling temperature show promise. However, limited experimental data are available to characterize thermal remediation because of challenges associated with high temperature. This research reports an experimental method using uniformly contaminated clay packed into two types of experimental cells, a rigid-wall stainless steel tube and a flexible-wall Teflon tube in a pressurized chamber. Both tubes are 5 cm in diameter and approximately 25 cm long. This laboratory apparatus was developed as a 1D physical model for contaminant transport in a cylindrical matrix towards a fracture, which is represented by one end of the cylinder and serves as the outlet of vapor and contaminant. The clay was contaminated with dissolved 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) and bromide, and the columns were heated to more than 100 °C and then the top end was depressurized to atmospheric pressure to induce boiling. The outflow was condensed and analyzed for contaminant mass. The flexible-wall cell was confined to 100 kPa (gage), allowing equilibrium boiling temperatures of approximately 120 °C to be maintained. The clay was sampled before and after heating and extracted to determine the DCA distribution along the length of the column. During a typical test in the rigid-wall cell, internal temperatures and pressures along the column during heating reached the saturated vapor pressure curve. DCA concentrations in the recovered condensate were up to 12 times of the initial pore concentration in the clay. Less than 5% of non-volatile bromide was recovered. Significant removal of DCA and water occurred along the entire length of the clay column. This suggests that boiling was occurring in the clay matrix. PMID:23872027

  5. Experimental methods in the study of neutron scattering at small angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragolici, Cristian A.

    2014-11-01

    Small angle scattering (SAS) is the collective name given to the techniques of small angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS) scattering. They offer the possibility to analyze particles without disturbing their natural environment. In each of these techniques radiation is elastically scattered by a sample and the resulting scattering pattern is analyzed to provide information about the size, shape and orientation of some component of the sample. Accordingly, a large number of methods and experimental patterns have been developed to ease the investigation of condensed matter by use of these techniques. Some of them are the discussed in this paper.

  6. An experimental method for directly determining the interconnectivity of melt in a partially molten system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daines, Martha J.; Richter, Frank M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental method for directly determining the degree of interconnectivity of melt in a partially molten system is discussed using an olivine-basalt system as an example. Samarium 151 is allowed time to diffuse through mixtures of olivine and basalt powder which have texturally equilibrated at 1350 C and 13 to 15 kbars. The final distribution of samarium is determined through examination of developed radiographs of the samples. Results suggest an interconnected melt network is established at melt fractions at least as low as 1 wt pct and all melt is completely interconnected at melt fractions at least as low as 2 wt pct for the system examined.

  7. Experimental methods in the study of neutron scattering at small angles

    SciTech Connect

    Dragolici, Cristian A.

    2014-11-24

    Small angle scattering (SAS) is the collective name given to the techniques of small angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS) scattering. They offer the possibility to analyze particles without disturbing their natural environment. In each of these techniques radiation is elastically scattered by a sample and the resulting scattering pattern is analyzed to provide information about the size, shape and orientation of some component of the sample. Accordingly, a large number of methods and experimental patterns have been developed to ease the investigation of condensed matter by use of these techniques. Some of them are the discussed in this paper.

  8. An experimental evaluation method for the performance of a laser line scanning system with multiple sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qingguo; Yang, Yujie; Zhang, Xiangyu; Ge, Baozhen

    2014-01-01

    Laser line scanning 3D digitising systems have a wide range of applications. Their working performance is mainly determined by the system calibration procedure and is also affected by the working conditions, CCD camera imperfections, and object surface optical characteristics. Therefore, a comprehensive evaluation of working performance is necessary before and during use. This study proposes an experimental method for the performance evaluation of a laser line scanner (LLS) with 8 scanning sensors developed in our laboratory. This method first obtains the dense point clouds of standard parts composed of disks, cylinders, and squares. Next, the single-layer point clouds located in horizontal planes of different heights are fitted using the least squares method to obtain the enclosed contours S. Three parameters, namely, the standard deviation of the distance distribution between points and S, the mean distance of the distance distribution, and the shape feature sizes, are used to evaluate the performance. The proposed method evaluates both the scanner as a whole and each scanning sensor. Using this method, more comprehensive information can be acquired to evaluate the scanner performance. The experimental results show that the absolute dimension size error and relative error are less than 5 mm and 3%, respectively, and the relative shape error is less than 2%; therefore, the evaluated LLS system can meet the requirements for human anthropometry applications. Although each scanning sensor has different random and systematic error, these errors are the function of measurement depth. These conclusions are helpful for the further use of this scanner system and can be utilised to optimise this LLS system further.

  9. An inverse finite element method for beam shape sensing: theoretical framework and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Shape sensing, i.e., reconstruction of the displacement field of a structure from surface-measured strains, has relevant implications for the monitoring, control and actuation of smart structures. The inverse finite element method (iFEM) is a shape-sensing methodology shown to be fast, accurate and robust. This paper aims to demonstrate that the recently presented iFEM for beam and frame structures is reliable when experimentally measured strains are used as input data. The theoretical framework of the methodology is first reviewed. Timoshenko beam theory is adopted, including stretching, bending, transverse shear and torsion deformation modes. The variational statement and its discretization with C0-continuous inverse elements are briefly recalled. The three-dimensional displacement field of the beam structure is reconstructed under the condition that least-squares compatibility is guaranteed between the measured strains and those interpolated within the inverse elements. The experimental setup is then described. A thin-walled cantilevered beam is subjected to different static and dynamic loads. Measured surface strains are used as input data for shape sensing at first with a single inverse element. For the same test cases, convergence is also investigated using an increasing number of inverse elements. The iFEM-recovered deflections and twist rotations are then compared with those measured experimentally. The accuracy, convergence and robustness of the iFEM with respect to unavoidable measurement errors, due to strain sensor locations, measurement systems and geometry imperfections, are demonstrated for both static and dynamic loadings.

  10. Experimental Studies on the Fuel Control Method of the Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Song, Wenyan; Li, Jianping; Han, Xiaobao; Niu, Jun

    2014-08-01

    The fuel control method of the liquid kerosenefueled scramjet combustor was investigated experimentally in this article. The primary goal was to experimentally demonstrate the possibility of using the closed-loop control with a combustor wall pressure feedback in the scramjet combustor. The open-loop control and the closed-loop control experiment were investigated by using the direct-connected test facility of Northwestern Polytechnical University. The typical flow conditions at the combustor entrance were: Mach number Ma = 2.0, totaltemperature Tt ≈ 880 K and total-pressure Pt = 700 ~ 800 kPa, which corresponded to a flight condition with Mach number 4.0. The monotone relationship between the wall pressure and the engine thrust was experimentally demonstrated by the open-loop control experiments. The closed-loop control experiments demonstrated that it was feasible to use wall pressure or pressure ratio as the feedback parameter in the closed-loop control, and the results indicate that it can precise control the fuel applying and shows a good performance.

  11. Experimental Verification to Obtain Intrinsic Thermal Diffusivity by Laser-Flash Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akoshima, M.; Hay, B.; Neda, M.; Grelard, M.

    2013-05-01

    There is a need to obtain highly reliable values of thermophysical properties. The thermal conductivity of solids is often calculated from the thermal diffusivity, specific heat, and density, respectively, measured by the laser-flash method, differential scanning calorimetry, and Archimedes' method. The laser-flash method is one of the most well-known methods for measuring the thermal diffusivity of solids above room temperature. This method is very convenient to measure the thermal diffusivity without contact in a short time. On the other hand, it is considered as an absolute reference measurement method, in particular, because only measurements of basic quantities such as time, temperature, length, and electrical quantities are required, and because the uncertainty of measurement can be analytically evaluated. However, it could be difficult in some cases to obtain reliable thermal-diffusivity values. The measurement results can indeed depend on experimental conditions; in particular, the pulse heating energy. A procedure to obtain the intrinsic thermal-diffusivity value was proposed by National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ). Here, "intrinsic" means unique for the material, independent of measurement conditions. In this method, apparent thermal-diffusivity values are first measured by changing the pulse heating energy at the same test temperature. Then, the intrinsic thermal diffusivity is determined by extrapolating these apparent thermal diffusivities to a zero energy pulse. In order to verify and examine the applicability of the procedure for intrinsic thermal-diffusivity measurements, we have measured the thermal diffusivity of some materials (metals, ceramics) using the laser-flash method with this extrapolation procedure. NMIJ and Laboratoire National de Metrologie et d'essais (LNE) have laser-flash thermal-diffusivity measurement systems that are traceable to SI units. The thermal diffusivity measured by NMIJ and LNE on four materials shows good

  12. Development of advanced methods for analysis of experimental data in diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaques, Alonso V.

    There are numerous experimental configurations and data analysis techniques for the characterization of diffusion phenomena. However, the mathematical methods for estimating diffusivities traditionally do not take into account the effects of experimental errors in the data, and often require smooth, noiseless data sets to perform the necessary analysis steps. The current methods used for data smoothing require strong assumptions which can introduce numerical "artifacts" into the data, affecting confidence in the estimated parameters. The Boltzmann-Matano method is used extensively in the determination of concentration - dependent diffusivities, D(C), in alloys. In the course of analyzing experimental data, numerical integrations and differentiations of the concentration profile are performed. These methods require smoothing of the data prior to analysis. We present here an approach to the Boltzmann-Matano method that is based on a regularization method to estimate a differentiation operation on the data, i.e., estimate the concentration gradient term, which is important in the analysis process for determining the diffusivity. This approach, therefore, has the potential to be less subjective, and in numerical simulations shows an increased accuracy in the estimated diffusion coefficients. We present a regression approach to estimate linear multicomponent diffusion coefficients that eliminates the need pre-treat or pre-condition the concentration profile. This approach fits the data to a functional form of the mathematical expression for the concentration profile, and allows us to determine the diffusivity matrix directly from the fitted parameters. Reformulation of the equation for the analytical solution is done in order to reduce the size of the problem and accelerate the convergence. The objective function for the regression can incorporate point estimations for error in the concentration, improving the statistical confidence in the estimated diffusivity matrix

  13. Maximum-likelihood methods in cryo-EM. Part II: application to experimental data

    PubMed Central

    Scheres, Sjors H.W.

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of computationally feasible approaches to maximum likelihood image processing for cryo-electron microscopy, these methods have proven particularly useful in the classification of structurally heterogeneous single-particle data. A growing number of experimental studies have applied these algorithms to study macromolecular complexes with a wide range of structural variability, including non-stoichiometric complex formation, large conformational changes and combinations of both. This chapter aims to share the practical experience that has been gained from the application of these novel approaches. Current insights on how to prepare the data and how to perform two- or three-dimensional classifications are discussed together with aspects related to high-performance computing. Thereby, this chapter will hopefully be of practical use for those microscopists wanting to apply maximum likelihood methods in their own investigations. PMID:20888966

  14. Calculation of low bandgap homopolymers: Comparison of TD-DFT methods with experimental oligomer series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Eliezer Fernando; Roldao, Juan Carlos; Milián-Medina, Begoña; Lavarda, Francisco Carlos; Gierschner, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The performance of different DFT functionals (B3LYP, BHLYP, CAM-B3LYP, M06HF) on the prediction of vertical transition energies Evert of low bandgap homopolymers is tested against the experimentally available oligomer series (thienopyrazines and thienothiophenes). This allows for a detailed and accurate comparison on the consistency of DFT methods for chainlength evolution and polymer limit prediction, and for an understanding of geometry and time-dependent contributions to Evert by combinatorial analysis. Together with former studies on wide/medium bandgap polymers and low bandgap co-polymers, our results on low bandgap homopolymers suggest offset-corrected M06HF as the most viable method for time inexpensive and reliable prediction of semiconducting polymers at the moment.

  15. Structural, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of 4-bromoisoquinoline by experimental and theoretical DFT methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Thillai Govindaraja, S.; Jayapraksh, A.; Mohan, S.

    2013-04-01

    Quantum chemical calculations of energy, structural parameters and vibrational wavenumbers of 4-bromoisoquinoline (4BIQ) were carried out by using B3LYP method using 6-311++G**, cc-pVTZ and LANL2DZ basis sets. The optimised geometrical parameters obtained by DFT calculations are in good agreement with electron diffraction data. Interpretations of the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman spectra have been reported with the aid of the theoretical wavenumbers. The differences between the observed and scaled wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals are very small. The thermodynamic parameters have also been computed. Electronic properties of the molecule were discussed through the molecular electrostatic potential surface, HOMO-LUMO energy gap and NBO analysis. To provide precise assignments of 1H and 13C NMR spectra, isotropic shielding and chemical shifts were calculated with the Gauge-Invariant Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method.

  16. Experimental verification and comparison of mode shape-based damage detection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzieński, M.; Krawczuk, M.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents experimental verification and comparison of damage detection methods based on changes in mode shapes such as: mode shape curvature (MSC), modal assurance criterion (MAC), strain energy (SE), modified Laplacian operator (MLO), generalized fractal dimension (GFD) and Wavelet Transform (WT). The object of the investigation is to determine benefits and drawbacks of the aforementioned methods and to develop data preprocessing algorithms for increasing damage assessment effectiveness by using signal processing techniques such as interpolation and extrapolation of measured points. Noise reduction algorithms based on moving average, median filter, and wavelet decomposition are also tested. The experiments were performed on an aluminium plate with riveted stiffeners. Damage was introduced in a form of damaged rivets and a saw cut in the angle bar. Measurements were made using a non-contact Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) at 101 points in two rows, distributed over the structure height and positioned along two reinforcing ribs.

  17. Experimental and Statistical Evaluation of Cutting Methods in Relation to Specific Energy and Rock Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engin, Irfan Celal; Bayram, Fatih; Yasitli, Nazmi Erhan

    2013-07-01

    In a processing plant, natural stone can be cut by methods such as circular sawing (CS), frame sawing (FS), water jet cutting (WJC) and abrasive water jet cutting (AWJC). The efficiency of cutting systems can be compared using various parameters. In this study, the specific energy values were determined and compared to evaluate the efficiency of rock-cutting methods. Rock-cutting experiments were performed on 12 different types of rock samples using a circular sawing machine and an AWJC machine. The experimental results showed that the specific energy values in AWJC were generally higher than in CS. In addition, the relationships between specific energy values and rock properties were explained in this study. The Shore hardness and abrasion resistance were found to be strongly related to the specific energy values, and according to these parameters prediction charts of specific energy values were created.

  18. Comparison of spectral CT imaging methods based a photon-counting detector: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seungwan; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-04-01

    Photon-counting detectors allow spectral computed tomography (CT) imaging using energy-resolved information from a polychromatic X-ray spectrum. The spectral CT images based on the photon-counting detectors are dependent on the energy ranges defined by energy bins for image acquisition. In this study, K-edge and energy weighting imaging methods were experimentally implemented by using a spectral CT system with a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based photon-counting detector. The spectral CT images were obtained by various energy bins and compared in terms of CNR improvement for investigating the effect of energy bins and the efficiency of the spectral CT imaging methods. The results showed that the spectral CT image quality was improved by using the particular energy bins, which were optimized for each spectral CT imaging method and target material. The CNR improvement was different for the spectral CT imaging methods and target materials. It can be concluded that an appropriate selection of imaging method for each target material and the optimization of energy bin can maximize the quality of spectral CT images.

  19. An experimental method for measuring stress intensity factor distributions in three-dimensional problems

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.W.

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to briefly chart the progress over a period of some 30 years during which the writer and his associates have tried to effect a marriage between the well known, frozen stress method (augmented with the methods of Tardy and Post for refining the near tip fringe analysis), with the principles of fracture mechanics, using an extension of an idea proposed by Irwin. Although a conscious effort was made by the writer to keep the elements of the method as simple as possible so as to allow the application to as broad a range of practical problems as possible while maintaining reasonable engineering accuracy, there were occasional diversions into supporting developments such as the singularity change when a crack intersects a free boundary and the combined use of the stress freezing method with moire. In general, the guidelines employed by the writer included: Use of well established experimental methods; simple algorithms where singularity dominated data zones were revealed by the data itself; applicability to any crack shapes even when unknown apriori; and engineering accuracy of {+-}5% in K{sub 1} in Mode 1 dominated problems.

