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Sample records for cruciate ligament fixation

  1. Suspensory Anterior Tibial Fixation in the Anatomic Transtibial Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elazab, Ashraf; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kang, Seo Goo

    2016-01-01

    The transtibial technique is the most relevant among many surgical techniques for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and many types of fixation devices are used for tibial fixation according to the technique and the length of the graft. However, bone density in the fixation areas should be taken into consideration when choosing the fixation device to achieve rigid and stable fixation. However, density is not a substantial issue for anteromedial cortical fixation using a cortical suspension device. We describe tibial fixation with a TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL), which is a cortical suspension device, in anatomic transtibial posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:27073781

  2. Suture Bridge Fixation Technique for Posterior Cruciate Ligament Avulsion Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Lee, Gyu Sang; Choy, Won Sik

    2015-01-01

    We presented a surgical technique including a suture bridge technique with relatively small incision for the reduction and fixation of posterior ligament avulsion fractures. A suture anchor was used to hold the avulsed fragment and a knotless anchor was used to continuously compress the bony fragment into the fracture site, thereby maintaining reduction during healing. PMID:26640635

  3. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Screw Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizari, Mahmoud; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn; Barrett, Mel

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental and finite element analysis of tibial screw fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The mechanical properties of the bone and tendon graft are obtained from experiments using porcine bone and bovine tendon. The results of the numerical study are compared with those from mechanical testing. Analysis shows that the model may be used to establish the optimum placement of the tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by predicting mechanical parameters such as stress, strain and displacement at regions in the tunnel wall.

  4. RANDOMIZED PROSPECTIVE STUDY COMPARING TRANSVERSE AND EXTRACORTICAL FIXATION IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Guarilha, Eduardo; de Andrade Fígaro Caldeira, Paulo Roberto; de Almeida Lira Neto, Ozorio; Navarro, Marcelo Schmidt; Milani, Antonio; Filho, Mario Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study had the objective of prospectively comparing transverse fixation (Cross-Pin™) with extracortical fixation (EZLoc™) for the femur, in surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament, from a clinical, biomechanical and functional point of view. Methods: Between April 2007 and November 2009, 50 patients with acute or chronic anterior cruciate ligament injuries underwent arthroscopic reconstruction using the homologous flexor tendons (gracilis and semitendinosus). Randomization of the femoral fixation method was done by means of a draw at the time of the procedure. Patients were excluded if they presented multiple ligament lesions, fractures, previous surgery, autoimmune disease and impairment of the contralateral knee. The Lysholm scale, SF36 quality-of-life questionnaire and KT1000™ arthrometer were used. Results: After a mean follow-up of 18.1 months, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding the Lysholm scale and KT1000™ measurements. However, the SF36 questionnaire showed a statistical difference such that transverse fixation was superior regarding pain and vitality. Conclusion: Both techniques were shown to be efficient for transfemoral fixation, but with almost no statistically significant difference between them. We believe that new studies will be necessary for better understanding of these differences. PMID:27042646

  5. Arthroscopic Suture Fixation in Femoral-Sided Avulsion Fracture of Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Prasathaporn, Niti; Umprai, Vantawat; Laohathaimongkol, Thongchai; Kuptniratsaikul, Somsak; Kongrukgreatiyos, Kitiphong

    2015-01-01

    A femoral-sided avulsion fracture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a rare and challenging condition. Most reported cases have occurred in childhood or adolescence. Many techniques of ACL repair have been reported, and in recent years, techniques in arthroscopic surgery have been developed and have become ever more popular with orthopaedic surgeons. We created a technique of arthroscopic ACL repair with suture anchor fixation for a femoral-sided ACL avulsion fracture. This technique saves the natural ACL stump. It is available for cases in which creation of a tibial tunnel is not allowed. Moreover, it does not require a skin incision for fixation on the far femoral cortex and, therefore, does not require a second operation to remove the fixation device. The arthroscopic technique also has a good cosmetic outcome. PMID:26258035

  6. Biomechanical analysis on transverse tibial fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions☆

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Mendes, Mariane Henseler Damaceno; Claudino, Stephanie; Baracho, Filipe; Borges, Paulo César; da Cunha, Luiz Antonio Munhoz

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify whether the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw fixation presents biomechanical advantages when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw fixation for the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Methods Thirty-eight porcine knees and bovine extensor digitorum tendons were used as the graft materials. The tests were performed in three groups: (1) standard, used fourteen knees, and the grafts were fixated with the combination of femoral cross pin and a tibial screw; (2) inverted, used fourteen knees with an inverted combination of tibial cross pin and a femoral screw; (3) control, ten control tests performed with intact ACL. After the grafts fixation, all the knees were subjected to tensile testing to determine yield strength and ultimate strength. Results There was no statistically significant difference in survival techniques in regard to strength, yield load and tension. There was a higher survival compared in the standard curves of yield stress (p < 0.05). Conclusion There is no biomechanical advantage, observed in animal models testing, in the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw. PMID:26229913

  7. Autologous Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Failure Using the Anteromedial Portal Technique With Suspensory Femoral Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Galdi, Balazs; Reyes, Allan; Brabston, Eugene W.; Levine, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anteromedial portal technique for drilling of the femoral tunnel during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been advocated by many surgeons as allowing improved access to the anatomical footprint. Furthermore, suspensory fixation of soft tissue grafts has become popularized because of complications associated with cross-pin fixation. Concerns regarding the use of both have recently arisen. Purpose: To raise awareness of the increased risk of graft failure when using the anteromedial portal technique with suspensory femoral fixation during ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From November 1998 to August 2012, a total of 465 primary ACL reconstructions were performed using quadrupled hamstring autograft tendons, with drilling of the femoral tunnel performed via the transtibial portal. Graft fixation on the femur was achieved with cross-pin fixation, while interference screw fixation was used on the tibia. From September 2012 to October 2013, there were 69 reconstructions performed through an anteromedial portal. While there was no change in graft choice, a change was made to using suspensory femoral fixation. No other surgical or postoperative rehabilitation changes were made. Results: During the 14-year period in which ACL reconstructions were performed via the transtibial portal and with cross-pin fixation, 2 graft failures (0.4% failure rate) were reported. After switching to the anteromedial portal with suspensory fixation, 7 graft failures (10.1% failure rate) were reported over a 13-month period. These were 5 male and 2 female patients, with a mean age of 18.8 years—all elite athletes. The same surgical technique was used in all patients, and all patients had at least an 8 mm–diameter graft. Patients were cleared to return to sport at an average of 8.4 months postoperatively, after completing functional performance tests. Of the 7 patients, 6 sustained a rerupture of the graft within

  8. Tripled semitendinosus-cancellous bone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bioscrew fixation.

    PubMed

    Barber, F A

    1999-05-01

    A prospective evaluation of a tripled semitendinosus-autologous cancellous bone plug ACL reconstruction, secured with bioabsorbable interference screws (Bioscrew; Linvatec, Largo, FL) made of polyL-lactic acid, was undertaken from July 1994 through August 1995. A total of 21 patients with 22 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions were followed-up an average 29 months (range, 20 to 45). The average age was 38 years (range, 24 to 48 years). Tegner and Lysholm scores were 2.1 and 46, respectively, preoperatively and increased postoperatively to 4.4 and 90. KT tests at 24 months follow-up showed an average 20-lb laxity of 1.4 mm, an average 30-lb laxity of 2.1 mm, and an average KT maximum manual side-to-side difference of 2.9 mm. A pivot shift was absent in all but two patients at final follow-up. Full extension was rapidly achieved in all cases and flexion averaged 135 degrees at follow-up. No problems with the poly L-lactic acid interference screws occurred. These data support the effectiveness of Bioscrew fixation of the tripled semitendinosus-cancellous bone graft ACL reconstruction, which achieves both anatomic graft position and anatomic graft fixation. PMID:10355710

  9. Applying Cross-Pin System in Both Femoral and Tibial Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Xue, Jing; Li, Haifeng; Wang, Junliang; Qu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Use of the RigidFix Cross Pin System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) is a popular technique for femoral fixation of grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). However, tibial fixation is still limited to the use of interference screws and post fixation, and few surgeons apply the femoral RigidFix system in tibial fixation. Meanwhile, tunnel enlargement is still a problem that affects the outcome of ACLR with hamstring grafts. We have used the femoral RigidFix system in femoral and tibial fixation. The rod top of the guide frame should be placed under the level of the subchondral bone at the proximal end of the tibial tunnel to ensure that the pins will not be inserted into the joint. The pins are inserted through the center of the lateral tibia. Using our technique, the fixation points of the femur and tibia are close to the anterior cruciate ligament insertions, and full contact of the graft with the tunnel wall can be accomplished. On the basis of our preliminary observations and investigation, we are optimistic about the prospect of performing ACLR using the RigidFix system in femoral and tibial fixation. PMID:26697293

  10. [Arthroscopic fracture fixation of intercondylar eminence in children using instrumentarium for the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Sleczka, Paweł; Krzywoń, Jerzy; Ambrozy, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    In our article we introduce a proposal of intercondylar tibial eminence fracture in children management. When dealing with II and III type fracture according to Mes and McKeever classification, we would like to suggest artroscopic fracture fixation with the help of a tension band wiring technique using single bundle reconstruction set of anterior cruciate ligament.The method mentioned above was presented on two cases managed in our ward. Stable fixation of this type fracture allows for quick mobilization and physiotherapy of a patient. It appears to be the key element to full recovery in articular surface fracture. PMID:21648155

  11. MR imaging of cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Naraghi, Ali; White, Lawrence M

    2014-11-01

    Cruciate ligament injuries, and in particular injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), are the most commonly reconstructed ligamentous injuries of the knee. As such, accurate preoperative diagnosis is essential in optimal management of patients with cruciate ligament injuries. This article reviews the anatomy and biomechanics of the ACL and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and describes the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearances of complete and partial tears. Normal postoperative appearances of ACL and PCL reconstructions as well as MR imaging features of postoperative complications will also be reviewed. PMID:25442023

  12. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction. PMID:27327919

  13. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  14. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding. PMID:27200163

  15. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament by means of an anteromedial portal and femoral fixation using Rigidfix☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, André Manoel; Lopes Júnior, Osmar Valadão; Kuhn, André; Saggin, José Idílio; Fernandes Saggin, Paulo Renato; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro; de Castro, Daniela Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a series of patients who underwent surgery for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with flexor tendons, by means of the anteromedial transportal technique using Rigidfix for femoral fixation, and to analyze the positioning of the pins by means of tomography. Methods Thirty-two patients were included in the study. The clinical evaluation was done using the Lysholm, subjective IKDC and Rolimeter. All of them underwent computed tomography with 3D reconstruction in order to evaluate the entry point and positioning of the Rigidfix pins in relation to the joint cartilage of the lateral condyle of the femur. Results The mean Lysholm score obtained was 87.81 and the subjective IKDC was 83.72. Among the 32 patients evaluated, 43% returned to activities that were considered to be very vigorous, 9% vigorous, 37.5% moderate and 12.5% light. In 16 patients (50%), the distal entry point of the Rigidfix pin was located outside of the cartilage (extracartilage); in seven (21.87%), the distal pin injured the joint cartilage (intracartilage); and in nine (28.12%), it was at the border of the lateral condyle of the femur. Conclusion The patients who underwent ACL reconstruction by means of the anteromedial transportal using the Rigidfix system presented satisfactory clinical results over the length of follow-up evaluated. However, the risk of lesions of the joint cartilage from the distal Rigidfix pin needs to be taken into consideration when the technique via an anteromedial portal is used. Further studies with larger numbers of patients and longer follow-up times should be conducted for better evaluation. PMID:26229871

  16. Posterior cruciate ligament of the knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a powerful ligament extending from the top-rear surface of the tibia to the bottom-front surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from posterior instability.

  17. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  18. An Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Technique With 4-Strand Semitendinosus Grafts, Using Outside-In Tibial Tunnel Drilling and Suspensory Fixation Devices.

    PubMed

    Colombet, Philippe; Graveleau, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    We describe an anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a 4-strand semitendinosus graft fixed with 2 Pullup adjustable suspensory fixation systems (SBM, Lourdes, France). Outside-in full tibial tunnel drilling represents a secure option for length management of the graft. The preferred graft choice is a 4-strand semitendinosus autologous graft. A special technique is used to stitch the graft with a figure-of-8 stitch to load the 4 strands. The Pullup adjustable loop is equipped with 2 buttons of different sizes: a small button for the standard Pullup system on the femoral side and a large button for the Pullup XL system on the tibial side. With this method, graft tension is equally distributed among the 4 strands and the graft cannot bottom out in the tibial tunnel in case of inadequate graft length. PMID:26697313

  19. An Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Technique With 4-Strand Semitendinosus Grafts, Using Outside-In Tibial Tunnel Drilling and Suspensory Fixation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Colombet, Philippe; Graveleau, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We describe an anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a 4-strand semitendinosus graft fixed with 2 Pullup adjustable suspensory fixation systems (SBM, Lourdes, France). Outside-in full tibial tunnel drilling represents a secure option for length management of the graft. The preferred graft choice is a 4-strand semitendinosus autologous graft. A special technique is used to stitch the graft with a figure-of-8 stitch to load the 4 strands. The Pullup adjustable loop is equipped with 2 buttons of different sizes: a small button for the standard Pullup system on the femoral side and a large button for the Pullup XL system on the tibial side. With this method, graft tension is equally distributed among the 4 strands and the graft cannot bottom out in the tibial tunnel in case of inadequate graft length. PMID:26697313

  20. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  1. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  2. Secure fixation of femoral bone plug with a suspensory button in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone graft

    PubMed Central

    TAKETOMI, SHUJI; INUI, HIROSHI; NAKAMURA, KENSUKE; YAMAGAMI, RYOTA; TAHARA, KEITARO; SANADA, TAKAKI; MASUDA, HIRONARI; TANAKA, SAKAE; NAKAGAWA, TAKUMI

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the efficacy and safety of using a suspensory button for femoral fixation in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) graft have not been established. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate bone plug integration onto the femoral socket and migration of the bone plug and the EndoButton (EB) (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA, USA) after rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft. Methods thirty-four patients who underwent anatomical rectangular ACL reconstruction with BPTB graft using EB for femoral fixation and in whom three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) was performed one week and one year after surgery were included in this study. Bone plug integration onto the femoral socket, bone plug migration, soft tissue interposition, EB migration and EB rotation were evaluated on 3D CT. The clinical outcome was also assessed and correlated with the imaging outcomes. Results the bone plug was integrated onto the femoral socket in all cases. The incidence of bone plug migration, soft tissue interposition, EB migration and EB rotation was 15, 15, 9 and 56%, respectively. No significant association was observed between the imaging outcomes. The postoperative mean Lysholm score was 97.1 ± 5.0 points. The postoperative side-to-side difference, evaluated using a KT-2000 arthrometer, averaged 0.5 ± 1.3 mm. There were no complications associated with EB use. Imaging outcomes did not affect the postoperative KT side-to-side difference. Conclusions the EB is considered a reliable device for femoral fixation in anatomical rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26889465

  3. A security evaluation of the Rigid-fix crosses pin system used for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in tibial fixation site

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Huaqiang; Wang, Jian; Fu, Yangpan; Dong, Huixiang; Wang, Jianxiong; Tang, Cong; Huang, Changming; Shi, Zhanjun

    2014-01-01

    Our study aims to evaluate the safeness and feasibility that Rigid-fix cross pin system was used for hamstring graft anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the tibial fixation site. In this study, eleven adult conservative cadaver knees were performed using the Rigid-fix Cross Pin device in the tibial fixation site for modeling the ACL reconstruction. The guide rod top was put through the tibial tunnel at the three horizontal positions: equal pace to articular facet (group A), the plane 5 mm below articular facet (group B), and the plane 10 mm below articular facet (group C). We gave four rotation positions to the cross-pin guide: 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° slope, referring to the parallel line of the posterior border of tibial plateau. We recorded the iatrogenic damages incidence, in the four different slope angle in the three groups, and then compare the incidence using Chi-Square test. Our results suggested that the incidence of chondral injury of tibial plateau in group B and group C was significantly lower compared to group A (χ 2 A-B = 27.077, χ 2 A-C 45.517, P = 0.000); However, there was no significant difference for the incidence penetrating the medial condyle of tibial plateau among the three groups (χ 2 = 5.733, P = 0.057); The highest incidence of injuring ligamentum transversum is in group A with 72.7%, especially at the 60° slope angle. In summary, our study suggested that in order to achieve the satisfactory clinical effect for the Rigid-fix system used in the tibia end fixation of ACL reconstruction surgery, the guide rod top should be put at the 5 mm below articular facet with a slope that parallel to the tibial medial plane at 30°-60° slope angle. PMID:25550991

  4. Posterior Cruciate Ligament: Focus on Conflicting Issues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Seuk

    2013-01-01

    There is little consensus on how to optimally reconstruct the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the natural history of injured PCL is also unclear. The graft material (autograft vs. allograft), the type of tibial fixation (tibial inlay vs. transtibial tunnel), the femoral tunnel position within the femoral footprint (isometric, central, or eccentric), and the number of bundles in the reconstruction (1 bundle vs. 2 bundles) are among the many decisions that a surgeon must make in a PCL reconstruction. In addition, there is a paucity of information on rehabilitation after reconstruction of the PCL and posterolateral structures. This article focused on the conflicting issues regarding the PCL, and the scientific rationales behind some critical points are discussed. PMID:24340144

  5. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is located inside your knee joint and connects the bones of your upper and ... such as a knee dislocation , you will need knee surgery to repair the joint. For milder injuries, you may not need surgery. ...

  6. Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Murawski, Christopher D.; Wolf, Megan R.; Araki, Daisuke; Muller, Bart; Tashman, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is common procedure performed by orthopedic surgeons, particularly in association with sports-related injuries. Whereas traditional reconstruction techniques used a single bundle graft that was typically placed in a non-anatomic position, a renewed interest in anatomy has facilitated the popularization of anatomic reconstruction techniques. Recently, a focus has been placed on individualizing ACL surgery based on each patient’s native anatomical characteristics (e.g., insertion site size, notch size, and shape), thereby dictating the ultimate procedure of choice. As subjective outcome measurements have demonstrated varying outcomes with respect to single- versus double-bundle ACL reconstruction, investigators have turned to more objective techniques, such as in vivo kinematics, as a means of evaluating joint motion and cartilage contact mechanics. Further investigation in this area may yield important information with regard to the potential progression to osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction, including factors affecting or preventing it. PMID:26069663

  7. [Arthroscopic tightening of the anterior cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Charrois, O; Cheyrou, E; Remi, J; Panarella, L; Jouve, F; Beaufils, P

    2008-02-01

    We present here the preliminary results obtained with arthroscopic tightening of the anterior cruciate ligament. Six patients underwent the technique. Four had had prior ligamentoplasty, two had sequelae of tibial spine fractures. Laxity persisted in all cases. The transplant or the ligament were continuous and insertion points were well-positioned. The procedure consisted in using a trephine to bore the tibial bone at the "foot" of the ligament or transplant in order to tighten the ligament. There was no evidence of instability after the arthroscopic tightening procedure. Mean pre- and postoperative differential anterior drawer values were successively 9.2 and 3.9 mm. For native or reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, which are continuous and well-positioned but not loose, arthroscopic tightening spares the need for ligament transplant and appears to be free of specific morbidity. PMID:18342033

  8. Bone tunnel enlargement on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Adriano Barros de Aguiar; Duarte, Aires; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple graft of the flexor tendons and correlate the functional results in their presence. Methods: The studied lasted six months and included 25 patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 43 years old. Assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the third and sixth month of follow up in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Reconstruction of ligaments was performed with tendon grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscle fixated in the femur with transverse metal screw and in the tibia with interference screws. Patients were evaluated objectively by tests ligament, graded from zero to four crosses and subjectively by the Lysholm method preoperative and after sixth month follow up. Results: Significant increase in the tunnels diameters were observed, 20.56% for radiographs in the anteroposterior view, 26.48% in profile view and 23.22% in computed tomography. Descriptive statistics showed significant improvement in subjective and objective clinical parameters. Conclusions: The bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and it has no implications on clinical outcomes in the short term. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study. PMID:25328430

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Rick W.; Haas, Amanda K.; Anderson, Joy; Calabrese, Gary; Cavanaugh, John; Hewett, Timothy E.; Lorring, Dawn; McKenzie, Christopher; Preston, Emily; Williams, Glenn; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction rehabilitation has evolved over the past 20 years. This evolution has been driven by a variety of level 1 and level 2 studies. Evidence Acquisition: The MOON Group is a collection of orthopaedic surgeons who have developed a prospective longitudinal cohort of the ACL reconstruction patients. To standardize the management of these patients, we developed, in conjunction with our physical therapy committee, an evidence-based rehabilitation guideline. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Results: This review was based on 2 systematic reviews of level 1 and level 2 studies. Recently, the guideline was updated by a new review. Continuous passive motion did not improve ultimate motion. Early weightbearing decreases patellofemoral pain. Postoperative rehabilitative bracing did not improve swelling, pain range of motion, or safety. Open chain quadriceps activity can begin at 6 weeks. Conclusion: High-level evidence exists to determine appropriate ACL rehabilitation guidelines. Utilizing this protocol follows the best available evidence. PMID:26131301

  10. Posterior Wall Blowout in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Justin J.; Dean, Chase S.; Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J.; Cram, Tyler R.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Violation of the posterior femoral cortex, commonly referred to as posterior wall blowout, can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and lead to loss of graft fixation or early graft failure. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and adherence to proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and alternative fixation techniques is imperative to ensure optimal patient outcomes. This article highlights anatomic considerations for femoral tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction and techniques for avoidance and salvage of a posterior wall blowout. PMID:27335885

  11. Poly L-lactide co-glycolide/β-tricalcium phosphate interference screw fixation for bone-patellar tendon bone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Barber, F Alan; Hrnack, Scott A

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical effectiveness and radiographic response of a poly (l-lactide co-glycolide)/β-tricalcium phosphate (PlLA/PGA/β-TCP) interference screw used in bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. A prospective, consecutive series of 104 patellar tendon bone-tendon-bone ACL reconstructions fixed with PLLA/PGA/β-TCP biocomposite screws were studied. After receiving the approval from the Institutional Review Board, the following data were collected preoperatively from all patients: physical examination, Lysholm score, Cincinnati, and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) activity scores, and standard knee radiographs. In addition to these, follow-up assessments included Lachman and pivot-shift tests, Tegner scores, and KT side-to-side differences. Surgical failure was defined by a 2+ Lachman test, positive pivot-shift test, side-to-side KT difference of greater than 5 mm or subsequent ACL revision surgery. Approximately 95% of patients (99 of 104) with an average follow-up of 36 months (range, 24 to 68) are reported. The average age was 30 years (range, 13 to 57 years). Postoperatively, four patients demonstrated +1 Lachman score and one patient demonstrated a +2 Lachman score. Postoperative pivot-shift tests were a trace positive in one patients and +1 in two patients. The average KT side-to-side difference was 0.65 mm. All, but five patients, demonstrated KT side-to-side measurements of 3 mm or less and those five demonstrated measurements of 5 mm or less. No revision reconstructions were performed. Significant improvements in Cincinnati score (41 to 85 postoperative) and Lysholm score (46 to 90) were observed. The average postoperative Tegner score was 7. IKDC activity score increased from 2.3 to 3.1. Approximately 4% of patients (4 of 99) met the criteria for failure. A PLLA/PGA/β-TCP biocomposite interference fixation screw provides good graft

  12. Cruciate ligament loading during common knee rehabilitation exercises.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Macleod, Toran D; Wilk, Kevin E; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2012-09-01

    Cruciate ligament injuries are common and may lead to dysfunction if not rehabilitated. Understanding how to progress anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament loading, early after injury or reconstruction, helps clinicians prescribe rehabilitation exercises in a safe manner to enhance recovery. Commonly prescribed therapeutic exercises include both weight-bearing exercise and non-weight-bearing exercise. This review was written to summarize and provide an update on the available literature on cruciate ligament loading during commonly used therapeutic exercises. In general, weight-bearing exercise produces smaller loads on the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament compared with non-weight-bearing exercise. The anterior cruciate ligament is loaded less at higher knee angles (i.e. 50-100 degrees). Squatting and lunging with a more forward trunk tilt and moving the resistance pad proximally on the leg during the seated knee extension unloads the anterior cruciate ligament. The posterior cruciate ligament is less loaded at lower knee angles (i.e. 0-50 degrees), and may be progressed from level ground walking to a one-leg squat, lunges, wall squat, leg press, and the two-leg squat (from smallest to greatest). Exercise type and technique variation affect cruciate ligament loading, such that the clinician may prescribe therapeutic exercises to progress ligament loading safely, while ensuring optimal recovery of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:23025167

  13. Comparison of short-term results of bone tunnel enlargement between EndoButton CL and cross-pin fixation systems after chronic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autologous quadrupled hamstring tendons.

    PubMed

    Kuskucu, S M

    2008-01-01

    We performed arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions of chronic ACL rupture with autologous hamstring tendon grafts in males (mean age 23.9 years). Thirty-two cross-pin fixations and 24 EndoButton CL fixations were performed on the femoral side. Distal fixations on the tibial side were maintained with interference screws plus a staple. Tunnel enlargement was evaluated using X-rays. Femoral and tibial tunnels were measured at three levels 5 mm apart, and average enlargement was calculated after correction for magnification. Tunnel enlargement 12 months after surgery was greater for the EndoButton CL system (femoral side 43.71%, tibial side 51.11%) than for the cross-pin system (femoral side 32.61%, tibial side 25.62%); the difference was significant only on the tibial side. Both proximal fixation techniques were judged clinically successful (follow-up 16 - 36 months). The far fixation point in the EndoButton CL group may be related to mechanical loosening. PMID:18230264

  14. Mucoid Degeneration of Posterior Cruciate Ligament with Secondary Impingement of Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joon Ho; Jangir, Rajat R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mucoid degeneration of cruciate ligament is well known entity, but symptomatic lesions are rare. It is even rarer to find a symptomatic posterior cruciate ligament mucoid degeneration than anterior cruciate ligament. Case Report: A 65-years-old female presented to our hospital complaining of pain in right knee joint on terminal extension since 6 months. On clinical examination, there was a flexion deformity of 5 degree and a further flexion of 150 degree with mild pain exacerbated by extension. MRI of the right knee joint showed a diffusely thickened posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with increased intra ligamentous signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The arthroscopic findings of grossly thickened PCL with a yellowish hue are characteristic and the PCL was filled with a yellowish substance. We excised the yellowish substance from the PCL as precisely as possible not to damage the remaining PCL fiber (Limited Debulking). We did notchplasty of lateral wall and roof to accommodate the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and avoid impingement. Conclusion: Posterior cruciate ligament may enlarge significantly and may push the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in the notch and may lead to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) impingement symptoms. Partial Debulking of Posterior Cruciate Ligament and notchplasty is effective treatment with immediate postoperative pain relief and good functional results. PMID:27299097

  15. Return to Play Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ryan C; Hulstyn, Michael J; Fleming, Braden C; Owens, Brett D; Fadale, Paul D

    2016-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions are commonly performed in an attempt to return an athlete to sports activities. Accelerated rehabilitation has made recovery for surgery more predictable and shortened the timeline for return to play. Despite success with and advancements in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, some athletes still fail to return to play. PMID:27543405

  16. Minimally Invasive Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction in the Setting of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Daggett, Matt; Kajetanek, Charles; Thaunat, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in the rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for minimally invasive anterolateral ligament reconstruction as a complement to most techniques of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A gracilis tendon autograft is harvested and prepared in a double-strand, inverted V-shaped graft. The graft is percutaneously placed through a femoral stab incision, and each strand is then passed deep to the iliotibial band, emerging through each tibial stab incision. After the femoral-end loop graft is fixed, the tibial fixation of each strand is performed in full extension for optimal isometry. PMID:27274456

  17. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Seedhom, B B

    1992-01-01

    Ligaments are strong collagenous structures that act as constraints on joint motion, thus confining the articular surfaces to more or less the same paths. In so doing they prevent arbitrary apposition of these surfaces from occurring and resulting in abnormal stresses which may damage the joint surfaces. Ligaments rupture due to excessive loads, particularly those resulting from trauma occurring during sporting events or motor vehicle accidents. Knee and ankle joints have the highest frequency of ligamentous injuries. This paper is a brief review of the current approaches to the reconstruction of the knee ligaments with specific reference to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) being the most frequently reconstructed. This is not only because it is frequently injured but also because of the debilitating consequences of such an injury. Approaches ranging from the conservative to those that advocate the use of frank prosthetic replacement have been adopted by surgeons at both ends of the spectrum. Following a discussion of the rationale for reconstruction of the ACL, the mechanical and biological considerations of the reconstructive procedure are discussed. The different methods of ACL reconstruction are reviewed. These include: (a) primary repair, (b) reconstruction with different tissues, including autogenous allografts and xenografts, (c) reconstruction employing different synthetic devices. A brief discussion of the procedures used for reconstruction with different types of tissue and of the surviving examples of the synthetic devices will follow. PMID:1418190

  18. Arthroscopic fixation of an avulsion fracture of the tibia involving the posterior cruciate ligament: a modified technique in a series of 22 cases.

