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Sample records for cruzi circulante post-terapia

  1. Nucleologenesis in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Nepomuceno-Mejía, Tomás; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Hernández, Roberto; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Jiménez-García, Luis F

    2016-06-01

    Nucleolar assembly is a cellular event that requires the synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA, in addition to the participation of pre-nucleolar bodies (PNBs) at the end of mitosis. In mammals and plants, nucleolar biogenesis has been described in detail, but in unicellular eukaryotes it is a poorly understood process. In this study, we used light and electron microscopy cytochemical techniques to investigate the distribution of nucleolar components in the pathway of nucleolus rebuilding during closed cell division in epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of American trypanosomiasis. Silver impregnation specific for nucleolar organizer regions and an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid regressive procedure to preferentially stain ribonucleoprotein revealed the conservation and dispersion of nucleolar material throughout the nucleoplasm during cell division. Furthermore, at the end of mitosis, the argyrophilic proteins were concentrated in the nucleolar organizer region. Unexpectedly, accumulation of nucleolar material in the form of PNBs was not visualized. We suggest that formation of the nucleolus in epimastigotes of T. cruzi occurs by a process that does not require the concentration of nucleolar material within intermediate nuclear bodies such as mammalian and plant PNBs. PMID:27126372

  2. Clathrin expression in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clathrin-mediated vesicular trafficking, the mechanism by which proteins and lipids are transported between membrane-bound organelles, accounts for a large proportion of import from the plasma membrane (endocytosis) and transport from the trans-Golgi network towards the endosomal system. Clathrin-mediated events are still poorly understood in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. In this study, clathrin heavy (TcCHC) and light (TcCLC) chain gene expression and protein localization were investigated in different developmental forms of T. cruzi (epimastigotes, trypomastigotes and amastigotes), using both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies raised against T. cruzi recombinant proteins. Results Analysis by confocal microscopy revealed an accumulation of TcCHC and TcCLC at the cell anterior, where the flagellar pocket and Golgi complex are located. TcCLC partially colocalized with the Golgi marker TcRAB7-GFP and with ingested albumin, but did not colocalize with transferrin, a protein mostly ingested via uncoated vesicles at the cytostome/cytopharynx complex. Conclusion Clathrin heavy and light chains are expressed in T. cruzi. Both proteins typically localize anterior to the kinetoplast, at the flagellar pocket and Golgi complex region. Our data also indicate that in T. cruzi epimastigotes clathrin-mediated endocytosis of albumin occurs at the flagellar pocket, while clathrin-independent endocytosis of transferrin occurs at the cytostome/cytopharynx complex. PMID:24947310

  3. Endothelial Transmigration by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Bria M.; Sullivan, David P.; Makanji, Ming Y.; Du, Nga Y.; Olson, Cheryl L.; Muller, William A.; Engman, David M.; Epting, Conrad L.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas heart disease, the leading cause of heart failure in Latin America, results from infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Although T. cruzi disseminates intravascularly, how the parasite contends with the endothelial barrier to escape the bloodstream and infect tissues has not been described. Understanding the interaction between T. cruzi and the vascular endothelium, likely a key step in parasite dissemination, could inform future therapies to interrupt disease pathogenesis. We adapted systems useful in the study of leukocyte transmigration to investigate both the occurrence of parasite transmigration and its determinants in vitro. Here we provide the first evidence that T. cruzi can rapidly migrate across endothelial cells by a mechanism that is distinct from productive infection and does not disrupt monolayer integrity or alter permeability. Our results show that this process is facilitated by a known modulator of cellular infection and vascular permeability, bradykinin, and can be augmented by the chemokine CCL2. These represent novel findings in our understanding of parasite dissemination, and may help identify new therapeutic strategies to limit the dissemination of the parasite. PMID:24312535

  4. Differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi, T. cruzi marinkellei, T. dionisii and T. vespertilionis by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Petry, K; Baltz, T; Schottelius, J