  20. Experimental Methods for Investigation of Shape Memory Based Elastocaloric Cooling Processes and Model Validation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marvin; Ullrich, Johannes; Wieczorek, André; Frenzel, Jan; Eggeler, Gunther; Schütze, Andreas; Seelecke, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) using elastocaloric cooling processes have the potential to be an environmentally friendly alternative to the conventional vapor compression based cooling process. Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti) based alloy systems, especially, show large elastocaloric effects. Furthermore, exhibit large latent heats which is a necessary material property for the development of an efficient solid-state based cooling process. A scientific test rig has been designed to investigate these processes and the elastocaloric effects in SMAs. The realized test rig enables independent control of an SMA's mechanical loading and unloading cycles, as well as conductive heat transfer between SMA cooling elements and a heat source/sink. The test rig is equipped with a comprehensive monitoring system capable of synchronized measurements of mechanical and thermal parameters. In addition to determining the process-dependent mechanical work, the system also enables measurement of thermal caloric aspects of the elastocaloric cooling effect through use of a high-performance infrared camera. This combination is of particular interest, because it allows illustrations of localization and rate effects - both important for efficient heat transfer from the medium to be cooled. The work presented describes an experimental method to identify elastocaloric material properties in different materials and sample geometries. Furthermore, the test rig is used to investigate different cooling process variations. The introduced analysis methods enable a differentiated consideration of material, process and related boundary condition influences on the process efficiency. The comparison of the experimental data with the simulation results (of a thermomechanically coupled finite element model) allows for better understanding of the underlying physics of the elastocaloric effect. In addition, the experimental results, as well as the findings based on the simulation results, are used to improve the

  1. Experimental methods of indoor millimeter-wave radiometric imaging for personnel concealed contraband detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Taiyang; Xiao, Zelong; Li, Hao; Lv, Rongchuan; Lu, Xuan

    2014-11-01

    The increasingly emerging terrorism attacks and violence crimes around the world have posed severe threats to public security, so carrying out relevant research on advanced experimental methods of personnel concealed contraband detection is crucial and meaningful. All of the advantages of imaging covertly, avoidance of interference with other systems, intrinsic property of being safe to persons under screening , and the superior ability of imaging through natural or manmade obscurants, have significantly combined to enable millimeter-wave (MMW) radiometric imaging to offer great potential in personnel concealed contraband detection. Based upon the current research status of MMW radiometric imaging and urgent demands of personnel security screening, this paper mainly focuses on the experimental methods of indoor MMW radiometric imaging. The reverse radiation noise resulting from super-heterodyne receivers seriously affects the image experiments carried out at short range, so both the generation mechanism and reducing methods of this noise are investigated. Then, the benefit of sky illumination no longer exists for the indoor radiometric imaging, and this leads to the decrease in radiometric temperature contrast between target and background. In order to enhance the radiometric temperature contrast for improving indoor imaging performance, the noise illumination technique is adopted in the indoor imaging scenario. In addition, the speed and accuracy of concealed contraband detection from acquired MMW radiometric images are usually restricted to the deficiencies in traditional artificial interpretation by security inspectors, thus an automatic recognition and location algorithm by integrating improved Fuzzy C-means clustering with moment invariants is put forward. A series of original results are also presented to demonstrate the significance and validity of these methods.

  2. An Experimental Method for Measuring Water Droplet Impingement Efficiency on Two- and Three-dimensional Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, M.; Zumwalt, G. W.; Elangonan, R.; Freund, G. A., Jr.; Breer, M.; Whitmer, L.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental method was developed to determine the droplet impingement characteristics on 2-D and 3-D bodies. The experimental results provide the essential droplet impingement data required to validate water droplet trajectory codes, which are used in the analysis of aircraft icing. A body, whose water droplet impingement characteristics are required, is covered at strategic locations by thin strips of moisture absorbing (blotter) paper, and is exposed to an air stream containing a water dye solution spray cloud. Water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter strips by measuring the optical reflectance of the dye deposit on the strips, using an automated reflectometer. Models tested include a 4-inch diameter cylinder, a NACA 652015 airfoil section, a MS(1)-0317 supercritical airfoil section, three simulated ice shapes, an axisymmetric inlet and a Boeing 737-300 inlet model. Detailed descriptions of the dye tracer technique, instrumentation, data reduction method and the results obtained are presented. Analytical predictions of collection efficiency characteristics for most test configurations are included for comparison.

  3. A Wavelet-Based ECG Delineation Method: Adaptation to an Experimental Electrograms with Manifested Global Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hejč, Jakub; Vítek, Martin; Ronzhina, Marina; Nováková, Marie; Kolářová, Jana

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel wavelet-based ECG delineation method with robust classification of P wave and T wave. The work is aimed on an adaptation of the method to long-term experimental electrograms (EGs) measured on isolated rabbit heart and to evaluate the effect of global ischemia in experimental EGs on delineation performance. The algorithm was tested on a set of 263 rabbit EGs with established reference points and on human signals using standard Common Standards for Quantitative Electrocardiography Standard Database (CSEDB). On CSEDB, standard deviation (SD) of measured errors satisfies given criterions in each point and the results are comparable to other published works. In rabbit signals, our QRS detector reached sensitivity of 99.87% and positive predictivity of 99.89% despite an overlay of spectral components of QRS complex, P wave and power line noise. The algorithm shows great performance in suppressing J-point elevation and reached low overall error in both, QRS onset (SD = 2.8 ms) and QRS offset (SD = 4.3 ms) delineation. T wave offset is detected with acceptable error (SD = 12.9 ms) and sensitivity nearly 99%. Variance of the errors during global ischemia remains relatively stable, however more failures in detection of T wave and P wave occur. Due to differences in spectral and timing characteristics parameters of rabbit based algorithm have to be highly adaptable and set more precisely than in human ECG signals to reach acceptable performance. PMID:26577367

  4. Experimental measurements on transverse vibration characteristics of piezoceramic rectangular plates by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chien-Ching; Lin, Hsien-Yang

    2005-09-01

    This study provides two non-contact optical techniques to investigate the transverse vibration characteristics of piezoceramic rectangular plates in resonance. These methods, including the amplitude-fluctuation electronic speckle pattern interferometry (AF-ESPI) and laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV), are full-field measurement for AF-ESPI and point-wise displacement measurement for LDV, respectively. The edges of these piezoceramic rectangular plates may either be fixed or free. Both resonant frequencies and mode shapes of vibrating piezoceramic plates can be obtained simultaneously by AF-ESPI. Excellent quality of the interferometric fringe patterns for the mode shapes is obtained. In the LDV system, a built-in dynamic signal analyzer (DSA) composed of DSA software and a plug-in waveform generator board can provide the piezoceramic plates with the swept-sine excitation signal, whose gain at corresponding frequencies is analyzed by the DSA software. The peaks appeared in the frequency response curve are resonant frequencies. In addition to these optical methods, the numerical computation based on the finite element analysis is used to verify the experimental results. Good agreements of the mode shapes and resonant frequencies are obtained for experimental and numerical results.

  5. An experimental method to verify soil conservation by check dams on the Loess Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, X Z; Zhang, H W; Wang, G Q; Chen, S C; Dang, W Q

    2009-12-01

    A successful experiment with a physical model requires necessary conditions of similarity. This study presents an experimental method with a semi-scale physical model. The model is used to monitor and verify soil conservation by check dams in a small watershed on the Loess Plateau of China. During experiments, the model-prototype ratio of geomorphic variables was kept constant under each rainfall event. Consequently, experimental data are available for verification of soil erosion processes in the field and for predicting soil loss in a model watershed with check dams. Thus, it can predict the amount of soil loss in a catchment. This study also mentions four criteria: similarities of watershed geometry, grain size and bare land, Froude number (Fr) for rainfall event, and soil erosion in downscaled models. The efficacy of the proposed method was confirmed using these criteria in two different downscaled model experiments. The B-Model, a large scale model, simulates watershed prototype. The two small scale models, D(a) and D(b), have different erosion rates, but are the same size. These two models simulate hydraulic processes in the B-Model. Experiment results show that while soil loss in the small scale models was converted by multiplying the soil loss scale number, it was very close to that of the B-Model. Obviously, with a semi-scale physical model, experiments are available to verify and predict soil loss in a small watershed area with check dam system on the Loess Plateau, China. PMID:19067210

  6. Reliability of an experimental method to analyse the impact point on a golf ball during putting.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ashley K; Mitchell, Andrew C S; Hughes, Gerwyn

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the reliability of an experimental method identifying the location of the impact point on a golf ball during putting. Forty trials were completed using a mechanical putting robot set to reproduce a putt of 3.2 m, with four different putter-ball combinations. After locating the centre of the dimple pattern (centroid) the following variables were tested; distance of the impact point from the centroid, angle of the impact point from the centroid and distance of the impact point from the centroid derived from the X, Y coordinates. Good to excellent reliability was demonstrated in all impact variables reflected in very strong relative (ICC = 0.98-1.00) and absolute reliability (SEM% = 0.9-4.3%). The highest SEM% observed was 7% for the angle of the impact point from the centroid. In conclusion, the experimental method was shown to be reliable at locating the centroid location of a golf ball, therefore allowing for the identification of the point of impact with the putter head and is suitable for use in subsequent studies. PMID:26102559

  7. Extracting g tensor values from experimental data with Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Anagha; Liu, Weiwen; Zurakowski, Ryan; Doty, Matthew

    Quantum Dot Molecules(QDMs) have emerged as a new platform for optoelectronic and spintronic devices.QDMs consist of multiple Quantum Dots (QDs) arranged in close proximity such that interactions between them can tailor their optical and spin properties.These properties can be tuned during growth and in-situ by applying electric fields that vary the coupling between QDs,which controls the formation of delocalized molecular-like states.Engineering the formation of molecular states in QDMS can be used to achieve new functionalities unavailable with individual QDs. Using molecular engineering approaches to tailor QDMs require precise knowledge of parameters such as binding energies of charge complexes,magnitude of many body interactions or components of the g tensor.Precise values of these parameters are difficult to extract from either experimental measurements or theoretical calculations.We develop and demonstrate a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for extracting elements of the g tensor for a single hole confined in a QDM from photoluminescence data obtained as a function of electric and magnetic fields.This method can be applied to extract precise quantitative values of other physical parameters from sparse experimental data on a variety of systems.

  8. Designing specific protein–protein interactions using computation, experimental library screening, or integrated methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T Scott; Keating, Amy E

    2012-01-01

    Given the importance of protein–protein interactions for nearly all biological processes, the design of protein affinity reagents for use in research, diagnosis or therapy is an important endeavor. Engineered proteins would ideally have high specificities for their intended targets, but achieving interaction specificity by design can be challenging. There are two major approaches to protein design or redesign. Most commonly, proteins and peptides are engineered using experimental library screening and/or in vitro evolution. An alternative approach involves using protein structure and computational modeling to rationally choose sequences predicted to have desirable properties. Computational design has successfully produced novel proteins with enhanced stability, desired interactions and enzymatic function. Here we review the strengths and limitations of experimental library screening and computational structure-based design, giving examples where these methods have been applied to designing protein interaction specificity. We highlight recent studies that demonstrate strategies for combining computational modeling with library screening. The computational methods provide focused libraries predicted to be enriched in sequences with the properties of interest. Such integrated approaches represent a promising way to increase the efficiency of protein design and to engineer complex functionality such as interaction specificity. PMID:22593041

  9. Experimental test of a method for determining causal connectivities of species in reactions.

    PubMed

    Torralba, Antonio S; Yu, Kristine; Shen, Peidong; Oefner, Peter J; Ross, John

    2003-02-18

    Theoretical analysis has shown the possibility of determining causal connectivities of reacting species and the reaction mechanism in complex chemical and biochemical reaction systems by applying pulse changes of concentrations of one or more species, of arbitrary magnitude, and measuring the temporal response of as many species as possible. This method, limited to measured and pulsed species, is given here an experimental test on a part of glycolysis including the sequence of reactions from glucose to fructose 1,6-biphosphate, followed by the bifurcation of that sequence into two branches, one ending in glycerol 3-phosphate, the other in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. Pulses of concentrations of one species at a time are applied to the open system in a non-equilibrium stationary state, and the temporal responses in concentrations of six metabolites are measured by capillary zone electrophoresis. From the results of these measurements and the use of the theory for their interpretation, we establish the causal connectivities of the metabolites and thus the reaction mechanism, including the bifurcation of one chain of reactions into two. In this test case of the pulse method, no prior knowledge was assumed of the biochemistry of this system. We conclude that the pulse method is relatively simple and effective in determining reaction mechanisms in complex systems, including reactants, products, intermediates, and catalysts and their effectors. The method is likely to be useful for substantially more complex systems. PMID:12576555

  10. a Quick and Practical Experimental Method for Separating Wheel and Track Contributions to Rolling Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FRID, A.

    2000-03-01

    A rapid and inexpensive experimental method for the breakdown of wayside rolling noise into direct and indirect wheel and track components has been developed. “Direct” in this context refers to the sound radiation from the outside of wheel and track. “Indirect” refers to sound radiation from inside wheel/track parts which is first reflected in the running gear, vehicle subframe and ballast before being radiated to the wayside. The separation method requires simultaneous measurements with a close range highly directive parabolic reflector microphone and a microphone on the track bed. The method gives the sound power for the above-mentioned components in 1/3-octave bands. For validation, synthesized wayside sound pressure time histories in 1/3-octave bands are compared with measured ones at 5 and 25 m distance from the track. The acoustic model for the source separation also allows a rough assessment on the efficiency of noise reduction measures like shielding, wheel damping, bogie absorption, etc., to be made. The method is demonstrated on pass-bys of X2000 trains and the potential benefit of damping, absorption and shielding is discussed.

  11. REVIEW: A review of in vivo experimental methods to determine the composition of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutcliffe, J. F.

    1996-05-01

    This review of experimental methods employed in the measurement of the composition of the human body covers the developments that have occurred over the past 30 years. Early methods such as hydrodensitometry and skinfold anthropometry have been superseded by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. The measurement of the whole-body abundance of certain elements by isotopic dilution, neutron activation analysis and x-ray fluorescence can give important information of clinical significance, but neutron activation facilities remain available in only a few centres worldwide. The relatively simple, rapid and risk-free electrical methods such as multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis, which can be employed at the bedside, have been found to be more complicated in their interpretation. Electromagnetic methods may only measure the composition of the human body at its surface. X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have not yet been employed much in body composition measurements. Some models for the composition of the human body are reviewed.

  12. An experimental study of the accuracy in measurement of modulation transfer function using an edge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Image evaluation is necessary in digital radiography (DR) which is widely used in medical imaging. Among parameters of image evaluation, modulation transfer function (MTF) is the important factor in the field of medical imaging and necessary to obtain detective quantum efficiency (DQE) which represents overall performance of the detector signal-to-noise ratio. However, the accurate measurement of MTF is still not easy because of geometric effect, electric noise, quantum noise, and truncation error. Therefore, in order to improve accuracy of MTF, four experimental methods were tested in this study such as changing the tube current, applying smoothing method in edge spread function (ESF), adjusting line spread function (LSF) range, and changing tube angle. Our results showed that MTF's fluctuation was decreased by high tube current and smoothing method. However, tube current should not exceed detector saturation and smoothing in ESF causes a distortion in ESF and MTF. In addition, decreasing LSF range diminished fluctuation and the number of sampling in MTF and high tube angle generates degradation in MTF. Based on these results, excessively low tube current and the smoothing method should be avoided. Also, optimal range of LSF considering reduction of fluctuation and the number of sampling in MTF was necessary and precise tube angle is essential to obtain an accurate MTF. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that accurate MTF can be acquired.

  13. Experimental validation of a method for removing the capacitive leakage artifact from electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendia, R.; Seoane, F.; Gil-Pita, R.

    2010-11-01

    Often when performing electrical bioimpedance (EBI) spectroscopy measurements, the obtained EBI data present a hook-like deviation, which is most noticeable at high frequencies in the impedance plane. The deviation is due to a capacitive leakage effect caused by the presence of stray capacitances. In addition to the data deviation being remarkably noticeable at high frequencies in the phase and the reactance spectra, the measured EBI is also altered in the resistance and the modulus. If this EBI data deviation is not properly removed, it interferes with subsequent data analysis processes, especially with Cole model-based analyses. In other words, to perform any accurate analysis of the EBI spectroscopy data, the hook deviation must be properly removed. Td compensation is a method used to compensate the hook deviation present in EBI data; it consists of multiplying the obtained spectrum, Zmeas(ω), by a complex exponential in the form of exp(-jωTd). Although the method is well known and accepted, Td compensation cannot entirely correct the hook-like deviation; moreover, it lacks solid scientific grounds. In this work, the Td compensation method is revisited, and it is shown that it should not be used to correct the effect of a capacitive leakage; furthermore, a more developed approach for correcting the hook deviation caused by the capacitive leakage is proposed. The method includes a novel correcting expression and a process for selecting the proper values of expressions that are complex and frequency dependent. The correctness of the novel method is validated with the experimental data obtained from measurements from three different EBI applications. The obtained results confirm the sufficiency and feasibility of the correcting method.

