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Sample records for crossed-field diode sputtering

  1. Thin film deposition by electric and magnetic crossed-field diode sputtering

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Kimo M.

    1977-01-01

    Applying a thin film coating to the surface of a workpiece, in particular, applying a coating of titanium nitride to a klystron window by means of a crossed-field diode sputtering array. The array is comprised of a cohesive group of numerous small hollow electrically conducting cylinders and is mounted so that the open ends of the cylinders on one side of the group are adjacent a titanium cathode plate. The workpiece is mounted so as to face the open ends of the other side of the group. A magnetic field is applied to the array so as to be coaxial with the cylinders and a potential is applied across the cylinders and the cathode plate, the cylinders as an anode being positive with respect to the cathode plate. The cylinders, the cathode plate and the workpiece are situated in an atmosphere of nitrogen which becomes ionized such as by field emission because of the electric field between the cylinders and cathode plate, thereby establishing an anode-cathode discharge that results in sputtering of the titanium plate. The sputtered titanium coats the workpiece and chemically combines with the nitrogen to form a titanium nitride coating on the workpiece. Gas pressure, gas mixtures, cathode material composition, voltages applied to the cathode and anode, the magnetic field, cathode, anode and workpiece spacing, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to inner diameter) of the anode cylinders, all may be controlled to provide consistent optimum thin film coatings of various compositions and thicknesses. Another facet of the disclosure is the coating of microwave components per se with titanium nitride to reduce multipactoring under operating conditions of the components.

  2. Thin film deposition by electric and magnetic crossed-field diode sputtering

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Kimo M.

    1980-01-01

    Applying a thin film coating to the surface of a workpiece, in particular, applying a coating of titanium nitride to a klystron window by means of a crossed-field diode sputtering array. The array is comprised of a cohesive group of numerous small hollow electrically conducting cylinders and is mounted so that the open ends of the cylinders on one side of the group are adjacent a titanium cathode plate. The workpiece is mounted so as to face the open ends of the other side of the group. A magnetic field is applied to the array so as to be coaxial with the cylinders and a potential is applied across the cylinders and the cathode plate, the cylinders as an anode being positive with respect to the cathode plate. The cylinders, the cathode plate and the workpiece are situated in an atmosphere of nitrogen which becomes ionized such as by field emission because of the electric field between the cylinders and cathode plate, thereby establishing an anode-cathode discharge that results in sputtering of the titanium plate. The sputtered titanium coats the workpiece and chemically combines with the nitrogen to form a titanium nitride coating on the workpiece. Gas pressure, gas mixtures, cathode material composition, voltages applied to the cathode and anode, the magnetic field, cathode, anode and workpiece spacing, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to inner diameter) of the anode cylinders, all may be controlled to provide consistent optimum thin film coatings of various compositions and thicknesses. Another facet of the disclosure is the coating of microwave components per se with titanium nitride to reduce multipactoring under operating conditions of the components.

  3. Thin film deposition by electric and magnetic crossed-field diode sputtering. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Welch, K.M.

    1975-04-04

    Applying a coating of titanium nitride to a klystron window by means of a cross-field diode sputtering array is described. The array is comprised of a cohesive group of numerous small hollow electrically conducting cylinders and is mounted so that the open ends of the cylinders on one side of the group are adjacent to a titanium cathode plate. The workpiece is mounted so as to face the open ends of the other side of the group. A magnetic field is applied to the array so as to be coaxial with the cylinders and a potential is applied across the cylinders and the cathode plate, the cylinders as an anode being positive with respect to the cathode plate. The cylinders, the cathode plate, and the workpiece are situated in an atmosphere of nitrogen which becomes ionized such as by field emission because of the electric field between the cylinders and cathode plate, thereby establishing an anode-cathode discharge that results in sputtering of the titanium plate. The sputtered titanium coats the workpiece and chemically combines with the nitrogen to form a titanium nitride coating on the workpiece. Gas pressure, gas mixtures, cathode material composition, voltages applied to the cathode and anode, the magnetic field, cathode, anode and workpiece spacing, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to inner diameter) of the anode cylinders, all may be controlled to provide consistent optimum thin film coatings of various compositions and thickness. Another facet of the disclosure is the coating of microwave components per se with titanium nitride to reduce multifactoring under operating conditions of the components.

  4. Role of ions in a crossed-field diode.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y Y; Luginsland, J W; Cartwright, K L; Haworth, M D

    2007-01-01

    The effect of ions in a magnetically insulated crossed-field gap is studied using a single particle orbit model, shear flow model, and particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that, in general, the presence of ions in a crossed-field gap always increases the electrons' excursion toward the anode region, regardless of the location of the ions. Thus, the rate at which the electrons migrate toward the anode, which is a measure of the diode closure rate, is related to the rate at which ions are introduced into the crossed-field gap. This anode migration of electrons is unrelated to crossed-field ambipolar diffusion. The implications of these findings are explored, such as pulse shortening in relativistic magnetrons and bipolar flows in pulsed-power systems. PMID:17358481

  5. Rapid current transition in a crossed-field diode

    SciTech Connect

    Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-03-01

    The transmitted current in a crossed-field gap has been characterized analytically by a number of authors. Using a one dimensional PIC simulation, we explore the behavior of the crossed-field diode at {ital B}={ital B}{sub {ital Hull}}. For mono-energetic (cold) emission, a rapid reduction of transmitted current is observed when the injected current exceeds the critical current by just 1{percent}. The addition of a small electron temperature normal to the cathode eliminates the transition, even for {ital kT}/{ital V}{approximately}10{sup {minus}5} ({ital V}=10 kV, gap = 1 cm, {ital B}=337 G, {ital J}=1.69 A/cm{sup 2}), while an isotropic velocity distribution accelerates the transition. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Evolution of Modes in Magnetically Insulated Crossed-Field Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Keith

    2005-10-01

    The time-dependent behavior of electron sheaths in a magnetically insulated B>BHull anode-cathode gap with crossed electric and magnetic fields is studied. The crossed-field, diode is modeled for various magnetic fields by means of multidimensional (1d and 2d), self-consistent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The transient behavior of the system is examined in detail and is divided into three separate stages: cycloidal flow, collapse of cycloidal flow and sheared (near-Brillouin) flow. It has been shown in 1d planar geometry that the cycloidal flows collapse into a steady, near-Brillouin flow. Our 2d electromagnetic PIC simulations (both planar and cylindrical) show that cycloidal flows also collapses into a flow that is dominated by the E cross B drift, but is neither steady nor stable. The growth of the kinetic mode is faster than that of either magnetron or diocotron fluid instability. After the kinetic mode saturates, the fastest growing fluid mode grows to dominate the system. A slow wave structure (SWS) is added to the anode that matches the wavelength and frequency of the fastest growing fluid instability. The SWS is then perturbed so that wavelength and/or frequency does not match the smooth bore diode growth rate and the region of `lock-in' to the SWS is found. This work is supported by a grant from AFOSR.

  7. Evolution of Modes in Magnetically Insulated Crossed Field Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeall, S.; Greenwood, A.; Cartwright, K.; Fleming, T.; Mardahl, P.; Lau, Y. Y.; Roderick, N.

    2006-10-01

    The time-dependent behavior of electron sheaths in a magnetically insulated B>BHull anode-cathode gap with crossed electric and magnetic fields is studied. The crossed-field, space-charge limited diode is modeled for various magnetic fields by means of multidimensional (1d and 2d), self consistent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in both cylindrical and planar geometries. The transient behavior of the system is examined in detail and is divided into three separate stages: cycloidal flow, collapse of cycloidal flow and sheared (near-Brillouin) flow. Our 2d electromagnetic PIC simulations (both planar and cylindrical) show that cycloidal flow also collapses into a perturbed flow that is dominated by the E cross B drift, but is neither steady nor stable. This observed cycloidal flow instability is a kinetic mode, not a fluid mode such as the magnetron or diocotron instability. The growth of the kinetic mode is faster than that of either of the above mentioned fluid instabilities. After the kinetic mode saturates, the fastest growing fluid mode grows to dominate the system. The SWS is added by three different methods to separate the RF effects from the DC electric field effects created by the SWS. The first method is to add a circuit to the anode that does not effect the DC electric fields, the second is to add the SWS by placing a thin dielectric (with and unphysical large dielectric constant), and last is to add the geometric SWS.

  8. Similarity of stability characteristics of planar and coaxial crossed-field diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gopinath, V.P.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-07-01

    Simulations of cylindrical crossed-field diodes for anode/cathode radius ratios of 2 and 5 indicate that the limiting current curve in the region {ital B}{lt}{ital B}{sub {ital H}} in coaxial diodes follows the planar theory and simulations very closely. Coaxial diodes also follow planar theory predicting transition to turbulence in the region {ital B}{approx_gt}{ital B}{sub {ital H}}. Larger radius ratio (10, 20) diodes show somewhat larger limits. These results show little variation with respect to operating voltage or cathode radius. A possible explanation for this behavior is also examined. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Measurement and interpretation of current transmission in a crossed-field diode below cutoff

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderberg, B.H.; Eninger, J.E.

    1997-02-01

    Measurements on the current-voltage-magnetic field characteristics of a space-charge-limited cylindrical cross-field diode below cutoff are presented. The measured current is found to be lower than predicted by simple cold-fluid theory. This reduction combined with observed oscillations in the current can be explained by secondary electron emission from the anode, leading to an increase of space charge in the diode. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Measurement and interpretation of current transmission in a crossed-field diode below cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderberg, Bo H.; Eninger, Jan E.

    1997-02-01

    Measurements on the current-voltage-magnetic field characteristics of a space-charge-limited cylindrical cross-field diode below cutoff are presented. The measured current is found to be lower than predicted by simple cold-fluid theory. This reduction combined with observed oscillations in the current can be explained by secondary electron emission from the anode, leading to an increase of space charge in the diode.

  11. Modeling the effects of anode secondary electron emission on transmitted current in crossed-field diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Venkatesh; Vanderberg, Bo

    1996-11-01

    Recent experimental measurements of transmitted current in a crossed-field switch by Vanderberg and Eninger ( B. H. Vanderberg and J. E. Eninger, ``Space-charge limited current cut-off in crossed fields,'' presented at IEEE ICOPS'95, Madison, Wi. ) have shown that the measured values of transmitted current are significantly smaller than the theoretically predicted limit. The experiments also showed larger decrease in transmitted current for higher magnetic fields, implying an effect due to the higher angle of incidence of incident electrons (i.e., at values of B closer to B_H). Studies by Verboncoeur and Birdsall ( J. P. Verboncoeur and C. K. Birdsall. ``Rapid current transition in a crossed-field diode,'' Phys. Plasmas 3) 3, March 1996. have shown that even small amount ( < 1%) of over injection in a crossed-field diode near cut-off led to substantial decrease in transmitted current. In our current work, we show that the same effect can be triggered by the presence of secondary electron emission from the anode. This study models the dependence of emission upon incident electron angle and energy. Since the yield of secondary electrons increases with incident angle, this model follows the experimental results as B approaches B_Hull accurately. This work was supported in part by ONR under grant FD-N00014-90-J-1198

  12. Simulations of limiting current in a crossed-field gap: Hull diode

    SciTech Connect

    Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1994-12-31

    Simulations confirm the Hull cutoff as the limiting stable current for a space charge limited planar crossed-field diode, proposed by Lau. In addition, a current occurs beyond the Hull cutoff, with a near-zero average value plus a high frequency oscillatory component which dies rapidly in time. The diode reacts strongly to small increases in injection current above the current limit and magnetic field above the Hull cutoff, with a rapid reduction of transmitted current. The simulations are performed in 1D3V, using PDP1.

  13. Relaxation of virtual cathode oscillations due to transverse effects in a crossed-field diode

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, K.L.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Gopinath, V.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    Recent studies of cylindrical and planar cross-field diodes indicate the transverse dimension plays a role in delaying the onset of virtual cathode oscillations for currents injected above the theoretical limiting current. For 1d and 2d planar devices, the limiting current for the magnetized and unmagnetized diodes is examined for cold and thermal injection. A significant difference between the 1d and 2d smooth diodes is that the transverse direction gives an extra degree of freedom which is found to warm the electrons rapidly. The mechanism of this warming appears to be an instability in the transverse direction. The simulations show three different states; laminar flow, virtual cathode oscillation and warm flow. Warm flow occurs when the electron has a spread of energy, either due to an instability or by thermal injection, when they pas through the potential minimum. Birdsall and Bridges showed that a small thermal spread of injected electrons damps virtual cathode oscillations. This warming effect allows warm flow to exist on the 2d state diagram which is not found on the 1d state diagram for cold emission. Parameter space is explored on these state diagrams for B = 0 and B = B{sub Hull} for J near state transitions (J {approx_equal} J{sub C}).

  14. Sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1976-01-01

    The potential of using the sputtering process as a deposition technique is reviewed; however, the manufacturing and sputter etching aspects are also discussed. The basic mechanism for dc and rf sputtering is described. Sputter deposition is presented in terms of the unique advantageous features it offers such as versatility, momentum transfer, stoichiometry, sputter etching, target geometry (coating and complex surfaces), precise controls, flexibility, ecology, and sputtering rates. Sputtered film characteristics, such as strong adherence and coherence and film morphology, are briefly evaluated in terms of varying the sputtering parameters. Also discussed are some of the specific industrial areas which are turning to sputter deposition techniques.

  15. Enhancement of current injection in organic light emitting diodes with sputter treated molybdenum oxides as hole injection layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Sheng; Wu, I.-Wen; Tseng, Wei-Hsuan; Chen, Mei-Hsin; Wu, Chih-I.

    2011-04-01

    The enhancement of current density and luminance in organic light emitting diodes is achieved by treating molybdenum oxide (MoO3) hole-injection-layers with slight argon ion sputtering. The sputter treated MoO3 layers provide improvement in current injection efficiency, resulting in better current density which is about ten times higher than that of the reference devices. Photoemission spectroscopy shows that molybdenum in MoO3 is reduced to lower oxidation states after sputter treatment due to the removal of oxygen. As a result, gap states are formed to enhance metallic characteristics of the sputter treated MoO3 surface and facilitate better hole injection efficiency.

  16. Fabrication of full-color InGaN-based light-emitting diodes on amorphous substrates by pulsed sputtering.

    PubMed

    Shon, Jeong Woo; Ohta, Jitsuo; Ueno, Kohei; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been widely accepted as highly efficient light sources capable of replacing incandescent bulbs. However, applications of InGaN LEDs are limited to small devices because their fabrication process involves expensive epitaxial growth of InGaN by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on single-crystal wafers. If we can utilize a low-cost epitaxial growth process, such as sputtering on large-area substrates, we can fabricate large-area InGaN light-emitting displays. Here, we report the growth of GaN (0001) and InGaN (0001) films on amorphous SiO2 by pulsed sputtering deposition. We found that using multilayer graphene buffer layers allows the growth of highly c-axis-oriented GaN films even on amorphous substrates. We fabricated red, green, and blue InGaN LEDs and confirmed their successful operation. This successful fabrication of full-color InGaN LEDs on amorphous substrates by sputtering indicates that the technique is quite promising for future large-area light-emitting displays on amorphous substrates. PMID:24954609

  17. Improved output power of GaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with sputtered AlN nucleation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, C. H.; Lin, Y. W.; Tsai, M. T.; Lin, B. C.; Li, Z. Y.; Tu, P. M.; Huang, S. C.; Hsu, Earl; Uen, W. Y.; Lee, W. I.; Kuo, H. C.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) at 380 nm were grown on patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) by atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (AP-MOCVD). A sputtered AlN nucleation layer was utilized on the PSS to enhance the quality of the epitaxial layer. By using high-resolution X-ray diffraction, the full-width at half-maximum of the rocking curve shows that the UV-LEDs with sputtered AlN nucleation layer had better crystalline quality when compared to conventional GaN nucleation samples. From the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, it can be observed that the tip and sidewall portion of the pattern was smooth using the sputtered AlN nucleation layer. The threading dislocation densities (TDDs) are reduced from 6×107 cm-2 to 2.5×107 cm-2 at the interface between the u-GaN layers for conventional and AlN PSS devices, respectively. As a result, a much higher light output power was achieved. The light output power at an injection current of 20 mA was enhanced by 30%. Further photoluminescence (PL) measurement and numerical simulation confirm that this increase of output power can be attributed to the improvement of material quality and light extraction.

  18. Fabrication of full-color InGaN-based light-emitting diodes on amorphous substrates by pulsed sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, Jeong Woo; Ohta, Jitsuo; Ueno, Kohei; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been widely accepted as highly efficient light sources capable of replacing incandescent bulbs. However, applications of InGaN LEDs are limited to small devices because their fabrication process involves expensive epitaxial growth of InGaN by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on single-crystal wafers. If we can utilize a low-cost epitaxial growth process, such as sputtering on large-area substrates, we can fabricate large-area InGaN light-emitting displays. Here, we report the growth of GaN (0001) and InGaN (0001) films on amorphous SiO2 by pulsed sputtering deposition. We found that using multilayer graphene buffer layers allows the growth of highly c-axis-oriented GaN films even on amorphous substrates. We fabricated red, green, and blue InGaN LEDs and confirmed their successful operation. This successful fabrication of full-color InGaN LEDs on amorphous substrates by sputtering indicates that the technique is quite promising for future large-area light-emitting displays on amorphous substrates.

  19. Improved performance of GaN based light emitting diodes with ex-situ sputtered AlN nucleation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo-Wei; Li, Heng; Lu, Tien-Chang

    2016-04-01

    The crystal quality, electrical and optical properties of GaN based light emitting diodes (LEDs) with ex-situ sputtered physical vapor deposition (PVD) aluminum nitride (AlN) nucleation layers were investigated. It was found that the crystal quality in terms of defect density and x-ray diffraction linewidth was greatly improved in comparison to LEDs with in-situ low temperature GaN nucleation layer. The light output power was 3.7% increased and the reverse bias voltage of leakage current was twice on LEDs with ex-situ PVD AlN nucleation layers. However, larger compressive strain was discovered in LEDs with ex-situ PVD AlN nucleation layers. The study shows the potential and constrain in applying ex-situ PVD AlN nucleation layers to fabricate high quality GaN crystals in various optoelectronics.

  20. Dramatic reduction in process temperature of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes by pulsed sputtering growth technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Eiji; Ueno, Kohei; Ohta, Jitsuo; Fujioka, Hiroshi; Oshima, Masaharu

    2014-02-01

    P-type doping of GaN by pulsed sputtering deposition (PSD) at a low growth temperature of 480 °C and dramatic reduction in the growth process temperature for InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were achieved. Mg-doped GaN layers grown on semi-insulating GaN at 480 °C exhibited clear p-type conductivity with a hole concentration and mobility of 3.0 × 1017 cm-3 and 3.1 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. GaN/In0.33Ga0.67N/GaN LEDs fabricated at 480 °C showed clear rectifying characteristics and a bright electroluminescence emission near 640 nm. These results indicate that this low temperature PSD growth technique is quite promising for the production of nitride-based light-emitting devices on large-area glass substrates.

  1. Characterization of energetic and thermalized sputtered atoms in pulsed plasma using time-resolved tunable diode-laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Desecures, M.; Poucques, L. de; Easwarakhanthan, T.; Bougdira, J.

    2014-11-03

    In this work, a time-resolved tunable diode-laser (DL) induced fluorescence (TR-TDLIF) method calibrated by absorption spectroscopy has been developed in order to determine atom and flux velocity distribution functions (AVDF and FVDF) of the energetic and the thermalized atoms in pulsed plasmas. The experimental set-up includes a low-frequency (∼3 Hz) and high spectral-resolution DL (∼0.005 pm), a fast rise-time pulse generator, and a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) system. The induced TR-TDLIF signal is recorded every 0.5 μs with a digital oscilloscope of a second-long trace. The technique is illustrated with determining the AVDF and the FVDF of a metastable state of the sputtered neutral tungsten atoms in the HiPIMS post-discharge. Gaussian functions describing the population of the four W isotopes were used to fit the measured TR-TDLIF signal. These distribution functions provide insight into transition from the energetic to thermalized regimes from the discharge onset. This technique may be extended with appropriate DLs to probe any species with rapidly changing AVDF and FVDF in pulsed and strongly oscillating plasmas.

  2. Study on MoO{sub 3-x} films deposited by reactive sputtering for organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Nobuto; Watanabe, Hiroki; Sato, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Ito, Norihiro; Tsuji, Hiroya; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2010-07-15

    The authors investigate the role of reduced molybdenum trioxide [MoO{sub 3-x} (x{<=}1)] films in organic light-emitting diodes, particularly from the viewpoint of the oxidation state of Mo. MoO{sub 3-x} films were deposited by reactive sputtering under a mixture of argon (Ar) and oxygen (O{sub 2}). The O{sub 2} gas-flow ratio (GFR) [O{sub 2}/(Ar+O{sub 2})] was adjusted between 10% and 100%. Mo with six, five, and four valence electrons was detected in MoO{sub 3-x} film deposited with an O{sub 2} GFR of 10% and 12.5%, whereas, under higher O{sub 2} GFRs, only six valence electrons for Mo in the MoO{sub 3-x} film were detected. N,N{sup '}-di(1-naphthyl)-N,N{sup '}-diphenylbenzidine ({alpha}-NPD) layer, hole-transport material, were deposited over the MoO{sub 3-x} layer by subsequent vacuum evaporation. At the {alpha}-NPD/MoO{sub 3-x} interface, it was found that {alpha}-NPD cations were generated and that MoO{sub 3-x} was reduced, which provided evidence of charge transfer across the interface by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  3. Blue electroluminescence from Sb-ZnO/Cd-ZnO/Ga-ZnO heterojunction diode fabricated by dual ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sushil Kumar; Awasthi, Vishnu; Verma, Shruti; Mukherjee, Shaibal

    2014-12-15

    p-type Sb-doped ZnO/i-CdZnO/n-type Ga-doped ZnO was grown by dual ion beam sputtering deposition system. Current-voltage characteristics of the heterojunction showed a diode-like rectifying behavior with a turn-on voltage of ~5 V. The diode yielded blue electroluminescence emissions at around 446 nm in forward biased condition at room temperature. The emission intensity increased with the increase of the injection current. A red shifting of the emission peak position was observed with the increment of ambient temperature, indicating a change of band gap of the CdZnO active layer with temperature in low-temperature measurement. PMID:25607047

  4. The novel transparent sputtered p-type CuO thin films and Ag/p-CuO/n-Si Schottky diode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombak, A.; Benhaliliba, M.; Ocak, Y. S.; Kiliçoglu, T.

    In the current paper, the physical properties and microelectronic parameters of direct current (DC) sputtered p-type CuO film and diode have been investigated. The film of CuO as oxide and p-type semiconductor is grown onto glass and n-Si substrates by reactive DC sputtering at 250 °C. After deposition, a post-annealing procedure is applied at various temperatures in ambient. Through this research, several parameters are determined such structural, optical and electrical magnitudes. The thickness of CuO thin films goes from 122 to 254 nm. A (1 1 1)-oriented cubic crystal structure is revealed by X-ray analysis. The grain size is roughly depending on the post-annealing temperature, it increases with temperature within the 144-285 nm range. The transmittance reaches 80% simultaneously in visible and infrared bands. The optical band gap is varied between 1.99 and 2.52 eV as a result of annealing temperature while the resistivity and the charge carrier mobility decrease with an increase in temperature from 135 to 14 Ω cm and 0.92 to 0.06 cm2/Vs, respectively. The surface of samples is homogenous, bright dots are visible when temperature reaches the highest value. As a diode, Ag/CuO/n-Si exhibits a non-ideal behavior and the ideality factor is about 3.5. By Norde method, the barrier height and the series resistance are extracted and found to be 0.96 V and 86.6 Ω respectively.

