Science.gov

Sample records for crustacean molt cycle

  1. Interacting factors in the control of the crustacean molt cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    In order to account for the known phenomena of the crustacean molt cycle, at least six factors must be postulated: a molting hormone (20-OH-ecdysone), a molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH), an anecdysial limb autotomy factor, a proecdysial limb-autotomy factor, a limb growth-inhibiting factor and an exuviation factor. Only the molting hormone and its derivatives have been chemically well defined. The various factors interact in complex ways to maintain not only a coordinated proecdysial period in preparation for exuviation but also a proecdysial period with the flexibility to respond to such interim hazards as the loss of partially regenerated limbs. 79 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. Interacting factors in the control of the crustacean molt cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    In order to account for the known phenomena of the crustacean molt cycle, at least six factors must be postulated: a molting hormone (20-OH-ecdysone), a molt inhibiting hormone (MIH), an anecdysial limb autotomy factor, a proecdysial limb autotomy factor, a limb growth inhibiting factor and an exuviation factor. Only the molting hormone and its derivatives have been chemically well defined. The various factors interact in complex ways to maintain not only a coordinated proecdysial period in preparation for exuviation but also a proecdysial period with the flexibility to respond to such interim hazards as the loss of partially regenerated limbs. 78 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  3. Regulation of crustacean molting and regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.M.; Graham, D.E.; Holland, C.A.; Soumoff, C.; Mykles, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    The regulation of molting and regeneration by two antagonistic hormones is discussed. The time course of ecdysteroid titers in crustacean tissues has been followed during molt and regeneration cycles. (ACR)

  4. Molt cycle-associated changes in calcium-dependent proteinase activity that degrades actin and myosin in crustacean muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The role of calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) in the proecdysial atrophy of crustacean claw muscle has been investigated. During atrophy the molar ratio of actin to myosin heavy chain decreased 31%, confirming earlier ultrastructural observations that the ratio of thin:thick myofilaments declined from 9:1 to 6:1 (D.L. Mykles and D.M. Skinner, 1981, J. Ultrastruct. Res. 75, 314 to 325). The release of TCA-soluble material in muscle homogenates at neutral pH was stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ and completely inhibited by EGTA. The specific degradation of the major myofibrillar proteins (actin, myosin heavy and light chains, paramyosin, tropomyosin, troponin-T, and troponin-I) was demonstrated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteolytic activity was more than twofold greater in proecdysial muscle homogenates. Degradation of myofibrillar proteins was inhibited by EGTA, and the two inhibitors of crysteine proteinases, leupeptin, and antipain, but not pepstatin, an inhibitor of aspartic proteinases. Unlike CDPs from vertebrate muscle, the CDP(s) in crab claw muscle degrades actin and myosin in addition to other myofibrillar proteins.

  5. Binary gene expression patterning of the molt cycle: the case of chitin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Abehsera, Shai; Glazer, Lilah; Tynyakov, Jenny; Plaschkes, Inbar; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Khalaila, Isam; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Sagi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    In crustaceans, like all arthropods, growth is accompanied by a molting cycle. This cycle comprises major physiological events in which mineralized chitinous structures are built and degraded. These events are in turn governed by genes whose patterns of expression are presumably linked to the molting cycle. To study these genes we performed next generation sequencing and constructed a molt-related transcriptomic library from two exoskeletal-forming tissues of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, namely the gastrolith and the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium. To simplify the study of such a complex process as molting, a novel approach, binary patterning of gene expression, was employed. This approach revealed that key genes involved in the synthesis and breakdown of chitin exhibit a molt-related pattern in the gastrolith-forming epithelium. On the other hand, the same genes in the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium showed a molt-independent pattern of expression. Genes related to the metabolism of glucosamine-6-phosphate, a chitin precursor synthesized from simple sugars, showed a molt-related pattern of expression in both tissues. The binary patterning approach unfolds typical patterns of gene expression during the molt cycle of a crustacean. The use of such a simplifying integrative tool for assessing gene patterning seems appropriate for the study of complex biological processes. PMID:25919476

  6. Magnesium-aspartate-based crystallization switch inspired from shell molt of crustacean

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jinhui; Zhou, Dongming; Zhang, Zhisen; Xu, Xurong; Tang, Ruikang

    2009-01-01

    Many animals such as crustacean periodically undergo cyclic molt of the exoskeleton. During this process, amorphous calcium mineral phases are biologically stabilized by magnesium and are reserved for the subsequent rapid formation of new shell tissue. However, it is a mystery how living organisms can regulate the transition of the precursor phases precisely. We reveal that the shell mineralization from the magnesium stabilized precursors is associated with the presence of Asp-rich proteins. It is suggested that a cooperative effect of magnesium and Asp-rich compound can result into a crystallization switch in biomineralization. Our in vitro experiments confirm that magnesium increases the lifetime of amorphous calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate in solution so that the crystallization can be temporarily switched off. Although Asp monomer alone inhibits the crystallization of pure amorphous calcium minerals, it actually reduces the stability of the magnesium-stabilized precursors to switch on the transformation from the amorphous to crystallized phases. These modification effects on crystallization kinetics can be understood by an Asp-enhanced magnesium desolvation model. The interesting magnesium-Asp-based switch is a biologically inspired lesson from nature, which can be developed into an advanced strategy to control material fabrications. PMID:20007788

  7. Pharmacophore based approach to design inhibitors in crustaceans: an insight into the molt inhibition response to the receptor guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Sajal; Princy, S Adline

    2014-04-01

    The first set of competitive inhibitors of molt inhibiting hormone (MIH) has been developed using the effective approaches such as Hip-Hop, virtual screening and manual alterations. Moreover, the conserved residues at 71 and 72 positions in the molt inhibiting hormone is known to be significant for selective inhibition of ecdysteroidogenesis; thus, the information from mutation and solution structure were used to generate common pharmacophore features. The geometry of the final six-feature pharmacophore was also found to be consistent with the homology-modeled MIH structures from various other decapod crustaceans. The Hypo-1, comprising six features hypothesis was carefully selected as a best pharmacophore model for virtual screening created on the basis of rank score and cluster processes. The hypothesis was validated and the database was virtually screened using this 3D query and the compounds were then manually altered to enhance the fit value. The hits obtained were further filtered for drug-likeness, which is expressed as physicochemical properties that contribute to favorable ADME/Tox profiles to eliminate the molecules exhibit toxicity and poor pharmacokinetics. In conclusion, the higher fit values of CI-1 (4.6), CI-4 (4.9) and CI-7 (4.2) in conjunction with better pharmacokinetic profile made these molecules practically helpful tool to increase production by accelerating molt in crustaceans. The use of feeding sub-therapeutic dosages of these growth enhancers can be very effectively implemented and certainly turn out to be a vital part of emerging nutritional strategies for economically important crustacean livestock. PMID:24772941

  8. Molt-related susceptibility and regenerative limb growth as sensitive indicators of aquatic pollutant toxicity to crustaceans

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.R.; Conklin, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The study evaluated the comparative toxicity of various pollutants to intermolt and molting grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio). Most of the tested materials (pentachlorophenol, tetrachlorophenols, trichlorophenols, methylenebis dichlorophenol, dibutyl phthalate, chromium, and drilling mud) were more toxic to molting shrimp than to intermolt shrimp. Radio-tracer studies with 2,4,5-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol indicated that the increased susceptibility of newly molted shrimp is linked to increased pollutant uptake.

  9. MOLT-RELATED SUSCEPTIBILITY AND REGENERATIVE LIMB GROWTH AS SENSITIVE INDICATORS OF AQUATIC POLLUTANT TOXICITY TO CRUSTACEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluated the comparative toxicity of various pollutants to intermolt and molting grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio). Most of the tested materials (pentachlorophenol, tetrachlorophenols, trichlorophenols, methylenebis dichlorophenol, dibutyl phthalate, chromium, and dril...

  10. Role of ecdysteroids in the molting and reproductive cycles of the white shrimp, Penaeus vannamei

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    The molt cycle was characterized in the white shrimp Penaeus vannamei based upon changes in the morphology of pleopod setae. These characters were used subsequently to determine changes in ecdysteroids and related biosynthetic events during the stages of the molting cycle and in relation to reproduction. Ecdysteroid titers were measured during the molting cycle. They increased during the premolt, decreased at ecdysis and remained minimal through the intermolt. 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-OHE) was the major ecdysteroid present during the premolt. Injection of ({sup 3}H)ecdysone resulted in label accumulation in the epidermis and hepatopancreas in the form of 20-OHE which was subsequently hydroxylated further to a polar metabolite. ({sup 3}H)ecdysone was not metabolized by the Y-organ, hemolymph, muscle or intestine. Eyestalk ablation elevated hemolymph ecdysteroid titers and reduced the duration of all molt stages. However, 20-OHE injection into intact animals caused a disproportionate reduction in the durations of only the intermolt and early premolt stages.

  11. Zoological detective stories: the case of the facetotectan crustacean life cycle

    PubMed Central

    Scholtz, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    The reconstruction of complete animal life cycles is sometimes a considerable problem, even though the knowledge of the full life cycle may have far-reaching evolutionary implications. A new study published in BMC Biology on artificially induced metamorphosis in an enigmatic crustacean group that was only known from larval stages sheds new light on the evolution of parasitism. PMID:18598383

  12. Ecdysteroids regulate the levels of Molt-Inhibiting Hormone (MIH) expression in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Techa, Sirinart; Chung, J Sook

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod molt is coordinated through the interplay between ecdysteroids and neuropeptide hormones. In crustaceans, changes in the activity of Y-organs during the molt cycle have been regulated by molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH). Little has been known of the mode of direct effects of ecdysteroids on the levels of MIH and CHH in the eyestalk ganglia during the molt cycle. This study focused on a putative feedback of ecdysteroids on the expression levels of MIH transcripts using in vitro incubation study with ecdysteroids and in vivo RNAi in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Our results show a specific expression of ecdysone receptor (EcR) in which EcR1 is the major isoform in eyestalk ganglia. The initial elevation of MIH expression at the early premolt stages is replicated by in vitro incubations of eyestalk ganglia with ecdysteroids that mimic the intrinsic conditions of D0 stage: the concentration (75 ng/ml) and composition (ponasterone A and 20-hydroxyecdysone at a 3:1 (w:w) ratio). Additionally, multiple injections of EcR1-dsRNA reduce MIH expression by 67%, compared to the controls. Our data provide evidence on a putative feedback mechanism of hormonal regulation during molting cycle, specifically how the molt cycle is repeated during the life cycle of crustaceans. The elevated concentrations of ecdysteroids at early premolt stage may act positively on the levels of MIH expression in the eyestalk ganglia. Subsequently, the increased MIH titers in the hemolymph at postmolt would inhibit the synthesis and release of ecdysteroids by Y-organs, resulting in re-setting the subsequent molt cycle. PMID:25849453

  13. Ecdysteroids Regulate the Levels of Molt-Inhibiting Hormone (MIH) Expression in the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus

    PubMed Central

    Techa, Sirinart; Chung, J. Sook

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod molt is coordinated through the interplay between ecdysteroids and neuropeptide hormones. In crustaceans, changes in the activity of Y-organs during the molt cycle have been regulated by molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH). Little has been known of the mode of direct effects of ecdysteroids on the levels of MIH and CHH in the eyestalk ganglia during the molt cycle. This study focused on a putative feedback of ecdysteroids on the expression levels of MIH transcripts using in vitro incubation study with ecdysteroids and in vivo RNAi in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Our results show a specific expression of ecdysone receptor (EcR) in which EcR1 is the major isoform in eyestalk ganglia. The initial elevation of MIH expression at the early premolt stages is replicated by in vitro incubations of eyestalk ganglia with ecdysteroids that mimic the intrinsic conditions of D0 stage: the concentration (75 ng/ml) and composition (ponasterone A and 20-hydroxyecdysone at a 3:1 (w:w) ratio). Additionally, multiple injections of EcR1-dsRNA reduce MIH expression by 67%, compared to the controls. Our data provide evidence on a putative feedback mechanism of hormonal regulation during molting cycle, specifically how the molt cycle is repeated during the life cycle of crustaceans. The elevated concentrations of ecdysteroids at early premolt stage may act positively on the levels of MIH expression in the eyestalk ganglia. Subsequently, the increased MIH titers in the hemolymph at postmolt would inhibit the synthesis and release of ecdysteroids by Y-organs, resulting in re-setting the subsequent molt cycle. PMID:25849453

  14. Transcriptomic variation of hepatopancreas reveals the energy metabolism and biological processes associated with molting in Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu; Wang, Jun; Yue, Wucheng; Chen, Jiao; Gaughan, Sarah; Lu, Weiqun; Lu, Guoqing; Wang, Chenghui

    2015-01-01

    Molting is a critical developmental process for crustaceans, yet the underlying molecular mechanism is unknown. In this study, we used RNA-Seq to investigate transcriptomic profiles of the hepatopancreas and identified differentially expressed genes at four molting stages of Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis). A total of 97,398 transcripts were assembled, with 31,900 transcripts annotated. Transcriptomic comparison revealed 1,189 genes differentially expressed amongst different molting stages. We observed a pattern associated with energy metabolism and physiological responses during a molting cycle. In specific, differentially expressed genes enriched in postmolt were linked to energy consumption whereas genes enriched in intermolt were related to carbohydrates, lipids metabolic and biosynthetic processes. In premolt, a preparation stage for upcoming molting and energy consumption, highly expressed genes were enriched in response to steroid hormone stimulus and immune system development. The expression profiles of twelve functional genes detected via RNA-Seq were corroborated through real-time RT-PCR assay. Together, our results, including assembled transcriptomes, annotated functional elements and enriched differentially expressed genes amongst different molting stages, provide novel insights into the functions of the hepatopancreas in energy metabolism and biological processes pertaining to molting in crustaceans. PMID:26369734

  15. The mechanism of sensory transduction in a mechanoreceptor. Functional stages in campaniform sensilla during the molting cycle

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the ultrastructural modifications that cockroach campaniform sensilla undergo at three major stages in the molting cycle and finds that the sensilla are physiological functional at all developmental stages leading to ecdysis. Late stage animals on the verge of ecdysis have two completely separate cuticles. The campaniform sensillum sends a 220-mum extension of the sensory process through a hole in its cap in the new (inner) cuticle across a fluid-filled molting space to its functional insertion in the cap in the old (outer) cuticle. Mechanical stimulation of the old cap excites the sensillum. The ultrastructural geometry of late stage sensilla, coupled with the observation they are physiolgically functional, supports the hypotheses (a) that sensory transduction occurs at the tip of the sensory process, and (b) that cap identation causes the cap cuticle to pinch the tip of the sensory process, thereby stimulating the sensillum. PMID:993271

  16. Expression of the crustacean hyperglycaemic hormones and the gonad-inhibiting hormone during the reproductive cycle of the female American lobster Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    de Kleijn, D P; Janssen, K P; Waddy, S L; Hegeman, R; Lai, W Y; Martens, G J; Van Herp, F

    1998-02-01

    Crustacean reproduction is regulated by a complex chain of hormonal interactions in which the crustacean hyperglycaemic hormones A and B (CHH-A and CHH-B) and the gonad-inhibiting hormone (GIH) play a primary role. These neurohormones are produced in the same neuroendocrine cells of the X-organ sinus gland complex, situated in the eyestalks of the American lobster, Homarus americanus. In order to obtain more information on the synthesis, storage, release and function of these three neuropeptides during the reproductive cycle, we studied the levels of their mRNAs in the X-organ, their peptide storage in the sinus gland and their concentration in the haemolymph at different stages of the female reproductive cycle. A high CHH-A mRNA level was found only in the previtellogenic stage, while elevated mRNA levels were determined for CHH-B in the mature as well as the previtellogenic stage. High CHH storage levels in the sinus gland were found during previtellogenesis. The total amount of CHH (CHH-A plus -B) in the haemolymph was significantly higher during maturation. A low level of GIH mRNA in the X-organ and a low amount of the GIH I isoform in the sinus gland were found only in the immature stage. In contrast, GIH haemolymph levels were high during the immature and previtellogenic stages. We conclude that CHH-A and -B are involved in triggering the onset of vitellogenesis and that CHH-B in particular is responsible for stimulating oocyte maturation before spawning, while GIH prevents the start of vitellogenesis in the ovary. Moreover, our results show that the balance between the haemolymph levels of the CHHs and GIH may tune the synchronization of reproduction and molting during the biannual reproductive cycle of the American lobster. PMID:9518875

  17. Influence of molt cycle and beta-ecdysone on protein synthesis in the chelicerate arthropod, Limulus polyphemus.

    PubMed

    Winget, R R; Herman, W S

    1979-01-01

    1. The effect of molt cycle stage and beta-ecdysone on protein synthesis in the horsehoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, was examined. 2. A pronounced decline in protein specific radioactivity after incubation with 14C-leucine was noted in muscle, midgut gland and operculum from postmolt to intermolt to premolt and in gut and gill tissue from intermolt to premolt. 3. beta-Ecdysone injections produced an early stimulation of protein synthesis in the midgut gland followed by strong inhibition within 48 hr. 4. Results are compared with those obtained in mandibulate arthropods. PMID:95691

  18. Ecdysteroid metabolism in crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Mykles, Donald L

    2011-11-01

    The molting gland, or Y-organ (YO), is the primary site for ecdysteroid synthesis in decapod crustaceans. Ecdysteroid biosynthesis is divided into two stages: (1) conversion of cholesterol to 5?-diketol and (2) conversion of 5?-diketol to secreted products. Stage 1 involves the conversion of cholesterol to 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DC) by 7,8-dehydrogenase, the "Black Box" reactions involving 3-oxo-?(4) intermediates, and the conversion of ?(4)-diketol to 5?-diketol by 5?[H]-reductase. The stage 2 reactions generate four major products, depending on species: ecdysone, 3-dehydroecdysone (3DE), 25-deoxyecdysone (25dE), and 3-dehydro-25-deoxyecdysone (3D25dE). Peripheral tissues convert these compounds to the active hormones 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and ponasterone A (25-deoxy-20-hydroxyecdysone or 25d20E). The hydroxylations at C25, C22, C2, and C20 are catalyzed by cytochrome P-450 mono-oxygenases, which are encoded by the Halloween genes Phantom, Disembodied, Shadow, and Shade, respectively, in insects. Orthologs of these genes are present in the Daphnia genome and a cDNA encoding Phantom has been cloned from prawn. Inactivation involves conversion of ecdysteroids to polar metabolites and/or conjugates, which are eliminated in the urine and feces. The antennal gland is the major route for excretion of ecdysteroids synthesized by the YO. The hepatopancreas eliminates ingested ecdysteroids by forming apolar conjugates. The concentrations of ecdysteroids vary over the molt cycle and are determined by the combined effects biosynthesis, metabolism, and excretion. PMID:20837145

  19. Molting Mania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arce, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Most children are unaware of the process of molting, the periodic shedding and replacement of part or all of a coat or an outer covering of an animal, but it is an animal characteristic they are sure to be interested in and should have the opportunity to observe. In this article, the author shares how she and her students observed various…

  20. Depression of synaptic efficacy at intermolt in crayfish neuromuscular junctions by 20-hydroxyecdysone, a molting hormone.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R L; Ruffner, M E

    1998-04-01

    This report demonstrates that ecdysteroids can reduce synaptic transmission at an intermolt stage of a crustacean tonic neuromuscular junction by acting at a presynaptic site. The steroid molting hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-HE), appears to act through a rapid, nongenomic mechanism that decreases the probability of synaptic vesicle release and reduces the number of release sites. Quantal analysis revealed that fewer vesicles were released for a given stimulus when 20-HE was present, and this in turn accounted for the reduced synaptic efficacy. Reduced synaptic efficacy produced smaller evoked postsynaptic currents and smaller excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) across the muscle fiber membrane. The reduction in EPSPs was observed among muscle fibers that were innervated by high- or low-output terminals. The behavior of crustaceans/crayfish during the molt cycle, when 20-HE is high, may be explained by the reduction in synaptic transmission. Crustaceans become quiescent during the premolt periods as do insects. The effects of 20-HE can be reversed with the application of the crustacean neuromodulator serotonin, which enhances synaptic transmission. PMID:9535959

  1. Crustacean muscles: atrophy and regeneration during molting

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural basis of atrophy of claw closer muscle of the land crab and the organization of myofibrils and sacroplasmic reticulum during the hydrolysis of protein that occurs during proecdysis was examined. The changes that occur in contractile proteins during claw muscle atrophy and the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteinases (CDP) in myofilament degradation were investigated. (ACR)

  2. Switching skeletons: hydrostatic support in molting crabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jennifer R A.; Kier, William M.; Walker, I. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal support systems are essential for support, movement, muscular antagonism, and locomotion. Crustaceans shed their rigid exoskeleton at each molt yet are still capable of forceful movement. We hypothesize that the soft water-inflated body of newly molted crabs may rely on a hydrostatic skeleton, similar to that of worms and polyps. We measured internal hydrostatic pressure and the force exerted during claw adduction and observed a strong correlation between force and hydrostatic pressure, consistent with hydrostatic skeletal support. This alternation between the two basic skeletal types may be widespread among arthropods.

  3. Control of molting in crustacea

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.M.; Graham, D.E.; Holland, C.A.; Mykles, D.L.; Soumoff, C.; Yamaoka, L.H.

    1982-01-01

    The single, overriding event that occurs during all proecdysial periods in crustaceans is the synthesis of a new exoskeleton that encompasses an enlarged animal when the old shell is cast off. Regeneration of missing appendages and larval or puberty metamorphoses also occur during proecdysis. Proecdysial periods have been divided into substages defined by the occurrence of specific events. Although a number of factors must be postulated to account for individual proecdysial events, only the molting hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone, has been identified and isolated. Much evidence indicates that the X-organ sinus glands complex, a neurosecretory tissue located in the eyestalks, is the source of a molt inhibiting hormone (MIH) responsible for maintaining animals in anecdysis. An exuviation factor has been proposed to support the extrication of the animal from the old exoskeleton. There is evidence for a limb growth inhibitory factor (LGIF) that affects the rate of growth of regenerating limbs. We are proposing an anecdysial limb autotomy factor (LAF/sub an/) that propels into precocious molts anecdysial limb autotomy factor (LAF/sub pro/) that interrupts the proecdysial period of animals that lose one or more normal or partially regenerated pereopods before a critical time in proecdysis.

  4. Differential expression profiling of components associated with exoskeletal hardening in crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Kuballa, Anna V; Elizur, Abigail

    2008-01-01

    Background Exoskeletal hardening in crustaceans can be attributed to mineralization and sclerotization of the organic matrix. Glycoproteins have been implicated in the calcification process of many matrices. Sclerotization, on the other hand, is catalysed by phenoloxidases, which also play a role in melanization and the immunological response in arthropods. Custom cDNA microarrays from Portunus pelagicus were used to identify genes possibly associated with the activation pathways involved in these processes. Results Two genes potentially involved in the recognition of glycosylation, the C-type lectin receptor and the mannose-binding protein, were found to display molt cycle-related differential expression profiles. C-type lectin receptor up-regulation was found to coincide with periods associated with new uncalcified cuticle formation, while the up-regulation of mannose-binding protein occurred only in the post-molt stage, during which calcification takes place, implicating both in the regulation of calcification. Genes presumed to be involved in the phenoloxidase activation pathway that facilitates sclerotization also displayed molt cycle-related differential expression profiles. Members of the serine protease superfamily, trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like, were up-regulated in the intermolt stage when compared to post-molt, while trypsin-like was also up-regulated in pre-molt compared to ecdysis. Additionally, up-regulation in pre- and intermolt stages was observed by transcripts encoding other phenoloxidase activators including the putative antibacterial protein carcinin-like, and clotting protein precursor-like. Furthermore, hemocyanin, itself with phenoloxidase activity, displayed an identical expression pattern to that of the phenoloxidase activators, i.e. up-regulation in pre- and intermolt. Conclusion Cuticle hardening in crustaceans is a complex process that is precisely timed to occur in the post-molt stage of the molt cycle. We have identified differential expression patterns of several genes that are believed to be involved in biomineralization and sclerotization and propose possible regulatory mechanisms for these processes based on their expression profiles, such as the potential involvement of C-type lectin receptors and mannose binding protein in the regulation of calcification. PMID:19040762

  5. Molt cycle related changes and effect of short term starvation on the biochemical constituents of the blue swimmer crab Portunus pelagicus

    PubMed Central

    Sugumar, V.; Vijayalakshmi, G.; Saranya, K.

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis and hardening of a new exoskeleton are essential to the arthropod molting process. The present study emphasizes the variations in the levels of hemolymph total free sugars, hepatopancreas glycogen and cuticular proteins during the molting stages of Portunus pelagicus. It also reports the effect of short-term starvation conditions on the biochemical constituents of the hemolymph. Intermolt crabs were subjected to 6 days of starvation and hemolymph samples were taken. Standard biochemical procedures were followed toward the quantification of total proteins, total free sugars and total lipids. The total free sugar level in the hemolymph of P. pelagicus was observed to increase during early premolt D0 (3.108 ± 0.032 g/ml) and a gradual decrease till late postmolt B stage (0.552 ± 0.124 g/ml), suggesting the need for total free sugars to provide energy for the apolysis process. Increase in the levels of hepatopancreas glycogen was observed from 1225 ± 0.04 ?g/mg in early premolt D0 to 1700 ± 0.3 ?g/mg in late premolt D2–3. This is in correlation with the decreased levels of free sugars during premolt stages, suggesting an increase in the storage of glycogen reserves in the hepatopancreas. Cuticular proteins increased during stage B (2.702 ± 0.093 g/ml) and stage C (3.065 ± 0.012 g/ml), indicating exoskeleton hardening and mineralization. Results of the starvation studies clearly showed a steady decline in the level of total free sugars till day 6 (0.099 ± 0.00 g/ml) when compared to the control (8.646 ± 0.08 g/ml). Gradual decrease of total lipids was also observed from the first day of the experiment (6.088 ± 2.44 g/ml) to the last day of the study (0.401 ± 0.20 g/ml) which was 85% lesser than the control (8.450 ± 0.49 g/ml)suggesting the efficient usage of total sugars to consolidate the loss of energy reserves during starvation. The knowledge of Molt-cycle events can be used as a tool for the evaluation of the developmental state providing a morphological reference system for physiological and biochemical studies related to crab aquaculture. Starvation studies enlightens that increasing carbohydrate levels in crab feed together with good protein content could alleviate the natural effects of starvation, improve farm productivity and reduce the deleterious impact of nitrogen pollution generated by rich-protein feeds used in crab farming. PMID:23961226

  6. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers disrupt molting in neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Davies, Rebecca; Zou, Enmin

    2012-07-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame-retardants which can bioaccumulate and biomagnify and are found worldwide despite their banned usage in some countries. In recent years, the possibility that PBDEs may disrupt endocrine functions in vertebrates has been well investigated, but little attention has been paid to the endocrine disrupting potential in aquatic invertebrates. The current study aimed to investigate whether PBDEs affect molting in neonatal Daphnia magna. Prior to molting studies, 48 h LC50 values were tested for several environmentally prevalent PBDEs: PBDEs-28, -47, -99, -100 and -209. The 48 h LC50s determined were 110.7, 7.9, 2.6, and 11.1 ?g/L for PBDEs-28, -47, -99, and -100, respectively, but the highest concentration of PBDEs-209 tested (2.5 mg/L) did not affect survival at 48 h. Sublethal concentrations of these were used to investigate their potential effects on molting, assessed by the time taken to reach 4 molts. Molting studies found that PBDE-28 at 12 ?g/L significantly increased the time it took to complete 4 molts. PBDE-47 at 20 ?g/L inhibited daphnid molting initially but such an inhibitory effect disappeared with the prolongation of exposure due to the death of sensitive individuals. No other PBDEs affected molting at the concentrations tested, while still maintaining relatively high survival rates. In conclusion, this study found that PBDEs-28 and -47 can delay molting at ?g/L concentrations, which raises concern for disrupted molting in crustaceans exposed to PBDEs. PMID:22476648

  7. Testing competing hypotheses for chronology and intensity of lesser scaup molt during winter and spring migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, Michael J.; Anteau, Andrea C.E.; Afton, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    We examined chronology and intensity of molt and their relationships to nutrient reserves (lipid and protein) of Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinisK/i>) to test predictions of two competing hypotheses. The "staggered cost" hypothesis states that contour-feather molt is nutritionally costly and should not occur during nutritionally costly periods of the annual cycle unless adequate nutrients are available. The "breeding plumage" hypothesis states that prealternate molt must be complete prior to nesting, regardless of nutrient availability. Males and females were completing prebasic molt during winter (Louisiana) and had similar molt intensities. Females underwent prealternate molt during spring migration (Illinois and Minnesota) and prebreeding (Manitoba) periods; 53% and 93% of females were in moderate to heavy molt in Minnesota and Manitoba, respectively, despite experiencing other substantial nutritional costs. Intensity of prealternate molt was not correlated with lipid reserves even though females, on average, were nutritionally stressed. Molt intensity was not negatively correlated with protein reserves at any location. Chronology and intensity of prealternate molt varied little and were not temporally staggered from other nutritionally costly events. Prealternate molt did not influence nutrient reserves, and nutrient reserves likely were not the ultimate factor influencing chronology or intensity of prealternate molt of females. We surmise that nutrients required for prealternate molt come from exogenous sources and that the "staggered cost" hypothesis does not explain chronology of prealternate molt in female Lesser Scaup; rather, it appears that molt must be complete prior to nesting, consistent with the "breeding plumage" hypothesis.

  8. Testing competing hypotheses for chronology and intensity of lesser scaup molt during winter and spring migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, M.J.; Anteau, A.C.E.; Afton, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    We examined chronology and intensity of molt and their relationships to nutrient reserves (lipid and protein) of Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) to test predictions of two competing hypotheses. The "staggered cost" hypothesis states that contour-feather molt is nutritionally costly and should not occur during nutritionally costly periods of the annual cycle unless adequate nutrients are available. The "breeding plumage" hypothesis states that prealternate molt must be complete prior to nesting, regardless of nutrient availability. Males and females were completing prebasic molt during winter (Louisiana) and had similar molt intensities. Females underwent prealternate molt during spring migration (Illinois and Minnesota) and prebreeding (Manitoba) periods; 53% and 93% of females were in moderate to heavy molt in Minnesota and Manitoba, respectively, despite experiencing other substantial nutritional costs. Intensity of prealternate molt was not correlated with lipid reserves even though females, on average, were nutritionally stressed. Molt intensity was not negatively correlated with protein reserves at any location. Chronology and intensity of prealternate molt varied little and were not temporally staggered from other nutritionally costly events. Prealternate molt did not influence nutrient reserves, and nutrient reserves likely were not the ultimate factor influencing chronology or intensity of prealternate molt of females. We surmise that nutrients required for prealternate molt come from exogenous sources and that the "staggered cost" hypothesis does not explain chronology of prealternate molt in female Lesser Scaup; rather, it appears that molt must be complete prior to nesting, consistent with the "breeding plumage" hypothesis. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  9. Adult neurogenesis and cell cycle regulation in the crustacean olfactory pathway: from glial precursors to differentiated neurons.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jeremy M; Sandeman, David C; Benton, Jeanne L; Beltz, Barbara S

    2007-12-01

    Adult neurogenesis is a characteristic feature of the olfactory pathways of decapod crustaceans. In crayfish and clawed lobsters, adult-born neurons are the progeny of precursor cells with glial characteristics located in a neurogenic niche on the ventral surface of the brain. The daughters of these precursor cells migrate during S and G(2 )stages of the cell cycle along glial fibers to lateral (cluster 10) and medial (cluster 9) proliferation zones. Here, they divide (M phase) producing offspring that differentiate into olfactory interneurons. The complete lineage of cells producing neurons in these animals, therefore, is arranged along the migratory stream according to cell cycle stage. We have exploited this model to examine the influence of environmental and endogenous factors on adult neurogenesis. We find that increased levels of serotonin upregulate neuronal production, as does maintaining animals in an enriched (versus deprived) environment or augmenting their diet with omega-3 fatty acids; increased levels of nitric oxide, on the other hand, decrease the rate of neurogenesis. The features of the neurogenic niche and migratory streams, and the fact that these continue to function in vitro, provide opportunities unavailable in other organisms to explore the sequence of cellular and molecular events leading to the production of new neurons in adult brains. PMID:17624620

  10. Obesogens beyond Vertebrates: Lipid Perturbation by Tributyltin in the Crustacean Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Jordão, Rita; Casas, Josefina; Fabrias, Gemma; Campos, Bruno; Piña, Benjamín; Lemos, Marco F.L.; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M.; Tauler, Romà

    2015-01-01

    Background The analysis of obesogenic effects in invertebrates is limited by our poor knowledge of the regulatory pathways of lipid metabolism. Recent data from the crustacean Daphnia magna points to three signaling hormonal pathways related to the molting and reproductive cycles [retinoic X receptor (RXR), juvenile hormone (JH), and ecdysone] as putative targets for exogenous obesogens. Objective The present study addresses the disruptive effects of the model obesogen tributyltin (TBT) on the lipid homeostasis in Daphnia during the molting and reproductive cycle, its genetic control, and health consequences of its disruption. Methods D. magna individuals were exposed to low and high levels of TBT. Reproductive effects were assessed by Life History analysis methods. Quantitative and qualitative changes in lipid droplets during molting and the reproductive cycle were studied using Nile red staining. Lipid composition and dynamics were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Relative abundances of mRNA from different genes related to RXR, ecdysone, and JH signaling pathways were studied by qRT-PCR. Results and Conclusions TBT disrupted the dynamics of neutral lipids, impairing the transfer of triacylglycerols to eggs and hence promoting their accumulation in adult individuals. TBT’s disruptive effects translated into a lower fitness for offspring and adults. Co-regulation of gene transcripts suggests that TBT activates the ecdysone, JH, and RXR receptor signaling pathways, presumably through the already proposed interaction with RXR. These findings indicate the presence of obesogenic effects in a nonvertebrate species. Citation Jordão R, Casas J, Fabrias G, Campos B, Piña B, Lemos MF, Soares AM, Tauler R, Barata C. 2015. Obesogens beyond vertebrates: lipid perturbation by tributyltin in the crustacean Daphnia magna. Environ Health Perspect 123:813–819;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409163 PMID:25802986

  11. The lunar-tide cycle viewed by crustacean and mollusc gatherers in the State of Paraíba, Northeast Brazil and their influence in collection attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Alberto K; Nordi, Nivaldo; Alves, Rômulo RN

    2006-01-01

    Traditional human communities have a wide knowledge of their environment. Collection of animals in estuarine and coastal areas are directly influenced by tidal cycles. The aim of this study is to evaluate the understanding of the tides associated with the lunar cycle held by people who gather crustaceans and molluscs in the State of Paraiba. The empirical knowledge of 20 crab gatherers and 30 mollusc gatherers was recorded through open interviews and structured questionnaires. The results showed that the gatherers have an accurate comprehension of tidal phenomenon based on their exploitation of natural resources, which perpetuates through generations. PMID:16393342

  12. CRUSTACEAN ISSUES ] 3 Decapod Crustacean Phylogenetics

    E-print Network

    Alwes, Frederike

    CRUSTACEAN ISSUES ] 3 II %. m Decapod Crustacean Phylogenetics edited by Joel W. Martin, Keith A. Crandall, and Darryl L. Felder £\\ CRC Press J Taylor & Francis Group #12;Decapod Crustacean Phylogenetics to infringe. Library of Congress Cataloging-iii-Publication Data Decapod crustacean phylogenetics / editors

  13. Gene Expression Changes of Caenorhabditis elegans Larvae during Molting and Sleep-Like Lethargus

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Michal; Bringmann, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    During their development, Caenorhabditis elegans larvae go through four developmental stages. At the end of each larval stage, nematodes molt. They synthesize a new cuticle and shed the old cuticle. During the molt, larvae display a sleep-like behavior that is called lethargus. We wanted to determine how gene expression changes during the C. elegans molting cycle. We performed transcriptional profiling of C. elegans by selecting larvae displaying either sleep-like behavior during the molt or wake behavior during the intermolt to identify genes that oscillate with the molting-cycle. We found that expression changed during the molt and we identified 520 genes that oscillated with the molting cycle. 138 of these genes were not previously reported to oscillate. The majority of genes that had oscillating expression levels appear to be involved in molting, indicating that the majority of transcriptional changes serve to resynthesize the cuticle. Identification of genes that control sleep-like behavior during lethargus is difficult but may be possible by looking at genes that are expressed in neurons. 22 of the oscillating genes were expressed in neurons. One of these genes, the dopamine transporter gene dat-1, was previously shown in mammals and in C. elegans to control sleep. Taken together, we provide a dataset of genes that oscillate with the molting and sleep-wake cycle, which will be useful to investigate molting and possibly also sleep-like behavior during lethargus. PMID:25409030

  14. Reference: Biol. Bull., 153: 145-162. (August, 1977) COCKROACH MOLTING. II. THE NATURE OF REGENERATION-

    E-print Network

    Kunkel, Joseph G.

    145 Reference: Biol. Bull., 153: 145-162. (August, 1977) COCKROACH MOLTING. II. THE NATURE of Ephestia (Pohley, 1965) or autotomy of cockroach legs (O'Farrell and Stock, 1953, 1954; Stock and O of the cockroach molting cycle interact with the regenerating limb (Penzlin, 1965). Although progress has been made

  15. Survival of surf scoters and white-winged scoters during remigial molt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uher-Koch, Brian D.; Esler, Daniel N.; Dickson, Rian D.; Hupp, Jerry; Evenson, Joseph R.; Anderson, Eric M.; Barrett, Jennifer; Schmutz, Joel A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying sources and timing of variation in demographic rates is necessary to determine where and when constraints may exist within the annual cycle of organisms. Surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata) and white-winged scoters (M. fusca) undergo simultaneous remigial molt during which they are flightless for >1 month. Molt could result in reduced survival due to increased predation risk or increased energetic demands associated with regrowing flight feathers. Waterfowl survival during remigial molt varies across species, and has rarely been assessed for sea ducks. To quantify survival during remigial molt, we deployed very high frequency (VHF) transmitters on surf scoters (n?=?108) and white-winged scoters (n?=?57) in southeast Alaska and the Salish Sea (British Columbia and Washington) in 2008 and 2009. After censoring mortalities potentially related to capture and handling effects, we detected no mortalities during remigial molt; thus, estimates of daily and period survival for both scoter species during molt were 1.00. We performed sensitivity analyses in which mortalities were added to the dataset to simulate potential mortality rates for the population and then estimated the probability of obtaining a dataset with 0 mortalities. We found that only at high survival rates was there a high probability of observing 0 mortalities. We conclude that remigial molt is normally a period of low mortality in the annual cycle of scoters. The molt period does not appear to be a constraint on scoter populations; therefore, other annual cycle stages should be targeted by research and management efforts to change population trajectories.

  16. Whole Transcriptome Analysis Provides Insights into Molecular Mechanisms for Molting in Litopenaeus vannamei

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wei, Jiankai; Sun, Xiaoqing; Yuan, Jianbo; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    Molting is one of the most important biological processes in shrimp growth and development. All shrimp undergo cyclic molting periodically to shed and replace their exoskeletons. This process is essential for growth, metamorphosis, and reproduction in shrimp. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying shrimp molting remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated global expression changes in the transcriptomes of the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, the most commonly cultured shrimp species worldwide. The transcriptome of whole L. vannamei was investigated by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) throughout the molting cycle, including the inter-molt (C), pre-molt (D0, D1, D2, D3, D4), and post-molt (P1 and P2) stages, and 93,756 unigenes were identified. Among these genes, we identified 5,117 genes differentially expressed (log2ratio ?1 and FDR ?0.001) in adjacent molt stages. The results were compared against the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) non-redundant protein/nucleotide sequence database, Swiss-Prot, PFAM database, the Gene Ontology database, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database in order to annotate gene descriptions, associate them with gene ontology terms, and assign them to pathways. The expression patterns for genes involved in several molecular events critical for molting, such as hormone regulation, triggering events, implementation phases, skelemin, immune responses were characterized and considered as mechanisms underlying molting in L. vannamei. Comparisons with transcriptomic analyses in other arthropods were also performed. The characterization of major transcriptional changes in genes involved in the molting cycle provides candidates for future investigation of the molecular mechanisms. The data generated in this study will serve as an important transcriptomic resource for the shrimp research community to facilitate gene and genome annotation and to characterize key molecular processes underlying shrimp development. PMID:26650402

  17. Molting in workers of the Formosan subterranean termite (coptotermes formosanus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus, with its huge colonies, is a major urban pest in several southern states and Hawaii as well as in South Asia. Because of their cryptic nature (underground habitat) and very long life cycle, not much is known about molting in termite workers....

  18. Least squares estimation of avian molt rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    A straightforward least squares method of estimating the rate at which birds molt feathers is presented, suitable for birds captured more than once during the period of molt. The date of molt onset can also be estimated. The method is applied to male and female mourning doves.

  19. Diseases of Crustaceans

    E-print Network

    Diseases of Crustaceans Papers presented at the American Institute of Biological Sciences meeting #12;MFR PAPER 1139 Introductory Remarks on Diseases of Crustaceans GILBERT B. PAULEY Figure 1.-lnteractlon of host, environment, and pathogen to produce a disease (Snleszko, 1973). Potential Pathogen son

  20. Chronologically sampled flight feathers permits recognition of individual molt-migrants due to varying protein sources

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Anthony D.; Daniel, Thomas; Kelly, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    This is a proof of concept paper based on chronological samples of growing feathers from geese thought to be molt-migrants. When molt-migrant birds initiate molt shortly after migrating to a new isoscape, isotope values measured along the length of their feathers should change continuously. To assess long-term changes and daily cycling in ?15N and ?13C values, we serially sampled a growing primary from three presumed molt-migrant geese. Two showed changing ?15N signatures along the length of their growing primary, indicating they were molt-migrants, while the third, presumably a resident, showed no change. We then resampled these feathers at closer intervals for evidence of the predicted diel cycle in the use of exogenous and endogenous protein for feather growth, generated by the diel feeding cycle of these geese. As predicted, a periodicity of ca. 24 h in ?15N values was found along the primary of the two equilibrating geese, but not in the other goose that was probably a resident. Our results demonstrate that chronological sampling along the length of individual primaries holds great potential for identifying individuals that are molt-migrants. PMID:25649835

  1. Crustaceans as a model for microgravity-induced muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mykles, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    Atrophy of skeletal muscles is a serious problem in a microgravity environment. It is hypothesized that the unloading of postural muscles, which no longer must resist gravity force, causes an accelerated breakdown of contractile proteins, resulting in reduction in muscle mass and strength. A crustacean model using the land crab, Gecarcinus lateralis, to assess the effects of spaceflight on protein meatabolism is presented. The model is compared to a developmentally-regulated atrophy in which a premolt reduction in muscle mass allows the withdrawal of the large claws at molt. The biochemical mechanisms underlying protein breakdown involves both Ca2(+) -dependent and multicatalytic proteolytic enzymes. Crustacean claw muscle can be used to determine the interactions between shortening and unloading at the molecular level.

  2. Timing of molt of barn swallows is delayed in a rare Clock genotype

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Maria; Caprioli, Manuela; Fasola, Mauro; Lardelli, Roberto; Micheloni, Pierfrancesco; Scandolara, Chiara; Rubolini, Diego; Gianfranceschi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Photoperiodic responses are major factors entraining circannual life-cycles, functioning to adaptively synchronize annual routines to seasonal fluctuations in ecological conditions. Photoperiodism in physiology and behaviour is enforced by genes, including the vertebrate Clock orthologues, which are associated, for example, with phenology of migration in fish and breeding in birds. However, the role of Clock in photoperiodic plumage molt processes is unknown. We analyzed variation in molt schedules in relation to Clock genotype, using the long-distance migratory barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) as a model and by identifying males and females using molecular sexing techniques. Consistently with previous studies, we found one very common (Q7) and two rare (Q6, Q8) variants of a functionally significant Clock polyglutamine repeat. Molt schedules of primary wing feathers of swallows during their wintering period in Nigeria differed among Clock genotypes: rare (1.1%) Q7/Q8 heterozygotes had significantly delayed molt compared to the other genotypes. Molt schedules did not differ between males and females, and no differential association between molt and Clock in relation to sex emerged. The same rare Clock genotype that exhibited delayed breeding in Europe was here found to delay molt in Africa. Though based on a limited number of Q7/Q8 individuals from an otherwise very large sample, these novel results suggest that Clock is involved in the photoperiodic control of both molt and breeding, potentially also via reciprocal carry-over effects. If confirmed in species with higher Clock polymorphism, present results may have far-reaching consequences for the study of photoperiodic control of molt and expression of annual routines. PMID:23638351

  3. Environmental antiecdysteroids alter embryo development in the crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xueyan; LeBlanc, Gerald A

    2002-02-15

    The role of ecdysteroids in crustacean embryo development and the susceptibility of the developing embryo to the antiecdysteroidal properties of an environmental chemical were evaluated. The agricultural fungicide fenarimol was shown to exhibit antiecdysteroidal activity to the crustacean Daphnia magna by lowering endogenous ecdysone levels and delaying molting in a concentration-dependent fashion that was mitigated by co-exposure to exogenous 20-hydroxyecdysone. Exposure of either gravid maternal organisms or isolated embryos to fenarimol resulted in embryo abnormalities ranging from early partial developmental arrest to incomplete development of antennae and shell spines. Developmental abnormalities were associated with suppressed ecdysone levels in the embryos and the abnormalities could be prevented by co-exposure to 20-hydroxyecdysone. Developmental abnormalities caused by the antiecdysteroid were associated with reduced fecundity of the parental organisms. These results demonstrate that ecdysteroids are critical to normal crustacean embryo development and environmental antiecdysteroids can disrupt normal embryo development and compromise the production of viable offspring. Antiecdysteroidal activity may provide a means by which environmental chemicals impact crustacean species while not affecting vertebrates. PMID:11857462

  4. High fiber low energy diet for molt induction in laying hens: the impact of alfalfa on physiology, immunology and behavior 

    E-print Network

    Dunkley, Claudia Sharene

    2009-05-15

    Feed withdrawal is commonly used by commercial egg producers to induce molt and stimulate multiple egg-laying cycles in their flocks. However, the practice can compromise the welfare of the birds by elevating stress, ...

  5. Mechanical properties of the rigid and hydrostatic skeletons of molting blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer R A; Hebrank, Jack; Kier, William M

    2007-12-01

    Molting in crustaceans involves significant changes in the structure and function of the exoskeleton as the old cuticle is shed and a new one is secreted. The flimsy new cuticle takes several days to harden and during this time crabs rely on a hydrostatic skeletal support system for support and movement. This change from a rigid to a hydrostatic skeletal support mechanism implies correlated changes in the function, and thus mechanical properties, of the cuticle. In particular, it must change from primarily resisting compression, bending and torsional forces to resisting tension. This study was designed to explore the changes in the mechanical properties of the crustacean cuticle as the animals switch between two distinct skeletal support mechanisms. Samples of cuticle were removed from blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, at 1 h (soft-shell stage), 12 h (paper-shell stage), and 7 days (hard-shell stage) following molting. We measured and compared the flexural stiffness, Young's modulus of elasticity (in tension), and tensile strength for each postmolt stage. We found that the hard-shell cuticle has a flexural stiffness fully four orders of magnitude greater than the soft-shell and paper-shell cuticle. Although the soft-shell cuticle has a Young's modulus significantly lower than that of the paper-shell and hard-shell cuticle, it has the same tensile strength. Thus, the soft-shell and paper-shell cuticles are unable to resist the significant bending forces associated with a rigid skeletal support system, but can resist the tensile forces that characterize hydrostatic support systems. The mechanical properties of the cuticle thus change dramatically during molting in association with the change in function of the cuticle. These results emphasize the significant role that mechanics plays in the evolution of the molting process in arthropods, and possibly other ecdysozoans. PMID:18055616

  6. Lunar-Rhythmic Molting in Laboratory Populations of the Noble Crayfish Astacus astacus (Crustacea, Astacidea): An Experimental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Robert; Hoerstgen-Schwark, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile noble crayfish, Astacusastacus (Crustacea, Astacidea) in the second year of age were kept in the laboratory for a twelve-month period under continuing “summer conditions” (LD 16:8, 19°C). Molting processes in this population could be synchronized by artificial moonlight cycles. Peaks of exuviations occurred at “new moons”. Males showed a slightly higher degree of synchronization than females. A phase-shift of the artificial lunar cycle in relation to the natural cycle resulted in a corresponding shift of the molting cycle. This clearly demonstrates that changes in the nocturnal light regime provide the primary external information for the lunar-monthly molting rhythm. There is a first indication that lunar photic stimuli do not act directly but as a zeitgeber which entrains an endogenous molting rhythm to the lunar cycle. Moreover, the results of the long-term experiments suggest that the hibernal resting period of A. astacus in the field (no molts between October and April) may also involve some endogenous programming. Continuing artificial summer conditions can delay but not completely suppress this resting period. The adaptive significance of the phenomena and how the findings may be applied to improve the management of crowded crayfish stocks are discussed. PMID:23840899

  7. Effects of alternatives of molting on bird well-being

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induced molting by feed withdrawal may cause stress in birds and affect bird well-being. The objective of this study was to develop a welfare friendly alternative for molting by evaluating the effects of currently available molting alternatives on bird stress responses and well-being. One thousand, ...

  8. Respiratory and Metabolic Impacts of Crustacean Immunity: Are there Implications for the Insects?

    PubMed

    Burnett, Karen G; Burnett, Louis E

    2015-11-01

    Extensive similarities in the molecular architecture of the crustacean immune system to that of insects give credence to the current view that the Hexapoda, including Insecta, arose within the clade Pancrustacea. The crustacean immune system is mediated largely by hemocytes, relying on suites of pattern recognition receptors, effector functions, and signaling pathways that parallel those of insects. In crustaceans, as in insects, the cardiovascular system facilitates movement of hemocytes and delivery of soluble immune factors, thereby supporting immune surveillance and defense along with other physiological functions such as transport of nutrients, wastes, and hormones. Crustaceans also rely heavily on their cardiovascular systems to mediate gas exchange; insects are less reliant on internal circulation for this function. Among the largest crustaceans, the decapods have developed a condensed heart and a highly arteriolized cardiovascular system that supports the metabolic demands of their often large body size. However, recent studies indicate that mounting an immune response can impair gas exchange and metabolism in their highly developed vascular system. When circulating hemocytes detect the presence of potential pathogens, they aggregate rapidly with each other and with the pathogen. These growing aggregates can become trapped in the microvasculature of the gill where they are melanized and may be eliminated at the next molt. Prior to molting, trapped aggregates of hemocytes also can impair hemolymph flow and oxygenation at the gill. Small shifts to anaerobic metabolism only partially compensate for this decrease in oxygen uptake. The resulting metabolic depression is likely to impact other energy-expensive cellular processes and whole-animal performance. For crustaceans that often live in microbially-rich, but oxygen-poor aquatic environments, there appear to be distinct tradeoffs, based on the gill's multiple roles in respiration and immunity. Insects have developed a separate tracheal system for the delivery of oxygen to tissues, so this particular tradeoff between oxygen transport and immune function is avoided. Few studies in crustaceans or insects have tested whether mounting an immune response might impact other functions of the cardiovascular system or alter integrity of the gut, respiratory, and reproductive epithelia where processes of the attack on pathogens, defense by the host, and physiological functions play out. Such tradeoffs might be fruitfully addressed by capitalizing on the ease of molecular and genetic manipulation in insects. Given the extensive similarities between the insect and the crustacean immune systems, such models of epithelial infection could benefit our understanding of the physiological consequences of immune defense in all of the Pancrustacea. PMID:26223773

  9. Neocaridina denticulata: A Decapod Crustacean Model for Functional Genomics.

    PubMed

    Mykles, Donald L; Hui, Jerome H L

    2015-11-01

    A decapod crustacean model is needed for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying physiological processes, such as reproduction, sex determination, molting and growth, immunity, regeneration, and response to stress. Criteria for selection are: life-history traits, adult size, availability and ease of culture, and genomics and genetic manipulation. Three freshwater species are considered: cherry shrimp, Neocaridina denticulata; red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii; and redclaw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus. All three are readily available, reproduce year round, and grow rapidly. The crayfish species require more space for culture than does N. denticulata. The transparent cuticle of cherry shrimp provides for direct assessment of reproductive status, stage of molt, and tissue-specific expression of reporter genes, and facilitates screening of mutations affecting phenotype. Moreover, a preliminary genome of N. denticulata is available and efforts toward complete genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing have been initiated. Neocaridina denticulata possesses the best combination of traits that make it most suitable as a model for functional genomics. The next step is to obtain the complete genome sequence and to develop molecular technologies for the screening of mutants and for manipulating tissue-specific gene expression. PMID:26002561

  10. Ionotropic Crustacean Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  11. Depression of synaptic efficacy in high- and low-output Drosophila neuromuscular junctions by the molting hormone (20-HE).

    PubMed

    Ruffner, M E; Cromarty, S I; Cooper, R L

    1999-02-01

    The molt-related steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-HE), was applied to muscles 6 and 7 of third instar larval of Drosophila melanogaster neuromuscular junction preparations to examine if rapid, nongenomic responses could be observed as was shown recently to occur in crustacean neuromuscular junctions. At a dose of 10 microM, the excitatory junction potentials were reduced in amplitude within minutes. To elucidate the site of action of the hormone, focal-macropatch recordings of synaptic currents were obtained over the neuromuscular junctions. The results showed that the high-output (Is) and the low-output (Ib) motor nerve terminals, which innervate muscles 6 and 7, released fewer synaptic vesicles for each stimulation while exposed to 20-HE. Because the size and shape of synaptic currents from spontaneous releases did not change, the effects of the 20-HE are presynaptic. The rapid effects of this hormone may account in part for the quiescent behavior associated with molts among insects and crustaceans. PMID:10036278

  12. The Evolution of Crustacean Mating

    E-print Network

    Shuster, Stephen M.

    Paracerceis sculpta allow reproductive females (here inside the sponge) to enter their host sponges; beta (PIT). According to this view, female reproduction is limited by the availability of resources requiredThe Evolution of Crustacean Mating Systems 2 Stephen M. Shuster The alpha males of the isopod

  13. Flightless and post-molt survival and movements of female mallards molting in Klamath Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleskes, Joseph P.; Mauser, David M.; Yee, Julie L.; Blehert, David S.; Yarris, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Flightless and post-molt survival and movements were studied during August-May, 2001-2002, 2002- 2003 and 2006-2007 for 181 adult female Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Birds were radiotagged just before or early in their flightless period on four wetlands that differed in size on Klamath Basin (KB) National Wildlife Refuge complex. Flightless survival varied among years but was higher on two larger than two smaller wetlands; 30-day survival ranged from 11% (SE = 6.5%) on a small wetland in 2006 to 93% (SE = 6.5%) on a large wetland in 2001, and averaged 76.8% (SE = 6.1%). Most flightless mortality was from avian botulism (64%) and predation (26%). Of the 81 radiotagged Mallards that did not die in KB, 80% moved to the Central Valley of California (CVCA) before 31 January, 16% wintered in unknown areas, and 4% remained in KB through 31 January. Mallards departed KB 21 August-13 January (average: 11 Nov 2001, 25 Oct 2002, 19 Nov 2006). Post-molt survival during August-March in KB (20.7%, SE = 6.3%) was lower than in CVCA during this (62.9%, SE = 10.1%) and an earlier study. Survival in KB was consistently high only for females that molted in large permanent marshes, and although the impact of poor survival of molting females on Mallard population dynamics is unknown, KB water management plans should be developed that maintain these habitats.

  14. Molt-inhibiting hormone stimulates vitellogenesis at advanced ovarian developmental stages in the female blue crab, Callinectes sapidus 1: an ovarian stage dependent involvement

    PubMed Central

    Zmora, Nilli; Trant, John; Zohar, Yonathan; Chung, J Sook

    2009-01-01

    To understand the hormonal coordination of the antagonism between molting and reproduction in crustaceans, the terminally anecdysial mature female Callinectes sapidus was used as a model. The regulatory roles of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) and molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) in vitellogenesis were examined. A competitive specific RIA was used to measure the levels of MIH and CHH in the hemolymphs of mature females at pre- and mid- vitellogenic stages, and their effects on vitellogenesis at early (early 2, E2) and mid vitellogenesis (3) stages were determined in vitro. A hepatopancreas fragments incubation system was developed and the levels of vitellogenin (VtG), as well as VtG mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear (hn)VtG RNA were determined using RIA or QPCR, respectively. MIH titers were four times higher at mid-vitellogenesis than at pre-vitellogenesis, while CHH levels in the hemolymph were constant. In the in vitro incubation experiments, MIH increased both VtG mRNA levels and secretion at ovarian stage 3. At stage E2, however, MIH resulted in a mixed response: downregulation of VtG mRNA and upregulation of hnVtG RNA. CHH had no effect on any of the parameters. Actinomycin D blocked the stimulatory effects of MIH in stage 3 animals on VtG mRNA and VtG, while cycloheximide attenuated only VtG levels, confirming the MIH stimulatory effect at this stage. MIH is a key endocrine regulator in the coordination of molting and reproduction in the mature female C. sapidus, which simultaneously inhibits molt and stimulates vitellogenesis. PMID:19583852

  15. MOLTING AND SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS INFECTION: THE PROBLEM AND SOME SOLUTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induced molting is an important economic tool used by the egg industry to recycle an aging layer flock. It is estimated that approximately 70% of the flocks nationwide and almost 100% in California are molted annually. Considering that there are approximately240 million hens in production in the U...

  16. Movements of flightless long-tailed ducks during wing molt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Lacroix, D.L.; Reed, J.A.; Lanctot, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the movements of flightless Long-tailed Ducks (Clangula hyemalis) during the wing molt in the near-shore lagoons of the Beaufort Sea in Alaska. Estimates of site fidelity during the 21-day flightless period ranged from 1-100%, with considerable variation among locations and within locations among years. There was no effect of low-level experimental disturbance or an underwater seismic survey on site fidelity of molting Long-tailed Ducks. Birds molting along a relatively consistent habitat gradient were more likely to move than those molting in a fragmented habitat. While flocks of birds are consistently observed in the same locations, these data suggest considerable turnover within these aggregations. These results, in conjunction with other studies, suggest that forage is relatively uniformly distributed within lagoons. We conclude that habitat selection by molting Long-tailed Ducks is likely influenced by protection from wind and associated waves.

  17. Primary feather molt of adult mourning doves in North and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, G.H.; Amend, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    Examination of 8,141 adult mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) in North and South Carolina revealed that substantial numbers complete primary feather molt in September. Adult mourning doves shed primaries at the rate of 1 per 14 days. No difference was found in this rate between sexes or among years, 1969-74. The initiation of molt differed from year to year, and female molt always preceded male molt. Available data show that southern doves complete primary molt a month earlier than northern doves. Therefore, age based on primary molt can be biased upward if all molt-complete wings from southern hunting samples are considered immature.

  18. Molt and taxonomy of red-breasted nuthatches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, R.C.

    1970-01-01

    The postnuptial and postjuvenal molts of Red-breasted Nuthatches occur from middle June to late September. Some birds may be nearly finished with the complete molt before other individuals begin, so that specimens taken at any given time may differ by as much as two months in the age of their plumage. No characters useful in ageing birds after the completion of the autumn molt were found.....The proposed racial subdivision of Sitta canadensis was based on misleading evidence resulting from variation of plumage age in birds assumed to be seasonally comparable, sooting of birds in industrialized parts of the country, and variation in quality of prepared specimens.

  19. Effects of salinity fluctuation frequency on the growth, molting rate and hemolymph 20-hydroxyecdysone concentration in Juvenile Chinese shrimp, Fenneropenaeus chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Sen; Wang, Fang; Sun, Hao; Dong, Shuanglin

    2009-09-01

    This experiment was conducted to examine the effects of salinity fluctuation frequency on the growth, molting rate and hemolymph 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-HE) concentration for juvenile Fenneropenaeus chinensis with an initial wet body weight of 1.115 g±0.012 g. The salinity of the control treatment (represented by D0) was 28 throughout the experiment, whereas treatments D2, D4, D6 and D8 were subjected to different salinity fluctuation frequencies of 2, 4, 6 and 8 d, respectively. The range of salinity fluctuation was 4. The salinity in treatments D2, D4, D6 and D8 was kept at 28 for 2, 4, 6 and 8 d, respectively; each original salinity was decreased abruptly to salinity 24, which first lasted for another 2 d and was then raised to its initial value 28. This constituted a salinity fluctuation cycle and afterwards the cycle repeated. It was found that: 1) The weight gain of shrimp in treatment D4 was 202.9% and significantly higher than that in treatment D0 ( P<0.05). The molting rate in treatment D2 was the lowest, while that in treatment D6 was the highest and significantly higher than those in treatments D0 and D2 ( P<0.05). 2) The hemolymph 20-HE concentration of shrimps in all treatments was at low levels and increased first gradually during the inter-molt period and then increased sharply. It reached a peak value during the pre-molt stage, and then decreased abruptly during the post-molt stage when the lowest level occurred. 3) During the post-molt stage, the hemolymph 20-HE concentration in treatment D2 was 7.47 pg ?L-1 and significantly higher than that in treatment D0 ( P<0.05). There were, however, no significant differences in hemolymph 20-HE concentration among all five treatments during the inter-molt stage ( P>0.05). During the pre-molt stage, the hemolymph 20-HE concentration in treatment D6 was significantly higher than that in treatment D0 ( P<0.05), whereas the hemolymph 20-HE concentration in treatment D2 was significantly lower than that in other treatments ( P<0.05). Adequate salinity fluctuation promoted the molting rate through increasing hemolymph 20-HE concentration at the pre-molt stage.

  20. California condor plumage and molt as field study aids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilbur, S.R.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis is made of the reliability of plumage and molt characteristics of the California condor for estimating age and identifying individual birds. Neither character seems sufficiently reliable to use in more than a general way.

  1. Behavioral and genomic characterization of molt-sleep in the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    MacWilliam, Dyan; Arensburger, Peter; Higa, Jason; Cui, Xinping; Adams, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    During the transition from feeding to molting, larval insects undergo profound changes in behavior and patterns of gene expression regulated by the neuroendocrine system. For some species, a distinctive characteristic of molting larvae is presence of a quiescent state sometimes referred to as "molt-sleep". Here, observations of 4th instar Manduca sexta larvae indicate the molting period involves a predominantly quiescent state that shares behavioral properties of adult insect sleep in that it is rapidly reversible and accompanied by a reduced responsiveness to both mildly arousing and noxious stimuli. When subjected to noxious stimuli, molting larvae exhibit locomotory and avoidance behaviors similar to those of inter-molt larvae. Although less consolidated, inter-molt quiescence shares many of the same behavioral traits with molting quiescence. However, when subjected to deprivation of quiescence, inter-molt larvae display a compensatory rebound behavior that is not detected in molting larvae. This suggests that molting quiescence is a specialized form of inactivity that affords survival advantages to molting larvae. RNA-seq analysis of molting larvae shows general reduction in expression of genes encoding GPCRs and down regulation of genes connected with cyclic nucleotide signaling. On the other hand, certain ion channel genes are up-regulated, including transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, chloride channels and a voltage-dependent calcium channel. These findings suggest patterns of gene expression consistent with elevation of quiescent state characteristic of the molt in a model holometabolous insect. PMID:25661727

  2. Effects of drinking water treatment on susceptibility of laying hens to Salmonella enteritidis during forced molt.

    PubMed

    Kubena, L F; Byrd, J A; Moore, R W; Ricke, S C; Nisbet, D J

    2005-02-01

    Feed deprivation is used in the layer industry to induce molting and stimulate multiple egg-laying cycles in laying hens. Unfortunately, the stress involved increases susceptibility to Salmonella enteritidis (SE), the risk of SE-positive eggs, and incidence of SE in internal organs. Leghorn hens over 50 wk of age were divided into 4 treatment groups of 12 hens each in experiment 1 and 3 treatment groups of 12 hens in experiments 2 and 3; hens were placed in individual laying hen cages. Treatment groups were 1) nonmolted (NM) and received feed and distilled water for 9 d, 2) force molted by feed removal for 9 d and received distilled water, 3) force molted by feed removal for 9 d and received 0.5% lactic acid (LA) in distilled water. An additional group (4) in experiment 1 only was force molted by feed removal for 9 d and received 0.5% acetic acid in distilled water. Seven days before feed removal hens were exposed to an 8L:16D photoperiod, which was continued throughout the experiment. Individual hens among all treatments were challenged orally with 10(4) SE on d 4 of feed removal. When compared with the NM treatments, weight losses were significantly higher in the M treatments, regardless of water treatments. When compared with NM treatments, crop pH was significantly higher in the M treatment receiving distilled water. Crop pH was reduced to that of the NM controls by 0.5% acetic acid in the drinking water. No consistent significant changes were observed for volatile fatty acids. The number of hens positive for SE in crop and ceca after culture and the number of SE per crop and per gram of cecal contents were higher in the M treatments, when compared with the NM treatments, but there was no effect of addition of either of the acids to the drinking water. Additional research using different acid treatment regimens may provide a tool for reducing the incidence of SE in eggs and internal organs during and following molting of laying hens. PMID:15742955

  3. EFFECTS OF ZINC COMPOUNDS ON THE ENVIRONMENT OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT AND SUSCEPTIBILITY OF LAYING HENS TO SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS DURING FORCED MOLT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The method most commonly used to induce molting and stimulate multiple egg-laying cycles in laying hens for commercial egg production is feed deprivation. Unfortunately, an increased risk of Salmonella enteritidis (SE) may result from the use of this method. Methods to stimulate multiple egg-layi...