    1986-03-01

    Anti-T. dionisii and anti-T. vespertilionis monoclonal antibodies secreted by 17 hybridoma clones were tested against various strains of T. dionisii, T. vespertilionis, T. cruzi and T. cruzi marinkellei. Strain and species specific antigens were detected for the homologous immunizing strains. The common antigenic determinants of the tested trypanosome species include a component of the flagellum and different cell structures. Seventeen T. cruzi strains could be classified into two groups when tested with anti-T. dionisii monoclonal antibodies. The cross reactions between T. dionisii and T. cruzi demonstrate a strong correlation between T. dionisii and T. cruzi group 2. On the other hand T. cruzi group 1 and T. cruzi marinkellei show very similar antigenic character. PMID:2424290

  5. Protein geranylgeranyltransferase-I of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Kohei; Gillespie, John R.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I (PGGT-I) and protein farnesyltransferase (PFT) occur in many eukaryotic cells. Both consist of two subunits, the common αsubunit and a distinct β subunit. In the gene database of protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, a putative protein that consists of 401 amino acids with ∼20% amino acid sequence identity to the PGGT-I β of other species was identified, cloned, and characterized. Multiple sequence alignments show that the T. cruzi ortholog contains all three of the zinc-binding residues and several residues uniquely conserved in the β subunit of PGGT-I. Co-expression of this protein and the α subunit of T. cruzi PFT in Sf9 insect cells yielded a dimeric protein that forms a tight complex selectively with [3H]geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, indicating a key characteristic of a functional PGGT-I. Recombinant T. cruzi PGGT-I ortholog showed geranylgeranyltransferase activity with distinct specificity toward the C-terminal CaaX motif of protein substrates compared to that of the mammalian PGGT-I and T. cruzi PFT. Most of the CaaX-containing proteins with X=Leu are good substrates of T. cruzi PGGT-I, and those with X=Met are substrates for both T. cruzi PFT and PGGT-I, whereas unlike mammalian PGGT-I, those with X=Phe are poor substrates for T. cruzi PGGT-I. Several candidates for T. cruzi PGGT-I or PFT substrates containing the C-terminal CaaX motif are found in the T. cruzi gene database. Among five C-terminal peptides of those tested, a peptide of a Ras-like protein ending with CVLL was selectively geranylgeranylated by T. cruzi PGGT-I. Other peptides with CTQQ (Tcj2 DNAJ protein), CAVM (TcPRL-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase), CHFM (a small GTPase like protein), and CQLF (TcRho1 GTPase) were specific substrates for T. cruzi PFT but not for PGGT-I. The mRNA and protein of the T. cruzi PGGT-I β ortholog were detected in three life-cycle stages of T. cruzi. Cytosol fractions from

  6. Autochthonous Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Perniciaro, Leon; Yabsley, Michael J.; Roellig, Dawn M.; Balsamo, Gary; Diaz, James; Wesson, Dawn

    2007-01-01

    Autochthonous transmission of the Chagas disease parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, was detected in a patient in rural New Orleans, Louisiana. The patient had positive test results from 2 serologic tests and hemoculture. Fifty-six percent of 18 Triatoma sanguisuga collected from the house of the patient were positive for T. cruzi by PCR. PMID:17553277

  7. Intermediary metabolism of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Urbina, J A

    1994-03-01

    In this article, Julio Urbino discusses the characteristics o f the intermediary metabolism of Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative agent of Chagas disease), which are responsible for the unusual capacity of this parasite to use carbohydrates or amino acids as carbon and energy sources without drastic changes in its catabolic enzyme levels(1-3). Many, but not all, o f the metabolic capabilities of this organism are shared with Leishmania and the procyclic form o f the African trypanosomes, and the reviewer presents a metabolic model which is also consistent with the information available on these other parasites(2,4). PMID:15275492

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi congenital transmission in wild bats.

    PubMed

    Añez, Néstor; Crisante, Gladys; Soriano, Pascual J

    2009-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi congenital transmission in wild bats (Molossus molossus), associated with infected Rhodnius prolixus in a natural habitat from a rural locality in western Venezuela, is reported. T. cruzi blood circulating trypomastigotes in a pregnant bat were detected by parasitological methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays carried out in samples from the heart and the fetus of the same infected female, revealed the presence of T. cruzi-specific DNA in both of the tissues, demonstrating transmission of the infection from the mother to the offspring. Eighty percent of the captured bats and 100% of the examined fetuses from pregnant specimens were shown to be infected by T. cruzi, indicating that M. molossus is a very susceptible species for this parasite, and that T. cruzi congenital transmission is a common phenomenon in nature. To our knowledge, this seems to be the first report on congenital T. cruzi transmission in wild bats in Venezuela. The circulation of T. cruzi lineage I in the study area was demonstrated by typing the isolates from bats and triatomine bugs captured in the same habitat. The potential epidemiological implication of these findings in areas where Chagas disease is endemic is discussed. PMID:18823929