  5. Imaging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by means of sputtered neutrals mass spectrometry using a diode-pumped solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Kenji; Sakamoto, Tetsuo; Saikawa, Jiro; Ishigaki, Naoya; Tojo, Koji; Ido, Yutaka; Hayashi, Shun-ichi; Ishiuchi, Shun-ichi; Misawa, Kentaro; Fujii, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    Laser post-ionization of sputtered molecules by pulsed Ga focused ion-beam (Ga-FIB) bombardment was examined for the detection and imaging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on particles. As model samples, pyrene and pelyrene adsorbed on TiO2, blended regents of pyrene and n-heneicosan were used. The TiO2 particle size was selected to be several micro-meters. Laser light and Ga-FIB were synchronized with each other. The repetition rate synchronized with Ga-FIB was 1 kHz for pyrene analysis and 2 kHz for perylene, respectively. The laser wavelength was set to 266 nm. The wavelength was a generated fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG DPSS (diode-pumped solid-state) micro-chip laser (UV microchip laser). By using a UV microchip laser, laser-SNMS (laser post-ionized sputtered neutral mass spectrometry) analysis and imaging were performed. The imaging of pyrene (m/z = 202, C16H10) and perylene (m/z = 252, C20H12) has been successful. Both the scanning ion microscopy image of TiO2 and the PAHs image in laser-SNMS analysis were well-fitted with each other. PMID:23474717

  6. Sputter target

    DOEpatents

    Gates, Willard G.; Hale, Gerald J.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an improved sputter target for use in the deposition of hard coatings. An exemplary target is given wherein titanium diboride is brazed to a tantalum backing plate using a gold-palladium-nickel braze alloy.

  7. Theory and simulation of oscillations on near-steady state in crossed-field electron flow and the resulting transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Keith Lewis

    The purpose of this study is to understand the oscillatory steady-state behavior of crossed-field electron flow in diodes for magnetic fields greater than the Hull field (B > BH) by the means of theory and self-consistent, electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Many prior analytic studies of diode-like problems have been time-independent, which leaves the stability and time-dependence of these models unresolved. We investigate fluctuations through the system, including virtual cathode oscillations, and compare results for various cathode injection models. The dominant oscillations in magnetically insulated crossed-field diodes are found to be a series resonance, Z(ω s) = 0, between the pure electron plasma and vacuum impedance of the diode. The series resonance in crossed-field electron flow is shown to be the ky --> 0 (one-dimensional) limit of the diocotron/magnetron eigenmode equation. The wavenumber, ky, is perpendicular to the direction across the diode and magnetic field. The series resonance is derived theoretically and verified with self-consistent, electrostatic, PIC simulations. Electron transport across the magnetic field in a cutoff planar smooth-bore magnetron is described on the basis of surface waves (formed by the shear flow instability) perpendicular to the magnetic field and along the cathode. A self-consistent, 2d3v (two spatial dimensions and three velocity components), electrostatic PIC simulation of a crossed-field diode produces a near- Brillouin flow which slowly expands across the diode, punctuated by sudden transport across the diode. The theory of slow transport across the diode is explained by the addition of perturbed orbits to the Brillouin shear flow motion of the plasma in the diode. A slow drift compared to the shear flow is described which results from the fields caused by the surface wave inducing an electrostatic ponderomotive-like force in a dc external magnetic field. In order to perform the above

  8. Cathode driven high gain crossed-field amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-07-01

    The objective of this three-phase program is to achieve the design of a cathode driven high gain re-entrant Crossed Field Amplifier capable of meeting the parameters of Raytheon Company specification No. 968838 dated 10 May 1978. The effort includes the fabrication and test of three developmental and four final configuration tubes. One final configuration tube will be life tested and two will be delivered to the Navy. The tasks discussed during this report period relate to the cold tests performed on various subassemblies of model no. 4 and on the sealed-in model no. 4 of the S-band high gain cathode driven crossed field amplifier. Based on the performance of model no. 3 certain remedial measures have been implemented in model no. 4 that have resulted in the elimination of key resonances within the tube and an improvement in the isolation between the cathode and anode circuits.

  9. Electromagnetic instabilities attributed to a cross-field ion drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. L.; Wong, H. K.; Wu, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    Instabilities due to a cross-field ion flow are reexamined by including the electromagnetic response of the ions, which has been ignored in existing discussions. It is found that this effect can lead to significant enhancement of the growth rate. Among the new results, a purely growing, electromagnetic unstable mode with a wave vector k parallel to the ambient magnetic field is found. The plasma configuration under consideration is similar to that used in the discussion of the well-known modified-two-stream instability. This instability has a growth rate faster than the ion cyclotron frequency, and is not susceptible to high-plasma-beta stabilization.

  10. Crossed-field divertor for a plasma device

    DOEpatents

    Kerst, Donald W.; Strait, Edward J.

    1981-01-01

    A divertor for removal of unwanted materials from the interior of a magnetic plasma confinement device includes the division of the wall of the device into segments insulated from each other in order to apply an electric field having a component perpendicular to the confining magnetic field. The resulting crossed-field drift causes electrically charged particles to be removed from the outer part of the confinement chamber to a pumping chamber. This method moves the particles quickly past the saddle point in the poloidal magnetic field where they would otherwise tend to stall, and provides external control over the rate of removal by controlling the magnitude of the electric field.

  11. Kr II and Xe II axial velocity distribution functions in a cross-field ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lejeune, A.; Bourgeois, G.; Mazouffre, S.

    2012-07-15

    Laser induced fluorescence measurements were carried out in a cross-field ion source to examine the behaviour of the axial ion velocity distribution functions (VDFs) in the expanding plasma. In the present paper, we focus on the axial VDFs of Kr II and Xe II ions. We examine the contourplots in a 1D-phase space (x,v{sub x}) representation in front of the exhaust channel and along the centerline of the ion source. The main ion beam, whose momentum corresponds to the ions that are accelerated through the whole potential drop, is observed. A secondary structure reveals the ions coming from the opposite side of the channel. We show that the formation of the neutralized ion flow is governed by the annular geometry. The assumption of a collisionless shock or a double layer due to supersonic beam interaction is not necessary. A non-negligible fraction of slow ions originates in local ionization or charge-exchange collision events between ions of the expanding plasma and atoms of the background residual gas. Slow ions that are produced near the centerline in the vicinity of the exit plane are accelerated toward the source body with a negative velocity leading to a high sputtering of front face. On the contrary, the ions that are produced in the vicinity of the channel exit plane are partially accelerated by the extended electric field.

  12. Kr II and Xe II axial velocity distribution functions in a cross-field ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejeune, A.; Bourgeois, G.; Mazouffre, S.

    2012-07-01

    Laser induced fluorescence measurements were carried out in a cross-field ion source to examine the behaviour of the axial ion velocity distribution functions (VDFs) in the expanding plasma. In the present paper, we focus on the axial VDFs of Kr II and Xe II ions. We examine the contourplots in a 1D-phase space (x,vx) representation in front of the exhaust channel and along the centerline of the ion source. The main ion beam, whose momentum corresponds to the ions that are accelerated through the whole potential drop, is observed. A secondary structure reveals the ions coming from the opposite side of the channel. We show that the formation of the neutralized ion flow is governed by the annular geometry. The assumption of a collisionless shock or a double layer due to supersonic beam interaction is not necessary. A non-negligible fraction of slow ions originates in local ionization or charge-exchange collision events between ions of the expanding plasma and atoms of the background residual gas. Slow ions that are produced near the centerline in the vicinity of the exit plane are accelerated toward the source body with a negative velocity leading to a high sputtering of front face. On the contrary, the ions that are produced in the vicinity of the channel exit plane are partially accelerated by the extended electric field.

  13. Nonlinear analysis of generalized cross-field current instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Lui, Anthony T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of the generalized cross-field current instability is carried out in which cross-field drift of both the ions and electrons and their temperatures are permitted to vary in time. The unstable mode under consideration is the electromagnetic generalization of the classical modified-two-stream instability. The generalized instability is made of the modified-two-stream and ion-Weibel modes. The relative importance of the features associated with the ion-Weibel mode and those of the modified-two-stream mode is assessed. Specific applications are made to the Earth's neutral sheet prior to substorm onset and to the Earth's bow shock. The numerical solution indicates that the ion-Weibel mode dominates in the Earth's neutral sheet environment. In contrast, the situation for the bow shock is dominated by the modified-two-stream mode. Notable differences are found between the present calculation and previous results on ion-Weibel mode which restrict the analysis to only parallel propagating waves. However, in the case of Earth's bow shock for which the ion-Weibel mode plays no important role, the inclusion of the electromagnetic ion response is found to differ little from the previous results which treats ions responding only to the electrostatic component of the excited waves.

  14. Sputtering and ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on sputtering and ion plating are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) concepts and applications of ion plating, (2) sputtering for deposition of solid film lubricants, (3) commercial ion plating equipment, (4) industrial potential for ion plating and sputtering, and (5) fundamentals of RF and DC sputtering.

  15. Magnetron sputtering source

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.; Grabner, R.F.; Ramsey, P.B.

    1994-08-02

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal. 12 figs.

  16. Magnetron sputtering source

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.; Grabner, R. Fred; Ramsey, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

  17. Solar coronal loop heating by cross-field wave transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amendt, Peter; Benford, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    Solar coronal arches heated by turbulent ion-cyclotron waves may suffer significant cross-field transport by these waves. Nonlinear processes fix the wave-propagation speed at about a tenth of the ion thermal velocity, which seems sufficient to spread heat from a central core into a large cool surrounding cocoon. Waves heat cocoon ions both through classical ion-electron collisions and by turbulent stochastic ion motions. Plausible cocoon sizes set by wave damping are in roughly kilometers, although the wave-emitting core may be only 100 m wide. Detailed study of nonlinear stabilization and energy-deposition rates predicts that nearby regions can heat to values intermediate between the roughly electron volt foot-point temperatures and the about 100 eV core, which is heated by anomalous Ohmic losses. A volume of 100 times the core volume may be affected. This qualitative result may solve a persistent problem with current-driven coronal heating; that it affects only small volumes and provides no way to produce the extended warm structures perceptible to existing instruments.

  18. Lockhart Crossing field: new Wilcox trend in southeastern Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Self, G.A.; Breard, S.Q.; Rael, H.P.; Stein, J.A.; Thayer, P.A.; Traugott, M.O.; Eason, W.D.

    1986-05-01

    In 1982, a significant onshore oil discovery in the lower Eocene Wilcox was made at Lockhart Crossing field, illuminating a new oil trend in southeast Louisiana. Twenty-eight producers and nine dry holes were drilled, resulting in development of 3400 productive acres with estimated recoverable reserves of 21 million bbl of oil after secondary recovery. The main field reservoir is a 40 to 80-ft (12 to 24-m) marine sandstone. The dominant facies is an upward-coarsening sequence of very fine to fine-grained glauconitic sandstone deposited as a nearshore marine bar. The associated facies is a younger, upward-fining, channelized sequence of medium to very fine-grained sandstone. Faulting initiated channeling and erosion into the existing nearshore bar facies with subsequent deposition of channel fill. Together these two facies constitute one reservoir. The primary trapping mechanism is structural, in the form of a rollover anticline. This solution gas drive reservoir is normally pressured and displays a concave-downward producing water level that initially masked the true productive limits of the field. 14 figures, 3 tables.

  19. A cross-field current instability for substorm expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, A.T.Y. ); Chang, C.L.; Mankofsky, A. ); Wong, H.K. ); Winske, D. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors investigate a cross-field current instability (CFCI) as a candidate for current disruption during substorm expansions. The numerical solution of the linear dispersion equation indicates that (1) the proposed instability can occur at the inner edge or the midsection of the neutral sheet just prior to the substorm expansion onset although the former environment is found more favorable at the same drift speed scaled to the ion thermal speed, (2) the computed growth time is comparable to the substorm onset time, and (3) the excited waves have a mixed polarization with frequencies near the ion gyrofrequency at the inner edge and near the lower hybrid frequency in the midtail region. On the basis of this analysis, they propose a substorm development scenario in which plasma sheet thinning during the substorm growth phase leads to an enhancement in the relative drift between ions and electrons. This results in the neutral sheet being susceptible to the CHCI and initiates the diversion of the cross-tail current through the ionosphere. Whether or not a substorm current wedge is ultimately formed is regulated by the ionospheric condition. A large number of substorm features can be readily understood with the proposed scheme. These include (1) precursory activities (pseudobreakups) prior to substorm onset, (2) substorm initiation region to be spatially localized, (3) three different solar wind conditions for substorm occurence, (4) skew towards evening local times for substorm onset locations, (5) different acceleration characteristics between ions and electrons, (6) tailward spreading of current disruption region after substorm onset, and (7) local time expansion of substorm current wedge with possible discrete westward jump for the evening expansion.

  20. Solar system sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombrello, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    The sites and materials involved in solar system sputtering of planetary surfaces are reviewed, together with existing models for the processes of sputtering. Attention is given to the interaction of the solar wind with planetary atmospheres in terms of the role played by the solar wind in affecting the He-4 budget in the Venus atmosphere, and the erosion and differentiation of the Mars atmosphere by solar wind sputtering. The study is extended to the production of isotopic fractionation and anomalies in interplanetary grains by irradiation, and to erosion effects on planetary satellites with frozen volatile surfaces, such as with Io, Europa, and Ganymede. Further measurements are recommended of the molecular form of the ejected material, the yields and energy spectra of the sputtered products, the iosotopic fractionation sputtering causes, and the possibility of electronic sputtering enhancement with materials such as silicates.

  1. Ion beam sputter etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1986-01-01

    An ion beam etching process which forms extremely high aspect ratio surface microstructures using thin sputter masks is utilized in the fabrication of integrated circuits. A carbon rich sputter mask together with unmasked portions of a substrate is bombarded with inert gas ions while simultaneous carbon deposition occurs. The arrival of the carbon deposit is adjusted to enable the sputter mask to have a near zero or even slightly positive increase in thickness with time while the unmasked portions have a high net sputter etch rate.

  2. Effect of sputtering pressure on crystalline quality and residual stress of AlN films deposited at 823 K on nitrided sapphire substrates by pulsed DC reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Makoto; Takeuchi, Hiroto; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a promising material for use in applications such as deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. In the present study, the effect of sputtering pressure on the surface morphology, crystalline quality, and residual stress of AlN films deposited at 823 K on nitrided a-plane sapphire substrates, which have high-crystalline-quality c-plane AlN thin layers, by pulsed DC reactive sputtering was investigated. The c-axis-oriented AlN films were homoepitaxially grown on nitrided sapphire substrates at sputtering pressures of 0.4–1.5 Pa. Surface damage of the AlN sputtered films increased with increasing sputtering pressure because of arcing (abnormal electrical discharge) during sputtering. The sputtering pressure affected the crystalline quality and residual stress of AlN sputtered films because of a change in the number and energy of Ar+ ions and Al sputtered atoms. The crystalline quality of AlN films was improved by deposition with lower sputtering pressure.

  3. Sputtering of uranium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, R.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study of the sputtering of U-235 atoms from foil targets by hydrogen, helium, and argon ions, which was performed by observing tracks produced in mica by fission fragments following thermal-neutron-induced fission. The technique used allowed measurements of uranium sputtering yields of less than 0.0001 atom/ion as well as yields involving the removal of less than 0.01 monolayer of the uranium target surface. The results reported include measurements of the sputtering yields for 40-120-keV protons, 40-120-keV He-4(+) ions, and 40- and 80-keV Ar-40(+) ions, the mass distribution of chunks emitted during sputtering by the protons and 80-keV Ar-40(+) ions, the total chunk yield during He-4(+) sputtering, and some limited data on molecular sputtering by H2(+) and H3(+). The angular distribution of the sputtered uranium is discussed, and the yields obtained are compared with the predictions of collision cascade theory.

  4. PIC Simulation for ICF Plasma Sputter Coater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Huang, H.; Parks, P. B.; Chan, V. S.; Walton, C. C.; Wilks, S. C.

    2010-11-01

    To satisfy mesh spacing constraint δ/λDebye<=1 particle In Cell (PIC) simulations at 25x reduced cathode currents levels are used to numerically model the distribution of currents, electrostatic potentials and particle kinetics in a Type II ``unbalanced'' cylindrically symmetric magnetron discharge used for Be sputter coating of ICF capsules. Simulation indicates a strong magnetic field confinement of the plasma in the closed field lines region adjacent to cathode, and accompanying cross-field line plasma diffusion into the open-field line region connected to wall/anode. A narrow Charles-Langmuir sheath and a pre-sheath that is ˜10x wider due to the existence of the B-field are observed. The effects of varying boundary conditions, e.g., the separation between the anode/cathode, the anode bias voltage, etc., are studied, which is expected to aid experimentalists in turning these ``knobs'' for better coating qualities. We also show that the etch rate due to sputtering of Be targets predicted by the results of our PIC simulations, after rescaling to experimental conditions, agrees with experiments.

  5. Data Diode

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-07

    The Data Diode is a data security technology that can be deployed within an organization's defense-in-depth computer network strategy for information assurance. For internal security, the software creates an environment within the network where an organization's approved users can work freely inside an enclave of protected data, but file transfers out of the enclave is restricted. For external security, once a network intruder has penetrated the network, the intruder is able to "see" the protected data, but is unable to download the actual data. During the time it takes for the intruder to search for a way around the obstacle created by the Data Diode, the network's intrusion detection technologies can locate and thwart the malicious intent of the intruder. Development of the Data Diode technology was made possible by funding from the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  6. Data Diode

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-11-07

    The Data Diode is a data security technology that can be deployed within an organization's defense-in-depth computer network strategy for information assurance. For internal security, the software creates an environment within the network where an organization's approved users can work freely inside an enclave of protected data, but file transfers out of the enclave is restricted. For external security, once a network intruder has penetrated the network, the intruder is able to "see" the protectedmore » data, but is unable to download the actual data. During the time it takes for the intruder to search for a way around the obstacle created by the Data Diode, the network's intrusion detection technologies can locate and thwart the malicious intent of the intruder. Development of the Data Diode technology was made possible by funding from the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).« less

  7. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  8. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly.

  9. Fundamental sputtering studies: Nonresonant ionization of sputtered neutrals

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, J.W.; Pellin, M.J.; Calaway, W.F.; Gruen, D.M. ); Yates, J.T. Jr. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-01-04

    Because of the practical importance of sputtering, numerous theories and computer simulations are used for predicting many aspects of the sputtering process. Unfortunately, many of the calculated sputtering results are untested by experiment. Until recently, most sputtering experiments required either very high ion fluences or the detection of only minor constituents of the sputtered flux, i.e., ions. These techniques may miss the subtleties involved in the sputtering process. High-detection-efficiency mass spectrometry, coupled with the laser ionization of neutral atoms, allows the detection of the major sputtered species with very low incident ion fluences. The depth-of-origin of sputtered atoms is one example of an important but poorly understood aspect of the sputtering process. By following the sputtering yield of a substrate atom with various coverages of an adsorbed overlayer, the depth of origin of sputtered atoms has been determined. Our results indicate that two-thirds of the sputtered flux originates in the topmost atomic layer. The ion-dose dependence of sputtering yields has long been assumed to be quite minor for low- to-moderate primary ion fluences. We have observed a two-fold decrease in the sputtering yield of the Ru(0001) surface for very low primary ion fluences. Data analysis results in a cross section for damage of 2.7 {plus minus} 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}15}cm{sup 2}. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Current-Free Plasma Thruster Controlling Cross-Field Diffusion under a Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod; Ando, Akira

    A current-free helicon plasma thruster is designed to control cross-field diffusion in a magnetic nozzle while maintaining a constant plasma injection into the nozzle for investigation of the cross-field diffusion effect on the thruster performance. When increasing the magnetic field strength, the cross-field diffusion is inhibited and the higher plasma density in the magnetic nozzle downstream of the thruster is observed. Directly measured thrust also increases with an increase in the field strength, as the Lorentz force arising from the radial magnetic field and the electron diamagnetic drift current is enhanced by the higher electron pressure within the magnetic nozzle. Further, the rf power is increased up to 2 kW and the maximum thrust of about 15 mN is obtained for 20 sccm argon propellant.

  11. Cross-field current instability for auroral bead formation in breakup arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The physical process responsible for the onset of substorm expansion is still unresolved in spite of decades of research on the topic. Detailed properties of the spatially periodic auroral beads on prebreakup auroral arcs that initiate substorm expansion onset are now available. These auroral bead properties impose severe observational constraints on the onset process. In this work, theoretical predictions of the cross-field current instability are evaluated in terms of these constraints. The growth rates and wavelengths associated with auroral beads in several previously published events are reproduced by the cross-field current instability, implying that the instability can indeed account for the characteristics of auroral beads that eventually lead to substorm onset. The present results differ from the conclusion reached by a previous analysis that the shear flow ballooning instability can account for the growth and spatial scales of auroral beads better than the cross-field current instability.

  12. Contrasting characteristics of linear-field and cross-field atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2008-09-01

    This letter reports an experimental study of two types of atmospheric pressure plasma jets in terms of their fundamental properties and their efficiency in etching polymeric materials. The first plasma jet has a cross-field configuration with its electric field perpendicular to its gas flow field, whereas the second is a linear-field device having parallel electric and flow fields. The linear-field jet is shown to drive electron transportation to the downstream application region, thus facilitating more active plasma chemistry there. This is responsible for its etching rate of polyamide films being 13-fold that of its cross-field counterpart.

  13. Influence of sputtering power on the optical properties of ITO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Aijo John; Kumar, Vineetha V.; M, Deepak; T, Manju

    2014-10-01

    Tin doped indium oxide films are widely used in transparent conducting coatings such as flat panel displays, crystal displays and in optical devices such as solar cells and organic light emitting diodes due to the high electrical resistivity and optical transparency in the visible region of solar spectrum. The deposition parameters have a commendable influence on the optical and electrical properties of the thin films. In this study, ITO thin films were prepared by RF magnetron sputtering. The properties of the films prepared under varying sputtering power were compared using UV- visible spectrophotometry. Effect of sputtering power on the energy band gap, absorption coefficient and refractive index are investigated.

  14. Influence of sputtering power on the optical properties of ITO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    K, Aijo John; M, Deepak T, Manju; Kumar, Vineetha V.

    2014-10-15

    Tin doped indium oxide films are widely used in transparent conducting coatings such as flat panel displays, crystal displays and in optical devices such as solar cells and organic light emitting diodes due to the high electrical resistivity and optical transparency in the visible region of solar spectrum. The deposition parameters have a commendable influence on the optical and electrical properties of the thin films. In this study, ITO thin films were prepared by RF magnetron sputtering. The properties of the films prepared under varying sputtering power were compared using UV- visible spectrophotometry. Effect of sputtering power on the energy band gap, absorption coefficient and refractive index are investigated.

  15. Magnetron sputtered boron films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1998-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  16. Magnetron sputtered boron films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1998-06-16

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence. 8 figs.

  17. Contamination removal by ion sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Christopher G.

    1990-11-01

    Experimental investigations are described for ion-beam sputtering and RF-plasma sputtering to determine the effectiveness of the methods for removing contaminants from an optical surface. The effects of ion-beam sputtering are tested with an ion gun and measured by mounting a 5-MHz quartz-crystal microbalance on a sample holder and simulating spacecraft contamination. RF-plasma sputtering involves the application of an alternating electric field to opposing electrodes immersed in a low density gas, and is tested with the same setup. The energy dependence of the sputtering yields is measured to determine whether the different contaminants are removed and whether the mirror surface is affected. Ion-beam sputtering removes all contaminants tested, but also affects the mirror surface at high energies. When the correct DC bias is applied, RF sputtering can remove the contaminants without removing the metal-mirror surface.

  18. Effect of electron thermal anisotropy on the kinetic cross-field streaming instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, S. T.; Tanaka, M.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.; Wu, C. S.; Da Jornada, E. H.; Ziebell, L. F.

    1984-01-01

    The investigation of the kinetic cross-field streaming instability, motivated by the research of collisionless shock waves and previously studied by Wu et al. (1983), is discussed more fully. Since in the ramp region of a quasi-perpendicular shock electrons can be preferentially heated in the direction transverse to the ambient magnetic field, it is both desirable and necessary to include the effect of the thermal anisotropy on the instability associated with a shock. It is found that Te-perpendicular greater than Te-parallel can significantly enhance the peak growth rate of the cross-field streaming instability when the electron beta is sufficiently high. Furthermore, the present analysis also improves the analytical and numerical solutions previously obtained.

