Science.gov

Sample records for crossover interference count

  1. Estimating crossover frequencies and testing for numerical interference with highly polymorphic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, J.

    1996-12-31

    Interference maybe viewed as having two aspects, numerical interference referring to the numbers of crossovers occurring, and positional interference referring to the positions of crossovers. Here, the focus is on numerical interference and on methods of testing for its presence. A dense map of highly polymorphic markers is assumed so that each crossover can be observed. General relationships are worked out between crossover distributions and underlying chiasma distributions. It is shown that crossover distributions may be invalid, and methods are developed to estimate valid crossover distributions from observed counts of crossovers. Based on valid estimates of crossover distributions, tests for interference and development of empirical map functions are outlined. The methods are applied to published data on human chromosomes 9 and 19. 16 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Interference-mediated synaptonemal complex formation with embedded crossover designation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangran; Espagne, Eric; de Muyt, Arnaud; Zickler, Denise; Kleckner, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Biological systems exhibit complex patterns at length scales ranging from the molecular to the organismic. Along chromosomes, events often occur stochastically at different positions in different nuclei but nonetheless tend to be relatively evenly spaced. Examples include replication origin firings, formation of chromatin loops along chromosome axes and, during meiosis, localization of crossover recombination sites (“crossover interference”). We present evidence in the fungus Sordaria macrospora that crossover interference is part of a broader pattern that includes synaptonemal complex (SC) nucleation. This pattern comprises relatively evenly spaced SC nucleation sites, among which a subset are crossover sites that show a classical interference distribution. This pattern ensures that SC forms regularly along the entire length of the chromosome as required for the maintenance of homolog pairing while concomitantly having crossover interactions locally embedded within the SC structure as required for both DNA recombination and structural events of chiasma formation. This pattern can be explained by a threshold-based designation and spreading interference process. This model can be generalized to give diverse types of related and/or partially overlapping patterns, in two or more dimensions, for any type of object. PMID:25380597

  3. Juxtaposition of heterozygous and homozygous regions causes reciprocal crossover remodelling via interference during Arabidopsis meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Ziolkowski, Piotr A; Berchowitz, Luke E; Lambing, Christophe; Yelina, Nataliya E; Zhao, Xiaohui; Kelly, Krystyna A; Choi, Kyuha; Ziolkowska, Liliana; June, Viviana; Sanchez-Moran, Eugenio; Franklin, Chris; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Henderson, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis homologous chromosomes undergo crossover recombination. Sequence differences between homologs can locally inhibit crossovers. Despite this, nucleotide diversity and population-scaled recombination are positively correlated in eukaryote genomes. To investigate interactions between heterozygosity and recombination we crossed Arabidopsis lines carrying fluorescent crossover reporters to 32 diverse accessions and observed hybrids with significantly higher and lower crossovers than homozygotes. Using recombinant populations derived from these crosses we observed that heterozygous regions increase crossovers when juxtaposed with homozygous regions, which reciprocally decrease. Total crossovers measured by chiasmata were unchanged when heterozygosity was varied, consistent with homeostatic control. We tested the effects of heterozygosity in mutants where the balance of interfering and non-interfering crossover repair is altered. Crossover remodeling at homozygosity-heterozygosity junctions requires interference, and non-interfering repair is inefficient in heterozygous regions. As a consequence, heterozygous regions show stronger crossover interference. Our findings reveal how varying homolog polymorphism patterns can shape meiotic recombination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03708.001 PMID:25815584

  4. Crossover distribution and high interference for both the X chromosome and an autosome during oogenesis and spermatogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Meneely, Philip M; Farago, Anna F; Kauffman, Tate M

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of both the number and the location of crossovers during meiosis is important for normal chromosome segregation. We used sequence-tagged site polymorphisms to examine the distribution of all crossovers on the X chromosome during oogenesis and on one autosome during both oogenesis and spermatogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. The X chromosome has essentially one crossover during oogenesis, with only three possible double crossover exceptions among 220 recombinant X chromosomes. All three had one of the two crossovers in the same chromosomal interval, suggesting that crossovers in that interval do not cause interference. No other interval was associated with double crossovers. Very high interference was also found on an autosome during oogenesis, implying that each chromosome has only one crossover during oogenesis. During spermatogenesis, recombination on this autosome was reduced by approximately 30% compared to oogenesis, but the relative distribution of the residual crossovers was only slightly different. In contrast to previous results with other autosomes, no double crossover chromosomes were observed. Despite an increased frequency of nonrecombinant chromosomes, segregation of a nonrecombinant autosome during spermatogenesis appears to occur normally. This indicates that an achiasmate segregation system helps to ensure faithful disjunction of autosomes during spermatogenesis. PMID:12454064

  5. Evolution of recombination in eutherian mammals: insights into mechanisms that affect recombination rates and crossover interference

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Joana; Ferretti, Luca; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastián; Capilla, Laia; Farré, Marta; Reis, Fernanda; Oliver-Bonet, Maria; Fernández-Bellón, Hugo; Garcia, Francisca; Garcia-Caldés, Montserrat; Robinson, Terence J.; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    Recombination allows faithful chromosomal segregation during meiosis and contributes to the production of new heritable allelic variants that are essential for the maintenance of genetic diversity. Therefore, an appreciation of how this variation is created and maintained is of critical importance to our understanding of biodiversity and evolutionary change. Here, we analysed the recombination features from species representing the major eutherian taxonomic groups Afrotheria, Rodentia, Primates and Carnivora to better understand the dynamics of mammalian recombination. Our results suggest a phylogenetic component in recombination rates (RRs), which appears to be directional, strongly punctuated and subject to selection. Species that diversified earlier in the evolutionary tree have lower RRs than those from more derived phylogenetic branches. Furthermore, chromosome-specific recombination maps in distantly related taxa show that crossover interference is especially weak in the species with highest RRs detected thus far, the tiger. This is the first example of a mammalian species exhibiting such low levels of crossover interference, highlighting the uniqueness of this species and its relevance for the study of the mechanisms controlling crossover formation, distribution and resolution. PMID:24068360

  6. Statistical Analysis of Crossover Interference Using the Chi-Square Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, H.; Speed, T. P.; McPeek, M. S.

    1995-01-01

    The chi-square model (also known as the gamma model with integer shape parameter) for the occurrence of crossovers along a chromosome was first proposed in the 1940's as a description of interference that was mathematically tractable but without biological basis. Recently, the chi-square model has been reintroduced into the literature from a biological perspective. It arises as a result of certain hypothesized constraints on the resolution of randomly distributed crossover intermediates. In this paper under the assumption of no chromatid interference, the probability for any single spore or tetrad joint recombination pattern is derived under the chi-square model. The method of maximum likelihood is then used to estimate the chi-square parameter m and genetic distances among marker loci. We discuss how to interpret the goodness-of-fit statistics appropriately when there are some recombination classes that have only a small number of observations. Finally, comparisons are made between the chi-square model and some other tractable models in the literature. PMID:7713407

  7. A few of our favorite things: Pairing, the bouquet, crossover interference and evolution of meiosis.

    PubMed

    Zickler, Denise; Kleckner, Nancy

    2016-06-01

    Meiosis presents many important mysteries that await elucidation. Here we discuss two such aspects. First, we consider how the current meiotic program might have evolved. We emphasize the central feature of this program: how homologous chromosomes find one another ("pair") so as to create the connections required for their regular segregation at Meiosis I. Points of emphasis include the facts that: (i) the classical "bouquet stage" is not required for initial homolog contacts in the current evolved meiotic program; and (ii) diverse observations point to commonality between molecules that mediate meiotic inter-homolog interactions and molecules that are integral to centromeres and/or to microtubule organizing centers (a.k.a. spindle pole bodies or centrosomes). Second, we provide an overview of the classical phenomenon of crossover (CO) interference in an effort to bridge the gap between description on the one hand versus logic and mechanism on the other. PMID:26927691

  8. Formation of interference-sensitive meiotic cross-overs requires sufficient DNA leading-strand elongation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiyue; Cheng, Zhihao; Wang, Cong; Hong, Yue; Su, Hang; Wang, Jun; Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Ma, Hong; Wang, Yingxiang

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis halves diploid genomes to haploid and is essential for sexual reproduction in eukaryotes. Meiotic recombination ensures physical association of homologs and their subsequent accurate segregation and results in the redistribution of genetic variations among progeny. Most organisms have two classes of cross-overs (COs): interference-sensitive (type I) and -insensitive (type II) COs. DNA synthesis is essential for meiotic recombination, but whether DNA synthesis has a role in differentiating meiotic CO pathways is unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis POL2A, the homolog of the yeast DNA polymerase-ε (a leading-strand DNA polymerase), is required for plant fertility and meiosis. Mutations in POL2A cause reduced fertility and meiotic defects, including abnormal chromosome association, improper chromosome segregation, and fragmentation. Observation of prophase I cell distribution suggests that pol2a mutants likely delay progression of meiotic recombination. In addition, the residual COs in pol2a have reduced CO interference, and the double mutant of pol2a with mus81, which affects type II COs, displayed more severe defects than either single mutant, indicating that POL2A functions in the type I pathway. We hypothesize that sufficient leading-strand DNA elongation promotes formation of some type I COs. Given that meiotic recombination and DNA synthesis are conserved in divergent eukaryotes, this study and our previous study suggest a novel role for DNA synthesis in the differentiation of meiotic recombination pathways. PMID:26392549

  9. The challenge of evolving stable polyploidy: could an increase in "crossover interference distance" play a central role?

    PubMed

    Bomblies, Kirsten; Jones, Gareth; Franklin, Chris; Zickler, Denise; Kleckner, Nancy

    2016-06-01

    Whole genome duplication is a prominent feature of many highly evolved organisms, especially plants. When duplications occur within species, they yield genomes comprising multiple identical or very similar copies of each chromosome ("autopolyploids"). Such genomes face special challenges during meiosis, the specialized cellular program that underlies gamete formation for sexual reproduction. Comparisons between newly formed (neo)-autotetraploids and fully evolved autotetraploids suggest that these challenges are solved by specific restrictions on the positions of crossover recombination events and, thus, the positions of chiasmata, which govern the segregation of homologs at the first meiotic division. We propose that a critical feature in the evolution of these more effective chiasma patterns is an increase in the effective distance of meiotic crossover interference, which plays a central role in crossover positioning. We discuss the findings in several organisms, including the recent identification of relevant genes in Arabidopsis arenosa, that support this hypothesis. PMID:26753761

  10. Reticulated platelets interfere with flow cytometric reticulocyte counts.

    PubMed

    Ivory, K; Sarria, B; Fairweather-Tait, S J; Hughes, D A

    2007-10-01

    As part of an iron absorption study, we needed to accurately count reticulocytes in the peripheral blood of healthy human volunteers before measuring their enrichment with stable iron isotopes given in an oral dose. Recent studies have suggested the usefulness of reticulocyte counting by flow cytometry, through a combination of differential light scatter and measurement of the stoichiometric binding of thiazole orange (TO) to RNA within the maturing erythrocyte. Using this method we set out to improve the precision of our quantitative analysis by counting more cells, as reticulocytes normally comprise <2% of the red cell population. To ensure exclusion of other cell types, we identified WBCs and platelets with CD16+CD45- allophycocyanin and CD61- phycoerythrin, respectively. After removal of CD16(+) CD45(+) TO(+) WBCs and CD61(+) TO(-) platelets from analysis, the remaining cells were a combination of CD61(-) TO(-) erythrocytes, CD61(-) TO(+) reticulocytes and CD61(+) TO(+) reticulated platelets. Reticulocyte counts were lower after exclusion of CD61(+) TO(+) cells from analysis. They were similarly lower when erythrocyte precursors were positively identified through their glycophorin A expression and TO uptake. We conclude that it is necessary to exclude reticulated platelets from flow cytometric reticulocyte analysis. PMID:17824916

  11. Full counting statistics of the interference contrast from independent Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, Steffen Patrick; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2010-11-15

    We show that the visibility in interference experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates is directly related to the condensate fraction. The probability distribution of the contrast over many runs of an interference experiment thus gives the full counting statistics of the condensed atom number. For two-dimensional Bose gases, we discuss the universal behavior of the probability distribution in the superfluid regime and provide analytical expressions for the distributions for both homogeneous and harmonically trapped samples. They are non-Gaussian and unimodal with a variance that is directly related to the superfluid density. In general, the visibility is a self-averaging observable only in the presence of long-range phase coherence. Close to the transition temperature, the visibility distribution reflects the universal order-parameter distribution in the vicinity of the critical point.

  12. Accurate cell counts in live mouse embryos using optical quadrature and differential interference contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; Newmark, Judith A.; Zhao, Bing; Warner, Carol M.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2006-02-01

    Present imaging techniques used in in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics are unable to produce accurate cell counts in developing embryos past the eight-cell stage. We have developed a method that has produced accurate cell counts in live mouse embryos ranging from 13-25 cells by combining Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) and Optical Quadrature Microscopy. Optical Quadrature Microscopy is an interferometric imaging modality that measures the amplitude and phase of the signal beam that travels through the embryo. The phase is transformed into an image of optical path length difference, which is used to determine the maximum optical path length deviation of a single cell. DIC microscopy gives distinct cell boundaries for cells within the focal plane when other cells do not lie in the path to the objective. Fitting an ellipse to the boundary of a single cell in the DIC image and combining it with the maximum optical path length deviation of a single cell creates an ellipsoidal model cell of optical path length deviation. Subtracting the model cell from the Optical Quadrature image will either show the optical path length deviation of the culture medium or reveal another cell underneath. Once all the boundaries are used in the DIC image, the subtracted Optical Quadrature image is analyzed to determine the cell boundaries of the remaining cells. The final cell count is produced when no more cells can be subtracted. We have produced exact cell counts on 5 samples, which have been validated by Epi-Fluorescence images of Hoechst stained nuclei.

  13. Studying the optical second-order interference pattern formation process with classical light in the photon counting regime.

    PubMed

    He, Yuchen; Liu, Jianbin; Zhang, Songlin; Wang, Wentao; Bai, Bin; Le, Mingnan; Xu, Zhuo

    2015-12-01

    The formation process of the second-order interference pattern is studied experimentally in the photon counting regime by superposing two independent single-mode continuous-wave lasers. Two-photon interference based on the superposition principle in Feynman's path integral theory is employed to interpret the experimental results. The second-order interference pattern of classical light can be formulated when, with high probability, there are only two photons in the interferometer at one time. The studies are helpful in understanding the second-order interference of classical light in the language of photons. The method and conclusions can be generalized to the third- and higher-order interference of light and interference of massive particles. PMID:26831397

  14. Combining optical quadrature and differential interference contrast to facilitate embryonic cell counting with fluorescence imaging for confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; Newmark, Judith A.; Chang, ChihChing; Brooks, Dana H.; Warner, Carol M.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2005-03-01

    The Multifunctional Staring Mode Microscope was developed to permit three modes of imaging for cell counting in mouse embryos: Optical Quadrature, Differential Interference Contrast (DIC), and Fluorescence Imaging. The Optical Quadrature Microscope, consisting of a modified Mach-Zender Interferometer, uses a 632.8 nm laser to measure the amplitude and phase of the signal beam that travels through the embryo. Four cameras, preceded by multiple beamsplitters, are used to read the four interferograms, which are then combined to produce an image of the complex electric field amplitude. The phase of the complex amplitude is then unwrapped using a 2-D phase unwrap algorithm and images of optical path length are produced. To combine the additional modes of DIC and Fluorescence Imaging with the Optical Quadrature Microscope, a 632.8 nm narrow bandpass beamsplitter was placed at the output of the microscope. This allows the laser light to continue through the Mach-Zender while all other wavelengths are reflected at 90 degrees to another camera. This was effective in combining the three modes as the fluorescence wavelength for the Hoechst stain is well below the bandpass window of the beamsplitter. Both live and fixed samples have been successfully imaged in all three modes. Accuracy in cell counting was achieved by using the DIC image for detecting cell boundaries and the Optical Quadrature image for phase mapping to determine where cells overlap. The final results were verified by Hoechst fluorescence imaging to count the individual nuclei. Algorithms are currently being refined so larger cell counts can be done more efficiently.

  15. Chip-interleaved optical code division multiple access relying on a photon-counting iterative successive interference canceller for free-space optical channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Zheng, Xiaowei; Zhang, Rong; Hanzo, Lajos

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we design a novel Poisson photon-counting based iterative successive interference cancellation (SIC) scheme for transmission over free-space optical (FSO) channels in the presence of both multiple access interference (MAI) as well as Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence fading, shot-noise and background light. Our simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme exhibits a strong MAI suppression capability. Importantly, an order of magnitude of BER improvements may be achieved compared to the conventional chip-level optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) photon-counting detector. PMID:23842379

  16. Hot Regions of Noninterfering Crossovers Coexist with a Nonuniformly Interfering Pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Basu-Roy, Sayantani; Gauthier, Franck; Giraut, Laurène; Mézard, Christine; Falque, Matthieu; Martin, Olivier C.

    2013-01-01

    In most organisms that have been studied, crossovers formed during meiosis exhibit interference: nearby crossovers are rare. Here we provide an in-depth study of crossover interference in Arabidopsis thaliana, examining crossovers genome-wide in >1500 backcrosses for both male and female meiosis. This unique data set allows us to take a two-pathway modeling approach based on superposing a fraction p of noninterfering crossovers and a fraction (1 − p) of interfering crossovers generated using the gamma model characterized by its interference strength nu. Within this framework, we fit the two-pathway model to the data and compare crossover interference strength between chromosomes and then along chromosomes. We find that the interfering pathway has markedly higher interference strength nu in female than in male meiosis and also that male meiosis has a higher proportion p of noninterfering crossovers. Furthermore, we test for possible intrachromosomal variations of nu and p. Our conclusion is that there are clear differences between left and right arms as well as between central and peripheral regions. Finally, statistical tests unveil a genome-wide picture of small-scale heterogeneities, pointing to the existence of hot regions in the genome where crossovers form preferentially without interference. PMID:24026099

  17. Modeling Interference in Genetic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    McPeek, M. S.; Speed, T. P.

    1995-01-01

    In analyzing genetic linkage data it is common to assume that the locations of crossovers along a chromosome follow a Poisson process, whereas it has long been known that this assumption does not fit the data. In many organisms it appears that the presence of a crossover inhibits the formation of another nearby, a phenomenon known as ``interference.'' We discuss several point process models for recombination that incorporate position interference but assume no chromatid interference. Using stochastic simulation, we are able to fit the models to a multilocus Drosophila dataset by the method of maximum likelihood. We find that some biologically inspired point process models incorporating one or two additional parameters provide a dramatically better fit to the data than the usual ``no-interference'' Poisson model. PMID:7713406

  18. RNA Interference

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > RNA Interference Fact Sheet RNA Interference Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is RNA interference? RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process ...

  19. Low serum enterolactone concentration is associated with low colonic Lactobacillus-Enterococcus counts in men but is not affected by a synbiotic mixture in a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over intervention study.

    PubMed

    Holma, Reetta; Kekkonen, Riina A; Hatakka, Katja; Poussa, Tuija; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Adlercreutz, Herman; Korpela, Riitta

    2014-01-28

    The aims of the present study were to assess the possible differences in faecal microbiota between men with a low serum enterolactone concentration and those with a high concentration, and to investigate the impact of a synbiotic mixture on serum enterolactone concentration in men with a low concentration. We compared faecal microbiota between ten men with the lowest serum enterolactone concentration and ten men with the highest concentration at recruitment (n 84). Furthermore, we carried out a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over intervention study (6-week intervention periods and 4-week washout period) to investigate the impact of a synbiotic mixture (two Lactobacillus strains, one Bifidobacterium strain, one Propionibacterium strain and galacto-oligosaccharides (32 g/l)) on serum enterolactone concentration in fifty-two men who had a concentration < 20 nmol/l. Serum sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration was measured at the end of the first intervention period. Men with a low serum enterolactone concentration when compared with those with a high concentration had less faecal bacteria, especially those belonging to the Lactobacillus-Enterococcus group (median 8·2 (interquartile range 7·8-8·4) log10 colony-forming units/g v. median 8·8 (interquartile range 8·5-8·9) log10 colony-forming units/g, P= 0·009). The synbiotic mixture that was used did not have a significant effect on serum enterolactone (synbiotic v. placebo ratio 0·96 (95 % CI 0·76, 1·22), P= 0·724) or serum sensitive CRP (synbiotic v. placebo ratio 0·99 (95 % CI 0·74, 1·33), P= 0·954) concentration. Men with a low serum enterolactone concentration harbour less colonic bacteria, especially those belonging to the Lactobacillus-Enterococcus group. A synbiotic mixture does not increase serum enterolactone concentration. PMID:23919920

  20. Cell counting.

    PubMed

    Phelan, M C; Lawler, G

    2001-05-01

    This unit presents protocols for counting cells using either a hemacytometer or electronically using a Coulter counter. Cell counting with a hemacytometer permits effective discrimination of live from dead cells using trypan blue exclusion. In addition, the procedure is less subject to errors arising from cell clumping or size heterogeneity. Counting cells is more quickly and easily performed using an electronic counter, but live-dead discrimination is unreliable. Cell populations containing large numbers of dead cells and/or cell clumps are difficult to count accurately. In addition, electronic counting requires resetting of the instrument for cell populations of different sizes; heterogeneous populations can give rise to inaccurate counts, and resting and activated cells may require counting at separate settings. In general, electronic cell counting is best performed on fresh peripheral blood cells. PMID:18770655

  1. Crossover sexual offenses.

    PubMed

    Heil, Peggy; Ahlmeyer, Sean; Simons, Dominique

    2003-10-01

    Crossover sexual offenses are defined as those in which victims are from multiple age, gender, and relationship categories. This study investigates admissions of crossover sexual offending from sex offenders participating in treatment who received polygraph testing. For 223 incarcerated and 266 paroled sexual offenders, sexual offenses were recorded from criminal history records and admissions during treatment coupled with polygraph testing. The majority of incarcerated offenders admitted to sexually assaulting both children and adults from multiple relationship types. In addition, there was a substantial increase in offenders admitting to sexually assaulting victims from both genders. In a group of incarcerated offenders who sexually assaulted children, the majority of offenders admitted to sexually assaulting both relatives and nonrelatives, and there was a substantial increase in the offenders admitting to assaulting both male and female children. Although similar trends were observed for the sample of parolees, the rates were far less dramatic. Parolees appeared to have greater levels of denial, had participated in fewer treatment sessions, and perceived greater supervision restrictions as a result of admitting additional offenses. These findings support previous research indicating that many sexual offenders do not exclusively offend against a preferred victim type. PMID:14571530

  2. Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H.

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  3. Crossover studies with survival outcomes.

    PubMed

    Buyze, Jozefien; Goetghebeur, Els

    2013-12-01

    Crossover designs are well known to have major advantages when comparing the effect of two treatments which do not interact. With a right-censored survival endpoint, however, this design is quickly abandoned in favour of the more costly parallel design. Motivated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention studies which lacked power, we evaluate what may be gained in this setting and compare parallel with crossover designs. In a heterogeneous population, we find and explain a substantial increase in power for the crossover study using a non-parametric logrank test. With frailties in a proportional hazards model, crossover designs equally lead to substantially smaller variance for the subject-specific hazard ratio (HR), while the population-averaged HR sees negligible gain. Its efficiency benefit is recovered when the population-averaged HR is reconstructed from estimated subject-specific hazard rates. We derive the time point for treatment crossover that optimizes efficiency and end with the analysis of two recent HIV prevention trials. We find that a Cellulose sulphate trial could have hardly gained efficiency from a crossover design, while a Nonoxynol-9 trial stood to gain substantial power. We conclude that there is a role for effective crossover designs in important classes of survival problems. PMID:21715438

  4. Crossover scaling for moments in multifractal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alstrom, Preben; Hansen, Lars K.; Rasmussen, Dan R.

    1987-07-01

    Invoking the formalism known from second-order phase transitions and thermodynamics, we analyze the step structure obtained at transitions to chaos in dynamical systems or where Cantor sets evolve in general. As examples, we treat the skew tent map analytically and Arnold's sine map numerically, but the presented formalism employed for embedding dimension d=1 is readily extended to higher dimensions. We outline the scaling behavior for the counting, the measure, and higher moments. In particular, we consider the crossover exponent ν which enters the scaling functions and for the measure is related to the critical exponent β and fractal dimension D. We emphasize that the general presence of a multifractal structure results in a value of ν which depends on from which moment it is defined, and deduce the saturation value of ν in the high-moment limit. Also, we derive the connection to thermodynamical functions as pressure, entropy, and escape rate. Finally, we examine the scaling behavior of the moments and scaling relations for exponents when either a ``ghost'' field or noise is introduced as a conjugated field involving the critical exponents α, γ, and δ as well as the crossover exponent μ.

  5. Counting Penguins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  6. RBC count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drugs that can increase the RBC count include: Gentamicin Methyldopa Lower-than-normal numbers of RBCs may be due to: Anemia Bleeding Bone marrow failure (for example, from radiation, toxins, or tumor) Deficiency of a hormone called erythropoietin (caused by ...

  7. Counting Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the…

  8. Genetic Interference: Don’t Stand So Close to Me

    PubMed Central

    Berchowitz, Luke E; Copenhaver, Gregory P

    2010-01-01

    Meiosis is a dynamic process during which chromosomes undergo condensation, pairing, crossing-over and disjunction. Stringent regulation of the distribution and quantity of meiotic crossovers is critical for proper chromosome segregation in many organisms. In humans, aberrant crossover placement and the failure to faithfully segregate meiotic chromosomes often results in severe genetic disorders such as Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome. In most sexually reproducing organisms, crossovers are more evenly spaced than would be expected from a random distribution. This phenomenon, termed interference, was first reported in the early 20th century by Drosophila geneticists and has been subsequently observed in a vast range of organisms from yeasts to humans. Yet, many questions regarding the behavior and mechanism of interference remain poorly understood. In this review, we examine results new and old, from a wide range of organisms, to begin to understand the progress and remaining challenges to understanding the fundamental unanswered questions regarding genetic interference. PMID:20885817

  9. Microelectronic superconducting crossover and coil

    DOEpatents

    Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J.

    1994-03-01

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T[sub c] superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO[sub 3]; and a third high T[sub c] superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps and which can be opened to the atmosphere between depositions. 13 figures.

  10. Microelectronic superconducting crossover and coil

    DOEpatents

    Wellstood, Frederick C.; Kingston, John J.; Clarke, John

    1994-01-01

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T.sub.c superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO.sub.3 ; and a third high T.sub.c superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps and which can be opened to the atmosphere between depositions.

  11. The BCS-BEC Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Meera M.

    2015-09-01

    This chapter presents the crossover from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) state of weakly correlated pairs of fermions to the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of diatomic molecules in the atomic Fermi gas. Our aim is to provide a pedagogical review of the BCS-BEC crossover, with an emphasis on the basic concepts, particularly those that are not generally known or are difficult to find in the literature. We shall not attempt to give an exhaustive survey of current research in the limited space here; where possible, we will direct the reader to more extensive reviews.

  12. Reticulocyte Count Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reticulocyte Count Related tests: Red Blood Cell Count ; Hemoglobin ; Hematocrit ; Complete Blood Count ; Blood Smear ; Erythropoietin ; Vitamin ... on a complete blood count (CBC) , RBC count , hemoglobin or hematocrit , to help determine the cause To ...

  13. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , White ...

  14. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Matthew P; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5-10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies. PMID:27577091

  15. An Analysis of Semantic Aware Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uy, Nguyen Quang; Hoai, Nguyen Xuan; O'Neill, Michael; McKay, Bob; Galván-López, Edgar

    It is well-known that the crossover operator plays an important role in Genetic Programming (GP). In Standard Crossover (SC), semantics are not used to guide the selection of the crossover points, which are generated randomly. This lack of semantic information is the main cause of destructive effects from SC (e.g., children having lower fitness than their parents). Recently, we proposed a new semantic based crossover known GP called Semantic Aware Crossover (SAC) [25]. We show that SAC outperforms SC in solving a class of real-value symbolic regression problems. We clarify the effect of SAC on GP search in increasing the semantic diversity of the population, thus helping to reduce the destructive effects of crossover in GP.

  16. Becoming a crossover-competent DSB.

    PubMed

    Lake, Cathleen M; Hawley, R Scott

    2016-06-01

    The proper execution of meiotic recombination (or crossing over) is essential for chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division, and thus this process is regulated by multiple, and often elaborate, mechanisms. Meiotic recombination begins with the programmed induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), of which only a subset are selected to be repaired into crossovers. This crossover selection process is carried out by a number of pro-crossover proteins that regulate the fashion in which DSBs are repaired. Here, we highlight recent studies regarding the process of DSB fate selection by a family of pro-crossover proteins known as the Zip-3 homologs. PMID:26806636

  17. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  18. 24 CFR 3285.701 - Electrical crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrical crossovers. 3285.701... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Electrical Systems and Equipment § 3285.701 Electrical crossovers. Multi-section homes with electrical wiring in more than one section...

  19. 24 CFR 3285.701 - Electrical crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrical crossovers. 3285.701... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Electrical Systems and Equipment § 3285.701 Electrical crossovers. Multi-section homes with electrical wiring in more than one section...

  20. 24 CFR 3285.701 - Electrical crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrical crossovers. 3285.701... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Electrical Systems and Equipment § 3285.701 Electrical crossovers. Multi-section homes with electrical wiring in more than one section...

  1. 24 CFR 3285.701 - Electrical crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrical crossovers. 3285.701... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Electrical Systems and Equipment § 3285.701 Electrical crossovers. Multi-section homes with electrical wiring in more than one section...

  2. 24 CFR 3285.701 - Electrical crossovers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrical crossovers. 3285.701... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Electrical Systems and Equipment § 3285.701 Electrical crossovers. Multi-section homes with electrical wiring in more than one section...

  3. Dimensional crossover of nonrelativistic bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, Soeren; Boettcher, Igor; Wetterich, Christof

    2016-06-01

    We investigate how confining a transverse spatial dimension influences the few- and many-body properties of nonrelativistic bosons with pointlike interactions. Our main focus is on the dimensional crossover from three to two dimensions, which is of relevance for ultracold-atom experiments. Using functional-renormalization-group equations and T -matrix calculations we study how the phase transition temperature changes as a function of the spatial extent of the transverse dimension and relate the three- and two-dimensional s -wave scattering lengths. The analysis reveals how the properties of the lower-dimensional system are inherited from the higher-dimensional one during renormalization-group evolution. We limit the discussion to confinements in a potential well with periodic boundary conditions and argue why this qualitatively captures the physics of other compactifications such as transverse harmonic confinement as in cold-atom experiments.

  4. Herschel's Interference Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkalskis, Benjamin S.; Freeman, J. Reuben

    2000-01-01

    Describes Herschel's demonstration of interference arising from many coherent rays. Presents a method for students to reproduce this demonstration and obtain beautiful multiple-beam interference patterns. (CCM)

  5. Counting statistics of many-particle quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Klaus; Tichy, Malte C.; Buchleitner, Andreas; Mintert, Florian; Konrad, Thomas

    2011-06-15

    We study quantum walks of many noninteracting particles on a beam splitter array as a paradigmatic testing ground for the competition of single- and many-particle interference in a multimode system. We derive a general expression for multimode particle-number correlation functions, valid for bosons and fermions, and infer pronounced signatures of many-particle interferences in the counting statistics.

  6. Observation of a crossover in kinetic aggregation of Palladium colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafari, M.; Ranjbar, M.; Rouhani, S.

    2015-10-01

    We use field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) to investigate the growth of palladium colloids over the surface of thin films of WO3/glass. The film is prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) at different temperatures. A PdCl2 (aq) droplet is injected on the surface and in the presence of steam hydrogen the droplet is dried through a reduction reaction process. Two distinct aggregation regimes of palladium colloids are observed over the substrates. We argue that the change in aggregation dynamics emerges when the measured water drop Contact Angel (CA) for the WO3/glass thin films passes a certain threshold value, namely CA ≈ 46°, where a crossover in kinetic aggregation of palladium colloids occurs. Our results suggest that the mass fractal dimension of palladium aggregates follows a power-law behavior. The fractal dimension (Df) in the fast aggregation regime, where the measured CA values vary from 27° up to 46° according to different substrate deposition temperatures, is Df = 1.75(± 0.02) - the value of Df is in excellent agreement with kinetic aggregation of other colloidal systems in fast aggregation regime. Whereas for the slow aggregation regime, with CA = 58°, the fractal dimension changes abruptly to Df = 1.92(± 0.03). We have also used a modified Box-Counting method to calculate fractal dimension of gray-level images and observe that the crossover at around CA ≈ 46° remains unchanged.

  7. The Big Pumpkin Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplestone-Loomis, Lenny

    1981-01-01

    Pumpkin seeds are counted after students convert pumpkins to jack-o-lanterns. Among the activities involved, pupils learn to count by 10s, make estimates, and to construct a visual representation of 1,000. (MP)

  8. Spin-crossover molecule based thermoelectric junction

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti; Parida, Prakash; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-05-11

    Using ab-initio numerical methods, we explore the spin-dependent transport and thermoelectric properties of a spin-crossover molecule (i.e., iron complex of 2-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-(1H-tetrazole-5-yl)pyridine) based nano-junction. We demonstrate a large magnetoresistance, efficient conductance-switching, and spin-filter activity in this molecule-based two-terminal device. The spin-crossover process also modulates the thermoelectric entities. It can efficiently switch the magnitude as well as spin-polarization of the thermocurrent. We find that thermocurrent is changed by ∼4 orders of magnitude upon spin-crossover. Moreover, it also substantially affects the thermopower and consequently, the device shows extremely efficient spin-crossover magnetothermopower generation. Furthermore, by tuning the chemical potential of electrodes into a certain range, a pure spin-thermopower can be achieved for the high-spin state. Finally, the reasonably large values of figure-of-merit in the presence and absence of phonon demonstrate a large heat-to-voltage conversion efficiency of the device. We believe that our study will pave an alternative way of tuning the transport and thermoelectric properties through the spin-crossover process and can have potential applications in generation of spin-dependent current, information storage, and processing.

  9. Multiferroic crossover in perovskite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, L.; Cui, X. Y.; Ringer, S. P.; Stampfl, C.

    2016-04-01

    drives the ferroelectric state (Kv). The recovery of the lattice instability for high-spin d5-d7 and d8 cations is due to (i) a reduction in K0 due to a significant volume increase arising from population of the σ -bonded axial d eg orbitals, and (ii) an increase in the Kv contribution arising from increased p -d hybridization; our calculations suggest that the former mechanism is dominant. Surprisingly, we are able to show that, in some cases unpaired electron spins actually drive ferroelectricity, rather than inhibit it, which represents a shift in the understanding of how ferroelectricity and magnetism interact in perovskite oxides. It follows, that for the case of BiCoO3, the Co3 + ion plays a major role in the ferroelectric lattice instability. Importantly, the ferroelectric polarization is greatly enhanced when the Co3 + ion is in the high-spin state, when compared to the nonmagnetic, low-spin state, and a large coupling of the electric and magnetic polarization is present. Generally, for d5-d7 B cations in A B O3 perovskites, an inherent and remarkably strong magnetoelectric coupling exists via the multiferroic crossover effect, whereby switching the spin state strongly affects the ferroelectric polarization and, potentially, manipulation of the polarization with an externally applied electric field could induce a spin-state transition. This novel effect is demonstrated for BiCoO3, for which the ground spin state is switched by reducing the internal ferroelectric polarization. These results provide a deeper insight into perovskite ferroelectrics and multiferroics.

  10. Is Family-to-Work Interference Related to Co-Workers' Work Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Euwema, Martin C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have convincingly shown that employees' family lives can affect their work outcomes. We investigate whether family-to-work interference (FWI) experienced by the employee also affects the work outcomes of a co-worker. We predict that the employee's FWI has an effect on the co-worker's outcomes through the crossover of positive and…

  11. Crossover Pedagogy: The Collaborative Search for Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the author's cross-pedagogical approach to co-teaching with student affairs colleagues. The central goal of this approach is to help students create meaning for their lives. The author also gives an account of an incident that occurred in one seminar and illustrates the benefits of a crossover approach.

  12. The Design of Cluster Randomized Crossover Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rietbergen, Charlotte; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2011-01-01

    The inefficiency induced by between-cluster variation in cluster randomized (CR) trials can be reduced by implementing a crossover (CO) design. In a simple CO trial, each subject receives each treatment in random order. A powerful characteristic of this design is that each subject serves as its own control. In a CR CO trial, clusters of subjects…

  13. Cedarwood: cross-over pressure research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to determine the cross-over pressure for cedarwood oil in carbon dioxide. A closed stirrer reactor with an in-line loop connected to the injector of a GC was used to measure the concentration of cedarwood oil in the carbon dioxide. Both neat cedarwood oil as ...

  14. Counting Sheep in Basque

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Frank P.

    1975-01-01

    Demonstrates the interplay of a cognitive system, the Basque numerative system, and a behavioral one, counting sheep. The significant features of the Basque numerative system are analyzed; then it is shown how use of these features facilitates the counting of sheep on open ranges by Basque sheep farmers in California. (Author/RM)

  15. The Makah Counting Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinn, Arlington A., Jr.

    The first edition of the counting workbook centers around the numbers from 1 to 100 and focuses on number and set concepts. The workbook introduces the Makah spelling of each number and reinforces the spelling with exercises such as matching words to numbers, writing the words, counting symbols, and circling the correct number. Spaced throughout…

  16. Complexities of Counting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stake, Bernadine Evans

    This document focuses on one child's skip counting methods. The pupil, a second grade student at Steuben School, in Kankakee, Illinois, was interviewed as she made several attempts at counting twenty-five poker chips on a circular piece of paper. The interview was part of a larger study of "Children's Conceptions of Number and Numeral," funded by…

  17. Wind tunnel wall interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Perry A.; Mineck, Raymond E.; Barnwell, Richard W.; Kemp, William B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    About a decade ago, interest in alleviating wind tunnel wall interference was renewed by advances in computational aerodynamics, concepts of adaptive test section walls, and plans for high Reynolds number transonic test facilities. Selection of NASA Langley cryogenic concept for the National Transonic Facility (NTF) tended to focus the renewed wall interference efforts. A brief overview and current status of some Langley sponsored transonic wind tunnel wall interference research are presented. Included are continuing efforts in basic wall flow studies, wall interference assessment/correction procedures, and adaptive wall technology.

  18. Thick Film Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trefil, James

    1983-01-01

    Discusses why interference effects cannot be seen with a thick film, starting with a review of the origin of interference patterns in thin films. Considers properties of materials in films, properties of the light source, and the nature of light. (JN)

  19. Sublattice counting and orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Amihay; Orlando, Domenico; Reffert, Susanne

    2010-06-01

    Abelian orbifolds of mathbb{C}3 are known to be encoded by hexagonal brane tilings. To date it is not known how to count all such orbifolds. We fill this gap by employing number theoretic techniques from crystallography, and by making use of Polya's Enumeration Theorem. The results turn out to be beautifully encoded in terms of partition functions and Dirichlet series. The same methods apply to counting orbifolds of any toric non-compact Calabi-Yau singularity. As additional examples, we count the orbifolds of the conifold, of the L aba theories, and of mathbb{C}4.

  20. Inventory count strategies.

    PubMed

    Springer, W H

    1996-02-01

    An important principle of accounting is that asset inventory needs to be correctly valued to ensure that the financial statements of the institution are accurate. Errors is recording the value of ending inventory in one fiscal year result in errors to published financial statements for that year as well as the subsequent fiscal year. Therefore, it is important that accurate physical counts be periodically taken. It is equally important that any system being used to generate inventory valuation, reordering or management reports be based on consistently accurate on-hand balances. At the foundation of conducting an accurate physical count of an inventory is a comprehensive understanding of the process coupled with a written plan. This article presents a guideline of the physical count processes involved in a traditional double-count approach. PMID:10165241

  1. Calorie count - Alcoholic beverages

    MedlinePlus

    ... want to watch how much you drink. Cocktails mixed with soda, cream, or ice cream can have especially high calorie counts. If you find you are having trouble cutting back on alcohol , talk with your doctor. Here is a list ...

  2. Blood Count Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Your blood contains red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in your blood. This helps doctors check on your overall health. ...

  3. Blood Count Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in ... helps doctors check on your overall health. The tests can also help to diagnose diseases and conditions ...

  4. Counting Knights and Knaves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin,Oscar; Roberts, Gerri M.

    2013-01-01

    To understand better some of the classic knights and knaves puzzles, we count them. Doing so reveals a surprising connection between puzzles and solutions, and highlights some beautiful combinatorial identities.

  5. Crossover from quantum to classical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morr, Dirk K.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the crossover from quantum to classical transport has become of fundamental importance not only for technological applications due to the creation of sub-10-nm transistors - an important building block of our modern life - but also for elucidating the role played by quantum mechanics in the evolutionary fitness of biological complexes. This article provides a basic introduction into the nature of charge and energy transport in the quantum and classical regimes. It discusses the characteristic transport properties in both limits and demonstrates how they can be connected through the loss of quantum mechanical coherence. The salient features of the crossover physics are identified, and their importance in opening new transport regimes and in understanding efficient and robust energy transport in biological complexes are demonstrated.

  6. JavaGenes: Evolving Graphs with Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Atsatt, Sean; Lawton, John; Wipke, Todd

    2000-01-01

    Genetic algorithms usually use string or tree representations. We have developed a novel crossover operator for a directed and undirected graph representation, and used this operator to evolve molecules and circuits. Unlike strings or trees, a single point in the representation cannot divide every possible graph into two parts, because graphs may contain cycles. Thus, the crossover operator is non-trivial. A steady-state, tournament selection genetic algorithm code (JavaGenes) was written to implement and test the graph crossover operator. All runs were executed by cycle-scavagging on networked workstations using the Condor batch processing system. The JavaGenes code has evolved pharmaceutical drug molecules and simple digital circuits. Results to date suggest that JavaGenes can evolve moderate sized drug molecules and very small circuits in reasonable time. The algorithm has greater difficulty with somewhat larger circuits, suggesting that directed graphs (circuits) are more difficult to evolve than undirected graphs (molecules), although necessary differences in the crossover operator may also explain the results. In principle, JavaGenes should be able to evolve other graph-representable systems, such as transportation networks, metabolic pathways, and computer networks. However, large graphs evolve significantly slower than smaller graphs, presumably because the space-of-all-graphs explodes combinatorially with graph size. Since the representation strongly affects genetic algorithm performance, adding graphs to the evolutionary programmer's bag-of-tricks should be beneficial. Also, since graph evolution operates directly on the phenotype, the genotype-phenotype translation step, common in genetic algorithm work, is eliminated.

  7. Particle and Photon Detection: Counting and Energy Measurement.

    PubMed

    Janesick, James; Tower, John

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental limits for photon counting and photon energy measurement are reviewed for CCD and CMOS imagers. The challenges to extend photon counting into the visible/nIR wavelengths and achieve energy measurement in the UV with specific read noise requirements are discussed. Pixel flicker and random telegraph noise sources are highlighted along with various methods used in reducing their contribution on the sensor's read noise floor. Practical requirements for quantum efficiency, charge collection efficiency, and charge transfer efficiency that interfere with photon counting performance are discussed. Lastly we will review current efforts in reducing flicker noise head-on, in hopes to drive read noise substantially below 1 carrier rms. PMID:27187398

  8. Quantum-classical crossover in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, Janos

    2006-09-15

    A classical field theory is proposed for the electric current and the electromagnetic field interpolating between microscopic and macroscopic domains. It represents a generalization of the density functional for the dynamics of the current and the electromagnetic field in the quantum side of the crossover and reproduces standard classical electrodynamics on the other side. The effective action derived in the closed time path formalism and the equations of motion follow from the variational principle. The polarization of the Dirac-sea can be taken into account in the quadratic approximation of the action by the introduction of the deplacement field strengths as in conventional classical electrodynamics. Decoherence appears naturally as a simple one-loop effect in this formalism. It is argued that the radiation time arrow is generated from the quantum boundary conditions in time by decoherence at the quantum-classical crossover and the Abraham-Lorentz force arises from the accelerating charge or from other charges in the macroscopic or the microscopic side, respectively. The functional form of the quantum renormalization group, the generalization of the renormalization group method for the density matrix, is proposed to follow the scale dependence through the quantum-classical crossover in a systematical manner.

  9. Dynamical Landau theory of the glass crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Tommaso

    2016-07-01

    I introduce a dynamical field theory to describe the glassy behavior in supercooled liquids. The mean-field approximation of the theory predicts a dynamical arrest transition, as in the ideal mode-coupling theory and mean-field discontinuous spin-glass models. Instead, beyond the mean-field approximation, the theory predicts that the transition is avoided and transformed into a crossover, as observed in experiments and simulations. To go beyond mean-field, a standard perturbative loop expansion is performed at first. Approaching the ideal critical point this expansion is divergent at all orders and I show that the leading divergent term at any given order is the same as a dynamical stochastic equation, called stochastic-beta relaxation (SBR) in Europhys. Lett. 106, 56003 (2014), 10.1209/0295-5075/106/56003. At variance with the original theory, SBR can be studied beyond mean-field directly, without the need to resort to a perturbative expansion. Thus it provides a qualitative and quantitative description of the dynamical crossover. For consistency reasons, it is important to establish the connection between the dynamical field theory and SBR beyond perturbation theory. This can be done with the help of a stronger result: the dynamical field theory is exactly equivalent to a theory with quenched disorder. Qualitatively, the nonperturbative mechanism leading to the crossover is therefore the same as the mechanism of SBR. Quantitatively, SBR is equivalent to making the mean-field approximation once the quenched disorder has been generated.

  10. Linkage Mapping Reveals Strong Chiasma Interference in Sockeye Salmon: Implications for Interpreting Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Limborg, Morten T.; Waples, Ryan K.; Allendorf, Fred W.; Seeb, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is fundamental for generating new genetic variation and for securing proper disjunction. Further, recombination plays an essential role during the rediploidization process of polyploid-origin genomes because crossovers between pairs of homeologous chromosomes retain duplicated regions. A better understanding of how recombination affects genome evolution is crucial for interpreting genomic data; unfortunately, current knowledge mainly originates from a few model species. Salmonid fishes provide a valuable system for studying the effects of recombination in nonmodel species. Salmonid females generally produce thousands of embryos, providing large families for conducting inheritance studies. Further, salmonid genomes are currently rediploidizing after a whole genome duplication and can serve as models for studying the role of homeologous crossovers on genome evolution. Here, we present a detailed interrogation of recombination patterns in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). First, we use RAD sequencing of haploid and diploid gynogenetic families to construct a dense linkage map that includes paralogous loci and location of centromeres. We find a nonrandom distribution of paralogs that mainly cluster in extended regions distally located on 11 different chromosomes, consistent with ongoing homeologous recombination in these regions. We also estimate the strength of interference across each chromosome; results reveal strong interference and crossovers are mostly limited to one per arm. Interference was further shown to continue across centromeres, but metacentric chromosomes generally had at least one crossover on each arm. We discuss the relevance of these findings for both mapping and population genomic studies. PMID:26384769

  11. Interference and Polarized Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charas, Seymour

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a demonstration of interference phenomena using three sheets of polaroid material, a light source, and a light meter. Describes instructional procedures with mathematical expressions and a diagram. (YP)

  12. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOEpatents

    Swansen, James E.

    1987-01-01

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a .sup.3 He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output ) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  13. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOEpatents

    Swansen, J.E.

    1985-03-05

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a /sup 3/He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  14. Whose interests count?

    PubMed

    Brudney, Daniel; Lantos, John D

    2014-10-01

    Whose interests should count and how should various interests be balanced at the pediatric patient's bedside? The interests of the child patient clearly count. Recently, however, many authors have argued that the family's interests also count. But how should we think about the interests of others? What does it mean to talk about "the family" in this context? Does it really just mean the interests of each individual family member? Or is the family itself a moral entity that has interests of its own independent of the interests of each of its members? Are such interests important only as they affect the patient's interest or also for their own sake? In this special supplement to Pediatrics, a group of pediatricians, philosophers, and lawyers grapple with these questions. They examine these issues from different angles and reach different conclusions. Jointly, they demonstrate the ethical importance and, above all, the ethical complexity of the family's role at the bedside. PMID:25274878

  15. Photon counting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoli, Nazif; Skenderović, Hrvoje; Stipčević, Mario; Pavičić, Mladen

    2016-05-01

    Digital holography uses electronic sensors for hologram recording and numerical method for hologram reconstruction enabling thus the development of advanced holography applications. However, in some cases, the useful information is concealed in a very wide dynamic range of illumination intensities and successful recording requires an appropriate dynamic range of the sensor. An effective solution to this problem is the use of a photon-counting detector. Such detectors possess counting rates of the order of tens to hundreds of millions counts per second, but conditions of recording holograms have to be investigated in greater detail. Here, we summarize our main findings on this problem. First, conditions for optimum recording of digital holograms for detecting a signal significantly below detector's noise are analyzed in terms of the most important holographic measures. Second, for time-averaged digital holograms, optimum recordings were investigated for exposures shorter than the vibration cycle. In both cases, these conditions are studied by simulations and experiments.