  9. Unveiling the Trypanosoma cruzi Nuclear Proteome

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Júnior, Agenor de Castro Moreira; Kalume, Dário Eluan; Camargo, Ricardo; Gómez-Mendoza, Diana Paola; Correa, José Raimundo; Charneau, Sébastien; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; de Lima, Beatriz Dolabela; Ricart, Carlos André Ornelas

    2015-01-01

    Replication of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, displays peculiar features, such as absence of chromosome condensation and closed mitosis. Although previous proteome and subproteome analyses of T. cruzi have been carried out, the nuclear subproteome of this protozoan has not been described. Here, we report, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the isolation and proteome analysis of T. cruzi nuclear fraction. For that, T. cruzi epimastigote cells were lysed and subjected to cell fractionation using two steps of sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The purity of the nuclear fraction was confirmed by phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed the identification of 864 proteins. Among those, 272 proteins were annotated as putative uncharacterized, and 275 had not been previously reported on global T. cruzi proteome analysis. Additionally, to support our enrichment method, bioinformatics analysis in DAVID was carried out. It grouped the nuclear proteins in 65 gene clusters, wherein the clusters with the highest enrichment scores harbor members with chromatin organization and DNA binding functions. PMID:26383644

  10. Unveiling the Trypanosoma cruzi Nuclear Proteome.

    PubMed

    dos Santos Júnior, Agenor de Castro Moreira; Kalume, Dário Eluan; Camargo, Ricardo; Gómez-Mendoza, Diana Paola; Correa, José Raimundo; Charneau, Sébastien; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; de Lima, Beatriz Dolabela; Ricart, Carlos André Ornelas

    2015-01-01

    Replication of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, displays peculiar features, such as absence of chromosome condensation and closed mitosis. Although previous proteome and subproteome analyses of T. cruzi have been carried out, the nuclear subproteome of this protozoan has not been described. Here, we report, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the isolation and proteome analysis of T. cruzi nuclear fraction. For that, T. cruzi epimastigote cells were lysed and subjected to cell fractionation using two steps of sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The purity of the nuclear fraction was confirmed by phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed the identification of 864 proteins. Among those, 272 proteins were annotated as putative uncharacterized, and 275 had not been previously reported on global T. cruzi proteome analysis. Additionally, to support our enrichment method, bioinformatics analysis in DAVID was carried out. It grouped the nuclear proteins in 65 gene clusters, wherein the clusters with the highest enrichment scores harbor members with chromatin organization and DNA binding functions. PMID:26383644

  11. Biological characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi strains.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Díaz, R A; Escario, J A; Nogal-Ruiz, J J; Gómez-Barrio, A

    2001-01-01

    Biological parameters of five Trypanosoma cruzi strains from different sources were determined in order to know the laboratory behaviour of natural populations. The parameters evaluated were growth kinetics of epimastigotes, differentiation into metacyclic forms, infectivity in mammalian cells grown in vitro and parasite susceptibility to nifurtimox, benznidazole and gentian violet. Differences in transformation to metacyclic, in the percentage of infected cells as well as in the number of amastigotes per cell were observed among the strains. Regarding to pharmacological assays, Y strain was the most sensitive to the three assayed compounds. These data demonstrate the heterogeneity of natural populations of T. cruzi, the only responsible of infection in humans. PMID:11285475

  12. Susceptibility of radiation chimeras to Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Trischmann, T.M.

    1982-05-01

    Reciprocal bone marrow transfers were performed with C3H/HeJ mice, which are susceptible to infection with the Brazil strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, and resistant F1 (C3H/HeJ X C57BL/6J) mice. Mice reconstituted after lethal irradiation with syngeneic bone marrow displayed the resistance phenotype of the strain used, but neither C3H mice reconstituted with F1 bone marrow cells nor F1 mice reconstituted with C3H bone marrow cells survived challenge. Resistance to T. cruzi appears to be dependent upon factors associated both with host background and with bone marrow-derived cells.