    PubMed

    Chen, L B; Wang, H; Tie, K; Mohammed, A; Qi, Y J

    2015-09-01

    A total of 22 patients with a tibial avulsion fracture involving the insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with grade II or III posterior laxity were reduced and fixed arthroscopically using routine anterior and double posteromedial portals. A double-strand Ethibond suture was inserted into the joint and wrapped around the PCL from anterior to posterior to secure the ligament above the avulsed bony fragment. Two tibial bone tunnels were created using the PCL reconstruction guide, aiming at the medial and lateral borders of the tibial bed. The ends of the suture were pulled out through the bone tunnels and tied over the tibial cortex between the openings of the tunnels to reduce and secure the bony fragment. Satisfactory reduction of the fracture was checked arthroscopically and radiographically. The patients were followed-up for a mean of 24.5 months (19 to 28). Bone union occurred six weeks post-operatively. At final follow-up, all patients had a negative posterior drawer test and a full range of movement. KT-1000 arthrometer examination showed that the mean post-operative side-to-side difference improved from 10.9 mm (standard deviation (sd) 0.7) pre-operatively to 1.5 mm (sd 0.6) (p = 0.001). The mean Tegner and the International Knee Documentation Committee scores improved significantly (p = 0.001). The mean Lysholm score at final follow-up was 92.0 (85 to 96). We conclude that this technique is convenient, reliable and minimally invasive and successfully restores the stability and function of the knee. PMID:26330588

  19. Knee imaging after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M B; Silva, J J; Homsi, C; Stump, X M; Lecouvet, F E

    2001-01-01

    An increasing number of reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are performed every year, due to both the increasing occurrence of sport related injuries and the development of diagnostic and surgical techniques. The most used surgical procedure for the torn ACL reconstruction is the use of autogenous material, most often the patellar and semitendinosus tendons. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spiral-CT performed after arthrography with multiplanar reconstructions are the imaging methods of choice for post-operative evaluation of ACL ligamentoplasty. This paper provides a brief bibliographic and more extensive pictorial review of the normal evolution and possible complications after ACL repair. PMID:11817479

  20. Current Trends in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Review.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Ingole, Sachin; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is an accepted and established surgical technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and is now being practiced across the globe in increasing numbers. Although most patients get good to excellent results in the short-term after ACLR, its consequences in the long-term in prevention or acceleration of knee osteoarthritis (OA) are not yet well-defined. Still, there are many debatable issues related to ACLR, such as the appropriate timing of surgery, graft selection, fixation methods of the graft, operative techniques, rehabilitation after surgery, and healing augmentation techniques. Most surgeons prefer not to wait long after an ACL injury to do an ACLR, as delayed reconstruction is associated with secondary damages to the intra- and periarticular structures of the knee. Autografts are the preferred choice of graft in primary ACLR, and hamstring tendons are the most popular amongst surgeons. Single bundle ACLR is being practiced by the majority, but double bundle ACLR is getting popular due to its theoretical advantage of providing more anatomical reconstruction. A preferred construct is the interference fixation (Bio-screw) at the tibial site and the suspensory method of fixation at the femoral site. In a single bundle hamstring graft, a transportal approach for creating a femoral tunnel has recently become more popular than the trans-tibial technique. Various healing augmentation techniques, including the platelet rich plasma (PRP), have been tried after ACLR, but there is still no conclusive proof of their efficacy. Accelerated rehabilitation is seemingly more accepted immediately after ACLR. PMID:26697280

  1. Current Trends in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Ingole, Sachin; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is an accepted and established surgical technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and is now being practiced across the globe in increasing numbers. Although most patients get good to excellent results in the short-term after ACLR, its consequences in the long-term in prevention or acceleration of knee osteoarthritis (OA) are not yet well-defined. Still, there are many debatable issues related to ACLR, such as the appropriate timing of surgery, graft selection, fixation methods of the graft, operative techniques, rehabilitation after surgery, and healing augmentation techniques. Most surgeons prefer not to wait long after an ACL injury to do an ACLR, as delayed reconstruction is associated with secondary damages to the intra- and periarticular structures of the knee. Autografts are the preferred choice of graft in primary ACLR, and hamstring tendons are the most popular amongst surgeons. Single bundle ACLR is being practiced by the majority, but double bundle ACLR is getting popular due to its theoretical advantage of providing more anatomical reconstruction. A preferred construct is the interference fixation (Bio-screw) at the tibial site and the suspensory method of fixation at the femoral site. In a single bundle hamstring graft, a transportal approach for creating a femoral tunnel has recently become more popular than the trans-tibial technique. Various healing augmentation techniques, including the platelet rich plasma (PRP), have been tried after ACLR, but there is still no conclusive proof of their efficacy. Accelerated rehabilitation is seemingly more accepted immediately after ACLR. PMID:26697280

  2. Treatment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries.

    PubMed

    Sanders, James O; Brown, Gregory A; Murray, Jayson; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2016-08-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has developed the Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) document Treatment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain the best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from patient indications that generally accompany an anterior cruciate ligament injury, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature. The 56 patient scenarios and 8 treatments were developed by the Writing Panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Lastly, a separate, multidisciplinary Voting Panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3). PMID:27355285

  3. Case report ganglion cysts of the bilateral cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Kurosaka, M; Maeno, K; Mizuno, K

    1999-01-01

    Ganglion cysts originating from the cruciate ligaments have been reported rarely. A 38-year-old woman developed symptoms of knee pain with 10 degrees loss of knee extension. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed a well-demarcated cystic mass surrounding the posterior cruciate ligament so clearly that further examination was not recommended. Because examination under anesthesia confirmed full extension of the knee, we presumed that pain produced by compression caused the diminished extension, and that mechanical block was not the reason. During arthroscopic examination, a mass was impinged between the anterior cruciate ligament and the intercondylar notch when extension of the knee was attempted. The mass was resected and immediate improvement was noted. The patient had experienced the same episode in the contralateral knee and removal of a ganglion cyst on the cruciate ligament 10 years ago. At the latest follow-up she was completely symptom free in both knees without any sign of recurrence. PMID:10564867

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament rupture and osteoarthritis progression.

    PubMed

    Wong, James Min-Leong; Khan, Tanvir; Jayadev, Chethan S; Khan, Wasim; Johnstone, David

    2012-01-01

    Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) rupture is a common sporting injury that frequently affects young, athletic patients. Apart from the functional problems of instability, patients with ACL deficient knees also develop osteoarthritis. Although this is frequently cited as an indication for ACL reconstruction, the relationship between ACL rupture, reconstruction and the instigation and progression of articular cartilage degenerative change is controversial.The purpose of this paper is to review the published literature with regards ACL rupture and the multifactorial causes for osteoarthritis progression, and whether or not this is slowed or stopped by ACL reconstruction.There is no evidence in the published literature to support the view that ACL reconstruction prevents osteoarthritis, although it may prevent further meniscal damage. It must be recognised that this conclusion is based on the current literature which has substantial methodological limitations. PMID:22896777

  5. Infections in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Stucken, Charlton; Garras, David N.; Shaner, Julie L.; Cohen, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a safe, common, and effective method of restoring stability to the knee after injury, but evolving techniques of reconstruction carry inherent risk. Infection after ACL reconstruction, while rare, carries a high morbidity, potentially resulting in a poor clinical outcome. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December 2012) as well as from textbook chapters. Results: Treatment with culture-specific antibiotics and debridement with graft retention is recommended as initial treatment, but with persistent infection, consideration should be given to graft removal. Graft type likely has no effect on infection rates. Conclusion: The early diagnosis of infection and appropriate treatment are necessary to avoid the complications of articular cartilage damage and arthrofibrosis. PMID:24427432

  6. Tibial Tuberosity-Posterior Cruciate Ligament Distance.

    PubMed

    Daynes, Jake; Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Farr, Jack

    2016-08-01

    When trochlear dysplasia is present, it is difficult to measure the tibial tuberosity to trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance. A new measurement to assess tuberosity position was recently described by Seitlinger et al, which avoids the difficulty of identifying the TG as it references the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). To evaluate the reproducibility of the Seitlinger et al findings, 42 knees in 41 patients with a documented history of recurrent patellar instability and 84 knees in patients with no history of patellar instability or patellofemoral symptoms were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. The TT-PCL distance was increased in the instability group (mean, 21.6 mm) compared with the control group (mean, 19.0 mm). The TT-PCL distance is an independent risk factor for patients with recurrent patellar instability. Its role in surgical planning remains to be determined. PMID:26509659

  7. Patellotibial contusions in anterior cruciate ligament tears.

    PubMed

    Wissman, Robert D; England, Eric; Mehta, Kaushal; Nepute, Joshua; Von Fischer, Nathaniel; Apgar, Josh; Javadi, Ariyan

    2014-02-01

    Bone contusions are an important ancillary finding of many knee injuries. Not only are they a source of pain, they may suggest a mechanism of injury or a specific derangement of the knee joint. We have encountered a small number of patients being evaluated for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears with unexplained patellar and tibial edema at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We present three individuals with contusions of the inferior patella with a corresponding contusion of the anteromedial tibial plateau. Internal derangements in these patients were similar to other individuals with acute ACL tears, however osseous contusions were more widespread. In conclusion, patellotibial contusions are rare and may indicate an injury with forces greater than usually encountered in most ACL tears. A careful search for uncommon associated injuries is prudent in these high-energy knee injuries. PMID:24037484

  8. [Ultrasound imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament. Possibilities and limits].

    PubMed

    Kelsch, G; Ulrich, C; Bickelhaupt, A

    1996-02-01

    We carried out sonography of the femoral origin of the anterior cruciate ligament in the dorsal cross section with a 7.5-MHz linear scanner in 25 test subjects with healthy knee joints. A physiological difference between the sides in the size of the hypoechoic region of the origin could be defined on the basis of the measurements obtained in both knee joints. Values outside a reference range which could be evaluated from this difference were rated as pathological in terms of an anterior cruciate ligament rupture. The reliability of this method in definitively diagnosing an anterior cruciate ligament rupture was analysed statistically as compared to the golden standard of arthroscopy on 65 patients by means of the two-by-two frequency table test. The femoral origin of the cruciate ligament in 25 test subjects had a median width of 3.1 mm (range 1.7-5.8 mm) on the right and 3.4 mm (range 1.7-4.4 mm) on the left. The median difference between the sides is 0.4 mm (range 0-1.8 mm). If the 3rd to the 97th percentile is selected as the reference range, our data show a physiological difference between the sides of 0-1.5 mm. The median age of the 65 patients was 31 years (range 14-74 years). Two thirds of all patients were men. A rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament was diagnosed sonographically in 19 patients. The result was confirmed arthroscopically in 15 patients. In 4 patients, there was a false positive sonographic finding. Forty-six patients did not fulfil the sonographic criteria of a rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament. Of these, 38 showed an intact anterior cruciate ligament on arthroscopy. Eight patients had a false-negative sonographic finding. The corresponding statistical analysis showed sensitivity of 65%, specificity of 90% and precision of 79%. Accordingly, the diagnostic reliability of knee joint sonography in diagnosing a rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament appears to be unsatisfactory, since old ruptures, above all, cannot be imaged with

  9. All-Inside Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: GraftLink Technique

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Matthew R.; Stuart, Michael J.; King, Alexander H.; Sousa, Paul L.; Levy, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries account for nearly 20% of knee ligament injuries. PCL injuries can occur in isolation or, more commonly, in the setting of multiligamentous knee injuries. Isolated PCL disruptions are commonly treated nonoperatively; however, symptomatic grade III injuries, as well as PCL injuries found in multiligamentous injuries, are frequently treated surgically. Several reconstructive techniques exist for the treatment of PCL deficiency without a clear optimal approach. We describe our preferred operative technique to reconstruct the PCL using an all-inside arthroscopic approach with a quadrupled tibialis anterior or peroneus longus allograft with both tibial and femoral suspensory fixation. PMID:26900564

  10. All-Inside Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: GraftLink Technique.

    PubMed

    Prince, Matthew R; Stuart, Michael J; King, Alexander H; Sousa, Paul L; Levy, Bruce A

    2015-10-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries account for nearly 20% of knee ligament injuries. PCL injuries can occur in isolation or, more commonly, in the setting of multiligamentous knee injuries. Isolated PCL disruptions are commonly treated nonoperatively; however, symptomatic grade III injuries, as well as PCL injuries found in multiligamentous injuries, are frequently treated surgically. Several reconstructive techniques exist for the treatment of PCL deficiency without a clear optimal approach. We describe our preferred operative technique to reconstruct the PCL using an all-inside arthroscopic approach with a quadrupled tibialis anterior or peroneus longus allograft with both tibial and femoral suspensory fixation. PMID:26900564

  11. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  12. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Marcano, Alejandro I.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat, Ramon; Farmer, Kevin W; Moser, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient. PMID:26550585

  13. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a steering group of the Dutch Orthopaedic Association. What is the role of physical examination and additional diagnostic tools? Which patient-related outcome measures should be used? What are the relevant parameters that influence the indication for an ACL reconstruction? Which findings or complaints are predictive of a bad result of an ACL injury treatment? What is the optimal timing for surgery for an ACL injury? What is the outcome of different conservative treatment modalities? Which kind of graft gives the best result in an ACL reconstruction? What is the optimal postoperative treatment concerning rehabilitation, resumption of sports, and physiotherapy? These 8 questions were answered and recommendations were made, using the “Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation” instrument. This instrument seeks to improve the quality and effectiveness of clinical practical guidelines by establishing a shared framework to develop, report, and assess. The steering group has also developed 7 internal indicators to aid in measuring and enhancing the quality of the treatment of patients with an ACL injury, for use in a hospital or practice. PMID:22900914

  14. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Meuffels, Duncan E; Poldervaart, Michelle T; Diercks, Ron L; Fievez, Alex W F M; Patt, Thomas W; Hart, Cor P van der; Hammacher, Eric R; Meer, Fred van der; Goedhart, Edwin A; Lenssen, Anton F; Muller-Ploeger, Sabrina B; Pols, Margreet A; Saris, Daniel B F

    2012-08-01

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a steering group of the Dutch Orthopaedic Association. What is the role of physical examination and additional diagnostic tools? Which patient-related outcome measures should be used? What are the relevant parameters that influence the indication for an ACL reconstruction? Which findings or complaints are predictive of a bad result of an ACL injury treatment? What is the optimal timing for surgery for an ACL injury? What is the outcome of different conservative treatment modalities? Which kind of graft gives the best result in an ACL reconstruction? What is the optimal postoperative treatment concerning rehabilitation, resumption of sports, and physiotherapy? These 8 questions were answered and recommendations were made, using the "Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation" instrument. This instrument seeks to improve the quality and effectiveness of clinical practical guidelines by establishing a shared framework to develop, report, and assess. The steering group has also developed 7 internal indicators to aid in measuring and enhancing the quality of the treatment of patients with an ACL injury, for use in a hospital or practice. PMID:22900914

  15. Approaching the ruptured anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Sarraf, Khaled M; Sadri, Amir; Thevendran, Gowreeson; Vedi, Vikas

    2011-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) disruptions are common injuries that currently hold a fearsome reputation among athletes of all abilities and disciplines. Indeed, if the diagnosis is missed at first presentation, it is difficult to attribute ongoing instability and recurrent injury to an ACL tear. Classically, patients then often improve shortly before repeatedly reinjuring their knee. At some point, the knee may lock, necessitating an arthroscopic meniscectomy. Tragically, this then hastens the progression of joint arthrosis and the decline of the joint function. While the burden of responsibility does not lie solely with the junior doctor or the general practitioner, it is often at the first consultation that the natural history of this devastating injury is decided. The ability to recognise, institute early management and reassure patients with ACL tears about the future is an invaluable asset to the non-specialist junior doctor. Once diagnosed, the responsibility of advising and further counselling of patients with ACL injuries is best left to the orthopaedic knee specialist. Family practitioners and emergency room doctors should not feel pressured to offer advice on specialist areas such as return to sports without reconstruction or indeed the need for reconstruction. Indeed, decisions to return to sports with ACL-deficient knees have all too often led to disastrous reinjury events to the articular cartilage and/or the menisci. PMID:21097944

  16. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, “ossified” knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as “is postoperative brace use really necessary?”, “what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?”, “to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?”, “how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?”, “should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?” be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament surgery in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Various methods regarding allograft knee replacements have been described. The animal models, which are generally used for this purpose include sheep, dogs, goats, and pigs, and accrue significant costs for study protocols. The authors herein describe an efficient and cost-effective model to study either native or tissue-engineered allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) replacement in a New Zealand rabbit model with the potential for transgenic and cell migration studies. Methods ACL reconstructions were performed in rabbits under general anesthesia. For fresh allograft implantations, two animals were operated in parallel. Each right extensor digitorum longus tendon was harvested and prepared for implantation. After excision of the ACL, tibial and femoral bone tunnels were created to implant each graft in the native ACL position. Results During a 2-year period, the authors have successfully undertaken this surgery in 61 rabbits and have not noticed any major complications attributed to this surgical technique. In addition, the authors have observed fast recovery in the animals postoperatively. Conclusion The authors recommend this surgical procedure as an excellent model for the study of knee surgery. PMID:23957941

  18. Knee Bracing After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Merchán, E Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Although some articles in the literature are in favor of the use of a postoperative brace after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, this review found that several systematic reviews and other reports on the topic do not support the use of a postoperative brace after ACL reconstruction. There is no scientific evidence so far to support the routine use of a functional knee brace following a successful ACL reconstruction in the postoperative course. Most authors believe that bracing is not necessary. There is insufficient evidence to inform current practice. Good-quality randomized trials are required to remedy this situation. Future studies should better define the role of a brace following ACL surgery. A search of MEDLINE for articles published between January 1, 1995, and September 30, 2013, was performed. Key search terms used were ACL reconstruction and knee brace. Ninety-one articles were found, but only 28 focused on the subject of bracing after ACL reconstruction and were selected for this review. Several systematic reviews and randomized, controlled trials on the topic do not recommend the use of postoperative brace after ACL reconstruction. Postoperative bracing after ACL reconstruction does not seem to help with pain, function, rehabilitation, and stability. The literature does not support the use of a postoperative brace following ACL reconstruction. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e602-e609.]. PMID:27203412

  19. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament healing

    SciTech Connect

    Ihara, Hidetoshi; Miwa, Megumi; Deya, Keizo; Torisu, Kenji

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate using MRI the natural healing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) when treated conservatively by early protective motion. Consecutive acute complete intraligamentous ruptures of the ACL in 50 cases that were allowed to heal without surgery were evaluated before and after 3 month treatment by MRI, arthroscopy, and stress radiographs. Twenty-nine of the 50 patients were also reevaluated 11 months from the initial injury, of which 7 were reevaluated again 24 months from the initial injury by MRI. The MR appearance of the treated ACL was categorized into four grades depending on homogeneity, straight band, and size. MR assessment of the ACL after 3 month treatment demonstrated a well defined normal-sized straight band in 37 cases (74%). There was a significant relationship between the 3 and 11 month MR evaluations (r. = 0.801, p < 0.0001). There were also significant relationships between the MR and arthroscopic evaluations (r, = 0.455, p < 0.005) and between the MR and stress radiographic evaluations (r, = 0.348, p < 0.025) after the 3 month treatment. MRI can demonstrate ACL healing when treated conservatively with early protective mobilization. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Active knee motion after cruciate ligament rupture. Stereoradiography.

    PubMed

    Kärrholm, J; Selvik, G; Elmqvist, L G; Hansson, L I

    1988-04-01

    In 10 patients with an old injury of the anterior cruciate ligament, the three-dimensional movements of the knee joint were studied when the patients flexed their knees. Tibial motions were recorded using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis. Internal rotation and adduction of the tibia were reduced in the injured knees when compared with the intact knees; during flexion of the knee joint, the tibial intercondylar eminence occupied a more lateral and posterior position on the injured side. Our results may indicate that the knee joint is continuously exposed to abnormal stresses when the anterior cruciate ligament is torn. PMID:3364185

  1. Surgical treatment of avulsion fractures at the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament: functional result☆

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marcos Alexandre; Cervone, Gabriel Lopes de Faria; Costa, André Luis Serigatti

    2015-01-01

    Objective To objectively and subjectively evaluate the functional result from before to after surgery among patients with a diagnosis of an isolated avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament who were treated surgically. Method Five patients were evaluated by means of reviewing the medical files, applying the Lysholm questionnaire, physical examination and radiological examination. For the statistical analysis, a significance level of 0.10 and 95% confidence interval were used. Results According to the Lysholm criteria, all the patients were classified as poor (<64 points) before the operation and evolved to a mean of 96 points six months after the operation. We observed that 100% of the posterior drawer cases became negative, taking values less than 5 mm to be negative. Conclusion Surgical methods with stable fixation for treating avulsion fractures at the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament produce acceptable functional results from the surgical and radiological points of view, with a significance level of 0.042.

  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Duthon, Victoria; Servien, Elvire; Neyret, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goals of this study are to address several questions, the answers to which are key to the understanding and eventually to the prevention of this frequent source of morbidity. These questions include the following: (1) What is the natural history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency? (2) How important is the status of the meniscus at the time of reconstruction? (3) Does ACL reconstruction prevent the development of osteoarthritis in the long term? (4) Can we predict which patients will develop osteoarthritis? (5) What can be done? Design: This study addresses the key questions above through the long-term follow-up of a cohort of patients treated with ACL reconstruction by Professor Henri Dejour in Lyon, France, supplemented with a review of the relevant literature. Results: The prevalence of osteoarthritis in ACL-deficient knees is about 40% after 15 years and close to 90% after 25 to 35 years. It remains unclear whether reconstruction of the ACL significantly reduces this risk. The status of the meniscus at the time of ACL reconstruction is a strong predictor of the risk of osteoarthritis: Patients who undergo total meniscectomy are at 2- to 10-fold increased risk of developing osteoarthritis relative to those with intact menisci. Patients showing early evidence of arthritis at short- to medium-term follow-up are at high risk for progression over subsequent years. Numerous emerging techniques may provide tools to more effectively prevent and treat osteoarthritis following ACL injury in the future. Conclusion: Osteoarthritis following ACL injury continues to be a major problem requiring further research. PMID:26069662

  3. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Wakeboarding

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Harlan M.; Sanders, Brett

    2012-01-01

    Background: Wakeboarding is an increasingly popular sport that involves aggressive stunts with high risk for lower extremity injury, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Little has been reported on prevalence or mechanism of ACL injury while wakeboarding. Hypothesis: The prevalence of ACL injury in wakeboarding approaches that of other high-risk sports. Analyzing the mechanism of ACL injury may aid in future efforts of prevention. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: In sum, 1580 surveys were sent internationally to professional and amateur wakeboarders. The survey questioned the participants on their history of an ACL tear while wakeboarding and asked them to describe the mechanism of injury and treatment. Results: A total of 123 surveys were returned. Of this group, 52 (42.3%) acknowledged having had an ACL tear while wakeboarding. The majority described feeling a pop or buckle after attempting to land a high jump. Only 5 participants (13.5%) described a rotational mechanism created by catching the board edge in the water. Thirty-seven participants (71.15%) said that the injury ruined their ability to wakeboard before reconstruction, and 41 (78.85%) had the injury repaired surgically. Conclusion: The prevalence of ACL tears in this data set, 42.3%, is the highest reported in the literature for wakeboarding and one of the highest for any sport. The main mechanism of injury appears to involve axial compression while one lands in a provocative position; it is not related to a rotational force created by fixed bindings. The injury should be surgically repaired to effectively continue the sport. Further study is needed to determine if wakeboarding represents a high-risk sport for ACL injury. Clinical Significance: Wakeboarding may be a high-risk sport for ACL injury. Noncontact axial compression appears to be the main mechanism of injury. PMID:23016104

  4. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Chang, Ji-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity has been considered a risk factor causing late failure of reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, although it is unknown whether that is the case for reconstructed posterior cruciate ligaments. We hypothesized patients with generalized joint laxity, compared with those without laxity, would have similar postoperative knee stability, range of motion, and functional scores after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Beighton and Horan criteria were used to determine generalized joint laxity. We enrolled 24 patients with generalized joint laxity (Group L) and 29 patients without any positive findings of joint laxity (Group N) matched by gender and age. The average side-by-side differences of posterior tibial translation were 4.72 mm in Group L and 3.63 mm in Group N. We observed no differences in posterior tibial translation with differing graft materials or combined procedures. In Group L the International Knee Documentation Committee score was normal in 12.5% and nearly normal in 45.8% whereas in Group N, 24.1% were normal and 55.2% nearly normal. Patients with generalized joint laxity showed more posterior laxity than patients without joint laxity. Generalized joint laxity therefore appears to be a risk factor associated with posterior laxity after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Level of Evidence: Level III, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18843524

  5. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kumar, Praveen

    2010-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity is a genetically determined component of overall joint flexibility. The incidence of joint laxity in the overall population is approximately 5% to 20%, and its prevalence is higher in females. Recently it was noticed that individuals with generalized joint laxity are not only prone to anterior cruciate ligament injuries but also have inferior results after a reconstruction. Therefore, an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized laxity should be undertaken with caution due to the higher expected failure rate from the complexity of problems associated with this condition. It is also necessary to identify the risk factors for the injury as well as for the post operative outcome in this population. A criterion that includes all the associated components is necessary for the proper screening of individuals for generalized joint laxity. Graft selection for an anterior cruciate reconstruction in patients with ligament laxity is a challenge. According to the senior author, a hamstring autograft is an inferior choice and a double bundle reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-bone autograft yields better results than a single bundle bone-patella tendon-bone autograft. Future studies comparing the different grafts available might be needed to determine the preferred graft for this subset of patients. Improved results after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be achieved by proper planning and careful attention to each step beginning from the clinical examination to the postoperative rehabilitation. PMID:20808583

  6. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    PubMed

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  7. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Boutlis, Craig S.; Chen, Darren B.; Liu, Eunice Y.-T.

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  8. LARS Artificial Ligament Versus ABC Purely Polyester Ligament for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Iliadis, Dimitrios Ph.; Bourlos, Dimitrios N.; Mastrokalos, Dimitrios S.; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Babis, George C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is of critical importance. Various grafts have been used so far, with autografts long considered the optimal solution for the treatment of ACL-deficient knees. Limited data are available on the long-term survivorship of synthetic grafts. Purpose: To compare the functional outcome and survivorship of ACL reconstructions performed using the LARS (ligament augmentation and reconstruction system) ligament and the ABC (active biosynthetic composite) purely polyester ligament. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The results of 72 patients who underwent primary arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with the LARS ligament and 31 cases with an ABC purely polyester ligament were reviewed. The mean follow-up periods for the LARS and ABC groups were 9.5 and 5.1 years, respectively. A survivorship analysis of the 2 synthetic grafts was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method with a log-rank test (Mantel-Cox, 95% CI). Lysholm, Tegner activity, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores as well as laxity measurements obtained using a KT-1000 arthrometer were recorded for all intact grafts, and a Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison reasons. Results: The rupture rates for LARS and ABC grafts were 31% (95% CI, 20%-42%) and 42% (95% CI, 25%-59%), respectively. For intact grafts, the mean Lysholm score was good for both groups (90 for the LARS group and 89 for the ABC group), with the majority of patients returning to their preinjury level of activities, and the mean IKDC score was 90 for the LARS group and 86 for the ABC group. Conclusion: The rupture rates of both LARS and ABC grafts were both high. However, the LARS ligament provided significantly better survivorship compared with the ABC ligament at short- to midterm follow-up (95% CI). PMID:27453894

  9. Spatial Change of Cruciate Ligaments in Rat Embryo Knee Joint by Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Takaishi, Ryota; Higuchi, Shinya; Yamada, Shigehito; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Takakuwa, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the spatial developmental changes of rat cruciate ligaments by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction using episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC). Cruciate ligaments of Wister rat embryos between embryonic day (E) 16 and E20 were analyzed. Samples were sectioned and visualized using EFIC. 3D reconstructions were generated using Amira software. The length of the cruciate ligaments, distances between attachment points to femur and tibia, angles of the cruciate ligaments and the cross angle of the cruciate ligaments were measured. The shape of cruciate ligaments was clearly visible at E17. The lengths of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) increased gradually from E17 to E19 and drastically at E20. Distances between attachment points to the femur and tibia gradually increased. The ACL angle and PCL angle gradually decreased. The cross angle of the cruciate ligaments changed in three planes. The primordium of the 3D structure of rat cruciate ligaments was constructed from the early stage, with the completion of the development of the structures occurring just before birth. PMID:26098761

  10. Comparison of femoral and tibial pullout forces in bone-patellar tendon-bone anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions with a new interference fixation device.