  16. The joy of six: how to control your crossovers.

    PubMed

    Globus, Samuel T; Keeney, Scott

    2012-03-30

    Meiotic cells tightly regulate the number and distribution of crossovers to promote accurate chromosome segregation. Yokoo and colleagues uncover a metazoan-specific, cyclin-like protein that is crucial for crossover formation. They utilize this protein's unique properties to explore a remarkable example of biological numerology, whereby nearly every meiotic cell in C. elegans makes precisely six crossovers, one for each of its six chromosome pairs. PMID:22464316

  17. Accounting for What Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Joseph O.; Ferran, Joan E.; Martin, Katharine Y.

    2003-01-01

    No Child Left Behind legislation makes it clear that outside evaluators determine what gets taught in the classroom. It is important to ensure they measure what truly counts in school. This fact is poignantly and sadly true for the under funded, poorly resourced, "low performing" schools that may be hammered by administration accountants in the…

  18. Making Research Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleby, Yvon; Kerwin, Marie; McCulloch, Sue

    2008-01-01

    Making research count in the education sector is often difficult to achieve as people, quite properly, question its relevance, purpose and impact. One of the significant barriers to research supporting practice in the lifelong learning sector is that funded research carried out in higher education institutions is frequently privileged above…

  19. LOW ENERGY COUNTING CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, P.M.

    1960-02-16

    A beta particle counter adapted to use an end window made of polyethylene terephthalate was designed. The extreme thinness of the film results in a correspondingly high transmission of incident low-energy beta particles by the window. As a consequence, the counting efficiency of the present counter is over 40% greater than counters using conventional mica end windows.

  20. Counting digital filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zohar, S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Several embodiments of a counting digital filter of the non-recursive type are disclosed. In each embodiment two registers, at least one of which is a shift register, are included. The shift register received j sub x-bit data input words bit by bit. The kth data word is represented by the integer.

  1. What Counts as Evidence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty Stahl, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Each disciplinary community has its own criteria for determining what counts as evidence of knowledge in their academic field. The criteria influence the ways that a community's knowledge is created, communicated, and evaluated. Situating reading, writing, and language instruction within the content areas enables teachers to explicitly…

  2. Combined fluorescent and electron microscopic imaging unveils the specific properties of two classes of meiotic crossovers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lorinda K; Lohmiller, Leslie D; Tang, Xiaomin; Hammond, D Boyd; Javernick, Lauren; Shearer, Lindsay; Basu-Roy, Sayantani; Martin, Olivier C; Falque, Matthieu

    2014-09-16

    Crossovers (COs) shuffle genetic information and allow balanced segregation of homologous chromosomes during the first division of meiosis. In several organisms, mutants demonstrate that two molecularly distinct pathways produce COs. One pathway produces class I COs that exhibit interference (lowered probability of nearby COs), and the other pathway produces class II COs with little or no interference. However, the relative contributions, genomic distributions, and interactions of these two pathways are essentially unknown in nonmutant organisms because marker segregation only indicates that a CO has occurred, not its class type. Here, we combine the efficiency of light microscopy for revealing cellular functions using fluorescent probes with the high resolution of electron microscopy to localize and characterize COs in the same sample of meiotic pachytene chromosomes from wild-type tomato. To our knowledge, for the first time, every CO along each chromosome can be identified by class to unveil specific characteristics of each pathway. We find that class I and II COs have different recombination profiles along chromosomes. In particular, class II COs, which represent about 18% of all COs, exhibit no interference and are disproportionately represented in pericentric heterochromatin, a feature potentially exploitable in plant breeding. Finally, our results demonstrate that the two pathways are not independent because there is interference between class I and II COs. PMID:25197066

  3. Regulation of Spatial Selectivity by Crossover Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cafaro, Jon; Rieke, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Signals throughout the nervous system diverge into parallel excitatory and inhibitory pathways that later converge on downstream neurons to control their spike output. Converging excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs can exhibit a variety of temporal relationships. A common motif is feedforward inhibition, in which an increase (decrease) in excitatory input precedes a corresponding increase (decrease) in inhibitory input. The delay of inhibitory input relative to excitatory input originates from an extra synapse in the circuit shaping inhibitory input. Another common motif is push-pull or “crossover” inhibition, in which increases (decreases) in excitatory input occur together with decreases (increases) in inhibitory input. Primate On midget ganglion cells receive primarily feedforward inhibition and On parasol cells receive primarily crossover inhibition; this difference provides an opportunity to study how each motif shapes the light responses of cell types that play a key role in visual perception. For full-field stimuli, feedforward inhibition abbreviated and attenuated responses of On midget cells, while crossover inhibition, though plentiful, had surprisingly little impact on the responses of On parasol cells. Spatially structured stimuli, however, could cause excitatory and inhibitory inputs to On parasol cells to increase together, adopting a temporal relation very much like that for feedforward inhibition. In this case, inhibitory inputs substantially abbreviated a cell’s spike output. Thus inhibitory input shapes the temporal stimulus selectivity of both midget and parasol ganglion cells, but its impact on responses of parasol cells depends strongly on the spatial structure of the light inputs. PMID:23575830

  4. Universal entanglement crossover of coupled quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Jacobsen, Jesper; Saleur, Hubert

    2014-03-01

    We consider the entanglement between two one-dimensional quantum wires (Luttinger Liquids) coupled by tunneling through a quantum impurity. The physics of the system involves a crossover between weak and strong coupling regimes characterized by an energy scale TB, and methods of conformal field theory therefore cannot be applied. The evolution of the entanglement in this crossover has led to many numerical studies, but has remained little understood, analytically or even qualitatively. This is, in part, due to the fact that the entanglement in this case is non-perturbative in the tunneling amplitude. We argue that the correct universal scaling form of the entanglement entropy S (for an arbitrary interval containing the impurity) is ∂S / ∂lnL = f(LTB) . In the special case where the coupling to the impurity can be refermionized, we show how the universal function f(LTB) can be obtained analytically using recent results on form factors of twist fields and a defect massless-scattering formalism. Our results are carefully checked against numerical simulations. This work was supported by the the French ANR (ANR Projet 2010 Blanc SIMI 4 : DIME), the US DOE (grant number DE-FG03-01ER45908), the Quantum Materials program of LBNL (RV) and the Institut Universitaire de France (JLJ).

  5. Quantum interference in polyenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald; Movassagh, Ramis; Datta, Supriyo

    2014-12-14

    The explicit form of the zeroth Green's function in the Hückel model, approximated by the negative of the inverse of the Hückel matrix, has direct quantum interference consequences for molecular conductance. We derive a set of rules for transmission between two electrodes attached to a polyene, when the molecule is extended by an even number of carbons at either end (transmission unchanged) or by an odd number of carbons at both ends (transmission turned on or annihilated). These prescriptions for the occurrence of quantum interference lead to an unexpected consequence for switches which realize such extension through electrocyclic reactions: for some specific attachment modes the chemically closed ring will be the ON position of the switch. Normally the signs of the entries of the Green's function matrix are assumed to have no physical significance; however, we show that the signs may have observable consequences. In particular, in the case of multiple probe attachments – if coherence in probe connections can be arranged – in some cases new destructive interference results, while in others one may have constructive interference. One such case may already exist in the literature.

  6. Counting every quantum

    PubMed Central

    Sakitt, B.

    1972-01-01

    1. Human subjects were asked to rate both blanks and very dim flashes of light under conditions of complete dark adaptation at 7° in the periphery. The ratings used were 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. 2. For one subject (B.S.) the distributions of ratings were approximately Poisson distributions. The data were consistent with each rating being the actual number of effective quantal absorptions plus the number of noise events. This subject was presumably able to count every rod signal (effective absorptions plus noise). 3. For two other subjects, the data were consistent with the ratings being one less (L.F.) and two less (K.D.) than the number of effective absorptions plus noise. They were able to count every rod signal beginning with 2 and 3 respectively. A fourth subject's erratic data could not be fitted. 4. The fraction of quanta incident at the cornea that resulted in a rod signal was estimated to be about 0·03 which is consistent with physical estimates of effective absorption for that retinal region. 5. A simulated forced choice experiment leads to an absolute threshold about 0·40 log units below the normal yes-no absolute threshold. This and other results indicate that subjects can use the sensory information they receive even when only 1, 2 or 3 quanta are effectively absorbed, depending on the individual. Humans may be able to count every action potential or every discrete burst of action potentials in some critical neurone. PMID:5046137

  7. Electromagnetic pump stator frame having power crossover struts

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1995-01-01

    A stator frame for an electromagnetic pump includes a casing joined to a hub by a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart struts. At least one electrically insulated power crossover lead extends through the hub, through a crossover one of the struts, and through the casing for carrying electrical current therethrough.

  8. Crossover ensembles of random matrices and skew-orthogonal polynomials

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Santosh; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > We study crossover ensembles of Jacobi family of random matrices. > We consider correlations for orthogonal-unitary and symplectic-unitary crossovers. > We use the method of skew-orthogonal polynomials and quaternion determinants. > We prove universality of spectral correlations in crossover ensembles. > We discuss applications to quantum conductance and communication theory problems. - Abstract: In a recent paper (S. Kumar, A. Pandey, Phys. Rev. E, 79, 2009, p. 026211) we considered Jacobi family (including Laguerre and Gaussian cases) of random matrix ensembles and reported exact solutions of crossover problems involving time-reversal symmetry breaking. In the present paper we give details of the work. We start with Dyson's Brownian motion description of random matrix ensembles and obtain universal hierarchic relations among the unfolded correlation functions. For arbitrary dimensions we derive the joint probability density (jpd) of eigenvalues for all transitions leading to unitary ensembles as equilibrium ensembles. We focus on the orthogonal-unitary and symplectic-unitary crossovers and give generic expressions for jpd of eigenvalues, two-point kernels and n-level correlation functions. This involves generalization of the theory of skew-orthogonal polynomials to crossover ensembles. We also consider crossovers in the circular ensembles to show the generality of our method. In the large dimensionality limit, correlations in spectra with arbitrary initial density are shown to be universal when expressed in terms of a rescaled symmetry breaking parameter. Applications of our crossover results to communication theory and quantum conductance problems are also briefly discussed.

  9. Stress Crossover in Newlywed Marriage: A Longitudinal and Dyadic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Lisa A.; Karney, Benjamin R.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of stress and marital quality often assess stress as an intrapersonal phenomenon, examining how spouses' stress may influence their own relationship well-being. Yet spouses' stress also may influence partners' relationship evaluations, a phenomenon referred to as stress crossover. This study examined stress crossover, and conditions that…

  10. Extended precedence preservative crossover for job shop scheduling problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Chung Sin; Moin, Noor Hasnah; Omar, Mohd

    2013-04-01

    Job shop scheduling problems (JSSP) is one of difficult combinatorial scheduling problems. A wide range of genetic algorithms based on the two parents crossover have been applied to solve the problem but multi parents (more than two parents) crossover in solving the JSSP is still lacking. This paper proposes the extended precedence preservative crossover (EPPX) which uses multi parents for recombination in the genetic algorithms. EPPX is a variation of the precedence preservative crossover (PPX) which is one of the crossovers that perform well to find the solutions for the JSSP. EPPX is based on a vector to determine the gene selected in recombination for the next generation. Legalization of children (offspring) can be eliminated due to the JSSP representation encoded by using permutation with repetition that guarantees the feasibility of chromosomes. The simulations are performed on a set of benchmarks from the literatures and the results are compared to ensure the sustainability of multi parents recombination in solving the JSSP.

  11. Standard model cross-over on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, Michela; Rummukainen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    With the physical Higgs mass the standard model symmetry restoration phase transition is a smooth cross-over. We study the thermodynamics of the cross-over using numerical lattice Monte Carlo simulations of an effective SU (2 )×U (1 ) gauge+Higgs theory, significantly improving on previously published results. We measure the Higgs field expectation value, thermodynamic quantities like pressure, energy density, speed of sound and heat capacity, and screening masses associated with the Higgs and Z fields. While the cross-over is smooth, it is very well defined with a width of only ˜5 GeV . We measure the cross-over temperature from the maximum of the susceptibility of the Higgs condensate, with the result Tc=159.5 ±1.5 GeV . Outside of the narrow cross-over region the perturbative results agree well with nonperturbative ones.

  12. Fuel cell membranes and crossover prevention

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; York, Cynthia A.; Waszczuk, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2009-08-04

    A membrane electrode assembly for use with a direct organic fuel cell containing a formic acid fuel includes a solid polymer electrolyte having first and second surfaces, an anode on the first surface and a cathode on the second surface and electrically linked to the anode. The solid polymer electrolyte has a thickness t:.gtoreq..times..times..times..times. ##EQU00001## where C.sub.f is the formic acid fuel concentration over the anode, D.sub.f is the effective diffusivity of the fuel in the solid polymer electrolyte, K.sub.f is the equilibrium constant for partition coefficient for the fuel into the solid polymer electrolyte membrane, I is Faraday's constant n.sub.f is the number of electrons released when 1 molecule of the fuel is oxidized, and j.sub.f.sup.c is an empirically determined crossover rate of fuel above which the fuel cell does not operate.

  13. Neutrino dynamics below the electroweak crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate the thermal masses and damping rates of active (m < eV) and sterile (M ~ GeV) neutrinos with thermal momenta k~ 3T at temperatures below the electroweak crossover (5 GeV < T < 160 GeV) . These quantities fix the equilibration or ``washout'' rates of Standard Model lepton number densities. Sterile neutrinos interact via direct scatterings mediated by Yukawa couplings, and via their overlap with active neutrinos. Including all leading-order reactions we find that the washout rate generally exceeds the Hubble rate for 5 GeV < T < 30 GeV . Therefore it is challenging to generate a large lepton asymmetry facilitating dark matter computations operating at T < 5 GeV, whereas the generation of a baryon asymmetry at T > 130 GeV remains an option. Our differential rates are tabulated in a form suitable for studies of specific scenarios with given neutrino Yukawa matrices.

  14. Shocks generate crossover behavior in lattice avalanches.

    PubMed

    Burridge, James

    2013-11-22

    A spatial avalanche model is introduced, in which avalanches increase stability in the regions where they occur. Instability is driven globally by a driving process that contains shocks. The system is typically subcritical, but the shocks occasionally lift it into a near- or supercritical state from which it rapidly retreats due to large avalanches. These shocks leave behind a signature-a distinct power-law crossover in the avalanche size distribution. The model is inspired by landslide field data, but the principles may be applied to any system that experiences stabilizing failures, possesses a critical point, and is subject to an ongoing process of destabilization that includes occasional dramatic destabilizing events. PMID:24313528

  15. Nonequilibrium spin crossover in copper phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, Benjamin; Donarini, Andrea; Grifoni, Milena

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the nonequilibrium tip induced control of the spin state of copper phthalocyanine on an insulator coated substrate. We find that, under the condition of energetic proximity of many-body neutral excited states to the anionic ground state, the system can undergo a population inversion towards these excited states. The resulting state of the system is accompanied by a change in the total spin quantum number. Experimental signatures of the crossover are the appearance of additional nodal planes in the topographical scanning tunneling microscopy images as well as a strong suppression of the current near the center of the molecule. The robustness of the effect against moderate charge conserving relaxation processes has also been tested.

  16. Lattice thermal conductivity crossovers in semiconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mingo, N; Broido, D A

    2004-12-10

    For binary compound semiconductor nanowires, we find a striking relationship between the nanowire's thermal conductivity kappa(nwire), the bulk material's thermal conductivity kappa(bulk), and the mass ratio of the material's constituent atoms, r, as kappa(bulk)/kappa(nwire) (alpha) (1+1/r)(-3/2). A significant consequence is the presence of crossovers in which a material with higher bulk thermal conductivity than the rest is no longer the best nanowire thermal conductor. We show that this behavior stems from a change in the dominant phonon scattering mechanism with decreasing nanowire size. The results have important implications for nanoscale heat dissipation, thermoelectricity, and thermal conductivity of nanocomposites. PMID:15697834

  17. Phosphorylation of the Synaptonemal Complex Protein Zip1 Regulates the Crossover/Noncrossover Decision during Yeast Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangyu; Suhandynata, Ray T.; Sandhu, Rima; Rockmill, Beth; Mohibullah, Neeman; Niu, Hengyao; Liang, Jason; Lo, Hsiao-Chi; Miller, Danny E.; Zhou, Huilin; Börner, G. Valentin; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    Interhomolog crossovers promote proper chromosome segregation during meiosis and are formed by the regulated repair of programmed double-strand breaks. This regulation requires components of the synaptonemal complex (SC), a proteinaceous structure formed between homologous chromosomes. In yeast, SC formation requires the “ZMM” genes, which encode a functionally diverse set of proteins, including the transverse filament protein, Zip1. In wild-type meiosis, Zmm proteins promote the biased resolution of recombination intermediates into crossovers that are distributed throughout the genome by interference. In contrast, noncrossovers are formed primarily through synthesis-dependent strand annealing mediated by the Sgs1 helicase. This work identifies a conserved region on the C terminus of Zip1 (called Zip1 4S), whose phosphorylation is required for the ZMM pathway of crossover formation. Zip1 4S phosphorylation is promoted both by double-strand breaks (DSBs) and the meiosis-specific kinase, MEK1/MRE4, demonstrating a role for MEK1 in the regulation of interhomolog crossover formation, as well as interhomolog bias. Failure to phosphorylate Zip1 4S results in meiotic prophase arrest, specifically in the absence of SGS1. This gain of function meiotic arrest phenotype is suppressed by spo11Δ, suggesting that it is due to unrepaired breaks triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. Epistasis experiments combining deletions of individual ZMM genes with sgs1-md zip1-4A indicate that Zip1 4S phosphorylation functions prior to the other ZMMs. These results suggest that phosphorylation of Zip1 at DSBs commits those breaks to repair via the ZMM pathway and provides a mechanism by which the crossover/noncrossover decision can be dynamically regulated during yeast meiosis. PMID:26682552

  18. Differential interference contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Vishnyakov, Gennady; Levin, Gennady; Minaev, Vladimir; Latushko, Mikhail; Nekrasov, Nikolay; Pickalov, Valery

    2016-07-01

    We present a new approach to optical tomography of phase objects that is referred to as differential interference contrast tomography (DICT). The main feature of DICT is that the result of tomographic reconstruction is a 3D DIC image. This image is described by partial derivative of 3D refractive index distribution in one direction. The DICT setup consists of a lateral shearing phase-shifting interference microscope with low-coherent LED illumination. To create projections of the sample at various illumination angles, an angular scanning beam was used. 3D DIC tomograms of a white blood cell are presented. The comparison between the reconstructed DIC tomogram slices and the conventional DIC images of the same sample at the same depths are also represented. PMID:27367095

  19. Interference suppression of SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanov, V P

    2011-01-24

    The theory of three-wave SRS is developed, which takes into account nonlinear dispersion of a medium for arbitrary phases of the pump waves at the input to the medium. The effect of interference suppression of SRS is predicted for values of the total phase of the three-wave pump (2n+1){pi} (n=0, {+-}1, {+-}2...), the effect being caused by the destructive interference of polarisations of the nonresonant dipole-allowed transitions. The relation between the contributions of the linear and nonlinear dispersions to the SRS is found. It is shown that at a sufficiently large wave detuning, the anti-Stokes wave amplitude experiences spatial oscillations. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  20. Magnetoconductance of CdSe in the hopping regime: The effect of quantum interference

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Dai, P.; Sarachik, M.P. )

    1992-04-15

    A magnetoconductance is observed for weakly insulating {ital n}-type CdSe, which, depending on the temperature of the measurement, is quadratic or approximately linear with field in small magnetic fields, and exhibits saturation as the field is increased. The crossovers from quadratic to linear behavior and to saturation occur at magnetic fields which are consistent with theoretical expectations for the effect of quantum interference in the hopping regime.

  1. Counting supersymmetric branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinschmidt, Axel

    2011-10-01

    Maximal supergravity solutions are revisited and classified, with particular emphasis on objects of co-dimension at most two. This class of solutions includes branes whose tension scales with xxxx. We present a group theory derivation of the counting of these objects based on the corresponding tensor hierarchies derived from E 11 and discrete T- and U-duality transformations. This provides a rationale for the wrapping rules that were recently discussed for σ ≤ 3 in the literature and extends them. Explicit supergravity solutions that give rise to co-dimension two branes are constructed and analysed.

  2. Whole-Genome Analysis of Individual Meiotic Events in Drosophila melanogaster Reveals That Noncrossover Gene Conversions Are Insensitive to Interference and the Centromere Effect

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Danny E.; Smith, Clarissa B.; Kazemi, Nazanin Yeganeh; Cockrell, Alexandria J.; Arvanitakis, Alexandra V.; Blumenstiel, Justin P.; Jaspersen, Sue L.; Hawley, R. Scott

    2016-01-01

    A century of genetic analysis has revealed that multiple mechanisms control the distribution of meiotic crossover events. In Drosophila melanogaster, two significant positional controls are interference and the strongly polar centromere effect. Here, we assess the factors controlling the distribution of crossovers (COs) and noncrossover gene conversions (NCOs) along all five major chromosome arms in 196 single meiotic divisions to generate a more detailed understanding of these controls on a genome-wide scale. Analyzing the outcomes of single meiotic events allows us to distinguish among different classes of meiotic recombination. In so doing, we identified 291 NCOs spread uniformly among the five major chromosome arms and 541 COs (including 52 double crossovers and one triple crossover). We find that unlike COs, NCOs are insensitive to the centromere effect and do not demonstrate interference. Although the positions of COs appear to be determined predominately by the long-range influences of interference and the centromere effect, each chromosome may display a different pattern of sensitivity to interference, suggesting that interference may not be a uniform global property. In addition, unbiased sequencing of a large number of individuals allows us to describe the formation of de novo copy number variants, the majority of which appear to be mediated by unequal crossing over between transposable elements. This work has multiple implications for our understanding of how meiotic recombination is regulated to ensure proper chromosome segregation and maintain genome stability. PMID:26944917

  3. Whole-Genome Analysis of Individual Meiotic Events in Drosophila melanogaster Reveals That Noncrossover Gene Conversions Are Insensitive to Interference and the Centromere Effect.

    PubMed

    Miller, Danny E; Smith, Clarissa B; Kazemi, Nazanin Yeganeh; Cockrell, Alexandria J; Arvanitakas, Alexandra V; Blumenstiel, Justin P; Jaspersen, Sue L; Hawley, R Scott

    2016-05-01

    A century of genetic analysis has revealed that multiple mechanisms control the distribution of meiotic crossover events. In Drosophila melanogaster, two significant positional controls are interference and the strongly polar centromere effect. Here, we assess the factors controlling the distribution of crossovers (COs) and noncrossover gene conversions (NCOs) along all five major chromosome arms in 196 single meiotic divisions to generate a more detailed understanding of these controls on a genome-wide scale. Analyzing the outcomes of single meiotic events allows us to distinguish among different classes of meiotic recombination. In so doing, we identified 291 NCOs spread uniformly among the five major chromosome arms and 541 COs (including 52 double crossovers and one triple crossover). We find that unlike COs, NCOs are insensitive to the centromere effect and do not demonstrate interference. Although the positions of COs appear to be determined predominately by the long-range influences of interference and the centromere effect, each chromosome may display a different pattern of sensitivity to interference, suggesting that interference may not be a uniform global property. In addition, unbiased sequencing of a large number of individuals allows us to describe the formation of de novo copy number variants, the majority of which appear to be mediated by unequal crossing over between transposable elements. This work has multiple implications for our understanding of how meiotic recombination is regulated to ensure proper chromosome segregation and maintain genome stability. PMID:26944917

  4. High background photon counting lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lentz, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    Photon counting with lidar returns is usually limited to low light levels, while wide dynamic range is achieved by counting for long times. The broad emission spectrum of inexpensive high-power semiconductor lasers makes receiver filters pass too much background light for traditional photon counting in daylight. Very high speed photon counting is possible, however, at more than 500 MHz which allows the construction of eyesafe lidar operating in the presence of bright clouds. Detector improvements are possible to count to 20 GHz producing a single shot dynamic range of ten decades.

  5. Pressure and Temperature Sensors Using Two Spin Crossover Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jureschi, Catalin-Maricel; Linares, Jorge; Boulmaali, Ayoub; Dahoo, Pierre Richard; Rotaru, Aurelian; Garcia, Yann

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of a new design concept for dual spin crossover based sensors for concomitant detection of both temperature and pressure is presented. It is conjectured from numerical results obtained by mean field approximation applied to a Ising-like model that using two different spin crossover compounds containing switching molecules with weak elastic interactions it is possible to simultaneously measure P and T. When the interaction parameters are optimized, the spin transition is gradual and for each spin crossover compounds, both temperature and pressure values being identified from their optical densities. This concept offers great perspectives for smart sensing devices. PMID:26848663

  6. Hydration-dependent dynamic crossover phenomenon in protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Fratini, Emiliano; Li, Mingda; Le, Peisi; Mamontov, Eugene; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2014-10-01

    The characteristic relaxation time τ of protein hydration water exhibits a strong hydration level h dependence. The dynamic crossover is observed when h is higher than the monolayer hydration level hc=0.2-0.25 and becomes more visible as h increases. When h is lower than hc, τ only exhibits Arrhenius behavior in the measured temperature range. The activation energy of the Arrhenius behavior is insensitive to h, indicating a local-like motion. Moreover, the h dependence of the crossover temperature shows that the protein dynamic transition is not directly or solely induced by the dynamic crossover in the hydration water.

  7. Deformation mechanism crossover and mechanical behaviour in nanocrystalline materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakov, V.; Wolf, D.; Phillpot, S. R.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Gleiter, H.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of California-Davis; Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    2003-06-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the transition with decreasing grain size from a dislocation- to a grain-boundary-based deformation mechanism in nanocrystalline fcc metals. Our simulations reveal that this crossover is accompanied by a pronounced transition in the mechanical behaviour of the material; namely, at the grain size where the crossover occurs (the 'strongest size'), the strain rate under tensile elongation goes through a minimum. This simultaneous transition in both the deformation mechanism and the corresponding mechanical behaviour offers an explanation for the experimentally observed crossover in the yield strength of nanocrystalline materials, from Hall-Petch hardening to 'inverse Hall-Petch' softening.

  8. A crossover in the mechanical response of nanocrystalline ceramics.

    PubMed

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2005-08-01

    Multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulation of indentation of nanocrystalline silicon carbide reveals unusual deformation mechanisms in brittle nanophase materials, resulting from the coexistence of brittle grains and soft amorphous grain boundary phases. Simulations predict a crossover from intergranular continuous deformation to intragrain discrete deformation at a critical indentation depth. The crossover arises from the interplay between cooperative grain sliding, grain rotations, and intergranular dislocation formation similar to stick-slip behavior. The crossover is also manifested in switching from deformation dominated by indentation-induced crystallization to deformation dominated by disordering, leading to amorphization. This interplay between deformation mechanisms is critical for the design of ceramics with superior mechanical properties. PMID:16081730

  9. Collective Interference of Composite Two-Fermion Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Malte C.; Bouvrie, Peter Alexander; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    The composite character of two-fermion bosons manifests itself in the interference of many composites as a deviation from the ideal bosonic behavior. A state of many composite bosons can be represented as a superposition of different numbers of perfect bosons and fermions, which allows us to provide the full Hong-Ou-Mandel-like counting statistics of interfering composites. Our theory quantitatively relates the deviation from the ideal bosonic interference pattern to the entanglement of the fermions within a single composite boson.

  10. Interference competition and species coexistence.

    PubMed Central

    Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2002-01-01

    Interference competition is ubiquitous in nature. Yet its effects on resource exploitation remain largely unexplored for species that compete for dynamic resources. Here, I present a model of exploitative and interference competition with explicit resource dynamics. The model incorporates both biotic and abiotic resources. It considers interference competition both in the classical sense (i.e. each species suffers a net reduction in per capita growth rate via interference from, and interference on, the other species) and in the broad sense (i.e. each species suffers a net reduction in per capita growth rate via interference from, but can experience an increase in growth rate via interference on, the other species). Coexistence cannot occur under classical interference competition even when the species inferior at resource exploitation is superior at interference. Such a trade-off can, however, change the mechanism of competitive exclusion from dominance by the superior resource exploiter to a priority effect. Now the inferior resource exploiter can exclude the superior resource exploiter provided it has a higher initial abundance. By contrast, when interference is beneficial to the interacting species, coexistence is possible via a trade-off between exploitation and interference. These results hold regardless of whether the resource is biotic or abiotic, indicating that the outcome of exploitative and interference competition does not depend on the exact nature of resource dynamics. The model makes two key predictions. First, species that engage in costly interference mechanisms (e.g. territoriality, overgrowth or undercutting, allelopathy and other forms of chemical competition) should not be able to coexist unless they also engage in beneficial interference mechanisms (e.g. predation or parasitism). Second, exotic invasive species that displace native biota should be superior resource exploiters that have strong interference effects on native species with little

  11. Sensors Locate Radio Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx Location System (LLS) to locate electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the location of the interfering emitter.

  12. Standard Model thermodynamics across the electroweak crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, M.; Meyer, M.

    2015-07-22

    Even though the Standard Model with a Higgs mass m{sub \\tiny H}=125 GeV possesses no bulk phase transition, its thermodynamics still experiences a “soft point” at temperatures around T=160 GeV, with a deviation from ideal gas thermodynamics. Such a deviation may have an effect on precision computations of weakly interacting dark matter relic abundances if their mass is in the few TeV range, or on leptogenesis scenarios operating in this temperature range. By making use of results from lattice simulations based on a dimensionally reduced effective field theory, we estimate the relevant thermodynamic functions across the crossover. The results are tabulated in a numerical form permitting for their insertion as a background equation of state into cosmological particle production/decoupling codes. We find that Higgs dynamics induces a non-trivial “structure” visible e.g. in the heat capacity, but that in general the largest radiative corrections originate from QCD effects, reducing the energy density by a couple of percent from the free value even at T>160 GeV.

  13. Vortices and flux tubes: The crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, A.; Spiegel, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    The sun has magnetic flux tubes that cause sunspots by locally inhibiting convection near its surface. Jupiter has vortices that make the great red spot and other such blemishes. Why are there no similar vortices on the sun? How is the difference in the two kinds of system controlled by the magnetic Prandtl number? What happens at the crossover between the two behaviors? The transition between velocity and magnetically dominated regimes is the driving question of this work. It should occur somewhere in the enormous range in Prandtl number between the sun and planets like Jupiter. Objects that lie in between these vastly different extremes are Brown Dwarfs that have such low mass that they do not burn hydrogen in their cores. These objects are now being actively observed though there is as yet no direct evidence bearing on the present calculations. Other possibly interesting conditions may arise in certain disks around newborn stars where planetary systems are thought to be forming. These may be cool enough to place them in an interesting parameter range for the competition we describe. Using 2D calculations, we seek a quantitative measure of the relative importance of the two vector fields seen in the calculations, statistical or spectral, topological or structural.

  14. Microelectromechanical systems integrating molecular spin crossover actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique-Juarez, Maria D.; Rat, Sylvain; Mathieu, Fabrice; Saya, Daisuke; Séguy, Isabelle; Leïchlé, Thierry; Nicu, Liviu; Salmon, Lionel; Molnár, Gábor; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2016-08-01

    Silicon MEMS cantilevers coated with a 200 nm thin layer of the molecular spin crossover complex [Fe(H2B(pz)2)2(phen)] (H2B(pz)2 = dihydrobis(pyrazolyl)borate and phen = 1,10-phenantroline) were actuated using an external magnetic field and their resonance frequency was tracked by means of integrated piezoresistive detection. The light-induced spin-state switching of the molecules from the ground low spin to the metastable high spin state at 10 K led to a well-reproducible shift of the cantilever's resonance frequency (Δfr = -0.52 Hz). Control experiments at different temperatures using coated as well as uncoated devices along with simple calculations support the assignment of this effect to the spin transition. This latter translates into changes in mechanical behavior of the cantilever due to the strong spin-state/lattice coupling. A guideline for the optimization of device parameters is proposed so as to efficiently harness molecular scale movements for large-scale mechanical work, thus paving the road for nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) actuators based on molecular materials.

  15. Electrostatically-tuned dimensional crossover in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, Michelle; Cheng, Guanglei; Huang, Mengchen; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    The electron system at the interface of two complex oxides, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, exhibits a number of interesting strongly-correlated electronic properties, such as superconductivity and spin-orbit coupling. Reduced dimensionality is made accessible through nanowire devices created with conducting AFM lithography. Here, we describe an electrostatically-controlled dimensionality crossover in weak antilocalization behavior of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 nanowires at low temperature. These measurements give insight to the interplay of spin-orbit coupling and dimensionality. Characterizing the behavior of the strongly-correlated electronic properties in these reduced dimensions is necessary in order to develop this system as a multifunctional nanoelectronics platform. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the following agencies and grants: ARO (W911NF-08-1-0317), AFOSR FA9550-10-1-0524 (JL) and FA9550-12-1-0342 (CBE), and NSF (DMR-1104191, DMR-1124131 (JL), ONR N00014-15-1-2847 (JL) and DMR-1234096 (CBE).

  16. Laser frequency stabilization using bichromatic crossover spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Taek; Seb Moon, Han

    2015-03-07

    We propose a Doppler-free spectroscopic method named bichromatic crossover spectroscopy (BCS), which we then use for the frequency stabilization of an off-resonant frequency that does not correspond to an atomic transition. The observed BCS in the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition of {sup 87}Rb is related to the hyperfine structure of the conventional saturated absorption spectrum of this transition. Furthermore, the Doppler-free BCS is numerically calculated by considering all of the degenerate magnetic sublevels of the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition in an atomic vapor cell, and is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, we successfully achieve modulation-free off-resonant locking at the center frequency between the two 5S{sub 1/2}(F = 1 and 2) → 5P{sub 1/2}(F′ = 1) transitions using a polarization rotation of the BCS. The laser frequency stability was estimated to be the Allan variance of 2.1 × 10{sup −10} at 1 s.

  17. Hysteretic behavior of spin-crossover noise driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudyma, Iurii; Maksymov, Artur; Dimian, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    The influence of white Gaussian noise on hysteretic behavior of spin-crossover system is analyzed in the framework of stochastic Langevin dynamics. Various stochastic simulations are performed and several important properties of spin-transition in spin-crossover system driven by noise are reproduced. The numerical results are tested against the stationary probability function and the associated dynamic potential obtained from Fokker-Planck equation corresponding to spin-crossover Langevin dynamics. The dependence of light-induced optical hysteresis width and non-hysteretic transition curve slope on the noise intensity is illustrated. The role of low-spin and high-spin phase stabilities in the hysteretic behavior of noise-driven spin-crossover system is discussed.

  18. High-order jamming crossovers and density anomalies.

    PubMed

    Pica Ciamarra, Massimo; Sollich, Peter

    2013-10-28

    We demonstrate that particles interacting via core-softened potentials exhibit a series of successive density anomalies upon isothermal compression, leading to oscillations in the diffusivity and thermal expansion coefficient, with the latter reaching negative values. These finite-temperature density anomalies are then shown to correspond to zero-temperature high-order jamming crossovers. These occur when particles are forced to come into contact with neighbours in successive coordination shells upon increasing the density. The crossovers induce anomalous behavior of the bulk modulus, which oscillates with density. We rationalize the dependence of these crossovers on the softness of the interaction potential, and relate the jamming crossovers and the anomalous diffusivity via the properties of the vibrational spectrum. PMID:26029762

  19. Electromagnetic Interference on Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, Okan

    2002-01-01

    External sources, either within or outside the hospital environment, may interfere with the appropriate function of pacemakers which are being implanted all around the world in current medical practice. The patient and the physician who is responsible for follow-up of the pacing systems may be confronted with some specific problems regarding the various types of electromagnetic interference (EMI). To avoid these unwanted EMI effects one must be aware of this potential problem and need to take some precautions. The effects of EMI on pacemaker function and precautions to overcome some specific problems were discussed in this review article. There are many sources of EMI interacting with pacemakers. Magnetic resonance imaging creates real problem and should be avoided in pacemaker patients. Cellular phones might be responsible for EMI when they were held on the same side with the pacemaker. Otherwise they don't cause any specific type of interaction with pacemakers. Sale security systems are not a problem if one walks through it without lingering in or near it. Patients having unipolar pacemaker systems are prone to develop EMI because of pectoral muscle artifacts during vigorous active physical exercise. PMID:17006562

  20. Spin-Crossover Molecular Solids Beyond Rigid Crystal Approximation.

    PubMed

    Gudyma, Iurii V; Ivashko, Victor V

    2016-12-01

    The qualitative analysis of the spin-crossover molecular solid with distortion effect is presented. A spin-crossover solid with effect of distortion is studied in the framework of the Ising-like model with two-order parameters under statistical approach, where the effect of elastic strain on inter-ion interaction is considered. These considerations lead to examination of the relation between the primary and secondary order parameters during temperature and pressure changes. PMID:27075338

  1. Spin-Crossover Molecular Solids Beyond Rigid Crystal Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudyma, Iurii V.; Ivashko, Victor V.

    2016-04-01

    The qualitative analysis of the spin-crossover molecular solid with distortion effect is presented. A spin-crossover solid with effect of distortion is studied in the framework of the Ising-like model with two-order parameters under statistical approach, where the effect of elastic strain on inter-ion interaction is considered. These considerations lead to examination of the relation between the primary and secondary order parameters during temperature and pressure changes.

  2. Beamforming design with proactive interference cancelation in MISO interference channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Tian, Yafei; Yang, Chenyang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we design coordinated beamforming at base stations (BSs) to facilitate interference cancelation at users in interference networks, where each BS is equipped with multiple antennas and each user is with a single antenna. By assuming that each user can select the best decoding strategy to mitigate the interference, either canceling the interference after decoding when it is strong or treating it as noise when it is weak, we optimize the beamforming vectors that maximize the sum rate for the networks under different interference scenarios and find the solutions of beamforming with closed-form expressions. The inherent design principles are then analyzed, and the performance gain over passive interference cancelation is demonstrated through simulations in heterogeneous cellular networks.

  3. The kinetochore prevents centromere-proximal crossover recombination during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Vincenten, Nadine; Kuhl, Lisa-Marie; Lam, Isabel; Oke, Ashwini; Kerr, Alastair Rw; Hochwagen, Andreas; Fung, Jennifer; Keeney, Scott; Vader, Gerben; Marston, Adèle L

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, crossover recombination is essential to link homologous chromosomes and drive faithful chromosome segregation. Crossover recombination is non-random across the genome, and centromere-proximal crossovers are associated with an increased risk of aneuploidy, including Trisomy 21 in humans. Here, we identify the conserved Ctf19/CCAN kinetochore sub-complex as a major factor that minimizes potentially deleterious centromere-proximal crossovers in budding yeast. We uncover multi-layered suppression of pericentromeric recombination by the Ctf19 complex, operating across distinct chromosomal distances. The Ctf19 complex prevents meiotic DNA break formation, the initiating event of recombination, proximal to the centromere. The Ctf19 complex independently drives the enrichment of cohesin throughout the broader pericentromere to suppress crossovers, but not DNA breaks. This non-canonical role of the kinetochore in defining a chromosome domain that is refractory to crossovers adds a new layer of functionality by which the kinetochore prevents the incidence of chromosome segregation errors that generate aneuploid gametes. PMID:26653857

  4. The kinetochore prevents centromere-proximal crossover recombination during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Vincenten, Nadine; Kuhl, Lisa-Marie; Lam, Isabel; Oke, Ashwini; Kerr, Alastair RW; Hochwagen, Andreas; Fung, Jennifer; Keeney, Scott; Vader, Gerben; Marston, Adèle L

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, crossover recombination is essential to link homologous chromosomes and drive faithful chromosome segregation. Crossover recombination is non-random across the genome, and centromere-proximal crossovers are associated with an increased risk of aneuploidy, including Trisomy 21 in humans. Here, we identify the conserved Ctf19/CCAN kinetochore sub-complex as a major factor that minimizes potentially deleterious centromere-proximal crossovers in budding yeast. We uncover multi-layered suppression of pericentromeric recombination by the Ctf19 complex, operating across distinct chromosomal distances. The Ctf19 complex prevents meiotic DNA break formation, the initiating event of recombination, proximal to the centromere. The Ctf19 complex independently drives the enrichment of cohesin throughout the broader pericentromere to suppress crossovers, but not DNA breaks. This non-canonical role of the kinetochore in defining a chromosome domain that is refractory to crossovers adds a new layer of functionality by which the kinetochore prevents the incidence of chromosome segregation errors that generate aneuploid gametes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10850.001 PMID:26653857

  5. Quantum interference with photon pairs created in spatially separated sources

    SciTech Connect

    Riedmatten, H. de; Marcikic, I.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.; Tittel, W.

    2003-02-01

    We report on a quantum interference experiment to probe the coherence between two photons coming from nondegenerate photon pairs at telecom wavelength created in spatially separated sources. The two photons are mixed on a beam splitter and we observe a reduction of up to 84% in the net coincidence count rate when the photons are made indistinguishable. This experiment constitutes an important step towards the realization of quantum teleportation and entanglement swapping with independent sources.

  6. Particle and Photon Detection: Counting and Energy Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Janesick, James; Tower, John

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental limits for photon counting and photon energy measurement are reviewed for CCD and CMOS imagers. The challenges to extend photon counting into the visible/nIR wavelengths and achieve energy measurement in the UV with specific read noise requirements are discussed. Pixel flicker and random telegraph noise sources are highlighted along with various methods used in reducing their contribution on the sensor’s read noise floor. Practical requirements for quantum efficiency, charge collection efficiency, and charge transfer efficiency that interfere with photon counting performance are discussed. Lastly we will review current efforts in reducing flicker noise head-on, in hopes to drive read noise substantially below 1 carrier rms. PMID:27187398

  7. Making environmental DNA count.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    The arc of reception for a new technology or method--like the reception of new information itself--can pass through predictable stages, with audiences' responses evolving from 'I don't believe it', through 'well, maybe' to 'yes, everyone knows that' to, finally, 'old news'. The idea that one can sample a volume of water, sequence DNA out of it, and report what species are living nearby has experienced roughly this series of responses among biologists, beginning with the microbial biologists who developed genetic techniques to reveal the unseen microbiome. 'Macrobial' biologists and ecologists--those accustomed to dealing with species they can see and count--have been slower to adopt such molecular survey techniques, in part because of the uncertain relationship between the number of recovered DNA sequences and the abundance of whole organisms in the sampled environment. In this issue of Molecular Ecology Resources, Evans et al. (2015) quantify this relationship for a suite of nine vertebrate species consisting of eight fish and one amphibian. Having detected all of the species present with a molecular toolbox of six primer sets, they consistently find DNA abundances are associated with species' biomasses. The strength and slope of this association vary for each species and each primer set--further evidence that there is no universal parameter linking recovered DNA to species abundance--but Evans and colleagues take a significant step towards being able to answer the next question audiences tend to ask: 'Yes, but how many are there?' PMID:26768195

  8. Compton suppression gamma-counting: The effect of count rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millard, H.T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Past research has shown that anti-coincidence shielded Ge(Li) spectrometers enhanced the signal-to-background ratios for gamma-photopeaks, which are situated on high Compton backgrounds. Ordinarily, an anti- or non-coincidence spectrum (A) and a coincidence spectrum (C) are collected simultaneously with these systems. To be useful in neutron activation analysis (NAA), the fractions of the photopeak counts routed to the two spectra must be constant from sample to sample to variations must be corrected quantitatively. Most Compton suppression counting has been done at low count rate, but in NAA applications, count rates may be much higher. To operate over the wider dynamic range, the effect of count rate on the ratio of the photopeak counts in the two spectra (A/C) was studied. It was found that as the count rate increases, A/C decreases for gammas not coincident with other gammas from the same decay. For gammas coincident with other gammas, A/C increases to a maximum and then decreases. These results suggest that calibration curves are required to correct photopeak areas so quantitative data can be obtained at higher count rates. ?? 1984.

  9. Low-Background Counting at Homestake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Iseley

    2009-10-01

    Background characterization at Homestake is an ongoing project crucial to the experiments located there. From neutrino physics to WIMP detection, low-background materials and their screening require highly sensitive detectors. Naturally, shielding is needed to lower ``noise'' in these detectors. Because of its vast depth, Homestake will be effective in shielding against cosmic-ray radiation. This means little, however, if radiation from materials used still interferes. Specifically, our group is working on designing the first low-background counting facility at the Homestake mine. Using a high-purity germanium crystal detector from ORTEC, measurements will be taken within a shield that is made to specifically account for radiation underground and fits the detector. Currently, in the design, there is a layer of copper surrounded by an intricate stainless steel casing, which will be manufactured air tight to accommodate for nitrogen purging. Lead will surround the stainless steel shell to further absorb gamma rays. A mobile lift system has been designed for easy access to the detector. In the future, this project will include multiple testing stations located in the famous Davis Cavern where future experiments will have the ability to use the site as an efficient and accurate counting facility for their needs (such as measuring radioactive isotopes in materials). Overall, this detector (and its shield system) is the beginning of a central testing facility that will serve Homestake's scientific community.

  10. The dynamical crossover in attractive colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Mallamace, Domenico; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2013-12-07

    We study the dynamical arrest in an adhesive hard-sphere colloidal system. We examine a micellar suspension of the Pluronic-L64 surfactant in the temperature (T) and volume fraction (ϕ) phase diagram. According to mode-coupling theory (MCT), this system is characterized by a cusp-like singularity and two glassy phases: an attractive glass (AG) phase and a repulsive glass (RG) phase. The T − ϕ phase diagram of this system as confirmed by a previous series of scattering data also exhibits a Percolation Threshold (PT) line, a reentrant behavior (AG-liquid-RG), and a glass-to-glass transition. The AG phase can be generated out of the liquid phase by using T and ϕ as control parameters. We utilize viscosity and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. NMR data confirm all the characteristic properties of the colloidal system phase diagram and give evidence of the onset of a fractal-like percolating structure at a precise threshold. The MCT scaling laws used to study the shear viscosity as a function of ϕ and T show in both cases a fragile-to-strong liquid glass-forming dynamic crossover (FSC) located near the percolation threshold where the clustering process is fully developed. These results suggest a larger thermodynamic generality for this phenomenon, which is usually studied only as a function of the temperature. We also find that the critical values of the control parameters, coincident with the PT line, define the locus of the FSC. In the region between the FSC and the glass transition lines the system dynamics are dominated by clustering effects. We thus demonstrate that it is possible, using the conceptual framework provided by extended mode-coupling theory, to describe the way a system approaches dynamic arrest, taking into account both cage and hopping effects.

  11. The dynamical crossover in attractive colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Mallamace, Domenico; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2013-12-01

    We study the dynamical arrest in an adhesive hard-sphere colloidal system. We examine a micellar suspension of the Pluronic-L64 surfactant in the temperature (T) and volume fraction (ϕ) phase diagram. According to mode-coupling theory (MCT), this system is characterized by a cusp-like singularity and two glassy phases: an attractive glass (AG) phase and a repulsive glass (RG) phase. The T - ϕ phase diagram of this system as confirmed by a previous series of scattering data also exhibits a Percolation Threshold (PT) line, a reentrant behavior (AG-liquid-RG), and a glass-to-glass transition. The AG phase can be generated out of the liquid phase by using T and ϕ as control parameters. We utilize viscosity and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. NMR data confirm all the characteristic properties of the colloidal system phase diagram and give evidence of the onset of a fractal-like percolating structure at a precise threshold. The MCT scaling laws used to study the shear viscosity as a function of ϕ and T show in both cases a fragile-to-strong liquid glass-forming dynamic crossover (FSC) located near the percolation threshold where the clustering process is fully developed. These results suggest a larger thermodynamic generality for this phenomenon, which is usually studied only as a function of the temperature. We also find that the critical values of the control parameters, coincident with the PT line, define the locus of the FSC. In the region between the FSC and the glass transition lines the system dynamics are dominated by clustering effects. We thus demonstrate that it is possible, using the conceptual framework provided by extended mode-coupling theory, to describe the way a system approaches dynamic arrest, taking into account both cage and hopping effects.