  4. A molt timer is involved in the metamorphic molt in Manduca sexta larvae

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yuichiro; Koyama, Takashi; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Riddiford, Lynn M.; Truman, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Manduca sexta larvae are a model for growth control in insects, particularly for the demonstration of critical weight, a threshold weight that the larva must surpass before it can enter metamorphosis on a normal schedule, and the inhibitory action of juvenile hormone on this checkpoint. We examined the effects of nutrition on allatectomized (CAX) larvae that lack juvenile hormone to impose the critical weight checkpoint. Normal larvae respond to prolonged starvation at the start of the last larval stage, by extending their subsequent feeding period to ensure that they begin metamorphosis above critical weight. CAX larvae, by contrast, show no homeostatic adjustment to starvation but start metamorphosis 4 d after feeding onset, regardless of larval size or the state of development of their imaginal discs. By feeding starved CAX larvae for various durations, we found that feeding for only 12–24 h was sufficient to result in metamorphosis on day 4, regardless of further feeding or body size. Manipulation of diet composition showed that protein was the critical macronutrient to initiate this timing. This constant period between the start of feeding and the onset of metamorphosis suggests that larvae possess a molt timer that establishes a minimal time to metamorphosis. Ligation experiments indicate that a portion of the timing may occur in the prothoracic glands. This positive system that promotes molting and the negative control via the critical weight checkpoint provide antagonistic pathways that evolution can modify to adapt growth to the ecological needs of different insects. PMID:23852731

  5. Neural mechanism of optimal limb coordination in crustacean swimming

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Calvin; Guy, Robert D.; Mulloney, Brian; Zhang, Qinghai; Lewis, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in neuroscience is to understand how biologically salient motor behaviors emerge from properties of the underlying neural circuits. Crayfish, krill, prawns, lobsters, and other long-tailed crustaceans swim by rhythmically moving limbs called swimmerets. Over the entire biological range of animal size and paddling frequency, movements of adjacent swimmerets maintain an approximate quarter-period phase difference with the more posterior limbs leading the cycle. We use a computational fluid dynamics model to show that this frequency-invariant stroke pattern is the most effective and mechanically efficient paddling rhythm across the full range of biologically relevant Reynolds numbers in crustacean swimming. We then show that the organization of the neural circuit underlying swimmeret coordination provides a robust mechanism for generating this stroke pattern. Specifically, the wave-like limb coordination emerges robustly from a combination of the half-center structure of the local central pattern generating circuits (CPGs) that drive the movements of each limb, the asymmetric network topology of the connections between local CPGs, and the phase response properties of the local CPGs, which we measure experimentally. Thus, the crustacean swimmeret system serves as a concrete example in which the architecture of a neural circuit leads to optimal behavior in a robust manner. Furthermore, we consider all possible connection topologies between local CPGs and show that the natural connectivity pattern generates the biomechanically optimal stroke pattern most robustly. Given the high metabolic cost of crustacean swimming, our results suggest that natural selection has pushed the swimmeret neural circuit toward a connection topology that produces optimal behavior. PMID:25201976

  6. Functional analysis of insect molting fluid proteins on the protection and regulation of ecdysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Lu, Anrui; Kong, Lulu; Zhang, Qiaoli; Ling, Erjun

    2014-12-26

    Molting fluid accumulates between the old and new cuticles during periodical ecdysis in Ecdysozoa. Natural defects in insect ecdysis are frequently associated with melanization (an immunity response) occurring primarily in molting fluids, suggesting that molting fluid may impact immunity as well as affect ecdysis. To address this hypothesis, proteomic analysis of molting fluids from Bombyx mori during three different types of ecdysis was performed. Many proteins were newly identified, including immunity-related proteins, in each molting fluid. Molting fluids inhibited the growth of bacteria in vitro. The entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana, which can escape immune responses in feeding larvae, is quickly recognized by larvae during ecdysis, followed by melanization in molting fluid and old cuticle. Fungal conidia germination was delayed, and no hyphae were detected in the hemocoels of pharate instar insects. Molting fluids protect the delicate pharate instar insects with extremely thin cuticles against microorganisms. To explore the function of molting fluids in ecdysis regulation, based on protein similarity, 32 genes were selected for analysis in ecdysis regulation through RNAi in Tribolium castaneum, a model commonly used to study integument development because RNAi is difficult to achieve in B. mori. We identified 24 molting proteins that affected ecdysis after knockdown, with different physiological functions, including old cuticle protein recycling, molting fluid pressure balance, detoxification, and signal detection and transfer of molting fluids. We report that insects secrete molting fluid for protection and regulation of ecdysis, which indicates a way to develop new pesticides through interrupting insect ecdysis in the future. PMID:25368323

  7. Hormonal treatment and flight feather molt in immature Sandhill Cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    Molt, the production of a new generation of feathers, is a poorly understood physiological phenomenon in nondomestic birds. Often in large birds like geese, flight is restricted by clipping the primary remiges on 1 wing and flight is restored after the molt when the primaries are replaced. A similar technique would be desirable for use with cranes conditioned for release to the native habitat. However, immature sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) did not appear to replace their primaries annually; therefore, we studied their flight feather molt (from 4 months to 3.5 years of age) and attempted to influence molting. Under natural conditions tail feathers (rectrices) were replaced annually and all secondaries replaced in 2.5-year-old birds. However, replacement of primaries in immature sandhill cranes appears to be a gradual process beginning the 2nd year; about 33% of the original primaries (present at 10 months of age) persisted in the 3.5-year-oId birds. Pulling out the primaries of immature sandhill cranes induces the growth of new primaries, as is true of many other birds. However, the new primaries were incapable of supporting flight, fell out repeatedly, and those that remained were often deformed. Pulling the primaries, under the influence of tranquilizers and anesthetics to relax the feather papillae, also did not induce normal growth of the replacement primaries. Progesterone (including excessively high doses), thyroxine, and follicle stimulating hormone, although effective in inducing feather replacement in domestic poultry, had no effect on crane molt.

  8. Role of calcium-dependent proteinase in molt-induced claw muscle atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The claw closer muscle of the Bermuda land crab Gecarcinus lateralis undergoes a sequential atrophy and restoration during each intermolt cycle. Muscle protein decreases 40% during proecdysis and is restored following ecdysis. Amino acid incorporation into protein of postecdysial muscle is five times greater than that in anecdysial muscle. Since the rates of protein synthesis in anecdysial and proecdysial muscle are the same it appears that proecdysial muscle atrophy is caused primarily by an increase in protein degradation. A calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) active at neutral pH has been implicated in the nonlysosomal hydrolysis of myofibrillar proteins. We have examined the role of a CDP in atrophy of the claw closer muscle. The many similarities between crustacean and vertebrate CDPs have established this crustacean system as a simple and convenient model for the role of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteolysis in myofibrillar protein turnover and its manifestation in the structure of the sarcomere. 16 references, 8 figures. (ACR)

  9. Topographical and typological comparison of the rodlike setae of ambulatory dactylopodites in decapod crustaceans

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    The arrangement and external morphology of the rodlike setae and associated structures located on the dactylopodites of the walking legs of six species of decapod crustaceans are compared. The dactyls of littoral species, represented by the rock crab, Cancer antennarius, and the spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus, have dense tufts and bands of rodlike setae, as is typical of many decapods, and additionally only a few small plumed setae. The arrangement of setae on the dactyls of the recently discovered Galapagos vent crab. Bythograea thermydron, closely resembles that of C. antennarius. Rodlike and long plumed setae occur in about equal numbers on the dactyls of the pelagic anomuran, Pleuroncodes planipes. The dactyls having the fewest rodlike setae are those of the terrestrial hermit crab, Coenobita perlatus, and those of the kelp crab, Pugettia producta, where flat setae typical of Majidae have replace most rodlike setae. The presence and structures of the terminal pores in rodlike setae vary intra- and interspecifically, possibly as a function of molt stage. Variations in some features of rodlike setae, such as tip acuity and presence of microsetae and surface sculpting, appear to be related to development. Serrated setae occur on the dactyls of megalopal P. producta but not in later stages. The topography and typolgy of setae located on the ambulatory dactyls of decapod crustaceans are considered in light of recent interest in using seta characteristics to determine the sensory functions of sensilla and to clarify the phylogeny of arthropod groups.

  10. A review on development of novel strategies for controlling Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in laying hens: fiber-based molt diets.

    PubMed

    Ricke, S C; Dunkley, C S; Durant, J A

    2013-02-01

    Limiting Salmonella Enteritidis from table eggs can involve intervention approaches at several levels of the production cycle, beginning at the hatchery and ending at the processing or table egg production facilities. Likewise, interventions that limit Salmonella Enteritidis dissemination can be implemented at various stages during the life cycle of infection of Salmonella in the laying hen. However, achieving complete elimination of Salmonella infestation in egg products has remained elusive. There is a multitude of reasons for this, including adaptability of the organism, virulence properties, and persistence. Likewise, environmental factors in the layer house such as transmission routes, reservoirs, and feed sources can influence the exposure of susceptible laying hens to Salmonella Enteritidis. Consequently, successful applications of control measures depend not only on the timing of when they are applied but also on effective surveillance to detect frequency and level of infection of Salmonella. Several studies demonstrated that molt induction by feed withdrawal altered the immune system and the gastrointestinal tract of hens, making them susceptible to Salmonella Enteritidis colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. To alleviate this, the development of alternative methods to induce a molt became necessary. The use of several fiber-containing diets was shown to effectively induce a molt with alfalfa-based diets being the most extensively studied. Further reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis levels in eggs will probably require application of multiple interventions at several steps during egg production and processing as well as a better understanding of the mechanisms used by Salmonella Enteritidis to persist in laying flocks. PMID:23300320

  11. Complex Population Responses to Food Resources in the Marine Crustacean Americamysis Bahia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most observations of stressor effects on marine crustaceans are made on individuals or even-aged cohorts. Results of these studies are difficult to translate into ecological predictions, either because life cycle models are incomplete, or because stressor effects on mixed age po...

  12. ALTERATIONS IN THE GROWTH, REPRODUCTION AND ENERGY METABOLISM OF ESTUARINE CRUSTACEANS AS INDICATORS OF POLLUTANT STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An estuarine mysid (Mysidopsis bahia) has been identified as one of the most sensitive members of the estuarine community to pollutant stress (for a review see Nimmo and Hamaker, 1982). n the majority of life-cycle toxicity tests using this planktonic estuarine crustacean, sublet...

  13. Inverse Demographic Analysis of Compensatory Responses to Resource Limitation in the Mysid Crustacean Americamysis bahia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most observations of stressor effects on marine crustaceans are made on individuals or even-aged cohorts. Results of these studies are difficult to translate into ecological predictions, either because life cycle models are incomplete, or because stressor effects on mixed age po...

  14. The phenology of molting, breeding and their overlap in central Amazonian birds

    E-print Network

    Stouffer, Phil

    141 The phenology of molting, breeding and their overlap in central Amazonian birds Erik I. Johnson of molting and breeding are usually temporally separated in temperate birds, but can occur simultaneously in tropical birds, a condition known as molt­breeding overlap. Here, we document great variation in the timing

  15. MOLT IN THE NORTHERN FUR SEAL by Victor B. Scheffer and Ancel M. Johnson

    E-print Network

    450; 3^ MOLT IN THE NORTHERN FUR SEAL by Victor B. Scheffer and Ancel M. Johnson ;:arine Biological of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director MOLT IN THE NORTHERN FUR SEAL by Victor B. Scheffer Summary ,, 32 Acknowledgments 33 Literature cited 33 111 #12;#12;MOLT IN THE NORTHERN FUR SEAL by Victor B

  16. The effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (Aroclor 1242) on thyroxine, estradiol, molt, and plumage characteristics in the American kestrel (Falco sparverius)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinn, M.J.; French, J.B.; McNabb, F.M.A.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effects of Aroclor 1242, a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), on plumage characteristics and molt in the American kestrel, Falco sparverills. Several characteristics of plumage. including color and molt schedule, are modulated by hormonal signals and hence may be modified by endocrine-active contaminants. If so, the functions of plumage (e.g. communication for mating or territorial defense) may be compromised by exposure to such compounds. Captive American kestrels were fed Aroclor 1242 at 0. 6.0. and 60.0 ppm (n = 6 males and 6 females per treatment) mixed in their normal diet. Concentrations of plasma estradiol and thyroxine were measured weekly from the beginning of treatment. Measured plumage characteristics included width of the black subterminal band on the tail, color (a composite index of hue and saturation), reflectance from 230 to 800 min. pattern of feather loss and regrowth on the tail and wing. and timing of onset and duration of molt. Aroclor 1242 depressed plasma thyroxine. Plasma estradiol levels remained low due to the phase of the breeding cycle. Treatments did not disrupt the measured plumage characteristics. This may be due to timing or dose of exposure or to genetic factors.

  17. Conserved behavioral and genetic mechanisms in the pre-hatching molt of the nematode Pristionchus pacificus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During development, juvenile nematodes undergo four molts. Although the number of molts appears to be constant within the Nematoda, the timing of the first molt can occur either before or after hatching. A previous study indicates that, as in some parasitic nematode lineages, a pre-hatching juvenile stage also exists in Diplogastrid nematodes. A detailed description of these sequence of events has yet to be shown for any single species. Findings To delineate the timing of the pre-hatching molt in the beetle-associated Pristionchus pacificus, we tracked individual mid-J1 stage worms inside the eggshell through the J1-J2 transition and hatching. We found that active movement ended 21 hours after egg-laying, followed by lethargus and hatching. We inferred that lethargus behavior represents the onset of the first molt, which precedes each post-hatching molt in C. elegans and P. pacificus. The onset of the J1-J2 molt was also marked by the upregulation of the P. pacificus molting marker Ppa-pnhr-1. We further corroborated the pre-hatching molt with the isolation of two genetic mutants that exhibited aberrant molting both inside the egg and after hatching, as characterized by protracted and often-aborted shedding of the old cuticle. Conclusion Our results describe in detail the pre-hatching juvenile molt in P. pacificus, provide strong visual evidence of a pre-hatching molt, and show support for common genetic mechanisms regulating molting in the pre-hatching and post-hatching developmental stages. Our findings support the hypothesis that the evolution of pre-hatching development in Diplogastrid nematodes is likely due to a heterochronic shift between the timing of the first molt and hatching. PMID:25276336

  18. Analysis of snail genes in the crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis: insight into snail gene family evolution.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Roberta L; Price, Alivia L; Parchem, Ronald J; Patel, Nipam H

    2012-05-01

    The transcriptional repressor snail was first discovered in Drosophila melanogaster, where it initially plays a role in gastrulation and mesoderm formation, and later plays a role in neurogenesis. Among arthropods, this role of snail appears to be conserved in the insects Tribolium and Anopheles gambiae, but not in the chelicerates Cupiennius salei and Achaearanea tepidariorum, the myriapod Glomeris marginata, or the Branchiopod crustacean Daphnia magna. These data imply that within arthropoda, snail acquired its role in gastrulation and mesoderm formation in the insect lineage. However, crustaceans are a diverse group with several major taxa, making analysis of more crustaceans necessary to potentially understand the ancestral role of snail in Pancrustacea (crustaceans + insects) and thus in the ancestor of insects as well. To address these questions, we examined the snail family in the Malacostracan crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis. We found three snail homologs, Ph-snail1, Ph-snail2 and Ph-snail3, and one scratch homolog, Ph-scratch. Parhyale snail genes are expressed after gastrulation, during germband formation and elongation. Ph-snail1, Ph-snail2, and Ph-snail3 are expressed in distinct patterns in the neuroectoderm. Ph-snail1 is the only Parhyale snail gene expressed in the mesoderm, where its expression cycles in the mesodermal stem cells, called mesoteloblasts. The mesoteloblasts go through a series of cycles, where each cycle is composed of a migration phase and a division phase. Ph-snail1 is expressed during the migration phase, but not during the division phase. We found that as each mesoteloblast division produces one segment's worth of mesoderm, Ph-snail1 expression is linked to both the cell cycle and the segmental production of mesoderm. PMID:22466422

  19. VITELLOGENISIS AND IT'S ENDOCRINE CONTROL IN DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vitellogenesis, the production of vitellin (major yolk protein), is controlled in decapod crustaceans by several hormones. With increasing efforts world-wide to successfully culture economically important crustaceans, such as shrimp, there is growing interest in attaining a bette...

  20. 50 CFR 17.46 - Special rules-crustaceans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special rules-crustaceans. 17.46 Section 17.46 Wildlife and Fisheries ...PLANTS Threatened Wildlife § 17.46 Special rules—crustaceans. (a) Madison Cave isopod (Antrolana lira...

  1. 50 CFR 17.46 - Special rules-crustaceans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules-crustaceans. 17.46 Section 17.46 Wildlife and Fisheries ...PLANTS Threatened Wildlife § 17.46 Special rules—crustaceans. (a) Madison Cave isopod (Antrolana lira...

  2. 50 CFR 17.46 - Special rules-crustaceans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special rules-crustaceans. 17.46 Section 17.46 Wildlife and Fisheries ...PLANTS Threatened Wildlife § 17.46 Special rules—crustaceans. (a) Madison Cave isopod (Antrolana lira...

  3. 50 CFR 17.46 - Special rules-crustaceans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special rules-crustaceans. 17.46 Section 17.46 Wildlife and Fisheries ...PLANTS Threatened Wildlife § 17.46 Special rules—crustaceans. (a) Madison Cave isopod (Antrolana lira...

  4. 50 CFR 17.46 - Special rules-crustaceans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special rules-crustaceans. 17.46 Section 17.46 Wildlife and Fisheries ...PLANTS Threatened Wildlife § 17.46 Special rules—crustaceans. (a) Madison Cave isopod (Antrolana lira...

  5. Temporal Dynamics of Convergent Modulation at a Crustacean Neuromuscular Junction

    E-print Network

    Abbott, Laurence

    Temporal Dynamics of Convergent Modulation at a Crustacean Neuromuscular Junction JUAN CARLOS JORGE mod- (Flamm and Harris-Warrick 1986b; Hooper and Marder ulation at a crustacean neuromuscular junction; Evans and Siegler 1982), crustacean EJPs in gm4 have a large initial amplitude and show relatively

  6. Knockdown of Parhyale Ultrabithorax recapitulates evolutionary changes in crustacean

    E-print Network

    Patel, Nipam H.

    Knockdown of Parhyale Ultrabithorax recapitulates evolutionary changes in crustacean appendage of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, and approved May 29, 2009 (received for review March 24, 2009) Crustaceans possess. Previous studies in a wide range of crustaceans have demonstrated a correlation between the anterior

  7. 9 The expression of crustacean mating strategies STEPHEN M. SHUSTER

    E-print Network

    Shuster, Stephen M.

    9 · The expression of crustacean mating strategies STEPHEN M. SHUSTER CHAPTER SUMMARY Three the Crustacea. 9.1 INTRODUCTION Although crustaceans were among the first recorded examples of alternative scarcity of reports of male polymorphism among crustaceans is unexpected given the frequency with which

  8. Learning Comprehensible Relational Features to Distinguish Subfossil Decapod Crustacean Dactyls

    E-print Network

    Goadrich, Mark

    Learning Comprehensible Relational Features to Distinguish Subfossil Decapod Crustacean Dactyls Programming to a new domain in- volving decapod crustacean claws. We nd that we can distinguish dactyl shapes Description Because decapod crustacean claws are potentially a ected by numerous selective agents

  9. Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Crustaceans1

    E-print Network

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FA-115 Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Crustaceans1 Deborah B. Pouder, Eric W Guide: Crustaceans The information provided in this guide is not intended to be a complete, detailed Center. #12;2Common Freshwater Fish Parasites Pictorial Guide: Crustaceans https

  10. Spatial and Temporal Variation in Ephemeral Pool Crustacean Communities1

    E-print Network

    Spatial and Temporal Variation in Ephemeral Pool Crustacean Communities1 Janette Holtz2 , Marie A Corps Air Station, Miramar. Crustacean communities in eight vernal pools in San Diego County were;Poster Session ­ Ephemeral Pool Crustacean Communities ­ Holtz and Others Table 1--Number of species

  11. Recent advances in crustacean genomics Jonathon H. Stillman,1,

    E-print Network

    Pfrender, Michael

    Recent advances in crustacean genomics Jonathon H. Stillman,1,Ã John K. Colbourne, Carol E. Lee of Biology, Utah State University, 5305 Old Main Hill Road, Logan, UT 84322-5305, USA Synopsis Crustaceans genomics (transcriptomics) projects that are currently underway in crustacean biology. Specifically, we

  12. Neural mechanism of optimal limb coordination in crustacean swimming

    E-print Network

    Guy, Bob

    Neural mechanism of optimal limb coordination in crustacean swimming Calvin Zhanga , Robert D. Guya neural circuits. Crayfish, krill, prawns, lobsters, and other long-tailed crustaceans swim the full range of biologically relevant Reynolds numbers in crustacean swimming. We then show

  13. Temporal and spatial shifts in habitat use by Black Brant immediately following flightless molt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Tyler L.; Flint, Paul L.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Derksen, Dirk V.

    2010-01-01

    Each year thousands of Pacific Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) undergo flightless wing molt in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area (TLSA), Alaska, in two distinct habitats: inland, freshwater lakes and coastal, brackish wetlands. Brant lose body mass during wing molt and likely must add reserves upon regaining flight to help fuel their 2,500 km migration to autumn staging areas. We characterized movements and habitat use by Brant during post-molt (the period immediately following the recovery of flight) by (1) marking individual Brant with GPS (global positioning system) transmitters, and (2) conducting a series of replicate aerial surveys. Individuals molting in inland habitats promptly abandoned their molt wetland during the post-molt and moved into coastal habitats. Consequently, inland habitats were nearly deserted by early August when Brant had regained flight, a decrease of >5,000 individuals from the flightless period of early July. Conversely, coastal molting Brant largely remained in coastal habitats during the post-molt and many coastal wetlands were occupied by large flocks (>1,000 birds). Our results indicate that inland, freshwater wetlands were less suitable post-molt habitats for Brant, while coastal wetlands were preferred as they transitioned from flightless molt. The immediacy with which Brant vacated inland habitats upon regaining flight suggests that food may be limiting during molt and they are not selecting inland molt sites strictly for food resources, but rather a balance of factors including predator avoidance and acquisition of protein for feather growth. Our data clearly demonstrate that patterns of habitat use by Brant in the TLSA change over the course of the molt season, an important consideration for management of future resource development activities in this area.

  14. The effects of storage time on vitelline membrane protein banding patterns and interior egg quality of eggs from non-molted and molted hens 

    E-print Network

    Kelley, Angela Jean

    2004-09-30

    banding patterns, interior egg quality, and vitelline membrane rupture strength. Eggs were gathered from commercial egg producers from pre-molt (26 wk or 72 wk) and post-molted (74 wk or 82 wk) hens. In each of two trials twenty-one eggs were gathered...

  15. Demographic characteristics of molting black brant near Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bollinger, K.S.; Derksen, D.V.

    1996-01-01

    Molting Brant in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area (TLSA) on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska were studied from 1987 to 1992 using capture-mark-recapture techniques to determine origin, age and sex composition, return rates and site fidelity. Brant originated from 10 nesting colonies in Canada and Alaska. The captured birds were 76% adults and 57% males. Ninety-one percent of known-age recaptures were

  16. EFFECT OF DIFLUBENZURON ON AN ESTUARINE CRUSTACEAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data are reported for tests exposing a small, estuarine crustacean, Mysidopsis bahia, to diflubenzuron (Dimilin, TH-6040, (1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(2,6-difluorobenzoyl)urea)) in flowing seawater. Tests were conducted in intermittent flows from a diluter or continuous flowing water i...

  17. Progress of primary feather molt of adult mourning doves in Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sadler, K.C.; Tomlinson, R.E.; Wight, H.M.

    1970-01-01

    The examination of 7,892 adult doves in Missouri between 1953 and 1965 showed that less than 2.5% of adult doves completed their molt before October 1. Adult doves of both sexes began molting their primary feathers during early June in Missouri and lost the last (tenth) primary during the latter half of October. Approximately 140-150 days were required to complete the molt. Thus, early-hatched immatures, which begin their primary molt 25-30 days after hatching, contributed the bulk of the wings with completed molts in September. By correctly classifying September samples of dove wings with a completed molt as young-of-the-year a more accurate young:adult ratio is obtained.

  18. Variation in plumage, molt, and morphology of the Whiskered Auklet (Aethia pygmaea) in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitocchelli, J.; Piatt, J.F.; Carter, H.R.

    2003-01-01

    We studied molt and size variation in Whiskered Auklets collected at sea in August from the Aleutian Islands in 1992 and 1993. We evaluated size differences from external and skeletal measurements. Adults were molting extensively in August, indicating that molt began in July. Primaries 1-5 had been completely replaced, while primaries 6-8 were in various stages of replacement, and primaries 9 and 10 were old in most birds. We also found that juveniles were not molting. This pattern is similar to other species of small auklets where breeding and molt in adults overlap, but juveniles do not molt until the following summer. This suggests that Whiskered Auklets are subjected to similar ecological constraints as other auklets. We provide the first skeletal measurements of Whiskered Auklets and some new external measurements. Results of statistical analyses indicate that there is no sexual dimorphism in adults. A small sample of juveniles suggests that they are similar in size to adults.

  19. Cuticular Biominerals of the Terrestrial Crustacean Oniscus asellus (Isopoda, Linnaeus 1758)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergelsberg, S. T.; Mukhopadhyay, B.; Dove, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Biomineralization is a phenomenon observed in many eukaryotic organisms and evidence suggests this process began relatively early in the evolution of multicellular life (Marin F et al. 1996). Crustaceans form a large fraction of all eukaryotic biomineralizers by incorporating calcium carbonate (CaCO3) into their cuticle. Terrestrial species are challenged in their production of CaCO3 by the absence of calcium-rich waters. To cope with this limitation, the terrestrial crustacean Oniscus asellus recycles up to 80% (Auzou G 1953) of its total calcium during the molting process. This feat is accomplished by separate molting of the front and back cuticle, with temporary storage of the calcium carbonate as amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) in the front half (Ziegler A 1997). These processes infer a highly efficient and regulated mechanism for biomineralization that is most likely orchestrated by a myriad of proteins (Ziegler A et al. 2012). Until recently, investigations of biomineralization were largely directed toward understanding morphology and large-scale chemistry of the minerals, ignoring the mechanistic roles of biomacromolecules in mineralization processes. More recent work suggests a high involvement of these compounds on the formation of biominerals and, in some cases, the specific polymorphs thereof (Keene EC et al. 2010). This study focuses on identifying the components of the biological mineralization matrix at each stage of the process. Using chemical demineralization of the stored ACC, all biomacromolecules can be separated and purified for subsequent analysis by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. To link the localized biochemistry more intimately to the polymorph of calcium carbonate that forms in the animal, the inorganic phase (';the mineral') will be monitored at each life stage using XRD and TEM. This analysis will reveal the organic components of a very precise biomineralization mechanism and may shed insight on its evolutionary origin. References: Marin F, Westbroek P et al., 1996, Proc Nat Acad Sci 93:1554-1559 Auzou G, 1953, L Ann Sci Nat 15:71-98 Ziegler A, 1997, Zoomorphology 117:181-187 Ziegler A et al., 2012, Cryst Growth Des 12:646-655 Keene EC et al., 2010, Cryst Growth Des 10:1383-1389

  20. Gene Silencing in Crustaceans: From Basic Research to Biotechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Sagi, Amir; Manor, Rivka; Ventura, Tomer

    2013-01-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) is gaining momentum for crustaceans, both in basic research and for commercial development. RNAi has proven instrumental in a growing number of crustacean species, revealing the functionality of novel crustacean genes essential among others to development, growth, metabolism and reproduction. Extensive studies have also been done on silencing of viral transcripts in crustaceans, contributing to the understanding of the defense mechanisms of crustaceans and strategies employed by viruses to overcome these. The first practical use of gene silencing in aquaculture industry has been recently achieved, through manipulation of a crustacean insulin-like androgenic gland hormone. This review summarizes the advancements in the use of RNAi in crustaceans, and assesses the advantages of this method, as well as the current hurdles that hinder its large-scale practice. PMID:24705266

  1. Body molt of male long-tailed ducks in the nearshore waters of the north slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, M.D.; Grand, J.B.; Flint, P.L.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the timing and intensity of body molt in relation to stage of remige growth for postbreeding adult male Long-tailed Ducks (Clangula hyemalis) off the coast of northern Alaska. During this period, remige and rectrix feathers are molted simultaneously with body feathers during the prebasic molt, which results in a period of increased energetic and nutritional demands. We collected birds from late July through mid-August and recorded intensity of molt in eight regions: head and neck, back and rump, greater coverts, lesser coverts, flank and sides, breast, belly, and tail. Using nonlinear regression, we estimated the peak intensity and variation for each region in relation to ninth primary length. We found little evidence of molt in the head and neck region. The greater and lesser coverts, and back and rump reached peak molt intensities earliest and were followed by tail, breast, and belly. Molt intensity in the flank and side region was highly variable and indicated a more prolonged molting pattern in relation to other regions. While body molt occurs simultaneously with wing molt, we found that molt among regions occurred in a staggered pattern. Long-tailed Ducks may employ this staggered molting pattern to minimize the energetic and nutritional requirements of molt.

  2. Inexplicable inefficiency of avian molt? Insights from an opportunistically breeding arid-zone species, Lichenostomus penicillatus.

    PubMed

    Hoye, Bethany J; Buttemer, William A

    2011-01-01

    The majority of bird species studied to date have molt schedules that are not concurrent with other energy demanding life history stages, an outcome assumed to arise from energetic trade-offs. Empirical studies reveal that molt is one of the most energetically demanding and perplexingly inefficient growth processes measured. Furthermore, small birds, which have the highest mass-specific basal metabolic rates (BMR(m)), have the highest costs of molt per gram of feathers produced. However, many small passerines, including white-plumed honeyeaters (WPHE; Lichenostomus penicillatus), breed in response to resource availability at any time of year, and do so without interrupting their annual molt. We examined the energetic cost of molt in WPHE by quantifying weekly changes in minimum resting metabolic rate (RMR(min)) during a natural-molt period in 7 wild-caught birds. We also measured the energetic cost of feather replacement in a second group of WPHEs that we forced to replace an additional 25% of their plumage at the start of their natural molt period. Energy expenditure during natural molt revealed an energy conversion efficiency of just 6.9% (±0.57) close to values reported for similar-sized birds from more predictable north-temperate environments. Maximum increases in RMR(min) during the molt of WPHE, at 82% (±5.59) above individual pre-molt levels, were some of the highest yet reported. Yet RMR(min) maxima during molt were not coincident with the peak period of feather replacement in naturally molting or plucked birds. Given the tight relationship between molt efficiency and mass-specific metabolic rate in all species studied to date, regardless of life-history pattern (Efficiency (%) ?=?35.720 x 10(-0.494BMRm); r²?=?0.944; p? =? or < 0.0001), there appears to be concomitant physiological costs entrained in the molt period that is not directly due to feather replacement. Despite these high total expenditures, the protracted molt period of WPHE significantly reduces these added costs on a daily basis. PMID:21311594

  3. Inexplicable Inefficiency of Avian Molt? Insights from an Opportunistically Breeding Arid-Zone Species, Lichenostomus penicillatus

    PubMed Central

    Hoye, Bethany J.; Buttemer, William A.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of bird species studied to date have molt schedules that are not concurrent with other energy demanding life history stages, an outcome assumed to arise from energetic trade-offs. Empirical studies reveal that molt is one of the most energetically demanding and perplexingly inefficient growth processes measured. Furthermore, small birds, which have the highest mass-specific basal metabolic rates (BMRm), have the highest costs of molt per gram of feathers produced. However, many small passerines, including white-plumed honeyeaters (WPHE; Lichenostomus penicillatus), breed in response to resource availability at any time of year, and do so without interrupting their annual molt. We examined the energetic cost of molt in WPHE by quantifying weekly changes in minimum resting metabolic rate (RMRmin) during a natural-molt period in 7 wild-caught birds. We also measured the energetic cost of feather replacement in a second group of WPHEs that we forced to replace an additional 25% of their plumage at the start of their natural molt period. Energy expenditure during natural molt revealed an energy conversion efficiency of just 6.9% (±0.57) close to values reported for similar-sized birds from more predictable north-temperate environments. Maximum increases in RMRmin during the molt of WPHE, at 82% (±5.59) above individual pre-molt levels, were some of the highest yet reported. Yet RMRmin maxima during molt were not coincident with the peak period of feather replacement in naturally molting or plucked birds. Given the tight relationship between molt efficiency and mass-specific metabolic rate in all species studied to date, regardless of life-history pattern (Efficiency (%) ?=?35.720•10?0.494BMRm; r2?=?0.944; p?=?<0.0001), there appears to be concomitant physiological costs entrained in the molt period that is not directly due to feather replacement. Despite these high total expenditures, the protracted molt period of WPHE significantly reduces these added costs on a daily basis. PMID:21311594

  4. Carotenoids in Aquaculture: Fish and Crustaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerkeng, Bjorn

    This Chapter deals with selected topics on the use of carotenoids for colouration in aquaculture and incudes examples from ecological studies which support our understanding of functions and actions of carotenoids and colouration in fishes and crustaceans. Animal colours may be physical or structural in origin [1], e.g. Tyndall blues and iridescent diffraction colours, or they may be due to pigments, including carotenoids (Chapter 10).

  5. Lake acidification: Effects on crustacean zooplankton populations

    SciTech Connect

    Havens, K.E. ); Yan, N.D. ); Keller, W. )

    1993-08-01

    The ranked acid sensitivities of six common crustacean zooplankton taxa were determined from a multilake field survey in Ontario and from laboratory bioassays. The two approaches gave the same ranking (from most to least sensitive): Daphnia galeata mendotae, Daphnia retrocurva, and Skistodiaptomus oregonensis > Diaphanosoma birgei > Mesocyclops edax > Bosmina longirostris. This finding suggests that acidification has caused the widespread damage which has been documented for the zooplankton of Ontario and northeastern US lakes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. The Effect of Temperature on Synchronization of Brood Development of the Bopyrid Isopod Parasite Probopyrus pandalicola with Molting of Its Host, the Daggerblade Grass Shrimp Palaemonetes pugio.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Brigette A; Curran, Mary Carla

    2015-08-01

    The bopyrid isopod Probopyrus pandalicola is a hematophagous ectoparasite that sexually sterilizes some palaemonid shrimps, including female daggerblade grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio. The reproduction of parasitic isopods is thought to occur synchronously with host molting because the brood would be unsuccessful if molting occurred before the larvae were free swimming. Temperature affects the length of the molting cycle of shrimp, and therefore may also affect the incubation time of isopod broods. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of temperature on brood development of the parasite and on the degree of synchronization with the molting of its host. Parasitized P. pugio were monitored daily at 2 experimental temperatures, 23 and 15 C, in temperature-controlled chambers for the duration of a full parasite reproductive cycle. Developmental stage was determined by the visible coloration of the brood through the exoskeleton of the host, and was designated as egg, embryo I, embryo II, or epicaridium larvae. Temperature significantly affected median brood incubation time, which was only 11 days at 23 C, as compared to 35 days at 15 C. The final developmental stage (epicaridium larvae) was 3 times shorter at 23 C (median 3 days; n = 45) than at 15 C (median 9 days; n = 15). Temperature significantly affected the intermolt period of parasitized shrimp, which was shorter at 23 C (median 12 days) than at 15 C (median 37 days). A smaller percentage of the intermolt period elapsed between larval release and shrimp molting at 23 C (0.0%) than at 15 C (3.1%), indicating closer synchronization between host molting and parasite reproduction at the warmer temperature. At 15 C, the isopods utilized a smaller proportion of the time that was available for brood incubation during the intermolt period of their host. Brood size ranged from 391 to 4,596 young and was positively correlated with parasite and host size. Because development progressed more rapidly at 23 C, warmer temperatures could increase the prevalence of P. pandalicola. The corresponding reduction in the abundance of ovigerous grass shrimp as a result of sexual sterilization by bopyrids could adversely impact estuarine ecosystems, as grass shrimp are a crucial link in transferring energy from detritus to secondary consumers. PMID:25826017

  7. Cyanobacterial protease inhibitor microviridin J causes a lethal molting disruption in Daphnia pulicaria.

    PubMed

    Rohrlack, Thomas; Christoffersen, Kirsten; Kaebernick, Melanie; Neilan, Brett A

    2004-08-01

    Laboratory experiments identified microviridin J as the source of a fatal molting disruption in Daphnia species organisms feeding on Microcystis cells. The molting disruption was presumably linked to the inhibitory effect of microviridin J on daphnid proteases, suggesting that hundreds of further cyanobacterial protease inhibitors must be considered potentially toxic to zooplankton. PMID:15294849

  8. INTRODUCTION: CURRENT AND FUTURE PROSPECTS FOR INDUCED MOLTING IN LAYING HENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induced molting to revive the productivity of aging laying flocks has been widely practiced by the commercial egg industry in the United States for many years. Recently, the induction of molting by feed deprivation has been the focus of vigorous criticism on the basis of both animal welfare implicat...

  9. Molt performance and bone density of cortical, medullary, and cancellous bone in laying hens during feed restriction or alfalfa-based feed molt.

    PubMed

    Kim, W K; Donalson, L M; Bloomfield, S A; Hogan, H A; Kubena, L F; Nisbet, D J; Ricke, S C

    2007-09-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of alfalfa-based molt diets on molting performance and bone qualities. A total of 36 Single Comb White Leghorn hens were used for the study. There were 6 treatments: pretrial control (PC), fully fed (FF), feed withdrawal (FW), 90% alfalfa:10% layer ration (A90), 80% alfalfa:20% layer ration (A80), and 70% alfalfa:30% layer ration (A70). For the PC treatment, hens were euthanized by CO(2) gas, and bones were collected before molt was initiated. At the end of the 9-d molt period, hens were euthanized, and femurs and tibias were collected to evaluate bone qualities by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, mechanical testing, and conventional ash weights. The hens fed alfalfa-based molt diets and FW stopped laying eggs within 5 d after molt started, and all hens in these groups had reduced ovary weights compared with those of the FF hens. In the FW and A90 groups, total femur volumetric bone mineral densities (vBMD) at the midshaft were significantly lower, but those of the A80 and A70 groups were not significantly different from the values for the PC and FF hens. In cortical bone density, the midshaft tibial vBMD were significantly higher for FF and A70 hens than for PC hens. The medullary bone densities at the midshaft femur or tibia of the FW, A90, A80, and A70 hens were reduced compared with those of the PC hens. Femur cancellous densities at the distal femur for the FW and A90 hens were significantly reduced compared with those of the PC and FF hens. The FW, A80, and A70 hens yielded significantly higher elastic moduli, and the A80 hens had higher ultimate stress compared with the PC hens, suggesting that the mechanical integrity of the midshaft bone was maintained even though the medullary vBMD was reduced. These results suggest that alfalfa-based molt diets exhibit molt performance similar to FW, that medullary and cancellous bones are labile bone compartments during molting, and that alfalfa-based molt diets may be beneficial to maintain the mechanical properties of bones during molt. PMID:17704367

  10. 50 CFR 665.440 - Mariana crustacean fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Mariana Archipelago Fisheries § 665.440 Mariana crustacean fisheries....

  11. 50 CFR 665.440 - Mariana crustacean fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Mariana Archipelago Fisheries § 665.440 Mariana crustacean fisheries....

  12. 50 CFR 665.440 - Mariana crustacean fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Mariana Archipelago Fisheries § 665.440 Mariana crustacean fisheries....

  13. 50 CFR 665.440 - Mariana crustacean fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Mariana Archipelago Fisheries § 665.440 Mariana crustacean fisheries....

  14. 50 CFR 665.440 - Mariana crustacean fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Mariana Archipelago Fisheries § 665.440 Mariana crustacean fisheries....

  15. ECOGRAPHV 21: 327-,135. Copenhagen 1998 Community structure of crustacean zooplankton in subarctic

    E-print Network

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    ECOGRAPHV 21: 327-,135. Copenhagen 1998 Community structure of crustacean zooplankton in subarctic of crustacean zooplankton in subarctic ponds - elTects of altitude and physical heterogeneity. Bcography 21: 327 335. Crustacean zooplankton (Cladocera. Copcpoda) distribution patterns, commutiity composition

  16. THE FRESHWATER DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS (Pa/aemon/dae, Cambar/dae)

    E-print Network

    Georgia, University of

    .. - - - o THE FRESHWATER DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS (Pa/aemon/dae, Cambar/dae) OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER;- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - #12;- - THE FRESHWATER DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS (PALAEMONIDAE, CAMBARIDAE) OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT LIST OF DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS ON THE SRP . ECOLOGICAL CONSI DERATIONS COLLECTING TECHNIQUES

  17. Population dynamics and parasitation of planktonic and epibenthic crustaceans in the Baltic Schlei fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollasch, S.; Zander, C. D.

    1995-03-01

    The planktonic and epibenthic crustacean fauna from two sites of the brackish Schlei fjord, Northern Germany, was investigated over a six-month period. Calanoid and cyclopoid copepods were more abundant in lower salinities, whereas, benthic decapods, isopods and amphipods prevailed in the site of higher salinity. Cestodan larvae were found only in spring which may be due to the timing of the respective life-cycles. Parasites of benthic crustaceans, mostly digenean metacercariae but also cestodans, acanthocephalans and nematodes, appeared from spring to late summer. Decreasing salinities caused lower intensities of the most abundant parasite, Maritrema subdolum; only the true brackish-water species among the hosts were more heavily infested than those found in higher salinities. The correlation of parasite size and host size at infestation became apparent. Therefore, Crangon crangon is an optimal host for the large Podocotyle atomon metacercariae. Coevolutive trends between some hosts and parasites are made evident.

  18. Beyond molting—roles of the steroid molting hormone in regulation of memory and sleep in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) is an active metabolite of ecdysone and plays vital roles during ontogeny of the fruit fly Drosophila, coordinating critical developmental transitions such as molting and metamorphosis. Although 20E is known to exist throughout life in both male and female flies, its functions in adult physiology and behavior remain largely elusive. Notably, findings from previous studies suggest that this hormone may be involved in adult stress responses. Consistent with this possibility, we have found that ecdysone signaling in adult flies is activated by “stressful” social interactions and plays a role in the formation of long-term courtship memory.1 In addition, we recently reported that ecdysone signaling contributes to the regulation of sleep, affecting transitions between sleep and wakefulness.2 Here we first summarize our findings on the unconventional roles of 20E in regulating memory and sleep in adult flies. We then discuss speculative ideas concerning the stress hormone-like features of 20E, as well as the possibility that ecdysone signaling contributes to remodeling of the adult nervous system, at both the functional and structural levels, through epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:21444997

  19. GROWTH RATE OF THE SAND CRAB, EMERITA ANALOGA, (HIPPIDAE) IN TWO DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS

    E-print Network

    by the "instantaneous growth rate" technique. The growth rate of a crustacean species is of con- siderable ecological in the past to measure the incremental type of growth experi- enced by crustaceans, all ofwhich have merits The "instantane- ous growth rate" method used here takes advan- tage ofcertain aspects ofthe crustacean molt cycle

  20. Structure, molting, and mineralization of the dorsal ossicle complex in the gastric mill of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Vatcher, Hayley E; Roer, Robert D; Dillaman, Richard M

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the mesocardiac and urocardiac ossicles in the gastric mill of the blue crab to describe its structure, mineralization, and dynamics throughout the molt cycle, and to assess its possible utility in age determination. Morphologically, the mineralized ossicles are similar to the calcified dorsal carapace having a lamellate structure comprised of sheets of chitin/protein fibrils. Staining with acridine orange showed the same arrangement of an epicuticle, exocuticle, and endocuticle. In much of the mesocardiac and urocardiac ossicles, the endocuticle is very reduced, with the exocuticle predominating; the reverse of the dimensions of the exoskeleton. The lamellate structure of the ossicles was confirmed with scanning electron microscopy; however, elemental mapping by energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays revealed that the ossicles are mineralized with calcium phosphate, in contrast to the calcium carbonate biomineral of the exoskeleton. The medial tooth of the urocardiac ossicle is not calcified, but the epicuticle is highly elaborated and impregnated with silica. Histological examination of the ossicles demonstrated that they are molted during ecdysis, so despite the appearance of bands in the mesocardiac ossicle, it is difficult to hypothesize how the bands could represent a record of chronological age. J. Morphol. 276:1358-1367, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26473637

  1. Light-level geolocators reveal covariation between winter plumage molt and phenology in a trans-Saharan migratory bird.

    PubMed

    Saino, Nicola; Rubolini, Diego; Ambrosini, Roberto; Romano, Maria; Scandolara, Chiara; Fairhurst, Graham D; Caprioli, Manuela; Romano, Andrea; Sicurella, Beatrice; Liechti, Felix

    2015-08-01

    Contingent individual performance can depend on the environment experienced at previous life-stages. Migratory birds are especially susceptible to such carry-over effects as they periodically travel between breeding ranges and 'wintering' areas where they may experience broadly different ecological conditions. However, the study of carry-over effects is hampered by the difficulty of tracking vagile organisms throughout their annual life-cycle. Using information from light-level geolocators on the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica), we tested if feather growth bar width (GBW), a proxy of feather growth rate which depends on individual condition, and wing isometric size and shape predict the phenology of subsequent migration. GBW did not predict duration of wintering but negatively predicted the duration of spring migration and arrival date to the breeding sites, suggesting that migration phenology is not constrained by molt, and individuals in prime condition achieve both faster molt and earlier arrival. Wing morphology did not predict migration duration, as expected if wing shape were optimized for foraging, rather than migration performance, in this aerially foraging, insectivorous bird. Thus, we showed for the first time that migration phenology in a long-distance migratory bird covaries with body condition during wintering, as reflected by the growth rate of feathers. PMID:25822115

  2. Breeding chronology, molt, and measurements of accipiter hawks in northeastern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Olson, R.A.; Fleming, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    Most northern goshawks completed laying eggs in April, while most Cooper's hawks completed their clutches in May with essentially no overlap. The sharp-shinned hawks laid in late May and June. Juvenile females represented 4% of the northern goshawk breeding population; 22% of the Cooper's hawk breeding population (highest reported for the species) and 60% of the sharp-shinned hawk breeding population, northern goshawks and Cooper's hawks in juvenal plumage generally nested later in the season, but not sharp-shinned hawks. Females of each species began molting first. Primaries were molted from the innermost outward in all species, but rectrix molt sequence was variable. Usually R1 was molted first. Primary molt of the 2 wings was usually synchronous; however, the rectrix molt was not as orderly. Arrested molt was observed in some individuals of all species; it probably has an energy-saving function. Wing chords of adult northern goshawks from Oregon were not different from Wisconsin fall migrants or birds from Alaska; however, rectrices were significantly shorter in Oregon than Wisconsin. Cooper's hawks nesting in Oregon were much smaller than those trapped in Wisconsin. Wing chords and rectrices were significantly shorter for both sexes, and, although weights were not directly comparable, Oregon Cooper's hawks also weighed much less. The limited number of sharp-shinned hawks measured precluded statistical analyses.

  3. Limnetic crustacean zooplankton of Lake Oahe, May-October 1969

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selgeby, James H.

    1974-01-01

    The limnetic crustacean zooplankton of Lake Oahe was dominated by copepods. Cyclops bicuspidatus thomasi was the dominant crustacean throughout the lake. Mesocyclops edax, Diaptomus ashlandi and Daphnia pulex were major components of the zooplankton in the deep, downstream portion of the lake while Bosmina longirostris and Daphnia retrocurva were important constituents in the river-like, upstream section of the lake.

  4. Blood chemistry of wild Brazilian Coscoroba Swans during molt.

    PubMed

    Calabuig, Cecilia Pérez; Ferrer, Miguel; Muriel, Roberto

    2010-04-01

    The Coscoroba Swan (Coscoroba coscoroba) is an unusual member of the Anatidae found in South America, from the Falkland Islands and Tierra del Fuego through Chile and Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay as far north as Mato Grosso do Sul in Brazil. The species is not threatened globally, but some local populations have declined and the status of others is unknown. The objective of this study was to quantify the plasma chemistry of a wild population of Coscoroba Swans in southern Brazil during their molting period. We captured 12 chicks, 14 juveniles, and 31 mature birds. The following blood parameters were measured: glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, uric acid, creatine-kinase, aspartate amino transferase, alanine-aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, and pancreatic amylase. Significant differences between males and females were not observed for any of the parameters, and only the levels of alkaline phosphatase differed significantly among age groups. PMID:20688656

  5. Significant fluctuations in ecdysteroid receptor gene (EcR) expression in relation to seasons of molt and reproduction in the grapsid crab, Metopograpsus messor (Brachyura: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Shyamal, Sharmishtha; Anilkumar, G; Bhaskaran, R; Doss, G P; Durica, D S

    2015-01-15

    Metopograpsus messor, a brachyuran crab inhabiting the estuaries of North Kerala (India), is a prolific breeder releasing approximately 14-16 broods a year. The present paper reports the sequence information on the DNA binding domain (C domain, DBD), linker (D domain) and ligand binding domain (E domain, LBD) of M. messor ecdysteroid receptor (MmEcR) gene, the first grapsid brachyuran crab EcR examined. We have also measured MmEcR transcript levels in the ovary and the hepatopancreas throughout the annual cycle, with special reference to seasons of molt and reproduction. MmEcR expression in both the tissues is found to be at its peak (P<0.05) in late premolt crabs (January/May, molt/reproduction season); the expression levels are lowest (P<0.05) during June/July, when the females would neither molt nor reproduce (season for molt/reproduction repose). Intermediate levels of expression were found during the breeding season (August/December). Interestingly, this pattern of gene expression is in concordance with the fluctuating ecdysteroid levels of the hemolymph and Y organ secretory activity. The significant levels of fluctuation in the ovarian expression of MmEcR strongly suggest the ovary as a potential target for ecdysteroid action. A season-wise comparison of the gene expression reveals that ovarian MmEcR transcript levels are higher in breeding crabs (August/December) than the non-breeding animals (June/July), implicating a possible ecdysteroid role in reproduction in M. messor. PMID:25448252

  6. Crustacean parasites Of all the metazoan groups discussed in this book, the crustaceans are the most diverse and

    E-print Network

    Chapter 4 Crustacean parasites Of all the metazoan groups discussed in this book, the crustaceans of and survival on the hosts. Many copepods have great eco- nomic importance as agents of disease in wild of the Thoracica are parasitic (on dogfish and polychaetes), whereas the rhizocephalans parasitise other

  7. Allometry of the Duration of Flight Feather Molt in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Rohwer, Sievert; Ricklefs, Robert E.; Rohwer, Vanya G.; Copple, Michelle M.

    2009-01-01

    We used allometric scaling to explain why the regular replacement of the primary flight feathers requires disproportionately more time for large birds. Primary growth rate scales to mass (M) as M0.171, whereas the summed length of the primaries scales almost twice as fast (M0.316). The ratio of length (mm) to rate (mm/day), which would be the time needed to replace all the primaries one by one, increases as the 0.14 power of mass (M0.316/M0.171?=?M0.145), illustrating why the time required to replace the primaries is so important to life history evolution in large birds. Smaller birds generally replace all their flight feathers annually, but larger birds that fly while renewing their primaries often extend the primary molt over two or more years. Most flying birds exhibit one of three fundamentally different modes of primary replacement, and the size distributions of birds associated with these replacement modes suggest that birds that replace their primaries in a single wave of molt cannot approach the size of the largest flying birds without first transitioning to a more complex mode of primary replacement. Finally, we propose two models that could account for the 1/6 power allometry between feather growth rate and body mass, both based on a length-to-surface relationship that transforms the linear, cylindrical growing region responsible for producing feather tissue into an essentially two-dimensional structure. These allometric relationships offer a general explanation for flight feather replacement requiring disproportionately more time for large birds. PMID:19529759

  8. Genomic identification of a putative circadian system in the cladoceran crustacean Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Tilden, Andrea R; McCoole, Matthew D; Harmon, Sarah M; Baer, Kevin N; Christie, Andrew E

    2011-09-01

    Essentially nothing is known about the molecular underpinnings of crustacean circadian clocks. The genome of Daphnia pulex, the only crustacean genome available for public use, provides a unique resource for identifying putative circadian proteins in this species. Here, the Daphnia genome was mined for putative circadian protein genes using Drosophila melanogaster queries. The sequences of core clock (e.g. CLOCK, CYCLE, PERIOD, TIMELESS and CRYPTOCHROME 2), clock input (CRYPTOCHROME 1) and clock output (PIGMENT DISPERSING HORMONE RECEPTOR) proteins were deduced. Structural analyses and alignment of the Daphnia proteins with their Drosophila counterparts revealed extensive sequence conservation, particularly in functional domains. Comparisons of the Daphnia proteins with other sequences showed that they are, in most cases, more similar to homologs from other species, including vertebrates, than they are to those of Drosophila. The presence of both CRYPTOCHROME 1 and 2 in Daphnia suggests the organization of its clock may be more similar to that of the butterfly Danaus plexippus than to that of Drosophila (which possesses CRYPTOCHROME 1 but not CRYPTOCHROME 2). These data represent the first description of a putative circadian system from any crustacean, and provide a foundation for future molecular, anatomical and physiological investigations of circadian signaling in Daphnia. PMID:21798832

  9. Migration and molt patterns of red bats, Lasiurus borealis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae), in Illinois

    E-print Network

    Timm, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Red bats, Lasiurus borealis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae), are widespread in North America, but many aspects of their biology are poorly known. In an attempt to elucidate patterns of migration and molt in red bats, data were collected over...

  10. Chemoreception in the marine environment Many marine crustaceans rely heavily on olfaction to find

    E-print Network

    Koehl, Mimi

    Chemoreception in the marine environment Many marine crustaceans rely heavily on olfaction to find-Faust, 1989). Crustaceans gather chemical information from distant odor sources by means of specialized access in marine crustaceans. Stomatopods are aggressive, shrimp-like crustaceans that form burrows

  11. The crustaceans and pycnogonids of the Mariana Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Paulay, Gustav; Kropp, Roy K. ); Ng, Peter K.; Eldredge, Lucius G.

    2003-09-01

    The crustacean and pycnogonid fauna of the Mariana Islands is reviewed, and 829 crustacean and 15 pycnogonid species are documented from the archipelago based on literature records and new collections, including 272 new records. Voucher specimens are listed for 605 and photographic records for 356 species. The bulk of the fauna is marine, including 12 terrestrial and 11 freshwater decapods with marine larvae. Five cladocerans comprise the known freshwater fauna, and 25 peracarids and one copepod are currently documented on land. Coverage reflects a taxonomically uneven effort, and is strongly biased toward macrocrustaceans, with decapods accounting for 80%, and crabs for 50% of the recorded crustacean diversity.

  12. Abundance and distribution of the common eider in eastern North America during the molting season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savard, Jean-Pierre L.; Allen, B.; McAuley, D.; Milton, G.R.; Gililand, S.

    2005-01-01

    Like most other sea ducks, male common eiders (Somateria mollissima) concentrate in large groups to molt following the breeding season. Although Maine conducted surveys in the 1980s, little was known of eider molting sites in Atlantic Canada until recently, when surveys and research conducted in Quebec, Newfoundland, Labrador, Nova Scotia and Maine revealed a number of important molting sites. Sites vary in importance from a few hundred males to tens of thousands. Important sites include the western and southern coastal areas of Anticosti island (40,000 birds), Baie des Milles Vaches (9,000) in Quebec, southwestern Nova Scotia (40,000), Petit Manan Island archipelago (7,000), and Metinic Island archipelago (10,000) in Maine. Molting eider surveys conducted in Maine during the early 1980s and in the St. Lawrence in 2003-2004 revealed large flock sizes, commonly over 2,000 birds, in consistent locations annually. An estimated 40,000 males molt in Nova Scotia and 28,400 in Maine (1981 data). Surveys indicate that important sites are used consistently between years and that local movements occur. Recoveries from banded birds suggest that eiders breeding on the lower North Shore of the St. Lawrence, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and even Newfoundland appear to concentrate at the Petit Manan site in Maine. They also suggest inter annual movements between the Nova Scotia and Petit Manan sites. Greater understanding of the relationships between breeding, wintering, and molting sites will facilitate management of this heavily exploited sea duck.

  13. EFFECTS OF CHLORINATED SEAWATER ON DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS AND 'MULINIA' LARVAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eggs and larvae of decapod crustaceans and embryos of Mulinia lateralis were exposed to chlorinated seawater for varying periods in continuous flow systems. Mortality, developmental rate, and general behavior were recorded. Panopeus herbstii zoeae were more sensitive to chlorine-...

  14. Stages of Embryonic Development in the Amphipod Crustacean, Parhyale hawaiensis

    E-print Network

    Browne, William E.

    ARTICLE Stages of Embryonic Development in the Amphipod Crustacean, Parhyale hawaiensis William E, Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, Committee on Developmental Biology, Chicago, Illinois 2 University of California ­ Berkeley, Departments of Molecular Cell Biology, Integrative Biology, Center

  15. Insect molting hormone and sterol biosynthesis in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenok, R.J.; Adler, J.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Insect molting hormones, which are produced by plants and are effective molecules in the control of insect crop pests, are biosynthesized in developing spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea L.). The major sterols biosynthesized by spinach are avenasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholesta-7,24(28)-dien-3{beta}-ol), spinasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholesta-7,22-dien-3{beta}-ol), and 22-dihydrospinasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholest-7-en-3{beta}-ol). The major ecdysteroids biosynthesized are ecdysterone (2{beta},3{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-hexahydroxy-5{beta}-cholest-7-en-6-one) and polypodine B (2{beta},3{beta},5{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-heptahycroxycholest-7-en-6-one) and polypodine B (2{beta},3{beta},5{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-heptahydroxycholest-7-en-6-one). When labeled 2-{sup 14}C-mevalonic acid was incorporated into young leaves isolated squalene, sterols and ecdysteroids contained the label. During a short (16 h) incorporation period in intact young leaves of 100 day old plants, the avenasterol has the highest specific activity in counts per minute per {mu}g of sterol followed by 22-dihydrospinasterol which is more highly labeled than spinasterol. The ecdysteroids synthesized, on an entire plant basis, account for 20% of the total steroid (sterol and ecdysteroid) isolated from the plant.

  16. Haste Makes Waste: Accelerated Molt Adversely Affects the Expression of Melanin-Based and Depigmented Plumage Ornaments in House Sparrows

    PubMed Central

    Vágási, Csongor I.; Pap, Péter L.; Barta, Zoltán

    2010-01-01

    Background Many animals display colorful signals in their integument which convey information about the quality of their bearer. Theoretically, these ornaments incur differential production and/or maintenance costs that enforce their honesty. However, the proximate mechanisms of production costs are poorly understood and contentious in cases of non-carotenoid-based plumage ornaments like the melanin-based badge and depigmented white wing-bar in house sparrows Passer domesticus. Costly life-history events are adaptively separated in time, thus, when reproduction is extended, the time available for molt is curtailed and, in turn, molt rate is accelerated. Methodology/Principal Findings We experimentally accelerated the molt rate by shortening the photoperiod in order to test whether this environmental constraint is mirrored in the expression of plumage ornaments. Sparrows which had undergone an accelerated molt developed smaller badges and less bright wing-bars compared to conspecifics that molted at a natural rate being held at natural-like photoperiod. There was no difference in the brightness of the badge or the size of the wing-bar. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that the time available for molt and thus the rate at which molt occurs may constrain the expression of melanin-based and depigmented plumage advertisements. This mechanism may lead to the evolution of honest signaling if the onset of molt is condition-dependent through the timing of and/or trade-off between breeding and molt. PMID:21151981

  17. Body condition, food habits, and molt status of late-wintering ruddy ducks in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hohman, W.L.; Ankney, C.D.; Roster, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    We studied body condition, food habits, and molt status of late-wintering ruddy ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) using drainwater evaporation ponds in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California. Levels of body fat and protein were similar by sex but varied by age (adults greater than immatures). Masses of breast and leg muscle protein were greatest in adult males and lowest in immature males, but similar in adult and immature females. Fat and protein levels in late-wintering ruddy ducks were independent of their body size. We detected no differences among sex-age classes in the proportion of animal foods consumed. Aquatic invertebrates composed 85% of the diet; midge larvae (Diptera: Chironomidae) and brine flies (Diptera: Ephydridae) were the principal taxa consumed. Molt score by feather region and overall molt score did not vary by sex or age. Light to moderate molt (25 to 50% molting feathers) was recorded in all feather regions. High levels of body fat and protein were attributed to premigratory hyperphagia and consumption of foods with a high protein:energy ratio.

  18. Haemolymph protein composition and copper levels in decapod crustaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depledge, M. H.; Bjerregaard, P.

    1989-06-01

    Variations in haemolymph protein composition and concentration, in copper content and copper distribution in the tissue of decapod crustaceans are reviewed. Haemocyanin is the major haemolymph constituent (> 60%); the remaining proteins (in order of concentration) include coagulogen, apohaemocyanin, hormones and antisomes. Moulting, nutritional state, infection, hypoxia and salinity fluctuations are the major factors affecting the relative proportions and total quantities of the haemolymph proteins. With regard to haemocyanin, the changes in concentration during the moult cycle are principally associated with changes in haemolymph volume, rather than with changes in total haemocyanin content due to synthesis or catabolism. The role of the midgut gland in regulating haemolymph copper and haemocyanin concentration has been re-evaluated. More than 50% of the whole body copper load is stored in the haemolymph. In contrast, less than 3% of the copper load resides in the midgut gland. The latter has little potential for regulating haemolymph copper levels, at least in the short term (hours to a few days), though it may be involved in regulating haemocyanin levels over longer periods (weeks to months). The total copper content of the haemolymph remains within a narrow range, except during starvation when levels may decrease. Consequently, variations in the copper content of soft tissues, which constitute only 20% of decapod dry weight, do not significanlty alter whole body copper concentrations. Evidence that copper released following haemocyanin catabolism becomes bound to metallothionein for later use in the resynthesis of haemocyanin is reviewed and found to be inconclusive. The amount of copper that can be stored in this way is trivial compared with the amount of copper required to permit significant changes in haemolymph haemocyanin concentration. Average tissue copper requirements, calculated during the present study, are approx. 4 times higher than previous theoretical estimates.

  19. Calcium movements in single crustacean muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, C. C.; Ellory, J. C.; Hainaut, K.

    1974-01-01

    1. Internal microinjection of the Ca-sensitive photoprotein aequorin or the isotope 45Ca have been used to assess Ca movements in single muscle fibres from the barnacle Balanus nubilus and the crab Maia squinado. 2. Progressive isosomotic replacement of external Na by Li, choline, sucrose or Tris was associated with a rapid increase in the level of light emission from internally injected aequorin. This response was dependent upon the presence of external Ca. The light output was maximal for Na concentrations < 50 mM in the replaced salines, while Na concentrations > 350 mM produced no apparent increase in the resting light emission. 3. If the Ca concentration in the external saline was altered, no effect was observed in Na replaced salines when the Ca concentration was < 1 mM, but maximal effects were observed at concentrations of Ca of ca. 100 mM. 4. The increased light emission from aequorin in Na-replaced salines was substantially inhibited by 1 mM-La3+ applied externally, but not by N-ethyl maleimide (NEM), propanolol or D-600. 5. Following microinjection of 45Ca and 2 hr equilibration, the residual efflux of Ca was shown to be sensitive to the removal of external Ca and Na, the extent of each component being variable. 6. The Na-sensitive Ca efflux was partially inhibited by external La3+ (1 mM), but not by high concentrations of Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+ or Co2+. It was stimulated by NEM and ethacrynic acid, which was considered to be due to an indirect effect upon the sarcoplasmic reticulum. 7. It is concluded that Ca movements in these single crustacean muscle fibres involve Na gradients and a Ca: Ca exchange and from the relative insensitivity of Ca movements to various inhibitors, in contrast to the Mg system, it seems that there may be two independent modes for divalent cation transport in this preparation. PMID:4436825

  20. MOTIVATION OF HENS TO OBTAIN FEED DURING A MOLT INDUCED BY EITHER FEED WITHDRAWAL, WHEAT MIDDLINGS OR MELENGESTROL ACETATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditionally, molting had been done by withdrawing feed, which leads to weight loss and increased mortality. Public criticism of feed withdrawal, based on the perception that it inhumanely increases hunger, has led the industry to ban the practice. Thus far, alternatives result in poor post-molt p...