    PubMed

    Seitz, H; Vécsei, V; Menth-Chiari, W A; Pichl, W; Wielke, B; Marlovits, S

    1999-03-01

    Interference screws have become the standard method for fixing bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts. To avoid the inherent pitfalls and complications of interference screws, a 28-mm long and from 5 to 7 mm spreadable metal bolt with nontapping threads was developed for this study. The technical applicability and biomechanical characteristics of this new BPTB interference fixation device were investigated by dissection or tensile testing of 48 cadaveric knee specimens from young donors. No problems occurred with respect to bone plug anchoring during insertion of the spreading bolts. The clinically important linear load was 920+/-283 N for the femoral and 635+/-247 N for the tibial fixation site. Bone plug pullout was the mode of failure in all specimens. The results of this study indicate that the spreading bolt is a reasonable alternative to interference screws. PMID:10210075

  11. Clinical Outcomes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, Lisa M.; Long, Joy L.; Schilling, Peter L.; Lilly, Ryan J.; Carpenter, James E.; Miller, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinical outcomes of autograft and allograft anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions are mixed, with some reports of excellent to good outcomes and other reports of early graft failure or significant donor site morbidity. Objective: To determine if there is a difference in functional outcomes, failure rates, and stability between autograft and allograft ACL reconstructions. Data Sources: Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Evidence Based Medicine Reviews Collection), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Web of Science, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus were searched for articles on ACL reconstruction. Abstracts from annual meetings of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, and Arthroscopy Association of North America were searched for relevant studies. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria for studies were as follows: primary unilateral ACL injuries, mean patient age less than 41 years, and follow-up for at least 24 months postreconstruction. Exclusion criteria for studies included the following: skeletally immature patients, multiligament injuries, and publication dates before 1990. Data Extraction: Joint stability measures included Lachman test, pivot-shift test, KT-1000 arthrometer assessment, and frequency of graft failures. Functional outcome measures included Tegner activity scores, Cincinnati knee scores, Lysholm scores, and IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee) total scores. Results: More than 5000 studies were identified. After full text review of 576 studies, 56 were included, of which only 1 directly compared autograft and allograft reconstruction. Allograft ACL reconstructions were more lax when assessed by the KT-1000 arthrometer. For all other outcome measures, there was no statistically significant difference between autograft and allograft ACL reconstruction. For all outcome measures, there was strong evidence of statistical heterogeneity between

  12. A Comparison of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Laxity Between Female and Male Basketball Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weesner, Carol L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament laxity of 90 uninjured male and female high school players were measured. No significant differences were found, indicating that the greater female injury rate may be due to inadequate conditioning, not greater knee ligament laxity. (Author/MT)

  13. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Autologous Hamstring

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, Brian M.; Williams, Phillip N.; Burge, Alissa; Voigt, Marcia; Altchek, David W.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Allen, Answorth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent clinical investigations have identified inadequate autograft hamstring graft diameter (<8 mm) to be predictive of failure after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Purpose/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine the utility of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables of the hamstring tendons for the prediction of graft diameter at the time of surgery. The hypothesis was that cross-sectional area (CSA) of the hamstring tendon measured on MRI could accurately predict graft diameter, and threshold measurements could be established to predict graft diameter at the time of surgery. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 84 consecutive skeletally mature patients prospectively enrolled in our ACL reconstruction patient registry were identified for study purposes. Patients were included if they underwent an MRI of the affected knee at our institution prior to ACL reconstruction with hamstring (HT) autograft. Graft preparation was performed via a standard quadrupled hamstring technique after harvesting both the gracilis and semitendinosus (4-GST). The smallest diameter end of the HT autograft was then utilized for measurement analysis. Total CSA was calculated for both hamstring tendons using the “region of interest tool” on the corresponding proton density–weighted axial image of the knee at the widest condylar dimension. Three independent reviewers measured the MRI scans so that intra- and interrater reliability of the measurements could be determined. A trend analysis was then undertaken to establish correlations between the MRI CSA and graft diameter. Predictive analysis was then performed to establish threshold MRI measurement values for specific graft diameters and determine whether any patient-specific factors would affect graft diameter (age, sex, and body mass index). Results: Mean patient age at the time of surgery was 36 years (range, 11

  14. Degenerative changes of the cranial cruciate ligament harvested from dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    PubMed Central

    ICHINOHE, Tom; KANNO, Nobuo; HARADA, Yasuji; YOGO, Takuya; TAGAWA, Masahiro; SOETA, Satoshi; AMASAKI, Hajime; HARA, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is characterized histologically by degenerating extracellular matrix (ECM) and chondroid metaplasia. Here, we describe the progression of chondroid metaplasia and the changes in the expression of ECM components in canine CCL rupture (CCLR). CCLs from 26 stifle joints with CCLR (CCLR group) and normal CCLs from 12 young beagles (control group) were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for expression of type I (COLI), type II (COLII), type III collagen (COLIII) and Sry-type HMG box 9 (SOX9). Cell density and morphology of CCLs were quantified using hematoxylin–eosin staining. The percentage of round cells was higher in the CCLR group than in controls. COLI-positive areas were seen extensively in the connecting fibers, but weakly represented in the cytoplasm of normal CCLs. In the CCLR group, there were fewer COLI-positive areas, but many COLI-positive cells. The percentages of COLII-, COLIII- and SOX9-positive cells were higher in the CCLR group than in controls. The number of spindle cells with perinuclear halo was high in the CCLR group, and most of these cells were SOX9-positive. Deposition of COLI, the main ECM component of ligaments, decreased with increased COLIII expression in degenerated CCL tissue, which shows that the deposition of the ECM is changed in CCLR. On the contrary, expression of SOX9 increased, which may contribute to the synthesis of cartilage matrix. The expression of COLII and SOX9 in ligamentocytes showed that these cells tend to differentiate into chondrocytes. PMID:25716871

  15. Ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament in a child.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Shamsi Abdul; Sujir, Premjit; Naik, Monappa A; Rao, Sharath K

    2012-04-01

    Ganglion cysts are more commonly associated with the anterior cruciate ligament than the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A literature review showed that all reported cases of ganglion cysts to date involved adults. We report a rare case of ganglion cyst in the PCL of a four-year-old boy, and discuss its aetiology, clinical presentation, imaging features and management. Ganglion cysts of the PCL may be confused with meniscal cysts arising from tears of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hence, the posterior horn of the medial meniscus has to be carefully evaluated to rule out a tear. MR imaging is the method of choice to confirm diagnosis, and arthroscopic resection is a safe treatment modality even in children. PMID:22511069

  16. Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Structure, Injuries and Regenerative Treatments.

    PubMed

    Negahi Shirazi, Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Khademhosseini, Ali; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most vulnerable ligaments of the knee. ACL impairment results in episodic instability, chondral and meniscal injury and early osteoarthritis. The poor self-healing capacity of ACL makes surgical treatment inevitable. Current ACL reconstructions include a substitution of torn ACL via biological grafts such as autograft, allograft. This review provides an insight of ACL structure, orientation and properties followed by comparing the performance of various constructs that have been used for ACL replacement. New approaches, undertaken to induce ACL regeneration and fabricate biomimetic scaffolds, are also discussed. PMID:26545750

  17. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, John; Hutt, Jonathan; Rickman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This report details the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in an 18-year-old man with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The reduced mechanical properties of the tissue in EDS can pose a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. In this case, we describe the use of a hamstring autograft combined with a Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS). There was a good radiographical, clinical, and functional outcome after two years. This technique gave a successful outcome in the reconstruction of the ACL in a patient with EDS and therefore may help surgeons faced with the same clinical scenario. PMID:26221555

  18. LEG'S COMPARTMENT SYNDROME AFTER RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Jorge Sayum; Ramos, Leonardo Adeo; Sayum, Jorge; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Ejnisman, Benno; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsuro; Nicolini, Alexandre; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient that was submitted to a surgery of reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and collateral medial ligament repair of the left knee that complicated to a compartment syndrome. PMID:27047834

  19. Controversies in Knee Rehabilitation: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Failla, Mathew J.; Arundale, Amelia J.H.; Logerstedt, David S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Controversy in management of athletes exists after anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction. Consensus criteria for evaluating successful outcomes following ACL injury include no re-injury or recurrent giving way, no joint effusion, quadriceps strength symmetry, restored activity level and function, and returning to pre-injury sports. Using these criterions, we will review the success rates of current management strategies after ACL injury and provide recommendations for the counseling of athletes after ACL injury. PMID:25818715

  20. Genetic basis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Baird, Arabella Elizabeth Gardiner; Carter, Stuart D; Innes, John F; Ollier, William E; Short, Andrea D

    2014-08-01

    Cranial Cruciate Ligament rupture (CCLR) is one of the most common forms of lameness in dogs and is analogous to rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament in humans, for which it can serve as a model. As there is a strong breed-related predisposition to CCLR in dogs, a study was undertaken to consider putative genetic components in susceptible dog breeds. A candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping approach using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (Sequenom Ltd) was designed to investigate several CCLR-susceptible dog breeds and identify CCLR-associated genes/gene regions that may confer susceptibility or resistance. A meta-analysis was performed using the breed case/control candidate gene data to identify SNP associations that were common to the whole cohort of susceptible dogs. We identified SNPs in key genes involved in ligament strength, stability and extracellular matrix formation (COL5A1, COL5A2, COL1A1, COL3A1, COL11A1, COL24A1, FBN1, LOX, LTBP2) which were significantly associated with CCLR susceptibility across the dog breeds used in this study. These SNPs could have an involvement in CCLR due to a detrimental effect on ligament structure and strength. This is the first published candidate gene study that has revealed significant genetic associations with canine CCLR. PMID:24684544

  1. Biomechanical Measures During Landing and Postural Stability Predict Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Return to Sport

    PubMed Central

    Paterno, Mark V.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Ford, Kevin R.; Rauh, Mitchell J.; Myer, Gregory D.; Huang, Bin; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Athletes who return to sport participation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) have a higher risk of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury (either reinjury or contralateral injury) compared with non–anterior cruciate ligament–injured athletes. Hypotheses Prospective measures of neuromuscular control and postural stability after ACLR will predict relative increased risk for a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Study Design Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Fifty-six athletes underwent a prospective biomechanical screening after ACLR using 3-dimensional motion analysis during a drop vertical jump maneuver and postural stability assessment before return to pivoting and cutting sports. After the initial test session, each subject was followed for 12 months for occurrence of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Lower extremity joint kinematics, kinetics, and postural stability were assessed and analyzed. Analysis of variance and logistic regression were used to identify predictors of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Results Thirteen athletes suffered a subsequent second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Transverse plane hip kinetics and frontal plane knee kinematics during landing, sagittal plane knee moments at landing, and deficits in postural stability predicted a second injury in this population (C statistic = 0.94) with excellent sensitivity (0.92) and specificity (0.88). Specific predictive parameters included an increase in total frontal plane (valgus) movement, greater asymmetry in internal knee extensor moment at initial contact, and a deficit in single-leg postural stability of the involved limb, as measured by the Biodex stability system. Hip rotation moment independently predicted second anterior cruciate ligament injury (C = 0.81) with high sensitivity (0.77) and specificity (0.81). Conclusion Altered neuromuscular control of the hip and knee during a dynamic landing task

  2. Anatomic Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Remnant Preservation Using Outside-In Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Ill; Kwon, Sai-Won; Choi, Hyung-Suk; Chun, Dong-Il; Kim, Yong-Beom; Kim, Byoung-Min

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a modified anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction technique using the FlipCutter guide pin (Arthrex, Naples, FL) as a retrograde drill and a cortical suspensory fixation device (TightRope; Arthrex) with an adjustable graft loop length. Preservation of the ACL remnant as a biological sleeve for the graft is an important issue from the viewpoints of acceleration of revascularization and ligamentization, preservation of the proprioceptive nerve fibers, enhancement of the biological environment for healing, and maintenance of the anchor point at the native tibial attachment, in addition to yielding a lower incidence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement. The goal of our technique is to obtain some advantages of the remnant-preserving technique through an anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, which is performed to minimize damage to the ACL tibial remnant. PMID:26759771

  3. 3D Printing Surgical Implants at the clinic: A Experimental Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, An; Xue, Guang-huai; Sun, Miao; Shao, Hui-feng; Ma, Chi-yuan; Gao, Qing; Gou, Zhong-ru; Yan, Shi-gui; Liu, Yan-ming; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers (D3DPs) have become a popular tool for fabricating personalized consumer products, favored for low cost, easy operation, and other advantageous qualities. This study focused on the potential for using D3DPs to successfully, rapidly, and economically print customized implants at medical clinics. An experiment was conducted on a D3DP-printed anterior cruciate ligament surgical implant using a rabbit model. A well-defined, orthogonal, porous PLA screw-like scaffold was printed, then coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve its osteoconductivity. As an internal fixation as well as an ideal cell delivery system, the osteogenic scaffold loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated through both in vitro and in vivo tests to observe bone-ligament healing via cell therapy. The MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel on PLA/HA screw-like scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. In vivo assessment of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament models for 4 and 12 weeks showed that the PLA/HA screw-like scaffold loaded with MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel exhibited significant bone ingrowth and bone-graft interface formation within the bone tunnel. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that fabricating surgical implants at the clinic (fab@clinic) with D3DPs can be feasible, effective, and economical. PMID:26875826

  4. 3D Printing Surgical Implants at the clinic: A Experimental Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Xue, Guang-huai; Sun, Miao; Shao, Hui-feng; Ma, Chi-yuan; Gao, Qing; Gou, Zhong-ru; Yan, Shi-gui; Liu, Yan-ming; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers (D3DPs) have become a popular tool for fabricating personalized consumer products, favored for low cost, easy operation, and other advantageous qualities. This study focused on the potential for using D3DPs to successfully, rapidly, and economically print customized implants at medical clinics. An experiment was conducted on a D3DP-printed anterior cruciate ligament surgical implant using a rabbit model. A well-defined, orthogonal, porous PLA screw-like scaffold was printed, then coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve its osteoconductivity. As an internal fixation as well as an ideal cell delivery system, the osteogenic scaffold loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated through both in vitro and in vivo tests to observe bone-ligament healing via cell therapy. The MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel on PLA/HA screw-like scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. In vivo assessment of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament models for 4 and 12 weeks showed that the PLA/HA screw-like scaffold loaded with MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel exhibited significant bone ingrowth and bone-graft interface formation within the bone tunnel. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that fabricating surgical implants at the clinic (fab@clinic) with D3DPs can be feasible, effective, and economical. PMID:26875826

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament repair - Series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    If the ACL is torn, the knee joint may become unstable and affect the ability to perform work or athletic activities. ... ACL reconstruction is surgery to replace the torn ACL ligament. There ... including an autograft (tissue from the patient’s own body) ...

  6. Tibial Tunnel Cyst Formation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Non-Bioabsorbable Interference Screw

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Yogesh V.; Phaltankar, Padmanabh M.; Charalambous, Charalambos P.

    2015-01-01

    Tibial cyst formation following the use of bioabsorbable interference screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is well-described; however, cyst formation after the use of metallic interference screws is not well-documented. We describe a case of osteolytic lesion of the proximal tibia presenting to us 20 years after ACL reconstruction using an autologous bone-tendon-bone graft. The original graft fixation technique was interference fixation with a metal screw in the tibial and femoral tunnels. A two-stage revision reconstruction of the ACL was undertaken with curettage and bone grafting of the tibial lesion in the first stage and reconstruction using a four-strand hamstring tendon in the second stage. The patient recovered satisfactorily with complete healing of the cyst and returned to pre-injury level of activities. We have reviewed case reports and case series that describe the aetiology of intra-osseous cyst formation following ACL reconstruction. PMID:26673117

  7. Tibial Tunnel Cyst Formation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Non-Bioabsorbable Interference Screw.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Yogesh V; Bhaskar, Deepu; Phaltankar, Padmanabh M; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2015-12-01

    Tibial cyst formation following the use of bioabsorbable interference screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is well-described; however, cyst formation after the use of metallic interference screws is not well-documented. We describe a case of osteolytic lesion of the proximal tibia presenting to us 20 years after ACL reconstruction using an autologous bone-tendon-bone graft. The original graft fixation technique was interference fixation with a metal screw in the tibial and femoral tunnels. A two-stage revision reconstruction of the ACL was undertaken with curettage and bone grafting of the tibial lesion in the first stage and reconstruction using a four-strand hamstring tendon in the second stage. The patient recovered satisfactorily with complete healing of the cyst and returned to pre-injury level of activities. We have reviewed case reports and case series that describe the aetiology of intra-osseous cyst formation following ACL reconstruction. PMID:26673117

  8. Bilateral Medial Tibial Plateau Fracture after Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jae; Jeon, Jong Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Tibial plateau fractures after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are rare, and only isolated cases have been reported. The authors describe a case of bilateral medial tibial plateau fracture following a minor motorcycle accident in a patient who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in the past. Two years and four months before the accident, the patient underwent an arthroscopically assisted ACL reconstruction using double-bundle technique on his left knee at a hospital. He had the same surgery using single-bundle technique on his right knee about eight months ago at another hospital. The fractures in his both involved knees occurred through the tibial tunnel and required open reduction with internal fixation. At three weeks after fixation, a second-look arthroscopy revealed intact ACLs in both knees. At five months follow-up, he was able to walk without instability on physical examination. Follow-up radiographs of the patient showed callus formations with healed fractures. PMID:26060613

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Female Athletes: Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, Mary Lloyd

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To present epidemiologic studies on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in female athletes. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched from 1978 to 1998 with the terms “anterior cruciate ligament” and “female athlete” among others. Additional sources were knowledge base and oral, didactic, and video presentations. Data Synthesis: Epidemiologic studies have focused on level of participation, specific sports, sex differences and contributing factors, injury mechanism, prevention programs, and outcomes studies. Female athletes have a significantly increased risk of noncontact ACL injuries over male athletes in soccer and basketball. Conclusions/Recommendations: I believe that appropriate intervention programs can reduce these alarming rates of ACL injuries. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3. PMID:16558558

  10. Histological characteristics and ultrastructure of polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shao-Bin; Yang, Rong-Hua; Zuo, Zhong-Nan; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament were the remnant of LARS ligament used for repairing posterior cruciate ligament obtained from operation. We want to study histological characteristics and ultrastructure of polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament in rabbits. Therefore, we replaced the original ACL with polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament which was covering with the remnant of ACL in 9 rabbits (L-LARS group), while just only polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament were transplanted in 3 rabbits (LARS group) with the remnant of ACL. Compared with group LARS, inflammatory cell reaction and foreign body reaction were more significant in group L-LARS. Moreover, electron microscopy investigation showed the tissue near LARS fibers was highly cellular with a matrix of thin collagen fibrils (50-100 nm) in group L-LARS. These above findings suggest the polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament possess the high biocompatibility, which contributes to the polyethylene terephthalate LARS covered with recipient connective tissues. PMID:25356104

  11. [Implant-free anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with the patella ligament and press-fit double bundle technique].

    PubMed

    Hertel, P; Behrend, H

    2010-07-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using autologous tendons (BTB patellar tendon, hamstrings, quadriceps tendon) in an implant-free fixation technique is becoming more and more popular due to biological and economical reasons. In 1987 an implant-free press-fit fixation technique of a BTB graft from the medial side of the patellar tendon (via mini-arthrotomy) was introduced and first published during the 4th ESKA Conference 1990 in Stockholm. Special emphasis is given to the anatomical orientation of the BTB graft. During the inside-out femoral press-fit fixation the bone-ligament margin of the graft is placed directly into the femoral insertion line of the natural ACL adapting its double-bundle structure. The graft is fixed by press-fit within the tibial metaphysis and its ligamentous part is secured in the metaphysis by harvested cancellous bone blocks driven into the joint line from the outside. The postoperative regime includes weight-bearing as tolerated and free motion. Out of 159 patients 95 could be seen for follow-up after an average of 10.7 years. The final IKDC knee score revealed 22.1% in group A (very good) and 62.1% in group B (good). The Tegner activity level was 6.8 preinjury and 6.0 postoperatively. The average KT 1,000 side-to-side difference was 1.8 mm. Subjectively no patient complained of instability and 99% of the patients could kneel on hard ground with minimal or no complaints. ACL revision surgery due to graft failure was not necessary in any of the patients. Advantages of the described procedure are a narrow anatomical orientation including the double bundle structure of the ACL, rapid graft incorporation by bone-to-bone healing, lack of bone resorption at the graft-host interface, decreased donor site morbidity, cost-effectiveness and ease of possible revision surgery. PMID:20607510

  12. Anatomic Double-Bundle Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Nitri, Marco; Civitarese, David; Dean, Chase S; Moulton, Samuel G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is known to be the main posterior stabilizer of the knee. Anatomic single-bundle PCL reconstruction, focusing on reconstruction of the larger anterolateral bundle, is the most commonly performed procedure. Because of the residual posterior and rotational tibial instability after the single-bundle procedure and the inability to restore the normal knee kinematics, an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction has been proposed in an effort to re-create the native PCL footprint more closely and to restore normal knee kinematics. We detail our technique for an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction using Achilles and anterior tibialis tendon allografts. PMID:27284530

  13. Ossicle in Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A Rare Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amanpreet; Gogna, Paritosh

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of an intra-articular ossicle is not rare in the knee, with reports suggesting the existence of meniscal osscile. There are also reports describing the attachment of the posterolateral bundle of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) to an accessory ossicle. However, despite an extensive search of the English literature we did not find much written about an intrasubstance ossicle in the ACL. We present the case of a 13-year-old male with an intrasubstance ossicle in the anteromedial bundle of the ACL of his right knee. PMID:24822144

  14. An audit of tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Topliss, C; Webb, J

    2001-03-01

    We audited 114 primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. Notes were reviewed and tunnel positions assessed on lateral and AP radiographs. A literature review established optimal tunnel position. Sixteen surgeons performed 57 arthroscopic and 57 open reconstructions, using 24 hamstring and 90 bone-tendon-bone autografts. Eighty-five sets of radiographs were available for review. Sixty-five percent of femoral tunnels and 59% of the tibial tunnels were malpositioned in the sagittal plane. Guidelines for best practice are required for key procedures in each speciality. Tunnel position in ACL reconstruction can be easily measured and should be correct in at least 90% of cases. PMID:11248570

  15. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:26417571

  16. The Evolution of Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Getgood, Alan; Spalding, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has evolved significantly since the early 1900’s, back when an emphasis was placed on repair and not reconstruction. Over the past century, the technique has evolved from intra-articular non anatomic reconstruction, to extra articular reconstruction, back to intra articular (performed arthroscopically), to now, the advent of anatomic insertion site restoration. This review will aim to illustrate the changes that have occurred, describing the rational for this process, based upon anatomical, radiological, biomechanical and clinical studies, all of which have aimed to improve patient function following ACL injury. PMID:22905073

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament injury in indoor ball games.

    PubMed

    Ebstrup, J F; Bojsen-Møller, F

    2000-04-01

    Three videorecorded incidents of knee injuries inflicted during indoor ball games are reported. Injuries and especially anterior cruciate ligament ruptures seemed to be triggered in varus loaded knees by femural external rotation, or in valgus loaded knees by femural internal rotation with the pivot shifted to the lateral femurotibial compartment. The observations suggest that it may be to the players' advantage to be trained in not letting their knees sag medially or laterally during side-stepping or sudden changes in speed. PMID:10755283

  18. Clinics in diagnostic imaging. 141. Complete anterior cruciate ligament tear.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hollie M Y; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2012-09-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with right knee pain and swelling following a football injury. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed a complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear and lateral meniscal tears. The torn ACL was repaired with a graft obtained from the semitendinosus muscle, and the menisci were debrided. The mechanisms of injury to the ACL are varied and may be due to direct or indirect contact with the knee as well as with twisting injuries. Knowledge of the ACL's normal anatomy, together with MR imaging technique and understanding of the appearance of the lesion on MR examination, is crucial to aid in the identification of an ACL tear. Diagnosis of an ACL tear should be based on direct MR imaging signs, although indirect signs may be helpful, particularly in chronic tears. Other associated injuries to be aware of include meniscal and other ligamentous injuries. Normal ACL graft and post-ACL graft reconstruction complications are also briefly discussed. PMID:23023908

  19. Injuries to the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Bergfeld, J; Järvinen, M; Johnson, R J; Pope, M; Renström, P; Yasuda, K

    1991-08-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the strongest ligament about the knee and is approximately twice as strong as the anterior cruciate ligament. Its main function is to prevent the posterior dislocation of the tibia in relation to the femur, providing 95% of the strength to resist the tibial posterior displacement. Along with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) the PCL controls the passive 'screw home' mechanism of the knee in terminal knee extension. It also provides mechanical support for the collateral ligaments during valgus or varus stress of the knee. PCL ruptures are uncommon apparently due to its strong fibre structure. The most frequent injury mechanism in isolated PCL tears is a direct blow on the anterior tibia with the knee flexed thus driving the tibia posteriorly. Automobile accidents (in which the knee hits the dashboard) and soccer injuries (in which an athlete receives a blow to the anterior surface of the tibia during knee flexion) characteristically produce this type of injury. In other PCL injury mechanisms (hyperextension, hyperflexion or rotational injuries with associated valgum/varum stress), other knee structures are also often damaged. The most characteristic diagnostic finding in a knee with a PCL rupture is the 'posterior sag sign' meaning the apparent disappearance of the tibial tubercle in lateral inspection when the knee is flexed 90 degrees. This is due to gravity-assisted posterior displacement of the tibia in relation to the femur. A positive posterior drawer test performed at 90 degrees of flexion and a knee hyperextension sign are sensitive but nonspecific tests. False negative findings are frequent, especially in acute cases. If necessary, the clinical diagnosis of the PCL tear can be verified by magnetic resonance imaging, examination under anaesthesia, arthroscopy, or a combination of these modalities. If a PCL avulsion fragment has been dislocated, surgical treatment is recommended. In isolated, complete midsubstance

  20. Posterior Cruciate Ligament (pcl) Reconstruction by Transtibial Tunnel:. Suggestions of Lengthening and Slippage Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jay-Jung; Kim, Cheol-Woong

    This paper examined the biomechanical fatigue behavior of Achilles tendon autograft after posterior cruciate ligament (PLC) reconstructions. It experimented with various fixation devices and locations on the degree of initial lengthening and slippage to investigate the relationship between lengthening and slippage ratios among calcaneal and soft tissue fixation methods. Eight specimens of proximal tibia and Achilles tendon grafts were harvested from cadavers and classified into four groups according to the type of transtibial fixation technique. A cyclic load ranging from 50N to 250N was applied to each graft when fixed to the proximal tibia at 55 degrees. The soft tissue fixation method, which uses an interference screw, demonstrated a 56.4% ratio of slippage to total elongation. The use of a double cross-pin with the same method demonstrated a 45.4% slippage ratio. The former was associated with approximately 2 mm less total elongation and 13% more slippage than lengthening compared to the latter. This result was predominantly due to the poor standard of fixation compared to the same method using a double cross-pin.

  1. ANATOMICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT OF THE KNEE: DOUBLE BAND OR SINGLE BAND?

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Luiz Antonio Zanotelli; Junior, Adair Bervig; Badotti, Augusto Alves; Michelin, Alexandre Froes; Algarve, Rodrigo Ilha; de Quadros Martins, Cesar Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the double-band and single-band techniques for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and demonstrate that the double-band technique not only provides greater anterior stability but also causes less pain and a better subjective patient response. Methods: We selected 42 patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, by means of either the single-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using flexor tendon grafts with two tunnels, or the double-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using four tunnels and grafts from the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All fixations were performed using interference screws. There was no variation in the sample. Before the operation, the objective and subjective IKDC scores, Lysholm score and length of time with the injury were evaluated. All these variables were reassessed six months later, and the KT-1000 correlation with the contralateral knee was also evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but the single-band group showed better results in relation to range of motion and objective evaluations including KT-1000 (with statistical significance). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that there was no difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but better results were found using the single-band anatomical technique, in relation to objective evaluations. PMID:27042621

  2. FEMORAL INSERTION OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: AN ANATOMICAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; Neto, Leopoldo Viana Batista; Goarayeb, Dedley Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify objective parameters to guide correct location of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in the femur. Methods: The PCLs of 20 human cadavers were resected. The following portions were measured: distance from the most distal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior edge of the cartilage (AB); distance from the most proximal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior cartilage (AC); distance between the two parts of the ligament close to the roof (BC); distance from the distal edge in its posterior portion, to the more posterior joint edge (DE); distance from the distal edge of the ligament in its posterior portion, to the intercondylar roof (DF); and finally, the format of the ligament insertion and area of coverage on the femoral condyle. Results: The PCL has the shape of a quarter ellipse, with an average area of 153.5mm2. The mean distances found were: AB of 2.1mm, AC of 10.7mm, BC of 8.6mm DE of 12.4mm and DF of 16.8mm. Conclusions: The edge close to the roof of the anterolateral bundle is closer to the joint cartilage (2.1mm) than the posteromedial bundle is, which is 12.4mm from the edge proximal to the cartilage. These references should assist in better and more accurate positioning of femoral tunnels in PCL reconstruction. PMID:27027059

  3. Variations in cell morphology in the canine cruciate ligament complex.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Vaughan-Thomas, A; Spiller, D G; Clegg, P D; Innes, J F; Comerford, E J

    2012-08-01

    Cell morphology may reflect the mechanical environment of tissues and influence tissue physiology and response to injury. Normal cruciate ligaments (CLs) from disease-free stifle joints were harvested from dog breeds with a high (Labrador retriever) and low (Greyhound) risk of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Antibodies against the cytoskeletal components vimentin and alpha tubulin were used to analyse cell morphology; nuclei were stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, and images were collected using conventional and confocal microscopy. Both cranial and caudal CLs contained cells of heterogenous morphologies. Cells were arranged between collagen bundles and frequently had cytoplasmic processes. Some of these processes were long (type A cells), others were shorter, thicker and more branched (type B cells), and some had no processes (type C cells). Processes were frequently shown to contact other cells, extending longitudinally and transversely through the CLs. Cells with longer processes had fusiform nuclei, and those with no processes had rounded nuclei and were more frequent in the mid-substance of both CLs. Cells with long processes were more commonly noted in the CLs of the Greyhound. As contact between cells may facilitate direct communication, variances in cell morphology between breeds at a differing risk of CCL rupture may reflect differences in CL physiology. PMID:22465617

  4. The effect of immediate weightbearing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tyler, T F; McHugh, M P; Gleim, G W; Nicholas, S J

    1998-12-01

    Immediate weightbearing has been advocated after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and is thought to enhance the return of quadriceps muscle activity and knee extension range of motion without jeopardizing graft integrity. This study examined the effect of immediate weightbearing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on the return of vastus medialis oblique electromyography activity, knee extension range of motion, knee stability, physical examination, Lysholm score, and anterior knee pain. Forty-nine patients (24 men and 25 women) undergoing endoscopic central third patella tendon autograft reconstruction were randomized prospectively into two groups. Group 1 patients underwent immediate weightbearing as tolerated. Group 2 patients were kept nonweightbearing for 2 weeks. All measurements were taken before surgery, 2 weeks after surgery, and between 6 and 14 months (average, 7.3 months) followup. There was no effect of weightbearing on knee extension range of motion or vastus medialis oblique function at followup. In addition, knee stability was not compromised after surgery. Seven of 20 (35%) nonweightbearing patients and only two of 25 (8%) immediate weightbearing patients reported anterior knee pain at followup. Overall, immediate weightbearing did not compromise knee joint stability and resulted in a better outcome with a decreased incidence of anterior knee pain. PMID:9917711

  5. REHABILITATION PROTOCOL AFTER ISOLATED POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Kiyomoto, Henry Dan; Rosal, Gustavo Fogolin; Bryk, Flávio Fernandes; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; de Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix

    2015-01-01

    To create a rehabilitation protocol following reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), through a literature review. The literature review was conducted in the Medline and Embase databases, to search for data on biomechanical concepts and analyses relating to the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee. The search strategy was set up using the following rules: problem or injury in association with anatomical location terms; or surgical intervention procedure in association with rehabilitation terms. We began the process in this manner and subsequently introduced restrictions on certain terms to improve the search specificity. To design the protocol, a table was created for better data assessment, based on the time that elapsed between surgery and the start of physiotherapy. A rehabilitation protocol was created to improve weight-bearing control in the initial weeks after surgery, with the aid of a knee brace. Our aim was to achieve gains in total range of motion of the knee, which should be attained by the third month, thereby avoiding contractures resulting from the tissue healing process. Strengthening exercises and sensory-motor training were guided accordingly, thus avoiding overload on the graft and respecting the healing phases. The protocol proposed through this review was based on the current evidence relating to this subject. PMID:27047844

  6. Microvascular system of anterior cruciate ligament in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Baba, Hisatoshi; Uchida, Kenzo; Negoro, Kohei; Sato, Mituhiko; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Nomura, Eiki; Murakami, Kaname; Shimizubata, Matsuyuki; Meir, Adam