  12. Transient regimes and crossover for epitaxial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Haselwandter, Christoph A; Vvedensky, Dimitri D

    2010-02-01

    We apply a formalism for deriving stochastic continuum equations associated with lattice models to obtain equations governing the transient regimes of epitaxial growth for various experimental scenarios and growth conditions. The first step of our methodology is the systematic transformation of the lattice model into a regularized stochastic equation of motion that provides initial conditions for differential renormalization-group (RG) equations for the coefficients in the regularized equation. The solutions of the RG equations then yield trajectories that describe the original model from the transient regimes, which are of primary experimental interest, to the eventual crossover to the asymptotically stable fixed point. We first consider regimes defined by the relative magnitude of deposition noise and diffusion noise. If the diffusion noise dominates, then the early stages of growth are described by the Mullins-Herring (MH) equation with conservative noise. This is the classic regime of molecular-beam epitaxy. If the diffusion and deposition noise are of comparable magnitude, the transient equation is the MH equation with nonconservative noise. This behavior has been observed in a recent report on the growth of aluminum on silicone oil surfaces [Z.-N. Fang, Thin Solid Films 517, 3408 (2009)]. Finally, the regime where deposition noise dominates over diffusion noise has been observed in computer simulations, but does not appear to have any direct experimental relevance. For initial conditions that consist of a flat surface, the Villain-Lai-Das Sarma (VLDS) equation with nonconservative noise is not appropriate for any transient regime. If, however, the initial surface is corrugated, the relative magnitudes of terms can be altered to the point where the VLDS equation with conservative noise does indeed describe transient growth. This is consistent with the experimental analysis of growth on patterned surfaces [H.-C. Kan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 146101 (2004); T

  13. The dynamical crossover in attractive colloidal systems.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Stanley, H Eugene; Mallamace, Domenico; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2013-12-01

    We study the dynamical arrest in an adhesive hard-sphere colloidal system. We examine a micellar suspension of the Pluronic-L64 surfactant in the temperature (T) and volume fraction (φ) phase diagram. According to mode-coupling theory (MCT), this system is characterized by a cusp-like singularity and two glassy phases: an attractive glass (AG) phase and a repulsive glass (RG) phase. The T - φ phase diagram of this system as confirmed by a previous series of scattering data also exhibits a Percolation Threshold (PT) line, a reentrant behavior (AG-liquid-RG), and a glass-to-glass transition. The AG phase can be generated out of the liquid phase by using T and φ as control parameters. We utilize viscosity and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. NMR data confirm all the characteristic properties of the colloidal system phase diagram and give evidence of the onset of a fractal-like percolating structure at a precise threshold. The MCT scaling laws used to study the shear viscosity as a function of φ and T show in both cases a fragile-to-strong liquid glass-forming dynamic crossover (FSC) located near the percolation threshold where the clustering process is fully developed. These results suggest a larger thermodynamic generality for this phenomenon, which is usually studied only as a function of the temperature. We also find that the critical values of the control parameters, coincident with the PT line, define the locus of the FSC. In the region between the FSC and the glass transition lines the system dynamics are dominated by clustering effects. We thus demonstrate that it is possible, using the conceptual framework provided by extended mode-coupling theory, to describe the way a system approaches dynamic arrest, taking into account both cage and hopping effects. PMID:24320386

  14. Graphene quantum interference photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this work, a graphene quantum interference (QI) photodetector was simulated in two regimes of operation. The structure consists of a graphene nanoribbon, Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI), which exhibits a strongly resonant transmission of electrons of specific energies. In the first regime of operation (that of a linear photodetector), low intensity light couples two resonant energy levels, resulting in scattering and differential transmission of current with an external quantum efficiency of up to 5.2%. In the second regime of operation, full current switching is caused by the phase decoherence of the current due to a strong photon flux in one or both of the interferometer arms in the same MZI structure. Graphene QI photodetectors have several distinct advantages: they are of very small size, they do not require p- and n-doped regions, and they exhibit a high external quantum efficiency. PMID:25821713

  15. Single-plasmon interferences.

    PubMed

    Dheur, Marie-Christine; Devaux, Eloïse; Ebbesen, Thomas W; Baron, Alexandre; Rodier, Jean-Claude; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Lalanne, Philippe; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Messin, Gaétan; Marquier, François

    2016-03-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves coupled to collective electron oscillations propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, exhibiting a bosonic character. Recent experiments involving surface plasmons guided by wires or stripes allowed the reproduction of quantum optics effects, such as antibunching with a single surface plasmon state, coalescence with a two-plasmon state, conservation of squeezing, or entanglement through plasmonic channels. We report the first direct demonstration of the wave-particle duality for a single surface plasmon freely propagating along a planar metal-air interface. We develop a platform that enables two complementary experiments, one revealing the particle behavior of the single-plasmon state through antibunching, and the other one where the interferences prove its wave nature. This result opens up new ways to exploit quantum conversion effects between different bosonic species as shown here with photons and polaritons. PMID:26998521

  16. Single-plasmon interferences

    PubMed Central

    Dheur, Marie-Christine; Devaux, Eloïse; Ebbesen, Thomas W.; Baron, Alexandre; Rodier, Jean-Claude; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Lalanne, Philippe; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Messin, Gaétan; Marquier, François

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves coupled to collective electron oscillations propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, exhibiting a bosonic character. Recent experiments involving surface plasmons guided by wires or stripes allowed the reproduction of quantum optics effects, such as antibunching with a single surface plasmon state, coalescence with a two-plasmon state, conservation of squeezing, or entanglement through plasmonic channels. We report the first direct demonstration of the wave-particle duality for a single surface plasmon freely propagating along a planar metal-air interface. We develop a platform that enables two complementary experiments, one revealing the particle behavior of the single-plasmon state through antibunching, and the other one where the interferences prove its wave nature. This result opens up new ways to exploit quantum conversion effects between different bosonic species as shown here with photons and polaritons. PMID:26998521

  17. Interference Among Group A Arboviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zebovitz, Eugene; Brown, Arthur

    1968-01-01

    Interference among group A arboviruses is described which does not involve the mediation of interferon. Interference was observed only if the interfering virus had an advantage over the challenge virus, either in time or in multiplicity of infection. Adsorption, penetration, and uncoating of challenge virus did not appear to be inhibited, but the synthesis of infectious viral ribonucleic acid of the challenge virus was significantly retarded. It was shown with temperature-sensitive viruses or mutants that the replication of viral ribonucleic acid by the interfering virus was required to establish interference. A mechanism of interference based on a competition for replication sites or substrates is compared with other possible explanations. PMID:5701825

  18. Quantum Interference in Graphene Nanoconstrictions.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Pascal; Sadeghi, Hatef; Sangtarash, Sara; Lau, Chit Siong; Liu, Junjie; Ardavan, Arzhang; Warner, Jamie H; Lambert, Colin J; Briggs, G Andrew D; Mol, Jan A

    2016-07-13

    We report quantum interference effects in the electrical conductance of chemical vapor deposited graphene nanoconstrictions fabricated using feedback controlled electroburning. The observed multimode Fabry-Pérot interferences can be attributed to reflections at potential steps inside the channel. Sharp antiresonance features with a Fano line shape are observed. Theoretical modeling reveals that these Fano resonances are due to localized states inside the constriction, which couple to the delocalized states that also give rise to the Fabry-Pérot interference patterns. This study provides new insight into the interplay between two fundamental forms of quantum interference in graphene nanoconstrictions. PMID:27295198

  19. Young Children Counting at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Rose

    2007-01-01

    Learning to count is something that most children start to do by the time they are about two, and parents know from first-hand experience that family members play a big part in helping with this complex process. In this article, the author describes a project involving families sharing effective counting activities. The project called "Getting…

  20. Preschooler's Counting in Peer Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Reagan P.

    For this experiment, part of a larger study on preschoolers' counting competence, 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds played a counting game with their peers after becoming familiar with the game during structured interviews with an adult. It was expected that the symmetrical nature of peer interaction would allow children to display quantitative knowledge in…

  1. [Case-crossover design: Basic essentials and applications].

    PubMed

    Carracedo-Martínez, Eduardo; Tobías, Aurelio; Saez, Marc; Taracido, Margarita; Figueiras, Adolfo

    2009-01-01

    Case-crossover analysis is an observational epidemiological design that was proposed by Maclure in 1991 to assess whether a given intermittent or unusual exposure may have triggered an immediate short-term, acute event. The present article outlines the basics of case-crossover designs, as well as their applications and limitations. The case-crossover design is based on exclusively selecting case subjects. To calculate relative risk, exposure during the period of time prior to the event (case period) is compared against the same subject's exposure during one or more control periods. This method is only appropriate when the exposures are transient in time and have acute short-term effects. For exposures in which there is no trend, a unidirectional approach is the most frequent and consists of selecting one or more control periods prior to the case period. When the exposure displays a time trend (e.g., air pollution), a unidirectional approach will yield biased estimates, and therefore bidirectional case-crossover designs are used, which select control time intervals preceding and subsequent to that of the event. The case-crossover design is being increasingly used across a wide range of fields, including factors triggering traffic, occupational and domestic accidents and acute myocardial infarction, and those involved in air pollution and health and pharmacoepidemiology, among others. Insofar as data-analysis is concerned, case-crossover designs can generally be regarded as matched case-control studies and consequently conditional logistic regression can be applied. Lastly, this study analyzes practical examples of distinct applications of the case-crossover design. PMID:19303669

  2. Electronic structure in the crossover regimes in lower dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, R.; Dev, B. N.

    2014-11-01

    Modern growth and fabrication techniques can produce lower dimensional structures in the crossover regimes. Such structures in the crossover regimes can provide tunability of various properties of materials. For example, a zero-dimensional (0-D) structure (quantum dot) evolving towards a 3-D structure (bulk) shows electronic structure, which is neither 0-D-like, nor 3-D-like in the dimensional crossover regime. Within the crossover regime the electronic density of states (DOS) at Fermi level (Ef) keeps on changing as the size of the system changes. DOS at Ef determines many properties of materials, such as electronic specific heat, spin susceptibility, etc. Such properties can be tuned by controlling the size of the system in the crossover regimes. Keeping the importance of DOS at Ef in mind, we determine their values and other details of electronic structure of lower dimensional structures, in the 0-D to 1-D, 1-D to 2-D, 2-D to 3-D, 0-D to 2-D, 0-D to 3-D and 1-D to 3-D crossover regimes, in a simple free electron model. We compare our results with analytical theory and experimental results, wherever available. We also present some results obtained by scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements on Ag islands on Si(1 1 1) substrates evolving from a 0-D to a 2-D structure. This simple model is quite useful in understanding lower dimensional structures in the crossover regimes and, in general, in nanoscale science. Fabrication of such structures would provide control on materials properties.

  3. Detection of crossover time scales in multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Erjia; Leung, Yee

    2013-04-01

    Fractal is employed in this paper as a scale-based method for the identification of the scaling behavior of time series. Many spatial and temporal processes exhibiting complex multi(mono)-scaling behaviors are fractals. One of the important concepts in fractals is crossover time scale(s) that separates distinct regimes having different fractal scaling behaviors. A common method is multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). The detection of crossover time scale(s) is, however, relatively subjective since it has been made without rigorous statistical procedures and has generally been determined by eye balling or subjective observation. Crossover time scales such determined may be spurious and problematic. It may not reflect the genuine underlying scaling behavior of a time series. The purpose of this paper is to propose a statistical procedure to model complex fractal scaling behaviors and reliably identify the crossover time scales under MF-DFA. The scaling-identification regression model, grounded on a solid statistical foundation, is first proposed to describe multi-scaling behaviors of fractals. Through the regression analysis and statistical inference, we can (1) identify the crossover time scales that cannot be detected by eye-balling observation, (2) determine the number and locations of the genuine crossover time scales, (3) give confidence intervals for the crossover time scales, and (4) establish the statistically significant regression model depicting the underlying scaling behavior of a time series. To substantive our argument, the regression model is applied to analyze the multi-scaling behaviors of avian-influenza outbreaks, water consumption, daily mean temperature, and rainfall of Hong Kong. Through the proposed model, we can have a deeper understanding of fractals in general and a statistical approach to identify multi-scaling behavior under MF-DFA in particular.

  4. A Link between Meiotic Prophase Progression and CrossoverControl

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, Peter M.; Farruggio, Alfonso P.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-07-06

    During meiosis, most organisms ensure that homologous chromosomes undergo at least one exchange of DNA, or crossover, to link chromosomes together and accomplish proper segregation. How each chromosome receives a minimum of one crossover is unknown. During early meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans and many other species, chromosomes adopt a polarized organization within the nucleus, which normally disappears upon completion of homolog synapsis. Mutations that impair synapsis even between a single pair of chromosomes in C. elegans delay this nuclear reorganization. We quantified this delay by developing a classification scheme for discrete stages of meiosis. Immunofluorescence localization of RAD-51 protein revealed that delayed meiotic cells also contained persistent recombination intermediates. Through genetic analysis, we found that this cytological delay in meiotic progression requires double-strand breaks and the function of the crossover-promoting heteroduplex HIM-14 (Msh4) and MSH-5. Failure of X chromosome synapsis also resulted in impaired crossover control on autosomes, which may result from greater numbers and persistence of recombination intermediates in the delayed nuclei. We conclude that maturation of recombination events on chromosomes promotes meiotic progression, and is coupled to the regulation of crossover number and placement. Our results have broad implications for the interpretation of meiotic mutants, as we have shown that asynapsis of a single chromosome pair can exert global effects on meiotic progression and recombination frequency.

  5. A Link between Meiotic Prophase Progression and Crossover Control

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Peter M; Farruggio, Alfonso P; Dernburg, Abby F

    2006-01-01

    During meiosis, most organisms ensure that homologous chromosomes undergo at least one exchange of DNA, or crossover, to link chromosomes together and accomplish proper segregation. How each chromosome receives a minimum of one crossover is unknown. During early meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans and many other species, chromosomes adopt a polarized organization within the nucleus, which normally disappears upon completion of homolog synapsis. Mutations that impair synapsis even between a single pair of chromosomes in C. elegans delay this nuclear reorganization. We quantified this delay by developing a classification scheme for discrete stages of meiosis. Immunofluorescence localization of RAD-51 protein revealed that delayed meiotic cells also contained persistent recombination intermediates. Through genetic analysis, we found that this cytological delay in meiotic progression requires double-strand breaks and the function of the crossover-promoting heteroduplex HIM-14 (Msh4) and MSH-5. Failure of X chromosome synapsis also resulted in impaired crossover control on autosomes, which may result from greater numbers and persistence of recombination intermediates in the delayed nuclei. We conclude that maturation of recombination events on chromosomes promotes meiotic progression, and is coupled to the regulation of crossover number and placement. Our results have broad implications for the interpretation of meiotic mutants, as we have shown that asynapsis of a single chromosome pair can exert global effects on meiotic progression and recombination frequency. PMID:16462941

  6. The first jamming crossover: geometric and mechanical features.

    PubMed

    Pica Ciamarra, Massimo; Sollich, Peter

    2013-03-28

    The jamming transition characterizes athermal systems of particles interacting via finite range repulsive potentials, and occurs on increasing the density when particles cannot avoid making contacts with those of their first coordination shell. We have recently shown [M. Pica Ciamarra and P. Sollich, e-print arXiv:1209.3334] that the same systems are also characterized by a series of jamming crossovers. These occur at higher volume fractions as particles are forced to make contact with those of subsequent coordination shells. At finite temperature, the crossovers give rise to dynamic and thermodynamic density anomalies, including a diffusivity anomaly and a negative thermal expansion coefficient. Density anomalies may therefore be related to structural changes occurring at the jamming crossovers. Here we elucidate these structural changes, investigating the evolution of the structure and of the mechanical properties of a jammed system as its volume fraction varies from the jamming transition to and beyond the first jamming crossover. We show that the first jamming crossover occurs at a well defined volume fraction, and that it induces a rearrangement of the force network causing a softening of the system. It also causes qualitative changes in the normal mode density of states and the spatial properties of the normal mode vectors. PMID:23556780

  7. The first jamming crossover: Geometric and mechanical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciamarra, Massimo Pica; Sollich, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The jamming transition characterizes athermal systems of particles interacting via finite range repulsive potentials, and occurs on increasing the density when particles cannot avoid making contacts with those of their first coordination shell. We have recently shown [M. Pica Ciamarra and P. Sollich, e-print arXiv:1209.3334] that the same systems are also characterized by a series of jamming crossovers. These occur at higher volume fractions as particles are forced to make contact with those of subsequent coordination shells. At finite temperature, the crossovers give rise to dynamic and thermodynamic density anomalies, including a diffusivity anomaly and a negative thermal expansion coefficient. Density anomalies may therefore be related to structural changes occurring at the jamming crossovers. Here we elucidate these structural changes, investigating the evolution of the structure and of the mechanical properties of a jammed system as its volume fraction varies from the jamming transition to and beyond the first jamming crossover. We show that the first jamming crossover occurs at a well defined volume fraction, and that it induces a rearrangement of the force network causing a softening of the system. It also causes qualitative changes in the normal mode density of states and the spatial properties of the normal mode vectors.

  8. Crossover Analysis of CHANG'E-1 Laser Altimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Yue, Z.; Di, K.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a preliminary result of crossover analysis and adjustment of Chang'E-1(CE-1) Laser Altimeter (LAM) data of the Moon for global and regional mapping applications. During the operation of Chang'E-1 from November 28, 2007 to December 4, 2008, the laser altimeter acquired 1400 orbital profiles with about 9.12 million altimetric points. In our experiment, we derived more than 1.38 million crossovers from 1395 ground tracks covering the entire lunar surface after eliminating outliers of orbits and altimetric points. A method of least-squares crossover adjustment with a series of basis functions of time (trigonometric functions and polynomials) is developed to reconcile the LAM data by minimizing the crossover residuals globally. The normal equations are very large but sparse; therefore they are stored and solved using sparse matrix technique. In a test area (0°N~60°N, 50°W~0°W), the crossover residuals are reduced from 62.1m to 32.8m, and the quality of the DEM generated from the adjusted LAM data is improved accordingly. We will optimize the method for the global adjustment to generate a high precision consistent global DEM, which can be used as absolute control for lunar mapping with orbital images.

  9. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  10. The RNA interference revolution.

    PubMed

    Lenz, G

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of double-stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing has rapidly led to its use as a method of choice for blocking a gene, and has turned it into one of the most discussed topics in cell biology. Although still in its infancy, the field of RNA interference has already produced a vast array of results, mainly in Caenorhabditis elegans, but recently also in mammalian systems. Micro-RNAs are short hairpins of RNA capable of blocking translation, which are transcribed from genomic DNA and are implicated in several aspects from development to cell signaling. The present review discusses the main methods used for gene silencing in cell culture and animal models, including the selection of target sequences, delivery methods and strategies for a successful silencing. Expected developments are briefly discussed, ranging from reverse genetics to therapeutics. Thus, the development of the new paradigm of RNA-mediated gene silencing has produced two important advances: knowledge of a basic cellular mechanism present in the majority of eukaryotic cells and access to a potent and specific new method for gene silencing. PMID:16302089

  11. Serum indices: managing assay interference.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Christopher-John L; Carter, Andrew C

    2016-09-01

    Clinical laboratories frequently encounter samples showing significant haemolysis, icterus or lipaemia. Technical advances, utilizing spectrophotometric measurements on automated chemistry analysers, allow rapid and accurate identification of such samples. However, accurate quantification of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interference is of limited value if laboratories do not set rational alert limits, based on sound interference testing experiments. Furthermore, in the context of increasing consolidation of laboratories and the formation of laboratory networks, there is an increasing requirement for harmonization of the handling of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia-affected samples across different analytical platforms. Harmonization may be best achieved by considering both the analytical aspects of index measurement and the possible variations in the effects of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interferences on assays from different manufacturers. Initial verification studies, followed up with ongoing quality control testing, can help a laboratory ensure the accuracy of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia index results, as well as assist in managing any biases in index results from analysers from different manufacturers. Similarities, and variations, in the effect of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interference in assays from different manufacturers can often be predicted from the mechanism of interference. Nevertheless, interference testing is required to confirm expected similarities or to quantify differences. It is important that laboratories are familiar with a number of interference testing protocols and the particular strengths and weaknesses of each. A rigorous approach to all aspects of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interference testing allows the analytical progress in index measurement to be translated into improved patient care. PMID:27147624

  12. Interference Phenomenon with Mobile Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trantham, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    A simple experiment is presented in which the spacing and geometric pattern of pixels in mobile displays is measured. The technique is based on optical constructive interference. While the experiment is another opportunity to demonstrate wave interference from a grating-like structure, this can also be used to demonstrate concepts of solid state…

  13. Supersonic Wave Interference Affecting Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Eugene S.

    1958-01-01

    Some of the significant interference fields that may affect stability of aircraft at supersonic speeds are briefly summarized. Illustrations and calculations are presented to indicate the importance of interference fields created by wings, bodies, wing-body combinations, jets, and nacelles.

  14. Output Interference in Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Amy H.; Malmberg, Kenneth J.; Shiffrin, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Dennis and Humphreys (2001) proposed that interference in recognition memory arises solely from the prior contexts of the test word: Interference does not arise from memory traces of other words (from events prior to the study list or on the study list, and regardless of similarity to the test item). We evaluate this model using output…

  15. Industrial interference and radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessner, A.

    2013-07-01

    The interferer - victim scenario is described for the case of industrial interference affecting radio astronomical observatories. The sensitivity of radio astronomical receivers and their interference limits are outlined. EMC above 30 MHz is a serious problem for Radio Astronomy. Interferer (CISPR) and victim (ITU-R RA 769) standards are not harmonised. The emissions from the interferer and their spectral characteristics are not defined sufficiently well by CISPR standards. The required minimum coupling losses (MCL) between an industrial device and radio astronomical antenna depends on device properties but is shown to exceed 140 dB in most cases. Spatial separation of a few km is insufficient on its own, the terrain must shield > 30-40 dB, additional mitigations such as extra shielding or suppression of high frequency emissions may be necessary. A case by case compatibility analysis and tailored EMC measures are required for individual installations. Aggregation of many weak rfi emitters can become serious problem. If deployment densities are high enough, the emission constraints can even exceed those for a single interferer at a short distance from the radio observatory. Compatibility studies must account not only for the single interferer but also for many widely distributed interference sources.

  16. Spin-State Tuning at Pseudo-tetrahedral d(6) Ions: Spin Crossover in [BP3]Fe(II)-X Complexes.

    PubMed

    Creutz, Sidney E; Peters, Jonas C

    2016-04-18

    Low-coordinate transition-metal complexes that undergo spin crossover remain rare. We report here a series of four-coordinate, pseudo-tetrahedral P3FeII–X complexes supported by tris(phosphine)borate P3 ([PhBP3R]−) and phosphiniminato X-type ligands (−N═PR3′) that, in combination, tune the spin-crossover behavior of the system. Most of the reported iron complexes undergo spin crossover at temperatures near or above room temperature in solution and in the solid state. The change in spin state coincides with a significant change in the degree of π-bonding between Fe and the bound N atom of the phosphiniminato ligand. Spin crossover is accompanied by striking changes in the ultraviolet–visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra, which allows for quantitative modeling of the thermodynamic parameters of the spin equilibria. These spin equilibria have also been studied by numerous techniques including paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared, and Mössbauer spectroscopies; X-ray crystallography; and solid-state superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. These studies allow qualitative correlations to be made between the steric and electronic properties of the ligand substituents and the enthalpy and entropy changes associated with the spin equilibria. PMID:27042863

  17. Transient electromagnetic interference in substations

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, C.M.; Thomas, D.E.; Nickel, F.S.; Salas, T.M. ); Wright, S.E. )

    1994-10-01

    Electromagnetic interference levels on sensitive electronic equipment are quantified experimentally and theoretically in air and gas insulated substations of different voltages. Measurement techniques for recording interference voltages and currents and electric and magnetic fields are reviewed and actual interference data are summarized. Conducted and radiated interference coupling mechanisms and levels in substation control wiring are described using both measurement results and electromagnetic models validated against measurements. The nominal maximum field and control wire interference levels expected in the switchyard and inside the control house from switching operations, faults, and an average lightning strike are estimated using high frequency transient coupling models. Comparisons with standards are made and recommendations given concerning equipment shielding and surge protection.

  18. Sagnac interference in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishara, Waheb; Refael, Gil; Bockrath, Marc

    2008-10-01

    The Sagnac interference mode arises when two interfering counterpropogating beams traverse a loop, but with their velocities detuned by a small amount 2u , with vR/L=vF±u . In this paper we perform a perturbative nonequilibrium calculation of Sagnac interference in single-channel wires as well as armchair nanotube loops. We study the dependence of the Sagnac conductance oscillations on temperature and interactions. We find that the Sagnac interference is not destroyed by strong interactions, but becomes weakly dependent on the velocity detuning u . In armchairs nanotubes with typical interaction strength, 0.25≤g≤0.5 , we find that the necessary temperature for observing the interference effect, TSAG is also only weakly dependent on the interaction, and is enhanced by a factor of 8 relative to the temperature necessary for observing Fabry-Pérot interference in the same system, TFP .

  19. Uncertainty in measurements by counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bich, Walter; Pennecchi, Francesca

    2012-02-01

    Counting is at the base of many high-level measurements, such as, for example, frequency measurements. In some instances the measurand itself is a number of events, such as spontaneous decays in activity measurements, or objects, such as colonies of bacteria in microbiology. Countings also play a fundamental role in everyday life. In any case, a counting is a measurement. A measurement result, according to its present definition, as given in the 'International Vocabulary of Metrology—Basic and general concepts and associated terms (VIM)', must include a specification concerning the estimated uncertainty. As concerns measurements by counting, this specification is not easy to encompass in the well-known framework of the 'Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement', known as GUM, in which there is no guidance on the topic. Furthermore, the issue of uncertainty in countings has received little or no attention in the literature, so that it is commonly accepted that this category of measurements constitutes an exception in which the concept of uncertainty is not applicable, or, alternatively, that results of measurements by counting have essentially no uncertainty. In this paper we propose a general model for measurements by counting which allows an uncertainty evaluation compliant with the general framework of the GUM.

  20. Reproductive interference between animal species.

    PubMed

    Gröning, Julia; Hochkirch, Axel

    2008-09-01

    Although sexual interactions between species (reproductive interference) have been reported from a wide range of animal taxa, their potential for determining species coexistence is often disregarded. Here, we review evidence from laboratory and field studies illustrating that heterospecific sexual interactions are frequently associated with fitness loss and can have severe ecological and evolutionary consequences. We define reproductive interference as any kind of interspecific interaction during the process of mate acquisition that adversely affects the fitness of at least one of the species involved and that is caused by incomplete species recognition. We distinguish seven types of reproductive interference: signal jamming, heterospecific rivalry, misdirected courtship, heterospecific mating attempts, erroneous female choice, heterospecific mating, and hybridization. We then discuss the sex-specific costs of these types and highlight two typical features of reproductive interference: density-dependence and asymmetry. Similar to competition, reproductive interference can lead to displacement of one species (sexual exclusion), spatial, temporal, or habitat segregation, changes in life history parameters, and reproductive character displacement. In many cases, patterns of coexistence might be shaped by reproductive interference rather than by resource competition, as the presence of a few heterospecifics might substantially decrease reproductive success. Therefore, interspecific sexual interactions should receive more attention in ecological research. Reproductive interference has mainly been discussed in the context of invasive species or hybrid zones, whereas its influence on naturally-occurring sympatric species pairs has rarely been addressed. To improve our knowledge of the ecological significance of reproductive interference, findings from laboratory experiments should be validated in the field. Future studies should also focus on ecological mechanisms, such

  1. Mice can count and optimize count-based decisions.

    PubMed

    Çavdaroğlu, Bilgehan; Balcı, Fuat

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies showed that rats and pigeons can count their responses, and the resultant count-based judgments exhibit the scalar property (also known as Weber's Law), a psychophysical property that also characterizes interval-timing behavior. Animals were found to take a nearly normative account of these well-established endogenous uncertainty characteristics in their time-based decision-making. On the other hand, no study has yet tested the implications of scalar property of numerosity representations for reward-rate maximization in count-based decision-making. The current study tested mice on a task that required them to press one lever for a minimum number of times before pressing the second lever to collect the armed reward (fixed consecutive number schedule, FCN). Fewer than necessary number of responses reset the response count without reinforcement, whereas emitting responses at least for the minimum number of times reset the response counter with reinforcement. Each mouse was tested with three different FCN schedules (FCN10, FCN20, FCN40). The number of responses emitted on the first lever before pressing the second lever constituted the main unit of analysis. Our findings for the first time showed that mice count their responses with scalar property. We then defined the reward-rate maximizing numerical decision strategies in this task based on the subject-based estimates of the endogenous counting uncertainty. Our results showed that mice learn to maximize the reward-rate by incorporating the uncertainty in their numerosity judgments into their count-based decisions. Our findings extend the scope of optimal temporal risk-assessment to the domain of count-based decision-making. PMID:26463617

  2. White blood cell counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and tests of a prototype white blood cell counting system for use in the Skylab IMSS are presented. The counting system consists of a sample collection subsystem, sample dilution and fluid containment subsystem, and a cell counter. Preliminary test results show the sample collection and the dilution subsystems are functional and fulfill design goals. Results for the fluid containment subsystem show the handling bags cause counting errors due to: (1) adsorption of cells to the walls of the container, and (2) inadequate cleaning of the plastic bag material before fabrication. It was recommended that another bag material be selected.

  3. Counting of fermions and spins in strongly correlated systems in and out of thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Braungardt, Sibylle; Rodriguez, Mirta; Glauber, Roy J.; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2011-01-15

    Atom counting theory can be used to study the role of thermal noise in quantum phase transitions and to monitor the dynamics of a quantum system. We illustrate this for a strongly correlated fermionic system, which is equivalent to an anisotropic quantum XY chain in a transverse field and can be realized with cold fermionic atoms in an optical lattice. We analyze the counting statistics across the phase diagram in the presence of thermal fluctuations and during its thermalization when the system is coupled to a heat bath. At zero temperature, the quantum phase transition is reflected in the cumulants of the counting distribution. We find that the signatures of the crossover remain visible at low temperature and are obscured with increasing thermal fluctuations. We find that the same quantities may be used to scan the dynamics during the thermalization of the system.

  4. Hadron-quark crossover and hot neutron stars at birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2016-02-01

    We construct a new isentropic equation of state (EOS) at finite temperature, "Rover," on the basis of the hadron-quark crossover at high density. By using the new EOS, we study the structure of hot neutron stars at birth with typical lepton fraction (Y_l=0.3-0.4) and typical entropy per baryon (hat {S}=1{-}2). Due to the gradual appearance of quark degrees of freedom at high density, the temperature T and the baryon density ρ at the center of hot neutron stars with hadron-quark crossover are found to be smaller than those without the crossover by a factor of two or more. Typical energy release due to the contraction of a hot neutron star to a cold neutron star with mass M=1.4 M_{⊙} is shown to be about 0.04 M_{⊙}, with a spin-up rate of about 14%.

  5. Licensing MLH1 sites for crossover during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Martín, Azahara C; Shaw, Peter; Phillips, Dylan; Reader, Steve; Moore, Graham

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes synapse and recombine at sites marked by the binding of the mismatch repair protein MLH1. In hexaploid wheat, the Ph1 locus has a major effect on whether crossover occurs between homologues or between related homoeologues. Here we report that--in wheat-rye hybrids where homologues are absent--Ph1 affects neither the level of synapsis nor the number of MLH1. Thus in the case of wheat-wild relative hybrids, Ph1 must affect whether MLH1 sites are able to progress to crossover. The observed level of synapsis implies that Ph1 functions to promote homologue pairing rather than suppress homoeologue pairing in wheat. Therefore, Ph1 stabilises polyploidy in wheat by both promoting homologue pairing and preventing MLH1 sites from becoming crossovers on paired homoeologues during meiosis. PMID:25098240

  6. Full counting statistics for current through each channel of orbital degenerate Anderson impurity with exchange interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakano, Rui; Oguri, Akira; Nisikawa, Yunori

    We study non-equilibrium currents, current fluctuations and cross-correlations of the currents through Kondo-correlated quantum dots at low applied bias-voltages, using full counting statistics. To elucidate impact of dot-site interaction to these current properties in crossover between noninteracting and some Kondo states, renormalized perturbation theory or local Fermi liquid theory are employed. The exact form of the cumulant generating function up to third order of bias-voltage is derived in term of renormalized parameters. Specifically, crossover behavior of the Fano factor (ratio between noise and current) and current crosscorrelations for two-fold orbital case is discussed with using computed renormalized parameters by numerical renormalization group.

  7. Complete Blood Count (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... Metabolic Panel (BMP) Blood Test: Hemoglobin Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Word! Complete Blood Count (CBC) Medical Tests ...

  8. Counting Triangles to Sum Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMaio, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Counting complete subgraphs of three vertices in complete graphs, yields combinatorial arguments for identities for sums of squares of integers, odd integers, even integers and sums of the triangular numbers.

  9. Interpretation and bias in case-crossover studies.

    PubMed

    Redelmeier, D A; Tibshirani, R J

    1997-11-01

    The case-crossover design is an innovative epidemiologic technique with distinct strengths and limitations. We review the fundamental logic of this self-matching non-randomized design and direct attention to 15 concerns related to the available data, unavailable data, analytic technique, quantitative statistics, and etiologic model. Implications for each concern are discussed in the context of a recent report on whether cellular telephone calls are associated with an increased risk of a motor vehicle collision. We suggest that an understanding of the case-crossover design may help investigators explore selected questions in behavioral medical research. PMID:9393384

  10. Sound modes at the BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Heiselberg, H.

    2006-01-15

    First and second sound speeds are calculated for a uniform superfluid gas of Fermi atoms as a function of temperature, density, and interaction strength. The second sound speed is of particular interest as it is a clear signal of a superfluid component and it determines the critical temperature. The sound modes and their dependence on density, scattering length, and temperature are calculated in the BCS, molecular Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), and unitarity limits and a smooth crossover is extrapolated. It is found that first and second sounds undergo avoided crossing on the BEC side due to mixing. Consequently, they are detectable at crossover both as density and thermal waves in traps.

  11. Crossover from Ballistic to Diffusive Thermal Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Konabe, Satoru; Shiomi, Junichiro; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2009-09-01

    We present a theoretical scheme that seamlessly handles the crossover from fully ballistic to diffusive thermal transport regimes and apply it to carbon nanotubes. At room temperature, micrometer-length nanotubes belong to the intermediate regime in which ballistic and diffusive phonons coexist. According to our scheme, the thermal conductance of these nanotubes exhibit anomalous nonlinear dependence of tube length due to this coexistence. This result is in excellent agreement with molecular-dynamics simulation results showing the nonlinear thermal conductance. Additionally, we clarify the mechanism of crossover in terms of the length-dependent characteristic frequency.

  12. Counting on Using a Number Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Counting all and counting on are distinct counting strategies that can be used to compute such quantities as the total number of objects in two sets (Wright, Martland, and Stafford 2010). Given five objects and three more objects, for example, children who use counting all to determine quantity will count both collections; that is, they count…

  13. Optical interference with digital holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossman, David; Perez-Garcia, Benjamin; Hernandez-Aranda, Raul I.; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    In 1804, Thomas Young reported the observation of fringes in the intensity of light, and attributed it to the concept of interference between coherent sources. In this paper, we revisit this famous experiment and show how it can easily be demonstrated with digital holography. We look closely at the concept of interference with light and ask, "fringes in what?" We then show that depending on how light interferes, fringe patterns in observables other than intensity can be seen. We explain this conceptually and demonstrate it experimentally. We provide a holistic approach to the topic, aided by modern laboratory practices for a straightforward demonstration of the underlying physics.

  14. Age Differences in Implicit Interference

    PubMed Central

    Ikier, Simay; Hasher, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    We assessed age differences in interference effects in priming by using fragment completion. In Experiment 1, noninterfering filler words preceded critical targets at study, and priming was age invariant. In Experiment 2, the same target items had interfering competitors at the beginning of the list, such that both the target and the competitor were legitimate solutions to a fragment. Having two responses to a cue was disruptive for older adults, but not for younger adults. Younger and older adults differ in their susceptibility to interference in implicit tasks, and interference may play a role in influencing the magnitude of age differences in priming. PMID:16960231

  15. RNA Interference in Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Kocan, Katherine M.; Blouin, Edmour; de la Fuente, José

    2011-01-01

    Ticks are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites of wild and domestic animals and humans, and are considered to be second worldwide to mosquitoes as vectors of human diseases1 and the most important vectors affecting cattle industry worldwide2. Ticks are classified in the subclass Acari, order Parasitiformes, suborder Ixodida and are distributed worldwide from Arctic to tropical regions3. Despite efforts to control tick infestations, these ectoparasites remain a serious problem for human and animal health4,5. RNA interference (RNAi)6 is a nucleic acid-based reverse genetic approach that involves disruption of gene expression in order to determine gene function or its effect on a metabolic pathway. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are the effector molecules of the RNAi pathway that is initiated by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and results in a potent sequence-specific degradation of cytoplasmic mRNAs containing the same sequence as the dsRNA trigger7-9. Post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms initiated by dsRNA have been discovered in all eukaryotes studied thus far, and RNAi has been rapidly developed in a variety of organisms as a tool for functional genomics studies and other applications10. RNAi has become the most widely used gene-silencing technique in ticks and other organisms where alternative approaches for genetic manipulation are not available or are unreliable5,11. The genetic characterization of ticks has been limited until the recent application of RNAi12,13. In the short time that RNAi has been available, it has proved to be a valuable tool for studying tick gene function, the characterization of the tick-pathogen interface and the screening and characterization of tick protective antigens14. Herein, a method for RNAi through injection of dsRNA into unfed ticks is described. It is likely that the knowledge gained from this experimental approach will contribute markedly to the understanding of basic biological systems and the development of vaccines

  16. Origin of conductivity crossover in entangled multiwalled carbon nanotube networks filled by iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimowa, George; Linganiso, Ella C.; Churochkin, Dmitry; Coville, Neil J.; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2011-11-01

    A realistic transport model showing the interplay of the hopping transport between the outer shells of iron-filled entangled multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), and the diffusive transport through the inner part of the tubes, as a function of the filling percentage, is developed. This model is based on low-temperature electrical resistivity and magneto-resistance (MR) measurements. The conductivity at low temperatures showed a crossover from Efros-Shklovski variable range hopping (VRH) to Mott VRH in three dimensions (3D) between the neighboring tubes as the iron weight percentage is increased from 11% to 19% in the MWNTs. The MR in the hopping regime is strongly dependent on temperature as well as magnetic field and shows both positive and negative signs, which are discussed in terms of wave-function shrinkage and quantum-interference effects, respectively. A further increase of the iron percentage from 19% to 31% gives a conductivity crossover from Mott VRH to 3D weak localization (WL). This change is ascribed to the formation of long iron nanowires at the core of the nanotubes, which yields a long dephasing length (e.g., 30 nm) at the lowest measured temperature. Although the overall transport in this network is described by a 3D WL model, the weak temperature dependence of inelastic scattering length expressed as Lφ ˜ T-0.3 suggests the possibility for the presence of one-dimensional channels in the network due to the formation of long Fe nanowires inside the tubes, which might introduce an alignment in the random structure.

  17. Evaluation of the platelet counting by Abbott CELL-DYN SAPPHIRE haematology analyser compared with flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, E; Del Vecchio, L; Scopacasa, F; Lo Pardo, C; Capone, F; Pariante, S; Scalia, G; De Caterina, M

    2009-04-01

    The Abbot Cell-Dyn Sapphire is a new generation haematology analyser. The system uses optical/fluorescence flow cytometry in combination with electronic impedance to produce a full blood count. Optical and impedance are the default methods for platelet counting while automated CD61-immunoplatelet analysis can be run as selectable test. The aim of this study was to determine the platelet count performance of the three counting methods available on the instrument and to compare the results with those provided by Becton Dickinson FACSCalibur flow cytometer used as reference method. A lipid interference experiment was also performed. Linearity, carryover and precision were good, and satisfactory agreement with reference method was found for the impedance, optical and CD61-immunoplatelet analysis, although this latter provided the closest results in comparison with flow cytometry. In the lipid interference experiment, a moderate inaccuracy of optical and immunoplatelet counts was observed starting from a very high lipid value. PMID:18177435

  18. Effect of xylitol on cariogenic and beneficial oral streptococci: a randomized, double-blind crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Bahador, A; Lesan, S; Kashi, N

    2012-01-01

    Background/purpose Although habitual consumption of xylitol reduces cariogenic streptococci levels, its effect on beneficial oral streptococci is less clear. The main aim of the study is to investigate the effect of short-term xylitol consumption on the oral beneficial streptococci level of saliva, Streptococcus sanguinis and S. mitis. Material and Methods Twenty four volunteers with a median age of 23.7 years (range: 20-28) harboring Streptococcus mutans, S. sobrinus, S. sanguinis and S. mitis participated in the randomized, double-blind, cross-over study. The experimental chewing gum (1.5 g/pellet) contained 70% xylitol w/w while the control gum contained 63% sorbitol w/w. Saliva samples were collected before and after two three-week test periods with a four-week washout interval. Colony-forming units (CFU)/ml were enumerated for the estimation of S. mutans levels on Mitis Salivarius-Mutans valinomycin (MS-MUTV), S. sobrinus on Mitis Salivarius-Sobrinus (MS-SOB), S. sanguinis on Modified Medium 10-Sucrose (MM10-S) and S. mitis on Mitis Salivarius Agar with Tellurite (MSAT) media. Results The S. mutans and S. sobrinus counts of the saliva samples decreased significantly (p = 0.01 and p = 0.011, respectively) in the xylitol gum group but not in the sorbitol gum group. The salivary S. sanguinis and S. mitis counts did not decrease in both xylitol and sorbitol gum groups. Conclusions Based on the findings of this study, xylitol consumption reduced S. mutans and S. sobrinus counts in saliva but appeared not to effect numbers of S. sanguinis and S. mitis in saliva. So, habitual consumption of xylitol reduces cariogenic streptococci levels without any effect on beneficial sterptococci for the oral cavity. PMID:22973473

  19. Interference colors with ''hidden'' polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Mark P.

    1981-09-01

    The author demonstrates the importance of polarizers when investigating interference colors in birefringence by considering a special case of cellophane placed on a smooth kitchen table illuminated from behind by an open window.(AIP)

  20. Interference Colors in Thin Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, H. L.

    1979-01-01

    Explains interference colors in thin films as being due to the removal, or considerable reduction, of a certain color by destructive inteference that results in the complementary color being seen. (GA)

  1. Electromagnetic Interference In New Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, William E.

    1991-01-01

    Report reviews plans to develop tests and standards to ensure that digital avionics systems in new civil aircraft immune to electromagnetic interference (EMI). Updated standards reflect more severe environment and vulnerabilities of modern avionics.

  2. Crossover dynamics at large metastability in gas-liquid nucleation.

    PubMed

    Santra, Mantu; Bagchi, Biman

    2011-03-01

    We have developed an alternate description of dynamics of nucleation in terms of an extended set of order parameters. The order parameters consist of an ordered set of kth largest clusters, ordered such that k= 1 is the largest cluster in the system, k= 2 is the second largest cluster, and so on. We have derived an analytic expression for the free energy for the kth largest cluster, which is in excellent agreement with the simulated results. At large supersaturation, the free energy barrier for the growth of the kth largest cluster disappears and the nucleation becomes barrierless. The major success of this extended theoretical formalism is that it can clearly explain the observed change in mechanism at large metastability [P. Bhimalapuram et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 206104 (2007)] and the associated dynamical crossover. The classical nucleation theory cannot explain this crossover. The crossover from activated to barrierless nucleation is found to occur at a supersaturation where multiple clusters cross the critical size. We attribute the crossover as the onset of the kinetic spinodal. We have derived an expression for the rate of nucleation in the barrierless regime by modeling growth as diffusion on the free energy surface of the largest cluster. The model reproduces the slower increase in the rate of growth as a function of supersaturation, as observed in experiments. PMID:21517508

  3. Ligand Induced Spin Crossover in Penta-Coordinated Ferric Dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, P.; Iyer, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    On addition of lewis bases to Fe(dtc)2X, ligand exchange takes place through a SN2 mechanism, with a parallel spin crossover in the ferric ion. The two species (S = 3/2 and S = 5/2) formed are in dynamic chemical equilibrium, and a slow decomposition is then initiated.

  4. 50 CFR 660.120 - Trawl fishery-crossover provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Trawl fishery-crossover provisions. 660.120 Section 660.120 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West...

  5. 50 CFR 660.120 - Trawl fishery-crossover provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Trawl fishery-crossover provisions. 660.120 Section 660.120 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West...

  6. 50 CFR 660.120 - Trawl fishery-crossover provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Trawl fishery-crossover provisions. 660.120 Section 660.120 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West...

  7. 50 CFR 660.120 - Trawl fishery-crossover provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trawl fishery-crossover provisions. 660.120 Section 660.120 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West...

  8. 50 CFR 660.120 - Trawl fishery-crossover provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Trawl fishery-crossover provisions. 660.120 Section 660.120 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West...

  9. Crossover between work and home in dyadic partner relationships.

    PubMed

    Dikkers, Josje S E; Geurts, Sabine A E; Kinnunen, Ulla; Kompier, Michiel A J; Taris, Toon W

    2007-12-01

    This study aimed at providing insight into the processes underlying crossover between "work" and "home" in dyadic partner relationships. Specifically, we examined to what extent husbands' work demands (work load and overtime hours) and psychological health (fatigue and depressive symptoms) "cross over" to their wives' home demands (home load) and psychological health. These associations were investigated among three couple groups, based on wives' working hours (i.e., more than 20 hours per week, from 1 to 20 hours per week, and not engaged in paid work) (253 couples in total). All husbands worked for at least 35 hours a week. Three possible crossover mechanisms were hypothesized: (i) time-based, (ii) strain-based, and (iii) empathy-based crossover. The results partially supported mechanisms (i) and (ii): when husbands reported higher work load (mechanism i) and more psychological health complaints (mechanism ii), their wives experienced higher home load. The results further supported mechanism (iii) that wives' and husbands' psychological health were associated. It is concluded that crossover from husbands to wives may occur through various mechanisms. PMID:18028075

  10. Crossover Improvement for the Genetic Algorithm in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vrajitoru, Dana

    1998-01-01

    In information retrieval (IR), the aim of genetic algorithms (GA) is to help a system to find, in a huge documents collection, a good reply to a query expressed by the user. Analysis of phenomena seen during the implementation of a GA for IR has led to a new crossover operation, which is introduced and compared to other learning methods.…

  11. Academic Crossover Study, University of Hawaii Community Colleges, Fall 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Office of the Chancellor for Community Colleges.

    The academic crossover study was developed to answer two questions: (1) What is the course-taking pattern of the different groups of academic majors? (e.g. what is proportion of academic load taken outside the major); and (2) What is the client-serving pattern of the different subject disciplines? (e.g. what are the groups of students served by…

  12. Size-dependent dielectrophoretic crossover frequency of spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ping-You; Chen, I-An; Yeh, Che-Kai; Chen, Pin-Yi; Juang, Jia-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been extensively used in lab-on-a-chip systems for trapping, separating, and manipulating of micro particles suspended in a liquid medium. The most widely used analytic model, the dipole model, provides an accurate prediction on the crossover frequency of submicron particles, but cannot explain the significant drop in crossover frequency of larger particles. Here, we present numerical simulations using the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) and finite element method to study the size effect of the DEP crossover frequency of spherical polystyrene particles suspended in de-ionized water. Our results show that the surface conductance due to the electrical double layer plays a key role, and the size dependency of crossover frequency obtained by the MST method agrees reasonably well with published experimental data. The exponents of the power law are approximately -1.0 and -4.3 for smaller (diameter < 4.6 μm) and larger particles (diameter  > 4.6 μm), respectively. The free surface charge distribution reveals that the charge begins accumulating on the particle equator for particle diameters larger than a critical diameter of 4.6 μm, a result not captured by the dipolar approximation. This method may be extended to analyze bioparticles with complex shapes and composition, and provides new insights into the interpretation of dielectrophoresis applications using lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:26909121

  13. Ergodic crossover in partially self-avoiding stochastic walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbert, Juliana M.; González, Rodrigo Silva; Martinez, Alexandre Souto

    2013-09-01

    Consider a one-dimensional environment with N randomly distributed sites. An agent explores this random medium moving deterministically with a spatial memory μ. A crossover from local to global exploration occurs in one dimension at a well-defined memory value μ1=log2N. In its stochastic version, the dynamics is ruled by the memory and by temperature T, which affects the hopping displacement. This dynamics also shows a crossover in one dimension, obtained computationally, between exploration schemes, characterized yet by the trajectory size (Np) (aging effect). In this paper we provide an analytical approach considering the modified stochastic version where the parameter T plays the role of a maximum hopping distance. This modification allows us to obtain a general analytical expression for the crossover, as a function of the parameters μ, T, and Np. Differently from what has been proposed by previous studies, we find that the crossover occurs in any dimension d. These results have been validated by numerical experiments and may be of great value for fixing optimal parameters in search algorithms.