  1. Multiple parasitic crustacean infestation on belonid fish Strongylura strongylura

    PubMed Central

    Aneesh, Panakkool-Thamban; Sudha, Kappalli; Helna, Ameri Kottarathil; Anilkumar, Gopinathan; Trilles, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Simultaneous multiple infestation of parasitic crustacean species involving a cymothoid isopod, Cymothoa frontalis Milne Edward, 1840 and four species of copepods such as Lernanthropus tylosuri Richiardi, 1880, Caligodes lacinatus Kroyer, 1863, Bomolochus bellones Burmeister, 1833 and Dermoergasilus coleus Cressey & Collette, 1970 was frequently noticed on spot-tail needlefish, Strongylura strongylura (Belonidae) captured from the Malabar coast (Kerala, India) during the period from April 2011 to March 2012. All the 43 fishes (Strongylura strongylura) collected, were under the hyper-infection with parasitic crustaceans; a total of 388 parasitic crustaceans including 57 Cymothoa frontalis, 252 Lernanthropus tylosuri, 31 Caligodes lacinatus, 24 Bomolochus bellones and 32 Dermoergasilus coleus were recovered from the host fish. 4 members (9.30%) of host fish were under quadruple parasitism, in two different combinations. Seventeen (39.53%) host fishes showed triple parasitism and 20 (46.51%) members exhibited double parasitism, with four and five parasitic combinations respectively. Remaining two (4.65%) fishes were parasitized only by the copepod, Lernanthropus tylosuri. The infestations by all recovered parasitic crustaceans were highly site specific. The damage caused by the parasitic crustaceans was also discussed. PMID:25561846

  2. Crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone in the nervous system of the primitive crustacean species Daphnia magna and Artemia salina (Crustacea: Branchiopoda).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Keller, R; Dircksen, H

    1997-02-01

    Crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone-immunoreactive neuronal systems are detected in the central and peripheral nervous systems of two entomostracan crustaceans, Daphnia magna and Artemia salina, by immunocytochemistry using specific antisera against crustacean hyperglycaemic hormones of the decapod crustaceans Orconectes limosus and Carcinus maenas. In D. magna, four small putative interneurones are detected in the brain. In the thorax, ten bipolar peripheral neurones are stained by both antisera. They are obviously segmental homologues with centrally projecting axons that form interdigitating varicose fibres and terminals in putative neurohaemal areas next to the surface of the anterior part of the thoracic ganglia. Similar immunopositive neurones occur both in the central and peripheral nervous systems of A. salina. A total of five groups of neurones occur in the protocerebrum, the deutocerebrum and the mandibular ganglion. Some of the protocerebral neurones are bipolar and project to the dorsal frontal organ. A single pair of peripheral multipolar neurones in the maxillary segment projects centrally into the ventral nerve cord and innervates unidentified somatic muscles and tissues in the maxillary and the first appendage segments. None of the brain neurones in both species show similarities to decapod X-organ sinus gland neurosecretory neurones. Chromatography of brain extracts of D. magna combined with immunodot blotting revealed two strongly immunoreactive fractions at retention times close to that of the crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone of crayfish. Moreover, preabsorption controls suggest that the cross-reacting peptides of D. magna and A. salina are structurally closely related to those of decapods. PMID:9023085

  3. Haste Makes Waste but Condition Matters: Molt Rate–Feather Quality Trade-Off in a Sedentary Songbird

    PubMed Central

    Vágási, Csongor I.; Pap, Péter L.; Vincze, Orsolya; Benk?, Zoltán; Marton, Attila; Barta, Zoltán

    2012-01-01

    Background The trade-off between current and residual reproductive values is central to life history theory, although the possible mechanisms underlying this trade-off are largely unknown. The ‘molt constraint’ hypothesis suggests that molt and plumage functionality are compromised by the preceding breeding event, yet this candidate mechanism remains insufficiently explored. Methodology/Principal Findings The seasonal change in photoperiod was manipulated to accelerate the molt rate. This treatment simulates the case of naturally late-breeding birds. House sparrows Passer domesticus experiencing accelerated molt developed shorter flight feathers with more fault bars and body feathers with supposedly lower insulation capacity (i.e. shorter, smaller, with a higher barbule density and fewer plumulaceous barbs). However, the wing, tail and primary feather lengths were shorter in fast-molting birds if they had an inferior body condition, which has been largely overlooked in previous studies. The rachis width of flight feathers was not affected by the treatment, but it was still condition-dependent. Conclusions/Significance This study shows that sedentary birds might face evolutionary costs because of the molt rate–feather quality conflict. This is the first study to experimentally demonstrate that (1) molt rate affects several aspects of body feathers as well as flight feathers and (2) the costly effects of rapid molt are condition-specific. We conclude that molt rate and its association with feather quality might be a major mediator of life history trade-offs. Our findings also suggest a novel advantage of early breeding, i.e. the facilitation of slower molt and the condition-dependent regulation of feather growth. PMID:22808221

  4. Sensitivity of Crustaceans to Substrate-Borne Vibration.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Louise; Breithaupt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the responsiveness of crustaceans to vibrations, especially in the context of marine developments where techniques such as pile driving create strong vibrations that are readily transmitted through the seabed. Experiments were undertaken under controlled conditions to investigate the sensitivity of unconditioned crustaceans to substrate-borne vibration. The subjects were exposed to a range of frequencies and amplitudes using the staircase method of presentation to determine the thresholds of response. Behavior varied according to the strength of the stimuli and included bursts of movement and rapid bouts of movement. PMID:26611051

  5. Molecular phylogenetic evidence for the reorganization of the Hyperiid amphipods, a diverse group of pelagic crustaceans

    E-print Network

    Browne, William E.

    of pelagic crustaceans Carla Hurt a , Steven H.D. Haddock b , William E. Browne a, a University of Miami, Cox s t r a c t Within the crustaceans, the Amphipoda rank as one of the most speciose extant orders rights reserved. 1. Introduction The Hyperiidea are an exclusively pelagic group of amphipod crustaceans

  6. NEW MARINE DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS FROM WATERS INFLUENCED BY HYDROmERMAL DISCHARGE, BRINE, AND HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE

    E-print Network

    NEW MARINE DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS FROM WATERS INFLUENCED BY HYDROmERMAL DISCHARGE, BRINE, AND HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE AUSTIN B. WILLIAMS} ABSTRACT Five species of decapod crustaceans new to science and collections could be ac- complished. The species of decapod crustaceans reported here come from hydrothermal

  7. THE DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS OF BEAUFORT, N. C.~ AND THE SURROUNDING REGION

    E-print Network

    THE DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS OF BEAUFORT, N. C.~ AND THE SURROUNDING REGION By W. P. Hay and C. A. Shore for pagination #12;THE DECAPOD CRUSTACEANS OF BEAUFORT, N. C., AND THE SURROUNDING REGION. By W. P.RAY and C. A- INTRODUCTION. The following report on the decapod crustaceans of the region surrounding Beaufort, N. C

  8. SEASONAL COMPOSITION AND ABUNDANCE OF DECAPOD AND STOMATOPOD CRUSTACEANS FROM COASTAL HABITATS,

    E-print Network

    SEASONAL COMPOSITION AND ABUNDANCE OF DECAPOD AND STOMATOPOD CRUSTACEANS FROM COASTAL HABITATS crustaceans WerE' collected by trawl during seasonal cruises from Cape Fear, North Carolina to Cape Canaveral. Florida at depths from 4 to 20 m. A total of 60 species of decapod and 3 species of stomatopod crustaceans

  9. HOST PARTITIONING BY PARASITES IN AN INTERTIDAL CRUSTACEAN COMMUNITY Anson V. Koehler and Robert Poulin

    E-print Network

    Poulin, Robert

    HOST PARTITIONING BY PARASITES IN AN INTERTIDAL CRUSTACEAN COMMUNITY Anson V. Koehler and Robert, immunology, and behavior. We looked at parasite transmission in the intertidal crustacean community of Lower the major crustacean species, (2) identifying hosts that play the most important transmission role for each

  10. BAC library for the amphipod crustacean, Parhyale hawaiensis Ronald J. Parchem a,1

    E-print Network

    Patel, Nipam H.

    BAC library for the amphipod crustacean, Parhyale hawaiensis Ronald J. Parchem a,1 , Francis Poulin Crustacean Arthropod Amphipod BAC library Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are capable of propagating generated a BAC library for the marine amphipod crustacean, Parhyale hawaiensis. The library was generated

  11. Widespread Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods and other crustaceans 123 Widespread Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods

    E-print Network

    Richard, Cordaux,

    Widespread Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods and other crustaceans 123 Widespread Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods and other crustaceans Richard Cordaux1 , Samuel Pichon1,3 , Houda Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods and other crustaceans. In: Strus J, Taiti S, Sfenthourakis S (Eds

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Analysis of snail genes in the crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis

    E-print Network

    Patel, Nipam H.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Analysis of snail genes in the crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis: insight into snail crustacean Daphnia magna. These data imply that within arthropoda, snail acquired its role in gastrulation and mesoderm forma- tion in the insect lineage. However, crustaceans are a diverse group with several major

  13. Reference: Biol. Bull., 148: 259-273. (April 1975) COCKROACH MOLTING. I. TEMPORAL ORGANIZATION OF

    E-print Network

    Kunkel, Joseph G.

    Reference: Biol. Bull., 148: 259-273. (April 1975) 259 COCKROACH MOLTING. I. TEMPORAL ORGANIZATION an approach to the study of cockroach development using feeding (Kunkel, 1966) and regeneration (O'Farrell and Stock, 1953) as extrinsically controllable cues for regulating the development of cockroach cultures

  14. Demecology in the Cambrian: synchronized molting in arthropods from the Burgess Shale

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Burgess Shale is well known for its preservation of a diverse soft-bodied biota dating from the Cambrian period (Series 3, Stage 5). While previous paleoecological studies have focused on particular species (autecology) or entire paleocommunities (synecology), studies on the ecology of populations (demecology) of Burgess Shale organisms have remained mainly anecdotal. Results Here, we present evidence for mass molting events in two unrelated arthropods from the Burgess Shale Walcott Quarry, Canadaspis perfecta and a megacheiran referred to as Alalcomenaeus sp. Conclusions These findings suggest that the triggers for such supposed synchronized molting appeared early on during the Cambrian radiation, and synchronized molting in the Cambrian may have had similar functions in the past as it does today. In addition, the finding of numerous juvenile Alalcomenaeus sp. molts associated with the putative alga Dictyophycus suggests a possible nursery habitat. In this nursery habitat a population of this animal might have found a more protected environment in which to spend critical developmental phases, as do many modern species today. PMID:23721223

  15. Food Color Preferences of Molting House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) in Relation to Sex and Plumage Coloration

    E-print Network

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    Food Color Preferences of Molting House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) in Relation to Sex has focused on the food color preferences of birds because they are highly visual animals and play. Recently it has been suggested that birds may use food color as an indicator of antioxidant content

  16. Influence of exogenous melatonin administration on Salmonella enteritidis colonization in molted layers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of exogenous melatonin on Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infection in experimentally-challenged laying hens subjected to a forced molt. Single Comb White Leghorn hens (W-36) over 50-wk-of-age were randomly placed in one of two rooms, allowed to acclima...

  17. Dietary mercury exposure causes decreased escape takeoff flight performance and increased molt rate in European starlings

    E-print Network

    Swaddle, John

    Dietary mercury exposure causes decreased escape takeoff flight performance and increased molt rate 2014 Ó Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014 Abstract Mercury is a widespread and persistent that forage from primarily terrestrial sources have shown evidence of bioaccumula- tion of mercury, but little

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF THE MOLTING HORMONE OF THE SWEEET POTATO (BEMISIA TABACI) AND GREENHOUSE (TRIALEURODES VAPORARIORUM) WHITEFLY.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to identify the whitefly molting hormone, whole body extracts of mature 4th instar and newly formed pharate adult Bemisia tabaci (Strain B) and Trialeurodes vaporariorum were prepared and subjected to reverse phase HPLC. Ecdysteroid content of fractions was determined by enzymeimmunoassay....

  19. Use of plant protein sources in crustacean diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    World production of crustaceans has experienced a steady expansion that is expected to continue as world population increases and demand for quality sea food continues to rise. Paralleling the growth of industry has been an expansion in feed production, which has been primarily dominated by marine s...

  20. PHOTOINDUCED TOXICITY OF FLUORANTHENE TO SEVEN MARINE BENTHIC CRUSTACEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven marine benthic crustaceans were exposed in 4 d water-only toxicity tests to five concentrations of fluoranthene.After exposures, mortality (LC50) and the ability to bury in clean sediment (EC50) were determined. Survivors were then exposed to UV radiation for 1 h. The diffe...

  1. Crustacean hemolymph microbiota: Endemic, tightly controlled, and utilization expectable.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Wei; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2015-12-01

    Increasing number of evidence suggests that the hemolymph of numerous apparently healthy invertebrates is unsterile. Investigation of hemolymph microbiota properties and the homeostasis between host and bacteria is helpful to reveal bacteria pathogenesis, host immunity, and possible utilization in disease control. Crustaceans represent a large family of aquatic animals. Therefore, crustacean fishery is of important economic value worldwide. Research related to crustacean hemolymph microbiota has been performed over the years. In the present study, we conclude currently available information and present a comprehensive analysis regarding homeostasis between host and bacteria. In general, the presence of microbiota in crustacean hemolymph is an endemic event and can be influenced by internal and external factors. Opportunistic bacteria may have generated some changes or mutations under hemolymph stress. Meanwhile, hosts suppress hemolymph microbiota proliferation with the help of some critical antimicrobial peptides and lectins. The hemolymph microbiota may be beneficial for hosts as resistance against external damages. In addition, the hemolymph microbiota may be utilized in aquaculture. PMID:26153452

  2. Hydrodynamics of Sniffing by Crustaceans Mimi A.R. Koehl

    E-print Network

    Koehl, Mimi

    is the capture of odor molecules from the water around an organism. Olfactory antennules of crustaceans are used to study the physical process of odor capture because they are external organs protruding into the water olfactory organs interact with the water or air around them. The olfactory antennules of M.A.R. Koehl

  3. High fidelity does not preclude colonization: range expansion of molting Black Brant on the Arctic coast of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, Paul L.; Meixell, Brandt W.; Mallek, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    High rates of site fidelity have been assumed to infer static distributions of molting geese in some cases. To test this assumption, we examined movements of individually marked birds to understand the underlying mechanisms of range expansion of molting Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) on the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of Alaska. The Teshekpuk Lake Special Area (TLSA) on the ACP was created to protect the primary molting area of Brant. When established in 1977, the TLSA was thought to include most, if not all, wetlands used by molting Brant on the ACP. From 2010 to 2013, we surveyed areas outside the TLSA and counted an average of 9800 Brant per year, representing 29–37% of all molting Brant counted on the ACP. We captured and banded molting Brant in 2011 and 2012 both within the TLSA and outside the TLSA at the Piasuk River Delta and Cape Simpson to assess movements of birds among areas across years. Estimates of movement rates out of the TLSA exceeded those into the TLSA, demonstrating overall directional dispersal. We found differences in sex and age ratios and proportions of adult females with brood patches, but no differences in mass dynamics for birds captured within and outside the TLSA. Overall fidelity rates to specific lakes (0.81, range = 0.49–0.92) were unchanged from comparable estimates obtained in the early 1990s. We conclude that Brant are dispersing from the TLSA into new molting areas while simultaneously redistributing within the TLSA, likely as a consequence of changes in relative habitat quality. Shifts in distribution resulted from colonization of new areas by young birds as well as low levels of directional dispersal of birds that previously molted in the TLSA. Based on combined counts, the overall number of molting Brant across the ACP has increased substantially.

  4. Molt-inhibiting hormone stimulates vitellogenesis at advanced ovarian developmental stages in the female blue crab, Callinectes sapidus 2: novel specific binding sites in hepatopancreas and cAMP as a second messenger

    PubMed Central

    Zmora, Nilli; Sagi, Amir; Zohar, Yonathan; Chung, J Sook

    2009-01-01

    The finding that molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) regulates vitellogenesis in the hepatopancreas of mature Callinectes sapidus females, raised the need for the characterization of its mode of action. Using classical radioligand binding assays, we located specific, saturable, and non-cooperative binding sites for MIH in the Y-organs of juveniles (J-YO) and in the hepatopancreas of vitellogenic adult females. MIH binding to the hepatopancreas membranes had an affinity 77 times lower than that of juvenile YO membranes (KD values: 3.22 × 10-8 and 4.19 × 10-10 M/mg protein, respectively). The number of maximum binding sites (BMAX) was approximately two times higher in the hepatopancreas than in the YO (BMAX values: 9.24 × 10-9 and 4.8 × 10-9 M/mg protein, respectively). Furthermore, MIH binding site number in the hepatopancreas was dependent on ovarian stage and was twice as high at stage 3 than at stages 2 and 1. SDS-PAGE separation of [125I] MIH or [125I] crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) crosslinked to the specific binding sites in the membranes of the J-YO and hepatopancreas suggests a molecular weight of ~51 kDa for a MIH receptor in both tissues and a molecular weight of ~61 kDa for a CHH receptor in the hepatopancreas. The use of an in vitro incubation of hepatopancreas fragments suggests that MIH probably utilizes cAMP as a second messenger in this tissue, as cAMP levels increased in response to MIH. Additionally, 8-Bromo-cAMP mimicked the effects of MIH on vitellogenin (VtG) mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear (hn) VtG RNA levels. The results imply that the functions of MIH in the regulation of molt and vitellogenesis are mediated through tissue specific receptors with different kinetics and signal transduction. MIH ability to regulate vitellogenesis is associated with the appearance of MIH specific membrane binding sites in the hepatopancreas upon pubertal/final molt. PMID:19583849

  5. Phylogenetic position of the pentastomida and [pan]crustacean relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrov, Dennis V.; Brown, Wesley M.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-31

    Pentastomids are a small group of vermiform animals with unique morphology and parasitic lifestyle. They are generally recognized as being related to the Arthropoda, however the nature of this relationship is controversial. We have determined the complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the pentastomid Armillifer armillatus and complete, or nearly complete, mtDNA sequences from representatives of four previously unsampled groups of Crustacea: Remipedia (Speleonectes tulumensis), Cephalocarida (Hutchinsoniella macracantha), Cirripedia (Pollicipes polymerus), and Branchiura (Argulus americanus). Analyses of the mtDNA gene arrangements and sequences determined in this study indicate unambiguously that pentastomids are a group of modified crustaceans likely related to branchiurans. In addition, gene arrangement comparisons strongly support an unforeseen assemblage of pentastomids with maxillopod and cephalocarid crustaceans, to the exclusion of remipedes, branchiopods, malacos tracans and insects.

  6. Immunohistochemical localization and morphometry of somatotrophs and lactotrophs in protein, probiotic and symbiotic supplemented molted layers

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, H.; Rahman, Z.U.; Javed, I.; Muhammad, F.

    2012-01-01

    Two hundred Single Comb White Leg-Horn spent hens at the age of 70 weeks were purchased from a commercial layer farm. The birds were shifted to the Poultry Research Station, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan. High dietary zinc (3 g/kg feed/day) was used to induce molting in all the birds after one week of acclimatization. Thereafter, birds were divided in groups of 50 birds each, with the following treatments: G1 [control; crude protein (CP)16%, no other supplement], G2 (CP18%, no other supplement), G3 (CP16%, Symbiotic, 85 mg/L drinking water) and G4 (CP16%, Probiotic, 85 mg/L in drinking water). Fifteen birds were slaughtered at 5% of peak of production for each group to collect their pituitary glands. Better egg production was seen in all the supplemented groups as compared to the control. Especially an earlier post molt production recovery and delayed decline was seen in G2 as compared to all other groups. The immunohistochemistry of the pituitary gland reveals the decrease (P?0.01) in the cell and nucleus size as well as area of somatotrophs in G2 and G4 as compared to G1. The cell and nucleus size as well as area of lactotrophs decreased (P?0.01) in G2, G3 and G4 as compared to G1. The better and earlier post molt production in G2 highlights the potential role of protein supplementation in connection with the decreased lactotroph size and area in molted birds. PMID:23027344

  7. Mitochondrial genomes suggest that hexapods and crustaceans are mutually paraphyletic.

    PubMed

    Cook, Charles E; Yue, Qiaoyun; Akam, Michael

    2005-06-22

    For over a century the relationships between the four major groups of the phylum Arthropoda (Chelicerata, Crustacea, Hexapoda and Myriapoda) have been debated. Recent molecular evidence has confirmed a close relationship between the Crustacea and the Hexapoda, and has included the suggestion of a paraphyletic Hexapoda. To test this hypothesis we have sequenced the complete or near-complete mitochondrial genomes of three crustaceans (Parhyale hawaiensis, Squilla mantis and Triops longicaudatus), two collembolans (Onychiurus orientalis and Podura aquatica) and the insect Thermobia domestica. We observed rearrangement of transfer RNA genes only in O. orientalis, P. aquatica and P. hawaiensis. Of these, only the rearrangement in O. orientalis, an apparent autapomorphy for the collembolan family Onychiuridae, was phylogenetically informative.We aligned the nuclear and amino acid sequences from the mitochondrial protein-encoding genes of these taxa with their homologues from other arthropod taxa for phylogenetic analysis. Our dataset contains many more Crustacea than previous molecular phylogenetic analyses of the arthropods. Neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian posterior probabilities all suggest that crustaceans and hexapods are mutually paraphyletic. A crustacean clade of Malacostraca and Branchiopoda emerges as sister to the Insecta sensu stricto and the Collembola group with the maxillopod crustaceans. Some, but not all, analyses strongly support this mutual paraphyly but statistical tests do not reject the null hypotheses of a monophyletic Hexapoda or a monophyletic Crustacea. The dual monophyly of the Hexapoda and Crustacea has rarely been questioned in recent years but the idea of both groups' paraphyly dates back to the nineteenth century. We suggest that the mutual paraphyly of both groups should seriously be considered. PMID:16024395

  8. The mercury levels in crustaceans and cephalopods from Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nurul Izzah; Noh, Mohd Fairulnizal Mohd; Mahiyuddin, Wan Rozita Wan; Jaafar, Hamdan; Ishak, Ismail; Azmi, Wan Nurul Farah Wan; Veloo, Yuvaneswary; Mokhtar, Fazlin Anis

    2015-09-01

    This study is to determine total mercury in edible tissues of eight species of cephalopods and 12 species of crustaceans purchased from 11 identified major fish landing ports and wet markets throughout Peninsular Malaysia. The concentration of mercury was measured by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) technique using the Perkin Elmer Flow Injection Mercury System (FIMS-400). In general, the mercury levels were low with concentrations in cephalopods ranging from 0.099 to 2.715 mg/kg dry weight (or 0.0184-0.505 mg/kg wet weight) and in crustaceans ranging from 0.057 to 1.359 mg/kg dry weight (or 0.0111-0.265 mg/kg wet weight). The mercury levels showed no significant differences (P?>?0.05) between species for both cephalopods and crustaceans. There was no significant correlation between mercury concentrations and the body size of individual for both groups as well. Comparisons with mercury levels obtained found from other previous studies and/or species noted that they were of the same magnitude or relatively low compared to various locations reported worldwide. PMID:25916470

  9. LOCALIZATION AND PROPERTIES OF THE CHOLINESTERASE IN CRUSTACEAN MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Spielholz, Neil I.; Van der Kloot, William G.

    1973-01-01

    Cholinesterase (ChE) activity is present in crustacean muscle extracts. However, since acetylcholine (ACh) is not a neuromuscular transmitter in these animals, the role and exact localization of ChE was unknown. The histochemical localization of the enzyme was studied in whole muscle and in the sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction of the extract, 50-µm frozen sections of glutaraldehyde-fixed crayfish tail flexor muscle were incubated with acetylthiocholine (ATC) as substrate, and examined under the electron microscope. After some modifications in published techniques, dense deposits were found associated with the sarcolemma, sarcolemmal invaginations, and transverse tubules. No deposits were found in 10-4 M eserine, or if butyrylthiocholine (BTC) was substituted for ATC. The vesicles in the sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction which demonstrate the activity must represent minced bits of these membranes. Using a spectrophotometric method, the kinetics of the crustacean muscle enzyme was compared to the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on mammalian red blood cells and in the lobster ventral nerve cord. Surprisingly, and contrary to previous reports, the crustacean muscle enzyme did not demonstrate substrate inhibition. While a number of similarities to AChE were found, this lack of substrate inhibition makes questionable an unequivocal similarity with classical AChE. PMID:4805007

  10. Rapid and step-wise eye growth in molting diving beetle larvae.

    PubMed

    Werner, Shannon; Buschbeck, Elke K

    2015-11-01

    However complex a visual system is, the size (and growth rate) of all its components-lens, retina and nervous system-must be precisely tuned to each other for the system to be functional. As organisms grow, their eyes must be able to achieve and maintain emmetropia, a state in which photoreceptors receive sharp images of objects that are at infinity. While there has been ample research into how vertebrates coordinate eyes growth, this has never been addressed in arthropods with camera eyes, which tend to grow dramatically and typically in a step-wise manner with each molt (ecdysis). Here, we used histological and optical methods to measure how the larval eyes of Sunburst Diving Beetles (Thermonectus marmoratus, Coleoptera, Dytiscidae) grow, and how well optical and morphological parameters match, during the dramatic growth that occurs between two consecutive larval stages. We find that the eye tubes of the principal eyes of T. marmoratus grow substantially around molt, with the vitreous-like crystalline cone contributing the most to the overall growth. Lenses also reform relatively quickly, undergoing a period of dysfunction and then regaining the ability to project sharp images onto the retina around 8 h post-molt. PMID:26358041

  11. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    SciTech Connect

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek; Kostrouchova, Marta

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  12. Knockdown of Cs-Spook induces delayed larval molting in rice striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Muhammad Faisal; Li, Yao; Ge, Chang; Sun, Yang; Yang, Qiupu; Li, Fei

    2015-03-01

    Spook has essential roles in the biogenesis of the molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-E). The function of spook in the rice striped stem borer (SSB) Chilo suppressalis remains unclear, prompting our hypothesis that it exerts actions similar to those reported for other insect species. Here we amplified the full-length transcript of spook (Cs-Spook) in SSB by 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Cs-Spook has conserved P450 motifs such as Helix-C, Helix-I, Helix-K, and PERF motif (PxxFxPxRF). It was highly expressed in late instar larvae but less so in newly molted larvae. Cs-Spook was highly expressed in prothoracic glands. Cs-Spook was knocked down by dsRNA treatments. Compared with controls, the gene expression level was reduced to 9% at 24 h post injection (PI), 33% at 48 h PI, and 24% at 72 h PI. The ecdysteroid titer decreased significantly in the dsRNA-treated group (P < 0.05), resulting in delayed larval development. The delayed development in dsRNA-treatment group was rescued by treating with 20-E. Our work demonstrates that Cs-Spook participates in the biogenesis of 20-E and regulates the molt of SSB, as seen in other species. PMID:25354095

  13. Identification of the molting hormone of the sweet potato (Bemisia tabaci) and greenhouse (Trialeurodes vaporariorum) whitefly.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Dale B; Blackburn, Michael B; Hu, Jing S

    2005-01-01

    In order to identify the whitefly molting hormone, whole body extracts of mature 4th instar and newly formed pharate adult Bemisia tabaci (Biotype B) and Trialeurodes vaporariorum were prepared and subjected to reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RPHPLC). Ecdysteroid content of fractions was determined by enzymeimmunoassay (EIA). The only detectable ecdysteroids that were present in significant amounts in whitefly extracts were ecdysone and 20-hydroxyecdysone. The concentrations of 20-hydroxyecdysone in B. tabaci and T. vaporariorum extracts, respectively, were 40 and 15 times greater than the concentrations of ecdysone. The identity of the two ecdysteroids was confirmed by normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (NPHPLC). When ecdysteroid content of RPHPLC fractions was assayed by radioimmunoassay (RIA), small amounts of polar ecdysteroids were also detected indicating that these ecdysteroids have a very low affinity for the antiserum used in the EIA. Ecdysteroid at 10.4 mM administered by feeding stimulated 2nd instar whitefly nymphs to molt. Based on our results, it appears that 20-hydroxyecdysone is the whitefly molting hormone. PMID:15686645

  14. Metamorphosis in the Cirripede Crustacean Balanus amphitrite

    PubMed Central

    Maruzzo, Diego; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S.; Høeg, Jens T.

    2012-01-01

    Stalked and acorn barnacles (Cirripedia Thoracica) have a complex life cycle that includes a free-swimming nauplius larva, a cypris larva and a permanently attached sessile juvenile and adult barnacle. The barnacle cyprid is among the most highly specialized of marine invertebrate larvae and its settlement biology has been intensively studied. By contrast, surprisingly few papers have dealt with the critical series of metamorphic events from cementation of the cyprid to the substratum until the appearance of a suspension feeding juvenile. This metamorphosis is both ontogenetically complex and critical to the survival of the barnacle. Here we use video microscopy to present a timeline and description of morphological events from settled cyprid to juvenile barnacle in the model species Balanus amphitrite, representing an important step towards both a broader understanding of the settlement ecology of this species and a platform for studying the factors that control its metamorphosis. Metamorphosis in B. amphitrite involves a complex sequence of events: cementation, epidermis separation from the cypris cuticle, degeneration of cypris musculature, rotation of the thorax inside the mantle cavity, building of the juvenile musculature, contraction of antennular muscles, raising of the body, shedding of the cypris cuticle, shell plate and basis formation and, possibly, a further moult to become a suspension feeding barnacle. We compare these events with developmental information from other barnacle species and discuss them in the framework of barnacle settlement ecology. PMID:22666355

  15. Dissociation of Circadian and Circatidal Timekeeping in the Marine Crustacean Eurydice pulchra

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Hastings, Michael H.; Green, Edward W.; Tauber, Eran; Sladek, Martin; Webster, Simon G.; Kyriacou, Charalambos P.; Wilcockson, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Tidal (12.4 hr) cycles of behavior and physiology adapt intertidal organisms to temporally complex coastal environments, yet their underlying mechanism is unknown. However, the very existence of an independent “circatidal” clock has been disputed, and it has been argued that tidal rhythms arise as a submultiple of a circadian clock, operating in dual oscillators whose outputs are held in antiphase i.e., ?12.4 hr apart. Results We demonstrate that the intertidal crustacean Eurydice pulchra (Leach) exhibits robust tidal cycles of swimming in parallel to circadian (24 hr) rhythms in behavioral, physiological and molecular phenotypes. Importantly, ?12.4 hr cycles of swimming are sustained in constant conditions, they can be entrained by suitable stimuli, and they are temperature compensated, thereby meeting the three criteria that define a biological clock. Unexpectedly, tidal rhythms (like circadian rhythms) are sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of Casein kinase 1, suggesting the possibility of shared clock substrates. However, cloning the canonical circadian genes of E. pulchra to provide molecular markers of circadian timing and also reagents to disrupt it by RNAi revealed that environmental and molecular manipulations that confound circadian timing do not affect tidal timing. Thus, competent circadian timing is neither an inevitable nor necessary element of tidal timekeeping. Conclusions We demonstrate that tidal rhythms are driven by a dedicated circatidal pacemaker that is distinct from the circadian system of E. pulchra, thereby resolving a long-standing debate regarding the nature of the circatidal mechanism. PMID:24076244

  16. The First Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequences for Stomatopod Crustaceans: Implications for Phylogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Swinstrom, Kirsten; Caldwell, Roy; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-09-07

    We report the first complete mitochondrial genome sequences of stomatopods and compare their features to each other and to those of other crustaceans. Phylogenetic analyses of the concatenated mitochondrial protein-coding sequences were used to explore relationships within the Stomatopoda, within the malacostracan crustaceans, and among crustaceans and insects. Although these analyses support the monophyly of both Malacostraca and, within it, Stomatopoda, it also confirms the view of a paraphyletic Crustacea, with Malacostraca being more closely related to insects than to the branchiopod crustaceans.

  17. 76 FR 77214 - Hawaii Crustacean Fisheries; 2012 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lobster Harvest Guideline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ...DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA838 Hawaii Crustacean Fisheries; 2012 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lobster Harvest Guideline AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries...

  18. Adult neurogenesis in the decapod crustacean brain: A hematopoietic connection?

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Barbara S.; Zhang, Yi; Benton, Jeanne L.; Sandeman, David C.

    2011-01-01

    New neurons are produced and integrated into circuits in the adult brains of many organisms, including crustaceans. In some crustacean species, the 1st- generation neuronal precursors reside in a niche exhibiting characteristics analogous to mammalian neurogenic niches. However, unlike mammalian niches where several generations of neuronal precursors coexist, the lineage of precursor cells in crayfish is spatially separated allowing the influence of environmental and endogenous regulators on specific generations in the neuronal precursor lineage to be defined. Experiments also demonstrate that the 1st-generation neuronal precursors in the crayfish Procambarus clarkii are not self-renewing. A source external to the neurogenic niche must therefore provide cells that replenish the 1st-generation precursor pool, because although these cells divide and produce a continuous efflux of 2nd-generation cells from the niche, the population of 1st-generation niche precursors is not diminished with growth and aging. In vitro studies show that cells extracted from the hemolymph, but not other tissues, are attracted to and incorporated into the neurogenic niche, a phenomenon that appears to involve serotonergic mechanisms. We propose that in crayfish, the hematopoietic system may be a source of cells that replenish the niche cell pool. These and other studies reviewed here establish decapod crustaceans as model systems in which the processes underlying adult neurogenesis, such as stem cell origins and transformation, can be readily explored. Studies in diverse species where adult neurogenesis occurs will result in a broader understanding of fundamental mechanisms and how evolutionary processes may have shaped the vertebrate/mammalian condition. PMID:21929622

  19. Barremian decapod crustaceans from Serre de Bleyton (Drôme, SE France)

    PubMed Central

    Hyžný, Matúš; Kroh, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Based on mostly small-sized isolated cheliped fingers, a new decapod crustacean assemblage is described from the Barremian of Serre de Bleyton (Drôme, SE France). The assemblage is composed mostly of representatives of the crab family Dynomenidae. In addition, remains of astacidean lobsters, axiidean shrimps, paguroid hermit crabs and brachyurous crabs of the families Necrocarcinidae and ?Cenomanocarcinidae occur in low numbers. Graptocarcinus moosleitneri (Dynomenidae) and ?Paranecrocarcinus schloegli (Necrocarcinidae) are introduced as new species. They both exhibit presence of multi-setal pores on dactyli that are interpreted as parts of a sieving mechanism used in feeding. The stratigraphic range of Graptocarcinus is extended herein to the Barremian. PMID:26097276

  20. A microsatellite-based genetic linkage map of the waterflea, Daphnia pulex: On the prospect of crustacean genomics

    E-print Network

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    of crustacean genomics Melania E.A. Cristescu a,, John K. Colbourne b , Jelena Radivojac b , Michael Lynch; Daphnia; Linkage The waterflea Daphnia pulex (Crustacea, Cladocera, Anomopoda) is an aquatic crustacean

  1. The Dscam Homologue of the Crustacean Daphnia Is Diversified by Alternative Splicing Like in Insects

    E-print Network

    Obbard, Darren

    The Dscam Homologue of the Crustacean Daphnia Is Diversified by Alternative Splicing Like, and evolutionary aspects of a Dscam homolog in 2 species of the crustacean Daphnia. The Dscam of Daphnia generates the taxonomic range of a highly diversified Dscam beyond the insects. Additionally, we have identified 4

  2. NOTES ON DECAPOD AND EUPHAUSIID CRUSTACEANS, CONTINENTAL MARGIN, WESTERN ATLANTIC, GEORGES BANK

    E-print Network

    and 1 species ofeuphausiid are reported from the outer continental shelf. submarine canyons. and nearby. transtridensl. Records of decapod crustaceans from the outer continental shelf, submarine canyons, and nearby crustaceans from submarine canyons, outer listed from north to south, successive visits are arranged

  3. 40 CFR 230.31 - Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms in the food web.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other... § 230.31 Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms in the food web. (a) Aquatic organisms...) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged or fill material can variously affect populations of...

  4. 40 CFR 230.31 - Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms in the food web.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other... § 230.31 Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms in the food web. (a) Aquatic organisms...) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged or fill material can variously affect populations of...

  5. 40 CFR 230.31 - Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms in the food web.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other... § 230.31 Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms in the food web. (a) Aquatic organisms...) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged or fill material can variously affect populations of...

  6. 40 CFR 230.31 - Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms in the food web.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other... § 230.31 Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms in the food web. (a) Aquatic organisms...) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged or fill material can variously affect populations of...

  7. 40 CFR 230.31 - Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms in the food web.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other... § 230.31 Fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms in the food web. (a) Aquatic organisms...) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged or fill material can variously affect populations of...

  8. Pancrustacean phylogeny: hexapods are terrestrial crustaceans and maxillopods are not monophyletic.

    PubMed

    Regier, Jerome C; Shultz, Jeffrey W; Kambic, Robert E

    2005-02-22

    Recent molecular analyses indicate that crustaceans and hexapods form a clade (Pancrustacea or Tetraconata), but relationships among its constituent lineages, including monophyly of crustaceans, are controversial. Our phylogenetic analysis of three protein-coding nuclear genes from 62 arthropods and lobopods (Onychophora and Tardigrada) demonstrates that Hexapoda is most closely related to the crustaceans Branchiopoda (fairy shrimp, water fleas, etc.) and Cephalocarida + Remipedia, thereby making hexapods terrestrial crustaceans and the traditionally defined Crustacea paraphyletic. Additional findings are that Malacostraca (crabs, isopods, etc.) unites with Cirripedia (barnacles, etc.) and they, in turn, with Copepoda, making the traditional crustacean class Maxillopoda paraphyletic. Ostracoda (seed shrimp)--either all or a subgroup--is associated with Branchiura (fish lice) and likely to be basal to all other pancrustaceans. A Bayesian statistical (non-clock) estimate of divergence times suggests a Precambrian origin for Pancrustacea (600 Myr ago or more), which precedes the first unambiguous arthropod fossils by over 60 Myr. PMID:15734694

  9. Shrimps that pay attention: saccadic eye movements in stomatopod crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, N. J.; Land, M. F.; Cronin, T. W.

    2014-01-01

    Discovering that a shrimp can flick its eyes over to a fish and follow up by tracking it or flicking back to observe something else implies a ‘primate-like’ awareness of the immediate environment that we do not normally associate with crustaceans. For several reasons, stomatopods (mantis shrimp) do not fit the general mould of their subphylum, and here we add saccadic, acquisitional eye movements to their repertoire of unusual visual capabilities. Optically, their apposition compound eyes contain an area of heightened acuity, in some ways similar to the fovea of vertebrate eyes. Using rapid eye movements of up to several hundred degrees per second, objects of interest are placed under the scrutiny of this area. While other arthropod species, including insects and spiders, are known to possess and use acute zones in similar saccadic gaze relocations, stomatopods are the only crustacean known with such abilities. Differences among species exist, generally reflecting both the eye size and lifestyle of the animal, with the larger-eyed more sedentary species producing slower saccades than the smaller-eyed, more active species. Possessing the ability to rapidly look at and assess objects is ecologically important for mantis shrimps, as their lifestyle is, by any standards, fast, furious and deadly. PMID:24395969

  10. Do Decapod Crustaceans Have Nociceptors for Extreme pH?

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Sakshi; Faulkes, Zen

    2010-01-01

    Background Nociception is the physiological detection of noxious stimuli. Because of its obvious importance, nociception is expected to be widespread across animal taxa and to trigger robust behaviours reliably. Nociception in invertebrates, such as crustaceans, is poorly studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Three decapod crustacean species were tested for nociceptive behaviour: Louisiana red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus), and grass shrimp (Palaemonetes sp.). Applying sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid, or benzocaine to the antennae caused no change in behaviour in the three species compared to controls. Animals did not groom the stimulated antenna, and there was no difference in movement of treated individuals and controls. Extracellular recordings of antennal nerves in P. clarkii revealed continual spontaneous activity, but no neurons that were reliably excited by the application of concentrated sodium hydroxide or hydrochloric acid. Conclusions/Significance Previously reported responses to extreme pH are either not consistently evoked across species or were mischaracterized as nociception. There was no behavioural or physiological evidence that the antennae contained specialized nociceptors that responded to pH. PMID:20422026

  11. Plumage development and molt in Long-tailed Manakins (Chiroxiphia linearis): Variation according to sex and age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doucet, S.M.; McDonald, D.B.; Foster, M.S.; Clay, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Lek-mating Long-tailed Manakins (Chiroxiphia linearis) exhibit an unusual pattern of delayed plumage maturation. Each year, males progress through a series of predefinitive plumages before attaining definitive plumage in their fifth calendar year. Females also exhibit variation in plumage coloration, with some females displaying male-like plumage characteristics. Using data from mist-net captures in northwest Costa Rica (n = 1,315) and museum specimens from throughout the range of Long-tailed Manakins (n = 585), we documented the plumage sequence progression of males, explored variation in female plumage, and described the timing of molt in this species. Males progressed through a series of age-specific predefinitive plumages, which enabled the accurate aging of predefinitive-plumaged males in the field; this preclefinitive plumage sequence is the basis for age-related status- signaling in these males. Females tended to acquire red coloration in the crown as they aged. However, colorful plumage in females may be a byproduct of selection on bright male plumage. Females exhibited an early peak of molt activity from February to April, little molt from May through July, and a second, more pronounced peak of molt activity in October. By contrast, males in older predefinitive-plumage stages and males in definitive plumage exhibited comparable unimodal distributions in molt activity beginning in June and peaking between July and October. Our data are consistent with selective pressure to avoid the costs of molt-breeding overlap in females and older males. Our findings have important implications for social organization and signaling in Longtailed Manakins, and for the evolution of delayed plumage maturation in birds.

  12. Regulation of life-long neurogenesis in the decapod crustacean brain Barbara S. Beltz*, David C. Sandeman

    E-print Network

    Beltz, Barbara S.

    Regulation of life-long neurogenesis in the decapod crustacean brain Barbara S. Beltz*, David C-long neurogenesis in the decapod crustacean brain, where the proliferation of sensory and interneurons is controlled organization and accessibility of the crustacean brain provide opportunities to examine specific neuronal

  13. Evolution of new appendage types by gradual changes in Hox gene expression the case of crustacean maxillipeds1

    E-print Network

    Averof, Michalis

    Evolution of new appendage types by gradual changes in Hox gene expression ­ the case of crustacean- ous groups of crustaceans. Studies in model organisms have shown that members of the Hox gene family of segment specialization (e. g. insects, decapod crustaceans) will turn out to have a larger number of Hox

  14. Conservation status of the inland aquatic crustaceans in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico: shortcomings of a protection strategy

    E-print Network

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    Conservation status of the inland aquatic crustaceans in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. The Yucatan Peninsula (YP), Mexico, is a large karstic Neotropical system hosting a highly diverse crustacean the YP karstic aquifer and its related crustacean fauna, the spatial distribution of 212 species from

  15. Many marine crustaceans use water-borne chemical cues in ecologically critical activities such as finding food, mates and

    E-print Network

    Koehl, Mimi

    Many marine crustaceans use water-borne chemical cues in ecologically critical activities., 2002). Crustaceans sample the fine structure of the odor filaments by moving their antennules through crustaceans) use the information contained in odor filaments to find the source of the odorant. Initial

  16. Silencing of an abdominal Hox gene during early development is correlated with limb development in a crustacean trunk

    E-print Network

    McGinnis, William

    in a crustacean trunk Cheryl C. Hsia, Adam C. Pare´, Michael Hannon, Matthew Ronshaugen, and William Mc- pods, particularly in appendage morphology. Among the Pancrustacea (crustaceans1insectsFRegier et al crustaceans with homonomous trunk segments, all bearing limbs, a state that is believed to resemble the trunk

  17. Multiple forms of calcium-dependent proteinase in crustacean muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Four calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) activities in lobster muscles have been resolved by high performance liquid chromatography. These activities differ in molecular weight and net charge. Though optimum activity occurred at high (5 and 10 mM) calcium at pH 6.8, the enzymes differ in activation at lower calcium concentrations. Only one of the CDPs is active at 100 ..mu..M calcium; none are active at 10 ..mu..M and below. Although all four CDPs are inhibited by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors leupeptin, E-64, and iodoacetamide, they show a differential response to the aspartic proteinase inhibitor pepstatin and the serine proteinase inhibitor PMSF. In contrast to CDPs from vertebrate tissues, crustacean muscles contain multiple forms that require calcium at millimolar levels. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Distalless expression in crustaceans and the patterning of branched limbs.

    PubMed

    Williams, T A

    1998-01-01

    In Drosophila, Distalless (Dll) is critical in establishing the proximal/distal axis of the leg. Lack of proper Dll expression causes distal limb structures to be truncated or lost. Dll expression was examined through the course of development in the limbs of two crustaceans, Triops and Nebalia. Because the limbs of these two species are branched, they provide a comparison to the uniramous (unbranched) leg of Drosophila. In Triops and Nebalia, development of limb branches is not tightly coupled with Dll expression: in some cases, branches can arise prior to Dll expression and in others, certain branches never express Dll. These data suggest that, while Dll may indeed initiate overall limb outgrowth, limb branches are unlikely to be patterned by a simple iteration of the mechanism patterning the unbranched leg of Drosophila. PMID:9510537

  19. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):260270, Fall 2009 Molt migration by giant Canada geese in

    E-print Network

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 3(2):260­270, Fall 2009 Molt migration by giant Canada geese in eastern, Valley City State University Valley City, ND 58072, USA Abstract: We captured giant Canada geese (Branta (1997) for giant Canada geese banded in eastern South Dakota from 1955 to 1995. We believe it is likely

  20. Immunological cell and serum metabolite response of sixty-week old commercial laying hens to an alfalfa meal molt diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The practice of inducing molt in commercial poultry involves light restriction, feed removal, and limiting water for five to fourteen days. Many animal welfare groups are concerned about this issue due to the stresses that feed and water deprivation cause. With this in mind, alternative diets have...

  1. USE OF A LIVE ATTENUATED SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM VACCINE TO PROTECT HENS AGAINST S. ENTERITIDIS INFECTION WHILE UNDERGOING MOLT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies demonstrated that Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infections in hens undergoing molt via feed withdrawal were more severe than in full fed hens. Two trials were conducted to determine whether immunizing hens with Megan®Vac1, a commercially-available attenuated S. typhimurium vaccine, w...

  2. Plasma biochemistry values in emperor geese (Chen canagica) in Alaska: comparisons among age, sex, incubation, and molt.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.; Schmutz, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reduced populations of emperor geese (Chen canagica), a Bering Sea endemic, provided the need to assess plasma biochemistry values as indicators of population health. A precursory step to such an investigation was to evaluate patterns of variability in plasma biochemistry values among age, sex, and reproductive period. Plasma from 63 emperor geese was collected on their breeding grounds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in western Alaska, USA. The geese sampled included 18 incubating adult females captured, in mid June, on their nests by using bow nets, and 30 adults and 15 goslings captured in corral traps in late July and early August, when the adults were molting their wing feathers and the goslings were 5-6 weeks old. Plasma was evaluated for 15 biochemical parameters, by comparing results among age, sex, and sampling period (incubation versus wing-feather molt). Ten of the 15 biochemical parameters assayed differed among adults during incubation, the adults during molt, and the goslings at molt, whereas sex differences were noted in few parameters.

  3. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde; Smith, Jim T; Ford, Alex T

    2015-10-01

    Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive. Current phyla-specific dose levels and limits proposed by major regulatory bodies were found to be inadequate to protect species across a range of endpoints including morbidity, mutation and reproduction and examples are discussed within. These findings serve to prioritise areas for future research that will significantly advance understanding of radiation-induced effects in aquatic invertebrates and consequently enhance ability to predict the impacts of radioactive releases on the environment. PMID:26261880

  4. Arthropod phylogeny revisited, with a focus on crustacean relationships.

    PubMed

    Koenemann, Stefan; Jenner, Ronald A; Hoenemann, Mario; Stemme, Torben; von Reumont, Björn M

    2010-01-01

    Higher-level arthropod phylogenetics is an intensely active field of research, not least as a result of the hegemony of molecular data. However, not all areas of arthropod phylogenetics have so far received equal attention. The application of molecular data to infer a comprehensive phylogeny of Crustacea is still in its infancy, and several emerging results are conspicuously at odds with morphology-based studies. In this study, we present a series of molecular phylogenetic analyses of 88 arthropods, including 57 crustaceans, representing all the major lineages, with Onychophora and Tardigrada as outgroups. Our analyses are based on published and new sequences for two mitochondrial markers, 16S rDNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), and the nuclear ribosomal gene 18S rDNA. We designed our phylogenetic analyses to assess the effects of different strategies of sequence alignment, alignment masking, nucleotide coding, and model settings. Our comparisons show that alignment optimization of ribosomal markers based on secondary structure information can have a radical impact on phylogenetic reconstruction. Trees based on optimized alignments recover monophyletic Arthropoda (excluding Onychophora), Pancrustacea, Malacostraca, Insecta, Myriapoda and Chelicerata, while Maxillopoda and Hexapoda emerge as paraphyletic groups. Our results are unable to resolve the highest-level relationships within Arthropoda, and none of our trees supports the monophyly of Myriochelata or Mandibulata. We discuss our results in the context of both the methodological variations between different analyses, and of recently proposed phylogenetic hypotheses. This article offers a preliminary attempt to incorporate the large diversity of crustaceans into a single molecular phylogenetic analysis, assessing the robustness of phylogenetic relationships under varying analysis parameters. It throws into sharp relief the relative strengths and shortcomings of the combined molecular data for assessing this challenging phylogenetic problem, and thereby provides useful pointers for future studies. PMID:19854296

  5. The relationship between circulating ecdysteroids and chela allometry in male tanner crabs: Evidence for a terminal molt in the genus Chionoecetes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tamone, S.L.; Taggart, S.J.; Andrews, A.G.; Mondragon, J.; Nielsen, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Whether male Tanner crabs, Chionoecetes bairdi, undergo a terminal molt associated with a change in claw allometry has long been debated. We measured molting hormone levels in captured male C. bairdi to assess the potential for molting. We plotted a frequency histogram of chela height to carapace width ratios and found a bimodal distribution of crabs with a ratio of approximately 0.18 separating the two modes. Male crabs with a ratio less than 0.18 were classified as "small-clawed" (SC) while crabs with a ratio greater than 0.18 were classified as "large-clawed" (LC). Circulating molting hormones between SC and LC crabs were compared. Significantly lower ecdysteroid levels were found in LC crabs, indicating that this morphotype had negligible potential for molting. Circulating ecdysteroids were measured in SC males of different shell conditions (soft, new, old, and very old) and no significant differences were found. This research suggests that the molt to LC morphology is a terminal molt. The results from this study have important implications for fisheries management because sub-legal LC males will not recruit into the fishery and removal of larger males may have long term effects on population size structure.

  6. Developmental changes in the embryo, pronymph, and first molt of the scorpion Centruroides vittatus (scorpiones: buthidae).

    PubMed

    Farley, Roger D

    2005-07-01

    For the first time the scanning electron microscope was used to compare developmental changes in scorpion embryos and the first and second stadia. In the buthid species of this study, Centruroides vittatus, and all other scorpions, the newborn climb up on their mother's back and remain there without feeding for several days. At this location, they undergo their first molt and in a few days they disperse, fully capable of foraging in the terrestrial environment. The results here support earlier suggestions that the first stadium (pronymph) is a continuation and extension of embryological development. The first molt results in a nymph with exoskeletal features much like those in the adult. In the first molt the metasoma becomes relatively longer, and the sting (aculeus) becomes sharp and functional. The metasomal segments are modified for dorsal flexion and sting use. The embryos and the pronymphs have spiracles that open into an invagination near the posterior margin of flap-like abdominal plates in segments 4-7 of the ventral mesosoma. The second instars have spiracles that lead to book lungs farther anterior in sternites. Tubular legs with cylindrical segments in embryos and pronymphs become more sculptured and oval in the transverse plane. Each leg in the pronymph has a blunt, cup-shaped tip while distal claws (ungues, dactyl) are present in the second instar and subsequent stages. There are some sharp bristles and primordial sensilla in the pronymphs, but the second stadium has adult-like surface features: rows of knobs or granulations (carinae), serrations on the inner surfaces of cheliceral and pedipalpal claws, filtering hairs at the mouthparts, peg sensilla on the pectines, and mechano- and chemoreceptor sensilla on the body and appendages. Scorpion embryos and pronymphs have some structures like fossil scorpions thought to have been aquatic. There is a gradual development of features that appear to be terrestrial adaptations. Evidence is provided for the formation of the sternum from third and fourth leg coxal primordia and possibly from the first abdominal segment. This study is the first to provide evidence for a forward shift of the gonopore along with other structures in the anterior abdomen. PMID:15549700

  7. Fine scale movements and habitat use of black brant during the flightless Wing Molt in Arctic Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Tyler L.; Flint, Paul L.; Derksen, Dirk V.; Schmutz, Joel A.

    2011-01-01

    Thousands of Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) migrate annually to the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area (TLSA), Alaska, to undergo the flightless wing molt on tundra lakes and wetlands. GPS transmitters were attached to Brant over two summers (2007â€"2008) to examine patterns of movement and habitat use of molting Brant, including variation by habitat type, year and body mass. Molting Brant were located an average of 31 ±1 m (SE) from shore and this distance did not vary across any of the explanatory variables. Brant moved an average of 123 ±3 m hr -1 while flightless. Movement rates varied by year, averaging 22 ±12 m hr -1 faster in 2008, and across habitat types, averaging 22 ±13 m hr -1 faster in inland versus coastal and estuarine habitats. Two kernel home ranges were estimated: entire home range, which encompassed the complete 95% probability contour, and shoreline home range, which included only shoreline areas used by molting Brant. Entire home range (x bar = 15.1 ±2.2 km 2) was negatively correlated with body mass, suggesting that heavier individuals have more body reserves to contribute to feather growth and thereby require less food and smaller home ranges. Conversely, shoreline home range (x bar = 4.3 ±0.6 km 2) did not vary by body mass, but rather by habitat type, being larger in estuarine habitats. The complex shorelines and numerous deltaic islands of estuarine habitats offer more shoreline per area than either coastal or inland habitats. Brant appear to have limited ability to adjust their home range size or forage further from shore in response to variable food resources across years or habitats, instead altering their movement rate. Given this apparent lack of behavioral flexibility, Brant may be sensitive to development-related disturbances or habitat losses at molt sites in the TLSA.

  8. Fine scale movements and habitat use of black brant during the flightless Wing Molt in Arctic Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, T.L.; Flint, P.L.; Derksen, D.V.; Schmutz, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Thousands of Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) migrate annually to the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area (TLSA), Alaska, to undergo the flightless wing molt on tundra lakes and wetlands. GPS transmitters were attached to Brant over two summers (2007?????"2008) to examine patterns of movement and habitat use of molting Brant, including variation by habitat type, year and body mass. Molting Brant were located an average of 31 ??1 m (SE) from shore and this distance did not vary across any of the explanatory variables. Brant moved an average of 123 ??3 m hr-1 while flightless. Movement rates varied by year, averaging 22 ??12 m hr-1 faster in 2008, and across habitat types, averaging 22 ??13 m hr-1 faster in inland versus coastal and estuarine habitats. Two kernel home ranges were estimated: entire home range, which encompassed the complete 95% probability contour, and shoreline home range, which included only shoreline areas used by molting Brant. Entire home range (x bar = 15.1 ??2.2 km2) was negatively correlated with body mass, suggesting that heavier individuals have more body reserves to contribute to feather growth and thereby require less food and smaller home ranges. Conversely, shoreline home range (x bar = 4.3 ??0.6 km2) did not vary by body mass, but rather by habitat type, being larger in estuarine habitats. The complex shorelines and numerous deltaic islands of estuarine habitats offer more shoreline per area than either coastal or inland habitats. Brant appear to have limited ability to adjust their home range size or forage further from shore in response to variable food resources across years or habitats, instead altering their movement rate. Given this apparent lack of behavioral flexibility, Brant may be sensitive to development-related disturbances or habitat losses at molt sites in the TLSA.

  9. Dietary mercury exposure causes decreased escape takeoff flight performance and increased molt rate in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jenna R; Cristol, Daniel; Swaddle, John P

    2014-10-01

    Mercury is a widespread and persistent environmental contaminant that occurs in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Recently, songbirds that forage from primarily terrestrial sources have shown evidence of bioaccumulation of mercury, but little research has assessed the effects of mercury on their health and fitness. There are many indications that mercury negatively affects neurological functioning, bioenergetics, and behavior through a variety of mechanisms and in a wide array of avian taxa. Effective flight is crucial to avian fitness and feather molt is an energetically expensive life history trait. Therefore, we investigated whether mercury exposure influenced flight performance and molt in a common songbird, the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Specifically, we dosed the diet of captive starlings with methylmercury cysteine at 0.0, 0.75, or 1.5 ?g/g wet weight and recorded changes in flight performance after 1 year of dietary mercury exposure. We also recorded the annual molt of wing feathers. We found that individuals dosed with mercury exhibited decreased escape takeoff flight performance compared with controls and blood mercury was also correlated with an increased rate of molt, which can reduce flight performance and thermoregulatory ability. This study reveals two novel endpoints, flight performance and molt, that may be affected by dietary mercury exposure. These findings suggest a potential impact on wild songbirds exposed to mercury levels comparable to the high dosage levels in the present study. Any decrease in flight efficiency could reduce fitness due to a direct impact on survival during predation events or by decreased efficiency in other critical activities (such as foraging or migration) that require efficient flight. PMID:25030113

  10. Using body mass dynamics to examine long-term habitat shifts of arctic-molting geese: Evidence for ecological change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Tyler L.; Flint, Paul L.; Derksen, Dirk V.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Taylor, Eric J.; Bollinger, Karen S.

    2011-01-01

    From 1976 onward, molting brant geese (Branta bernicla) within the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area, Alaska, shifted from inland, freshwater lakes toward coastal wetlands. Two hypotheses explained this redistribution: (1) ecological change: redistribution of molting brant reflects improvements in coastal foraging habitats, which have undergone a succession toward salt-tolerant plants due to increased coastal erosion and saltwater intrusion as induced by climate change or (2) interspecific competition: greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) populations increased 12-fold at inland lakes, limiting food availability and forcing brant into coastal habitats. Both hypotheses presume that brant redistributions were driven by food availability; thus, body mass dynamics may provide insight into the relevance of these hypotheses. We compared body mass dynamics of molting brant across decades (1978, 1987–1992, 2005–2007) and, during 2005–2007, across habitats (coastal vs. inland). Brant lost body mass during molt in all three decades. At inland habitats, rates of mass loss progressively decreased by decade despite the increased number of greater white-fronted geese. These results do not support an interspecific competition hypothesis, instead suggesting that ecological change enhanced foraging habitats for brant. During 2005–2007, rates of mass loss did not vary by habitat. Thus, while habitats have improved from earlier decades, our results cannot distinguish between ecological changes at inland versus coastal habitats. However, we speculate that coastal forage quality has improved beyond that of inland habitats and that the body mass benefits of these higher quality foods are offset by the disproportionate number of brant now molting coastally.

  11. A Supramolecular Substance, [2] Rotaxane, Induces Apoptosis in Human Molt-3 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Makio, K; Hara, K; Hiruma, W; Fujita, Y; Takata, T; Nishio, K; Ono, N

    2015-11-01

    The antitumor effects of a supramolecular substance, the [2] rotaxane (TRO-A0001), and its molecular mechanisms were investigated. TRO-A0001 suppressed the proliferation of cultured human Molt-3 acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells for 12-72?h in a dose-dependent manner. Based on flow cytometry, TRO-A0001 clearly induced apoptosis after 24?h. The mitochondrial membrane potential disappeared after treatment with 1.0?µM of TRO-A0001. Expression of the cleaved forms of capase-9 and caspase-3 was significantly increased in cells exposed to TRO-A0001, whereas the expression of XIAP, a type of inhibitor of apoptosis family, was decreased. These results suggest that [2] rotaxane TRO-A0001 may be a highly promising new antitumor medicine. PMID:25463596

  12. Population variation in isotopic composition of shorebird feathers: Implications for determining molting grounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres-Dowdall, J.; Farmer, A.H.; Bucher, E.H.; Rye, R.O.; Landis, G.

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotope analyses have revolutionized the study of migratory connectivity. However, as with all tools, their limitations must be understood in order to derive the maximum benefit of a particular application. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of stable isotopes of C, N, H, O and S for assigning known-origin feathers to the molting sites of migrant shorebird species wintering and breeding in Argentina. Specific objectives were to: 1) compare the efficacy of the technique for studying shorebird species with different migration patterns, life histories and habitat-use patterns; 2) evaluate the grouping of species with similar migration and habitat use patterns in a single analysis to potentially improve prediction accuracy; and 3) evaluate the potential gains in prediction accuracy that might be achieved from using multiple stable isotopes. The efficacy of stable isotope ratios to determine origin was found to vary with species. While one species (White-rumped Sandpiper, Calidris fuscicollis) had high levels of accuracy assigning samples to known origin (91% of samples correctly assigned), another (Collared Plover, Charadrius collaris) showed low levels of accuracy (52% of samples correctly assigned). Intra-individual variability may account for this difference in efficacy. The prediction model for three species with similar migration and habitat-use patterns performed poorly compared with the model for just one of the species (71% versus 91% of samples correctly assigned). Thus, combining multiple sympatric species may not improve model prediction accuracy. Increasing the number of stable isotopes in the analyses increased the accuracy of assigning shorebirds to their molting origin, but the best combination - involving a subset of all the isotopes analyzed - varied among species.

  13. POLYCLONAL ANTISERA AGAINST ESTUARINE CRUSTACEAN VITELLINS: A MOLECULAR APPROACH TO REPRODUCTIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    To fully elucidate the action of crustacean hormones, or their agonists, on reproduction and vitellogenesis it has become increasingly important to develop sensitive assays that indicate a stimulatory or inhibitory effect on easily measured endpoints. Because of the relative abun...

  14. 78 FR 9327 - Hawaii Crustacean Fisheries; 2013 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lobster Harvest Guideline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ...DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 665 RIN 0648-XC453 Hawaii Crustacean Fisheries; 2013 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lobster Harvest Guideline AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries...

  15. 76 FR 4551 - Hawaii Crustacean Fisheries; 2011 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lobster Harvest Guideline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ...DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 665 RIN 0648-XA159 Hawaii Crustacean Fisheries; 2011 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Lobster Harvest Guideline AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries...

  16. 19 CFR 12.26 - Importations of wild animals, fish, amphibians, reptiles, mollusks, and crustaceans; prohibited...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...any specie or subspecie of other live or dead fish or wildlife, including any...Unreleased species or subspecies of live or dead endangered fish or wildlife, including...amphibian, reptile, mollusk, crustacean, or dead body or egg thereof. The...

  17. REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL SCREENING PROTOCOLS FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS USING ESTUARINE CRUSTACEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research is to develop in vivo screening protocols for endocrine disruption in marine crustaceans, invertebrates of ecological and economic importance. A series of comparative developmental and reproductive studies were performed on several species of estuar...

  18. POLYCLONAL ANTISERA AGAINST ESTUARINE CRUSTACEAN VITELLINS: A MOLECULAR APPROACH TO REPRODUCTIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To fully elucidate the action of crustacean hormones, or their agonists, on vitellogenesis and reproduction, it has become increasingly important to develop sensitive assays that indicate a stimulatory or inhibitory effect on easily measured endpoints. Because of the relative ab...

  19. Molecular cloning of tropomyosins identified as allergens in six species of crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Kanna; Suma, Yota; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji; Shiomi, Kazuo

    2007-02-01

    Although tropomyosin is known to be a major allergen of crustaceans, its structural information is limited to only five species. In this study, tropomyosin was confirmed to be a major allergen in six species of crustaceans (black tiger prawn, kuruma prawn, pink shrimp, king crab, snow crab, and horsehair crab) by immunoblotting. Then, the amino acid sequences of tropomyosins from these crustaceans were elucidated by a cDNA cloning technique. Sequence data for crustacean tropomyosins including the obtained results reveal that fast tropomyosins are contained in shrimps (or prawns) and lobsters, slow tropomyosins in crabs, and both tropomyosins in crayfishes and hermit crabs. Although fast and slow tropomyosins share a high sequence identity (about 90%) with each other, significant differences are observed in specific regions between both tropomyosins. PMID:17263503

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF INSECT JUVENILE HORMONE AGONISTTS ON METAMORPHOSIS AND REPRODUCTION IN ESTUARINE CRUSTACEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative developmental and reproductive studies were performed on several species of estuarine crustaceans in response to three juvenile hormone agonists (JHAs) (methoprene, fenoxycarb, and pyriproxyfen). Larval development of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, was greater ...

  1. Functional Assessment of Residues in the Amino- and Carboxyl-Termini of Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) in the Mud Crab Scylla olivacea Using Point-Mutated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Jing; Huang, Shiau-Shan; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Chang, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Yun-Ru; Huang, Wen-San; Lee, Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    To assess functional importance of the residues in the amino- and carboxyl-termini of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone in the mud crab Scylla olivacea (Sco-CHH), both wild-type and point-mutated CHH peptides were produced with an amidated C-terminal end. Spectral analyses of circular dichroism, chromatographic retention time, and mass spectrometric analysis of the recombinant peptides indicate that they were close in conformation to native CHH and were produced with the intended substitutions. The recombinant peptides were subsequently used for an in vivo hyperglycemic assay. Two mutants (R13A and I69A rSco-CHH) completely lacked hyperglycemic activity, with temporal profiles similar to that of vehicle control. Temporal profiles of hyperglycemic responses elicited by 4 mutants (I2A, F3A, D12A, and D60A Sco-CHH) were different from that elicited by wild-type Sco-CHH; I2A was unique in that it exhibited significantly higher hyperglycemic activity, whereas the remaining 3 mutants showed lower activity. Four mutants (D4A, Q51A, E54A, and V72A rSco-CHH) elicited hyperglycemic responses with temporal profiles similar to those evoked by wild-type Sco-CHH. In contrast, the glycine-extended version of V72A rSco-CHH (V72A rSco-CHH-Gly) completely lost hyperglycemic activity. By comparing our study with previous ones of ion-transport peptide (ITP) and molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) using deleted or point-mutated mutants, detail discussion is made regarding functionally important residues that are shared by both CHH and ITP (members of Group I of the CHH family), and those that discriminate CHH from ITP, and Group-I from Group-II peptides. Conclusions summarized in the present study provide insights into understanding of how functional diversification occurred within a peptide family of multifunctional members. PMID:26261986

  2. Neurogenesis in the central olfactory pathway of adult decapod crustaceans: development of the neurogenic niche in the brains of procambarid crayfish

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the decapod crustacean brain, neurogenesis persists throughout the animal's life. After embryogenesis, the central olfactory pathway integrates newborn olfactory local and projection interneurons that replace old neurons or expand the existing population. In crayfish, these neurons are the descendants of precursor cells residing in a neurogenic niche. In this paper, the development of the niche was documented by monitoring proliferating cells with S-phase-specific markers combined with immunohistochemical, dye-injection and pulse-chase experiments. Results Between the end of embryogenesis and throughout the first post-embryonic stage (POI), a defined transverse band of mitotically active cells (which we will term 'the deutocerebral proliferative system' (DPS) appears. Just prior to hatching and in parallel with the formation of the DPS, the anlagen of the niche appears, closely associated with the vasculature. When the hatchling molts to the second post-embryonic stage (POII), the DPS differentiates into the lateral (LPZ) and medial (MPZ) proliferative zones. The LPZ and MPZ are characterized by a high number of mitotically active cells from the beginning of post-embryonic life; in contrast, the developing niche contains only very few dividing cells, a characteristic that persists in the adult organism. Conclusions Our data suggest that the LPZ and MPZ are largely responsible for the production of new neurons in the early post-embryonic stages, and that the neurogenic niche in the beginning plays a subordinate role. However, as the neuroblasts in the proliferation zones disappear during early post-embryonic life, the neuronal precursors in the niche gradually become the dominant and only mechanism for the generation of new neurons in the adult brain. PMID:22225949

  3. Biodegradation of the chitin-protein complex in crustacean cuticle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artur, Stankiewicz B.; Mastalerz, Maria; Hof, C.H.J.; Bierstedt, A.; Flannery, M.B.; Briggs, D.E.G.; Evershed, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    Arthropod cuticles consist predominantly of chitin cross-linked with proteins. While there is some experimental evidence that this chitin-protein complex may resist decay, the chemical changes that occur during degradation have not been investigated in detail. The stomatopod crustacean Neogonodactylus oerstedii was decayed in the laboratory under anoxic conditions. A combination of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and FTIR revealed extensive chemical changes after just 2 weeks that resulted in a cuticle composition dominated by chitin. Quantitative analysis of amino acids (by HPLC) and chitin showed that the major loss of proteins and chitin occurred between weeks 1 and 2. After 8 weeks tyrosine, tryptophan and valine are the most prominent amino acid moieties, showing their resistance to degradation. The presence of cyclic ketones in the pyrolysates indicates that mucopolysaccharides or other bound non-chitinous carbohydrates are also resistant to decay. There is no evidence of structural degradation of chitin prior to 8 weeks when FTIR revealed a reduction in chitin-specific bands. The chemical changes are paralleled by structural changes in the cuticle, which becomes an increasingly open structure consisting of loose chitinous fibres. The rapid rate of decay in the experiments suggests that where chitin and protein are preserved in fossil cuticles degradation must have been inhibited.Arthropod cuticles consist predominantly of chitin cross-linked with proteins. While there is some experimental evidence that this chitin-protein complex may resist decay, the chemical changes that occur during degradation have not been investigated in detail. The stomatopod crustacean Neogonodactylus oerstedii was decayed in the laboratory under anoxic conditions. A combination of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and FTIR revealed extensive chemical changes after just 2 weeks that resulted in a cuticle composition dominated by chitin. Quantitative analysis of amino acids (by HPLC) and chitin showed that the major loss of proteins and chitin occurred between weeks 1 and 2. After 8 weeks tyrosine, tryptophan and valine are the most prominent amino acid moieties, showing their resistance to degradation. The presence of cyclic ketones in the pyrolysates indicates that mucopolysaccharides or other bound non-chitinous carbohydrates are also resistant to decay. There is no evidence of structural degradation of chitin prior to 8 weeks when FTIR revealed a reduction in chitin-specific bands. The chemical changes are paralleled by structural changes in the cuticle, which becomes an increasingly open structure consisting of loose chitinous fibres. The rapid rate of decay in the experiments suggests, that where chitin and protein are preserved in fossil cuticles degradation must have been inhibited.