    2006-07-01

    This study was done to investigate the microvascular system of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using dogs. The objective was to study the microvascular architecture and the status of the barrier function of the capillary wall in the ACL by using microangiogram, scanning (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The vascular system in the ACL has been intensively studied by a number of researchers, using several microangiographic techniques in dogs, rabbits, and humans. However, most of these microangiographic studies had significant shortcomings, including the lack of three-dimensional observations and function of the blood-joint barrier in the ACL. In this study, the microstructure of the ACL was examined using microangiogram, SEM, and TEM. We investigated the vasculature of the ACL with SEM of vascular corrosion casts. In addition, we examined the status of the barrier function of the capillary wall in the ACL using the protein tracer horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Feeding vessels of the ligament were predominantly coming from the synovial-derived vessels originating from the synovium attached to the ligament near the tibial and femoral bone insertions of the ACL. The anterior cruciate ligament was surrounded by synovium, which had abundant vessels. The branches of these synovial vessels were penetrating into the ligament and making the intrinsic vascular network. It was also ascertained under SEM that the perivascular space around the intrinsic vessels were communicating through the intrinsic ligament fiber bundles and the mesh-like synovial membrane. The capillaries in the ACL were all of the continuous type under TEM. The protein tracer that was injected into the joint space passed through the synovial membrane and entered into the capillary lumen in the ACL, but the tracer that was injected intravenously did not appear in the perivascular space. The existence of a blood-ACL barrier does not necessarily imply the existence of an ACL-blood barrier. We

  7. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Isometry Is Affected by the Orientation of the Femoral Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ebersole, Gregg M; Eckerle, Paul; Farrow, Lutul D; Cutuk, Adnan; Bledsoe, Gary; Kaar, Scott

    2016-04-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft length and tension throughout knee range of motion with transtibial, anteromedial (AM) portal, and all-epiphyseal drilling techniques with suspensory and apical femoral fixation. Methods The three different femoral tunnel drilling techniques using the same intra-articular starting point within the center of the femoral footprint were performed on fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens. All groups underwent standard tibial drilling in the center of the ACL tibial footprint. FiberWire (Arthrex Inc., Naples, FL) was used to simulate anatomic single bundle reconstructions. Changes in graft length and tension were measured at knee flexion angles of 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 135 degrees. Results Graft length and tension decreased from 0 through 60 degrees and subsequently increased from 90 to 135 degrees for all groups. The transtibial, AM portal suspensory, and apical fixation groups were similar. However, the all-epiphyseal tunnel with suspensory fixation had a significantly increased change in length (90, 120, and 135 degrees) and tension (120 and 135 degrees). Conclusion Transtibial and AM portal suspensory fixation and apical fixation demonstrate similar changes in length and tension throughout knee range of motion. The all-epiphyseal tunnel with suspensory fixation was associated with greater length and tension changes at higher degrees of knee flexion. All techniques demonstrated decreased graft length and tension with knee flexion to 60 degrees after which they increased with further knee flexion. Clinical Relevance ACL graft length and tension change throughout knee range of motion and also depend on femoral tunnel orientation and fixation type. The use of an all-epiphyseal tunnel with suspensory fixation should be studied further for evidence of graft elongation. PMID:26190786

  8. Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee: Back to the Future in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; D’Amelio, Andrea; Pellegrino, Pietro; Rosso, Federica; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of the anterolateral stabilizing structures of the knee in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries has been recognized since many years, most of orthopedic surgeons do not take into consideration the anterolateral structures when performing an ACL reconstruction. Anatomic single or double bundle ACL reconstruction will improve knee stability, but a small subset of patients may experience some residual anteroposterior and rotational instability. For this reason, some researchers have turned again towards the anterolateral aspect of the knee and specifically the anterolateral ligament. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding the anterolateral ligament of the knee, including anatomy, histology, biomechanics and imaging. In addition, the most common anterolateral reconstruction/tenodesis techniques are described together with their respective clinical outcomes. PMID:26330991

  9. Outcome of transtibial AperFix system in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    PubMed Central

    Görmeli, Gökay; Görmeli, C Ayşe; Karakaplan, Mustafa; Korkmaz, M Fatih; Diliçıkık, Uğur; Gözükara, Harika

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the major stabilizing factor of the knee that resist anterior translation, valgus and varus forces. ACL is the most commonly ruptured ligament of the knee. The graft fixation to bone is considered to be the weakest link of the reconstruction. According to the parallel forces to the tibial drill hole and the quality of tibial metaphyseal bone is inferior to femoral bone stock, graft fixation to the tibia is more difficult to secure. AperFix system (Cayenne Medical, Inc., Scottsdale, Arizona, USA) which consists femoral and tibial component that includes bioinert polymer polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is one of the new choice for ACL reconstruction surgery. aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcomes and fixation durability of the AperFix (Cayenne Madical, Inc., Scottsdale, Arizona, USA) system and to determine the effect of patient's age in arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Materials and Methods: Patients with symptomatic anterior cruciate ligament rupture underwent arthroscopic reconstruction. Patients were evaluated in terms of range of motion (ROM) values; Lysholm, Cincinati and Tegner activity scales; laxity testing and complications. Femoral tunnel widening was assessed by computer tomography scans. Early postoperative and last followup radiographs were compared. Results: Fifty one patients were evaluated with mean followup of 29 months (range 25–34 months). Mean age at the surgery was 26.5 ± 7.2 years. Lysholm, Cincinati and Tegner activity scales were significantly higher from preoperative scores (Lysholm scores: Preoperative: 51.4 ± 17.2, postoperative: 88.6 ± 7.7 [P < 0.001]; Tegner activity scores: Preoperative 3.3 ± 1.38, postoperative: 5.3 ± 1.6 [P < 0.001]; Cincinati scores: Preoperative: 44.3 ± 17, postoperative: 81.3 ± 13.9 [P < 0.001]). The mean femoral tunnel diameter increased significantly from 9.94 ± 0.79 mm postoperatively to 10.79 ± 0.95 mm

  10. Avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament in an uncommon location associated with distal injury to the patellar ligament☆

    PubMed Central

    e Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; da Palma, Idemar Monteiro; Cobra, Hugo; de Paula Mozella, Alan; Vaques, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament in unusual locations are rare injuries. We report the first case in the literature of an avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament associated with distal injury to the patellar ligament. The aim of this study was to present a novel case, the therapy used and the clinical follow-up. PMID:27218089

  11. Surgical Treatment of a Rare Isolated Bilateral Agenesis of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments. PMID:25197599

  12. Arterial Supply to the Human Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Toy, Brian J.; Yeasting, Richard A.; Morse, Dennis E.; McCann, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    The arterial supply to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was prepared for study by injecting a fresh cadaver knee with an epoxy lead-oxide solution and subsequently immersing it in 10% formalin for a 2-week period. The vasculature of the ACL was exposed through dissection for examination. A second specimen was prepared similarly and was evaluated by a CAT scan. ACL vascularization arises from the middle genicular artery and vessels of the infrapatella fat pad and adjacent synovium. The artery gives rise to periligamentous vessels which form a web-like network within the synovial membrane. These periligamentous vessels give rise to penetrating branches which transversely cross the ACL and anastomose with a network of longitudinally oriented endoligamentous vessels. Terminal branches of the inferior medial and lateral genicular arteries supply the distal portion of the ACL directly. The extremities of the ACL seem to be better vascularized than the middle part, and the proximal portion seems to have a greater vascular density than the distal portion. The arteries at the ligamentous-osseous junctions of the ACL do not significantly contribute to the ligament's vascularity. Ramifications concerning the ACL's blood supply as it relates to athletic training is also discussed. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4. PMID:16558326

  13. Ring-shaped lateral meniscus with hypoplasic anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Cátia; Castro, Ricardo; Cadilha, Rui; Raposo, Frederico; Melão, Lina

    2015-12-01

    Knee joint lesions can be solitary or occur concomitantly with other lower limb abnormalities. Ring-shaped lateral meniscus (RSM) and hypoplasic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are two rare malformations. The therapeutic management of such abnormalities is not consensual, and highly depends on clinical symptomatology. We report a case of a 25-year-old girl with progressive knee pain whose MRI demonstrated a continuous segment of lateral meniscus situated along the medial aspect of the lateral compartment, continuous with the otherwise normal-appearing lateral meniscus, compatible with an RSM. This anatomic variant can be mistaken by a displaced meniscal fragment, like a bucket-handle tear, a central tear of a discoid meniscus, or incomplete discoid meniscus, as previously reported. Her MRI examination also showed a thinned ACL with anomalous lateral course. This abnormality may be mistaken for an ACL rupture and/or a meniscofemoral ligament with agenesis of ACL. Multiple images in different planes as well as following the course of meniscal and ligaments are critical clues to avoid misdiagnosis. As a result, the diagnosis of an RSM along with hypoplasic ACL with abnormal attachment was assumed based on MRI and confirmed during arthroscopy. The patient was treated conservatively with clinical outcome improvement. PMID:26178136

  14. High prevalence of anterolateral ligament abnormalities in magnetic resonance images of anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees.

    PubMed

    Claes, Steven; Bartholomeeusen, Stijn; Bellemans, Johan

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the newly described anterolateral ligament of the human knee on magnetic resonance imaging and to describe its eventual radiological abnormalities in anterior cruciate ligament-injured subjects. A retrospective cohort study on a series of consecutive subjects undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstructive surgery was performed. The MR images of 206 included knees were studied and the status of the anterolateral ligament status was judged to be either "non-visualized", "normal" or "abnormal". Of all the visualized anterolateral ligaments, 44 (21.3%) were considered uninjured, while 162 (78.8%) knees demonstrated radiological ALL abnormalities. The majority of ALL abnormalities were situated in the distal part of the ligament (77.8%). In conclusion, the anterolateral ligament can be identified on classic knee magnetic resonance images. Although anterior cruciate ligament injured subjects often demonstrated associated anterolateral ligament lesions, further research is needed in order to establish the clinical relevance of these highly frequent radiological abnormalities. PMID:24873084

  15. A proposal for a new tibial guide system for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Pacagnan, André Valente; Loyola, Hugo Alexandre Guimarães; Cohen, Moisés; Camanho, Gilberto Luís; Forgas, Andrea

    2007-07-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is always a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. It is difficult when the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is intact. We propose a new guide system through the posteromedial portal, avoiding ACL damage. The arthroscope is inserted anteromedially (30 degrees), and anterolateral portals are used for instruments to confirm the diagnosis and inspect the joint to search for and treat associated lesions that may appear eventually. The posteromedial portal is located posterior to the collateral medial ligament superficially, adjacent to a portion of the posteromedial femoral condyle, which is located 1 cm proximal to the posteromedial tibial plate (where a skin marker must be used before insufflation of the knee). Our system is designed with an articular end in the form of a rasp, which helps prepare the area of the posterior tibia to be stripped before the tibial tunnel is drilled while being protected by the drill guide; this simplifies the preparation and creation of the tibial tunnel via a single device, which can be done with a 30 degrees arthroscope but is easier with a 70 degree arthroscope. The guide system through the posteromedial portal is used to determine a fixed 40 degrees angle of approach to the tibia in the anteroposterior direction to drill the tibial tunnel; this approach is particularly helpful in the presence of an intact ACL. The graft into the femoral tunnel is fixed with a bioabsorbable interference screw whose size must fit the graft and the tunnel walls. Before tibial graft fixation, it is necessary to reduce the posterior drawer. In the tibia the bundle corresponding to the anterolateral portion is tensioned and fixed under flexion, followed by the posteromedial portion in extension, by means of a Bottom Fix system (Smith & Nephew, Mayfield, MA) placed near the exit of the tibial tunnel. PMID:17637420

  16. Isokinetic and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstrings or patella tendon graft: analysis of literature.

    PubMed

    Dauty, M; Tortellier, L; Rochcongar, P

    2005-09-01

    We report isokinetic results of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring graft from the literature analysis. The literature was defined from two search "textwords": Isokinetic and Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and from three databases: Medline, Pascal, and Herasmus. Two independent physicians (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation) carried out an analysis according to the French National Accreditation and Health Evaluation Agency recommendations. Fifty-three studies were selected: 29 reported isokinetic results after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft, 15 reported isokinetic results after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring graft, and 9 studies compared the two surgical procedures. After discussing different bias and in reference to prospective randomised and comparative studies, the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft involves a knee extensors deficit during several months. The hamstring surgical procedure involves a less important knee extensor deficit (from 6 to 19 % against 8 to 21 %). Knee sprain and intra-articular surgery involve a long-lasting knee extensors deficit. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstrings graft involves a knee flexors deficit over several months. The patellar tendon surgical procedure involves a less important knee flexors deficit (from 1 to 15 % against 5 to 17 %). In reference to isokinetic parameters, no difference between the two surgical procedures (patellar tendon graft or hamstring graft) is shown after more than twenty-four post-surgical months. PMID:16195995

  17. [Increase in surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury].

    PubMed

    Meuffels, D E

    2009-01-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a very common musculoskeletal injury. The number of ACL reconstructions is increasing, both in the Netherlands and worldwide. Substantial progress has been made in surgical technique: from open to arthroscopic procedures. An ACL reconstruction will not diminish the chance of osteoarthritis, and the biomechanical properties of the knee will never be the same as before the trauma. An ACL reconstruction does, however, reduce the chance of instability, or 'giving way', which is the most important indication for surgical intervention. There are insufficient long-term results described in the literature to indicate either surgery or conservative measures as the treatment of choice. Treatment should be individually determined, taking into consideration factors such as: pattern of symptoms, degree of instability, desire to practise sport, age and willingness to commit to a 9-month rehabilitation programme. PMID:21401972

  18. Simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Demircay, Emre; Ofluoglu, Demet; Ozel, Omer; Oztop, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are rare, and bilateral ganglion cysts are even rarer. These cysts may cause intermittent or chronic nonspecific knee discomfort. Although three cases of bilateral ganglion cysts have been reported in the literature, the knees were not simultaneously affected in those cases. Herein, we report the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the ACL that were symptomatic. She was successfully treated with arthroscopic resection and debridement. We also present a brief review of the literature, highlighting the aetiology, diagnosis and management of ganglion cysts of the ACL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral intra-articular ganglion cysts of the ACL. PMID:25917477

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament assessment using arthrometry and stress imaging.

    PubMed

    Rohman, Eric M; Macalena, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-01

    Arthrometry and stress imaging are useful clinical tools for the objective assessment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) integrity. They are most frequently used for the diagnosis of a complete ACL tear when other workup is equivocal, in conjunction with history and clinical exam findings. Other applications include the diagnosis of partial ACL tears, injury prognosis, and post-operative monitoring. However, further studies are needed to validate these uses. Many different devices and techniques exist for objective examination, which have been compared in recent literature. Reliability and validity measures of these methods vary, and often depend upon examiner familiarity and skill. The KT series of devices is the current gold standard for arthrometry, although the newer robotic GNRB device shows promising early results. Newer methods of data interpretation have been developed for stress imaging, and portable technology may impact this field further. PMID:26984335

  20. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status. PMID:27478579

  1. Popliteal pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan J M; Driessen, Marcel J M

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the case of a 30-year-old motocross (BMX) cyclist with a third-degree posterior cruciate ligament rupture. The technique used for reconstruction was the transtibial single-bundle autologous hamstring technique. Unfortunately, the procedure was complicated by a popliteal pseudoaneurysm, which was located in line with the tibial canal. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with an end-to-end anastomosis and the patient recovered without further complaints. In this case, the popliteal artery was damaged most probably by the edge of the reamer or the guide wire during removal. Vascular complications can be limb- and life-threatening. This case report aims to increase the awareness of this serious complication with a review of the literature. PMID:25229050

  2. Simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Ofluoglu, Demet; Ozel, Omer; Oztop, Pinar

    2015-04-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are rare, and bilateral ganglion cysts are even rarer. These cysts may cause intermittent or chronic nonspecific knee discomfort. Although three cases of bilateral ganglion cysts have been reported in the literature, the knees were not simultaneously affected in those cases. Herein, we report the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the ACL that were symptomatic. She was successfully treated with arthroscopic resection and debridement. We also present a brief review of the literature, highlighting the aetiology, diagnosis and management of ganglion cysts of the ACL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral intra-articular ganglion cysts of the ACL. PMID:25917477

  3. Radiological evidence for the triple bundle anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    MacKay, James W; Whitehead, Harry; Toms, Andoni P

    2014-10-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has traditionally been described as having two bundles--one anteromedial and one posterolateral. This has been challenged by studies proposing the existence of a third, intermediate, bundle with distinct functional significance, an arrangement that has been described in a number of domesticated animal species. No radiological evidence for the triple bundle ACL has previously been described. A prevalence study was carried out on 73 consecutive human knee magnetic resonance (MR) studies to determine the number of visible bundles, excluding individuals with a history of ACL injury or mucoid degeneration. A triple bundle ACL was demonstrated in 15 out of 73 human knees (20.5%, 95% confidence interval 12.9-31.2%). This is the first radiological description of the human triple bundle ACL. There was MR imaging evidence of a triple bundle ACL in approximately one fifth of human knees in this study. PMID:24890455

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction graft harvesting: pitfalls and tips.

    PubMed

    McGuire, David A; Hendricks, Stephen D

    2007-12-01

    Surgical treatment for anterior cruciate ligament deficiency has relied predominantly on reconstruction with autografts. Grafts taken from patients' own central third of their patellar tendon, bone-patellar tendon bone, or one or more of the hamstring tendons, semitendinosus, and gracilis, constitute the majority of grafts used for these purposes. Although there is no single graft option that clearly outperforms another, an abundance of articles replete with complications associated with harvest and use are available from peer-reviewed journals. It is these complications and their prevention that will be addressed in the following chapter. The idea in mind is that the reader might adopt these techniques to improve their patient outcomes by minimizing, or eliminating, the ongoing problems that such complications produce. PMID:18004217

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction among university students.

    PubMed

    Freedman, K B; Glasgow, M T; Glasgow, S G; Bernstein, J

    1998-11-01

    The consequences of athletic injuries extend beyond the musculoskeletal system. Depression, anger, and tension have been observed in athletes with athletic injuries. It was hypothesized that among student athletes, the psychologic impact of injury may be seen as a drop in academic performance. Thirty-eight students who had an anterior cruciate ligament injury and subsequent reconstruction were evaluated retrospectively by academic transcript and questionnaire to measure their academic performance before their injury, in the semester of their injury, and in the semester after their surgery. The patients were compared with randomly selected undergraduate control subjects. To evaluate any effect of the timing of the surgery on academic performance, the patients were separated into two groups, according to the timing of their reconstruction: those who had surgery during the academic semester, and those who elected to wait for a school break. There was a significant drop in grade point average of 0.3 grade points during the semester of injury among all injured students. Compared with those who had surgery during a break, the students who had surgery during the semester received more frequently the grade of failure (6% versus 0%) or incomplete (33% versus 9%). These students also missed more school days (10.5 days versus 1.5 days) and examinations (2.2 examinations versus 0.1 examinations). Only 47% of students who had surgery during the semester were satisfied with their decision for surgical timing, compared with 96% satisfied with the timing during an academic break. Acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture, and surgical reconstruction during an academic semester, have a significant academic effect in university students. PMID:9917686

  6. Evaluation of pain after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Brown, D W; Curry, C M; Ruterbories, L M; Avery, F L; Anson, P S

    1997-01-01

    Pain after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate reconstruction was examined during the first 5 postoperative days to evaluate its intensity and duration. One hundred consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft were examined. During surgery, ketorolac (60 mg) was given intravenously and 0.25% bupivicaine (1 ml/kg total) was injected into the joint space and the graft donor site. After surgery, all patients received scheduled doses of oral acetaminophen (650 mg) and ketorolac (10 mg) four times a day, and they were allowed to take oral oxycodone (5 to 10 mg) every 2 hours as needed. Pain scores at rest and with activity reached a maximum on the 2nd postoperative morning. Oxycodone consumption also peaked on the 2nd postoperative day. Eighty-nine (89%) patients reported overall pain as mild or moderate, and 95 patients (95%) reported either excellent or good overall relief of pain. The 5-day cumulative mean of visual analog scale pain scores for attempting straight leg raises was significantly higher for patients unable to successfully perform that activity than for patients who were able to perform it. The association between elevated pain scores and diminished ability to perform straight leg raises suggests that pain may inhibit function and therefore early rehabilitation. PMID:9079170

  7. Combined anterolateral ligament and anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee.

    PubMed

    Smith, James O; Yasen, Sam K; Lord, Breck; Wilson, Adrian J

    2015-11-01

    Although anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is established for the surgical treatment of anterolateral knee instability, there remains a significant cohort of patients who continue to experience post-operative instability. Recent advances in our understanding of the anatomic, biomechanical and radiological characteristics of the native anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have led to a resurgent interest in reconstruction of this structure as part of the management of knee instability. This technical note describes our readily reproducible combined minimally invasive technique to reconstruct both the ACL and ALL anatomically using autologous semitendinosus and gracilis grafts. This method of ALL reconstruction can be easily integrated with all-inside ACL reconstruction, requiring minimal additional operative time, equipment and expertise. Level of evidence V. PMID:26387120

  8. Feasibility of utilizing the patellar ligament angle for assessing cranial cruciate ligament rupture in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-ha

    2014-01-01

    The patellar ligament angle (PLA) was assessed in 105 normal stifle joints of 79 dogs and 33 stifle joints of 26 dogs with a ruptured cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL). The PLA of stifles with complete CrCL rupture was significantly lower than that of normal stifles, particularly at a flexion angle of 60~80° in both plain and stress views. If the PLA was <90.55° on the stress view with a 60~80° flexion angle, the dog was diagnosed with a complete rupture of the CrCL with a sensitivity of 83.9% and specificity of 100%. In conclusion, measuring the PLA is a quantitative method for diagnosing complete CrCL rupture in canines. PMID:24962409

  9. Current practice variations in the management of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Mahnik, Alan; Mahnik, Silvija; Dimnjakovic, Damjan; Curic, Stjepan; Smoljanovic, Tomislav; Bojanic, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate current preferences and opinions on the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in Croatia. METHODS: The survey was conducted using a questionnaire which was sent by e-mail to all 189 members of the Croatian Orthopaedic and Traumatology Association. Only respondents who had performed at least one ACL reconstruction during 2011 were asked to fill out the questionnaire. RESULTS: Thirty nine surgeons responded to the survey. Nearly all participants (95%) used semitendinosus/gracilis tendon autograft for reconstruction and only 5% used bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft. No other graft type had been used. The accessory anteromedial portal was preferred over the transtibial approach (67% vs 33%). Suspensory fixation was the most common graft fixation method (62%) for the femoral side, followed by the cross-pin (33%) and bioabsorbable interference screw (5%). Almost all respondents (97%) used a bioabsorbable interference screw for tibial side graft fixation. CONCLUSION: The results show that ACL reconstruction surgery in Croatia is in step with the recommendations from latest world literature. PMID:24147268

  10. Adolescent Segond fracture with an intact anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Deepak; Alexander, Reginald; Hussain, Waqas M; Leland, J Martin

    2012-07-01

    Segond fractures, or avulsion fractures of the proximal lateral tibial plateau, have been well documented and studied since their original description in 1878. Segond fractures have a widely recognized pathognomonic association with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and often prompt orthopedic surgeons to consider reconstruction following radiographic and clinical evaluation. Adolescent patients are particularly vulnerable to these fractures due to the relative weakness of their physeal growth plates compared with the strength of their accompanying ligamentous structures. This article describes a case of a 13-year-old boy who sustained a Segond fracture that was not coupled with an ACL avulsion or tear. The patient sustained a twisting injury to his knee. He presented to the emergency room with an effusion and radiographic findings consistent with a Segond fracture. On follow-up examination 1 week after injury, the ACL was intact. The patient was followed for 5 months of conservative treatment. At final follow-up, the patient had reestablished his previous level of activity. This article describes the history, physical examination, and radiographic findings necessary to care for patients who present with a Segond fracture. Although considered pathognomonic for an associated ACL injury, this article describes a Segond fracture that occurred in isolation. PMID:22784911

  11. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament repair with LARS (ligament advanced reinforcement system): a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee is common. Following complete rupture of the ACL, insufficient re-vascularization of the ligament prevents it from healing completely, creating a need for reconstruction. A variety of grafts are available for use in ACL reconstruction surgery, including synthetic grafts. Over the last two decades new types of synthetic ligaments have been developed. One of these synthetic ligaments, the Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS), has recently gained popularity. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the current best available evidence for the effectiveness of the LARS as a surgical option for symptomatic, anterior cruciate ligament rupture in terms of graft stability, rehabilitation time and return to pre-injury function. Method This systematic review included studies using subjects with symptomatic, ACL ruptures undergoing LARS reconstruction. A range of electronic databases were searched in May 2010. The methodological quality of studies was appraised with a modified version of the Law critical appraisal tool. Data relating to study characteristics, surgical times, complication rates, outcomes related to knee stability, quality of life, function, and return to sport as well as details of rehabilitation programs and timeframes were collected. Results This review identified four studies of various designs, of a moderate methodological quality. Only one case of knee synovitis was reported. Patient satisfaction with LARS was high. Graft stability outcomes were found to be inconsistent both at post operative and at follow up periods. The time frames of rehabilitation periods were poorly reported and at times omitted. Return to pre-injury function and activity was often discussed but not reported in results. Conclusions There is an emerging body of evidence for LARS with comparable complication rates to traditional surgical techniques, and high patient satisfaction scores. However, this

  13. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant-Preserving Reconstruction Using a "Lasso-Loop" Knot Configuration.

    PubMed

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karampalis, Christos; Tzavelas, Anastasios; Vraggalas, Vasileios; Christodoulou, Pavlos; Bisbinas, Ilias

    2015-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture predisposes to altered kinematics and possible knee joint degeneration. Graft fiber maturation and ligamentization may eliminate this risk during ACL reconstruction procedures. ACL remnant-sparing techniques support the theory that the preserved tissue enhances revascularization, preserves the mechanoreceptors, and leads to anatomic remodeling. The purpose of this article is to present a simple and reproducible technique of tensioning the preserved ACL remnant over the femur. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the ACL remnant with a "lasso-loop" technique using a curved rotator cuff hook. Femoral and tibial tunnel preparation is performed according to a standard surgical technique for the EndoButton device (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA). The free ends of the ACL remnant suture are retrieved through the tibial tunnel and passed through each outside hole of the EndoButton device. The hamstring graft is passed through the tibial and femoral tunnels and fixed to the femoral cortex by flipping the EndoButton and to the tibia by an interference screw. Finally, non-sliding half-stitch locking knots are made to secure the ACL remnant suture on the EndoButton device, by use of a knot pusher. This technique offers simple and secure tensioning of the ACL remnant on the fixation device. PMID:26870656

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant–Preserving Reconstruction Using a “Lasso-Loop” Knot Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karampalis, Christos; Tzavelas, Anastasios; Vraggalas, Vasileios; Christodoulou, Pavlos; Bisbinas, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture predisposes to altered kinematics and possible knee joint degeneration. Graft fiber maturation and ligamentization may eliminate this risk during ACL reconstruction procedures. ACL remnant–sparing techniques support the theory that the preserved tissue enhances revascularization, preserves the mechanoreceptors, and leads to anatomic remodeling. The purpose of this article is to present a simple and reproducible technique of tensioning the preserved ACL remnant over the femur. A nonabsorbable suture is passed through the ACL remnant with a “lasso-loop” technique using a curved rotator cuff hook. Femoral and tibial tunnel preparation is performed according to a standard surgical technique for the EndoButton device (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA). The free ends of the ACL remnant suture are retrieved through the tibial tunnel and passed through each outside hole of the EndoButton device. The hamstring graft is passed through the tibial and femoral tunnels and fixed to the femoral cortex by flipping the EndoButton and to the tibia by an interference screw. Finally, non-sliding half-stitch locking knots are made to secure the ACL remnant suture on the EndoButton device, by use of a knot pusher. This technique offers simple and secure tensioning of the ACL remnant on the fixation device. PMID:26870656

  15. Combined Intra- and Extra-articular Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament: The Reconstruction of the Knee Anterolateral Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique for the combined intra- and extra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Intra-articular reconstruction is performed in an outside-in manner according to the precepts of the anatomic femoral tunnel technique. Extra-articular reconstruction is performed with the gracilis tendon while respecting the anatomic parameters of the origin and insertion points and the path described for the knee anterolateral ligament. PMID:26258037

  16. The Impact of the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Research on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, T. Sean; Parker, Richard D.; Patel, Ronak M.; Andrish, Jack T.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2015-01-01

    With an estimated 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions performed annually in the United States, there is an emphasis on determining patient-specific information to help educate patients on expected clinically relevant outcomes. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network consortium was created in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a large population cohort of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. The study group has enrolled >4,400 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from seven institutions to establish the large level I prospective anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes cohort. The group has become more than a database with information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injuries; it has helped to establish a new benchmark for conducting multicenter, multisurgeon orthopaedic research. The changes in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practice resulting from the group include the use of autograft for high school, college, and competitive athletes in their primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Other modifications include treatment options for meniscus and cartilage injuries, as well as lifestyle choices made after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:25667401

  17. Diagnostic value of ultrasonography to assess stifle lesions in dogs after cranial cruciate ligament rupture: 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Arnault, F; Cauvin, E; Viguier, E; Kraft, E; Sonet, J; Carozzo, C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasonographic diagnosis of lesions in the canine stifle associated with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Thirteen dogs that had a diagnosis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture were included in this prospective clinical study. Two ultrasonographers who were unaware of specific historical and clinical data performed the sonography with a high frequency (8-16 MHz) linear transducer. Surgical treatment of the affected stifle was performed within two days of ultrasonography by a surgeon who was unaware of the ultrasonographic findings. The lesions observed during ultrasonography and arthrotomy were compared at the completion of the study. Visualisation of the superficial tendons (quadriceps and long digital extensor) and ligaments (patellar ligament, collateral ligaments) of the stifle using ultrasonography was excellent. However, the detection of deep stifle ligaments (cranial cruciate ligament and caudal cruciate ligament) was extremely difficult to perform using ultrasonography. For cranial cruciate ligament rupture, the sensitivity for ultrasonographic diagnosis was 15.4%. For meniscal lesions, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for ultrasonographic diagnosis were 82%, 93%, 90% and 88% respectively. High frequency ultrasonography is a non-invasive method for accurately and efficiently detecting superficial ligaments, tendons and meniscal lesions associated with cranial cruciate ligament rupture in the stifle of non-sedated dogs. PMID:19876521

  18. Simultaneous bicompartmental bucket-handle meniscal tears with intact anterior cruciate ligament: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Bucket handle tear of the menisci is a common type of lesion resulting from injury to the knee joint. Bucket handle injury of both menisci in almost all cases is associated with a lesion to either the anterior or the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee joint. We describe a case of acute bucket-handle tear of the medial and lateral menisci with intact anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments in a dancer. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of this type of injury in the literature. Case presentation A 28-year-old Caucasian Greek woman presented to the emergency department after sustaining an injury to her right knee during dancing. An MRI evaluation demonstrated tears in both menisci of the right knee, while the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments were found to be intact. A partial medial and lateral meniscectomy was then performed. At a follow-up examination six months after her injury, clinical tests demonstrated that our patient's right knee was stable, had a full range of motion and had no tenderness. She was satisfied with the outcome of the operation and returned to her pre-injury activities. Conclusion We present the first case in the literature that describes a combined bucket-handle injury of both the medial and lateral menisci with an intact anterior cruciate ligament. The clinical examination of the anterior cruciate ligament was unremarkable, with no signs of deficiency or rupture. The posterior cruciate ligament was also intact. On magnetic resonance imaging, the ligaments were visualised as intact in all their length. These findings were confirmed by arthroscopic evaluation. PMID:20181059

  19. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendon Autograft With Preserved Insertions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Bahadur, Raj; Malhotra, Anubhav; Masih, Gladson David; Gupta, Parmanand

    2016-04-01

    We present a technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft with preserved tibial insertions. The tendons, harvested with an open-ended tendon stripper while their tibial insertions are preserved, are looped around to prepare a quadrupled graft. The femoral tunnel is drilled independently through a transportal technique, whereas the tibial tunnel is drilled in a standard manner. The length of the quadrupled graft and loop of the RetroButton is adjusted so that it matches the calculated length of both tunnels and the intra-articular part of the proposed ACL graft. After the RetroButton is flipped, the graft is manually tensioned with maximal stretch on the free end, which is then sutured to the other end with preserved insertions. We propose that preserving the insertions is more biological and may provide better proprioception. The technique eliminates the need for a tibial-side fixation device, thus reducing the cost of surgery. Furthermore, tibial-side fixation of the free graft is the weakest link in the overall stiffness of the reconstructed ACL, and this technique circumvents this problem. Postoperative mechanical stability and functional outcome with this technique need to be explored and compared with those of ACL reconstruction using free hamstring autograft. PMID:27354946

  20. Telemetry system for monitoring anterior cruciate ligament graft forces in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Eric L.; Hull, Maury L.; Howell, Stephen M.