  19. Electron Cross-field Transport in a Low Power Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2004-06-24

    Conventional annular Hall thrusters become inefficient when scaled to low power. Cylindrical Hall thrusters, which have lower surface-to-volume ratio, are therefore more promising for scaling down. They presently exhibit performance comparable with conventional annular Hall thrusters. Electron cross-field transport in a 2.6 cm miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (100 W power level) has been studied through the analysis of experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics in the thruster channel. The numerical model takes into account elastic and inelastic electron collisions with atoms, electron-wall collisions, including secondary electron emission, and Bohm diffusion. We show that in order to explain the observed discharge current, the electron anomalous collision frequency {nu}{sub B} has to be on the order of the Bohm value, {nu}{sub B} {approx} {omega}{sub c}/16. The contribution of electron-wall collisions to cross-field transport is found to be insignificant.

  20. Anomalous Cross-Field Current and Fluctuating Equilibrium of Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rypdal, K.; Garcia, O.E.; Paulsen, J.

    1997-09-01

    It is shown by simple physical arguments and fluid simulations that electrostatic flute-mode fluctuations can sustain a substantial cross-field current in addition to mass and energy transport. The simulations show that this current determines essential features of the fluctuating plasma equilibrium, and explain qualitatively the experimental equilibria and the coherent flute-mode structures observed in a simple magnetized torus. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Apparent Cross-field Superslow Propagation of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in Solar Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T.; Goossens, M.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Wright, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we show that the phase-mixing of continuum Alfvén waves and/or continuum slow waves in the magnetic structures of the solar atmosphere as, e.g., coronal arcades, can create the illusion of wave propagation across the magnetic field. This phenomenon could be erroneously interpreted as fast magnetosonic waves. The cross-field propagation due to the phase-mixing of continuum waves is apparent because there is no real propagation of energy across the magnetic surfaces. We investigate the continuous Alfvén and slow spectra in two-dimensional (2D) Cartesian equilibrium models with a purely poloidal magnetic field. We show that apparent superslow propagation across the magnetic surfaces in solar coronal structures is a consequence of the existence of continuum Alfvén waves and continuum slow waves that naturally live on those structures and phase-mix as time evolves. The apparent cross-field phase velocity is related to the spatial variation of the local Alfvén/slow frequency across the magnetic surfaces and is slower than the Alfvén/sound velocities for typical coronal conditions. Understanding the nature of the apparent cross-field propagation is important for the correct analysis of numerical simulations and the correct interpretation of observations.

  2. Recent horizontal drilling in Lockhart Crossing Field, Livingston Parish, Louisiana: Its impact on geological interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.J. )

    1993-09-01

    Recent horizontal completions drilled to date by Callon Petroleum Company in the Lockhart Crossing field have optimized production in the lower Eocene First Wilcox sandstone, a 40-45-ft-thick, marine bar composed to very fine- to fine-grained glauconitic sand. The First Wilcox sandstone reservoir has produced a cumulative of 16 MMBO and 17 BCFG from a total of 40 wells on the Lockhart Crossing field since 1982. Well-site geology was a key factor in these successful horizontal completions because mud logs, electric logs, and cores were not taken for these well bores. Over 3000 ft of drilled cuttings, taken at 10-ft intervals, were examined to maintain the drilling well bore near the top of the First Wilcox sandstone, which has the highest degree of permeability and porosity. By drilling horizontally, we encountered First Wilcox sandstone structure that was not previously mapped using existing subsurface well control. Callon's International Paper Company (IPCO) No. 6 well, the first of three horizontal wells drilled in the Lockhart Crossing field, flowed at a rate of 527 BOPD and 400 MCFGD with a final tubing pressure of 650 lb from the First Wilcox Sandstone in March 1992. The IPCO No. 6 horizontal well, located upthrown to a down-to-the-south fault, has produced 147 MBO an should adequately drain this area of the reservoir.

  3. Measurement of NSLS distributed diode sputter ion pump characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    For the DI pump to have acceptable pumping speed, the pump must be glow discharge conditioned after the 150/sup 0/C max vacuum bakeout. Other DI pump conditioning procedures have not been investigated. Glow discharge conditioning of the system using the DI pump anode significantly improves the pumping speed at low pressures and high pressure pumping speed is slightly improved. The NSLS DI pump speed is not linear with pressure even though the average current is. Pumping speed drops to less than 25% of the high pressure speed at pressures below 10/sup -9/ torr, depending on the pump condition. The pumping speed is sufficiently close to its calculated value at high pressure. These results agree with actual ring experience with the distributed pump. The DI pump is most efficient pumping distributed gas loads from beam operation rather than gas loads introduced at the ends of the pump. Most of the gas load is distributed adjacent to the pump during beam operation due synchrotron radiation included desorption. 11 references, 5 figures.

  4. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Sputtered coatings of the refractory metal carbides are of great interest for applications where hard wear-resistant materials are desired. The usefulness of sputtered refractory carbides is often limited, in practice, by spalling or interfacial separation. In this work improvements in the adherence of refractory carbides on iron, nickel and titanium based alloys were obtained by using oxidation, reactive sputtering or sputtered interlayers to alter the coating-substrate interfacial region. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and argon ion etching were used to characterize the interfacial regions, and an attempt was made to correlate adherence as measured in wear tests with the chemical nature of the interface.

  5. Cross-Field Electron Heat Transport in a Magnetoplasma, in the Presence of Ion Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needelman, David Dore

    Cross-field heat transport through a cylindrical pulsed argon afterglow magnetoplasma, (B_0 = 48-300G, rm T_{e} ~ 0.5-7 eV, n_{e} ~ 10^{11} cm^{ -3}, Phi_{s } ~ 2V, radius = 5 cm), is investigated. The study of heat flow is relevant to the fields of fusion engineering and space physics. A BaO-coated dispenser cathode is used to produce a pulsed electron beam, (V_{b}=750 V, I_{b} = 1A, radius = 1.27 cm, tau_{b} = 5 - 10mus, fired 300 mus into the afterglow), propagating down the central axis of the plasma. The beam heats the background electrons within some centimeters of the beam launching point (Whe85); heat diffuses along field lines, forming a "flux tube" of hot plasma. Biased grids, (radius = 5 cm, V_{g} = -200V), are used to retard the axial heat flow through the tube. A radially inserted Langmuir probe is used to map T_{e}, n_ {e}, and Phi_{s } as a function of position and time. There profiles are used to deduce the electron cross-field thermal conductivity coefficient, kappa_| . Anomalous heat transport is found for all cases studied; kappa_| is found to be up to two orders of magnitude above classical predictions. Such transport is attributed to quasilinear effects; collisions of the background electrons with radial ion acoustic waves created indirectly by the beam, through action of the beam/plasma and oscillating two-stream instabilities (Whe85), and with azimuthal ion acoustic waves, created by the pressure-gradient instability(All74). An enhanced collision frequency leads to faster cross-field particle and heat diffusion. Measurements of wave amplitudes are presented, as are correlation measurements proving the waves are ion acoustic. Comparisons of experimental measurements with quasilinear theory predictions (Man78) are shown to be quite close.

  6. Cross-field diffusion in Hall thrusters and other plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, J. P.

    2012-10-01

    Understanding and quantifying electron transport perpendicular to the magnetic field is a challenge in many low temperature plasma applications. Hall effect thrusters (HETs) provide an excellent example of cross-field transport. The HET is a very successful concept that can be considered both as a gridless ion source and an electromagnetic thruster. In HETs, the electric field E accelerating the ions is a consequence of the Lorentz force due to an external magnetic field B acting on the ExB Hall electron current. An essential aspect of HETs is that the ExB drift is closed, i.e. is in the azimuthal direction of a cylindrical channel. In the first part of this presentation we will discuss the physics of cross-field electron transport in HETs, and the current understanding (or non-understanding) of the possible role of turbulence and wall collisions on cross-field diffusion. We will also briefly comment on alternative designs of ion sources based on the same principles as the conventional HET (Anode Layer Thruster, Diverging Cusp Field Thrusters, End-Hall ion sources). In a second part of the presentation we show that the Lorentz force acting on diamagnetic currents (associated with the ∇PexB term in the electron momentum equation) can also provide thrust. This is the case for example in helicon thrusters where the plasma expands in a magnetic nozzle. We will report and discuss recent work on helicon thrusters and other devices where the diamagnetic current is dominant (with some examples where the ∇PexB current is not closed and is directed toward a wall!).

  7. Influence of oblique magnetic field on electron cross-field transport in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Miedzik, Jan; Daniłko, Dariusz; Barral, Serge

    2015-04-15

    The effects of the inclination of the magnetic field with respect to the channel walls in a Hall effect thruster are numerically studied with the use of a one-dimensional quasi-neutral Particle-In-Cell model with guiding center approximation of electron motion along magnetic lines. Parametric studies suggest that the incidence angle strongly influences electron transport across the magnetic field. In ion-focusing magnetic topologies, electrons collide predominantly on the side of the magnetic flux tube closer to the anode, thus increasing the electron cross-field drift. The opposite effect is observed in ion-defocussing topology.

  8. Influence of oblique magnetic field on electron cross-field transport in a Hall effect thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miedzik, Jan; Barral, Serge; Daniłko, Dariusz

    2015-04-01

    The effects of the inclination of the magnetic field with respect to the channel walls in a Hall effect thruster are numerically studied with the use of a one-dimensional quasi-neutral Particle-In-Cell model with guiding center approximation of electron motion along magnetic lines. Parametric studies suggest that the incidence angle strongly influences electron transport across the magnetic field. In ion-focusing magnetic topologies, electrons collide predominantly on the side of the magnetic flux tube closer to the anode, thus increasing the electron cross-field drift. The opposite effect is observed in ion-defocussing topology.

  9. Evidence for enhanced cross-field transport mechanisms in the TCV Snowflake divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijvers, Wouter

    2015-11-01

    TCV experiments demonstrate that cross-field plasma transport is enhanced in the Snowflake divertor (SFD) compared to a standard single-null divertor (SND). This enhanced cross-field transport spreads the exhaust power over a larger surface area than can be achieved by magnetic geometry alone and, thereby, reduces the peak heat flux. Comparison of the experiments with modelling identifies steepened radial gradients, ExB drift effects, and βp-driven instabilities as the responsible transport mechanisms. The uncovered physics is also relevant to the SND and may help improve predictive models for the target profiles in ITER and DEMO. In SFD variants with an X-point in the scrape-off layer (SOL), part of the heat flux profile is split off and redirected to an additional target. The resulting steepened radial gradients enhance cross-field diffusion. This is confirmed by EMC3-Eirene simulations, which show a factor two reduction of the parallel heat flux, even if diffusivities remain constant. Theoretical analysis predicts enhanced ExB drifts in the SFD by increased poloidal gradients of the temperature and density. The predictions are confirmed by target heat and particle flux measurements in dedicated experiments with both toroidal field directions. Cross-field convection by curvature-driven modes at high βp (``churning modes'') explains the large fluxes into the private flux region of the SFD. This activates the extra targets and reduces the peak power to the primary targets up to a factor four. This mechanism is expected to be most effective when the divertor conditions are most severe: near the separatrix of a narrow, high-pressure SOL of a large tokamak. These and other alternative divertor configurations thus provide potential solutions to the power exhaust challenge, as well as laboratories to study SOL transport, one of the most important topics in tokamak research. This project was carried out with financial support from NWO. The work was carried out within

  10. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.; Calaway, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Diode and Diode Circuits, a Programmed Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman; Kirwin, Gerald J.

    This programed text on diode and diode circuits was developed under contract with the United States Office of Education as Number 4 in a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is intended as a supplement to a regular text and other instructional material. (DH)

  12. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  13. Electron Cross-field Transport in a Miniaturized Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov Artem, Raitses Yevgeny, Fisch Nathaniel J

    2005-10-14

    Conventional annular Hall thrusters become inefficient when scaled to low power. Cylindrical Hall thrusters, which have lower surface-to-volume ratio, are more promising for scaling down. They presently exhibit performance comparable with conventional annular Hall thrusters. The present paper gives a review of the experimental and numerical investigations of electron crossfield transport in the 2.6 cm miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (100 W power level). We show that, in order to explain the discharge current observed for the typical operating conditions, the electron anomalous collision frequency {nu}{sub b} has to be on the order of the Bohm value, {nu}{sub B} {approx} {omega}{sub c}/16. The contribution of electron-wall collisions to cross-field transport is found to be insignificant. The optimal regimes of thruster operation at low background pressure (below 10{sup -5} Torr) in the vacuum tank appear to be different from those at higher pressure ({approx} 10{sup -4} Torr).

  14. Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex formation and particle transport in a cross-field plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Theilhaber, K.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-02-13

    The time-dependent behavior of a magnetized, two-dimensional plasma-wall sheath has been studied through particle simulations, whcih have shown that the cross-field sheath develops into a turbulent boundary layer, driven by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The sheath acquires an equilibrium thickness l/sub x/approx.5rho/sub i/, and maintains long-lived vortices, with amplitudes deltaphiapprox.-2T/sub i//e, which drift parallel to the wall at half the ion thermal velocity. A central simulation result is that for ..omega../sub ..pi../greater than or equal to2..omega../sub ci/, the anomalous particle transport in the sheath scales like Bohn diffusion.

  15. Thermal effects and space-charge limited transition in crossed-field devices

    SciTech Connect

    Marini, Samuel; Rizzato, Felipe B.; Pakter, Renato

    2014-08-15

    A fully kinetic model for the electron flow in a crossed field device is derived and used to determine the system stationary states. It is found that for low injection temperatures, there is a simultaneous presence of distinct stationary solutions and an abrupt transition between accelerating and space-charge limited regimes. On the other hand, for high injection temperatures, there is only a single stationary solution branch and the change between the regimes becomes continuous. For intermediate temperatures, it is then identified a critical point that separates the abrupt and continuous behaviors. It is also investigated how intrinsic space-charge oscillations may drive stationary states unstable in certain parameter regimes. The results are verified with N-particle self-consistent simulations.

  16. Computer model of crossed-field devices using moving wavelength codes

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, H.L.

    1996-12-31

    DECFA and DEMAG are moving wavelength, particle in cell codes for modeling crossed-field amplifiers (CFAs) and magnetrons. The codes model the interaction between a single traveling wave on a smooth anode surface and the space charge in crossed electric and magnetic fields. The detailed anode vane tip geometry is not included in the model. Periodic boundary conditions are imposed on the sides of the moving interaction wavelength thereby imposing the wave periodicity on the solution. In spite of the assumptions involved, the codes successfully model the performance of many existing CFAs and magnetrons. Correlation of computer model and experimental results will be presented for typical devices. The only failures of the codes to correlate with device performance have occurred for small gap anode vane tip geometries which degrade the efficiency of electron collection. To avoid such possibilities, the simulation codes need to be supplemented with trajectory tracing studies of electrons between anode vanes. Results of such studies will be presented.

  17. Plasma heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Quest, K. B.; Tanaka, M.; Wu, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability, which is the finite beta (ratio of plasma to magnetic pressure) extension of the modified two stream instability, is studied. Heating rates are derived from quasi-linear theory and compared with results from particle simulations to show that electron heating relative to ion heating and heating parallel to the magnetic field relative to perpendicular heating for both the electrons and ions increase with beta. The simulations suggest that electron dynamics determine the saturation level of the instability, which is manifested by the formation of a flattop electron distribution parallel to the magnetic field. As a result, both the saturation levels of the fluctuations and the heating rates decrease sharply with beta. Applications of these results to plasma heating in simulations of shocks and the earth's bow shock are described.

  18. Local and global effects of the cross-field current instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    1996-01-01

    The cross-field current instability (CCI) was proposed elsewhere as a plausible mechanism for the initiation and intensification of substorm expansions. This instability encompasses the modified two stream, the ion-Weibel and the lower hybrid drift modes. The work carried out in relation to this instability and its local and global effects is reviewed. Predicted local effects include current reduction, particle acceleration, the excitation of oblique whistlers and lower hybrid drift waves, and the breakdown of the frozen-in-field condition through anomalous dissipation. The predicted global effects of CCI include the offset of force equilibrium and the generation of field aligned currents at the disruption site, which allow the efficient large scale transportation of mass, momentum and energy within the magnetosphere.

  19. Low-Energy Sputtering Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.; Shutthanandan, V.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study is described to measure low-energy (less than 600 eV) sputtering yields of molybdenum with xenon ions using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and secondary neutral mass spectroscopy (SNMS). An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. The ion current density at the target surface was approximately 30 (micro)A/sq cm. For RBS measurements, the sputtered material was collected on a thin aluminum strip which was mounted on a semi-circular collector plate. The target was bombarded with 200 and 500 eV xenon ions at normal incidence. The differential sputtering yields were measured using the RBS method with 1 MeV helium ions. The differential yields were fitted with a cosine fitting function and integrated with respect to the solid angle to provide the total sputtering yields. The sputtering yields obtained using the RBS method are in reasonable agreement with those measured by other researchers using different techniques. For the SNMS measurements, 150 to 600 eV xenon ions were used at 50deg angle of incidence. The SNMS spectra were converted to sputtering yields for perpendicular incidence by normalizing SNMS spectral data at 500 eV with the yield measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Sputtering yields as well as the shape of the yield-energy curve obtained in this manner are in reasonable agreement with those measured by other researchers using different techniques. Sputtering yields calculated by using two semi-spherical formulations agree reasonably well with measured data. The isotopic composition of secondary ions were measured by bombarding copper with xenon ions at energies ranging from 100 eV to 1.5 keV. The secondary ion flux was found to be enriched in heavy isotopes at low incident ion energies. The heavy isotope enrichment was observed to decrease with increasing impact energy. Beyond 700 eV, light isotopes were sputtered preferentially with the enrichment remaining nearly constant.

  20. DEEPER BY THE DOZEN: UNDERSTANDING THE CROSS-FIELD TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Jenkins, B. S.; Worley, B. T.

    2013-02-10

    Spectroscopic analysis of coronal loops has revealed a variety of cross-field temperature distributions. Some loops appear to be isothermal while others require multithermal plasma. The EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode has the spatial resolution and temperature coverage required for differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of coronal loops. Our results also use data from the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode as a high-temperature constraint. Of our 12 loops, two were post-flare loops with broad temperature distributions, two were narrow but not quite isothermal, and the remaining eight were in the mid range. We consider our DEM methods to be a significant advance over previous work, and it is also reassuring to learn that our findings are consistent with results available in the literature. For the quiescent loops analyzed here, 10 MK plasma, a signature of nanoflares, appears to be absent at a level of approximately two orders of magnitude down from the DEM peak. We find some evidence that warmer loops require broader DEMs. The cross-field temperatures obtained here cannot be modeled as single flux tubes. Rather, the observed loop must be composed of several or many unresolved strands. The plasma contained in each of these strands could be cooling at different rates, contributing to the multithermal nature of the observed loop pixels. An important implication of our DEM results involves observations from future instruments. Once solar telescopes can truly resolve X-ray and EUV coronal structures, these images would have to reveal the loop substructure implied by our multithermal results.

  1. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  2. Evidence of stochastic diffusion across a cross-field sheath due to Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.E.; Xu, X.Q.; Lichtenberg, A.J.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1992-03-15

    We identify mechanisms for particle transport across a cross-field sheath. We present a study of {bold E}{times}{bold B} drift motion in a vortex in which the ion drifts are perturbed by their finite gyroradii and electron drifts are perturbed by one or more traveling waves. Large-scale vortices, which are the result of nonlinear saturation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability resulting from shear in the {bold E}{times}{bold B} drift velocity, have been observed in plasma simulations of the cross-field sheath (K. Theilhaber and C. K. Birdsall, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 772 (1989); Phys. Fluids B 1, 2241 (1989); 1, 2260 (1989)). Small-scale turbulence is also present, and ions and electrons are transported across the sheath. A vortex alone does not allow for the observed electron transport because the electron drift orbits simply circulate. On the other hand, the ion motion can be stochastic from resonant interaction between harmonics of the drift motion and the gyromotion, independent of the background turbulence. The fluctuations in the ion density would then give rise to a small-amplitude wave spectrum. The combined action of the vortex fields and traveling-wave fields on the electron motion can then lead to stochastic electron diffusion. We study these effects, showing that the values of vortex fields observed in the simulation are sufficient to lead to both ion and electron stochasticity. Furthermore, the rate of the resulting diffusion is sufficient to account for the diffusion observed in the simulation.

  3. Laser diode protection circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Burgyan, L.; Hand, W.L.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a method for protecting a laser diode included within an electro-optical circuit. It comprises: the laser diode, a DC bias supply for supplying forward conduction current to the laser diode to cause it to emit light energy at a predetermined quiescent operating point, and an RF amplifier means for supplying an RF amplitude of an analog modulating signal to the laser diode for modulating the intensity of the emitted light energy about the quiescent operating point thereof, the method including providing a very high impedance to the laser diode during its nominal operating conditions about the quiescent point and, sensing an instantaneous amplitude of the RF amplitude modulating signal to detect amplitude surges therein, and responding to the sensing means by removing forward conduction current from the laser diode during the sense amplitude surges int he RF amplitude of the analog modulating signal, thereby causing the laser diode to reduce emission of light energy to a safe level.

  4. Sputtering. [as deposition technique in mechanical engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1976-01-01

    This paper primarily reviews the potential of using the sputtering process as a deposition technique; however, the manufacturing and sputter etching aspects are also discussed. Since sputtering is not regulated by classical thermodynamics, new multicomponent materials can be developed in any possible chemical composition. The basic mechanism for dc and rf sputtering is described. Sputter-deposition is described in terms of the unique advantageous features it offers such as versatility, momentum transfer, stoichiometry, sputter-etching, target geometry (coating complex surfaces), precise controls, flexibility, ecology, and sputtering rates. Sputtered film characteristics, such as strong adherence and coherence and film morphology, are briefly evaluated in terms of varying the sputtering parameters. Also described are some of the specific industrial areas which are turning to sputter-deposition techniques.

  5. Polycrystalline Diamond Schottky Diodes and Their Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ganming

    In this work, four-hot-filament CVD techniques for in situ boron doped diamond synthesis on silicon substrates were extensively studied. A novel tungsten filament shape and arrangement used to obtain large-area, uniform, boron doped polycrystalline diamond thin films. Both the experimental results and radiative heat transfer analysis showed that this technique improved the uniformity of the substrate temperature. XRD, Raman and SEM studies indicate that large area, uniform, high quality polycrystalline diamond films were obtained. Schottky diodes were fabricated by either sputter deposition of silver or thermal evaporation of aluminum or gold, on boron doped diamond thin films. High forward current density and a high forward-to-reverse current ratio were exhibited by silver on diamond Schottky diodes. Schottky barrier heights and the majority carrier concentrations of both aluminum and gold contacted diodes were determined from the C-V measurements. Furthermore, a novel theoretical C-V-f analysis of deep level boron doped diamond Schottky diodes was performed. The analytical results agree well with the experimental results. Compressive stress was found to have a large effect on the forward biased I-V characteristics of the diamond Schottky diodes, whereas the effect on the reverse biased characteristics was relatively small. The stress effect on the forward biased diamond Schottky diode was attributed to piezojunction and piezoresistance effects. The measured force sensitivity of the diode was as high as 0.75 V/N at 1 mA forward bias. This result shows that CVD diamond device has potential for mechanical transducer applications. The quantitative photoresponse characteristics of the diodes were studied in the spectral range of 300 -1050 nm. Semi-transparent gold contacts were used for better photoresponse. Quantum efficiency as high as 50% was obtained at 500 nm, when a reverse bias of over 1 volt was applied. The Schottky barrier heights between either gold or

  6. Simultaneous ion sputter polishing and deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, S.; Banks, B.; Brdar, M.

    1981-01-01

    Results of experiments to study ion beam sputter polishing in conjunction with simultaneous deposition as a mean of polishing copper surfaces are presented. Two types of simultaneous ion sputter polishing and deposition were used in these experiments. The first type utilized sputter polishing simultaneous with vapor deposition, and the second type utilized sputter polishing simultaneous with sputter deposition. The etch and deposition rates of both techniques were studied, as well as the surface morphology and surface roughness.

  7. Sputter etching of hemispherical bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiesser, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Technique was developed for fabricating three dimensional pumping grooves on gas bearings by sputter etching. Method eliminates problems such as groove nonuniformity, profile, and finish, which are associated with normal grooving methods.