  14. Ergodic crossover in partially self-avoiding stochastic walks.

    PubMed

    Berbert, Juliana M; González, Rodrigo Silva; Martinez, Alexandre Souto

    2013-09-01

    Consider a one-dimensional environment with N randomly distributed sites. An agent explores this random medium moving deterministically with a spatial memory μ. A crossover from local to global exploration occurs in one dimension at a well-defined memory value μ_{1}=log_{2}N. In its stochastic version, the dynamics is ruled by the memory and by temperature T, which affects the hopping displacement. This dynamics also shows a crossover in one dimension, obtained computationally, between exploration schemes, characterized yet by the trajectory size (N_{p}) (aging effect). In this paper we provide an analytical approach considering the modified stochastic version where the parameter T plays the role of a maximum hopping distance. This modification allows us to obtain a general analytical expression for the crossover, as a function of the parameters μ, T, and N_{p}. Differently from what has been proposed by previous studies, we find that the crossover occurs in any dimension d. These results have been validated by numerical experiments and may be of great value for fixing optimal parameters in search algorithms. PMID:24125225

  15. Altered Crossover Distribution and Frequency in Spermatocytes of Infertile Men with Azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Ren, He; Ferguson, Kyle; Kirkpatrick, Gordon; Vinning, Tanya; Chow, Victor; Ma, Sai

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair to facilitate the exchange of DNA at crossover sites along the chromosomes. The frequency and distribution of crossover formation are tightly regulated to ensure the proper progression of meiosis. Using immunofluorescence techniques, our group and others have studied the meiotic proteins in spermatocytes of infertile men, showing that this population displays a reduced frequency of crossovers compared to fertile men. An insufficient number of crossovers is thought to promote chromosome missegregation, in which case the faulty cell may face meiotic arrest or contribute to the production of aneuploid sperm. Increasing evidence in model organisms has suggested that the distribution of crossovers may also be important for proper chromosome segregation. In normal males, crossovers are shown to be rare near centromeres and telomeres, while frequent in subtelomeric regions. Our study aims to characterize the crossover distribution in infertile men with non-obstructive (NOA) and obstructive azoospermia (OA) along chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. Eight of the 16 NOA men and five of the 21 OA men in our study displayed reduced crossover frequency compared to control fertile men. Seven NOA men and nine OA men showed altered crossover distributions on at least one of the chromosome arms studied compared to controls. We found that although both NOA and OA men displayed altered crossover distributions, NOA men may be at a higher risk of suffering both altered crossover frequencies and distributions compared to OA men. Our data also suggests that infertile men display an increase in crossover formation in regions where they are normally inhibited, specifically near centromeres and telomeres. Finally, we demonstrated a decrease in crossovers near subtelomeres, as well as increased average crossover distance to telomeres in infertile men. As telomere-guided mechanisms are speculated to play a role in crossover formation in subtelomeres, future

  16. Altered Crossover Distribution and Frequency in Spermatocytes of Infertile Men with Azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Ren, He; Ferguson, Kyle; Kirkpatrick, Gordon; Vinning, Tanya; Chow, Victor; Ma, Sai

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair to facilitate the exchange of DNA at crossover sites along the chromosomes. The frequency and distribution of crossover formation are tightly regulated to ensure the proper progression of meiosis. Using immunofluorescence techniques, our group and others have studied the meiotic proteins in spermatocytes of infertile men, showing that this population displays a reduced frequency of crossovers compared to fertile men. An insufficient number of crossovers is thought to promote chromosome missegregation, in which case the faulty cell may face meiotic arrest or contribute to the production of aneuploid sperm. Increasing evidence in model organisms has suggested that the distribution of crossovers may also be important for proper chromosome segregation. In normal males, crossovers are shown to be rare near centromeres and telomeres, while frequent in subtelomeric regions. Our study aims to characterize the crossover distribution in infertile men with non-obstructive (NOA) and obstructive azoospermia (OA) along chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. Eight of the 16 NOA men and five of the 21 OA men in our study displayed reduced crossover frequency compared to control fertile men. Seven NOA men and nine OA men showed altered crossover distributions on at least one of the chromosome arms studied compared to controls. We found that although both NOA and OA men displayed altered crossover distributions, NOA men may be at a higher risk of suffering both altered crossover frequencies and distributions compared to OA men. Our data also suggests that infertile men display an increase in crossover formation in regions where they are normally inhibited, specifically near centromeres and telomeres. Finally, we demonstrated a decrease in crossovers near subtelomeres, as well as increased average crossover distance to telomeres in infertile men. As telomere-guided mechanisms are speculated to play a role in crossover formation in subtelomeres, future

  17. Hanford whole body counting manual

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, H.E.; Rieksts, G.A.; Lynch, T.P.

    1990-06-01

    This document describes the Hanford Whole Body Counting Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy--Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include providing in vivo measurements of internally deposited radioactivity in Hanford employees (or visitors). Specific chapters of this manual deal with the following subjects: program operational charter, authority, administration, and practices, including interpreting applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for in vivo measurement frequency, etc., for the plant-wide whole body counting services; state-of-the-art facilities and equipment used to provide the best in vivo measurement results possible for the approximately 11,000 measurements made annually; procedures for performing the various in vivo measurements at the Whole Body Counter (WBC) and related facilities including whole body counts; operation and maintenance of counting equipment, quality assurance provisions of the program, WBC data processing functions, statistical aspects of in vivo measurements, and whole body counting records and associated guidance documents. 16 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Optimization of simultaneous tritium-radiocarbon internal gas proportional counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonicalzi, R. M.; Aalseth, C. E.; Day, A. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Mace, E. K.; Moran, J. J.; Overman, C. T.; Panisko, M. E.; Seifert, A.

    2016-03-01

    Specific environmental applications can benefit from dual tritium and radiocarbon measurements in a single compound. Assuming typical environmental levels, it is often the low tritium activity relative to the higher radiocarbon activity that limits the dual measurement. In this paper, we explore the parameter space for a combined tritium and radiocarbon measurement using a natural methane sample mixed with an argon fill gas in low-background proportional counters of a specific design. We present an optimized methane percentage, detector fill pressure, and analysis energy windows to maximize measurement sensitivity while minimizing count time. The final optimized method uses a 9-atm fill of P35 (35% methane, 65% argon), and a tritium analysis window from 1.5 to 10.3 keV, which stops short of the tritium beta decay endpoint energy of 18.6 keV. This method optimizes tritium-counting efficiency while minimizing radiocarbon beta-decay interference.

  19. Sources and Structures of Mitotic Crossovers That Arise When BLM Helicase Is Absent in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    LaFave, Matthew C.; Andersen, Sabrina L.; Stoffregen, Eric P.; Holsclaw, Julie K.; Kohl, Kathryn P.; Overton, Lewis J.; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    The Bloom syndrome helicase, BLM, has numerous functions that prevent mitotic crossovers. We used unique features of Drosophila melanogaster to investigate origins and properties of mitotic crossovers that occur when BLM is absent. Induction of lesions that block replication forks increased crossover frequencies, consistent with functions for BLM in responding to fork blockage. In contrast, treatment with hydroxyurea, which stalls forks, did not elevate crossovers, even though mutants lacking BLM are sensitive to killing by this agent. To learn about sources of spontaneous recombination, we mapped mitotic crossovers in mutants lacking BLM. In the male germline, irradiation-induced crossovers were distributed randomly across the euchromatin, but spontaneous crossovers were nonrandom. We suggest that regions of the genome with a high frequency of mitotic crossovers may be analogous to common fragile sites in the human genome. Interestingly, in the male germline there is a paucity of crossovers in the interval that spans the pericentric heterochromatin, but in the female germline this interval is more prone to crossing over. Finally, our system allowed us to recover pairs of reciprocal crossover chromosomes. Sequencing of these revealed the existence of gene conversion tracts and did not provide any evidence for mutations associated with crossovers. These findings provide important new insights into sources and structures of mitotic crossovers and functions of BLM helicase. PMID:24172129

  20. What's Mine Is Yours: The Crossover of Day-Specific Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Angela; Sonnentag, Sabine; Niessen, Cornelia; Unger, Dana

    2012-01-01

    This diary study examines the daily crossover of self-esteem within working couples. By integrating self-esteem research into the crossover framework, we hypothesized that the day-specific self-esteem experienced by one partner after work crosses over to the other partner. Furthermore, we proposed that this daily crossover process is moderated by…

  1. 49 CFR 236.203 - Hand operated crossover between main tracks; protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hand operated crossover between main tracks..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Block Signal Systems Standards § 236.203 Hand operated crossover between main tracks; protection. At hand-operated crossover between main tracks, protection shall be provided by...

  2. 49 CFR 236.203 - Hand operated crossover between main tracks; protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hand operated crossover between main tracks..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Block Signal Systems Standards § 236.203 Hand operated crossover between main tracks; protection. At hand-operated crossover between main tracks, protection shall be provided by...

  3. 49 CFR 236.203 - Hand operated crossover between main tracks; protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hand operated crossover between main tracks..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Block Signal Systems Standards § 236.203 Hand operated crossover between main tracks; protection. At hand-operated crossover between main tracks, protection shall be provided by...

  4. 49 CFR 236.203 - Hand operated crossover between main tracks; protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hand operated crossover between main tracks..., AND APPLIANCES Automatic Block Signal Systems Standards § 236.203 Hand operated crossover between main tracks; protection. At hand-operated crossover between main tracks, protection shall be provided by...

  5. LINEAR COUNT-RATE METER

    DOEpatents

    Henry, J.J.

    1961-09-01

    A linear count-rate meter is designed to provide a highly linear output while receiving counting rates from one cycle per second to 100,000 cycles per second. Input pulses enter a linear discriminator and then are fed to a trigger circuit which produces positive pulses of uniform width and amplitude. The trigger circuit is connected to a one-shot multivibrator. The multivibrator output pulses have a selected width. Feedback means are provided for preventing transistor saturation in the multivibrator which improves the rise and decay times of the output pulses. The multivibrator is connected to a diode-switched, constant current metering circuit. A selected constant current is switched to an averaging circuit for each pulse received, and for a time determined by the received pulse width. The average output meter current is proportional to the product of the counting rate, the constant current, and the multivibrator output pulse width.

  6. Photon Counting - One More Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Richard H.

    2012-05-01

    Photon counting has been around for more than 60 years, and has been available to amateurs for most of that time. In most cases single photons are detected using photomultiplier tubes, "old technology" that became available after the Second World War. But over the last couple of decades the perfection of CCD devices has given amateurs the ability to perform accurate photometry with modest telescopes. Is there any reason to still count photons? This paper discusses some of the strengths of current photon counting technology, particularly relating to the search for fast optical transients. Technology advances in counters and photomultiplier modules are briefly mentioned. Illustrative data are presented including FFT analysis of bright star photometry and a technique for finding optical pulses in a large file of noisy data. This latter technique is shown to enable the discovery of a possible optical flare on the polar variable AM Her.

  7. Kentucky Kids Count 2001 County Data Book: Families Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salley, Valerie

    This Kids Count county data book is the eleventh in a series to measure the well-being of Kentucky's children and focuses on the vital role that families play in ensuring their children's success. Included at the beginning of this document is an executive summary of the databook providing an overview of the statewide data for six child and family…

  8. Critical Crossover Functions for Simple Fluids: Non-Analytical Scaling Determination of the Ising-Like Crossover Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre, Carole; Marre, Samuel; LeNeindre, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    A non-analytical scaling determination of the Ising-like crossover parameter is proposed considering the critical isochore of a simple fluid at finite distance from its critical temperature. The mean crossover functions, estimated from the bounded results of the massive renormalization scheme in field theory applied to the ( Φ 2) d2( n) model in three dimensions (d=3) and scalar order parameter (n=1), are used to formulate the corresponding scaling equations valid in two well-defined temperature ranges from the critical temperature. The validity range and the Ising-like nature of the corresponding crossover description are discussed in terms of a single Ising-like scale factor characterizing the critical isochore. The asymptotic value of this scale factor can be predicted within the Ising-like preasymptotic domain. Unfortunately, the absence of precise experimental data in such a close vicinity of the critical point leads the direct testing impossible. A contrario, from our scaling equations and the use of precise measurements performed at finite distance from the critical point, its local value can be estimated beyond the Ising-like preasymptotic domain. This non-analytical scaling determination only needs to make reference to the universal features estimated from the mean crossover functions and to introduce a single master dimensionless length common to all the simple fluids. This latter parameter guaranties the uniqueness of the physical length unit used for the theoretical crossover functions and the fluid singular properties when the generalized critical coordinates of the vapor-liquid critical point of each fluid are known. Xenon case along its critical isochore is considered as a typical example to demonstrate the singleness of the Ising-like crossover parameter. With the measurements at finite temperature range of the effective singular behaviors of the isothermal compressibility in the homogeneous domain, and the vapor-liquid coexisting densities in the

  9. Conductance of quantum interference transistors in parallel and in series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, K.; Nikolić, P.; Šordan, R.

    1999-07-01

    We theoretically study the electronic conductance G and the current-voltage characteristics of two quantum interference transistors in parallel and in series. We use two different definitions of conductance, G ˜ T and G ˜ T / R. Neither can reproduce the classical additivity law in the case of coherent transport due to quantum interference for the elements in series and quasibound states when elements are in parallel. In the case of two transistors in series, we find that the quantity T / R only qualitatively better represents the additivity law, which is probably expected because this model avoids counting the contact resistance twice. However, for the parallel configuration of transistors, the conductance is almost additive for the majority of energies when G ˜ T, except for the single-mode regime. Possible use of these configurations in digital electronics for basic logic functions is discussed.

  10. Shakespeare Live! and Character Counts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookshire, Cathy A.

    This paper discusses a live production of Shakespeare's "Macbeth" (in full costume but with no sets) for all public middle school and high school students in Harrisonburg and Rockingham, Virginia. The paper states that the "Character Counts" issues that are covered in the play are: decision making, responsibility and citizenship, trustworthiness,…

  11. Meal Counting and Claiming Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This manual contains information about the selection and implementation of a meal counting and claiming system for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and the School Breakfast Program (BSP). Federal reimbursement is provided for each meal that meets program requirements and is served to an eligible student. Part 1 explains the six elements of…

  12. What Really Counts in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Elliot W.

    1991-01-01

    Brains are biological, but minds are cultural achievements. What really counts in schools is teaching children the excitement of exploring ideas, helping youngsters formulate their own problems and resolution strategies, developing multiple literacy forms, imparting the importance of wonder, creating a sense of community, and recognizing each…

  13. South Carolina Kids Count, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, A. Baron

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of South Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 41 indicators in the areas of demographics, family, economic status, health, readiness and early school performance, scholastic achievement, and adolescent risk behaviors. The indicators are: (1) population; (2)…

  14. Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingraham, Sandy

    This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school…

  15. On Counting the Rational Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almada, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we show how to construct a function from the set N of natural numbers that explicitly counts the set Q[superscript +] of all positive rational numbers using a very intuitive approach. The function has the appeal of Cantor's function and it has the advantage that any high school student can understand the main idea at a glance…

  16. KIDS COUNT New Hampshire, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shemitz, Elllen, Ed.

    This Kids Count report presents statewide trends in the well-being of New Hampshire's children. The statistical report is based on 22 indicators of child well-being in 5 interrelated areas: (1) children and families (including child population, births, children living with single parent, and children experiencing parental divorce); (2) economic…

  17. Automatic Crater Counts on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C.; Brumby, S.; Asphaug, E.; Chamberlain, D.; Engel, T.

    2004-03-01

    We present results of an automated crater counting technique for THEMIS data. Algorithms were developed using GENIE machine learning software. The technique detects craters, generalizes well to new data, and is used to rapidly produce R-plots and statistical data.

  18. Carbon fiber counting. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for characterizing the number and lengths of carbon fibers accidentally released by the burning of composite portions of civil aircraft structure in a jet fuel fire after an accident. Representative samplings of carbon fibers collected on transparent sticky film were counted from photographic enlargements with a computer aided technique which also provided fiber lengths.

  19. Wiskids Count Data Book, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranley, M. Martha; Bianchi, J. P.; Eleson, Charity; Hall, Linda; Jacobson, Bob; Jackson, Kristin; Peacock, Jon

    This WisKids Count data book provides a statistical portrait of the well-being of Wisconsin's children. In addition to demographic data indicating changing communities, the indicators and data are organized into five overarching goals: (1) Healthy Families and Children Thrive, including births to single women, infant deaths, and health care…

  20. South Carolina Kids Count, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, A. Baron

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of South Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 42 indicators in the areas of demographics, family, economic status, health, readiness and early school performance, scholastic achievement, and adolescent risk behaviors. The indicators are: (1) population; (2)…

  1. KIDS COUNT Data Brief, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This 2009 KIDS COUNT Data Brief features highlights of the enhanced, mobile-friendly Data Center; data on the 10 key indicators of child well-being for all U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and many cities, counties, and school districts; and a summary of this year's essay, which calls for improvements to the nation's ability to design and…

  2. Counting a Culture of Mealworms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    Math is not the only topic that will be discussed when young children are asked to care for and count "mealworms," a type of insect larvae (just as caterpillars are the babies of butterflies, these larvae are babies of beetles). The following activity can take place over two months as the beetles undergo metamorphosis from larvae to adults. As the…

  3. Kids Count in Colorado! 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeke, Kaye

    This Kids Count report examines state, county, and regional trends in the well-being of Colorado's children. The first part of the report is presented in four chapters. Chapter 1 includes findings regarding the increasing diversity of the child population, linguistic isolation, the impact of parental unemployment, child poverty, and the affordable…

  4. Verbal Counting in Bilingual Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donevska-Todorova, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Informal experiences in mathematics often include playful competitions among young children in counting numbers in as many as possible different languages. Can these enjoyable experiences result with excellence in the formal processes of education? This article discusses connections between mathematical achievements and natural languages within…

  5. Kids Count Data Sheet, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, MD.

    Data from the 50 United States are listed for 1997 from Kids Count in an effort to track state-by-state the status of children in the United States and to secure better futures for all children. Data include percent low birth weight babies; infant mortality rate; child death rate; rate of teen deaths by accident, homicide, and suicide; teen birth…

  6. Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '96.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingraham, Sandy

    This data book presents findings of the Kids Count Project on current conditions faced by Oklahoma children age birth through 18. This second annual factbook organizes state and county data over a period of time to enable conditions for children in each county to be compared and ranked. The benchmark indicators studied include low birthweight…

  7. Detection of Retinitis Pigmentosa by Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Jeong; Lee, Hyunho; Cho, Joon Hyong; Cho, Young Ho; Kim, Chul-Ki; Lee, Taik Jin; Lee, Seok; Park, Ki Ho; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Lee, Hyuk-jae; Jun, Seong Chan; Kim, Jae Hun

    2014-01-01

    Differential interference contrast microscopy is designed to image unstained and transparent specimens by enhancing the contrast resulting from the Nomarski prism-effected optical path difference. Retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common inherited retinal diseases, is characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptors. In this study, Differential interference contrast microscopy was evaluated as a new and simple application for observation of the retinal photoreceptor layer and retinitis pigmentosa diagnostics and monitoring. Retinal tissues of Royal College of Surgeons rats and retinal-degeneration mice, both well-established animal models for the disease, were prepared as flatmounts and histological sections representing different elapsed times since the occurrence of the disease. Under the microscopy, the retinal flatmounts showed that the mosaic pattern of the photoreceptor layer was irregular and partly collapsed at the early stage of retinitis pigmentosa, and, by the advanced stage, amorphous. The histological sections, similarly, showed thinning of the photoreceptor layer at the early stage and loss of the outer nuclear layer by the advanced stage. To count and compare the number of photoreceptors in the normal and early-retinitis pigmentosa-stage tissues, an automated cell-counting program designed with MATLAB, a numerical computing language, using a morphological reconstruction method, was applied to the differential interference contrast microscopic images. The number of cells significantly decreased, on average, from 282 to 143 cells for the Royal College of Surgeons rats and from 255 to 170 for the retinal-degeneration mouse. We successfully demonstrated the potential of the differential interference contrast microscopy technique’s application to the diagnosis and monitoring of RP. PMID:24810005

  8. Quantum interference of edge supercurrents in a two-dimensional topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachov, G.; Burset, P.; Trauzettel, B.; Hankiewicz, E. M.

    2015-07-01

    Josephson weak links made of two-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) exhibit magnetic oscillations of the supercurrent that are reminiscent of those in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). We propose a microscopic theory of this effect that goes beyond the approaches based on the standard SQUID theory. For long junctions we find a temperature-driven crossover from Φ0-periodic SQUID-like oscillations to a 2 Φ0 -quasiperiodic interference pattern with different peaks at even and odd values of the magnetic flux quantum Φ0=c h /2 e . This behavior is absent in short junctions where the main interference signal occurs at zero magnetic field. Both types of interference patterns reveal gapless (protected) Andreev bound states. We show, however, that the usual sawtooth current-flux relationship is profoundly modified by a Doppler-like effect of the shielding current which has been overlooked previously. Our findings may explain recently observed even-odd interference patterns in InAs/GaSb-based TI Josephson junctions and uncover unexplored operation regimes of nano-SQUIDs.

  9. Limits of adaptation, residual interferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mokry, Miroslav (Editor); Erickson, J. C., Jr.; Goodyer, Michael J.; Mignosi, Andre; Russo, Giuseppe P.; Smith, J.; Wedemeyer, Erich H.; Newman, Perry A.

    1990-01-01

    Methods of determining linear residual wall interference appear to be well established theoretically; however they need to be validated, for example by comparative studies of test data on the same model in different adaptive-wall wind tunnels as well as in passive, ventilated-wall tunnels. The GARTEur CAST 7 and the CAST 10/DOA 2 investigations are excellent examples of such comparative studies. Results to date in both one-variable and two-variable methods for nonlinear wall interference indicate that a great deal more research and validation are required. The status in 2D flow is advanced over that in 3D flow as is the case generally with adaptive-wall development. Nevertheless, it is now well established that for transonic testing with extensive supercritical flow present, significant wall interference is likely to exist in conventional ventilated test sections. Consequently, residual correction procedures require further development hand-in-hand with further adaptive-wall development.

  10. Whirling waves in Interference experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Urbasi; Sawant, Rahul; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Aninda; Sinha, Supurna

    2014-03-01

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well- known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption, the wave function hypothesis, which is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from non-classical paths in interference experiments which provide a measurable deviation from the wave function hypothesis. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these non-classical paths is hard. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence. I will also describe some ongoing experimental efforts towards testing our theoretical findings.

  11. Crossover between Weak Antilocalization and Weak Localization of Bulk States in Ultrathin Bi2Se3 Films

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huichao; Liu, Haiwen; Chang, Cui-Zu; Zuo, Huakun; Zhao, Yanfei; Sun, Yi; Xia, Zhengcai; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xie, X. C.; Xue, Qi-Kun; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    We report transport studies on the 5 nm thick Bi2Se3 topological insulator films which are grown via molecular beam epitaxy technique. The angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data show that the Fermi level of the system lies in the bulk conduction band above the Dirac point, suggesting important contribution of bulk states to the transport results. In particular, the crossover from weak antilocalization to weak localization in the bulk states is observed in the parallel magnetic field measurements up to 50 Tesla. The measured magneto-resistance exhibits interesting anisotropy with respect to the orientation of parallel magnetic field B// and the current I, signifying intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in the Bi2Se3 films. Our work directly shows the crossover of quantum interference effect in the bulk states from weak antilocalization to weak localization. It presents an important step toward a better understanding of the existing three-dimensional topological insulators and the potential applications of nano-scale topological insulator devices. PMID:25056600

  12. Fano-Kondo and the Kondo box regimes crossover in a quantum dot coupled to a quantum box.

    PubMed

    Apel, Victor M; Orellana, Pedro A; Pacheco, Monica; Anda, Enrique V

    2013-12-18

    In this work, we study the Kondo effect of a quantum dot (QD) connected to leads and to a discrete set of one-particle states provided by a quantum box represented by a quantum ring (QR) pierced by a magnetic flux side attached to the QD. The interplay between the bulk Kondo effect and the so-called Kondo box regime is studied. In this system the QR energies can be continuously modified by the application of the magnetic field. The crossover between these two regimes is analyzed by changing the connection of the QD to the QR from the weak to the strong coupling regime. In the weak coupling regime, the differential conductance develops a sequence of Fano-Kondo anti-resonances due to destructive interference between the discrete quantum ring levels and the conducting Kondo channel provided by the leads. In the strong coupling regime the differential conductance has very sharp resonances when one of the Kondo discrete sub-levels characterizing the Kondo box is tuned by the applied potential. The conductance, the current fluctuations and the Fano coefficient result as being the relevant physical magnitudes to be analyzed to reveal the physical properties of these two Kondo regimes and the crossover region between them. The results were obtained by using the slave boson mean field theory (SBMFT). PMID:24275637

  13. Intralist interference in recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Kim, K; Glanzer, M

    1995-09-01

    Three experiments on recognition memory were carried out to define the nature of intralist interference effects. Experiment 1 replicated the findings of an earlier study (A. I. Schulman, 1971) on what appeared to be combined study (input) and test (output) order effects and added information on the presence of speed-accuracy trade-off effects. Experiment 2 demonstrated that only test order was effective and that study order effects did not occur. Experiment 3 demonstrated again that only test order was effective and also showed that the effect remained when response times were controlled. Attention/likelihood theory was fitted to the data of the final, clarified interference effect. PMID:8744957

  14. Interference of probabilities in dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zak, Michail

    2014-08-15

    A new class of dynamical systems with a preset type of interference of probabilities is introduced. It is obtained from the extension of the Madelung equation by replacing the quantum potential with a specially selected feedback from the Liouville equation. It has been proved that these systems are different from both Newtonian and quantum systems, but they can be useful for modeling spontaneous collective novelty phenomena when emerging outputs are qualitatively different from the weighted sum of individual inputs. Formation of language and fast decision-making process as potential applications of the probability interference is discussed.

  15. Meiotic recombination and the crossover assurance checkpoint in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhouliang; Kim, Yumi; Dernburg, Abby F

    2016-06-01

    During meiotic prophase, chromosomes pair and synapse with their homologs and undergo programmed DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation to initiate meiotic recombination. These DSBs are processed to generate a limited number of crossover recombination products on each chromosome, which are essential to ensure faithful segregation of homologous chromosomes. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has served as an excellent model organism to investigate the mechanisms that drive and coordinate these chromosome dynamics during meiosis. Here we focus on our current understanding of the regulation of DSB induction in C. elegans. We also review evidence that feedback regulation of crossover formation prolongs the early stages of meiotic prophase, and discuss evidence that this can alter the recombination pattern, most likely by shifting the genome-wide distribution of DSBs. PMID:27013114

  16. Stress-Based Crossover Operator for Structural Topology Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cuimin; Hiroyasu, Tomoyuki; Miki, Mitsunori

    In this paper, we propose a stress-based crossover (SX) operator to solve the checkerboard-like material distributation and disconnected topology that is common for simple genetic algorithm (SGA) to structural topology optimization problems (STOPs). A penalty function is defined to evaluate the fitness of each individual. A number of constrained problems are adopted to experiment the effectiveness of SX for STOPs. Comparison of 2-point crossover (2X) with SX indicates that SX can markedly suppress the checkerboard-like material distribution phenomena. Comparison of evolutionary structural optimization (ESO) and SX demonstrates the global search ability and flexibility of SX. Experiments of a Michell-type problem verifies the effectiveness of SX for STOPs. For a multi-loaded problem, SX searches out alternate solutions on the same parameters that shows the global search ability of GA.

  17. Strategy Uniform Crossover Adaptation Evolution in a Minority Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei-Song; Wang, Bing-Hong; Quan, Hong-Jun; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2003-10-01

    We propose and study a new adaptation minority game for understanding of the complex dynamical behaviour characterized by agent interactions competing limited resource in many natural and social systems. Intelligent agents may modify a part of strategies held by them periodically, depending on the strategy performances. In the new model, the strategies will be updated according to uniform-crossover variation process inspired by genetic evolution algorithm in biology. The performances of the agents in the new model are calculated for different parameter conditions. It has been found that the new system may evolve via the strategy uniform crossover adaptation mechanism into a frozen equilibrium state in which the performance of the system may reach the best limit, implying the strongest cooperation among agents and the most effective utilization of the social resources.

  18. Particle-hole fluctuations in BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Floerchinger, S.; Scherer, M.; Wetterich, C.; Diehl, S.

    2008-11-01

    The effect of particle-hole fluctuations for the BCS-BEC crossover is investigated by use of functional renormalization. We compute the Gorkov effect and the critical temperature for the whole range in the scattering length a. On the BCS side for small negative a we recover the Gorkov approximation, while on the BEC side of small positive a the particle-hole fluctuations play no important role, and we find a system of interacting bosons. In the unitarity limit of infinite scattering length our quantitative estimate yields T{sub c}/T{sub F}=0.264. We also investigate the crossover from broad to narrow Feshbach resonances - for the latter we obtain T{sub c}/T{sub F}=0.204 for a{sup -1}=0. A key ingredient for our treatment is the computation of the momentum dependent four-fermion vertex and its bosonization in terms of an effective bound-state exchange.

  19. BCS to Bose crossover: Broken-symmetry state

    SciTech Connect

    Engelbrecht, J.R. |; Randeria, M. |; Sa de Melo, C.A.

    1997-06-01

    A functional integral formulation, used previously to calculate T{sub c} and describe normal state properties of the BCS-Bose crossover, is extended to T{lt}T{sub c}. The saddle point approximation is shown to be qualitatively correct for T{lt}T{sub c} for {ital all} couplings, in contrast to the situation above T{sub c}. Several features of the crossover are described. The difference between the T=0 {open_quotes}pair size{close_quotes} and the (prefactor of the T dependent) Ginzburg-Landau coherence length is pointed out: the two quantities are the same only in the BCS limit. The evolution of the collective modes from the BCS to the Bose regime is discussed together with the mixing of the amplitude and phase in the absence of a particle-hole symmetry. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Isospin Dependent Pairing Interactions and BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Sagawa, H.; Margueron, J.; Hagino, K.

    2008-11-11

    We propose new types of density dependent contact pairing interaction which reproduce the pairing gaps in symmetric and neutron matters obtained by a microscopic treatment based on the realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction. The BCS-BEC crossover of neutrons pairs in symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matters is studied by using these contact interactions. It is shown that the bare and screened pairing interactions lead to different features of the BCS-BEC crossover in symmetric nuclear matter. We perform Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations for semi-magic Calcium, Nickel, Tin and Lead isotopes and N = 20, 28, 50 and 82 isotones using these density-dependent pairing interactions. Our calculations well account for the experimental data for the neutron number dependence of binding energy, two neutrons separation energy, and odd-even mass staggering of these isotopes. Especially the interaction IS+IV Bare without the medium polarization effect gives satisfactory results for all the isotopes.

  1. Crossover behavior in hydrogen sensing mechanism for palladium ultrathin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, S. B.; Ramanathan, M.; Skudlarek, G.; Wang, H. H.; Illinois Math and Science Academy

    2010-01-01

    Palladium has been extensively studied as a material for hydrogen sensors because of the simplicity of its reversible resistance change when exposed to hydrogen gas. Various palladium films and nanostructures have been used, and different responses have been observed with these diverse morphologies. In some cases, such as with nanowires, the resistance will decrease, whereas in others, such as with thick films, the resistance will increase. Each of these mechanisms has been explored for several palladium structures, but the crossover between them has not been systematically investigated. Here we report on a study aimed at deciphering the nanostructure-property relationships of ultrathin palladium films used as hydrogen gas sensors. The crossover in these films is observed at a thickness of {approx} 5 nm. Ramifications for future sensor developments are discussed.

  2. Crossover from percolation to self-organized criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drossel, Barbara; Clar, Siegfried; Schwabl, Franz

    1994-10-01

    We include immunity against fire into the self-organized critical forest-fire model. When the immunity assumes a critical value, clusters of burnt trees are identical to percolation clusters of random bond percolation. As long as the immunity is below its critical value, the asymptotic critical exponents are those of the original self-organized critical model, i.e., the system performs a crossover from percolation to self-organized criticality. We present a scaling theory and computer simulation results.

  3. Flow equations for the BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.; Gies, H.; Pawlowski, J. M.; Wetterich, C.

    2007-08-15

    The functional renormalization group is used for the BCS-BEC crossover in gases of ultracold fermionic atoms. In a simple truncation, we see how universality and an effective theory with composite bosonic diatom states emerge. We obtain a unified picture of the whole phase diagram. The flow reflects different effective physics at different scales. In the BEC limit as well as near the critical temperature, it describes an interacting bosonic theory.

  4. Nanoparticles of iron(II) spin-crossover.

    PubMed

    Forestier, Thibaut; Mornet, Stéphane; Daro, Nathalie; Nishihara, Taishi; Mouri, Shin-ichiro; Tanaka, Koichiro; Fouché, Olivier; Freysz, Eric; Létard, Jean-François

    2008-09-28

    We report the synthesis of spin crossover 69 nm spherical nanoparticles of [Fe(NH2-trz)3](Br)2.3H2O.0.03(surfactant) (NH2trz = 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole, surfactant = Lauropal), prepared by the reverse micelle technique, which exhibit at room temperature a thermal hysteresis characterized by magnetic, diffuse reflectivity and Raman studies. PMID:18802559

  5. Hyperon puzzle, hadron-quark crossover and massive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Bulk properties of cold and hot neutron stars are studied on the basis of the hadron-quark crossover picture where a smooth transition from the hadronic phase to the quark phase takes place at finite baryon density. By using a phenomenological equation of state (EOS) "CRover", which interpolates the two phases at around 3 times the nuclear matter density (ρ0, it is found that the cold NSs with the gravitational mass larger than 2M_{odot} can be sustained. This is in sharp contrast to the case of the first-order hadron-quark transition. The radii of the cold NSs with the CRover EOS are in the narrow range (12.5 ± 0.5) km which is insensitive to the NS masses. Due to the stiffening of the EOS induced by the hadron-quark crossover, the central density of the NSs is at most 4 ρ0 and the hyperon-mixing barely occurs inside the NS core. This constitutes a solution of the long-standing hyperon puzzle. The effect of color superconductivity (CSC) on the NS structures is also examined with the hadron-quark crossover. For the typical strength of the diquark attraction, a slight softening of the EOS due to two-flavor CSC (2SC) takes place and the maximum mass is reduced by about 0.2M_{odot}. The CRover EOS is generalized to the supernova matter at finite temperature to describe the hot NSs at birth. The hadron-quark crossover is found to decrease the central temperature of the hot NSs under isentropic condition. The gravitational energy release and the spin-up rate during the contraction from the hot NS to the cold NS are also estimated.

  6. COSA-1 reveals robust homeostasis and separable licensing and reinforcement steps governing meiotic crossovers.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Rayka; Zawadzki, Karl A; Nabeshima, Kentaro; Drake, Melanie; Arur, Swathi; Villeneuve, Anne M

    2012-03-30

    Crossovers (COs) between homologous chromosomes ensure their faithful segregation during meiosis. We identify C. elegans COSA-1, a cyclin-related protein conserved in metazoa, as a key component required to convert meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs) into COs. During late meiotic prophase, COSA-1 localizes to foci that correspond to the single CO site on each homolog pair and indicate sites of eventual concentration of other conserved CO proteins. Chromosomes gain and lose competence to load CO proteins during meiotic progression, with competence to load COSA-1 requiring prior licensing. Our data further suggest a self-reinforcing mechanism maintaining CO designation. Modeling of a nonlinear dose-response relationship between IR-induced DSBs and COSA-1 foci reveals efficient conversion of DSBs into COs when DSBs are limiting and a robust capacity to limit cytologically differentiated CO sites when DSBs are in excess. COSA-1 foci serve as a unique live cell readout for investigating CO formation and CO interference. PMID:22464324

  7. High-resolution mapping of meiotic crossovers and noncrossovers in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mancera, Eugenio; Bourgon, Richard; Brozzi, Alessandro; Huber, Wolfgang; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2009-01-01

    Meiotic recombination plays a central role in the evolution of sexually reproducing organisms. The two recombination outcomes, crossover (CO) and noncrossover (NCO), increase genetic diversity, but have the potential to homogenize alleles by gene conversion. While CO rates are known to vary considerably across the genome, NCOs and gene conversions have only been identified in a handful of loci. To examine recombination genome-wide and at high spatial resolution, we generated maps of COs, CO-associated gene conversion and NCO gene conversion using dense genetic marker data collected from all four products of 56 yeast meioses. Our maps reveal differences in the distributions of COs and NCOs, showing more regions where either COs or NCOs are favoured than expected by chance. Furthermore, we detect evidence for interference between COs and NCOs, a phenomenon previously only known to occur between COs. Up to 1% of the genome of each meiotic product is subject to gene conversion in a single meiosis, with detectable bias towards GC nucleotides. The maps represent the first high-resolution, genome-wide characterization of the multiple outcomes of recombination in any organism. In addition, because NCO hot spots create holes of reduced linkage within haplotype blocks, our results stress the need to incorporate NCOs into genetic linkage analysis. PMID:18615017

  8. Pressure and Temperature Spin Crossover Sensors with Optical Detection

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Jorge; Codjovi, Epiphane; Garcia, Yann

    2012-01-01

    Iron(II) spin crossover molecular materials are made of coordination centres switchable between two states by temperature, pressure or a visible light irradiation. The relevant macroscopic parameter which monitors the magnetic state of a given solid is the high-spin (HS) fraction denoted nHS, i.e., the relative population of HS molecules. Each spin crossover material is distinguished by a transition temperature T1/2 where 50% of active molecules have switched to the low-spin (LS) state. In strongly interacting systems, the thermal spin switching occurs abruptly at T1/2. Applying pressure induces a shift from HS to LS states, which is the direct consequence of the lower volume for the LS molecule. Each material has thus a well defined pressure value P1/2. In both cases the spin state change is easily detectable by optical means thanks to a thermo/piezochromic effect that is often encountered in these materials. In this contribution, we discuss potential use of spin crossover molecular materials as temperature and pressure sensors with optical detection. The ones presenting smooth transitions behaviour, which have not been seriously considered for any application, are spotlighted as potential sensors which should stimulate a large interest on this well investigated class of materials. PMID:22666041

  9. Dynamical and orientational structural crossovers in low-temperature glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyedi, Salman; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-07-01

    Mean-square displacements of hydrogen atoms in glass-forming materials and proteins, as reported by incoherent elastic neutron scattering, show kinks in their temperature dependence. This crossover, known as the dynamical transition, connects two approximately linear regimes. It is often assigned to the dynamical freezing of subsets of molecular modes at the point of equality between their corresponding relaxation times and the instrumental observation window. The origin of the dynamical transition in glass-forming glycerol is studied here by extensive molecular dynamics simulations. We find the dynamical transition to occur for both the center-of-mass translations and the molecular rotations at the same temperature, insensitive to changes of the observation window. Both the translational and rotational dynamics of glycerol show a dynamic crossover from the structural to a secondary relaxation at the temperature of the dynamical transition. A significant and discontinuous increase in the orientational Kirkwood factor and in the dielectric constant is observed in the same range of temperatures. No indication is found of a true thermodynamic transition to an ordered low-temperature phase. We therefore suggest that all observed crossovers are dynamic in character. The increase in the dielectric constant is related to the dynamic freezing of dipolar domains on the time scale of simulations.

  10. Universal crossovers between entanglement entropy and thermal entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swingle, Brian; Senthil, T.

    2013-01-01

    We postulate the existence of universal crossover functions connecting the universal parts of the entanglement entropy to the low-temperature thermal entropy in gapless quantum many-body systems. These scaling functions encode the intuition that the same low-energy degrees of freedom which control low-temperature thermal physics are also responsible for the long-range entanglement in the quantum ground state. We demonstrate the correctness of the proposed scaling form and determine the scaling function for certain classes of gapless systems whose low-energy physics is described by a conformal field theory. We also use our crossover formalism to argue that local systems which are “natural” can violate the boundary law at most logarithmically. In particular, we show that several non-Fermi-liquid phases of matter have entanglement entropy that is at most of order Ld-1log(L) for a region of linear size L thereby confirming various earlier suggestions in the literature. We also briefly apply our crossover formalism to the study of fluctuations in conserved quantities and discuss some subtleties that occur in systems that spontaneously break a continuous symmetry.

  11. Dynamical and orientational structural crossovers in low-temperature glycerol.

    PubMed

    Seyedi, Salman; Martin, Daniel R; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-07-01

    Mean-square displacements of hydrogen atoms in glass-forming materials and proteins, as reported by incoherent elastic neutron scattering, show kinks in their temperature dependence. This crossover, known as the dynamical transition, connects two approximately linear regimes. It is often assigned to the dynamical freezing of subsets of molecular modes at the point of equality between their corresponding relaxation times and the instrumental observation window. The origin of the dynamical transition in glass-forming glycerol is studied here by extensive molecular dynamics simulations. We find the dynamical transition to occur for both the center-of-mass translations and the molecular rotations at the same temperature, insensitive to changes of the observation window. Both the translational and rotational dynamics of glycerol show a dynamic crossover from the structural to a secondary relaxation at the temperature of the dynamical transition. A significant and discontinuous increase in the orientational Kirkwood factor and in the dielectric constant is observed in the same range of temperatures. No indication is found of a true thermodynamic transition to an ordered low-temperature phase. We therefore suggest that all observed crossovers are dynamic in character. The increase in the dielectric constant is related to the dynamic freezing of dipolar domains on the time scale of simulations. PMID:27575188

  12. Automatic identification of vessel crossovers in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, L.; Barreira, N.; Penedo, M. G.; Cancela, B.

    2015-02-01

    Crossovers and bifurcations are interest points of the retinal vascular tree useful to diagnose diseases. Specifically, detecting these interest points and identifying which of them are crossings will give us the opportunity to search for arteriovenous nicking, this is, an alteration of the vessel tree where an artery is crossed by a vein and the former compresses the later. These formations are a clear indicative of hypertension, among other medical problems. There are several studies that have attempted to define an accurate and reliable method to detect and classify these relevant points. In this article, we propose a new method to identify crossovers. Our approach is based on segmenting the vascular tree and analyzing the surrounding area of each interest point. The minimal path between vessel points in this area is computed in order to identify the connected vessel segments and, as a result, to distinguish between bifurcations and crossovers. Our method was tested using retinographies from public databases DRIVE and VICAVR, obtaining an accuracy of 90%.

  13. Metameric interference security image structures.

    PubMed

    Baloukas, Bill; Martinu, Ludvik

    2008-04-01

    We study innovative interference security image structures based on metamerism. We have designed, fabricated, and evaluated different structures that can be used in transmission or in reflection. These metameric structures are either a combination of two different interference filters or of an interference filter and a noniridescent colored material. In the latter case, by closely matching the spectra, the sensitivity of the device to changes in light sources and observers is minimized. Because of the intrinsic color shift of interference filters, one can create a hidden image that appears at a specific observation angle. The presence of the hidden image, as well as in some cases of the noniridescent material, which serves as a color reference, increases the complexity of such devices while facilitating the user's authentication process as well as automatized detection by using a laser at a specific angle. We present the design approach, analyze the filters' sensitivity to deposition errors, and evaluate the performance of prototype devices prepared by dual ion beam sputtering. PMID:18382590

  14. Fano Interference in Classical Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satpathy, S.; Roy, A.; Mohapatra, A.

    2012-01-01

    We seek to illustrate Fano interference in a classical coupled oscillator by using classical analogues of the atom-laser interaction. We present an analogy between the dressed state picture of coherent atom-laser interaction and a classical coupled oscillator. The Autler-Townes splitting due to the atom-laser interaction is analogous to the…

  15. "Quantum Interference with Slits" Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Tony; Boughn, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Marcella has presented a straightforward technique employing the Dirac formalism to calculate single- and double-slit interference patterns. He claims that no reference is made to classical optics or scattering theory and that his method therefore provides a purely quantum mechanical description of these experiments. He also presents his…

  16. Suprasegmental Aspects of Reading Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Colston R.

    Information is presented in this paper regarding suprasegmental features of Black English thay may cause reading interference for some Black children. Much of the research concerning reading problems of many Afro-American students stresses the segmental differences of the phonology, the morphology, the syntax, and lexical selection between two…

  17. Imaging by terahertz photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikushima, Kenji; Komiyama, Susumu

    2010-08-01

    Photon counting method is indispensable in visible/near-infrared optical measurements for detecting extremely weak radiation. The method, however, has been inaccessible in terahertz region, where the photon energies are more than 100 times smaller and catching individual photons is difficult. Here we review photon counting measurements of terahertz waves, by incorporating a semiconductor quantum-dot terahertz-photon detector into a scanning terahertz microscope. By using a quantum Hall effect detector as well, measurements cover the intensity dynamic range more than six orders of magnitude. Applying the measurement system to the study of semiconductor quantum Hall effect devices, we image extremely weak cyclotron radiation emitted by nonequilibrium electrons. Owing to the unprecedented sensitivity, a variety of new features of electron kinetics are unveiled. Besides semiconductor electric devices studied here, the experimental method will find application in diverse areas of molecular dynamics, microthermography, and cell activities.

  18. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts

    PubMed Central

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:22523437

  19. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts.

    PubMed

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B

    2011-12-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:22523437

  20. 1/Nc Countings in Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Goity

    2004-05-01

    The 1/N{sub c} power countings for baryon decays and configuration mixings are determined by means of a non-relativistic quark picture. Such countings are expected to be robust as the quark masses are decreased towards the chiral limit. It is shown that excited baryons have natural widths of {Omicron}(N{sub c}{sup 0}). These dominant widths are due to the decays that proceed directly to the ground state baryons, with cascade decays being suppressed to {Omicron}(1/N{sub c}). Configuration mixings, defined as mixings between states belonging to different O(3) x SU(2N{sub f}) multiplets, are shown to be sub-leading in an expansion in 1/{radical}N{sub c}, except for certain mixings between excited multiplets belonging to the mixed-symmetric spin-flavor representation and different O(3) representations, where the mixings are of zeroth order in 1/N{sub c}.

  1. Stability of fringe counting interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, J. W.; Andrew, K. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two configurations of an automatic bidirectional, fringe-counting corner-cube interferometer are compared. They differ only in the method of quadrature phase introduction. The one using polarization coding has good phase stability at optical path differences as large as 955 mm, the one using adjacent beams has such poor phase stability as to render it useless at path differences greater than 700 mm. A useful well-defined alignment procedure is given for the corner-cube interferometer.

  2. Approximate Counting of Graphical Realizations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In 1999 Kannan, Tetali and Vempala proposed a MCMC method to uniformly sample all possible realizations of a given graphical degree sequence and conjectured its rapidly mixing nature. Recently their conjecture was proved affirmative for regular graphs (by Cooper, Dyer and Greenhill, 2007), for regular directed graphs (by Greenhill, 2011) and for half-regular bipartite graphs (by Miklós, Erdős and Soukup, 2013). Several heuristics on counting the number of possible realizations exist (via sampling processes), and while they work well in practice, so far no approximation guarantees exist for such an approach. This paper is the first to develop a method for counting realizations with provable approximation guarantee. In fact, we solve a slightly more general problem; besides the graphical degree sequence a small set of forbidden edges is also given. We show that for the general problem (which contains the Greenhill problem and the Miklós, Erdős and Soukup problem as special cases) the derived MCMC process is rapidly mixing. Further, we show that this new problem is self-reducible therefore it provides a fully polynomial randomized approximation scheme (a.k.a. FPRAS) for counting of all realizations. PMID:26161994

  3. Approximate Counting of Graphical Realizations.

    PubMed

    Erdős, Péter L; Kiss, Sándor Z; Miklós, István; Soukup, Lajos

    2015-01-01

    In 1999 Kannan, Tetali and Vempala proposed a MCMC method to uniformly sample all possible realizations of a given graphical degree sequence and conjectured its rapidly mixing nature. Recently their conjecture was proved affirmative for regular graphs (by Cooper, Dyer and Greenhill, 2007), for regular directed graphs (by Greenhill, 2011) and for half-regular bipartite graphs (by Miklós, Erdős and Soukup, 2013). Several heuristics on counting the number of possible realizations exist (via sampling processes), and while they work well in practice, so far no approximation guarantees exist for such an approach. This paper is the first to develop a method for counting realizations with provable approximation guarantee. In fact, we solve a slightly more general problem; besides the graphical degree sequence a small set of forbidden edges is also given. We show that for the general problem (which contains the Greenhill problem and the Miklós, Erdős and Soukup problem as special cases) the derived MCMC process is rapidly mixing. Further, we show that this new problem is self-reducible therefore it provides a fully polynomial randomized approximation scheme (a.k.a. FPRAS) for counting of all realizations. PMID:26161994

  4. Fine Scale Analysis of Crossover and Non-Crossover and Detection of Recombination Sequence Motifs in the Honeybee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Bessoltane, Nadia; Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Solignac, Michel; Mougel, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Background Meiotic exchanges are non-uniformly distributed across the genome of most studied organisms. This uneven distribution suggests that recombination is initiated by specific signals and/or regulations. Some of these signals were recently identified in humans and mice. However, it is unclear whether or not sequence signals are also involved in chromosomal recombination of insects. Methodology We analyzed recombination frequencies in the honeybee, in which genome sequencing provided a large amount of SNPs spread over the entire set of chromosomes. As the genome sequences were obtained from a pool of haploid males, which were the progeny of a single queen, an oocyte method (study of recombination on haploid males that develop from unfertilized eggs and hence are the direct reflect of female gametes haplotypes) was developed to detect recombined pairs of SNP sites. Sequences were further compared between recombinant and non-recombinant fragments to detect recombination-specific motifs. Conclusions Recombination events between adjacent SNP sites were detected at an average distance of 92 bp and revealed the existence of high rates of recombination events. This study also shows the presence of conversion without crossover (i. e. non-crossover) events, the number of which largely outnumbers that of crossover events. Furthermore the comparison of sequences that have undergone recombination with sequences that have not, led to the discovery of sequence motifs (CGCA, GCCGC, CCGCA), which may correspond to recombination signals. PMID:22567142

  5. Measuring 36Ar without H35Cl interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton, John

    2015-04-01

    Noble gas measurements are usually made in static mode, when the mass spectrometer sensitivity is inversely proportional to volume: this makes the building of very large instruments to obtain high mass resolution impracticable. A particularly challenging interference has hitherto been H35Cl, which differs in mass from 36Ar by 1 part in 3937. We have developed a method which makes improved use of the available MRP to remove interferences, and used it to obtain HCl-free 36Ar measurements on a multicollector instrument with MRP of only ~6000 (MRP= mass resolving power = m/dm 5-95% on side of peak). By arranging that the target mass position on a minor isotope (e.g. 36Ar), from which the interference must be removed, coincides with the ~50% point on the side of a major isotope (e.g. 40Ar), it is possible both to set the mass accurately and to verify the mass position and stability during measurements. The peak top of 40Ar is measured in a separate mass step. Two small corrections are necessary. One compensates for the residual HCl tail at the 36Ar position. The other arises because the peak is not totally flat in the region of interest: 40Ar and 36Ar+HCl are measured on the peak top, whilst 36Ar is measured at the extreme edge, with slightly lower efficiency. The required correction parameters can be obtained from a series of air calibrations with different target/interference ratios. With samples containing 4x10-15to 3x10-14moles of 40Ar, 36Ar/40Ar was measured, without HCl interference, to a 1σ precision of 0.5%, only slightly worse than counting statistics. This is potentially useful for 40Ar/39Ar dating, where 36Ar is used to correct for trapped air, and may be particularly significant for smaller or younger samples.