  14. A Direct Method for Incorporating Experimental Data into Multiscale Coarse-Grained Models.

    PubMed

    Dannenhoffer-Lafage, Thomas; White, Andrew D; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-05-10

    To extract meaningful data from molecular simulations, it is necessary to incorporate new experimental observations as they become available. Recently, a new method was developed for incorporating experimental observations into molecular simulations, called experiment directed simulation (EDS), which utilizes a maximum entropy argument to bias an existing model to agree with experimental observations while changing the original model by a minimal amount. However, there is no discussion in the literature of whether or not the minimal bias systematically and generally improves the model by creating agreement with the experiment. In this work, we show that the relative entropy of the biased system with respect to an ideal target is always reduced by the application of a minimal bias, such as the one utilized by EDS. Using all-atom simulations that have been biased with EDS, one can then easily and rapidly improve a bottom-up multiscale coarse-grained (MS-CG) model without the need for a time-consuming reparametrization of the underlying atomistic force field. Furthermore, the improvement given by the many-body interactions introduced by the EDS bias can be maintained after being projected down to effective two-body MS-CG interactions. The result of this analysis is a new paradigm in coarse-grained modeling and simulation in which the "bottom-up" and "top-down" approaches are combined within a single, rigorous formalism based on statistical mechanics. The utility of building the resulting EDS-MS-CG models is demonstrated on two molecular systems: liquid methanol and ethylene carbonate. PMID:27045328

  15. Stacking Interactions between Carbohydrate and Protein Quantified by Combination of Theoretical and Experimental Methods

    PubMed Central

    Nečasová, Ivona; Mishra, Sushil Kumar; Komárek, Jan; Koča, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate – receptor interactions are an integral part of biological events. They play an important role in many cellular processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell differentiation and in-cell signaling. Carbohydrates can interact with a receptor by using several types of intermolecular interactions. One of the most important is the interaction of a carbohydrate's apolar part with aromatic amino acid residues, known as dispersion interaction or CH/π interaction. In the study presented here, we attempted for the first time to quantify how the CH/π interaction contributes to a more general carbohydrate - protein interaction. We used a combined experimental approach, creating single and double point mutants with high level computational methods, and applied both to Ralstonia solanacearum (RSL) lectin complexes with α-l-Me-fucoside. Experimentally measured binding affinities were compared with computed carbohydrate-aromatic amino acid residue interaction energies. Experimental binding affinities for the RSL wild type, phenylalanine and alanine mutants were −8.5, −7.1 and −4.1 kcal.mol−1, respectively. These affinities agree with the computed dispersion interaction energy between carbohydrate and aromatic amino acid residues for RSL wild type and phenylalanine, with values −8.8, −7.9 kcal.mol−1, excluding the alanine mutant where the interaction energy was −0.9 kcal.mol−1. Molecular dynamics simulations show that discrepancy can be caused by creation of a new hydrogen bond between the α-l-Me-fucoside and RSL. Observed results suggest that in this and similar cases the carbohydrate-receptor interaction can be driven mainly by a dispersion interaction. PMID:23056230

  16. Spatial memory: Theoretical basis and comparative review on experimental methods in rodents.

    PubMed

    Paul, Carrillo-Mora; Magda, Giordano; Abel, Santamaría

    2009-11-01

    The assessment of learning and memory in animal models has been widely employed in scientific research for a long time. Among these models, those representing diseases with primary processes of affected memory - such as amnesia, dementia, brain aging, etc. - studies dealing with the toxic effects of specific drugs, and other exploring neurodevelopment, trauma, epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders, are often called on to employ these tools. There is a diversity of experimental methods assessing animal learning and memory skills. Overall, mazes are the devices mostly used today to test memory in rodents; there are several types of them, but their real usefulness, advantages and applications remain to be fully established and depend on the particular variant selected by the experimenter. The aims of the present article are first, to briefly review the accumulated knowledge in regard to spatial memory tasks; second, to bring the reader information on the different types of rodent mazes available to test spatial memory; and third, to elucidate the usefulness and limitations of each of these devices. PMID:19467271

  17. Microbiota of Soil-Like Substrate Depending on Wheat Straw Processing Method in Experimental LSS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirranen, Lyalya; Sysoeva, Olga

    In previous experiments conducted in the closed environmental system BIOS-3 plant waste and test persons' exometabolites were carried away from the life-support system (LSS). It is possible to create a new-generation LSS with a higher degree of matter cycle closure by adding to the soil-like substrate inedible plant waste used for cultivation of plants in the experimental LSS model. Using single-factor analysis of variance, we estimated the effect of the introduced inedible plant waste on the microbiota of the soil-like substrate (SLS). The plant waste was used: to increase the degree of matter cycle closure in the system; to replace the volume of soil-like substrate in the system; as a fertilizer for growing higher plants in the experimental LSS model. A statistically significant effect of wheat straw processing method on the number of all microorganism groups was observed in different variants of the experiment. The obtained results can be used in planning and carrying out of subsequent experiments with higher plants cultivated on SLS with waste in a closed environmental system including humans.

  18. Determining the performance of energy wheels: Part 1 -- Experimental and numerical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, C.J.; Ciepliski, D.L.; Besant, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    Measuring and modeling the performance of energy recovery devices is difficult and, in some cases, may result in unacceptably high uncertainties. In this paper, controlled laboratory experiments and a detailed numerical model are presented, which, together with uncertainty analysis, can quantify the performance of energy wheels. A numerical model that has been developed from physical principles and an experimental method for determining the performance of energy wheels with acceptable uncertainties are detailed. Included is a pre-test, during-test, and post-test uncertainty analysis that allows the experimenter to estimate accurately precision (random) and bias (fixed) errors a priori, during, and a posteriori each experiment using energy and mass balances on the air-to-air energy recovery device as well as the characteristics of each instrument and the data acquisition system. A comprehensive set of measured data for the sensible, latent, and total effectiveness of an energy wheel is compared with the corresponding simulation results in Part 2 of this paper.

  19. Integration of experimental and computational methods for identifying geometric, thermal and diffusive properties of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weres, Jerzy; Kujawa, Sebastian; Olek, Wiesław; Czajkowski, Łukasz

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of physical properties of biomaterials is important in understanding and designing agri-food and wood processing industries. In the study presented in this paper computational methods were developed and combined with experiments to enhance identification of agri-food and forest product properties, and to predict heat and water transport in such products. They were based on the finite element model of heat and water transport and supplemented with experimental data. Algorithms were proposed for image processing, geometry meshing, and inverse/direct finite element modelling. The resulting software system was composed of integrated subsystems for 3D geometry data acquisition and mesh generation, for 3D geometry modelling and visualization, and for inverse/direct problem computations for the heat and water transport processes. Auxiliary packages were developed to assess performance, accuracy and unification of data access. The software was validated by identifying selected properties and using the estimated values to predict the examined processes, and then comparing predictions to experimental data. The geometry, thermal conductivity, specific heat, coefficient of water diffusion, equilibrium water content and convective heat and water transfer coefficients in the boundary layer were analysed. The estimated values, used as an input for simulation of the examined processes, enabled reduction in the uncertainty associated with predictions.

  20. Validation of RF CCP Discharge Model against Experimental Data using PIC Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icenhour, Casey; Kummerer, Theresa; Green, David L.; Smithe, David; Shannon, Steven

    2014-10-01

    The particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation method is a well-known standard for the simulation of laboratory plasma discharges. Using parallel computation on the Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), this research is concerned with validation of a radio-frequency (RF) capacitively-coupled plasma (CCP) discharge PIC model against previously obtained experimental data. The plasma sources under simulation are 10--100 mTorr argon plasmas with a 13 MHz source and 27 MHz source operating at 50--200 W in both pulse and constant power conditions. Plasma parameters of interest in the validation include peak electron density, electron temperature, and RF plasma sheath voltages and thicknesses. The plasma is modeled utilizing the VSim plasma simulation tool, developed by the Tech-X Corporation. The implementation used here is a two-dimensional electromagnetic model, with corresponding external circuit model of the experimental setup. The goal of this study is to develop models for more complex RF plasma systems utilizing highly parallel computing technologies and methodology. This work is carried out with the support of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Tech-X Corporation.

  1. Experimental method for laser-driven flyer plates for 1-D shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D. L.; Luo, S. N.; Swift, D. C.; Loomis, E.; Johnson, R.; Greenfield, S.; Peralta, P.; Koskelo, A.; Tonks, D.

    2007-12-12

    One-dimensional shocks can be generated by impacting flyer plates accelerated to terminal velocities by a confined laser-ablated plasma. Over the past few years, we have developed this capability with our facility-size laser, TRIDENT, capable of {>=}500 Joules at multi-microsecond pulse lengths to accelerate 1-D flyer plates, 8-mm diameter by 0.1-2 mm thick. Plates have been accelerated to terminal velocities of 100 to {>=}500 m/s, with full recovery of the flyer and target for post mortem metallography. By properly tailoring the laser temporal and spatial profile, the expanding confined plasma accelerates the plate away from the transparent sapphire substrate, and decouples the laser parameters from shock pressure profile resulting from the plate impact on a target. Since the flyer plate is in free flight on impact with the target, minimal collateral damage occurs to either. The experimental method to launch these plates to terminal velocity, ancillary diagnostics, and representative experimental data is presented.

  2. Molecular assay optimized by Taguchi experimental design method for venous thromboembolism investigation.

    PubMed

    Celani de Souza, Helder Jose; Moyses, Cinthia B; Pontes, Fabrício J; Duarte, Roberto N; Sanches da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; Alberto, Fernando Lopes; Ferreira, Ubirajara R; Silva, Messias Borges

    2011-01-01

    Two mutations - Factor V Leiden (1691G > A) and the 20210G > A on the Prothrombin gene - are key risk factors for a frequent and potentially fatal disorder called Venous Thromboembolism. These molecular alterations can be investigated using real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) with Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) probes and distinct DNA pools for both factors. The objective of this paper is to present an application of Taguchi Experimental Design Method to determine the best parameters adjustment of a Molecular Assays Process in order to obtain the best diagnostic result for Venous Thromboembolism investigation. The complete process contains six three-level factors which usually demands 729 experiments to obtain the final result, if using a Full Factorial Array. In this research, a Taguchi L27 Orthogonal Array is chosen to optimize the analysis and reduce the number of experiments to 27 without degrading the final result accuracy. The application of this method can lessen the time and cost necessary to achieve the best operation condition for a required performance. The results is proven in practice and confirmed that the Taguchi method can really offer a good approach for clinical assay efficiency and effectiveness improvement even though the clinical diagnostics can be based on the use of qualitative techniques. PMID:21867748

  3. Use of experimental data in testing methods for design against uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosca, Raluca Ioana

    Modern methods of design take into consideration the fact that uncertainty is present in everyday life, whether in the form of variable loads (the strongest wind that would affect a building), material properties of an alloy, or future demand for the product or cost of labor. Moreover, the Japanese example showed that it may be more cost-effective to design taking into account the existence of the uncertainty rather than to plan to eliminate or greatly reduce it. The dissertation starts by comparing the theoretical basis of two methods for design against uncertainty, namely probability theory and possibility theory. A two-variable design problem is then used to show the differences. It is concluded that for design problems with two or more cases of failure of very different magnitude (as the stop of a car due to lack of gas or motor failure), probability theory divides existent resources in a more intuitive way than possibility theory. The dissertation continues with the description of simple experiments (building towers of dominoes) and then it presents the methodology to increase the amount of information that can be drawn from a given data set. The methodology is shown on the Bidder-Challenger problem, a simulation of a problem of a company that makes microchips to set a target speed for its next microchip. The simulations use the domino experimental data. It is demonstrated that important insights into methods of probability and possibility based design can be gained from experiments.

  4. [Research on fast experimental measurement method for atmosphere downward long-wave radiance].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ju-Yang; Tang, Shi-Hao; Dong, Li-Xin; Li, Xiang

    2012-06-01

    Direct measurement of the sky radiation in the direction of a special zenith angle as the average downward radiation is the fastest instantaneous downward radiation measurement. But this method has not been widely used, because there is no accu rate method for determining special zenith angle. The present paper analyzed the special angle with the variation of the aerosol optical thickness and atmospheric temperature and humidity through simulation by radiative transfer model. The results show that the special angles will be affected none by aerosols in clear skies, very little by atmospheric temperature, but significantly by atmospheric water vapor content. Therefore, the special angle could be determined only by atmospheric water vapor content in downward radiance infrared spectroscopy measurements in clear sky conditions. The downward radiation measurements results in western desert region indicate that the special angles determined by local atmospheric water vapor content are the same as experimental results. Besides, the error caused by taking the radiance at the special angle as the integral radiance meets the accuracy requirements. Accordingly, this fast measurement method can be widely used in field experiments while the special angle can be determined by atmospheric water vapor of the study area, since it can measure instantaneous downward radiance conveniently and accurately. PMID:22870647

  5. On the reliability of HELIOSAT method: A comparison with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Guemene Dountio, E.; Njomo, D.; Fouda, Efa; Simo, A.

    2010-06-15

    This study deals with comparison of Cameroonian ground based measurements with estimations done using satellite images, by applying the second version of the HELIOSAT method, as computed by the web tool HELIOCLIM of the SoDa project. Measurements and satellite resources were chosen for the same period of the year 1985, on ten Cameroonian locations, distributed with mean spatial resolution of 200 km between two neighbouring stations. Correlations curves are constructed between daily irradiation estimates from satellite data and from measurements. The consequent regression equations are established, using the least square method. Finally, a brief discussion is carried out on the spatial distribution of errors observed on results. Similarly to previous studies this study confirmed the capability of the method to produce good results for the Garoua location, and established its extension on other sahelian sites, comparatively to the poor agreement observed on southern sites. Furthermore, even if the study was not done on a long period, it brought out the necessity to correct the HELIOSAT results for many Cameroonian locations, to march the experimental results. (author)

  6. Experimental barbiturate dependence. I. Barbiturate dependence development in rats by drug-admixed food (DAF) method.

    PubMed

    Tagashira, E; Izumi, T; Yanaura, S

    1978-04-28

    A method for testing a rat's physical-dependence liability to sedaditive-hypnotic agents and for evaluating that dependence was studied by using the method. Rats received phenobarbital- or barbital-admixed food on a graded-increase dosage schedule over 30-40 days. Manifestations of CNS-suppressing action of either drug (e.g., systemic muscle relaxation, motor incoordination, staggering gait, and ptosis) persisted day and night during the drug medication. Twenty-four to 48 h after withdrawal of either drug, abstinence symptoms (e.g., muscle fasciculation, nuchal twitching, vocalization, increased irritability, ataxia, hyperthermia, and clonic-tonic and grand mal-type convulsions) were evidenced in all animals (N = 6), some of which died after convulsions. These withdrawal signs in rats were classified and found to be closely correlated with the magnitude of weight loss during the withdrawal. The calssification provides a basis for quantitatively assessing physical-dependence liability. The data obtained in the present study suggest that rats, like dogs and monkeys, are suitable experimental animals for tests in early stages of dependence liability, and that the administration of drug-admixed food is a useful method of developing dependence on both barbiturate and morphine-type drugs. PMID:418446

  7. Learning from our GWAS mistakes: from experimental design to scientific method

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Christophe G.; Black, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    Many public and private genome-wide association studies that we have analyzed include flaws in design, with avoidable confounding appearing as a norm rather than the exception. Rather than recognizing flawed research design and addressing that, a category of quality-control statistical methods has arisen to treat only the symptoms. Reflecting more deeply, we examine elements of current genomic research in light of the traditional scientific method and find that hypotheses are often detached from data collection, experimental design, and causal theories. Association studies independent of causal theories, along with multiple testing errors, too often drive health care and public policy decisions. In an era of large-scale biological research, we ask questions about the role of statistical analyses in advancing coherent theories of diseases and their mechanisms. We advocate for reinterpretation of the scientific method in the context of large-scale data analysis opportunities and for renewed appreciation of falsifiable hypotheses, so that we can learn more from our best mistakes. PMID:22285994

  8. Simple experimental method for alpha particle range determination in lead iodide films

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, Yuri; Bennett, Paul R.; Cirignano, Leonard J.; Klugerman, Mikhail; Shah, Kanai S.

    2007-05-15

    An experimental method for determining the range of alpha particles in films based on I-V{sub s} analysis has been suggested. The range of 5.5 MeV alpha particles in PbI{sub 2} films determined by this technique is 30{+-}5 {mu}m, and this value is in agreement with the value calculated by SRIM (the stopping and range of ions in matter), r=24 {mu}m in PbI{sub 2}. More than 100 I-V{sub s} of PbI{sub 2} films with different thicknesses and quality have been analyzed, and the influence of alpha particle radiation on PbI{sub 2} I-V{sub s} curves has been studied. Developed analytical methods (dependence of current density on electric field and conception of surface defects) were used, and the method limitations are discussed. It was shown that I-V{sub s} demonstrate the tendency to obey Ohm's law under alpha radiation. On the other hand, dark conductivity of the lead iodide films shows a typical impure character that can lead to an overestimation of the alpha particles' range in PbI{sub 2} films. After films were exposed to alpha radiation, the dark resistivity and I-V shape of some films improved. Also, a weak decrease of the charge carrier concentration, due to a decrease of the ''surface defect'' concentration (''surface refining''), was registered after successive measurements of I-V{sub s}.