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Neotropical Wild Carnivores (Mammalia: Carnivora): At the Top of the T. cruzi Transmission Chain

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Fabiana Lopes; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; de Lima, Juliane Saab; Cheida, Carolina Carvalho; Lemos, Frederico Gemesio; de Azevedo, Fernanda Cavalcanti; Arrais, Ricardo Corassa; Bilac, Daniele; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Mourão, Guilherme; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Little is known on the role played by Neotropical wild carnivores in the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycles. We investigated T. cruzi infection in wild carnivores from three sites in Brazil through parasitological and serological tests. The seven carnivore species examined were infected by T. cruzi, but high parasitemias detectable by hemoculture were found only in two Procyonidae species. Genotyping by Mini-exon gene, PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I) and kDNA genomic targets revealed that the raccoon (Procyon cancrivorus) harbored TcI and the coatis (Nasua nasua) harbored TcI, TcII, TcIII-IV and Trypanosoma rangeli, in single and mixed infections, besides four T. cruzi isolates that displayed odd band patterns in the Mini-exon assay. These findings corroborate the coati can be a bioaccumulator of T. cruzi Discrete Typing Units (DTU) and may act as a transmission hub, a connection point joining sylvatic transmission cycles within terrestrial and arboreal mammals and vectors. Also, the odd band patterns observed in coatis’ isolates reinforce that T. cruzi diversity might be much higher than currently acknowledged. Additionally, we assembled our data with T. cruzi infection on Neotropical carnivores’ literature records to provide a comprehensive analysis of the infection patterns among distinct carnivore species, especially considering their ecological traits and phylogeny. Altogether, fifteen Neotropical carnivore species were found naturally infected by T. cruzi. Species diet was associated with T. cruzi infection rates, supporting the hypothesis that predator-prey links are important mechanisms for T. cruzi maintenance and dispersion in the wild. Distinct T. cruzi infection patterns across carnivore species and study sites were notable. Musteloidea species consistently exhibit high parasitemias in different studies which indicate their high infectivity potential. Mesocarnivores that feed on both invertebrates and mammals, including the coati, a host that can be

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi screening in Texas blood donors, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M N; Woc-Colburn, L; Rossmann, S N; Townsend, R L; Stramer, S L; Bravo, M; Kamel, H; Beddard, R; Townsend, M; Oldham, R; Bottazzi, M E; Hotez, P J; Murray, K O

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease is an important emerging disease in Texas that results in cardiomyopathy in about 30% of those infected with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Between the years 2008 and 2012, about 1/6500 blood donors were T. cruzi antibody-confirmed positive. We found older persons and minority populations, particularly Hispanic, at highest risk for screening positive for T. cruzi antibodies during routine blood donation. Zip code analysis determined that T. cruzi is associated with poverty. Chagas disease has a significant disease burden and is a cause of substantial economic losses in Texas. PMID:25170765

  15. The N-myristoylome of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Adam J; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Protein N-myristoylation is catalysed by N-myristoyltransferase (NMT), an essential and druggable target in Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. Here we have employed whole cell labelling with azidomyristic acid and click chemistry to identify N-myristoylated proteins in different life cycle stages of the parasite. Only minor differences in fluorescent-labelling were observed between the dividing forms (the insect epimastigote and mammalian amastigote stages) and the non-dividing trypomastigote stage. Using a combination of label-free and stable isotope labelling of cells in culture (SILAC) based proteomic strategies in the presence and absence of the NMT inhibitor DDD85646, we identified 56 proteins enriched in at least two out of the three experimental approaches. Of these, 6 were likely to be false positives, with the remaining 50 commencing with amino acids MG at the N-terminus in one or more of the T. cruzi genomes. Most of these are proteins of unknown function (32), with the remainder (18) implicated in a diverse range of critical cellular and metabolic functions such as intracellular transport, cell signalling and protein turnover. In summary, we have established that 0.43-0.46% of the proteome is N-myristoylated in T. cruzi approaching that of other eukaryotic organisms (0.5-1.7%). PMID:27492267