  6. Fine-Scale Crossover Rate Variation on the Caenorhabditis elegans X Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Max R; Rockman, Matthew V

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination creates genotypic diversity within species. Recombination rates vary substantially across taxa, and the distribution of crossovers can differ significantly among populations and between sexes. Crossover locations within species have been found to vary by chromosome and by position within chromosomes, where most crossover events occur in small regions known as recombination hotspots. However, several species appear to lack hotspots despite significant crossover heterogeneity. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was previously found to have the least fine-scale variation in crossover distribution among organisms studied to date. It is unclear whether this pattern extends to the X chromosome given its unique compaction through the pachytene stage of meiotic prophase in hermaphrodites. We generated 798 recombinant nested near-isogenic lines (NILs) with crossovers in a 1.41 Mb region on the left arm of the X chromosome to determine if its recombination landscape is similar to that of the autosomes. We find that the fine-scale variation in crossover rate is lower than that of other model species, and is inconsistent with hotspots. The relationship of genomic features to crossover rate is dependent on scale, with GC content, histone modifications, and nucleosome occupancy being negatively associated with crossovers. We also find that the abundances of 4- to 6-bp DNA motifs significantly explain crossover density. These results are consistent with recombination occurring at unevenly distributed sites of open chromatin. PMID:27172189

  7. Fine-Scale Crossover Rate Variation on the Caenorhabditis elegans X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Max R.; Rockman, Matthew V.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination creates genotypic diversity within species. Recombination rates vary substantially across taxa, and the distribution of crossovers can differ significantly among populations and between sexes. Crossover locations within species have been found to vary by chromosome and by position within chromosomes, where most crossover events occur in small regions known as recombination hotspots. However, several species appear to lack hotspots despite significant crossover heterogeneity. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was previously found to have the least fine-scale variation in crossover distribution among organisms studied to date. It is unclear whether this pattern extends to the X chromosome given its unique compaction through the pachytene stage of meiotic prophase in hermaphrodites. We generated 798 recombinant nested near-isogenic lines (NILs) with crossovers in a 1.41 Mb region on the left arm of the X chromosome to determine if its recombination landscape is similar to that of the autosomes. We find that the fine-scale variation in crossover rate is lower than that of other model species, and is inconsistent with hotspots. The relationship of genomic features to crossover rate is dependent on scale, with GC content, histone modifications, and nucleosome occupancy being negatively associated with crossovers. We also find that the abundances of 4- to 6-bp DNA motifs significantly explain crossover density. These results are consistent with recombination occurring at unevenly distributed sites of open chromatin. PMID:27172189

  8. Second-order interference of two independent and tunable single-mode continuous-wave lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianbin, Liu; Dong, Wei; Hui, Chen; Yu, Zhou; Huaibin, Zheng; Hong, Gao; Fu-Li, Li; Zhuo, Xu

    2016-03-01

    The second-order temporal interference of two independent single-mode continuous-wave lasers is discussed by employing two-photon interference in Feynman’s path integral theory. It is concluded that whether the second-order temporal interference pattern can or cannot be retrieved via two-photon coincidence counting rate is dependent on the resolution time of the detection system and the frequency difference between these two lasers. Two identical and tunable single-mode continuous-wave diode lasers are employed to verify the predictions. These studies are helpful to understand the physics of two-photon interference with photons of different spectra. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11404255) and the Doctor Foundation of Education Ministry of China (Grant No. 20130201120013).

  9. Many-particle interference beyond many-boson and many-fermion statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Malte C.; Tiersch, Markus; Mintert, Florian; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Identical particles exhibit correlations even in the absence of inter-particle interaction, due to the exchange (anti)symmetry of the many-particle wavefunction. Two fermions obey the Pauli principle and anti-bunch, whereas two bosons favor bunched, doubly occupied states. Here, we show that the collective interference of three or more particles leads to much more diverse behavior than expected from the boson-fermion dichotomy known from quantum statistical mechanics. The emerging complexity of many-particle interference is tamed by a simple law for the strict suppression of events in the Bell multiport beam splitter. The law shows that counting events are governed by widely species-independent interference, such that bosons and fermions can even exhibit identical interference signatures, while their statistical character remains subordinate. Recent progress in the preparation of tailored many-particle states of bosonic and fermionic atoms promises experimental verification and applications in novel many-particle interferometers.

  10. Medical Registry Data Collection Efficiency: A Crossover Study Comparing Web-Based Electronic Data Capture and a Standard Spreadsheet

    PubMed Central

    Staziaki, Pedro Vinícius; Kim, Phillip; Vadvala, Harshna V

    2016-01-01

    Background Electronic medical records and electronic data capture (EDC) have changed data collection in clinical and translational research. However, spreadsheet programs, such as Microsoft Excel, are still used as data repository to record and organize patient data for research. Objective The objective of this study is to assess the efficiency of EDC as against a standard spreadsheet in regards to time to collect data and data accuracy, measured in number of errors after adjudication. Methods This was a crossover study comparing the time to collect data in minutes between EDC and a spreadsheet. The EDC tool used was Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap), whereas the spreadsheet was Microsoft Excel. The data collected was part of a registry of patients who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography in the emergency setting. Two data collectors with the same experience went over the same patients and collected relevant data on a case report form identical to the one used in our Emergency Department (ED) registry. Data collection tool was switched after the patient that represented half the cohort. For this, the patient cohort was exactly 30 days of our ED coronary Computed Tomography Angiography registry and the point of crossover was determined beforehand to be 15 days. We measured the number of patients admitted, and time to collect data. Accuracy was defined as absence of blank fields and errors, and was assessed by comparing data between data collectors and counting every time the data differed. Statistical analysis was made using paired t -test. Results The study included 61 patients (122 observations) and 55 variables. The crossover occurred after the 30th patient. Mean time to collect data using EDC in minutes was 6.2±2.3, whereas using Excel was 8.0±2.0 (P <.001), a difference of 1.8 minutes between both means (22%). The cohort was evenly distributed with 3 admissions in the first half of the crossover and 4 in the second half. We saw 2 (<0

  11. EASI - EQUILIBRIUM AIR SHOCK INTERFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    New research on hypersonic vehicles, such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), has raised concerns about the effects of shock-wave interference on various structural components of the craft. State-of-the-art aerothermal analysis software is inadequate to predict local flow and heat flux in areas of extremely high heat transfer, such as the surface impingement of an Edney-type supersonic jet. EASI revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from shock wave interference. The program expands these methods to solve problems involving the six shock-wave interference patterns on a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with an equilibrium chemically reacting gas mixture (representing, for example, the scramjet cowl of the NASP). The inclusion of gas chemistry allows for a more accurate prediction of the maximum pressure and heating loads by accounting for the effects of high temperature on the air mixture. Caloric imperfections and specie dissociation of high-temperature air cause shock-wave angles, flow deflection angles, and thermodynamic properties to differ from those calculated by a calorically perfect gas model. EASI contains pressure- and temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties to determine heating rates, and uses either a calorically perfect air model or an 11-specie, 7-reaction reacting air model at equilibrium with temperatures up to 15,000 K for the inviscid flowfield calculations. EASI solves the flow field and the associated maximum surface pressure and heat flux for the six common types of shock wave interference. Depending on the type of interference, the program solves for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction, expansion-fan/boundary-layer interaction, attaching shear layer or supersonic jet impingement. Heat flux predictions require a knowledge (from experimental data or relevant calculations) of a pertinent length scale of the interaction. Output files contain flow

  12. What I Need to Know about Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... URL Español What I need to know about Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes Page Content On this page: ... counting? Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate * counting, also called carb counting, is ...

  13. REM sleep rescues learning from interference.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, Elizabeth A; Duggan, Katherine A; Mednick, Sara C

    2015-07-01

    Classical human memory studies investigating the acquisition of temporally-linked events have found that the memories for two events will interfere with each other and cause forgetting (i.e., interference; Wixted, 2004). Importantly, sleep helps consolidate memories and protect them from subsequent interference (Ellenbogen, Hulbert, Stickgold, Dinges, & Thompson-Schill, 2006). We asked whether sleep can also repair memories that have already been damaged by interference. Using a perceptual learning paradigm, we induced interference either before or after a consolidation period. We varied brain states during consolidation by comparing active wake, quiet wake, and naps with either non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM), or both NREM and REM sleep. When interference occurred after consolidation, sleep and wake both produced learning. However, interference prior to consolidation impaired memory, with retroactive interference showing more disruption than proactive interference. Sleep rescued learning damaged by interference. Critically, only naps that contained REM sleep were able to rescue learning that was highly disrupted by retroactive interference. Furthermore, the magnitude of rescued learning was correlated with the amount of REM sleep. We demonstrate the first evidence of a process by which the brain can rescue and consolidate memories damaged by interference, and that this process requires REM sleep. We explain these results within a theoretical model that considers how interference during encoding interacts with consolidation processes to predict which memories are retained or lost. PMID:25498222

  14. Task duration in contextual interference.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter J K

    2002-12-01

    Duration of practice trial on a pursuit rotor task in contextual interference was investigated. Participants practiced at each of 4 angular velocities, with 24 participants completing 28 trials lasting 20 sec., and 24 participants completing 112 trials of 5 sec. Half of the participants in each trial-duration condition practiced in a blocked format and half practiced in a random format. After random practice posttest performance was better than blocked practice when practice-trial duration was 20 sec., but worse when practice-trial duration was 5 sec. This result is not consistent with theoretical explanations of the contextual interference effect and is discussed with reference to the task characteristics and demands of the pursuit rotor. PMID:12578255

  15. Scaling behavior in interference lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Agayan, R.R.; Banyai, W.C.; Fernandez, A.

    1998-02-27

    Interference lithography is an emerging, technology that provides a means for achieving high resolution over large exposure areas (approximately 1 m{sup 2}) with virtually unlimited depth of field. One- and two-dimensional arrays of deep submicron structures can be created using near i-line wavelengths and standard resist processing. In this paper, we report on recent advances in the development of this technology, focusing, in particular, on how exposure latitude and resist profile scale with interference period We present structure width vs dose curves for periods ranging from 200 nm to 1 um, demonstrating that deep submicron structures can be generated with exposure latitudes exceeding 30%. Our experimental results are compared to simulations based on PROLITIV2.

  16. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Neutropenia and cancer; Absolute neutrophil count and cancer; ANC and cancer ... A person with cancer can get a low white blood cell count from the cancer or from treatment for the cancer. Cancer may ...

  17. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F.; Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  18. Interference techniques in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet

    We developed a set of interference-based optical microscopy techniques to study biological structures through nanometer-scale axial localization of fluorescent biomarkers. Spectral self-interference fluorescence microscopy (SSFM) utilizes interference of direct and reflected waves emitted from fluorescent molecules in the vicinity of planar reflectors to reveal the axial position of the molecules. A comprehensive calculation algorithm based on Green's function formalism is presented to verify the validity of approximations used in a far-field approach that describes the emission of fluorescent markers near interfaces. Using the validated model, theoretical limits of axial localization were determined with emphasis given to numerical aperture (NA) dependence of localization uncertainty. SSFM was experimentally demonstrated in conformational analysis of nucleoproteins. In particular, interaction between surface-tethered 75-mer double strand DNA and integration host factor (IHF) protein was probed on Si-SiO2 substrates by determining the axial position of fluorescent labels attached to the free ends of DNA molecules. Despite its sub-nanometer precision axial localization capability, SSFM lacks high lateral resolution due to the low-NA requirement for planar reflectors. We developed a second technique, 4Pi-SSFM, which improves the lateral resolution of a conventional SSFM system by an order of magnitude while achieving nanometer-scale axial localization precision. Using two opposing high-NA objectives, fluorescence signal is interferometrically collected and spectral interference pattern is recorded. Axial position of emitters is found from analysis of the spectra. The 4Pi-SSFM technique was experimentally demonstrated by determining the surface profiles of fabricated glass surfaces and outer membranes of Shigella, a type of Gram-negative bacteria. A further discussion is presented to localize surface O antigen, which is an important oligosaccharide structure in the

  19. Dimer Involvement and Origin of Crossover in Nickel-Catalyzed Aldehyde–Alkyne Reductive Couplings

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of nickel(0)-catalyzed reductive coupling of aldehydes and alkynes has been studied. Extensive double-labeling crossover studies have been conducted. While previous studies illustrated that phosphine- and N-heterocyclic carbene-derived catalysts exhibited differing behavior, the origin of these effects has now been evaluated in detail. Many variables, including ligand class, sterics of the ligand and alkyne, temperature, and ring size being formed in intramolecular versions, all influence the extent of crossover observed. A computational evaluation of these effects suggests that dimerization of a key metallacyclic intermediate provides the origin of crossover. Protocols that proceed with crossover are typically less efficient than those without crossover given the thermodynamic stability and low reactivity of the dimeric metallacycles involved in crossover pathways. PMID:25401337

  20. Crossover of marital dissatisfaction during military downsizing among Russian army officers and their spouses.

    PubMed

    Westman, Mina; Vinokur, Amiram D; Hamilton, V Lee; Roziner, Ilan

    2004-10-01

    This study examined mechanisms of strain crossover within couples and the moderating role of gender. Data were collected at a time of military downsizing from a sample of 1,250 Russian army officers and their spouses. The authors tested a model that incorporated 3 mechanisms for the crossover of marital dissatisfaction among dual-earner couples. The model provided support for 2 suggested crossover mechanisms: direct reactions of crossover and indirect mediated effects through social undermining. Strong evidence was also provided for gender asymmetry in the crossover process. Marital dissatisfaction crossed over from husbands to wives but not vice versa, and social undermining behavior played a role in the process of crossover of marital dissatisfaction for husbands but not for wives. PMID:15506859

  1. Quantum interference in plasmonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Heeres, Reinier W; Kouwenhoven, Leo P; Zwiller, Valery

    2013-10-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (plasmons) are a combination of light and a collective oscillation of the free electron plasma at metal/dielectric interfaces. This interaction allows subwavelength confinement of light beyond the diffraction limit inherent to dielectric structures. As a result, the intensity of the electromagnetic field is enhanced, with the possibility to increase the strength of the optical interactions between waveguides, light sources and detectors. Plasmons maintain non-classical photon statistics and preserve entanglement upon transmission through thin, patterned metallic films or weakly confining waveguides. For quantum applications, it is essential that plasmons behave as indistinguishable quantum particles. Here we report on a quantum interference experiment in a nanoscale plasmonic circuit consisting of an on-chip plasmon beamsplitter with integrated superconducting single-photon detectors to allow efficient single plasmon detection. We demonstrate a quantum-mechanical interaction between pairs of indistinguishable surface plasmons by observing Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference, a hallmark non-classical interference effect that is the basis of linear optics-based quantum computation. Our work shows that it is feasible to shrink quantum optical experiments to the nanoscale and offers a promising route towards subwavelength quantum optical networks. PMID:23934097

  2. Interference in multilayer relativistic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Babaei, Javad; Taghipour, Meisam; Mohammadzadeh, Zahra

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, reflection coefficient of a relativistic ultra-thin electron multilayer is calculated using electromagnetic interference procedures. The relativistic electron layers are assumed to be formed by nonlinear plasma wake waves that constitute the electron density cusps. It is shown that the interference between successive relativistic mirrors is restricted by the condition, τ p ≫ ( 2 γ 0 ) 5 / 2 / ω p 0 , where τp is the laser pulse duration. The results showed that tailoring the pulse amplitude, incident wave frequency value, incidence angle, and plasma density leads to increasing reflection coefficient a few orders of magnitudes. This constructive interference condition can be used for increasing conversion efficiency in the reflected energy from relativistic mirrors for the purpose of generating ultra-short coherence pulses in the extreme ultraviolet and x-ray regions. We also performed reflection from relativistic thin electron layers using relativistic 1D3V electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It was found that the results of PIC simulation are in agreement with analytical considerations.

  3. Oculomotor interference of bimodal distractors.

    PubMed

    Heeman, Jessica; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Van der Stoep, Nathan; Theeuwes, Jan; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    When executing an eye movement to a target location, the presence of an irrelevant distracting stimulus can influence the saccade metrics and latency. The present study investigated the influence of distractors of different sensory modalities (i.e. auditory, visual and audiovisual) which were presented at various distances (i.e. close or remote) from a visual target. The interfering effects of a bimodal distractor were more pronounced in the spatial domain than in the temporal domain. The results indicate that the direction of interference depended on the spatial layout of the visual scene. The close bimodal distractor caused the saccade endpoint and saccade trajectory to deviate towards the distractor whereas the remote bimodal distractor caused a deviation away from the distractor. Furthermore, saccade averaging and trajectory deviation evoked by a bimodal distractor was larger compared to the effects evoked by a unimodal distractor. This indicates that a bimodal distractor evoked stronger spatial oculomotor competition compared to a unimodal distractor and that the direction of the interference depended on the distance between the target and the distractor. Together, these findings suggest that the oculomotor vector to irrelevant bimodal input is enhanced and that the interference by multisensory input is stronger compared to unisensory input. PMID:27164053

  4. Quantum interference in plasmonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeres, Reinier W.; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.; Zwiller, Valery

    2013-10-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (plasmons) are a combination of light and a collective oscillation of the free electron plasma at metal/dielectric interfaces. This interaction allows subwavelength confinement of light beyond the diffraction limit inherent to dielectric structures. As a result, the intensity of the electromagnetic field is enhanced, with the possibility to increase the strength of the optical interactions between waveguides, light sources and detectors. Plasmons maintain non-classical photon statistics and preserve entanglement upon transmission through thin, patterned metallic films or weakly confining waveguides. For quantum applications, it is essential that plasmons behave as indistinguishable quantum particles. Here we report on a quantum interference experiment in a nanoscale plasmonic circuit consisting of an on-chip plasmon beamsplitter with integrated superconducting single-photon detectors to allow efficient single plasmon detection. We demonstrate a quantum-mechanical interaction between pairs of indistinguishable surface plasmons by observing Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference, a hallmark non-classical interference effect that is the basis of linear optics-based quantum computation. Our work shows that it is feasible to shrink quantum optical experiments to the nanoscale and offers a promising route towards subwavelength quantum optical networks.

  5. DC KIDS COUNT e-Databook Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DC Action for Children, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report presents indicators that are included in DC Action for Children's 2012 KIDS COUNT e-databook, their definitions and sources and the rationale for their selection. The indicators for DC KIDS COUNT represent a mix of traditional KIDS COUNT indicators of child well-being, such as the number of children living in poverty, and indicators of…

  6. Count-doubling time safety circuit

    DOEpatents

    Rusch, Gordon K.; Keefe, Donald J.; McDowell, William P.

    1981-01-01

    There is provided a nuclear reactor count-factor-increase time monitoring circuit which includes a pulse-type neutron detector, and means for counting the number of detected pulses during specific time periods. Counts are compared and the comparison is utilized to develop a reactor scram signal, if necessary.

  7. SPERM COUNT DISTRIBUTIONS IN FERTILE MEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sperm concentration and count are often used as indicators of environmental impacts on male reproductive health. Existing clinical databases may be biased towards subfertile men with low sperm counts and less is known about expected sperm count distributions in cohorts of fertil...

  8. Crossover from anomalous to normal diffusion in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarão Reis, F. D. A.; di Caprio, Dung

    2014-06-01

    Random walks (RW) of particles adsorbed in the internal walls of porous deposits produced by ballistic-type growth models are studied. The particles start at the external surface of the deposits and enter their pores in order to simulate an external flux of a species towards a porous solid. For short times, the walker concentration decays as a stretched exponential of the depth z, but a crossover to long-time normal diffusion is observed in most samples. The anomalous concentration profile remains at long times in very porous solids if the walker steps are restricted to nearest neighbors and is accompanied with subdiffusion features. These findings are correlated with a decay of the explored area with z. The study of RW of tracer particles left at the internal part of the solid rules out an interpretation by diffusion equations with position-dependent coefficients. A model of RW in a tube of decreasing cross section explains those results by showing long crossovers from an effective subdiffusion regime to an asymptotic normal diffusion. The crossover position and density are analytically calculated for a tube with area decreasing exponentially with z and show good agreement with numerical data. The anomalous decay of the concentration profile is interpreted as a templating effect of the tube shape on the total number of diffusing particles at each depth, while the volumetric concentration in the actually explored porous region may not have significant decay. These results may explain the anomalous diffusion of metal atoms in porous deposits observed in recent works. They also confirm the difficulty in interpreting experimental or computational data on anomalous transport reported in recent works, particularly if only the concentration profiles are measured.

  9. Computational approach to the study of thermal spin crossover phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Rudavskyi, Andrii; Broer, Ria; Sousa, Carmen

    2014-05-14

    The key parameters associated to the thermally induced spin crossover process have been calculated for a series of Fe(II) complexes with mono-, bi-, and tridentate ligands. Combination of density functional theory calculations for the geometries and for normal vibrational modes, and highly correlated wave function methods for the energies, allows us to accurately compute the entropy variation associated to the spin transition and the zero-point corrected energy difference between the low- and high-spin states. From these values, the transition temperature, T{sub 1/2}, is estimated for different compounds.

  10. Meige syndrome: double-blind crossover study of sodium valproate.

    PubMed Central

    Snoek, J W; van Weerden, T W; Teelken, A W; van den Burg, W; Lakke, J P

    1987-01-01

    A double-blind crossover study of sodium valproate and placebo was conducted in five patients with Meige syndrome. CSF neurotransmitter studies were performed at the end of each treatment period. GABA levels were not influenced by the administration of sodium valproate. An increase in HVA levels was observed in every patient, which may reflect an increase in central dopaminergic activity. This finding may explain the trend towards clinical deterioration which was observed during treatment with sodium valproate. Sodium valproate appears to be ineffective in Meige syndrome. PMID:3121795

  11. Crossover from superdiffusive to diffusive dynamics in fluctuating light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marqués, Manuel I.

    2016-06-01

    The expressions for the optical drag force, the equilibrium kinetic energy, and the diffusion constant of an electric dipole in a light field consisting of electromagnetic plane waves with polarizations randomly distributed and fluctuating phases are obtained. The drag force is proportional to the extinction cross section of the dipole and to the intensity. The diffusion constant does not depend on the amplitude of the electromagnetic field and is proportional to the time interval between fluctuations. Numerical simulations for the dynamics of a resonant dipole, initially at rest, show the crossover between the superdiffusive and the diffusive regimes theoretically predicted.

  12. Repeated Nitrogen Dioxide Exposures and Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthmatics: A Randomized Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Guillossou, Gaëlle; Neukirch, Catherine; Dehoux, Monique; Koscielny, Serge; Bonay, Marcel; Cabanes, Pierre-André; Samet, Jonathan M.; Mure, Patrick; Ropert, Luc; Tokarek, Sandra; Lambrozo, Jacques; Aubier, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a ubiquitous atmospheric pollutant, may enhance the asthmatic response to allergens through eosinophilic activation in the airways. However, the effect of NO2 on inflammation without allergen exposure is poorly studied. Objectives: We investigated whether repeated peaks of NO2, at various realistic concentrations, induce changes in airway inflammation in asthmatics. Methods: Nineteen nonsmokers with asthma were exposed at rest in a double-blind, crossover study, in randomized order, to 200 ppb NO2, 600 ppb NO2, or clean air once for 30 min on day 1 and twice for 30 min on day 2. The three series of exposures were separated by 2 weeks. The inflammatory response in sputum was measured 6 hr (day 1), 32 hr (day 2), and 48 hr (day 3) after the first exposure, and compared with baseline values measured twice 10–30 days before the first exposure. Results: Compared with baseline measurements, the percentage of eosinophils in sputum increased by 57% after exposure to 600 ppb NO2 (p = 0.003) but did not change significantly after exposure to 200 ppb. The slope of the association between the percentage of eosinophils and NO2 exposure level was significant (p = 0.04). Eosinophil cationic protein in sputum was highly correlated with eosinophil count and increased significantly after exposure to 600 ppb NO2 (p = 0.001). Lung function, which was assessed daily, was not affected by NO2 exposure. Conclusions: We observed that repeated peak exposures of NO2 performed without allergen exposure were associated with airway eosinophilic inflammation in asthmatics in a dose-related manner. Citation: Ezratty V, Guillossou G, Neukirch C, Dehoux M, Koscielny S, Bonay M, Cabanes PA, Samet JM, Mure P, Ropert L, Tokarek S, Lambrozo J, Aubier M. 2014. Repeated nitrogen dioxide exposures and eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatics: a randomized crossover study. Environ Health Perspect 122:850–855; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307240 PMID

  13. DNA methylation epigenetically silences crossover hot spots and controls chromosomal domains of meiotic recombination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yelina, Nataliya E.; Lambing, Christophe; Hardcastle, Thomas J.; Zhao, Xiaohui; Santos, Bruno; Henderson, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes undergo crossover recombination, which is typically concentrated in narrow hot spots that are controlled by genetic and epigenetic information. Arabidopsis chromosomes are highly DNA methylated in the repetitive centromeres, which are also crossover-suppressed. Here we demonstrate that RNA-directed DNA methylation is sufficient to locally silence Arabidopsis euchromatic crossover hot spots and is associated with increased nucleosome density and H3K9me2. However, loss of CG DNA methylation maintenance in met1 triggers epigenetic crossover remodeling at the chromosome scale, with pericentromeric decreases and euchromatic increases in recombination. We used recombination mutants that alter interfering and noninterfering crossover repair pathways (fancm and zip4) to demonstrate that remodeling primarily involves redistribution of interfering crossovers. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing, we show that crossover remodeling is driven by loss of CG methylation within the centromeric regions. Using cytogenetics, we profiled meiotic DNA double-strand break (DSB) foci in met1 and found them unchanged relative to wild type. We propose that met1 chromosome structure is altered, causing centromere-proximal DSBs to be inhibited from maturation into interfering crossovers. These data demonstrate that DNA methylation is sufficient to silence crossover hot spots and plays a key role in establishing domains of meiotic recombination along chromosomes. PMID:26494791

  14. An alternative approach for neural network evolution with a genetic algorithm: crossover by combinatorial optimization.

    PubMed

    García-Pedrajas, Nicolás; Ortiz-Boyer, Domingo; Hervás-Martínez, César

    2006-05-01

    In this work we present a new approach to crossover operator in the genetic evolution of neural networks. The most widely used evolutionary computation paradigm for neural network evolution is evolutionary programming. This paradigm is usually preferred due to the problems caused by the application of crossover to neural network evolution. However, crossover is the most innovative operator within the field of evolutionary computation. One of the most notorious problems with the application of crossover to neural networks is known as the permutation problem. This problem occurs due to the fact that the same network can be represented in a genetic coding by many different codifications. Our approach modifies the standard crossover operator taking into account the special features of the individuals to be mated. We present a new model for mating individuals that considers the structure of the hidden layer and redefines the crossover operator. As each hidden node represents a non-linear projection of the input variables, we approach the crossover as a problem on combinatorial optimization. We can formulate the problem as the extraction of a subset of near-optimal projections to create the hidden layer of the new network. This new approach is compared to a classical crossover in 25 real-world problems with an excellent performance. Moreover, the networks obtained are much smaller than those obtained with classical crossover operator. PMID:16343847

  15. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section 193.2633...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section 193.2633...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section 193.2633...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section 193.2633...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section 193.2633...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize...

  20. High-Resolution Mapping of Crossover and Non-crossover Recombination Events by Whole-Genome Re-sequencing of an Avian Pedigree

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnström, Anna; Ellegren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Recombination is an engine of genetic diversity and therefore constitutes a key process in evolutionary biology and genetics. While the outcome of crossover recombination can readily be detected as shuffled alleles by following the inheritance of markers in pedigreed families, the more precise location of both crossover and non-crossover recombination events has been difficult to pinpoint. As a consequence, we lack a detailed portrait of the recombination landscape for most organisms and knowledge on how this landscape impacts on sequence evolution at a local scale. To localize recombination events with high resolution in an avian system, we performed whole-genome re-sequencing at high coverage of a complete three-generation collared flycatcher pedigree. We identified 325 crossovers at a median resolution of 1.4 kb, with 86% of the events localized to <10 kb intervals. Observed crossover rates were in excellent agreement with data from linkage mapping, were 52% higher in male (3.56 cM/Mb) than in female meiosis (2.28 cM/Mb), and increased towards chromosome ends in male but not female meiosis. Crossover events were non-randomly distributed in the genome with several distinct hot-spots and a concentration to genic regions, with the highest density in promoters and CpG islands. We further identified 267 non-crossovers, whose location was significantly associated with crossover locations. We detected a significant transmission bias (0.18) in favour of ‘strong’ (G, C) over ‘weak’ (A, T) alleles at non-crossover events, providing direct evidence for the process of GC-biased gene conversion in an avian system. The approach taken in this study should be applicable to any species and would thereby help to provide a more comprehensive portray of the recombination landscape across organism groups. PMID:27219623

  1. High-Resolution Mapping of Crossover and Non-crossover Recombination Events by Whole-Genome Re-sequencing of an Avian Pedigree.

    PubMed

    Smeds, Linnéa; Mugal, Carina F; Qvarnström, Anna; Ellegren, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Recombination is an engine of genetic diversity and therefore constitutes a key process in evolutionary biology and genetics. While the outcome of crossover recombination can readily be detected as shuffled alleles by following the inheritance of markers in pedigreed families, the more precise location of both crossover and non-crossover recombination events has been difficult to pinpoint. As a consequence, we lack a detailed portrait of the recombination landscape for most organisms and knowledge on how this landscape impacts on sequence evolution at a local scale. To localize recombination events with high resolution in an avian system, we performed whole-genome re-sequencing at high coverage of a complete three-generation collared flycatcher pedigree. We identified 325 crossovers at a median resolution of 1.4 kb, with 86% of the events localized to <10 kb intervals. Observed crossover rates were in excellent agreement with data from linkage mapping, were 52% higher in male (3.56 cM/Mb) than in female meiosis (2.28 cM/Mb), and increased towards chromosome ends in male but not female meiosis. Crossover events were non-randomly distributed in the genome with several distinct hot-spots and a concentration to genic regions, with the highest density in promoters and CpG islands. We further identified 267 non-crossovers, whose location was significantly associated with crossover locations. We detected a significant transmission bias (0.18) in favour of 'strong' (G, C) over 'weak' (A, T) alleles at non-crossover events, providing direct evidence for the process of GC-biased gene conversion in an avian system. The approach taken in this study should be applicable to any species and would thereby help to provide a more comprehensive portray of the recombination landscape across organism groups. PMID:27219623

  2. Kids Count in Delaware, Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Kids Count in Delaware.

    This Kids Count Fact Book is combined with the Families Count Fact Book to provide information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The Kids Count and Families Count indicators have been combined into four new categories: health and health behaviors, educational involvement and achievement, family environment and…

  3. Somatic Cell Counts in Bovine Milk

    PubMed Central

    Dohoo, I. R.; Meek, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Factors which influence somatic cell counts in bovine milk are reviewed and guidelines for their interpretation are presented. It is suggested that the thresholds of 300 000 and 250 000 cells/mL be used to identify infected quarters and cows respectively. However, it is stressed that somatic cell counts are general indicators of udder health which are subject to the influence of many factors. Therefore the evaluation of several successive counts is preferable to the interpretation of an individual count. Relationships between somatic cell counts and both milk production and milk composition are discussed. Subclinical mastitis reduces milk quality and decreases yield although the relationship between production loss and somatic cell count requires clarification. Finally the availability of somatic cell counting programs in Canada is presented. PMID:17422127

  4. Corynebacterium glutamicum Metabolic Engineering with CRISPR Interference (CRISPRi)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important organism for the industrial production of amino acids. Metabolic pathways in this organism are usually engineered by conventional methods such as homologous recombination, which depends on rare double-crossover events. To facilitate the mapping of gene expression levels to metabolic outputs, we applied CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) technology using deactivated Cas9 (dCas9) to repress genes in C. glutamicum. We then determined the effects of target repression on amino acid titers. Single-guide RNAs directing dCas9 to specific targets reduced expression of pgi and pck up to 98%, and of pyk up to 97%, resulting in titer enhancement ratios of l-lysine and l-glutamate production comparable to levels achieved by gene deletion. This approach for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering, which only requires 3 days, indicates that CRISPRi can be used for quick and efficient metabolic pathway remodeling without the need for gene deletions or mutations and subsequent selection. PMID:26829286

  5. Corynebacterium glutamicum Metabolic Engineering with CRISPR Interference (CRISPRi).

    PubMed

    Cleto, Sara; Jensen, Jaide Vk; Wendisch, Volker F; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-05-20

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important organism for the industrial production of amino acids. Metabolic pathways in this organism are usually engineered by conventional methods such as homologous recombination, which depends on rare double-crossover events. To facilitate the mapping of gene expression levels to metabolic outputs, we applied CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) technology using deactivated Cas9 (dCas9) to repress genes in C. glutamicum. We then determined the effects of target repression on amino acid titers. Single-guide RNAs directing dCas9 to specific targets reduced expression of pgi and pck up to 98%, and of pyk up to 97%, resulting in titer enhancement ratios of l-lysine and l-glutamate production comparable to levels achieved by gene deletion. This approach for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering, which only requires 3 days, indicates that CRISPRi can be used for quick and efficient metabolic pathway remodeling without the need for gene deletions or mutations and subsequent selection. PMID:26829286

  6. Superconductor-Insulator Transition and Fermi-Bose Crossovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Nandini; Loh, Yen Lee; Randeria, Mohit; Chang, Chia-Chen; Scalettar, Richard

    The direct transition from an insulator to a superconductor (SC) in Fermi systems is a problem of long-standing interest, which necessarily goes beyond the standard BCS paradigm of superconductivity as a Fermi surface instability. We introduce here a simple, translationally-invariant lattice fermion model that undergoes a SC-insulator transition (SIT) and elucidate its properties using analytical methods and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We show that there is a fermionic band insulator to bosonic insulator crossover in the insulating phase and a BCS-to-BEC crossover in the SC. The SIT is always found to be from a bosonic insulator to a BEC-like SC, with an energy gap for fermions that remains finite across the SIT. The energy scales that go critical at the SIT are the gap to pair excitations in the insulator and the superfluid stiffness in the SC. In addition to giving insights into important questions about the SIT in solid state systems, our model should be experimentally realizable using ultracold fermions in optical lattices. Ref: arXiv:1507.05641 We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF DMR-1410364 (MR), DOE DE-FG02-07ER46423 (NT), and from the UC Office of the President (CC, RTS).

  7. Recombination patterns in maize reveal limits to crossover homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Gaganpreet K.; Fang, Celestia; Olson, Mischa A.; Falque, Matthieu; Martin, Olivier C.; Pawlowski, Wojciech P.

    2015-01-01

    During meiotic recombination, double-strand breaks (DSBs) are formed in chromosomal DNA and then repaired as either crossovers (COs) or non–crossovers (NCOs). In most taxa, the number of DSBs vastly exceeds the number of COs. COs are required for generating genetic diversity in the progeny, as well as proper chromosome segregation. Their formation is tightly controlled so that there is at least one CO per pair of homologous chromosomes whereas the maximum number of COs per chromosome pair is fairly limited. One of the main mechanisms controlling the number of recombination events per meiosis is CO homeostasis, which maintains a stable CO number even when the DSB number is dramatically altered. The existence of CO homeostasis has been reported in several species, including mouse, yeast, and Caenorhabditis elegans. However, it is not known whether homeostasis exists in the same form in all species. In addition, the studies of homeostasis have been conducted using mutants and/or transgenic lines exhibiting fairly severe meiotic phenotypes, and it is unclear how important homeostasis is under normal physiological conditions. We found that, in maize, CO control is robust only to ensure one CO per chromosome pair. However, once this limit is reached, the CO number is linearly related to the DSB number. We propose that CO control is a multifaceted process whose different aspects have a varying degree of importance in different species. PMID:26668366

  8. Superconductor-Insulator Transition and Fermi-Bose Crossovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Yen Lee; Randeria, Mohit; Trivedi, Nandini; Chang, Chia-Chen; Scalettar, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The direct transition from an insulator to a superconductor (SC) in Fermi systems is a problem of long-standing interest, which necessarily goes beyond the standard BCS paradigm of superconductivity as a Fermi surface instability. We introduce here a simple, translationally invariant lattice fermion model that undergoes a SC-insulator transition (SIT) and elucidate its properties using analytical methods and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We show that there is a fermionic band insulator to bosonic insulator crossover in the insulating phase and a BCS-to-BEC crossover in the SC. The SIT is always found to be from a bosonic insulator to a BEC-like SC, with an energy gap for fermions that remains finite across the SIT. The energy scales that go critical at the SIT are the gap to pair excitations in the insulator and the superfluid stiffness in the SC. In addition to giving insight into important questions about the SIT in solid-state systems, our model should be experimentally realizable using ultracold fermions in optical lattices.

  9. Bottleneck crossover between classical and quantum superfluid turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    L'vov, Victor S.; Rudenko, Oleksii; Nazarenko, Sergei V.

    2007-07-01

    We consider superfluid turbulence near absolute zero of temperature generated by classical means, e.g., towed grid or rotation but not by counterflow. We argue that such turbulence consists of a polarized tangle of mutually interacting vortex filaments with quantized vorticity. For this system, we predict and describe a bottleneck accumulation of the energy spectrum at the classical-quantum crossover scale l. Demanding the same energy flux through scales, the value of the energy at the crossover scale should exceed the Kolmogorov-41 (K41) spectrum by a large factor ln{sup 10/3}(l/a{sub 0}) (l is the mean intervortex distance and a{sub 0} is the vortex core radius) for the classical and quantum spectra to be matched in value. One of the important consequences of the bottleneck is that it causes the mean vortex line density to be considerably higher than that based on K41 alone, and this should be taken into account in (re)interpretation of new (and old) experiments as well as in further theoretical studies.

  10. Metal-to-insulator crossover in alkali doped zeolite

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Mutsuo; Jeglič, Peter; Krajnc, Andraž; Žitko, Rok; Nakano, Takehito; Nozue, Yasuo; Arčon, Denis

    2016-01-01

    We report a systematic nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the 23Na spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, in sodium loaded low-silica X (LSX) zeolite, Nan/Na12-LSX, for various loading levels of sodium atoms n across the metal-to-insulator crossover. For high loading levels of n ≥ 14.2, 1/T1T shows nearly temperature-independent behaviour between 10 K and 25 K consistent with the Korringa relaxation mechanism and the metallic ground state. As the loading levels decrease below n ≤ 11.6, the extracted density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level sharply decreases, although a residual DOS at Fermi level is still observed even in the samples that lack the metallic Drude-peak in the optical reflectance. The observed crossover is a result of a complex loading-level dependence of electric potential felt by the electrons confined to zeolite cages, where the electronic correlations and disorder both play an important role. PMID:26725368

  11. Crossover Inhibition Generates Sustained Visual Responses in the Inner Retina

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Juliana M.; Ruehle, Sabine; Ding, Huayu; Lagnado, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Summary In daylight, the input to the retinal circuit is provided primarily by cone photoreceptors acting as band-pass filters, but the retinal output also contains neuronal populations transmitting sustained signals. Using in vivo imaging of genetically encoded calcium reporters, we investigated the circuits that generate these sustained channels within the inner retina of zebrafish. In OFF bipolar cells, sustained transmission was found to depend on crossover inhibition from the ON pathway through GABAergic amacrine cells. In ON bipolar cells, the amplitude of low-frequency signals was regulated by glycinergic amacrine cells, while GABAergic inhibition regulated the gain of band-pass signals. We also provide the first functional description of a subset of sustained ON bipolar cells in which synaptic activity was suppressed by fluctuations at frequencies above ∼0.2 Hz. These results map out the basic circuitry by which the inner retina generates sustained visual signals and describes a new function of crossover inhibition. PMID:27068790

  12. Dimensional crossover of a boson gas in multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, P.; Sevilla, F. J.; Fortes, M.; Solis, M. A.; Llano, M. de; Camacho, A.

    2010-09-15

    We obtain the thermodynamic properties for a noninteracting Bose gas constrained on multilayers modeled by a periodic Kronig-Penney delta potential in one direction and allowed to be free in the other two directions. We report Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) critical temperatures, chemical potential, internal energy, specific heat, and entropy for different values of a dimensionless impenetrability P{>=}0 between layers. The BEC critical temperature T{sub c} coincides with the ideal gas BEC critical temperature T{sub 0} when P=0 and rapidly goes to zero as P increases to infinity for any finite interlayer separation. The specific heat C{sub V} as a function of absolute temperature T for finite P and plane separation a exhibits one minimum and one or two maxima in addition to the BEC, for temperatures larger than that of BEC T{sub c}. This highlights the effects due to particle confinement. We then discuss a distinctive dimensional crossover of the system through the specific heat behavior driven by the magnitude of P. For Tcrossover is revealed by a change in slope of logC{sub V}(T) and when T>T{sub c}, it is exhibited by a broad minimum in C{sub V}(T).

  13. Low Crossover Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, G. K. Surya; Smart, Marshall; Atti, Anthony R.; Olah, George A.; Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T.; Surampudi, S.

    1996-01-01

    Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC's) using polymer electrolyte membranes are promising power sources for portable and vehicular applications. State of the art technology using Nafion(R) 117 membranes (Dupont) are limited by high methanol permeability and cost, resulting in reduced fuel cell efficiencies and impractical commercialization. Therefore, much research in the fuel cell field is focused on the preparation and testing of low crossover and cost efficient polymer electrolyte membranes. The University of Southern California in cooperation with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is focused on development of such materials. Interpenetrating polymer networks are an effective method used to blend polymer systems without forming chemical links. They provide the ability to modify physical and chemical properties of polymers by optimizing blend compositions. We have developed a novel interpenetrating polymer network based on poly (vinyl - difluoride)/cross-linked polystyrenesulfonic acid polymer composites (PVDF PSSA). Sulfonation of polystyrene accounts for protonic conductivity while the non-polar, PVDF backbone provides structural integrity in addition to methanol rejection. Precursor materials were prepared and analyzed to characterize membrane crystallinity, stability and degree of interpenetration. USC JPL PVDF-PSSA membranes were also characterized to determine methanol permeability, protonic conductivity and sulfur distribution. Membranes were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) and tested for single cell performance. Tests include cell performance over a wide range of temperatures (20 C - 90 C) and cathode conditions (ambient Air/O2). Methanol crossover values are measured in situ using an in-line CO2 analyzer.

  14. Modeling the covariance structure in pharmacokinetic crossover trials.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, J K; Wang, J; Byrom, W D; Jones, B

    1999-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies of drug and metabolite concentrations in the blood are usually conducted as crossover trials, especially in phases I and II. A longitudinal series of measurements is collected on each subject within each period. However, much of the dependence among such observations, within and between periods, is generally ignored in analyzing this type of data. Usually, only a random coefficient model is fitted for the parameters in the nonlinear mean function, along with allowing the variance to depend on the mean so that it changes over time. Here, we develop models to allow more fully for the structure of the crossover study. We introduce two levels of variance components, for the subjects and for the periods within subjects, and also an autocorrelation within periods. We also retain the time-varying variance, using a separate variance function for this, different from that for the mean. We apply this model to a phase I study of the drug flosequinan and its metabolite. This drug was developed for the treatment of heart failure. Because the metabolite also exhibits an active pharmacologic effect, study of both the parent drug and the metabolite is of interest. We find that the autocorrelation is the element in the covariance structure that most improves the fit of the model but that two levels of variance components can also be necessary. PMID:10473030

  15. Chaos based crossover and mutation for securing DICOM image.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Dhivya; Praveenkumar, Padmapriya; Balaguru Rayappan, John Bosco; Amirtharajan, Rengarajan

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel encryption scheme based on combining multiple chaotic maps to ensure the safe transmission of medical images. The proposed scheme uses three chaotic maps namely logistic, tent and sine maps. To achieve an efficient encryption, the proposed chao-cryptic system employs a bio-inspired crossover and mutation units to confuse and diffuse the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image pixels. The crossover unit extensively permutes the image pixels row-wise and column-wise based on the chaotic key streams generated from the Combined Logistic-Tent (CLT) system. Prior to mutation, the pixels of the crossed over image are decomposed into two images with reduced bit depth. The decomposed images are then mutated by XOR operation with quantized chaotic sequences from Combined Logistic-Sine (CLS) system. In order to validate the sternness of the proposed algorithm, the developed chao-cryptic scheme is subjected to various security analyses such as statistical, differential, key space, key sensitivity, intentional cropping attack and chosen plaintext attack analyses. The experimental results prove the proposed DICOM cryptosystem has achieved a desirable amount of protection for real time medical image security applications. PMID:27046666

  16. IETS and quantum interference: Propensity rules in the presence of an interference feature

    SciTech Connect

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Solomon, Gemma C.; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2014-09-28

    Destructive quantum interference in single molecule electronics is an intriguing phenomenon; however, distinguishing quantum interference effects from generically low transmission is not trivial. In this paper, we discuss how quantum interference effects in the transmission lead to either low current or a particular line shape in current-voltage curves, depending on the position of the interference feature. Second, we consider how inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy can be used to probe the presence of an interference feature by identifying vibrational modes that are selectively suppressed when quantum interference effects dominate. That is, we expand the understanding of propensity rules in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy to molecules with destructive quantum interference.

  17. IETS and quantum interference: propensity rules in the presence of an interference feature.

    PubMed

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2014-09-28

    Destructive quantum interference in single molecule electronics is an intriguing phenomenon; however, distinguishing quantum interference effects from generically low transmission is not trivial. In this paper, we discuss how quantum interference effects in the transmission lead to either low current or a particular line shape in current-voltage curves, depending on the position of the interference feature. Second, we consider how inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy can be used to probe the presence of an interference feature by identifying vibrational modes that are selectively suppressed when quantum interference effects dominate. That is, we expand the understanding of propensity rules in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy to molecules with destructive quantum interference. PMID:25273424

  18. Interference in astronomical speckle patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Astronomical speckle patterns are examined in an atmospheric-optics context in order to determine what kind of image quality is to be expected from several different imaging techniques. The model used to describe the instantaneous complex field distribution across the pupil of a large telescope regards the pupil as a deep phase grating with a periodicity given by the size of the cell of uniform phase or the refractive index structure function. This model is used along with an empirical formula derived purely from the physical appearance of the speckle patterns to discuss the orders of interference in astronomical speckle patterns.

  19. Optical Path, Phase, and Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2005-11-01

    A powerful tool in wave optics is the concept of optical path length, a notion usually introduced with Fermat's principle.1-3 The analysis of Fermat's principle requires the application of the calculus of variations and the concept of an extremum, ideas too advanced for beginning students. However, the concept has proven its usefulness in the analysis4 of interference experiments such as those of Michelson and Fabry-Perot. In this paper we shall show how optical path length can aid in the analysis of a modified two-slit Young experiment.

  20. Long working distance interference microscope

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B.; DeBoer, Maarten P.; Smith, Norman F.

    2004-04-13

    Disclosed is a long working distance interference microscope suitable for three-dimensional imaging and metrology of MEMS devices and test structures on a standard microelectronics probe station. The long working distance of 10-30 mm allows standard probes or probe cards to be used. This enables nanometer-scale 3-D height profiles of MEMS test structures to be acquired across an entire wafer. A well-matched pair of reference/sample objectives is not required, significantly reducing the cost of this microscope, as compared to a Linnik microinterferometer.

  1. Photon counting compressive depth mapping.

    PubMed

    Howland, Gregory A; Lum, Daniel J; Ware, Matthew R; Howell, John C

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate a compressed sensing, photon counting lidar system based on the single-pixel camera. Our technique recovers both depth and intensity maps from a single under-sampled set of incoherent, linear projections of a scene of interest at ultra-low light levels around 0.5 picowatts. Only two-dimensional reconstructions are required to image a three-dimensional scene. We demonstrate intensity imaging and depth mapping at 256 × 256 pixel transverse resolution with acquisition times as short as 3 seconds. We also show novelty filtering, reconstructing only the difference between two instances of a scene. Finally, we acquire 32 × 32 pixel real-time video for three-dimensional object tracking at 14 frames-per-second. PMID:24104293

  2. Low Background Counting At SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce

    2011-04-27

    It is a continuous and ongoing effort to maintain radioactivity in materials and in the environment surrounding most underground experiments at very low levels. These low levels are required so that experiments can achieve the required detection sensitivities for the detection of low-energy neutrinos, searches for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to determine these low background levels in the materials and the underground environment. This proceedings will describe the SNOLAB High Purity Germanium Detector which has been in continuous use for the past five years and give results of many of the items that have been counted over that period. Brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be given, and the radon levels at SNOLAB will be discussed.