    1997-02-01

    Quantifying changes in the tension of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft in vivo during rehabilitative exercises is vital for developing the optimal rehabilitation for patients who have had reconstructive surgery. The purpose of this project was to design, built, and test a telemetry system that can measure the in vivo ACL graft tension postoperatively. A commercially available fixation device was modified to sense the graft tension, house electronic components, transmit an output signal, and pass the power generating signal. A transcutaneous inductive link was used to power the implanted telemetry electronics. The current difference technique was used to measure changes in two strain gages that monitored shear strain developed on the femoral fixation device by the ACL graft. This current regulated a frequency modulated output signal and transmitted it, by using the ionic properties of body tissue as the medium, to external EMG surface electrodes. A signal conditioning board detected and converted the output to an analog voltage for collection by a computer data acquisition system. A performance evaluation demonstrated that the telemetry system either met or exceeded al of the criteria necessary for the application.

  1. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Chambat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and represent 10–27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction) and classical (anatomical) reconstruction. PMID:26229890

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries among wakeboarders: a case report.

    PubMed

    Narita, Tetsuya; Mori, Atsushi; Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Iizawa, Norishige; Takeda, Tomomichi; Hattori, Mikihiko; Ito, Hiromoto

    2004-02-01

    No previous cases of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries sustained during wake-boarding have been reported. We report on a case involving an ACL injury sustained during wakeboarding. A 27-year-old man sustained an injury while attempting a wakeboarding maneuver(a heel-side back roll, consisting of a jump and simultaneous roll toward the heel side). He failed to complete his roll before landing, striking the water with his right shoulder foremost, then plunging underwater. When his wakeboard struck the water, his left knee was sprained by the rotational force exerted by the board. The patient was diagnosed with an isolated ACL injury and underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstructive surgery. The board used in wakeboarding is wider and subject to greater water resistance than that used in water skiing. The feet of the wakeboarder are firmly attached by binding boots to a board, laterally with respect to the direction of motion, impeding easy separation of the board from the feet in the event of a fall. Thus, wakeboarding conditions would appear to put wakeboarders at particular risk for ACL injuries. These conditions need be assessed from a medical perspective in order to devise ways to minimize the risk of such injuries. PMID:15129597

  3. Rehabilitation After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Female Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Kevin E.; Arrigo, Christopher; Andrews, James R.; Clancy, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the rehabilitation program after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the female athlete. In addition, we will discuss 8 unique characteristics identified in the female athlete and specific training drills to address and correct the potentially deleterious effects of these unique characteristics. Background: The female athlete appears to be more susceptible to noncontact ACL injuries than the male athlete. There seem to be many differences between the female and male athlete that may contribute to the increased injury rate in the female athlete. These variations include anatomical and neuromuscular considerations and differences. Description: Based on the unique characteristics of the female athlete and the anatomical and neuromuscular dissimilarities, a specially designed rehabilitation program has been established for the female athlete after ACL surgery. Clinical Advantages: The rehabilitation drills discussed in this article challenge the neuromuscular system through proprioception, kinesthesia, dynamic joint stability, neuromuscular control, and perturbation training activities. Improving the female athlete's neuromuscular system will, we believe, expedite the injured athlete's recovery after ACL injury or surgery. Although the concepts discussed are part of a postoperative rehabilitation program after ACL surgery, these concepts may also be implemented as a preventive program to assist in reducing the incidence of ACL injuries in the female athlete. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13.Figure 14.Figure 15.Figure 16.Figure 17.Figure 18.Figure 19.Figure 20.Figure 21.Figure 22.Figure 23. PMID:16558561

  4. Adaptation Strategies of Individuals With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roper, Jaimie A.; Terza, Matthew J.; Tillman, Mark D.; Hass, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the strong implications for rehabilitation design, the capability of individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) to adapt and store novel gait patterns have not been well studied. Purpose: To investigate how reconstructive surgery may affect the ability to adapt and store novel gait patterns in persons with ACLR while walking on a split-belt treadmill. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Gait adaptation was compared between 20 participants with ACLR and 20 healthy controls during split-belt treadmill walking. Gait adaptation was assessed in slow- and fast-adapting parameters by (1) the magnitude of symmetry during late adaptation and (2) the amount of the asymmetry during de-adaptation. Results: Healthy individuals adapted a new walking pattern and stored the new walking pattern equally in both the dominant and nondominant limbs. Conversely, individuals with ACLR displayed impairments in both slow-adapting and fast-adapting derived gait adaptation and significant differences in behavior between the reconstructed and uninjured limb. Conclusion: While surgical reconstruction and physical therapy are aimed at improving mechanical stability to the knee, the study data suggest that fundamental features of motor control remain altered. After ACLR, participants display an altered ability to learn and store functional gait patterns. PMID:26894200

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and rehabilitation: predictors of functional outcome

    PubMed Central

    DELLA VILLA, FRANCESCO; RICCI, MARGHERITA; PERDISA, FRANCESCO; FILARDO, GIUSEPPE; GAMBERINI, JACOPO; CAMINATI, DANIELE; DELLA VILLA, STEFANO

    2015-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of an injured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) leads to full recovery of function and sports activity in a high percentage of cases. The aim of the present study was to analyze variables related to the patient, the surgical technique and the post-surgical rehabilitation methods, seeking to identify predictors of outcome and recovery time after ACL reconstruction. One hundred and four patients (81 M, 23 F) undergoing a step-based rehabilitation protocol after ACL reconstruction were evaluated. 43.2% of them had an isolated ACL lesion, whereas 56.8% had one or more concurrent injuries. Data relating to personal characteristics, surgery and post-operative management were collected and analyzed for correlation. Clinical outcome was evaluated with IKDC subjective score and the Tegner score, and the time to reach full recovery was noted as well. Young patients with a higher pre-injury Tegner activity level or who practice sport at professional level, no concurrent capsular lesions and no postoperative knee bracing had better clinical results and took shorter time to recover. Also, a higher percentage of on-the-field rehabilitation sessions, and absence of significant muscle strength deficits at the first knee isokinetic test emerged as rehabilitation-related factors leading to a better post-surgical outcome. Personal, surgical and rehabilitation factors should be considered in order to optimize patient management and maximize the expected results. Further studies are needed to find the strongest factors in different patients. Level of evidence Level IV, retrospective study. PMID:26904523

  6. Discoid medial meniscus completely coalesced with the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deepak; Jain, Vineet; Goyal, Ankit; Bahl, Vibhu; Chaudhary, Deepak

    2013-11-01

    Discoid meniscus is an abnormality of the knee in which the meniscus is discoid rather than semilunar in shape. Medial discoid menisci are rare, and no specific associated symptoms suggest this condition. Several medial meniscus anomalies, including discoid variants, have been reported in the literature. This article describes a rare case of medial discoid meniscus completely coalesced with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A 22-year-old man presented with intermittent right knee pain of 6 months' duration. Physical examination revealed mild wasting of the quadriceps with medial joint line tenderness but no effusion. Radiographically, hypoplasia of the lateral tibial spine, increased medial joint space, and increased concavity of the medial tibial condyle were noted in both knees. Arthroscopic examination revealed a complete discoid medial meniscus that was contiguous with the ACL. On probing, a horizontal tear in the medial meniscus was noted. A meniscectomy was performed, and deep longitudinal furrows with exposed subchondral bone were noted underlying the posteromedial tibial condyle. At the patient's 6-month follow-up visit, he had no knee symptoms and had returned to his daily activities, which included jogging. Discoid medial meniscus is a rare anomaly, and this case represents only the second reported in the literature of discoid medial meniscus completely coalesced with ACL. This case supports the theory that the ACL and menisci can be differentiated from 1 mesenchyme. PMID:24200455

  7. Mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament: Management and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Vivek; Suman, CPS; Sharma, Swati; Rao, Sripathi P; Kiran Acharya, KV; Sambaji, Charudutt

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mucoid degeneration (MD) is a rare pathological affection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Mucinous material within the substance of ACL produces pain and limited motion in the knee. This series describes the clinicoradiological presentation of patients with mucoid ACL, partial arthroscopic debridement of ACL and outcomes. Materials and Methods: During a period of 3 years, 11 patients were included based upon the clinical suspicion, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, arthroscopic features and histopathologic confirmation of MD of ACL. Result: Six patients were male and five were female with median age of 40 years (range 21-59 years). All patients complained of knee pain with median duration of 5 months (range 1-24 months). All patients had painful deep flexion with 63.6% (N = 7) reporting trivial trauma before the onset of symptoms. MRI revealed MD of ACL in all with associated cyst in three patients. Partial debridement of ACL was done in ten and complete in one patient. None of them required notchplasty. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis in all of them. At the mean followup of 13.81 months (range 6-28 months), all patients regained complete flexion and none complained of instability. Conclusion: Prior knowledge of condition with high index of suspicion and careful interpretation of MRI can establish the diagnosis preoperatively. It responds well to partial debridement of ACL and mucinous material without development of instability. PMID:24741143

  8. Anatomic Tunnel Placement in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Aman; Gallo, Robert A; Lynch, Scott A

    2016-07-01

    The anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction concept has developed in part from renewed interest in the insertional anatomy of the ACL, using surgical techniques that can reproduce this anatomy reliably and accurately during surgical reconstruction. Several technical tools are available to help identify and place the tibial and femoral grafts anatomically, including arthroscopic anatomic landmarks, a malleable ruler device, and intraoperative fluoroscopy. The changes in technique for anatomic tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction follow recent biomechanical and kinematic data that demonstrate improved time zero characteristics. A better re-creation of native ACL kinematics and biomechanics is achieved with independent femoral drilling techniques that re-create a central footprint single-bundle ACL reconstruction or double-bundle reconstruction. However, to date, limited short-term and long-term clinical outcome data have been reported that support using either of these techniques rather than a transtibial drilling technique. This lack of clear clinical advantage for femoral independent and/or double-bundle techniques may arise because of the potentially offsetting biologic incorporation challenges of these grafts when placed using these techniques or could result from modifications made in traditional endoscopic transtibial techniques that allow improved femoral and tibial footprint restoration. PMID:27243794

  9. Basic science of anterior cruciate ligament injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Kiapour, A. M.; Murray, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most devastating and frequent injuries of the knee. Surgical reconstruction is the current standard of care for treatment of ACL injuries in active patients. The widespread adoption of ACL reconstruction over primary repair was based on early perception of the limited healing capacity of the ACL. Although the majority of ACL reconstruction surgeries successfully restore gross joint stability, post-traumatic osteoarthritis is commonplace following these injuries, even with ACL reconstruction. The development of new techniques to limit the long-term clinical sequelae associated with ACL reconstruction has been the main focus of research over the past decades. The improved knowledge of healing, along with recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, has resulted in the discovery of novel biologically augmented ACL-repair techniques that have satisfactory outcomes in preclinical studies. This instructional review provides a summary of the latest advances made in ACL repair. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:20–31. PMID:24497504

  10. [Meniscus injuries in dogs with rupture of the cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Timmermann, C; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Nolte, I

    1998-10-01

    In a period of 18 months, 132 stifle joints of 125 dogs with a partial or complete rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament were examined according to a systematic protocol at the Clinic for Small Animals of the School of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany. Surgery was performed with either an intraarticular or extraarticular surgical technique. In all cases a "cleaning up" was carried out. If the medial meniscus was damaged it was resected and the lesion was inspected macroscopically. After six months, 88 patients were examined clinically and radiologically according to the same protocol as half a year before. Injuries of the medial meniscus occurred in 77.3% of the 132 cases. Furthermore it could be shown that patients which had a lameness for more than six weeks before examination had a higher rate of lesions of the medial meniscus than patients that had been lame for a shorter period. A detachment of the caudal horn of the medial meniscus was the most common meniscal lesion. There was no difference in success of therapy between patients with a meniscal resection and those without resection. PMID:9818524

  11. Kinesiophobia and Return to Sports After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Medvecky, Michael J; Nelson, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is typically recommended for patients who wish to return to aggressive athletic activity. Unfortunately, reconstructive knee surgery is not a guarantee that all patients will return to their preinjury level of function. A recent meta-analysis including 48 studies showed that after a mean follow-up of 41 months, 82% of participants had returned to some kind of athletic activity but only 63% returned to their preinjury level of participation and a disappointing 44% returned to competitive sports. The reasons why some athletes have been unsuccessful in returning to previous levels of activity are vast and our understanding of these factors is limited. The importance of psychological factors has recently been emphasized. One such factor, kinesiophobia, or fear of reinjury, may play a significant role in some patients' inability to successfully return to their previous level of sports participation. In the meta-analysis, kinesiophobia was the most common reason cited for postoperative reduction in, or cessation of, sports participation. PMID:26244221

  12. [Infection after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: grave error in treatment?].

    PubMed

    Regauer, M; Neu, J

    2012-09-01

    A 28-year-old patient showed clear signs of knee joint infection 8 days after arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. The treating physicians recommended further observation although they stated that a knee joint infection could not be reliably excluded. One week later arthroscopic revision was performed and intraoperative smear tests showed infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Therefore, another 6 days later the obviously infected transplant had to be removed. In the long run painful and limited range of motion of the affected knee joint persisted. The patient complained about medical malpractice concerning management of the complication. The expert opinion stated that due to the fateful course of infection the tendon graft could not be retrieved after the eighth day post surgery anyway. Thus, only flawed delay of treatment was criticized. The arbitration board argued, however, that scientific data concerning the fate of infected tendon grafts do not support the expert opinion and that immediate arthroscopy and antibiotic treatment at least had the potential to influence the course of infection in a positive manner. Evidence clearly shows that survival of an infected tendon graft depends on early diagnosis and emergency treatment rather than just on fate. Due to the fact that, although having in mind the possibility of a knee joint infection, the necessary therapy was delayed for 8 days, the arbitration board considered the described medical malpractice a severe treatment error, leading to reversal of evidence in favour of the patient. PMID:22706649

  13. [Magnetic resonance imaging features of a caudal cruciate ligament rupture associated with a suspected bone bruise lesion in a dog].

    PubMed

    Schmohl, M; Konar, M; Tassani-Prell, M; Rupp, S

    2014-04-16

    In this case study we describe a surgically confirmed caudal cruciate ligament rupture in a 10-year-old Border Collie. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a complete rupture of the caudal cruciate ligament, a suspected bone bruise lesion on the proximolateral tibia and a muscle strain injury of the M. flexor digitorum lateralis. In human medicine, bone bruise lesions in MRI have been described as "footprint injuries" and can thereby explain the mechanism of trauma in ligament injuries. The combination of the MRI findings in this case can help to understand how the rarely diagnosed isolated rupture of the caudal cruciate ligament occurred in this dog. PMID:24737186

  14. [Revision of the anterior cruciate ligament in TransFix(R)- and OATS(R)-technique].

    PubMed

    Attmanspacher, W; Dittrich, V; Stedtfeld, H W

    2002-10-01

    Transplant failure after anterior cruciate ligament-plastic is a typical complication. In larger collectives, revisions amount to about 8-12 % of the reconstructive operations of the anterior cruciate ligament. The number of revisions is also growing in our clinic and makes at present 11 %. There are different reasons of transplant failure. Many mistakes occur as a result of technical pitfalls during the preparation. A new "adequate trauma" is rarely the cause of a rerupture. In this paper a new concept of revision in failed anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions will be presented, which can be frequently performed as one-step technique even in bone tunnel enlargement or sclerosis of the tunnel. Our results in 21 cases will be discussed with the literature. In our opinion the TransFix(R) technique, if necessary in conjunction with the OATS(R) technical equipment, is a reproducable alternative for one step revision surgery and should be recommended. PMID:12410451

  15. The Clinical Outcomes of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Surgery Based on Iatrogenic Damage

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Murat; Erkoç, Mustafa Fatih; Karaaslan, Fatih; Mermerkaya, Musa Uğur

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the degenerative changes of adjacent cartilage and bony structure, after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery. Methods: 27 subjects, who had anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery due to various reasons at least 12 months ago, were admitted to study. MRI data of patients were acquired retrospectively. Pre-operative and post-operative MRI images were compared according to retropatellar cartilage thickness, evidence of any new osteophytes formation or any signal intensity change on bony elements. Paired statistical analysis was applied. Results: The MRI revelation showed that; there were 14 patients with decrement of retropatellar cartilage thickness, 9 patients with new osteophytes formation and 21 patients with abnormal signal intensity change on bony elements; which were statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusion: These results provide basic information about the degenerative effect of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery, on adjacent cartilage and bony structure.

  16. Establishment of a rat model for osteoarthritis resulting from anterior cruciate ligament rupture and its significance

    PubMed Central

    OUYANG, XIAO; WANG, JIAN; HONG, SHI DONG; XIN, FENG; WANG, LIN; YANG, XIAO WEI; WANG, JING RONG; WANG, LI MING; WEI, BO; WANG, QING; CUI, WEI DING

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the establishment of a model concerned with osteoarthritis resulting from the anterior cruciate ligament rupture of rats and investigate the associated mechanism, as well as provide a theoretical basis for clinical treatment of the disease. Forty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into two groups of 20 rats each and the anterior cruciate ligament transaction model and knee joint brake model were successfully established. Two rats in the anterior cruciate ligament transection group (10%) and 3 rats in the knee joint brake group (15.0%) died. The survival rate of the two groups was not statistically significant (χ2<0.001, P=1.000). Swelling of the knee joint and synovium of rats in the two experimental groups was aggravated. The Mankin score was significantly higher in the anterior cruciate ligament transection group than that in the experimental group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, no significant difference was observed for osteoarthritis severity for the two experimental groups (P>0.05). Analysis of the subgroups showed that the proportion of the anterior cruciate ligament in the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the knee joint brake group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, the difference was not statistically significant in the comparison of the medium and early proportion (P>0.05). The content of protein polysaccharide and II collagen fiber in the experimental group of the anterior cruciate ligament transection was lower than that of the knee joint brake group, and this difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Thus the mechanism of osteoarthritis may be associated with the decrease in the content of protein and II collagen fibers. PMID:26668592

  17. Symmetric limb overgrowth following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a skeletally immature patient.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Lance J; Jauregui, Julio J; Riis, Jacob F; Tuten, Hans Robert

    2015-11-01

    This report describes a case of symmetric femoral and tibial overgrowth of 2.8 cm in a 13-year-old patient after undergoing reconstruction surgery for his torn right anterior cruciate ligament. A literature review of previous cases is also provided. Following a pediatric anterior cruciate ligament tear, delaying surgery until the patient approaches skeletal maturity may avoid long-term growth disturbances, however, delaying this procedure may increase the probability of further joint damage. This growth disturbance was managed with a percutaneous epiphysiodesis that corrected the limb length deformity. PMID:25919804

  18. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Parameters with Two Different Surgical Methods for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Çiloğlu, Osman; Çiçek, Hakan; Yılmaz, Ahmet; Özalay, Metin; Söker, Gökhan; Leblebici, Berrin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We investigated the effects anatomic or nonanatomic femoral tunnel positions and tunnel fixation methods obtained using two different surgery methods on tunnel widening and clinical results in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. Methods: Patients with isolated anterior cruciate ligament rupture are included to study who don’t have intra-and extra-articular additional pathology of the knee, without previously a history of operations of both knees. 2 groups were created. Group 1 Aperfix implant were used which can be able to perform non anatomical femoral tunnel and intra tunnel fixation with transtibial technique. In Group 2 Endobutton CL implant were used which can make fixation from outside the cortex with anatomic femoral tunnel in use of anteromedial portal techniques. 27 patients (average age 29,33, range 18 to 55 years) in group 1 and 27 patients (average age 27,51, range 16 to 45 years) in group 2 totally 54 patients were performed surgery. All patients were assessed using the IKDC (International knee documentation committee), Tegner Activity Scala and Lysholm II Functional Scores. Muscle strength measurements in both groups compared to intact knee was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer Biodex System 3 Pro. The location of the femoral tunnel aperture and tunnel widening were imaged with 3D reconstructive computed tomography. All measurements were performed using the same software application by the same radiologist. Results: The two groups were similar with respect to age and sex distribution, operated side, the size of the tunnel created, and follow-up period (p>0.05). After surgery in both groups, the clinical scores showed significant improvement compared to preoperative (p=0,0001). However, postoperative clinical outcomes in the two groups did not show a difference significantly (p>0,005). Isokinetic muscle strength study showed significant differences between the two groups (p=0,0001). Location of femoral tunnel aperture

  19. Trends in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Buller, Leonard T.; Best, Matthew J.; Baraga, Michael G.; Kaplan, Lee D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most frequently injured ligament in the knee for which surgery is performed. United States national estimates of ACL reconstruction vary widely. Purpose: This study sought to use the most recently available Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data to investigate changes in the utilization of inpatient and ambulatory surgery for ACL tears in the United States. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: The National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery, conducted in 1994, 1995, 1996, and 2006 (data from 1994, 1996, and 2006 were used in the study), and the National Hospital Discharge Survey, conducted between 1990 and 2007, were used to identify cases of ACL reconstruction. The data were analyzed for trends in demographics, treatment, and utilization. Results: Between 1994 and 2006, the population-adjusted estimate of the rate of ACL reconstructions increased by 37% (33.0/100,000 capita or 86,837 total procedures to 45.1/100,000 capita or 134,421 total procedures). There was an increase in the proportion of females undergoing reconstruction in both the ambulatory (30% to 40%) and inpatient (29% to 47%) settings over the study period, with a 304% increase in the sex-adjusted estimate of the rate of female ambulatory procedures between 1994 and 2006. Age-adjusted estimates of the rates of ambulatory ACL reconstruction increased among all age groups, with a 924% increase in patients less than 15 years of age. Concurrent meniscectomy remained relatively constant in the ambulatory (37% to 40%) and inpatient (37% to 33%) settings between 1994 and 2007. Private insurance was the largest compensator, representing 77% of cases in 2006. Between 1994 and 2006, the use of peripheral nerve blocks during ambulatory surgery increased from 0.7% to 30.8%. Conclusion: The rate of ACL reconstruction increased dramatically between 1990 and 2007 based on the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery and National Hospital

  20. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Balazs, George C; Grimm, Patrick D; Donohue, Michael A; Keblish, David J; Rue, John-Paul

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to report the clinical and functional outcomes of revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a young, active duty military population. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction were enrolled in an institutional clinical database and followed prospectively. The primary outcomes were patients' scores on a timed run, as compared with recorded scores before reinjury. Secondary outcomes included scores on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective (IKDC subjective), the Short Form - 36 health survey (SF-36) version 2, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and the Tegner activity scale. A total of 13 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria and had complete follow-up. The mean age at revision ACL reconstruction was 20.5 years (range, 19-22 years), and mean follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 13-66 months). All patients underwent a single stage revision ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, ipsilateral hamstring autograft, or bone-tendon-bone allograft. Mean physical readiness test (PRT) score at final follow-up was not statistically different than documented preinjury PRT score (77.9 vs. 85.5, p > 0.05), nor was the mean run time (7:12 vs. 6:43/mile, p > 0.05). Significant improvements exceeding published minimal clinically important differences were seen in SANE score, SF-36 physical component summary score, KOOS sports and recreation, KOOS quality of life, WOMAC pain score, and WOMAC function score. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction at our facility show good recovery of baseline physical performance as measured by the semiannual PRT and timed run test, and significant improvements in patient-reported outcome scores. Level of Evidence Level IV, case series. PMID:26524090

  1. Defending Puts the Anterior Cruciate Ligament at Risk During Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Silvers, Holly J.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Soccer athletes are at risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. To date, there are limited studies on the mechanisms of ACL injuries in soccer athletes and no video-based analysis or sex-based comparison of these mechanisms. Hypothesis: There is no difference in ACL injury mechanisms among soccer athletes by sex. Study design: Case series. Level of evidence: Level 4. Methods: Fifty-five videos of ACL injuries in 32 male and 23 female soccer players were reviewed. Most athletes were professionals (22 males, 4 females) or collegiate players (8 males, 14 females). Visual analysis of each case was performed to describe the injury mechanisms in detail (game situation, player behavior, and lower extremity alignment). Results: The majority of ACL injuries occurred when the opposing team had the ball and the injured athlete was defending (73%). Females were more likely to be defending when they injured their ACLs (87% vs 63% for males, P = 0.045). The most common playing action was tackling (51%), followed by cutting (15%). Most injuries occurred due to a contact mechanism (56%) with no significant difference for sex. Females were more likely to suffer a noncontact injury in their left knee (54%) than males (33%) (P = 0.05). Conclusion: Soccer players are at greatest risk for ACL injury when defending, especially when tackling the opponent in an attempt to win possession of the ball. Females are more likely to injure their ACLs when defending and are at greater risk for noncontact injuries in their left lower extremity. Clinical Relevance: Soccer ACL injury prevention programs should include proper defending and tackling techniques, particularly for female athletes. PMID:26131302

  2. Return to work in miners following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tiftikci, Ugur; Serbest, Sancar; Kilinc, Cem Yalin; Karabicak, Gül Öznur; Vergili, Özge

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study is retrospectively investigated durations for returning to work following anatomic ACL reconstruction by hamstring autograft in miners and the reasons in patients who were delayed to return to work. Methods Miners with symptomatic anterior cruciate ligament rupture underwent arthroscopic reconstruction. Patients were evaluated in terms of range of motion (ROM) values; Lysholm, Cincinati and Tegner activity scales; laxity testing and complications. By modifying the method used by Fitzgerald et al. we decided for the criteria returning to work. Results Thirty three patients were evaluated with mean followup of 22.7 ± 8.3 months (range 13-46 months). Mean age at the surgery was 27.8 (18-38) years. Lysholm, Cincinati and Tegner activity scales were signifi cantly higher from preoperative scores (Lysholm scores: preoperative: 60.7 ± 12.5, postoperative: 90.3 ± 4.8 (P < 0.001); Tegner activity scores: Preoperative 3.5 ± 1.4, postoperative: 6.2 ± 1.5 (P < 0.001); Cincinati scores: Preoperative: 14.8 ± 5.3, postoperative: 26.9 ± 1.6 (P < 0.001). The average time for returning to work was determined as 15,3 ± 4 weeks. There was no significant difference for knee scores and time for returning to work between patients with meniscal injuries and don't have meniscus lesions. Conclusion The reasons for delays in returning to work was work accident. Hematoma or effusion and pain inside the knee were the most significant reason which affected returning to work. PMID:26918069

  3. Risk Factors for Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Brent A; Cain, E Lyle; Pflugner, Ryan; Fleisig, Glenn S; Young, Bradley L; Boohaker, Hikel A; Swain, Thomas A; Andrews, James R; Dugas, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for revision surgery following primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods A retrospective analysis of 2,965 patients who underwent a primary ACL reconstruction were separated into two groups: those who returned to our center for revision of their reconstruction (n = 67) and those who did not return to our center for revision of their reconstruction (n = 2,898). Patient characteristics assessed at the time of primary reconstruction include age, gender, graft type, graft source, meniscal and/or chondral injury, sport, side of effected extremity, level of competition, and surgeon. Multivariable analyses were performed to identify significant, independent associations with the need for revision. Results The portion of patients who returned for revision reconstruction after primary ACL reconstruction was 2.3% (67/2,965). Age (p < 0.001), sport type (p = 0.007), and level of participation (p < 0.001) were significantly different between the nonrevision and revision patients. Graft type preferences varied among surgeons (p < 0.001). Accounting for sport type or level of competition, age (p = 0.014) and surgeon (p = 0.041) were independently associated with revision. Gender, extremity (R vs. L), meniscal or chondral injury, and graft characteristics were not associated with revision. Conclusion Revision of primary ACL reconstructions is independently associated with age and choice of surgeon at the time of primary reconstruction. PMID:26238768

  4. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Flexible Reamer System

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Saluan, Paul; Richter, Dustin L.; Huff, Nathan; Schenck, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Anatomic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has been shown to improve stability of the knee, particularly rotational stability, potentially leading to superior clinical outcomes and a shorter return to sport. Nonanatomic ACL reconstruction has been linked to graft failure and abnormal cartilage loading thought to contribute to progression of degenerative joint disease. Use of the far anteromedial portal (FAMP) to uncouple the tibial and femoral tunnels has led to improved reproduction of the femoral footprint and facilitates drilling of the femoral tunnel in an anatomic position. The use of the FAMP and straight reamer systems introduces its own set of potential complications, including short femoral tunnels and peroneal nerve injury. These potential complications have been addressed by drilling the femoral tunnel in a hyperflexed position, which can lead to difficulty with positioning the operative extremity, visualization, and identification of anatomic landmarks. The purpose of this case report was to review the advantages and technical aspects of using a flexible reamer system and the FAMP to achieve an anatomic ACL reconstruction while avoiding potential complications and pitfalls. Flexible reamer systems allow an additional way of uncoupling the tibial and femoral tunnels to clearly visualize and establish an anatomic starting point within the femoral footprint of the native ACL while avoiding the complications associated with knee hyperflexion and straight reamers with the far anteromedial portal. In the authors’ experience, an anatomic reconstruction of the ACL can be achieved safely using flexible reamers while avoiding some of the difficulties seen with straight reamers used in conjunction with an uncoupled, far anteromedial approach. PMID:26673860

  5. Assessment of Knee Proprioception in the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk Position in Healthy Subjects: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Seyed Mohsen; Talebian, Saeed; Naseri, Nasrin; Hadian, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Knee joint proprioception combines sensory input from a variety of afferent receptors that encompasses the sensations of joint position and motion. Poor proprioception is one of the risk factors of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Most studies have favored testing knee joint position sense in the sagittal plane and non-weight-bearing position. One of the most common mechanisms of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury is dynamic knee valgus. No study has measured joint position sense in a manner relevant to the mechanism of injury. Therefore, the aim of this study was to measure knee joint position sense in the noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury risk position and normal condition. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy male athletes participated in the study. Joint position sense was evaluated by active reproduction of the anterior cruciate ligament injury risk position and normal condition. The dominant knees of subjects were tested. [Results] The results showed less accurate knee joint position sense in the noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury risk position rather than the normal condition. [Conclusion] The poorer joint position sense in non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury risk position compared with the normal condition may contribute to the increased incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury. PMID:25364100

  6. [Reinforcement of freshly glued or sutured rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament using the semitendinous tendon. Indications and early results].