  4. Global Diversity of Marine Isopods (Except Asellota and Crustacean Symbionts)

    PubMed Central

    Poore, Gary C. B.; Bruce, Niel L.

    2012-01-01

    The crustacean order Isopoda (excluding Asellota, crustacean symbionts and freshwater taxa) comprise 3154 described marine species in 379 genera in 37 families according to the WoRMS catalogue. The history of taxonomic discovery over the last two centuries is reviewed. Although a well defined order with the Peracarida, their relationship to other orders is not yet resolved but systematics of the major subordinal taxa is relatively well understood. Isopods range in size from less than 1 mm to Bathynomus giganteus at 365 mm long. They inhabit all marine habitats down to 7280 m depth but with few doubtful exceptions species have restricted biogeographic and bathymetric ranges. Four feeding categories are recognised as much on the basis of anecdotal evidence as hard data: detritus feeders and browsers, carnivores, parasites, and filter feeders. Notable among these are the Cymothooidea that range from predators and scavengers to external blood-sucking micropredators and parasites. Isopods brood 10–1600 eggs depending on individual species. Strong sexual dimorphism is characteristic of several families, notably in Gnathiidae where sessile males live with a harem of females while juvenile praniza stages are ectoparasites of fish. Protandry is known in Cymothoidae and protogyny in Anthuroidea. Some Paranthuridae are neotenous. About half of all coastal, shelf and upper bathyal species have been recorded in the MEOW temperate realms, 40% in tropical regions and the remainder in polar seas. The greatest concentration of temperate species is in Australasia; more have been recorded from temperate North Pacific than the North Atlantic. Of tropical regions, the Central Indo-Pacific is home to more species any other region. Isopods are decidedly asymmetrical latitudinally with 1.35 times as many species in temperate Southern Hemisphere than the temperate North Atlantic and northern Pacific, and almost four times as many Antarctic as Arctic species. More species are known from the bathyal and abyssal Antarctic than Arctic GOODS provinces, and more from the larger Pacific than Atlantic oceans. Two areas with many species known are the New Zealand-Kermadec and the Northern North Pacific provinces. Deep hard substrates such as found on seamounts and the slopes are underrepresented in samples. This, the documented numbers of undescribed species in recent collections and probable cryptic species suggest a large as yet undocumented fauna, potentially an order of magnitude greater than presently known. PMID:22952700

  5. Global diversity of marine isopods (except Asellota and crustacean symbionts).

    PubMed

    Poore, Gary C B; Bruce, Niel L

    2012-01-01

    The crustacean order Isopoda (excluding Asellota, crustacean symbionts and freshwater taxa) comprise 3154 described marine species in 379 genera in 37 families according to the WoRMS catalogue. The history of taxonomic discovery over the last two centuries is reviewed. Although a well defined order with the Peracarida, their relationship to other orders is not yet resolved but systematics of the major subordinal taxa is relatively well understood. Isopods range in size from less than 1 mm to Bathynomus giganteus at 365 mm long. They inhabit all marine habitats down to 7280 m depth but with few doubtful exceptions species have restricted biogeographic and bathymetric ranges. Four feeding categories are recognised as much on the basis of anecdotal evidence as hard data: detritus feeders and browsers, carnivores, parasites, and filter feeders. Notable among these are the Cymothooidea that range from predators and scavengers to external blood-sucking micropredators and parasites. Isopods brood 10-1600 eggs depending on individual species. Strong sexual dimorphism is characteristic of several families, notably in Gnathiidae where sessile males live with a harem of females while juvenile praniza stages are ectoparasites of fish. Protandry is known in Cymothoidae and protogyny in Anthuroidea. Some Paranthuridae are neotenous. About half of all coastal, shelf and upper bathyal species have been recorded in the MEOW temperate realms, 40% in tropical regions and the remainder in polar seas. The greatest concentration of temperate species is in Australasia; more have been recorded from temperate North Pacific than the North Atlantic. Of tropical regions, the Central Indo-Pacific is home to more species any other region. Isopods are decidedly asymmetrical latitudinally with 1.35 times as many species in temperate Southern Hemisphere than the temperate North Atlantic and northern Pacific, and almost four times as many Antarctic as Arctic species. More species are known from the bathyal and abyssal Antarctic than Arctic GOODS provinces, and more from the larger Pacific than Atlantic oceans. Two areas with many species known are the New Zealand-Kermadec and the Northern North Pacific provinces. Deep hard substrates such as found on seamounts and the slopes are underrepresented in samples. This, the documented numbers of undescribed species in recent collections and probable cryptic species suggest a large as yet undocumented fauna, potentially an order of magnitude greater than presently known. PMID:22952700

  6. Cryptic speciation within Phytoptus avellanae s.l. (Eriophyoidea: Phytoptidae) revealed by molecular data and observations on molting Tegonotus-like nymphs.

    PubMed

    Cvrkovi?, Tatjana; Chetverikov, Philipp; Vidovi?, Biljana; Petanovi?, Radmila

    2016-01-01

    Hazelnut big bud mite, Phytoptus avellanae Nalepa, is one of the most harmful pests of Corylus spp. (Corylaceae) worldwide. Herein, we show that this species represents a complex of two cryptic species: one that lives and reproduces in buds causing their enlargement ('big buds') and drying, whereas the other is a vagrant living on leaves, under bud scales and in catkins, based on phylogenetic analyzes of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) DNA and the nuclear D2 region of 28S rDNA sequences. A molecular assessment based on mtCOI DNA and nuclear D2 28S rDNA revealed consistent differences of 16.8 and 3.5 % between the two species, respectively. Molecular analysis also revealed that atypical flattened nymphs (Tegonotus-like nymphs sensu Keifer in Mites Injurious to Economic Plants, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp 327-562, 1975) with differently annulated opisthosoma, which appear in the life cycle of P. avellanae s.l., belong to the 'vagrant' lineage, i.e. vagrant cryptic species. Light microscopy images of Tegonotus-like nymphs molting into males and females are presented for the first time. Our results suggest that the name P. avellanae comprise two species. Big bud mite should keep the name P. avellanae, and the vagrant cryptic species should be re-named after a proper morphological description is made. PMID:26530992

  7. Ultraviolet filters in stomatopod crustaceans: diversity, ecology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Bok, Michael J; Porter, Megan L; Cronin, Thomas W

    2015-07-01

    Stomatopod crustaceans employ unique ultraviolet (UV) optical filters in order to tune the spectral sensitivities of their UV-sensitive photoreceptors. In the stomatopod species Neogonodactylus oerstedii, we previously found four filter types, produced by five distinct mycosporine-like amino acid pigments in the crystalline cones of their specialized midband ommatidial facets. This UV-spectral tuning array produces receptors with at least six distinct spectral sensitivities, despite expressing only two visual pigments. Here, we present a broad survey of these UV filters across the stomatopod order, examining their spectral absorption properties in 21 species from seven families in four superfamilies. We found that UV filters are present in three of the four superfamilies, and evolutionary character reconstruction implies that at least one class of UV filter was present in the ancestor of all modern stomatopods. Additionally, postlarval stomatopods were observed to produce the UV filters simultaneously alongside development of the adult eye. The absorbance properties of the filters are consistent within a species; however, between species we found a great deal of diversity, both in the number of filters and in their spectral absorbance characteristics. This diversity correlates with the habitat depth ranges of these species, suggesting that species living in shallow, UV-rich environments may tune their UV spectral sensitivities more aggressively. We also found additional, previously unrecognized UV filter types in the crystalline cones of the peripheral eye regions of some species, indicating the possibility for even greater stomatopod visual complexity than previously thought. PMID:25964422

  8. Detritivorous crustaceans become herbivores on jasmonate-deficient plants

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Edward E.; Dubugnon, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    The jasmonate signal pathway is known to control defenses against herbivores, such as leaf eaters (folivores). Does the reach of the pathway extend to defense against other types of animal? Among the arthropods attracted to seed baits placed below flowering Arabidopsis thaliana plants are 2 largely nocturnal isopod crustaceans generally considered as detritivores: Porcellio scaber and Armadillidium vulgare. Parallel laboratory experiments identified the isopods as being capable of predation on intact plants. Isopod feeding was strongly facilitated in jasmonate-deficient Arabidopsis and rice plants. The feeding activity of isopods revealed potentially detritivore-sensitive, jasmonate-protected Achilles' heels in these architecturally different plants (petioles and inflorescence stems in Arabidopsis, and lower stem and mesocotyl in rice). The work addresses the question of what stops 2 detritivores from attacking living plants and provides evidence that it is, in part, the jasmonate signal pathway. Furthermore, senescent leaves from an Arabidopsis jasmonate mutant were consumed more rapidly than senescent wild-type leaves, suggesting that past activity of the jasmonate signal pathway in leaves may slow carbon recycling through detritivory. PMID:19139394

  9. Remarkable Diversity of Endogenous Viruses in a Crustacean Genome

    PubMed Central

    Thézé, Julien; Leclercq, Sébastien; Moumen, Bouziane; Cordaux, Richard; Gilbert, Clément

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in paleovirology have uncovered myriads of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) integrated in the genome of their eukaryotic hosts. These fragments result from endogenization, that is, integration of the viral genome into the host germline genome followed by vertical inheritance. So far, most studies have used a virus-centered approach, whereby endogenous copies of a particular group of viruses were searched in all available sequenced genomes. Here, we follow a host-centered approach whereby the genome of a given species is comprehensively screened for the presence of EVEs using all available complete viral genomes as queries. Our analyses revealed that 54 EVEs corresponding to 10 different viral lineages belonging to 5 viral families (Bunyaviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Totiviridae) and one viral order (Mononegavirales) became endogenized in the genome of the isopod crustacean Armadillidium vulgare. We show that viral endogenization occurred recurrently during the evolution of isopods and that A. vulgare viral lineages were involved in multiple host switches that took place between widely divergent taxa. Furthermore, 30 A. vulgare EVEs have uninterrupted open reading frames, suggesting they result from recent endogenization of viruses likely to be currently infecting isopod populations. Overall, our work shows that isopods have been and are still infected by a large variety of viruses. It also extends the host range of several families of viruses and brings new insights into their evolution. More generally, our results underline the power of paleovirology in characterizing the viral diversity currently infecting eukaryotic taxa. PMID:25084787

  10. Inorganic Contaminants, Nutrient Reserves and Molt Intensity in Autumn Migrant Red-Necked Grebes (Podiceps grisegena) at Georgian Bay.

    PubMed

    Holman, Katie L; Schummer, Michael L; Petrie, Scott A; Chen, Yu-Wei; Belzile, Nelson

    2015-11-01

    Red-necked grebes (Podiceps grisegena) are piscivorous waterbirds that breed on freshwater lakes in northwestern Canada and stop-over at the Great Lakes during autumn migration to molt feathers and replenish lipid and protein reserves. The objectives of this study were to (1) describe concentrations of, and correlations among, inorganic contaminants in a sample of autumn migrant red-necked grebes from the Great Lakes, (2) compare concentrations of inorganic contaminants to those in autumn migrant common loons from Schummer et al. (Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 62:704, 2011a), (3) evaluate if the inorganic elements are negatively associated with lipid and protein reserves, and (4) determine if nutrient reserves and molt intensity were correlated. None of the 14 contaminants analyzed were above threshold levels known to cause acute health problems in piscivorous birds. Body masses of plucked birds were within the normal reported range. Lipid reserves varied positively with hepatic concentrations of arsenic, copper, iron, nickel, lead, and selenium and negatively with mercury and magnesium. Protein reserves variety negatively with hepatic concentrations of arsenic, calcium, nickel, lead, and zinc and positively with aluminum, cadmium, and iron. A negative correlation was observed between chest molt and lipid reserves but not between nutrient reserves and other feather tracts. The relationships between lipid reserves and both mercury and selenium were consistent with current research on other piscivorous waterbirds at the Great Lakes and justify continued work to determine interactions of these contaminants in waterbirds that breed, stage, and winter in the region. PMID:26250452

  11. The Steroid Molting Hormone Ecdysone Regulates Sleep in Adult Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Ecdysone is the major steroid hormone in insects and plays essential roles in coordinating developmental transitions such as larval molting and metamorphosis through its active metabolite 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Although ecdysone is present throughout life in both males and females, its functions in adult physiology remain largely unknown. In this study we demonstrate that ecdysone-mediated signaling in the adult is intimately involved in transitions between the physiological states of sleep and wakefulness. First, administering 20E to adult Drosophila melanogaster promoted sleep in a dose-dependent manner, and it did so primarily by altering the length of sleep and wake bouts without affecting waking activity. Second, mutants for ecdysone synthesis displayed the “short-sleep phenotype,” and this was alleviated by administering 20E at the adult stage. Third, mutants for nuclear ecdysone receptors showed reduced sleep, and conditional overexpression of wild-type ecdysone receptors in the adult mushroom bodies resulted in an isoform-specific increase in sleep. Finally, endogenous ecdysone levels increased after sleep deprivation, and mutants defective for ecdysone signaling displayed little sleep rebound, suggesting that ecdysone is involved in homeostatic sleep regulation. In light of the recent finding that lethargus—a period at larval-stage transitions in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans—is a sleep-like state, our results suggest that sleep is functionally and mechanistically linked to a genetically programmed, quiescent behavioral state during development. PMID:20215472

  12. Immunization of cattle with Ra86 impedes Rhipicephalus appendiculatus nymphal-to-adult molting.

    PubMed

    Olds, Cassandra; Mwaura, Stephen; Crowder, David; Odongo, David; van Oers, Monique; Owen, Jeb; Bishop, Richard; Daubenberger, Claudia

    2012-06-01

    Commercial vaccines based on the tick gut protein Bm86 have been successful in controlling the one-host tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and provide heterologous protection against certain other non-target ixodid tick species. This cross protection, however, does not extend to the three-host tick R. appendiculatus, the vector of the protozoan parasite Theileria parva. When transmitted to cattle, T. parva causes the often fatal disease East Coast fever. Here, we used insect cell-expressed recombinant versions of the R. appendiculatus homologs of Bm86, named Ra86, to vaccinate cattle. We measured multiple fitness characteristics for ticks that were fed on cattle Ra86-vaccinated or unvaccinated. The Ra86 vaccination of cattle significantly decreased the molting success of nymphal ticks to the adult stage. Modeling simulations based on our empirical data suggest that repeated vaccinations using Ra86 could reduce tick populations over successive generations. Vaccination with Ra86 could thus form a component of integrated control strategies for R. appendiculatus leading to a reduction in use of environmentally damaging acaricides. PMID:22658857

  13. A comparison of cell killing by heat and/or x rays in Chinese hamster V79 cells, Friend erythroleukemia mouse cells, and human thymocyte MOLT-4 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Szekely, J.; Lobreau, A.; Azzam, E.I.

    1983-05-01

    The radiation and/or heat sensitivity of Chinese hamster V79 cells, Friend erythroleukemia (FELC) mouse cells, and MOLT-4 human transformed thymocytes were compared. MOLT-4 cells were more radiosensitive (D/sub o/=0.50 Gy) than FELC (D/sub o/ = 0.65 Gy) and V79 cells (D/sub o/ = 1.43 Gy). Arrhenius analysis showed that MOLT-4 cells were more heat sensitive than FELC or V79 cells below 42.0/sup 0/C, but more heat resistant at higher temperatures. In addition, the MOLT-4 cells showed a single-heat inactivation energy between 41.0 and 45.0/sup 0/C, while FELC and V79 cells both showed a transition in the inactivation energy at about 43.0 and 43.5/sup 0/C, respectively. These differences may be related to the fact that the upper temperature limit for the development of thermal tolerance during continuous heating was lower for MOLT-4 cells than for FELC or V79 cells. Killing of FELC and V79 cells was dependent on the sequence in which heat and X rays were applied, but the greatest effect was obtained when both treatments were given simultaneously. Recovery occurred when treatments were separated by incubation at 37.0/sup 0/C. The MOLT-4 cells did not show a sequence dependence for heating and irradiation. Survival of MOLT-4 cells after heating and/or irradiation was compared using trypan blue dye exclusion or colony formation. Both assays showed similar qualitative responses, but survival levels measured by the trypan blue assay were much higher than those determined from the colony-forming assay.

  14. Persistent reversal of P-glycoprotein-mediated daunorubicin resistance by tetrandrine in multidrug-resistant human T lymphoblastoid leukemia MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Li; Hirano, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Oka, Kitaro

    2003-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) represents a major problem in cancer chemotherapy. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the drug efflux pump that mediates this resistance, can be inhibited by compounds with a variety of pharmacological functions, thus circumventing the MDR phenotype. The present study was performed to evaluate a unique MDR-reversal feature of a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid tetrandrine (TET) in a P-gp expressing MOLT-4 MDR line (MOLT-4/DNR) established in our laboratory. Cell viability was determined by an MTT assay. P-gp function was characterized by determining the Rh123 accumulation/efflux capacity. P-gp overexpression in resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells was confirmed by flow cytometry analysis after staining with phycoerythrin-conjugated anti-P-gp monoclonal antibody 17F9. Compared to ciclosporin A (CsA), TET exhibited stronger activity to reverse drug resistance to daunorubicin (DNR), vinblastine (VLB) and doxorubicin (DOX) in MOLT-4/DNR cells. TET showed no cytotoxic effects on parental MOLT-4 cells lacking P-gp expression or on the resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells. TET modulated DNR cytotoxicity even after it was washed with the medium for 24 h, while CsA almost completely lost its reversal capability 24 h after washing. TET and CsA similarly increased the accumulation of Rh123 in resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells. However, TET inhibited Rh123 efflux from resistant cells even after washing with the medium, while CsA rapidly lost its ability to inhibit Rh123 efflux after washing. The current study suggests that TET enhances the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs in the P-gp expressing MDR cell line by modulating P-gp in a different manner to the well-known P-gp inhibitor CsA. PMID:14713364

  15. Knockdown of spalt function by RNAi causes de-repression of Hox genes and homeotic transformations in the crustacean Artemia franciscana

    E-print Network

    Averof, Michalis

    in the crustacean Artemia franciscana Tijana Copf a,b , Nicolas Rabet c , Michalis Averof a, a Institute or acts as their target. Here we study the role of spalt in the branchiopod crustacean Artemia franciscana

  16. Primary structures of decapod crustacean metallothioneins with special emphasis on freshwater and semi-terrestrial species.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, S N; Pedersen, K L; Højrup, P; Depledge, M H; Knudsen, J

    1996-01-01

    Cadmium injections induced only a single form of metallothionein (MT) in the midgut gland of Potamon potamios, whereas the same treatment induced two isoforms in Astacus astacus. The only difference between the two latter isoforms was that one had an extra N-terminal methionine residue. MT from P. potamios showed structural differences from other decapod crustacean MTs. It contained a Gly-Thr motif at positions 8 and 8a, which had previously been found only in certain vertebrate and molluscan MTs. Furthermore P. potamios MT contained two to three times as many glutamic acid residues as normally found in decapod crustacean MT. The primary structure of MT from the freshwater crayfish A. astacus showed a high degree of sequence identity with MT from other decapod crustaceans, especially the marine astacidean Homarus americanus, although two valine residues were unexpectedly found at positions 8 and 21, where lysine residues are normally found. PMID:8921011

  17. Primary structures of decapod crustacean metallothioneins with special emphasis on freshwater and semi-terrestrial species.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, S N; Pedersen, K L; Højrup, P; Depledge, M H; Knudsen, J

    1996-11-01

    Cadmium injections induced only a single form of metallothionein (MT) in the midgut gland of Potamon potamios, whereas the same treatment induced two isoforms in Astacus astacus. The only difference between the two latter isoforms was that one had an extra N-terminal methionine residue. MT from P. potamios showed structural differences from other decapod crustacean MTs. It contained a Gly-Thr motif at positions 8 and 8a, which had previously been found only in certain vertebrate and molluscan MTs. Furthermore P. potamios MT contained two to three times as many glutamic acid residues as normally found in decapod crustacean MT. The primary structure of MT from the freshwater crayfish A. astacus showed a high degree of sequence identity with MT from other decapod crustaceans, especially the marine astacidean Homarus americanus, although two valine residues were unexpectedly found at positions 8 and 21, where lysine residues are normally found. PMID:8921011

  18. [Effects of large bio-manipulation fish pen on community structure of crustacean zooplankton in Meiliang Bay of Taihu Lake].

    PubMed

    Ke, Zhi-Xin; Xie, Ping; Guo, Long-Gen; Xu, Jun; Zhou, Qiong

    2012-08-01

    In 2005, a large bio-manipulation pen with the stock of silver carp and bighead carp was built to control the cyanobacterial bloom in Meiliang Bay of Taihu Lake. This paper investigated the seasonal variation of the community structure of crustacean zooplankton and the water quality within and outside the pen. There were no significant differences in the environmental parameters and phytoplankton biomass within and outside the pen. The species composition and seasonal dynamics of crustacean zooplankton within and outside the pen were similar, but the biomass of crustacean zooplankton was greatly suppressed by silver carp and bighead carp. The total crustacean zooplankton biomass and cladocerans biomass were significantly lower in the pen (P < 0.05). In general, silver carp and bighead carp exerted more pressure on cladoceran species than on copepod species. A distinct seasonal succession of crustacean zooplankton was observed in the Bay. Many crustacean species were only dominated in given seasons. Large-sized crustacean (mainly Daphnia sp. and Cyclops vicnus) dominated in winter and spring, while small-sized species (mainly Bosmina sp., Ceriodaphnia cornuta, and Limnoithona sinensis) dominated in summer and autumn. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that water transparency, temperature, and phytoplankton biomass were the most important factors affecting the seasonal succession of the crustacean. PMID:23189709

  19. CHANGES IN NUCLEIC ACIDS OVER THE MOLT CYCLE IN RELATION TO FOOD AVAILABILITY AND TEMPERATURE IN HOMARUS AMERICANUS POSTLARVAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Postlarval lobsters Homarus americanus Milne Edwards hatched from three females collected in 1989 fr m Block Island Sound, Rhode Island were reared individually in the laboratory under nine treatment combinations of temperature (15, 18 and 200C) and feeding(starved, low ration, a...

  20. Developmental toxicity of testosterone in the crustacean Daphnia magna involves anti-ecdysteroidal activity.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xueyan; LeBlanc, Gerald A

    2002-11-01

    Testosterone has been shown to cause developmental arrest of embryonic daphnids (Daphnia magna). The present study was undertaken to determine whether this toxicity might be due to anti-ecdysteroidal activity associated with testosterone. The effect of testosterone on molt frequency of early instar daphnids was first evaluated to determine whether testosterone interfered with this ecdysteroid-regulated process. Molt frequency was delayed by exposure to testosterone and this effect was mitigated by co-exposure to the ecdysteroid 20-hydroxyecdysone. Testosterone exposure concentrations that interfered with molting also elicited developmental abnormalities among neonatal organisms produced by maternal organisms that were continuously exposed to testosterone or among embryos that were removed from unexposed mothers and exposed directly to the hormone. Embryos were significantly protected against the developmental toxicity of testosterone by co-exposure to 20-hydroxyecdysone. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the embryo toxicity of testosterone to daphnids is due largely to its ability to interfere with ecdysteroid control of development. Experiments next were conducted to determine whether testosterone interfered with ecdysteroidal activity by acting as an ecdysone receptor antagonist or by reducing endogenous ecdysone levels. Testosterone significantly antagonized the action of 20-hydroxyecdysone in an ecdysone-responsive cell line. Testosterone had no discernable effect on endogenous ecdysone levels in daphnids. These results demonstrated that (1). ecdysteroids regulate critical processes in daphnid embryo development, (2). testosterone elicits embryo toxicity to daphnids by interfering with ecdysteroid activity, and (3). ecdysteroid receptor antagonism could be one mechanism by which testosterone elicits these effects. PMID:12441123

  1. `Akohekohe response to flower availability: seasonal abundance, foraging, breeding, and molt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berlin, Kim E.; Simon, John C.; Pratt, T.K.; Kowalsky, James R.; Hatfield, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the relationship of flower availability to the seasonality of life history events of the `Akohekohe (Palmeria dolei), a primarily nectarivorous and endangered Hawaiian honeycreeper from montane rain forests on Maui, Hawai`i. For comparison, we also investigated temporal bird density and foraging behavior of three other competing Hawaiian honeycreepers: `Apapane (Himatione sanguinea), `I`iwi (Vestiaria coccinea), and Hawai`i `Amakihi (Hemignathus virens). All species except `Amakihi fed primarily on nectar of `Ohi?a-lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha), which produced flowers year-round but had an annual flowering peak in January. Flowers of several subcanopy shrubs and trees were important components of the diet for all nectarivores, and these were available seasonally depending upon the species. `Akohekohe densities did not change temporally, suggesting a relatively stable population residing above 1,700 m. Monthly densities of `Apapane, `I`iwi, and Hawai`i `Amakihi were positively correlated with monthly `Ohi?a-lehua flower abundance, and 50-80% of these populations departed temporarily from our high-elevation site in July. There was a positive correlation with the timing of Akohekohe breeding and high abundance of `Ohi?a-lehua bloom. Molt followed breeding. From a conservation perspective, these results show that `Akohekohe maintain a relatively stable population above the mid-elevation zone of disease transmission, particularly during the fall when `Ohi?a-lehua bloom decreases and mosquitoes increase. `Akohekohe remain on their territories partly by switching their foraging to subcanopy trees and shrubs, most of which require protection from feral pigs (Sus scrofa).

  2. Vertical and temporal distribution of pelagic decapod crustaceans over the shelf-break and middle slope in two contrasting zones around Mallorca (western Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão, Daniela S.; Torres, Asvin P.; Olivar, M. Pilar; Abelló, Pere

    2014-10-01

    The pelagic decapod crustacean fauna of two different zones (Sóller and Cabrera) with different hydrographic dynamics and oligotrophy levels was studied around Mallorca (western Mediterranean), the latter with a higher degree of oligotrophy than the former. Samples were taken with a Pelagic Trawl and an IKMT in the upper 600 m of the water column, targeting larger and middle-sized nektonic species, respectively. Fourteen species were collected: five dendrobranchiate shrimps, eight caridean shrimps and one scyllarid lobster. Some species were restricted to the shelf-break: Chlorotocus crassicornis and Plesionika heterocarpus. Others were exclusive of the middle slope: Pasiphaea multidentata, and Sergia robusta. Pasiphaea sivado and Gennadas elegans occurred in all pelagic strata. Multivariate analyses showed several distinct assemblages related to bathymetry and sampling depth. No significant differences were found concerning zone or sampled seasons. Bathymetrically, Deep Scattering Layers showed the highest diversity. No decapod crustaceans occurred in epipelagic daytime samples. The pelagic decapod community sampled was structured by both the geomorphology (and associated hydrographic characteristics over the shelf-break) and the influence of light in the water column. Size analysis showed species-specific patterns concerning size/age movements into the water column throughout the day-night cycle.

  3. Identification and cloning of a selenophosphate synthetase (SPS) from tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, and its transcription in relation to molt stages and following pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Maw-Sheng; Huang, Chang-Jen; Guo, Chih-Hung; Liu, Kuan-Fu; Tsai, Inn-Ho; Cheng, Winton

    2012-01-01

    Complementary (c)DNA encoding selenophosphate synthetase (SPS) messenger (m)RNA of the tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon, designated PmSPS, was obtained from the hepatopancreas by a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The 1582-bp cDNA contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 1248 bp, a 103-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), and a 231-bp 3'-UTR, which contained a conserved selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element, a conventional polyadenylation signal, and a poly A tail. The molecular mass of the deduced amino acid (aa) sequence (416 aa) was 45.5 kDa with an estimated pI of 4.85. It contained a putative selenocysteine residue which was encoded by the unusual stop codon, (275)TGA(277), which formed at the active site with residues Sec(58) and Lys(61). A comparison of amino acid sequences showed that PmSPS was more closely related to invertebrate SPS1, such as those of Heliothis virescens and Drosophila melanogaster a and b. PmSPS cDNA was synthesized in all tested tissues, especially in the hepatopancreas. PmSPS in the hepatopancreas of shrimp significantly increased after an injection with either Photobacterium damsela or white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in order to protect cells against damage from oxidation, and enhance the recycling of selenocysteine or selenium metabolism, indicating that PmSPS is involved in the disease-resistance response. The PmSPS expression by hemocytes significantly increased in stage C, and then gradually decreased until stage A, suggesting that the cloned PmSPS in hemocytes might play a role in viability by renewing hemocytes and antioxidative stress response for new exoskeleton synthesis during the molt cycle of shrimp. PMID:21664929

  4. Genes involved in thoracic exoskeleton formation during the pupal-to-adult molt in a social insect model, Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The insect exoskeleton provides shape, waterproofing, and locomotion via attached somatic muscles. The exoskeleton is renewed during molting, a process regulated by ecdysteroid hormones. The holometabolous pupa transforms into an adult during the imaginal molt, when the epidermis synthe3sizes the definitive exoskeleton that then differentiates progressively. An important issue in insect development concerns how the exoskeletal regions are constructed to provide their morphological, physiological and mechanical functions. We used whole-genome oligonucleotide microarrays to screen for genes involved in exoskeletal formation in the honeybee thoracic dorsum. Our analysis included three sampling times during the pupal-to-adult molt, i.e., before, during and after the ecdysteroid-induced apolysis that triggers synthesis of the adult exoskeleton. Results Gene ontology annotation based on orthologous relationships with Drosophila melanogaster genes placed the honeybee differentially expressed genes (DEGs) into distinct categories of Biological Process and Molecular Function, depending on developmental time, revealing the functional elements required for adult exoskeleton formation. Of the 1,253 unique DEGs, 547 were upregulated in the thoracic dorsum after apolysis, suggesting induction by the ecdysteroid pulse. The upregulated gene set included 20 of the 47 cuticular protein (CP) genes that were previously identified in the honeybee genome, and three novel putative CP genes that do not belong to a known CP family. In situ hybridization showed that two of the novel genes were abundantly expressed in the epidermis during adult exoskeleton formation, strongly implicating them as genuine CP genes. Conserved sequence motifs identified the CP genes as members of the CPR, Tweedle, Apidermin, CPF, CPLCP1 and Analogous-to-Peritrophins families. Furthermore, 28 of the 36 muscle-related DEGs were upregulated during the de novo formation of striated fibers attached to the exoskeleton. A search for cis-regulatory motifs in the 5?-untranslated region of the DEGs revealed potential binding sites for known transcription factors. Construction of a regulatory network showed that various upregulated CP- and muscle-related genes (15 and 21 genes, respectively) share common elements, suggesting co-regulation during thoracic exoskeleton formation. Conclusions These findings help reveal molecular aspects of rigid thoracic exoskeleton formation during the ecdysteroid-coordinated pupal-to-adult molt in the honeybee. PMID:23981317

  5. Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone, a possible endocrine regulator of ecdysis in the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta

    E-print Network

    Fuse, Megumi

    ecdysis because (i) its endocrine system is well characterized, (ii) it has identifiable cells fromCrustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone, a possible endocrine regulator of ecdysis in the tobacco hornworm State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 Fig. 3: Paired endocrine cells of the Third thoracic ganglia

  6. Fine structure and optical properties of biological polarizers in crustaceans and cephalopods

    E-print Network

    Caldwell, Roy

    Fine structure and optical properties of biological polarizers in crustaceans and cephalopods Tsyr signals, especially those based on color. To escape this problem, certain cephalopod mollusks types of polarizers found in cephalopods and stomatopods. Although all the polarizers share a somewhat

  7. Mass spectrometric evaluation of neuropeptidomic profiles upon heat stabilization treatment of neuroendocrine tissues in crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Robert M.; Greer, Tyler; Woodards, Nicole; Gemperline, Erin; Li, Lingjun

    2012-01-01

    Tissue heat stabilization is a vital component in successful mammalian neuropeptidomic studies. Heat stabilization using focused microwave irradiation, conventional microwave irradiation, boiling, and treatment with the Denator Stabilizor T1 have all proven effective in arresting post-mortem protein degradation. Although research has reported the presence of protein fragments in crustacean hemolymph when protease inhibitors were not added to the sample, the degree to which postmortem protease activity affects neuropeptidomic tissue studies in crustacean species has not been investigated in depth. This work examines the need for Stabilizor T1 or boiling tissue stabilization methods for neuropeptide studies of Callinectes sapidus (blue crab) pericardial organ tissue. Neuropeptides in stabilized and non-stabilized tissue are extracted using acidified methanol or N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) and analyzed by MALDI-TOF and nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS platforms. Post-mortem fragments did not significantly affect MALDI analysis in the range m/z 650–1600, but observations in ESI MS/MS experiments suggest that putative post-mortem fragments can mask neuropeptide signal and add spectral complexity to crustacean neuropeptidomic studies. The impact of the added spectral complexity did not dramatically affect the number of detected neuropeptides between stabilized and non-stabilized tissues. However, it is prudent that neuropeptidomic studies of crustacean species include a preliminary experiment using the heat stabilization method to assess the extent of neuropeptide masking by larger, highly charged molecular species. PMID:23227893

  8. The "Crustacean Seas" --an evolutionary perspective on the PontoCaspian peracarids

    E-print Network

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    biogeographic region, which includes the Black, Azov, Caspian, and Aral seas. However, the endemism in variedThe "Crustacean Seas" -- an evolutionary perspective on the Ponto­Caspian peracarids Melania E in the Black, Caspian, and Aral seas. This study tests several evolutionary scenarios based on the extent

  9. 2004 BOOK REVIEWS 1003 this is probably true of any book on crustacean groups,

    E-print Network

    Song, Yun S.

    2004 BOOK REVIEWS 1003 this is probably true of any book on crustacean groups, it would have been, and specifically Drosophila, data for many of the gene expression discussions in the book. The book is also lacking of science, including biology, mathematics, and computer science. Unfolded in this book is a story about

  10. MYSID CRUSTACEANS AS POTENTIAL TEST ORGANISMS FOR THE EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verslycke, Tim A., Nancy Fockedey, Charles L. McKenney, Jr., Stephen D. Roast, Malcolm B. Jones, Jan Mees and Colin R. Janssen. 2004. Mysid Crustaceans as Potential Test Organisms for the Evaluation of Environmental Endocrine Disruption: A Review. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 23(5):12...

  11. Genetic basis of eye and pigment loss in the cave crustacean, Asellus aquaticus

    E-print Network

    Patel, Nipam H.

    Genetic basis of eye and pigment loss in the cave crustacean, Asellus aquaticus Meredith E. Protasa and the loss of eyes and pigmentation, have evolved multiple times in a diverse assemblage of cave animals responsible for several pigmentation traits and eye loss. Our study provides support for the prediction

  12. Reef-associated crustacean fauna: biodiversity estimates using semi-quantitative sampling and DNA barcoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaisance, L.; Knowlton, N.; Paulay, G.; Meyer, C.

    2009-12-01

    The cryptofauna associated with coral reefs accounts for a major part of the biodiversity in these ecosystems but has been largely overlooked in biodiversity estimates because the organisms are hard to collect and identify. We combine a semi-quantitative sampling design and a DNA barcoding approach to provide metrics for the diversity of reef-associated crustacean. Twenty-two similar-sized dead heads of Pocillopora were sampled at 10 m depth from five central Pacific Ocean localities (four atolls in the Northern Line Islands and in Moorea, French Polynesia). All crustaceans were removed, and partial cytochrome oxidase subunit I was sequenced from 403 individuals, yielding 135 distinct taxa using a species-level criterion of 5% similarity. Most crustacean species were rare; 44% of the OTUs were represented by a single individual, and an additional 33% were represented by several specimens found only in one of the five localities. The Northern Line Islands and Moorea shared only 11 OTUs. Total numbers estimated by species richness statistics (Chao1 and ACE) suggest at least 90 species of crustaceans in Moorea and 150 in the Northern Line Islands for this habitat type. However, rarefaction curves for each region failed to approach an asymptote, and Chao1 and ACE estimators did not stabilize after sampling eight heads in Moorea, so even these diversity figures are underestimates. Nevertheless, even this modest sampling effort from a very limited habitat resulted in surprisingly high species numbers.

  13. The role of crustacean fisheries and aquaculture in global food security: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Bondad-Reantaso, Melba G; Subasinghe, Rohana P; Josupeit, Helga; Cai, Junning; Zhou, Xiaowei

    2012-06-01

    The 1996 World Food Summit defined food security as "Food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life". This paper looks at the status of production from both shrimp capture fisheries and shrimp aquaculture, as well as trade, in order to understand the contribution of the crustacean sector to overall fish production and thus to global food security. This paper also examines some sustainability issues that will potentially affect the contribution of the crustacean sector (particularly shrimp) to food security. These include sustainable shrimp capture fisheries, sustainable shrimp trade and sustainable shrimp aquaculture. The paper concludes that crustaceans are an important source of aquatic food protein. Production (as food and ornamental) and trade are extremely important for developing countries. It provides both economic development and empowerment in terms of contribution to GDP, consumption, employment, catch value and exports. The crustacean sector generates high value export products which enables producers to buy lower value products in the world market - thus a positive contribution to food security in both producing and exporting countries. PMID:22433997

  14. Sexual Contests in Aquatic Crustaceans: What's Physiology Got To Do with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keogh, Daniel P.; Sparkes, Timothy C.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a science laboratory on reproductive behavior and studies the dynamics in Lirceus, an aquatic crustacean of which the females evaluate the males' quality through mating contests. Explains collecting isopods and developing colonies in the lab environment. Investigates food deprivation, locomotor activity, and behavioral trials to…

  15. Development of a Method for Crustacean Allergens Using Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hiroyuki; Minatani, Tomiaki; Goto, Kotaro

    2015-01-01

    An LC/MS/MS analysis method was developed for crustacean allergens, tropomyosin, and arginine kinase. A protein extract from shrimp was reduced, alkylated, and digested by trypsin. Peptide spectra were obtained using full scan analysis by LC/MS/MS, and we determined a sequence through a protein search. 22ADTLEQQNK30, 92IQLLEEDLER101, 113LAEASQAADESER125, 134SLSDEER140, 153FLAEEADR160, and 190IVELEEELR198 of tropomyosin and 152VSSTLSSLEGELK164 and 217TFLVWVNEEDHLR229 of arginine kinase were selected as the specific peptides, and optimal multiple-reaction monitoring conditions were used. The results obtained through the LC/MS/MS analysis correlated well with those using the ELISA method for various crustacean samples (r2>0.9). Moreover, unregulated species, such as krill or insects, which produce positive results in some crustacean ELISA assays, can be differentiated by LC/MS/MS. These findings suggest that LC/MS/MS analysis may be effective for crustacean food allergen analysis. PMID:26525255

  16. Interannual variability and species turnover of crustacean zooplankton in Shield lakes

    E-print Network

    Arnott, Shelley

    Interannual variability and species turnover of crustacean zooplankton in Shield lakes Shelley E turnover rates and richness of the zooplankton annually over a 12-year period in eight lakes in south-central Ontario. Although species richness varied little among years (CV = 13%), apparent species turnover rates

  17. Sensitization pattern of crustacean-allergic individuals can indicate allergy to molluscs.

    PubMed

    Vidal, C; Bartolomé, B; Rodríguez, V; Armisén, M; Linneberg, A; González-Quintela, A

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the sensitization pattern of crustacean-allergic patients according to tolerance to molluscs. Thirty-one patients with anaphylaxis to crustaceans (14 with mollusc allergy and 17 with mollusc tolerance) were studied using skin prick tests (SPTs), specific IgEs (sIgEs) and SDS-PAGE immunoblotting. IgE-reactive shrimp proteins were identified by proteomic analyses. Patients with mollusc allergy presented more frequently SPTs positive to molluscs and higher sIgE titres in response to both molluscs and crustaceans. Shrimp-sIgE and rPen a1-sIgE values of 1.57 kUA /l and 4.38 kUA /l, respectively, showed positive likelihood ratios of 4.3 and 10.9 for the identification of mollusc allergy. Patients with mollusc allergy reacted more frequently to tropomyosin in immunoblots than did patients without it (93% vs 35%, respectively, P = 0.004). Reactivity to proteins other than tropomyosin (n = 14) was not different between the two groups. Among patients with crustacean anaphylaxis, patients with mollusc allergy and mollusc tolerance show a different pattern of sensitization, something that may help identify them. PMID:26186699

  18. DETERMINATION OF LETHAL DISSOLVED OXYGEN LEVELS FOR SELECTED MARINE AND ESTUARINE FISHES, CRUSTACEANS AND A BIVALVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to provide a database of the incipient lethal concentrations for reduced dissolved oxygen (DO) for selected marine and estuarine species including 12 species of fish, 9 crustaceans, and 1 bivalve. All species occur in the Virginian Province, USA, w...

  19. Insect protein as a partical replacement of fishmeal in the diets of juvenile fish and crustaceans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter represents a review of the published literature to determine if insect protein is an important supplement to - or even a replacement for - fishmeal in diets for juvenile fish and crustaceans. Fishmeal is becoming a finite resource. This chapter highlights areas of opportunity for prod...

  20. Absence of preserved glucosamine and amino acids in fossil crustacean exoskeletons

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmelmann, A.; Krause, R.G.F.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    No glucosamine and only traces of amino acids were detected in kerogen prepared from fossil crustacean exoskeletons. The elemental C/N ratios of the kerogen samples were above 20, indicating that most of the organic nitrogen was eliminated from the chitin biopolymer during diagenesis. The results contradict earlier reports of the stability of chitin during fossilization.

  1. Insect protein as a partial replacement of fishmeal in the diets of juvenile fish and crustaceans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter represents a review of the published literature to determine if insect protein is an important supplement to - or even a replacement for - fishmeal in diets for juvenile fish and crustaceans. Fishmeal is becoming a finite resource. This chapter highlights areas of opportunity for produc...

  2. Insect Protein as a partial Replacement of Fishmeal in the Diets of Juvenile Fish and Crustaceans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter represents a review of the published literature to determine if insect protein is an important supplement to - or even a replacement for - fishmeal in diets for juvenile fish and crustaceans. Fishmeal is becoming a finite resource. This chapter highlights areas of opportunity for produc...

  3. Changes in abundance and spatial distribution of geese molting near Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska: Interspecific competition or ecological change?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Mallek, E.J.; King, R.J.; Schmutz, J.A.; Bollinger, K.S.; Derksen, D.V.

    2008-01-01

    Goose populations molting in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska have changed in size and distribution over the past 30 years. Black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) are relatively stable in numbers but are shifting from large, inland lakes to salt marshes. Concurrently, populations of greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons frontalis) have increased seven fold. Populations of Canada geese (Branta canadensis and/or B. hutchinsii) are stable with little indication of distributional shifts. The lesser snow goose (Anser caerulescens caerulescens) population is proportionally small, but increasing rapidly. Coastline erosion of the Beaufort Sea has altered tundra habitats by allowing saltwater intrusion, which has resulted in shifts in composition of forage plant species. We propose two alternative hypotheses for the observed shift in black brant distribution. Ecological change may have altered optimal foraging habitats for molting birds, or alternatively, interspecific competition between black brant and greater white-fronted geese may be excluding black brant from preferred habitats. Regardless of the causative mechanism, the observed shifts in species distributions are an important consideration for future resource planning. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Sampling Daphnia's expressed genes: preservation, expansion and invention of crustacean genes with reference to insect genomes

    PubMed Central

    Colbourne, John K; Eads, Brian D; Shaw, Joseph; Bohuski, Elizabeth; Bauer, Darren J; Andrews, Justen

    2007-01-01

    Background Functional and comparative studies of insect genomes have shed light on the complement of genes, which in part, account for shared morphologies, developmental programs and life-histories. Contrasting the gene inventories of insects to those of the nematodes provides insight into the genomic changes responsible for their diversification. However, nematodes have weak relationships to insects, as each belongs to separate animal phyla. A better outgroup to distinguish lineage specific novelties would include other members of Arthropoda. For example, crustaceans are close allies to the insects (together forming Pancrustacea) and their fascinating aquatic lifestyle provides an important comparison for understanding the genetic basis of adaptations to life on land versus life in water. Results This study reports on the first characterization of cDNA libraries and sequences for the model crustacean Daphnia pulex. We analyzed 1,546 ESTs of which 1,414 represent approximately 787 nuclear genes, by measuring their sequence similarities with insect and nematode proteomes. The provisional annotation of genes is supported by expression data from microarray studies described in companion papers. Loci expected to be shared between crustaceans and insects because of their mutual biological features are identified, including genes for reproduction, regulation and cellular processes. We identify genes that are likely derived within Pancrustacea or lost within the nematodes. Moreover, lineage specific gene family expansions are identified, which suggest certain biological demands associated with their ecological setting. In particular, up to seven distinct ferritin loci are found in Daphnia compared to three in most insects. Finally, a substantial fraction of the sampled gene transcripts shares no sequence similarity with those from other arthropods. Genes functioning during development and reproduction are comparatively well conserved between crustaceans and insects. By contrast, genes that were responsive to environmental conditions (metal stress) and not sex-biased included the greatest proportion of genes with no matches to insect proteomes. Conclusion This study along with associated microarray experiments are the initial steps in a coordinated effort by the Daphnia Genomics Consortium to build the necessary genomic platform needed to discover genes that account for the phenotypic diversity within the genus and to gain new insights into crustacean biology. This effort will soon include the first crustacean genome sequence. PMID:17612412

  5. Seasonal dynamics of crustacean zooplankton community structure in Erhai Lake, a plateau lake, with reference to phytoplankton and environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Deng, Daogui; Zhang, Sai; Hu, Cuilin

    2014-09-01

    The seasonal dynamics of a crustacean zooplankton community in Erhai Lake was investigated from May 2010 to April 2011. In total, 11 species were recorded, including six (6 genera) cladoceran and five (5 genera) copepod species. The crustacean zooplankton densities ranged from 24.3 to 155.4 ind./L. In winter and spring, the large-bodied cladoceran Daphnia galeata dominated the crustacean plankton community. In summer and autumn, when the colonial or filamentous algae dominated the phytoplankton communities, the small-bodied species (e.g. B osmina fatalis, Ceriodaphnia quadrangular, and Mesocyclops leuckarti) replaced the large-bodied ones. One-way ANOVA and redundancy analysis revealed that community structure was dependent upon total nitrogen, total phosphorus, water temperature, transparency, and the biomass of small algae. The variation in both phytoplankton structure and environmental variables were important factors in the seasonal succession of crustacean zooplankton structure in Erhai Lake.

  6. Ultrastructure and development of the new stylets inside pre-molting first instar nymphs of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ultrastructure and development of new stylets was studied in pre-molting first instar nymph of Diaphorina citri. Two oval-shaped masses of cuboidal hypodermal cells, located in the cephalic region, had long extensions that ended with developing pairs of mandibular and maxillary stylets, apparent...

  7. The in vivo and in vitro effect of a fructooligosaccharide prebiotic combined with alfalfa molt diets on egg production and salmonella in laying hens 

    E-print Network

    Donalson, Lisa Michelle

    2005-08-29

    have encouraged the industry to seek alternatives to feed withdrawal with one alternative being feeding a high fiber diet like alfalfa. Alfalfa is high in protein, but low in energy which is desirable for a molt diet. Alfalfa??s fermentation properties...

  8. Evaluation of the use of alfalfa diets as an alternative to feed deprivation for the induction of molt in commercial laying chickens 

    E-print Network

    Landers, Kristin Lynn

    2004-11-15

    provide available energy for the hens, while still inducing a molt that is economically advantageous to producers. Alfalfa, provided in meal or pelleted form, provides only 1/2 the metabolizable energy and 1/4 of the calcium required of a laying hen...

  9. Scale Dependence of the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Crustaceans Thin Films as Biomimetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Devendra; Qu, Tao; Tomar, Vikas

    2015-04-01

    The exoskeletons of crustacean species in the form of thin films have been investigated by several researchers to better understand the role played by the exoskeletal structure in affecting the functioning of species such as shrimps, crabs, and lobsters. These species exhibit similar designs in their exoskeleton microstructure, such as a Bouligand pattern (twisted plywood structure), layers of different thickness across cross section, change in mineral content through the layers, etc. Different parts of crustaceans exhibit a significant variation in mechanical properties based on the variation in the above-mentioned parameters. This change in mechanical properties has been analyzed by using imaging techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and by using mechanical characterization techniques such as nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy. In this article, the design principles of these biological composites are discussed based on two shrimp species: Rimicaris exoculata and Pandalus platyceros.

  10. Selfing in a malacostracan crustacean: why a tanaidacean but not decapods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakui, Keiichi; Hiruta, Chizue

    2013-09-01

    The crustacean class Malacostraca, with over 22,000 species, includes commercially important members, such as crabs, shrimps, and lobsters. A few simultaneous hermaphrodites are known in this group, but self-fertilization was unknown. Here we show, through microscopy and breeding experiments, that the simultaneously hermaphroditic malacostracan Apseudes sp. (order Tanaidacea) can self-fertilize; individuals reared in isolation become hermaphroditic via a male-like phase and produce eggs that develop into fertile adults. Although selfing occurs in crustaceans like the Branchiopoda, in which simultaneous hermaphrodites have the sex ducts united, in decapods the separation of gonadal ducts and gonopores, specialized mating organs, and complex mating behavior appear to have constrained the evolution of selfing. In contrast, in most tanaidaceans, sperm is released externally by a male and reaches the eggs in the female brood pouch, where fertilization occurs. This mode of fertilization permitted Apseudes sp. to achieve selfing without large modifications in morphology or behavior.

  11. Crustacean assemblages in a polluted estuary from South-Western Spain.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moyano, J Emilio; García-Asencio, Isabel

    2010-10-01

    The spatial-temporal variation in crustacean assemblages of the Odiel-Tinto estuary, one of the most polluted areas in the world, was studied in 2000, 2002 and 2004. The crustacean assemblages were mainly established according to the natural gradient from estuarine to marine environment (based on water and sediment characteristics such as dissolved oxygen, salinity, granulometry or organic content). Pollutants such as copper, zinc or phosphates could also explain partially this pattern based on BIOENV and canonical correspondence analyses. However, there were clear symptoms of perturbation, mainly in the inner areas, such as a low number of species and a low abundance, especially in relation to the typical estuarine species (e.g. Cyathura carinata, Corophium spp.). This study provides baseline information which can be used as a reference point in a long-term perspective. PMID:20701928

  12. Effects of temperature and salinity on the development of the amphipod crustacean Eogammarus sinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Suyan; Fang, Jianguang; Zhang, Jihong; Jiang, Zengjie; Mao, Yuze; Zhao, Fazhen

    2013-09-01

    The amphipod crustacean Eogammarus sinensis has useful features that make it suitable for use in the aquaculture of fish and large decapod crustaceans. In this study, we investigated the effects of temperature and salinity on the development, fecundity, survival, and growth rate of E. sinensis. The results show that temperature significantly affected E. sinensis development, but salinity. As temperature increased, the duration of E. sinensis embryonic development decreased. Fecundity was affected significantly by temperature and the combination of temperature and salinity, but by salinity alone. In addition, high temperatures accelerated E. sinensis juvenile growth rates, whereas high salinity reduced it. Therefore, our data suggest that E. sinensis tolerates a wide range of salinities and that temperature has more significant effects than salinity on the embryonic development, fecundity, and growth of E. sinensis. Our results shall be useful for mass production of this species for use in aquaculture.

  13. Roles of small RNAs in the immune defense mechanisms of crustaceans.

    PubMed

    He, Yaodong; Ju, Chenyu; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    Small RNAs, 21-24 nucleotides in length, are non-coding RNAs found in most multicellular organisms, as well as in some viruses. There are three main types of small RNAs including microRNA (miRNA), small-interfering RNA (siRNA), and piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA). Small RNAs play key roles in the genetic regulation of eukaryotes; at least 50% of all eukaryote genes are the targets of small RNAs. In recent years, studies have shown that some unique small RNAs are involved in the immune response of crustaceans, leading to lower or higher immune responses to infections and diseases. SiRNAs could be used as therapy for virus infection. In this review, we provide an overview of the diverse roles of small RNAs in the immune defense mechanisms of crustaceans. PMID:26210184

  14. Abundance of ringed seals (Pusa hispida) in the fjords of Spitsbergen, Svalbard, during the peak molting period

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krafft, B.A.; Kovacs, K.M.; Andersen, M.; Aars, J.; Lydersen, C.; Ergon, T.; Haug, T.

    2006-01-01

    Ringed seal (Pusa hispida) abundance in Spitsbergen, Svalbard, was estimated during the peak molting period via aerial, digital photographic surveys. A total of 9,145 images, covering 41.7%?100% of the total fast-ice cover (1,496 km2) of 18 different fjords and bays, were inspected for the presence of ringed seals. A total of 1,708 seals were counted, and when accounting for ice areas that were not covered by images, a total of 3,254 (95% CI: 3,071?3,449) ringed seals were estimated to be hauled out during the surveys. Extensive behavioral data from radio-tagged ringed seals (collected in a companion study) from one of the highest density fjords during the molting period were used to create a model that predicts the proportion of seals hauled out on any given date, time of day, and under various meteorological conditions. Applying this model to the count data from each fjord, we estimated that a total of 7,585 (95% CI: 6,332-9,085) ringed seals were present in the surveyed area during the peak molting period. Data on interannual variability in ringed seal abundance suggested higher numbers of seals in Van Keulenfjorden in 2002 compared to 2003, while other fjords with very stable ice cover showed no statistical differences. Poor ice conditions in general in 2002 probably resulted in seals from a wide area coming to Van Keulenfjorden (a large fjord with stable ice in 2002). The total estimated number of ringed seals present in the study area at the time of the survey must be regarded as a population index, or at least a minimum estimate for the area, because it does not account for individuals leaving and arriving, which might account for a considerable number of animals. The same situation is likely the case for many other studies reporting aerial census data for ringed seals. To achieve accurate estimates of population sizes from aerial surveys, more extensive knowledge of ringed seal behavior will be required.

  15. Crustacean (malacostracan) Hox genes and the evolution of the arthropod trunk.

    PubMed

    Abzhanov, A; Kaufman, T C

    2000-06-01

    Representatives of the Insecta and the Malacostraca (higher crustaceans) have highly derived body plans subdivided into several tagma, groups of segments united by a common function and/or morphology. The tagmatization of segments in the trunk, the part of the body between head and telson, in both lineages is thought to have evolved independently from ancestors with a distinct head but a homonomous, undifferentiated trunk. In the branchiopod crustacean, Artemia franciscana, the trunk Hox genes are expressed in broad overlapping domains suggesting a conserved ancestral state (Averof, M. and Akam, M. (1995) Nature 376, 420-423). In comparison, in insects, the Antennapedia-class genes of the homeotic clusters are more regionally deployed into distinct domains where they serve to control the morphology of the different trunk segments. Thus an originally Artemia-like pattern of homeotic gene expression has apparently been modified in the insect lineage associated with and perhaps facilitating the observed pattern of tagmatization. Since insects are the only arthropods with a derived trunk tagmosis tested to date, we examined the expression patterns of the Hox genes Antp, Ubx and abd-A in the malacostracan crustacean Porcellio scaber (Oniscidae, Isopoda). We found that, unlike the pattern seen in Artemia, these genes are expressed in well-defined discrete domains coinciding with tagmatic boundaries which are distinct from those of the insects. Our observations suggest that, during the independent tagmatization in insects and malacostracan crustaceans, the homologous 'trunk' genes evolved to perform different developmental functions. We also propose that, in each lineage, the changes in Hox gene expression pattern may have been important in trunk tagmatization. PMID:10804167

  16. Links between Osmoregulation and Nitrogen-Excretion in Insects and Crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Weihrauch, Dirk; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    The epithelia involved in ionoregulation and detoxification in crustaceans and insects are quite distinct: the gills, hepatopancreas, and antennal gland serve these functions in crustaceans, whereas the Malpighian tubules, hindgut, and, to some extent, the midgut, are involved in insects. This article compares the means by which the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and the vacuolar type H(+)-ATPase are used to energize ionoregulatory processes in both groups. The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase is particularly important as a generator of both H(+) gradients and transmembrane electrical gradients that can be used to energize electroneutral or electrogenic exchange of Na(+) and/or K(+) for H(+). In addition to cation:proton antiporters, epithelia in both groups depend upon the activity of Na(+):K(+):2Cl(-) cotransporters, Cl(-)/[Formula: see text] exchangers, and channels for K(+) and Cl(-) for transepithelial ion transport. This article also contrasts the dominant role of ammonia as the primary nitrogenous waste in crustaceans, with the excretion of ammonia, uric acid, or both in insects. PMID:25888942

  17. Cross communication between signaling pathways: juvenoid hormones modulate ecdysteroid activity in a crustacean.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xueyan; Leblanc, Gerald A

    2004-10-01

    Methyl farnesoate is a juvenoid hormone that regulates a variety of processes in crustaceans including male sex determination among daphnids (Branchiopoda, Cladocera). The synthetic juvenoids pyriproxyfen and fenoxycarb mimic the action of methyl farnesoate in daphnids. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that juvenoids also can regulate ecdysteroid activity in a crustacean (Daphnia magna). Methyl farnesoate, pyriproxyfen, and fenoxycarb all disrupted ecdysteroid-regulated aspects of embryo development in daphnids. Exposure of ecdysteroid-responsive cells to 20-hydroxyecdysone reduced cell proliferation and increased mRNA levels of the ecdysone receptor and its partner protein ultraspiracle. Co-treatment of cells with the juvenoid pyriproxyfen attenuated all of these ecdysteroid mediated responses. While juvenoids functioned as anti-ecdysteroids in both intact embryos and in cultured cells, 20-hydroxyecdysone showed no evidence of acting as an anti-juvenoid. The combined effects of pyroproxyfen with the ecdysteroid synthesis inhibitor fenarimol and the ecdysteroid receptor antagonist testosterone were evaluated in an effort to discern whether the action of the juvenoids were additive with those of know anti-ecdysteroids. The anti-ecdysteroid effects of pyriproxyfen were non-additive with those of either anti-ecdysteroid. Rather, joint effects conformed to a model of synergy. These results demonstrated that juvenoids elicit anti-ecdysteroidal activity in a crustacean through a unique mechanism of action. A model involving receptor partner deprivation is proposed that explains the synergistic interactions observed. PMID:15449346

  18. Aminergic modulation of the myogenic heart in the branchiopod crustacean Triops longicaudatus.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Hiroshi

    2003-07-01

    Although crustaceans typically have a neurogenic heart, the primitive crustacean Triops longicaudatus has a myogenic heart with the heartbeat arising from the endogenous rhythmic activity of the myocardium. In the present investigation, the effects of six biogenic amines, epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, octopamine, serotonin and histamine, on the myogenic heart of T. longicaudatus were examined. Epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine and octopamine accelerated the heartbeat, increasing both the frequency and amplitude of the action potential of the myocardium in a concentration dependent manner. The ability of epinephrine and norepinephrine to produce the acceleratory effects was more potent than that of dopamine and octopamine; the threshold concentrations of epinephrine and norepinephrine were approximately 10(-10) M and those of dopamine and octopamine approximately 10(-7) M. Serotonin weakly inhibited the heartbeat, decreasing both the frequency and amplitude of the myocardial action potential in a concentration dependent manner with a threshold concentration of approximately 10(-6) M. Histamine exhibited no effect on the heartbeat. The results provide the first evidence for direct effects of amines on the crustacean myocardium and suggest neurohormonal regulation of the myogenic heart in T. longicaudatus. PMID:12867712

  19. Adult neurogenesis: Examples from the decapod crustaceans and comparisons with mammals

    PubMed Central

    Sandeman, David C.; Bazin, Francois; Beltz, Barbara S.

    2011-01-01

    Defining evolutionary origins is a means of understanding an organism’s position within the integrated web of living beings, and to not only to trace characteristics back in time, but also to project forward in an attempt to reveal relationships with more recently evolved forms. Both the vertebrates and arthropods possess condensed nervous systems, but this is dorsal in the vertbrates and ventral in the arthropods. Also, whereas the nervous system in the vertebrates develops from a neural tube in the embryo, that of the arthropods comes from an ectodermal plate. Despite these apparently fundamental differences, it is now generally accepted that life-long neurogenesis, the generation of functionally integrated neurons from progenitor cells, is a common feature of the adult brains of a variety of organisms, ranging from insects and crustaceans to birds and mammals. Among decapod crustaceans, there is evidence for adult neurogenesis in basal species of the Dendrobranchiata, as well as in more recent terrestrial, marine and fresh-water species. The widespread nature of this phenomenon in decapod species may relate to the importance of the adult-born neurons, although their functional contribution is not yet known. The many similarities between the systems generating neurons in the adult brains of decapod crustaceans and mammals, reviewed in this paper, suggest that adult neurogenesis is governed by common ancestral mechanisms that have been retained in a phylogenetically broad group of species. PMID:21396485

  20. Comparative toxicology for risk assessment of marine fishes and crustaceans. [Cyprinodon variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, G.W. II; Rosen, A.E. )

    1988-05-01

    The goal of this study was to collect data on the effects of chemicals on marine fishes and crustaceans and to evaluate the predictive power of the data for assessing risks to marine resources. The data sets consisted of acute median lethal concentrations (LC{sub 50s}) and chronic maximum acceptable toxicant concentrations (MATCs). They were analyzed with regression models and simple comparisons. The conclusions include the following: (1) the variability found in the marine data was comparable to that found in freshwater data; (2) the standard marine test fish Cyprinodon variegatus appears to be representative of marine fishes; (3) the responses of marine crustaceans are so highly diverse that the concept of a representative crustacean is questionable; (4) mysid and penaeid shrimp appear to be particularly sensitive to toxic chemicals. These conclusions are subject to the constraints of the existing limited data base and should be confirmed by a systematic study of the relative sensitivity of marine organisms to chemicals with diverse modes of action.

  1. Variation of heavy metals within and among feathers of birds of prey: effects of molt and external contamination.

    PubMed

    Dauwe, T; Bervoets, L; Pinxten, R; Blust, R; Eens, M

    2003-01-01

    In this study we examined the effect of external contamination on the heavy metal (Ag, Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) concentration in feathers. We compared the heavy metal content among the 10 primary wing feathers of sparrowhawks (Accipiter nisus), little owls (Athene nocta) and barn owls (Tyto alba) and the variation within the outermost tail feather of sparrowhawks and tawny owls (Strix aluco). The concentration of Hg was significantly higher in feathers molted first, suggesting that levels in feathers reflect levels in the blood during formation. For some other elements (Al, Co, Ni, Pb, Zn) on the other hand, there are strong indications that external contamination may have an important impact on the levels detected in the feathers. This should be taken into account in future monitoring studies. PMID:12758023

  2. Transcriptome Analysis of Integument Differentially Expressed Genes in the Pigment Mutant (quail) during Molting of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tingcai; Li, Qiongyan; Wu, Yuqian; Zhou, Mengting; Zhang, Yinxia; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-01-01

    In the silkworm Bombyx mori, pigment mutants with diverse body colors have been maintained throughout domestication for about 5000 years. The silkworm larval body color is formed through the mutual interaction of melanin, ommochromes, pteridines and uric acid. These pigments/compounds are synthesized by the cooperative action of various genes and enzymes. Previous reports showed that melanin, ommochrome and pteridine are increased in silkworm quail (q) mutants. To understand the pigment increase and alterations in pigment synthesis in q mutant, transcriptome profiles of the silkworm integument were investigated at 16 h after head capsule slippage in the fourth molt in q mutants and wild-type (Dazao). Compared to the wild-type, 1161 genes were differentially expressed in the q mutant. Of these modulated genes, 62.4% (725 genes) were upregulated and 37.6% (436 genes) were downregulated in the q mutant. The molecular function of differently expressed genes was analyzed by Blast2GO. The results showed that upregulated genes were mainly involved in protein binding, small molecule binding, transferase activity, nucleic acid binding, specific DNA-binding transcription factor activity and chromatin binding, while exclusively down-expressed genes functioned in oxidoreductase activity, cofactor binding, tetrapyrrole binding, peroxidase activity and pigment binding. We focused on genes related to melanin, pteridine and ommochrome biosynthesis; transport of uric acid; and juvenile hormone metabolism because of their importance in integument coloration during molting. This study identified differently expressed genes implicated in silkworm integument formation and pigmentation using silkworm q mutant. The results estimated the number and types of genes that drive new integument formation. PMID:24718369

  3. Measurement of DNA damage and apoptosis in Molt-4 cells after in vitro exposure to radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Hook, Graham J; Zhang, Peng; Lagroye, I; Li, Li; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Moros, Eduardo G; Straube, William L; Pickard, William F; Baty, Jack D; Roti Roti, Joseph L

    2004-02-01

    To determine whether exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation can induce DNA damage or apoptosis, Molt-4 T lymphoblastoid cells were exposed with RF fields at frequencies and modulations of the type used by wireless communication devices. Four types of frequency/modulation forms were studied: 847.74 MHz code-division multiple-access (CDMA), 835.62 MHz frequency-division multiple-access (FDMA), 813.56 MHz iDEN(R) (iDEN), and 836.55 MHz time-division multiple-access (TDMA). Exponentially growing cells were exposed to RF radiation for periods up to 24 h using a radial transmission line (RTL) exposure system. The specific absorption rates used were 3.2 W/kg for CDMA and FDMA, 2.4 or 24 mW/kg for iDEN, and 2.6 or 26 mW/kg for TDMA. The temperature in the RTLs was maintained at 37 degrees C +/- 0.3 degrees C. DNA damage was measured using the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay. The annexin V affinity assay was used to detect apoptosis. No statistically significant difference in the level of DNA damage or apoptosis was observed between sham-treated cells and cells exposed to RF radiation for any frequency, modulation or exposure time. Our results show that exposure of Molt-4 cells to CDMA, FDMA, iDEN or TDMA modulated RF radiation does not induce alterations in level of DNA damage or induce apoptosis. PMID:14731070

  4. Threshold Level of p53 Required for the Induction of Apoptosis in X-Irradiated MOLT-4 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Hisako . E-mail: nakano@rinshoken.or.jp; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Shinohara, Kunio

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the threshold level for the initiation of apoptosis by studying the quantitative aspect of p53 response to DNA damage in individual cells, to better understand the process in X-ray-induced p53-dependent apoptosis. Methods and Materials: Time-sequential changes in p53 protein level were obtained for X-irradiated MOLT-4 cells using flow cytometry and analyzed. Results: The changes in the cellular frequency distribution pattern of p53 content could be divided into two parts at a certain p53 level. The p53 vs. side-scatter in flow cytometry showed the sequential changes of p53 increase followed by an increase in cell death. On the basis of these results we determined a threshold level of p53 for the initiation of apoptosis. The level was estimated to be (1.08 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup 5} molecules per cell, which was approximately threefold higher than the mean content of control cells. The minimum times for p53 level to reach this threshold level were independent of X-ray dose and 1.4-1.6 h. The times for the signal transduction from the p53 accumulation to disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and cell death were 1.6, 2.1, and 2.8 h, respectively. Conclusions: The threshold level of p53 for the initiation of apoptosis and the time sequence in the course of apoptotic events were determined in X-irradiated MOLT-4 cells.