  8. Bypass diode integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Protective bypass diodes and mounting configurations which are applicable for use with photovoltaic modules having power dissipation requirements in the 5 to 50 watt range were investigated. Using PN silicon and Schottky diode characterization data on packaged diodes and diode chips, typical diodes were selected as representative for each range of current carrying capacity, an appropriate heat dissipating mounting concept along with its environmental enclosure was defined, and a thermal analysis relating junction temperature as a function of power dissipation was performed. In addition, the heat dissipating mounting device dimensions were varied to determine the effect on junction temperature. The results of the analysis are presented as a set of curves indicating junction temperature as a function of power dissipation for each diode package.

  9. Simulation of Large Parallel Plasma Flows in the Tokamak SOL Driven by Cross-Field Transport Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A Y; Krasheninnikov, S I; LaBombard, B; Rognlien, T D

    2006-06-06

    Large-Mach-number parallel plasma flows in the single-null SOL of different tokamaks are simulated with multi-fluid transport code UEDGE. The key role of poloidal asymmetry of cross-field plasma transport as the driving mechanism for such flows is discussed. The impact of ballooning-like diffusive and convective transport and plasma flows on divertor detachment, material migration, impurity flows, and erosion/deposition profiles is studied. The results on well-balanced double null plasma modeling that are indicative of strong asymmetry of cross-field transport are presented.

  10. Improved refractory coatings. [sputtered coatings on substrates that form stable nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The adhesion, friction and wear properties of sputtered refractory coatings on substrates of materials that form stable nitrides are enhanced by placing each substrate directly below a titanium carbide target of a commercial radiofrequency diode apparatus in a vacuum chamber. Nitrogen is bled into the system through a nozzle resulting in a small partial pressure of about 0.5% to 2.5% during the first two minutes of deposition. The flow of nitrogen is then stopped, and the sputtering ambient is reduced to pure argon through a nozzle without interrupting the sputtering process. When nitrogen is deliberately introduced during the crucial interface formation, some of the titanium at the interface reacts to form titanium nitride while the metal of the substrate also forms the nitride. These two nitrides atomically mixed together in the interfacial region act to more strongly bond the growing titanium carbide coating as it forms on the substrate.

  11. Coaxial foilless diode

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Long; Liu, QingXiang; Li, XiangQiang; Wang, ShaoMeng

    2014-05-15

    A kind of coaxial foilless diode is proposed in this paper, with the structure model and operating principle of the diode are given. The current-voltage relation of the coaxial foilless diode and the effects of structure parameters on the relation are studied by simulation. By solving the electron motion equation, the beam deviation characteristic in the presence of external magnetic field in transmission process is analyzed, and the relationship between transverse misalignment with diode parameters is obtained. These results should be of interest to the area of generation and propagation of radial beam for application of generating high power microwaves.

  12. Cross-field electron transport induced by a rotating spoke in a cylindrical Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, C. L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2012-01-15

    Rotating spoke phenomena have been observed in a variety of Hall thruster and other E x B devices. It has been suggested that the spoke may be associated with the enhancement of the electron cross-field transport. In this paper, the current conducted across the magnetic field via a rotating spoke has been directly measured for the first time in the E x B discharge of a cylindrical Hall thruster. The spoke current was measured using a segmented anode. Synchronized measurements with a high speed camera and a four-segment anode allow observation of the current as a function of time and azimuthal position. Upwards of 50% of the total current is conducted through the spoke, which occupies a quarter of the Hall thruster channel area. To determine the transport mechanism, emissive and Langmuir probes were installed to measure fluctuating plasma potential, electron density, and temperature. A perturbed, azimuthal electric field and density are observed to oscillate in-phase with the rotating spoke. The resulting drift current is found to enhance electron transport with a magnitude equal to the spoke current to within margins of error.

  13. Internal feedback and its effect on phase linearity in a forward wave crossed-field amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Chernin, D.

    1995-12-31

    Two sources of internal feedback couple the input and output of crossed-field amplifiers (CFA`s). Direct rf feedback occurs because the ends of the slow wave circuit radiate energy into the drift space connecting the output and input; the magnitude of this type of feedback may be measured at cold test. Electronic feedback, on the other hand, occurs only when the tube is operating, and is much harder to measure. It is due to the residual coherency retained by the beam after its passage through the drift space. As the input signal frequency of the amplifier is varied, the difference in electrical path length around the tube leads to a periodic variation of the total feedback signal relative to that of the input signal, resulting in a variation in phase of the effective drive signal, which in turn produces a periodic variation in phase of the output signal. This variation can have significant consequences for the system in which the CFA is used. The magnitude of this variation is very difficult to estimate other than by the use of a simulation code. The authors have applied their CFA simulation code, MASK, to this problem and have produced very good agreement with measurements of output phase versus frequency for a high power, forward wave S-band tube.

  14. Effect of Secondary Electron Emission on Electron Cross-Field Current in E×B Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Igor D. Kaganovich, Alexander Khrabrov, Dmytro Sydorenko, Nathaniel J. Fisch and Andrei Smolyakov

    2011-02-10

    This paper reviews and discusses recent experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies of plasma-wall interaction in a weakly collisional magnetized plasma bounded with channel walls made from different materials. A lowpressure ExB plasma discharge of the Hall thruster was used to characterize the electron current across the magnetic field and its dependence on the applied voltage and electron-induced secondary electron emission (SEE) from the channel wall. The presence of a depleted, anisotropic electron energy distribution function with beams of secondary electrons was predicted to explain the enhancement of the electron cross-field current observed in experiments. Without the SEE, the electron crossfield transport can be reduced from anomalously high to nearly classical collisional level. The suppression of SEE was achieved using an engineered carbon velvet material for the channel walls. Both theoretically and experimentally, it is shown that the electron emission from the walls can limit the maximum achievable electric field in the magnetized plasma. With nonemitting walls, the maximum electric field in the thruster can approach a fundamental limit for a quasineutral plasma.

  15. ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY OBSERVATIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS: CROSS-FIELD TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Jenkins, B. S.; Pathak, S.

    2013-06-10

    We construct revised response functions for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) using the new atomic data, ionization equilibria, and coronal abundances available in CHIANTI 7.1. We then use these response functions in multithermal analysis of coronal loops, which allows us to determine a specific cross-field temperature distribution without ad hoc assumptions. Our method uses data from the six coronal filters and the Monte Carlo solutions available from our differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The resulting temperature distributions are not consistent with isothermal plasma. Therefore, the observed loops cannot be modeled as single flux tubes and must be composed of a collection of magnetic strands. This result is now supported by observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager, which show fine-scale braiding of coronal strands that are reconnecting and releasing energy. Multithermal analysis is one of the major scientific goals of AIA, and these results represent an important step toward the successful achievement of that goal. As AIA DEM analysis becomes more straightforward, the solar community will be able to take full advantage of the state-of-the-art spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution of the instrument.

  16. A high power cross-field amplifier at X-Band

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Lee, T.; Nelson, E.

    1991-05-01

    A high power cross-field amplifier is under development at SLAC with the objective of providing sufficient peak power to feed a section of an X-Band (11.424 GHz) accelerator without the need for pulse compression. The CFA being designed employs a conventional distributed secondary emission cathode but a novel anode structure which consists of an array of vane resonators alternatively coupled to a rectangular waveguide. The waveguide impedance (width) is tapered linearly from input to output so as to provide a constant RF voltage at the vane tips, leading to uniform power generation along the structure. Nominal design for this tube calls for 300 MW output power, 20 dB gain, DC voltage 142 KV, magnetic field 5 KG, anode-cathode gap 3.6 mm and total interaction length of about 60 cm. These specifications have been supported by computer simulations of both the RF slow wave structure as well as the electron space charge wave interaction. We have used ARGUS to model the cold circuit properties and CONDOR to model the electronic power conversion. An efficiency of 60 percent can be expected. We will discuss the details of the design effort. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Cross-Field Current Instabilities in Thin Ionization Layers and the Enhanced Aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Jay R. Johnson and Hideo Okuda

    2008-05-20

    Nearly half of the time, auroral displays exhibit thin, bright layers known as \\enhanced aurora." There is a substantial body of evidence that connects these displays with thin, dense, heavy ion layers in the E-region. Based on the spectral characteristics of the enhanced layers, it is believed that they result when wave-particle interaction heats ambient electrons to energies at or just above the 17 eV ionization energy of N2. While there are several possible instabilities that could produce suprathermal electrons in thin layers, there has been no clear theoretical investigation which examines in detail how wave instabilities in the thin ionization layers could develop and produce the suprathermal electrons. We examine instabilities which would occur in thin, dense, heavy ion layers using extensive analytical analysis combined with particle simulations. We analyze a cross field current instability that is found to be strongly unstable in the heavy ion layers. Electrostatic simulations show that substantial heating of the ambient electrons occurs with energization at or above the N2 ionization energy.

  18. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  19. Diodes stabilize LED output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deters, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Small-signal diodes are placed in series with light-emitting diodes (LED's) to stabilize LED output against temperature fluctuations. Simple inexpensive method compensates for thermal fluctuations over a broad temperature range. Requiring few components, technique is particularly useful where circuit-board space is limited.

  20. Masking Technique for Ion-Beam Sputter Etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Improved process for fabrication of integrated circuits developed. Technique utilizes simultaneous ion-beam sputter etching and carbon sputter deposition in conjunction with carbon sputter mask or organic mask decomposed to produce carbon-rich sputter-mask surface. Sputter etching process replenishes sputter mask with carbon to prevent premature mask loss.

  1. Pulsed high-voltage dc RF sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przybyszewski, J. S., Jr.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    Sputtering technique uses pulsed high voltage direct current to the object to be plated and a radio frequency sputtered film source. Resultant film has excellent adhesion, and objects can be plated uniformly on all sides.

  2. Sputtered silicon nitride coatings for wear protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon nitride films were deposited by RF sputtering on 304 stainless steel substrates in a planar RF sputtering apparatus. The sputtering was performed from a Si3N4 target in a sputtering atmosphere of argon and nitrogen. The rate of deposition, the composition of the coatings, the surface microhardness and the adhesion of the coatings to the substrates were investigated as a function of the process parameters, such as: substrate target distance, fraction nitrogen in the sputtering atmosphere and sputtering pressure. Silicon rich coating was obtained for fraction nitrogen below 0.2. The rate of deposition decreases continuously with increasing fraction nitrogen and decreasing sputtering pressure. It was found that the adherence of the coatings improves with decreasing sputtering pressure, almost independently of their composition.

  3. Ion beam sputtering of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Etching and deposition of fluoropolymers are of considerable industrial interest for applications dealing with adhesion, chemical inertness, hydrophobicity, and dielectric properties. This paper describes ion beam sputter processing rates as well as pertinent characteristics of etched targets and films. An argon ion beam source was used to sputter etch and deposit the fluoropolymers PTFE, FEP, and CTFE. Ion beam energy, current density, and target temperature were varied to examine effects on etch and deposition rates. The ion etched fluoropolymers yield cone or spire-like surface structures which vary depending upon the type of polymer, ion beam power density, etch time, and target temperature. Also presented are sputter target and film characteristics which were documented by spectral transmittance measurements, X-ray diffraction, ESCA, and SEM photomicrographs.

  4. Mass dependence of nitride sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elovikov, S. S.; Khrustachev, I. K.; Mosunov, A. S.; Yurasova, V. E.

    2003-08-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the sputtering yield Y for BN, AlN and GaN polycrystals of wurtzite structure as a function of the masses m 1 of bombarding ions with energies from 200 to 2000 eV. A nonmonotonic behavior of the Y ( m 1 ) curve was obtained for the irradiation by low-energy ions, the curve having a maximum with a position being dependent on m 2 / m 1 ( m 2 is the average mass of atoms in a compound). For AlN and GaN the maximum was observed at m 2 / m 1 = 2, and for BN at m 2 / m 1 = 1. The effect of the mass of bombarding ions on the mean energies and energy spectra of sputtered particles, the depth of sputtering origin, and the generation of emitted atoms for nitrides was also investigated and discussed.

  5. Faraday screen sputtering on TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1994-12-01

    The TPX design stipulates that the ion-cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) antenna must have a Faraday screen (FS). The author considers here possible low Z coatings for the screen, as well as sputtering behavior of the Ni and Ti substrates. The theory of rf-induced sputtering has been developed, and he follows those theoretical approaches. The author`s emphasis will be on both impurity generation as a possible source of increased Z{sub eff}, and also on actual erosion-lifetime of the materials under worst case conditions.

  6. Transport of sputtered neutral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.J.; Hitchon, W.N.G.; Koch, D.J. ||

    1995-04-01

    The initial deposition rate of sputtered material along the walls of a trench is calculated numerically. The numerical scheme is a nonstatistical description of long-mean-free-path transport in the gas phase. Gas-phase collisions are included by using a ``transition matrix`` to describe the particle motion, which in the present work is from the source through a cylindrical chamber and into a rectangular trench. The method is much faster and somewhat more accurate than Monte Carlo methods. Initial deposition rates of sputtered material along the walls of the trench are presented for various physical and geometrical situations, and the deposition rates are compared to other computational and experimental results.

  7. Fabrication of thick structures by sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, J. M.; Mcclanahan, E. D.; Busch, R.; Moss, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Deposit, 5500-gram of Cu-0.15 wt % Zr alloy, sputtered onto copper cylinder to average thickness of 12.29 mm. Structure was achieved with high-rate sputter deposition for about 100 hours total sputtering time. Material had twice the strength of unsputtered material at temperatures to 723 K and equivalent strength at nearly 873 K.

  8. Modeling target erosion during reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strijckmans, K.; Depla, D.

    2015-03-01

    The influence of the reactive sputter conditions on the racetrack and the sputter profile for an Al/O2 DC reactive sputter system is studied by modeling. The role of redeposition, i.e. the deposition of sputtered material back on the target, is therefore taken into account. The used model RSD2013 is capable of simulating the effect of redeposition on the target condition in a spatial resolved way. Comparison between including and excluding redeposition in the RSD2013 model shows that the in-depth oxidation profile of the target differs. Modeling shows that it is important to distinguish between the formed racetrack, i.e. the erosion depth profile, and the sputter profile. The latter defines the distribution of the sputtered atoms in the vacuum chamber. As the target condition defines the sputter yield, it does determine the racetrack and the sputter profile of the planar circular target. Both the shape of the racetrack and the sputter profile change as function of the redeposition fraction as well as function of the oxygen flow change. Clear asymmetries and narrowing are observed for the racetrack shape. Similar effects are noticed for the sputter profile but to a different extent. Based on this study, the often heard misconception that the racetrack shape defines the distribution of the sputtered atoms during reactive sputtering is proven to be wrong.

  9. Room-temperature-processed flexible n-InGaZnO/p-Cu2O heterojunction diodes and high-frequency diode rectifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Hsu, Po-Ching; Chien, Chih-Wei; Chang, Kuei-Ming; Hsu, Chao-Jui; Chang, Ching-Hsiang; Lee, Wei-Kai; Chou, Wen-Fang; Hsieh, Hsing-Hung; Wu, Chung-Chih

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we report successful implementation of room-temperature-processed flexible n-InGaZnO/p-Cu2O heterojunction diodes on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) plastic substrates using the sputtering technique. Using n-type InGaZnO and p-type Cu2O films deposited by sputtering at room temperature, flexible n-InGaZnO/p-Cu2O heterojunction diodes were successfully fabricated on PEN plastic substrates. The didoes on PEN substrates exhibited a low apparent turn-on voltage of 0.44 V, a high rectification ratio of up to 3.4 × 104 at ±1.2 V, a high forward current of 1 A cm-2 around 1 V and a decent ideality factor of 1.4, similar to the characteristics of n-InGaZnO/p-Cu2O diodes fabricated on glass substrates. The characterization of the frequency response of the room-temperature-processed flexible n-InGaZnO/p-Cu2O heterojunction diode rectifiers indicated that they are capable of high-frequency operation up to 27 MHz, sufficient for high-frequency (13.56 MHz) applications. Preliminary bending tests on diode characteristics and rectifier frequency responses indicate their promise for applications in flexible electronics.

  10. Magnetron-Sputtered Amorphous Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Mehra, M.; Khanna, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous coatings of refractory metal/metalloid-based alloys deposited by magnetron sputtering provide extraordinary hardness and wear resistance. Sputtering target fabricated by thoroughly mixing powders of tungsten, rhenium, and boron in stated proportions and pressing at 1,200 degrees C and 3,000 lb/in. to second power (21 MPa). Substrate lightly etched by sputtering before deposition, then maintained at bias of - 500 V during initial stages of film growth while target material sputtered onto it. Argon gas at pressure used as carrier gas for sputter deposition. Coatings dense, pinhole-free, extremely smooth, and significantly resistant to chemical corrosion in acidic and neutral aqueous environments.

  11. Sputtering technology in solid film lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Current and potential sputtering technology is reviewed as it applies primarily to the deposition of MoS2, though such lubricants as WS2 and PTFE are also considered. It is shown by electron microscopy and surface sensitive analytical techniques that the lubricating properties of sputtered MoS2 films are directly influenced by the sputtering parameters selected (i.e., power density, pressure, sputter etching, dc-biasing, etc.), substrate temperature, chemistry, topography, and environmental conditions during the friction test. Electron micrographs and diffractograms of sputtered MoS2 films clearly show the resultant changes in film morphology which affect film adherence and frictional properties.

  12. Sputtering technology in solid film lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Potential and present sputtering technology is discussed as it applies to the deposition of solid film lubricants particularly MoS2, WS2, and PTFE. Since the sputtered films are very thin, the selection of the sputtering parameters and substrate condition is very critical as reflected by the lubricating properties. It was shown with sputtered MoS2 films that the lubricating characteristics are directly affected by the selected sputtering parameters (power density, pressure, sputter etching, dc-biasing, etc.) and the substrate temperature, chemistry, topography and the environmental conditions during the friction tests. Electron microscopy and other surface sensitive analytical techniques illustrate the resulting changes in sputtered MoS2 film morphology and chemistry which directly influence the film adherence and frictional properties.

  13. Redeposition of the sputtered surface in limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.N.; McGrath, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Erosion of the surface coating of a pumped limiter by sputtering may be a critical life-limiting issue for future tokamak reactors. Redeposition of the sputtered material, however, may extend the coating life significantly. This subject has now been studied through the use of a code which models the redeposition of sputtered material which gets ionized in the scrape-off layer. The code also treats the transfer of wall-sputtered material to the limiter. The code uses models of the plasma density and temperature in the scrape-off zone, sheath potential, sputtering coefficients, spatial distribution of the sputtered atoms, and electron impact ionization coefficient for the sputtered atoms. The studies were made for high flux and low flux edge conditions corresponding to FED and STARFIRE limiters and assumed plasma-edge parameters. The results indicate that substantial redeposition from the scrape-off layer ionized neutrals occurs in the cases considered.

  14. Propulsion of nanowire diodes.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Marzal, Percy; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Windmiller, Joshua R; Dao, Cuong; Wang, Joseph

    2010-03-14

    The propulsion of semiconductor diode nanowires under external AC electric field is described. Such fuel-free electric field-induced nanowire propulsion offers considerable promise for diverse technological applications. PMID:20177595

  15. Study of breakdown voltage of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide-based Schottky diode

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Qian; Yan, Linlong; Luo, Yi; Song, Aimin

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the intensive studies on thin-film transistors based on indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO), the research on IGZO-based diodes is still very limited, particularly on their behavior and stability under high bias voltages. Our experiments reveal a sensitive dependence of the breakdown voltage of IGZO Schottky diodes on the anode metal and the IGZO film thickness. Devices with an Au anode are found to breakdown easily at a reverse bias as low as −2.5 V, while the devices with a Pd anode and a 200-nm, fully depleted IGZO layer have survived up to −15 V. All diodes are fabricated by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature without any thermal treatment, yet showing an ideality factor as low as 1.14, showing the possibility of achieving high-performance Schottky diodes on flexible plastic substrate.

  16. Study of breakdown voltage of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide-based Schottky diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Qian; Yan, Linlong; Luo, Yi; Song, Aimin

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to the intensive studies on thin-film transistors based on indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO), the research on IGZO-based diodes is still very limited, particularly on their behavior and stability under high bias voltages. Our experiments reveal a sensitive dependence of the breakdown voltage of IGZO Schottky diodes on the anode metal and the IGZO film thickness. Devices with an Au anode are found to breakdown easily at a reverse bias as low as -2.5 V, while the devices with a Pd anode and a 200-nm, fully depleted IGZO layer have survived up to -15 V. All diodes are fabricated by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature without any thermal treatment, yet showing an ideality factor as low as 1.14, showing the possibility of achieving high-performance Schottky diodes on flexible plastic substrate.

  17. Vortex diode jet

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-05-17

    A fluid transfer system is described that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other. 10 figures.

  18. Inelastic tunnel diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Power is extracted from plasmons, photons, or other guided electromagnetic waves at infrared to midultraviolet frequencies by inelastic tunneling in metal-insulator-semiconductor-metal diodes. Inelastic tunneling produces power by absorbing plasmons to pump electrons to higher potential. Specifically, an electron from a semiconductor layer absorbs a plasmon and simultaneously tunnels across an insulator into metal layer which is at higher potential. The diode voltage determines the fraction of energy extracted from the plasmons; any excess is lost to heat.

  19. Light-emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Opel, Daniel R.; Hagstrom, Erika; Pace, Aaron K.; Sisto, Krisanne; Hirano-Ali, Stefanie A.; Desai, Shraddha

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the early 1990s, the biological significance of light-emitting diodes was realized. Since this discovery, various light sources have been investigated for their cutaneous effects. Study design: A Medline search was performed on light-emitting diode lights and their therapeutic effects between 1996 and 2010. Additionally, an open-label, investigator-blinded study was performed using a yellow light-emitting diode device to treat acne, rosacea, photoaging, alopecia areata, and androgenetic alopecia. Results: The authors identified several case-based reports, small case series, and a few randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of four different wavelengths of light-emitting diodes. These devices were classified as red, blue, yellow, or infrared, and covered a wide range of clinical applications. The 21 patients the authors treated had mixed results regarding patient satisfaction and pre- and post-treatment evaluation of improvement in clinical appearance. Conclusion: Review of the literature revealed that differing wavelengths of light-emitting diode devices have many beneficial effects, including wound healing, acne treatment, sunburn prevention, phototherapy for facial rhytides, and skin rejuvenation. The authors’ clinical experience with a specific yellow light-emitting diode device was mixed, depending on the condition being treated, and was likely influenced by the device parameters. PMID:26155326

  20. Transport of sputtered particles in capacitive sputter sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The transport of sputtered aluminum inside a multi frequency capacitively coupled plasma chamber is simulated by means of a kinetic test multi-particle approach. A novel consistent set of scattering parameters obtained for a modified variable hard sphere collision model is presented for both argon and aluminum. An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution is fitted to results from Monte Carlo simulations and used for the kinetic simulation of the transport of sputtered aluminum. For the proposed configuration, the transport of sputtered particles is characterized under typical process conditions at a gas pressure of p = 0.5 Pa. It is found that—due to the peculiar geometric conditions—the transport can be understood in a one dimensional picture, governed by the interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. It is shown that the precise geometric features play an important role only in proximity to the electrode edges, where the effect of backscattering from the outside chamber volume becomes the governing mechanism.

  1. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1995-02-28

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil. 7 figs.

  2. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil.

  3. In-situ sputtering apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Mark R.; Poole, Henry J.; Custer, III, Arthur W.; Hershcovitch, Ady

    2015-06-09

    A sputtering apparatus that includes at least a target presented as an inner surface of a confinement structure, the inner surface of the confinement structure is preferably an internal wall of a circular tube. A cathode is disposed adjacent the internal wall of the circular tube. The cathode preferably provides a hollow core, within which a magnetron is disposed. Preferably, an actuator is attached to the magnetron, wherein a position of the magnetron within the hollow core is altered upon activation of the actuator. Additionally, a carriage supporting the cathode and communicating with the target is preferably provided, and a cable bundle interacting with the cathode and linked to a cable bundle take up mechanism provided power and coolant to the cathode, magnetron, actuator and an anode of the sputtering apparatus.