    PubMed

    Paar, O

    1985-11-01

    Inopportune rupture forms deteriorate the prognosis after reconstructive operations on the anterior cruciate ligament. In order to improve the treatment results, we apply fibrin glue on intraligamentous ruptures and reinforce the reconstruction result with a distally fixed semitendinosus tendon graft. In old ruptures with beginning degenerative changes on the rupture stumps we refix the rest of the cruciate ligament as a posterolateral ligament part through transosseous sutures and also use the semitendinosus tendon as a reinforcement graft. 19 of the 26 cruciate ligaments treated in this way were stable at the reexamination which took place 9 months after the operation on a average. 7 remaining instabilities are due to degenerative changes of both the tendon graft and the reconstructed rests of the cruciate ligaments: this could be proved by CT-studies. Using a tendon graft in combination with alloplastic materials ought to improve the postoperative results in future. PMID:3908015

  7. A Systematic Summary of Systematic Reviews on the Topic of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael J.; Browning, William M.; Urband, Christopher E.; Kluczynski, Melissa A.; Bisson, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been a substantial increase in the amount of systematic reviews and meta-analyses published on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Purpose: To quantify the number of systematic reviews and meta-analyses published on the ACL in the past decade and to provide an overall summary of this literature. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of all ACL-related systematic reviews and meta-analyses published between January 2004 and September 2014 was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Database. Narrative reviews and non-English articles were excluded. Results: A total of 1031 articles were found, of which 240 met the inclusion criteria. Included articles were summarized and divided into 17 topics: anatomy, epidemiology, prevention, associated injuries, diagnosis, operative versus nonoperative management, graft choice, surgical technique, fixation methods, computer-assisted surgery, platelet-rich plasma, rehabilitation, return to play, outcomes assessment, arthritis, complications, and miscellaneous. Conclusion: A summary of systematic reviews on the ACL can supply the surgeon with a single source for the most up-to-date synthesis of the literature. PMID:27047983

  8. Functional Outcomes of Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Tibialis Anterior Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Başar, Selda; Büyükafşar, Enes; Hazar, Zeynep; Ataoğlu, Baybars; Kanatlı, Ulunay

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Allografts have potential advantages in primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), including the absence of donor site morbidity, shorter operative times, improved cosmesis, and easier rehabilitation. There is limited and conflicting outcome data for ACLR with tibialis anterior allograft. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of ACLR with tibialis anterior allograft. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated patients underwent ACLR using with tibialis anterior allograft between 2005 and 2013. Totally 12 patients who were performed suspensory fixation technique were included in this study (range: 25-43 years). Exclusion criteria included double bundle, bone tendon bone technique and revision surgery. Clinical outcomes were measured by subject part of International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scores. Results: A significant increase was reported in all the clinical scores. In particular, the IKDC-subjective score increased from a basal value of 45.5±12.7 to 84.3±5.50 at the 12 months' evaluation (p<0.05). The Lysholm score revealed a significant improvement from 49.7±14.2 to 83.5±20.5 at the 12 months' evaluation (p<0.05). Conclusion: ACLR with tibialis anterior allograft is an effective treatment for correcting loss of function and increasing quality of life.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction as a day case with extended recovery.

    PubMed

    Haug; Sørensen; Dichmann

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the procedures and the postoperative outcome of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction when carried out a day case with extended recovery. Between December 1995 and September 1998, 91 patients underwent surgery using bone-patellatendon-bone autografts and interference screw fixation. Additional surgical procedures were performed on 35 of the patients. The patient records were evaluated for a mean of 17 months (1-33 months) postoperatively. The course of treatment was. (1) Evaluation and KLT-arthrometer test 14 days preoperatively. (2) Surgery, cryocuff, bupivacain, paracetamol, NSAID and ketobemidon for postoperative pain control. (3) Discharge from hospital within 24 h. (4) Physiotherapy after 14 days. (5) Follow-up after 6 weeks with bandage removal and after 6 months. Eight patients required one further day of hospitalisation due to pain (four), nausea (one), haematoma (two) and prolonged anaesthesia (one). Five patients were readmitted to hospital for a mean of 8 (3-16) days postoperatively. Three patients underwent re-surgery due to haematoma/rupture of the scar. No deep infections were found. We concluded that this effective method of ACL-reconstruction can be carried out safely as a day case procedure with extended recovery to the benefit of the patients. PMID:11063947

  10. A new harvest site for bone graft in anterior cruciate ligament revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Papalia, Rocco; Di Martino, Alberto; Rizzello, Giacomo; Allaire, Robert; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2007-05-01

    During revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery, femoral interference screws frequently require removal. This may lead to significant tunnel widening and possible graft fixation failure as a result. Solutions include drilling the revision tunnel in a different location, using stacked interference screws, or using bone graft to fill the defect. Autogenous iliac crest graft and allograft are both used, but there are significant comorbidities associated with each. We developed a new technique for harvesting autogenous bone graft that avoids many of the complications associated with other graft sources. By use of the existing surgical incision from the initial harvest of the bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, bone from the medial tibial metaphyseal safe zone is harvested via an OATS tube harvester (Arthrex, Naples, FL). A bone plug 1 mm larger in size than the femoral defect is harvested and arthroscopically inserted via a press-fit technique. At 3 months after bone grafting, patients undergo revision ACL reconstruction. The proximal tibial metaphysis is a safe bone graft harvest site in revision ACL surgery and offers an effective method for filling large bony defects, allowing anatomic reconstruction of the ACL after bone healing has occurred. Furthermore, it eliminates the problems associated with allograft or use of a remote graft donor site. PMID:17478290

  11. The Mechanistic Connection Between the Trunk, Knee, and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, Timothy E.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Neuromuscular control of the trunk and knee predicts anterior cruciate ligament injury risk with high sensitivity and specificity. These predictors are linked, as lateral trunk positioning creates high knee abduction torque (load). The hypotheses explored are that lateral trunk motion increases load and that neuromuscular training that increases trunk control will decrease load. PMID:21799427

  12. Anatomical considerations in hamstring tendon harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Charalambous, Charalambos Panayiotou; Kwaees, Tariq Adam

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hamstring tendons are widely used for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction of the knee. Certain anatomical considerations must be taken into account when harvesting the hamstring tendons to be used in ACL reconstruction. These anatomical considerations are discussed in this review article. PMID:23738306

  13. Training for Women's Basketball: A Biomechanical Emphasis for Preventing Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Robert W.; Bryson, Erin R.

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes proposed variables linked with higher incidences of anterior cruciate ligament tears in females and the biomechanical aspects of the lower extremity during the performance of common basketball skills, focusing on gender differences in knee joint stability and neuromuscular control, biomechanical aspects of lower extremity skills in…

  14. Implementation of Open and Closed Kinetic Chain Quadriceps Strengthening Exercises after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael D.; Denegar, Craig R.; Winzenried, Jay A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the effects of open kinetic chain (OKC) and closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain and patellofemoral joint stress, suggesting a combination of the two for quadriceps strengthening after ACL reconstruction. Both OKC and CKC exercises may be modified and implemented for quadriceps strengthening after…

  15. Compression of the Popliteal Artery after Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using the Tibial Inlay Technique

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seung Suk; Kim, Do Hun; Park, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Popliteal artery compression rarely occurs after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using the tibial inlay technique that allows for direct visualization of the surgical field. However, we experienced a popliteal artery compression after PCL reconstruction performed using the technique, which eventually required re-operation. Here, we report this rare case and discuss reasons of popliteal artery compression. PMID:26673356

  16. What Strains the Anterior Cruciate Ligament During a Pivot Landing?

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Youkeun K.; Lipps, David B.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Wojtys, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The relative contributions of an axial tibial torque and frontal plane moment to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain during pivot landings are unknown. Hypothesis The peak normalized relative strain in the anteromedial (AM) bundle of the ACL is affected by the direction of the axial tibial torque but not by the direction of the frontal plane moment applied concurrently during a simulated jump landing. Study Design Controlled and descriptive laboratory studies. Methods Fifteen adult male knees with pretensioned knee muscle-tendon unit forces were loaded under a simulated pivot landing test. Compression, flexion moment, internal or external tibial torque, and knee varus or valgus moment were simultaneously applied to the distal tibia while recording the 3D knee loads and tibiofemoral kinematics. The AM-ACL relative strain was measured using a 3-mm differential variable reluctance transducer. The results were analyzed using nonparametric Wilcoxon signed–rank tests. A 3D dynamic biomechanical knee model was developed using ADAMS and validated to help interpret the experimental results. Results The mean (SD) peak AM-ACL relative strain was 192% greater (P <.001) under the internal tibial torque combined with a knee varus or valgus moment (7.0% [3.9%] and 7.0% [4.1%], respectively) than under external tibial torque with the same moments (2.4% [2.5%] and 2.4% [3.2%], respectively). The knee valgus moment augmented the AM-ACL strain due to the slope of the tibial plateau inducing mechanical coupling (ie, internal tibial rotation and knee valgus moment); this augmentation occurred before medial knee joint space opening. Conclusion An internal tibial torque combined with a knee valgus moment is the worst-case ACL loading condition. However, it is the internal tibial torque that primarily causes large ACL strain. Clinical Relevance Limiting the maximum coefficient of friction between the shoe and playing surface should limit the peak internal tibial torque

  17. Psychological Factors Associated With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Christino, Melissa A.; Fleming, Braden C.; Machan, Jason T.; Shalvoy, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psychological factors may have underappreciated effects on surgical outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction; however, few studies have investigated the relationship between specific psychological factors, objective clinical data, and patient-oriented outcomes. Purpose: Psychological factors are significantly associated with patient perceptions and functional outcomes after ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate relationships between self-esteem, health locus of control, and psychological distress with objective clinical outcomes, patient-oriented outcomes, and return to sport. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Twenty-seven patients who were 6 to 24 months post–computer-assisted ACL reconstruction by a single surgeon consented to participate in the study (52% response rate). Participants had a 1-time visit with a physician consisting of: a physical examination, a single-leg hop test, KT-1000 arthrometer measurements, and survey completion. Psychological measures included the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Brief Profile of Mood States. Outcome measures included the Tegner activity scale, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Score, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score–Quality of Life subscale (KOOS-QOL), and Short Form–36 (SF-36). Patient charts were also reviewed for pertinent operative details. Results: The mean age of patients (±SD) was 25.7 ± 8.4 years, and the mean duration of time since surgery was 16.5 ± 5.9 months. The majority (89%) of the patients identified themselves as athletes, and of these, 65% reported returning to sports at a competitive level. Sport returners were found to have higher levels of self-esteem (P = .002) and higher reported KOOS-QOL scores (P = .02). Self-esteem was significantly associated with IKDC scores (r = 0.46, P < .05), KOOS-QOL scores (r = 0

  18. Delay to Reconstruction of the Adolescent Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Justin T.; Carry, Patrick M.; Terhune, Elizabeth B.; Spruiell, Murray; Heare, Austin; Mayo, Meredith; Vidal, Armando F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A delay in pediatric and adolescent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is associated with an increase in the number of concomitant meniscal and chondral injuries. Factors that contribute to this delay have not been well described. Hypothesis: Socioeconomic and demographic factors are related to ACL surgery timing. Study Methods: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All subjects who underwent primary ACL reconstruction at a single tertiary pediatric hospital between 2005 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Variables included concomitant knee injuries (cartilage or meniscus injuries requiring additional operative treatment) and chronologic, demographic, and socioeconomic factors. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazards analyses were used to identify factors related to ACL surgery timing. Results: The mean age of the 272 subjects was 15.2 ± 2.12 years. Time to surgery was significantly different among subjects who required multiple additional surgical procedures at time of ACL reconstruction (median, 3.3 months) compared with subjects with 1 (median, 2.0 months) or no additional injuries (median, 1.6 months). Subjects underwent ACL reconstruction significantly sooner if they were older at the time of injury (hazard ratio [HR], 1.2 per 1 year; 95% CI, 1.1-1.2; P < .0001) or were covered by a commercial insurance plan (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6; P < .0001). Median time to ACL surgery was 1.5 months (95% CI, 1.3-1.7) for subjects with commercial insurance plans compared with 3.0 months (95% CI, 2.3-3.3) for subjects with noncommercial insurance coverage. Conclusion: The risk of delayed ACL surgery was significantly higher among pediatric and adolescent subjects who were less affluent, who were covered by a noncommercial insurance plan, and who were younger. This study also confirms previous studies that have reported an association between a delay in ACL surgery and the presence of additional knee injuries requiring operative treatment

  19. Subsequent Surgery after Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, David; Group, Mars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Failure or reinjury after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can lead to recurrent instability and concomitant intra-articular injuries. While revision ACL reconstruction (rACLR) can be performed to restore knee stability and improve patient activity level, outcomes after these surgeries are reported to be inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. Further reoperation after rACLR can have an even more profound effect on patient satisfaction and outcome. Yet, there is a current lack of information regarding the rate and risk factors for subsequent surgery after rACLR. Methods: 1205 patients who underwent rACLR were enrolled between 2006 and 2011, comprising the prospective cohort. Two-year questionnaire follow-up was obtained on 989 (82%), while telephone follow-up was obtained on 1112 (92%). If a patient reported having a subsequent surgery, operative reports detailing the subsequent procedure(s) were obtained and categoriezed. A repeated meaures ANOVA was used to reveal significatnt differences in patient reported outcomes. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for reoperation. Results: One hundred and twenty-two patients (10.1%) underwent a total of 172 subsequent procedures on the ipsilateral knee at 2-year follow-up. Of the reoperation procedures, 26.7% were meniscus procedures (69% meniscectomy, 26% repair), 18.6% were subsequent rACLR, 17.4% were cartilage procedures (61% chondroplasty, 17% microfracture, and 13% mosaicplasty), 10% hardware removal, and 9.3% were procedures for arthrofibrosis such has lysis of adhesions and synovectomy. Patients who had reoperations had significantly lower IKDC, KOOS symptoms and pain scores, and WOMAC stiffness scores at two-year follow up. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients under 20 years old were 2.1 times more likely than patients aged 20-29 to have a reoperation. Use of allograft at the time of rACLR and staged revision (bone grafting of

  20. Autograft Versus Nonirradiated Allograft Tissue for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mariscalco, Michael W.; Magnussen, Robert A.; Mehta, Divyesh; Hewett, Timothy E.; Flanigan, David C.; Kaeding, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Background An autograft has traditionally been the gold standard for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), but the use of allograft tissue has increased in recent years. While numerous studies have demonstrated that irradiated allografts are associated with increased failure rates, some report excellent results after ACLR with nonirradiated allografts. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine whether the use of nonirradiated allograft tissue is associated with poorer outcomes when compared with autografts. Hypothesis Patients undergoing ACLR with autografts versus nonirradiated allografts will demonstrate no significant differences in graft failure risk, laxity on postoperative physical examination, or differences in patient-oriented outcome scores. Study Design Systematic review. Methods A systematic review was performed to identify prospective or retrospective comparative studies (evidence level 1, 2, or 3) of autografts versus nonirradiated allografts for ACLR. Outcome data included graft failure based on clinical findings and instrumented laxity, postoperative laxity on physical examination, and patient-reported outcome scores. Studies were excluded if they did not specify whether the allograft had been irradiated. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed by 2 examiners. Results Nine studies comparing autografts and nonirradiated allografts were included. Six of the 9 studies compared bone– patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autografts with BPTB allografts. Two studies compared hamstring tendon autografts to hamstring tendon allografts, and 1 study compared hamstring tendon autografts to tibialis anterior allografts. The mean patient age in 7 of 9 studies ranged from 24.5 to 32 years, with 1 study including only patients older than 40 years and another not reporting patient age. The mean follow-up duration was 24 to 94 months. Six of 9 studies reported clinical graft failure rates, 8 of 9 reported postoperative instrumented

  1. Functional Performance Testing After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: When to allow an athlete to return to unrestricted sporting activity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remains controversial. Purpose: To report the results of functional performance testing reported in the literature for individuals at differing time points following ACL reconstruction and to examine differences between graft types. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed using PRISMA guidelines. Inclusion criteria were English-language studies that examined any functional rehabilitation test from 6 months to 2 years following ACL reconstruction. All patient-, limb-, and knee-specific demographics were extracted from included investigations. All functional rehabilitation tests were analyzed and compared when applicable. Results: The search term returned a total of 890 potential studies, with 88 meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 4927 patients were included, of which 66% were male. The mean patient age was 26.5 ± 3.4 years. The predominant graft choices for reconstruction were bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autograft (59.8%) and hamstring autograft (37.9%). The most commonly reported functional tests were the hop tests. The results of these functional tests, as reported in the Limb Symmetry Index (LSI), improved with increasing time, with nearly all results greater than 90% at 1 year following primary ACL reconstruction. At 6 months postoperatively, a number of isokinetic strength measurements failed to reach 80% LSI, most commonly isokinetic knee extension testing in both BPTB and hamstring autograft groups. The knee flexion strength deficit was significantly less in the BPTB autograft group as compared with those having hamstring autograft at 1 year postoperatively, while no significant differences were found in isokinetic extension strength between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Hop

  2. Tensions in the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments of the knee during passive loading: predicting ligament loads from in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Vahey, J W; Draganich, L F

    1991-07-01

    Cruciate ligament tensions were predicted for anteroposterior (AP) tibial translation at 20 degrees, 30 degrees, 80 degrees, and 90 degrees of knee flexion based on in vitro measurements from six cadaver knees. A three-dimensional trigonometric equation was derived to calculate cruciate ligament tension as functions of AP force applied to the tibia and knee flexion angle (KFA). AP forces less than or equal to 150 N were applied. Ligament tension increased with applied AP force. The relationship between ligament tension and applied AP force appeared linear, but a Hotteling's T2 test failed to demonstrate a linear relationship. Tensions in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) attained magnitudes of approximately equal to 140 N. Tensions in the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) attained magnitudes of approximately equal to 220 N. An analysis was performed to determine the sensitivity of ligament tension to hypothetical errors in the experimentally measured parameters used to compute ligament tension. The new method we report can be used to determine tensions in the ligaments of the knee or other joints for various loading conditions. PMID:2045979

  3. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided aspiration of an anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: description of technique and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Krill, Michael; Peck, Evan

    2014-12-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst is an infrequent but potentially clinically significant cause of knee pain. Although the cyst may be removed surgically, percutaneous ultrasound-guided anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst aspiration and injection is feasible. To our knowledge, we present the first reported case description of the utilization of ultrasound guidance to perform this procedure with a successful clinical outcome. PMID:25088315

  4. Determination of a zero strain reference for the anteromedial band of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Fleming, B C; Beynnon, B D; Tohyama, H; Johnson, R J; Nichols, C E; Renström, P; Pope, M H

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this study was to verify a method previously used to determine a reference length for calculations of anterior cruciate ligament strain. In nine knee specimens, an arthroscopic force probe and a Hall effect transducer were placed in the anteromedial band of the ligament. Anteroposterior-directed shear loads then were applied to the knee joint with the knee flexed to 30 degrees. From the sigmoidal curve for shear load versus displacement of the anterior cruciate ligament midsubstance, the length of the transducer at the inflection point was determined graphically by two independent examiners. Previous studies suggested that the inflection point corresponds to the slack-taut transition of the anteromedial band. The force probe was used to determine the actual length of the transducer when the anteromedial band became load bearing. No significant differences were found between the reference lengths determined by the inflection point method and the force probe. The force probe demonstrated that the anterior cruciate ligament became load bearing when an anterior shear load of 8.8 N was applied to the tibia with the knee at 30 degrees of flexion. Furthermore, multiple cycles of anteroposterior shear loading did not influence these values. The force probe verified that the inflection method provides a reasonable estimate of the absolute strain reference (within 0.7% strain). PMID:7983554

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of anterior cruciate ligament tears: reevaluation of quantitative parameters and imaging findings including a simplified method for measuring the anterior cruciate ligament angle.

    PubMed

    Mellado, J M; Calmet, J; Olona, M; Giné, J; Saurí, A

    2004-05-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for predicting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears using both quantitative parameters and nonquantitative imaging findings. MRI examinations were retrospectively evaluated in a group of patients with arthroscopically confirmed complete ACL tear and in a control group with arthroscopically confirmed intact ACL. We evaluated multiple MRI features to compare their sensitivity and specificity for detecting ACL tears. Particular emphasis is put on the evaluation of three different quantitative parameters, including a simplified method for measuring the ACL angle. With a threshold value of 45 degrees the ACL angle reached a sensitivity and specificity of 100% for detecting ACL tears. With a threshold value of 0 degrees the Blumensaat angle had a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 98%. Finally, a threshold value of 115 degrees gave the posterior cruciate ligament angle a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 82%. Discontinuity was found to be the most useful of the ACL abnormalities. Of the secondary findings anterior tibial displacement was the best predictor of ligamentous injury. However, ACL abnormalities and secondary findings, alone or combined, failed to surpass the diagnostic value of the ACL angle for predicting ACL tears. Quantitative parameters are thus good predictors of ACL tears and may increase the overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI. The ACL angle may be confidently measured in a single MRI section and can be considered to be the most reliable quantitative parameter for detecting ACL tears. PMID:14530852

  6. Neural Excitability Alterations After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Lepley, Adam S.; Ericksen, Hayley M.; Clements, Amy; Sohn, David H.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2015-01-01

    Context Neuromuscular dysfunction is common after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). However, little is known about quadriceps spinal-reflex and descending corticomotor excitability after ACL-R. Understanding the effects of ACL-R on spinal-reflex and corticomotor excitability will help elucidate the origins of neuromuscular dysfunction. Objective To determine whether spinal-reflex excitability and corticomotor excitability differed between the injured and uninjured limbs of patients with unilateral ACL-R and between these limbs and the matched limbs of healthy participants. Design Case-control study. Setting Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 28 patients with unilateral ACL-R (9 men, 19 women; age = 21.28 ± 3.79 years, height = 170.95 ± 10.04 cm, mass = 73.18 ± 18.02 kg, time after surgery = 48.10 ± 36.17 months) and 29 participants serving as healthy controls (9 men, 20 women; age = 21.55 ± 2.70 years, height = 170.59 ± 8.93 cm, mass = 71.89 ± 12.70 kg) volunteered. Main Outcome Measure(s) Active motor thresholds (AMTs) were collected from the vastus medialis (VM) using transcranial magnetic stimulation. We evaluated VM spinal reflexes using the Hoffmann reflex normalized to maximal muscle responses (H : M ratio). Voluntary quadriceps activation was measured with the superimposed-burst technique and calculated using the central activation ratio (CAR). We also evaluated whether ACL-R patients with high or low voluntary activation had different outcomes. Results The AMT was higher in the injured than in the uninjured limb in the ACL-R group (t27 = 3.32, P = .003) and in the matched limb of the control group (t55 = 2.05, P = .04). The H : M ratio was bilaterally higher in the ACL-R than the control group (F1,55 = 5.17, P = .03). The quadriceps CAR was bilaterally lower in the ACL-R compared with the control group (F1,55 = 10.5, P = .002). The ACL-R group with low voluntary activation (CAR < 0.95) had higher AMT than

  7. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques

    PubMed Central

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-01-01

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal or ligamentous injuries accompany ACL ruptures and further deteriorate the resulting kinematics and clinical outcomes. Knowing the surgical options, anatomic relations and current evidence to restore ACL function and considering the influence of concomitant injuries on resulting kinematics to restore full function can together help to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:26925379

  8. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-02-18

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal or ligamentous injuries accompany ACL ruptures and further deteriorate the resulting kinematics and clinical outcomes. Knowing the surgical options, anatomic relations and current evidence to restore ACL function and considering the influence of concomitant injuries on resulting kinematics to restore full function can together help to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:26925379

  9. Immunohistochemical analysis of the neural structures of the posterior cruciate ligament in osteoarthritis patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty: an analysis of thirty-four cases

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Glaucus Cajaty; Camanho, Gilberto; Rodrigues, Mara Ibis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many authors recommend posterior cruciate ligament-retaining arthroplasty with the intention to maintain the proprioception properties of this ligament. Preservation of the neuroreceptors and nervous fibers may be essential for retaining the proprioception function of the posterior cruciate ligament. The present study was thus developed to evaluate the presence of neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament resected during posterior stabilized arthroplasty in osteoarthritis patients. In particular, clinical, radiographic and histological parameters were correlated with the presence or absence of neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament. METHODS: In total, 34 posterior cruciate ligament specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Gomori trichrome. An immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against the S100 protein and neurofilaments was also performed. The presence of neural structures was correlated with parameters such as tibiofemoral angulation, histological degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament, Ahlbäck radiological classification, age, gender and the histologic pattern of the synovial neurovascular bundle around the posterior cruciate ligament. RESULTS: In total, 67.5% of the cases presented neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament. In 65% of the cases, the neurovascular bundle was degenerated. Nervous structures were more commonly detected in varus knees than in valgus knees (77% versus 50%). Additionally, severe histologic degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament was related to neurovascular bundle degeneration. CONCLUSIONS: Severe posterior cruciate ligament degeneration was related to neurovascular bundle compromise. Neural structures were more commonly detected in varus knees. Intrinsic neural structures were detected in the majority of the posterior cruciate ligaments of patients submitted to knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. PMID:25789514

  10. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training. PMID:27512258

  11. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention.

  12. Stifle synovial cyst in a Labrador Retriever with concurrent cranial cruciate ligament deficiency.

    PubMed

    Franklin, A D; Havlicek, M; Krockenberger, M B

    2011-01-01

    A seven-year-old Labrador Retriever dog was presented with the complaint of chronic left hindlimb lameness. A diagnosis of partial rupture of the left cranial cruciate ligament with concurrent cranio-medial synovial cyst formation was made. This cystic structure was assumed to be communicating with the stifle joint. There was no evidence of a meniscal tear, but superficial fibrillation of the axial border was present. Surgical excision of the cyst with concurrent treatment of the cranial cruciate ligament deficiency by tibial tuberosity advancement was performed with a successful outcome. Whilst commonly encountered in humans, synovial cysts are uncommon in dogs. To the authors' knowledge this is the first reported case of synovial cyst formation in the stifle of a dog. PMID:21243179

  13. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training. PMID:27512258

  14. Disadvantages and advantages of transtibial technique for creating the anterior cruciate ligament femoral socket.

    PubMed

    Robin, Brett N; Lubowitz, James H

    2014-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) femoral socket techniques have distinct advantages and disadvantages when considering the following techniques: transtibial, anteromedial portal, outside-in, and outside-in retroconstruction. There is no one perfect technique and we have an incomplete understanding of anatomical, biomechanical, isometry, stability, and clinical outcomes. Our primary focus is transtibial technique for creating the ACL femoral socket. Advantages include less invasive, isometric graft placement, stable Lachman exam, and minimal graft impingement with the tunnel and notch. Disadvantages include nonanatomic vertical graft placement that can cause rotational instability and positive pivot shift, interference screw divergence, graft-tunnel length mismatch, femoral socket constraint, posterior cruciate ligament impingement, and a short, oblique tibial tunnel that may undermine the medial plateau in an attempt to achieve anatomic ACL reconstruction. PMID:24951951

  15. Tibial plateau leveling osteotomy in a cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis) with cranial cruciate ligament ruptures.