  5. Thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.; Soliman, M. A.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Cox, K. E.; Lawson, D.

    1975-01-01

    The thermochemical production of hydrogen is described along with the HYDRGN computer program which attempts to rate the various thermochemical cycles. Specific thermochemical cycles discussed include: iron sulfur cycle; iron chloride cycle; and hybrid sulfuric acid cycle.

  6. Circadian rhythms are not involved in the regulation of circannual reproductive cycles in a sub-tropical bird, the spotted munia.

    PubMed

    Budki, Puja; Malik, Shalie; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, Vinod

    2014-07-15

    Circannual rhythms regulate seasonal reproduction in many vertebrates. The present study investigated whether circannual reproductive phenotypes (rhythms in growth of gonads and molt) were generated independently of the circadian clocks in the subtropical non-photoperiodic spotted munia (Lonchura punctulata). Birds were subjected to light:dark (LD) cycles with identical light but varying dark hours, such that the period of LD cycle (T) equaled 16 h (T16; 12 h L:4 h D), 21 h (T21; 12 h L:9 h D), 24 h (T24; 12 h L:12 h D) and 27 h (T27; 12 h L:15 h D), or to continuous light (LL, 24 h L:0 h D) at ~18°C. During the ~21 month exposure, munia underwent at least two cycles of gonadal development and molt; changes in body mass were not rhythmic. This was similar to the occurrence of annual cycles in reproduction and molt observed in wild birds. A greater asynchrony between circannual cycles of gonad development and molt indicated their independent regulation. Females showed reproductive rhythms with similar circannual periods, whilst in males, circannual periods measured between peak gonadal size were longer in T21 and T24 than in T16 or T27. This suggested a sex-dependent timing of annual reproduction in the spotted munia. Also, food availability periods may not influence the circannual timing of reproduction, as shown by the results on the rhythm in gonadal growth and regression in munia under T-photocycles and LL that provided differential light (feeding) hours. Further, a short-term experiment revealed that activity-rest patterns in munia were synchronized with T-photocycles, but were arrhythmic under LL. We conclude that circadian rhythms are not involved in the timing of the annual reproductive cycle in the spotted munia. PMID:24803462

  7. Larval ecology and synchronous reproduction of two crustacean species : Semibalanus balanoides in New England, USA and Gecarcinus quadratus in Veraguas, Panama

    E-print Network

    Gyory, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The environmental cues for synchronous reproduction were investigated for two highly abundant, ecologically important crustacean species: the temperate acorn barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides, and the tropical terrestrial ...

  8. De novo assembly and characterization of a maternal and developmental transcriptome for the emerging model crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arthropods are the most diverse animal phylum, but their genomic resources are relatively few. While the genome of the branchiopod Daphnia pulex is now available, no other large-scale crustacean genomic resources are available for comparison. In particular, genomic resources are lacking for the most tractable laboratory model of crustacean development, the amphipod Parhyale hawaiensis. Insight into shared and divergent characters of crustacean genomes will facilitate interpretation of future developmental, biomedical, and ecological research using crustacean models. Results To generate a transcriptome enriched for maternally provided and zygotically transcribed developmental genes, we created cDNA from ovaries and embryos of P. hawaiensis. Using 454 pyrosequencing, we sequenced over 1.1 billion bases of this cDNA, and assembled them de novo to create, to our knowledge, the second largest crustacean genomic resource to date. We found an unusually high proportion of C2H2 zinc finger-containing transcripts, as has also been reported for the genome of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Consistent with previous reports, we detected trans-spliced transcripts, but found that they did not noticeably impact transcriptome assembly. Our assembly products yielded 19,067 unique BLAST hits against nr (E-value cutoff e-10). These included over 400 predicted transcripts with significant similarity to D. pulex sequences but not to sequences of any other animal. Annotation of several hundred genes revealed P. hawaiensis homologues of genes involved in development, gametogenesis, and a majority of the members of six major conserved metazoan signaling pathways. Conclusions The amphipod P. hawaiensis has higher transcript complexity than known insect transcriptomes, and trans-splicing does not appear to be a major contributor to this complexity. We discuss the importance of a reliable comparative genomic framework within which to consider findings from new crustacean models such as D. pulex and P. hawaiensis, as well as the need for development of further substantial crustacean genomic resources. PMID:22118449

  9. Survivorship in micro fungi and crustacean resting stages during ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum land testing of EXPOSE unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Victor; Alekseev, Victor; Novikova, Nataliya; Sychev, Vladimir; Levinskikh, Margarita; Deshevaya, Elena; Brancelj, Anton; Malyavin, Stanislav

    Dormancy protects animals and plants in harsh environmental conditions within a special resting phases of life cycle lasting from months up to hundred years. This phenomenon is perspective for space researches on interplanetary quarantine within space missions. Direct experiments in open space supported in principle the fact of survivorship of bacteria and fungi spores in open space during long time experiments (Novikova et al. 2007). The rate of survivorship in long-term mission was low but enough to conclude that biological invasion to Mars is a real danger. The possibility for resting stages to survive under UV treatment in vacuum without some protection was not clear. To test it dormant stages (spores) of primitive fungi Aspergillus versicolor, Aspergillus sydowii, Penicillium expansum, and Penicillium aurantiogriseum derived from ISS environment were used in the land EXPOSE imitation of outside space station UV and vacuum conditions. Survivorship in resting eggs of some crustaceans with dried (cladoceran Daphnia magna, fair-shrimp Streptocephalus torvicornis and ostracode Eucypris ornate from hemi desert Caspian area) and wet diapause state (copepod Mixodiaptomus tatricus from the Tatra mountains, altitude 1510 m) was tested also. The total UV dose of 9,1x10 to the 4th KJ/m2 during this imitation was accomplished with a SOL 2000 sun simulator lamp. The final vacuum value achieved during EST was 10 to the minus 6 Pa. Temperature during the experiment fluctuated in the range 19-25 o C. Micro fungi showed a high level of survivorship in samples treated with UV samples varied from 95 till 100 Supported by RFBR grant 07-04-00006.

  10. Detrimental effect of CO2-driven seawater acidification on a crustacean brine shrimp, Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao-qun; Jeswin, Joseph; Shen, Kai-li; Lablche, Meghan; Wang, Ke-jian; Liu, Hai-peng

    2015-03-01

    The effects of the decline in ocean pH, termed as ocean acidification due to the elevated carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, on calcifying organisms such as marine crustacean are unclear. To understand the possible effects of ocean acidification on the physiological responses of a marine model crustacean brine shrimp, Artemia sinica, three groups of the cysts or animals were raised at different pH levels (8.2 as control; 7.8 and 7.6 as acidification stress according to the predictions for the end of this century and next century accordingly) for 24 h or two weeks, respectively, followed by examination of their hatching success, morphological appearance such as deformity and microstructure of animal body, growth (i.e. body length), survival rate, expression of selected genes (involved in development, immunity and cellular activity etc), and biological activity of several key enzymes (participated in antioxidant responses and physiological reactions etc). Our results clearly demonstrated that the cysts hatching rate, growth at late stage of acidification stress, and animal survival rate of brine shrimp were all reduced due to lower pH level (7.6 & 7.8) on comparison to the control group (pH 8.2), but no obvious change in deformity or microstructure of brine shrimp was present under these acidification stress by microscopy observation and section analysis. In addition, the animals subjected to a lower pH level of seawater underwent changes on their gene expressions, including Spätzle, MyD88, Notch, Gram-negative bacteria binding protein, prophenoloxidase, Apoptosis inhibitor 5, Trachealess, Caveolin-1 and Cyclin K. Meanwhile, several key enzyme activities, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase and acid phosphatase, were also affected by acidified seawater stress. Taken together, our findings supports the idea that CO2-driven seawater acidification indeed has a detrimental effect, in case of hatching success, growth and survival, on a model crustacean brine shrimp, which will increase the risk of juvenile brine shrimp and possibly also other crustaceans, as important live feeds for aquaculture being introduced in the ecosystem especially the marine food webs. PMID:25555807

  11. Pile-Driving Pressure and Particle Velocity at the Seabed: Quantifying Effects on Crustaceans and Groundfish.

    PubMed

    Miller, James H; Potty, Gopu R; Kim, Hui-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the effects of pile driving on crustaceans, groundfish, and other animals near the seafloor. Three different waves were investigated, including the compressional wave, shear wave, and interface wave. A finite element (FE) technique was employed in and around the pile, whereas a parabolic equation (PE) code was used to predict propagation at long ranges from the pile. Pressure, particle displacement, and particle velocity are presented as a function of range at the seafloor for a shallow-water environment near Rhode Island. We discuss the potential effects on animals near the seafloor. PMID:26611024

  12. The role of epibenthic crustacean predators in an estuarine food web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffaelli, D.; Conacher, A.; McLachlan, H.; Emes, C.

    1989-02-01

    Two field experiments were carried out on an estuarine intertidal mudflat, enclosing varying densities of the crustacean predators Carcinus maenas and Crangon crangon. Effects of predation on prey densities were few and limited to cages with abnormally high densities of crabs. In both experiments there were significant effects on the size structure of the amphipod Corophium volutator. The results are compared with those from other caging experiments and it is suggested that, where marked, predation effects have been recorded unnaturally high densities of predators were used.

  13. Effects of naturally occurring polymethyoxyflavonoids on cell growth, p-glycoprotein function, cell cycle, and apoptosis of daunorubicin-resistant T lymphoblastoid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kimiko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Kagami, Keisuke; Henmi, Kayo; Toyoda, Hiroo; Kaise, Toshikazu; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2010-03-01

    Effects of polymethoxyflavonoids tangeretin and nobiletin and the related polyphenolic compounds baicalein, wogonin, quercetin, and epigallocatechin gallate on the cell growth, P-glycoprotein function, apoptosis, and cell cycle of human T lymphoblastoid leukemia MOLT-4 and its daunorubicin-resistant cells were investigated. The IC50 values of these compounds on the cell growth were 7.1-32.2 micromol/L, and the inhibitory effects were observed to be almost equal to the parent MOLT-4 and the daunorubicin-resistant cells. Tangeretin and nobiletin showed the strongest effects with the IC50 values of 7.1-14.0 micromol/L. These polymethoxyflavonoids inhibited the P-glycoprotein function and significantly influenced the cell cycle (p<.05), whereas they did not induce apoptosis. PMID:19863351

  14. Influence of Molting and Starvation on Digestive Enzyme Activities and Energy Storage in Gammarus fossarum

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic) and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity) in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin) decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar) increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities) and physiological (energy reserves) responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs. PMID:24788197

  15. Differences in response of two model estuarine crustaceans after lethal and sublethal exposures to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Key, Peter B; Simonik, Elizabeth; Kish, Nicole; Chung, Katy W; Fulton, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the in vitro and in vivo effects of an acetylcholinesterase enzyme inhibitor (chlorpyrifos) in two estuarine crustaceans: grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) and mysid (Americamysis bahia). The differences in response were quantified after lethal and sublethal exposures to chlorpyrifos and in vitro assays with chlorpyrifos-oxon. Results from the in vitro experiments indicated that the target enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), in the two species was similar in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos inhibition with IC50s of 0.98 nM and 0.89 nM for grass shrimp and mysids, respectively. In vivo experiments showed that mysids were significantly more sensitive to chlorpyrifos-induced AChE inhibition after 24 h of exposure. The in vivo EC50s for AChE inhibition were 1.23 ?g L(-1) for grass shrimp and 0.027 ?g L(-1) for mysids. Median lethal concentrations (24h LC50 values) were 1.06 ?g L(-1) for grass shrimp and 0.068 ?g L(-1) for mysids. The results suggest that differences in the response of these two crustaceans are likely related to differences in uptake and metabolism rather than target site sensitivity. PMID:23998309

  16. Genetic Evidence Confirms Polygamous Mating System in a Crustacean Parasite with Multiple Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Jossart, Quentin; Wattier, Rémi A.; Kastally, Chedly; Aron, Serge; David, Bruno; De Ridder, Chantal; Rigaud, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Mating systems are diverse in animals, notably in crustaceans, but can be inferred from a limited set of parameters. Baeza and Thiel (2007) proposed a model predicting mating systems of symbiotic crustaceans with three host characteristics and the risk of predation. These authors proposed five mating systems, ranging from monogamy to polygynandry (where multiple mating occurs for both genders). Using microsatellite loci, we tested the putatively mating system of the ectoparasite crab Dissodactylus primitivus. We determined the mating frequencies of males and females, parentage assignment (COLONY & GERUD software) as well as the contents of female spermathecae. Our results are globally consistent with the model of Baeza and Thiel and showed, together with previous aquarium experiments, that this ectoparasite evolved a polygamous mating system where males and females move between hosts for mate search. Parentage analyses revealed that polyandry is frequent and concerns more than 60% of clutches, with clutches being fertilized by up to 6 different fathers. Polygyny is supported by the detection of eight males having sired two different broods. We also detected a significant paternity skew in 92% of the multipaternal broods. Moreover, this skew is probably higher than the estimation from the brood because additional alleles were detected in most of spermathecae. This high skew could be explained by several factors as sperm competition or cryptic female choice. Our genetic data, combined with previous anatomic analyses, provide consistent arguments to suggest sperm precedence in D. primitivus. PMID:24609105

  17. Comparative toxicity of pyrethroid insecticides to two estuarine crustacean species, Americamysis bahia and Palaemonetes pugio.

    PubMed

    DeLorenzo, Marie E; Key, Peter B; Chung, Katy W; Sapozhnikova, Yelena; Fulton, Michael H

    2014-10-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used on agricultural crops, as well as for nurseries, golf courses, urban structural and landscaping sites, residential home and garden pest control, and mosquito abatement. Evaluation of sensitive marine and estuarine species is essential for the development of toxicity testing and risk-assessment protocols. Two estuarine crustacean species, Americamysis bahia (mysids) and Palaemonetes pugio (grass shrimp), were tested with the commonly used pyrethroid compounds, lambda-cyhalothrin, permethrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, and phenothrin. Sensitivities of adult and larval grass shrimp and 7-day-old mysids were compared using standard 96-h LC50 bioassay protocols. Adult and larval grass shrimp were more sensitive than the mysids to all the pyrethroids tested. Larval grass shrimp were approximately 18-fold more sensitive to lambda-cyhalothrin than the mysids. Larval grass shrimp were similar in sensitivity to adult grass shrimp for cypermethrin, deltamethrin, and phenothrin, but larvae were approximately twice as sensitive to lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin as adult shrimp. Acute toxicity to estuarine crustaceans occurred at low nanogram per liter concentrations of some pyrethroids, illustrating the need for careful regulation of the use of pyrethroid compounds in the coastal zone. PMID:23364944

  18. Mass spectrometric elucidation of the neuropeptidome of a crustacean neuroendocrine organ

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Limei; Xiang, Feng; Zhang, Yuzhuo; Li, Lingjun

    2012-01-01

    The blue crab Callinectes sapidus has been used as an experimental model organism for the study of regulation of cardiac activity and other physiological processes. Moreover, it is an economically and ecologically important crustacean species. However, there was no previous report on the characterization of its neuropeptidome. To fill in this gap, we employed multiple sample preparation methods including direct tissue profiling, crude tissue extraction and tissue extract fractionation by HPLC to obtain a complete description of the neuropeptidome of C. sapidus. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) and MALDI-time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF were utilized initially to obtain a quick snapshot of the neuropeptide profile, and subsequently nanoflow liquid chromatography (nanoLC) coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF) tandem MS analysis of neuropeptide extracts was conducted for de novo sequencing. Simultaneously, the pericardial organ (PO) tissue extract was labeled by a novel N, N-dimethylated leucine (DiLeu) reagent, offering enhanced fragmentation efficiency of peptides. In total, 130 peptide sequences belonging to 11 known neuropeptide families including orcomyotropin, pyrokinin, allatostatin A (AST-A), allatostatin B (AST-B), FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs), and orcokinin were identified. Among these 130 sequences, 44 are novel peptides and 86 are previously identified. Overall, our results lay the groundwork for future physiological studies of neuropeptides in C. sapidus and other crustaceans. PMID:22627023

  19. The origin of crustaceans: new evidence from the Early Cambrian of China.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J. Y.; Vannier, J.; Huang, D. Y.

    2001-01-01

    One of the smallest arthropods recently discovered in the Early Cambrian Maotianshan Shale Lagerstätte is described. Ercaia gen. nov. has an untagmatized trunk bearing serially repeated biramous appendages (long and segmented endopods and flap-like exopods), a head with an acron bearing stalked lateral eyes and a sclerite and two pairs of antennae. The position of this 520 million-year-old tiny arthropod within the Crustacea is supported by several anatomical features: (i) a head with five pairs of appendages including two pairs of antennae, (ii) highly specialized antennae (large setose fans with a possible function in feeding), and (iii) specialized last trunk appendages (segmented pediform structures fringed with setae). The segmentation pattern of Ercaia (5 head and 13 trunk) is close to that of Maxillopoda but lacks the trunk tagmosis of modern representatives of the group. Ercaia is interpreted as a possible derivative of the stem group Crustacea. Ercaia is likely to have occupied an ecological niche similar to those of some Recent meiobenthic organisms (e.g. copepods living in association with sediment). This new fossil evidence supports the remote ancestry of crustaceans well before the Late Cambrian and shows, along with other fossil data (mainly Early Cambrian in China), that a variety of body plans already coexisted among the primitive crustacean stock. PMID:11674864

  20. Melatonin: Neuritogenesis and neuroprotective effects in crustacean x-organ cells

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Gregory A.; Cuttler, Anne S.; Duda, Kirsten A.; Kusema, Escar T.; Myers, Jennifer A.; Tilden, Andrea R.

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin has both neuritogenic and neuroprotective effects in mammalian cell lines such as neuroblastoma cells. The mechanisms of action include receptor-coupled processes, direct binding and modulation of calmodulin and protein kinase C, and direct scavenging of free radicals. While melatonin is produced in invertebrates and has influences on their physiology and behavior, little is known about its mechanisms of action. We studied the influence of melatonin on neuritogenesis in well-differentiated, extensively-arborized crustacean x-organ neurosecretory neurons. Melatonin significantly increased neurite area in the first 24 h of culture. The more physiological concentrations, 1 nM and 1 pM, increased area at 48 h also, whereas the pharmacological 1?M concentration appeared to have desensitizing effects by this time. Luzindole, a vertebrate melatonin receptor antagonist, had surprising and significant agonist-like effects in these invertebrate cells. Melatonin receptors have not yet been studied in invertebrates. However, the presence of membrane-bound receptors in this population of crustacean neurons is indicated by this study. Melatonin also has significant neuroprotective effects, reversing the inhibition of neuritogenesis by 200 and 500 ?M hydrogen peroxide. Because this is at least in part a direct action not requiring a receptor, melatonin’s protection from oxidative stress is not surprisingly phylogenetically-conserved. PMID:22200560

  1. Juvenoid hormone methyl farnesoate is a sex determinant in the crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Allen W; Leblanc, Gerald A

    2002-12-01

    Daphnids (Daphnia magna) utilize cyclic parthenogenesis as a reproductive strategy. During periods of abundant resources, these organisms reproduce asexually. In response to environmental cues that signal the onset of environmental adversity, daphnids produce males and reproduce sexually. The environmental cues that stimulate the sexual reproductive phase are well known; however, the endocrine signals that transduce these environmental cues remain unknown. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the crustacean juvenoid hormone, methyl farnesoate, is a male sex determinant in this species. Continuous exposure to aqueous concentrations of methyl farnesoate greater than approximately 30 nM stimulated a concentration-dependent production of male-containing broods of organisms. Short-term exposures to methyl farnesoate during periods of egg and embryo maturation revealed that male sex determination occurred during a specific 12-hour period of ovarian egg development. Exposure of eggs to 400 nM methyl farnesoate during this sensitive developmental period resulted in the production of all-male broods of offspring, while exposure to concentrations as low as 52 nM produced mixed broods of males and females. This active concentration range of methyl farnesoate is consistent with levels measured in the hemolymph of some decapod crustaceans. These results demonstrate that methyl farnesoate is capable of programming daphnid embryos to develop into males and is likely the endocrine factor responsible for initiating the sexual reproductive phase in these organisms. PMID:12410602

  2. From cooperation to combat: adverse effect of thermal stress in a symbiotic coral-crustacean community.

    PubMed

    Stella, J S; Munday, P L; Walker, S P W; Pratchett, M S; Jones, G P

    2014-04-01

    Although mutualisms are ubiquitous in nature, our understanding of the potential impacts of climate change on these important ecological interactions is deficient. Here, we report on a thermal stress-related shift from cooperation to antagonism between members of a mutualistic coral-dwelling community. Increased mortality of coral-defending crustacean symbionts Trapezia cymodoce (coral crab) and Alpheus lottini (snapping shrimp) was observed in response to experimentally elevated temperatures and reduced coral-host (Pocillopora damicornis) condition. However, strong differential numerical effects occurred among crustaceans as a function of species and sex, with shrimp (75%), and female crabs (55%), exhibiting the fastest and greatest declines in numbers. These declines were due to forceful eviction from the coral-host by male crabs. Furthermore, surviving female crabs were impacted by a dramatic decline (85%) in egg production, which could have deleterious consequences for population sustainability. Our results suggest that elevated temperature switches the fundamental nature of this interaction from cooperation to competition, leading to asymmetrical effects on species and/or sexes. Our study illustrates the importance of evaluating not only individual responses to climate change, but also potentially fragile interactions within and among susceptible species. PMID:24343842

  3. Myocardial Depolarizing Response to Glutamate in the Myogenic Heart of the Branchiopod Crustacean Triops longicaudatus.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, H; Ando, Y; Matsuzaki, O

    2000-01-01

    Fine structure of the heart and the effects on the heartbeat of some transmitter candidates in crustacean cardioregulatory system were examined in the myogenic heart of the branchiopod crustacean Triops longicaudatus. Electron microscopy revealed that, in each myocardial cell, myofibrils are confined in the part facing the epicardium and intercalated disks are present between the myofibrillar regions of adjacent myocardial cells. No neural elements were found in the heart, suggesting lack of extrinsic cardioregulatory nerves from the central nervous system. Gamma aminobutyric acid and acetylcholine produced no detect-able changes in the myogenic activity of the heart at concentrations up to 10(-3) M, respectively. Glutamate induced a depolarizing membrane response in the cardiac muscle with a threshold concentration of approximately 1x10(-5) M. The amplitude of the depolarizing response was concetration-dependent and saturated at approximately 1x10(-4) M. The myogenic activity of the heart increased in frequency with glutamate of less than approximately 3x10(-5) M. With higher dose of glutamate, action potential adaptation occurred in the cardiac muscle and the heart exhibited a systolic arrest. PMID:18494569

  4. Evidence for widespread Wolbachia infection in isopod crustaceans: molecular identification and host feminization.

    PubMed Central

    Bouchon, D; Rigaud, T; Juchault, P

    1998-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited, intracellular, alpha proteobacteria that infect a wide range of arthropods. They cause three kinds of reproductive alterations in their hosts: cytoplasmic incompatibility, parthenogenesis and feminization. There have been many studies of the distribution of Wolbachia in arthropods, but very few crustacean species are known to be infected. We investigated the prevalence of Wolbachia in 85 species from five crustacean orders. Twenty-two isopod species were found to carry these bacteria. The bacteria were found mainly in terrestrial species, suggesting that Wolbachia came from a continental environment. The evolutionary relationships between these Wolbachia strains were determined by sequencing bacterial genes and by interspecific transfers. All the bacteria associated with isopods belonged to the Wolbachia B group, based on 16S rDNA sequence data. All the terrestrial isopod symbionts in this group except one formed an independent clade. The results of interspecific transfers show evidence of specialization of Wolbachia symbionts to their isopod hosts. They also suggest that host species plays a more important role than bacterial phylogeny in determining the phenotype induced by Wolbachia infection. PMID:9684374

  5. Comprehensive analysis of Hox gene expression in the amphipod crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis.

    PubMed

    Serano, Julia M; Martin, Arnaud; Liubicich, Danielle M; Jarvis, Erin; Bruce, Heather S; La, Konnor; Browne, William E; Grimwood, Jane; Patel, Nipam H

    2016-01-01

    Hox genes play crucial roles in establishing regional identity along the anterior-posterior axis in bilaterian animals, and have been implicated in generating morphological diversity throughout evolution. Here we report the identification, expression, and initial genomic characterization of the complete set of Hox genes from the amphipod crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis. Parhyale is an emerging model system that is amenable to experimental manipulations and evolutionary comparisons among the arthropods. Our analyses indicate that the Parhyale genome contains a single copy of each canonical Hox gene with the exception of fushi tarazu, and preliminary mapping suggests that at least some of these genes are clustered together in the genome. With few exceptions, Parhyale Hox genes exhibit both temporal and spatial colinearity, and expression boundaries correlate with morphological differences between segments and their associated appendages. This work represents the most comprehensive analysis of Hox gene expression in a crustacean to date, and provides a foundation for functional studies aimed at elucidating the role of Hox genes in arthropod development and evolution. PMID:26569556

  6. Parasite transfer from crustacean to fish hosts in the Lübeck Bight, SW Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, C. D.; Groenewold, S.; Strohbach, U.

    1994-03-01

    Four helminth parasites out of 19 species found in the Lübeck Bight, Baltic Sea, were chosen for investigations on the transfer from invertebrate to small-sized fish hosts: larvae of the tapeworms Schistocephalus sp. and Bothriocephalus sp. (Cestoda) living in planktonic copepods as primary hosts; Podocotyle atomon (Digenea) and Hysterothylacium sp. (Nematoda) were found in benthic crustaceans, especially Gammarus spp. These hosts were the prey of 3 gobiid fishes, Gobiusculus flavescens (feeding mainly on plankton), Pomatoschistus minutus (preferring benthos), and P. pictus (feeding more on plankton than benthos). Because the fishes selected smaller sizes of crustaceans, they ingested all stages of the copepods but only the smaller-sized groups of gammarids which were often less infested by parasites. In order to evaluate the probability for a fish to be parasitized by a helminth, an infestation potential index (IP) was calculated. Podocotyle atomon and Hysterothylacium sp. revealed an IP which was far lower in gobies than expected when the prevalences of the previous hosts were taken into consideration. The IP of tapeworm larvae was mainly influenced by the feeding pressure of the gobiid predators, which might change with developmental stage and season. It is concluded that parasite transfer to the next host decreases when sizes of prey and predator differ only moderately. This mechanism can reduce the numbers of parasites transferred to less suitable or wrong hosts.

  7. Crustacean dopamine receptors: localization and G protein coupling in the stomatogastric ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Merry C.; Khan, Reesha; Baro, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuromodulators, such as dopamine (DA), control motor activity in many systems. To begin to understand how DA modulates motor behaviors, we study a well-defined model: the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system (STNS). The spiny lobster STNS receives both neuromodulatory and neurohormonal dopaminergic input, and extensive background information exists on the cellular and network effects of DA. However, there is a void of information concerning the mechanisms of DA signal transduction in this system. In this study, we show that Gs, Gi, and Gq are activated in response to DA in STNS membrane preparations from five crustacean species representing distant clades in the order Decapoda. Three evolutionarily conserved DA receptors mediate this response in spiny lobsters: D1?Pan, D1?Pan and D1?Pan. G protein coupling for these receptors can vary with the cell type. In the native membrane, the D1?Pan receptor couples with Gs and Gq, the D1?Pan receptor couples with Gs, and the D2?Pan receptor couples with Gi. All three receptors are localized exclusively to the synaptic neuropil and most likely generate global biochemical signals that alter ion channels in distant compartments, as well as local signals. PMID:17986222

  8. Induction of human malignant T-lymphoblastic cell lines MOLT-3 and jurkat by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate: biochemical, physical, and morphological characterization.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, K; Howatson, A; Mak, T W

    1981-10-01

    The process of induction of human malignant T-lymphoblastic cell line MOLT-3 by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was examined. It was found that the induction process by TPA, which included increase in cells with receptors to sheep red blood cells (E--rosette positive--E+) and decrease in the levels of the marker enzyme terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) was not affected by the presence of DNA synthesis inhibitor arabinofuranosylcytosine (Ara-C). The exposure time to TPA required to elicit these changes was found to be short, in the order of 1 hour or less. The kinetics of the increased in E+ cells, decrease in the levels of TdT in these cells, or decrease in the ability to proliferate as measured by colony formation were similar with exposure to TPA for 1, 6, 24, or 96 hours. We have examined the effect of antitumor promoter compounds on their ability to block induction of MOLT-3 cells by TPA. Results indicated that none of these compounds, dexamethasone, antipain, retinoic acid, and L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethylchloromethyl ketone (TPCK), was effective in reducing the number of E+ cells induced by TPA. Examination of three other leukemic T-cell lines indicated that, in addition to MOLT-3, the leukemic T-cell line Jurkat also responded to TPA, whereas two other leukemic T-cells lines CCRF-CEM and CCRF-HSB-2 did not. Certain physical and morphological changes were also observed after stimulation of MOLT-3 cells and Jurkat cells by TPA. We found that, following the addition of TPA, the cell volumes of MOLT-3 cells decreased from an average of 1150 micrometers3 to about 500 micrometers3, whereas those of Jurkat were reduced to about 700 micrometers3 from 1100 micrometers3. Electron microscopic studies of these lymphoblasts also revealed that after treatment with TPA the induced cells were generally smaller in size with increase in the density of the nuclear materials and condensation of the chromatin structures. PMID:6976970

  9. Post-embryonic development of remipede crustaceans Stefan Koenemann,a, Frederick R. Schram,b Armin Bloechl,a Thomas M. Iliffe,c Mario Hoenemann,a

    E-print Network

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    #12;Post-embryonic development of remipede crustaceans Stefan Koenemann,a,Ã Frederick R. Schram of remipede crustaceans. Based on four early naupliar stages and a post- naupliar larva, it is possible. These specimens begin to fill in some critical gaps in our knowledge of this important group of crustaceans

  10. Multiple adaptive mechanisms affect asparagine synthetase substrate availability in asparaginase-resistant MOLT-4 human leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Aslanian, A M; Kilberg, M S

    2001-08-15

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is treated by combination chemotherapy with a number of drugs, almost always including the enzyme L-asparaginase (ASNase). Although the initial remission rate is quite high, relapse and associated drug resistance remain a problem. In vitro studies have demonstrated an adaptive increase in asparagine synthetase (AS) expression in ASNase-resistant cells, which is believed to permit ASNase-resistant human leukaemia cells to survive in vivo. The present results, obtained with ASNase-sensitive and -resistant human MOLT-4 leukaemia cell lines, illustrate that several other adaptive processes occur to provide sufficient amounts of the AS substrates, aspartate and glutamine, required to support this increased enzymic activity. In both cell populations, aspartate is derived almost exclusively from intracellular sources, whereas the necessary glutamine arises from both intracellular and extracellular sources. Transport of glutamine into ASNase-resistant cells is significantly enhanced compared with the parental cells, whereas amino acid efflux (e.g. asparagine) is reduced. Most of the adaptive change for the amino acid transporters, Systems A, ASC and L, is rapidly (12 h) reversed following ASNase removal. The enzymic activity of glutamine synthetase is also enhanced in ASNase-resistant cells by a post-transcriptional mechanism. The results demonstrate that there are several sites of metabolic adaptation in ASNase-treated leukaemia cells that serve to promote the replenishment of both glutamine and asparagine. PMID:11485552

  11. Future prospects for prophylactic immune stimulation in crustacean aquaculture - the need for improved metadata to address immune system complexity.

    PubMed

    Hauton, Chris; Hudspith, Meggie; Gunton, Laetitia

    2015-02-01

    Future expansion of the crustacean aquaculture industry will be required to ensure global food security. However, this expansion must ensure: (a) that natural resources (including habitat use and fish meal) are sustainably exploited, (b) that the socio-economic development of producing nations is safeguarded, and (c) that the challenge presented by crustacean diseases is adequately met. Conventionally, the problem of disease in crustacean aquaculture has been addressed through prophylactic administration of stimulants, additives or probiotics. However, these approaches have been questioned both experimentally and philosophically. In this review, we argue that real progress in the field of crustacean immune stimulants has now slowed, with only incremental advances now being made. We further contend that an overt focus on the immune effector response has been misguided. In light of the wealth of new data reporting immune system complexity, a more refined approach is necessary - one that must consider the important role played by pattern recognition proteins. In support of this more refined approach, there is now a much greater requirement for the reporting of essential metadata. We propose a broad series of recommendations regarding the 'Minimum Information required to support a Stimulant Assessment experiment' (MISA guidelines) to foster new progression within the field. PMID:24796867

  12. In arthropods, particularly insects and crustaceans, a large number of peptides have been identified because of their effect

    E-print Network

    Cooper, Robin L.

    neuropeptides have been described. Many of them are members of peptide families that have been established of Penaeus vannamei (Nieto et al., 1998). Recently, no less than 20 neuropeptides belonging-orcokinin and Val13- orcokinin, two known members of the orcokinin neuropeptide family native to crustaceans

  13. Enzyme-liked immunosorbent assay for the detection of pathogenic spiroplasma in commercially exploited crustaceans from China

    E-print Network

    ., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Aeromonas hydrophila). Very weak color reaction freshwater crustaceans from China. The bacteria infect Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis), crayfish of the assay was less than 10%, with an excellent reliability in moderate and heavy infections. The whole test

  14. JOURNAL OF CRUSTACEAN BIOLOGY, 16(3): 564-573. 1996 SYNALPHEUS REGALIS, NEW SPECIES, A SPONGE-

    E-print Network

    Duffy, J. Emmett

    JOURNAL OF CRUSTACEAN BIOLOGY, 16(3): 564-573. 1996 SYNALPHEUS REGALIS, NEW SPECIES, A SPONGE group, S. regalis lives exclusively within the internal canals of living sponges, and at the type locality is found in only 2 of the 21 sponge species that harbor commensal shrimps. Such host specificity

  15. Limb development in a primitive crustacean, Triops longicaudatus: subdivision of the early limb bud gives rise to multibranched limbs.

    PubMed

    Williams, T A; Müller, G B

    1996-11-01

    Recent advances in developmental genetics of Drosophila have uncovered some of the key molecules involved in the positioning and outgrowth of the leg primordia. Although expression patterns of these molecules have been analyzed in several arthropod species, broad comparisons of mechanisms of limb development among arthropods remain somewhat speculative since no detailed studies of limb development exist for crustaceans, the postulated sister group of insects. As a basis for such comparisons, we analysed limb development in a primitive branchiopod crustacean, Triops longicaudatus. Adults have a series of similar limbs with eight branches or lobes that project from the main shaft. Phalloidin staining of developing limbs buds shows the distal epithelial ridge of the early limb bud exhibits eight folds that extend in a dorsal ventral (D/V) arc across the body. These initial folds subsequently form the eight lobes of the adult limb. This study demonstrates that, in a primitive crustacean, branched limbs do not arise via sequential splitting. Current models of limb development based on Drosophila do not provide a mechanism for establishing eight branches along the D/V axis of a segment. Although the events that position limbs on a body segment appear to be conserved between insects and crustaceans, mechanisms of limb branching may not. PMID:24173518

  16. SPATIO-TEMPORAL FLUCTUATIONS IN THE DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF DEMERSAL FISH AND EPIBENTHIC CRUSTACEANS IN YAQUINA BAY, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    A total of over 32,000 demersal fish and epibenthic crustaceans belonging to 62 species were caught in 42 biweekly trawls from 10 stations in Yaquina Bay, Oregon, during 1967 and 1968. English sole, Parophrys vetulus, was the most abundant species. eventeen species (13 fishes and...

  17. LTR-Retrotransposons in R. exoculata and Other Crustaceans: The Outstanding Success of GalEa-Like Copia Elements

    PubMed Central

    Esnault, Caroline; Graça, Paula; Higuet, Dominique; Bonnivard, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Transposable elements are major constituents of eukaryote genomes and have a great impact on genome structure and stability. They can contribute to the genetic diversity and evolution of organisms. Knowledge of their distribution among several genomes is an essential condition to study their dynamics and to better understand their role in species evolution. LTR-retrotransposons have been reported in many diverse eukaryote species, describing a ubiquitous distribution. Given their abundance, diversity and their extended ranges in C-values, environment and life styles, crustaceans are a great taxon to investigate the genomic component of adaptation and its possible relationships with TEs. However, crustaceans have been greatly underrepresented in transposable element studies. Using both degenerate PCR and in silico approaches, we have identified 35 Copia and 46 Gypsy families in 15 and 18 crustacean species, respectively. In particular, we characterized several full-length elements from the shrimp Rimicaris exoculata that is listed as a model organism from hydrothermal vents. Phylogenic analyses show that Copia and Gypsy retrotransposons likely present two opposite dynamics within crustaceans. The Gypsy elements appear relatively frequent and diverse whereas Copia are much more homogeneous, as 29 of them belong to the single GalEa clade, and species- or lineage-dependent. Our results also support the hypothesis of the Copia retrotransposon scarcity in metazoans compared to Gypsy elements. In such a context, the GalEa-like elements present an outstanding wide distribution among eukaryotes, from fishes to red algae, and can be even highly predominant within a large taxon, such as Malacostraca. Their distribution among crustaceans suggests a dynamics that follows a “domino days spreading” branching process in which successive amplifications may interact positively. PMID:23469217

  18. Assimilation and retention of selenium and other trace elements from crustacean food by juvenile striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baines, Stephen B.; Fisher, Nicholas S.; Stewart, Robin

    2002-01-01

     Estimates of the assimilation and retention of trace elements from food by fish are useful for linking toxicity with the biogeochemical cycling of these elements through aquatic food webs. Here we use pulse-chase radiotracer techniques to estimate the assimilation and retention of Se and four trace metals, Ag, Am, Zn, and Cd, by 43- and 88-d-old juvenile striped bass, Morone saxatilis, from crustacean food. Brine shrimp nauplii, Artemia franciscana, or adult copepods,Acartia tonsa, were fed radiolabeled diatoms and then fed to juvenile striped bass. Assimilation efficiencies (AEs ± SD) for 43-d-old fish were 18 ± 2%, 6 ± 1%, 23 ± 4%, 33 ± 3%, and 23 ± 2% for Ag, Am, Cd, Se, and Zn, respectively. For 88-d-old fish, the AEs were 28 ± 1%, 42 ± 5%, and 40 ± 5% for Cd, Se, and Zn, respectively. The higher AEs in the older fish may result from longer gut passage times for larger fish. The 44-d-old fish excreted 5 ± 0.8%, 4 ± 2.0%, 7 ± 0.3%, 9 ± 0.4%, and 1.3 ± 0.9% of the Ag, Am, Cd, Se, and Zn, respectively, they ingested from food per day, whereas the 88-d-old fish excreted 3 ± 1.0%, 8 ± 0.5%, and 3 ± 0.5% of the assimilated Cd, Se, and Zn per day, respectively. Predictions of steady state Se concentrations in juvenile striped bass tissues made using a biokinetic model and the measured AE and efflux rates ranged from 1.8 to 3.0 mg Se g-1dry wt for muscle tissue and 6.8 to 11.6 mg Se g-1 dry wt for gut tissue. These predictions agreed well with average values of 2.1 and 13 mg Se g-1 dry wt measured independently in North San Francisco Bay, where elevated Se concentrations are of concern. The model results imply that the planktonic food web, including juvenile striped bass, does not transfer Se as efficiently to top consumers as does the benthic food web.

  19. Immunochemical and immunocytochemical studies of the crustacean vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH).

    PubMed

    Meusy, J J; Martin, G; Soyez, D; van Deijnen, J E; Gallo, J M

    1987-09-01

    Immunochemical investigations, using dot immunobinding assay (DIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and immunocytochemical studies reveal the following new information about crustacean vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH): (1) The structure of VIH is sufficiently different from that of the other sinus gland neuropeptides to allow a selective recognition of VIH by polyclonal antibodies. (2) From immunochemical criteria, VIH does not seem strictly species specific. The antisera raised against VIH of Homarus americanus cross-react with sinus gland extracts of Palaemonetes varians, Palaemon serratus, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, Carcinus maenas, and Porcellio dilatatus. (3) In the sinus gland of H. americanus, VIH immunoreactivity is localized mainly in electron-dense granules of medium size (110-185 nm in diameter) while, in P. dilatatus, the labeling is mostly on the largest granules (200-270 nm in diameter). PMID:3666410

  20. Trehalose and vitreous states: desiccation tolerance of dormant stages of the crustaceans Triops and Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Hengherr, S; Heyer, A G; Brümmer, F; Schill, R O

    2011-01-01

    Several aquatic organisms are able to withstand extreme desiccation in at least one of their life stages. This is commonly known as "anhydrobiosis." It was often thought that to tolerate such a desiccated state required high amounts of compatible solutes such as the nonreducing disaccharide trehalose, which protects cellular structures by water replacement and glass formation. Trehalose levels of dormant eggs and cysts of five freshwater crustaceans (Daphnia magna, Daphnia pulex, Triops longicaudatus, Triops cancriformis, and Triops australiensis) were observed in different states of hydration and dehydration. Although trehalose was detected in all species, the concentration was under 0.5% of the dry weight (0.05 ?g/?g protein), and no change between the different states was observed. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements indicated that dried cysts of all Triops species were in a glassy state, supporting the vitrification hypothesis. No indication for a vitreous state was found in dried resting eggs of Daphnia. PMID:21460525

  1. Annotated checklist of the decapod crustaceans of the Gulf of Oman, northwestern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Naderloo, Reza; Ebrahimnezhad, Saeed; Sari, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The decapod crustaceans of the Gulf of Oman have been documented based on the published literature and new sampling along the Iranian coast between 2005 and 2015. A total of 121 species were collected along the Iranian coast, of which 43 are new records for the Gulf of Oman. The Decapoda of the Gulf is currently represented by 258 species belonging to five infraorders: Axiidea, Achelata, Anomura, Brachyura, and Caridea. Brachyura, with 176 species, are the best represented group, followed by Anomura and Caridea with 42 and 17 species, respectively. The least diverse groups are Achelata, with five species, and Axiidea, with three. On the basis of the available information, the northern (Iranian) coast with 189 species is more diverse than the southern (United Arab Emirates and Oman) coast with 134 species. PMID:26624317

  2. Combined toxicity of mercury and plastic wastes to crustacean and gastropod inhabiting the waters in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Bu-Olayan, A H; Thomas, B V

    2015-11-01

    The present study determined total mercury (T-Hg) in crustacean Portunus pelagicus (blue crab) and mollusc Tapes sulcarius (Furrowed Venus: Cockle) following suspected rise in beach plastic wastes and their effect on marine organisms. Live samples were collected from beaches representing six Kuwait Governorate areas and exposed to toxicity (96hr) and bio accumulation tests for 180 d with inclusion of plastic wastes and environmental conditions simulated in laboratory. Results revealed high T-Hg concentrations in T sulcarius (1.44ng l(-1)) compared to P. pelagicus (1.03ng l(-1)) during winter than summer, with bio accumulation factor (BAF) > 1 labelled these species as hyper-accumulators. Significantly, combination of T-Hg concentrations from plastic wastes and in seawater validated the possibilities of detrimental effects of other marine lives besides deteriorating the aesthetic values of scenic beaches and likelihood of invasive species in such coastal areas. PMID:26688963

  3. Transforming nanostructured chitin from crustacean waste into beneficial health products: a must for our society

    PubMed Central

    Morganti, P; Morganti, G; Morganti, A

    2011-01-01

    Chitin, obtained principally from crustacean waste, is a sugar-like polymer that is available at low cost. It has been shown to be bio- and ecocompatible, and has a very low level of toxicity. Recently, it has become possible to industrially produce pure chitin crystals, named “chitin nanofibrils” (CN) for their needle-like shape and nanostructured average size (240 × 5 × 7 nm). Due to their specific chemical and physical characteristics, CN may have a range of industrial applications, from its use in biomedical products and biomimetic cosmetics, to biotextiles and health foods. At present, world offshore disposal of this natural waste material is around 250 billion tons per year. It is an underutilized resource and has the potential to supply a wide range of useful products if suitably recycled, thus contributing to sustainable growth and a greener economy. PMID:24198491

  4. Phylogenetics reveals the crustacean order Amphionidacea to be larval shrimps (Decapoda: Caridea)

    PubMed Central

    De Grave, Sammy; Chan, Tin-Yam; Chu, Ka Hou; Yang, Chien-Hui; Landeira, José M.

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that the single representative of the crustacean order Amphionidacea is a decapod shrimp and not a distinct order. After reviewing available morphological evidence, it is concluded that Amphionides is a larval form, but with an as yet unknown parentage. Although the most likely adult form is in the family Pandalidae, the limited molecular data available cannot fully resolve its affinity. We therefore propose to treat Amphionides reynaudii as incertae sedis within Caridea, rather than a separate family. In view of the large scale, tropical and subtropical distribution of the taxon, the possibility is discussed that Amphionides is more likely to be a composite taxon at generic level, rather than larvae of a single shrimp species. PMID:26642937

  5. Foreseeing fates: a commentary on Manton (1928) ‘On the embryology of a mysid crustacean, Hemimysis lamornae’

    PubMed Central

    Akam, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Sidnie Manton became best known for her work on arthropod locomotion, and for proposing radical views on the evolution of arthropods that were accepted for a generation. However, her early training was as an embryologist, and the work that she carried out at the beginning of her career still stands as one of the major twentieth century contributions to the study of crustacean embryology. Here, I review her first major paper, largely completed while she was a graduate student, describing embryonic development in Hemimysis lamornae, a small shrimp-like animal found in the seas around the UK. The clarity of her writing and the quality of her figures set a standard that laid the basis for subsequent work, and although not all of her conclusions have stood the test of time, they remain a standard reference for work today. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750244

  6. Life histories and abundance of crustacean zooplankton in the outlet of Lake Superior, 1971-72

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selgeby, James H.

    1975-01-01

    In sampling throughout a year, at about 3-wk intervals, of the crustacean zooplankton discharged from Lake Superior through the St. Marys River, 30 species were collected, including three not previously recorded for the lake: the copepod Cyclops strenuus, and the cladocerans Alona costata and Alonella acutirostris. Five copepods, Cyclops bicuspidatus thomasi, Diaptomus ashlandi, D. sicilis, Limnocalanus macrurus, and Senecella calanoides were present in the plankton throughout the year while three other copepods, Diaptomus minutus, Epischura lacustris, and Mesocyclops edax, along with all cladocerans, were present only during summer and fall. Five species of copepods, Diaptomus sicilis, D. minutus, Limnocalanus macrurus, Senecella calanoides, and Epischura lacustris produced a single generation annually; three other copepods and all cladocerans produced two or more generations. All species breed 1-3 mo later in Lake Superior than in lakes Michigan and Erie.

  7. Phylogenetics reveals the crustacean order Amphionidacea to be larval shrimps (Decapoda: Caridea).

    PubMed

    De Grave, Sammy; Chan, Tin-Yam; Chu, Ka Hou; Yang, Chien-Hui; Landeira, José M

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that the single representative of the crustacean order Amphionidacea is a decapod shrimp and not a distinct order. After reviewing available morphological evidence, it is concluded that Amphionides is a larval form, but with an as yet unknown parentage. Although the most likely adult form is in the family Pandalidae, the limited molecular data available cannot fully resolve its affinity. We therefore propose to treat Amphionides reynaudii as incertae sedis within Caridea, rather than a separate family. In view of the large scale, tropical and subtropical distribution of the taxon, the possibility is discussed that Amphionides is more likely to be a composite taxon at generic level, rather than larvae of a single shrimp species. PMID:26642937

  8. Direct and indirect fitness consequences of female choice in a crustacean.

    PubMed

    Cothran, Rickey D

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the evolution and maintenance of female mate choice requires information on both the benefits (the sum of direct and indirect benefits) and costs of selective mating. In this study, I assessed the fitness consequences of female mate choice in a freshwater crustacean. In Hyalella amphipods, males attempt to form precopulatory pairs with females. Large males, bearing large posterior gnathopods, tend to be over-represented in precopulatory pairs. I show that females receive both direct (reduced risk of predation while paired) and indirect (sexy sons) benefits from mating with these males. Furthermore, the behavioral mechanisms used to filter male phenotypes carry no detectable energetic cost for females. Thus, females that choose males with successful phenotypes are expected to have higher Darwinian fitness than females that mate at random. This study shows that direct and indirect selection act together to favor large male size, which explains the sexual size dimorphism and size-based mating biases observed in this species. PMID:18410531

  9. Mapping of Neuropeptides in the Crustacean Stomatogastric Nervous System by Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Hui, Limei; Kellersberger, Katherine; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) with great emphasis on comprehensive analysis and mapping distribution of its diverse neuropeptide complement. Previously, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has been applied to this endeavor, yet with identification accuracy and throughput compromised. Therefore, molecular imaging methods are pursued to unequivocally determine the identity and location of the neuropeptides at a high spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a novel, multi-faceted mass spectrometric strategy combining profiling and imaging techniques to characterize and map neuropeptides from the blue crab Callinectes sapidus STNS at the network level. In total, 55 neuropeptides from 10 families were identified from the major ganglia in the C. sapidus STNS for the first time, including the stomatogastric ganglion (STG), the paired commissural ganglia (CoG), the esophageal ganglion (OG), and the connecting nerve stomatogastric nerve ( stn) using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and the MS/MS capability of this technique. In addition, the locations of multiple neuropeptides were documented at a spatial resolution of 25 ?m in the STG and upstream nerve using MALDI-TOF/TOF and high-mass-resolution and high-mass-accuracy MALDI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) instrument. Furthermore, distributions of neuropeptides in the whole C. sapidus STNS were examined by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Different isoforms from the same family were simultaneously and unambiguously mapped, facilitating the functional exploration of neuropeptides present in the crustacean STNS and exemplifying the revolutionary role of this novel platform in neuronal network studies.

  10. Mapping of neuropeptides in the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system by imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hui; Hui, Limei; Kellersberger, Katherine; Li, Lingjun

    2012-01-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) with great emphasis on comprehensive analysis and mapping distribution of its diverse neuropeptide complement. Previously, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has been applied to this endeavor yet with identification accuracy and throughput compromised. Therefore, molecular imaging methods are pursued to unequivocally determine the identity and location of the neuropeptides at a high spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a novel multi-faceted mass spectrometric strategy combining profiling and imaging techniques to characterize and map neuropeptides from the blue crab Callinectes sapidus STNS at the network level. In total, 55 neuropeptides from 10 families were identified from the major ganglia in the C. sapidus STNS for the first time, including the stomatogastric ganglion (STG), the paired commissural ganglia (CoG), the esophageal ganglion (OG), and the connecting nerve stomatogastric nerve (stn) using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and the MS/MS capability of this technique. In addition, the locations of multiple neuropeptides were documented at a spatial resolution of 25 ?m in the STG and upstream nerve using MALDI-TOF/TOF and high-mass-resolution and high-mass-accuracy MALDI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) instrument. Furthermore, distributions of neuropeptides in the whole C. sapidus STNS were examined by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Different isoforms from the same family were simultaneously and unambiguously mapped, facilitating the functional exploration of neuropeptides present in the crustacean STNS and exemplifying the revolutionary role of this novel platform in neuronal network studies. PMID:23192703

  11. An epipodite-bearing crown-group crustacean from the Lower Cambrian.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-guang; Siveter, David J; Waloszek, Dieter; Maas, Andreas

    2007-10-01

    Crown-group crustaceans (Eucrustacea) are common in the fossil record of the past 500 million years back to the early Ordovician period, and very rare representatives are also known from the late Middle and Late Cambrian periods. Finds in Lower Cambrian rocks of the Phosphatocopina, the fossil sister group to eucrustaceans, imply that members of the eucrustacean stem lineage co-occurred, but it remained unclear whether crown-group members were also present at that time. 'Orsten'-type fossils are typically tiny embryos and cuticle-bearing animals, of which the cuticle is phosphatized and the material is three-dimensional and complete with soft parts. Such fossils are found predominantly in the Cambrian and Ordovician and provide detailed morphological and phylogenetic information on the early evolution of metazoans. Here we report an Orsten-type Konservat-Lagerstätte from the Lower Cambrian of China that contains at least three new arthropod species, of which we describe the most abundant form on the basis of exceptionally well preserved material of several growth stages. The limb morphology and other details of this new species are markedly similar to those of living cephalocarids, branchiopods and copepods and it is assigned to the Eucrustacea, thus representing the first undoubted crown-group crustacean from the early Cambrian. Its stratigraphical position provides substantial support to the proposition that the main cladogenic event that gave rise to the Arthropoda was before the Cambrian. Small leaf-shaped structures on the outer limb base of the new species provide evidence on the long-debated issue of the origin of epipodites: they occur in a set of three, derive from setae and are a ground-pattern feature of Eucrustacea. PMID:17914395

  12. Evidence of self-organization in a gregarious land-dwelling crustacean (Isopoda: Oniscidea).

    PubMed

    Broly, Pierre; Mullier, Romain; Devigne, Cédric; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    How individuals modulate their behavior according to social context is a major issue in the understanding of group initiation, group stability and the distribution of individuals. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms of aggregation behavior in Porcellio scaber, a terrestrial isopod member of the Oniscidea, a unique and common group of terrestrial crustaceans. We performed binary choice tests using shelters with a wide range of population densities (from 10 to 150 individuals). First, the observed collective choices of shelters strengthen the demonstration of a social inter-attraction in terrestrial isopods; especially, in less than 10 min, the aggregation reaches its maximal value, and in less than 100 s, the collective choice is made, i.e., one shelter is selected. In addition, the distribution of individuals shows the existence of (1) quorum rules, by which an aggregate cannot emerge under a threshold value of individuals, and (2) a maximum population size, which leads to a splitting of the populations. These collective results are in agreement with the individual's probability of joining and leaving an aggregate attesting to a greater attractiveness of the group to migrants and greater retention of conspecifics with group size. In this respect, we show that the emergence of aggregation in terrestrial isopods is based on amplification mechanisms. And lastly, our results indicate how local cues about the spatial organization of individuals may favor this emergence and how individuals spatiotemporally reorganize toward a compact form reducing the exchange with the environment. This study provides the first evidence of self-organization in a gregarious crustacean, similar as has been widely emphasized in gregarious insects and eusocial insects. PMID:26391028

  13. Neurogenesis in the crustacean ventral nerve cord: homology of neuronal stem cells in Malacostraca and Branchiopoda?

    PubMed

    Harzsch, S

    2001-01-01

    In Insecta and malacostracan Crustacea, neurons in the ventral ganglia are generated by the unequal division of neuronal stem cells, the neuroblasts (Nbs), which are arranged in a stereotyped, grid-like pattern. In malacostracans, however, Nbs originate from ectoteloblasts by an invariant lineage, whereas Nbs in insects differentiate without a defined lineage by cell-to-cell interactions within the neuroectoderm. As the ventral ganglia in entomostracan crustaceans were thought to be generated by a general inward proliferation of ectodermal cells, the question arose as to whether neuroblasts in Euarthropoda represent a homologous type of stem cell. In the current project, neurogenesis in metanauplii of the entomostracan crustaceans Triops cancriformis Fabricius, 1780 (Branchiopoda, Phyllopoda) and Artemia salina Linné, 1758 (Branchiopoda, Anostraca) was examined by in vivo incorporation of the mitosis marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and compared to stem cell proliferation in embryos of the malacostracan Palaemonetes argentinus Nobili, 1901 (Eucarida, Decapoda). The developmental expression of synaptic proteins (synapsins) was studied immunohistochemically. Results indicate that in the ventral neurogenic zone of Branchiopoda, neuronal stem cells with cellular characteristics of malacostracan neuroblasts are present. However, a pattern similar to the lineage-dependent, grid-like arrangement of the malacostracan neuroblasts was not found. Therefore, the homology of entomostracan and malacostracan neuronal stem cells remains uncertain. It is now well established that during arthropod development, identical and most likely homologous structures can emerge, although the initiating steps or the mode of generation of these structures are different. Recent evidence suggests that adult Entomostraca and Malacostraca share corresponding sets of neurons so that the present report provides an example that those homologous neurons may be generated via divergent developmental pathways. In this perspective, it remains difficult at this point to discuss the question of common patterns of stem cell proliferation with regard to the phylogeny and evolution of Atelocerata and Crustacea. PMID:11440250

  14. Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) Gene Diversity in the Crustacean Calanus finmarchicus – Contributors to Cellular Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C.; Passamaneck, Yale; Christie, Andrew E.; Lenz, Petra H.

    2015-01-01

    Detoxification is a fundamental cellular stress defense mechanism, which allows an organism to survive or even thrive in the presence of environmental toxins and/or pollutants. The glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily is a set of enzymes involved in the detoxification process. This highly diverse protein superfamily is characterized by multiple gene duplications, with over 40 GST genes reported in some insects. However, less is known about the GST superfamily in marine organisms, including crustaceans. The availability of two de novo transcriptomes for the copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, provided an opportunity for an in depth study of the GST superfamily in a marine crustacean. The transcriptomes were searched for putative GST-encoding transcripts using known GST proteins from three arthropods as queries. The identified transcripts were then translated into proteins, analyzed for structural domains, and annotated using reciprocal BLAST analysis. Mining the two transcriptomes yielded a total of 41 predicted GST proteins belonging to the cytosolic, mitochondrial or microsomal classes. Phylogenetic analysis of the cytosolic GSTs validated their annotation into six different subclasses. The predicted proteins are likely to represent the products of distinct genes, suggesting that the diversity of GSTs in C. finmarchicus exceeds or rivals that described for insects. Analysis of relative gene expression in different developmental stages indicated low levels of GST expression in embryos, and relatively high expression in late copepodites and adult females for several cytosolic GSTs. A diverse diet and complex life history are factors that might be driving the multiplicity of GSTs in C. finmarchicus, as this copepod is commonly exposed to a variety of natural toxins. Hence, diversity in detoxification pathway proteins may well be key to their survival. PMID:25945801

  15. Self-Assembled, Iridescent, Crustacean-Mimetic Nanocomposites with Tailored Periodicity and Layered Cuticular Structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baochun; Walther, Andreas

    2015-11-24

    Natural high-performance materials inspire the pursuit of ordered hard/soft nanocomposite structures at high fractions of reinforcements and with balanced molecular interactions. Herein, we develop a facile, waterborne self-assembly pathway to mimic the multiscale cuticle structure of the crustacean armor by combining hard reinforcing cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with soft poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). We show iridescent CNC nanocomposites with cholesteric liquid-crystal structure, in which different helical pitches and photonic band gaps can be realized by varying the CNC/PVA ratio. We further show that multilayered crustacean-mimetic materials with tailored periodicity and layered cuticular structure can be obtained by sequential preparation pathways. The transition from a cholesteric to a disordered structure occurs for a critical polymer concentration. Correspondingly, we find a transition from stiff and strong mechanical behavior to materials with increasing ductility. Crack propagation studies using scanning electron microscopy visualize the different crack growth and toughening mechanisms inside cholesteric nanocomposites as a function of the interstitial polymer content for the first time. Different extents of crack deflection, layered delamination, ligament bridging, and constrained microcracking can be observed. Drawing of highly plasticized films sheds light on the mechanistic details of the transition from a cholesteric/chiral nematic to a nematic structure. The study demonstrates how self-assembly of biobased CNCs in combination with suitable polymers can be used to replicate a hierarchical biological structure and how future design of these ordered multifunctional nanocomposites can be optimized by understanding mechanistic details of deformation and fracture. PMID:26372330

  16. Toxicity on crustaceans and endocrine disrupting activity on Saccharomyces cerevisiae of eight alkylphenols.

    PubMed

    Isidori, Marina; Lavorgna, Margherita; Nardelli, Angela; Parrella, Alfredo

    2006-06-01

    In the last few years many concerns have been raised regarding the environmental safety of alkylphenol polyethoxylate surfactants (APnEOs). They are widely used in detergents, paints, herbicides and many other formulated products. It has been estimated that 60% of APnEOs end up in the aquatic environment; they are biodegradable and transformed into alkylphenols, such as nonylphenol and octylphenol that are hydrophobic and tend to accumulate. In the present study, acute and chronic aquatic toxicity and the estrogenic activity of the following eight alkylphenols were assessed: 4-nonylphenol, 4-octylphenol, 4-nonylphenol-10-ethoxylate, 4-tert-octylphenol, POE (1 to 2)-nonylphenol, POE (6)-nonylphenol, POE (3)-tert-octylphenol and POE (9 to 10)-tert-octylphenol. The toxic potential was measured on the crustaceans Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia, while the estrogenic activity was determined by using the YES-test with the strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae RMY326. The results showed that the exposure of crustaceans to the eight xenoestrogens investigated caused both acute and chronic effects. The EC50 values found for C. dubia at 48 h were compared to D. magna at 24h and, gave a first indication about the toxic activity of the compounds investigated, that is better expressed in the long-term. In fact, chronic data showed a strong increase in toxicity with EC50 values one or two orders of magnitude lower than the acute values. The results of the YES-test showed that nonylphenol, octylphenol and 4-tert-octylphenol were the most estrogenic and the bioassay was able to detect their estrogenicity at very low concentrations (ng-microg/l). PMID:16343595

  17. Putative Pacemakers in the Eyestalk and Brain of the Crayfish Procambarus clarkii Show Circadian Oscillations in Levels of mRNA for Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Nelson-Mora, Janikua; Prieto-Sagredo, Julio; Loredo-Ranjel, Rosaura; Fanjul-Moles, María Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) synthesizing cells in the optic lobe, one of the pacemakers of the circadian system, have been shown to be present in crayfish. However, the presence of CHH in the central brain, another putative pacemaker of the multi-oscillatory circadian system, of this decapod and its circadian transcription in the optic lobe and brain have yet to be explored. Therefore, using qualitative and quantitative PCR, we isolated and cloned a CHH mRNA fragment from two putative pacemakers of the multi-oscillatory circadian system of Procambarus clarkii, the optic lobe and the central brain. This CHH transcript synchronized to daily light-dark cycles and oscillated under dark, constant conditions demonstrating statistically significant daily and circadian rhythms in both structures. Furthermore, to investigate the presence of the peptide in the central brain of this decapod, we used immunohistochemical methods. Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of CHH-IR in fibers and cells of the protocerebral and tritocerebal clusters and neuropiles, particularly in some neurons located in clusters 6, 14, 15 and 17. The presence of CHH positive neurons in structures of P. clarkii where clock proteins have been reported suggests a relationship between the circadian clockwork and CHH. This work provides new insights into the circadian regulation of CHH, a pleiotropic hormone that regulates many physiological processes such as glucose metabolism and osmoregulatory responses to stress. PMID:24391849

  18. Subsurface crustacean communities as proxy for groundwater-surface water interactions in the Henares and Tajuña Rivers floodplains, central Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasines Ladero, Ruben; Iepure, Sanda; Careño, Francisco; de Bustamante, Irene

    2013-04-01

    In the last decades, the linkage between surface water - groundwater via the hyporheic zone and the alluvial floodplains become more and more acknowledged. Hydrological exchanges between the stream and hyporheic zone ensure the transport of matter and energy and provide support for biogeochemical processes occurring in-stream bed sediments. Furthermore, the hyporheic zone is directly linked to permeable alluvial aquifers of which exchanges in both directions ensure the withstanding of a mixt biotic community's that may originate either from the surface benthic habitats or from the shallow aquifer. Data on the subsurface crustacean assemblages are used to infer the surface-groundwater interaction in two-groundwater fed-streams in central Spain. The survey was conducted on 20 hyporheic sites (20-40 cm depth) and 28 shallow or deep boreholes. Multivariate statistics were applied to test for differences in crustacean communities resulting from changes in water chemistry between the upstream and downstream parts of the alluvial aquifer, and between the hyporheic zone and the alluvial aquifer. Our aims were to: 1) test whether groundwater discharges in-stream bed sediments are reflected in changes in the crustacean assemblage's structure; and 2) establish whether the surface water influence decreases with increasing groundwater depth and distance from the river. We further aimed to test whether the diversity-stability ecotonal paradigm associated with the distinct level of disturbances and stability at the interface surface-groundwater and the aquifer is reflected in groundwater crustacean community structure. We start from the assumption that groundwater ecosystems undergo significant changes in space and time, and that classical groundwater stability hypothesis ought to be changed to concepts operative for surface ecosystems: disturbance and resilience. The streams are characterised by distinct gradients of surface-groundwater exchanges at spatial scale, with major interactions at the rivers headwaters compare to the lower part of the alluvial aquifer. The origin of the water in-stream bed sediments is indicated by water chemistry, whereas crustacean communities indicate surface-groundwater exchanges by modifications of the community's structure i.e., upwelling groundwater is indicated by large stygobites populations (obligate groundwater species), whereas downwelling surface waters is usually linked to mixed stygophiles and stygoxene populations. The downwelled surface water flow pattern has detectable influence on increasing nutrient content in shallow hyporheic waters and consequently, crustacean assemblages show distinctly high density and diversity. The crustacean diversity slightly declines with increasing depth, whereas no relationship with the population density was detected. The results obtained highlight the recognition of crustacean communities as alternative proxy to investigate surface water-groundwater exchanges. We concluded that the hydrological connections between surface water and groundwater had a major influence in shaping the crustacean communities structure by controlling the diversity, density and ecological configuration of these populations. In the perspective of increasing alteration of surface-groundwater exchanges due to human actions, both small and large scale monitoring surveys are critical for placing groundwater changes in quality and quantity into a wider context, in order to enhance the assessment of subsurface ecosystems sensitivity to anthropogenic forcing and consequently reduce the negative impact.

  19. Impact of heat processing on the detection of the major shellfish allergen tropomyosin in crustaceans and molluscs using specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sandip D; Abdel Rahman, Anas M; Komoda, Toshikazu; Lopata, Andreas L

    2013-12-15

    The major heat-stable shellfish allergen, tropomyosin, demonstrates immunological cross-reactivity, making specific differentiation of crustaceans and molluscs for food labelling very difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of allergen-specific monoclonal antibodies in differential detection of shellfish-derived tropomyosin in 11 crustacean and 7 mollusc species, and to study the impact of heating on its detection. Cross-reactive tropomyosin was detected in all crustacean species, with partial detection in molluscs: mussels, scallops and snails but none in oyster, octopus and squid. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that heating of shellfish has a profound effect on tropomyosin detection. This was evident by the enhanced recognition of multiple tropomyosin variants in the analysed shellfish species. Specific monoclonal antibodies, targetting the N-terminal region of tropomyosin, must therefore be developed to differentiate tropomyosins in crustaceans and molluscs. This can help in correct food labelling practices and thus protection of consumers. PMID:23993581

  20. Abundance, composition, and distribution of crustacean zooplankton in relation to hypolimnetic oxygen depletion in west-central Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heberger, Roy F.; Reynolds, James B.