  4. Energy spectrum of sputtered uranium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, R. A.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fission track technique for detecting uranium 235 was used in conjunction with a mechanical time-of-flight spectrometer to measure the energy spectrum in the region 1 eV to 1 keV of material sputtered from a 93% enriched U-235 foil by 80 keV Ar-40(+) ions. The spectrum was found to exhibit a peak in the region 2-4 eV and to decrease approximately as E to the -1.77 power for E is approximately greater than 100 eV. The design, construction and resolution of the mechanical spectrometer are discussed and comparisons are made between the data and the predictions of the ramdom collision cascade model of sputtering.

  5. Sputtering Holes with Ion Beamlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, D. C.; Banks, B. A.

    1974-01-01

    Ion beamlets of predetermined configurations are formed by shaped apertures in the screen grid of an ion thruster having a double grid accelerator system. A plate is placed downstream from the screen grid holes and attached to the accelerator grid. When the ion thruster is operated holes having the configuration of the beamlets formed by the screen grid are sputtered through the plate at the accelerator grid.

  6. Significant improvement of GaN crystal quality with ex-situ sputtered AlN nucleation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo-Wei; Yang, Young; Wen, Wei-Chih; Li, Heng; Lu, Tien-Chang

    2016-03-01

    Ex-situ sputtered AlN nucleation layer has been demonstrated effective to significantly improve crystal quality and electrical properties of GaN epitaxy layers for GaN based Light-emitting diodes (LEDs). In this report, we have successfully reduced X-ray (102) FWHM from 240 to 110 arcsec, and (002) FWHM from 230 to 101 arcsec. In addition, reverse-bias voltage (Vr) increased around 20% with the sputtered AlN nucleation layer. Furthermore, output power of LEDs grown on sputtered AlN nucleation layer can be improved around 4.0% compared with LEDs which is with conventional GaN nucleation layer on pattern sapphire substrate (PSS).

  7. Sputtering and ion plating for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1981-01-01

    Sputtering and ion plating technologies are reviewed in terms of their potential and present uses in the aerospace industry. Sputtering offers great universality and flexibility in depositing any material or in the synthesis of new ones. The sputter deposition process has two areas of interest: thin film and fabrication technology. Thin film sputtering technology is primarily used for aerospace mechanical components to reduce friction, wear, erosion, corrosion, high temperature oxidation, diffusion and fatigue, and also to sputter-construct temperature and strain sensors for aircraft engines. Sputter fabrication is used in intricate aircraft component manufacturing. Ion plating applications are discussed in terms of the high energy evaporant flux and the high throwing power. Excellent adherence and 3 dimensional coverage are the primary attributes of this technology.

  8. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering. PMID:26245857

  9. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  10. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remaindermore » is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence monitoring of the gas phase in a glow discharge during reactive sputtering of vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvostikov, V. A.; Grazhulene, S. S.; Burmii, Zh. P.; Marchenko, V. A.

    2011-11-01

    Processes in the gas phase of a glow discharge during diode and magnetron reactive sputtering of vanadium in an Ar-O2 atmosphere have been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) as a function of the parameters of the glow discharge and the composition of the atmosphere. The intensity of the fluorescence spectra increased by 1.5-2.0 orders of magnitude in the magnetron sputtering process compared with that of diode sputtering. Under continuous sputtering conditions, the dependences of the intensities and relative compositions of the fluorescence spectra on the discharge parameters (discharge voltage and current) have been investigated. In pulsed mode of the glow discharge, the dynamics of changes in the spectra have been studied versus variations in the discharge duration and the lag time for recording the fluorescence signal. The dependence of the spectral line intensities on the partial pressure of oxygen has been found for vanadium and its oxide. The cathode surface at pressures of 0.03-0.04 Pa was shown to convert to the oxidized state.

  12. Photovoltaic module bypass diode encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented. The Semicon PN junction diode cells were selected. Diode junction to heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1 deg C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150 deg C. Three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed. Thermal testing of these modules enabled the formulation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally mounted packaged diodes. It is concluded that, when proper designed and installed, these bypass diode devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

  13. THE HYDROMAGNETIC INTERIOR OF A SOLAR QUIESCENT PROMINENCE. II. MAGNETIC DISCONTINUITIES AND CROSS-FIELD MASS TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B. C.; Casini, R.; Liu, W.; Berger, T.

    2012-09-20

    This second paper of the series investigates the transverse response of a magnetic field to the independent relaxation of its flux tubes of fluid seeking hydrostatic and energy balance, under the frozen-in condition and suppression of cross-field thermal conduction. The temperature, density, and pressure naturally develop discontinuities across the magnetic flux surfaces separating the tubes, requiring the finite pressure jumps to be compensated by magnetic-pressure jumps in cross-field force balance. The tangentially discontinuous fields are due to discrete currents in these surfaces, {delta}-function singularities in the current density that are fully admissible under the rigorous frozen-in condition but must dissipate resistively if the electrical conductivity is high but finite. The magnetic field and fluid must thus endlessly evolve by this spontaneous formation and resistive dissipation of discrete currents taking place intermittently in spacetime, even in a low-{beta} environment. This is a multi-dimensional effect in which the field plays a central role suppressed in the one-dimensional (1D) slab model of the first paper. The study begins with an order-of-magnitude demonstration that of the weak resistive and cross-field thermal diffusivities in the corona, the latter is significantly weaker for small {beta}. This case for spontaneous discrete currents, as an important example of the general theory of Parker, is illustrated with an analysis of singularity formation in three families of two-dimensional generalizations of the 1D slab model. The physical picture emerging completes the hypothesis formulated in Paper I that this intermittent process is the origin of the dynamic interiors of a class of quiescent prominences revealed by recent Hinode/SOT and SDO/AIA high-resolution observations.

  14. On the sputtering of binary compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haff, P. K.; Switkowski, Z. E.

    1975-01-01

    A simple physical model is presented to describe some aspects of the sputtering of compound targets. In particular, expressions are developed for the partial sputtering yields for binary systems in terms of the elemental sputtering rates, the stoichiometric concentrations and surface binding energy. The partial yields depend non-linearly on the bulk target concentrations. Comparison of the theoretical predictions with the data on sputtering of PtSi, NiSi and Cu3Au indicates that the general features are well described.

  15. Sputtering Threshold Energies of Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1999-01-01

    Sputter erosion in ion thrusters has been measured in lifetests at discharge voltages as low as 25 V. Thruster operation at this discharge voltage results in component erosion rates sufficiently low to satisfy most mission requirements. It has been recognized that most of the internal sputtering in ion thrusters is done by doubly charged ions. Knowledge of the sputtering threshold voltage of a xenon molybdenum system would be beneficial in understanding the sputtering process as well as making more accurate calculations of the sputtering rates of ion thruster components. Sputtering threshold energies calculated from various formulations found in the literature results in values ranging from 28 to 200 eV. It is evident that some of these formulations cannot be relied upon to provide sputtering thresholds with any degree of accuracy. This paper re-examines the threshold energies measurements made in the early sixties by Askerov and Sena, and Stuart and Wehner. The threshold voltages as derived by Askerov and au have been reevaluated by using a different extrapolation method of sputter yields at low ion energies. The resulting threshold energies are in general similar to those measured by Stuart and Wehner. An empirical relationship is derived,for mercury and xenon ions for the ratio of the sputtering threshold energy to the sublimation energy as a function of the ratio of target to ion atomic mass.

  16. Sputtering of silicon membranes with nanoscale thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobler, Gerhard; Nietiadi, Maureen L.; Bradley, R. Mark; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2016-06-01

    A theoretical study of forward and backward sputtering produced by the impact of single 20 keV Ar ions on freestanding amorphous Si membranes is carried out. We use three techniques: Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, as well as analytical theory based on the Sigmund model of sputtering. We find that the analytical model provides a fair description of the simulation results if the film thickness d exceeds about 10%-30% of the mean depth of energy deposition a. In this regime, backward sputtering is nearly independent of the membrane thickness and forward sputtering shows a maximum for thicknesses d ≈a . The dependence of forward sputtering on the ion's incidence angle shows a qualitative change as a function of d: while for d ≲ a , the forward sputter yield has a maximum at oblique incidence angles, the maximum occurs at normal incidence for d ≳ a . As the membrane thickness is reduced below 0.1- 0.3 a , the theory's predictions increasingly deviate from the MC results. For example, the predicted forward sputter yield approaches a finite value but the MC result tends to zero. This behavior is interpreted in terms of energy deposition and sputtering efficiency. Near-perfect agreement is observed between the sputter yields calculated by MD and MC simulations even for the thinnest membranes studied (d = 5 Å).

  17. Modified Sigmund sputtering theory: isotopic puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. L.; Zhang, L.

    2005-05-01

    The theory of anisotropic sputtering proposed by Zhang [Z.L. Zhang, Phys. Rev. B 71 026101 (2005).] and [Z.L. Zhang and L. Zhang, Radiat. Eff. Defects Solids 159(5) 301 (2004).] has been generalized to sputtering of isotopic mixtures. The present theory (modified Sigmund theory) has been shown to fit numerous simulations and experimental measurements, including energy and angular distribution of sputtered atoms. In particular, the theory has successfully solved the isotope puzzle of sputtering induced by low energy and heavy ion bombardment.

  18. Cryogenic thermal diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Brandon R.; Batty, J. C.; Agren, John

    2000-01-01

    Space based cryogenic thermal management systems for advanced infrared sensor platforms are a critical failure mode to the spacecraft missions they are supporting. Recent advances in cryocooler technologies have increased the achievable cooling capacities and decreased the operating temperatures of these systems, but there is still a fundamental need for redundancy in these systems. Cryogenic thermal diodes act as thermal switches, allowing heat to flow through them when in a conduction mode and restricting the flow of heat when in an isolation mode. These diodes will allow multiple cryocoolers to cool a single infrared focal plane array. The Space Dynamics Laboratory has undertaken an internal research and development effort to develop this innovative technology. This paper briefly describes the design parameters of several prototype thermal diodes that were developed and tested. .

  19. Pyrolyzed carbon film diodes.

    PubMed

    Morton, Kirstin C; Tokuhisa, Hideo; Baker, Lane A

    2013-11-13

    We have previously reported pyrolyzed parylene C (PPC) as a conductive carbon electrode material for use with micropipets, atomic force microscopy probes, and planar electrodes. Advantages of carbon electrode fabrication from PPC include conformal coating of high-aspect ratio micro/nanoscale features and the benefits afforded by chemical vapor deposition of carbon polymers. In this work, we demonstrate chemical surface doping of PPC through the use of previously reported methods. Chemically treated PPC films are characterized by multiple spectroscopic and electronic measurements. Pyrolyzed parylene C and doped PPC are used to construct diodes that are examined as both p-n heterojunction and Schottky barrier diodes. Half-wave rectification is achieved with PPC diodes and demonstrates the applicability of PPC as a conductive and semiconductive material in device fabrication. PMID:24090451

  20. Coaxial diode and vircator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guozhi; Qiu, Shi; Wang, Hongjun; Huang, Wenhua; Wang, Feng

    1997-10-01

    The experimental and theoretical results of coaxial diode and the theoretical results of coaxial vircator are presented in this paper. The cathode is a cold, field- emitting graphite ring and needle-shaped copper applied to a grounded cylinder. The anode is a semi-transparent cylinder located inside of, and concentric to the cathode cylinder. The anode cylinder is pulsed positive. The coaxial vircator generates microwave by injecting a radial electron beam into cylinder such that the space-charge limited current is exceeded. A virtual cathode forms and oscillates in radial position and amplitude, generating microwaves which are extracted by an attached waveguide with a circular cross- section. Analytic and PIC simulations were used to study coaxial diode and vircator, with aid of the two dimensional PIC code, KARAT. The comparisons between the theoretical and the experimental results for a coaxial diode are presented.

  1. Blanket integrated blocking diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uebele, P.; Kasper, C.; Rasch, K.-D.

    1986-11-01

    Two types of large area protection diodes for integration in solar arrays were developed in planar technology. For application in a bus voltage concept of V sub bus = 80 V a p-doped blanket integrated blocking diode (p-IBD) was developed with V sub rev = 120 V, whereas for the high voltage concept of V sub bus = 160 V a n-IBD with V sub rev = 250 V was developed. Application as blanket integrated shunt diodes is recommended. The optimized rearside diffusion provides a low forward voltage drop in the temperature range of minus 100 to plus 150 C. As a consequence of planar technology metallized coverglasses have to be used to minimize the photocurrent.

  2. Resputtering of zinc oxide films prepared by radical assisted sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Song Qiuming; Jiang Yousong; Song Yizhou

    2009-02-15

    Sputtering losses of zinc oxide films prepared by radical assisted sputtering were studied. It was found that the sputtering loss can be very severe in oxygenous sputtering processes of zinc oxide films. In general, resputtering caused by negative oxygen ions dominates the sputtering loss, while diffuse deposition plays a minor role. Resputtering is strongly correlated with the sputtering threshold energy of the deposited films and the concentration of O{sup -} in the sputtering zone. The balance between the oxygen concentration in the sputtering zone and the oxidation degree of the growing films depends on the sputtering rate. Our research suggests that a lower oxygen concentration in the sputtering zone and a higher oxidation degree of the growing films are favorable for reducing the resputtering losses. The sputtering loss mechanisms discussed in this work are also helpful for understanding the deposition processes of other magnetron sputtering systems.

  3. Heat pipes - Thermal diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptekar, B. F.; Baum, J. M.; Ivanovskii, M. N.; Kolgotin, F. F.; Serbin, V. I.

    The performance concept and peculiarities of the new type of thermal diode with the trap and with the wick breakage are dealt with in the report. The experimental data were obtained and analysed for the working fluid mass and the volume of the liquid in the wick on the forward-mode limiting heat transfer. The flow rate pulsation of the working fluid in the wick was observed visually on the setup with the transparent wall. The quantitative difference on the data on the investigated thermal diode and on the identical heat pipes without the wick breakage is found experimentally concerning the forward-mode limiting heat transfer.

  4. Sputtered amorphous silicon solar cells. Quarterly report No. 2, October 22, 1980-January 22, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Moustakas, T.D.; Morel, D.L.; Wronski, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of hydrogen incorporation during the film growth was investigated through hydrogen content studies. The data are consistent with a kinetic model of hydrogen incorporation. The hole mobility-lifetime products were measured on a-SiH/sub x//metal Schottky barrier structures with a new method utilizing optical absorption, collection efficiency, and capacitance voltage measurements. The diode properties of reactively sputtered hydrogenated amorphous silicon Schottky barrier structures (a-SiH/sub x//Pt) were investigated as a function of hydrogen content. The data are interpreted in terms of hydrogen modification of the valence band edge and interfacial oxide effects. The fabrication by the method of sputtering of P-I-N/ITO solar cell structures is reported. (MHR)

  5. High performance all-sputter deposited Cu2S/CdS junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, J. A.; Anderson, W. W.

    1982-04-01

    Thin-film Cu2S/CdS solar cells are fabricated in a multisource chamber using magnetron reactive sputtering to deposit the Cu2S and CdS layers. An analysis of junction current voltage, log short-circuit current vs open-circuit voltage, and capacitance versus voltage measurements suggests that the junctions have very good quality, with diode ideality factors near unity and interface recombination velocities of about 2 x 10 to the 5th cm/s. The cells show that Cu2S/CdS junctions equivalent to those formed using the topotaxial ion exchange method can be formed by sequential all-vacuum deposition of CdS and Cu2S and that magnetron sputtering does not cause damage that compromises their electrical performance.

  6. Dual function conducting polymer diodes

    DOEpatents

    Heeger, Alan J.; Yu, Gang

    1996-01-01

    Dual function diodes based on conjugated organic polymer active layers are disclosed. When positively biased the diodes function as light emitters. When negatively biased they are highly efficient photodiodes. Methods of preparation and use of these diodes in displays and input/output devices are also disclosed.

  7. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers. [coolant passage closing by triode sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Hecht, R. J.; Broch, J. W.; Allard, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Procedures for closing out coolant passages in regeneratively cooled thrust chambers by triode sputtering, using post and hollow Cu-0.15 percent Zr cathodes are described. The effects of aluminum composite filler materials, substrate preparation, sputter cleaning, substrate bias current density and system geometry on closeout layer bond strength and structure are evaluated. High strength closeout layers were sputtered over aluminum fillers. The tensile strength and microstructure of continuously sputtered Cu-0.15 percent Zr deposits were determined. These continuous sputtered deposits were as thick as 0.75 cm. Tensile strengths were consistently twice as great as the strength of the material in wrought form.

  8. Kelvin--Helmholtz vortex formation and particle transport in a cross-field plasma sheath. I. Transient behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Theilhaber, K.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1989-11-01

    The time-dependent behavior of a transversely magnetized, two-dimensional plasma--wall sheath has been studied through particle simulations, with the aim of modeling plasma behavior in the vicinity of the limiters and walls of magnetized plasma devices. The model assumes a magnetic field perfectly parallel to the confining surfaces. The simulations have shown that the cross-field sheath between a wall and a plasma is a self-sustaining turbulent boundary layer, with strong potential fluctuations and anomalous particle transport. The driving mechanism for this turbulence is the Kelvin--Helmholtz instability, which arises from the sheared particle drifts created near the wall. In this paper, the transient behavior leading to the turbulent steady state is presented, and the processes of linear growth, vortex saturation, and vortex coalescence are examined. An analytic model for the boundary Kelvin--Helmholtz instability is derived and shown to correctly predict the growth rates of the long-wavelength modes. In a companion paper, the steady-state structure and behavior of the cross-field sheath will be discussed in detail.

  9. Kelvin--Helmholtz vortex formation and particle transport in a cross-field plasma sheath. II. Steady state

    SciTech Connect

    Theilhaber, K.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1989-11-01

    The steady-state behavior of the magnetized plasma--wall sheath has been studied through two-dimensional particle simulations, which have shown that the sheath maintains itself in a strongly nonlinear, turbulent equilibrium, continuously driven by the edge Kelvin--Helmholtz instability. The sheath assumes a thickness of order {ital l}{sub {ital x}}{similar to}5{rho}{sub {ital i}}, and maintains large, long-lived vortices, with amplitudes {delta}{phi}{similar to}2.5{ital T}{sub {ital i}}/{ital e}, which drift parallel to the wall at half the ion thermal velocity. The sheath also maintains a large, spatially averaged potential drop from the wall to the plasma with {Delta}{phi}{approx}{minus}2{ital T}{sub {ital i}}/{ital e}, opposite in sign to that of the unmagnetized sheath. Accompanying the long-wavelength vortices are shorter-wavelength fluctuations, which induce an anomalous cross-field transport, scaling in accordance to Bohm diffusion when {omega}{sub {ital pi}}{ge}2{omega}{sub {ital ci}}. At lower densities, {omega}{sub {ital pi}}{lt}2{omega}{sub {ital ci}}, the diffusion coefficient has an additional factor, proportional to the density. These results permit the modeling of the cross-field sheath by a simple effective boundary condition.

  10. Cross-field diffusion of energetic (100 keV to 2 MeV) protons in interplanetary space

    SciTech Connect

    Costa Jr, Edio da; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Alves, Maria Virgínia; Echer, Ezequiel; Lakhina, Gurbax S. E-mail: costajr.e@gmail.com

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic field magnitude decreases (MDs) are observed in several regions of the interplanetary medium. In this paper, we characterize MDs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft instrumentation over the solar south pole by using magnetic field data to obtain the empirical size, magnetic field MD, and frequency of occurrence distribution functions. The interaction of energetic (100 keV to 2 MeV) protons with these MDs is investigated. Charged particle and MD interactions can be described by a geometrical model allowing the calculation of the guiding center shift after each interaction. Using the distribution functions for the MD characteristics, Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain the cross-field diffusion coefficients as a function of particle kinetic energy. It is found that the protons under consideration cross-field diffuse at a rate of up to ≈11% of the Bohm rate. The same method used in this paper can be applied to other space regions where MDs are observed, once their local features are well known.

  11. Dust Growth by RF Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Churton, B.; Samarian, A. A.; Coueedel, L.

    2008-09-07

    The effect of the dust particle growth by RF sputtering on glow discharge has been investigated. It has been found that the growth of dust particles modifies the electrical characteristics of the discharge. In particularly, the absolute value of the self-bias voltage decreases during the particle growth due to the electron losses on the dust particles. To find the correlation between the dust growth and the self bias evolution, dust particles have been collected at different times. The dust particle growth rate is found to be linear.

  12. A photon thermal diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Wong, Carlaton; Lubner, Sean; Yee, Shannon; Miller, John; Jang, Wanyoung; Hardin, Corey; Fong, Anthony; Garay, Javier E; Dames, Chris

    2014-01-01

    A thermal diode is a two-terminal nonlinear device that rectifies energy carriers (for example, photons, phonons and electrons) in the thermal domain, the heat transfer analogue to the familiar electrical diode. Effective thermal rectifiers could have an impact on diverse applications ranging from heat engines to refrigeration, thermal regulation of buildings and thermal logic. However, experimental demonstrations have lagged far behind theoretical proposals. Here we present the first experimental results for a photon thermal diode. The device is based on asymmetric scattering of ballistic energy carriers by pyramidal reflectors. Recent theoretical work has predicted that this ballistic mechanism also requires a nonlinearity in order to yield asymmetric thermal transport, a requirement of all thermal diodes arising from the second Law of Thermodynamics, and realized here using an 'inelastic thermal collimator' element. Experiments confirm both effects: with pyramids and collimator the thermal rectification is 10.9 ± 0.8%, while without the collimator no rectification is detectable (<0.3%). PMID:25399761

  13. Graphene-based ultrafast diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoman, D.; Dragoman, M.; Plana, R.

    2010-10-01

    We present a graphene-based ballistic diode, which is able to rectify an incident signal due to an oblique gate positioned between the two terminals of the device. The operating point of the diode can be controlled by the applied gate voltage, whereas the current-voltage dependence of the device can be changed by varying the inclination angle of the gate. In particular, the ideality factor of the graphene-based diode can take values higher or lower than 1 by modifying this inclination angle. The rectifying properties of the graphene diode are thus tunable, in deep contrast with semiconductor-based diodes.

  14. Plasma reactivity in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering through oxygen kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelaru, Catalin; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2013-09-02

    The atomic oxygen metastable dynamics in a Reactive High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS) discharge has been characterized using time-resolved diode laser absorption in an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture with a Ti target. Two plasma regions are identified: the ionization region (IR) close to the target and further out the diffusion region (DR), separated by a transition region. The μs temporal resolution allows identifying the main atomic oxygen production and destruction routes, which are found to be very different during the pulse as compared to the afterglow as deduced from their evolution in space and time.

  15. REACTIVE SPUTTER DEPOSITION OF CHROMIUM NITRIDE COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of substrate temperature and sputtering gas compositon on the structure and properties of chromium-chromium nitride films deposited on C-1040 steel using r.f. magnetron sputter deposition was investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the structure ...

  16. Nanoscale growth twins in sputtered metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Anderoglu, O.; Hoagland, R. G.; Misra, A.

    2008-09-01

    This article reviews recent studies on the mechanical properties of sputtered copper and 330 stainless-steel films with {111} nanoscale growth twins preferentially oriented perpendicular to growth direction. The mechanisms of formation of growth twins during sputtering, unusually high strengths, and excellent thermal stability of nanotwinned structures are highlighted.

  17. Sputter metalization of Wolter type optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledger, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical task showed that the coating thickness distribution for both internal and external optical elements coated using either electron beam or sputter sources can be made uniform and will not affect the surface figure of coated elements. Also, sputtered samples of nickel, molybdenum, iridium and ruthenium deposited onto both hot and cold substrates showed excellent adhesion.

  18. Graphene: the ultimately thin sputtering shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, Charlotte; Michely, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy methods are applied to investigate the potential of monolayer graphene as a sputtering shield for the underlying metal substrate. To visualize the effect, a bare and a graphene protected Ir(111) surface are irradiated with 500 eV Xe+, as well as 200 eV Xe+ and Ar+ ions, all at 1000 K. By quantitatively evaluating the sputtered material from the surface vacancy island area, we find a drastic decrease in metal sputtering for the graphene protected surface. It is demonstrated that efficient sputter protection relies on self-repair of the ion damage in graphene, which takes place efficiently in the temperature range of chemical vapor deposition growth. Based on the generality of the underlying principles of ion damage, graphene self-repair, and graphene growth, we speculate that efficient sputter protection is possible for a broad range of metals and alloys.