    PubMed

    Molter, Christine M; Jackson, Joshua; Clippinger, Tracy L; Sutherland-Smith, Meg

    2015-03-01

    A 13-yr-old female Cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis) presented with an acute mild right pelvic limb lameness that progressed to a non-weight-bearing lameness. Diagnosis of a ruptured cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) was made based on positive cranial drawer during physical examination and was supported by radiographs. A surgical repair with a tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) and bone anchor with an OrthoFiber suture was performed. The tibial plateau angle was reduced from 30 to 5 degrees. The otter returned to normal function after 12 wk of exercise restriction. Twelve months after surgery, the left CCL ruptured and a TPLO was performed. No complications developed after either surgery, and the otter had an excellent return to function. This is the first report of a cranial cruciate ligament rupture and TPLO procedure in a mustelid, supporting its application to noncanid and felid species. PMID:25831598

  16. Surgical treatment of simultaneous rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament and the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Kyohei; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Hino, Kazunori; Watanabe, Seiji; Yamaoka, Gotaro; Shirakata, Haruo; Fujii, Yuko; Miura, Hiromasa

    2013-12-01

    Although the rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common sports injury, a simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon (PT) is relatively rare. We experienced a case in which a patient simultaneously ruptured the ACL, the medial collateral ligament (MCL), and the PT while sliding during a baseball game. We sutured the PT and MCL during the acute stage, and 7 months later we conducted a double-bundle reconstruction of the ACL. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PT repair using only fiber wire thread, and two-phase double-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:23288727

  17. A phenomenological contact model: Understanding the graft-tunnel interaction in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Salehghaffari, Shahab; Dhaher, Yasin Y

    2015-07-16

    In this paper, we sought to expand the fidelity of a validated model of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) procedure by incorporating a stick-slip contact model with linear pressure-overclosure relationship at the interface. The suggested model is characterized by three unknown parameters, friction coefficient, shear stress softening and contact stiffness. In the absence of any isolated experiments exploring the graft-tunnel interactions during an aggregate joint load, the calibration data used in this study are derived from a reported biomechanical study. A Bayesian calibration procedure was employed to find the unknown probability distribution function (PDF) of these contact parameters. Initially, the response surface approximations of the predicted graft forces from laxity test simulations was adopted to estimate the likelihood of noisy experimental data reported in the literature. Then, the wide domain of contact parameters was sampled sequentially based on the Marcov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method with acceptance-rejection criteria to search for population of samples in significantly narrower domain of unknown parameters that are associated with the highest occurrence likelihood of noisy experimental data. Our simulations with calibrated contact parameters indicate that pre-tensioning applied at 30° of flexion leads to larger graft force after the joint is fully extended compared to the graft force when the same pre-tensioning force is applied at full extension. Moreover, regardless of the pre-tensioning force, the graft-tunnel contact pressure is larger when the fixation of the graft is performed at full extension, increasing with the pre-tensioning force. PMID:26100464

  18. Risk factors and prevention strategies of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Laible, Catherine; Sherman, Orrin H

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of women playing sports has increased significantly. The passage of Title IX in 1972 had a significant effect in encouraging female participation in sports. This increase in women's sports participation also led to a rise in noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. As ACL injuries in young female athletes have be- come a public health issue, much research has been done on risk factors and prevention strategies. PMID:25150329

  19. Acute Simultaneous Ruptures of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Patellar Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gwang Chul; Park, Sung-Hae

    2014-01-01

    Acute simultaneous rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and patellar tendon is a rare injury. We present a case report of a 32-year-old male patient with ruptured ACL and ipsilateral patellar tendon rupture sustained while playing baseball. Surgery was performed on the patellar tendon and the ACL simultaneously. The clinical and radiological outcomes of the treatment were successful. We present this case with a review of the literatures. PMID:24639949

  20. Results of meniscectomy and meniscal repair in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    DELEDDA, DAVIDE; ROSSO, FEDERICA; COTTINO, UMBERTO; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. A deficient medial meniscus results in knee instability and could lead to higher stress forces on the ACL reconstruction. Comparison of results in meniscectomy and meniscal repairs revealed worse clinical outcomes in meniscectomy, but higher re-operation rates in meniscal repairs. Our aim was to review the results of ACL reconstruction associated with meniscectomy or meniscal repair. PMID:26889472

  1. Comparative Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Determination of Isometric Points with and Without Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Fabio J.; Albuquerque, Roberto F. M.; Sasaki, Sandra U.; Camanho, Gilberto L.; Hernandez, Arnaldo J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the accuracy of tunnel placement and graft isometry for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction performed using a computer-assisted navigation system (Orthopilot) and using traditional instruments. METHODS: The anterior cruciate ligament was removed intact from 36 pairs of human cadaver knees. From each pair, one knee was randomized to Group 1 (conventional) and the other to Group 2 (Orthopilot). An inelastic suture was then passed through the central points of the tibial and femoral tunnels. Neither of the tunnels was drilled. All knees were then dissected, and six parameters were obtained: distances from the tibial tunnel center to the 1) posterior cruciate ligament, 2) anterior horn of the lateral meniscus and 3) medial tibial spine; 4) distance from the femoral tunnel center to the posterior femoral cortex; 5) femoral tunnel coronal angle; and 6) variation of the distance from the femoral to the tibial tunnel with the knee extended and at 90 degrees of flexion. RESULTS: The variation of the distance from the femoral to the tibial tunnel during flexion and extension was smaller in the Orthopilot group (better isometry) compared to the conventional group. There were no statistical differences in any other parameters between the groups, and all tunnels were considered to be in satisfactory positions. DISCUSSION: The results obtained for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction depend on precise isometric point positioning, and a navigation system is a precision tool that can assist surgeons in tunnel positioning. CONCLUSION: No differences in tunnel position were observed between the groups. Nonetheless, better isometry was achieved in the Orthopilot group than with conventional instruments. PMID:20668625

  2. Elastographic imaging of strain distribution in the anterior cruciate ligament and at the ligament-bone insertions.

    PubMed

    Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Gallina, Jason; Fung-Kee-Fung, Simon D; Konofagou, Elisa E; Lu, Helen H

    2006-10-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) functions as a mechanical stabilizer in the tibiofemoral joint, and is the most commonly injured knee ligament. To improve the clinical outcome of tendon grafts used for ACL reconstructions, our long-term goal is to promote graft-bone integration via the regeneration of the native ligament-bone interface. An understanding of strain distribution at this interface is crucial for functional scaffold design and clinical evaluation. Experimental determination, however, has been difficult due to the small length scale of the insertion sites. This study utilizes ultrasound elastography to characterize the response of the ACL and ACL-bone interface under tension. Specifically, bovine tibiofemoral joints were mounted on a material testing system and loaded in tension while radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired at 5 MHz. Axial strain elastograms between RF frames and a reference frame were generated using crosscorrelation and recorrelation techniques. Elastographic analyses revealed that when the joint was loaded in tension, complex strains with both compressive and tensile components occurred at the tibial insertion, with higher strains found at the insertion sites. In addition, the displacement was greatest at the ACL proper and decreased in value gradually from ligament to bone, likely a reflection of the matrix organization at the ligament-bone interface. Our results indicate that elastography is a novel method that can be readily used to characterize the mechanical properties of the ACL and its insertions into bone. PMID:16900541

  3. Knee shape might predict clinical outcome after an anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Eggerding, V; van Kuijk, K S R; van Meer, B L; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; van Arkel, E R A; Reijman, M; Waarsing, J H; Meuffels, D E

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated whether shape of the knee can predict the clinical outcome of patients after an anterior cruciate ligament rupture. We used statistical shape modelling to measure the shape of the knee joint of 182 prospectively followed patients on lateral and Rosenberg view radiographs of the knee after a rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament. Subsequently, we associated knee shape with the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective score at two years follow-up. The mean age of patients was 31 years (21 to 51), the majority were male (n = 121) and treated operatively (n = 135). We found two modes (shape variations) that were significantly associated with the subjective score at two years: one for the operatively treated group (p = 0.002) and one for the non-operatively treated group (p = 0.003). Operatively treated patients who had higher subjective scores had a smaller intercondylar notch and a smaller width of the intercondylar eminence. Non-operatively treated patients who scored higher on the subjective score had a more pyramidal intercondylar notch as opposed to one that was more dome-shaped. We conclude that the shape of the femoral notch and the intercondylar eminence is predictive of clinical outcome two years after a rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament. PMID:24891572

  4. Current Concepts for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Criterion–Based Rehabilitation Progression

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, DOUGLAS; LOGERSTEDT, DAVID; HUNTER-GIORDANO, AIRELLE; AXE, MICHAEL J.; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction should be evidence based. Since our original published guidelines in 1996, successful outcomes have been consistently achieved with the rehabilitation principles of early weight bearing, using a combination of weight-bearing and non–weight-bearing exercise focused on quadriceps and lower extremity strength, and meeting specific objective requirements for return to activity. As rehabilitative evidence and surgical technology and procedures have progressed, the original guidelines should be revisited to ensure that the most up-to-date evidence is guiding rehabilitative care. Emerging evidence on rehabilitative interventions and advancements in concomitant surgeries, including those addressing chondral and meniscal injuries, continues to grow and greatly affect the rehabilitative care of patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The aim of this article is to update previously published rehabilitation guidelines, using the most recent research to reflect the most current evidence for management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The focus will be on current concepts in rehabilitation interventions and modifications needed for concomitant surgery and pathology. PMID:22402434

  5. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients’ ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements. PMID:27134367

  6. Recurrent pretibial ganglion cyst formation over 5 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Jon K; Elkousy, Hussein A; Fu, Freddie H

    2004-03-01

    Although ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament have been described in the literature, they are a relatively rare phenomenon. Cyst formation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is even less frequent, with only a few reported cases. The proposed etiology of these cysts has been attributed to a number of causes, including the use of bioabsorbable screws, Gore-Tex (W. L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) grafts, extra-articular fluid extravasation secondary to direct tibial tunnel communication, allografts with or without ethylene oxide sterilization, and the use of nonabsorbable suture. We report an unusual case of a recurrent pretibial ganglion cyst that initially formed more than 5 years after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and recurred 2 years after resection of the mass. We believe the initial surgical resection was unsuccessful probably because the foreign body irritant was not identified. Only after resection of the entire stalk of the cyst and removal of all of the inciting suture material that was found near the entrance of the tibial tunnel were we able to definitively eradicate the ganglion cyst. PMID:15007323

  7. Rehabilitative techniques for athletes after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Lutz, G E; Stuart, M J; Sim, F H; Scott, S G

    1990-10-01

    A wide spectrum of protocols is available for rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and little agreement exists on the specifics of strengthening exercises or the sequence of activities. In this article, we discuss the current rehabilitative techniques used at the Mayo Clinic for athletes who have undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. These techniques are based on established principles of rehabilitation, clinical experience, and new information about the related biomechanics of the knee. An illustrative case reflects the benefits of this rehabilitation program, which lasts up to 1 year and is divided into five stages. The early stages focus on protected mobilization and a strengthening program that emphasizes closed rather than open kinetic chain exercises. Later, neuromuscular-proprioceptive training and sport-specific agility training redevelop the reaction time and the "coordination engrams" necessary for athletic competition. High-quality surgical care and a closely supervised rehabilitation program, based on kinesiologic and biomechanical factors as they pertain to the anterior cruciate ligament, are necessary for a successful outcome. PMID:2214879

  8. Evaluation of static and dynamic balance in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury – A controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Felix, Ellen Cristina Rodrigues; Bessa, Felipe; Luna, Natália MS; Sugimoto, Dai; Greve, Júlia Maria D’Andrea; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Anterior cruciate ligament injury leads to adaptive responses to maintain postural control. However, there is no consensus regarding whether leg dominance also affects postural control in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dynamic and static postural control among athletes with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury to the dominant leg. METHODS: Twenty-eight athletes, twenty-one males and seven females aged 15-45 years, were allocated to one of two groups: the anterior cruciate ligament injury group (26±3 years) or the control group without anterior cruciate ligament injury (25±6.5 years). All subjects performed one legged stance tests under eyes open and eyes closed conditions and squat and kick movement tests using a postural control protocol (AccuSwayPlus force platform, Massachusetts). The center of pressure displacement and speed were measured by the force platform. In addition, the distance traveled on the single-leg hop test was assessed as an objective measure of function. RESULTS: Significantly greater mediolateral sway was found under the eyes closed condition (p=0.04) and during squat movement (p=0.01) in the anterior cruciate ligament injury group than in the control group. Analysis of the single-leg hop test results showed no difference between the groups (p=0.73). CONCLUSION: Athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury had greater mediolateral displacement of the center of pressure toward the dominant leg under the eyes closed condition and during squat movement compared to control athletes.

  9. The Restoration of Passive Rotational Tibio-Femoral Laxity after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Moewis, Philippe; Duda, Georg N.; Jung, Tobias; Heller, Markus O.; Boeth, Heide; Kaptein, Bart; Taylor, William R.

    2016-01-01

    While the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is considered one of the most important ligaments for providing knee joint stability, its influence on rotational laxity is not fully understood and its role in resisting rotation at different flexion angles in vivo remains unknown. In this prospective study, we investigated the relationship between in vivo passive axial rotational laxity and knee flexion angle, as well as how they were altered with ACL injury and reconstruction. A rotometer device was developed to assess knee joint rotational laxity under controlled passive testing. An axial torque of ±2.5Nm was applied to the knee while synchronised fluoroscopic images of the tibia and femur allowed axial rotation of the bones to be accurately determined. Passive rotational laxity tests were completed in 9 patients with an untreated ACL injury and compared to measurements at 3 and 12 months after anatomical single bundle ACL reconstruction, as well as to the contralateral controls. Significant differences in rotational laxity were found between the injured and the healthy contralateral knees with internal rotation values of 8.7°±4.0° and 3.7°±1.4° (p = 0.003) at 30° of flexion and 9.3°±2.6° and 4.0°±2.0° (p = 0.001) at 90° respectively. After 3 months, the rotational laxity remained similar to the injured condition, and significantly different to the healthy knees. However, after 12 months, a considerable reduction of rotational laxity was observed towards the levels of the contralateral controls. The significantly greater laxity observed at both knee flexion angles after 3 months (but not at 12 months), suggests an initial lack of post-operative rotational stability, possibly due to reduced mechanical properties or fixation stability of the graft tissue. After 12 months, reduced levels of rotational laxity compared with the injured and 3 month conditions, both internally and externally, suggests progressive rotational stability of the reconstruction with

  10. Anatomic Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction of the Knee Leads to Overconstraint at any Fixation Angle

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Jason; Brady, Alex; Moatshe, Gilbert; Cruz, Raphael; Chahla, Jorge; Dornan, Grant; Turnbull, Travis L.; Engebretsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are one of the most common injuries among athletes. However, the ability to fully restore rotational stability with ACL reconstruction (ACLR) remains a challenge because up to 25% of patients may present with a residual pivot shift following surgery. Advocacy for reconstruction of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) is rapidly increasing because biomechanical studies have reported that the ALL is a significant contributor to internal rotational stability of the knee. Although several graft fixation angles for the anatomic ALL reconstruction (ALLR) have been reported in literature, none have been biomechanically validated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the effect of ALLR graft fixation angle on knee joint kinematics in the clinically relevant setting of a concomitant ACLR. The goal was to find the optimal knee flexion angle for fixation of the ALLR graft that would most accurately restore native knee kinematics without introducing overconstraint to the knee. It was hypothesized that all fixation angles would significantly reduce rotational laxity compared to the sectioned ALL state and that fixation at 30° would best reproduce native joint kinematics. Methods: Eight non-paired fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees with no prior injury, surgical history, or gross anatomic abnormality were evaluated with a 6 degree-of-freedom robotic system. Each specimen underwent a full kinematic assessment in each of the following states: 1) intact, 2) anatomic single-bundle (SB) ACLR with intact ALL, 3) anatomic SB ACLR with sectioned ALL, 4) 7 anatomic SB ACLR and ALLR states utilizing ALL graft fixation knee flexion angles of 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75° and 90°, and 5) sectioned ACL and ALL. Internal rotation during a 5 N-m internal rotation torque and anterior displacement during an 88 N anterior load were recorded at 15° intervals between 0° and 120° of knee flexion. Axial plane displacement and

  11. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING FLEXOR TENDONS AND RIGID GUIDE TRANSVERSE SCREW

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Renato Luiz Bevilacqua; Acras, Sandor Dosa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the results of ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) reconstruction using quadruple flexor tendons as grafts, with ligament fixation in the femur using a rigid guide transverse screw and in the tibia, using a cancellous screw with a fixing washer. Methods: 173 knees (166 from males and seven from females) that had undergone surgery with ACL reconstruction using this technique between December 2002 and February 2007 were evaluated. The mean age was 30 years (from 13 to 56 years), and the mean follow-up time was 30 months (6-55 months). We divided the knees into three groups, which were assessed using the Lysholm scale: Group A with six months of follow-up; Group B with 12 months of follow-up; and Group C with 24 months of follow-up. Results: We evaluated the results, and groups A, B and C received 94, 95 and 95 points respectively on the Lysholm scale. Conclusions: The surgical technique proved to be safe and easy to perform, with good results and a low complication rate. Also, its results were maintained throughout the study period of 24 months. PMID:27027002

  12. Effect of Femoral Tunnel Placement for Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament on Tibial Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Ristanis, Stavros; Stergiou, Nicholas; Siarava, Eleftheria; Ntoulia, Aikaterini; Mitsionis, Grigorios; Georgoulis, Anastasios D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Rotational knee movement after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been difficult to quantify. The purpose of this study was to identify in vivo whether a more horizontal placement of the femoral tunnel (in the ten o'clock position rather than in the eleven o'clock position) can restore rotational kinematics, during highly demanding dynamic activities, in a knee in which a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft had been used to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament. Methods: We evaluated ten patients in whom a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft had been used to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament with the femoral tunnel in the eleven o'clock position, ten patients who had had the same procedure with the femoral tunnel in the ten o'clock position, and ten healthy controls. Kinematic data were collected while the subjects (1) descended from a stairway, made foot contact, and then pivoted 90° on the landing lower limb and (2) jumped from a platform, landed with both feet on the ground, and pivoted 90° on the right or left lower limb. The dependent variable that we examined was tibial rotation during pivoting. Results: The results demonstrated that reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with the femoral tunnel in either the ten or the eleven o'clock position successfully restored anterior tibial translation. However, both techniques resulted in tibial rotation values, during the dynamic activities evaluated, that were significantly larger than those in the intact contralateral lower limbs and those in the healthy controls. Tibial rotation did not differ significantly between the two reconstruction groups or between the healthy controls and the intact contralateral lower limbs. However, we noticed that positioning the tunnel at ten o'clock resulted in slightly decreased rotation values that may have clinical relevance but not statistical significance. Conclusions: Regardless of which of the two tested positions was utilized to

  13. Emerging Updates on the Posterior Cruciate Ligament: A Review of the Current Literature.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Christopher M; Civitarese, David M; Rasmussen, Matthew T; LaPrade, Robert F

    2015-12-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is recognized as an essential stabilizer of the knee. However, the complexity of the ligament has generated controversy about its definitive role and the recommended treatment after injury. A proper understanding of the functional role of the PCL is necessary to minimize residual instability, osteoarthritic progression, and failure of additional concomitant ligament graft reconstructions or meniscal repairs after treatment. Recent anatomic and biomechanical studies have elucidated the surgically relevant quantitative anatomy and confirmed the codominant role of the anterolateral and posteromedial bundles of the PCL. Although nonoperative treatment has historically been the initial treatment of choice for isolated PCL injury, possibly biased by the historically poorer objective outcomes postoperatively compared with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, surgical intervention has been increasingly used for isolated and combined PCL injuries. Recent studies have more clearly elucidated the biomechanical and clinical effects after PCL tears and resultant treatments. This article presents a thorough review of updates on the clinically relevant anatomy, epidemiology, biomechanical function, diagnosis, and current treatments for the PCL, with an emphasis on the emerging clinical and biomechanical evidence regarding each of the treatment choices for PCL reconstruction surgery. It is recommended that future outcomes studies use PCL stress radiographs to determine objective outcomes and that evidence level 1 and 2 studies be performed to assess outcomes between transtibial and tibial inlay reconstructions and also between single- and double-bundle PCL reconstructions. PMID:25776184

  14. Effect of Varying Hamstring Tension on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Strain During in Vitro Impulsive Knee Flexion and Compression Loading

    PubMed Central

    Withrow, Thomas J.; Huston, Laura J.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The hamstring muscles are well positioned to limit both anterior tibial translation and anterior cruciate ligament strain during the knee flexion phase of a jump landing. We hypothesized that systematically increasing or decreasing hamstring tension during the knee flexion phase of a simulated jump landing would significantly affect peak relative strain in the anterior cruciate ligament. Methods: Ten cadaveric knees from four male and six female donors (mean age [and standard deviation] at the time of death, 60.3 ± 23.6 years) were mounted in a custom fixture to initially position the specimen in 25° of knee flexion and simulate axial impulsive loading averaging 1700 N to cause an increase in knee flexion. Quadriceps, hamstring, and gastrocnemius muscle forces were simulated with use of pretensioned linear springs, with the tension in the hamstrings arranged to be increased, held constant, decreased, at “baseline,” or absent during knee flexion. Impulsive loading applied along the tibia and femur was monitored with use of triaxial load transducers, while uniaxial load cells monitored quadriceps and medial and lateral hamstring forces. Relative strain in the anterior cruciate ligament was measured with use of a differential variable reluctance transducer, and tibiofemoral kinematics were measured optoelectronically. For each specimen, anterior cruciate ligament strains were recorded over eighty impact trials: ten preconditioning trials, ten “baseline” trials involving decreasing hamstring tension performed before and after three sets of ten trials conducted with increasing hamstring tension, constant hamstring tension, or no hamstring tension. Peak relative strains in the anterior cruciate ligament were normalized for comparison across specimens. Results: Increasing hamstring force during the knee flexion landing phase decreased the peak relative strain in the anterior cruciate ligament by >70% compared with the baseline condition (p = 0

  15. Broken bioabsorbable femoral cross-pin as a cause of a chondral lesion after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Ziogas, Evangelos; Dimitriadis, Theofilos; Voulgaropoulos, Harilaos

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of a chondral lesion after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction caused by femoral cross-pin breakage and intra-articular migration of the fragment. A 20-year-old man initially underwent ACL reconstruction using a hamstring autograft. The RigidFix bioabsorbable cross-pin (DePuy Mitek) was used for the femoral fixation. The patient returned to a pre-injury level of activity (professional soccer player) 6 months postoperatively. However, 20 months postoperatively, the patient presented with effusion and lateral joint-line pain after practice, without signs of instability in clinical examination. Conservative treatment failed and at re-arthroscopy a chondral lesion of the lateral femoral and tibial condyle was found, which had been caused by the broken femoral cross-pin. The fragment was removed and the symptoms resolved. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of this complication when using a bioabsorbable cross-pin for femoral fixation in ACL reconstruction. PMID:21686583

  16. Broken bioabsorbable femoral cross-pin as a cause of a chondral lesion after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Ziogas, Evangelos; Dimitriadis, Theofilos; Voulgaropoulos, Harilaos

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of a chondral lesion after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction caused by femoral cross-pin breakage and intra-articular migration of the fragment. A 20-year-old man initially underwent ACL reconstruction using a hamstring autograft. The RigidFix bioabsorbable cross-pin (DePuy Mitek) was used for the femoral fixation. The patient returned to a pre-injury level of activity (professional soccer player) 6 months postoperatively. However, 20 months postoperatively, the patient presented with effusion and lateral joint-line pain after practice, without signs of instability in clinical examination. Conservative treatment failed and at re-arthroscopy a chondral lesion of the lateral femoral and tibial condyle was found, which had been caused by the broken femoral cross-pin. The fragment was removed and the symptoms resolved. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of this complication when using a bioabsorbable cross-pin for femoral fixation in ACL reconstruction. PMID:21686583

  17. Biomechanical Comparison Between Bashti Bone Plug Technique and Biodegradable Screw for Fixation of Grafts in Ligament surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashti, Kaveh; Tahmasebi, Mohammad N; Kaseb, Hasan; Farahmand, Farzam; Akbar, Mohammad; Mobini, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ligament reconstruction is a common procedure in orthopedic surgery. Although several popular techniques are currently in use, new methods are proposed for secure fixation of the tendon graft into the bone tunnel. Purposes: We sought to introduce our new technique of Bashti bone plug for fixation of soft tissue graft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to compare its biomechanical features with conventional absorbable interference screw technique in a bovine model. Methods: Twenty pairs of bovine knees were harvested after death. Soft tissue was removed and the Achilles tendon was harvested to be used as an ACL graft. It was secured into the bone tunnel on the tibial side via two different methods: Bashti Bone Plug technique and conventional screw method. Biomechanical strength was measured using 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading on the graft. Pull out strength was also tested until the graft fails. Results: No graft failure was observed after 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading in either fixation methods. When testing for pull out failure, 21 tendons (53%) were torn and 19 tendons (48%) slipped out. No fixation failure occurred, which did not reveal a significant difference between the bone plug or interference screw group (P=0.11). The mean pull out force until failure of the graft was 496±66 N in the screw group and 503±67 N in the bone plug group (P=0.76). Conclusions: Our suggested fixation technique of Bashti bone plug is a native, cheap, and feasible method that provides comparable biomechanical strength with interference screw when soft tissue fixation was attempted in bovine model. PMID:25692166

  18. Inter-Segmental Coordination Pattern in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency during a Single-Step Descent

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Mohammadreza; Razeghi, Mohsen; Mehdizadeh, Sina; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Piroozi, Soraya; Rojhani Shirazi, Zahra; Rafiee, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury is a debilitating pathology which may alter lower limb coordination pattern in both intact and affected lower extremities during activities of daily living. Emerging evidence supports the notion that kinematic variables may not be a good indicator to differentiate patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency during step descent task. The aim of the present study was to examine alterations in kinematics as well as coordination patterns and coordination variability of both limbs of these patients during a single step descent task. Continuous relative phase technique was used to measure coordination pattern and coordination variability between a group of anterior cruciate ligament deficient (n = 23) and a healthy control group (n = 23). A third order polynomial Curve fitting was utilized to provide a curve that best fitted to the data points of coordination pattern and coordination variability of the healthy control group. This was considered as a reference to compare to that of patient group using nonlinear regression analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated an altered coordination pattern of the supporting shank-thigh and the stepping foot-shank couplings in anterior cruciate ligament deficient subjects. It was further noticed that there was an increased coordination variability in foot-shank and shank-thigh couplings of both supporting and stepping legs. There was no significant difference in the hip, knee and ankle joints kinematics in either side of these patients. Anterior cruciate ligament deficient individuals showed altered strategies in both intact and affected legs, with increased coordination variability. Kinematic data did not indicate any significant difference between the two groups. It could be concluded that more sophisticated dynamic approach such as continuous relative phase would uncover discrepancies between the healthy and anterior cruciate ligament deficient individuals. PMID:26900698

  19. Anterior Tibial Translation in Collegiate Athletes with Normal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Rosene, John M.; Fogarty, Tracey D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine differences in anterior tibial translation (ATT) among sports, sex, and leg dominance in collegiate athletes with normal anterior cruciate ligament integrity. Design and Setting: Subjects from various athletic teams were measured for ATT in right and left knees. Subjects: Sixty subjects were measured for ATT with a KT-1000 knee arthrometer. Measurements: Statistical analyses were computed for each sex and included a 2 × 3 × 4 mixed-factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) for anterior cruciate ligament displacement, right and left sides, and force and sport. A 2 × 2 × 3 mixed-factorial ANOVA was computed to compare means for sex and force. A 2 × 3 mixed-factorial ANOVA was computed to compare sex differences across 3 forces. Results: For males and females, no significant interactions were found among leg, force, and sport for mean ATT, for leg and sport or leg and force, or for translation values between dominant and nondominant legs. Males had a significant interaction for force and sport, and a significant difference was found for side of body, since the right side had less translation than the left side. Females had greater ATT than males at all forces. Conclusions: Sex differences exist for ATT, and differences in ATT exist among sports for both sexes. Differences between the right and left sides of the body should be expected when making comparisons of ligamentous laxity. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 5. PMID:16558565

  20. Single-leg postural stability deficits following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in pediatric and adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Dai; Howell, David R; Micheli, Lyle J; Meehan, William P

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the postural stability of pediatric and adolescent athletes without anterior cruciate ligament injury with those who underwent anterior cruciate reconstruction (ACLR). Postural stability ratings derived from a video-force plate system during the three stances of the modified Balance Error Scoring System were collected from pediatric and adolescent athletes who underwent ACLR (N=24; mean 1.2 years after surgery) and from uninjured controls (N=479). The postural control rating was calculated as the mean of the displacement and variance of the torso and center of pressure data, normalized on a scale from 0 to 100. A higher rating indicates greater postural stability. Participants who underwent ACLR showed lower postural stability ratings during single-leg stance compared with uninjured controls (40.0 vs. 48.7; P=0.037). ACLR is associated with deficits in postural stability. PMID:26863483

  1. COMPLICATIONS OF THE SCREW/WASHER TIBIAL FIXATION TECHNIQUE FOR KNEE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Roveda, Gilberto; Valin, Márcio Rangel; Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto de; Sartor, Vanderlei; Alves, Soraya Melina

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of pain at the site of the surgical incision and the need to remove the tibial fixation screw in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, in relation to sex and body mass index (BMI). Methods: A group of 265 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral flexor tendon grafts from the thigh in which the tibial fixation technique consisted of using a cortical screw and metal washer, between July 2000 and November 2007, were evaluated. Results: 176 patients were evaluated for an average of 33.3 ± 19.5 months; median of 29.5 months; IIQ: 17-45 months; minimum of 8 and maximum of 87 months. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.272) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.633) between sexes. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.08) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.379) according to BMI. Conclusion: The pain complaint rate at the screw site from the screw and metal washer method used for tibial fixation in ACL reconstruction was of the order of 25%, and the screw had to be removed in 10.8% of the cases. There was no predominance of pain complaints at the surgical wound between the sexes. There was a greater tendency to complain about pain among patients with BMI < 25. There was no predominance of screw and washer removal between the sexes or between individuals with different BMIs. PMID:27022587

  2. Arthroscopic single-bundle posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: retrospective review of hamstring tendon graft versus LARS artificial ligament

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Wen, Yu; Qian, Qirong; Wu, Yuli; Lin, Xiangbo

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to compare the results of reconstruction of isolated chronic posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury using a four-strand hamstring graft (4SHG) and a LARS artificial ligament. Thirty-six patients were divided into a 4SHG group (n = 15) and a LARS group (n = 21). The minimum follow-up time was two years. The outcome measures used were KT-1000 measurements, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scoring system, Lysholm knee scoring scale and Tegner activity rating. Both groups improved significantly between the preoperative and postoperative assessment in terms of the knee laxity and functional examination (P < 0.01). Meanwhile, knee stability was significantly improved in the LARS group when compared with the 4SHG group (P < 0.05); this was also the case for the Lysholm, Tegner and IKDC scores (P < 0.05). Our study indicates that using a LARS ligament for PCL reconstruction was clinically more useful than using a 4SHG in the treatment of the PCL-deficient knee. PMID:18654776