  9. Simple experimental method for alpha particle range determination in lead iodide films.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Yuri; Bennett, Paul R; Cirignano, Leonard J; Klugerman, Mikhail; Shah, Kanai S

    2007-05-01

    An experimental method for determining the range of alpha particles in films based on I-V(s) analysis has been suggested. The range of 5.5 MeV alpha particles in PbI(2) films determined by this technique is 30+/-5 microm, and this value is in agreement with the value calculated by SRIM (the stopping and range of ions in matter), r=24 microm in PbI(2). More than 100 I-V(s) of PbI(2) films with different thicknesses and quality have been analyzed, and the influence of alpha particle radiation on PbI(2) I-V(s) curves has been studied. Developed analytical methods (dependence of current density on electric field and conception of surface defects) were used, and the method limitations are discussed. It was shown that I-V(s) demonstrate the tendency to obey Ohm's law under alpha radiation. On the other hand, dark conductivity of the lead iodide films shows a typical impure character that can lead to an overestimation of the alpha particles' range in PbI(2) films. After films were exposed to alpha radiation, the dark resistivity and I-V shape of some films improved. Also, a weak decrease of the charge carrier concentration, due to a decrease of the "surface defect" concentration ("surface refining"), was registered after successive measurements of I-V(s). PMID:17552841

  10. Might the Masson trichrome stain be considered a useful method for categorizing experimental tendon lesions?

    PubMed

    Martinello, Tiziana; Pascoli, Francesco; Caporale, Giovanni; Perazzi, Anna; Iacopetti, Ilaria; Patruno, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Strain injuries of tendons are the most common orthopedic injuries in athletic subjects, be they equine or human. When the tendon is suddenly damaged, an acute inflammatory phase occurs whereas its repetitive overloading may cause chronic injuries. Currently the criteria used for grading injuries are general and subjective, and therefore a reliable grading method would be an improvement. The main purpose of this study was to assess qualitatively the histological pattern of Masson trichrome stain in healthy and injured tendons; indeed, the known "paradox" of Masson staining was used to create an evaluation for the matrix of tendons, following experimental lesions and natural repair processes. A statistically significant difference of aniline-staining between healthy and lesioned tendons was observed. Overall, we think that the Masson staining might be regarded as an informative tool in discerning the collagen spatial arrangement and therefore the histological characteristics of tendons. PMID:25733060

  11. Marine Mammal Train Oil Production Methods: Experimental Reconstructions of Norwegian Iron Age Slab-Lined Pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, Gørill

    2016-08-01

    Seal hunting and whaling have played an important part of people's livelihoods throughout prehistory as evidenced by rock carvings, remains of bones, artifacts from aquatic animals and hunting tools. This paper focuses on one of the more elusive resources relating to such activities: marine mammal blubber. Although marine blubber easily decomposes, the organic material has been documented from the Mesolithic Period onwards. Of particular interest in this article are the many structures in Northern Norway from the Iron Age and in Finland on Kökar, Åland, from both the Bronze and Early Iron Ages in which these periods exhibited traits interpreted as being related to oil rendering from marine mammal blubber. The article discusses methods used in this oil production activity based on historical sources, archaeological investigations and experimental reconstruction of Iron Age slab-lined pits from Northern Norway.

  12. Contaminated water delivery as a simple and effective method of experimental Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Hope; Pham, Oanh H.; Benoun, Joseph M.; Ravesloot-Chávez, Marietta M.; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims In most infectious disease models, it is assumed that gavage needle infection is the most reliable means of pathogen delivery to the gastrointestinal tract. However, this methodology can cause esophageal tearing and induces stress in experimental animals, both of which have the potential to impact early infection and the subsequent immune response. Materials and Methods C57BL/6 mice were orally infected with virulent Salmonella Typhimurium SL1344 either by intragastric gavage preceded by sodium bicarbonate, or by contamination of drinking water. Results We demonstrate that water contamination delivery of Salmonella is equivalent to gavage inoculation in providing a consistent model of infection. Furthermore, exposure of mice to contaminated drinking water for as little as 4 hours allowed maximal mucosal and systemic infection, suggesting an abbreviated window exists for natural intestinal entry. Conclusions Together, these data question the need for gavage delivery for infection with oral pathogens. PMID:26439708

  13. Marine Mammal Train Oil Production Methods: Experimental Reconstructions of Norwegian Iron Age Slab-Lined Pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, Gørill

    2016-02-01

    Seal hunting and whaling have played an important part of people's livelihoods throughout prehistory as evidenced by rock carvings, remains of bones, artifacts from aquatic animals and hunting tools. This paper focuses on one of the more elusive resources relating to such activities: marine mammal blubber. Although marine blubber easily decomposes, the organic material has been documented from the Mesolithic Period onwards. Of particular interest in this article are the many structures in Northern Norway from the Iron Age and in Finland on Kökar, Åland, from both the Bronze and Early Iron Ages in which these periods exhibited traits interpreted as being related to oil rendering from marine mammal blubber. The article discusses methods used in this oil production activity based on historical sources, archaeological investigations and experimental reconstruction of Iron Age slab-lined pits from Northern Norway.

  14. Online signal filtering based on the algebraic method and its experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, R.; Segura, E.; Somolinos, J. A.; Núñez, L. R.; Sira-Ramírez, H.

    2016-01-01

    An on-line algebraic filtering scheme, based on the recently introduced algebraic approach to parameter and state estimation, is presented along with successful experimental results. The proposed filtering algorithm is based on the connections between a time derivative estimator and an algebraically based signal filtering option. The main advantages of the proposed approach are: (i) there are no appreciable delays in the filtered signal; (ii) the method does not require any statistical assessment of the noises corrupting the signal; (iii) high attenuation of the noise effects is achieved; (iv) the on-line computations are carried out in real time; and (v) high versatility and ease of implementation. Several experiments related to real depth measurements were conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Comparisons are performed with different filtering alternatives.

  15. Inferring Regulatory Networks from Experimental Morphological Phenotypes: A Computational Method Reverse-Engineers Planarian Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Daniel; Levin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transformative applications in biomedicine require the discovery of complex regulatory networks that explain the development and regeneration of anatomical structures, and reveal what external signals will trigger desired changes of large-scale pattern. Despite recent advances in bioinformatics, extracting mechanistic pathway models from experimental morphological data is a key open challenge that has resisted automation. The fundamental difficulty of manually predicting emergent behavior of even simple networks has limited the models invented by human scientists to pathway diagrams that show necessary subunit interactions but do not reveal the dynamics that are sufficient for complex, self-regulating pattern to emerge. To finally bridge the gap between high-resolution genetic data and the ability to understand and control patterning, it is critical to develop computational tools to efficiently extract regulatory pathways from the resultant experimental shape phenotypes. For example, planarian regeneration has been studied for over a century, but despite increasing insight into the pathways that control its stem cells, no constructive, mechanistic model has yet been found by human scientists that explains more than one or two key features of its remarkable ability to regenerate its correct anatomical pattern after drastic perturbations. We present a method to infer the molecular products, topology, and spatial and temporal non-linear dynamics of regulatory networks recapitulating in silico the rich dataset of morphological phenotypes resulting from genetic, surgical, and pharmacological experiments. We demonstrated our approach by inferring complete regulatory networks explaining the outcomes of the main functional regeneration experiments in the planarian literature; By analyzing all the datasets together, our system inferred the first systems-biology comprehensive dynamical model explaining patterning in planarian regeneration. This method provides an automated

  16. An experimental study of rill sediment delivery in purple soil, using the volume-replacement method

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuhan; Luo, Banglin; Ding, Linqiao; Gong, Chunming

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies provide a basis for understanding the mechanisms of rill erosion and can provide estimates for parameter values in physical models simulating the erosion process. In this study, we investigated sediment delivery during rill erosion in purple soil. We used the volume-replacement method to measure the volume of eroded soil and hence estimate the mass of eroded soil. A 12 m artificial rill was divided into the following sections: 0–0.5 m, 0.5–1 m, 1–2 m, 2–3 m, 3–4 m, 4–5 m, 5–6 m, 6–7 m, 7–8 m, 8–10 m, and 10–12 m. Erosion trials were conducted with three flow rates (2 L/min, 4 L/min, and 8 L/min) and five slope gradients (5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, and 25°). The eroded rill sections were refilled with water to measure the eroded volume in each section and subsequently calculate the eroded sediment mass. The cumulative sediment mass was used to compute the sediment concentration along the length of the rill. The results show that purple soil sediment concentration increases with rill length before eventually reaching a maximal value; that is, the rate of increase in sediment concentration is greatest at the rill inlet and then gradually slows. Steeper slopes and higher flow rates result in sediment concentration increasing more rapidly along the rill length and the maximum sediment concentration being reached at an earlier location in the rill. Slope gradient and flow rate both result in an increase in maximal sediment concentration and accumulated eroded amount. However, slope gradient has a greater influence on rill erosion than flow rate. The results and experimental method in this study may provide a reference for future rill-erosion experiments. PMID:26734498

  17. Inferring regulatory networks from experimental morphological phenotypes: a computational method reverse-engineers planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Daniel; Levin, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Transformative applications in biomedicine require the discovery of complex regulatory networks that explain the development and regeneration of anatomical structures, and reveal what external signals will trigger desired changes of large-scale pattern. Despite recent advances in bioinformatics, extracting mechanistic pathway models from experimental morphological data is a key open challenge that has resisted automation. The fundamental difficulty of manually predicting emergent behavior of even simple networks has limited the models invented by human scientists to pathway diagrams that show necessary subunit interactions but do not reveal the dynamics that are sufficient for complex, self-regulating pattern to emerge. To finally bridge the gap between high-resolution genetic data and the ability to understand and control patterning, it is critical to develop computational tools to efficiently extract regulatory pathways from the resultant experimental shape phenotypes. For example, planarian regeneration has been studied for over a century, but despite increasing insight into the pathways that control its stem cells, no constructive, mechanistic model has yet been found by human scientists that explains more than one or two key features of its remarkable ability to regenerate its correct anatomical pattern after drastic perturbations. We present a method to infer the molecular products, topology, and spatial and temporal non-linear dynamics of regulatory networks recapitulating in silico the rich dataset of morphological phenotypes resulting from genetic, surgical, and pharmacological experiments. We demonstrated our approach by inferring complete regulatory networks explaining the outcomes of the main functional regeneration experiments in the planarian literature; By analyzing all the datasets together, our system inferred the first systems-biology comprehensive dynamical model explaining patterning in planarian regeneration. This method provides an automated

  18. Experimental study and finite element analysis based on equivalent load method for laser ultrasonic measurement of elastic constants.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yu; Liu, Changsheng; Zhang, Fengpeng; Qiu, Zhaoguo

    2016-07-01

    The laser ultrasonic generation of Rayleigh surface wave and longitudinal wave in an elastic plate is studied by experiment and finite element method. In order to eliminate the measurement error and the time delay of the experimental system, the linear fitting method of experimental data is applied. The finite element analysis software ABAQUS is used to simulate the propagation of Rayleigh surface wave and longitudinal wave caused by laser excitation on a sheet metal sample surface. The equivalent load method is proposed and applied. The pulsed laser is equivalent to the surface load in time and space domain to meet the Gaussian profile. The relationship between the physical parameters of the laser and the load is established by the correction factor. The numerical solution is in good agreement with the experimental result. The simple and effective numerical and experimental methods for laser ultrasonic measurement of the elastic constants are demonstrated. PMID:27079489

  19. Interfacial oxidative processes of carbon electrodes and liners at low oxygen potentials -- An experimental method

    SciTech Connect

    James, B.J.; Welch, B.J.; Hyland, M.M.; Mittag, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Oxidative reactions of carbon are frequently characterized by an ignition temperature determined, for example, by correlation with thermogravimetric analysis. However, the heterogeneous nature of the carbon materials used for cathodes and liners makes this method insensitive. Ignition in furnace liners is further complicated by selective oxidation. An experimental approach has been developed using a low thermal mass furnace in which samples may be heated in an atmosphere with controlled oxygen partial pressures, similar to those that might exist in the cathode cavity of a reduction cell. Product gases are continuously sampled by a mass spectrometer for sensitive detection of oxides; a coupled thermogravimetric apparatus is also used in order to perform a continuous total materials balance. Results show slow reaction occurs well before accepted ignition temperature, the rate displaying a time/temperature interdependence. Above a certain temperature the oxygen partial pressure becomes the limiting factor (e.g. 600 C for a graphite/ECA mix sample). This paper presents a description of the method and apparatus used, preliminary results and comparison with reported ignition temperatures.

  20. TiO{sub 2} synthesized by microwave assisted solvothermal method: Experimental and theoretical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, K.F.; Maul, J.; Albuquerque, A.R.; Casali, G.P.

    2014-02-15

    In this study, a microwave assisted solvothermal method was used to synthesize TiO{sub 2} with anatase structure. The synthesis was done using Ti (IV) isopropoxide and ethanol without templates or alkalinizing agents. Changes in structural features were observed with increasing time of synthesis and evaluated using periodic quantum chemical calculations. The anatase phase was obtained after only 1 min of reaction besides a small amount of brookite phase. Experimental Raman spectra are in accordance with the theoretical one. Micrometric spheres constituted by nanometric particles were obtained for synthesis from 1 to 30 min, while spheres and sticks were observed after 60 min. - Graphical abstract: FE-SEM images of anatase obtained with different periods of synthesis associated with the order–disorder degree. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Anatase microspheres were obtained by the microwave assisted hydrothermal method. • Only ethanol and titanium isopropoxide were used as precursors during the synthesis. • Raman spectra and XRD patterns were compared with quantum chemical calculations. • Time of synthesis increased the short-range disorder in one direction and decreased in another.

  1. Vibrational studies on (E)-1-((pyridine-2-yl)methylene)semicarbazide using experimental and theoretical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subashchandrabose, S.; Ramesh Babu, N.; Saleem, H.; Syed Ali Padusha, M.

    2015-08-01

    The (E)-1-((pyridine-2-yl)methylene)semicarbazide (PMSC) was synthesized. The experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure and vibrational spectra were carried out. The FT-IR (400-4000 cm-1), FT-Raman (50-3500 cm-1) and UV-Vis (200-500 nm) spectra of PMSC were recorded. The geometric structure, conformational analysis, vibrational wavenumbers of PMSC in the ground state have been calculated using B3LYP method of 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The complete vibrational assignments were made on the basis of TED, calculated by SQM method. The Non-linear optical activity was measured by means of first order hyperpolarizability calculation and π-electrons of conjugative bond in the molecule. The intra-molecular charge transfer, mode hyperconjugative interaction and molecular stabilization energies were calculated. The band gap energies between occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals were analyzed; it proposes lesser band gap with more reactivity. To understand the electronic properties of this molecule the Mulliken charges were also calculated.

  2. An investigation on characterizing dense coal-water slurry with ultrasound: theoretical and experimental method

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, M.H.; Su, M.X.; Dong, L.L.; Shang, Z.T.; Cai, X.S.

    2010-07-01

    Particle size distribution and concentration in particulate two-phase flow are important parameters in a wide variety of industrial areas. For the purpose of online characterization in dense coal-water slurries, ultrasonic methods have many advantages such as avoiding dilution, the capability for being used in real time, and noninvasive testing, while light-based techniques are not capable of providing information because optical methods often require the slurry to be diluted. In this article, the modified Urick equation including temperature modification, which can be used to determine the concentration by means of the measurement of ultrasonic velocity in a coal-water slurry, is evaluated on the basis of theoretical analysis and experimental study. A combination of the coupled-phase model and the Bouguer-Lambert-Beer law is employed in this work, and the attenuation spectrum is measured within the frequency region from 3 to 12 MHz. Particle size distributions of the coal-water slurry at different volume fractions are obtained with the optimum regularization technique. Therefore, the ultrasonic technique presented in this work brings the possibility of using ultrasound for online measurements of dense slurries.

  3. Experimental Sentinel-2 LAI estimation using parametric, non-parametric and physical retrieval methods - A comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrelst, Jochem; Rivera, Juan Pablo; Veroustraete, Frank; Muñoz-Marí, Jordi; Clevers, Jan G. P. W.; Camps-Valls, Gustau; Moreno, José

    2015-10-01

    Given the forthcoming availability of Sentinel-2 (S2) images, this paper provides a systematic comparison of retrieval accuracy and processing speed of a multitude of parametric, non-parametric and physically-based retrieval methods using simulated S2 data. An experimental field dataset (SPARC), collected at the agricultural site of Barrax (Spain), was used to evaluate different retrieval methods on their ability to estimate leaf area index (LAI). With regard to parametric methods, all possible band combinations for several two-band and three-band index formulations and a linear regression fitting function have been evaluated. From a set of over ten thousand indices evaluated, the best performing one was an optimized three-band combination according to (ρ560 -ρ1610 -ρ2190) / (ρ560 +ρ1610 +ρ2190) with a 10-fold cross-validation RCV2 of 0.82 (RMSECV : 0.62). This family of methods excel for their fast processing speed, e.g., 0.05 s to calibrate and validate the regression function, and 3.8 s to map a simulated S2 image. With regard to non-parametric methods, 11 machine learning regression algorithms (MLRAs) have been evaluated. This methodological family has the advantage of making use of the full optical spectrum as well as flexible, nonlinear fitting. Particularly kernel-based MLRAs lead to excellent results, with variational heteroscedastic (VH) Gaussian Processes regression (GPR) as the best performing method, with a RCV2 of 0.90 (RMSECV : 0.44). Additionally, the model is trained and validated relatively fast (1.70 s) and the processed image (taking 73.88 s) includes associated uncertainty estimates. More challenging is the inversion of a PROSAIL based radiative transfer model (RTM). After the generation of a look-up table (LUT), a multitude of cost functions and regularization options were evaluated. The best performing cost function is Pearson's χ -square. It led to a R2 of 0.74 (RMSE: 0.80) against the validation dataset. While its validation went fast

  4. Experimental method of determining the stress-strain state of bodies on the basis of the absorption of light

    SciTech Connect

    Myl`nikov, A.V.; Rudyak, Yu.A.