  19. Confined ion beam sputtering device and method

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A hollow cylindrical target, lined internally with a sputter deposit material and open at both ends, surrounds a substrate on which sputtered deposition is to be obtained. An ion beam received through either one or both ends of the open cylindrical target is forced by a negative bias applied to the target to diverge so that ions impinge at acute angles at different points of the cylindrical target surface. The ion impingement results in a radially inward and downstream directed flux of sputter deposit particles that are received by the substrate. A positive bias applied to the substrate enhances divergence of the approaching ion beams to generate a higher sputtered deposition flux rate. Alternatively, a negative bias applied to the substrate induces the core portion of the ion beams to reach the substrate and provide ion polishing of the sputtered deposit thereon.

  20. Confined ion beam sputtering device and method

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, D.J.

    1986-03-25

    A hollow cylindrical target, lined internally with a sputter deposit material and open at both ends, surrounds a substrate on which sputtered deposition is to be obtained. An ion beam received through either one or both ends of the open cylindrical target is forced by a negative bias applied to the target to diverge so that ions impinge at acute angles at different points of the cylindrical target surface. The ion impingement results in a radially inward and downstream directed flux of sputter deposit particles that are received by the substrate. A positive bias applied to the substrate enhances divergence of the approaching ion beams to generate a higher sputtered deposition flux rate. Alternatively, a negative bias applied to the substrate induces the core portion of the ion beams to reach the substrate and provide ion polishing of the sputtered deposit thereon.

  1. Ion beam sputter deposited diamond like films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    A single argon ion beam source was used to sputter deposit carbon films on fused silica, copper, and tantalum substrates under conditions of sputter deposition alone and sputter deposition combined with simultaneous argon ion bombardment. Simultaneously deposited and ion bombarded carbon films were prepared under conditions of carbon atom removal to arrival ratios of 0, 0.036, and 0.71. Deposition and etch rates were measured for films on fused silica substrates. Resulting characteristics of the deposited films are: electrical resistivity of densities of 2.1 gm/cu cm for sputter deposited films and 2.2 gm/cu cm for simultaneously sputter deposited and Ar ion bombarded films. For films approximately 1700 A thick deposited by either process and at 5550 A wavelength light the reflectance was 0.2, the absorptance was 0.7, the absorption coefficient was 67,000 cm to the -1 and the transmittance was 0.1.

  2. Sputter Deposition of Metallic Sponges

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Hayes, J P

    2002-01-18

    Metallic films are grown with a sponge-like morphology in the as-deposited condition using planar magnetron sputtering. The morphology of the deposit is characterized by metallic continuity in three dimensions with continuous porosity on the sub-micron scale. The stabilization of the metallic sponge is directly correlated with a limited range for the sputter deposition parameters of working gas pressure and substrate temperature. This sponge-like morphology augments the features as generally understood in the classic zone models of growth for physical vapor deposits. Nickel coatings are deposited with working gas pressures up to 4 Pa and for substrate temperatures up to 1100 K. The morphology of the deposits is examined in plan and in cross-section with scanning electron microscopy. The parametric range of gas pressure and substrate temperature (relative to absolute melt point) for the deposition processing under which the metallic sponges are produced appear universal for many metals, as for example, including gold, silver, and aluminum.

  3. Spatiotemporal splitting of global eigenmodes due to cross-field coupling via vortex dynamics in drift wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C; Thakur, S C; Light, A D; Negrete, J; Tynan, G R

    2014-12-31

    Spatiotemporal splitting events of drift wave (DW) eigenmodes due to nonlinear coupling are investigated in a cylindrical helicon plasma device. DW eigenmodes in the radial-azimuthal cross section have been experimentally observed to split at radial locations and recombine into the global eigenmode with a time shorter than the typical DW period (t≪fDW(-1)). The number of splits correlates with the increase of turbulence. The observed dynamics can be theoretically reproduced by a Kuramoto-type model of a network of radially coupled azimuthal eigenmodes. Coupling by E×B-vortex convection cell dynamics and ion gyro radii motion leads to cross-field synchronization and occasional mode splitting events. PMID:25615346

  4. Cross-Field Differences in Creative Problem-Solving Skills: A Comparison of Health, Biological, and Social Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, Michael D.; Antes, Alison L.; Caughron, Jared J.; Connelly, Shane; Beeler, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, 258 doctoral students working in the health, biological, and social sciences were asked to solve a series of field-relevant problems calling for creative thought. Proposed solutions to these problems were scored with respect to critical creative thinking skills such as problem definition, conceptual combination, and idea generation. Results indicated that health, biological, and social scientists differed with respect to their skill in executing various operations, or processes, involved in creative thought. Interestingly, no differences were observed as a function of the students’ level of experience. The implications of these findings for understanding cross-field, and cross-experience level, differences in creative thought are discussed. PMID:20936085

  5. Cross-Field Differences in Creative Problem-Solving Skills: A Comparison of Health, Biological, and Social Sciences.

    PubMed

    Mumford, Michael D; Antes, Alison L; Caughron, Jared J; Connelly, Shane; Beeler, Cheryl

    2010-02-01

    In the present study, 258 doctoral students working in the health, biological, and social sciences were asked to solve a series of field-relevant problems calling for creative thought. Proposed solutions to these problems were scored with respect to critical creative thinking skills such as problem definition, conceptual combination, and idea generation. Results indicated that health, biological, and social scientists differed with respect to their skill in executing various operations, or processes, involved in creative thought. Interestingly, no differences were observed as a function of the students' level of experience. The implications of these findings for understanding cross-field, and cross-experience level, differences in creative thought are discussed. PMID:20936085

  6. Influence of crossed fields in structures combining large grain, bulk (RE)BCO superconductors and soft ferromagnetic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, M. P.; Fagnard, J. F.; Wéra, L.; Morita, M.; Nariki, S.; Teshima, H.; Caps, H.; Vanderheyden, B.; Vanderbemden, P.

    2016-03-01

    Bulk (RE)BCO superconductors are able to trap record magnetic fields and can be used as powerful permanent magnets in various engineering applications such as rotating machines and magnetic bearings. When such superconducting (SC) “trapped field magnets” are combined to a ferromagnetic (FM) disc, the total magnetic moment is increased with respect to that of the superconductor alone. In the present work, we study experimentally the magnetic behaviour of such hybrid FM/SC structures when they are subjected to cycles of applied field that are orthogonal to their permanent magnetization, i.e. a “crossed-field” configuration. Experimental results show that the usual “crossed-field demagnetization” caused by the cycles of transverse field is strongly reduced in the presence of the ferromagnet.

  7. Spin-Wave Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jin; Yu, Weichao; Wu, Ruqian; Xiao, Jiang

    2015-10-01

    A diode, a device allowing unidirectional signal transmission, is a fundamental element of logic structures, and it lies at the heart of modern information systems. The spin wave or magnon, representing a collective quasiparticle excitation of the magnetic order in magnetic materials, is a promising candidate for an information carrier for the next-generation energy-saving technologies. Here, we propose a scalable and reprogrammable pure spin-wave logic hardware architecture using domain walls and surface anisotropy stripes as waveguides on a single magnetic wafer. We demonstrate theoretically the design principle of the simplest logic component, a spin-wave diode, utilizing the chiral bound states in a magnetic domain wall with a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and confirm its performance through micromagnetic simulations. Our findings open a new vista for realizing different types of pure spin-wave logic components and finally achieving an energy-efficient and hardware-reprogrammable spin-wave computer.

  8. Sputtering erosion in ion and plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1995-08-01

    An experimental set-up to measure low-energy (below 1 keV) sputtering of materials is described. The materials to be bombarded represent ion thruster components as well as insulators used in the stationary plasma thruster. The sputtering takes place in a 9 inch diameter spherical vacuum chamber. Ions of argon, krypton and xenon are used to bombard the target materials. The sputtered neutral atoms are detected by a secondary neutral mass spectrometer (SNMS). Samples of copper, nickel, aluminum, silver and molybdenum are being sputtered initially to calibrate the spectrometer. The base pressure of the chamber is approximately 2 x 10(exp -9) Torr. the primary ion beam is generated by an ion gun which is capable of delivering ion currents in the range of 20 to 500 nA. The ion beam can be focused to a size approximately 1 mm in diameter. The mass spectrometer is positioned 10 mm from the target and at 90 deg angle to the primary ion beam direction. The ion beam impinges on the target at 45 deg. For sputtering of insulators, charge neutralization is performed by flooding the sample with electrons generated from an electron gun. Preliminary sputtering results, methods of calculating the instrument response function of the spectrometer and the relative sensitivity factors of the sputtered elements will be discussed.

  9. Sputtering erosion in ion and plasma thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental set-up to measure low-energy (below 1 keV) sputtering of materials is described. The materials to be bombarded represent ion thruster components as well as insulators used in the stationary plasma thruster. The sputtering takes place in a 9 inch diameter spherical vacuum chamber. Ions of argon, krypton and xenon are used to bombard the target materials. The sputtered neutral atoms are detected by a secondary neutral mass spectrometer (SNMS). Samples of copper, nickel, aluminum, silver and molybdenum are being sputtered initially to calibrate the spectrometer. The base pressure of the chamber is approximately 2 x 10(exp -9) Torr. the primary ion beam is generated by an ion gun which is capable of delivering ion currents in the range of 20 to 500 nA. The ion beam can be focused to a size approximately 1 mm in diameter. The mass spectrometer is positioned 10 mm from the target and at 90 deg angle to the primary ion beam direction. The ion beam impinges on the target at 45 deg. For sputtering of insulators, charge neutralization is performed by flooding the sample with electrons generated from an electron gun. Preliminary sputtering results, methods of calculating the instrument response function of the spectrometer and the relative sensitivity factors of the sputtered elements will be discussed.

  10. Particle contamination formation in magnetron sputtering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.S.; Sequeda, F.; Huang, C.

    1997-07-01

    Defects caused by particulate contamination are an important concern in the fabrication of thin film products. Often, magnetron sputtering processes are used for this purpose. Particle contamination generated during thin film processing can be detected using laser light scattering, a powerful diagnostic technique which provides real-time, {ital in situ} imaging of particles {gt}0.3 {mu}m on the target, substrate, or in the plasma. Using this technique, we demonstrate that the mechanisms for particle generation, transport, and trapping during magnetron sputter deposition are different from the mechanisms reported in previously studied plasma etch processes, due to the inherent spatial nonuniformity of magnetically enhanced plasmas. During magnetron sputter deposition, one source of particle contamination is linked to portions of the sputtering target surface exposed to weaker plasma density. There, film redeposition induces filament or nodule growth. Sputter removal of these features is inhibited by the dependence of sputter yield on angle of incidence. These features enhance trapping of plasma particles, which then increases filament growth. Eventually the growths effectively {open_quotes}short-circuit{close_quotes} the sheath, causing high currents to flow through these features. This, in turn, causes mechanical failure of the growth resulting in fracture and ejection of the target contaminants into the plasma and onto the substrate. Evidence of this effect has been observed in semiconductor fabrication and storage disk manufacturing. Discovery of this mechanism in both technologies suggests it may be universal to many sputter processes. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  11. Whiskerless Schottky diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, William L. (Inventor); Mcleod, Kathleen A. (Inventor); Mattauch, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A Schottky diode for millimeter and submillimeter wave applications is comprised of a multi-layered structure including active layers of gallium arsenide on a semi-insulating gallium arsenide substrate with first and second insulating layers of silicon dioxide on the active layers of gallium arsenide. An ohmic contact pad lays on the silicon dioxide layers. An anode is formed in a window which is in and through the silicon dioxide layers. An elongated contact finger extends from the pad to the anode and a trench, preferably a transverse channel or trench of predetermined width, is formed in the active layers of the diode structure under the contact finger. The channel extends through the active layers to or substantially to the interface of the semi-insulating gallium arsenide substrate and the adjacent gallium arsenide layer which constitutes a buffer layer. Such a structure minimizes the effect of the major source of shunt capacitance by interrupting the current path between the conductive layers beneath the anode contact pad and the ohmic contact. Other embodiments of the diode may substitute various insulating or semi-insulating materials for the silicon dioxide, various semi-conductors for the active layers of gallium arsenide, and other materials for the substrate, which may be insulating or semi-insulating.

  12. Process for preparing schottky diode contacts with predetermined barrier heights

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Jan, Chia-Hong; Chen, Chia-Ping

    1996-01-01

    A process is provided for producing a Schottky diode having a preselected barrier height .phi..sub.Bn. The substrate is preferably n-GaAs, the metallic contact is derived from a starting alloy of the Formula [.SIGMA.M.sub..delta. ](Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x) wherein: .SIGMA.M is a moiety which consists of at least one M, and when more than one M is present, each M is different, M is a Group VIII metal selected from the group consisting of nickel, cobalt, ruthenium, rhodium, indium and platinum, .delta. is a stoichiometric coefficient whose total value in any given .SIGMA.M moiety is 1, and x is a positive number between 0 and 1 (that is, x ranges from greater than 0 to less than 1). Also, the starting alloy is capable of forming with the substrate a two phase equilibrium reciprocal system of the binary alloy mixture [.SIGMA.M.sub..delta. ]Ga-[.SIGMA.M.sub..delta. ]Al-AlAs-GaAs. When members of an alloy subclass within this Formula are each preliminarily correlated with the barrier height .phi..sub.Bn of a contact producable therewith, then Schottky diodes of predetermined barrier heights are producable by sputtering and annealing. Further provided are the product Schottky diodes that are produced according to this process.

  13. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  14. Nanoscale growth twins in sputtered metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Amit; Anderoglu, Osman; Hoagland, Richard G; Zhang, X

    2008-01-01

    We review recent studies on the mechanical properties of sputtered Cu and 330 stainless steel films with {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} nanoscale growth twins preferentially oriented perpendicular to growth direction. The mechanisms of formation of growth twins during sputtering and the deformation mechanisms that enable usually high strengths in nanotwinned structures are highlighted. Growth twins in sputtered films possess good thermal stability at elevated temperature, providing an approach to extend the application of high strength nanostructured metals to higher temperatures.

  15. Detection of sputtered metastable atoms by autoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Wucher, A.; Berthold, W.; Oechsner, H.; Franzreb, K.

    1994-03-01

    We report on a scheme for the detection of sputter-generated metastable atoms that is based on the resonant excitation of an autoionizing state by single-photon absorption from a tunable laser. Using this technique, sputtered silver atoms ejected in the metastable 4{ital d}{sup 9}5{ital s}{sup 2}{ital D}{sub 5/2} state with an excitation energy of 3.75 eV have been detected. This represents the highest excitation energy of sputtered metastable atoms observed so far.

  16. Composition of sputtered material from CuNi alloy during Xe + ion sputtering at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Shigeyuki; Shimizu, Hazime; Ichimura, Singo

    1995-04-01

    Polycrystalline CuNi alloys were sputtered by 3 kV Xe + ions at elevated temperatures to analyze the ion-beam-induced diffusion. The time evolution of the composition of the sputtered materials from the start of the sputtering was measured by TOF-SNMS (time-of-flight sputtered neutral mass spectrometry). During removal of the Gibbsian segregation layer of copper, the sputtered flux consisted of almost only copper atoms. Then, the copper content gradually decreased due to the formation of a sputter-induced copper-depleted surface layer, and reached an almost steady state with still higher copper content than the bulk composition. From the temperature dependence of the composition at the quasi-steady state the activation energy of copper transportation through a high diffusivity path was derived to be 54 kJ mol -1 (0.56 eV). The high diffusivity path was assigned to copper diffusion through grain boundaries.

  17. Lifetime dependence of nitrided carbon stripper foils on sputter angle during N+ ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, I.; Oyaizu, M.; Takeda, Y.; Kawakami, H.; Kawasaki, K.; Hattori, T.; Kadono, T.

    2015-09-01

    We fabricated high-lifetime thin nitride carbon stripper (NCS) foils with high nitrogen contents using ion-beam sputtering with reactive nitrogen gas and investigated the dependence of their lifetimes on the sputter angle. The nitrogen in carbon foils plays a critical role in determining their lifetime. Therefore, in order to investigate the effects of the nitrogen level in NCS foils on foil lifetime, we measured the sputtering yield for different sputter angles at a sputtering voltage of 10 kV while using carbon-based targets. We also measured the nitrogen-to-carbon thickness ratios of the foils using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The foils made at a sputter angle of 15° using a glassy amorphous carbon target exhibited an average increase of 200-fold in lifetime when compared to commercially available foils.

  18. Cryogenic thermal diode heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.

    1979-01-01

    The development of spiral artery cryogenic thermal diode heat pipes was continued. Ethane was the working fluid and stainless steel the heat pipe material in all cases. The major tasks included: (1) building a liquid blockage (blocking orifice) thermal diode suitable for the HEPP space flight experiment; (2) building a liquid trap thermal diode engineering model; (3) retesting the original liquid blockage engineering model, and (4) investigating the startup dynamics of artery cryogenic thermal diodes. An experimental investigation was also conducted into the wetting characteristics of ethane/stainless steel systems using a specially constructed chamber that permitted in situ observations.

  19. A new cryogenic diode thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. S.; Swinehart, P. R.; Yeager, C. J.

    2002-05-01

    While the introduction of yet another cryogenic diode thermometer is not earth shattering, a new diode thermometer, the DT-600 series, recently introduced by Lake Shore Cryotronics, possesses three features that make it unique among commercial diode thermometers. First, these diodes have been probed at the chip level, allowing for the availability of a bare chip thermometer matching a standard curve-an important feature in situations where real estate is at a premium (IR detectors), or where in-situ calibration is difficult. Second, the thermometry industry has assumed that interchangeability should be best at low temperatures. Thus, good interchangeability at room temperatures implies a very good interchangeability at cryogenic temperature, resulting in a premium priced sensor. The DT-600 series diode thermometer is available in an interchangeability band comparable to platinum RTDs with the added advantage of interchangeability to 2 K. Third, and most important, the DT-600 series diode does not exhibit an instability in the I-V characteristic in the 8 K to 20 K temperature range that is observed in other commercial diode thermometer devices [1]. This paper presents performance characteristics for the DT-600 series diode thermometer along with a comparison of I-V curves for this device and other commercial diode thermometers exhibiting an I-V instability.

  20. BIN Diode For Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J.

    1989-01-01

    Diode formed by selective doping during epitaxial growth, starting with semi-insulating substrate. Use of high-mobility semiconductors like GaAs extends cutoff frequency. Either molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) or organometallic chemical-vapor deposition used to form layers of diode. Planar growth process permits subsequent fabrication of arrays of diodes by standard photolithographic techniques, to achieve quasi-optical coupling of submillimeter radiation. Useful for generation of harmonics or heterodyne mixing in receivers for atmospheric and space spectroscopy operating at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Used as frequency doublers or triplers, diodes of new type extend frequency range of present solid-state oscillators.

  1. Corrosion Behaviour of Sputtered Alumina Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, I. Neelakanta; Dey, Arjun; Sridhara, N.; Anoop, S.; Bera, Parthasarathi; Rani, R. Uma; Anandan, Chinnasamy; Sharma, Anand Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Corrosion studies of sputtered alumina thin films grown on stainless steel (SS) 304 were carried out by linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Noticeable changes were not observed in morphology and surface roughness of films after carrying out the corrosion test. Corrosion current density (icorr) of alumina coated SS decreased up to 10-10 A cm-2 while icorr value in the range of 10-5-10-6 A cm-2 was observed for bare SS. The direct sputtered film showed superior corrosion resistance behaviour than the reactive sputtered film. This might be attributed to the difference in thickness of the films sputtered by direct and reactive methods. The electronic structure of deposited alumina films was studied both before and after corrosion test by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique which also confirmed no structural changes of alumina film after exposing it to corrosive environment.

  2. High temperature, bonded titanium diboride sputter target

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, G.J.; Gates, W.G.

    1981-10-01

    A high-temperature bonding technique has been employed in the development of an improved sputter deposition target for hard, crack-prone materials such as titanium diboride (TiB/sub 2/). Titanium diboride was bonded to a thin metal backing plate, both materials having a similar linear coefficient of thermal expansion (LCTE) using a high-temperature braze alloy. The thin metal backing plate helps stabilize the movement of the target material during the sputter deposition operation. The bonded sputter target has a useable life of 50 to 75 times that of a unbonded target. This bonding technique may be used on a variety of hard, brittle, crack-prone, sputterable materials (including metal oxides, carbides borides, and nitrides). US Patent 4,209,375 has been issued as a result of this endeavor.

  3. Large Area Sputter Coating on Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Yoshihito

    Large glass has been used for commercial buildings, housings and vehicles for many years. Glass size for flat displays is getting larger and larger. The glass for the 8th generation is more than 5 m2 in area. Demand of the large glass is increasing not only in these markets but also in a solar cell market growing drastically. Therefore, large area coating is demanded to plus something else on glass more than ever. Sputtering and pyrolysis are the major coating methods on large glass today. Sputtering process is particularly popular because it can deposit a wide variety of materials in good coating uniformity on the glass. This paper describes typical industrial sputtering system and recent progress in sputtering technology. It also shows typical coated glass products in architectural, automotive and display fields and comments on their functions, film stacks and so on.

  4. Heavy particle transport in sputtering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    This contribution aims to discuss the theoretical background of heavy particle transport in plasma sputtering systems such as direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS), high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), or multi frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (MFCCP). Due to inherently low process pressures below one Pa only kinetic simulation models are suitable. In this work a model appropriate for the description of the transport of film forming particles sputtered of a target material has been devised within the frame of the OpenFOAM software (specifically dsmcFoam). The three dimensional model comprises of ejection of sputtered particles into the reactor chamber, their collisional transport through the volume, as well as deposition of the latter onto the surrounding surfaces (i.e. substrates, walls). An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution fitted to results from Monte-Carlo simulations is assumed initially. Binary collisions are treated via the M1 collision model, a modified variable hard sphere (VHS) model. The dynamics of sputtered and background gas species can be resolved self-consistently following the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) approach or, whenever possible, simplified based on the test particle method (TPM) with the assumption of a constant, non-stationary background at a given temperature. At the example of an MFCCP research reactor the transport of sputtered aluminum is specifically discussed. For the peculiar configuration and under typical process conditions with argon as process gas the transport of aluminum sputtered of a circular target is shown to be governed by a one dimensional interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. The results are analyzed and discussed on the basis of the obtained velocity distribution functions (VDF). This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  5. Sputtering of sodium on the planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, M. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown here that ion sputtering cannot account for the observed neutral sodium vapor column density on Mercury, but that it is an important loss mechanism for Na. Photons are likely to be the dominant stimulus, both directly through photodesorption and indirectly through thermal desorption of absorbed Na. It is concluded that the atmosphere produced is characterized by the planet's surface temperature, with the ion-sputtered Na contributing to a lesser, but more extended, component of the atmosphere.

  6. Chemical mechanical polishing characteristics of ITO thin film prepared by RF magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang-Yeon; Choi, Gwon-Woo; Kim, Yong-Jae; Choi, Youn-Ok; Kim, Nam-Oh

    2012-02-01

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films have attracted intensive interest because of their unique properties of good conductivity, high optical transmittance over the visible region and easy patterning ability. ITO thin films have found many applications in anti-static coatings, thermal heaters, solar cells, flat panel displays (FPDs), liquid crystal displays (LCDs), electroluminescent devices, sensors and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). ITO thin films are generally fabricated by using various methods, such as spraying, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), evaporation, electron gun deposition, direct current electroplating, high frequency sputtering, and reactive sputtering. In this research, ITO films were grown on glass substrates by using a radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method. In order to achieve a high transmittance and a low resistivity, we examined the various film deposition conditions, such as substrate temperature, working pressure, annealing temperature, and deposition time. Next, in order to improve the surface quality of the ITO thin films, we performed a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) with different process parameters and compared the electrical and the optical properties of the polished ITO thin films. The best CMP conditions with a high removal rate, low nonuniformity, low resistivity and high transmittance were as follows: platen speed, head speed, polishing time, and slurry flow rate of 30 rpm, 30 rpm, 60 sec, and 60 ml/min, respectively.

  7. Chemical Sputtering Studies of Lithiated Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Priya; Groll, Andrew; Abrams, Tyler; Curreli, Davide; Andruczyk, Daniel; Ruzic, D. N.