  3. Analgesic Effect of Clonidine Added to Bupivacaine in Spinal Anesthesia for Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lak, Marzieh; Yousefi, Asghar; Karimi-Sari, Hamidreza; Saghafinia, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several researchers have suggested that addition of local anesthetics to spinal anesthesia increases the duration of post-operative analgesia. Objectives: This study sought to assess the effect of addition of clonidine to bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia on analgesia after cruciate ligament repair. Patients and Methods: This double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 50 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class I or II patients who were candidates for cruciate ligament repair. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups; one group received 15 mg of bupivacaine (group B) and the other 15 mg of bupivacaine plus clonidine (75 µg, group BC). The two groups were compared in terms of post-operative analgesia and related factors using the SPSS software version 20. Results: All patients were males with a mean age of 24.9 years in group B, and 25.2 years in group BC (P > 0.05). In group BC, time lapse to request analgesics was 160 minutes longer and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) at this time was 0.3 units less than group B. The time to regression of sensory block by two dermatomes was seven minutes longer, VAS in the recovery room was 1 unit less and Bromage scale in the recovery room and ward was 0.6 and 0.9 units more, respectively in the BC group. Hypotension and ephedrine usage was 36% more in the BC group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Clonidine plus bupivacaine can increase the duration of motor and sensory block in arthroscopic cruciate ligament repair under spinal anesthesia. However, due to significant hemodynamic changes, further studies are required to determine a safer dose. PMID:26290855

  4. ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY: TREATMENT AND REHABILITATION. CURRENT PERSPECTIVES AND TRENDS

    PubMed Central

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Astur, Diego da Costa; Kanas, Michel; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the procedures used by knee surgeons in Brazil for treating and rehabilitating anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 21 closed questions was developed, addressing topics relating to treatment and rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The questionnaire was applied to Brazilian knee surgeons during the three days of the 42nd Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology in 2010. Results: A total of 226 surgeons filled out the questionnaire completely. The most commonly used types of graft were hamstrings tendons and the central third of the ipsilateral patellar tendon, which were used by 82.3% and 53.5% of the sample, respectively. The technique of reconstruction with a single transtibial band was the first preference and was used by 66.4% of the participants. A period of 1 to 4 weeks between injury and surgical procedure was considered ideal by most participants (52.65%). Complaints from patients that the knee was ‘giving way’ or unstable and presence of a positive pivot shift maneuver were the most decisive factors considered in making the decision to operate the patient. Patient satisfaction and absence of complaints of instability during the postoperative period were the criteria deemed to be most important for the surgery to be considered a success. Conclusions: There are clearly evolving trends in treating and rehabilitating the anterior cruciate ligament in Brazil. However, more prospective controlled studies are needed in order to evaluate the clinical and scientific benefits of these trends. PMID:27042620

  5. Healing of the goat anterior cruciate ligament after a new suture repair technique and bioscaffold treatment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D Tan; Geel, Jurre; Schulze, Martin; Raschke, Michael J; Woo, Savio L-Y; van Dijk, C Niek; Blankevoort, Leendert

    2013-10-01

    Primary suture repair of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has been used clinically in an attempt to heal the ruptured ACL. The results, however, were not satisfactory, which in retrospect can be attributed to the used suturing technique and the suboptimal healing conditions. These constraining conditions can be improved by introducing a new suturing technique and by using small intestinal submucosa (SIS) as a bioscaffold. It is hypothesized that the suturing technique keep the torn ends together and that SIS enhance and promote the healing of the ACL. The goat was used as the study model. In the Suture group, the left ACL was transected and suture repaired with a new locking suture repair technique (n=5) allowing approximation and fixation under tension. The Suture-SIS group underwent the same procedure with the addition of SIS (n=5). The right ACL served as control. After 12 weeks of healing, anterior-posterior translation and in situ force of the healing ACL were measured, followed by the measurement of the cross-sectional area and structural stiffness. Routine histology was performed on tissue samples. Gross morphology showed that the healing ACL was continuous with collagenous tissue in both groups. The cross-sectional area of the Suture and the Suture-SIS group was 35% and 50% of the intact control, respectively. The anterior-posterior translations at different flexion angles were statistically not different between the Suture group and the Suture-SIS group. Only the in situ force at 30° in the Suture-SIS group was higher than in the Suture group. Tensile tests showed that the stiffness for the Suture group was not different from the Suture-SIS group (31.1±8.1 N/mm vs. 41.9±18.0 N/mm [p>0.05]). Histology showed longitudinally aligned collagen fibers from origo to insertion. More fibroblasts were present in the healing tissue than in the control intact tissue. The study demonstrated the proof of concept of ACL repair in a goat model with a new suture

  6. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook

    2016-01-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  7. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook; Ha, Jeong Ku

    2016-03-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  8. Editorial: Functional testing in the assessment of return to sports after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Luning; Fan, Jing; Gill, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    The paper entitled “Functional testing differences in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction patients released versus not released to return to sport” published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine (AJSM) assessed Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Lower Quarter Y Balance Test (YBT-LQ) as possible objective tools for evaluating a patient’s readiness to return to sports after ACL reconstruction. The results suggest that many patients clinically cleared continue to have measurable function deficits and that both FMS and YBT-LQ may be used as additional tools for return to sports clearance. PMID:26539442

  9. Brucella arthritis of the knee, 1 year after revision of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, S G; Koukoulias, N E; Koumis, P; Kyparlis, D; Santas, R

    2011-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infection with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. The authors report the first case in the literature of septic arthritis of the knee 1 year after revision of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Brucella melitensis biotype 3 was found in both synovial fluid and blood cultures. The patient was treated initially with arthroscopic debridement. After the diagnosis was confirmed, a second arthroscopic lavage and metal work removal was applied leaving the graft in place. Antimicrobial chemotherapy was prescribed for 3 months. The infection was fully eradicated and the patient is still asymptomatic, 4 years after the treatment. PMID:22700607

  10. Brucella arthritis of the knee, 1 year after revision of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, S G; Koukoulias, N E; Koumis, P; Kyparlis, D; Santas, R

    2011-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infection with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. The authors report the first case in the literature of septic arthritis of the knee 1 year after revision of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Brucella melitensis biotype 3 was found in both synovial fluid and blood cultures. The patient was treated initially with arthroscopic debridement. After the diagnosis was confirmed, a second arthroscopic lavage and metal work removal was applied leaving the graft in place. Antimicrobial chemotherapy was prescribed for 3 months. The infection was fully eradicated and the patient is still asymptomatic, 4 years after the treatment. PMID:22700607

  11. Pseudogout: A Rare Cause of Acute Arthritis Following Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mahvash; Sabir, Numaera; Charalambous, Charalambos P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an acute pseudogout attack following single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a 35-year-old man. At the initial reconstruction surgery, he was found to have early degenerative changes mainly in the lateral compartment. He presented with acute onset pain and swelling following reconstruction of the ACL. Arthroscopic irrigation was performed and the synovial fluid was positive for calcium pyrophosphate crystals. A pseudogout attack must be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases of acute onset pain and swelling after arthroscopic surgery, especially with the background of degenerative knee changes, and this may signify a poorer long-term outcome. PMID:26389074

  12. [Plastic surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament: experimental study of intra-articular aramid fibers in dogs].

    PubMed

    Passuti, N; Daculsi, G; Gouin, F; Martin, S; Vigneron, M

    1989-01-01

    The authors explored the possibility of replacing an anterior cruciate ligament with an aramid fiber (Kevlar) implant. This study was performed in intra-articular site in 9 dogs and the average implantation period was 5 months. Studies were carried out by macroscopic, photon microscopy, and electron microscopy examination of the samples obtained at the time the animals were sacrificed. Clinical and radiographic studies of the knees were performed in order to assess functional consequences. Overall, the results showed a partial or complete rupture of 10 neoligaments out of the 17 studied ligaments; on the other hand, osseous anchorage and reintegration in the intra-articular zone appeared satisfactory. Kevlar fiber only partially meets the performance specifications for an artificial ligament intended to serve as an anterior cruciate ligament substitute. Some positive results have encouraged the authors to carry on further this experimental study. PMID:2595049

  13. Dynamic neuromuscular analysis training for preventing anterior cruciate ligament injury in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Timothy E; Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Slauterbeck, James R

    2007-01-01

    Female athletes are four to six times more likely to sustain an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury than male athletes. Since the enactment of Title IX, male athletic participation at the high school level has remained steady (3.8 million), whereas female athletic participation has increased tenfold (from 0.3 to 3.0 million). Geometric growth in athletic participation and the higher injury rate in female athletes have led to gender inequity in ACL injury rates. Most ACL injuries occur as a result of noncontact mechanisms such as during landing from a jump or while making a lateral pivot. Dynamic knee instability, caused by ligament dominance (decreased dynamic neuromuscular control of the joint), quadriceps dominance (decreased hamstring strength and recruitment), and leg dominance (side-to-side differences in strength and coordination) may be responsible for gender inequity in ACL injury rates. PMID:17472323

  14. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Biomechanics During Robotic and Mechanical Simulations of Physiologic and Clinical Motion Tasks: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Nathaniel A.; Myer, Gregory D.; Shearn, Jason T.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Investigators use in vitro joint simulations to invasively study the biomechanical behaviors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The aims of these simulations are to replicate physiologic conditions, but multiple mechanisms can be used to drive in vitro motions, which may influence biomechanical outcomes. The objective of this review was to examine, summarize, and compare biomechanical evidence related to anterior cruciate ligament function from in vitro simulations of knee motion. A systematic review was conducted (2004 to 2013) in Scopus, PubMed/Medline, and SPORTDiscus to identify peer-reviewed studies that reported kinematic and kinetic outcomes from in vitro simulations of physiologic or clinical tasks at the knee. Inclusion criteria for relevant studies were articles published in English that reported on whole-ligament anterior cruciate ligament mechanics during the in vitro simulation of physiologic or clinical motions on cadaveric knees that were unaltered outside of the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact, -deficient, and -reconstructed conditions. A meta-analysis was performed to synthesize biomechanical differences between the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact and reconstructed conditions. 77 studies met our inclusion/exclusion criteria and were reviewed. Combined joint rotations have the greatest impact on anterior cruciate ligament loads, but the magnitude by which individual kinematic degrees of freedom contribute to ligament loading during in vitro simulations is technique-dependent. Biomechanical data collected in prospective, longitudinal studies corresponds better with robotic-manipulator simulations than mechanical-impact simulations. Robotic simulation indicated that the ability to restore intact anterior cruciate ligament mechanics with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions was dependent on loading condition and degree of freedom examined. PMID:25547070

  15. Anterior cruciate ligament biomechanics during robotic and mechanical simulations of physiologic and clinical motion tasks: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Myer, Gregory D; Shearn, Jason T; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    Investigators use in vitro joint simulations to invasively study the biomechanical behaviors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The aims of these simulations are to replicate physiologic conditions, but multiple mechanisms can be used to drive in vitro motions, which may influence biomechanical outcomes. The objective of this review was to examine, summarize, and compare biomechanical evidence related to anterior cruciate ligament function from in vitro simulations of knee motion. A systematic review was conducted (2004 to 2013) in Scopus, PubMed/Medline, and SPORTDiscus to identify peer-reviewed studies that reported kinematic and kinetic outcomes from in vitro simulations of physiologic or clinical tasks at the knee. Inclusion criteria for relevant studies were articles published in English that reported on whole-ligament anterior cruciate ligament mechanics during the in vitro simulation of physiologic or clinical motions on cadaveric knees that were unaltered outside of the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact, -deficient, and -reconstructed conditions. A meta-analysis was performed to synthesize biomechanical differences between the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact and reconstructed conditions. 77 studies met our inclusion/exclusion criteria and were reviewed. Combined joint rotations have the greatest impact on anterior cruciate ligament loads, but the magnitude by which individual kinematic degrees of freedom contribute to ligament loading during in vitro simulations is technique-dependent. Biomechanical data collected in prospective, longitudinal studies corresponds better with robotic-manipulator simulations than mechanical-impact simulations. Robotic simulation indicated that the ability to restore intact anterior cruciate ligament mechanics with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions was dependent on loading condition and degree of freedom examined. PMID:25547070

  16. Incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury among active duty U.S. military servicemen and servicewomen.

    PubMed

    Owens, Brett D; Mountcastle, Sally B; Dunn, Warren R; DeBerardino, Thomas M; Taylor, Dean C

    2007-01-01

    Although some studies have reported an increased incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in women athletes, little is known about the gender differences in injury patterns in the U.S. military. Using the Defense Medical Epidemiology Database, a search was performed for International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) codes 717.83 (old disruption of ACL) and 844.2 (sprain, strain cruciate ligament of the knee) among all servicemen and servicewomen between 1997 and 2003. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis was used to estimate the rate of ACL injuries per 1000 person-years, controlling for age and race, for each ICD-9 code. We computed rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by using male as the reference category. The injury rates for code 717.83 were 3.09 cases per 1,000 person-years for men and 2.29 cases per 1000 person-years for women, controlling for age and race (relative risk, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.71-0.76). The injury rates for ICD-9 code 844.2 were 3.79 cases per 1000 person-years for men and 2.95 cases per 1,000 person-years for women, controlling for age and race (relative risk, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.76-0.80). There was not an observed increase in the incidence of ACL injuries among female soldiers in the U.S. military between 1997 and 2003. PMID:17274274

  17. Intra-articular ganglion cyst arising from the anterior cruciate ligament: a case report.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J R; Frieman, B G; Kaplan, R H

    1996-01-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts have been reported in the medical literature but are extremely rare. A MEDLINE search from 1966 to July 1995 revealed no reported cases in the Physical Medicine literature. This case report details the presentation, evaluation and treatment course of a patient with knee complaints who was subsequently diagnosed to have a ganglion cyst arising from the anterior cruciate ligament. The patient was a 38-year-old woman with a 6-month history of knee swelling and pain. She had difficulty walking. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents had not alleviated her symptoms significantly. Physiatric evaluation revealed a supra-patellar effusion and a mass lateral to the patellar tendon. MRI evaluation revealed an intra-articular cyst. The patient underwent surgical removal of what was subsequently determined to be an intra-articular ganglion cyst arising from the anterior cruciate ligament. The patient has had progressive resolution of her knee symptoms post-operatively. Physiatrists need to be aware of this cause of mechanical knee symptoms. PMID:24572556

  18. Prognosis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a data-driven approach

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Abhijit; Kar, Oliva; Wu, Kuan-Chuen; Hall, Michelle; Gillette, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who suffer anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are at higher risk of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA) and almost 50% display symptoms 10–20 years post injury. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) often does not protect against knee OA development. Accordingly, a multi-scale formulation for data-driven prognosis (DDP) of post-ACLR is developed. Unlike traditional predictive strategies that require controlled off-line measurements or ‘training’ for determination of constitutive parameters to derive the transitional statistics, the proposed DDP algorithm relies solely on in situ measurements. The proposed DDP scheme is capable of predicting onset of instabilities. As the need for off-line testing (or training) is obviated, it can be easily implemented for ACLR, where such controlled a priori testing is almost impossible to conduct. The DDP algorithm facilitates hierarchical handling of the large dataset and can assess the state of recovery in post-ACLR conditions based on data collected from stair ascent and descent exercises of subjects. The DDP algorithm identifies inefficient knee varus motion and knee rotation as primary difficulties experienced by some of the post-ACLR population. In such cases, levels of energy dissipation rate at the knee, and its fluctuation may be used as measures for assessing progress after ACL reconstruction.

  19. Interface and biocompatibility of polyethylene terephthalate knee ligament prostheses. A histological and ultrastructural device retrieval analysis in failed synthetic implants used for surgical repair of anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Kock, H J; Stürmer, K M; Letsch, R; Schmit-Neuerburg, K P

    1994-01-01

    In a prospective clinical study of 54 patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament instability, 56 artificial ligaments made of polyethylene terephthalate (Trevira hochfest) were implanted to restore knee stability. The average follow-up of these artificial knee ligaments was 40.2 (12-79) months; five implants (10%) had to be explanted due to failure after an average of 17.8 (6-50) months. All explants were examined by histological and ultrastructural methods in a device retrieval analysis. With regard to short- and medium-term artificial ligament failure in the human knee joint, a non-isometric surgical implantation technique, inappropriate strain during rehabilitation and implant fatigue and wear were responsible for ligament failures. PMID:7696041

  20. CT Arthrography and Virtual Arthroscopy in the Diagnosis of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Meniscal Abnormalities of the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Whal; Kim, Ho Sung; Kim, Seok Jung; Kim, Hyung Ho; Chung, Jin Wook; Kang, Heung Sik; Choi, Ja-Young

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus pathology. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight consecutive patients who underwent CT arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee were included in this study. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 52 years and all of the patients were male. Sagittal, coronal, transverse and oblique coronal multiplanar reconstruction images were reformatted from CT arthrography. Virtual arthroscopy was performed from 6 standard views using a volume rendering technique. Three radiologists analyzed the MPR images and two orthopedic surgeons analyzed the virtual arthroscopic images. Results The sensitivity and specificity of CT arthrography for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5%-100% and 93.3-96.7%, respectively, and those for meniscus abnormalities were 91.7%-100% and 98.1%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of virtual arthroscopy for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5% and 83.3-90%, respectively, and those for meniscus abnormalities were 83.3%-87.5% and 96.1-98.1%, respectively. Conclusion CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy showed good diagnostic accuracy for anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal abnormalities. PMID:15064559

  1. Discoid meniscus associated with agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament in an 8-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Rayar, M; Bouillis, J; Fraisse, B; Marleix, S; Chapuis, M; Violas, P

    2011-12-01

    Among the congenital anomalies involving the lateral compartment of the knee, the combination of both a discoid meniscus and agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is extremely rare and probably underestimated due to the presence of a meniscofemoral ligament often mistaken for an intact ACL. The therapeutic management of such abnormalities is not univocal and highly depends on their clinical impact. We report on the observations of an 8-year-old boy presenting with a cystic formation on a lateral discoid meniscus associated with agenesis of the ACL and the presence of an anterior lateral meniscofemoral ligament. PMID:22112462

  2. Evaluation of the effect of joint constraints on the in situ force distribution in the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Livesay, G A; Rudy, T W; Woo, S L; Runco, T J; Sakane, M; Li, G; Fu, F H

    1997-03-01

    The function of the anterior cruciate ligament was investigated for different conditions of kinematic constraint placed on the intact knee using a six-degree-of-freedom robotic manipulator combined with a universal force-moment sensor. To do this, the in situ forces and force distribution within the porcine anterior cruciate ligament during anterior tibial loading up to 100 N were compared at 30, 60, and 90 degrees of flexion under: (a) unconstrained, five-degree-of-freedom knee motion, and (b) constrained, one-degree-of-freedom motion (i.e., anterior translations only). The robotic/universal force-moment sensor testing system was used to both apply the specified external loading to the intact joint and measure the resulting kinematics. After tests of the intact knee were completed, all soft tissues except the anterior cruciate ligament were removed, and these motions were reproduced such that the in situ force and force distribution could be determined. No significant differences in the magnitude of in situ forces in the anterior cruciate ligament were found between the unconstrained and constrained testing conditions. In contrast, the direction of in situ force changed significantly; the force vector in the unconstrained case was more parallel with the direction of the applied tibial load. In addition, the distribution of in situ force between the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles of the ligament was nearly equal for all flexion angles for the unconstrained case, whereas the anteromedial bundle carried higher forces than the posterolateral bundle at both 60 and 90 degrees of flexion for the constrained case. This demonstrates that the constraint conditions placed on the joint have a significant effect on the apparent role of the anterior cruciate ligament. Specifically, constraining joint motion to one degree of freedom significantly alters both the direction and distribution of the in situ force in the ligament from that observed for unconstrained joint

  3. Healing of a surgically created partial detachment of the posterior cruciate ligament using marrow stimulation: an experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rodkey, William G; Arnoczky, Steven P; Steadman, J Richard

    2006-01-01

    The inability of intra-articular (cruciate) ligaments to generate a substantive reparative response may preclude the primary surgical repair of such lesions. A marrow stimulation technique that provides access to a fibrin scaffold, cytokines, and mesenchymal stem cells has been shown to be successful in generating a repair response in articular cartilage. We hypothesized that a similar approach may be effective in initiating and supporting a healing response in cruciate ligament injuries. The ability to treat cruciate ligament injuries by primary repair may have significant advantages over the more extensive reconstructive procedures currently advocated. Bilateral subtotal (75% of width) lacerations were made in the proximal aspect of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in 10 adult mongrel dogs. A marrow stimulation technique in which small holes were made through the femoral origin of the PCL into the marrow cavity immediately adjacent to the lesion was performed in one limb. The contralateral limb served as the non-stimulated control. Twelve weeks after surgery the extent of healing and the histological character of the repair tissue in both groups were compared. Marrow stimulation resulted in a statistically significant (P<.05) improvement in the healing of subtotal lacerations made in the PCL. The marrow-stimulated repair tissue was more cellular and had a more organized extracellular matrix than the repair tissue in the non-stimulated group. Our hypothesis was confirmed. Marrow stimulation can induce a "healing response" in intra-articular (cruciate) ligaments. This technique may have clinical applications in primary surgical repair of these structures. PMID:16468489

  4. Mechanical stretch increases CCN2/CTGF expression in anterior cruciate ligament-derived cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Yoshiaki; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kubota, Satoshi; Kawata, Kazumi; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} CCN2/CTGF localizes to the ligament-to-bone interface, but is not to the midsubstance region of human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). {yields} Mechanical stretch induces higher increase of CCN2/CTGF gene expression and protein secretion in ACL interface cells compared with ACL midsubstance cells. {yields} CCN2/CTGF treatment stimulates the proliferation of ACL interface cells. -- Abstract: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-to-bone interface serves to minimize the stress concentrations that would arise between two different tissues. Mechanical stretch plays an important role in maintaining cell-specific features by inducing CCN family 2/connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF). We previously reported that cyclic tensile strain (CTS) stimulates {alpha}1(I) collagen (COL1A1) expression in human ACL-derived cells. However, the biological function and stress-related response of CCN2/CTGF were still unclear in ACL fibroblasts. In the present study, CCN2/CTGF was observed in ACL-to-bone interface, but was not in the midsubstance region by immunohistochemical analyses. CTS treatments induced higher increase of CCN2/CTGF expression and secretion in interface cells compared with midsubstance cells. COL1A1 expression was not influenced by CCN2/CTGF treatment in interface cells despite CCN2/CTGF stimulated COL1A1 expression in midsubstance cells. However, CCN2/CTGF stimulated the proliferation of interface cells. Our results suggest that distinct biological function of stretch-induced CCN2/CTGF might regulate region-specific phenotypes of ACL-derived cells.

  5. Modulation of proliferation and differentiation of human anterior cruciate ligament-derived stem cells by different growth factors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming-Te; Yang, Hui-Wen; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng

    2009-12-01

    We have previously isolated and identified stem cells from human cruciate ligaments. The goal of this study was to evaluate the proliferation and differentiation abilities of ligament-derived stem cells (LSCs) cultured with growth factors, including fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), epidermal growth factor, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-b1). The ligament tissues were obtained from patients with anterior cruciate ligament injuries receiving arthroscopic surgeries. LSCs were obtained by collagenase digestion and plating as previously reported. Surface immunophenotype and the potential for trilineage differentiation into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes were confirmed. It was found that proliferation of the cells was enhanced with the addition of FGF-2 and TGF-b1. Upon TGF-b1 treatment, expression of collagen type I and type III, tenascin-c, fibronectin, and a-smooth muscle actin were significantly upregulated. Additionally, LSCs treated with TGF-b1 and FGF-2 increased the production of collagenous and noncollagenous extracellular matrix protein. Together, these results demonstrate that LSCs respond differently to various cytokines, and the results further validate the potential of using cruciate ligament tissue as a stem cell source for tissue engineering purposes. PMID:19586317

  6. Functional results from reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using the central third of the patellar ligament and flexor tendons☆

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Leao, Marcos George; Pampolha, Abelardo Gautama Moreira; Orlando Junior, Nilton

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate knee function in patients undergoing reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using the central third of the patellar ligament or the medial flexor tendons of the knee, i.e. quadruple ligaments from the semitendinosus and gracilis (ST-G), by means of the Knee Society Score (KSS) and the Lysholm scale. Methods This was a randomized prospective longitudinal study on 40 patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between September 2013 and August 2014. They comprised 37 males and three females, with ages ranging from 16 to 52 years. The patients were numbered randomly from 1 to 40: the even numbers underwent surgical correction using the ST-G tendons and the odd numbers, using the patellar tendon. Functional evaluations were made using the KSS and Lysholm scale, applied in the evening before the surgical procedure and six months after the operation. Results From the statistical analysis, it could be seen that the patients’ functional capacity was significantly greater after the operation than before the operation. There was strong evidence that the two forms of therapy had similar results (p = >0.05), in all the comparisons. Conclusions The results from the ACL reconstructions were similar with regard to functional recovery of the knee and improvement of quality of life, independent of the type of graft. It was not possible to identify the best method of surgical treatment. The surgeon's clinical and technical experience and the patient are the factors that determine the choice of graft type for use in ACL surgery. PMID:27218084

  7. Spontaneous Healing of the Ruptured Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Justin; Salmon, Lucy; Waller, Alison; Linklater, James; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: It is widely believed that ACL tears are incapable of healing. However, there are anecdotal experiences of the healed ACL and sporadic case reports and series documenting either clinical or radiographic evidence of healed ACL tears. A truly healed ACL would demonstrate a clinically stable knee on Lachman and pivot shift testing, normal return to function and MRI and/or arthroscopic documentation of a continuous ligament. This is in contrast to “copers” who have an ACL deficient knee but lack instability either because of good neuromuscular control or non-participation in activities which are heavily ACL dependent. In this prospective series we report on the presentation and 5 year follow-up of patients with both clinical and radiographically healed ACLs. Methods: 19 patients who presented between July 2007 and April 2010 within 6 weeks of injury with clinical laxity and MRI confirmed ACL rupture. Patients subsequently demonstrated clinical knee stability at 8-12 weeks after pre-habilitation to obtain a pain free mobile joint. Prospective data was collected on these patients with MRI at 12 months, IKDC clinical and subjective scores, KT1000 instrumental laxity testing and Lysholm knee score at 12, 24 and 60 months. Results: At one year follow-up MRI 18/19 patients demonstrated a healed ACL with normal signal, normal trajectory and continuity of fibres. Remainder 1 patient demonstrated bridging of ACL tear with scar tissue and abnormal trajectory of fibers. 5 of 19 patients re-ruptured within 5 years of follow-up. At 5 years follow-up, intact healed ACL patients had a mean IKDC score of 88, mean Lysholm score of 92 and mean KT1000 score of 1.7 mm. 100% reported regular participation in strenuous sport. Conclusion: Although rare, spontaneous healing of the ACL is possible. The mechanism by which this occurs in unknown. It is recommended that reassessment of knee stability should be performed in the non-acute phase after an appropriate prehabilitation

  8. Treatment of posterior cruciate ligament avulsion fractures of the tibia using a toothed plate and hollow lag screw

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Luo, Wei; Chen, Zhiqing; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION To investigate the feasibility and clinical efficacy of using a toothed plate and hollow lag screw in the surgical treatment of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) avulsion fractures of the tibia. METHODS A total of 21 patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using a toothed plate and hollow lag screw, through a posteromedial approach using an inverted L-shaped incision. The patients were allowed appropriate functional exercises, including knee flexion and extension, after removal of the plaster at postoperative weeks 3–6. The follow-up period was between six months and two years. RESULTS This was a retrospective study of patients with PCL avulsion fractures of the tibia caused by road traffic accidents (n = 9), sports-related injuries (n = 6), falls (n = 5) and machinery-related injuries (n = 1). 20 patients presented with fresh fractures and one with an old fracture. The patients (13 men, eight women) had a mean age of 41.5 (range 19–72) years. Anatomical reduction of the fracture and satisfactory fixation were achieved in all 21 patients. Bony union was achieved in all patients at 8–12 weeks after surgery. Six months after surgery, knee flexion was 121.9° ± 10.4° and extension was 0°. According to the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, 19 patients were rated as ‘excellent’ and two as ‘good’. CONCLUSION The use of a toothed plate and hollow lag screw could be a simple and reliable approach for PCL avulsion fractures of the tibia. Patients achieved good knee function after surgery. PMID:26831316

  9. Athymic rat model for evaluation of engineered anterior cruciate ligament grafts.

    PubMed

    Leong, Natalie L; Kabir, Nima; Arshi, Armin; Nazemi, Azadeh; Wu, Ben M; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common ligamentous injury that often requires surgery because the ACL does not heal well without intervention. Current treatment strategies include ligament reconstruction with either autograft or allograft, which each have their associated limitations. Thus, there is interest in designing a tissue-engineered graft for use in ACL reconstruction. We describe the fabrication of an electrospun polymer graft for use in ACL tissue engineering. This polycaprolactone graft is biocompatible, biodegradable, porous, and is comprised of aligned fibers. Because an animal model is necessary to evaluate such a graft, this paper describes an intra-articular athymic rat model of ACL reconstruction that can be used to evaluate engineered grafts, including those seeded with xenogeneic cells. Representative histology and biomechanical testing results at 16 weeks postoperatively are presented, with grafts tested immediately post-implantation and contralateral native ACLs serving as controls. The present study provides a reproducible animal model with which to evaluate tissue engineered ACL grafts, and demonstrates the potential of a regenerative medicine approach to treatment of ACL rupture. PMID:25867958

  10. Arthroscopic repair of "peel-off" lesion of the posterior cruciate ligament at the femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Federica; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are uncommon, and most occur in association with other lesions. The treatment of PCL injuries remains controversial; in addition, PCL injuries have been documented to have a propensity to heal. In the literature several different patterns of PCL injury have been described including midsubstance tears/injuries, tibial bony avulsions, femoral bony avulsions, and femoral "peel-off" injuries. A peel-off injury is a complete or incomplete soft-tissue disruption of the PCL at its femoral attachment site without associated bony avulsion. In recent years arthroscopic repair of femoral avulsion and peel-off lesions of the PCL has been reported. In most of these articles, a transosseous repair with sutures passed through 2 bone tunnels into the medial femoral condyle has been described. We present a case of a femoral PCL avulsion in a 20-year-old collegiate football player with an associated medial collateral ligament injury, and we report about a novel technique for PCL repair using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures and two 2.9-mm PushLock anchors (Arthrex) to secure tensioning the ligament at its footprint. PMID:24749037