  3. Counting solutions from finite samplings.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiping; Zhou, Haijun

    2012-02-01

    We formulate the solution counting problem within the framework of the inverse Ising problem and use fast belief propagation equations to estimate the entropy whose value provides an estimate of the true one. We test this idea on both diluted models [random 2-SAT (2-satisfiability) and 3-SAT problems] and a fully connected model (binary perceptron), and show that when the constraint density is small, this estimate can be very close to the true value. The information stored by the salamander retina under the natural movie stimuli can also be estimated, and our result is consistent with that obtained by the Monte Carlo method. Of particular significance is that the sizes of other metastable states for this real neuronal network are predicted. PMID:22463290

  4. Counting solutions from finite samplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiping; Zhou, Haijun

    2012-02-01

    We formulate the solution counting problem within the framework of the inverse Ising problem and use fast belief propagation equations to estimate the entropy whose value provides an estimate of the true one. We test this idea on both diluted models [random 2-SAT (2-satisfiability) and 3-SAT problems] and a fully connected model (binary perceptron), and show that when the constraint density is small, this estimate can be very close to the true value. The information stored by the salamander retina under the natural movie stimuli can also be estimated, and our result is consistent with that obtained by the Monte Carlo method. Of particular significance is that the sizes of other metastable states for this real neuronal network are predicted.

  5. Perceptual interference decays over short unfilled intervals.

    PubMed

    Schulkind, M D

    2000-09-01

    The perceptual interference effect refers to the fact that object identification is directly related to the amount of information available at initial exposure. The present article investigated whether perceptual interference would dissipate when a short, unfilled interval was introduced between exposures to a degraded object. Across three experiments using both musical and pictorial stimuli, identification performance increased directly with the length of the unfilled interval. Consequently, significant perceptual interference was obtained only when the interval between exposures was relatively short (< 500 msec for melodies; < 300 msec for pictures). These results are consistent with explanations that attribute perceptual interference to increased perceptual noise created by exposures to highly degraded objects. The data also suggest that perceptual interference is mediated by systems that are not consciously controlled by the subject and that perceptual interference in the visual domain decays more rapidly than perceptual interference in the auditory domain. PMID:11105520

  6. Familiarity interferes with filial imprinting.

    PubMed

    van Kampen, H S; de Vos, G J

    1996-10-01

    The present study was performed to investigate whether and how pre-exposure to an object affects subsequent filial imprinting to that object. In Experiment 1 junglefowl chicks (Gallus gallus spadiceus) were first exposed to either a red object alone (control group), or a red and a yellow object simultaneously (experimental group; phase 1). Subsequently, all chicks were exposed to the yellow object in the presence of a black and blue one (phase 2). At the end of phase 1, most experimental chicks had developed a preference for the red object over the yellow one. At the end of phase 2, preferences of experimental chicks were shifted away from the yellow object towards the novel black and blue object, relative to preferences of control chicks. This shows that pre-exposure may interfere with imprinting. Experiment 2 revealed that when control chicks were tested with the yellow object at the end of phase 1, filial responses were as strong as in experimental chicks. This shows that the yellow object had not acquired control over filial behaviour during phase 1, and also that the relatively impaired imprinting on that object in phase 2 was not due to reduced generalization from the red object. One possible explanation why pre-exposure may interfere with imprinting is that familiarity alters the level of attention attracted by an object, a mechanism suggested to underlie 'latent inhibition' in conditioning. PMID:24897630

  7. Motor interference in interactive contexts.

    PubMed

    Chinellato, Eris; Castiello, Umberto; Sartori, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Action observation and execution share overlapping neural substrates, so that simultaneous activation by observation and execution modulates motor performance. Previous literature on simple prehension tasks has revealed that motor influence can be two-sided: facilitation for observed and performed congruent actions and interference for incongruent actions. But little is known of the specific modulations of motor performance in complex forms of interaction. Is it possible that the very same observed movement can lead either to interference or facilitation effects on a temporally overlapping congruent executed action, depending on the context? To answer this question participants were asked to perform a reach-to-grasp movement adopting a precision grip (PG) while: (i) observing a fixation cross, (ii) observing an actor performing a PG with interactive purposes, (iii) observing an actor performing a PG without interactive purposes. In particular, in the interactive condition the actor was shown trying to pour some sugar on a large cup located out of her reach but close to the participant watching the video, thus eliciting in reaction a complementary whole-hand grasp. Notably, fine-grained kinematic analysis for this condition revealed a specific delay in the grasping and reaching components and an increased trajectory deviation despite the observed and executed movement's congruency. Moreover, early peaks of trajectory deviation seem to indicate that socially relevant stimuli are acknowledged by the motor system very early. These data suggest that interactive contexts can determine a prompt modulation of stimulus-response compatibility effects. PMID:26113835

  8. Avian leucocyte counting using the hemocytometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dein, F.J.; Wilson, A.; Fischer, D.; Langenberg, P.

    1994-01-01

    Automated methods for counting leucocytes in avian blood are not available because of the presence of nucleated erythrocytes and thrombocytes. Therefore, total white blood cell counts are performed by hand using a hemocytometer. The Natt and Herrick and the Unopette methods are the most common stain and diluent preparations for this procedure. Replicate hemocytometer counts using these two methods were performed on blood from four birds of different species. Cells present in each square of the hemocytometer were counted. Counting cells in the corner, side, or center hemocytometer squares produced statistically equivalent results; counting four squares per chamber provided a result similar to that obtained by counting nine squares; and the Unopette method was more precise for hemocytometer counting than was the Natt and Herrick method. The Unopette method is easier to learn and perform but is an indirect process, utilizing the differential count from a stained smear. The Natt and Herrick method is a direct total count, but cell identification is more difficult.

  9. A spin-crossover ionic liquid from the cationic iron(III) Schiff base complex.

    PubMed

    Okuhata, Megumi; Funasako, Yusuke; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Mochida, Tomoyuki

    2013-09-01

    A thermochromic magnetic ionic liquid containing a cationic iron(III) Schiff-base complex has been developed, whose color and magnetic moment change with temperature because of spin crossover in the liquid state. This spin-crossover behavior closely resembles that of a solid having the same cation. PMID:23872624

  10. Spillover and Crossover of Exhaustion and Life Satisfaction among Dual-Earner Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demerouti, Evangelia; Bakker, Arnold B.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.

    2005-01-01

    This study integrates spillover research of stress transferring from work to home and crossover research of strains transferring from one spouse to another. A spillover and crossover model was tested among 191 (couples of) dual-earner parents. For both males and females, it was hypothesized that (self-reported and partners' rating of)…

  11. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  12. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  13. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  14. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  15. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  16. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  17. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  18. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  19. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  20. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  1. DNA Crossover Motifs Associated with Epigenetic Modifications Delineate Open Chromatin Regions in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shilo, Shay; Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Barkai, Naama

    2015-01-01

    The rate of crossover, the reciprocal exchanges of homologous chromosomal segments, is not uniform along chromosomes differing between male and female meiocytes. To better understand the factors regulating this variable landscape, we performed a detailed genetic and epigenetic analysis of 737 crossover events in Arabidopsis thaliana. Crossovers were more frequent than expected in promoters. Three DNA motifs enriched in crossover regions and less abundant in crossover-poor pericentric regions were identified. One of these motifs, the CCN repeat, was previously unknown in plants. The A-rich motif was preferentially associated with promoters, while the CCN repeat and the CTT repeat motifs were preferentially associated with genes. Analysis of epigenetic modifications around the motifs showed, in most cases, a specific epigenetic architecture. For example, we show that there is a peak of nucleosome occupancy and of H3K4me3 around the CCN and CTT repeat motifs while nucleosome occupancy was lowest around the A-rich motif. Cytosine methylation levels showed a gradual decrease within ∼2 kb of the three motifs, being lowest at sites where crossover occurred. This landscape was conserved in the decreased DNA methylation1 mutant. In summary, the crossover motifs are associated with epigenetic landscapes corresponding to open chromatin and contributing to the nonuniformity of crossovers in Arabidopsis. PMID:26381163

  2. Evolution of a MCM complex in flies promoting meiotic crossovers by blocking BLM helicase

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Kathryn P.; Jones, Corbin D.; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Generation of meiotic crossovers in many eukaryotes requires the elimination of anti-crossover activities by utilizing the Msh4–Msh5 heterodimer to block helicases. Msh4 and Msh5 have been lost from the flies Drosophila and Glossina but we identified a complex of mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins that functionally replace Msh4–Msh5. REC, an ortholog of MCM8 that evolved under strong positive selection in flies, interacts with MEI-217 and MEI-218, which arose from a previously undescribed metazoan-specific MCM protein. Meiotic crossovers are reduced in Drosophila rec, mei-217, and mei-218 mutants; however, removal of the Bloom syndrome helicase ortholog restores crossovers. Thus, MCMs were co-opted into a novel complex that replaces the meiotic pro-crossover function of Msh4–Msh5 in flies. PMID:23224558

  3. Unraveling the daily stress crossover between unemployed individuals and their employed spouses.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhaoli; Foo, Maw-Der; Uy, Marilyn A; Sun, Shuhua

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the dynamic relationship of distress levels between spouses when one is unemployed (and looking for a job) while the other is engaged in full-time employment. Using the diary survey method, we sampled 100 couples in China for 10 days and tested a model comprising three stress crossover mechanisms: the direct crossover, the mediating crossover, and the common stressor mechanisms. Results supported the direct crossover and common stressor mechanisms. Other stressors (e.g., work–family conflict and negative job search experience) were also related to distress of the unemployed individuals and their employed spouses. Additionally, we found a three-way interaction involving gender, marital satisfaction, and distress levels of employed spouses. We discuss how the study contributes to the unemployment and stress crossover literatures. PMID:20919793

  4. Traffic effects on bird counts on North American Breeding Bird Survey routes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, Emily H.; Sauer, John R.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) is an annual roadside survey used to estimate population change in >420 species of birds that breed in North America. Roadside sampling has been criticized, in part because traffic noise can interfere with bird counts. Since 1997, data have been collected on the numbers of vehicles that pass during counts at each stop. We assessed the effect of traffic by modeling total vehicles as a covariate of counts in hierarchical Poisson regression models used to estimate population change. We selected species for analysis that represent birds detected at low and high abundance and birds with songs of low and high frequencies. Increases in vehicle counts were associated with decreases in bird counts in most of the species examined. The size and direction of these effects remained relatively constant between two alternative models that we analyzed. Although this analysis indicated only a small effect of incorporating traffic effects when modeling roadside counts of birds, we suggest that continued evaluation of changes in traffic at BBS stops should be a component of future BBS analyses.

  5. Antithrombotic properties of rafigrelide: a phase 1, open-label, non-randomised, single-sequence, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, K; Viswanathan, G; Dragone, J; Grose-Hodge, R; Martin, P; Troy, S; Preston, P; Zaman, A G

    2014-07-01

    Platelets play a central role in atherothrombotic events. We investigated the effect of a novel platelet-lowering agent, rafigrelide, on thrombus formation and characteristics. In this phase 1, open-label, non-randomised, single-sequence, crossover study, healthy male volunteers received rafigrelide for 14 days (Period 1). Following a ≥6-week washout period, they then received rafigrelide + acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) for 14 days (Period 2). Thrombus formation was assessed ex vivo using the Badimon perfusion chamber, and thrombus characteristics were assessed using thromboelastography. A total of 15 volunteers were enrolled in the study and were assigned to Panel A or Panel B, which had different schedules of assessments. In Panel A, after treatment with rafigrelide alone (Period 1), mean (± standard deviation) platelet count was reduced from 283 (± 17) × 10⁹/l at Day 1, to 125 (± 47) × 10⁹/l at Day 14 (n=6) and thrombus area reduced under high and low shear conditions. Reductions in thrombus area under high shear conditions correlated with reductions in platelet count (r²=0.11, p=0.022; n=12). Rafigrelide treatment prolonged clot formation time and reduced clot strength. The addition of ASA to rafigrelide (Period 2) had no additional effect on platelet count or thrombus area under high or low shear conditions. Similar results were seen in Panel B for all parameters. The most common adverse events (≥3 participants per period) were thrombocytopenia and headache. While confirming the platelet-lowering effects of rafigrelide, this early phase study also indicates that rafigrelide has antithrombotic properties under both high and low shear conditions. PMID:24553755

  6. Synaptonemal Complex Proteins of Budding Yeast Define Reciprocal Roles in MutSγ-Mediated Crossover Formation.

    PubMed

    Voelkel-Meiman, Karen; Cheng, Shun-Yun; Morehouse, Savannah J; MacQueen, Amy J

    2016-07-01

    During meiosis, crossover recombination creates attachments between homologous chromosomes that are essential for a precise reduction in chromosome ploidy. Many of the events that ultimately process DNA repair intermediates into crossovers during meiosis occur within the context of homologous chromosomes that are tightly aligned via a conserved structure called the synaptonemal complex (SC), but the functional relationship between SC and crossover recombination remains obscure. There exists a widespread correlation across organisms between the presence of SC proteins and successful crossing over, indicating that the SC or its building block components are procrossover factors . For example, budding yeast mutants missing the SC transverse filament component, Zip1, and mutant cells missing the Zip4 protein, which is required for the elaboration of SC, fail to form MutSγ-mediated crossovers. Here we report the reciprocal phenotype-an increase in MutSγ-mediated crossovers during meiosis-in budding yeast mutants devoid of the SC central element components Ecm11 or Gmc2, and in mutants expressing a version of Zip1 missing most of its N terminus. This novel phenotypic class of SC-deficient mutants demonstrates unequivocally that the tripartite SC structure is dispensable for MutSγ-mediated crossover recombination in budding yeast. The excess crossovers observed in SC central element-deficient mutants are Msh4, Zip1, and Zip4 dependent, clearly indicating the existence of two classes of SC proteins-a class with procrossover function(s) that are also necessary for SC assembly and a class that is not required for crossover formation but essential for SC assembly. The latter class directly or indirectly limits MutSγ-mediated crossovers along meiotic chromosomes. Our findings illustrate how reciprocal roles in crossover recombination can be simultaneously linked to the SC structure. PMID:27184389

  7. Quantum Corrections Crossover and Ferromagnetism in Magnetic Topological Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lihong; Wang, Weiyi; Meyer, Nicholas; Liu, Yanwen; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Kai; Ai, Ping; Xiu, Faxian

    2013-01-01

    Revelation of emerging exotic states of topological insulators (TIs) for future quantum computing applications relies on breaking time-reversal symmetry and opening a surface energy gap. Here, we report on the transport response of Bi2Te3 TI thin films in the presence of varying Cr dopants. By tracking the magnetoconductance (MC) in a low doping regime we observed a progressive crossover from weak antilocalization (WAL) to weak localization (WL) as the Cr concentration increases. In a high doping regime, however, increasing Cr concentration yields a monotonically enhanced anomalous Hall effect (AHE) accompanied by an increasing carrier density. Our results demonstrate a possibility of manipulating bulk ferromagnetism and quantum transport in magnetic TI, thus providing an alternative way for experimentally realizing exotic quantum states required by spintronic applications. PMID:23928713

  8. Crossover from Quantum to Classical Creep in YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shung, E.; Beauchamp, K. M.; Rosenbaum, T. F.; Welp, U.; Crabtree, G. W.

    1996-03-01

    We use a miniature Hall probe array to measure the local magnetization relaxation S in single crystals of YBCO with columnar defects from milliKelvin to tens of Kelvin. In addition to the usual quantum signature of temperature independence of the relaxation, we probe the relationship between S and the critical current density J_c, tuned by varying columnar defect density. S can increase concurrently with Jc in the Bose glass when quantum effects dominate (K. M. Beauchamp et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), 3942 (1995). Moreover, we test recent theoretical predictions of the dependence of the quantum to classical crossover temperature on critical current density (L. Radzihovsky, Phys Rev. Lett. 74), 4923 (1995).

  9. Self-adaptive genetic algorithms with simulated binary crossover.

    PubMed

    Deb, K; Beyer, H G

    2001-01-01

    Self-adaptation is an essential feature of natural evolution. However, in the context of function optimization, self-adaptation features of evolutionary search algorithms have been explored mainly with evolution strategy (ES) and evolutionary programming (EP). In this paper, we demonstrate the self-adaptive feature of real-parameter genetic algorithms (GAs) using a simulated binary crossover (SBX) operator and without any mutation operator. The connection between the working of self-adaptive ESs and real-parameter GAs with the SBX operator is also discussed. Thereafter, the self-adaptive behavior of real-parameter GAs is demonstrated on a number of test problems commonly used in the ES literature. The remarkable similarity in the working principle of real-parameter GAs and self-adaptive ESs shown in this study suggests the need for emphasizing further studies on self-adaptive GAs. PMID:11382356

  10. Critical velocity in the BEC-BCS crossover.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Wolf; Morgener, Kai; Singh, Vijay Pal; Siegl, Jonas; Hueck, Klaus; Luick, Niclas; Mathey, Ludwig; Moritz, Henning

    2015-03-01

    We map out the critical velocity in the crossover from Bose-Einstein condensation to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superfluidity with ultracold ^{6}Li gases. A small attractive potential is dragged along lines of constant column density. The rate of the induced heating increases steeply above a critical velocity v_{c}. In the same samples, we measure the speed of sound v_{s} by exciting density waves and compare the results to the measured values of v_{c}. We perform numerical simulations in the Bose-Einstein condensation regime and find very good agreement, validating the approach. In the strongly correlated regime our measurements of v_{c} provide a testing ground for theoretical approaches. PMID:25793823

  11. Progesterone and the premenstrual syndrome: a double blind crossover trial.

    PubMed Central

    Dennerstein, L; Spencer-Gardner, C; Gotts, G; Brown, J B; Smith, M A; Burrows, G D

    1985-01-01

    A double blind, randomised, crossover trial of oral micronised progesterone (two months) and placebo (two months) was conducted to determine whether progesterone alleviated premenstrual complaints. Twenty three women were interviewed premenstrually before treatment and in each month of treatment. They completed Moos's menstrual distress questionnaire, Beck et al's depression inventory, Spielberger et al's state anxiety inventory, the mood adjective checklist, and a daily symptom record. Analyses of data found an overall beneficial effect of being treated for all variables except restlessness, positive moods, and interest in sex. Maximum improvement occurred in the first month of treatment with progesterone. Nevertheless, an appreciably beneficial effect of progesterone over placebo for mood and some physical symptoms was identifiable after both one and two months of treatment. Further studies are needed to determine the optimum duration of treatment. PMID:3924191

  12. Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless crossover in a photonic lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Eran; Pugatch, Rami; Silberberg, Yaron

    2011-01-15

    We show that a periodic two-dimensional (2D) photonic lattice with Kerr nonlinearity exhibits a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) crossover associated with a vortex-unbinding transition. We find that averaging over random initial conditions is equivalent to Boltzmann thermal averaging with the discrete nonlinear Schro{center_dot}{center_dot}dinger Hamiltonian. By controlling the initial randomness we can continuously vary the effective temperature. Since this Hamiltonian is in the 2D XY universality class, a BKT transition ensues. We verify this prediction using experimentally accessible observables and find good agreement between theory and simulations. This opens the possibility of experimental access to interesting phase transitions known in condensed matter using nonlinear optics.

  13. FM-AFM crossover in vanadium oxide nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demishev, S. V.; Chernobrovkin, A. L.; Glushkov, V. V.; Grigorieva, A. V.; Goodilin, E. A.; Sluchanko, N. E.; Samarin, N. A.; Semeno, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic properties of nanomaterials based on vanadium oxide (multiwall nanotubes, nanorods, and nanolayers) have been investigated in the temperature range of 1.8-220 K by high-frequency (60-GHz) EPR. A transition from a ferromagnetic temperature dependence to an antiferromagnetic temperature dependence has been observed in nanorods and nanotubes with a decrease in the temperature. The FM-AFM crossover observed near T C ˜ 110 K is accompanied by a low-temperature increase in the Curie constant by a factor of 2.7-7. The comparison of the experimental data for various VO x nanoparticles indicates that the most probable cause of the change in the type of magnetic interaction is a change in the concentration of V4+ magnetic ions.

  14. Workaholism and relationship quality: a spillover-crossover perspective.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Arnold B; Demerouti, Evangelia; Burke, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    This study of 168 dual-earner couples examined the relationship between workaholism and relationship satisfaction. More specifically, on the basis of the literature, it was hypothesized that workaholism is positively related to work-family conflict. In addition, the authors predicted that workaholism is related to reduced support provided to the partner, through work-family conflict, and that individuals who receive considerable support from their partners are more satisfied with their relationship. Finally, the authors hypothesized direct crossover of relationship satisfaction between partners. The results of structural equation modeling analyses using the matched responses of both partners supported these hypotheses. Moreover, in line with predictions, the authors found that gender did not affect the strength of the relationships in the proposed model. The authors discuss workplace interventions as possible ways to help workaholics and their partners. PMID:19210044

  15. Vacuum energy density kicked by the electroweak crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Klinkhamer, F. R.; Volovik, G. E.

    2009-10-15

    Using q-theory, we show that the electroweak crossover can generate a remnant vacuum energy density {lambda}{approx}E{sub ew}{sup 8}/E{sub Planck}{sup 4}, with effective electroweak energy scale E{sub ew}{approx}10{sup 3} GeV and reduced Planck-energy scale E{sub Planck}{approx}10{sup 18} GeV. The obtained expression for the effective cosmological constant {lambda} may be a crucial input for the suggested solution by Arkani-Hamed et al. of the triple cosmic coincidence puzzle (why the orders of magnitude of the energy densities of vacuum, matter, and radiation are approximately the same in the present Universe)

  16. An inverted crossover resonance aiding laser cooling of ^171Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFerran, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    We observe an inverted crossover resonance in $\\pi$-driven four-level systems, where $F'-F=0,+1$. The signal is observed through saturated absorption spectroscopy of the $(6s^{2})$ $^{1}S_{0}$ $-$ $(6s6p)$ $^{3}P_{1}$ transition in $^{171}$Yb, where the nuclear spin $I=1/2$. The enhanced absorption signal is used to generate a dispersive curve for 556 nm laser frequency stabilisation and the stabilised light cools $^{171}$Yb atoms in a two-stage magneto-optical trap, achieving temperatures of 20 $\\mu$K. The Doppler-free spectroscopy scheme is further used to measure isotopic frequency shifts and hyperfine separations for the intercombination line in ytterbium.

  17. Experimental evidence for a dynamical crossover in liquid aluminium.

    PubMed

    Demmel, F; Fraile, A; Szubrin, D; Pilgrim, W-C; Morkel, C

    2015-11-18

    The temperature dependence of the dynamic structure factor at next-neighbour distances has been investigated for liquid aluminium. This correlation function is a sensitive parameter for changes in the local environment and its Fourier transform was measured in a coherent inelastic neutron scattering experiment. The zero frequency amplitude decreases in a nonlinear way and indicates a change in dynamics around 1.4 ∙ Tmelting. From that amplitude a generalized viscosity can be derived which is a measure of local stress correlations on next-neighbour distances. The derived generalized longitudinal viscosity shows a changing slope at the same temperature range. At this temperature the freezing out of degrees of freedom for structural relaxation upon cooling sets in which can be understood as a precursor towards the solid state. That crossover in dynamics of liquid aluminium shows the same signatures as previously observed in liquid rubidium and lead, indicating an universal character. PMID:26465204

  18. Crossover from BCS to Bose superconductivity: A functional integral approach

    SciTech Connect

    Randeria, M.; Sa de Melo, C.A.R.; Engelbrecht, J.R.

    1993-04-01

    We use a functional integral formulation to study the crossover from cooperative Cooper pairing to the formation and condensation of tightly bound pairs in a 3D continuum model of fermions with attractive interactions. The inadequacy of a saddle point approximation with increasing coupling is pointed out, and the importance of temporal (quantum) fluctuations for normal state properties at intermediate and strong coupling is emphasized. In addition to recovering the Nozieres-Schmitt-Pink interpolation scheme for T{sub c}, and the Leggett variational results for T = 0, we also present results for evolution of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation and collective mode spectrum as a function of the coupling.

  19. Experimental evidence for a dynamical crossover in liquid aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmel, F.; Fraile, A.; Szubrin, D.; Pilgrim, W.-C.; Morkel, C.

    2015-11-01

    The temperature dependence of the dynamic structure factor at next-neighbour distances has been investigated for liquid aluminium. This correlation function is a sensitive parameter for changes in the local environment and its Fourier transform was measured in a coherent inelastic neutron scattering experiment. The zero frequency amplitude decreases in a nonlinear way and indicates a change in dynamics around 1.4\\cdot {{T}\\text{melting}} . From that amplitude a generalized viscosity can be derived which is a measure of local stress correlations on next-neighbour distances. The derived generalized longitudinal viscosity shows a changing slope at the same temperature range. At this temperature the freezing out of degrees of freedom for structural relaxation upon cooling sets in which can be understood as a precursor towards the solid state. That crossover in dynamics of liquid aluminium shows the same signatures as previously observed in liquid rubidium and lead, indicating an universal character.

  20. A crossover in anisotropic nanomechanochemistry of van der Waals crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamura, Kohei; Misawa, Masaaki; Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Vashishta, Priya

    2015-12-01

    In nanoscale mechanochemistry, mechanical forces selectively break covalent bonds to essentially control chemical reactions. An archetype is anisotropic detonation of layered energetic molecular crystals bonded by van der Waals (vdW) interactions. Here, quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a crossover of anisotropic nanomechanochemistry of vdW crystal. Within 10-13 s from the passage of shock front, lateral collision produces NO2 via twisting and bending of nitro-groups and the resulting inverse Jahn-Teller effect, which is mediated by strong intra-layer hydrogen bonds. Subsequently, as we transition from heterogeneous to homogeneous mechanochemical regimes around 10-12 s, shock normal to multilayers becomes more reactive, producing H2O assisted by inter-layer N-N bond formation. These time-resolved results provide much needed atomistic understanding of nanomechanochemistry that underlies a wider range of technologies.

  1. A crossover in anisotropic nanomechanochemistry of van der Waals crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamura, Kohei; Misawa, Masaaki; Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Shimojo, Fuyuki

    2015-12-07

    In nanoscale mechanochemistry, mechanical forces selectively break covalent bonds to essentially control chemical reactions. An archetype is anisotropic detonation of layered energetic molecular crystals bonded by van der Waals (vdW) interactions. Here, quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a crossover of anisotropic nanomechanochemistry of vdW crystal. Within 10{sup −13} s from the passage of shock front, lateral collision produces NO{sub 2} via twisting and bending of nitro-groups and the resulting inverse Jahn-Teller effect, which is mediated by strong intra-layer hydrogen bonds. Subsequently, as we transition from heterogeneous to homogeneous mechanochemical regimes around 10{sup −12} s, shock normal to multilayers becomes more reactive, producing H{sub 2}O assisted by inter-layer N-N bond formation. These time-resolved results provide much needed atomistic understanding of nanomechanochemistry that underlies a wider range of technologies.

  2. Crossover Phenomena in Detrended Fluctuation Analysis Used in Financial Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shi-Hao

    2009-02-01

    A systematic analysis of Shanghai and Japan stock indices for the period of Jan. 1984 to Dec. 2005 is performed. After stationarity is verified by ADF (Augmented Dickey-Fuller) test, the power spectrum of the data exhibits a power law decay as a whole characterized by 1/fβ processes with possible long range correlations. Subsequently, by using the method of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of the general volatility in the stock markets, we find that the long-range correlations are occurred among the return series and the crossover phenomena exhibit in the results obviously. Further, Shanghai stock market shows long-range correlations in short time scale and shows short-range correlations in long time scale. Whereas, for Japan stock market, the data behaves oppositely absolutely. Last, we compare the varying of scale exponent in large volatility between two stock markets. All results obtained may indicate the possibility of characteristic of multifractal scaling behavior of the financial markets.

  3. Statistical aspects of point count sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, R.J.; Sauer, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The dominant feature of point counts is that they do not census birds, but instead provide incomplete counts of individuals present within a survey plot. Considering a simple model for point count sampling, we demon-strate that use of these incomplete counts can bias estimators and testing procedures, leading to inappropriate conclusions. A large portion of the variability in point counts is caused by the incomplete counting, and this within-count variation can be confounded with ecologically meaningful varia-tion. We recommend caution in the analysis of estimates obtained from point counts. Using; our model, we also consider optimal allocation of sampling effort. The critical step in the optimization process is in determining the goals of the study and methods that will be used to meet these goals. By explicitly defining the constraints on sampling and by estimating the relationship between precision and bias of estimators and time spent counting, we can predict the optimal time at a point for each of several monitoring goals. In general, time spent at a point will differ depending on the goals of the study.

  4. Identification of CSF fistulas by radionuclide counting

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Y.; Kunishio, K.; Sunami, N.; Yamamoto, Y.; Satoh, T.; Suga, M.; Asari, S. )

    1990-07-01

    A radionuclide counting method, performed with the patient prone and the neck flexed, was used successfully to diagnose CSF rhinorrhea in two patients. A normal radionuclide ratio (radionuclide counts in pledget/radionuclide counts in 1-ml blood sample) was obtained in 11 normal control subjects. Significance was determined to be a ratio greater than 0.37. Use of radionuclide counting method of determining CSF rhinorrhea is recommended when other methods have failed to locate a site of leakage or when posttraumatic meningitis suggests subclinical CSF rhinorrhea.

  5. Effect of counting errors on immunoassay precision

    SciTech Connect

    Klee, G.G.; Post, G. )

    1989-07-01

    Using mathematical analysis and computer simulation, we studied the effect of gamma scintillation counting error on two radioimmunoassays (RIAs) and an immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). To analyze the propagation of the counting errors into the estimation of analyte concentration, we empirically derived parameters for logit-log data-reduction models for assays of digoxin and triiodothyronine (RIAs) and ferritin (IRMA). The component of the analytical error attributable to counting variability, when expressed as a CV of the analyte concentration, decreased approximately linearly with the inverse of the square root of the maximum counts bound. Larger counting-error CVs were found at lower concentrations for both RIAs and the IRMA. Substantially smaller CVs for overall assay were found when the maximum counts bound progressively increased from 500 to 10,000 counts, but further increases in maximum bound counts resulted in little decrease in overall assay CV except when very low concentrations of analyte were being measured. Therefore, RIA and IRMA systems based in duplicate determinations having at least 10,000 maximum counts bound should have adequate precision, except possibly at very low concentrations.

  6. Vector perturbations of galaxy number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, Ruth; Tansella, Vittorio

    2016-07-01

    We derive the contribution to relativistic galaxy number count fluctuations from vector and tensor perturbations within linear perturbation theory. Our result is consistent with the the relativistic corrections to number counts due to scalar perturbation, where the Bardeen potentials are replaced with line-of-sight projection of vector and tensor quantities. Since vector and tensor perturbations do not lead to density fluctuations the standard density term in the number counts is absent. We apply our results to vector perturbations which are induced from scalar perturbations at second order and give numerical estimates of their contributions to the power spectrum of relativistic galaxy number counts.

  7. Spatial light interference tomography (SLIT).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Marks, Daniel L; Carney, Paul Scott; Millet, Larry J; Gillette, Martha U; Mihi, Agustin; Braun, Paul V; Shen, Zhen; Prasanth, Supriya G; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-10-10

    We present spatial light interference tomography (SLIT), a label-free method for 3D imaging of transparent structures such as live cells. SLIT uses the principle of interferometric imaging with broadband fields and combines the optical gating due to the micron-scale coherence length with that of the high numerical aperture objective lens. Measuring the phase shift map associated with the object as it is translated through focus provides full information about the 3D distribution associated with the refractive index. Using a reconstruction algorithm based on the Born approximation, we show that the sample structure may be recovered via a 3D, complex field deconvolution. We illustrate the method with reconstructed tomographic refractive index distributions of microspheres, photonic crystals, and unstained living cells. PMID:21996999

  8. Quasiparticle interference from magnetic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derry, Philip G.; Mitchell, Andrew K.; Logan, David E.

    2015-07-01

    Fourier transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy (FT-STS) measures the scattering of conduction electrons from impurities and defects, giving information about the electronic structure of both the host material and adsorbed impurities. We interpret such FT-STS measurements in terms of the quasiparticle interference (QPI), here investigating in detail the QPI due to single magnetic impurities adsorbed on a range of representative nonmagnetic host surfaces, and contrasting with the case of a simple scalar impurity or point defect. We demonstrate how the electronic correlations present for magnetic impurities markedly affect the QPI, showing, e.g., a large intensity enhancement due to the Kondo effect, and universality at low temperatures/scanning energies. The commonly used joint density of states interpretation of FT-STS measurements is also considered, and shown to be insufficient in many cases, including that of magnetic impurities.

  9. Graphene Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girit, Çaǧlar; Bouchiat, Vincent; Naaman, Ofer; Zhang, Yuanbo; Crommie, Michael; Zettl, Alex; Siddiqi, Irfan

    2010-03-01

    Graphene can support Cooper pair transport when contacted with two superconducting electrodes, resulting in the well-known Josephson effect. By depositing aluminum/palladium electrodes in the geometry of a loop onto a single graphene sheet, we fabricate a two junction dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Not only an the supercurrent in this device be increased by moving the electrostatic gate away from the Dirac point, but it can also be modulated periodically by an applied magnetic field---a potentially powerful probe of electronic transport in graphene. We analyze the magnetic field modulation of the critical current with the asymmetric/inductive SQUID model of Fulton and Dynes and discuss the variation of the fitting parameters with gate voltage.

  10. Design and numerical characterization of a crossover EBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, Sabrina Langbein, A. Meusel, Oliver; Kester, Oliver

    2015-01-09

    For the investigation of highly charged ions, a crossover EBIS (XEBIS) was developed at the University of Frankfurt. In contrast to conventional EBIS/T devices the compression of the electron beam is achieved by electrostatic focusing to a crossover point in the interaction region. This concept allows a compact and simple design. Simulations performed with EGUN show a perveance of 2.1×10{sup −7} A/V{sup 3/2} for the realized gun system. In the interaction region the electron beam has a density of around 10 A/cm{sup 2} and a minimum radius of 0.15 mm. The XEBIS has a total length of 112 mm with a trap length of 26 mm. It is designed for electron beam energies of up to 6 keV/q. The storage capacity of the trap region is in the order of 1×10{sup 8} charges. Charge state breeding studies with CBSIM indicate for the noble gases as maximal achievable charge state Ar{sup 16+}, Kr{sup 30+} and Xe{sup 35+}. Thus ion beam currents of around 2.04 nA assuming 50 Hz repetition rate can be expected. The emittance of the extracted beam is approximated to 8 mm mrad. After completion of the construction phase, the XEBIS will be installed for first performance investigations at a dedicated test bench, equipped with a fast Faraday Cup (FC), a retarding field spectrometer, a luminescence screen and optical diagnostics. Subsequently the XEBIS will serve as source for highly charged ions at different experimental setups.

  11. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more » or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  12. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  13. Photon counting with an EMCCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Olivier; Blais-Ouellette, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    In order to make faint flux imaging efficient with an EMCCD, the Clock Induced Charges (CIC) must be reduced to a minimum. Some techniques were proposed to reduce the CIC but until now, neither commercially available CCD controller nor commercial cameras were able to implement them and get satisfying results. CCCP, the CCD Controller for Counting Photons, has been designed with the aim of reducing the CIC generated when an EMCCD is read out. It is optimized for driving EMCCDs at high speed (>= 10MHz), but may be used also for driving conventional CCDs (or the conventional output of an EMCCD) at high, moderate, or low speed. This new controller provides an arbitrary clock generator, yielding a timing resolution of ~20 ps and a voltage resolution of ~2mV of the overlap of the clocks used to drive the EMCCD. The frequency components of the clocks can be precisely controlled, and the inter-clock capacitance effect of the CCD can be nulled to avoid overshoots and undershoots. Using this controller, CIC levels as low as 0.001 - 0.002 e per pixel per frame were measured on a 512×512 CCD97 operating in inverted mode, at an EM gain of ~2000. This is 5 to 10 times less than what is usually seen in commercial EMCCD cameras using the same EMCCD chip.

  14. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  15. Filtering algorithm for dotted interferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterloh, K.; Bücherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.; Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.; Bock, S.

    2011-09-01

    An algorithm has been developed to remove reliably dotted interferences impairing the perceptibility of objects within a radiographic image. This particularly is a major challenge encountered with neutron radiographs collected at the NECTAR facility, Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II): the resulting images are dominated by features resembling a snow flurry. These artefacts are caused by scattered neutrons, gamma radiation, cosmic radiation, etc. all hitting the detector CCD directly in spite of a sophisticated shielding. This makes such images rather useless for further direct evaluations. One approach to resolve this problem of these random effects would be to collect a vast number of single images, to combine them appropriately and to process them with common image filtering procedures. However, it has been shown that, e.g. median filtering, depending on the kernel size in the plane and/or the number of single shots to be combined, is either insufficient or tends to blur sharp lined structures. This inevitably makes a visually controlled processing image by image unavoidable. Particularly in tomographic studies, it would be by far too tedious to treat each single projection by this way. Alternatively, it would be not only more comfortable but also in many cases the only reasonable approach to filter a stack of images in a batch procedure to get rid of the disturbing interferences. The algorithm presented here meets all these requirements. It reliably frees the images from the snowy pattern described above without the loss of fine structures and without a general blurring of the image. It consists of an iterative, within a batch procedure parameter free filtering algorithm aiming to eliminate the often complex interfering artefacts while leaving the original information untouched as far as possible.

  16. Coping with Radio Frequency Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    The radio spectrum is a finite resource, on which humanity makes many demands. And pressure on it is ever increasing with the development of new technology and ideas for radio services. After all, we all benefit from wifi and cell phones. Radio astronomers have a small percentage of the spectrum allocated to them at octave intervals in the metre-centimetre bands, and at important frequencies, such as that of the 21cm line of HI. Signals from other services, as well as from our own poorly-engineered equipment, sometimes contaminate our bands: these signals constitute RFI. These may totally obliterate the astronomical signal, or, in the case of CLOUDSAT, may be capable of completely destroying a receiver, which introduces us to the new possibility of 'destructive interference'. A geo-stationary satellite can block access to a piece of sky from one site. Good equipment design eliminates self-inflicted interference, while physical separation often provides adequate practical mitigation at many frequencies. However, new observatories end up being located in the West Australian desert or Antarctica. In future they may be on the back side of the Moon. But there is no Earth-bound protection via physical separation against satellite signals. Some mitigation can be achieved by frequent data dumps and the excision of RFI, or by real-time detection and blanking of the receiver, or by more sophisticated algoriths. Astronomers of necessity aim to achieve mitigation via coordination, at the local level, and by participating in spectrum management at the national and international levels. This involves them spending a lot of time in Geneva at the International Telegraphic Union protecting their access to spectrum, and access to clean spectrum from the L3 point and the far side of the Moon.

  17. Parasitic interference in nulling interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, A.; Defrère, D.; Danchi, W. C.; Lopez, B.; Absil, O.

    2013-05-01

    Nulling interferometry aims to detect faint objects close to bright stars. Its principle is to produce a destructive interference along the line of sight so that the stellar flux is rejected, while the flux of the off-axis source can be transmitted. In practice, various instrumental perturbations can degrade the nulling performance. Any imperfection in phase, amplitude or polarization produces a spurious flux that leaks to the interferometer output and corrupts the transmitted off-axis flux. One of these instrumental perturbations is the crosstalk phenomenon, which occurs because of multiple parasitic reflections inside transmitting optics, and/or diffraction effects related to beam propagation along finite size optics. It can include a crosstalk of a beam with itself, and a mutual crosstalk between different beams. This can create a parasitic interference pattern, which degrades the intrinsic transmission map - or intensity response - of the interferometer. In this context, we describe how this instrumental effect impairs the performance of a Bracewell interferometer. A simple formalism is developed to derive the corresponding modified intensity response of the interferometer, as a function of the two parameters of interest: the crosstalk level (or contamination rate) and the phase shift between the primary and secondary - parasitic - beams. We then apply our mathematical approach to a few scientific cases, both analytically and using the GENIESIM simulation software, adapted to handle coherent crosstalk. Our results show that a coherent crosstalk level of about 1 per cent implies a 20 per cent drop of the signal-to-noise ratio at most. Careful attention should thus be paid to reduce the crosstalk level inside an interferometric instrument and ensure an instrumental stability that provides the necessary sensitivity through calibration procedures.

  18. CDMA with interference cancellation for multiprobe missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, D.; Simon, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Code division multiple-access spread spectrum has been proposed for use in future multiprobe/multispacecraft missions. This article considers a general parallel interference-cancellation scheme that significantly reduces the degradation effect of probe (user) interference but with a lesser implementation complexity than the maximum-likelihood technique. The scheme operates on the fact that parallel processing simultaneously removes from each probe (user) the total interference produced by the remaining most reliably received probes (users) accessing the channel. The parallel processing can be done in multiple stages. The proposed scheme uses tentative decision devices with different optimum thresholds at the multiple stages to produce the most reliably received data for generation and cancellation of probe/spacecraft interference. The one-stage interference cancellation was analyzed for two types of tentative decision devices, namely, hard and null zone decisions. Simulation results are given for one- and two-stage interference cancellation for equal as well as unequal received power probes.

  19. Effects of capacitance at crossover wirings in power GaAs M.E.S.F.E.T.s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aono, Y.; Higashisaka, A.; Hasegawa, F.

    1980-05-01

    Power GaAs FETs with an air-bridge crossover were compared with those of SiO2 crossover to find the effect of the capacitance at the crossover points. The capacitance of SiO2 crossover points is much smaller than that of the gate pad or the gate busbar in power GaAs FETs, and deterioration of the microwave performance due to that capacitance is negligible.

  20. A Comparison of Methods for Counting Viruses in Aquatic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bettarel, Yvan; Sime-Ngando, Telesphore; Amblard, Christian; Laveran, Henri

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we compared different methods—including transmission electron microscopy—and various nucleic acid labeling methods in which we used the fluorochromes 4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), 4-[3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-oxazole)-2-methylmethyledene]-1-(3′-trimethyl ammoniumpropyl)-quinilinium diioide (YOPRO-1), and SYBR Green I, which can be detected by epifluorescence microscopy (EM), for counting viruses in samples obtained from freshwater ecosystems whose trophic status varied and from a culture of T7 phages. From a quantitative and qualitative viewpoint, our results showed that the greatest efficiency for all ecosystems was obtained when we used the EM counting protocol in which YOPRO-1 was the label, as this fluorochrome exhibited strong and very stable fluorescence. A modification of the original protocol in which YOPRO-1 was used is recommended, because this modification makes the protocol faster and allows it to be used for routine analysis of fixed samples. Because SYBR Green I fades very quickly, the use of this fluorochrome is not recommended for systems in which the viral content is very high (>108 particles/ml), such as treated domestic sewage effluents. Experiments in which we used DNase and RNase revealed that the number of viruses determined by EM was slightly overestimated (by approximately 15%) because of interference caused by the presence of free nucleic acids. PMID:10831400

  1. Warship detection in smoke screen interference based on region of interest for CMAC-prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaoke; Shi, Caicheng

    2015-10-01

    Warship detection in smoke screen interference background belongs to the field of object extraction from image with low contrast and low signal/noise ratio. Aimed at the specialty of the complex background, a novel algorithm of warship detection in smoke screen interference based on region of interest for CMAC-prediction is proposed in the article. The regions-of-interest (ROI) must be predicted in target tracking of IR image for increasing capture probability. CMAC estimator can effectually resolve conflict between operational counts and predicting precision. The local fractal dimension is used to differentiate the warship from the ROI. The experimental results show that CMAC can accurately estimate the ROI and a similar performance in a low-noise environment and superiority of the fractal operators in a high noise, the algorithms are effectively for smoke screen interference and are easy to be implemented by parallel processing hardware.

  2. Direct Validation of the Wall Interference Correction System of the Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Norbert; Boone, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    Data from the test of a large semispan model was used to perform a direct validation of a wall interference correction system for a transonic slotted wall wind tunnel. At first, different sets of uncorrected aerodynamic coefficients were generated by physically changing the boundary condition of the test section walls. Then, wall interference corrections were computed and applied to all data points. Finally, an interpolation of the corrected aerodynamic coefficients was performed. This interpolation made sure that the corrected Mach number of a given run would be constant. Overall, the agreement between corresponding interpolated lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficient sets was very good. Buoyancy corrections were also investigated. These studies showed that the accuracy goal of one drag count may only be achieved if reliable estimates of the wall interference induced buoyancy correction are available during a test.

  3. Hyperspectral imaging camera using wavefront division interference.

    PubMed

    Bahalul, Eran; Bronfeld, Asaf; Epshtein, Shlomi; Saban, Yoram; Karsenty, Avi; Arieli, Yoel

    2016-03-01

    An approach for performing hyperspectral imaging is introduced. The hyperspectral imaging is based on Fourier transform spectroscopy, where the interference is performed by wavefront division interference rather than amplitude division interference. A variable phase delay between two parts of the wavefront emanating from each point of an object is created by a spatial light modulator (SLM) to obtain variable interference patterns. The SLM is placed in the exit pupil of an imaging system, thus enabling conversion of a general imaging optical system into an imaging hyperspectral optical system. The physical basis of the new approach is introduced, and an optical apparatus is built. PMID:26974085

  4. Three-slit interference: A duality relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asad Siddiqui, Mohd; Qureshi, Tabish

    2015-08-01

    The issue of interference and which-way information is addressed in the context of three-slit interference experiments. A new path distinguishability DQ is introduced, based on unambiguous quantum state discrimination. An inequality connecting the interference visibility and path distinguishability, V + {2D_Qover 3- D_Q} ≤ 1, is derived which puts a bound on how much fringe visibility and which-way information can be simultaneously obtained. It is argued that this bound is tight. For two-slit interference, we derive a new duality relation which reduces to Englert's duality relation and the Greenberger-Yasin duality relation, in different limits.

  5. The perirhinal cortex and recognition memory interference

    PubMed Central

    Watson, H.C.; Lee, A. C. H.

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been an increase in interest in the effects of visual interference on memory processing, with the aim of eluciating the role of the perirhinal cortex (PRC) in recognition memory. One view argues that the PRC processes highly complex conjunctions of object features, and recent evidence from rodents suggests that these representations may be vital for buffering against the effects of pre-retrieval interference on object recognition memory. To investigate whether PRC-dependent object representations play a similar role in humans, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan neurologically healthy participants while they carried out a novel interference-match-to-sample task. This paradigm was specifically designed to concurrently assess the impact of object vs. spatial interference, on recognition memory for objects or scenes, while keeping constant the amount of object and scene information presented across all trials. Activity at retrieval was examined, within an anatomically defined PRC region of interest, according to the demand for object or scene memory, following a period of object compared to spatial interference. Critically, we found greater PRC activity for object memory following object interference, compared to object memory following scene interference, and no difference between object and scene interference for scene recognition. These data demonstrate a role for the human PRC following a period of object, but not scene, interference, during object recognition memory, and emphasize the importance of representational content to mnemonic processing. PMID:23447626

  6. Radio frequency selection and interference prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroot, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    The bands available for deep-space communications, and the choice of particular mission frequencies are discussed. The more general susceptibility of deep-space Earth stations to various kinds of interference is then presented. An associated topic is the development of protection criteria that specify maximum allowable levels of interference. Next, the prediction of interference from near-Earth satellites is described, with particular emphasis on the problems and uncertainties of such predictions. Finally, a brief description of other activities aimed at the prevention or avoidance of interference to deep-space radio communications is given.

  7. Quantum interference of edge supercurrents in a two-dimensional topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachov, Grigory; Burset, Pablo; Trauzettel, Bjoern; Hankiewicz, Ewelina

    2015-03-01

    Josephson weak links made of two-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) exhibit magnetic oscillations of the supercurrent that are reminiscent of those in superconducting quantum interference devices. We propose a microscopic theory of such a TI SQUID effect. The key ingredient of our model is the exact treatment of the influence of an external magnetic field on the edge supercurrents. We show that this influence has the form of a 1D Doppler effect that describes the flux-controlled interference of the edge currents with superimposed suppression of Andreev reflection. Both long and short junctions are discussed. In particular, for long junctions the theory shows a temperature-driven crossover from the normal Φ0-periodic SQUID pattern to a 2 Φ0- quasiperiodic pattern consisting of a series of alternating even and odd peaks (where Φ0=ch/2e is the magnetic flux quantum). The predicted even-odd effect is the signature of gapless (protected) Andreev bound states with a sawtooth dependence on the magnetic flux. Our findings may shed some light on the recently observed even-odd interference pattern in InAs/GaSb-based TI Josephson junctions, suggesting new operation regimes for nano-SQUIDs. G.T. acknowledges financial support of the German Research Foundation (DFG Grant No TK60/1-1). This work was also supported by DFG FOR 1162, SPP1666, JST research unit ``Topotronics'' and the ENB graduate school ``Topological insulators.''

  8. 7 CFR 1220.625 - Counting requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Counting requests. 1220.625 Section 1220.625 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.625 Counting requests. (a)...

  9. 7 CFR 1220.625 - Counting requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Counting requests. 1220.625 Section 1220.625 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.625 Counting requests. (a)...

  10. 7 CFR 1220.625 - Counting requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Counting requests. 1220.625 Section 1220.625 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.625 Counting requests. (a)...