    1977-01-01

    Samples of crustacean zooplankton were collected monthly in west-central Lake Erie in April and June to October 1968, and in July and August 1970, before and during periods of hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen (DO) depletion. The water column at offshore stations was thermally stratified from June through September 1968, and the hypolimnion contained no DO in mid-August of 1968 or 1970. Composition, abundance, and vertical distribution of crustacean zooplankton changed coincidentally with oxygen depletion. From July to early August, zooplankton abundance dropped 79% in 1968 and 50% in 1970. The declines were attributed largely to a sharp decrease in abundance of planktonic Cyclops bicuspidatus thomasi. Zooplankton composition shifted from mainly cyclopoid copepods in July to mainly cladocerans and copepod nauplii in middle to late August. We believe that mortality of adults and dormancy of copepodites in response to anoxia was the probable reason for the late summer decline in planktonic C. b. thomasi.

  1. Distributional patterns of decapod crustaceans in the circum-Mediterranean area during the Oligo-Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyžný, Matúš

    2015-04-01

    During the Oligocene and Miocene, the circum-Mediterranean area was a complex network of (mostly) shallow marine basins. Significant biogeographic differentiation of this area has been documented (Harzhauser et al. 2007), mainly during the Miocene, when connections between Proto-Mediterranean, Paratethys and Proto-Indo-West Pacific were intermittently opening and closing. These seaways allowed migration of marine faunas. Distributional patterns has so far been discussed for several different animal groups, especially for molluscs (e.g. Studencka et al. 1998; Harzhauser et al. 2002, 2003, 2007). To test these patterns with decapod crustaceans, a database has been compiled including all previously published Oligocene and Miocene decapod occurrences and newly gathered data from examined material deposited in the institutional collections. Decapod associations have been significant components of marine habitats since the Mesozoic times with ever-increasing importance throughout the Cenozoic. Müller (1979) argued that brachyuran decapods are among the best zoogeographical indicators. Although decapods were used as such indicators before (e.g. Schweitzer 2001; Feldmann & Schweitzer 2006), no detailed analysis of the circum-Mediterranean taxa has been conducted so far. Based on proposed anti-estuarine circulation pattern, decapods originated in the Proto-Mediterranean, and migrated both into the North Sea and the Paratethys. Moreover, during the Early Miocene the Rhine Graben served as a connection between the North Sea and the Paratethys which enabled faunal exchange. The Middle Miocene Proto-Mediterranean and Paratethys decapod assemblages as taken together were relatively homogeneous, although distinct due to increasing rate of endemites in the Paratethys during the Miocene. The research has been supported by FWF: Lise Meitner Program M 1544-B25. References Feldmann R.M. & Schweitzer C.E. 2006: Paleobiogeography of Southern Hemisphere decapod Crustacea. J. Paleontol. 80, 83-103. Harzhauser M., Kroh A., Mandic O., Piller W.E., Göhlich U., Reuter M. & Berning B. 2007: Biogeographic responses to geodynamics: a key study all around the Oligo-Miocene Tethyan Seaway. Zool. Anz. 246, 241-256. Harzhauser M., Mandic O. & Zuschin M. 2003: Changes in Paratethyan marine molluscs at the Early/Middle Miocene transition: diversity, palaeogeography and palaeoclimate. Acta Geol. Pol. 53, 323-339. Harzhauser M., Piller W.E. & Steininger F.F. 2002: Circum-Mediterranean Oligo/Miocene Biogeographic Evolution - the Gastropods' Point of View. Palaeogeogr., Palaeoclimatol., Palaeoecol. 183, 103-133. Müller P. 1979: The Indo-West-Pacific character of the Badenian decapod crustaceans of the Paratethys. In: VII International Congress on Mediterranean Neogene. Athens, September 27-October 2. Ann. Géol. Pays Hellén., Tome hors série 2, 865-869. Schweitzer C.E. 2001: Paleobiogeography of Cretaceous and Tertiary decapod crustaceans of the North Pacific Ocean. J. Paleontol. 75, 808-826. Studencka B., Gontsharova I.A. & Popov S.V. 1998: The bivalve faunas as a basis for reconstruction of the Middle Miocene history of the Paratethys. Acta Geol. Pol. 48, 285-342.

  2. Conserved and convergent organization in the optic lobes of insects and isopods, with reference to other crustacean taxa.

    PubMed

    Sinakevitch, I; Douglass, J K; Scholtz, G; Loesel, R; Strausfeld, N J

    2003-12-01

    The shared organization of three optic lobe neuropils-the lamina, medulla, and lobula-linked by chiasmata has been used to support arguments that insects and malacostracans are sister groups. However, in certain insects, the lobula is accompanied by a tectum-like fourth neuropil, the lobula plate, characterized by wide-field tangential neurons and linked to the medulla by uncrossed axons. The identification of a lobula plate in an isopod crustacean raises the question of whether the lobula plate of insects and isopods evolved convergently or are derived from a common ancestor. This question is here investigated by comparisons of insect and crustacean optic lobes. The basal branchiopod crustacean Triops has only two visual neuropils and no optic chiasma. This finding contrasts with the phyllocarid Nebalia pugettensis, a basal malacostracan whose lamina is linked by a chiasma to a medulla that is linked by a second chiasma to a retinotopic outswelling of the lateral protocerebrum, called the protolobula. In Nebalia, uncrossed axons from the medulla supply a minute fourth optic neuropil. Eumalacostracan crustaceans also possess two deep neuropils, one receiving crossed axons, the other uncrossed axons. However, in primitive insects, there is no separate fourth optic neuropil. Malacostracans and insects also differ in that the insect medulla comprises two nested neuropils separated by a layer of axons, called the Cuccati bundle. Comparisons suggest that neuroarchitectures of the lamina and medulla distal to the Cuccati bundle are equivalent to the eumalacostracan lamina and entire medulla. The occurrence of a second optic chiasma and protolobula are suggested to be synapomorphic for a malacostracan/insect clade. PMID:14595766

  3. Peptide discovery in the ectoparasitic crustacean Argulus siamensis: identification of the first neuropeptides from a member of the Branchiura.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing have facilitated the generation of large transcriptomic datasets for an ever-growing number of crustaceans, one being the carp louse Argulus siamensis. This and other members of the subclass Branchiura are obligate fish ectoparasites, and as such, are a major concern for commercial aquaculture. Using the extant transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) sequences for A. siamensis, 27 transcripts encoding putative neuropeptide precursors were identified, and their pre/preprohormones deduced and characterized using a well-established bioinformatics workflow. The structures of 105 distinct peptides were predicted from the deduced proteins, including isoforms of adipokinetic hormone (AKH), allatostatin A, allatostatin B, allatostatin C, allatotropin, bursicon ?, bursicon ?, crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), diuretic hormone 31, diuretic hormone 44, eclosion hormone, myosuppressin, neuroparsin, neuropeptide Y, orcokinin, pigment dispersing hormone, proctolin, short neuropeptide F, SIFamide, sulfakinin and tachykinin-related peptide. While several of the predicted peptides are known from other crustacean and/or insect species, e.g. RYLPT, a broadly conserved arthropod proctolin isoform, and PFCNAFTGCamide (disulfide bridging between the two cysteines), the stereotypical crustacean CCAP, the vast majority of them are described here for the first time, e.g. pQVNFSTKWamide, a new AKH/red pigment concentrating hormone superfamily member, pQEGLDHMFMRFamide, a novel myosuppressin, and SYKSKPPFNGSIFamide, a new member of the SIFamide family. As the peptides presented here are the only ones thus far described from A. siamensis, or for that matter, any branchiuran, they represent a new resource to begin investigations of peptidergic control of physiology and behavior in this and other related aquacultural pests. PMID:24842716

  4. [Localization of crustaceans--fish parasites and nose capsules as the habitat of the genus Salmincola (Podoplea: Lernaeopodidae) mesoparasites].

    PubMed

    Pronin, N M; Burdukovskaia, T G

    2013-01-01

    Copepoda parasitica of Baikal fishes (16 species) is divided into 7 groups according to their localization: parasites of the gill apparatus, gill covers, gill and buccal cavities, nasal fossa, cutaneous covering, and fins. It was proposed to separate nasal fossa parasites as the special ecological group ofmesoparasites. Typical speciemens of the group include crustaceans Salmincola longimanus complex--parasites of grayling and cisco fishes consist of three species (S. longimanus, S. svetlanovi, S. lavaretus) and one subspecies (S. longimanus sibirica). PMID:24455872

  5. Menstrual Cycle

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pregnancy This information in Spanish ( en español ) The menstrual cycle Day 1 starts with the first day of ... drop around Day 25 . This signals the next menstrual cycle to begin. The egg will break apart and ...

  6. Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This lecture will introduce the concept of biogeochemical cycling. The roles of microbes in the cycling of nutrients, production and consumption of trace gases, and mineralization will be briefly introduced.

  7. Role of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) in the environmental stressor-exposed intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Jeong, Chang-Bum; Han, Jeonghoon; Kim, Il-Chan; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2013-09-01

    To identify and characterize CHH (TJ-CHH) gene in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus, we analyzed the full-length cDNA sequence, genomic structure, and promoter region. The full-length TJ-CHH cDNA was 716 bp in length, encoding 136 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequences of TJ-CHH showed a high similarity of the CHH mature domain to other crustaceans. Six conserved cysteine residues and five conserved structural motifs in the CHH mature peptide domain were also observed. The genomic structure of the TJ-CHH gene contained three exons and two introns in its open reading frame (ORF), and several transcriptional elements were detected in the promoter region of the TJ-CHH gene. To investigate transcriptional change of TJ-CHH under environmental stress, T. japonicus were exposed to heat treatment, UV-B radiation, heavy metals, and water-accommodated fractions (WAFs) of Iranian crude oil. Upon heat stress, TJ-CHH transcripts were elevated at 30 °C and 35 °C for 96 h in a time-course experiment. UV-B radiation led to a decreased pattern of the TJ-CHH transcript 48 h and more after radiation (12 kJ/m(2)). After exposure of a fixed dose (12 kJ/m(2)) in a time-course experiment, TJ-CHH transcript was down-regulated in time-dependent manner with a lowest value at 12h. However, the TJ-CHH transcript level was increased in response to five heavy metal exposures for 96 h. Also, the level of the TJ-CHH transcript was significantly up-regulated at 20% of WAFs after exposure to WAFs for 48 h and then remarkably reduced in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that the enhanced TJ-CHH transcript level is associated with a cellular stress response of the TJ-CHH gene as shown in decapod crustaceans. This study is also helpful for a better understanding of the detrimental effects of environmental changes on the CHH-triggered copepod metabolism. PMID:23797038

  8. Dormant stages of crustaceans as a mechanism of propagation in the extreme and unpredictable environment in the Crimean hypersaline lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadrin, Nickolai V.; Anufriieva, Elena V.; Amat, Francisco; Eremin, Oleg Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A pool of dormant stages of planktonic organisms in saline lakes is a substantial component in the plankton communities; we need to take it into account to understand plankton dynamics. Hypersaline water bodies in Crimea, the largest peninsula in the Black Sea, constitute a very characteristic and peculiar habitat type in the region. We examined the presence of crustacean resting stages in sediments of dried up sites of the Crimean hypersaline lakes. Sediment samples were taken in 9 different lakes. Experiments performed on the hatching of these resting stages showed the presence of Moina salina (Cladocera), parthenogenetic Artemia and Artemia urmiana (Anostraca), Eucypris mareotica ( inflata) (Ostracoda), and Cletocamptus retrogressus (Harpacticoida). Comparing the experimental results obtained with clean dried brine shrimp cysts and those kept in sediment samples, it was noted that clean cysts hatched much faster than those from sediments did. Some components in bottom sediments slow down and desynchronize hatching from resting eggs in different groups of crustaceans. The sediments of different lakes inhibited the nauplii output from Artemia and ostracod resting eggs to different degrees. More data are needed before we can discuss the reasons of this inhibition. The nonsynchronous output of active stages from the bottom resting ones may be an adaptation that allows crustacean species to exist in extreme and unpredictably changing environments, avoiding the risk that all may emerge at once under unsuitable conditions.

  9. Mitogenomic phylogenetic analysis supports continental-scale vicariance in subterranean thalassoid crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Bauzà-Ribot, Maria M; Juan, Carlos; Nardi, Francesco; Oromí, Pedro; Pons, Joan; Jaume, Damià

    2012-11-01

    Many continental subterranean water crustaceans ("stygobionts") display extreme disjunct distributions, where different species in the same genus are isolated on continents or islands separated by broad oceanic expanses. Despite their freshwater habitat, most of these taxa appear to be most closely related to typical marine groups ("thalassoid" origin). Among the hadzioids-thalassoid amphipods including the stygobiont families Hadziidae, Pseudoniphargidae, and Metacrangonyctidae-several genera are restricted to inland groundwaters ranging from the Caribbean region to the Mediterranean and Middle East, including interspersed oceanic islands. This distribution might have arisen from Tethyan vicariance triggered by the sequential occlusion of the former Tethys Sea, a vast circumtropical ocean existing from the Middle Jurassic up to 20 million years ago (mya). Previous studies have been based on morphological analyses or limited DNA sequence data, making it difficult to test this hypothesis. We used complete mitochondrial protein-coding gene sequences, mainly obtained by next-generation sequencing methods and a nuclear ribosomal gene to resolve the phylogeny and to establish a time frame for diversification of the family Metacrangonyctidae (Amphipoda). The results were consistent with the plate tectonics vicariance hypothesis, with major diversifications occurring between 96 and 83 mya. PMID:23063439

  10. The influence of finfish aquaculture on benthic fish and crustacean assemblages in Fitzgerald Bay, South Australia.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Jason E; Williams, Kane

    2015-01-01

    The influence of sea-cage aquaculture on wildfish assemblages has received little attention outside of Europe. Sea-cage aquaculture of finfish is a major focus in South Australia, and while the main species farmed is southern bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii), there is also an important yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi) industry. Yellowtail kingfish aquaculture did not appear to have any local or regional effects on demersal assemblages (primarily fish, but also some crustaceans) surveyed by baited remote underwater video (BRUV) in Fitzgerald Bay. We did, however, detect small scale spatial variations in assemblages within the bay. The type of bait used strongly influenced the assemblage recorded, with significantly greater numbers of fish attracted to deployments where sardines were used as the bait to compared to those with no bait. The pelleted feed used by the aquaculture industry was just as attractive as sardines at one site, and intermediate between sardines and no bait at the other. There was significant temporal variability in assemblages at both farm sites and one control site, while the second control site was temporally stable (over the 9 weeks of the study). Overall, the results suggested that aquaculture was having little if any impact on the abundance and assemblage structure of the demersal macrofauna in Fitzgerald Bay. PMID:26401452

  11. Elucidating the temporal dynamics of optical birefringence changes in crustacean nerves

    PubMed Central

    Badreddine, Ali H.; Schoener, Kurt J.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic optical properties, such as optical birefringence, may serve as a tool for minimally invasive neuroimaging methods with high spatiotemporal resolution to aid in the study of neuronal activation patterns. To facilitate imaging neuronal activity by sensing dynamic birefringence, temporal characteristics behind the signal must be better understood. We have developed a novel nerve chamber to investigate changes in birefringence at the stimulation site, and at distances ~4-28 mm from that site. Using crustacean nerves with either heterogeneous or homogeneous size distributions of axon diameters, we found that the gradual (slow) recovery of the crossed-polarized signal is not explained by the arrival times of action potentials in smaller axons. Through studying the effects of stimulating current and voltage pulses, we hypothesize that the recovery may be caused by a capacitive-like coupling between firing axons and adjacent tissue structures, and we report data consistent with this hypothesis. This study will aid in the utilization of action-potential-related changes in birefringence to study fast changes in neuronal network activity. PMID:26504663

  12. The influence of finfish aquaculture on benthic fish and crustacean assemblages in Fitzgerald Bay, South Australia

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kane

    2015-01-01

    The influence of sea-cage aquaculture on wildfish assemblages has received little attention outside of Europe. Sea-cage aquaculture of finfish is a major focus in South Australia, and while the main species farmed is southern bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii), there is also an important yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi) industry. Yellowtail kingfish aquaculture did not appear to have any local or regional effects on demersal assemblages (primarily fish, but also some crustaceans) surveyed by baited remote underwater video (BRUV) in Fitzgerald Bay. We did, however, detect small scale spatial variations in assemblages within the bay. The type of bait used strongly influenced the assemblage recorded, with significantly greater numbers of fish attracted to deployments where sardines were used as the bait to compared to those with no bait. The pelleted feed used by the aquaculture industry was just as attractive as sardines at one site, and intermediate between sardines and no bait at the other. There was significant temporal variability in assemblages at both farm sites and one control site, while the second control site was temporally stable (over the 9 weeks of the study). Overall, the results suggested that aquaculture was having little if any impact on the abundance and assemblage structure of the demersal macrofauna in Fitzgerald Bay. PMID:26401452

  13. Environmental and scale-dependent evolutionary trends in the body size of crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Klompmaker, Adiël A; Schweitzer, Carrie E; Feldmann, Rodney M; Kowalewski, Micha?

    2015-07-22

    The ecological and physiological significance of body size is well recognized. However, key macroevolutionary questions regarding the dependency of body size trends on the taxonomic scale of analysis and the role of environment in controlling long-term evolution of body size are largely unknown. Here, we evaluate these issues for decapod crustaceans, a group that diversified in the Mesozoic. A compilation of body size data for 792 brachyuran crab and lobster species reveals that their maximum, mean and median body size increased, but no increase in minimum size was observed. This increase is not expressed within lineages, but is rather a product of the appearance and/or diversification of new clades of larger, primarily burrowing to shelter-seeking decapods. This argues against directional selective pressures within lineages. Rather, the trend is a macroevolutionary consequence of species sorting: preferential origination of new decapod clades with intrinsically larger body sizes. Furthermore, body size evolution appears to have been habitat-controlled. In the Cretaceous, reef-associated crabs became markedly smaller than those in other habitats, a pattern that persists today. The long-term increase in body size of crabs and lobsters, coupled with their increased diversity and abundance, suggests that their ecological impact may have increased over evolutionary time. PMID:26156761

  14. Sulfate uptake by crustacean hepatopancreatic brush border membrane vesicles. [Homarus americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Gerencser, G.A.; Cattey, M.A; Ahearn, G.A. Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu )

    1990-02-26

    Purified brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were prepared from Atlantic lobster (Homarus americanus) hepatopancreas using differential centrifugation and Mg{sup +2} precipitation techniques. Uptake of 0.1 mM {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} was stimulated by pre-loading vesicles with Cl{sup {minus}} leading to a transient accumulation of isotope more than twice that at equilibrium. Pre-loading with HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} or gluconate had no effect on sulfate uptake. No stimulation of {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} was observed in the presence of inwardly directed Na{sup +} or tetramethylammonium{sup +} gradients. Uptake of the divalent anion was strongly stimulated by inwardly directed proton gradients (pH{sub o} < pH{sub i}) and markedly inhibited by outwardly directed proton gradients (pH{sub o} > pH{sub i}). {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}/Cl{sup {minus}} exchange was enhanced by imposing a transmembrane inside positive K{sup +} diffusion potential and inhibited by a membrane potential of the opposite polarity (K{sup +}/valinomycin). Results suggest the presence of a proton-dependent, electrogenic anion antiport mechanism in BBMV isolated from the crustacean hepatopancreas.

  15. Functional characterization of a putative disaccharide membrane transporter in crustacean intestine.

    PubMed

    Likely, Rasheda; Johnson, Eric; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    Transepithelial absorption of dietary sucrose in the American lobster, Homarus americanus, was investigated by mounting an intestine in a perfusion chamber to characterize mucosal to serosal (MS) (14)C-sucrose transport. These fluxes were measured by adding varying concentrations of (14)C-sucrose to the perfusate and monitoring their appearance in the bathing solution. Transepithelial (14)C-sucrose transport was the combination of a hyperbolic function of luminal concentration, following Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and apparent diffusion. The kinetic constants of the putative sucrose transporter were KM = 20.50 ± 6.00 µM and J max = 1.81 ± 0.50 pmol/cm(2) × min. Phloridzin, an inhibitor of Na(+)-dependent mucosal glucose transport, decreased MS (14)C-sucrose transport. Decreased MS (14)C-sucrose transport also occurred in the presence of luminal trehalose, a disaccharide containing D-glucose moieties. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) identified the chemical nature of radioactively labeled sugars in the bath following transepithelial transport. TLC revealed (14)C-sucrose was transported across the intestine largely intact with no (14)C-glucose or (14)C-fructose appearing in the serosal bath or luminal perfusate. Only 13% of bath radioactivity was volatile metabolites. Results suggest that disaccharide sugars can be transported intact across crustacean intestine and support the occurrence of a functional disaccharide membrane transporter. PMID:25416426

  16. The Crustacean Central Nervous System in Focus: Subacute Neurodegeneration Induces a Specific Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Chaves da Silva, Paula Grazielle; Corrêa, Clynton Lourenço; de Carvalho, Sergio Luiz; Allodi, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    To date nothing is known about the subacute phase of neurodegeneration following injury in invertebrates. Among few clues available are the results published by our group reporting hemocytes and activated glial cells at chronic and acute phases of the lesion. In vertebrates, glial activation and recruitment of immunological cells are crucial events during neurodegeneration. Here, we aimed to study the subacute stage of neurodegeneration in the crab Ucides cordatus, investigating the cellular/molecular strategy employed 48 hours following ablation of the protocerebral tract (PCT). We also explored the expression of nitric oxide (NO) and histamine in the PCT during this phase of neurodegeneration. Three immune cellular features which seem to characterize the subacute phase of neurodegeneration were revealed by: 1) the recruitment of granulocytes and secondarily of hyalinocytes to the lesion site (inducible NO synthase- and histamine-positive cells); 2) the attraction of a larger number of cells than observed in the acute phase; 3) the presence of activated glial cells as shown by the round shaped nuclei and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein. We suggest that molecules released from granulocytes in the acute phase attract the hyalinocytes thus moving the degeneration process to the subacute phase. The importance of our study resides in the characterization of cellular and biochemical strategies peculiar to the subacute stage of the neurodegeneration in invertebrates. Such events are worth studying in crustaceans because in invertebrates this issue may be addressed with less interference from complex strategies resulting from the acquired immune system. PMID:24278343

  17. The function of Notch signalling in segment formation in the crustacean Daphnia magna (Branchiopoda).

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Ungerer, Petra; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2013-11-15

    Ten years ago we showed for the first time that Notch signalling is required in segmentation in spiders, indicating the existence of similar mechanisms in arthropod and vertebrate segmentation. However, conflicting results in various arthropod groups hampered our understanding of the ancestral function of Notch in arthropod segmentation. Here we fill a crucial data gap in arthropods and analyse segmentation in a crustacean embryo. We analyse the expression of homologues of the Drosophila and vertebrate segmentation genes and show that members of the Notch signalling pathway are expressed at the same time as the pair-rule genes. Furthermore, inactivation of Notch signalling results in irregular boundaries of the odd-skipped-like expression domains and affects the formation of segments. In severe cases embryos appear unsegmented. We suggest two scenarios for the function of Notch signalling in segmentation. The first scenario agrees with a segmentation clock involving Notch signalling, while the second scenario discusses an alternative mechanism of Notch function which is integrated into a hierarchical segmentation cascade. PMID:24063806

  18. The identification and expression of achaete-scute genes in the branchiopod crustacean Triops longicaudatus.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Scott R; Skeath, James B

    2005-06-01

    The achaete-scute (ac/sc) genes are a highly conserved family of transcription factors that play important roles in the development of neural cells in both vertebrates and invertebrates. As such, the study of arthropod ac/sc gene expression during neurogenesis has become a model system for investigating the evolution of neural patterning. To date, ac/sc gene expression has been investigated in insects, chelicerates, and myriapods. Here we present the identification of two ac/sc genes from the branchiopod crustacean Triops longicaudatus. Triops longicaudatus achaete-scute homologs1 and 2 (Tl-ASH1 and Tl-ASH2) exhibit dynamic and distinct expression profiles during Triops neurogenesis. Tl-ASH1 expression initiates in nearly all cells of the neurogenic region and subsequently in clusters of cells evenly spaced along the length of the developing limbs. In contrast, Tl-ASH2 initiates expression after Tl-ASH1. In the CNS, only a subset of Tl-ASH1 cells appears to express Tl-ASH2. Similarly, in the PNS individual Tl-ASH2 positive cells appear to arise from the clusters of Tl-ASH1 expressing cells. Shortly after activating Tl-ASH2 expression, these cells enlarge and divide. The expression dynamics of ac/sc genes in Triops parallel those observed in insects and contrasts with those found in chelicerates and myriapods. PMID:15939382

  19. On some interesting marine decapod crustaceans (Alpheidae, Laomediidae, Strahlaxiidae) from Lombok, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Anker, Arthur; Pratama, Idham Sumarto; Firdaus, Muhammad; Rahayu, Dwi Listyo

    2015-01-01

    Several rare or uncommon, mostly infaunal decapod crustaceans are reported from intertidal and shallow subtidal habitats of Lombok, Indonesia. The alpheid shrimps Alpheus angustilineatus Nomura & Anker, 2005, Athanas shawnsmithi Anker, 2011, Jengalpheops rufus Anker & Dworschak, 2007, Salmoneus alpheophilus Anker & Marin, 2006, Salmoneus colinorum De Grave, 2004, and the laomediid mud-shrimp Naushonia carinata Dworschak, Marin & Anker, 2006, are reported for the first time since their original descriptions and represent new records for the marine fauna of Indonesia. The alpheid shrimps Alpheus macellarius Chace, 1988, Alpheus platyunguiculatus (Banner, 1953), Athanas japonicus Kubo, 1936, Athanas polymorphus Kemp, 1915, Leptalpheus denticulatus Anker & Marin, 2009, Richalpheus palmeri Anker & Jeng, 2006, Salmoneus gracilipes Miya, 1972, Salmoneus tricristatus Banner, 1959 and the laomediid mudshrimps Laomedia astacina De Haan, 1841 and Naushonia lactoalbida Berggren, 1992 are new records for Indonesian waters. The remaining alpheid shrimps, namely Alpheopsis yaldwyni Banner & Banner, 1973, Alpheus savuensis De Man, 1908, Automate anacanthopus De Man, 1910, Automate dolichognatha De Man, 1888, Salmoneus serratidigitus (Coutière, 1896), and the strahlaxiid mud-shrimp Neaxius glyptocercus (von Martens, 1869), all previously known from Indonesia, are recorded for the first time from Lombok. Colour photographs are provided for all species reported, some shown in colour for the first time.  PMID:25661615

  20. The trophic importance of algal turfs for coral reef fishes: the crustacean link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, M. J.; Bellwood, O.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-06-01

    On coral reefs, the epilithic algal matrix (EAM) is widely recognised as an important resource for herbivorous and detritivorous fishes. In comparison, little is known of the interaction between benthic carnivores and the EAM, despite the abundance of Crustacea within the EAM. The trophic importance of the EAM to fishes was investigated in Pioneer Bay, Orpheus Island, Great Barrier Reef. Fish densities were quantified using visual and clove oil censuses, and gut content analyses conducted on abundant fish species. Crustaceans were found to be an important dietary category, contributing between 49.5 and 100 % of the gut contents, with harpacticoid copepods being the dominant component. Of the benthic carnivores, the goby Eviota zebrina was found to consume the most harpacticoids with a mean of 249 copepods m-2 day-1. This represents approximately 0.1 % of the available harpacticoid population in the EAM. In a striking comparison, herbivorous parrotfishes were estimated to consume over 12,000 harpacticoids m-2 day-1, over 27 times more than all benthic carnivores surveyed, representing approximately 5.3 % of the available harpacticoid copepod population each day. The high consumption of harpacticoid copepods by benthic carnivores and parrotfishes indicates that harpacticoids form an important trophic link between the EAM and higher trophic levels on coral reefs.

  1. Sphingomonas japonica sp. nov., isolated from the marine crustacean Paralithodes camtschatica.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Tanaka, Naoto; Frolova, Galina M; Mikhailov, Valery V

    2009-05-01

    A Sphingomonas-like bacterium, strain KC7(T), was isolated from a marine crustacean specimen obtained from the Sea of Japan and subjected to a polyphasic study. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis positioned the novel strain in the genus Sphingomonas as an independent lineage adjacent to a subclade containing Sphingomonas trueperi LMG 2142(T), Sphingomonas pituitosa EDIV(T) and Sphingomonas azotifigens NBRC 15497(T). Strain KC7(T) shared highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (96.1 %) with S. trueperi LMG 2142(T), Sphingomonas dokdonensis DS-4(T) and S. azotifigens NBRC 15497(T); similarities to strains of other recognized Sphingomonas species were lower (96.0-93.9 %). The strain contained sphingoglycolipid and the predominant fatty acids were C(16 : 1), C(16 : 0) and C(18 : 1); 2-OH C(14 : 0) was the major 2-hydroxy fatty acid. Previously, these lipids have been found to be characteristic of members of the genus Sphingomonas sensu stricto. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and physiological and biochemical characterization, strain KC7(T) represents a novel species of the genus Sphingomonas, for which the name Sphingomonas japonica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KC7(T) (=KMM 3038(T) =NRIC 0738(T) =JCM 15438(T)). PMID:19406815

  2. Heading which way? Y-maze chemical assays: not all crustaceans are alike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenning, Matthes; Lehmann, Philipp; Lindström, Magnus; Harzsch, Steffen

    2015-09-01

    In a world full of chemicals, many crustaceans rely on elaborate olfactory systems to guide behaviors related to finding food or to assess the presence of conspecifics and predators. We analyzed the responses of the isopod Saduria entomon to a range of stimuli by which the animal is likely to encounter in its natural habitat using a Y-maze bioassay. In order to document the efficiency of the experimental design, the same bioassay was used to test the behavior of the crayfish Procambarus fallax whose ability to track odors is well documented. The crayfish performed well in the Y-maze and were able to locate the source of a food-related odor with high fidelity. The isopod S. entomon reacted indifferently or with aversion to most of the stimuli applied. In 1800 trials, only four out of 15 different stimuli yielded statistically significant results, and only one odorant was found to be significantly attractive. The findings raise several questions whether the stimuli presented and/or the experimental setup used represents an ecologically relevant situation for S. entomon. In each instance, our experiments illustrate that established methods cannot be readily transferred from one species to another.

  3. A Successful Crayfish Invader Is Capable of Facultative Parthenogenesis: A Novel Reproductive Mode in Decapod Crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Bu?i?, Miloš; Hulák, Martin; Kouba, Antonín

    2011-01-01

    Biological invasions are impacting biota worldwide, and explaining why some taxa tend to become invasive is of major scientific interest. North American crayfish species, particularly of the family Cambaridae, are prominent invaders in freshwaters, defying the “tens rule” which states that only a minority of species introduced to new regions become established, and only a minority of those become invasive and pests. So far, success of cambarid invaders has largely been attributed to rapid maturation, high reproductive output, aggressiveness, and tolerance to pollution. We provide experimental evidence that females of one cambarid species particularly widespread in Europe, the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus, are capable of facultative parthenogenesis. Such reproductive mode has never before been recognized in decapods, the most diverse crustacean order. As shown by analysis of seven microsatellite loci, crayfish females kept physically separated from males produced genetically homogeneous offspring identical with maternal individuals; this suggests they reproduced by apomixis, unlike those females which mated with males and had a diverse offspring. Further research is needed to clarify what environmental conditions are necessary for a switch to parthenogenesis in O. limosus, and what role it plays in natural crayfish populations. However, if such reproductive plasticity is present in other cambarid crayfish species, it may contribute to the overwhelming invasive success of this group. PMID:21655282

  4. Elucidating the temporal dynamics of optical birefringence changes in crustacean nerves.

    PubMed

    Badreddine, Ali H; Schoener, Kurt J; Bigio, Irving J

    2015-10-01

    Intrinsic optical properties, such as optical birefringence, may serve as a tool for minimally invasive neuroimaging methods with high spatiotemporal resolution to aid in the study of neuronal activation patterns. To facilitate imaging neuronal activity by sensing dynamic birefringence, temporal characteristics behind the signal must be better understood. We have developed a novel nerve chamber to investigate changes in birefringence at the stimulation site, and at distances ~4-28 mm from that site. Using crustacean nerves with either heterogeneous or homogeneous size distributions of axon diameters, we found that the gradual (slow) recovery of the crossed-polarized signal is not explained by the arrival times of action potentials in smaller axons. Through studying the effects of stimulating current and voltage pulses, we hypothesize that the recovery may be caused by a capacitive-like coupling between firing axons and adjacent tissue structures, and we report data consistent with this hypothesis. This study will aid in the utilization of action-potential-related changes in birefringence to study fast changes in neuronal network activity. PMID:26504663

  5. Seasonal distribution and abundance of fishes and decapod crustaceans in a Cape Cod estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Able, K.W.; Fahay, M.P.; Heck, K.L.; Roman, C.T.; Lazzari, M.A.; Kaiser, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Sampling in several habitat types (sand/mud, eelgrass, sand, gravel, macroalgae/mud) during all seasons with a variety of gears in Nauset Marsh, Massachusetts during 1985-1987 found a fauna consisting of 35 fish and 10 decapod crustacean species. Although most of the abundant species were found in several habitat types, species richness and habitat use appeared to be highest for vegetated habitats (eelgrass, macroalgae). The fishes and decapods were numerically dominated by cold-water taxa; however, numerous fish species, represented by rare individuals of predominantly southern forms, enriched the fauna. Species composition of Nauset Marsh could be distinguished from estuaries south of Cape Cod and even from the south shore of the cape. Both fishes and decapods were most abundant during the summer, apparently due to the contributions from spring and summer spawning in the estuary and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean. The location of Nauset Marsh and other estuaries on Cape Cod provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the importance of this region as a faunal boundary to estuarine species.

  6. Disentangling the effects of local and regional factors on the thermal tolerance of freshwater crustaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottin, Delphine; Roussel, Damien; Foucreau, Natacha; Hervant, Frédéric; Piscart, Christophe

    2012-04-01

    In the global warming context, we compared the thermal tolerance of several populations of the crustacean Gammarus pulex (Amphipoda: Gammaridae) along a latitudinal thermal gradient in the Rhône Valley. To disentangle the effect of regional (North vs. South) and local (site-specific) factors, the ecophysiological responses of populations were investigated at two levels of biological organisation: whole organism level considering body size [critical thermal maximum (CTmax), mean speed of locomotion (MS), time mobile (TM)] and organelle function level [mitochondrial respiratory control ratios (RCRs)]. CTmax and RCRs, but not MS and TM, revealed a significantly higher thermal tolerance in southern populations compared to northern ones. Nevertheless, temperatures ? 30°C were deleterious for all populations, suggesting that populations located in the warmer limit of the species distribution will be more threatened by climate change as they live closer to their upper thermal limits. The strong differences observed between populations indicate that the species-level thermal tolerance used in predictive models may not be informative enough to study the impact of global warming on species distributions. This work also reveals that an appropriate choice of indicators is essential to study the consequences of global warming since the response of organisms at the whole body level can be influenced by local conditions.

  7. PAH phototoxicity: Identification of sensitive marine infaunal crustaceans and the effects of alkylation

    SciTech Connect

    Boese, B.; Swartz, R.; Lamberson, J.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicity of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been shown to be greatly enhanced in the presence of UV light. The objectives of the research were to: (1) test for PAH phototoxicity using seven marine infaunal crustacean species, (2) determine if the sensitivity to PAH phototoxicity was related to their potential exposure to sunlight in nature, and (3) determine if alkylation alters PAH phototoxicity. The first objective was accomplished by exposing test species to fluoranthene in 4-day, water-only bioassays. Survivors of the tests were then exposed to UV light in an exposure chamber for one hour. The differences between EC50s (the ability to bury in sediment) before and after UV exposure were used to access phototoxicity. The results indicated that species having the greatest potential for natural exposure to sunlight were the least sensitive UV-enhanced fluoranthene toxicity. The amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius, which in nature has the least potential for exposure to sunlight among the organisms tested, was the most sensitive. Rhepoxynius abronius was subsequently used in a series of tests to determine if alkylation of PAHs alters phototoxicity. This was done by conducting standard 10-day sediment bioassay using alkylated and unalkylated PAHs. As in the water-only tests, EC{sub 50}s were determined before and after UV light exposures. The results indicated that alkylation of PAHs, in general, did not alter phototoxicity.

  8. Neurogenesis in the water flea Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Branchiopoda) suggests different mechanisms of neuroblast formation in insects and crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Ungerer, Petra; Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2011-09-01

    Within euarthropods, the morphological and molecular mechanisms of early nervous system development have been analysed in insects and several representatives of chelicerates and myriapods, while data on crustaceans are fragmentary. Neural stem cells (neuroblasts) generate the nervous system in insects and in higher crustaceans (malacostracans); in the remaining euarthropod groups, the chelicerates (e.g. spiders) and myriapods (e.g. millipedes), neuroblasts are missing. In the latter taxa, groups of neural precursors segregate from the neuroectoderm and directly differentiate into neurons and glial cells. In all euarthropod groups, achaete-scute homologues are required for neuroblast/neural precursor group formation. In the insects Drosophila melanogaster and Tribolium castaneum achaete-scute homologues are initially expressed in clusters of cells (proneural clusters) in the neuroepithelium but expression becomes restricted to the future neuroblast. Subsequently genes such as snail and prospero are expressed in the neuroblasts which are required for asymmetric division and differentiation. In contrast to insects, malacostracan neuroblasts do not segregate into the embryo but remain in the outer neuroepithelium, similar to vertebrate neural stem cells. It has been suggested that neuroblasts are present in another crustacean group, the branchiopods, and that they also remain in the neuroepithelium. This raises the questions how the molecular mechanisms of neuroblast selection have been modified during crustacean and insect evolution and if the segregation or the maintenance of neuroblasts in the neuroepithelium represents the ancestral state. Here we take advantage of the recently published Daphnia pulex (branchiopod) genome and identify genes in Daphnia magna that are known to be required for the selection and asymmetric division of neuroblasts in the fruit fly D. melanogaster. We unambiguously identify neuroblasts in D. magna by molecular marker gene expression and division pattern. We show for the first time that branchiopod neuroblasts divide in the same pattern as insect and malacostracan neuroblasts. Furthermore, in contrast to D. melanogaster, neuroblasts are not selected from proneural clusters in the branchiopod. Snail rather than ASH is the first gene to be expressed in the nascent neuroblasts suggesting that ASH is not required for the selection of neuroblasts as in D. melanogaster. The prolonged expression of ASH in D. magna furthermore suggests that it is involved in the maintenance of the neuroblasts in the neuroepithelium. Based on these and additional data from various representatives of arthropods we conclude that the selection of neural precursors from proneural clusters as well as the segregation of neural precursors represents the ancestral state of neurogenesis in arthropods. We discuss that the derived characters of malacostracans and branchiopods - the absence of neuroblast segregation and proneural clusters - might be used to support or reject the possible groupings of paraphyletic crustaceans. PMID:21624360

  9. Accumulation of dioxins in deep-sea crustaceans, fish and sediments from a submarine canyon (NW Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Jiménez, Javier; Rotllant, Guiomar; Ábalos, Manuela; Parera, Jordi; Dachs, Jordi; Company, Joan B.; Calafat, Antoni; Abad, Esteban

    2013-11-01

    Submarine canyons are efficient pathways transporting sediments and associated pollutants to deep sea. The objective of this work was to provide with the first assessment of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and dibenzofurans (PCDF) levels and accumulation in deep-sea megafauna (crustacean and fish) and sediments in the Blanes submarine canyon (North-Western Mediterranean Sea). The influence of the selected species habitats (pelagic, nektobenthic, and benthic) and the trophic chain level on the accumulation of dioxins was also investigated. Bottom sediment and biota samples were collected at different depths and locations inside the canyon and in the adjacent slope outside the canyon influence. ?2,3,7,8-PCDD/F concentrations in sediments varied from 102 to 680 pg g-1 dry weight (d.w.) (1-6 WHO98-TEQ pg g-1 d.w.). Dioxins are enriched in bottom sediments at higher depths inside the canyon and in particular in the deepest parts of the canyon axis (1700 m depth), whereas no enrichment of dioxins was verified at the deepest sediments from the adjacent open slope outside the canyon influence. The proportion of ?2,3,7,8-PCDF (furans) to ?2,3,7,8-PCDD (dioxins) increased for sediments with higher soot carbon content consistent with the higher affinity of PCDF for sorption onto soot carbon. Higher ?2,3,7,8-PCDD/F levels were found in crustaceans than in fish, ranging from 220 to 795 pg g-1 lipid weight (l.w.) (13-90 WHO98-TEQ pg g-1 l.w.) and 110 to 300 pg g-1 l.w. (22-33 WHO98-TEQ pg g-1 l.w.) in crustaceans and fish, respectively. Dioxin highest concentrations were found in nektobenthic organisms, i.e., benthic organism with swimming capabilities (both fish and crustaceans). These higher levels are consistent with the higher trophic level and predicted biomagnification factors (BMFs) of nektobenthic species. The reduced availability of sediment-bound PCDD/F for benthic species mainly due to soot and organic carbon sorption of these contaminants most probably influenced this result too. While biomagnification exerts a clear influence on the total dioxin concentrations in biota, life habits seem to exert an influence in the differential congener-specific accumulation of dioxins rather than in the total concentration. Thus, pelagic species reflected the estimated congener pattern from the surface water dissolved phase and phytoplankton, whereas the dioxin pattern in benthic and nektobenthic species was more similar to the estimated pattern in the deep-water dissolved phase and the sediment. The three crustacean species considered in this study bioaccumulated higher amounts of other dioxin congeners (non-2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs) compared to fish. An interplay of several factors, such as biota habitats, differential uptake of water column dioxin (dissolved and particle-bound fractions), and different metabolization capabilities and rates (CYP-mediated metabolism) may explain the differences observed in dioxin patterns among crustacean species and between fish and crustaceans in the Blanes submarine canyon.

  10. Advances in recording scattered light changes in crustacean nerve with electrical activation

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, K. M.; Rector, D. M.; Martinez, A. T.; Guerra, F. M.; George, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated optical changes associated with crustacean nerve stimulation using birefringent and large angle scattered light. Improved detection schemes disclosed high temporal structure of the optical signals and allowed further investigations of biophysical mechanisms responsible for such changes. Most studies of physiological activity in neuronal tissue use techniques that measure the electrical behavior or ionic permeability of the nerve, such as voltage or ion sensitive dyes injected into cells, or invasive electric recording apparatus. While these techniques provide high resolution, they are detrimental to tissue and do not easily lend themselves to clinical applications in humans. Electrical and chemical components of neural excitation evoke physical responses observed through changes in scattered and absorbed light. This method is suited for in-vivo applications. Intrinsic optical changes have shown themselves to be multifaceted in nature and point to several different physiological processes that occur with different time courses during neural excitation. Fast changes occur concomitantly with electrical events, and slow changes parallel metabolic events including changes in blood flow and oxygenation. Previous experiments with isolated crustacean nerves have been used to study the biophysical mechanisms of fast optical changes. However, they have been confounded by multiple superimposed action potentials which make it difficult to discriminate the temporal signatures of individual optical responses. Often many averages were needed to adequately resolve the signal. More recently, optical signals have been observed in single trials. Initially large angle scattering measurements were used to record these events with much of the signal coming from cellular swelling associated with water influx during activation. By exploiting the birefringent properties derived from the molecular stiucture of nerve membranes, signals appear larger with a greater contrast, but direct comparison of birefringent and 90{sup o} scattering signals has not been reported. New developments in computer and optical technology allow optical recording with higher temporal resolution than could be achieved previously. This has led us to undertake more detailed studies of the biophysical mechanisms underlying these transient changes. Optimization of this technology in conjunction with other technical developments presents a path to noninvasive dynamic clinical observation of optical responses. To conduct these optical recordings, we placed dissected leg, claw and ventral cord nerves from crayfish and lobster in a recording chamber constructed from black Delrin. The chamber consisted of several wells situated perpendicularly to the long axis of the nerve that could beelectrically isolated for stimulating and recording electrical activation, and a window in the center for optical measurements. To measure the birefringence from the nerve, light from a 120W halogen bulb was focused onto the nerve from below the window through a 10X microscope objective and polarized at a 45 degree angle with respect to the long axis of the nerve bundle. A second polarizer turned 90 degrees with respect to the first polarizer was placed on top of the chamber and excluded direct source illumination, passing only birefringent light from the nerve. A large area photodiode placed directly on top of the polarizer detected the magnitude of the birefringent light. To measure light scattered 90 degrees by the nerve, a short length of image conduit placed perpendicularly to the nerve directed large angle scattered light from the nerve to a second photodiode. The output of each photodiode was amplified by a first stage amplifier which produced a DC level output, and was coupled to an AC amplifier (0.3 Hz High Pass) with a gain of 1000 to optimally record changes across time.

  11. Selective inhibition of human Molt-4 leukemia type II inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase by the 1,5-diazabicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,4-diones.

    PubMed

    Barnes, B J; Eakin, A E; Izydore, R A; Hall, I H

    2000-11-14

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in de novo purine biosynthesis. IMPDH activity results from expression of two isoforms. Type I is constitutively expressed and predominates in normal resting cells, while Type II is selectively up-regulated in neoplastic and replicating cells. Inhibitors of IMPDH activity selectively targeting the Type II isoform have great potential as cancer chemotherapeutic agents. For this study, an expression system was developed which yields 35-50 mg of soluble, purified recombinant Type I and II protein from 1 L of bacteria. In addition, three 1,5-diazabicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,4-diones were synthesized and shown to act as specific inhibitors of human recombinant Type II IMPDH. The agents are competitive inhibitors with respect to the endogenous substrate IMP and K(i) values range from 5 to 44 microM but were inactive as inhibitors of the Type I isoform at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 500 microM. IC(50) values for recombinant Type II inhibition were determined and compared to IC(50) values obtained from Molt-4 cell extracts of IMPDH. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that the compounds inhibited Molt-4 leukemia growth with ED(50) values of 3.2-7.6 microM. Computational docking studies predict that the compounds bind to IMPDH in the IMP-binding site, although interactions with residues differ from those previously determined to interact with bound IMP. While all residues predicted to interact directly with the bound compounds are conserved in the Type I and Type II isoforms, sequence divergence within a helix adjacent to the active site may contribute to the observed selectivity for the human Type II isoform. These compounds represent the first class of selective IMPDH Type II inhibitors which may serve as lead compounds for the development of isoform-selective cancer chemotherapy. PMID:11076502

  12. Nucleic Acid Content in Crustacean Zooplankton: Bridging Metabolic and Stoichiometric Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Bullejos, Francisco José; Carrillo, Presentación; Gorokhova, Elena; Medina-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Villar-Argaiz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic and stoichiometric theories of ecology have provided broad complementary principles to understand ecosystem processes across different levels of biological organization. We tested several of their cornerstone hypotheses by measuring the nucleic acid (NA) and phosphorus (P) content of crustacean zooplankton species in 22 high mountain lakes (Sierra Nevada and the Pyrenees mountains, Spain). The P-allocation hypothesis (PAH) proposes that the genome size is smaller in cladocerans than in copepods as a result of selection for fast growth towards P-allocation from DNA to RNA under P limitation. Consistent with the PAH, the RNA:DNA ratio was >8-fold higher in cladocerans than in copepods, although ‘fast-growth’ cladocerans did not always exhibit higher RNA and lower DNA contents in comparison to ‘slow-growth’ copepods. We also showed strong associations among growth rate, RNA, and total P content supporting the growth rate hypothesis, which predicts that fast-growing organisms have high P content because of the preferential allocation to P-rich ribosomal RNA. In addition, we found that ontogenetic variability in NA content of the copepod Mixodiaptomus laciniatus (intra- and interstage variability) was comparable to the interspecific variability across other zooplankton species. Further, according to the metabolic theory of ecology, temperature should enhance growth rate and hence RNA demands. RNA content in zooplankton was correlated with temperature, but the relationships were nutrient-dependent, with a positive correlation in nutrient-rich ecosystems and a negative one in those with scarce nutrients. Overall our results illustrate the mechanistic connections among organismal NA content, growth rate, nutrients and temperature, contributing to the conceptual unification of metabolic and stoichiometric theories. PMID:24466118

  13. Fine structure and optical properties of biological polarizers in crustaceans and cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Caldwell, Roy L.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Cronin, Thomas W.

    2008-04-01

    The lighting of the underwater environment is constantly changing due to attenuation by water, scattering by suspended particles, as well as the refraction and reflection caused by the surface waves. These factors pose a great challenge for marine animals which communicate through visual signals, especially those based on color. To escape this problem, certain cephalopod mollusks and stomatopod crustaceans utilize the polarization properties of light. While the mechanisms behind the polarization vision of these two animal groups are similar, several distinctive types of polarizers (i.e. the structure producing the signal) have been found in these animals. To gain a better knowledge of how these polarizers function, we studied the relationships between fine structures and optical properties of four types of polarizers found in cephalopods and stomatopods. Although all the polarizers share a somewhat similar spectral range, around 450- 550 nm, the reflectance properties of the signals and the mechanisms used to produce them have dramatic differences. In cephalopods, stack-plates polarizers produce the polarization patterns found on the arms and around their eyes. In stomatopods, we have found one type of beam-splitting polarizer based on photonic structures and two absorptive polarizer types based on dichroic molecules. These stomatopod polarizers may be found on various appendages, and on the cuticle covering dorsal or lateral sides of the animal. Since the efficiencies of all these polarizer types are somewhat sensitive to the change of illumination and viewing angle, how these animals compensate with different behaviors or fine structural features of the polarizer also varies.

  14. Comparative cation dependency of sugar transport by crustacean hepatopancreas and intestine

    PubMed Central

    Duka, Ada; Ahearn, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glucose is transported in crustacean hepatopancreas and intestine by Na+-dependent co-transport, while Na+-dependent D-fructose influx has only been described for the hepatopancreas. It is still unclear if the two sugars are independently transported by two distinct cation-dependent co-transporter carrier systems. In this study, lobster (Homarus americanus) hepatopancreas brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were used to characterize, in detail, the cation-dependency of both D-[3H]-glucose and D-[3H]-fructose influxes, while in vitro perfused intestines were employed to determine the nature of cation-dependent sugar transport across this organ. Over the sodium concentration range of 0–100?mM, both [3H]-glucose and [3H]-fructose influxes (0.1?mM; 1?min uptakes) by hepatopancreatic BBMV were hyperbolic functions of [Na+]. [3H]-glucose and [3H]-fructose influxes by hepatopancreatic BBMV over a potassium concentration range of 15–100?mM were hyperbolic functions of [K+]. Both sugars displayed significant (p<0.01) Na+/K+-dependent and cation-independent uptake processes. Transepithelial 25?µM [3H]-glucose and [3H]-fructose fluxes across lobster intestine over luminal sodium and potassium concentration ranges of 0–50?mM and 5–100?mM, respectively, were hyperbolic functions of luminal [Na+] and [K+]. As with hepatopancreatic sugar transport, transepithelial intestinal sugar transport exhibited both significant (p<0.01) Na+/K+-dependent and cation-independent processes. Results suggest that both D-glucose and D-fructose are transported by a single SGLT-type carrier in each organ with sodium being the “preferred”, high affinity, cation for both sugars in the hepatopancreas, and potassium being the “preferred”, high affinity, cation for both sugars in the intestine. PMID:24950971

  15. Mitogenomic analysis of decapod crustacean phylogeny corroborates traditional views on their relationships.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Braband, Anke; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2013-03-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within decapod crustaceans are highly controversial. Even recent analyses based on molecular datasets have shown largely contradictory results. Previous studies using mitochondrial genomes are promising but suffer from a poor and unbalanced taxon sampling. To fill these gaps we sequenced the (nearly) complete mitochondrial genomes of 13 decapod species: Stenopus hispidus, Polycheles typhlops, Panulirus versicolor, Scyllarides latus, Enoplometopus occidentalis, Homarus gammarus, Procambarus fallax f. virginalis, Upogebia major, Neaxius acanthus, Calocaris macandreae, Corallianassa coutierei, Cryptolithodes sitchensis, Neopetrolisthes maculatus, and add that of Dromia personata. Our new data allow for comprehensive analyses of decapod phylogeny using the mitochondrial genomes of 50 species covering all major taxa of the Decapoda. Five species of Stomatopoda and one species of Euphausiacea serve as outgroups. Most of our analyses using Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) of nucleotide and amino acid datasets revealed congruent topologies for higher level decapod relationships: (((((((Anomala, Brachyura), Thalassinida: Gebiidea), Thalassinida: Axiidea), (Astacidea, Polychelida), Achelata), Stenopodidea), Caridea), Dendrobranchiata). This result corroborates several traditional morphological views and adds new perspectives. In particular, the position of Polychelida is surprising. Nevertheless, some problems can be identified. In a minority of analyses the basal branching of Reptantia is not fully resolved, Thalassinida are monophyletic; Polychelida are the sister group to Achelata, and Stenopodidea are resolved as sister group to Caridea. Despite this and although some nodal supports are low in our phylogenetic trees, we think that the largely stable topology of the trees regardless of different types of analyses suggests that mitochondrial genomes show good potential to resolve the relationship within Decapoda. PMID:23202543

  16. Environmental hypoxia influences hemoglobin subunit composition in the branchiopod crustacean Triops longicaudatus.

    PubMed

    Guadagnoli, J A; Braun, A M; Roberts, S P; Reiber, C L

    2005-09-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is a highly conserved protein that provides a vital link between environmental oxygen and its use and/or storage within an organism. While ubiquitous among vertebrates, Hb occurs frequently in invertebrate phyla as well. Many arthropod species use the copper-binding pigment hemocyanin, but unique in this phylum are the branchiopod crustaceans, which express Hb. Branchiopod Hb concentration and structure are exquisitely sensitive to environmental oxygen availability. Hemoglobin concentration and oxygen-binding affinity increase with decreasing oxygen tension in Daphnia, Artemia and Triops. The change in binding affinity is attributed to differential Hb subunit expression in Daphnia and Artemia but remains unclear for Triops. This is the first study to demonstrate developmental plasticity of Hb subunit expression in a notostracan, Triops longicaudatus, reared under conditions of varying oxygen availability. In response to variable oxygen environments, T. longicaudatus differentially express four primary Hb subunits ranging between 30 and 34 kDa, with normoxic-reared animals expressing primarily the heavier subunits, and hypoxic-reared animals expressing increased proportions of the lower molecular mass subunits. Moreover, differential Hb subunit expression is induced upon transfer of normoxic-reared adults to a hypoxic environment, such that the distribution of Hb subunits in the transferred adults becomes similar to that of hypoxic-reared animals. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and follow-up analyses revealed several isoforms of Hb subunits that may represent differential gene expression and/or post-translational modification. Unlike Daphnia and Artemia, the Hb hypoxic response in Triops is not reversible in that there was no significant decrease in Hb concentration or change in Hb subunit expression pattern when hypoxic-reared adults were transferred to a normoxic environment. PMID:16155226

  17. The role of wingless in the development of multibranched crustacean limbs.

    PubMed

    Nulsen, C; Nagy, L M

    1999-06-01

    Arthropods are the most diverse and speciose group of organisms on earth. A key feature in their successful radiation is the ease with which various appendages become readily adapted to new functions in novel environments. Arthropod limbs differ radically in form and function, from unbranched walking legs to multibranched swimming paddles. To uncover the developmental and genetic mechanisms underlying this diversification in form, we ask whether a three-signal model of limb growth based on Drosophila experiments is used in the development of arthropod limbs with variant shape. We cloned a Wnt-1 ortholog (Tlwnt-1) from Triops longicaudatus, a basal crustacean with a multibranched limb. We examined the mRNA in situ hybridization pattern during larval development to determine whether changes in wg expression are correlated with innovation in limb form. During larval growth and segmentation Tlwnt-1 is expressed in a segmentally reiterated pattern in the trunk. Unexpectedly, this pattern is restricted to the ventral portion of the epidermis. During early limb formation the single continuous stripe of Tlwnt-1 expression in each segment becomes ventrolaterally restricted into a series of shorter stripes. Some but not all of these shorter stripes correspond to what becomes the ventral side of a developing limb branch. We conclude that the Drosophila model of limb development cannot explain all types of arthropod proximodistal outgrowths, and that the multibranched limb of Triops develops from an early reorganization of the ventral body wall. In Triops, Tlwnt-1 plays a semiconservative role similar to that played by Drosophila wingless in segmentation and limb formation, and morphological innovation in limb form arises in part through an early modulation in the expression of the Tlwnt-1 gene. PMID:10370115

  18. Oxygen binding and its allosteric control in hemoglobin of the primitive branchiopod crustacean Triops cancriformis.

    PubMed

    Pirow, Ralph; Hellmann, Nadja; Weber, Roy E

    2007-07-01

    Branchiopod crustaceans are endowed with extracellular, high-molecular-mass hemoglobins (Hbs), the functional and allosteric properties of which have largely remained obscure. The Hb of the phylogenetically ancient Triops cancriformis (Notostraca) revealed moderate oxygen affinity, cooperativity and pH dependence (Bohr effect) coefficients: P(50) = 13.3 mmHg, n(50) = 2.3, and Phi = -0.18, at 20 degrees C and pH 7.44 in Tris buffer. The in vivo hemolymph pH was 7.52. Bivalent cations increased oxygen affinity, Mg(2+) exerting a greater effect than Ca(2+). Analysis of cooperative oxygen binding in terms of the nested Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model revealed an allosteric unit of four oxygen-binding sites and functional coupling of two to three allosteric units. The predicted 2 x 4 and 3 x 4 nested structures are in accord with stoichiometric models of the quarternary structure. The allosteric control mechanism of protons comprises a left shift of the upper asymptote of extended Hill plots which is ascribable to the displacement of the equilibrium between (at least) two high-affinity (relaxed) states, similar to that found in extracellular annelid and pulmonate molluscan Hbs. Remarkably, Mg(2+) ions increased oxygen affinity solely by displacing the equilibrium between the tense and relaxed conformations towards the relaxed states, which accords with the original MWC concept, but appears to be unique among Hbs. This effect is distinctly different from those of ionic effectors (bivalent cations, protons and organic phosphates) on annelid, pulmonate and vertebrate Hbs, which involve changes in the oxygen affinity of the tense and/or relaxed conformations. PMID:17550418

  19. A new view of insect-crustacean relationships I. Inferences from neural cladistics and comparative neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Andrew, David R

    2011-05-01

    Traditional hypotheses regarding the relationships of the major arthropod lineages focus on suites of comparable characters, often those that address features of the exoskeleton. However, because of the enormous morphological variety among arthropods, external characters may lead to ambiguities of interpretation and definition, particularly when species have undergone evolutionary simplification and reversal. Here we present the results of a cladistic analysis using morphological characters associated with brains and central nervous systems, based on the evidence that cerebral organization is generally robust over geological time. Well-resolved, strongly supported phylogenies were obtained from a neuromorphological character set representing a variety of discrete neuroanatomical traits. Phylogenetic hypotheses from this analysis support many accepted relationships, including monophyletic Chelicerata, Myriapoda, and Hexapoda, paraphyletic Crustacea and the union of Hexapoda and Crustacea (Tetraconata). They also support Mandibulata (Myriapoda + Tetraconata). One problematic result, which can be explained by symplesiomorphies that are likely to have evolved in deep time, is the inability to resolve Onychophora as a taxon distinct from Arthropoda. Crucially, neuronal cladistics supports the heterodox conclusion that both Hexapoda and Malacostraca are derived from a common ancestor that possessed a suite of discrete neural centers comprising an elaborate brain. Remipedes and copepods, both resolved as basal to Branchiopoda share a neural ground pattern with Malacostraca. These findings distinguish Hexapoda (Insecta) from Branchiopoda, which is the sister group of the clade Malacostraca + Hexapoda. The present study resolves branchiopod crustaceans as descendents of an ancestor with a complex brain, which means that they have evolved secondary simplification and the loss or reduction of numerous neural systems. PMID:21333750

  20. Islands beneath islands: phylogeography of a groundwater amphipod crustacean in the Balearic archipelago

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Metacrangonyctidae (Amphipoda, Crustacea) is an enigmatic continental subterranean water family of marine origin (thalassoid). One of the species in the genus, Metacrangonyx longipes, is endemic to the Balearic islands of Mallorca and Menorca (W Mediterranean). It has been suggested that the origin and distribution of thalassoid crustaceans could be explained by one of two alternative hypotheses: (1) active colonization of inland freshwater aquifers by a marine ancestor, followed by an adaptative shift; or (2) passive colonization by stranding of ancestral marine populations in coastal aquifers during marine regressions. A comparison of phylogenies, phylogeographic patterns and age estimations of clades should discriminate in favour of one of these two proposals. Results Phylogenetic relationships within M. longipes based on three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and one nuclear marker revealed five genetically divergent and geographically structured clades. Analyses of cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) mtDNA data showed the occurrence of a high geographic population subdivision in both islands, with current gene flow occurring exclusively between sites located in close proximity. Molecular-clock estimations dated the origin of M. longipes previous to about 6 Ma, whereas major cladogenetic events within the species took place between 4.2 and 2.0 Ma. Conclusions M. longipes displayed a surprisingly old and highly fragmented population structure, with major episodes of cladogenesis within the species roughly correlating with some of the major marine transgression-regression episodes that affected the region during the last 6 Ma. Eustatic changes (vicariant events) -not active range expansion of marine littoral ancestors colonizing desalinated habitats-explain the phylogeographic pattern observed in M. longipes. PMID:21791038

  1. Simulated climate change causes immune suppression and protein damage in the crustacean Nephrops norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Hernroth, Bodil; Sköld, Helen Nilsson; Wiklander, Kerstin; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Baden, Susanne

    2012-11-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration is causing global warming, which affects oceans by elevating water temperature and reducing pH. Crustaceans have been considered tolerant to ocean acidification because of their retained capacity to calcify during subnormal pH. However, we report here that significant immune suppression of the Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus, occurs after a 4-month exposure to ocean acidification (OA) at a level predicted for the year 2100 (hypercapnic seawater with a pH lowered by 0.4 units). Experiments carried out at different temperatures (5, 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18°C) demonstrated that the temperature within this range alone did not affect lobster immune responses. In the OA-treatment, hemocyte numbers were reduced by almost 50% and the phagocytic capacity of the remaining hemocytes was inhibited by 60%. The reduction in hemocyte numbers was not due to increased apoptosis in hematopoetic tissue. Cellular responses to stress were investigated through evaluating advanced glycation end products (AGE) and lipid oxidation in lobster hepatopancreata, and OA-treatment was shown to significantly increase AGEs', indicating stress-induced protein alterations. Furthermore, the extracellular pH of lobster hemolymph was reduced by approximately 0.2 units in the OA-treatment group, indicating either limited pH compensation or buffering capacity. The negative effects of OA-treatment on the nephropidae immune response and tissue homeostasis were more pronounced at higher temperatures (12-18°C versus 5°C), which may potentially affect disease severity and spread. Our results signify that ocean acidification may have adverse effects on the physiology of lobsters, which previously had been overlooked in studies of basic parameters such as lobster growth or calcification. PMID:22974540

  2. Seasonal bathymetric migrations of deep-sea fishes and decapod crustaceans in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguzzi, J.; Company, J. B.; Bahamon, N.; Flexas, M. M.; Tecchio, S.; Fernandez-Arcaya, U.; García, J. A.; Mechó, A.; Koenig, S.; Canals, M.

    2013-11-01

    Seasonal variations in the photophase length seem to drive migrations of marine animals, a phenomenon still largely unknown in deep-sea fishes and decapod crustaceans. Here, we report depth-oriented migrations of species living in the continental slope of the NW Mediterranean after repeated trawl sampling between 900 and 1500 m depths in four seasons. To understand the variations in the catchability of animals as a function of water depth, we analysed the relationship between population depth shifts and environmental factors by performing a multiparametric habitat monitoring at sea surface (PAR), in the water column (temperature and salinity), and on the seabed (organic matter flux and total mass flux). Significant connections are studied by NMDS and GAM analyses. Bathymetric changes in most targeted species are identified from winter, when distribution was the deepest, to spring and summer, and finally autumn, when the shallowest distribution was observed prior to a sudden bathymetric retreat. The analysis of size-class frequency distributions (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test) discards an effect of the juvenile recruitment on these bathymetric changes. Which environmental factor imparts seasonality to these depth-oriented migrations has not yet been clarified. A strong connection is found with water temperature and salinity, associated to flow of the Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) and the Western Mediterranean Deep Water (WMDW). The studied depth range was affected by seasonal fluctuations of both water masses and the interphase amongst them. LIW showed a stronger seasonal pattern, getting warmer, saltier in autumn and fresher in winter. The migration of most species towards shallower depths in spring, summer and autumn, and the sudden migration to deeper grounds in winter could therefore be related to changes in LIW temperature and salinity.