  16. The N-myristoylome of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Adam J.; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    Protein N-myristoylation is catalysed by N-myristoyltransferase (NMT), an essential and druggable target in Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. Here we have employed whole cell labelling with azidomyristic acid and click chemistry to identify N-myristoylated proteins in different life cycle stages of the parasite. Only minor differences in fluorescent-labelling were observed between the dividing forms (the insect epimastigote and mammalian amastigote stages) and the non-dividing trypomastigote stage. Using a combination of label-free and stable isotope labelling of cells in culture (SILAC) based proteomic strategies in the presence and absence of the NMT inhibitor DDD85646, we identified 56 proteins enriched in at least two out of the three experimental approaches. Of these, 6 were likely to be false positives, with the remaining 50 commencing with amino acids MG at the N-terminus in one or more of the T. cruzi genomes. Most of these are proteins of unknown function (32), with the remainder (18) implicated in a diverse range of critical cellular and metabolic functions such as intracellular transport, cell signalling and protein turnover. In summary, we have established that 0.43–0.46% of the proteome is N-myristoylated in T. cruzi approaching that of other eukaryotic organisms (0.5–1.7%). PMID:27492267

  17. Shelter Dogs as Sentinels for Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission across Texas

    PubMed Central

    Tenney, Trevor D.; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Snowden, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, an infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is increasingly diagnosed among humans in the southern United States. We assessed exposure of shelter dogs in Texas to T. cruzi; seroprevalence across diverse ecoregions was 8.8%. Canine serosurveillance is a useful tool for public health risk assessment. PMID:25062281

  18. Human and sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection in California.

    PubMed Central

    Navin, T R; Roberto, R R; Juranek, D D; Limpakarnjanarat, K; Mortenson, E W; Clover, J R; Yescott, R E; Taclindo, C; Steurer, F; Allain, D

    1985-01-01

    In August 1982, a 56-year-old woman from Lake Don Pedro, California, developed acute Chagas' disease (American trypanosomiasis). She had not traveled to areas outside the United States with endemic Chagas' disease, she had never received blood transfusions, and she did not use intravenous drugs. Trypanosoma cruzi cultured from the patient's blood had isoenzyme patterns and growth characteristics similar to T. cruzi belonging to zymodeme Z1. Triatoma protracta (a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi) infected with T. cruzi were found near the patient's home, a trypanosome resembling T. cruzi was cultured from the blood of two of 19 ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi), and six of 10 dogs had antibody to T. cruzi. A serosurvey of three groups of California residents revealed antibody to T. cruzi by complement fixation in six of 237 (2.5 per cent) individuals living near the patient and in 12 of 1,706 (0.7 per cent) individuals living in a community 20 miles northeast of the patient's home, but in only one of 637 (0.2 per cent) blood donors from the San Francisco Bay area. This is the first case of indigenously acquired Chagas' disease reported from California and the first case recognized in the United States since 1955. This investigation suggests that transmission of sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection to humans occurs in California but that Chagas' disease in humans is rare. PMID:3919598

  19. How Trypanosoma cruzi feasts upon its mammalian host.

    PubMed

    Carter, Nicola S; Ullman, Buddy

    2013-01-16

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex relationship with its mammalian host in which parasite and host metabolic networks are intertwined. A genome-wide functional screen of T. cruzi infection in HeLa cells (Caradonna et al., 2013) divulges host metabolic functions and signaling pathways that impact intracellular parasite replication and reveals potential targets for therapeutic exploitation. PMID:23332151

  20. Shelter dogs as sentinels for Trypanosoma cruzi transmission across Texas.

    PubMed

    Tenney, Trevor D; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Snowden, Karen F; Hamer, Sarah A

    2014-08-01

    Chagas disease, an infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is increasingly diagnosed among humans in the southern United States. We assessed exposure of shelter dogs in Texas to T. cruzi; seroprevalence across diverse ecoregions was 8.8%. Canine serosurveillance is a useful tool for public health risk assessment. PMID:25062281