  11. 2013 Kids Count in Colorado! Community Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Kids Count in Colorado!" is an annual publication of the Children's Campaign, providing state and county level data on child well-being factors including child health, education, and economic status. Since its first release 20 years ago, "Kids Count in Colorado!" has become the most trusted source for data and information on…

  12. Photon counts from stellar occultation sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buglia, James J.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using stars as radiation sources for Earth atmospheric occultation experiments is investigated. Exoatmospheric photon counts of the order of 10 to the 6th power photons/sq cm/sec are realized for the 15 visually brightest stars. Most photon counts appear to be marginally detectable unless photomultiplier or cascade detection devices can be used.

  13. 2009 KidsCount in Colorado!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "KidsCount in Colorado!" is an annual publication of the Colorado Children's Campaign, which provides the best available state- and county-level data to measure and track the education, health and general well-being of the state's children. KidsCount in Colorado! informs policy debates and community discussions, serving as a valuable resource for…

  14. Early Concepts of Number and Counting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Box, Katherine; Scott, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Before primitive man had grasped the concept of number, the written word or even speech, he was able to count. This was important for keeping track of food supplies, sending messages, trading between villages and even keeping track of how many animals were in their herd. Counting was done in various ways, but in all cases, the underlying principle…

  15. 2008 KidsCount in Colorado!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "KidsCount in Colorado!" is an annual publication of the Colorado Children's Campaign, which provides the best available state- and county-level data to measure and track the education, health and general well-being of the state's children. KidsCount in Colorado! informs policy debates and community discussions, serving as a valuable resource for…

  16. Is It Counting, or Is It Adding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhardt, Sara; Fisher, Molly H.; Thomas, Jonathan; Schack, Edna O.; Tassell, Janet; Yoder, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) expect second grade students to "fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies" (2.OA.B.2). Most children begin with number word sequences and counting approximations and then develop greater skill with counting. But do all teachers really understand how this…

  17. Accuracy of Carbohydrate Counting in Adults.

    PubMed

    Meade, Lisa T; Rushton, Wanda E

    2016-07-01

    In Brief This study investigates carbohydrate counting accuracy in patients using insulin through a multiple daily injection regimen or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. The average accuracy test score for all patients was 59%. The carbohydrate test in this study can be used to emphasize the importance of carbohydrate counting to patients and to provide ongoing education. PMID:27621531

  18. Kids Count in Indiana: 1996 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Judith B.

    This Kids Count report is the third in a series examining statewide trends in the well-being of Indiana's children. The report combines statistics of special concern in Indiana with 10 national Kids Count well-being indicators: (1) percent low birthweight; (2) infant mortality rate; (3) child death rate; (4) birth rate to unmarried teens ages 15…

  19. Crossover from the parity-conserving pair contact process with diffusion to other universality classes.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Chan; Park, Hyunggyu

    2009-05-01

    The pair contact process with diffusion (PCPD) with modulo 2 conservation (PCPD2) [ 2A-->4A , 2A-->0 ] is studied in one dimension, focused on the crossover to other well established universality classes: the directed Ising (DI) and the directed percolation (DP). First, we show that the PCPD2 shares the critical behaviors with the PCPD, both with and without directional bias. Second, the crossover from the PCPD2 to the DI is studied by including a parity-conserving single-particle process (A-->3A) . We find the crossover exponent 1/varphi_{1}=0.57(3) , which is argued to be identical to that of the PCPD-to-DP crossover by adding A-->2A . This suggests that the PCPD universality class has a well-defined fixed point distinct from the DP. Third, we study the crossover from a hybrid-type reaction-diffusion process belonging to the DP [ 3A-->5A , 2A-->0 ] to the DI by adding A-->3A . We find 1/varphi_{2}=0.73(4) for the DP-to-DI crossover. The inequality of varphi_{1} and varphi_{2} further supports the non-DP nature of the PCPD scaling. Finally, we introduce a symmetry-breaking field in the dual spin language to study the crossover from the PCPD2 to the DP. We find 1/varphi_{3}=1.23(10) , which is associated with a new independent route from the PCPD to the DP. PMID:19518439

  20. Kids Count in Delaware: Fact Book 1999 [and] Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Kids Count in Delaware.

    This Kids Count Fact Book is combined with the Families Count Fact Book to provide information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The Kids Count statistical profile is based on 10 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens; (2) low birth weight babies; (3) infant mortality; (4) child deaths; (5) teen…

  1. Kids Count in Delaware, Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Kids Count in Delaware.

    This Kids Count Fact Book is combined with the Families Count Fact Book to provide information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The Kids Count statistical profile is based on 11 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens 15-17 years; (2) births to teens 10 to 14 years; (3) low birth weight babies; (3)…

  2. A Pilot Study on Culottes versus Crossover Single Stenting for True Coronary Bifurcation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; Zhong, Wenliang; Luo, Yukun; Chen, Lianglong

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to compare clinical and angiographic outcomes of planned culottes technique with that of provisional crossover single stenting in the treatment of true coronary bifurcation lesions (CBL) with drug-eluting stent (DES). Methods True CBL patients (n = 104) were randomly assigned to either the provisional stenting of the side branch (crossover group) or the culottes group. Additional side branch (SB) stenting in the crossover group was required if there was thrombolysis in myocardial infarction flow ≤ 1 flow). The primary end point was the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at nine months, including cardiac death, myocardial infarction, target lesion/vessel revascularization and in-stent thrombosis. The secondary end point was angiographic in-segment restenosis at nine months. Results The rate of MACE at nine months was similar between the crossover and culottes groups (7.7% vs. 7.7%, p = 1.000). Additional SB stenting in the crossover group was required in 3.8% of patients. There was one procedural occlusion of SB in the crossover group. At nine months, the rate of in-segment restenosis was similar in the parent main vessel (0% vs. 1.9%, p = 1.000), main branch (1.9% vs. 7.7%, p = 0.363) and SB (17.3% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.250) between the crossover and culottes groups, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated that there is no significant difference in cumulative MACE or in-segment restenosis between crossover and culottes groups. Larger randomized clinical trials are warranted to re-evaluate the outcomes of the provisional crossover stenting versus the culottes stenting techniques utilizing DES for true CBL. PMID:27471358

  3. The Contextual Interference Effect in Applied Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreiros, Joao; Figueiredo, Teresa; Godinho, Mario

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the research literature that approaches the contextual interference effect in applied settings. In contrast to the laboratory settings, in which high interference conditions depress acquisition and promote learning evaluated in retention and transfer tests, in applied settings most of the studies (60%) fail to observe positive…

  4. Assessment and control of spacecraft electromagnetic interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Design criteria are presented to provide guidance in assessing electromagnetic interference from onboard sources and establishing requisite control in spacecraft design, development, and testing. A comprehensive state-of-the-art review is given which covers flight experience, sources and transmission of electromagnetic interference, susceptible equipment, design procedure, control techniques, and test methods.

  5. The Nature and Diagnosis of Interference Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denison, Norman

    1966-01-01

    The recognition of the systematic nature of the interference of the mother tongue when learning a second language is among the most significant advances in linguistics for the teaching and learning of foreign languages. The work of Weinreich showed that interference between language systems--the absorption of loan words, calques, and phonological,…

  6. Interference and the Law of Energy Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drosd, Robert; Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Introductory physics textbooks consider interference to be a process of redistribution of energy from the wave sources in the surrounding space resulting in constructive and destructive interferences. As one can expect, the total energy flux is conserved. However, one case of apparent non-conservation energy attracts great attention. Imagine that…

  7. Reversible Photoswitching of a Spin-Crossover Molecular Complex in the Solid State at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Rösner, Benedikt; Milek, Magdalena; Witt, Alexander; Gobaut, Benoît; Torelli, Piero; Fink, Rainer H; Khusniyarov, Marat M

    2015-10-26

    Spin-crossover metal complexes are highly promising magnetic molecular switches for prospective molecule-based devices. The spin-crossover molecular photoswitches developed so far operate either at very low temperatures or in the liquid phase, which hinders practical applications. Herein, we present a molecular spin-crossover iron(II) complex that can be switched between paramagnetic high-spin and diamagnetic low-spin states with light at room temperature in the solid state. The reversible photoswitching is induced by alternating irradiation with ultraviolet and visible light and proceeds at the molecular level. PMID:26480333

  8. Phonon-Mediated Nonclassical Interference in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Duncan G.; Fisher, Kent A. G.; MacLean, Jean-Philippe W.; Bustard, Philip J.; Heshami, Khabat; Resch, Kevin J.; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum interference of single photons is a fundamental aspect of many photonic quantum processing and communication protocols. Interference requires that the multiple pathways through an interferometer be temporally indistinguishable to within the coherence time of the photon. In this Letter, we use a diamond quantum memory to demonstrate interference between quantum pathways, initially temporally separated by many multiples of the optical coherence time. The quantum memory can be viewed as a light-matter beam splitter, mapping a THz-bandwidth single photon to a variable superposition of the output optical mode and stored phononic mode. Because the memory acts both as a beam splitter and as a buffer, the relevant coherence time for interference is not that of the photon, but rather that of the memory. We use this mechanism to demonstrate nonclassical single-photon and two-photon interference between quantum pathways initially separated by several picoseconds, even though the duration of the photons themselves is just ˜250 fs .

  9. Interference control in children with reading difficulties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shinmin; Gathercole, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    Two studies investigated whether the greater Stroop interference reported in children with reading difficulties compared to typical readers of the same age represents a generalized deficit in interference control or a consequence of their reading problems. In Study 1, a color-word Stroop task and a nonverbal task involving responses to locations associated with pictures were administered to 23 children with single word reading difficulties and 22 typically developing children matched for age and nonverbal ability. Children with reading difficulties showed disproportionate interference effects in the color-word Stroop but not the nonverbal task. In Study 2, groups of poor and typical readers completed a spatial Stroop task with printed input that did not require a verbal response and a nonverbal analogue. Both groups showed comparable interference in these two tasks. Thus, the reported problems in the color-word Stroop task in children with reading difficulties do not appear to entail general impairments in interference control. PMID:24852235

  10. Improved CDMA Performance Using Parallel Interference Cancellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin; Divsalar, Dariush

    1995-01-01

    This report considers a general parallel interference cancellation scheme that significantly reduces the degradation effect of user interference but with a lesser implementation complexity than the maximum-likelihood technique. The scheme operates on the fact that parallel processing simultaneously removes from each user the interference produced by the remaining users accessing the channel in an amount proportional to their reliability. The parallel processing can be done in multiple stages. The proposed scheme uses tentative decision devices with different optimum thresholds at the multiple stages to produce the most reliably received data for generation and cancellation of user interference. The 1-stage interference cancellation is analyzed for three types of tentative decision devices, namely, hard, null zone, and soft decision, and two types of user power distribution, namely, equal and unequal powers. Simulation results are given for a multitude of different situations, in particular, those cases for which the analysis is too complex.

  11. A revised monitor source method for practical deadtime count loss compensation in clinical planar and SPECT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siman, W.; Silosky, M.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study is to verify the fundamental assumption in the monitor source method, i.e. uniform fractional count loss across the field of view (FOV), and to introduce a revised monitor source method for SPECT deadtime correction that minimally interferes with the clinical protocol. SPECT images of non-uniform phantoms (4GBq 99mTc) with and without monitor sources (2  ×  20MBq 99mTc) attached to each detector were acquired nine times over 48 h in the photopeak energy window and the scatter energy window. Fractional count loss uniformity across the FOV was evaluated by correlating count rates in different regions of interest on projection images at different deadtime loss levels. The correction factors were calculated as the ratios of monitor source count rates with and without the phantom. Such factors were applied to the phantom images acquired without the monitor sources. The counting efficiency (count rate per unit activity) of the camera was calculated as a function of activity in the FOV both prior to and after the deadtime count-loss correction. The deadtime correction effectiveness was assessed by the independence of the efficiency on the activity in the FOV. Methods to interpolate the projection deadtime loss, based on limited projections, were also investigated. The fractional deadtime count loss was uniform across the FOV (r > 0.99). After the deadtime correction, the efficiency was largely independent of the activity in the FOV. The median and maximum absolute errors after the deadtime count loss correction were ≤1% and ~2%, respectively. Measured deadtime loss from five views per detector can be used to estimate deadtime count loss with errors ≤1% for all SPECT projections. The revised monitor source method can effectively correct planar and SPECT deadtime loss. Sparse sampling of the projection deadtime loss allows the acquisition of high monitor source counts with minimal time added while preserving the entire useful FOV.

  12. Semiflexible polymer brushes and the brush-mushroom crossover.

    PubMed

    Egorov, Sergei A; Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Milchev, Andrey; Binder, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    Semiflexible polymers end-grafted to a repulsive planar substrate under good solvent conditions are studied by scaling arguments, computer simulations, and self-consistent field theory. Varying the chain length N, persistence length lp, and grafting density σg, the chain linear dimensions and distribution functions of all monomers and of the free chain ends are studied. Particular attention is paid to the limit of very small σg, where the grafted chains behave as "mushrooms" no longer interacting with each other. Unlike a flexible mushroom, which has a self-similar structure from the size (a) of an effective monomer up to the mushroom height (h/a ∝ N(v), ν ≈ 3/5), a semiflexible mushroom (like a free semiflexible chain) exhibits three different scaling regimes, h/a ∝ N for contour length L = Na < lp, a Gaussian regime, h/a ∝ (Llp)(1/2)/a for lp ≪ L ≪ R* ∝ (lp(2)/a), and a regime controlled by excluded volume, h/a ∝ (lp/a)(1/5)N(ν). The semiflexible brush is predicted to scale as h/a ∝ (lpaσg)(1/3)N in the excluded volume regime, and h/a ∝ (lpa(3)σ(2))(1/4)N in the Gaussian regime. Since in the volume taken by a semiflexible mushroom excluded-volume interactions are much weaker in comparison to a flexible mushroom, there occurs an additional regime where semiflexible mushrooms overlap without significant chain stretching. Moreover, since the size of a semiflexible mushroom is much larger than the size of a flexible mushroom with the same N, the crossover from mushroom to brush behavior is predicted to take place at much smaller densities than for fully flexible chains. The numerical results, however, confirm the scaling predictions only qualitatively; for chain lengths that are relevant for experiments, often intermediate effective exponents are observed due to extended crossovers. PMID:25687784

  13. Multipoint linkage map of the human pseudoautosomal region, based on single-sperm typing: Do double crossovers occur during male meiosis?

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, K.; Arnheim, N.; Lazzeroni, L.C.; Goradia, T.M.; Lange, K.; Foote, S.; Vollrath, D.; Fisher, E.M.C.; Page, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Sperm typing was used to measure recombination fractions among pseudoautosomal markers and the beginning of the X/Y-specific sequences located at the pseudoautosomal boundary. These experiments included primer-extension preamplification and PCR followed by allele typing using gel electrophoresis. A newly developed data-analysis program allowed the construction of the first multipoint-linkage sperm-typing map, using results obtained on seven loci from three individuals. The large sample size not only confirmed the increased recombination activity of the pseudoautosomal region but allowed an estimate of interference of recombination to be made. The coefficient of coincidence was calculated to be .26 over a physical distance of only {approximately} 1,800 kb. The observation of a few sperm presumably resulting from double recombination argues that more than one crossover event can occur in this region during male meiosis. 44 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  14. Effect of pedometer use and goal setting on walking and functional status in overweight adults with multimorbidity: a crossover clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Paul Y; Quigg, Stephanie M; Croghan, Ivana T; Schroeder, Darrell R; Ebbert, Jon O

    2016-01-01

    Background Walking can improve functional status, and a pedometer and goal setting can increase walking and, potentially, gait speed. The efficacy of pedometer use and goal setting for increasing step counts among overweight and obese adults with multiple comorbid conditions has not been evaluated. Methods We recruited and randomly assigned obese or overweight adults with multimorbidity to immediate pedometer use with goal setting or delayed pedometer use, using a crossover design. The primary outcome of interest was step count, with secondary outcomes of gait speed and grip strength, with comparison between the intervention and delayed pedometer groups. Results Mean (standard deviation [SD]) age of the 130 participants was 63.4 (15.0) years. At 2 months, mean (SD) steps for the immediate pedometer use group (n=64) was 5,337 (3,096), compared with 4,446 (2,422) steps in the delayed pedometer group (n=66) (P=0.08). Within-group step count increased nonsignificantly, by 179 steps in the immediate pedometer group and 212 steps in the delayed pedometer group after 2 months of intervention, with no significant difference between the groups. Gait speed significantly increased by 0.08 m/s (P<0.05) and grip strength significantly increased by 1.6 kg (P<0.05) in the immediate pedometer group. Conclusion Pedometer use and goal setting did not significantly increase step count among overweight and obese adults with multimorbidity. The absolute step count was lower than many reported averages. Gait speed and grip strength increased with immediate pedometer use. The use of pedometers and goal setting may have an attenuated response in this population. PMID:27621602

  15. Age determination in manatees using growth-layer-group counts in bone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marmontel, M.; O'Shea, T.J.; Kochman, H.I.; Humphrey, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    Growth layers were observed in histological preparations of bones of known-age, known minimum-age, and tetracycline-marked free-ranging and captive Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris), substantiating earlier preliminary findings of other studies. Detailed analysis of 17 new case histories showed that growth-layer group (GLG) counts in the periotic bone were consistent with known age, or time since tetracycline administration, but were less reliable in other bones. GLG counts were also made in periotic bones of 1,196 Florida manatees of unknown age found dead from 1974 through 1991. These counts were conducted in order to assess variability and to determine relationships among estimated age, size, sex, and degree of bone resorption. Resorption can interfere with accuracy of GLG counts. This effect does not occur until ages greater than about 15 yr and body lengths greater than 300 cm are attained. GLGs were also observed in periotic bones of Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) but were not validated against known-age specimens. Use of GLG counts in the periotic bone is suitable for application to studies of population dynamics and other age-related aspects of manatee biology.

  16. B Counting at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Grant Duncan

    2008-12-16

    In this thesis we examine the method of counting B{bar B} events produced in the BABAR experiment. The original method was proposed in 2000, but improvements to track reconstruction and our understanding of the detector since that date make it appropriate to revisit the B Counting method. We propose a new set of cuts designed to minimize the sensitivity to time-varying backgrounds. We find the new method counts B{bar B} events with an associated systematic uncertainty of {+-} 0.6%.

  17. Coherent transport through spin-crossover magnet Fe2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Xie, Rong; Wang, Weiyi; Li, Qunxiang; Yang, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most promising building blocks in molecular spintronics, spin crossover (SCO) complexes have attracted increasing attention due to their magnetic bistability between the high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) states. Here, we explore the electronic structures and transport properties of SCO magnet Fe2 complexes with three different spin-pair configurations, namely [LS-LS], [LS-HS], and [HS-HS], by performing extensive density functional theory calculations combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function technique. Our calculations clearly reveal that the SCO magnet Fe2 complexes should display two-step spin transitions triggered by external stimuli, i.e. temperature or light, which confirm the previous phenomenological model and agree well with previous experimental measurements. Based on the calculated transport results, we observe a nearly perfect spin-filtering effect and negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior integrated in the SCO magnet Fe2 junction with the [HS-HS] configuration. The current through the [HS-HS] SCO magnet Fe2 complex under a small bias voltage is mainly contributed by the spin-down electrons, which is significantly larger than those of the [LS-LS] and [LS-HS] cases. The bias-dependent transmissions are responsible for the observed NDR effect. These theoretical findings suggest that SCO Fe2 complexes hold potential applications in molecular spintronic devices. PMID:26647165

  18. Quantum-to-classical crossover near quantum critical point

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vasin, M.; Ryzhov, V.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-12-21

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is an inherently dynamic phenomenon. However, while non-dissipative quantum dynamics is described in detail, the question, that is not thoroughly understood is how the omnipresent dissipative processes enter the critical dynamics near a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report a general approach enabling inclusion of both adiabatic and dissipative processes into the critical dynamics on the same footing. We reveal three distinct critical modes, the adiabatic quantum mode (AQM), the dissipative classical mode [classical critical dynamics mode (CCDM)], and the dissipative quantum critical mode (DQCM). We find that as a result of the transitionmore » from the regime dominated by thermal fluctuations to that governed by the quantum ones, the system acquires effective dimension d+zΛ(T), where z is the dynamical exponent, and temperature-depending parameter Λ(T)ε[0, 1] decreases with the temperature such that Λ(T=0) = 1 and Λ(T →∞) = 0. Lastly, our findings lead to a unified picture of quantum critical phenomena including both dissipation- and dissipationless quantum dynamic effects and offer a quantitative description of the quantum-to-classical crossover.« less

  19. Autotitrating versus standard noninvasive ventilation: a randomised crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Jaye, J; Chatwin, M; Dayer, M; Morrell, M J; Simonds, A K

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of automatic titration of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional NIV in stable neuromuscular and chest wall disorder patients established on long-term ventilatory support. In total, 20 neuromuscular and chest wall disease patients with nocturnal hypoventilation treated with long-term NIV completed a randomised crossover trial comparing two noninvasive pressure support ventilators: a standard bilevel ventilator (VPAP III) and a novel autotitrating bilevel ventilator (AutoVPAP). Baseline physiological measurements, overnight polysomnography and Holter monitoring were repeated at the end of each 1-month treatment period. Nocturnal oxygenation was comparable between the autotitrating device and standard ventilator, as were sleep efficiency, arousals and heart rate variability. However, there was a small significant increase in mean overnight transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension (median (interquartile range) 7.2 (6.7-7.7) versus 6.7 (6.1-7.0) kPa) and a decrease in percentage stage 1 sleep (mean+/-sd 16+/-9 versus 19+/-10%) on autotitrating NIV compared with conventional NIV. Autotitrating noninvasive ventilation using AutoVPAP produced comparable control of nocturnal oxygenation to standard nonivasive ventilation, without compromising sleep quality in stable neuromuscular and chest wall disease patients requiring long-term ventilatory support for nocturnal hypoventilation. PMID:19251798

  20. Quantum-to-classical crossover near quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasin, M.; Ryzhov, V.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is an inherently dynamic phenomenon. However, while non-dissipative quantum dynamics is described in detail, the question, that is not thoroughly understood is how the omnipresent dissipative processes enter the critical dynamics near a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report a general approach enabling inclusion of both adiabatic and dissipative processes into the critical dynamics on the same footing. We reveal three distinct critical modes, the adiabatic quantum mode (AQM), the dissipative classical mode [classical critical dynamics mode (CCDM)], and the dissipative quantum critical mode (DQCM). We find that as a result of the transition from the regime dominated by thermal fluctuations to that governed by the quantum ones, the system acquires effective dimension d + zΛ(T), where z is the dynamical exponent, and temperature-depending parameter Λ(T) ∈ [0, 1] decreases with the temperature such that Λ(T = 0) = 1 and Λ(T → ∞) = 0. Our findings lead to a unified picture of quantum critical phenomena including both dissipation- and dissipationless quantum dynamic effects and offer a quantitative description of the quantum-to-classical crossover.

  1. Flooding and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cynthia J; Wade, Timothy J; Hilborn, Elizabeth D

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospitalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community-associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more commonly reported. A case-crossover study was used to assess emergency room (ER) and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection following flood events in Massachusetts from 2003 through 2007. Exposure status was based on whether or not a flood occurred prior to the case/control date during the following risk periods: 0-6 days, 7-13 days, 14-20 days, and 21-27 days. Fixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of diagnosis with C. difficile infection following a flood. There were 129 flood events and 1575 diagnoses of C. difficile infection. Among working age adults (19-64 years), ER and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection were elevated during the 7-13 days following a flood (Odds Ratio, OR = 1.69; 95% Confidence Interval, CI: 0.84, 3.37). This association was more substantial among males (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.01-10.19). Associations during other risk periods were not observed (p < 0.05). Although we were unable to differentiate community-associated versus nosocomial infections, a potential increase in C. difficile infections should be considered as more flooding is projected due to climate change. PMID:26090609

  2. Crossover from Classical to Quantum Kibble-Zurek Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvi, Pietro; Morigi, Giovanna; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone

    2016-06-01

    The Kibble-Zurek (KZ) hypothesis identifies the relevant time scales in out-of-equilibrium dynamics of critical systems employing concepts valid at equilibrium: It predicts the scaling of the defect formation immediately after quenches across classical and quantum phase transitions as a function of the quench speed. Here, we study the crossover between the scaling dictated by a slow quench, which is ruled by the critical properties of the quantum phase transition, and the excitations due to a faster quench, where the dynamics is often well described by the classical model. We estimate the value of the quench rate that separates the two regimes and support our argument using numerical simulations of the out-of-equilibrium many-body dynamics. For the specific case of a ϕ4 model we demonstrate that the two regimes exhibit two different power-law scalings, which are in agreement with the KZ theory when applied to the quantum and classical cases. This result contributes to extending the prediction power of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism and to providing insight into recent experimental observations in systems of cold atoms and ions.

  3. Quantum-to-classical crossover near quantum critical point

    PubMed Central

    Vasin, M.; Ryzhov, V.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is an inherently dynamic phenomenon. However, while non-dissipative quantum dynamics is described in detail, the question, that is not thoroughly understood is how the omnipresent dissipative processes enter the critical dynamics near a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report a general approach enabling inclusion of both adiabatic and dissipative processes into the critical dynamics on the same footing. We reveal three distinct critical modes, the adiabatic quantum mode (AQM), the dissipative classical mode [classical critical dynamics mode (CCDM)], and the dissipative quantum critical mode (DQCM). We find that as a result of the transition from the regime dominated by thermal fluctuations to that governed by the quantum ones, the system acquires effective dimension d + zΛ(T), where z is the dynamical exponent, and temperature-depending parameter Λ(T) ∈ [0, 1] decreases with the temperature such that Λ(T = 0) = 1 and Λ(T → ∞) = 0. Our findings lead to a unified picture of quantum critical phenomena including both dissipation- and dissipationless quantum dynamic effects and offer a quantitative description of the quantum-to-classical crossover. PMID:26688102

  4. Crossover of formic acid through Nafion ® membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Young-Woo; Ha, Su Y.; Masel, Richard I.

    Formic acid has been proposed as a possible fuel for miniature fuel cells, because formic acid is expected to show low crossover and easy water management. In this paper, the permeation of formic acid through Nafion ® membranes is investigated at room temperature. It is found that the permeation of formic acid through Nafion ® 112 and 117 is much lower than that of methanol. For example, at a 1 M concentration, the steady state flux of formic acid through Nafion ® 117 is only 2.03±0.07×10 -8 mol/cm 2 s. By comparison, previous workers have observed a methanol flux of 3 to 6×10 -6 mol/cm 2 s through Nafion ® 117 under similar conditions. The flux through Nafion ® 117 increases with increasing formic acid concentration, reaching a maximum of 1.86±0.11×10 -7 mol/cm 2 s at a formic acid concentration of 10 M. The flux of formic acid is about a factor of two higher through Nafion ® 112 than through Nafion ® 117 but still low. These results show that the permeation of formic acid through Nafion ® is much slower than the permeation of methanol through the same membrane. Consequently, formic acid is an attractive alternative fuel for small polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells.

  5. Tuning size and thermal hysteresis in bistable spin crossover nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Galán-Mascarós, José Ramón; Coronado, Eugenio; Forment-Aliaga, Alicia; Monrabal-Capilla, María; Pinilla-Cienfuegos, Elena; Ceolin, Marcelo

    2010-06-21

    Nanoparticles of iron(II) triazole salts have been prepared from water-organic microemulsions. The mean size of the nanoparticles can be tuned down to 6 nm in diameter, with a narrow size distribution. A sharp spin transition from the low spin (LS) to the high spin (HS) state is observed above room temperature, with a 30-40-K-wide thermal hysteresis. The same preparation can yield second generation nanoparticles containing molecular alloys by mixing triazole with triazole derivatives, or from metallic mixtures of iron(II) and zinc(II). In these nanoparticles of 10-15 nm, the spin transition "moves" towards lower temperatures, reaching a 316 K limit for the cooling down transition and maintaining a thermal hysteresis over 15-20-K-wide. The nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering, TEM, and AFM, after deposition on gold or silicon surfaces. The spin transition was characterized by magnetic susceptibility measurements and EXAFS (in solid samples after solvent removal) and also by the color change between the LS (violet) and HS (colorless) states in an organic solvent suspension. The discovery of bistable magnetic nanoparticles of 6 nm with a wide thermal hysteresis above room temperature showcases the actual possibilities of spin crossover materials for nanotechnological applications. PMID:20503990

  6. Finite size induces crossover temperature in growing spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sienkiewicz, Julian; Suchecki, Krzysztof; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a growing one-dimensional quenched spin model that bases on asymmetrical one-side Ising interactions in the presence of external field. Numerical simulations and analytical calculations based on Markov chain theory show that when the external field is smaller than the exchange coupling constant J there is a nonmonotonous dependence of the mean magnetization on the temperature in a finite system. The crossover temperature Tc corresponding to the maximal magnetization decays with system size, approximately as the inverse of the Lambert W function. The observed phenomenon can be understood as an interplay between the thermal fluctuations and the presence of the first cluster determined by initial conditions. The effect exists also when spins are not quenched but fully thermalized after the attachment to the chain. By performing tests on real data we conceive the model is in part suitable for a qualitative description of online emotional discussions arranged in a chronological order, where a spin in every node conveys emotional valence of a subsequent post.

  7. Flooding and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cynthia J.; Wade, Timothy J.; Hilborn, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospitalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community-associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more commonly reported. A case-crossover study was used to assess emergency room (ER) and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection following flood events in Massachusetts from 2003 through 2007. Exposure status was based on whether or not a flood occurred prior to the case/control date during the following risk periods: 0–6 days, 7–13 days, 14–20 days, and 21–27 days. Fixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of diagnosis with C. difficile infection following a flood. There were 129 flood events and 1575 diagnoses of C. difficile infection. Among working age adults (19–64 years), ER and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection were elevated during the 7–13 days following a flood (Odds Ratio, OR = 1.69; 95% Confidence Interval, CI: 0.84, 3.37). This association was more substantial among males (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.01–10.19). Associations during other risk periods were not observed (p < 0.05). Although we were unable to differentiate community-associated versus nosocomial infections, a potential increase in C. difficile infections should be considered as more flooding is projected due to climate change. PMID:26090609

  8. Crossover from retro to specular Andreev reflections in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efetov, Dmitri K.; Efetov, Konstantin B.

    2016-08-01

    Ongoing experimental progress in the preparation of ultraclean graphene/superconductor (SC) interfaces enabled the recent observation of specular interband Andreev reflections (ARs) at bilayer graphene (BLG )/NbSe2 van der Waals interfaces [Efetov et al., Nat. Phys. 12, 328 (2016), 10.1038/nphys3583]. Motivated by this experiment we theoretically study the differential conductance across a BLG/SC interface at the continuous transition from high to ultralow Fermi energies EF in BLG. Using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations and the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk formalism we derive analytical expressions for the differential conductance across the BLG/SC interface. We find a characteristic signature of the crossover from intraband retro (high EF) to interband specular (low EF) ARs that manifests itself in a strongly suppressed interfacial conductance when the excitation energy |ɛ |=| EF|<Δ (the SC gap). The sharpness of these conductance dips is strongly dependent on the size of the potential step at the BLG/SC interface U0.

  9. At grade optical crossover for monolithic optial circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamieson, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Planar optical circuits may be made to cross through each other, (thus eliminating extra steps required to fabricate elevated, nonintersecting crossovers) by control of the dimensions of the crossing light conductors (10, 12) to be significantly greater than d=0.89.lambda. and the angle of crossing as nearly 90.degree. as conveniently possible. A light trap may be provided just ahead of the intersection to trap any light being reflected in the source conductor at angles greater than about 45.degree.. The light trap may take the form of triangular shaped portions (16a, 16b) on each side of the source conductor with the far side of the triangular portion receiving incident light at an angle so that incident light will be reflected to the other side, or it may take the form of windows (18a, 18b) in place of the triangular portions. Planar optical circuit boards (21-23) may be fabricated and stacked to form a keyboard (20) with intersecting conductors (26-29) and keyholes (0-9) where conductors merge at the broad side of the circuit boards. These keyholes may be prearranged to form an array or matrix of keyholes.

  10. Quantum-to-classical crossover near quantum critical point

    SciTech Connect

    Vasin, M.; Ryzhov, V.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-12-21

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is an inherently dynamic phenomenon. However, while non-dissipative quantum dynamics is described in detail, the question, that is not thoroughly understood is how the omnipresent dissipative processes enter the critical dynamics near a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report a general approach enabling inclusion of both adiabatic and dissipative processes into the critical dynamics on the same footing. We reveal three distinct critical modes, the adiabatic quantum mode (AQM), the dissipative classical mode [classical critical dynamics mode (CCDM)], and the dissipative quantum critical mode (DQCM). We find that as a result of the transition from the regime dominated by thermal fluctuations to that governed by the quantum ones, the system acquires effective dimension d+zΛ(T), where z is the dynamical exponent, and temperature-depending parameter Λ(T)ε[0, 1] decreases with the temperature such that Λ(T=0) = 1 and Λ(T →∞) = 0. Lastly, our findings lead to a unified picture of quantum critical phenomena including both dissipation- and dissipationless quantum dynamic effects and offer a quantitative description of the quantum-to-classical crossover.

  11. Crystallography and spin-crossover. A view of breathing materials.

    PubMed

    Guionneau, Philippe

    2014-01-14

    The spin-crossover phenomenon (SCO) is a fascinating field that potentially concerns any material containing a (d(4)-d(7)) transition metal complex finding therefore an echo in as diverse research fields as chemistry, physics, biology and geology. Particularly, molecular and coordination-polymers SCO solids are thoroughly investigated since their bistability promises new routes towards a large panel of potential applications including smart pigments, optical switches or memory devices. Notwithstanding these motivating applicative targets, numerous fundamental aspects of SCO are still debated. Among them, the investigation of the structure-property relationships is unfailingly at the heart of the SCO research field. All the facets of the richness of the structural behaviors shown by SCO compounds are only revealed when exploring the whole sample scales -from atomic to macroscopic- all the external stimuli-temperature, pressure, light and any combinations and derived perturbations- and the various forms of the SCO compounds in the solid state -crystalline powders, single-crystals, poorly crystalline or nano-sized particles. Crystallography allows investigating all these aspects of SCO solids. In the past few years, crystallography has certainly been in a significant phase of development pushing the frontiers of investigations, in particular thanks to the progress in X-ray diffraction techniques. The encounter between SCO materials and crystallography is captivating, taking advantages from each other. In this paper, a personal account mainly based on our recent results provides perspectives and new approaches that should be developed in the investigation of SCO materials. PMID:24201509

  12. Beamlike photon-pair generation for two-photon interference and polarization entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Hsin-Pin; Yabushita, Atsushi; Luo, Chih-Wei; Chen, Pochung; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2011-02-15

    Beamlike photon pairs were generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion using a type-II {beta}-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystal. A pump laser generated photon pairs when it transmitted through the crystal and was reflected back into the crystal by a mirror to generate more photon pairs. The photon pairs generated when the pump laser first transmitted through the crystal (first photon pairs) were also reflected back into the crystal to overlap with the light path of the photon pairs generated in the second transmission of the pump laser through the crystal (second photon pairs). We observed interference between the first and second photon pairs modulated with a half period of the wavelength of the photon pairs, which demonstrates two-photon interference using the beamlike photon pairs. The fringe period confirms that the observed interference is not classical interference but quantum two-photon interference. Through rotating the angles of quarter-wave plates in the light paths of the photon pairs, we generated beamlike photon pairs with entangled polarization. The phase between the first and second photon pairs could be tuned by changing the position of mirrors reflecting the pump pulses and photon pairs. The fringes of coincidence counts showed that the beamlike photon pairs have polarization entanglement.

  13. My word! Interference from reading object names implies a role for competition during picture name retrieval.

    PubMed

    Vitkovitch, Melanie; Cooper, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    A related word prime has been found to interfere with picture naming after unrelated intervening trials (word-to-picture interference). Recently, Stroop-type picture-word interference effects have been interpreted in terms of a postlexical response exclusion process rather than a competitive lexical selection process. An experiment is reported that examines whether word-to-picture effects could reflect response exclusion mechanisms and, more generally, strategic processing of the word prime. Forty-eight volunteer university students named aloud sequences of semantically related (and unrelated) word primes and picture targets, separated by two unrelated filler stimuli. On half of the trials, participants were asked to count backwards in threes from a random number presented immediately after naming the prime word. They were also given a surprise recall test at the end of the naming block. Results for naming times and errors indicated a main effect of relatedness; semantic interference effects were not dependent on the unfilled gap following the word prime trial and were also not tied to episodic recall of prime words. The data indicate that slowed picture naming times are more likely to emerge from processes intrinsic to word prime naming rather than controlled processing and do not readily fit the postlexical response exclusion account. The results are considered in relation to two recent accounts of interference over unrelated trials, which refer to some form of competition at, or prior to, lexical access. PMID:22390174

  14. Direct observation in 3d of structural crossover in binary hard sphere mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statt, Antonia; Pinchaipat, Rattachai; Turci, Francesco; Evans, Robert; Royall, C. Patrick

    2016-04-01

    For binary fluid mixtures of spherical particles in which the two species are sufficiently different in size, the dominant wavelength of oscillations of the pair correlation functions is predicted to change from roughly the diameter of the large species to that of the small species along a sharp crossover line in the phase diagram [C. Grodon et al., J. Chem. Phys. 121, 7869 (2004)]. Using particle-resolved colloid experiments in 3d we demonstrate that crossover exists and that its location in the phase diagram is in quantitative agreement with the results of both theory and our Monte-Carlo simulations. In contrast with previous work [J. Baumgartl et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 198303 (2007)], where a correspondence was drawn between crossover and percolation of both species, in our 3d study we find that structural crossover is unrelated to percolation.

  15. Time-dependent couplings and crossover length scales in nonequilibrium surface roughening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradas, Marc; López, Juan M.; Hernández-Machado, A.

    2007-07-01

    We show that time-dependent couplings may lead to nontrivial scaling properties of the surface fluctuations of the asymptotic regime in nonequilibrium kinetic roughening models. Three typical situations are studied. In the case of a crossover between two different rough regimes, the time-dependent coupling may result in anomalous scaling for scales above the crossover length. In a different setting, for a crossover from a rough to either a flat or damping regime, the time-dependent crossover length may conspire to produce a rough surface, although the most relevant term tends to flatten the surface. In addition, our analysis sheds light into an existing debate in the problem of spontaneous imbibition, where time-dependent couplings naturally arise in theoretical models and experiments.

  16. ERS-1 radial position refinement by dual crossover analysis with TOPEX/Poseidon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnochan, S.; Moore, P.; Ehlers, S.

    Achieving orbital accuracies in the radial direction for ERS-1 commensurate with those for TOPEX/Poseidon is of utmost importance for the integration of the two altimeter data sets. This paper outlines a procedure whereby the radial orbit error for ERS-1 is recovered as a time series expansion in the form of a finite Fourier series with additional terms for atmospheric drag, solar radiation pressure, and initial state vector mismodelling. Using a least squares collocation method with constraints derived from the JGM2 gravity field co-variance matrix, the radial error is recovered using both dual crossovers and ERS-1 single satellite crossovers. Aggregate arcs are then used to derive the ERS-1 orbit error over the repeat period of 35 days. The results are presented in the improvement of fit in the dual crossover, ERS-1 crossover and altimetry data sets as well as the recovery of an altimeter bias for the two satellites.

  17. 49 CFR 236.203 - Hand operated crossover between main tracks; protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Facing point locks on both switches of the crossover, with both locks operated by a single lever, or (c... matter on the rail prevents effective shunting; (2) Where facing point locks with a single lever...

  18. Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Pem Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells using various types of Nafion membranes as the solid polymer electrolyte have been studied. The rate of fuel crossover and electrical performance has been measured for cells with Nafion membranes of various thicknesses and equivalent weights. The crossover rate is found to decrease with increasing thickness and applied current. The dependence of crossover rate on current density can be understood in terms of a simple linear diffusion model which suggests that the crossover rate can be influenced by the electrode structure in addition to the membrane. The studies suggest that Nafion EW 1500 is a very promising alternate to Nafion EW 1100 for direct methanol fuel cells.

  19. Spin crossover in ferropericlase and velocity heterogeneities in the lower mantle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongqing; Wentzcovitch, Renata M

    2014-07-22

    Deciphering the origin of seismic velocity heterogeneities in the mantle is crucial to understanding internal structures and processes at work in the Earth. The spin crossover in iron in ferropericlase (Fp), the second most abundant phase in the lower mantle, introduces unfamiliar effects on seismic velocities. First-principles calculations indicate that anticorrelation between shear velocity (VS) and bulk sound velocity (Vφ) in the mantle, usually interpreted as compositional heterogeneity, can also be produced in homogeneous aggregates containing Fp. The spin crossover also suppresses thermally induced heterogeneity in longitudinal velocity (VP) at certain depths but not in VS. This effect is observed in tomography models at conditions where the spin crossover in Fp is expected in the lower mantle. In addition, the one-of-a-kind signature of this spin crossover in the RS/P (∂ ln VS/∂ ln VP) heterogeneity ratio might be a useful fingerprint to detect the presence of Fp in the lower mantle. PMID:25002507

  20. Investigating dimensional crossover of spin-orbit coupling in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rongpu; Tomczyk, Michelle; Cheng, Guanglei; Lu, Shicheng; Huang, Mengchen; Irvin, Patrick; Lee, Hyungwoo; Ryu, Sangwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Levy, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Weak anti-localization is a macroscopic observation of a quantum transport phenomenon in two-dimensional systems with spin-orbit coupling in which destructive self-interference of carrier trajectories leads to an enhanced conductivity at low magnetic fields. Characterizing spin-orbit coupling at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface is important in realizing this system's potential as a principal host for oxide nanoelectronics. Previously, the spin-orbit coupling at the 2D LAO/STO interface was shown to be gate-tunable. Here, we study a crossover from 2D to 1D regimes using nanowires at the LAO/STO interface using weak anti-localization measurements. Transport measurements were performed on nanowires with widths varying from 200 nm down to 10 nm. A series of magnetoresistance measurements were performed at various backgate voltages to study carrier-density dependence. The results are fit to both 2D and 1D models of a weak anti-localization conductance correction due to Rashba spin-orbit coupling. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from ARO (W911NF-08-1-0317), AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0524 and FA9550-12-1-0342) , and NSF (DMR-1104191, DMR-1124131 and DMR-1234096).

  1. Obligate short-arm exchange in de novo Robertsonian translocation formation influences placement of crossovers in chromosome 21 nondisjunction.

    PubMed

    Berend, Sue Ann; Page, Scott L; Atkinson, William; McCaskill, Christopher; Lamb, Neil E; Sherman, Stephanie L; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2003-02-01

    Robertsonian translocations (ROBs) involving chromosome 21 are found in approximately 5% of patients with Down syndrome (DS). The most common nonhomologous ROB in DS is rob(14q21q). Aberrant recombination is associated with nondisjunction (NDJ) leading to trisomy 21. Haplotype analysis of 23 patients with DS and de novo rob(14q21q) showed that all translocations and all nondisjoined chromosomes 21 were maternally derived. Meiosis II NDJ occurred in 21 of 23 families. For these, a ROB DS chromosome 21 genetic map was constructed and compared to a normal female map and a published trisomy 21 map derived from meiosis II NDJ. The location of exchanges differed significantly from both maps, with a significant shift to a more distal interval in the ROB DS map. The shift may perturb segregation, leading to the meiosis II NDJ in this study, and is further evidence for crossover interference. More importantly, because the event in the short arms that forms the de novo ROB influences the placement of chiasmata in the long arm, it is most likely that the translocation formation occurs through a recombination pathway in meiosis. Additionally, we have demonstrated that events that occur in meiosis I can influence events, such as chromatid segregation in meiosis II, many decades later. PMID:12506337

  2. Suppression: sound and light interference with targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Short, Kenneth R.; DeMarco, Robert M.; Chua, Florence B.; Janal, Malvin N.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    Civilian law enforcement and military operations on urban terrain (MOUT) regularly enter into unknown situations where some unidentified subset of the populace may possess armaments that may be used against them. Ultimately, the most relevant test of the effectiveness of non-lethal energies in these situations is their ability to interfere with the targeting of those weapons on the friendly forces. It is also the test that offers the most immediate and tangible reward in the prevention of personnel injuries. Perceptual interference (e.g., light-induced flash blindness) or distractions from loud noises may contribute to targeting interference. How much do various energies or perceptual interventions actually interfere with targeting? We have devised a program of experimentation that allows for the pure and precise measurement of interference with the targeting process by any of a broad range of energies and stimuli. Our primary focus has been on sound and light interference with targeting, and experiments toward that purpose are described here. As expected, targeting accuracy decreased and targeting latency increased as the distance from fixation point to the target increased. The light flash interfered more with shots at more distant targets. Furthermore, as the angle between the fixation point and the flash increased, targeting latency increased but targeting accuracy was unaffected. Thus, light interference is greatest when the flash is not at the point of fixation. These studies suggest that foveal flashes are less disruptive than peripheral flashes, and that disruption increases as targeting task demands increase.

  3. Applying contextual interference to the Pawlata roll.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Davies, M

    1995-12-01

    Contextual interference is manipulated by changing the practice order of a number of similar motor tasks, so that the learning context of each interferes with that of the other. The effect has been found to generalize to baseball batting, badminton serving and volleyball skills. The present study examined whether this practice technique could be applied to a Pawlata roll in a kayak. The study was further motivated by the fact that many instructors in Britain currently advocate learning the Pawlata roll in one direction only to a criterion of accuracy, thereafter transferring to the opposite direction. Contextual interference literature predicts that skill retention would be better served by practising on alternate sides. Accordingly, 16 undergraduate students with no kayaking experience were randomly allocated to either a low contextual interference group, which followed U'ren's (1993) recommendations, or a high contextual interference group, which practised the skill on alternate sides. The high contextual interference group took less time to acquire the skill, and were also quicker to achieve successful performance in retention (full roll) and transfer (half roll) tests, regardless of the direction of the roll, 1 week later. The time savings in practice were not expected, as acquisition under high contextual interference was improved rather than impaired. This finding suggests that bilateral transfer was increased by randomizing practice. These results are worthy of further investigation, in that they suggest that the recommended training methods may not be optimal. PMID:8850571

  4. Cosmic ray neutron background reduction using localized coincidence veto neutron counting

    DOEpatents

    Menlove, Howard O.; Bourret, Steven C.; Krick, Merlyn S.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to both the apparatus and method for increasing the sensitivity of measuring the amount of radioactive material in waste by reducing the interference caused by cosmic ray generated neutrons. The apparatus includes: (a) a plurality of neutron detectors, each of the detectors including means for generating a pulse in response to the detection of a neutron; and (b) means, coupled to each of the neutrons detectors, for counting only some of the pulses from each of the detectors, whether cosmic ray or fission generated. The means for counting includes a means that, after counting one of the pulses, vetos the counting of additional pulses for a prescribed period of time. The prescribed period of time is between 50 and 200 .mu.s. In the preferred embodiment the prescribed period of time is 128 .mu.s. The veto means can be an electronic circuit which includes a leading edge pulse generator which passes a pulse but blocks any subsequent pulse for a period of between 50 and 200 .mu.s. Alternately, the veto means is a software program which includes means for tagging each of the pulses from each of the detectors for both time and position, means for counting one of the pulses from a particular position, and means for rejecting those of the pulses which originate from the particular position and in a time interval on the order of the neutron die-away time in polyethylene or other shield material. The neutron detectors are grouped in pods, preferably at least 10. The apparatus also includes means for vetoing the counting of coincidence pulses from all of the detectors included in each of the pods which are adjacent to the pod which includes the detector which produced the pulse which was counted.

  5. Pneumotachometer counts respiration rate of human subject

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, O.

    1964-01-01

    To monitor breaths per minute, two rate-to-analog converters are alternately used to read and count the respiratory rate from an impedance pneumograph sequentially displayed numerically on electroluminescent matrices.

  6. Brain mechanisms of semantic interference in spoken word production: An anodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (atDCS) study.