    1995-11-01

    Various analytical and experimental methods have been devised for determining stresses and strains in solids [1,2,4,5,6,7]. Among the experimental methods are optical methods based on the refraction and interference of light, polarization (photoelasticity), moire fringes, holographic effects, and other phenomena. All of these methods are based on changes in the index of refraction of electromagnetic waves as a result if the manifestation of optical anisotropy in loaded specimens made of special materials. They also rely on precise measurements of strains of loaded objects obtained by holographic techniques.

  5. The dynamics of a cantilevered pipe aspirating fluid studied by experimental, numerical and analytical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacobbi, Dana B.; Rinaldi, Stephanie; Semler, Christian; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2012-04-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics of a slender, flexible, aspirating cantilevered pipe, ingesting fluid at its free end and conveying it towards its clamped end. The problem is interesting not only from a fundamental perspective, but also because applications exist, notably in ocean mining. First, the need for the present work is demonstrated through a review of previous research into the topic - spanning many years and yielding often contradictory results - most recently suggesting that the system loses stability by flutter at relatively low flow velocities. In the present paper, that conclusion is refined and expanded upon by exploring the problem in three ways: experimentally, numerically and analytically. First, air-flow experiments were conducted using different elastomer pipes and intake shapes, in which the flow velocity of the fluid was varied and the frequency and amplitude of oscillation of the pipe were measured. Second, a fully coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) model was developed in ANSYS™ in order to simulate experiments and corroborate experimental results. Finally, using a Newtonian analytical approach, a new linear equation of motion describing the system was derived, and then solved via the Galerkin method in order to determine its stability characteristics. Heavily influenced by the CFD analysis, the proposed analytical model is different from previous ones, most notably because of the inclusion of a two-part fluid depressurisation at the intake. In general, both the actual and numerical experiments suggest a first-mode loss of stability by flutter at flow velocities comparable to those for the discharging case, which agrees with the results from the new analytical model.

  6. Experimental evaluation of rodent exclusion methods to reduce hantavirus transmission to humans in rural housing.

    PubMed

    Glass, G E; Johnson, J S; Hodenbach, G A; Disalvo, C L; Peters, C J; Childs, J E; Mills, J N

    1997-04-01

    An experimental assessment of methods to reduce rodent infestations in rural housing was conducted in Yosemite National Park, California, Sequoia/Kings Canyon National Parks, California, and Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. During pretreatment surveys, nearly all (63 of 68) selected units had past or ongoing rodent activity inside. Active infestations were found in 58.8% of the units. Peromyscus spp. represented 91.2% of all animals caught inside housing units. Despite little harborage, rodent activity was common near housing (290 animals/2,254 trap nights). The most common species present was Peromyscus maniculatus (43-50% of all captures). This species was especially frequent (49-87% of Peromyscus captures) around the foundations of housing units. Habitat had little effect on captures. There were 1.8 Peromyscus caught per unit along the foundations of housing in modified rural settings with grass lawns compared with 1.2 Peromyscus caught per unit in sites located in mature woodlands. During autumn of 1994, randomly selected housing units were rodent proofed by sealing openings associated with chases, roof eaves, and attics with insulation and wire mesh. Housing was examined and the fauna was resampled in the spring-summer of 1995. Rodent-proofed houses were infested significantly less often (3 of 28) than control houses (13 of 36) (P = 0.02) and the intensity of infestation was lower in experimental houses (6 versus 23 mice/treatment). More than 25% of the mice trapped inside the houses had been marked outside the houses during the three-day surveys, demonstrating movement of mice adjacent to the buildings into not rodent-proofed housing. As in the previous autumn, most of the animals captured in (98.9%) and along the foundations of the houses (77.5%) were Peromyscus spp. These results demonstrate that Peromyscus frequently invade rural housing but rodent-proofing effectively eliminates or substantially reduces rodent activity. PMID:9158040

  7. On the Use of Experimental Methods to Improve Confidence in Educed Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.

    2011-01-01

    Results from impedance eduction methods developed by NASA Langley Research Center are used throughout the acoustic liner community. In spite of recent enhancements, occasional anomalies persist with these methods, generally at frequencies where the liner produces minimal attenuation. This investigation demonstrates an experimental approach to educe impedance with increased confidence over a desired frequency range, by combining results from successive tests with different cavity depths. A series of tests is conducted with three wire-mesh facesheets, for which the results should be weakly dependent on source sound pressure level and mean grazing flow speed. First, a raylometer is used to measure the DC flow resistance of each facesheet. These facesheets are then mounted onto a frame and a normal incidence tube is used to determine their respective acoustic impedance spectra. A comparison of the acoustic resistance component with the DC flow resistance for each facesheet is used to validate the measurement process. Next, each facesheet is successively mounted onto three frames with different cavity depths, and a grazing flow impedance tube is used to educe their respective acoustic impedance spectra with and without mean flow. The no-flow results are compared with those measured in the normal incidence tube to validate the impedance eduction method. Since the anti-resonance frequency varies with cavity depth, each sample provides robust results over a different frequency range. Hence, a combination of results can be used to determine the facesheet acoustic resistance. When combined with the acoustic reactance, observed to be weakly dependent on the source sound pressure level and grazing flow Mach number, the acoustic impedance can be educed with increased confidence. Representative results of these tests are discussed, and the complete database is available in electronic format upon request.

  8. Theoretical principles of experimental methods for determining the thermal diffusivity of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikayilov, F. D.; Shein, E. V.

    2010-05-01

    Mathematical models for predicting the heat transfer in soils are used for the management of the soil thermal conditions; the development of different soil constructions; the analysis of the thermal effects related to the loosening or compaction of the surface soil layers, the sanding of peat, and the application of friable mulching materials; and the description of many other phenomena and processes. The experimental support of the development and functioning of these models is provided by the function of thermal diffusivity, which describes the thermal diffusivity as a function of the water content and can be derived using the methods based on the solution of direct and inverse problems of heat transfer. On the basis of the different boundary conditions and sine-shaped daily and annual temperature cycles, a number of equations were proposed for calculating the thermal diffusivity that contained logarithms, arctangents of amplitudes, and the phase shift between the daily temperatures at two depths. A mean-integral solution was obtained for the estimation of the average temperature in a specific soil layer. A number of methods were developed starting from the analysis of the temperature dynamics on the basis of four daily observations at the same depth with 6-hour intervals, and nomograms were given for the rapid and simple calculation of the soil thermal diffusivity at a specific depth. The developed methods can be used for assessing the soil thermal diffusivity under natural conditions, which should improve the reliability, accuracy, and adequacy and expand the application range of predictive mathematical models for the thermal regime of soils.

  9. Assessment of experimental bond dissociation energies using composite ab initio methods and evaluation of the performances of density functional methods in the calculation of bond dissociation energies.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jin-Ti; Huang, Hao; Guo, Qing-Xiang

    2003-01-01

    Composite ab initio CBS-Q and G3 methods were used to calculate the bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of over 200 compounds listed in CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (2002 ed.). It was found that these two methods agree with each other excellently in the calculation of BDEs, and they can predict BDEs within 10 kJ/mol of the experimental values. Using these two methods, it was found that among the examined compounds 161 experimental BDEs are valid because the standard deviation between the experimental and theoretical values for them is only 8.6 kJ/mol. Nevertheless, 40 BDEs listed in the Handbook may be highly inaccurate as the experimental and theoretical values for them differ by over 20 kJ/mol. Furthermore, 11 BDEs listed in the Handbook may be seriously flawed as the experimental and theoretical values for them differ by over 40 kJ/mol. Using the 161 cautiously validated experimental BDEs, we then assessed the performances of the standard density functional (DFT) methods including B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91, and BH&HLYP in the calculation of BDEs. It was found that the BH&HLYP method performed poorly for the BDE calculations. B3LYP, B3P86, and B3PW91, however, performed reasonably well for the calculation of BDEs with standard deviations of about 12.1-18.0 kJ/mol. Nonetheless, all the DFT methods underestimated the BDEs by 4-17 kJ/mol in average. Sometimes, the underestimation by the DFT methods could be as high as 40-60 kJ/mol. Therefore, the DFT methods were more reliable for relative BDE calculations than for absolute BDE calculations. Finally, it was observed that the basis set effects on the BDEs calculated by the DFT methods were usually small except for the heteroatom-hydrogen BDEs. PMID:14632451

  10. Experimental Investigation of Pressure-volume-Temperature Mass Gauging Method Under Microgravity Condition by Parabolic Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Mansu; Park, Hana; Yoo, DonGyu; Jung, Youngsuk; Jeong, Sangkwon

    Gauging the volume or mass of liquid propellant of a rocket vehicle in space is an important issue for its economic feasibility and optimized design of loading mass. Pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging method is one of the most suitable measuring techniques in space due to its simplicity and reliability. This paper presents unique experimental results and analyses of PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition by parabolic flight. A vacuum-insulated and cylindrical-shaped liquid nitrogen storage tank with 9.2 L volume is manufactured by observing regulation of parabolic flight. PVT gauging experiments are conducted under low liquid fraction condition from 26% to 32%. Pressure, temperature, and the injected helium mass into the storage tank are measured to obtain the ullage volume by gas state equation. Liquid volume is finally derived by the measured ullage volume and the known total tank volume. Two sets of parabolic flights are conducted and each set is composed of approximately 10 parabolic flights. In the first set of flights, the short initial waiting time (3 ∼ 5 seconds) cannot achieve sufficient thermal equilibrium condition at the beginning. It causes inaccurate gauging results due to insufficient information of the initial helium partial pressure in the tank. The helium injection after 12 second waiting time at microgravity condition with high mass flow rate in the second set of flights achieves successful initial thermal equilibrium states and accurate measurement results of initial helium partial pressure. Liquid volume measurement errors in the second set are within 11%.

  11. Nanostructure Characterization of Bismuth Telluride-Based Powders and Extruded Alloys by Various Experimental Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevskiy, D.; Bourbia, O.; Gosselin, S.; Turenne, S.; Masut, R. A.

    2011-05-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations of mechanically alloyed powders and bulk extruded alloys give experimental evidence of nanosized grains in bismuth telluride-based materials. In this study we combine HRTEM observations and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, of both mechanically alloyed powders and extruded samples, with mechanical spectroscopy (MS) of extruded rods. Both HRTEM and XRD show that nanostructures with an average grain size near 25 nm can be achieved within 2 h of mechanical alloying from pure elements in an attritor-type milling machine. Residual strain orthogonal to the c-axis of powder nanoparticles has been evaluated at about 1.2% by XRD peak broadening. In contrast, XRD has been found unreliable for evaluation of grain size in highly textured extruded materials for which diffraction conditions are similar to those of single crystals, while MS appears promising for study of bulk extruded samples. Nanostructured extruded alloys at room temperature exhibit an internal friction (IF) background that is one order of magnitude higher than that of conventional zone-melted material with a grain size of several millimeters. IF as a function of sample temperature gives activation energies that are also different between bulk materials having nano- and millimeter-size grains, a result that is attributed to different creep mechanisms. Nanograin size, as well as orientation and volumetric proportion, provide valuable information for optimization of technological parameters of thermoelectric alloys and should be carefully cross-examined by various independent methods.

  12. Theoretical and experimental investigations on measuring underwater temperature by the coherent Brillouin scattering method.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiuyun; Tian, Zhaoshuo; Zhang, Yanchao; Wang, Ling; Fu, Shiyou

    2015-10-20

    In this paper, a new method of measuring a water-stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) frequency shift by optical coherent detection is presented, in order to remote-sense the underwater temperature of the ocean. A single longitudinal mode, passively Q-switched pulsed Nd:YAG laser is used as the light source, the water SBS beam is used as the signal beam, and a portion of the incident laser beam is used as the local oscillator. The heterodyne is detected by a high-speed photodetector, and the heterodyne frequency is the Brillouin frequency shift. Therefore, the underwater temperature can be determined according to the relationship between the Brillouin frequency shift and the water temperature. To test and verify its practicability, the heterodyne waveforms at different water temperatures are recorded in the laboratory with a wide-band oscilloscope, and the Brillouin frequency shifts are deduced by a Fourier transform. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical analysis. This work provides the foundation for the development of a water temperature measurement system based on coherent Brillouin scattering. PMID:26560393

  13. The 'triple contrast' method in experimental wound ballistics and backspatter analysis.

    PubMed

    Schyma, Christian; Lux, Constantin; Madea, Burkhard; Courts, Cornelius

    2015-09-01

    In practical forensic casework, backspatter recovered from shooters' hands can be an indicator of self-inflicted gunshot wounds to the head. In such cases, backspatter retrieved from inside the barrel indicates that the weapon found at the death scene was involved in causing the injury to the head. However, systematic research on the aspects conditioning presence, amount and specific patterns of backspatter is lacking so far. Herein, a new concept of backspatter investigation is presented, comprising staining technique, weapon and target medium: the 'triple contrast method' was developed, tested and is introduced for experimental backspatter analysis. First, mixtures of various proportions of acrylic paint for optical detection, barium sulphate for radiocontrast imaging in computed tomography and fresh human blood for PCR-based DNA profiling were generated (triple mixture) and tested for DNA quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) typing success. All tested mixtures yielded sufficient DNA that produced full STR profiles suitable for forensic identification. Then, for backspatter analysis, sealed foil bags containing the triple mixture were attached to plastic bottles filled with 10% ballistic gelatine and covered by a 2-3-mm layer of silicone. To simulate backspatter, close contact shots were fired at these models. Endoscopy of the barrel inside revealed coloured backspatter containing typable DNA and radiographic imaging showed a contrasted bullet path in the gelatine. Cross sections of the gelatine core exhibited cracks and fissures stained by the acrylic paint facilitating wound ballistic analysis. PMID:25616629

  14. A review of experimental methods for solid solubility determination in cryogenic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stefani, V.; Baba-Ahmed, A.; Richon, D.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past years, there have been a number of serious explosions in air industry, which have resulted in workers injuries and fatalities. At the same time, there has been an increase in the use of air separation products for industrial activities. The quality of air entering an air separation plant is of crucial importance for its safe and reliable operation and the interest in the solubility data of solids in cryogenic liquid solvents is closely connected to the problem of impurities accumulation in the process plant and storage tanks. Such accumulations, especially in liquid oxygen, may cause fouling and blockage in heat exchangers and pipelines and they may eventually cause serious explosions. For this reason the air contaminants composition in liquid oxygen must be determined with great precision. This paper aims at reviewing experimental methods for determining the solubility of solid compounds that may be present in the cryogenic liquefaction processing of air distillation. A review of the literature data on solubility of solids in liquid oxygen and nitrogen is included as well. Emphasis is given to the difficulties in setting-up measuring apparatuses working at extreme conditions, i.e. low compositions and low temperatures.

  15. Theoretical and experimental methods for in situ infrared spectroelectrochemistry of organic monomolecular films

    SciTech Connect

    Popenoe, D.D.

    1992-09-09

    This work describes the theoretical analysis, experimental development, and application of an in situ spectroelectrochemical cell for measuring infrared reflection-absorption spectra (IRRAS) of monolayer-coated Au surfaces beneath a thin aqueous overlayer. The cell allows the interchange of sample and reference substrates, thereby facilitating IRRAS of long-chain alkanethiolates in the C-H stretching region without electrochemical or polarization-modulation methods. The same in situ cell is combined with electrochemical modulation to study monolayers self-assembled from 11-mercaptoundecyl ferrocenecarboxylate (FcCOOC{sub 11}SH) at gold and to correlate the monolayer structure and composition with the ferrocenyl redox chemistry. An electrochemically active monolayer of an alkanethiolate derivatized with a flavin, formed by self-assembly from ethanolic solutions of 11,11`-dithiobisundecanoic acid, bis[2-(7,8-dimethyl-10-isoalloxazino)ethyl] ester, is described. IRRAS of the film, which is a candidate for future in situ spectroscopic studies, are presented and compared with transmission spectra of bulk analogs.

  16. Theoretical and experimental methods for in situ infrared spectroelectrochemistry of organic monomolecular films

    SciTech Connect

    Popenoe, D.D.