  1. Human Trypanosoma cruzi Infection and Seropositivity in Dogs, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Franco, Jose G.; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Diaz-Albiter, Hector; Ochoa-Garcia, Laucel; Barbabosa, Alberto; Vazquez-Chagoyan, Juan C.; Martinez-Perez, Miguel A.; Guzman-Bracho, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    We used 5 diagnostic tests in a cross-sectional investigation of the prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in Tejupilco municipality, State of Mexico, Mexico. Our findings showed a substantial prevalence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies to T. cruzi in human (n = 293, IgG 2.05%, IgM 5.5%, both 7.1%) and dog (n = 114, IgG 15.8%, IgM 11.4%, both 21%) populations. We also found antibodies to T. cruzi (n = 80, IgG 10%, IgM 15%, both 17.5%) in dogs from Toluca, an area previously considered free of T. cruzi. Our data demonstrate the need for active epidemiologic surveillance programs in these regions. A direct correlation (r2 = 0.955) of seropositivity between humans and dogs suggests that seroanalysis in dogs may help identify the human prevalence of T. cruzi infection in these areas. PMID:16704811

  2. Desaturation of fatty acids in Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    de Lema, M.G.; Aeberhard, E.E.

    1986-11-01

    Uptake and metabolism of saturated (16:0, 18:0) and unsaturated (18:1(n-9), 18:2(n-6), 18:3(n-3)) fatty acids by cultured epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi were studied. Between 17.5 and 33.5% of the total radioactivity of (1-/sup 14/C)labeled fatty acids initially added to the culture medium was incorporated into the lipids of T. cruzi and mostly choline and ethanolamine phospholipids. As demonstrated by argentation thin layer chromatography, gas liquid chromatography and ozonolysis of the fatty acids synthesized, exogenous palmitic acid was elongated to stearic acid, and the latter was desaturated to oleic acid and 18:2 fatty acid. The 18:2 fatty acid was tentatively identified as linoleic acid with the first bond in the delta 9 position and the second bond toward the terminal methyl end. Exogenous stearic acid was also desaturated to oleic and 18:2 fatty acid, while oleic acid was only converted into 18:2. All of the saturated and unsaturated fatty acids investigated were also converted to a small extent (2-4%) into polyunsaturated fatty acids. No radioactive aldehyde methyl ester fragments of less than nine carbon atoms were detected after ozonolysis of any of the fatty acids studied. These results demonstrate the existence of delta 9 and either delta 12 or delta 15 desaturases, or both, in T. cruzi and suggest that delta 6 desaturase or other desaturases of the animal type are likely absent in cultured forms of this organism.

  3. Occurrence of Trypanosoma cruzi in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Bruce, J.I., Jr.

    1962-01-01

    During 1954-1960, 2005 mammals of 18 species collected at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Maryland, were examined for trypanosomes. T. cruzi was found in 10 raccoons between October 31 and November 30. Infection occurred in 2 percent of all raccoons sampled, and in 11.3 percent of the 80 raccoons sampled in November. Examination was by direct smears, stained smears and cultures of heart blood. Although, in previous studies, at least two experimentally infected raccoons exhibited extended parasitemia (14 and 8 weeks), no such continuing parasitemia was observed in the natural infections. No trypanosomes were found in any of the other mammals examined.

  4. Genomic variation of Trypanosoma cruzi: involvement of multicopy genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, W; So, M

    1990-01-01

    By using improved pulsed field gel conditions, the karyotypes of several strains of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi were analyzed and compared with those of Leishmania major and two other members of the genus Trypanosoma. There was no difference in chromosome migration patterns between different life cycle stages of the T. cruzi strains analyzed. However, the sizes and numbers of chromosomal bands varied considerably among T. cruzi strains. This karyotype variation among T. cruzi strains was analyzed further at the chromosomal level by using multicopy genes as probes in Southern hybridizations. The chromosomal location of the genes encoding alpha- and beta-tubulin, ubiquitin, rRNA, spliced leader RNA, and an 85-kilodalton protein remained stable during developmental conversion of the parasite. The sizes and numbers of chromosomes containing these sequences varied among the different strains analyzed, implying multiple rearrangements of these genes during evolution of the parasites. During continuous in vitro cultivation of T. cruzi Y, the chromosomal location of the spliced leader gene shifted spontaneously. The spliced leader gene encodes a 35-nucleotide RNA that is spliced in trans from a 105-nucleotide donor RNA onto all mRNAs in T. cruzi. The spliced leader sequences changed in their physical location in both the cloned and uncloned Y strains. Associated with the complex changes was an increase in the infectivity of the rearranged variant for tissue culture cells. Our results indicate that the spliced leader gene clusters in T. cruzi undergo high-frequency genomic rearrangements. Images PMID:2169461