  3. Genome anatomy of the gastrointestinal pathogen, Vibrio parahaemolyticus of crustacean origin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, an important human pathogen, is associated with gastroenteritis and transmitted through partially cooked seafood. It has become a major concern in the production and trade of marine food products. The prevalence of potentially virulent and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in raw seafood is of public health significance. Here we describe the genome sequence of a V. parahaemolyticus isolate of crustacean origin which was cultured from prawns in 2008 in Selangor, Malaysia (isolate PCV08-7). The next generation sequencing and analysis revealed that the genome of isolate PCV08-7 has closest similarity to that of V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633. However, there are certain unique features of the PCV08-7 genome such as the absence of TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), and the presence of HU-alpha insertion. The genome of isolate PCV08-7 encodes a thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), an important virulence factor that classifies PCV08-7 isolate to be a serovariant of O3:K6 strain. Apart from these, we observed that there is certain pattern of genetic rearrangements that makes V. parahaemolyticus PCV08-7 a non-pandemic clone. We present detailed genome statistics and important genetic features of this bacterium and discuss how its survival, adaptation and virulence in marine and terrestrial hosts can be understood through the genomic blueprint and that the availability of genome sequence entailing this important Malaysian isolate would likely enhance our understanding of the epidemiology, evolution and transmission of foodborne Vibrios in Malaysia and elsewhere. PMID:24330647

  4. Trophic transfer of trace metals: Subcellular compartmentalization in a polychaete and assimilation by a decapod crustacean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainbow, P.S.; Poirier, L.; Smith, B.D.; Brix, K.V.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical form of accumulated trace metal in prey is important in controlling the bioavailataility of dietary metal to a predator. This study investigated the trophic transfer of radiolabelled Ag, Cd and Zn from the polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor to the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians. We used 2 populations of worms with different proportions of accumulated metals in different subcellular fractions as prey, and loaded the worms with radiolabelled metals either from sediment or from solution. Accumulated radiolabelled metals were fractionated into 5 components : metal-rich granules (MRG), cellular debris, organelles, metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP), and other (heat-sensitive) proteins (HSP). Assimilation efficiencies (AE) of the metals by P. varians were measured from the 4 categories of prey (i.e. 2 populations, radiolabelled from sediment or solution). There were significant differences for each metal between the AEs from the different prey categories, confirming that origin of prey and route of uptake of accumulated trace metal will cause intraspecific differences in subsequent metal assimilation. Correlations were sought between AEs and selected fractions or combinations of fractions of metals in the prey-MRG, Trophically Available Metal (TAM = MTLP + HSP + organelles) and total protein (MTLP + HSP). TAM explained 28% of the variance in AEs for Ag, but no consistent relationships emerged between AEs and TAM or total protein when the metals were considered separately. AEs did, however, show significant positive regressions with both TAM and total protein when the 3 metals were considered together, explaining only about 21 % of the variance in each case. A significant negative relationship was observed between MRG and AE for all metals combined. The predator (P. varians) can assimilate dietary metal from a range of the fractions binding metals in the prey (N. diversicolor), with different assimilation efficiencies summated across these fractions. TAM and/or total protein may represent an approximate minimum for trophic availability but neither of these alone is a fully accurate predictor. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  5. Heterodimeric TALENs induce targeted heritable mutations in the crustacean Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Naitou, Akiko; Kato, Yasuhiko; Nakanishi, Takashi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are artificial nucleases harboring a customizable DNA-binding domain and a FokI nuclease domain. The high specificity of the DNA-binding domain and the ease of design have enabled researchers to use TALENs for targeted mutagenesis in various organisms. Here, we report the development of TALEN-dependent targeted gene disruption in the crustacean Daphnia magna, the emerging model for ecological and toxicological genomics. First, a reporter transgene DsRed2 (EF1?-1::DsRed2) was targeted. Using the Golden Gate method with a GoldyTALEN scaffold, we constructed homodimeric and heterodimeric TALENs containing wild-type and ELD/KKR FokI domains. mRNAs that coded for either the customized homodimeric or heterodimeric TALENs were injected into one-cell-stage embryos. The high mortality of embryos injected with homodimeric TALEN mRNAs prevented us from detecting mutations. In contrast, embryos injected with heterodimeric TALEN mRNAs survived and 78%–87% of the adults lost DsRed2 fluorescence in a large portion of cells throughout the body. In addition, these adults produced non-fluorescent progenies, all of which carried mutations at the dsRed2 locus. We also tested heterodimeric TALENs targeted for the endogenous eyeless gene and found that biallelic mutations could be transmitted through germ line cells at a rate of up to 22%. Both somatic and heritable mutagenesis efficiencies of TALENs were higher than those of the CRISPR/Cas9 system that we recently developed. These results suggest that the TALEN system may efficiently induce heritable mutations into the target genes, which will further contribute to the progress of functional genomics in D. magna. PMID:25681393

  6. Changes in epizoic crustacean infestations during cetacean die-offs: the mass mortality of Mediterranean striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba revisited.

    PubMed

    Aznar, F J; Perdiguero, D; Pérez del Olmo, A; Repullés, A; Agustí, C; Raga, J A

    2005-11-28

    In the summer and autumn of 1990, a cetacean morbillivirus caused a massive epizootic mortality of striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba in the western Mediterranean. Previous circumstantial evidence suggested that the disease could also have increased host susceptibility to infestations with epizoic crustaceans. In this study we provide strong evidence supporting this hypothesis. We examined striped dolphins stranded along the Mediterranean central coast of Spain from 1981 to 2004 (n = 136), and recorded data on prevalence, intensity of infestation, size and reproductive status of 2 sessile crustacean species specific to cetaceans, the phoront cirriped Xenobalanus globicipitis and the mesoparasitic copepod Pennella balaenopterae. Compared with the pre-epizootic (n = 12) and post-epizootic (n = 62) dolphin samples, the following changes were noted in the dolphins stranded during the epizootic (n = 62): (1) the prevalence of both X. globicipitis and P. balaenopterae increased; (2) the intensity of X. globicipitis and P. balaenopterae infestations did not increase; indeed, it was even slightly lower than in the other periods, as was their degree of aggregation; (3) individuals of both species were smaller, and a higher proportion were non-gravid; (4) the 2 species tended to co-occur in the same dolphins, but their numbers did not co-vary. These patterns strongly suggest that, during the epizootic, there was a short-term increase in the probability of infestation of these 2 species because of the sudden rise in the population of susceptible hosts; the growth of the new recruits was limited by the early death of dolphins. The high susceptibility was likely related to the immunosuppressive effects of viral infection and the abnormally heavy loads of polychlorinated biphenyls found in sick dolphins; the level of inbreeding was also higher in dolphins from the 'epizootic' sample. Epizoic crustaceans could be suitable indicators of health in cetacean populations. PMID:16408840

  7. Analysis of spatiotemporal expression and function of the single-minded homolog in the branchiopod crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shinichi; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Tokishita, Shinichi; Ohta, Toshihiro

    2015-01-25

    In insect Drosophila melanogaster, ventral midline cells are crucial to formation of the central nervous system (CNS) and have roles in the specification of ectodermal neuroblasts. Notably, midline cells also have more recently recognized roles in the formation of the higher crustacean Parhyale dorso-ventral axis. The single-minded is a master regulator of ventral midline cells and is required for these functions. Recently sim expression patterns have been reported in various arthropods. These results suggest that the midline precursors evolved from ventral neuroectoderm of common ancestor Mandibulata. However, sim function has been only analyzed in few organisms. To investigate whether these functions of sim, the gene encoding Single-minded, are conserved among insects and crustaceans, we examined the embryonic expression pattern of a lower crustacean Daphnia sim homolog (dma sim) and analyzed the function of dma sim during embryonic development. The Dma Sim protein was expressed in the ventral neuroectoderm (like in onychophoran and chelicerate) and midline (like in mandibulatan). In addition to this conserved ventral neuroectoderm and midline expression, Dma Sim was expressed outside the ventral midline; it was expressed in maxilla 2, presumptive shell glands, and other tissues. To investigate dma sim function, we used RNA interference (RNAi) to inhibit dma sim in Daphnia embryos. Embryos subjected to dma sim RNAi exhibited improper axon tract formation and abnormal limb and ventral development. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated knockdown of dma slit, a putative Dma Sim target gene, resulted in similar embryonic phenotypes. These results indicated that dma sim might be required for proper dma slit-mediated ventral development in addition to being required for a conserved role in the ventral midline. Our findings indicated that sim homologs might have provided different developmental functions to ventral midline cells during metazoan evolution. PMID:25447925

  8. Size-Dependent Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles to Bacteria, Yeast, Algae, Crustaceans and Mammalian Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ivask, Angela; Kurvet, Imbi; Kasemets, Kaja; Blinova, Irina; Aruoja, Villem; Suppi, Sandra; Vija, Heiki; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Titma, Tiina; Heinlaan, Margit; Visnapuu, Meeri; Koller, Dagmar; Kisand, Vambola; Kahru, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The concept of nanotechnologies is based on size-dependent properties of particles in the 1–100 nm range. However, the relation between the particle size and biological effects is still unclear. The aim of the current paper was to generate and analyse a homogenous set of experimental toxicity data on Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) of similar coating (citrate) but of 5 different primary sizes (10, 20, 40, 60 and 80 nm) to different types of organisms/cells commonly used in toxicity assays: bacterial, yeast and algal cells, crustaceans and mammalian cells in vitro. When possible, the assays were conducted in ultrapure water to minimise the effect of medium components on silver speciation. The toxic effects of NPs to different organisms varied about two orders of magnitude, being the lowest (?0.1 mg Ag/L) for crustaceans and algae and the highest (?26 mg Ag/L) for mammalian cells. To quantify the role of Ag ions in the toxicity of Ag NPs, we normalized the EC50 values to Ag ions that dissolved from the NPs. The analysis showed that the toxicity of 20–80 nm Ag NPs could fully be explained by released Ag ions whereas 10 nm Ag NPs proved more toxic than predicted. Using E. coli Ag-biosensor, we demonstrated that 10 nm Ag NPs were more bioavailable to E. coli than silver salt (AgNO3). Thus, one may infer that 10 nm Ag NPs had more efficient cell-particle contact resulting in higher intracellular bioavailability of silver than in case of bigger NPs. Although the latter conclusion is initially based on one test organism, it may lead to an explanation for “size-dependent“ biological effects of silver NPs. This study, for the first time, investigated the size-dependent toxic effects of a well-characterized library of Ag NPs to several microbial species, protozoans, algae, crustaceans and mammalian cells in vitro. PMID:25048192

  9. Life cycle of the tick Haemaphysalis leporis-palustris (Acari: Ixodidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Labruna, M B; Leite, R C; Faccini, J L; Ferreira, F

    2000-01-01

    The life cycles of two separate populations (colonies A and B) of the rabbit tick, Haemaphysalis leporis-palustris, were studied under laboratory conditions. Domestic New Zealand rabbits, Oryctolagus cuniculus, and wild rabbits, Sylvilagus brasiliensis, were used as hosts for ticks from colony B and only O. cuniculus rabbits were used as hosts for ticks from colony A. Developmental periods were observed in an incubator at 27+/-1 degrees C and RH 90+/-5%. Larvae from colonies A and B fed for 8.0+/-3.7 days and 8.5+/-1.3 days, respectively, on O. cuniculus. On S. brasiliensis larvae from colony B fed for 7.2+/-1.3 days. Nymphs from colony A fed for 8.1+/-1.4 days on O. cuniculus and nymphs from colony B fed for 8.1+/-1.0 days on S. brasiliensis. Only one engorged nymph from colony B was recovered from O. cuniculus. Females from colony A fed for 20.9+/-5.9 days on O. cuniculus and females from colony B fed for 18.6+/-2.4 days on O. cuniculus and 18.7+/-3.7 days on S. brasiliensis. Engorged larvae from colony A required 13.7+/-3.7 days to molt while engorged larvae from colony B required 11.8+/-3.0 and 11.5+/-1.8 days to molt, after having fed on O. cuniculus and S. brasiliensis, respectively. Engorged nymphs from colonies A and B required 16.3+/-1.9 days and 14.7+/-1.4 days to molt, respectively. Engorged females from colonies A and B required 4-7 and 3-5 days, respectively, to start oviposition. Mean egg incubation periods lasted for 33-34 days. For ticks from colony B, host species accounted for significant differences (p < 0.05) in larval and nymphal feeding periods, oviposition weights and CEIs. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between the two colonies when ticks fed on O. cuniculus were observed for larval and nymphal feeding and premolt periods, engorged female and oviposition weights and conversion efficiency indexes (CEI). S. brasiliensis were always a more suitable host for H. leporis-palustris than O. cuniculus. Significantly more larvae and nymphs engorged and molted when fed on S. brasiliensis (p < 0.001). Females fed S. brasiliensis were more successful to lay fertile eggs and showed the highest engorged and egg mass weights, and the highest CEIs. Data of H. leporis-palustris fed on wild rabbits (one of its natural host species) are reported for the first time. PMID:11227826

  10. Response of biochemical biomarkers in the aquatic crustacean Daphnia magna exposed to silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ulm, Lea; Krivohlavek, Adela; Jurašin, Darija; Ljubojevi?, Marija; Šinko, Goran; Crnkovi?, Tea; Žuntar, Irena; Šiki?, Sandra; Vinkovi? Vr?ek, Ivana

    2015-12-01

    The proliferation of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) production and use owing to their antimicrobial properties justifies the need to examine the resulting environmental impacts. The discharge of biocidal nanoparticles to water bodies may pose a threat to aquatic species. This study evaluated the effects of citrate-coated AgNPs on the standardized test organism Daphnia magna Straus clone MBP996 by means of biochemical biomarker response. AgNP toxicity was compared against the toxic effect of Ag(+). The toxicity endpoints were calculated based upon measured Ag concentrations in exposure media. For AgNPs, the NOAEC and LOAEC values at 48 h were 5 and 7 ?g Ag/L, respectively, while these values were 0.5 and 1 ?g Ag/L, respectively, for Ag(+). The EC50 at 48 h was computed to be 12.4?±?0.6 and 2.6?±?0.1 ?g Ag/L for AgNPs and Ag(+), respectively, with 95 % confidence intervals of 12.1-12.8 and 2.3-2.8 ?g Ag/L, respectively. These results indicate significant less toxicity of AgNP compared to free Ag(+) ions. Five biomarkers were evaluated in Daphnia magna neonates after acute exposure to Ag(+) or AgNPs, including glutathione (GSH) level, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and catalase (CAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. AgNPs induced toxicity and oxidative stress responses in D. magna neonates at tenfold higher concentrations than Ag. Biochemical methods revealed a clear increase in AChE activity, decreased ROS level, increased GSH level and CAT activity, but no significant changes in SOD activity. As Ag(+) may dissolve from AgNPs, these two types of Ag could act synergistically and produce a greater toxic response. The observed remarkably high toxicity of AgNPs (in the parts-per-billion range) to crustaceans indicates that these organisms are a vulnerable link in the aquatic food chain with regard to contamination by nanosilver. Graphical Abstract ?. PMID:26296504

  11. Vapor Compression Cycle Design Program (CYCLE_D)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 49 NIST Vapor Compression Cycle Design Program (CYCLE_D) (PC database for purchase)   The CYCLE_D database package simulates the vapor compression refrigeration cycles. It is fully compatible with REFPROP 9.0 and covers the 62 single-compound refrigerants . Fluids can be used in mixtures comprising up to five components.

  12. Walking on insect paths? Early ommatidial development in the compound eye of the ancestral crustacean, Triops cancriformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzer, R. R.; Michalke, Clemens; Smola, Ulrich

    Ommatidia (the compound eye's functional units) in insects are formed by the recruitment of undifferentiated cells under the control of signalling factors. During this process, a sequence of "preclusters" composed of specifically arranged precursor cells is followed. In the growth zone of the eye of Triops, an ancestral crustacean, we observed a patterning process that corresponds well with that of insects. In both taxa, clusters with arc-like, five-cell and eight-cell patterns are found, and the sequence in which the photoreceptor or R-cells of each ommatidium become identifiable is basically the same. The first to appear are R8-like and R2/5-like cells, second are R3/4-like, and third are R1/6- and R7-like cells (if the fly's cell-numbering system is used). Thus, the morphogenetic steps during which the cell identities and the cellular architecture of the ommatidia develop appear to be conserved between these arthropod groups. Furthermore, the individual cells and cell pairs which build an insect ommatidium seem to have their homologues in crustaceans. In the evolution of developmental processes, intercellular recruitment seems to be a mechanism operating on the level of single cells even in distantly related species.

  13. Fatty acid patterns of Southern Ocean shelf and deep sea peracarid crustaceans and a possible food source, foraminiferans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würzberg, Laura; Peters, Janna; Brandt, Angelika

    2011-10-01

    In order to investigate the diversity of diet composition in macrobenthic peracarid crustaceans from the Antarctic shelf and deep sea, the fatty acid (FA) composition of different species belonging to the orders Isopoda, Amphipoda, Cumacea and Tanaidacea was analysed. Multivariate analyses of the FA composition confirmed general differences between the orders, but also distinct differences within these orders. To gain information on the origin of the FAs found, the potential food sources sediment, POM and foraminiferans were included in the study. Most of the analysed amphipod species displayed high 18:1( n-9)-18:1( n-7) ratios, widely used as an indicator for a carnivorous component in the diet. Cumaceans were characterised by increased phytoplankton FA markers such as 20:5( n-3) (up to 29% of total FAs), suggesting a diet based on phytodetritus. High values of the FA 20:4( n-6) were found in some munnopsid isopods (up to 21% of total FAs) and some tanaidacean species (up to 19% of total FAs). 20:4( n-6) also occurred in high proportions in some foraminiferan samples (up to 21% of total fatty acids), but not in sediment and POM, possibly indicating the ingestion of foraminiferans by some peracarid crustaceans.

  14. Tackling the Cytotoxic Effect of a Marine Polycyclic Quinone-Type Metabolite: Halenaquinone Induces Molt 4 Cells Apoptosis via Oxidative Stress Combined with the Inhibition of HDAC and Topoisomerase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shou-Ping; Lee, Man-Gang; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Juan, Yung-Shun; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Du, Ying-Chi; Su, Jui-Hsin; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Yang, Juan-Cheng; Wu, Yang-Chang; Lu, Mei-Chin

    2015-01-01

    A marine polycyclic quinone-type metabolite, halenaquinone (HQ), was found to inhibit the proliferation of Molt 4, K562, MDA-MB-231 and DLD-1 cancer cell lines, with IC50 of 0.48, 0.18, 8.0 and 6.76 ?g/mL, respectively. It exhibited the most potent activity against leukemia Molt 4 cells. Accumulating evidence showed that HQ may act as a potent protein kinase inhibitor in cancer therapy. To fully understand the mechanism of HQ, we further explored the precise molecular targets in leukemia Molt 4 cells. We found that the use of HQ increased apoptosis by 26.23%–70.27% and caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by 17.15%–53.25% in a dose-dependent manner, as demonstrated by Annexin-V/PI and JC-1 staining assays, respectively. Moreover, our findings indicated that the pretreatment of Molt 4 cells with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, diminished MMP disruption and apoptosis induced by HQ, suggesting that ROS overproduction plays a crucial rule in the cytotoxic activity of HQ. The results of a cell-free system assay indicated that HQ could act as an HDAC and topoisomerase catalytic inhibitor through the inhibition of pan-HDAC and topoisomerase II? expression, respectively. On the protein level, the expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins p-Akt, NF?B, HDAC and Bcl-2, as well as hexokinase II was inhibited by the use of HQ. On the other hand, the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax, PARP cleavage, caspase activation and cytochrome c release were increased after HQ treatment. Taken together, our results suggested that the antileukemic effect of HQ is ROS-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis combined with the inhibitory effect on HDAC and topoisomerase activities. PMID:26006712

  15. The endocrine control of reproduction and molt in male and female emperor (Aptenodytes forsteri) and adelie (Pygoscelis adeliae) penguins. I. Annual changes in plasma levels of gonadal steroids and LH.

    PubMed

    Groscolas, R; Jallageas, M; Goldsmith, A; Assenmacher, I

    1986-04-01

    Changes in plasma LH, testosterone, and estrogens were investigated throughout reproduction and molt in free-living male and female emperor (Aptenodytes forsteri) and adelie (Pygoscelis adeliae) penguins. In both sexes and species, plasma LH and gonadal steroids were severalfold above basal level at the time of arrival on the breeding grounds, suggesting that environmental cues (especially decreasing daylength in emperors) rather than mating and courting primarily stimulate gonadal development and reproduction. In both species a marked increase in plasma LH (both sexes), testosterone (males), and estrogens (females) corresponded with the time of maximum gonadal size, and peak values were obtained at the time of copulation, i.e., in emperors about 10-15 days prior to egg laying. In females, plasma LH and estrogens dropped to low levels between copulation and egg laying. Similarly, following copulation in males plasma testosterone fell to lower levels that in emperors were maintained during incubation and brooding of the non-thermally emancipated chick. Plasma LH levels followed the same trend as testosterone, falling after copulation and falling further prior to molt. Though lower than at copulation, plasma LH was higher in incubating (males) and brooding (males and females) emperors than during rearing of the thermally emancipated chicks, suggesting that plasma LH might be related to incubating, brooding, and territorial behavior. In male and female emperors and in male adelies, plasma gonadal steroids and LH were at basal levels throughout molt. PMID:3781216

  16. Muscular and hepatic pollution biomarkers in the fishes Phycis blennoides and Micromesistius poutassou and the crustacean Aristeus antennatus in the Blanes Submarine Canyon (NW Mediterranean).

    PubMed

    Solé, Montserrat; Hambach, Bastian; Cortijo, Verónica; Huertas, David; Fernández, Pilar; Company, Joan B

    2009-07-01

    Submarine canyons are regarded as a sink for pollutants. In order to determine if this theory applied to deep-sea species from an important fishing ground (the Blanes submarine canyon) located in the NW Mediterranean, we sampled the commercial fish Phycis blennoides and Micromesistius poutassou and the crustacean Aristeus antennatus. Specimens were sampled inside and outside (in the open continental slope) the submarine canyon; both are regarded as potentially affected by exposure to different anthropogenic chemicals. Several pollution biomarkers in muscle (activity of cholinesterases) and liver/hepatopancreas (catalase, glutathione S-transferases, carboxylesterases, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase in fish or mixed function oxygenase (MFO)-related reductases in crustacean, and lipid peroxidation levels) were measured. Chemical analysis of the persistent organic pollutants, namely polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) was also performed on the fish and crustacean muscle. Biomarker activities and levels were discussed in relation to pollutant exposure, habitat, and parameters including sex, size, and species. Biochemical responses and chemical analysis of PCBs evidenced interspecies differences as well as sex and size-related ones, mainly in A. antennatus. An indication of higher exposure to pollutants inside the canyon was observed, which was more clearly reflected in the fish than in the crustacean. However, further research is required to confirm this observation. PMID:18941829

  17. Menu Cycles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Alfred; Almony, John

    The curriculum guide for commercial foods instruction is designed to aid the teacher in communicating the importance of menu cycles in commercial food production. It also provides information about the necessary steps in getting food from the raw form to the finished product, and then to the consumer. In addition to providing information on how to…

  18. Limited genetic differentiation among breeding, molting, and wintering groups of the threatened Steller's eider: The role of historic and contemporary factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, J.M.; Talbot, S.L.; Petersen, M.R.; Rearick, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Due to declines in the Alaska breeding population, the Steller's eider (Polysticta stelleri) was listed as threatened in North America in 1997. Periodic non-breeding in Russia and Alaska has hampered field-based assessments of behavioral patterns critical to recovery plans, such as levels of breeding site fidelity and movements among three regional populations: Atlantic-Russia, Pacific-Russia and Alaska. Therefore, we analyzed samples from across the species range with seven nuclear microsatellite DNA loci and cytochrome b mitochondrial (mt)DNA sequence data to infer levels of interchange among sampling areas and patterns of site fidelity. Results demonstrated low levels of population differentiation within Atlantic and Pacific nesting areas, with higher levels observed between these regions, but only for mtDNA. Bayesian analysis of microsatellite data from wintering and molting birds showed no signs of sub-population structure, even though band-recovery data suggests multiple breeding areas are present. We observed higher estimates of F-statistics for female mtDNA data versus male data, suggesting female-biased natal site fidelity. Summary statistics for mtDNA were consistent with models of historic population expansion. Lack of spatial structure in Steller's eiders may result largely from insufficient time since historic population expansions for behaviors, such as natal site fidelity, to isolate breeding areas genetically. However, other behaviors such as the periodic non-breeding observed in Steller's eiders may also play a more contemporary role in genetic homogeneity, especially for microsatellite loci. ?? Springer 2005.

  19. Bioinformatic analyses of the publicly accessible crustacean expressed sequence tags (ESTs) reveal numerous novel neuropeptide-encoding precursor proteins, including ones from members of several little studied taxa.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Durkin, Christopher S; Hartline, Niko; Ohno, Paul; Lenz, Petra H

    2010-05-15

    ESTs have been generated for many crustacean species, providing an invaluable resource for peptide discovery in members of this arthropod subphylum. Here, these data were mined for novel peptide-encoding transcripts, with the mature peptides encoded by them predicted using a combination of online peptide prediction programs and homology to known arthropod sequences. In total, 70 mature full-length/partial peptides representing members of 16 families/subfamilies were predicted, the vast majority being novel; the species from which the peptides were identified included members of the Branchiopoda (Daphnia carinata and Triops cancriformis), Maxillopoda (Caligus clemensi, Caligus rogercresseyi, Lepeophtheirus salmonis and Lernaeocera branchialis) and Malacostraca (Euphausia superba, Marsupenaeus japonicus, Penaeus monodon, Homarus americanus, Petrolisthes cinctipes, Callinectes sapidus and Portunus trituberculatus). Of particular note were the identifications of an intermediate between the insect adipokinetic hormones and crustacean red pigment concentrating hormone and a modified crustacean cardioactive peptide from the daphnid D. carinata; Arg(7)-corazonin was also deduced from this species, the first identification of a corazonin from a non-decapod crustacean. Our data also include the first reports of members of the calcitonin-like diuretic hormone, FMRFamide-related peptide (neuropeptide F subfamily) and orcokinin families from members of the Copepoda. Moreover, the prediction of a bursicon alpha from the euphausid E. superba represents the first peptide identified from any member of the basal eucaridean order Euphausiacea. In addition, large collections of insect eclosion hormone- and neuroparsin-like peptides were identified from a variety of species, greatly expanding the number of known members of these families in crustaceans. PMID:20064519

  20. Unravelling the evolution of neural stem cells in arthropods: notch signalling in neural stem cell development in the crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Ungerer, Petra; Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2012-11-15

    The genetic regulatory networks controlling major developmental processes seem to be conserved in bilaterians regardless of an independent or a common origin of the structures. This has been explained by the employment of a genetic toolkit that was repeatedly used during bilaterian evolution to build the various forms and body plans. However, it is not clear how genetic networks were incorporated into the formation of novel structures and how homologous genes can regulate the disparate morphological processes. Here we address this question by analysing the role of Notch signalling, which is part of the bilaterian toolkit, in neural stem cell evolution in arthropods. Within arthropods neural stem cells have evolved in the last common ancestor of insects and crustaceans (Tetraconata). We analyse here for the first time the role of Notch signalling in a crustacean, the branchiopod Daphnia magna, and show that it is required in neural stem cells for regulating the time of neural precursor production and for binary cell fate decisions in the ventral neuroectoderm. The function of Notch signalling has diverged in the ventral neuroectoderm of insects and crustaceans accompanied by changes in the morphogenetic processes. In the crustacean, Notch controlled mechanisms of neuroblast regulation have evolved that are surprisingly similar to vertebrates and thus present a remarkable case of parallel evolution. These new data on a representative of crustaceans complete the arthropod data set on Notch signalling in the nervous system and allow for reconstructing how the Notch signalling pathway has been co-opted from pre-existing structures to the development of the evolving neural stem cells in the Tetraconata ancestor. PMID:22964415

  1. Novel transcriptome assembly and improved annotation of the whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), a dominant crustacean in global seafood mariculture

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Noushin; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Doan, Ryan; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Chen, Patricia L.; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrian; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A.; Carrasco, J. Salvador; Hong, Chris; Brieba, Luis G.; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Blood, Philip D.; Sawyer, Jason E.; Johnson, Charles D.; Dindot, Scott V.; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new transcriptome assembly of the Pacific whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), the species most farmed for human consumption. Its functional annotation, a substantial improvement over previous ones, is provided freely. RNA-Seq with Illumina HiSeq technology was used to analyze samples extracted from shrimp abdominal muscle, hepatopancreas, gills and pleopods. We used the Trinity and Trinotate software suites for transcriptome assembly and annotation, respectively. The quality of this assembly and the affiliated targeted homology searches greatly enrich the curated transcripts currently available in public databases for this species. Comparison with the model arthropod Daphnia allows some insights into defining characteristics of decapod crustaceans. This large-scale gene discovery gives the broadest depth yet to the annotated transcriptome of this important species and should be of value to ongoing genomics and immunogenetic resistance studies in this shrimp of paramount global economic importance. PMID:25420880

  2. The Application of DNA Barcodes for the Identification of Marine Crustaceans from the North Sea and Adjacent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, Michael J.; Barco, Andrea; Steinke, Dirk; Beermann, Jan; Laakmann, Silke; Mohrbeck, Inga; Neumann, Hermann; Kihara, Terue C.; Pointner, Karin; Radulovici, Adriana; Segelken-Voigt, Alexandra; Wesse, Christina; Knebelsberger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    During the last years DNA barcoding has become a popular method of choice for molecular specimen identification. Here we present a comprehensive DNA barcode library of various crustacean taxa found in the North Sea, one of the most extensively studied marine regions of the world. Our data set includes 1,332 barcodes covering 205 species, including taxa of the Amphipoda, Copepoda, Decapoda, Isopoda, Thecostraca, and others. This dataset represents the most extensive DNA barcode library of the Crustacea in terms of species number to date. By using the Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD), unique BINs were identified for 198 (96.6%) of the analyzed species. Six species were characterized by two BINs (2.9%), and three BINs were found for the amphipod species Gammarus salinus Spooner, 1947 (0.4%). Intraspecific distances with values higher than 2.2% were revealed for 13 species (6.3%). Exceptionally high distances of up to 14.87% between two distinct but monophyletic clusters were found for the parasitic copepod Caligus elongatus Nordmann, 1832, supporting the results of previous studies that indicated the existence of an overlooked sea louse species. In contrast to these high distances, haplotype-sharing was observed for two decapod spider crab species, Macropodia parva Van Noort & Adema, 1985 and Macropodia rostrata (Linnaeus, 1761), underlining the need for a taxonomic revision of both species. Summarizing the results, our study confirms the application of DNA barcodes as highly effective identification system for the analyzed marine crustaceans of the North Sea and represents an important milestone for modern biodiversity assessment studies using barcode sequences. PMID:26417993

  3. Stress signaling: coregulation of hemoglobin and male sex determination through a terpenoid signaling pathway in a crustacean.

    PubMed

    Rider, Cynthia V; Gorr, Thomas A; Olmstead, Allen W; Wasilak, Beth A; LeBlanc, Gerald A

    2005-01-01

    Environmental signals can activate neuro-endocrine cascades that regulate various physiological processes. In the present study, we demonstrate that two responses to environmental stress signaling in the crustacean Daphnia magna--hemoglobin accumulation and male offspring production--are co-elevated by the crustacean terpenoid hormone methyl farnesoate and several synthetic analogs. Potency of the hormones with respect to the induction of both hemoglobin and male offspring was highly correlated, suggesting that both processes are regulated by the same terpenoid signaling pathway. Six clones of the D. pulex/pulicaria species complex that were previously characterized as unable to produce male offspring and five clones that were capable of producing males were evaluated for both hemoglobin induction and male offspring production in response to methyl farnesoate. Four of the five male-producing clones produced both hemoglobin and male offspring in response to the hormone. Five of the six non-male-producing clones produced neither hemoglobin nor males in response to the hormone. These results provide additional evidence that both physiological processes are regulated by the same signaling pathway. Furthermore, the results indicate that the non-male-producing clones are largely defective in some methyl farnesoate signaling component, downstream from methyl farnesoate synthesis but upstream from the genes regulated by the hormone. A likely candidate for the site of the defect is the methyl farnesoate receptor. As a consequence of this defect, non-male-producing clones have lost their responsiveness to environmental signals that are transduced by this endocrine pathway. This defect in signaling would be likely to enhance population growth in stable environments due to the elimination of males from the population, assuming that other processes critical to population growth are not also compromised by this defect. PMID:15601873

  4. Soft-bottom crustacean assemblages in Mediterranean marine caves: the cave of Cerro Gordo (Granada, Spain) as case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Barranco, C.; Guerra-García, J. M.; Sánchez-Tocino, L.; García-Gómez, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Although marine caves are priority conservation areas according to the Directive 92/43/CEE of the European Community, there is a lack of studies dealing with their soft-bottom communities. For a case study, we selected the Cerro Gordo cave at 15 m depth. Three different zones were defined: a semi-dark 25-m long entrance area, a dark intermediate area of 35 m, and the final zone at 90 m from the entrance. Sediment samples were taken from these zones as well as from outside the cave (control) by SCUBA diving. Six rectangular cores of 10 × 250 cm2 were collected in each site for macrofaunal study, and three more replicates were taken to analyze physico-chemical parameters. The granulometry showed a clear gradient from medium sands outside the cave to silt and clay in the inner zone. Measurements of the crustacean assemblages showed that the number of species and abundance were significantly higher outside the cave (30-40 species, >4,000 ind m-2) than inside (5-10 species, <1,000 ind m-2). Multivariate analyses showed a clear difference in species composition between outside and inside the cave. Caprellids, tanaids, cumaceans, and decapods were only found outside the cave, while gammarids and isopods were present both outside and inside the cave. The gammarid Siphonoecetes sabatieri and the tanaid Apseudes latreilli were the dominant species outside the cave, while the gammarids Harpinia pectinata, Harpinia crenulata, and Harpinia ala were dominant inside. The present study represents an increase in depth range and geographic distribution for Kupellonura mediterranea and Monoculodes packardi. This is the first description of soft-bottom crustacean communities from submarine caves of southern Spain.

  5. Identification of a Divergent Environmental DNA Sequence Clade Using the Phylogeny of Gregarine Parasites (Apicomplexa) from Crustacean Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Rueckert, Sonja; Simdyanov, Timur G.; Aleoshin, Vladimir V.; Leander, Brian S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Environmental SSU rDNA surveys have significantly improved our understanding of microeukaryotic diversity. Many of the sequences acquired using this approach are closely related to lineages previously characterized at both morphological and molecular levels, making interpretation of these data relatively straightforward. Some sequences, by contrast, appear to be phylogenetic orphans and are sometimes inferred to represent “novel lineages” of unknown cellular identity. Consequently, interpretation of environmental DNA surveys of cellular diversity rely on an adequately comprehensive database of DNA sequences derived from identified species. Several major taxa of microeukaryotes, however, are still very poorly represented in these databases, and this is especially true for diverse groups of single-celled parasites, such as gregarine apicomplexans. Methodology/Principal Findings This study attempts to address this paucity of DNA sequence data by characterizing four different gregarine species, isolated from the intestines of crustaceans, at both morphological and molecular levels: Thiriotia pugettiae sp. n. from the graceful kelp crab (Pugettia gracilis), Cephaloidophora cf. communis from two different species of barnacles (Balanus glandula and B. balanus), Heliospora cf. longissima from two different species of freshwater amphipods (Eulimnogammarus verrucosus and E. vittatus), and Heliospora caprellae comb. n. from a skeleton shrimp (Caprella alaskana). SSU rDNA sequences were acquired from isolates of these gregarine species and added to a global apicomplexan alignment containing all major groups of gregarines characterized so far. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of these data demonstrated that all of the gregarines collected from crustacean hosts formed a very strongly supported clade with 48 previously unidentified environmental DNA sequences. Conclusions/Significance This expanded molecular phylogenetic context enabled us to establish a major clade of intestinal gregarine parasites and infer the cellular identities of several previously unidentified environmental SSU rDNA sequences, including several sequences that have formerly been discussed broadly in the literature as a suspected “novel” lineage of eukaryotes. PMID:21483868

  6. Sound production by white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus) analysis of another crustacean-like sound from the Gulf of Mexico, and the possible use of passive sonar for dedication and stock assessment of shrimp 

    E-print Network

    Berk, Ilona M.

    1997-01-01

    Sound production by white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus) was studied acoustically and behaviorally. Another crustacean-like signal from the Gulf of Mexico was analyzed, and the use of passive sonar for the detection and stock assessment of shrimp...

  7. Identification and cloning of a selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase from tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, and its transcription following pathogen infection and related to the molt stages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Fu; Yeh, Maw-Sheng; Kou, Guang-Hsiung; Cheng, Winton; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2010-09-01

    Complementary (c)DNA encoding glutathione peroxidase (GPx) messenger (m)RNA of the tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon was obtained from haemocytes by a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The 1321-bp cDNA contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 564bp, a 69-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), and a 688-bp 3'-UTR containing a poly A tail and a conserved selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element. The molecular mass of the deduced amino acid (aa) sequence (188 aa) was 21.05kDa long with an estimated pI of 7.68. It contains a putative selenocysteine residue which is encoded by the unusual stop codon, (190)TGA(192), and forms the active site with residues Glu(75) and Trp(143). Comparison of amino acid sequences showed that tiger shrimp GPx is more closely related to vertebrate GPx1, in accordance with those in Litopenaeus vannamei and Macrobrachium rosenbergii. GPx cDNA was synthesised in lymphoid organ, gills, heart, haemocytes, the hepatopancreas, muscles, and intestines. After injected with either Photobacterium damsela or white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), the respiratory bursts of shrimp significantly increased in order to kill the pathogen, and induced increases in the activities of superoxide dismutase and GPx, and regulation in the expression of cloned GPx mRNA to protect cells against damage from oxidation. The GPx expression significantly increased at stage D(0/1), and then gradually decreased until stage C suggesting that the cloned GPx might play a role in the molt regulation of shrimp. PMID:20399225

  8. Functions of nuclear receptor HR3 during larval-pupal molting in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) revealed by in vivo RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-Chao; Liu, Xin-Ping; Fu, Kai-Yun; Shi, Ji-Feng; Lü, Feng-Gong; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-08-01

    Our previous results revealed that RNA interference-aided knockdown of Leptinotarsa decemlineata FTZ-F1 (LdFTZ-F1) reduced 20E titer, and impaired pupation. In this study, we characterized a putative LdHR3 gene, an early-late 20E-response gene upstream of LdFTZ-F1. Within the first, second and third larval instars, three expression peaks of LdHR3 occurred just before the molt. In the fourth (final) larval instar 80 h after ecdysis and prepupal stage 3 days after burying into soil, two LdHR3 peaks occurred. The LdHR3 expression peaks coincide with the peaks of circulating 20E level. In vitro midgut culture and in vivo bioassay revealed that 20E and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide (Hal) enhanced LdHR3 expression in the final larval instars. Conversely, a decrease in 20E by feeding a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against an ecdysteroidogenesis gene Ldshd repressed the expression. Moreover, Hal rescued the transcript levels in the Ldshd-silenced larvae. Thus, 20E peaks activate the expression of LdHR3. Furthermore, ingesting dsRNA against LdHR3 successfully knocked down the target gene, and impaired pupation. Finally, knockdown of LdHR3 upregulated the transcription of three ecdysteroidogenesis genes (Ldphm, Lddib and Ldshd), increased 20E titer, and activated the expression of two 20E-response genes (LdEcR and LdFTZ-F1). Thus, LdHR3 functions in regulation of pupation in the Colorado potato beetle. PMID:26005119

  9. Your Menstrual Cycle

    MedlinePLUS

    ... during your menstrual cycle What happens during your menstrual cycle The menstrual cycle includes not just your period, but the rise ... tool is based on a sample 28-day menstrual cycle, but every woman is different in how long ...

  10. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-print Network

    August 2013 Available online 8 September 2013 Keywords: Hamartoma Injury Molting Crustacean a b s t r a c t Tumors are rare in crustaceans, and whereas a few have been reported from the lobster Homarus amer-like hamartoma reported from a lobster, and the second hamartoma reported from a crustacean. Ó 2013 Elsevier Inc

  11. The endocrine control of reproduction and molt in male and female emperor (Aptenodytes forsteri) and adelie (Pygoscelis adeliae) penguins. II. Annual changes in plasma levels of thyroxine and triiodothyronine.

    PubMed

    Groscolas, R; Leloup, J

    1986-08-01

    Changes in plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels were studied during a breeding season and in more detail during the postbreeding molt in male and female emperor (Aptenodytes forsteri) and adelie (Pygoscelis adeliae) penguins under natural conditions in the Antarctic. During the 4-month natural fast that accompanies courtship and incubation in male emperors, plasma T4 and T3 levels were maintained around 11 and 0.6 ng/ml, respectively. In courting, fasting female emperors plasma T4 levels were maintained around 10 ng/ml for more than 1 month; plasma T3 levels were around 0.8 ng/ml but were markedly depressed (0.1 ng/ml) at the time of copulation although they increased again (2.2 ng/ml) at oviposition. During the 5-month period of chick rearing, plasma T3 (males and females) and T4 (females) were maintained at the same levels as during courtship and incubation, but plasma T4 levels in male emperors were slightly lower (7 ng/ml). Similar plasma T4 and T3 levels were observed in breeding adelie penguins. These results do not provide any convincing evidence for thyroid-gonadal interrelations in breeding penguins, but demonstrate their capacity to maintain plasma thyroid hormone levels during very prolonged natural fasts. During the heavy postnuptial molt when the birds were fasting, in both species and sexes, marked but separate peaks in plasma T4 and T3 levels occurred concurrently with the initial growth of the new feathers, and with the subsequent shedding of the old plumage, respectively. Peak plasma T4 levels were observed at the time of the emergence of the new feathers out of the skin, and peak plasma T3 levels were roughly concurrent with the maximum daily body weight loss. This is the first strong evidence that increases in plasma T4 and T3 levels are correlated with different stages of molt in a wild seabird. Increased plasma T4 but not T3 levels at the time of feather papilla eruption suggest that T4 is concerned with feather growth, but is not exclusive of a role of T3. Increased plasma T3 but not T4 levels during the reduction in thermal insulation in molting penguins suggest that this hormone rather than T4 might be active in energy metabolism in penguins. PMID:3781233

  12. Serotonin immunoreactive interneurons in the brain of the Remipedia: new insights into the phylogenetic affinities of an enigmatic crustacean taxon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Remipedia, a group of homonomously segmented, cave-dwelling, eyeless arthropods have been regarded as basal crustaceans in most early morphological and taxonomic studies. However, molecular sequence information together with the discovery of a highly differentiated brain led to a reconsideration of their phylogenetic position. Various conflicting hypotheses have been proposed including the claim for a basal position of Remipedia up to a close relationship with Malacostraca or Hexapoda. To provide new morphological characters that may allow phylogenetic insights, we have analyzed the architecture of the remipede brain in more detail using immunocytochemistry (serotonin, acetylated ?-tubulin, synapsin) combined with confocal laser-scanning microscopy and image reconstruction techniques. This approach allows for a comprehensive neuroanatomical comparison with other crustacean and hexapod taxa. Results The dominant structures of the brain are the deutocerebral olfactory neuropils, which are linked by the olfactory globular tracts to the protocerebral hemiellipsoid bodies. The olfactory globular tracts form a characteristic chiasm in the center of the brain. In Speleonectes tulumensis, each brain hemisphere contains about 120 serotonin immunoreactive neurons, which are distributed in distinct cell groups supplying fine, profusely branching neurites to 16 neuropilar domains. The olfactory neuropil comprises more than 300 spherical olfactory glomeruli arranged in sublobes. Eight serotonin immunoreactive neurons homogeneously innervate the olfactory glomeruli. In the protocerebrum, serotonin immunoreactivity revealed several structures, which, based on their position and connectivity resemble a central complex comprising a central body, a protocerebral bridge, W-, X-, Y-, Z-tracts, and lateral accessory lobes. Conclusions The brain of Remipedia shows several plesiomorphic features shared with other Mandibulata, such as deutocerebral olfactory neuropils with a glomerular organization, innervations by serotonin immunoreactive interneurons, and connections to protocerebral neuropils. Also, we provided tentative evidence for W-, X-, Y-, Z-tracts in the remipedian central complex like in the brain of Malacostraca, and Hexapoda. Furthermore, Remipedia display several synapomorphies with Malacostraca supporting a sister group relationship between both taxa. These homologies include a chiasm of the olfactory globular tract, which connects the olfactory neuropils with the lateral protocerebrum and the presence of hemiellipsoid bodies. Even though a growing number of molecular investigations unites Remipedia and Cephalocarida, our neuroanatomical comparison does not provide support for such a sister group relationship. PMID:22947030

  13. The water flea Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera) as a test species for screening and evaluation of chemicals with endocrine disrupting effects on crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Tatarazako, Norihisa; Oda, Shigeto

    2007-02-01

    The water flea Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera) is a cyclical parthenogen, which can reproduce both by parthenogenesis and by sexual reproduction. With its ease of handling in the laboratory, several testing methods using D. magna exist for regulatory toxicity testing. Recently, several studies revealed that one of the major hormone groups in insects and crustaceans, juvenile hormones, are involved in the shift of reproductive mode from parthenogenesis to sexual reproduction (production of male neonates). Using offspring sex ratio as a new endpoint has made it possible to identify chemicals with juvenile hormone-like effects on crustaceans. The testing method using D. magna, in which offspring sex ratio is incorporated as a new endpoint, is now being proposed to the OECD as an enhanced version of the existing OECD Test Guideline 211: Daphnia magna reproduction test. No other clear-cut endpoint for identifying juvenile-hormone disrupting effects has ever been found in crustaceans than the induction of male neonates production in cladocerans. In this regard, it is expected that testing methods using D. magna are suitable for screening and risk assessment of chemicals with juvenile-hormone disrupting effects. PMID:17235669

  14. Effects of habitat structure on the epifaunal community in Mussismilia corals: does coral morphology influence the richness and abundance of associated crustacean fauna?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Marcos M.; Neves, Elizabeth; Johnsson, Rodrigo

    2015-06-01

    Coral habitat structures increase abundance and richness of organisms by providing niches, easy access to resources and refuge from predators. Corals harbor a great variety of animals; the variation in coral species morphology contributes to the heterogeneity and complexity of habitat types. In this report, we studied the richness and abundance of crustaceans (Decapoda, Copepoda, Peracarida and Ostracoda) associated with three species of Mussismilia exhibiting different growth morphologies, in two different coral reefs of the Bahia state (Caramuanas and Boipeba-Moreré, Brazil). Mussismilia hispida is a massive coral; M. braziliensis also has a massive growth pattern, but forms a crevice in the basal area of the corallum; M. harttii has a meandroid pattern. PERMANOVA analysis suggests significant differences in associated fauna richness among Mussismilia species, with higher values for M. harttii, followed by M. braziliensis and later by M. hispida. The same trend was observed for density, except that the comparison of M. braziliensis and M. hispida did not show differences. Redundancy and canonical correspondence analysis indicated that almost all of the crustacean species were more associated with the M. harttii colonies that formed a group clearly separated from colonies of M. braziliensis and M. hispida. We also found that the internal volume of interpolyp space, only present in M. harttii, was the most important factor influencing richness and abundance of all analyzed orders of crustaceans.

  15. On the Brain of a Crustacean: A Morphological Analysis of CaMKII Expression and Its Relation to Sensory and Motor Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Dib; Nazari, Evelise M.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) is a Ca2+-activated enzyme that is abundant in vertebrate and invertebrate brains. However, its characterization is poorly addressed in the nervous system of crustaceans, and, to our knowledge, no studies have determined the microanatomical location of CaMKII in a crustacean species. In this study, we found labeling of CaMKII in the eyestalk and brain of the prawn Macrobrachium acanthurus, by means of immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Antibodies against neuron (ß tubulin III), glutamate receptor (GluA1), and FMRFamide were used in order to further characterize the CaMKII-labeled cells in the brain. In the eyestalk, strong labeling with CaMKII was observed in the photoreceptors. These cells, especially in the rhabdom, were also reactive to anti-ß tubulin III, whereas the pigment cells were labeled with anti-CaMKII. GluA1 co-located with CaMKII in the photoreceptors. Also, CaMKII appeared in the same sites as FMRFamide in the deutocerebrum, including the olfactory lobe, and in the tritocerebrum, specifically in the antennular neuropil, indicating that the synaptic areas in these regions may be related to sensory-motor processing. In the brain, the identification of cells and regions that express CaMKII contributes to the understanding of the processing of neural connections and the modulating role of CaMKII in decapod crustaceans. PMID:23741406

  16. Moult cycle specific differential gene expression profiling of the crab Portunus pelagicus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Crustacean moulting is a complex process involving many regulatory pathways. A holistic approach to examine differential gene expression profiles of transcripts relevant to the moulting process, across all moult cycle stages, was used in this study. Custom cDNA microarrays were constructed for Portunus pelagicus. The printed arrays contained 5000 transcripts derived from both the whole organism, and from individual organs such as the brain, eyestalk, mandibular organ and Y-organ from all moult cycle stages. Results A total of 556 clones were sequenced from the cDNA libraries used to construct the arrays. These cDNAs represented 175 singletons and 62 contigs, resulting in 237 unique putative genes. The gene sequences were classified into the following biological functions: cuticular proteins associated with arthropod exoskeletons, farnesoic acid O-methyltransferase (FaMeT), proteins belonging to the hemocyanin gene family, lectins, proteins relevant to lipid metabolism, mitochondrial proteins, muscle related proteins, phenoloxidase activators and ribosomal proteins. Moult cycle-related differential expression patterns were observed for many transcripts. Of particular interest were those relating to the formation and hardening of the exoskeleton, and genes associated with cell respiration and energy metabolism. Conclusions The expression data presented here provide a chronological depiction of the molecular events associated with the biological changes that occur during the crustacean moult cycle. Tracing the temporal expression patterns of a large variety of transcripts involved in the moult cycle of P. pelagicus can provide a greater understanding of gene function, interaction, and regulation of both known and new genes with respect to the moulting process. PMID:21396120

  17. Status of selected bottomfish and crustacean species in Prince William Sound following the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.A.; Dinnel, P.A.; Orensanz, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Exposure and possible adverse effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) at depth were studied between 1989 and 1991 on several species of crustaceans, molluscs, and finfish that are characterized by ontogenetic shifts in distribution from meroplanktonic larvae to benthic and demersal juveniles and adults. The authors approach was to search for (1) evidence of exposure to Exxon Valdez crude oil (EVC) at depth (generally between 20 to 150 m) and (2) measurable perturbations at both the individual and population levels. Primary species targeted were Tanner crab (Chionoecetes bairdi), several pandalid shrimps (Pandalus platyceros, P. hypsinotus, P. borealis), flathead sole (Hippoglossoides elassodon), and several bivalves including scallops (Chlamys rubida) and infaunal clams (Nuculana, Yoldia, and Macoma spp.). The survey design provided a comparison between variables measured in oiled bays around Knight Island and non-oiled bays at other locations within Prince William Sound. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of petrogenic origin were measured in all bays sampled in this study and levels of PAHs derived from EVC were elevated in the oiled bays following the spill, yet attenuated to less than 200 ng/g sediment by 1991. 95 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Decapod crustacean larval communities in the Balearic Sea (western Mediterranean): Seasonal composition, horizontal and vertical distribution patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Asvin P.; Dos Santos, Antonina; Balbín, Rosa; Alemany, Francisco; Massutí, Enric; Reglero, Patricia

    2014-10-01

    Decapod crustaceans are the main target species of deep water bottom trawl fisheries in the Balearic Sea but little is known about their larval stages. This work focuses on the species composition of the decapod larval community, describing the main spatio-temporal assemblages and assessing their vertical distribution. Mesozooplankton sampling was carried out using depth-stratified sampling devices at two stations located over the shelf break and the mid slope, in the north-western and southern Mallorca in late autumn 2009 and summer 2010. Differences among decapod larvae communities, in terms of composition, adult's habitat such as pelagic or benthic, and distribution patterns were observed between seasons, areas and station. Results showed that for both seasons most species and developmental stages aggregated within the upper water column (above 75 m depth) and showed higher biodiversity in summer compared to late autumn. Most abundant species were pelagic prawns (e.g., Sergestidae) occurring in both seasons and areas. The larval assemblages' distributions were different between seasonal hydrographic scenarios and during situations of stratified and non-stratified water column. The vertical distribution patterns of different larval developmental stages in respect to the adult's habitat were analyzed in relation to environmental variables. Fluorescence had the highest explanatory power. Four clearly different vertical patterns were identified: two corresponding to late autumn, which were common for all the main larval groups and other two in summer, one corresponding to larvae of coastal benthic and the second to pelagic species larvae.

  19. The Involvement of Hemocyte Prophenoloxidase in the Shell-Hardening Process of the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Javier V.; Chung, J. Sook

    2015-01-01

    Cuticular structures of arthropods undergo dramatic molt-related changes from being soft to becoming hard. The shell-hardening process of decapod crustaceans includes sclerotization and mineralization. Hemocyte PPO plays a central role in melanization and sclerotization particularly in wound healing in crustaceans. However, little is known about its role in the crustacean initial shell-hardening process. The earlier findings of the aggregation of heavily granulated hemocytes beneath the hypodermis during ecdysis imply that the hemocytes may be involved in the shell-hardening process. In order to determine if hemocytes and hemocyte PPO have a role in the shell-hardening of crustaceans, a knockdown study using specific CasPPO-hemo-dsRNA was carried out with juvenile blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus. Multiple injections of CasPPO-hemo-dsRNA reduce specifically the levels of CasPPO-hemo expression by 57% and PO activity by 54% in hemocyte lysate at the postmolt, while they have no effect on the total hemocyte numbers. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis using a specific antiserum generated against CasPPO show granulocytes, semigranulocytes and hyaline cells as the cellular sources for PPO at the postmolt. Interestingly, the type of hemocytes, as the cellular sources of PPO, varies by molt stage. The granulocytes always contain PPO throughout the molt cycle. However, semigranulocytes and hyaline cells become CasPPO immune-positive only at early premolt and postmolt, indicating that PPO expression in these cells may be involved in the shell-hardening process of C. sapidus. PMID:26393802

  20. Genome Wide Expression Profiling of Cancer Cell Lines Cultured in Microgravity Reveals Significant Dysregulation of Cell Cycle and MicroRNA Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Vidyasekar, Prasanna; Shyamsunder, Pavithra; Arun, Rajpranap; Santhakumar, Rajalakshmi; Kapadia, Nand Kishore; Kumar, Ravi; Verma, Rama Shanker

    2015-01-01

    Zero gravity causes several changes in metabolic and functional aspects of the human body and experiments in space flight have demonstrated alterations in cancer growth and progression. This study reports the genome wide expression profiling of a colorectal cancer cell line-DLD-1, and a lymphoblast leukemic cell line-MOLT-4, under simulated microgravity in an effort to understand central processes and cellular functions that are dysregulated among both cell lines. Altered cell morphology, reduced cell viability and an aberrant cell cycle profile in comparison to their static controls were observed in both cell lines under microgravity. The process of cell cycle in DLD-1 cells was markedly affected with reduced viability, reduced colony forming ability, an apoptotic population and dysregulation of cell cycle genes, oncogenes, and cancer progression and prognostic markers. DNA microarray analysis revealed 1801 (upregulated) and 2542 (downregulated) genes (>2 fold) in DLD-1 cultures under microgravity while MOLT-4 cultures differentially expressed 349 (upregulated) and 444 (downregulated) genes (>2 fold) under microgravity. The loss in cell proliferative capacity was corroborated with the downregulation of the cell cycle process as demonstrated by functional clustering of DNA microarray data using gene ontology terms. The genome wide expression profile also showed significant dysregulation of post transcriptional gene silencing machinery and multiple microRNA host genes that are potential tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes including MIR22HG, MIR17HG and MIR21HG. The MIR22HG, a tumor-suppressor gene was one of the highest upregulated genes in the microarray data showing a 4.4 log fold upregulation under microgravity. Real time PCR validated the dysregulation in the host gene by demonstrating a 4.18 log fold upregulation of the miR-22 microRNA. Microarray data also showed dysregulation of direct targets of miR-22, SP1, CDK6 and CCNA2. PMID:26295583

  1. Migration and isolation during the turbulent Ponto-Caspian Pleistocene create high diversity in the crustacean Paramysis lacustris.

    PubMed

    Audzijonyte, Asta; Baltr?nait?, Laima; Väinölä, Risto; Arba?iauskas, K?stutis

    2015-09-01

    The Ponto-Caspian brackish-water fauna inhabits estuaries and rivers of the Black, Azov and Caspian seas and is fragmented by higher salinity waters and a major interbasin watershed. The fauna is known for the high levels of endemism, complex zoogeographic histories, and as a recent source of successful invasive species. It remains debated whether the Black and Azov Sea brackish-water populations survived unfavourable Pleistocene conditions in multiple separate refugia or whether the two seas were (repeatedly) recolonized from the Caspian. Using microsatellite and mtDNA markers, we demonstrate deep among- and within-basin subdivisions in a widespread Ponto-Caspian mysid crustacean Paramysis lacustris. Five genetic clusters were identified, but their relationships did not reflect the geography of the region. The Azov cluster was the most distinct (4-5% COI divergence), despite its geographic position in the corridor between Black and Caspian seas, and may represent a new species. In the northern Black Sea area, the Dnieper cluster was closer to the Caspian cluster than to the neighbouring Danube-Dniester-Bug populations, suggesting separate colonizations of the Black Sea. Overall, the data implied a predominant gene flow from the east to the Black Sea and highlight the importance of Caspian Sea transgressions in facilitating dispersal. Yet, the presence of distinct lineages in the Black Sea points to the persistence of isolated refugial populations that have gained diagnostic differences under presumably high mutation rates and large population sizes. The unfavourable Pleistocene periods in the Black Sea therefore appear to have promoted diversification of the brackish-water lineages, rather than extirpated them. PMID:26222386

  2. Distribution of heavy metals in muscles and internal organs of Korean cephalopods and crustaceans: risk assessment for human health.

    PubMed

    Mok, Jong Soo; Kwon, Ji Young; Son, Kwang Tae; Choi, Woo Seok; Shim, Kil Bo; Lee, Tae Seek; Kim, Ji Hoe

    2014-12-01

    Samples of seven species of cephalopods and crustaceans were collected from major fish markets on the Korean coast and analyzed for mercury (Hg) using a direct Hg analyzer and for the metals cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), chromium, silver, nickel, copper, and zinc using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The distributions of heavy metals in muscles, internal organs, and whole tissues were determined, and a risk assessment was conducted to provide information concerning consumer safety. The heavy metals accumulated to higher levels (P < 0.05) in internal organs than in muscles for all species. The mean concentrations of Cd, which had the highest concentrations of the three hazardous metals (Cd, Pb, and Hg), in all internal organs (except those of blue crab) exceeded the regulatory limits set by Korea and the European Union. The Cd concentrations in all whole tissues of squid and octopus (relatively large cephalopods), red snow crab, and snow crab exceeded the European Union limits. The estimated dietary intake of Cd, Pb, and Hg for each part of all species accounted for 1.73 to 130.57%, 0.03 to 0.39%, and 0.93 to 1.67%, respectively, of the provisional tolerable daily intake adopted by the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives; the highest values were found in internal organs. The hazard index (HI) is recognized as a reasonable parameter for assessing the risk of heavy metal consumption associated with contaminated food. Because of the high HI (>1.0) of the internal organs of cephalopods and the maximum HI for whole tissue of 0.424, consumers eating internal organs or whole tissues of cephalopods could be at risk of high heavy metal exposure. Therefore, the internal organs of relatively large cephalopods and crabs (except blue crab) are unfit for consumption. However, consumption of flesh after removing internal organs is a suitable approach for decreasing exposure to harmful metals. PMID:25474068

  3. Native and subunit molecular mass and quarternary structure of the hemoglobin from the primitive branchiopod crustacean Triops cancriformis.

    PubMed

    Rousselot, Morgane; Jaenicke, Elmar; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Harris, J Robin; Pirow, Ralph

    2006-09-01

    Many branchiopod crustaceans are endowed with extracellular, high-molecular-weight hemoglobins whose exact structural characteristics have remained a matter of conjecture. By using a broad spectrum of techniques, we provide precise and coherent information on the hemoglobin of one of the phylogenetically 'oldest' extant branchiopods, the tadpole shrimp Triops cancriformis. The hemoglobin dissociated under reducing conditions into two subunits, designated TcHbA and TcHbB, with masses of 35,775+/-4 and 36,055+/-4 Da, respectively, determined by ESI-MS. Nonreducing conditions showed only two disulfide-bridged dimers, a homodimer of TcHbA, designated D1 (71,548+/-5 Da), and the heterodimer D2 (71,828+/-5 Da). Carbamidomethylation of free SH groups revealed the presence of three cysteines per subunit and indicated one intrasubunit and one intersubunit disulfide bridge. Ultracentrifugation and light-scattering experiments under nondenaturating conditions yielded mass estimates that suggested an uneven number of 17 subunits forming the native hemoglobin. This unrealistic number resulted from the presence of two size classes (16-mer and 18-mer), which were recognized by native PAGE and Ferguson plot analysis. ESI-MS revealed three hemoglobin isoforms with masses of 588.1 kDa, 662.0 kDa, and 665.0 kDa. The 16-mer and the smaller 18-mer species are supposed to be composed of TcHbA only, given the dominance of this subunit type in SDS/PAGE. Transmission electron microscopy of negatively stained specimens showed a population of compact molecules with geometrical extensions of 14, 16 and 9 nm. The proposed stoichiometric model of quarternary structure provides the missing link to achieve a mechanistic understanding of the structure-function relationships among the multimeric arthropodan hemoglobins. PMID:16899051

  4. Brain architecture in the terrestrial hermit crab Coenobita clypeatus (Anomura, Coenobitidae), a crustacean with a good aerial sense of smell

    PubMed Central

    Harzsch, Steffen; Hansson, Bill S

    2008-01-01

    Background During the evolutionary radiation of Crustacea, several lineages in this taxon convergently succeeded in meeting the physiological challenges connected to establishing a fully terrestrial life style. These physiological adaptations include the need for sensory organs of terrestrial species to function in air rather than in water. Previous behavioral and neuroethological studies have provided solid evidence that the land hermit crabs (Coenobitidae, Anomura) are a group of crustaceans that have evolved a good sense of aerial olfaction during the conquest of land. We wanted to study the central olfactory processing areas in the brains of these organisms and to that end analyzed the brain of Coenobita clypeatus (Herbst, 1791; Anomura, Coenobitidae), a fully terrestrial tropical hermit crab, by immunohistochemistry against synaptic proteins, serotonin, FMRFamide-related peptides, and glutamine synthetase. Results The primary olfactory centers in this species dominate the brain and are composed of many elongate olfactory glomeruli. The secondary olfactory centers that receive an input from olfactory projection neurons are almost equally large as the olfactory lobes and are organized into parallel neuropil lamellae. The architecture of the optic neuropils and those areas associated with antenna two suggest that C. clypeatus has visual and mechanosensory skills that are comparable to those of marine Crustacea. Conclusion In parallel to previous behavioral findings of a good sense of aerial olfaction in C. clypeatus, our results indicate that in fact their central olfactory pathway is most prominent, indicating that olfaction is a major sensory modality that these brains process. Interestingly, the secondary olfactory neuropils of insects, the mushroom bodies, also display a layered structure (vertical and medial lobes), superficially similar to the lamellae in the secondary olfactory centers of C. clypeatus. More detailed analyses with additional markers will be necessary to explore the question if these similarities have evolved convergently with the establishment of superb aerial olfactory abilities or if this design goes back to a shared principle in the common ancestor of Crustacea and Hexapoda. PMID:18590553

  5. Fatty Acids in Six Small Pelagic Fish Species and Their Crustacean Prey from the Mindanao Sea, Southern Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Metillo, Ephrime Bicoy; Aspiras-Eya, Anna Arlene

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are important in human health and useful in the analysis of the marine food web, however information on tropical pelagic organisms is scarce. Six zooplanktivorous small pelagic fish species (Decapterus kurroides, Decapterus macarellus, Selar crumenophthalmus, Sardinella lemuru, Spratilloides gracilis and Stolephorus insularis) and four of their zooplanktonic crustacean prey [three sergestoid species (Acetes erythraeus, Acetes intermedius and Lucifer penicillifer) and one calanoid copepod (Acartia erythraea)] were collected from the Mindanao Sea, and their fatty acids were profiled. The resulting profiles revealed 17 fatty acids that were specific to certain species and 9 {myristic acid [C14:0], palmitic acid [C16:0], stearic acid [C18:0]; palmitoleic acid [C16:1], oleic acid [C18:1n9c], linoleic acid [C18:2n6c], linolenic acid [C18:3n3], eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) [C20:5n3] and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) [C22:6n3]} that were common to all species. Cluster analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) of fatty acids indicate a high similarity in profiles in all species, but separate fish and zooplankton clusters were obtained. Mackerel species (D. macarellus, D. kurroides and S. crumenophthalmus) had concentrations of total n-3 fatty acids that match those of their Acetes prey. The copepod A. erythraea and the sergestoid L. penicillifer exhibited the lowest values of the EPA:DHA ratio, which was most likely due to their phytoplanktivorous feeding habits, but the occurrence of the highest values of the ratio in Acetes suggests the inclusion of plant detritus in their diet. DHA values appear to affirm the trophic link among copepod, Lucifer, Acetes and mackerel species. PMID:25210591

  6. The implications of a Silurian and other thylacocephalan crustaceans for the functional morphology and systematic affinities of the group

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thylacocephala is a group of enigmatic extinct arthropods. Here we provide a full description of the oldest unequivocal thylacocephalan, a new genus and species Thylacares brandonensis, which is present in the Silurian Waukesha fauna from Wisconsin, USA. We also present details of younger, Jurassic specimens, from the Solnhofen lithographic limestones, which are crucial to our interpretation of the systematic position of Thylacocephala. In the past, Thylacocephala has been interpreted as a crustacean ingroup and as closely related to various groups such as cirripeds, decapods or remipeds. Results The Waukesha thylacocephalan, Thylacares brandonensis n. gen. n. sp., bears compound eyes and raptorial appendages that are relatively small compared to those of other representatives of the group. As in other thylacocephalans the large bivalved shield encloses much of the entire body. The shield lacks a marked optical notch. The eyes, which project just beyond the shield margin, appear to be stalked. Head appendages, which may represent antennulae, antennae and mandibles, appear to be present. The trunk is comprised of up to 22 segments. New details observed on thylacocephalans from the Jurassic Solnhofen lithographic limestones include antennulae and antennae of Mayrocaris bucculata, and endites on the raptorial appendages and an elongate last trunk appendage in Clausocaris lithographica. Preserved features of the internal morphology in C. lithographica include the muscles of the raptorial appendage and trunk. Conclusions Our results indicate that some ‘typical’ thylacocephalan characters are unique to the group; these autapomorphies contribute to the difficulty of determining thylacocephalan affinities. While the new features reported here are consistent with a eucrustacean affinity, most previous hypotheses for the position of Thylacocephala within Eucrustacea (as Stomatopoda, Thecostraca or Decapoda) are shown to be unlikely. A sister group relationship to Remipedia appears compatible with the observed features of Thylacocephala but more fossil evidence is required to test this assertion. The raptorial appendages of Thylacocephala most likely projected 45 degrees abaxially instead of directly forward as previously reconstructed. The overall morphology of thylacocephalans supports a predatory mode of life. PMID:25927449

  7. In vitro culture and developmental cycle of the parasitic dinoflagellate Hematodinium sp. from the blue crab

    E-print Network

    significant mortalities in marine crustacean fisheries worldwide. A species of Hematodinium infects the blue in vitro. Key words: parasite, crustacean, sporogony, life-history stage, disease, Syndiniales, Portunidae of crustacean hosts throughout the world (Shields, 1994; Stentiford and Shields, 2005). These parasites have

  8. The First Venomous Crustacean Revealed by Transcriptomics and Functional Morphology: Remipede Venom Glands Express a Unique Toxin Cocktail Dominated by Enzymes and a Neurotoxin

    PubMed Central

    von Reumont, Björn M.; Blanke, Alexander; Richter, Sandy; Alvarez, Fernando; Bleidorn, Christoph; Jenner, Ronald A.