    1992-09-09

    This work describes the theoretical analysis, experimental development, and application of an in situ spectroelectrochemical cell for measuring infrared reflection-absorption spectra (IRRAS) of monolayer-coated Au surfaces beneath a thin aqueous overlayer. The cell allows the interchange of sample and reference substrates, thereby facilitating IRRAS of long-chain alkanethiolates in the C-H stretching region without electrochemical or polarization-modulation methods. The same in situ cell is combined with electrochemical modulation to study monolayers self-assembled from 11-mercaptoundecyl ferrocenecarboxylate (FcCOOC{sub 11}SH) at gold and to correlate the monolayer structure and composition with the ferrocenyl redox chemistry. An electrochemically active monolayer of an alkanethiolate derivatized with a flavin, formed by self-assembly from ethanolic solutions of 11,11'-dithiobisundecanoic acid, bis(2-(7,8-dimethyl-10-isoalloxazino)ethyl) ester, is described. IRRAS of the film, which is a candidate for future in situ spectroscopic studies, are presented and compared with transmission spectra of bulk analogs.

  17. Numerical and Experimental Methods for Wake Flow Analysis in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Francesco; Astolfi, Davide; Piccioni, Emanuele; Terzi, Ludovico

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and interpretation of the quality of wind farms power output is a non-trivial task, which poses at least three main challenges: reliable comprehension of free wind flow, which is stretched to the limit on very complex terrains, realistic model of how wake interactions resemble on the wind flow, awareness of the consequences on turbine control systems, including alignment patterns to the wind and, consequently, power output. The present work deals with an onshore wind farm in southern Italy, which has been a test case of IEA- Task 31 Wakebench project: 17 turbines, with 2.3 MW of rated power each, are sited on a very complex terrain. A cluster of machines is investigated through numerical and experimental methods: CFD is employed for simulating wind fields and power extraction, as well as wakes, are estimated through the Actuator Disc model. SCADA data mining techniques are employed for comparison between models and actual performances. The simulations are performed both on the real terrain and on flat terrain, in order to disentangle the effects of complex flow and wake effects. Attention is devoted to comparison between actual alignment patterns of the cluster of turbines and predicted flow deviation.

  18. The birth of experimental psychology in Germany between psychophysical methods and physiological theories.

    PubMed

    Sinatra, Maria

    2006-01-01

    In 1879 Wundt's laboratory of psychology was opened in Leipzig, and it has been the landmark ever since for the beginning of modern experimental psychology. Its founder, Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt, was the first to successfully demarcate the areas of scientific psychology as being distinct from either physiology or philosophy, thus guaranteeing the survival of psychology, which was regarded as an autonomous discipline set upon a secure institutional framework. This paper attempts to clarify the basic facts and concepts related to the roots of scientific psychology in Germany, i.e., the context in which the "Founding Father" worked, as well as of those predecessors who proposed the topics and apparatus of his laboratory. Attention will be paid in particular to the psychophysical methods of Weber and Fechner, especially in regard to colour perception. In this context, an outline is presented of the history of reaction time experiments in astronomy, physiology, and psychology, and of the role played by the scientific instruments. It is shown how the methodology of physics and physiology contributed to the emancipation of scientific psychology and to the formation of its orientation. PMID:19569432

  19. Experimental Evaluation of a Method for Turbocharging Four-Stroke, Single Cylinder, Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchman, Michael; Winter, Amos

    2015-11-01

    Turbocharging an engine increases specific power, improves fuel economy, reduces emissions, and lowers cost compared to a naturally aspirated engine of the same power output. These advantages make turbocharging commonplace for multi-cylinder engines. Single cylinder engineers are not commonly turbocharged due to the phase lag between the exhaust stroke, which powers the turbocharger, and the intake stroke, when air is pumped into the engine. Our proposed method of turbocharging single cylinder engines is to add an ``air capacitor'' to the intake manifold, an additional volume that acts as a buffer to store compressed air between the exhaust and intake strokes, and smooth out the pressure pulses from the turbocharger. This talk presents experimental results from a single cylinder, turbocharged diesel engine fit with various sized air capacitors. Power output from the engine was measured using a dynamometer made from a generator, with the electrical power dissipated with resistive heating elements. We found that intake air density increases with capacitor size as theoretically predicted, ranging from 40 to 60 percent depending on heat transfer. Our experiment was able to produce 29 percent more power compared to using natural aspiration. These results validated that an air capacitor and turbocharger may be a simple, cost effective means of increasing the power density of single cylinder engines.

  20. Which electrode? A comparison of four endoscopic methods of electrocoagulation in experimental bleeding ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Swain, C P; Mills, T N; Shemesh, E; Dark, J M; Lewin, M R; Clifton, J S; Northfield, T C; Cotton, P B; Salmon, P R

    1984-01-01

    Several inexpensive endoscopic methods of electrocoagulation have been advocated for treatment of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. We compared four types of electrode: dry monopolar - Cameron Miller (M), liquid monopolar - Storz (L), bipolar - Bicap ACMI (B), and heater probe - Seattle (H). The electrical and thermal properties of these probes were studied using computerised monitoring of energy deposition and their efficacy and safety was tested in a randomised study in 140 experimental canine gastric ulcers. At optimal pulse settings 20J (M), 70J (L), 17J (B), 15J (H), effective haemostasis was achieved in all ulcers, the mean number of pulses being M5, L6, H6 and B11, the first three requiring significantly (p less than 0.01) less pulse than B. Relative safety of the electrodes was assessed by comparing the incidence of full thickness damage at histology: B24%, H20%, L58% and M69%; B and H proving significantly (p less than 0.01) safer than L and M. Sticking was assessed as H greater than B greater than M much greater than L. Insensitivity to extreme angulation and force of application was assessed as L greater than B greater than M (H is preset). Of the two safer electrodes the heater probe was more effective than the bipolar probe. Despite its greater tendency to stick than the other devices, the heater probe appeared the most promising of the endoscopic electrodes tested. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6510772

  1. An Experimental Comparison of Two Methods Of Teaching Numerical Control Manual Programming Concepts; Visual Media Versus Hands-On Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biekert, Russell

    Accompanying the rapid changes in technology has been a greater dependence on automation and numerical control, which has resulted in the need to find ways of preparing programers for industrial machines using numerical control. To compare the hands-on equipment method and a visual media method of teaching numerical control, an experimental and a…

  2. Correction of steel casing effect for density log using numerical and experimental methods in the slim borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Seho; Shin, Jehyun; Kim, Jongman; Won, Byeongho

    2015-03-10

    Density log is widely applied for a variety of fields such as the petroleum exploration, mineral exploration, and geotechnical survey. The logging condition of density log is normally open holes but there are frequently cased boreholes. The primary calibration curve by slim hole logging manufacturer is normally the calibration curves for the variation of borehole diameter. In this study, we have performed the correction of steel casing effects using numerical and experimental methods. We have performed numerical modeling using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code based on Monte Carlo method, and field experimental method from open and cased hole log. In this study, we used the FDGS (Formation Density Gamma Sonde) for slim borehole with a 100 mCi 137Cs source, three inch borehole and steel casing. The casing effect between numerical and experimental method is well matched.

  3. Improvement of mechanical properties of polymeric composites: Experimental methods and new systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Felix Nhanchau

    Filler- (e.g., particulate or fiber) reinforced structural polymers or polymeric composites have changed the way things are made. Today, they are found, for example, in air/ground transportation vehicles, sporting goods, ballistic barrier applications and weapons, electronic packaging, musical instruments, fashion items, and more. As the demand increases, so does the desire to have not only well balanced mechanical properties, but also light weight and low cost. This leads to a constant search for novel constituents and additives, new fabrication methods and analytical techniques. To achieve new or improved composite materials requires more than the identification of the right reinforcements to be used with the right polymer matrix at the right loading. Also, an optimized adhesion between the two phases and a toughened matrix system are needed. This calls for new methods to predict, modify and assess the level of adhesion, and new developments in matrix tougheners to minimize compromises in other mechanical/thermal properties. Furthermore, structural optimization, associated with fabrication (e.g., avoidance of fiber-fiber touching or particle aggregation), and sometimes special properties, such as electrical conductivity or magnetic susceptibility are necessary. Finally, the composite system's durability, often under hostile conditions, is generally mandatory. The present study researches new predictive and experimental methods for optimizing and characterizing filler-matrix adhesion and develops a new type of epoxy tougheners. Specifically, (1) a simple thermodynamic parameter evaluated by UNIFAC is applied successfully to screen out candidate adhesion promoters, which is necessary for optimization of the physio-chemical interactions between the two phases; (2) an optical-acoustical mechanical test assisted with an acoustic emission technique is developed to de-convolute filler debonding/delamination among many other micro failure events, and (3) novel core

  4. Cone penetration and bevameter geotechnical tests in lunar regolith simulants: discrete element method analysis and experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulchitsky, A. V.; Johnson, J.; Duvoy, P.; Wilkinson, A.; Creager, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    For in situ resource utilization on the Moon, asteroids, Mars, or other space body it is necessary to be able to simulate the interaction of mobile platforms and excavation machines with the regolith for engineering design, planning, and operations. For accurate simulations, tools designed to measure regolith properties will need to be deployed and interpreted. Two such tools are the penetrometer, used to measure a soil strength index as a function of depth, and the bevameter, used to characterize regolith surface properties of strength, friction and sinkage. The penetrometer interrogates regolith properties from the surface to a depth limited only by the capabilities of the instrument to penetrate the regolith while a bevameter interrogates only the upper few centimeters needed to describe a mobility platform's traction and sinkage. Interpretation of penetrometer and bevameter data can be difficult, especially on low gravity objects. We use the discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the large regolith deformations and failures associated with the tests to determine regolith properties. The DEM simulates granular material behavior using large aggregates of distinct particles. Realistic physics of particle-particle interaction introduces many granular specific phenomena such as interlocking and force chain formation that cannot be represented using continuum methods. In this work, experiments using a cone penetrometer test (CPT) and bevameter on lunar simulants JSC-1A and GRC-1 were performed at NASA Glenn Research Center. These tests were used to validate the physics in the COUPi DEM model. COUPi is a general physical DEM code being developed to model machine/regolith interactions as part of a NASA Lunar Science Institute sponsored project on excavation and mobility modeling. The experimental results were used in this work to build an accurate model to simulate the lunar regolith. The CPT consists of driving an instrumented cone with opening angle of 60

  5. Antimicrobial analysis of different root canal filling pastes used in pediatric dentistry by two experimental methods.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Lilian de Fátima Guedes de; Toledo, Orlando Airton de; Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues de Araújo; Decurcio, Daniel de Almeida; Estrela, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare, by two experimental methods, the antimicrobial efficacy of different root canal filling pastes used in pediatric dentistry. The tested materials were: Guedes-Pinto paste (GPP), zinc oxide-eugenol paste (OZEP), calcium hydroxide paste (CHP), chloramphenicol + tetracycline + zinc oxide and eugenol paste (CTZP) and Vitapex. Fiven microbial strains (S. aureus, E. faecalis, P. aeruginosa, B. subtilis and C. albicans) obtained from the American Type Culture Collection were inoculated in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) and incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h. For the direct exposure test (DET), 72 paper points were contaminated with the standard microbial suspensions and exposed to the root canal filling pastes for 1, 24, 48 and 72 h. The points were immersed in Letheen Broth (LB), followed by incubation at 37 degrees C for 48 h. An inoculum of 0.1 mL obtained from LB was then transferred to 7 mL of BHI, under identical incubations conditions and the microbial growth was evaluated. The pastes showed activity between 1 and 24 h, depending on the material. For the agar diffusion test (ADT), 30 Petri plates with 20 mL of BHI agar were inoculated with 0.1 mL of the microbial suspension, using sterile swabs that were spread on the medium. Three cavities were made in each agar plate (total = 90) and completely filled with one of the filling root canal pastes. The plates were pre-incubated for 1 h at room temperature and then incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 to 48 h. The inhibition zone around each well was recorded in mm. The complete antimicrobial effect in the direct exposure test was observed after 24 h on all microbial indicators. All root canal filling materials induced the formation of inhibition zones, except for Vitapex (range, 6.0-39.0 mm). PMID:17262146

  6. An experimental investigation by optical methods of the physics and chemistry of transient plasma ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, Scott James

    The use of nonequilibrium plasma generated by nanosecond discharges to ignite fuel/air mixtures, known as transient plasma ignition (TPI), has been shown to effectively reduce ignition delay and improve engine performance relative to spark ignition for combustion engines. While this method is potentially useful for many engine applications, at present the underlying physics are poorly understood. This work provides a review of previous engine implementation work as well as previous experimental work seeking to provide an understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms of TPI. Work on producing the pulses needed for TPI, both engine testing and optical diagnostic is presented. The emission of TPI is analyzed in order to determine the spectral, spatial, and temporal behavior of the discharge. Temperature mesurements of TPI using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) show that the temperature in streamer discharge and afterglow increases, though it is difficult to quantify the increase with this method. The results of coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy temperature measurements are reported and discussed, with temperature increases up to 1500 K above ambient observed in the discharge afterglow in fuel/air mixtures. The impact of this temperature increase on TPI and the possibility of thermal ignition is considered. In addition, CARS measurements show that generation of vibrationally excited states of nitrogen is inefficient during the discharge in air but that generation occurs at a high rate roughly 5 micros following the discharge; with the addition of fuels vibrationally excited states are observed during the discharge but an increase in population is still seen at 5 micros. Possible mechanisms for this behavior are discussed. Additionally, this work uses two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence to measure oxygen atom concentrations in streamer discharge afterglow in a variety of fuel/air mixtures in order to account for the oxygen pathways in

  7. Parameter estimation and uncertainty quantification in a biogeochemical model using optimal experimental design methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Joscha; Piwonski, Jaroslaw; Slawig, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The statistical significance of any model-data comparison strongly depends on the quality of the used data and the criterion used to measure the model-to-data misfit. The statistical properties (such as mean values, variances and covariances) of the data should be taken into account by choosing a criterion as, e.g., ordinary, weighted or generalized least squares. Moreover, the criterion can be restricted onto regions or model quantities which are of special interest. This choice influences the quality of the model output (also for not measured quantities) and the results of a parameter estimation or optimization process. We have estimated the parameters of a three-dimensional and time-dependent marine biogeochemical model describing the phosphorus cycle in the ocean. For this purpose, we have developed a statistical model for measurements of phosphate and dissolved organic phosphorus. This statistical model includes variances and correlations varying with time and location of the measurements. We compared the obtained estimations of model output and parameters for different criteria. Another question is if (and which) further measurements would increase the model's quality at all. Using experimental design criteria, the information content of measurements can be quantified. This may refer to the uncertainty in unknown model parameters as well as the uncertainty regarding which model is closer to reality. By (another) optimization, optimal measurement properties such as locations, time instants and quantities to be measured can be identified. We have optimized such properties for additional measurement for the parameter estimation of the marine biogeochemical model. For this purpose, we have quantified the uncertainty in the optimal model parameters and the model output itself regarding the uncertainty in the measurement data using the (Fisher) information matrix. Furthermore, we have calculated the uncertainty reduction by additional measurements depending on time

  8. Exploring the interplay between experimental methods and the performance of predictors of binding affinity change upon mutations in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Geng, Cunliang; Vangone, Anna; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2016-08-01

    Reliable prediction of binding affinity changes (ΔΔG) upon mutations in protein complexes relies not only on the performance of computational methods but also on the availability and quality of experimental data. Binding affinity changes can be measured by various experimental methods with different accuracies and limitations. To understand the impact of these on the prediction of binding affinity change, we present the Database of binding Affinity Change Upon Mutation (DACUM), a database of 1872 binding affinity changes upon single-point mutations, a subset of the SKEMPI database (Moal,I.H. and Fernández-Recio,J. Bioinformatics, 2012;28:2600-2607) extended with information on the experimental methods used for ΔΔG measurements. The ΔΔG data were classified into different data sets based on the experimental method used and the position of the mutation (interface and non-interface). We tested the prediction performance of the original HADDOCK score, a newly trained version of it and mutation Cutoff Scanning Matrix (Pires,D.E.V., Ascher,D.B. and Blundell,T.L. Bioinformatics 2014;30:335-342), one of the best reported ΔΔG predictors so far, on these various data sets. Our results demonstrate a strong impact of the experimental methods on the performance of binding affinity change predictors for protein complexes. This underscores the importance of properly considering and carefully choosing experimental methods in the development of novel binding affinity change predictors. The DACUM database is available online at https://github.com/haddocking/DACUM. PMID:27284087

  9. Investigation on the Oscillating Gas Flow Along AN Inertance Tube by Experimental and Cfd Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Houlei; Zhao, Miguang; Yang, Luwei; Cai, Jinghui; Hong, Guotong; Liang, Jingtao

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the oscillating gas flow along an inertance tube used in pulse tube coolers, a CFD model is set up for FLUENT and an experimental measuring cell is designed and optimized by CFD results. Some characteristics of oscillating flow are demonstrated and discussed. Then, the flow status along an inertance tube is measured by the optimized measuring cell. The experimental results validate the simulating results.