    2012-10-01

    Lithium treatments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment have shown dramatic improvements in plasma performance. In order to understand the complex system of lithiated ATJ graphite, chemical sputtering measurements of plain and lithiated ATJ graphite are conducted in IIAX (Ion Surface Interaction Experiment) facility with a differentially pumped Magnetic Sector Residual Gas Analyzer (MSRGA). The ATJ graphite target is mounted in such way that the target can be translated along a line to different positions to get direct comparison of ATJ and lithiated ATJ. Target is heated using joule heating and is connected to a biasing circuitry. Chemical sputtering of graphite is dependent on the ion energy and substrate temperature, hence the total effects of treating ATJ graphite with lithium in hydrogen plasma is investigated in terms of different target temperatures and bias voltages. For this purpose, lithium is evaporated in-situ onto ATJ graphite and chemically sputtered species in hydrogen plasma is measured using MSRGA. The dominant chemical sputtering product is CH4. It was found that lithium treatments have suppressed the chemical sputtering of ATJ Graphite. The suppression of chemical sputtering effect is presented as a function of varying lithium thickness on ATJ Graphite.

  8. Sputter ejection of matter from Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haff, P. K.; Watson, C. C.; Yung, Y. L.

    1981-01-01

    Direct collisional interaction of magnetospheric particles, particularly 520-eV S ions, with Io, cause sputter removal of matter. It is estimated that direct sputtering of a full-disk S-containing atmosphere with an exobase at a few hundred km, can provide up to 5 x 10 to the tenth S atoms per sq cm-s. Supplies of S and O required to stabilize the torus are estimated to be from 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 12th per sq cm-s. Sputtering rates are calculated for an atmosphere containing a one percent concentration of Na and K, and are found to be large enough to supply the fluxes required to maintain the Na and K clouds. Sputtering is found to remove heavy molecules from the atmosphere, and the rate of direct sputtering of unprotected surfaces is calculated for ejections of S and Na. Atomic species on the surface are ejected at a rate proportional to the surface abundance; and plume sputtering, avalanche cascading, and ionic saltation which lead to spatial and temporal variations in the number of ejected particles are observed.

  9. Analysis of DC magnetron sputtered beryllium films

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.W.; Hsieh, E.J.; Lindsey, E.F.; Pierce, E.L.; Norberg, J.C.

    1988-10-01

    We are evaluating techniques that alter the columnar grain structure in sputtered beryllium films on fused silica substrates. The films are formed by DC magnetron sputtering, and the columnar structure, which is characteristic of this and most other deposition techniques, is highly detrimental to the tensile strength of the films. Attempts to modify the columnar structure by using RF-biased sputtering combined with nitrogen pulsing have been successful, and this paper describes the analyses of these films. Sputtered beryllium films are quite brittle, and the columnar structure in particular tends to form a distinct intergranular fracture; therefore, the grain structure was analyzed in fractured specimens using the high-resolution capability of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with a field emission gun (FESEM). Ion microanalysis using secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was conducted on some specimens to determining relative contamination levels introduced by nitrogen pulsing. The capability to perform quantitative SIMS analyses using ion-implanted specimens as standards also is being developed. This work confirms that the structure of DC magnetron sputtered beryllium can be improved significantly with combined nitrogen pulsing and RF-biased sputtering. 8 refs.

  10. Anisotropy of sapphire single crystal sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Minnebaev, K. F.; Tolpin, K. A.; Yurasova, V. E.

    2015-08-15

    We have studied the spatial distribution of particles sputtered from the base (0001) plane of a sapphire single crystal with trigonal crystalline lattice (α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) that can be considered a superposition of two hexagonal close packed (hcp) structures–the ideal sublattice of oxygen and a somewhat deformed sublattice of aluminum. It is established that the particles sputtered from the base plane of sapphire are predominantly deposited along the sides of an irregular hexagon with spots at its vertices. The patterns of spots have been also studied for sputtering of particles from the (0001) face of a zinc single crystal with the hcp lattice. The spots of sputtered Zn atoms are arranged at the vertices of concentric equilateral hexagons. In both cases, the observed anisotropy of sputtering is related to focused collisions (direct and assisted focusing) and the channeling process. The chemical composition of spots has been determined in various regions of sputtered sapphire deposition. The results are discussed in comparison to analogous earlier data for secondary ion emission from an α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal.

  11. High power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Brenning, N.; Lundin, D.; Helmersson, U.

    2012-05-15

    The high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge is a recent addition to plasma based sputtering technology. In HiPIMS, high power is applied to the magnetron target in unipolar pulses at low duty cycle and low repetition frequency while keeping the average power about 2 orders of magnitude lower than the peak power. This results in a high plasma density, and high ionization fraction of the sputtered vapor, which allows better control of the film growth by controlling the energy and direction of the deposition species. This is a significant advantage over conventional dc magnetron sputtering where the sputtered vapor consists mainly of neutral species. The HiPIMS discharge is now an established ionized physical vapor deposition technique, which is easily scalable and has been successfully introduced into various industrial applications. The authors give an overview of the development of the HiPIMS discharge, and the underlying mechanisms that dictate the discharge properties. First, an introduction to the magnetron sputtering discharge and its various configurations and modifications is given. Then the development and properties of the high power pulsed power supply are discussed, followed by an overview of the measured plasma parameters in the HiPIMS discharge, the electron energy and density, the ion energy, ion flux and plasma composition, and a discussion on the deposition rate. Finally, some of the models that have been developed to gain understanding of the discharge processes are reviewed, including the phenomenological material pathway model, and the ionization region model.

  12. Cylindrical electron beam diode

    DOEpatents

    Bolduc, Paul E.

    1976-01-01

    A diode discharge device may include a tubular anode concentrically encircled by and spaced from a tubular cathode electrode with ends intermediate the ends of said anode electrode, and a metal conductive housing having a tubular wall disposed around the cathode electrode with end walls connected to the anode electrode. High energy electron current coupling is through an opening in the housing tubular wall to a portion of the cathode electrode intermediate its ends. Suitable utilization means may be within the anode electrode at positions to be irradiated by electrons emitted from the cathode electrode and transmitted through the anode walls.

  13. Diode laser applications in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Richard C.; Esch, Victor C.

    1995-05-01

    Diode lasers are air-cooled, efficient, compact devices which have the potential of very low cost when produced in quantity. The characteristics of diode lasers are discussed. Their applications in interstitial thermal treatment of the prostate, and laser ablation of prostate tissues, will be presented.

  14. Making an ultrastable diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, James; Washburn, Matt; van Zijll, Marshall; Erickson, Christopher; Neyenhuis, Brian; Doermann, Greg; Durfee, Dallin

    2006-10-01

    We have constructed a 657nm diode laser with excellent stability for use in an atom interferometer. The laser is a grating-stabilized diode laser is locked to a high-finesse cavity using the Pound-Drever-Hall method. We have measured a linewidth of about 1 kHz and are working on several improvements which should further reduce our linewidth.

  15. Analysis of surface sputtering on a quantum statistical basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Surface sputtering is explained theoretically by means of a 3-body sputtering mechanism involving the ion and two surface atoms of the solid. By means of quantum-statistical mechanics, a formula for the sputtering ratio S(E) is derived from first principles. The theoretical sputtering rate S(E) was found experimentally to be proportional to the square of the difference between incident ion energy and the threshold energy for sputtering of surface atoms at low ion energies. Extrapolation of the theoretical sputtering formula to larger ion energies indicates that S(E) reaches a saturation value and finally decreases at high ion energies. The theoretical sputtering ratios S(E) for wolfram, tantalum, and molybdenum are compared with the corresponding experimental sputtering curves in the low energy region from threshold sputtering energy to 120 eV above the respective threshold energy. Theory and experiment are shown to be in good agreement.

  16. Gallium phosphide high temperature diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop high temperature (> 300/sup 0/C) diodes for geothermal and other energy applications. A comparison of reverse leakage currents of Si, GaAs and GaP is made. Diodes made from GaP should be usable to > 500/sup 0/C. An LPE process for producing high quality, grown junction GaP diodes is described. This process uses low vapor pressure Mg as a dopant which allows multiple boat growth in the same LPE run. These LPE wafers have been cut into die and metallized to make the diodes. These diodes produce leakage currents below 10/sup -3/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 400/sup 0/C while exhibiting good high temperature rectification characteristics. High temperature life test data is presented which shows exceptional stability of the V-I characteristics.

  17. Sputtered coatings for microfluidic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, Dean W.; Martin, Peter M.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Johnston, John W.; Stewart, Donald C.; Bonham, Charles C.

    2000-07-01

    Magnetron sputter-deposited features and coatings are finding a broad range of uses in microfluidic devices being developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Such features are routinely incorporated into multilayer laminated microfluidic components where specific functionality is required, and where other methods for producing these features have been deemed unacceptable. Applications include electrochemical sensors, heaters and temperature probes, electrical leads and insulation layers, piezoelectric actuators and transducers, and chemical modification of surfaces. Small features, such as those required for the production of microsensor electrodes or miniature resistive heaters on microfluidic chips, were patterned using standard lithographic methods, or with masks produced by laser micromachining processes. Thin-film piezoelectric materials such as aluminum nitride have been deposited at low temperatures for use with temperature sensitive materials. Use of the coating technology and its application in the fabrication of specific microfluidic devices, including a groundwater sensor, miniature piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers and actuators, a polymerase chain reaction thermal cycler, and a microchannel flow diagnostic device, are discussed. Technical issues associated with these coatings, such as adhesion, chemical resistance, and surface defects are also addressed. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society.

  18. Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique called photodynamic therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source releasing long wavelengths of light) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can also be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED probe consists of 144 tiny pinhead-size diodes, is 9-inches long, and about one-half-inch in diameter. The small balloon aids in even distribution of the light source. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy by the Marshall Space Flight Center under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research program grant.

  19. Structural and morphological properties of sputtered NiO thin films at various sputtering pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A. Mallikarjuna; Reddy, Y. Ashok Kumar; Reddy, A. Sivasankar; Reddy, P. Sreedhara

    2012-06-05

    Nickel oxide thin films were successfully deposited on glass substrates at different sputtering pressures in the range of 3 x 10{sup -2} to 5 x 10{sup -2} mbar. It was observed that sputtering pressure influenced the structural and morphological properties. Structural properties were studied with X-ray diffractometer. All the deposited films were polycrystalline and exhibited cubic structure with preferential growth along (220) plane. From morphological studies it was observed that fine and uniform grains with RMS roughness of 9.4 nm were obtained when the films deposited at a sputtering pressure of 4 x 10{sup -2} mbar,. The grain size and the surface roughness decreased at higher sputtering pressures. The surface mobility of the adatoms decreased after series of collisions resulting in the decrease of grain size at high sputtering pressures.

  20. Sputtering - A vacuum deposition method for coating material.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1972-01-01

    The sputtering method is discussed in terms of the unique features which sputter offers in depositing coatings. These features include versatility, momentum transfer, configuration of target, precise controls, and a relatively slow deposition rate. Sputtered films are evaluated in terms of adherence, coherence, and the internal stresses. The observed strong adherence is attributed to the high kinetic energies of the sputtered material, sputter etched surface, and the submicroscopic particle size. Film thickness can be controlled to a millionth of a centimeter. Very adherent films of sputtered PTFE (teflon) can be deposited in a single operation on any type of material and on any geometrical configuration.

  1. Molecular dynamics investigation of hexagonal boron nitride sputtering and sputtered particle characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Brandon D.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2016-08-01

    The sputtering of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by impacts of energetic xenon ions is investigated using a molecular dynamics (MD) model. The model is implemented within an open-source MD framework that utilizes graphics processing units to accelerate its calculations, allowing the sputtering process to be studied in much greater detail than has been feasible in the past. Integrated sputter yields are computed over a range of ion energies from 20 eV to 300 eV, and incidence angles from 0° to 75°. Sputtering of boron is shown to occur at energies as low as 40 eV at normal incidence, and sputtering of nitrogen at as low as 30 eV at normal incidence, suggesting a threshold energy between 20 eV and 40 eV. The sputter yields at 0° incidence are compared to existing experimental data and are shown to agree well over the range of ion energies investigated. The semi-empirical Bohdansky curve and an empirical exponential function are fit to the data at normal incidence, and the threshold energy for sputtering is calculated from the Bohdansky curve fit as 35 ± 2 eV. These results are shown to compare well with experimental observations that the threshold energy lies between 20 eV and 40 eV. It is demonstrated that h-BN sputters predominantly as atomic boron and diatomic nitrogen, and the velocity distribution function (VDF) of sputtered boron atoms is investigated. The calculated VDFs are found to reproduce the Sigmund-Thompson distribution predicted by Sigmund's linear cascade theory of sputtering. The average surface binding energy computed from Sigmund-Thompson curve fits is found to be 4.5 eV for ion energies of 100 eV and greater. This compares well to the value of 4.8 eV determined from independent experiments.

  2. Inverse I-V Injection Characteristics of ZnO Nanoparticle-Based Diodes.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Paul; Vogel, Stefan; Bonrad, Klaus; von Seggern, Heinz

    2016-08-10

    Simple Al/ZnO(NP)/Au diodes produced by spin coating of ZnO nanoparticle dispersions (ZnO(NP)) on Al/Al2O3 and Au substrates and subsequent Au deposition have been investigated to understand electron injection properties of more complex devices, incorporating ZnO(NP) as injection layer. Inverse I-V characteristics have been observed compared to conventional Al/ZnO(SP)/Au diodes produced by reactive ion sputtering of ZnO. SEM micrographs reveal that the void-containing contact of ZnO(NP) with the bottom Al electrode and the rough morphology of the top Au electrode are likely to be responsible for the observed injection and ejection probabilities of electrons. A simple tunneling model, incorporating the voids, explains the strongly reduced injection currents from Al whereas the top electrode fabricated by vapor deposition of Au onto the nanoparticle topology adopts the inverse ZnO(NP) morphology leading to enlarged injection areas combined with Au-tip landscapes. These tips in contrast to the smooth sputtered ZnO(SP) lead to electric field enhancement and strongly increased injection of electrons in reverse direction. The injected charge piles up at the barrier generated by voids between ZnO(NP) and the bottom electrode forcing a change in the barrier shape and therefore allowing for higher ejection rates. Both effects in combination explain the inverse I-V characteristic of nanoparticle based diodes. PMID:27443793

  3. Examination of the effects of aluminium contamination for PSII fabricated diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Speth, R.R.; Shohet, J.L.; Booske, J.H.; Gearhart, S.S.; Liu, H.; Mau, R.

    1996-12-31

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) has long been regarded as a possible alternative to classical ion implantation. The benefits of PSII, such as low energy high dose implants and its comparatively small footprint, become increasingly tempting for integrated circuit fabrication as device dimensions shrink. An open question concerns the effect of plasma-sputtered contaminant ions on device characteristics. To address the contamination issue, a suite of experiments is currently underway which will quantify the allowable level of contamination in a diode array. The array of diodes is fabricated on 3 inch N type <100> P-doped silicon waters. The first contaminant to be studied is aluminum since it represents a preferred material for constructing PSII chambers, and it is expected that aluminum will be sputtered from the chamber walls. The experiment is a 2{sup 3} factorial design varying implant energy, aluminum concentration and their effects on the performance of test diodes of various dimensions. The measured responses are idealty factor, breakdown voltage and reverse bias leakage current. Results of these experiments as well as future directions of investigation will be presented.

  4. Effects of the duty ratio on the niobium oxide film deposited by pulsed-DC magnetron sputtering methods.

    PubMed

    Eom, Ji Mi; Oh, Hyun Gon; Cho, Il Hwan; Kwon, Sang Jik; Cho, Eou Sik

    2013-11-01

    Niobium oxide (Nb2O5) films were deposited on p-type Si wafers and sodalime glasses at a room temperature using in-line pulsed-DC magnetron sputtering system with various duty ratios. The different duty ratio was obtained by varying the reverse voltage time of pulsed DC power from 0.5 to 2.0 micros at the fixed frequency of 200 kHz. From the structural and optical characteristics of the sputtered NbOx films, it was possible to obtain more uniform and coherent NbOx films in case of the higher reverse voltage time as a result of the cleaning effect on the Nb2O5 target surface. The electrical characteristics from the metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) fabricated with the NbOx films shows the leakage currents are influenced by the reverse voltage time and the Schottky barrier diode characteristics. PMID:24245329

  5. Sputtering of Lunar Regolith by Solar Wind Protons and Heavy Ions, and General Aspects of Potential Sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alnussirat, S. T.; Sabra, M. S.; Barghouty, A. F.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Meyer, F.

    2014-01-01

    New simulation results for the sputtering of lunar soil surface by solar-wind protons and heavy ions will be presented. Previous simulation results showed that the sputtering process has significant effects and plays an important role in changing the surface chemical composition, setting the erosion rate and the sputtering process timescale. In this new work and in light of recent data, we briefly present some theoretical models which have been developed to describe the sputtering process and compare their results with recent calculation to investigate and differentiate the roles and the contributions of potential (or electrodynamic) sputtering from the standard (or kinetic) sputtering.

  6. The pumping of hydrogen and helium by sputter-ion pumps. Revision 3/93

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, K.M.; Pate, D.J.; Todd, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    The pumping of hydrogen in diode and triode sputter-ion pumps is discussed. The type of cathode material used in these pumps is shown to have a significant impact on the effectiveness with which hydrogen is pumped. Examples of this include data for pumps with aluminum and titanium-alloy cathodes. Diode pumps with aluminum cathodes are shown to be no more effective in the pumping of hydrogen than in the pumping of helium. The use of titanium or titanium alloy anodes is also shown to measurably impact on the speed of these pumps at.very low pressures. This stems from the fact that hydrogen is {times}10{sup 6} more soluble in titanium than in stainless steel. Hydrogen becomes resident in the anodes because of fast neutral burial. Lastly, quantitative data are given for the He speeds and capacities of both noble and conventional diode and triode pumps. The effectiveness of various pump regeneration procedures, subsequent to the pumping of He, is reported.These included bakeout and N{sub 2} glow discharge cleaning. The comparative desorption of He with the subsequent pumping of N{sub 2} is reported on. The N{sub 2} speed of these pumps was used as the benchmark for defining the size of the pumps vs. their respective He speeds.

  7. Diode Structure for Microwave and Infrared Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, George; Leinteran, Charles; Chiang, Bing

    1987-01-01

    Microwave signals switched or modulated optically. Planar diode with transparent cathode made in BaAs, Si, and InSb versions. Depending on specific configuration and material, such diode used for optical modulation of microwave signal or as infrared detector. Transparent cathode fabricated on GaAs diode so diode illuminates to generate and control short-circuit current.

  8. Laser diode array and transmission optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, Jin H.

    1989-01-01

    Information on laser diode array and transmission optics is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on coherent combining of laser diode arrays, amplification through a laser diode array, the far field pattern of a laser diode transmitter, and beam diameter at receiver vs. transmission distance.

  9. Sputtering properties of tungsten 'fuzzy' surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, D.; Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.; Yu, J. H.

    2011-08-01

    Sputtering yields of He-induced W 'fuzzy' surfaces bombarded by Ar have been measured in the linear divertor plasma simulator PISCES-B. It is found that the sputtering yield of a fuzzy surface, Yfuzzy, decreases with increasing fuzzy layer thickness, L, and saturates at ˜10% of that of a smooth surface, Ysmooth, at L > 1 μm. The reduction in the sputtering yield is suspected to be due mainly to the porous structure of fuzz, since the ratio, Yfuzzy/Ysmooth follows (1 - pfuzz), where pfuzz is the fuzz porosity. Further, Yfuzzy/Ysmooth is observed to increase with incident ion energy, Ei. This may be explained by an energy dependent change in the angular distribution of sputtered W atoms, since at lower Ei, the angular distribution is observed to become more butterfly-shaped. That is, a larger fraction of sputtered W atoms can line-of-sight deposit/stick onto neighboring fuzz nanostructures for lower Ei butterfly distributions, resulting in lower ratio of Yfuzzy/Ysmooth.

  10. Diode Laser Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Dan; Scifres, Don R.

    1994-08-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamental principles and applications of semiconductor diode laser arrays. All of the major types of arrays are discussed in detail, including coherent, incoherent, edge- and surface-emitting, horizontal- and vertical-cavity, individually addressed, lattice- matched and strained-layer systems. The initial chapters cover such topics as lasers, amplifiers, external-cavity control, theoretical modeling, and operational dynamics. Spatially incoherent arrays are then described in detail, and the uses of vertical-cavity surface emitter and edge-emitting arrays in parallel optical-signal processing and multi-channel optical recording are discussed. Researchers and graduate students in solid state physics and electrical engineering studying the properties and applications of such arrays will find this book invaluable.

  11. Emitron: microwave diode

    DOEpatents

    Craig, G.D.; Pettibone, J.S.; Drobot, A.T.

    1982-05-06

    The invention comprises a new class of device, driven by electron or other charged particle flow, for producing coherent microwaves by utilizing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with electron flow in diodes not requiring an external magnetic field. Anode and cathode surfaces are electrically charged with respect to one another by electron flow, for example caused by a Marx bank voltage source or by other charged particle flow, for example by a high energy charged particle beam. This produces an electric field which stimulates an emitted electron beam to flow in the anode-cathode region. The emitted electrons are accelerated by the electric field and coherent microwaves are produced by the three dimensional spatial and temporal interaction of the accelerated electrons with geometrically allowed microwave modes which results in the bunching of the electrons and the pumping of at least one dominant microwave mode.

  12. Unstable resonator diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.L.

    1988-04-19

    In a semiconductor diode laser, a structure is described comprising: a generally planar active layer, across which a forward bias voltage is applied, cladding layers adjacent to the active layer, to confine light in a direction perpendicular to the active layer, and first and second facets; in which the first facet is curved to present a concave part-cylindrical reflective surface toward the active layer, and in which the second facet includes a curved portion presenting a convex part-cylindrical reflective surface toward the active layer and a planar portion that is non-reflective. The curvatures of the two curved surfaces have axes of curvature that are approximately perpendicular to the active layer, the curvatures being selected to form an unstable resonator, in which light is confined in a particular sense by the cladding layers and from which energy is out-coupled through the planar portion of the second facet.

  13. White light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, J.; Schlotter, P.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN LEDs on SiC substrate chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white light emitting diodes (LUCOLEDs). The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta, is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence downconversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic dye molecules and many inorganic phosphors. For white light generation via the LUCOLED principle, the phosphor Y3Al5O12:Ce3+(4f1) is ideally suited. The optical characteristics of Ce3+(4f1) in Y3Al5O12(YAG) are discussed in detail. Possibilities to "tune" the white color by various substitutions in the garnet lattice are shortly outlined.

  14. Sputtering of amorphous silicon nitride irradiated with energetic C60 ions: Preferential sputtering and synergy effect between electronic and collisional sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, T.; Morita, Y.; Nakajima, K.; Narumi, K.; Saitoh, Y.; Matsuda, M.; Sataka, M.; Toulemonde, M.; Kimura, K.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride films (thickness 30 nm) deposited on Si(0 0 1) were irradiated with 30-1080 keV C60 and 100 MeV Xe ions to fluences ranging from 2 × 1011 to 1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The composition depth profiles of the irradiated samples were measured using high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The sputtering yields were estimated from the derived composition profiles. Pronounced preferential sputtering of nitrogen was observed in the electronic energy loss regime. In addition, a large synergy effect between the electronic and collisional sputtering was also observed. The sputtering yields were calculated using the unified thermal spike model to understand the observed results. Although the calculated results reproduced the observed total sputtering yields with a lowered sublimation energy, the observed preferential sputtering of nitrogen could not be explained. The present results suggest an additional sputtering mechanism related to the electronic energy loss.