    2014-01-01

    Animal venoms have evolved many times. Venomous species are especially common in three of the four main groups of arthropods (Chelicerata, Myriapoda, and Hexapoda), which together represent tens of thousands of species of venomous spiders, scorpions, centipedes, and hymenopterans. Surprisingly, despite their great diversity of body plans, there is no unambiguous evidence that any crustacean is venomous. We provide the first conclusive evidence that the aquatic, blind, and cave-dwelling remipede crustaceans are venomous and that venoms evolved in all four major arthropod groups. We produced a three-dimensional reconstruction of the venom delivery apparatus of the remipede Speleonectes tulumensis, showing that remipedes can inject venom in a controlled manner. A transcriptomic profile of its venom glands shows that they express a unique cocktail of transcripts coding for known venom toxins, including a diversity of enzymes and a probable paralytic neurotoxin very similar to one described from spider venom. We screened a transcriptomic library obtained from whole animals and identified a nontoxin paralog of the remipede neurotoxin that is not expressed in the venom glands. This allowed us to reconstruct its probable evolutionary origin and underlines the importance of incorporating data derived from nonvenom gland tissue to elucidate the evolution of candidate venom proteins. This first glimpse into the venom of a crustacean and primitively aquatic arthropod reveals conspicuous differences from the venoms of other predatory arthropods such as centipedes, scorpions, and spiders and contributes valuable information for ultimately disentangling the many factors shaping the biology and evolution of venoms and venomous species. PMID:24132120

  9. Chitin: Formation of Helically Structured Chitin/CaCO3 Hybrids through an Approach Inspired by the Biomineralization Processes of Crustacean Cuticles (Small 38/2015).

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Shunichi; Kajiyama, Satoshi; Nishimura, Tatsuya; Kato, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Biomineral-inspired hybrids forming helically ordered structures are developed by T. Kato and co-workers on page 5127. These helical hybrids consist of liquid-crystalline chitin and CaCO3 . They resemble the structures of crustacean cuticles such as the exoskeleton of a lobster or crayfish. These hybrids are formed through CaCO3 crystallization on the liquidcrystalline chitin templates. Polymer-stabilized amorphous CaCO3 is incorporated into the liquid-crystalline chitin templates. This approach is useful for the development of new hierarchical hybrid materials from abundant natural resources. PMID:26450162

  10. Neuropeptide complexity in the crustacean central olfactory pathway: immunolocalization of A-type allatostatins and RFamide-like peptides in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the olfactory system of malacostracan crustaceans, axonal input from olfactory receptor neurons associated with aesthetascs on the animal’s first pair of antennae target primary processing centers in the median brain, the olfactory lobes. The olfactory lobes are divided into cone-shaped synaptic areas, the olfactory glomeruli where afferents interact with local olfactory interneurons and olfactory projection neurons. The local olfactory interneurons display a large diversity of neurotransmitter phenotypes including biogenic amines and neuropeptides. Furthermore, the malacostracan olfactory glomeruli are regionalized into cap, subcap, and base regions and these compartments are defined by the projection patterns of the afferent olfactory receptor neurons, the local olfactory interneurons, and the olfactory projection neurons. We wanted to know how neurons expressing A-type allatostatins (A-ASTs; synonym dip-allatostatins) integrate into this system, a large family of neuropeptides that share the C-terminal motif –YXFGLamide. Results We used an antiserum that was raised against the A-type Diploptera punctata (Dip)-allatostatin I to analyse the distribution of this peptide in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab, Coenobita clypeatus (Anomura, Coenobitidae). Allatostatin A-like immunoreactivity (ASTir) was widely distributed in the animal’s brain, including the visual system, central complex and olfactory system. We focussed our analysis on the central olfactory pathway in which ASTir was abundant in the primary processing centers, the olfactory lobes, and also in the secondary centers, the hemiellipsoid bodies. In the olfactory lobes, we further explored the spatial relationship of olfactory interneurons with ASTir to interneurons that synthesize RFamide-like peptides. We found that these two peptides are present in distinct populations of local olfactory interneurons and that their synaptic fields within the olfactory glomeruli are also mostly distinct. Conclusions We discuss our findings against the background of the known neurotransmitter complexity in the crustacean olfactory pathway and summarize what is now about the neuronal connectivity in the olfactory glomeruli. A-type allatostatins, in addition to their localization in protocerebral brain areas, seem to be involved in modulating the olfactory signal at the level of the deutocerebrum. They contribute to the complex local circuits within the crustacean olfactory glomeruli the connectivity within which as yet is completely unclear. Because the glomeruli of C. clypeatus display a distinct pattern of regionalization, their olfactory systems form an ideal model to explore the functional relevance of glomerular compartments and diversity of local olfactory interneurons for olfactory processing in crustaceans. PMID:22967845

  11. Comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels in crustacean ventral nerve cord after photodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Shubina, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a prospective treatment modality of brain cancers. It is of importance to have information about relative survival rate of different cell types in nerve tissue during photodynamic treatment. Particularly, for development of sparing strategy of the photodynamic therapy of brain tumors, which pursuits both total elimination of malignant cells, which are usually of glial origin, and, at the same time, preservation of normal blood circulation as well as normal glial cells in the brain. The aim of this work was to carry out comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels after photodynamic treatment, using simple model object - ventral nerve cord of crustacean.

  12. Photovoltaics Life Cycle Analysis

    E-print Network

    1 Photovoltaics Life Cycle Analysis Vasilis Fthenakis Center of Life Cycle Analysis Earth Brookhaven National Laboratory www.clca.columbia.edu www.pv.bnl.gov #12;2 The Life Cycle of PVThe Life Cycle (air, water, solid) M, Q E PV array Photovoltaic modules Balance of System (BOS) (Inverters

  13. Cycling To Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Stan

    1999-01-01

    Encourages environmental and outdoor educators to promote bicycling. In the community and the curriculum, cycling connects environmental issues, health and fitness, law and citizenship, appropriate technology, and the joy of being outdoors. Describes the Ontario Cycling Association's cycling strategy and its four components: school cycling

  14. A new view of insect-crustacean relationships II. Inferences from expressed sequence tags and comparisons with neural cladistics.

    PubMed

    Andrew, David R

    2011-05-01

    The enormous diversity of Arthropoda has complicated attempts by systematists to deduce the history of this group in terms of phylogenetic relationships and phenotypic change. Traditional hypotheses regarding the relationships of the major arthropod groups (Chelicerata, Myriapoda, Crustacea, and Hexapoda) focus on suites of morphological characters, whereas phylogenomics relies on large amounts of molecular sequence data to infer evolutionary relationships. The present discussion is based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that provide large numbers of short molecular sequences and so provide an abundant source of sequence data for phylogenetic inference. This study presents well-supported phylogenies of diverse arthropod and metazoan outgroup taxa obtained from publicly-available databases. An in-house bioinformatics pipeline has been used to compile and align conserved orthologs from each taxon for maximum likelihood inferences. This approach resolves many currently accepted hypotheses regarding internal relationships between the major groups of Arthropoda, including monophyletic Hexapoda, Tetraconata (Crustacea + Hexapoda), Myriapoda, and Chelicerata sensu lato (Pycnogonida + Euchelicerata). "Crustacea" is a paraphyletic group with some taxa more closely related to the monophyletic Hexapoda. These results support studies that have utilized more restricted EST data for phylogenetic inference, yet they differ in important regards from recently published phylogenies employing nuclear protein-coding sequences. The present results do not, however, depart from other phylogenies that resolve Branchiopoda as the crustacean sister group of Hexapoda. Like other molecular phylogenies, EST-derived phylogenies alone are unable to resolve morphological convergences or evolved reversals and thus omit what may be crucial events in the history of life. For example, molecular data are unable to resolve whether a Hexapod-Branchiopod sister relationship infers a branchiopod-like ancestry of the Hexapoda, or whether this assemblage originates from a malacostracan-like ancestor, with the morphologically simpler Branchiopoda being highly derived. Whereas this study supports many internal arthropod relationships obtained by other sources of molecular data, other approaches are required to resolve such evolutionary scenarios. The approach presented here turns out to be essential: integrating results of molecular phylogenetics and neural cladistics to infer that Branchiopoda evolved simplification from a more elaborate ancestor. Whereas the phenomenon of evolved simplification may be widespread, it is largely invisible to molecular techniques unless these are performed in conjunction with morphology-based strategies. PMID:21315832

  15. Cell cycle effect on the activity of deoxynucleoside analogue metabolising enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Fyrberg, Anna; Albertioni, Freidoun; Lotfi, Kourosh . E-mail: koulo@imv.liu.se

    2007-06-15

    Deoxynucleoside analogues (dNAs) are cytotoxic towards both replicating and indolent malignancies. The impact of fluctuations in the metabolism of dNAs in relation to cell cycle could have strong implications regarding the activity of dNAs. Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK) are important enzymes for phosphorylation/activation of dNAs. These drugs can be dephosphorylated/deactivated by 5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTs) and elevated activities of 5'-NTs and decreased dCK and/or dGK activities represent resistance mechanisms towards dNAs. The activities of dCK, dGK, and three 5'-NTs were investigated in four human leukemic cell lines in relationship to cell cycle progression and cytotoxicity of dNAs. Synchronization of cell cultures to arrest in G0/G1 by serum-deprivation was performed followed by serum-supplementation for cell cycle progression. The activities of dCK and dGK increased up to 3-fold in CEM, HL60, and MOLT-4 cells as they started to proliferate, while the activity of cytosolic nucleotidase I was reduced in proliferating cells. CEM, HL60, and MOLT-4 cells were also more sensitive to cladribine, cytarabine, 9-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylguanine and clofarabine than K562 cells which demonstrated lower levels and less alteration of these enzymes and were least susceptible to the cytotoxic effects of most dNAs. The results suggest that, in the cell lines studied, the proliferation process is associated with a general shift in the direction of activation of dNAs by inducing activities of dCK/dGK and reducing the activity of cN-I which is favourable for the cytotoxic effects of cladribine, cytarabine and, 9-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylguanine. These results emphasize the importance of cellular proliferation and dNA metabolism by both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation for susceptibility to dNAs. It underscores the need to understand the mechanisms of action and resistance to dNAs in order to increase efficacy of dNAs treatment by new rational.

  16. Multiple functions of the crustacean gill: osmotic/ionic regulation, acid-base balance, ammonia excretion, and bioaccumulation of toxic metals

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Raymond P.; Lucu, ?edomil; Onken, Horst; Weihrauch, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The crustacean gill is a multi-functional organ, and it is the site of a number of physiological processes, including ion transport, which is the basis for hemolymph osmoregulation; acid-base balance; and ammonia excretion. The gill is also the site by which many toxic metals are taken up by aquatic crustaceans, and thus it plays an important role in the toxicology of these species. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the ecology, physiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology of the mechanisms of osmotic and ionic regulation performed by the gill. The current concepts of the mechanisms of ion transport, the structural, biochemical, and molecular bases of systemic physiology, and the history of their development are discussed. The relationship between branchial ion transport and hemolymph acid-base regulation is also treated. In addition, the mechanisms of ammonia transport and excretion across the gill are discussed. And finally, the toxicology of heavy metal accumulation via the gill is reviewed in detail. PMID:23162474

  17. Acute combined pressure and temperature exposures on a shallow-water crustacean: novel insights into the stress response and high pressure neurological syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morris, J P; Thatje, S; Ravaux, J; Shillito, B; Fernando, D; Hauton, C

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the ecological and physiological processes governing depth distribution limits in species. Temperature and hydrostatic pressure are considered to be two dominant factors. Research has shown that some marine ectotherms are shifting their bathymetric distributions in response to rapid anthropogenic ocean surface warming. Shallow-water species unable to undergo latitudinal range shifts may depend on bathymetric range shifts to seek refuge from warming surface waters. As a first step in constraining the molecular basis of pressure tolerance in shallow water crustaceans, we examined differential gene expression in response to acute pressure and temperature exposures in juveniles of the shallow-water shrimp Palaemonetes varians. Significant increases in the transcription of genes coding for an NMDA receptor-regulated protein, an ADP ribosylation factor, ?-actin, two heat shock protein 70 kDa isoforms (HSP70), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were found in response to elevated pressure. NMDA receptors have been implicated in pathways of excitotoxic damage to neurons and the onset of high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) in mammals. These data indicate that the sub-lethal effects of acute barotrauma are associated with transcriptional disturbances within the nervous tissue of crustaceans, and cellular macromolecular damage. Such transcriptional changes lead to the onset of symptoms similar to that described as HPNS in mammals, and may act as a limit to shallow water organisms' prolonged survival at depth. PMID:25433335

  18. Hyperglycemic activity of the recombinant crustacean hyperglycemic hormone B1 isoform (CHH-B1) of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Jiménez, Laura; Sánchez-Castrejón, Edna; Ponce-Rivas, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Márquez, Ma Enriqueta; Aguilar, Manuel B; Re, Ana Denisse; Díaz, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) is the most abundant neuropeptide produced by the X-organ/sinus gland (XO/SG) complex in the crustacean eyestalk. CHH plays a principal role in the control of glucose metabolism. The CHH-B1 isoform is produced in the eyestalk of Litopenaeus vannamei by alternative splicing of the chhB gene and its cDNA sequence has revealed that this isoform has a non-amidated C-terminal residue (CHH-like peptide). In this work, a recombinant CHH-B1 (rCHH-B1) with a sequence identical to the native hormone was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris X-33 and purified from the culture medium by RP-HPLC. The identity of the purified rCHH-B1 was confirmed by N-terminal sequencing and by using an anti-CHH-B1 polyclonal antibody. An in vivo assay showed that the hyperglycemic effect was dependant of the dosage of rCHH-B1, and the maximal hyperglycemic response was obtained with 250pmol treatment. These results suggest that the amino acid sequence of the C-terminus and its correct structure are both important for the hyperglycemic activity of naturally occurring non-amidated CHH peptides, such as CHH-B1. CHH-B1 appears to be the first reported CHH-like peptide with significant hyperglycemic activity produced in the sinus gland of a penaeid shrimp. PMID:26079393

  19. NJITMAGAZINE OF CRUSTACEANS,

    E-print Network

    Haimovich, Alexander

    in the central nervous system and what happens when those patterns become abnormal. Research into rhythmic neuron is attempting to answer the question of how the nervous system can be flexible, or plastic, while at the same biology spans a growing range of applications, including studies in animal and plant populations

  20. Characterizing diurnal and seasonal cycles in monsoon systems from TRMM and CEOP observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2006-01-01

    The CEOP Inter-Monsoon Study (CIMS) is one of the two main science drivers of CEOP that aims to (a) provide better understanding of fundamental physical processes in monsoon regions around the world, and (b) demonstrate the synergy and utility of CEOP data in providing a pathway for model physics evaluation and improvement. As the data collection phase for EOP-3 and EOP-4 is being completed, two full annual cycles (2003-2004) of research-quality data sets from satellites, reference sites, and model output location time series (MOLTS) have been processed and made available for data analyses and model validation studies. This article presents preliminary results of a CIMS study aimed at the characterization and intercomparison of all major monsoon systems. The CEOP reference site data proved its value in such exercises by being a powerful tool to cross-validate the TRMM data, and to intercompare with multi-model results in ongoing work. We use 6 years (1998-2003) of pentad CEOP/TRMM data with 2deg x 2.5deg latitude-longitude grid, over the domain of interests to define the monsoon climatological diurnal and annual cycles for the East Asian Monsoon (EAM), the South Asian Monsoon (SAM), the West Africa Monsoon (WAM), the North America/Mexican Monsoon (NAM), the South American Summer Monsoon (SASM) and the Australian Monsoon (AUM). As noted, the TRMM data used in the study were cross-validated using CEOP reference site data, where applicable. Results show that the observed diurnal cycle of rain peaked around late afternoon over monsoon land, and early morning over the oceans. The diurnal cycles in models tend to peak 2-3 hours earlier than observed. The seasonal cycles of the EAM and SAM show the strongest continentality, i.e, strong control by continental processes away from the ITCZ. The WAM, and the AUM shows the less continentality, i.e, strong control by the oceanic ITCZ.

  1. Characterizing Diurnal and Seasonal Cycles in Monsoon Systems from TRMM and CEOP Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The CEOP Inter-Monsoon Study (CIMS) is one of the two main science drivers of CEOP that aims to (a) provide better understanding of fundamental physical processes in monsoon regions around the world, and (b) demonstrate the synergy and utility of CEOP data in providing a pathway for model physics evaluation and improvement. As the data collection phase for EOP-3 and EOP-4 is being completed, two full annual cycles (2003-2004) of research-quality data sets from satellites, reference sites, and model output location time series (MOLTS) have been processed and made available for data analyses and model validation studies. This article presents preliminary results of a CIMS study aimed at the characterization and intercomparison of all major monsoon systems. The CEOP reference site data proved its value in such exercises by being a powerful tool to cross-validate the TRMM data, and to intercompare with multi-model results in ongoing work. We use 6 years (1998-2003) of pentad CEOP/TRMM data with 2 deg x 2.5 deg. latitude-longitude grid, over the domain of interests to define the monsoon climatological diurnal and annual cycles for the East Asian Monsoon (EAM), the South Asian Monsoon (SAM), the West Africa Monsoon (WAM), the North America/Mexican Monsoon (NAM), the South American Summer Monsoon (SASM) and the Australian Monsoon (AUM). As noted, the TRMM data used in the study were cross-validated using CEOP reference site data, where applicable. Results show that the observed diurnal cycle of rain peaked around late afternoon over monsoon land, and early morning over the oceans. The diurnal cycles in models tend to peak 2-3 hours earlier than observed. The seasonal cycles of the EAM and SAM show the strongest continentality, i.e, strong control by continental processes away from the ITCZ. The WAM, and the AUM shows the less continentality, i.e, strong control by the oceanic ITCZ.

  2. CyclePad Help System CyclePad License

    E-print Network

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    of Library Examples of Cycles Simple Steam Rankine Cycle Simple Refrigerator Cycle Basic Gas Turbine Cycle Steam Cycle with Reheat Combined Gas Turbine & Rankine Cycle Basic Engineering Thermodynamics Tables Turbine Compressor Pump Heater Cooler Heat Exchanger Throttle #12;CyclePad Help System 4 Splitter

  3. Ecdysone and The Cell Cycle: Investigations in a Mosquito Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, Ann M.; Gerenday, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Cell lines provide a tool for investigating basic biological processes that underlie the complex interactions among the tissues and organs of an intact organism. We compare the evolution of insect and mammalian populations as they progress from diploid cell strains to continuous cell lines, and review the history of the well-characterized Aedes albopictus mosquito cell line, C7-10. Like Kc and S3 cells from Drosophila melanogaster, C7-10 cells are sensitive to the insect steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), and express 20E-inducible proteins as well as the EcR and USP components of the ecdysteroid receptor. The decrease in growth associated with 20E treatment results in an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cycle, and a concomitant decrease in levels of cyclin A. In contrast, 20E induces a G2 arrest in a well-studied imaginal disc cell line from the moth, Plodia interpunctella. We hypothesize that 20E-mediated events associated with molting and metamorphosis include effects on regulatory proteins that modulate the mitotic cell cycle and that differences between the 20E response in diverse insect cell lines reflect an interplay between classical receptor-mediated effects on gene expression and non-classical effects on signaling pathways similar to those recently described for the vertebrate steroid hormone, estrogen. PMID:20303973

  4. Borrelia burgdorferi malQ mutants utilize disaccharides and traverse the enzootic cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hoon-Hanks, Laura L.; Morton, Elizabeth A.; Lybecker, Meghan C.; Battisti, James M.; Samuels, D. Scott; Drecktrah, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, cycles in nature between a vertebrate host and a tick vector. We demonstrate that B. burgdorferi can utilize several sugars that may be available during persistence in the tick, including trehalose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and chitobiose. The spirochete grows to a higher cell density in trehalose, which is found in tick hemolymph, than in maltose; these two disaccharides differ only in the glycosidic linkage between the glucose monomers. Additionally, B. burgdorferi grows to a higher density in GlcNAc than in the GlcNAc dimer chitobiose, both of which may be available during tick molting. We have also investigated the role of malQ (bb0166), which encodes an amylomaltase, in sugar utilization during the enzootic cycle. In other bacteria, MalQ is involved in utilizing maltodextrins and trehalose, but we show that, unexpectedly, it is not needed for B. burgdorferi to grow in vitro on any of the sugars assayed. In addition, infection of mice by needle inoculation or tick bite, as well as acquisition and maintenance of the spirochete in the tick vector, does not require MalQ. PMID:22672337

  5. HIV Life Cycle

    MedlinePLUS

    HIV Overview The HIV Life Cycle (Last updated 9/22/2015; last reviewed 9/22/2015) Key Points HIV gradually destroys the immune ... life cycle. What is the connection between the HIV life cycle and HIV medicines? Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ...

  6. The Influence of Allochthonous Leaf Detritus on the Occurrence of Crustacean Detritivores in the Soft-bottom Macrobenthos of the Po River Delta Area (northwestern Adriatic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, G.; Rossi, L.

    2002-05-01

    Core samples were examined quarterly at two coastal sites (S1 and S2) and at an offshore station (S3) located in the Po River delta area (northwestern Adriatic Sea). Analyses focused on (i) occurrence of coarse detritus of allochthonous origin in the sedimentary matrix and (ii) the relative influence of macrodetritus enrichment and other environmental factors on the vagile macrofauna. Plant debris occurred in site S1 sediments only in summer and autumn; in contrast, fragments of the phanerogams Cymodocea nodosa and Zostera spp. were found in site S2 sediment throughout the sampling period. Sediments from the offshore site S3 were characterized by negligible plant material, even though in summer and autumn samples debris of continental origin was observed. Even though leaf detritus occurrence at site S2 was ?5-fold higher compared to the other coastal site S1, it did not influence the total organic matter and its distribution among grain-size classes. Conversely, the specific organic content of dimensional fractions provided an effective assessment of detritus enrichment processes occurring at the two coastal sites. A group of brackish-originated crustaceans (i.e. the amphipods Gammarus insensibilis and G. aequicauda and the isopod Idotea baltica) was the main determinant of among-site multivariate differences in the vagile macrofauna; depositivorous ophiuroids accounted for the residual differences observed during the study period. The analysis of taxa abundance and individual body size indicated that in both site S1 and S3 macrodetritus advection to the benthic system corresponded with passive dispersal of brackish crustaceans, that provided a negligible contribution to the macrobenthic production. In contrast, in site S2 allochthonous inputs from marginal environments could have represented the key factor for the persistence of an authochthonous population of Gammarus insensibilis. The amphipod provided a considerable (19·4%) contribution to the total macrobenthic production of the site, dominated by filter-feeding bivalves and tubicolous deposit feeders. The potential effects of detritivorous crustaceans on soft-bottom macrobenthic assemblages of the northern Adriatic Sea are discussed.

  7. The microbial cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Nurse, P.; Streiblova, E.

    1984-01-01

    This book concentrates on the major problems of cell cycle control in microorganisms. A wide variety of microorganisms, ranging from bacteria and yeasts to hyphal fungi, algae, and ciliates are analyzed, with emphasis on the basic similarities among the organisms. Different ways of looking at cell cycle control which emphasize aspects of the problem such as circadian rhythms, limit cycle oscillators, and cell size models, are considered. New approaches such as the study of cell cycle mutants, and cloning of cell cycle control genes are also presented.

  8. Effect of Chitin Isolated from Crustaceans and Cephalopods on Denaturation of Fish Myofibrillar Protein and the State of Water during Frozen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo Romero, Eduardo; Nakamura, Yukio; Yamashita, Yasumitsu; Ichikawa, Hisashi; Goto, Shingi; Osatomi, Kiyoshi; Nozaki, Yukinori

    From the point of view of utilization of shells as a waste product of fishery industry, the cryoprotective effect of chitin made from shell of crustaceans (Japanese fan lobster and Japanese swimming crab) and cartilage of cephalopods (spear squid) are studied. Chitin from the shells and cartilage were added to lizard fish myofibrils, and the changes of unfrozen water in myofibrils and ATPase activity of myofibrillar protein were observed during frozen storage at -250°C for 120days. The amount of unfrozen water were increased by addition of three kinds of chitin, and decreased moderately during forzen storage. Whereas, in the chitin free sample, the amount of unfrozen water were decreased rapidly during frozen storage. Changes of ATPase activity of samples showed similar tendency to that of the amount of unfrozen water. The present moderate cryoprotective effect of chitin and data of unfrozen water and ATPase activity of myofibrillar protein suggest the importance of the amount of unfrozen water in frozen matrix.

  9. Formation of Helically Structured Chitin/CaCO3 Hybrids through an Approach Inspired by the Biomineralization Processes of Crustacean Cuticles.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Shunichi; Kajiyama, Satoshi; Nishimura, Tatsuya; Kato, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Chitin/CaCO3 hybrids with helical structures are formed through a biomineralization-inspired crystallization process under ambient conditions. Liquid-crystalline chitin whiskers are used as helically ordered templates. The liquid-crystalline structures are stabilized by acidic polymer networks which interact with the chitin templates. The crystallization of CaCO3 is conducted by soaking the templates in the colloidal suspension of amorphous CaCO3 (ACC) at room temperature. At the initial stage of crystallization, ACC particles are introduced inside the templates, and they crystallize to CaCO3 nanocrystals. The acidic polymer networks induce CaCO3 crystallization. The characterization of the resultant hybrids reveals that they possess helical order and homogeneous hybrid structures of chitin and CaCO3 , which resemble the structure and composition of the exoskeleton of crustaceans. PMID:26192070

  10. Deep-Sea decapod crustaceans (Caridea, Polychelida, Anomura and Brachyura) collected from the Nikko Seamounts, Mariana Arc, using a remotely operated vehicle "Hyper-Dolphin".

    PubMed

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Tsuchida, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Samples and images of deep-water benthic decapod crustaceans were collected from the Nikko Seamounts, Mariana Arc, at depths of 520-680 m, by using the remotely operate vehicle "Hyper-Dolphin", equipped with a high definition camera, digital camera, manipulators and slurp gun (suction sampler). The following seven species were collected, of which three are new to science: Plesionika unicolor n. sp. (Caridea: Pandalidae), Homeryon armarium Galil, 2000 (Polychelida: Polychelidae), Eumunida nikko n. sp. (Anomura: Eumunididae), Michelopagurus limatulus (Henderson, 1888) (Anomura: Paguridae), Galilia petricola n. sp. (Brachyura: Leucosiidae), Cyrtomaia micronesica Richer de Forges & Ng, 2007 (Brachyura: Inachidae), and Progeryon mus Ng & Guinot, 1999 (Brachyura: Progeryonidae). Affinities of these three new species are discussed. All but H. armarium are recorded from the Japanese Exclusive Economic Zone for the first time. Brief notes on ecology and/or behavior are given for each species. PMID:24870636

  11. Crustacean hyperglycemic hormones of two cold water crab species, Chionoecetes opilio and C. japonicus: isolation of cDNA sequences and localization of CHH neuropeptide in eyestalk ganglia.

    PubMed

    Chung, J Sook; Ahn, I S; Yu, O H; Kim, D S

    2015-04-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) is primarily known for its prototypical function in hyperglycemia which is induced by the release of CHH. The CHH release takes place as an adaptive response to the energy demands of the animals experiencing stressful environmental, physiological or behavioral conditions. Although >63 decapod CHH nucleotide sequences are known (GenBank), the majority of them is garnered from the species inhabiting shallow and warm water. In order to understand the adaptive role of CHH in Chionoecetes opilio and Chionoecetes japonicus inhabiting deep water environments, we first aimed for the isolation of the full-length cDNA sequence of CHH from the eyestalk ganglia of C. opilio (ChoCHH) and C. japonicus (ChjCHH) using degenerate PCR and 5' and 3' RACE. Cho- and ChjCHH cDNA sequences are identical in 5' UTR and ORF with 100% sequence identity of the putative 138aa of preproCHHs. The length of 3' UTR ChjCHH cDNA sequence is 39 nucleotides shorter than that of ChoCHH. This is the first report in decapod crustaceans that two different species have the identical sequence of CHH. ChoCHH expression increases during embryogenesis of C. opilio and is significantly higher in adult males and females. C. japonicus males have slightly higher ChjCHH expression than C. opilio males, but no statistical difference. In both species, the immunostaining intensity of CHH is stronger in the sinus gland than that of X-organ cells. Future studies will enable us to gain better understanding of the comparative metabolic physiology and endocrinology of cold, deep water species of Chionoecetes spp. PMID:25224573

  12. Low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, H. D. (editor); Kaisand, L. R. (editor); Halford, G. R. (editor); Leis, B. N. (editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on various aspects of low cycle fatigue, including cyclic deformation, crack propagation, high-temperature low cycle fatigue, microstructural defects, multiaxial and variable amplitude loading, and life prediction. Papers are presented on the low cycle fatigue of some aluminum alloys, prediction of crack growth under creep-fatigue loading conditions, high-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior and lifetime prediction of a nickel-base ODS alloy, and an integrated approach to creep-fatigue life prediction. Other topics discussed include thermal fatigue testing of coated monocrystalline superalloys, low cycle fatigue of Al-Mg-Si alloys, and the effect of superimposed stresses at high frequency on low cycle fatigue.

  13. [Cycling in Zagreb].

    PubMed

    Matos, Stipan; Krapac, Ladislav; Krapac, Josip

    2007-01-01

    Cycling in Zagreb, as means of urban transport inside and outside the city, has a bright past, hazy presence but a promising future. Every day, aggressive citizens who lack urban traffic culture mistreat many cyclists but also many pedestrians. Sedentary way of living, unhealthy eating habits and inadequate recreation would surely be reduced if Zagreb had a network of cycling tracks (190 cm) or lanes (80 cm). Main city roads were constructed at the beginning of the 20th century. Today, the lack of cycling tracks is particularly evident in terms of missing connections between northern and southern parts of the city. Transportation of bikes in public vehicles, parking of bikes as well as cycling along the foot of the mountains Medvednica and Zumberacko gorje is not adequately organized. Better organization is necessary not only because of the present young generation but also because of the young who will shortly become citizens of the EU, where cycling is enormously popular. Cycling tourism is not known in Zagreb, partly due to inadequate roads. The surroundings of Zagreb are more suitable for cycling tourism and attractive brochures and tourist guides offer information to tourists on bikes. Professional, acrobatic and sports cycling do not have a tradition in Zagreb and in Croatia. The same holds true for recreational cycling and indoor exercise cycling. The authors discuss the impact of popularization of cycling using print and electronic media. The role of district and local self-government in the construction and improvement of traffic roads in Zagreb is very important. It is also significant for the implementation of legal regulations that must be obeyed by all traffic participants in order to protect cyclists, the most vulnerable group of traffic participants besides passengers. Multidisciplinary action of all benevolent experts would surely increase safety and pleasure of cycling in the city and its surroundings. This would also help reduce daily stress and improve the quality of living in the capital of Croatia. PMID:18949922

  14. Solar activity secular cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramynin, A. P.; Mordvinov, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    Long-term variations in solar activity secular cycles have been studied using a method for the expansion of reconstructed sunspot number series Sn( t) for 11400 years in terms of natural orthogonal functions. It has been established that three expansion components describe more than 98% of all Sn( t) variations. In this case, the contribution of the first expansion component is about 92%. The averaged form of the 88year secular cycle has been determined based on the form of the first expansion coordinate function. The quasi-periodicities modulating the secular cycle have been revealed based on the time function conjugate to the first function. The quasi-periodicities modulating the secular cycle coincide with those observed in the Sn( t) series spectrum. A change in the secular cycle form and the time variations in this form are described by the second and third expansion components, the contributions of which are about 4 and 2%, respectively. The variations in the steepness of the secular cycle branches are more pronounced in the 200-year cycle, and the secular cycle amplitude varies more evidently in the 2300-year cycle.

  15. New insight into the RNA interference response against cathepsin-L gene in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum: molting or gut phenotypes specifically induced by injection or feeding treatments.

    PubMed

    Sapountzis, Panagiotis; Duport, Gabrielle; Balmand, Séverine; Gaget, Karen; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Febvay, Gérard; Charles, Hubert; Rahbé, Yvan; Colella, Stefano; Calevro, Federica

    2014-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been widely and successfully used for gene inactivation in insects, including aphids, where dsRNA administration can be performed either by feeding or microinjection. However, several aspects related to the aphid response to RNAi, as well as the influence of the administration method on tissue response, or the mixed success to observe phenotypes specific to the gene targeted, are still unclear in this insect group. In the present study, we made the first direct comparison of two administration methods (injection or feeding) for delivery of dsRNA targeting the cathepsin-L gene in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. In order to maximize the possibility of discovering specific phenotypes, the effect of the treatment was analyzed in single individual aphids at the level of five body compartments: the bacteriocytes, the gut, the embryonic chains, the head and the remaining body carcass. Our analysis revealed that gene expression knockdown effect in each single body compartment was dependent on the administration method used, and allowed us to discover new functions for the cathepsin-L gene in aphids. Injection of cathepsin-L dsRNA was much more effective on carcass and head, inducing body morphology alterations, and suggesting a novel role of this gene in the molting of these insects. Administration by feeding provoked cathepsin-L knockdown in the gut and specific gut epithelial cell alteration, therefore allowing a better characterization of tissue specific role of this gene in aphids. PMID:24859468

  16. Teaching the Krebs Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akeroyd, F. Michael

    1983-01-01

    Outlines a simple but rigorous treatment of the Krebs Cycle suitable for A-level Biology students. The importance of the addition of water molecules in various stages of the cycle is stressed as well as the removal of hydrogen atoms by the oxidizing enzymes. (JN)

  17. The Energy Strategy Cycle 

    E-print Network

    Korich, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    self-feeding are normally associated with unfavorable situations. However, an attempt is mane here to develop a cycle that has a tendency to be self-moving toward an improved long-range energy state. As with any self-closing cycle, a key issue...

  18. Quantum computing Hamiltonian cycles

    E-print Network

    T. Rudolph

    1996-03-03

    An algorithm for quantum computing Hamiltonian cycles of simple, cubic, bipartite graphs is discussed. It is shown that it is possible to evolve a quantum computer into an entanglement of states which map onto the set of all possible paths originating from a chosen vertex, and furthermore to subsequently project out all states not corresponding to Hamiltonian cycles.

  19. Rock Cycle Roulette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Stan M.; Palmer, Courtney

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an activity on the rock cycle. Sets 11 stages representing the transitions of an earth material in the rock cycle. Builds six-sided die for each station, and students move to the stations depending on the rolling side of the die. Evaluates students by discussing several questions in the classroom. Provides instructional information for…

  20. Seeing the Carbon Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drouin, Pamela; Welty, David J.; Repeta, Daniel; Engle-Belknap, Cheryl A.; Cramer, Catherine; Frashure, Kim; Chen, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a classroom experiment that was developed to introduce middle school learners to the carbon cycle. The experiment deals with transfer of CO[subscript 2] between liquid reservoirs and the effect CO[subscript 2] has on algae growth. It allows students to observe the influence of the carbon cycle on algae growth,…

  1. The carbon cycle revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolin, Bert; Fung, Inez

    1992-01-01

    Discussions during the Global Change Institute indicated a need to present, in some detail and as accurately as possible, our present knowledge about the carbon cycle, the uncertainties in this knowledge, and the reasons for these uncertainties. We discuss basic issues of internal consistency within the carbon cycle, and end by summarizing the key unknowns.

  2. The Oxygen Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swant, Gary D.

    Produced for primary grades, this booklet provides study of the oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle in nature. Line drawings, a minimum amount of narrative, and a glossary of terms make up its content. The booklet is designed to be used as reading material, a coloring book, or for dramatic arts with students acting out parts of the cycle. This work was…

  3. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  4. Localization of ORC1 During the Cell Cycle in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffman, Frederick D.; Reyes, Mai-Ling; Brown, Monique; Lambert, W. Clark; Cohen, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of the origin recognition complex (ORC) with replication origins is a critical parameter in eukaryotic replication initiation. In mammals the ORC remains bound except during mitosis, thus the localization of ORC complexes allows localization of origins. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes human ORC1 was used to localize ORC complexes in populations of human MOLT-4 cells separated by cell cycle position using centrifugal elutriation. ORC1 staining in cells in early G1 is diffuse and primarily peripheral. As the cells traverse G1, ORC1 accumulates and becomes more localized towards the center of the nucleus, however around the G1/S boundary the staining pattern changes and ORC1 appears peripheral. By mid to late S phase ORC1 immunofluorescence is again concentrated at the nuclear center. During anaphase, ORC1 staining is localized mainly in the pericentriolar regions. These findings suggest that concerted movements of origin DNA sequences in addition to the previously documented assembly and disassembly of protein complexes are an important aspect of replication initiation loci in eukaryotes. PMID:22045277

  5. Which 100-kyr Cycle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A.; Loutre, M. F.; Mélice, J. L.

    The origin of all the fundamental frequencies characterising the long term variations of the astronomical parameters has been identified. This allows to discuss their inter- relationship and possible changes in times. Different sources for the so-called 100-kyr cycle have been found in the astronomical parameters and in the insolation itself. The most popular 100-kyr cycle is certainly the eccentricity one. Actually, the periods of the most important spectral components of e used in Berger (1978) are 412 885, 14 945, 123 297, 99 590 and 131 248 yr. Instability of the resulting average 100-kyr cy- cle has been shown related to the ~ 400-kyr cycle. The derivative of eccentricity is definitely showing a spectrum dominated by the 100-kyr cycle with the same spectral components as e itself. The inclination of the Earth orbital plane on the ecliptic does not display any 100-kyr cycle, but it is not the case for its inclination on the reference plane for which cycles of 98 046 and 107 478 years appear. Finally the frequency modulation of obliquity is characterised by cycles 171 kyr and 97 kyr long. For inso- lation, it is known that there is only a very weak signal around 100-kyr coming from e itself. However, if we consider the seasonal cycle at the equator, its amplitude varies with cycles of 400 kyr, 100 kyr, 41 kyr, 10 kyr and 5 kyr, all related to e. Although all these cycles are close to the 100 kyr cycle found in geological data, the origin of this kind of cycle can be best identified by comparing the proxy record to the re- sponse of the climate system to the astronomical forcing. This forcing signal which contains, in one way or another, the astronomical characteristics mentioned above is, at least, partly distorted and transformed, a modification which can only be estimated through climate models. Such a climate model has been developed in the early 80Ss in Louvain-la-Neuve and used since to simulate the last and next glacial-interglacial cycles.

  6. The Anderson Quin Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

    1993-03-18

    The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

  7. Stable isotope ratios reveal food source of benthic fish and crustaceans along a gradient of trophic status in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ni-Na; Shiao, Jen-Chieh; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Kao, Shuh-Ji; Hsieh, Chih-hao

    2014-08-01

    The East China Sea (ECS) receives large quantities of particulate organic matter (POM) and inorganic nutrients transported from the Changjiang (Yangtze River), which have produced high productivity in the northwestern ECS. This study evaluated potential contributions of terrigenous POM (allochthonous food source) and nutrient-induced marine production (autochthonous source) to the ECS benthic ecosystem by analyzing stable isotopic compositions of phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthic crustaceans and fish. Benthic consumers exhibited ?13C values similar to those of their autochthonous food sources (i.e., phytoplankton and zooplankton), revealing their major reliance on marine production. In contrast, the ?13C values of benthic fish (-19.6‰ to -13.5‰) and crustaceans (-18.9‰ to -15.0‰) were much higher than that of terrigenous POM (-25.7‰), which generally accounted for less than 20% of the most fish diet. Phytoplankton and zooplankton generally exhibited higher ?13C values at eutrophic and highly productive inshore sites than at oligotrophic offshore sites. This enrichment of inshore ?13C values was mainly attributed to lower photosynthetic fractionation during algal blooms, an effect that was further enhanced during flood period of the Changjiang. The ?13C values of demersal fish assemblages were also significantly higher at inshore sites and decreased seaward. However, fish ?15N values and their estimated trophic levels showed relatively small spatial variation. The disproportionate variations in ?13C and ?15N values suggested that the enriched C isotopic signatures derived from an elevated ?13C baseline of the inshore food web instead of trophic enrichment of the isotopic ratios. The significantly positive correlations between concentrations of chlorophyll a and nutrients versus fish ?13C provided further evidence for the use of pelagic algal bloom materials by inshore consumers. The isotopic and oceanographic survey data suggested that inorganic nutrients discharged from the Changjiang River nourish benthic consumers in the ECS and play an important role in linking marine benthic ecosystems to local pelagic primary production as well as to the adjacent terrestrial watershed.

  8. Environmental Sex Determination in the Branchiopod Crustacean Daphnia magna: Deep Conservation of a Doublesex Gene in the Sex-Determining Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yasuhiko; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Watanabe, Hajime; Iguchi, Taisen

    2011-01-01

    Sex-determining mechanisms are diverse among animal lineages and can be broadly divided into two major categories: genetic and environmental. In contrast to genetic sex determination (GSD), little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying environmental sex determination (ESD). The Doublesex (Dsx) genes play an important role in controlling sexual dimorphism in genetic sex-determining organisms such as nematodes, insects, and vertebrates. Here we report the identification of two Dsx genes from Daphnia magna, a freshwater branchiopod crustacean that parthenogenetically produces males in response to environmental cues. One of these genes, designated DapmaDsx1, is responsible for the male trait development when expressed during environmental sex determination. The domain organization of DapmaDsx1 was similar to that of Dsx from insects, which are thought to be the sister group of branchiopod crustaceans. Intriguingly, the molecular basis for sexually dimorphic expression of DapmaDsx1 is different from that of insects. Rather than being regulated sex-specifically at the level of pre–mRNA splicing in the coding region, DapmaDsx1 exhibits sexually dimorphic differences in the abundance of its transcripts. During embryogenesis, expression of DapmaDsx1 was increased only in males and its transcripts were primarily detected in male-specific structures. Knock-down of DapmaDsx1 in male embryos resulted in the production of female traits including ovarian maturation, whereas ectopic expression of DapmaDsx1 in female embryos resulted in the development of male-like phenotypes. Expression patterns of another D. magna Dsx gene, DapmaDsx2, were similar to those of DapmaDsx1, but silencing and overexpression of this gene did not induce any clear phenotypic changes. These results establish DapmaDsx1 as a key regulator of the male phenotype. Our findings reveal how ESD is implemented by selective expression of a fundamental genetic component that is functionally conserved in animals using GSD. We infer that there is an ancient, previously unidentified link between genetic and environmental sex determination. PMID:21455482

  9. Solar Cycle Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William Dean

    2011-01-01

    Solar cycle predictions are needed to plan long-term space missions; just like weather predictions are needed to plan your next vacation. Fleets of satellites circle the Earth collecting many types of science data, protecting astronauts, and relaying information. All of these satellites are sensitive at some level to solar cycle effects. Predictions of drag on LEO spacecraft are one of the most important. Launching a satellite with less propellant can mean a higher orbit, but unanticipated solar activity and increased drag can make that a Pyrrhic victory. Energetic events at the Sun can produce crippling radiation storms that endanger all assets in space. Testing solar dynamo theories by quantitative predictions of what will happen in 5-20 years is the next arena for solar cycle predictions. I will describe the current state of solar cycle predictions and anticipate how those predictions could be made more accurate in the future.

  10. The Rock Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Raman J.; Bushee, Jonathan

    1977-01-01

    Presents a rock cycle diagram suitable for use at the secondary or introductory college levels which separates rocks formed on and below the surface, includes organic materials, and separates products from processes. (SL)

  11. Mining the Learning Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemler, Debra; King, Hobart

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach that uses the learning cycle to meaningfully teach students about mineral properties while alleviating the tedious nature of identifying mineral specimens. Discusses mineral properties, cooperative learning, and mineral identification. (JRH)

  12. Urea Cycle Disease Overview

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the body’s process to breakdown products, such as ammonia. Ammonia is a product of protein digestion and the ... cycle is required for the body to excrete ammonia. In patients with partial enzyme deficiencies, the first ...

  13. Synthetic battery cycling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    The group of techniques that as a class are referred to as synthetic battery cycling are described with reference to spacecraft battery systems. Synthetic battery cycling makes use of the capability of computer graphics to illustrate some of the basic characteristics of operation of individual electrodes within an operating electrochemical cell. It can also simulate the operation of an entire string of cells that are used as the energy storage subsystem of a power system.

  14. Solar Cycle Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William Dean

    2012-01-01

    Solar cycle predictions are needed to plan long-term space missions; just like weather predictions are needed to plan the launch. Fleets of satellites circle the Earth collecting many types of science data, protecting astronauts, and relaying information. All of these satellites are sensitive at some level to solar cycle effects. Predictions of drag on LEO spacecraft are one of the most important. Launching a satellite with less propellant can mean a higher orbit, but unanticipated solar activity and increased drag can make that a Pyrrhic victory as you consume the reduced propellant load more rapidly. Energetic events at the Sun can produce crippling radiation storms that endanger all assets in space. Solar cycle predictions also anticipate the shortwave emissions that cause degradation of solar panels. Testing solar dynamo theories by quantitative predictions of what will happen in 5-20 years is the next arena for solar cycle predictions. A summary and analysis of 75 predictions of the amplitude of the upcoming Solar Cycle 24 is presented. The current state of solar cycle predictions and some anticipations how those predictions could be made more accurate in the future will be discussed.

  15. cDNA cloning and transcript distribution of two novel members of the neuroparsin peptide family in a hemipteran insect (Nezara viridula) and a decapod crustacean (Jasus lalandii).

    PubMed

    Marco, Heather G; Anders, Lance; Gäde, Gerd

    2014-03-01

    Two novel neuroparsin (NP) precursor cDNAs were cloned: one from the corpora cardiaca of an insect, the green stink bug Nezara viridula, and the other from the X-organ of a decapod crustacean, the spiny lobster Jasus lalandii. The translated NP precursor consists of 106 amino acid residues in N. viridula and 103 amino acid residues in J. lalandii, with 14 and 12 cysteine residues, respectively, in conserved positions when aligned with known NPs. Reverse transcriptase PCR shows that in both arthropods, NP is expressed in some neural tissues: corpora cardiaca, sub-esophageal ganglion and brain of N. viridula; X-organ, brain, sub-esophageal and thoracic ganglion in J. lalandii. Additionally, NP is also expressed in non-neural tissues, such as fat body, leg muscle, flight muscle, reproductive organs and antennae in N. viridula, and heart and ovary in J. lalandii. There are no major differences in the NP transcript expression in mature and immature stink bugs, and also no difference between male and female stink bugs. PMID:24512948

  16. New evidence on an old question: is the "fight or flight" stage present in the cardiac and respiratory regulation of decapod crustaceans?

    PubMed

    Canero, Eliana M; Hermitte, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    The ability to stay alert to subtle changes in the environment and to freeze, fight or flight in the presence of predators requires integrating sensory information as well as triggering motor output to target tissues, both of which are associated with the autonomic nervous system. These reactions, which are commonly related to vertebrates, are the fundamental physiological responses that allow an animal to survive danger. The circulatory activity in vertebrates changes in opposite phases. The stage where circulatory activity is high is termed the "fight or flight stage", while the stage where circulatory activity slows down is termed the "rest and digest stage". It may be assumed that highly evolved invertebrates possess a comparable response system as they also require rapid cardiovascular and respiratory regulation to be primed when necessary. However, in invertebrates, the body plan may have developed such a system very differently. Since this topic is insufficiently studied, it is necessary to extend studies for a comparative analysis. In the present review, we use our own experimental results obtained in the crab Neohelice granulata and both older and newer findings obtained by other authors in decapod crustaceans as well as in other invertebrates, to compare the pattern of change in circulatory activity, especially in the "fight or flight" stage. We conclude that the main features of neuroautonomic regulation of the cardiac function were already present early in evolution, at least in highly evolved invertebrates, although conspicuous differences are also evident. PMID:25237011

  17. AN EARLY MIOCENE DEEP-WATER DECAPOD CRUSTACEAN FAUNULE FROM THE SLOVENIAN PART OF THE STYRIAN BASIN, AND ITS PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL AND PALAEOBIOGEOGRAPHICAL SIGNIFICANCE

    PubMed Central

    GAŠPARI?, ROK; HYŽNÝ, MATÚŠ

    2015-01-01

    A new decapod crustacean faunule is described from the early Miocene of the Slovenian part of the Styrian Basin. The Ivnik Beds exposed at the ?inžat locality contain seven species: Calliax michelottii (Axiidea: Callianassidae), Lepidophthalmus paratethyensis sp. nov. (Axiidea: Callianassidae), Jaxea kuemeli (Gebiidea: Laomediidae), Styrioplax exiguus (Brachyura: Chasmocarcinidae), Goneplax gulderi (Brachyura: Goneplacidae), Neopilumnoplax pohorjensis sp. nov. (Brachyura: Mathildellidae) and Retropluma slovenica sp. nov. (Brachyura: Retroplumidae). Numerous specimens of well-preserved Styrioplax exiguus permitted its redescription and re-assignment of its familial placement to Chasmocarcinidae. Neopilumnoplax pohorjensis sp. nov. constitutes the first fossil occurrence of the genus known to date. The decapod association, as well as other faunal elements, suggests low-energy deep-water depositional environment with epibathyal water depth of more than 125 m. The studied locality is situated in the Ribnica–Selnica graben filled with sediments once deposited in the Central Paratethys sea. Based on the affinities of decapod genera of the Central Paratethys and the Proto-Mediterranean, we conclude that the exchange of decapod faunas between these regions was probably regulated by an anti-estuarine circulation permitting an easier incursion of species from the Proto-Mediterranean into the Paratethys and simultaneous hindering the Paratethyan endemics (Styrioplax) from entering the Mediterranean. PMID:26689949

  18. Effect of Chitin Isolated from Crustaceans and Cephalopods on Denaturation of Fish Myofibrillar Protein and the State of Water during Frozen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yasumitsu; Zhang, Nong; Nozaki, Yukinori

    The effect of chitin hydrolysate made from shell of crustaceans and cartilage of cephalopods on the denaturation and the state of water of lizard fish myofibrillar protein (Mf) during frozen storage at -250°C for 120 days were investigated. 5.0% chitin hydrolysate (dried matter) added Mf samples were frozen at -25°C and storage for 120 days, and the change of inactivation of Mf Ca-ATPase and the change of unfrozen water in Mf were examined during the frozen storage. The decrease of Mf Ca-ATPase during frozen storage were slow by addition of chitin hydrolysate. The amount of unfrozen water in Mf were increased by addition of chitin hydrolysate, and decreaced gradually during frozen storage. On the other hand, the amount of unfrozen water of the control were decreaced suddenly during frozen storage. Above results suggest that chitin hydrolysate has cryoprotective effect on Mf. It is guessed that the mechanism of cryoprotective effect of chitin hydrolysate may be caused by an interaction between hydration sphere of Mf and equatorial OH groups in the molecular structure of chitin hydrolysate.

  19. Effects of four CeO2 nanocrystalline catalysts on early-life stages of zebrafish Danio rerio and crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Jemec, Anita; Djinovi?, Petar; Tišler, Tatjana; Pintar, Albin

    2012-06-15

    Effects of four different nanocrystalline CeO(2)-based catalysts on crustaceans Daphnia magna and early-life stages of zebrafish Danio rerio were studied. Pure CeO(2) and CuO-CeO(2) mixed oxides with a nominal 10, 15 and 20 mol.% CuO content were tested. Pure CeO(2) provoked no effects, but CuO-CeO(2) mixed oxides induced some sublethal effects on fish and affected daphnids' survival. The most pronounced effects were found on fish body growth, which was reduced at 10 mg/L in case of CuCe20 and 50 mg/L in cases of CuCe10 and CuCe15. Daphnids' survival was affected above 80 mg/L of CuCe20, while CuCe10 and CuCe15 did not affect daphnids. None of the materials was highly toxic to daphnids and fish in comparison to some other environmental pollutants. Differences in effects between the materials could not be explained by their specific physicochemical properties. This work indicates that more attention should be placed at potential toxicity of nanostructured materials, such as nanocrystalline mixed-oxides. PMID:22525480

  20. Neurogenesis in the developing visual system of the branchiopod crustacean Triops longicaudatus (LeConte, 1846): corresponding patterns of compound-eye formation in Crustacea and Insecta?

    PubMed

    Harzsch, S; Walossek, D

    2001-01-01

    In the discussion on arthropod phylogeny, the structural evolution of compound eyes and optic ganglia in Crustacea and Insecta is an important topic. On the one hand, many morphological features as well as developmental aspects of the visual system in Insecta and Crustacea correspond in so much detail that eye design in these two groups is likely to have a common euarthropodan ancestor. On the other hand, however, some authors advocate a convergent evolution of the crustacean and insect visual system founding their arguments on differences in the arrangement of the visual neuropils and the fibre connections between Malacostraca and Entomostraca (the "entomostracan enigma"). Therefore, information about cellular aspects of visual system formation in entomostracan Crustacea is likely to enliven this debate, but is not yet available. To fill this gap, we examined the proliferation of neuronal stem cells in the developing visual system of the tadpole shrimp Triops longicaudatus (LeConte, 1846) (Entomostraca, Branchiopoda, Phyllopoda, Calmanostraca, Notostraca) by in vivo incorporation of the proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine and subsequent immunohistochemical detection. Our results indicate that in the developing visual system of T. longicaudatus, three band-shaped zones containing neuronal stem cells are present corresponding to the proliferation zones found in Malacostraca. We therefore conclude that the ontogenetic mechanisms of visual-system formation are evolutionarily conserved (homologous) in Branchiopoda, Malacostraca, and Insecta. PMID:11277404

  1. Identification and developmental expression of the enzymes responsible for dopamine, histamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew E.; Fontanilla, Tiana M.; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C.; Lenz, Petra H.

    2013-01-01

    Neurochemicals are likely to play key roles in physiological/behavioral control in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton for much of the North Atlantic Ocean. Previously, a de novo assembled transcriptome consisting of 206,041 unique sequences was used to characterize the peptidergic signaling systems of Calanus. Here, this assembly was mined for transcripts encoding enzymes involved in amine biosynthesis. Using known Drosophila melanogaster proteins as templates, transcripts encoding putative Calanus homologs of tryptophan-phenylalanine hydroxylase (dopamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), tyrosine hydroxylase (dopamine biosynthesis), DOPA decarboxylase (dopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), histidine decarboxylase (histamine biosynthesis), tyrosine decarboxylase (octopamine biosynthesis), tyramine ?-hydroxylase (octopamine biosynthesis) and tryptophan hydroxylase (serotonin biosynthesis) were identified. Reverse BLAST and domain analyses show that the proteins deduced from these transcripts possess sequence homology to and the structural hallmarks of their respective enzyme families. Developmental profiling revealed a remarkably consistent pattern of expression for all transcripts, with the highest levels of expression typically seen in the early nauplius and early copepodite. These expression patterns suggest roles for amines during development, particularly in the metamorphic transitions from embryo to nauplius and from nauplius to copepodite. Taken collectively, the data presented here lay a strong foundation for future gene-based studies of aminergic signaling in this and other copepod species, in particular assessment of the roles they may play in developmental control. PMID:24148657

  2. Trophic transfer of trace metals from the polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor to the polychaete N. virens and the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainbow, P.S.; Poirier, L.; Smith, B.D.; Brix, K.V.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    Diet is an important exposure route for the uptake of trace metals by aquatic invertebrates, with trace metal trophic transfer depending on 2 stages - assimilation and subsequent accumulation by the predator. This study investigated the trophic transfer of trace metals from the sediment-dwelling polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor from metal-rich estuarine sediments in southwestern UK to 2 predators - another polychaete N. virens (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe) and the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe, Ag, As, Mn). N. virens showed net accumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd from the prey; accumulation increased with increasing prey concentration, but a coefficient of trophic transfer decreased with increasing prey concentration, probably because a higher proportion of accumulated metal in the prey is bound in less trophically available (insoluble) detoxified forms. The trace metal accumulation patterns of P. varians apparently restricted significant net accumulation of metals from the diet of N. diversicolor to just Cd. There was significant mortality of the decapods fed on the diets of metal-rich worms. Metal-rich invertebrates that have accumulated metals from the rich historical store in the sediments of particular SW England estuaries can potentially pass these metals along food chains, with accumulation and total food chain transfer depending on the metal assimilation efficiencies and accumulation patterns of the animal at each trophic level. This trophic transfer may be significant enough to have ecotoxicological effects. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  3. Identification and developmental expression of the enzymes responsible for dopamine, histamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Fontanilla, Tiana M; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C; Lenz, Petra H

    2014-01-01

    Neurochemicals are likely to play key roles in physiological/behavioral control in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton for much of the North Atlantic Ocean. Previously, a de novo assembled transcriptome consisting of 206,041 unique sequences was used to characterize the peptidergic signaling systems of Calanus. Here, this assembly was mined for transcripts encoding enzymes involved in amine biosynthesis. Using known Drosophila melanogaster proteins as templates, transcripts encoding putative Calanus homologs of tryptophan-phenylalanine hydroxylase (dopamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), tyrosine hydroxylase (dopamine biosynthesis), DOPA decarboxylase (dopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), histidine decarboxylase (histamine biosynthesis), tyrosine decarboxylase (octopamine biosynthesis), tyramine ?-hydroxylase (octopamine biosynthesis) and tryptophan hydroxylase (serotonin biosynthesis) were identified. Reverse BLAST and domain analyses show that the proteins deduced from these transcripts possess sequence homology to and the structural hallmarks of their respective enzyme families. Developmental profiling revealed a remarkably consistent pattern of expression for all transcripts, with the highest levels of expression typically seen in the early nauplius and early copepodite. These expression patterns suggest roles for amines during development, particularly in the metamorphic transitions from embryo to nauplius and from nauplius to copepodite. Taken collectively, the data presented here lay a strong foundation for future gene-based studies of aminergic signaling in this and other copepod species, in particular assessment of the roles they may play in developmental control. PMID:24148657

  4. Kalina cycle application to gas turbine combined cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorge, R.W.; Corman, J.C.; Smith, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    Gas turbine-based combined cycles have gained broad market acceptance due to their favorable economics, high efficiency and excellent environmental performance. Combined-cycle performance improvements have tracked the rapid advance of gas turbine technology. The introduction of the steam-cooled STAG 107H and 109H combined-cycle systems with their 60% net plant efficiency capability is the latest step in this trend. High-efficiency steam bottoming cycles have also advanced, with the current state-of-the-art being the three-pressure reheat cycle. The Kalina Cycle utilizing a mixture of ammonia and water as the working fluid promises to further continue these combined cycle-performance improvements with dramatic changes in the bottoming cycle. These improvements are due to non-isothermal heat acquisition and heat rejection, as well as internal heat recuperation, which reduce losses of thermodynamic availability, or exergy, in the cycle. This paper discusses the application of the Kalina Cycle to gas turbine-based combined cycles, including system design and performance characteristics. It compares Kalina Cycle performance and economics with that of a state-of-the-art steam bottoming cycle, showing the potential economic advantages of this innovative cycle in combined-cycle applications. Several variants of the Kalina Cycle system and the Distillation Condensation Subsystem (DCSS), which replaces the condenser as the heat rejection and recuperation system of the Kalina Cycle, have been studied. Results show that the Kalina Cycle can enhance the gas turbine bottoming cycle power output by over 15% when compared with a three-pressure reheat Rankine bottoming cycle. This yields an efficiency improvement of 2-3 percentage points, a significant advance in the state-of-the-art. Based on these substantial performance gains, GE is pursuing the commercialization of the Kalina Cycle for combined-cycle applications under a worldwide exclusive license from Exergy, Inc.

  5. Seasonal cycle and interannual variability in the Amazon hydrologic cycle

    E-print Network

    Zeng, Ning

    of Amazon deforestation involves various aspects of the hydro- logic cycle and its interactionSeasonal cycle and interannual variability in the Amazon hydrologic cycle Ning Zeng Department Abstract. An analysis of the Amazon basin hydrologic cycle has been carried out using the NASA

  6. Helium process cycle

    DOEpatents

    Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

    2008-08-12

    A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

  7. Helium process cycle

    DOEpatents

    Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

    2007-10-09

    A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

  8. Solar magnetic cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Karen L.

    1993-01-01

    Using NSO/KP magnetograms, the pattern and rate of the emergence of magnetic flux and the development of the large-scale patterns of unipolar fields are considered in terms of the solar magnetic cycle. Magnetic flux emerges in active regions at an average rate of 2 x 10(exp 21) Mx/day, approximately 10 times the estimated rate in ephemeral regions. Observations are presented that demonstrate that the large-scale unipolar fields originate in active regions and activity nests. For cycle 21, the net contribution of ephemeral regions to the axial dipole moment of the Sun is positive, and is of opposite sign to that of active regions. Its amplitude is smaller by a factor of 6, assuming an average lifetime of ephemeral regions of 8 hours. Active regions larger than 4500 Mm(sup 2) are the primary contributor to the cycle variation of Sun's axial dipole moment.

  9. Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Kotsubo, Vincent Y. (La Canada, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of .sup.3 He in a single phase .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He solution. The .sup.3 He in superfluid .sup.4 He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid .sup.3 He at an initial concentration in superfluid .sup.4 He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of .sup.4 He while restricting passage of .sup.3 He. The .sup.3 He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K.

  10. Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Swift, G.W.; Kotsubo, V.Y.

    1992-12-22

    A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of [sup 3]He in a single phase [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He solution. The [sup 3]He in superfluid [sup 4]He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid [sup 3]He at an initial concentration in superfluid [sup 4]He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of [sup 4]He while restricting passage of [sup 3]He. The [sup 3]He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K. 12 figs.

  11. The global sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, D. (editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the planetary biology microbial ecology's 1984 Summer Research Program, which examined various aspects of the global sulfur cycle are summarized. Ways in which sulfur flows through the many living and chemical species that inhabit the surface of the Earth were investigated. Major topics studied include: (1) sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototropic and filamentous sulfur bacteria; (2) sulfur reduction in sediments of marine and evaporite environments; (3) recent cyanobacterial mats; (4) microanalysis of community metabolism in proximity to the photic zone in potential stromatolites; and (5) formation and activity of microbial biofilms on metal sulfides and other mineral surfaces. Relationships between the global sulfur cycle and the understanding of the early evolution of the Earth and biosphere and current processes that affect global habitability are stressed.

  12. Complete sequence of Litopenaeus vannamei (Crustacea: Decapoda) vitellogenin cDNA and its expression in endocrinologically induced sub-adult females.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Shaul; Parnes, Shmuel; Segall, Carmen; Davis, Claytus; Sagi, Amir

    2006-01-01

    The gene that encodes vitellogenin (Vg), the precursor of the major yolk protein, vitellin, is expressed during vitellogenesis in decapod crustaceans. In this study, we sequenced the full-length cDNA from the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Vg gene (LvVg). This is the first open thelycum penaeid shrimp Vg cDNA to be sequenced. The transcript encodes a 2587 amino acid polypeptide with up to 85% identity to Vg of different penaeid species. Peptide mass fingerprints (PMFs) of the vitelline polypeptides suggest that the predicted endoprotease cleavage site at amino acids 725-728 does indeed undergo cleavage. Five prominent high-density lipoprotein polypeptides of masses 179, 113, 78, 61, and 42kDa were isolated from vitellogenic ovary, and their PMFs were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) spectrometry. It is likely that these polypeptides are all products of the LvVg gene. Removal of the X-organ sinus gland complex (XO-SG), which secretes the neurohormones that control the endocrine system regulating molt and reproduction, can induce both these processes. During the course of a number of molt cycles in induced sub-adult females, periodic ovarian growth and resorption were observed. Ovary growth correlated with LvVg expression in both the hepatopancreas and the ovary. Expression in ovaries of induced intermolt-early premolt females was significantly higher compared to all other sub-groups. Expression in ovaries of induced females was significantly higher compared to hepatopancreas at all molt cycle stages. Periodicity of molt and vitellogenesis in endocrinologically induced sub-adult shrimps may serve as a model to study alternate regulation of gene expression during these two processes. PMID:16122741

  13. The solar activity cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, Douglas M.; Devore, C. R.; Sheeley, Neil R., Jr.; Harvey, Karen L.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    This review emphasizes observations of photospheric magnetic flux during cycle 21 (1976-1986) and how these measurements have been used to model the cyclic variability of the heliospheric magnetic field. Indices of solar activity are discussed in terms of their potential to figure in theoretical or empirical models. Other recent data, such as measurements of large-scale surface flows and information on the sun's internal rotation from helioseismology, as well as the magnetic flux observations, are considered in the context of Babcock's phenomenological model of the solar cycle.

  14. Global water cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Christy, John R.; Goodman, Steven J.; Miller, Tim L.; Fitzjarrald, Dan; Lapenta, Bill; Wang, Shouping

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective is to determine the scope and interactions of the global water cycle with all components of the Earth system and to understand how it stimulates and regulates changes on both global and regional scales. The following subject areas are covered: (1) water vapor variability; (2) multi-phase water analysis; (3) diabatic heating; (4) MSU (Microwave Sounding Unit) temperature analysis; (5) Optimal precipitation and streamflow analysis; (6) CCM (Community Climate Model) hydrological cycle; (7) CCM1 climate sensitivity to lower boundary forcing; and (8) mesoscale modeling of atmosphere/surface interaction.

  15. Global water cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin; Goodman, Steven J.; Christy, John R.; Fitzjarrald, Daniel E.; Chou, Shi-Hung; Crosson, William; Wang, Shouping; Ramirez, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    This research is the MSFC component of a joint MSFC/Pennsylvania State University Eos Interdisciplinary Investigation on the global water cycle extension across the earth sciences. The primary long-term objective of this investigation is to determine the scope and interactions of the global water cycle with all components of the Earth system and to understand how it stimulates and regulates change on both global and regional scales. Significant accomplishments in the past year are presented and include the following: (1) water vapor variability; (2) multi-phase water analysis; (3) global modeling; and (4) optimal precipitation and stream flow analysis and hydrologic processes.

  16. Synthetic battery cycling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    Synthetic battery cycling makes use of the fast growing capability of computer graphics to illustrate some of the basic characteristics of operation of individual electrodes within an operating electrochemical cell. It can also simulate the operation of an entire string of cells that are used as the energy storage subsystem of a power system. The group of techniques that as a class have been referred to as Synthetic Battery Cycling is developed in part to try to bridge the gap of understanding that exists between single cell characteristics and battery system behavior.

  17. Cycles in fossil diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Robert A.; Muller, Richard A.

    2004-10-20

    It is well-known that the diversity of life appears to fluctuate during the course the Phanerozoic, the eon during which hard shells and skeletons left abundant fossils (0-542 Ma). Using Sepkoski's compendium of the first and last stratigraphic appearances of 36380 marine genera, we report a strong 62 {+-} 3 Myr cycle, which is particularly strong in the shorter-lived genera. The five great extinctions enumerated by Raup and Sepkoski may be an aspect of this cycle. Because of the high statistical significance, we also consider contributing environmental factors and possible causes.

  18. Ecdysteroids and Juvenile Hormones of Whiteflies, Important Insect Vectors for Plant Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecdysteroids and juvenile hormones (JHs) regulate many physiological events throughout the insect life cycle, including molting, metamorphosis, ecdysis, diapause, reproduction and behavior. Fluctuation of whitefly ecdysteroid levels and the identity of the whitefly molting hormone have only been re...

  19. Disengaging from Conflict Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Youth in pain often show self-defeating and destructive patterns of behavior which should be seen as calls for help and positive support. Instead, deep-seated brain programs and cultural beliefs about discipline can trigger angry or avoidant behavior by adults who deal with these young people. This brief introduction to the Conflict Cycle

  20. LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life cycle analysis, or LCA for short, is a term that has been used more and more over the past year to describe the cradle-to-grave environmental impacts of a product. he LCA is a way of looking at the environmental demands of a product holistically; that is, looking at,the reso...