    PubMed

    Meinzer, Marcus; Yetim, Özlem; McMahon, Katie; de Zubicaray, Greig

    2016-01-01

    When naming pictures, categorically-related compared to unrelated contexts typically slow production. We investigated proposed roles for the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and posterior middle and superior temporal gyri (pMTG/STG) in mediating this semantic interference effect. In a three-way, cross-over, sham-controlled study, we applied online anodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (atDCS) to LIFG or pMTG/STG while 24 participants performed parallel versions of the blocked cyclic naming paradigm. Significant effects of semantic context and cycle, and interactions of context and cycle, were observed on naming latencies in all three stimulation sessions. Additionally, atDCS over left pMTG/STG facilitated naming in related blocks from the second cycle onward, significantly reducing but not eliminating the interference effect. Applying atDCS over left LIFG likewise reduced the magnitude of interference compared to sham stimulation, although the facilitation was limited to the first few cycles of naming. We interpret these results as indicating semantic interference in picture naming reflects contributions of two complementary mechanisms: a relatively short-lived, top-down mechanism to bias selection and a more persistent lexical-level activation mechanism. PMID:27180210

  7. A Randomized Crossover Trial of Dalfampridine Extended Release for Effect on Ambulatory Activity in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Simnad, Virginia I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dalfampridine extended release (D-ER) is indicated to improve walking in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) as demonstrated by an increase in walking speed. This study assessed the effects of D-ER on accelerometer-based measures in people with MS, including intensity of walking and total amount of walking during daily activities. Methods: In this double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study, people with MS-related walking difficulty were randomized (1:1) to receive 4 weeks of D-ER 10 mg twice daily and 4 weeks of placebo in either order separated by a 2-week washout. Participants wore accelerometers for 7 days at baseline and week 3 of each on-drug period. The primary outcome was the peak activity index (PAI), defined as the most intense 30 individual minutes of the day (strides per minute). Secondary outcomes included daily step count, 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and patient-reported outcomes. A mixed-effects repeated-measures statistical model was used. Results: Forty-three participants were randomized (mean Expanded Disability Status Scale score, 5.17). Least squares mean (standard error) change from baseline on the PAI was 0.6 (0.54) strides/min on D-ER and 0.3 (0.55) strides/min on placebo and in daily step count was 148.7 (222.4) on D-ER and 128.0 (225.4) on placebo. Other accelerometer-based measures and the 6MWT showed no significant differences between D-ER and placebo. The TUG test (P = .042) favored D-ER. There were no serious adverse events. Conclusions: Dalfampridine did not show an effect on accelerometer-measured ambulatory activity in people with MS-related walking difficulty. More work is needed to confirm these results. PMID:27551241

  8. Wave and Particle in Molecular Interference Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Juffmann, Thomas; Truppe, Stefan; Geyer, Philipp; Major, Andras G.; Arndt, Markus; Deachapunya, Sarayut; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2009-12-31

    The wave-particle duality of massive objects is a cornerstone of quantum physics and a key property of many modern tools such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction or atom interferometry. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of quantum interference lithography with complex molecules. Molecular matter-wave interference patterns are deposited onto a reconstructed Si(111) 7x7 surface and imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy. Thereby both the particle and the quantum wave character of the molecules can be visualized in one and the same image. This new approach to nanolithography therefore also represents a sensitive new detection scheme for quantum interference experiments.

  9. Wave and particle in molecular interference lithography.

    PubMed

    Juffmann, Thomas; Truppe, Stefan; Geyer, Philipp; Major, András G; Deachapunya, Sarayut; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Arndt, Markus

    2009-12-31

    The wave-particle duality of massive objects is a cornerstone of quantum physics and a key property of many modern tools such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction or atom interferometry. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of quantum interference lithography with complex molecules. Molecular matter-wave interference patterns are deposited onto a reconstructed Si(111) 7x7 surface and imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy. Thereby both the particle and the quantum wave character of the molecules can be visualized in one and the same image. This new approach to nanolithography therefore also represents a sensitive new detection scheme for quantum interference experiments. PMID:20366311

  10. Neurogenesis-mediated forgetting minimizes proactive interference

    PubMed Central

    Epp, Jonathan R.; Silva Mera, Rudy; Köhler, Stefan; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Frankland, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    Established memories may interfere with the encoding of new memories, particularly when existing and new memories overlap in content. By manipulating levels of hippocampal neurogenesis, here we show that neurogenesis regulates this form of proactive interference. Increasing hippocampal neurogenesis weakens existing memories and, in doing so, facilitates the encoding of new, conflicting (but not non-conflicting) information in mice. Conversely, decreasing neurogenesis stabilizes existing memories, and impedes the encoding of new, conflicting information. These results suggest that reduced proactive interference is an adaptive benefit of neurogenesis-induced forgetting. PMID:26917323

  11. Gas Interference in Sucker Rod Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Abdus

    2010-10-01

    Commonly used artificial lift or dewatering system is sucker rod pump and gas interference of the pump is the biggest issue in the oil and gas industry. Gas lock or fluid pound problems occur due to the gas interference when the pump has partially or completely unfilled plunger barrel. There are several techniques available in the form of patents to solve these problems but those techniques have positive as well as negative aspects. Some of the designs rely on the leakage and some of the designs rely on the mechanical arrangements etc to break the gas lock. The present article compares the existing gas interference handling techniques.

  12. Crossover versus Stabilometric Platform for the Treatment of Balance Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Frazzitta, G.; Bossio, F.; Maestri, R.; Palamara, G.; Bera, R.; Ferrazzoli, D.

    2015-01-01

    Balance dysfunctions are a major challenge in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have shown that rehabilitation can play a role in their treatment. In this study, we have compared the efficacy of two different devices for balance training: stabilometric platform and crossover. We have enrolled 60 PD patients randomly assigned to two groups. The first one (stabilometric group) performed a 4-week cycle of balance training, using the stabilometric platform, whereas the second one (crossover group) performed a 4-week cycle of balance training, using the crossover. The outcome measures used were Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II, Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and Six Minutes Walking Test (6MWT). Results showed that TUG, BBS, and UPDRS II improved in both groups. There was not difference in the efficacy of the two balance treatments. Patients in both groups improved also the meters walked in the 6MWT at the end of rehabilitation, but the improvement was better for patients performing crossover training. Our results show that the crossover and the stabilometric platform have the same effect on balance dysfunction of Parkinsonian patients, while crossover gets better results on the walking capacity. PMID:26583142

  13. In situ measurements of water crossover through the membrane for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Zhao, T. S.

    We show analytically that the water-crossover flux through the membrane used for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) can be in situ determined by measuring the water flow rate at the exit of the cathode flow field. This measurement method enables investigating the effects of various design and geometric parameters as well as operating conditions, such as properties of cathode gas diffusion layer (GDL), membrane thickness, cell current density, cell temperature, methanol solution concentration, oxygen flow rate, etc., on water crossover through the membrane in situ in a DMFC. Water crossover through the membrane is generally due to electro-osmotic drag, diffusion and back convection. The experimental data showed that diffusion dominated the total water-crossover flux at low current densities due to the high water concentration difference across the membrane. With the increase in current density, the water flux by diffusion decreased, but the flux by back convection increased. The corresponding net water-transport coefficient was also found to decrease with current density. The experimental results also showed that the use of a hydrophobic cathode GDL with a hydrophobic MPL could substantially reduce water crossover through the membrane, and thereby significantly increasing the limiting current as the result of the improved oxygen transport. It was found that the cell operating temperature, oxygen flow rate and membrane thickness all had significant influences on water crossover, but the influence of methanol concentration was negligibly small.

  14. Mitotic crossover--an evolutionary rudiment which promotes carcinogenesis of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rovcanin, Branislav; Ivanovski, Ivan; Djuric, Olivera; Nikolic, Dimitrije; Petrovic, Jelena; Ivanovski, Petar

    2014-09-21

    Mitotic crossover is a natural mechanism that is a main source of the genetic variability of primitive organisms. In complex organisms such as mammals, it represents an evolutionary rudiment which persisted as one of the numerous DNA repair mechanisms, and results in the production of homozygous allele combinations in all heterozygous genes located on the chromosome arm distal to the crossover. This event is familiar as loss of heterozygosity, which is one of the key mechanisms responsible for the development and progression of almost all cancers. We propose the hypothesis in which mitotic crossover is a principal source of the increased loss of heterozygosity that leads to the initiation and progression of colorectal carcinoma. The hypothesis could be tested by in vitro inhibition of Rad51 protein, orthotopic grafting of human colon cancer tissue into the gut of mice, and treatment with potential inhibitors. After these procedures, the frequency of mitotic crossover would be estimated. The development of selective inhibitors of mitotic crossover could stop further carcinogenesis of colorectal carcinoma, as well as many other neoplastic events. Loss of heterozygosity is an event responsible for carcinogenesis, its reduction by selective inhibitors of mitotic crossover could have a positive effect on cancer chemoprevention, as well as on growth reduction and a cessation in the progression of earlier developed tumors. PMID:25253953

  15. Analysis of Crossovers in the Interbeat Sequences of Elderly Individuals and Heart Failure Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; del Río Correa, J. L.

    2006-09-01

    Many physical and biological systems exhibit complex behavior characterized by long-range power-law correlations. Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is a scaling analysis method that provides a scaling parameter to represent the correlation properties of a signal. The study of interbeat sequences with the DFA method has revealed the presence of crossovers associated with physiological aging and heart with failure; the hinges present in the crossover region from both the elderly healthy individuals and the patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are in opposite directions. The interbeat sequences of healthy young persons do not show crossovers. In this paper we study interbeat time series of healthy young and elderly persons and patients with CHF. We use the DFA-m method, where m refers to the order of the polynomial function used for the fitting. For instance, DFA-2 filters linear trends and DFA-3 filters quadratic trends. We found that the presence of the crossovers and the direction of the hinges are conserved when we apply the DFA method for different values of m. Therefore we conclude that the DFA-m method is a reliable method to accurately quantify correlations in interbeat time series even if there are polynomial trends. We can characterize the crossovers and we can conclude that the crossovers are not a result of the trends; they are part of the system dynamics.

  16. Spin crossover properties of enantiomers, co-enantiomers, racemates, and co-racemates.

    PubMed

    Qin, Long-Fang; Pang, Chun-Yan; Han, Wang-Kang; Zhang, Feng-Li; Tian, Lei; Gu, Zhi-Guo; Ren, Xuehong; Li, Zaijun

    2016-04-25

    Through multi-component self-assembly of chiral phenylethylamine, 1-alkyl-2-imidazolecarboxaldehyde and iron(ii) ions, two couples of enantiomeric iron(ii) complexes , , and with the formula of fac-Λ or Δ-[Fe(L)3](2+)(L = R or S-1-phenyl-N-(1-alkyl-1H-imidazol-2-ylmethylene)ethanamine) have been designed and synthesized as building blocks. Further binary cocrystallization of the prefabricated enantiomers enabled us to construct spin crossover co-enantiomers and , racemates and , and co-racemate . Compared with in a high spin state and with spin crossover at 291 K, the co-enantiomers exhibited gradual spin crossover at a higher temperature of 301 K, and the racemic alloys showed hysteresis loops induced by desolvation above room temperature. It was demonstrated that molecular chirality could be used effectively for stereochemical engineering of spin crossover materials. In addition, crystal packing, intramolecular π-π stacking, intermolecular C-Hπ interactions and solvent effects were elucidated to be responsible for the distinct spin crossover properties. This collective structural and magnetic study not only enriched the spin crossover library, but also provided a full comparison of optically pure, homochiral, and racemic materials with similar molecular structures. PMID:27021212

  17. Triplex-directed recognition of a DNA nanostructure assembled by crossover strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Rusling, David A; Nandhakumar, Iris S; Brown, Tom; Fox, Keith R

    2012-04-24

    DNA has been widely exploited for the self-assembly of nanosized objects and arrays that offer the potential to act as scaffolds for the spatial positioning of molecular components with nanometer precision. Methods that allow the targeting of components to specific locations within these structures are therefore highly sought after. Here we report that the triplex approach to DNA recognition, which relies on the specific binding of an oligonucleotide within the major groove of double-helical DNA, can be exploited to recognize specific loci within a DNA double-crossover tile and array, a nanostructure assembled by crossover strand exchange. The oligonucleotide can be targeted to both crossover and non-crossover strands and, surprisingly, across the region spanning the crossover junction itself. Moreover, by attaching biotin to the end of the oligonucleotide, we show that streptavidin molecules can be recruited to precise locations within a DX array, with an average spacing of 31.9 (±1.3) nm. This is a promising approach that could be exploited to introduce other components compatible with oligonucleotide synthesis into the wide variety of DNA nanostructures assembled by crossover strand exchange, such as those generated by DNA origami. PMID:22443318

  18. SIS Detectors for Terahertz Photon Counting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezawa, Hajime; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Ukibe, Masahiro; Fujii, Go; Shiki, Shigetomo

    2016-07-01

    An Intensity interferometer with photon counting detector is a candidate to realize a THz interferometer for astronomical observations. We have demonstrated that synthesis imaging is possible even with intensity interferometers. An SIS junction (or STJ) with low leakage current of 1 pA is a suitable device for photon counting detectors. Readout circuit utilizing FETs with low gate leakage, low gate capacitance, and fast response is discussed.

  19. Minimum Disclosure Counting for the Alternative Vote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Roland; Buckland, Richard

    Although there is a substantial body of work on preventing bribery and coercion of voters in cryptographic election schemes for plurality electoral systems, there are few attempts to construct such schemes for preferential electoral systems. The problem is preferential systems are prone to bribery and coercion via subtle signature attacks during the counting. We introduce a minimum disclosure counting scheme for the alternative vote preferential system. Minimum disclosure provides protection from signature attacks by revealing only the winning candidate.

  20. TVFMCATS. Time Variant Floating Mean Counting Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, R.K.

    1999-05-01

    This software was written to test a time variant floating mean counting algorithm. The algorithm was developed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company and a provisional patent has been filed on the algorithm. The test software was developed to work with the Val Tech model IVB prototype version II count rate meter hardware. The test software was used to verify the algorithm developed by WSRC could be correctly implemented with the vendor`s hardware.

  1. Time Variant Floating Mean Counting Algorithm

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-06-03

    This software was written to test a time variant floating mean counting algorithm. The algorithm was developed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company and a provisional patent has been filed on the algorithm. The test software was developed to work with the Val Tech model IVB prototype version II count rate meter hardware. The test software was used to verify the algorithm developed by WSRC could be correctly implemented with the vendor''s hardware.

  2. Clicks counting system for a riflescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumea, Andrei; Granciu, Dana

    2015-02-01

    A very useful requirement for a zoom aiming scope with high magnification used for long range rifle shooting is counting and display of knob's clicks number needed for elevation corrections. The paper analyzes one method for clicks counting usable with existing mechanical knobs and describes a microcontroller based system that implements it. Practical aspects like required changes in mechanical construction, influence of perturbations, complexity of electronics or power consumption are also analyzed.

  3. Power counting to better jet observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2014-12-01

    Optimized jet substructure observables for identifying boosted topologies will play an essential role in maximizing the physics reach of the Large Hadron Collider. Ideally, the design of discriminating variables would be informed by analytic calculations in perturbative QCD. Unfortunately, explicit calculations are often not feasible due to the complexity of the observables used for discrimination, and so many validation studies rely heavily, and solely, on Monte Carlo. In this paper we show how methods based on the parametric power counting of the dynamics of QCD, familiar from effective theory analyses, can be used to design, understand, and make robust predictions for the behavior of jet substructure variables. As a concrete example, we apply power counting for discriminating boosted Z bosons from massive QCD jets using observables formed from the n-point energy correlation functions. We show that power counting alone gives a definite prediction for the observable that optimally separates the background-rich from the signal-rich regions of phase space. Power counting can also be used to understand effects of phase space cuts and the effect of contamination from pile-up, which we discuss. As these arguments rely only on the parametric scaling of QCD, the predictions from power counting must be reproduced by any Monte Carlo, which we verify using Pythia 8 and Herwig++. We also use the example of quark versus gluon discrimination to demonstrate the limits of the power counting technique.

  4. Contribution of hand motor circuits to counting.

    PubMed

    Andres, Michael; Seron, Xavier; Olivier, Etienne

    2007-04-01

    The finding that number processing activates a cortical network partly overlapping that recruited for hand movements has renewed interest in the relationship between number and finger representations. Further evidence about a possible link between fingers and numbers comes from developmental studies showing that finger movements play a crucial role in learning counting. However, increased activity in hand motor circuits during counting may unveil unspecific processes, such as shifting attention, reciting number names, or matching items with a number name. To address this issue, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure changes in corticospinal (CS) excitability during a counting task performed silently and using either numbers or letters of the alphabet to enumerate items. We found an increased CS excitability of hand muscles during the counting task, irrespective of the use of numbers or letters, whereas it was unchanged in arm and foot muscles. Control tasks allowed us to rule out a possible influence of attention allocation or covert speech on CS excitability increase of hand muscles during counting. The present results support a specific involvement of hand motor circuits in counting because no CS changes were found in arm and foot muscles during the same task. However, the contribution of hand motor areas is not exclusively related to number processing because an increase in CS excitability was also found when letters were used to enumerate items. This finding suggests that hand motor circuits are involved whenever items have to be put in correspondence with the elements of any ordered series. PMID:17381248

  5. Factors affecting leukocyte count in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Carel, R S; Eviatar, J

    1985-09-01

    The relationships between white blood cell (WBC) count, smoking, and other health variables were determined among 35,000 apparently healthy men and women. The effect of smoking on the WBC count was greater than that of all other variables. The leukocyte level and the variance in WBC count values increased with increased smoking intensity. The relationship between smoking intensity and leukocyte level is expressed quantitatively by the following regression equation: WBC (10(3)/mm3) = 7.1 + 0.05(SM), where SM has seven values according to the smoking level. Multiple regression analysis with additional variables other than smoking did not much improve the predictive value of the equation. The effect of smoking on WBC count could be only partially explained by an inflammatory process, e.g., chronic bronchitis. Relationships of statistical significance (but mostly with r values of less than 0.10) were found between WBC count and the following variables: hemoglobin, heart rate, weight (or Quetelet index), cholesterol, uric acid, creatinine, sex, ethnic origin, systolic blood pressure, height, blood sugar, and diastolic blood pressure. The normal WBC count range for smokers differs from that of nonsmokers and is shifted to the right according to the smoking level. This may have both a diagnostic and prognostic significance in different clinical settings. PMID:4070192

  6. Gaseous air pollution and acute myocardial infarction mortality in Hong Kong: A time-stratified case-crossover study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hualiang; An, Qingzhu; Luo, Chao; Pun, Vivian C.; Chan, Chi Sing; Tian, Linwei

    2013-09-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common disease with serious consequences in mortality and morbidity. An association between gaseous air pollution and AMI has been suggested, but the epidemiological evidence is still limited. For the study period 1998-2010, daily counts of AMI deaths were collected, as well as daily air pollution data including concentrations of particulates (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) were also obtained. The associations between gaseous air pollutants and AMI mortality were estimated using time-stratified case-crossover analyses. NO2 and SO2 were found to be significantly associated with increased AMI mortality. The odds ratios (ORs) were 1.0455 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.017-1.0748) and 1.0256 (95% CI: 1.0027-1.0489) for an interquartile range (IQR) increase in the current day's NO2 and SO2 concentration, respectively, and this association persisted in 2-pollutant models; and no association was observed for CO and O3. It is likely that exposure to elevated ambient NO2 and SO2 air pollution contributed to increased AMI mortality.

  7. Diet restriction in migraine, based on IgG against foods: A clinical double-blind, randomised, cross-over trial

    PubMed Central

    Alpay, Kadriye; Ertaş, Mustafa; Orhan, Elif Kocasoy; Üstay, Didem Kanca; Lieners, Camille; Baykan, Betül

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: It is well-known that specific foods trigger migraine attacks in some patients. We aimed to investigate the effect of diet restriction, based on IgG antibodies against food antigens on the course of migraine attacks in this randomised, double blind, cross-over, headache-diary based trial on 30 patients diagnosed with migraine without aura. Methods: Following a 6-week baseline, IgG antibodies against 266 food antigens were detected by ELISA. Then, the patients were randomised to a 6-week diet either excluding or including specific foods with raised IgG antibodies, individually. Following a 2-week diet-free interval after the first diet period, the same patients were given the opposite 6-week diet (provocation diet following elimination diet or vice versa). Patients and their physicians were blinded to IgG test results and the type of diet (provocation or elimination). Primary parameters were number of headache days and migraine attack count. Of 30 patients, 28 were female and 2 were male, aged 19–52 years (mean, 35 ± 10 years). Results: The average count of reactions with abnormally high titre was 24 ± 11 against 266 foods. Compared to baseline, there was a statistically significant reduction in the number of headache days (from 10.5 ± 4.4 to 7.5 ± 3.7; P < 0.001) and number of migraine attacks (from 9.0 ± 4.4 to 6.2 ± 3.8; P < 0.001) in the elimination diet period. Conclusion: This is the first randomised, cross-over study in migraineurs, showing that diet restriction based on IgG antibodies is an effective strategy in reducing the frequency of migraine attacks. PMID:20647174

  8. Coherent transport through spin-crossover magnet Fe2 complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Xie, Rong; Wang, Weiyi; Li, Qunxiang; Yang, Jinlong

    2015-12-01

    As one of the most promising building blocks in molecular spintronics, spin crossover (SCO) complexes have attracted increasing attention due to their magnetic bistability between the high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) states. Here, we explore the electronic structures and transport properties of SCO magnet Fe2 complexes with three different spin-pair configurations, namely [LS-LS], [LS-HS], and [HS-HS], by performing extensive density functional theory calculations combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function technique. Our calculations clearly reveal that the SCO magnet Fe2 complexes should display two-step spin transitions triggered by external stimuli, i.e. temperature or light, which confirm the previous phenomenological model and agree well with previous experimental measurements. Based on the calculated transport results, we observe a nearly perfect spin-filtering effect and negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior integrated in the SCO magnet Fe2 junction with the [HS-HS] configuration. The current through the [HS-HS] SCO magnet Fe2 complex under a small bias voltage is mainly contributed by the spin-down electrons, which is significantly larger than those of the [LS-LS] and [LS-HS] cases. The bias-dependent transmissions are responsible for the observed NDR effect. These theoretical findings suggest that SCO Fe2 complexes hold potential applications in molecular spintronic devices.As one of the most promising building blocks in molecular spintronics, spin crossover (SCO) complexes have attracted increasing attention due to their magnetic bistability between the high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) states. Here, we explore the electronic structures and transport properties of SCO magnet Fe2 complexes with three different spin-pair configurations, namely [LS-LS], [LS-HS], and [HS-HS], by performing extensive density functional theory calculations combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function technique. Our calculations clearly reveal that the SCO

  9. Long-Term and Transitory Interference Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Howard I.; Weiss, Jay M.

    1976-01-01

    If animals receive inescapable electric shocks, their subsequent avoidance-escape learning is poor. This phenomenon, which can be called "the interference effect", was studied in four experiments. (Editor)

  10. Two Further Experiments on Electron Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteucci, G.; Pozzi, G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the results of two experiments concerning the phenomena of the interference of probabilities and of the so called Aharonov-Bohm effect. An electron biprism and a standard electron microscope have been used for the experiments. (Author/GA)

  11. 47 CFR 27.1221 - Interference protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference protection. 27.1221 Section 27.1221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband...

  12. 47 CFR 27.1221 - Interference protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference protection. 27.1221 Section 27.1221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband...

  13. 47 CFR 27.1221 - Interference protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interference protection. 27.1221 Section 27.1221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband...

  14. 47 CFR 27.1221 - Interference protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interference protection. 27.1221 Section 27.1221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband...

  15. 47 CFR 27.1221 - Interference protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interference protection. 27.1221 Section 27.1221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband...

  16. [FT4 immunoassay interference : A case report].

    PubMed

    Chaabouni, Khansa; Hargafi, Khaoula; Elleuch, Aida; Messedi, Mariem; Turki, Mouna; Lahyani, Amina; Ayedi, Fatma

    2015-04-01

    Measurement of thyrotropin and free thyroxin made using immunoassays are usually needed in clinical endocrinology. Here, we report a case of a patient with type 2 diabetes who presented a weight loss. To eliminate hyperthyroidism, thyroid function tests were performed. Free thyroxin (FT4) was decreased using two automated immunoassays TOSOH AIA 1800 and Roche ELECSYS 2010, with a normal thyrotropin value. Thyroid function tests repeated a month later were normal. The patient's history revealed contact with sheep, which may partly explain the interference. Investigations into the patient's serum were carried out using both the PEG test and dilution test. Interference factors were probably antibodies. Despite progress in immunoassays, we should be aware of interference occurrence since it can lead to false results, unnecessary investigations and incorrect treatment. Thus, simple tests must be carried out as if interference in immunoassays were suspected. Dilutions and PEG tests are generally performed as first line investigations. PMID:26375746

  17. Signal interference RF photonic bandstop filter.

    PubMed

    Aryanfar, Iman; Choudhary, Amol; Shahnia, Shayan; Pagani, Mattia; Liu, Yang; Marpaung, David; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2016-06-27

    In the microwave domain, signal interference bandstop filters with high extinction and wide stopbands are achieved through destructive interference of two signals. Implementation of this filtering concept using RF photonics will lead to unique filters with high performance, enhanced tuning range and reconfigurability. Here we demonstrate an RF photonic signal interference filter, achieved through the combination of precise synthesis of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) loss with advanced phase and amplitude tailoring of RF modulation sidebands. We achieve a square-shaped, 20-dB extinction RF photonic filter over a tunable bandwidth of up to 1 GHz with a central frequency tuning range of 16 GHz using a low SBS loss of ~3 dB. Wideband destructive interference in this novel filter leads to the decoupling of the filter suppression from its bandwidth and shape factor. This allows the creation of a filter with all-optimized qualities. PMID:27410650

  18. Small Aircraft RF Interference Path Loss Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mielnik, John J.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2007-01-01

    Interference to aircraft radio receivers is an increasing concern as more portable electronic devices are allowed onboard. Interference signals are attenuated as they propagate from inside the cabin to aircraft radio antennas mounted on the outside of the aircraft. The attenuation level is referred to as the interference path loss (IPL) value. Significant published IPL data exists for transport and regional category airplanes. This report fills a void by providing data for small business/corporate and general aviation aircraft. In this effort, IPL measurements are performed on ten small aircraft of different designs and manufacturers. Multiple radio systems are addressed. Along with the typical worst-case coupling values, statistical distributions are also reported that could lead to more meaningful interference risk assessment.

  19. Small Aircraft RF Interference Path Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mielnik, John J.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2007-01-01

    Interference to aircraft radio receivers is an increasing concern as more portable electronic devices are allowed onboard. Interference signals are attenuated as they propagate from inside the cabin to aircraft radio antennas mounted on the outside of the aircraft. The attenuation level is referred to as the interference path loss (IPL) value. Significant published IPL data exists for transport and regional category airplanes. This report fills a void by providing data for small business/corporate and general aviation aircraft. In this effort, IPL measurements are performed on ten small aircraft of different designs and manufacturers. Multiple radio systems are addressed. Along with the typical worst-case coupling values, statistical distributions are also reported that could lead to better interference risk assessment.

  20. 47 CFR 74.1203 - Interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... service of its primary station or cause such interference within the boundaries of the principal community... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES FM Broadcast Translator Stations...

  1. Parallel interference cancellation for CDMA applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor); Raphaeli, Dan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of decoding a spread spectrum composite signal, the composite signal comprising plural user signals that have been spread with plural respective codes, wherein each coded signal is despread, averaged to produce a signal value, analyzed to produce a tentative decision, respread, summed with other respread signals to produce combined interference signals, the method comprising scaling the combined interference signals with a weighting factor to produce a scaled combined interference signal, scaling the composite signal with the weighting factor to produce a scaled composite signal, scaling the signal value by the complement of the weighting factor to produce a leakage signal, combining the scaled composite signal, the scaled combined interference signal and the leakage signal to produce an estimate of a respective user signal.

  2. Interference Analysis Process in Military Aircraft Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenhaeusler, M.; Poisel, W.

    2012-05-01

    As flying platforms do have limited space for integration and increasing demands for antennas, interference and EMC analysis becomes ever more relevant for optimised antenna concepts. Of course aerodynamic and operational aspects are still important and can not be neglected, but interference can also be a performance killer if it is not analysed in a proper way. This paper describes an interference analysis process which is based on the electrical data of all transmitters and receivers, in- and out-of-band numerical simulation of the decoupling values of all involved antennas and includes EMC relevant data of conducted and radiated emissions, based on EMC standards like MIL-STD-461. Additionally hardware based interference cancellation is also taken into account as the last opportunity for the antenna engineer to reach the required decoupling for undisturbed communication.

  3. Devices That May Interfere with Pacemakers

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the devices that may interfere with pulse generators. Carry your pacemaker ID card to prove that ... 3 watts) don't appear to damage pulse generators or affect how the pacemaker works. Technology is ...

  4. Automotive radar - investigation of mutual interference mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goppelt, M.; Blöcher, H.-L.; Menzel, W.

    2010-09-01

    In the past mutual interference between automotive radar sensors has not been regarded as a major problem. With an increasing number of such systems, however, this topic is receiving more and more attention. The investigation of mutual interference and countermeasures is therefore one topic of the joint project "Radar on Chip for Cars" (RoCC) funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). RoCC's goal is to pave the way for the development of high-performance, low-cost 79 GHz radar sensors based on Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs). This paper will present some generic interference scenarios and report on the current status of the analysis of interference mechanisms.

  5. Bloodcurdling movies and measures of coagulation: Fear Factor crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Banne; Scheres, Luuk J J; Lijfering, Willem M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether, as has been hypothesised since medieval times, acute fear can curdle blood. Design Crossover trial. Setting Main meeting room of Leiden University’s Department of Clinical Epidemiology, the Netherlands, converted to a makeshift cinema. Participants 24 healthy volunteers aged ≤30 years recruited among students, alumni, and employees of the Leiden University Medical Center: 14 were assigned to watch a frightening (horror) movie followed by a non-threatening (educational) movie and 10 to watch the movies in reverse order. The movies were viewed more than a week apart at the same time of day and both lasted approximately 90 minutes. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measures were markers, or “fear factors” of coagulation activity: blood coagulant factor VIII, D-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, and prothrombin fragments 1+2. The secondary outcome was participant reported fear experienced during each movie using a visual analogue fear scale. Results All participants completed the study. The horror movie was perceived to be more frightening than the educational movie on a visual analogue fear scale (mean difference 5.4, 95% confidence interval 4.7 to 6.1). The difference in factor VIII levels before and after watching the movies was higher for the horror movie than for the educational movie (mean difference of differences 11.1 IU/dL (111 IU/L), 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 21.0 IU/dL). The effect of either movie on levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes, D-dimer, and prothrombin fragments 1+2 did not differ. Conclusion Frightening (in this case, horror) movies are associated with an increase of blood coagulant factor VIII without actual thrombin formation in young and healthy adults. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02601053. PMID:26673787

  6. Clarithromycin in GABA-related Hypersomnolence: A Randomized, Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Saini, Prabhjyot; Bliwise, Donald L.; Freeman, Amanda A.; Jenkins, Andrew; Rye, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Some central hypersomnolence syndromes are associated with a positive allosteric modulator of GABA-A receptors in cerebrospinal fluid. Negative allosteric modulators of GABA-A receptors, including clarithromycin, have been reported to reduce sleepiness in these patients. We sought to systematically assess the effects of clarithromycin on objective vigilance and subjective sleepiness. Methods This was a five-week, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial of clarithromycin 500 mg with breakfast and lunch, in patients with hypersomnolence syndromes (excluding narcolepsy with cataplexy) and evidence for abnormal cerebrospinal fluid potentiation of GABA-A receptors. The study occurred at a university-affiliated medical center. The primary outcome measure was median reaction time on the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) at week 2 in each condition. Secondary outcomes included the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Stanford Sleepiness Scale, Functional Outcomes of Sleep, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the SF-36, and additional PVT measures. Results Twenty-three patients began treatment. Three patients dropped out, and final analyses were performed on twenty complete cases. Median reaction time was not significantly different between clarithromycin and placebo. Subjective measures of sleepiness were significantly improved on clarithromycin versus placebo. Altered taste perception occurred, but was the only side effect more common on clarithromycin than placebo. No serious adverse events occurred. Interpretation Subjective sleepiness, but not psychomotor vigilance, improved during a two-week course of clarithromycin. Although additional studies are needed, this suggests that clarithromycin may be a reasonable treatment option in patients with treatment-refractory hypersomnolence. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01146600) and supported by the American Sleep Medicine Foundation. PMID:26094838

  7. Randomized Polypill Crossover Trial in People Aged 50 and Over

    PubMed Central

    Wald, David S.; Morris, Joan K.; Wald, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Background A Polypill is proposed for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in people judged to be at risk on account of their age alone. Its efficacy in reducing cholesterol and blood pressure is uncertain. Methods We conducted a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial of a Polypill among individuals aged 50+ without a history of cardiovascular disease and compared the reductions with those predicted from published estimates of the effects of the individual drugs. Participants took the Polypill (amlodipine 2.5 mg, losartan 25 mg, hydrochlorothiazide 12.5 mg and simvastatin 40 mg) each evening for 12 weeks and a placebo each evening for 12 weeks in random sequence. The mean within-person differences in blood pressure and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol at the end of each 12 week period were determined. Results 84 out of 86 participants completed both treatment periods. The mean systolic blood pressure was reduced by 17.9 mmHg (95% CI, 15.7–20.1) on the Polypill, diastolic blood pressure by 9.8 mmHg (8.1–11.5), and LDL cholesterol by 1.4 mmol/L (1.2–1.6), reductions of 12%, 11%, and 39% respectively. The results were almost identical to those predicted; 18.4 mmHg, 9.7 mmHg, and 1.4 mmol/L respectively. Conclusion The Polypill resulted in the predicted reductions in blood pressure and LDL cholesterol. Long term reductions of this magnitude would have a substantial effect in preventing heart attacks and strokes. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN36672232 PMID:22815989

  8. Sildenafil for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Randomized Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, David J.; Bartels, Matthew N.; Schluger, Neil W.; Brogan, Frances; Jellen, Patricia; Thomashow, Byron M.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Pulmonary hypertension with exercise is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may contribute to exercise limitation in this disease. We aimed to determine the effects of treatment with sildenafil on exercise capacity in patients with COPD and emphysema. Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 2-period crossover trial of sildenafil thrice daily in ten adults with COPD and emphysema on CT scan without pulmonary hypertension. We randomized study participants to 4 weeks of sildenafil (or placebo) followed by a 1-week washout and then 4 weeks of placebo (or sildenafil). The 2 primary outcomes were the 6-minute walk distance and oxygen consumption at peak exercise. Results Sildenafil had no effect on 6-minute walk distance (placebo-corrected difference = −7.8 m, 95% confidence interval, −23.2 to 7.5 m, p = 0.35) or oxygen consumption at peak exercise (placebo-corrected difference = −0.1 ml/kg/min, 95% confidence interval −2.1 to 1.8 ml/kg/min, p = 0.89). Sildenafil increased the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (p = 0.02), worsened symptoms (p = 0.04), and decreased quality-of-life (p = 0.03). Adverse events were more frequent while receiving sildenafil (p = 0.005). Conclusions Routine sildenafil administration did not have a beneficial effect on exercise capacity in patients with COPD and emphysema without pulmonary hypertension. Sildenafil significantly worsened gas exchange at rest and quality of life. (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00104637). PMID:22360383

  9. Nutrition intervention for migraine: a randomized crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited evidence suggests that dietary interventions may offer a promising approach for migraine. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a low-fat plant-based diet intervention on migraine severity and frequency. Methods Forty-two adult migraine sufferers were recruited from the general community in Washington, DC, and divided randomly into two groups. This 36-week crossover study included two treatments: dietary instruction and placebo supplement. Each treatment period was 16 weeks, with a 4-week washout between. During the diet period, a low-fat vegan diet was prescribed for 4 weeks, after which an elimination diet was used. Participants were assessed at the beginning, midpoint, and end of each period. Significance was determined using student’s t-tests. Results Worst headache pain in last 2 weeks, as measured by visual analog scale, was initially 6.4/10 cm (SD 2.1 cm), and declined 2.1 cm during the diet period and 0.7 cm during the supplement period (p=0.03). Average headache intensity (0–10 scale) was initially 4.2 (SD 1.4) per week, and this declined by 1.0 during the diet period and by 0.5 during the supplement period (p=0.20). Average headache frequency was initially 2.3 (SD 1.8) per week, and this declined by 0.3 during the diet period and by 0.4 during the supplement period (p=0.61). The Patient’s Global Impression of Change showed greater improvement in pain during the diet period (p<0.001). Conclusions These results suggest that a nutritional approach may be a useful part of migraine treatment, but that methodologic issues necessitate further research. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01699009 and NCT01547494. PMID:25339342

  10. Understanding conoscopic interference patterns in anisotropic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olorunsola, Oluwatobi Gabriel

    The interference patterns observed in conoscopy are important in studying the optical and geometrical properties of anisotropic materials. They have also been used to identify minerals and to explore the structure of biological tissues. In a conoscopic interferometer, an optically anisotropic specimen is placed between two crossed linear polarizers and illuminated by a convergent light beam. The interference patterns are produced because in an anisotropic material an incident light is split into two eigenwaves, namely the ordinary and the extraordinary waves. We report our work on the theoretical simulation and experimental observation of the conoscopic interference patterns in anisotropic crystals. In our simulation, the interference patterns are decomposed into fringes of isogyres and isochromates. For each light propagation direction inside the crystal there exist two eigenwaves that have their own characteristic velocities and vibration directions. The isogyres are obtained by computing the angle between the polarization of the incident light and the vibration directions of the two eigenwaves. The isochromates are obtained by computing the phase retardance between the two eigenwaves inside the crystal. The interference patterns are experimentally observed in several crystals, with their optic axes either parallel or perpendicular to their surfaces. An external electric field is applied to deform the crystals from uniaxial to biaxial. The results of our experimental observation agree well with our computer simulation. In conventional interferometers the isochromatic interference fringes are observed by using a circular polarizer and a circular analyzer, both constructed by a linear polarizer and a quarter wave plate. However, due to the dispersion of the quarter wave plates, the phase-retardance between the two light waves inside the quarter wave plates is wavelength-dependent, which results in different conoscopic interference patterns for different colors of

  11. Interference Fit Life Factors for Roller Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of hoop stresses in reducing cylindrical roller bearing fatigue life was determined for various classes of inner ring interference fit. Calculations were performed for up to seven interference fit classes for each of ten bearing sizes. Each fit was taken at tightest, average and loosest values within the fit class for RBEC-5 tolerance, thus requiring 486 separate analyses. The hoop stresses were superimposed on the Hertzian principal stresses created by the applied radial load to calculate roller bearing fatigue life. The method was developed through a series of equations to calculate the life reduction for cylindrical roller bearings based on interference fit. All calculated lives are for zero initial bearing internal clearance. Any reduction in bearing clearance due to interference fit was compensated by increasing the initial (unmounted) clearance. Results are presented as tables and charts of life factors for bearings with light, moderate and heavy loads and interference fits ranging from extremely light to extremely heavy and for bearing accuracy class RBEC 5 (ISO class 5). Interference fits on the inner bearing ring of a cylindrical roller bearing can significantly reduce bearing fatigue life. In general, life factors are smaller (lower life) for bearings running under light load where the unfactored life is highest. The various bearing series within a particular bore size had almost identical interference fit life factors for a particular fit. The tightest fit at the high end of the RBEC-5 tolerance band defined in ANSI/ABMA shaft fit tables produces a life factor of approximately 0.40 for an inner-race maximum Hertz stress of 1200 MPa (175 ksi) and a life factor of 0.60 for an inner-race maximum Hertz stress of 2200 MPa (320 ksi). Interference fits also impact the maximum Hertz stress-life relation.

  12. Simulating interference and diffraction in instructional laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, L.

    2013-03-01

    Studieshave shown that standard lectures and instructional laboratory experiments are not effective at teaching interference and diffraction. In response, the author created an interactive computer program that simulates interference and diffraction effects using the finite difference time domain method. The software allows students to easily control, visualize and quantitatively measure the effects. Students collected data from simulations as part of their laboratory exercise, and they performed well on a subsequent quiz, showing promise for this approach.

  13. Three-spin coherent oscillations and interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin-Lamarre, G.; Thorgrimson, J.; Studenikin, S. A.; Aers, G. C.; Kam, A.; Zawadzki, P.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Sachrajda, A. S.

    2015-03-01

    We utilize magnetic field dependencies to identify two hitherto unobserved quantum interference processes in a triple quantum dot circuit. The first observation involves the interplay of Landau-Zener-Stückelberg behavior from two separate anticrossings between two energy levels that anticross twice as a function of a detuning parameter. The second process involves quantum interference between all-exchange and hyperfine qubits activated in a three-spin system.

  14. Interference in the processing of adjunct control.

    PubMed

    Parker, Dan; Lago, Sol; Phillips, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on the memory operations used in language comprehension has revealed a selective profile of interference effects during memory retrieval. Dependencies such as subject-verb agreement show strong facilitatory interference effects from structurally inappropriate but feature-matching distractors, leading to illusions of grammaticality (Pearlmutter et al., 1999; Wagers et al., 2009; Dillon et al., 2013). In contrast, dependencies involving reflexive anaphors are generally immune to interference effects (Sturt, 2003; Xiang et al., 2009; Dillon et al., 2013). This contrast has led to the proposal that all anaphors that are subject to structural constraints are immune to facilitatory interference. Here we use an animacy manipulation to examine whether adjunct control dependencies, which involve an interpreted anaphoric relation between a null subject and its licensor, are also immune to facilitatory interference effects. Our results show reliable facilitatory interference in the processing of adjunct control dependencies, which challenges the generalization that anaphoric dependencies as a class are immune to such effects. To account for the contrast between adjunct control and reflexive dependencies, we suggest that variability within anaphora could reflect either an inherent primacy of animacy cues in retrieval processes, or differential degrees of match between potential licensors and the retrieval probe. PMID:26441723

  15. Investigation of Interference Models for RFID Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linchao; Ferrero, Renato; Gandino, Filippo; Rebaudengo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The reader-to-reader collision in an RFID system is a challenging problem for communications technology. In order to model the interference between RFID readers, different interference models have been proposed, mainly based on two approaches: single and additive interference. The former only considers the interference from one reader within a certain range, whereas the latter takes into account the sum of all of the simultaneous interferences in order to emulate a more realistic behavior. Although the difference between the two approaches has been theoretically analyzed in previous research, their effects on the estimated performance of the reader-to-reader anti-collision protocols have not yet been investigated. In this paper, the influence of the interference model on the anti-collision protocols is studied by simulating a representative state-of-the-art protocol. The results presented in this paper highlight that the use of additive models, although more computationally intensive, is mandatory to improve the performance of anti-collision protocols. PMID:26861326

  16. Interference in the processing of adjunct control

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dan; Lago, Sol; Phillips, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on the memory operations used in language comprehension has revealed a selective profile of interference effects during memory retrieval. Dependencies such as subject–verb agreement show strong facilitatory interference effects from structurally inappropriate but feature-matching distractors, leading to illusions of grammaticality (Pearlmutter et al., 1999; Wagers et al., 2009; Dillon et al., 2013). In contrast, dependencies involving reflexive anaphors are generally immune to interference effects (Sturt, 2003; Xiang et al., 2009; Dillon et al., 2013). This contrast has led to the proposal that all anaphors that are subject to structural constraints are immune to facilitatory interference. Here we use an animacy manipulation to examine whether adjunct control dependencies, which involve an interpreted anaphoric relation between a null subject and its licensor, are also immune to facilitatory interference effects. Our results show reliable facilitatory interference in the processing of adjunct control dependencies, which challenges the generalization that anaphoric dependencies as a class are immune to such effects. To account for the contrast between adjunct control and reflexive dependencies, we suggest that variability within anaphora could reflect either an inherent primacy of animacy cues in retrieval processes, or differential degrees of match between potential licensors and the retrieval probe. PMID:26441723

  17. Ethical Perspectives on RNA Interference Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ebbesen, Mette; Jensen, Thomas G.; Andersen, Svend; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference is a mechanism for controlling normal gene expression which has recently begun to be employed as a potential therapeutic agent for a wide range of disorders, including cancer, infectious diseases and metabolic disorders. Clinical trials with RNA interference have begun. However, challenges such as off-target effects, toxicity and safe delivery methods have to be overcome before RNA interference can be considered as a conventional drug. So, if RNA interference is to be used therapeutically, we should perform a risk-benefit analysis. It is ethically relevant to perform a risk-benefit analysis since ethical obligations about not inflicting harm and promoting good are generally accepted. But the ethical issues in RNA interference therapeutics not only include a risk-benefit analysis, but also considerations about respecting the autonomy of the patient and considerations about justice with regard to the inclusion criteria for participation in clinical trials and health care allocation. RNA interference is considered a new and promising therapeutic approach, but the ethical issues of this method have not been greatly discussed, so this article analyses these issues using the bioethical theory of principles of the American bioethicists, Tom L. Beauchamp and James F. Childress. PMID:18612370

  18. Covariance and crossover matrix guided differential evolution for global numerical optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, YongLi; Feng, JinFu; Hu, JunHua

    2016-01-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is an efficient and robust evolutionary algorithm and has wide application in various science and engineering fields. DE is sensitive to the selection of mutation and crossover strategies and their associated control parameters. However, the structure and implementation of DEs are becoming more complex because of the diverse mutation and crossover strategies that use distinct parameter settings during the different stages of the evolution. A novel strategy is used in this study to improve the crossover and mutation operations. The crossover matrix, instead of a crossover operator and its control parameter CR, is proposed to implement the function of the crossover operation. Meanwhile, Gaussian distribution centers the best individuals found in each generation based on the proposed covariance matrix, which is generated between the best individual and several better individuals. Improved mutation operator based on the crossover matrix is randomly selected to generate the trial population. This operator is used to generate high-quality solutions to improve the capability of exploitation and enhance the preference of exploration. In addition, the memory population is randomly chosen from previous generation and used to control the search direction in the novel mutation strategy. Accordingly, the diversity of the population is improved. Thus, CCDE, which is a novel efficient and simple DE variant, is presented in this paper. CCDE has been tested on 30 benchmarks and 5 real-world optimization problems from the IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation (CEC) 2014 and CEC 2011, respectively. Experimental and statistical results demonstrate the effectiveness of CCDE for global numerical and engineering optimization. CCDE can solve the test benchmark functions and engineering problems more successfully than the other DE variants and algorithms from CEC 2014. PMID:27512635

  19. Multiple mechanisms limit meiotic crossovers: TOP3α and two BLM homologs antagonize crossovers in parallel to FANCM.

    PubMed

    Séguéla-Arnaud, Mathilde; Crismani, Wayne; Larchevêque, Cécile; Mazel, Julien; Froger, Nicole; Choinard, Sandrine; Lemhemdi, Afef; Macaisne, Nicolas; Van Leene, Jelle; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Chelysheva, Liudmilla; Mercier, Raphael

    2015-04-14

    Meiotic crossovers (COs) have two important roles, shuffling genetic information and ensuring proper chromosome segregation. Despite their importance and a large excess of precursors (i.e., DNA double-strand breaks, DSBs), the number of COs is tightly regulated, typically one to three per chromosome pair. The mechanisms ensuring that most DSBs are repaired as non-COs and the evolutionary forces imposing this constraint are poorly understood. Here we identified Topoisomerase3α (TOP3α) and the RECQ4 helicases--the Arabidopsis slow growth suppressor 1 (Sgs1)/Bloom syndrome protein (BLM) homologs--as major barriers to meiotic CO formation. First, the characterization of a specific TOP3α mutant allele revealed that, in addition to its role in DNA repair, this topoisomerase antagonizes CO formation. Further, we found that RECQ4A and RECQ4B constitute the strongest meiotic anti-CO activity identified to date, their concomitant depletion leading to a sixfold increase in CO frequency. In both top3α and recq4ab mutants, DSB number is unaffected, and extra COs arise from a normally minor pathway. Finally, both TOP3α and RECQ4A/B act independently of the previously identified anti-CO Fanconi anemia of complementation group M (FANCM) helicase. This finding shows that several parallel pathways actively limit CO formation and suggests that the RECQA/B and FANCM helicases prevent COs by processing different substrates. Despite a ninefold increase in CO frequency, chromosome segregation was unaffected. This finding supports the idea that CO number is restricted not because of mechanical constraints but likely because of the long-term costs of recombination. Furthermore, this work demonstrates how manipulating a few genes holds great promise for increasing recombination frequency in plant-breeding programs. PMID:25825745

  20. Multiple mechanisms limit meiotic crossovers: TOP3α and two BLM homologs antagonize crossovers in parallel to FANCM

    PubMed Central

    Séguéla-Arnaud, Mathilde; Crismani, Wayne; Larchevêque, Cécile; Mazel, Julien; Froger, Nicole; Choinard, Sandrine; Lemhemdi, Afef; Macaisne, Nicolas; Van Leene, Jelle; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Chelysheva, Liudmilla; Mercier, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic crossovers (COs) have two important roles, shuffling genetic information and ensuring proper chromosome segregation. Despite their importance and a large excess of precursors (i.e., DNA double-strand breaks, DSBs), the number of COs is tightly regulated, typically one to three per chromosome pair. The mechanisms ensuring that most DSBs are repaired as non-COs and the evolutionary forces imposing this constraint are poorly understood. Here we identified Topoisomerase3α (TOP3α) and the RECQ4 helicases—the Arabidopsis slow growth suppressor 1 (Sgs1)/Bloom syndrome protein (BLM) homologs—as major barriers to meiotic CO formation. First, the characterization of a specific TOP3α mutant allele revealed that, in addition to its role in DNA repair, this topoisomerase antagonizes CO formation. Further, we found that RECQ4A and RECQ4B constitute the strongest meiotic anti-CO activity identified to date, their concomitant depletion leading to a sixfold increase in CO frequency. In both top3α and recq4ab mutants, DSB number is unaffected, and extra COs arise from a normally minor pathway. Finally, both TOP3α and RECQ4A/B act independently of the previously identified anti-CO Fanconi anemia of complementation group M (FANCM) helicase. This finding shows that several parallel pathways actively limit CO formation and suggests that the RECQA/B and FANCM helicases prevent COs by processing different substrates. Despite a ninefold increase in CO frequency, chromosome segregation was unaffected. This finding supports the idea that CO number is restricted not because of mechanical constraints but likely because of the long-term costs of recombination. Furthermore, this work demonstrates how manipulating a few genes holds great promise for increasing recombination frequency in plant-breeding programs. PMID:25825745