  15. Energization in regions of CIRs unconnected to shocks are probably not the result of cross-field transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.; Siscoe, George

    1995-01-01

    Corotating energetic ion populations (CEIPs) associated with the forward and reverse shocks of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are observed in CIRs at places where models say are magnetically unconnected to either shock. Such disconnections between CEIPs and shocks are common and have been documented with data from Pioneers 10 and 11 and confirmed with data from Ulysses. They pose a problem for models that account for these CEIPs in terms of ion energization at the shocks followed by ion propagation along field lines. Two possible resolutions to this problem have been suggested: diffusion of the ions across field lines and extension of the ion energization process to regions beyond the shock waves. Here we quantitatively examine the first of these possibilities. We give the Green's function solution to the convection-diffusion equation applied to idealized CIR geometry, with a source at the reverse shock -- the main producer of CEIPs. Two kinds of diffusion are considered: resonant diffusion and stochastic field line diffusion. We find that for resonant diffusion the computed ratio is many orders of magnitudes below the observed ratio. For stochastic field line diffusion, the computed ratio approximately equals the observed ratio if a diffusion coefficient appropriate to the free solar wind is used. It is several orders of magnitude below the observed ratio, however, if a diffusion coefficient appropriate to CIRs is used. We conclude that cross-field diffusion probably does not account for the presence of energetic ions in regions of CIRs that are magnetically unconnected to its shock waves. We suggest that the alternative possibility -- the energetic ions in regions magnetically unconnected to shocks result from an acceleration process that is independent of shocks -- be pursued to the point where quantitative tests can be performed.

  16. Laterally injected light-emitting diode and laser diode

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-06-16

    A p-type superlattice is used to laterally inject holes into an III-nitride multiple quantum well active layer, enabling efficient light extraction from the active area. Laterally-injected light-emitting diodes and laser diodes can enable brighter, more efficient devices that impact a wide range of wavelengths and applications. For UV wavelengths, applications include fluorescence-based biological sensing, epoxy curing, and water purification. For visible devices, applications include solid state lighting and projection systems.

  17. Solar Wind Sputtering of Lunar Surface Materials: Role and Some Possible Implications of Potential Sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Meyer, F.; Reinhold, c.

    2010-01-01

    Solar-wind induced sputtering of the lunar surface includes, in principle, both kinetic and potential sputtering. The role of the latter mechanism, however, in many focused studies has not been properly ascertained due partly to lack of data but can also be attributed to the assertion that the contribution of solar-wind heavy ions to the total sputtering is quite low due to their low number density compared to solar-wind protons. Limited laboratory measurements show marked enhancements in the sputter yields of slow-moving, highly-charged ions impacting oxides. Lunar surface sputtering yields are important as they affect, e.g., estimates of the compositional changes in the lunar surface, its erosion rate, as well as its contribution to the exosphere as well as estimates of hydrogen and water contents. Since the typical range of solar-wind ions at 1 keV/amu is comparable to the thickness of the amorphous rim found on lunar soil grains, i.e. few 10s nm, lunar simulant samples JSC-1A AGGL are specifically enhanced to have such rims in addition to the other known characteristics of the actual lunar soil particles. However, most, if not all laboratory studies of potential sputtering were carried out in single crystal targets, quite different from the rim s amorphous structure. The effect of this structural difference on the extent of potential sputtering has not, to our knowledge, been investigated to date.

  18. Ion-beam sputtering increases solar-cell efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, D. E.; Dubow, J. B.; Sites, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ion-beam sputtering, fabrication of oxide-semiconductor-on-silicon (OSOS) solar cells, results in cells of 12% efficiency. Ion-beam sputtering technique is compatible with low-cost continuous fabrication and requires no high-temperature processing.

  19. Physical sputtering of metallic systems by charged-particle impact

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.

    1989-12-01

    The present paper provides a brief overview of our current understanding of physical sputtering by charged-particle impact, with the emphasis on sputtering of metals and alloys under bombardment with particles that produce knock-on collisions. Fundamental aspects of ion-solid interactions, and recent developments in the study of sputtering of elemental targets and preferential sputtering in multicomponent materials are reviewed. We concentrate only on a few specific topics of sputter emission, including the various properties of the sputtered flux and depth of origin, and on connections between sputtering and other radiation-induced and -enhanced phenomena that modify the near-surface composition of the target. The synergistic effects of these diverse processes in changing the composition of the integrated sputtered-atom flux is described in simple physical terms, using selected examples of recent important progress. 325 refs., 27 figs.

  20. Fundamental Study of Boron Carbide Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Sudarshan; Yeoun, Dae; Janjua, Saad; Driver, Marcus; Caruso, Anthony

    2009-03-01

    Boron-rich carbides belong to a special class of solids whose main structural unit is the twelve atom icosahedra. When depositing thin films of boron carbide (nominally B4C) by RF or pulsed DC magnetron sputtering, the individual sputtered or ablated cluster size and the temperature of the substrate to which the clusters adsorb to form the film, greatly affects the bulk film physical and electronic structure. This talk will present mass spectrometry data of the target clusters as a function of RF power, DC bias and chamber pressure toward the goal of modeling and understanding how the icosahedral based boron-rich materials sputter and the resultant control over the final film properties. Argon trapped into the film during the deposition as determined by X-Ray photoemission will also be discussed.

  1. Ion beam sputtering in electric propulsion facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine sputter yields of potential ion beam target materials, to assess the impact of charge exchange on beam diagnostics in large facilities, and to examine material erosion and deposition after a 957 hr test of a 5 kW-class ion thruster. The xenon ion sputter yield of flexible graphite was lower than other graphite forms especially at high angles of incidence. Ion beam charge exchange effects were found to hamper beam probe current collection diagnostics even at pressures from 0.7 to 1.7 mPa. Estimates of the xenon ion beam envelope were made and predictions of the thickness of sputter deposited coatings in the facility were compared with measurements.

  2. CME impact on Mercury's sputtered exospheric environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfleger, M.; Lichtenegger, H. I. M.; Lammer, H.; Mura, A.; Wurz, P.; Martin-Fernandez, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    Solar wind and magnetospheric plasma precipitation onto the surface of Mercury triggers the formation of exospheric particle populations by sputtering processes. Numerical modeling of Mercury's magnetosphere has shown that the weak intrinsic magnetic field of the planet is sufficient to prevent the equatorial regions from being impacted by solar wind ions during moderate solar wind conditions. However, intense fluxes of protons are expected to hit the auroral regions, giving rise to the release of surface elements at high latitudes by ion sputtering. During high solar wind dynamic pressure conditions in the case of CME events, the solar wind protons will have access to Mercury's entire dayside surface, which may result in a considerable filling of the exosphere by sputtered surface material.

  3. Ion beam sputtering in electric propulsion facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine sputter yields of potential ion beam target materials, to assess the impact of charge exchange on beam diagnostics in large facilities, and to examine material erosion and deposition after a 957-hour test of a 5 kW-class ion thruster. The xenon ion sputter yield of flexible graphite was lower than other graphite forms especialy at high angles of incidence. Ion beam charge exchange effects were found to hamper beam probe current collection diagnostics even at pressures from 0.7 to 1.7 mPa. Estimates of the xenon ion beam envelope were made and predictions of the thickness of sputter deposited coatings in the facility were compared with measurements.

  4. Possible isotopic fractionation effects in sputtered minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haff, P. K.; Watson, C. C.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    A model which makes definite predictions for the fractionation of isotopes in sputtered material is discussed. The fractionation patterns are nonlinear, and the pattern for a particular set of isotopes depends on the chemical matrix within which those isotopes are contained. Calculations are presented for all nonmonoisotopic elements contained in the minerals perovskite, anorthite, ackermanite, enstatite, and troilite. All isotopes are fractionated at the level of approximately 4-6 deg/o per atomic mass unit. Oxygen is always positively fractionated (heavier isotopes sputtered preferentially), and heavier elements are generally negatively fractioned (light isotopes sputtered preferentially). The value of Delta (O-18:O-16) is always less by about 1.8 deg/o than a linear extrapolation based upon the calculated delta (O-17:O-16) value would suggest. The phenomenon of both negative and positive fractionation patterns from a single target mineral are used to make an experimental test of the proposed model.

  5. Characterization of ZnO:SnO2 (50:50) thin film deposited by RF magnetron sputtering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cynthia, S. R.; Sivakumar, R.; Sanjeeviraja, C.; Ponmudi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and tin oxide (SnO2) thin films have attracted significant interest recently for use in optoelectronic application such as solar cells, flat panel displays, photonic devices, laser diodes and gas sensors because of their desirable electrical and optical properties and wide band gap. In the present study, thin films of ZnO:SnO2 (50:50) were deposited on pre-cleaned microscopic glass substrate by RF magnetron sputtering technique. The substrate temperature and RF power induced changes in structural, surface morphological, compositional and optical properties of the films have been studied.

  6. Intergalactic medium metal enrichment through dust sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Simone; Ferrara, Andrea

    2005-04-01

    We study the motion of dust grains into the intergalactic medium (IGM) around redshift z= 3, to test the hypothesis that grains can efficiently pollute the gas with metals through sputtering. We use the results available in the literature for radiation-driven dust ejection from galaxies as initial conditions and follow the motion onwards. Via this mechanism, grains are ejected into the IGM with velocities >100 km s-1 as they move supersonically, grains can be efficiently eroded by non-thermal sputtering. However, Coulomb and collisional drag forces effectively reduce the charged grain velocity. Up-to-date sputtering yields for graphite and silicate (olivine) grains have been derived using the code TRANSPORT OF IONS IN MATTER (TRIM), for which we provide analytic fits. After training our method on a homogeneous density case, we analyse the grain motion and sputtering in the IGM density field as derived from a Λ cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological simulation at z= 3.27. We found that only large (a>~ 0.1μm) grains can travel up to considerable distances (few ×100 kpc physical) before being stopped. Resulting metallicities show a well-defined trend with overdensity δ. The maximum metallicities are reached for 10 < δ < 100[corresponding to systems, in quasi-stellar object (QSO) absorption spectra, with 14.5 < log N(HI) < 16]. However the distribution of sputtered metals is very inhomogeneous, with only a small fraction of the IGM volume polluted by dust sputtering (filling factors of 18 per cent for Si and 6 per cent for C). For the adopted size distribution, grains are never completely destroyed; nevertheless, the extinction and gas photoelectric heating effects resulting from this population of intergalactic grains are well below current detection limits.

  7. Ion beam sputter etching and deposition of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.; Miller, T. B.; Crandall, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoropolymer etching and deposition techniques including thermal evaporation, RF sputtering, plasma polymerization, and ion beam sputtering are reviewed. Etching and deposition mechanisms and material characteristics are discussed. Ion beam sputter etch rates for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were determined as a function of ion energy, current density and ion beam power density. Peel strengths were measured for epoxy bonds to various ion beam sputtered fluoropolymers. Coefficients of static and dynamic friction were measured for fluoropolymers deposited from ion bombarded PTFE.

  8. Ion beam sputter etching and deposition of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.; Miller, T. B.; Crandall, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoropolymer etching and deposition techniques including thermal evaporation, RF sputtering, plasma polymerization, and ion beam sputtering are reviewed. Etching and deposition mechanism and material characteristics are discussed. Ion beam sputter etch rates for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were determined as a function of ion energy, current density and ion beam power density. Peel strengths were measured for epoxy bonds to various ion beam sputtered fluoropolymers. Coefficients of static and dynamic friction were measured for fluoropolymers deposited from ion bombarded PTFE.

  9. Ion beam sputtering of Ag - Angular and energetic distributions of sputtered and scattered particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, René; Bundesmann, Carsten; Neumann, Horst; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    Ion beam sputter deposition (IBD) provides intrinsic features which influence the properties of the growing film, because ion properties and geometrical process conditions generate different energy and spatial distribution of the sputtered and scattered particles. A vacuum deposition chamber is set up to measure the energy and spatial distribution of secondary particles produced by ion beam sputtering of different target materials under variation of geometrical parameters (incidence angle of primary ions and emission angle of secondary particles) and of primary ion beam parameters (ion species and energies).

  10. Method of sputter etching a surface

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The surface of a target is textured by co-sputter etching the target surface with a seed material adjacent thereto, while the target surface is maintained at a pre-selected temperature. By pre-selecting the temperature of the surface while sputter etching, it is possible to predetermine the reflectance properties of the etched surface. The surface may be textured to absorb sunlight efficiently and have minimal emittance in the infrared region so as to be well-suited for use as a solar absorber for photothermal energy conversion.

  11. Carbonaceous Particles Production in a Sputtering Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Dominique, Claire; Sant, Marco; Arnas, Cecile

    2005-10-31

    Spherical dust particles have been produced in argon glow discharge by sputtering of a graphite cathode. Their size varies from 40 to 200 nm depending on the distance between the two electrodes and the largest ones have a cauliflower shape. Simulations giving the evolution of the energy distribution of sputtered carbon atoms suggest a mechanism of growth by carbon vapour condensation. The chemical composition and structure of particles have been investigated by infrared spectroscopy and appear to be a complex arrangement of the carbon atoms and hetero-atoms.

  12. Magnetospheric Sputtering Source of the Moon's Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, L. E.; Wilson, J. K.; Mendillo, M.

    2002-09-01

    Observations of lunar eclipses over the past decade have revealed that the Moon's transient sodium atmosphere at full Moon is both denser and more extended near equinox than it is near solstice. This fact suggests the presence of a variable magnetospheric source of sodium. An investigation of this source is carried out by modeling combinations of two sources: a constant source from micrometeor sputtering and photon-stimulated desorption, and a variable source (presumably plasma sputtering), which is higher during equinox conditions and lower during solstice conditions.

  13. Sputtering of dimers off a silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nietiadi, Maureen L.; Rosandi, Yudi; Kopnarski, Michael; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2012-10-01

    We present experimental and molecular-dynamics simulation results of the sputtering of a Si surface by 2 keV Ar ions. Results on both the monomer and dimer distributions are presented. In simulation, these distributions follow a generalized Thompson law with power exponent n=2 and n=3, respectively. The experimental data, obtained via plasma post-ionization in an SNMS (secondary neutral mass spectrometry) apparatus, show good agreement with respect to the dimer fraction, and the relative energy distributions of dimers and monomers. The consequences for the dimer sputtering mechanism are discussed.

  14. Temperature measurement of sputtered metal dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Fayet, P.; Wolf, J.P.; Woeste, L.

    1986-05-15

    The temperatures of sputtered alkali-metal dimers have been measured using one- and two-photon ionization spectroscopy. They are estimated to be 1470 +- 300 K, 1025 +- 200 K, and 1000 +- 200 K for Cs/sub 2/, K/sub 2/, and Na/sub 2/, respectively. The vibrational and rotational temperatures are found to be very similar. No dependence of the dimer excitation is found, neither on target temperature nor on the primary-ion energy. The results are compared with some currently used models to explain cluster formation in sputtering experiments.

  15. Method of sputter etching a surface

    DOEpatents

    Henager, C.H. Jr.

    1984-02-14

    The surface of a target is textured by co-sputter etching the target surface with a seed material adjacent thereto, while the target surface is maintained at a pre-selected temperature. By pre-selecting the temperature of the surface while sputter etching, it is possible to predetermine the reflectance properties of the etched surface. The surface may be textured to absorb sunlight efficiently and have minimal emittance in the infrared region so as to be well-suited for use as a solar absorber for photothermal energy conversion. 4 figs.

  16. Enhanced vbasis laser diode package

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, Robert J.; Chen, Diana; Bayramian, Andy; Freitas, Barry; Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-08-19

    A substrate having an upper surface and a lower surface is provided. The substrate includes a plurality of v-grooves formed in the upper surface. Each v-groove includes a first side and a second side perpendicular to the first side. A laser diode bar assembly is disposed within each of the v-grooves and attached to the first side. The laser diode bar assembly includes a first adhesion layer disposed on the first side of the v-groove, a metal plate attached to the first adhesion layer, a second adhesion layer disposed over the metal plate, and a laser diode bar attached to the second adhesion layer. The laser diode bar has a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) substantially similar to that of the metal plate.

  17. Thermometric Property of a Diode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Fred W.; Woodruff, Dan

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple way to implement the thermometric property of a semiconductor diode to produce a thermometer with a nearly linear dependence upon temperature over a wide range of temperatures. (JRH)

  18. Improvements on high voltage capacity and high temperature performances of Si-based Schottky potential barrier diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongshun, Wang; Li, Rui; Ghaffar, Adnan; Zaixing, Wang; Chunjuan, Liu

    2015-02-01

    In order to improve the reverse voltage capacity and low junction temperature characteristics of the traditional silicon-based Schottky diode, a Schottky diode with high reverse voltage capacity and high junction temperature was fabricated using ion implantation, NiPt60 sputtering, silicide-forming and other major technologies on an N-type silicon epitaxial layer of 10.6-11.4 μm and (2.2-2.4) × 1015 cm-3 doping concentration. The measurement results show that the junction temperature of the Schottky diode fabricated can reach 175 °C, that is 50 °C higher than that of the traditional one; the reverse voltage capacity VR can reach 112 V, that is 80 V higher than that of the traditional one; the leakage current is only 2 μA and the forward conduction voltage drop is VF = 0.71 V at forward current IF = 3 A.

  19. Method of making segmented pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOEpatents

    McKernan, Mark A.; Alford, Craig S.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Chen, Chih-Wen

    1994-01-01

    Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite wafers are oriented and bonded together such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are maximized along the back surface of the segmented pyrolytic graphite target to allow for optimum heat conduction away from the sputter target's sputtering surface and to allow for maximum energy transmission from the target's sputtering surface.

  20. Method of making segmented pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOEpatents

    McKernan, M.A.; Alford, C.S.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Chen, C.W.

    1994-02-08

    Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite wafers are oriented and bonded together such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are maximized along the back surface of the segmented pyrolytic graphite target to allow for optimum heat conduction away from the sputter target's sputtering surface and to allow for maximum energy transmission from the target's sputtering surface. 2 figures.

  1. Effect of sputtering power on the growth of Ru films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhanwar, Prachi; Kumar, Arvind; Verma, Seema; Rangra, K. J.

    2016-04-01

    Ruthenium is deposited by DC magnetron sputtering at different powers and is characterized. The effect of sputtering power on the electrical and structural properties of the film is investigated experimentally. High resolution X-ray diffraction is used to characterize the microstructure of Ru films deposited on SiO2 surface. The peak (002) is more sharp and intense with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.37° at 250W. The grain size increases with increase in sputtering power improving the crystallinity of the film. The film deposited at high sputtering power also showed lower resistivity (12.40 µΩ-cm) and higher mobility (4.82 cm2/V.s) as compared to the film deposited at low power. The surface morphology of the film is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  2. Amorphous silicon as electron transport layer for colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect

    Song Tao; Shen Xiaojuan; Sun Baoquan; Zhang Fute; Zhang Xiaohong; Zhu Xiulin

    2009-12-07

    We demonstrate the fabrication of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) made from all-inorganic colloidal semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). The diode utilizes a sandwich structure formed by placing CdSe/CdS NCs between two layers of Si and Ag{sub x}O, which act as electron- and hole-transporting materials, respectively. The photoluminescence properties of NCs are rendered less dependent upon surface chemistry and chemical environment by growing a thick CdS shell. It also enhances stability of the NCs during the process of magnetron sputtering for silicon deposition. The resulting LED device exhibits a low turn-on voltage of 2.5 V and the maximum external quantum efficiency of nearly 0.08%.

  3. Measuring size dependent electrical properties from nanoneedle structures: Pt/ZnO Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Shimin; Anderson, Daniel D.; Shang, Tao; Park, Byoungnam; Dillon, Shen J.

    2014-04-14

    This work reports the fabrication and testing of nanoneedle devices with well-defined interfaces that are amenable to a variety of structural and electrical characterization, including transmission electron microscopy. Single Pt/ZnO nanoneedle Schottky diodes were fabricated by a top down method using a combination of electro-polishing, sputtering, and focused ion beam milling. The resulting structures contained nanoscale planar heterojunctions with low ideality factors, the dimensions of which were tuned to study size-dependent electrical properties. The diameter dependence of the Pt/ZnO diode barrier height is explained by a joule heating effect and/or electronic inhomogeneity in the Pt/ZnO contact area.

  4. Electronic Transport of an Ni/ n-GaAs Diode Analysed Over a Wide Temperature Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzel, A.; Duman, S.; Yildirim, N.; Turut, A.

    2016-06-01

    We have reported a study on current-voltage ( I-V) characteristics and capacitance-voltage ( C-V) of an Ni/ n-GaAs Schottky barrier diode in a wide temperature ( T) range of 100-320 K in steps of 20 K, which is prepared by a magnetron direct current sputtering technique. The ideality factor decreases and barrier height (BH) increases with an increase in the temperature. The variation of the diode parameters with the sample temperature has been attributed to the presence of the lateral inhomogeneities in the BH. It has been seen that the junction current is dominated by thermionic field emission. The carrier concentration, diffusion potential, BH, Fermi energy level and the temperature coefficient of the BH have been calculated from the temperature-dependent C-V-T characteristics.

  5. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique, called Photodynamic Therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny, pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source that releases long wavelengths of light ) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. 'A young woman operated on in May 1999 has fully recovered with no complications and no evidence of the tumor coming back,' said Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Medical Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The LEDs, developed and managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, have been used on seven Space Shuttle flights inside the Microgravity Astroculture Facility. This technology has also been successfully used to further commercial research in crop growth.

  6. Magnetron Sputtering Deposits Corrosion-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Thakoor, A. P.; Williams, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Dense, amorphous, metallic film resists corrosion attack by acid. Coatings thermally stable up to 800 degrees C and made corrosion resistant by proper choice of sputtering deposition conditions. Protective, corrosionresistant coatings applied to process equipment that comes in contact with aqueous, neutral, or acidic solutions in chemical, petroleum, and paper industries, in wastewater treatment, and in heat exchangers.

  7. RF Sputtering of Gold Contacts On Niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Reliable gold contacts are deposited on niobium by combination of RF sputtering and photolithography. Process results in structures having gold only where desired for electrical contact. Contacts are stable under repeated cycling from room temperature to 4.2 K and show room-temperature contact resistance as much as 40 percent below indium contacts made by thermalcompression bonding.

  8. Carbon-Nanotube Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Wong, Eric; Schlecht, Erich; Hunt, Brian; Siegel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Schottky diodes based on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are being developed as essential components of the next generation of submillimeter-wave sensors and sources. Initial performance predictions have shown that the performance characteristics of these devices can exceed those of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes that have been the components of choice for room-temperature submillimeter-wave sensors for more than 50 years. For state-of-the-art Schottky diodes used as detectors at frequencies above a few hundred gigahertz, the inherent parasitic capacitances associated with their semiconductor junction areas and the resistances associated with low electron mobilities limit achievable sensitivity. The performance of such a detector falls off approximately exponentially with frequency above 500 GHz. Moreover, when used as frequency multipliers for generating signals, state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes exhibit extremely low efficiencies, generally putting out only micro-watts of power at frequencies up to 1.5 THz. The shortcomings of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes can be overcome by exploiting the unique electronic properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes. A single-walled carbon nanotube can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on its chirality, and exhibits high electron mobility (recently reported to be approx.= 2x10(exp 5)sq cm/V-s) and low parasitic capacitance. Because of the narrowness of nanotubes, Schottky diodes based on carbon nanotubes have ultra-small junction areas (of the order of a few square nanometers) and consequent junction capacitances of the order of 10(exp -18) F, which translates to cutoff frequency >5 THz. Because the turn-on power levels of these devices are very low (of the order of nano-watts), the input power levels needed for pumping local oscillators containing these devices should be lower than those needed for local oscillators containing state-of-the-art solid

  9. Gas Sensing Diode and Method of Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary William (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A diode for sensing hydrogen and hydrocarbons and the process for manufacturing the diode are disclosed. The diode is a Schottky diode which has a palladium chrome contact on the C-face of an n-type 6H Silicon carbide epilayer. The epilayer is grown on the C-face of a 6H silicon carbide substrate. The diode is capable of measuring low concentrations of hydrogen and hydrocarbons at high temperatures, for example, 800 C. The diode is both sensitive and stable at elevated temperatures.

  10. Gas Sensing Diode Comprising SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary William (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A diode for sensing hydrogen and hydrocarbons and the process for manufacturing the diode are disclosed. The diode is a Schottky diode which has a palladium chrome contact on the C-face of an n-type 6H Silicon carbide epilayer. The epilayer is grown on the C-face of a 6H silicon carbide substrate. The diode is capable of measuring low concentrations of hydrogen and hydrocarbons at high temperatures, for example, 800 degrees C. The diode is both sensitive and stable at elevated temperatures.