  10. INVESTIGATION ON THE OSCILLATING GAS FLOW ALONG AN INERTANCE TUBE BY EXPERIMENTAL AND CFD METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Houlei; Zhao Miguang; Yang Luwei; Cai Jinghui; Hong Guotong; Liang Jingtao

    2010-04-09

    To investigate the oscillating gas flow along an inertance tube used in pulse tube coolers, a CFD model is set up for FLUENT and an experimental measuring cell is designed and optimized by CFD results. Some characteristics of oscillating flow are demonstrated and discussed. Then, the flow status along an inertance tube is measured by the optimized measuring cell. The experimental results validate the simulating results.

  11. Maguelone (Languedoc coastline, France) : a shallow experimental site for CO2 storage hydrogeophysical monitoring methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezard, Philippe; Denchik, Nataliya; Lofi, Johanna; Perroud, Hervé; Neyens, Denis

    2010-05-01

    The Maguelone experimental site is located along the Mediterranean lido of the Gulf of Lions passive margin, 10 km south from Montpellier. Limited to the north by a coastal lagoon and to the south by the Mediterranean sea, this site offers a natural laboratory to study porous coastal reservoirs in a clastic and clay-rich context saturated with mostly saline fluids. Drilled and cored in 2003 for sedimentological purpose, the Maguelone site crosses from surface to 9 m depth a thin Holocene sequence constituted with lagoonal sediments made mostly of dark green clays. This sequence forms an impermeable seal overlying unconformably a Pliocene sequence consisting mainly of relatively homogeneous fine grained continental deposits (clays, silts, and clayey silts). The clayey fraction is relatively high all along, making those deposits poorly permeable. In this sequence, a single remarkable depositional unit located from 14 to 17 m, consists of porous and permeable conglomerates and sands interpreted as fluvial deposits. Sedimentary and geophysical measurements suggest a high permeability for this 3 m-thick reservoir. Hydrogen sulphite (H2S) (possibly resulting from lagoonal organic matter decomposition and compaction) encountered during coring operations near 15 m depth confirmed the presence of a small reservoir at this depth. As part of the ALIANCE EC project (FP5), a new downhole resistivity observatory prototype was constructed and set-up in 2004, tested in a dipole-dipole mode, and calibrated against induction resistivity logs. From this, time lapse measurements were emplaced and made automatic showing gradual changes over time in electrical resistivity. Taking advantage of this shallow and thin reservoir embedded in clays and silts, a new shallow experimental site is to be developed in the context of MUSTANG EC project (FP7). In particular, the downhole technology jointly developed by "Géosciences Montpellier" and "imaGeau" is to be adapted to resist the aggressive

  12. Measuring the Subjective Value of Risky and Ambiguous Options using Experimental Economics and Functional MRI Methods

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Ifat; Rosenberg Belmaker, Lior; Manson, Kirk; Tymula, Agnieszka; Glimcher, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the choices we make have uncertain consequences. In some cases the probabilities for different possible outcomes are precisely known, a condition termed "risky". In other cases when probabilities cannot be estimated, this is a condition described as "ambiguous". While most people are averse to both risk and ambiguity1,2, the degree of those aversions vary substantially across individuals, such that the subjective value of the same risky or ambiguous option can be very different for different individuals. We combine functional MRI (fMRI) with an experimental economics-based method3 to assess the neural representation of the subjective values of risky and ambiguous options4. This technique can be now used to study these neural representations in different populations, such as different age groups and different patient populations. In our experiment, subjects make consequential choices between two alternatives while their neural activation is tracked using fMRI. On each trial subjects choose between lotteries that vary in their monetary amount and in either the probability of winning that amount or the ambiguity level associated with winning. Our parametric design allows us to use each individual's choice behavior to estimate their attitudes towards risk and ambiguity, and thus to estimate the subjective values that each option held for them. Another important feature of the design is that the outcome of the chosen lottery is not revealed during the experiment, so that no learning can take place, and thus the ambiguous options remain ambiguous and risk attitudes are stable. Instead, at the end of the scanning session one or few trials are randomly selected and played for real money. Since subjects do not know beforehand which trials will be selected, they must treat each and every trial as if it and it alone was the one trial on which they will be paid. This design ensures that we can estimate the true subjective value of each option to each subject. We then

  13. Investigation of the intervertebral disc and fused joint dynamics through experimental modal analysis and the receptance coupling method.

    PubMed

    Malekian, M; Trieu, D; Owoc, J S; Park, S S; Hunter, C J

    2010-04-01

    Identification of intervertebral disc (IVD) dynamics is important in understanding the spine mechanism and behavior. This paper experimentally identifies the dynamics of the bovine caudal IVD using experimental modal analysis and the inverse receptance coupling method. Experimental modal analysis was performed on free-free mounted bovine caudal vertebrae joined by an IVD and a fused IVD joint. Shear, rotational, and axial dynamics of the joints are identified by curve fitting of the frequency response functions, and identifying the damping ratio, stiffness, and modal frequency in each axis. The identified dynamics are compared with the IVD joints with and without fusion. Results provide important insight into IVD dynamics and fused IVD dynamics. This method can be extended to identify human IVD joint dynamics. PMID:20387967

  14. The experimental detection of spectral diffusion by the saturation transient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscaino, R.; Gelardi, F. M.; Mantegna, R. N.

    The effect of spectral diffusion (SD) on the saturation properties of an inhomogeneous spin system has been experimentally investigated by examining the saturation transient regime of a sample of DPPH diluted in polystyrene ( c ˜ 2 × 10 18 cm -3) at T = 4.2 K. In agreement with the theoretical results obtained in our previous paper, two different regimes can be singled out in the experimental curves of the saturation transient response, at short and at long times, respectively. The agreement between theoretical and experimental results is quantitative as regards the dependence of the saturation transient curves on the microwave field strength. The comparison allows determination of the value of the characteristic time Td of the SD as 20 ± 5 μs.

  15. Application of a panel method to wake-vortex/wing interaction and comparison with experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brian E.; Ross, James C.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of the Vortex Separation AEROdynamics (VSAERO) program to calculate aerodynamic loads on wings due to interaction with free vortices was studied. The loads were calculated for various positions of a downstream following wing relative to an upstream vortex-generating wing. Calculated vortex-induced span loads, rolling-moment coefficients, and lift coefficients on the following wing were compared with experimental results of McMillan et al. and El-Ramly et al. Comparisons of calculated and experimental vortex tangential velocities were also made.

  16. Laser generation of Lamb waves for defect detection: experimental methods and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Susan E; Dutton, Ben; Dixon, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of Lamb waves generated by a pulsed laser beam in an aluminum sheet is modeled using finite element analysis, and the interaction with defects is studied and compared to experimental results. The ultrasonic Lamb waves are detected by an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). The frequency content of the received wave is shown to be enhanced when the generation point is situated directly over the defect in both the modeled and experimental cases. Time-frequency analysis using a Wigner transform has enabled individual modes to be identified. PMID:22293738

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Ultrasound Velocity in Binary Liquid Systems of PPG by Mathematical and Experimental Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayathri, A.; Venugopal, T.; Venkatramanan, K.

    The estimation of the speed of ultrasound is the fundamental requirement for investigating the transport properties of liquid and solid systems. Ultrasonic velocities of liquid mixtures containing polar and non-polar groups are of considerable importance in understanding inter-molecular interaction between component molecules and they find applications in several industrial and technological processes. There are many standard mathematical methods available to measure the ultrasonic velocity. In the present study, interferometric technique is planned for experimental measurement of ultrasound velocity. In this paper, the speed of ultrasound waves in Polypropylene Glycol (PPG 400, PPG 4000) in toluene has been estimated for different concentrations (2%, 4%, 6%, 8% & 10%) at 303K and these experimental values compared with theoretical values obtained by using various mathematical methods like Nomotto's Relation, Vandeal Vangeal Relation, Impedance Relation, and Rao's specific sound velocity. The most reliable method that matches with experimental method is identified using Average Percentage Error (APE) and analysed in the light of molecular interactions occurring in the binary liquid systems. Comparison of evaluated theoretical velocities with experimental values will reveal the nature of interaction between component molecules in the mixtures. Such theoretical study is useful in defining a comprehensive theoretical model for a specific liquid mixture. Also, various molecular interaction parameters like free volume, internal pressure, viscous relaxation time, inter atomic free length, etc are calculated and discussed in terms of polymer-solvent interactions.

  18. Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material/Air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

  19. Preliminary analysis of problem of determining experimental performance of air-cooled turbine III : methods for determining power and efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr; Ziemer, Robert R

    1950-01-01

    Suggested formula are given for determining air-cooled turbine-performance characteristics, such as power and efficiency, as functions of certain parameters. These functions, generally being unknown, are determined from experimental data obtained from specific investigations. Special plotting methods for isolating the effect of each parameter are outlined.

  20. Testing-the-Limits and Experimental Simulation: Two Methods to Explicate the Role of Learning in Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindenberger, Ulman; Bates, Paul B.

    1995-01-01

    Calls for a coalition of different research methods and strategies to better understand learning and development. Describes two such strategies: (1) testing-the-limits decomposing age-graded differences in upper limits of plasticity; and (2) experimental simulation of development, a coordinated sequence of theory-guided research steps. Both…

  1. Evaluating Propensity Score Methods in a Quasi-Experimental Study of the Impact of Menu-Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Stephanie L.; Lee, Brian K.; Auchincloss, Amy H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Quasi-experimental studies of menu labeling have found mixed results for improving diet. Differences between experimental groups can hinder interpretation. Propensity scores are an increasingly common method to improve covariate balance, but multiple methods exist and the improvements associated with each method have rarely been compared. In this re-analysis of the impact of menu labeling, we compare multiple propensity score methods to determine which methods optimize balance between experimental groups. Methods Study participants included adult customers who visited full-service restaurants with menu labeling (treatment) and without (control). We compared the balance between treatment groups obtained by four propensity score methods: 1) 1:1 nearest neighbor matching (NN), 2) augmented 1:1 NN (using caliper of 0.2 and an exact match on an imbalanced covariate), 3) full matching, and 4) inverse probability weighting (IPW). We then evaluated the treatment effect on differences in nutrients purchased across the different methods. Results 1:1 NN resulted in worse balance than the original unmatched sample (average standardized absolute mean distance [ASAM]: 0.185 compared to 0.171). Augmented 1:1 NN improved balance (ASAM: 0.038) but resulted in a large reduction in sample size. Full matching and IPW improved balance over the unmatched sample without a reduction in sample size (ASAM: 0.049 and 0.031, respectively). Menu labeling was associated with decreased calories, fat, sodium and carbohydrates in the unmatched analysis. Results were qualitatively similar in the propensity score matched/weighted models. Conclusions While propensity scores offer an increasingly popular tool to improve causal inference, choosing the correct method can be challenging. Our results emphasize the benefit of examining multiple methods to ensure results are consistent, and considering approaches beyond the most popular method of 1:1 NN matching. PMID:26677849

  2. Guided-Inquiry Labs Using Bean Beetles for Teaching the Scientific Method & Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlueter, Mark A.; D'Costa, Allison R.

    2013-01-01

    Guided-inquiry lab activities with bean beetles ("Callosobruchus maculatus") teach students how to develop hypotheses, design experiments, identify experimental variables, collect and interpret data, and formulate conclusions. These activities provide students with real hands-on experiences and skills that reinforce their understanding of the…

  3. Return to Our Roots: Raising Radishes to Teach Experimental Design. Methods and Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallings, William M.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews research in teaching applied statistics. Concludes that students should analyze data from studies they have designed and conducted. Describes an activity in which students study germination and growth of radish seeds. Includes a table providing student instructions for both the experimental procedure and data analysis. (CFR)

  4. Andragogical and Pedagogical Methods Compared: A Review of the Experimental Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, John R.

    Although andragogy became an article of faith among many adult educators in the 25 years since Knowles first popularized the concept, relatively few studies have attempted to compare andragogy and pedagogy experimentally. Eighteen studies that attempted to do so included 15 dissertations and 3 journal articles. The studies were organized by…

  5. Comparison of Breast Health Teaching Methods for Adolescent Females: Results of a Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Retta R.; Horton, Jacqueline A.; Ahmad, Wajih A.; Davies, Susan L.; Snyder, Scott W.; Macrina, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A breast health educational program was administered in two public high school settings in north Alabama to subjects enrolled in health related courses. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine if teaching breast health with or without interactive learning would affect the breast health knowledge and beliefs of…

  6. A simple method of calculating power-law velocity profile exponents from experimental data. [for boundary layer shape factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the effects of compressibility and heat transfer on laminar and turbulent shape factors H have been developed. Solving the turbulent equation for the power law velocity profile exponent N has resulted in a simple technique by which the N values of experimental turbulent profiles can be calculated directly from the integral parameters. Thus the data plotting, curve fitting, and slope measuring, which is the normal technique of obtaining experimental N values, is eliminated. The N values obtained by this method should be within the accuracy with which they could be measured.

  7. Experimental and calculated approach to the study of deformation and strength characteristics of elastoviscoplastic materials by direct impact method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, V. G.; Baranova, M. S.; Nagornykh, E. V.; Osetrov, D. L.

    2015-09-01

    It is proposed to develop experimental and calculated approach to the study of the strength characteristics of elastoviscoplastic materials in a non-uniform strain-stress state. Integral characteristics (forces, displacements and displacement speed) of the deformation process of hat-shaped specimens in tension are determined by a direct impact method, and their strain - stress states are determined by numerical solution of the axisymmetric problem. The results of experimental and theoretical study of the deformation and failure of hat-shaped specimens in the presence of stress concentrators are obtained.

  8. Swept shock/boundary-layer interactions: Scaling laws, flowfield structure, and experimental methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settles, Gary S.

    1993-01-01

    A general review is given of several decades of research on the scaling laws and flowfield structures of swept shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions. Attention is further restricted to the experimental study and physical understanding of the steady-state aspects of these flows. The interaction produced by a sharp, upright fin mounted on a flat plate is taken as an archetype. An overall framework of quasiconical symmetry describing such interactions is first developed. Boundary-layer separation, the interaction footprint, Mach number scaling, and Reynolds number scaling are then considered, followed by a discussion of the quasiconical similarity of interactions produced by geometrically-dissimilar shock generators. The detailed structure of these interaction flowfields is next reviewed, and is illustrated by both qualitative visualizations and quantitative flow images in the quasiconical framework. Finally, the experimental techniques used to investigate such flows are reviewed, with emphasis on modern non-intrusive optical flow diagnostics.

  9. A proposed experimental method for interpreting Doppler effect measurements and determining their precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    The principal problem in the measurement of the Doppler reactivity effect is separating it from the thermal reactivity effects of the expansion of the heated sample. It is shown in this proposal that the thermal effects of sample expansion can be experimentally determined by making additional measurements with porous samples having the same mass and/or volume as the primary sample. By combining these results with independent measurements of the linear temperature coefficient and the computed temperature dependence of the Doppler coefficient the magnitude of the Doppler coefficient may be extracted from the data. These addiational measurements are also useful to experimentally determine the precision of the reactivity oscillator technique used to measure the reactivity effects of the heated sample.

  10. Experimental method of optical coherence characterization in phase-space measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie-En; Fu, Jhih-Syuan; Hsiao, Ming-Shu; Tien, Chung-Hao

    2015-09-01

    A novel approach of phase-space measurement made its debut with the experimental result. We first designed an experiment based on the Young's interferometer to characterization the optical coherence property of light source. A well-known algorithm called Hough transformation was applied to deal with the misalignment of micro-lens array by post-processing. The phase-space image of plane wave was then reconstructed from the realigned raw image. Finally, the properties of this system were discussed.

  11. Experimental Plan for the Cold Demonstration (Scoping Tests) of Glass Removal Methods from a DWPF Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.E.

    2001-09-21

    SRS and WVDP currently do not have the capability to size reduce, decontaminate, classify, and dispose of large, failed, highly contaminated equipment. Tanks Focus Area Task 777 was developed to address this problem. The first activity for Task 777 is to develop and demonstrate techniques suitable for removing the solid HLW glass from HLW melters. This experimental plan describes the work that will be performed for this glass removal demonstration.

  12. Human experimental pain models: A review of standardized methods in drug development

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, K. Sunil kumar; Naidu, M. U. R.; Rani, P. Usha; Rao, T. Ramesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Human experimental pain models are essential in understanding the pain mechanisms and appear to be ideally suited to test analgesic compounds. The challenge that confronts both the clinician and the scientist is to match specific treatments to different pain-generating mechanisms and hence reach a pain treatment tailored to each individual patient. Experimental pain models offer the possibility to explore the pain system under controlled settings. Standardized stimuli of different modalities (i.e., mechanical, thermal, electrical, or chemical) can be applied to the skin, muscles, and viscera for a differentiated and comprehensive assessment of various pain pathways and mechanisms. Using a multimodel-multistructure testing, the nociception arising from different body structures can be explored and modulation of specific biomarkers by new and existing analgesic drugs can be profiled. The value of human experimental pain models is to link animal and clinical pain studies, providing new possibilities for designing successful clinical trials. Spontaneous pain, the main compliant of the neuropathic patients, but currently there is no human model available that would mimic chronic pain. Therefore, current human pain models cannot replace patient studies for studying efficacy of analgesic compounds, although being helpful for proof-of-concept studies and dose finding. PMID:23626642

  13. Comparison of the Experimental Performance of Ferroelectric CPW Circuits with Method of Moment Simulations and Conformal Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanKeuls, Fred W.; Chevalier, Chris T.; Miranda, Felix A.; Carlson, C. M.; Rivkin, T. V.; Parilla, P. A.; Perkins, J. D.; Ginley, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental measurements of coplanar waveguide (CPW) circuits atop thin films of ferroelectric Ba(x)Sr(1-x)TiO3 (BST) were made as a function bias from 0 to 200 V and frequency from 0.045 to 20 GHz. The resulting phase shifts are compared with method of moments electromagnetic simulations and a conformal mapping analysis to determine the dielectric constant of the BST films. Based on the correlation between the experimental and the modeled data, an analysis of the extent to which the electromagnetic simulators provide reliable values for the dielectric constant of the ferroelectric in these structures has been performed. In addition, to determine how well the modeled data compare with experimental data, the dielectric constant values were also compared to low frequency measurements of interdigitated capacitor circuits on the same films. Results of these comparisons will be presented.

  14. Experimental method for forecasting propagation delay of ground wave for timing signal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhonghuan

    1998-06-01

    Up to now, only two methods for forecasting the propagation delay of a ground wave for timing signals have been formally published. The author has further developed the method, described by Miao Yongrei et al. (1979). The results show that with the number M = 3 for the segments, the precision of the forecasted values of the time delay is much better than that from the method in which the whole path is regarded as a homogeneous one.

  15. NOVEL METHODS FOR EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF 3D SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC BEAM DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to measure initial Twiss parameters in transverse and longitudinal directions at the entrance of a linac with independent short accelerating cavities. For the transverse plane the usual technique of transverse profiles is used, and for the longitudinal direction a recently developed non-intercepting method is applied. The new method is based on a beam position monitor amplitudes analysis. The applicability of the methods are discussed and demonstrated on an example of the Spallation Neutron Source superconducting linac.

  16. Experimental Null Method to Guide the Development of Technical Procedures and to Control False-Positive Discovery in Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaomeng; Hu, Qiang; Li, Jun; Wang, Jianmin; Qu, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensive and accurate evaluation of data quality and false-positive biomarker discovery is critical to direct the method development/optimization for quantitative proteomics, which nonetheless remains challenging largely due to the high complexity and unique features of proteomic data. Here we describe an experimental null (EN) method to address this need. Because the method experimentally measures the null distribution (either technical or biological replicates) using the same proteomic samples, the same procedures and the same batch as the case-vs-contol experiment, it correctly reflects the collective effects of technical variability (e.g., variation/bias in sample preparation, LC-MS analysis, and data processing) and project-specific features (e.g., characteristics of the proteome and biological variation) on the performances of quantitative analysis. To show a proof of concept, we employed the EN method to assess the quantitative accuracy and precision and the ability to quantify subtle ratio changes between groups using different experimental and data-processing approaches and in various cellular and tissue proteomes. It was found that choices of quantitative features, sample size, experimental design, data-processing strategies, and quality of chromatographic separation can profoundly affect quantitative precision and accuracy of label-free quantification. The EN method was also demonstrated as a practical tool to determine the optimal experimental parameters and rational ratio cutoff for reliable protein quantification in specific proteomic experiments, for example, to identify the necessary number of technical/biological replicates per group that affords sufficient power for discovery. Furthermore, we assessed the ability of EN method to estimate levels of false-positives in the discovery of altered proteins, using two concocted sample sets mimicking proteomic profiling using technical and biological replicates, respectively, where the true

  17. An innovative method for coordinate measuring machine one-dimensional self-calibration with simplified experimental process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Cheng; Butler, David Lee

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, an innovative method for CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine) self-calibration is proposed. In contrast to conventional CMM calibration that relies heavily on a high precision reference standard such as a laser interferometer, the proposed calibration method is based on a low-cost artefact which is fabricated with commercially available precision ball bearings. By optimizing the mathematical model and rearranging the data sampling positions, the experimental process and data analysis can be simplified. In mathematical expression, the samples can be minimized by eliminating the redundant equations among those configured by the experimental data array. The section lengths of the artefact are measured at arranged positions, with which an equation set can be configured to determine the measurement errors at the corresponding positions. With the proposed method, the equation set is short of one equation, which can be supplemented by either measuring the total length of the artefact with a higher-precision CMM or calibrating the single point error at the extreme position with a laser interferometer. In this paper, the latter is selected. With spline interpolation, the error compensation curve can be determined. To verify the proposed method, a simple calibration system was set up on a commercial CMM. Experimental results showed that with the error compensation curve uncertainty of the measurement can be reduced to 50%.

  18. Experimental Method for Identification of Disper-Sive Three-Wave Coupling in Space Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, D.; Bates, I.; Balikhin, M. A.; Alleyne, H. St. C. K.; Dunlop, M.; Baumjohann, W.

    A statistical method used for estimating the linear and quadratic processes in laboratory plasma is adapted for dispersive waves in space plasma turbulence. This method is applied to magnetic field data obtained from AMPTE IRM and AMPTE UKS satellites in the magnetosheath just downstream of the Earth's bow shock. The results show the presence of two instabilities, presumably related to the distribution of ions.

  19. Theoretical and experimental comparative analysis of beamforming methods for loudspeaker arrays under given performance constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivieri, Ferdinando; Fazi, Filippo Maria; Nelson, Philip A.; Shin, Mincheol; Fontana, Simone; Yue, Lang

    2016-07-01

    Methods for beamforming are available that provide the signals used to drive an array of sources for the implementation of systems for the so-called personal audio. In this work, performance of the delay-and-sum (DAS) method and of three widely used methods for optimal beamforming are compared by means of computer simulations and experiments in an anechoic environment using a linear array of sources with given constraints on quality of the reproduced field at the listener's position and limit to input energy to the array. Using the DAS method as a benchmark for performance, the frequency domain responses of the loudspeaker filters can be characterized in three regions. In the first region, at low frequencies, input signals designed with the optimal methods are identical and provide higher directivity performance than that of the DAS. In the second region, performance of the optimal methods are similar to the DAS method. The third region starts above the limit due to spatial aliasing. A method is presented to estimate the boundaries of these regions.

  20. Comparison of Three Methods for Teaching and Evaluating Writing: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plutsky, Susan; Wilson, Barbara A.

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether significant differences exist in the performance of students based on three methods for teaching and evaluating writing: faculty review, group review, and Calibrated Peer Review (CPR), an Internet software program designed to teach writing. Classes were randomly assigned a method; 148 students were…

  1. Shear Lag in Box Beams Methods of Analysis and Experimental Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul; Chiarito, Patrick T

    1942-01-01

    The bending stresses in the covers of box beams or wide-flange beams differ appreciably from the stresses predicted by the ordinary bending theory on account of shear deformation of the flanges. The problem of predicting these differences has become known as the shear-lag problem. The first part of this paper deals with methods of shear-lag analysis suitable for practical use. The second part of the paper describes strain-gage tests made by the NACA to verify the theory. Three tests published by other investigators are also analyzed by the proposed method. The third part of the paper gives numerical examples illustrating the methods of analysis. An appendix gives comparisons with other methods, particularly with the method of Ebner and Koller.

  2. A comparative experimental evaluation of uncertainty estimation methods for two-component PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomsma, Aaron; Bhattacharya, Sayantan; Troolin, Dan; Pothos, Stamatios; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-09-01

    Uncertainty quantification in planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement is critical for proper assessment of the quality and significance of reported results. New uncertainty estimation methods have been recently introduced generating interest about their applicability and utility. The present study compares and contrasts current methods, across two separate experiments and three software packages in order to provide a diversified assessment of the methods. We evaluated the performance of four uncertainty estimation methods, primary peak ratio (PPR), mutual information (MI), image matching (IM) and correlation statistics (CS). The PPR method was implemented and tested in two processing codes, using in-house open source PIV processing software (PRANA, Purdue University) and Insight4G (TSI, Inc.). The MI method was evaluated in PRANA, as was the IM method. The CS method was evaluated using DaVis (LaVision, GmbH). Utilizing two PIV systems for high and low-resolution measurements and a laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) system, data were acquired in a total of three cases: a jet flow and a cylinder in cross flow at two Reynolds numbers. LDV measurements were used to establish a point validation against which the high-resolution PIV measurements were validated. Subsequently, the high-resolution PIV measurements were used as a reference against which the low-resolution PIV data were assessed for error and uncertainty. We compared error and uncertainty distributions, spatially varying RMS error and RMS uncertainty, and standard uncertainty coverages. We observed that qualitatively, each method responded to spatially varying error (i.e. higher error regions resulted in higher uncertainty predictions in that region). However, the PPR and MI methods demonstrated reduced uncertainty dynamic range response. In contrast, the IM and CS methods showed better response, but under-predicted the uncertainty ranges. The standard coverages (68% confidence interval) ranged from

  3. Characterisation of blast loading in complex, confined geometries using quarter symmetry experimental methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthistle, T.; Fletcher, D. I.; Tyas, A.

    2016-03-01

    Explosions in confined spaces lead to complicated patterns of shock wave reflection and interactions which are best investigated by use of experimental tests or numerical simulations. This paper describes the design and outcome of a series of experiments using a test cell to measure the pressures experienced when structures were placed inside to alter the propagation of shock waves, utilising quarter symmetry to reduce the size of the required test cell and charge. An 80 g charge of PE4 (a conventional RDX-based plastic explosive) was placed at half height in one corner of the test cell, which represents the centre of a rectangular enclosure when symmetry is taken into consideration. Steel cylinders and rectangular baffles were placed within the test cell at various locations. Good reproducibility was found between repeated tests in three different arrangements, in terms of both the recorded pressure data and the calculated cumulative impulse. The presence of baffles within the test cell made a small difference to the pressures and cumulative impulse experienced compared to tests with no baffles present; however, the number and spacing of baffles was seen to make minimal difference to the experienced pressures and no noticeable difference to the cumulative impulse history. The paper presents useful experimental data that may be used for three-dimensional code validation.

  4. Novel Approaches in Astrocyte Protection: from Experimental Methods to Computational Approaches.

    PubMed

    Garzón, Daniel; Cabezas, Ricardo; Vega, Nelson; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marcos; Gonzalez, Janneth; Gómez, Rosa Margarita; Echeverria, Valentina; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Barreto, George E

    2016-04-01

    Astrocytes are important for normal brain functioning. Astrocytes are metabolic regulators of the brain that exert many functions such as the preservation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, clearance of toxic substances, and generation of antioxidant molecules and growth factors. These functions are fundamental to sustain the function and survival of neurons and other brain cells. For these reasons, the protection of astrocytes has become relevant for the prevention of neuronal death during brain pathologies such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and other neurodegenerative conditions. Currently, different strategies are being used to protect the main astrocytic functions during neurological diseases, including the use of growth factors, steroid derivatives, mesenchymal stem cell paracrine factors, nicotine derivatives, and computational biology tools. Moreover, the combined use of experimental approaches with bioinformatics tools such as the ones obtained through system biology has allowed a broader knowledge in astrocytic protection both in normal and pathological conditions. In the present review, we highlight some of these recent paradigms in assessing astrocyte protection using experimental and computational approaches and discuss how they could be used for the study of restorative therapies for the brain in pathological conditions. PMID:26803310

  5. [Experimental bases of a new method of epidural anesthesia in patients with closed thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Belopukhov, A M; Anisimov, O G; Safin, R R

    2002-01-01

    The thoracic epidural block is the most effective method of anesthesia in patients with a closed mechanical trauma of the chest. But this method is associated with a risk of damage of the spinal cord. So it can be used but by highly qualified specialists. The authors have worked out a method of anesthesia of the thoracic segments based on the phenomenon of hydrolock. It is more simple, safe, easy for any specialist able to use the technique of routine lumbar epidural block. PMID:12638497

  6. Experimental and analytical methods for the determination of connected-pipe ramjet and ducted rocket internal performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-07-01

    Connected-pipe, subsonic combustion ramjet and ducted rocket performance determination procedures used by the NATO countries have been reviewed and evaluated. A working document has been produced which provides recommended methods for reporting test results and delineates the parameters that are required to be measured. Explanations and detailed numerical examples are presented covering the determination of both theoretical and experimental performances, the use of air heaters and uncertainty and error analysis.

  7. Influence of synthesis experimental parameters on the formation of magnetite nanoparticles prepared by polyol method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Chacón, Jaime; Picasso, Gino; Avilés-Félix, Luis; Jafelicci, Miguel, Jr.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a modified polyol method for synthesizing magnetite nanoparticles using iron (III) nitrate, a low toxic and cheap precursor salt. The influence of the precursor salt nature and initial ferric concentration in the average particle size and magnetic properties of the obtained nanoparticles were investigated. Magnetite nanoparticles have received much attention due to the multiple uses in the biomedical field; for these purposes nanoparticles with monodisperse size distribution, superparamagnetic behavior and a combination between small average size and high saturation magnetization are required. The polyol conventional method allows synthesizing water-dispersible magnetite nanoparticles with these features employing iron (III) acetylacetonate as precursor salt. Although the particle sizes of samples synthesized from the conventional polyol method (denoted CM) are larger than those of samples synthesized from the modified method (denoted MM), they display similar saturation magnetization. The differences in the nanoparticles average sizes of samples CM and samples MM were explained though the known nanoparticle formation mechanism.

  8. Experimental Reading with Invented Spelling (ERIS): A Preschool and Kindergarten Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richgels, Donald J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a program that associates phonics instruction with children's earliest reading and writing, using the ERIS method to teach sound/letter correspondences and to provide opportunities for writing and reading. (NKA)

  9. Experimental and theoretical studies of iterative methods for nonlinear, nonsymmetric systems arising in combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Hagstrom, T.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    1994-12-31

    The authors report on some iterative methods which they have tested for use in combustion simulations. In particular, they have developed a code to solve zero Mach number reacting flow equations with complex reaction and diffusion physics. These equations have the form of a nonlinear parabolic system coupled with constraints. In semi-discrete form, one obtains DAE`s of index two or three depending on the number of spatial dimensions. The authors have implemented a fourth order (fully implicit) BDF method in time, coupled with a suite of fourth order explicit and implicit spatial difference approximations. Most codes they know of for simulating reacting flows use a splitting strategy to march in time. This results in a sequence of nonlinear systems to solve, each of which has a simpler structure than the one they are faced with. The rapid and robust solution of the coupled system is the essential requirement for the success of their approach. They have implemented and analyzed nonlinear generalizations of conjugate gradient-like methods for nonsymmetric systems, including CGS and the quasi-Newton based method of Eirola and Nevanlinna. They develop a general framework for the nonlinearization of linear methods in terms of the acceleration of fixed-point iterations, where the latter is assumed to include the {open_quote}preconditioning{open_quote}. Their preconditioning is a single step of a split method, using lower order spatial difference approximations as well as simplified (Fickian) approximations of the diffusion physics.

  10. Comparison of six experimental methods to measure snow SSA in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, G.; Domine, F.; Arnaud, L.; Champollion, N.; Cliche, P.; Dufour, A.; Flin, F.; Gallet, J.; Langlois, A.; Lesaffre, B.; Royer, A.

    2009-12-01

    The size of snow grains is a crucial variable to interpret both optical and microwave remote sensing data, and to quantify physical and chemical processes within the snowpack. However, “grain size” is an ambiguous variable that is more and more replaced with the physical variable “specific surface area” (SSA). Up to recently, methods to measure snow SSA were tedious and not easy to implement in the field. These earlier methods include stereology, CH4 adsorption, and X-ray tomography. Recently, faster methods based on the measurement of NIR reflectance have been developed, but the accuracy of most of these methods has been subjected only to limited testing. We have therefore organized an intercomparison campaign on the Glacier de La Girose, 3200 m a.s.l., French Alps, in April 2009. Four recent or novel NIR / SWIR methods were used: The DUFISSS integrating sphere operating at 1310 nm, the POSSSUM SSA profiler operating at 1310 and 635 nm, the IRIS mobile integrating sphere operating at 1300 nm, and the NIR photography operating at 850 nm and originally developed at SLF in Switzerland. In addition, snow samples were taken and transported in liquid nitrogen for measurement in the laboratory using CH4 adsorption and other samples were filled in the field with 1-chloronaphthalene for X-Ray microtomography. Comparison of the data sets obtained using these six methods will be presented and discussed. Conclusions will be drawn regarding the accuracy and potential of the recent or novel NIR techniques tested here.