  5. Interferon-Gamma Promotes Infection of Astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Mariante, Rafael M.; Silva, Andrea Alice; dos Santos, Ana Luiza Barbosa; Roffê, Ester; Santiago, Helton; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS) and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO). Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD. PMID:25695249

  6. Interferon-gamma promotes infection of astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Mariante, Rafael M; Silva, Andrea Alice; dos Santos, Ana Luiza Barbosa; Roffê, Ester; Santiago, Helton; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS) and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO). Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD. PMID:25695249

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J.; Montgomery, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century. PMID:21976603

  8. Serologic survey of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi in coyotes and red foxes from Pennsylvania and Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Smith, Trynecia; Alexander, Andrew; Weaver, Melanie; Stewart, Richard; Houston, Allan; Gerhold, Richard; Van Why, Kyle; Dubey, Jitender P

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a zoonotic parasite of humans and other mammalian hosts with distribution throughout the Americas. Domestic and wild canine species are reservoirs for human T. cruzi infections. The present study examined the prevalence of antibodies to T. cruzi in wild canids from the United States. Sera from 13 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and 263 coyotes (Canis latrans), originating in Pennsylvania and Tennessee, were assayed for antibodies to T. cruzi with immunochromatographic tests. Antibodies to T. cruzi were found in 2 of 276 (0.72%) of all wild canids tested. Both T. cruzi-positive wild canids were coyotes and represented 2 of 21 (9.52%) wild canids assayed from Tennessee. Antibodies to T. cruzi were not detected in red fox. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies were not found in any wild canids from Pennsylvania. These results suggest that coyotes are exposed to T. cruzi in Tennessee but not in Pennsylvania. PMID:25632700

  9. Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi by Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Márquez, María Elizabeth; Concepción, Juan Luis; González-Marcano, Eglys; Mondolfi, Alberto Paniz

    2016-01-01

    American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) is an infectious disease caused by the hemoflagellate parasite Trypanosoma cruzi which is transmitted by reduviid bugs. T. cruzi infection occurs in a broad spectrum of reservoir animals throughout North, Central, and South America and usually evolves into an asymptomatic chronic clinical stage of the disease in which diagnosis is often challenging. This chapter describes the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA including protocols for sample preparation, DNA extraction, and target amplification methods. PMID:26843052

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of human infective Trypanosoma cruzi lineages with the bat-restricted subspecies T. cruzi marinkellei

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei is a bat-associated parasite of the subgenus Schizotrypanum and it is regarded as a T. cruzi subspecies. Here we report a draft genome sequence of T. c. marinkellei and comparison with T. c. cruzi. Our aims were to identify unique sequences and genomic features, which may relate to their distinct niches. Results The T. c. marinkellei genome was found to be ~11% smaller than that of the human-derived parasite T. c. cruzi Sylvio X10. The genome size difference was attributed to copy number variation of coding and non-coding sequences. The sequence divergence in coding regions was ~7.5% between T. c. marinkellei and T. c. cruzi Sylvio X10. A unique acetyltransferase gene was identified in T. c. marinkellei, representing an example of a horizontal gene transfer from eukaryote to eukaryote. Six of eight examined gene families were expanded in T. c. cruzi Sylvio X10. The DGF gene family was expanded in T. c. marinkellei. T. c. cruzi Sylvio X10 contained ~1.5 fold more sequences related to VIPER and L1Tc elements. Experimental infections of mammalian cell lines indicated that T. c. marinkellei has the capacity to invade non-bat cells and undergo intracellular replication. Conclusions Several unique sequences were identified in the comparison, including a potential subspecies-specific gene acquisition in T. c. marinkellei. The identified differences reflect the distinct evolutionary trajectories of these parasites and represent targets for functional investigation. PMID:23035642

  11. Subcellular proteomics of Trypanosoma cruzi reservosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Celso; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Pereira, Miria G.; Lourenço, Daniela; de Souza, Wanderley; Almeida, Igor C.; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa L.

    2009-01-01

    Reservosomes are the endpoint of the endocytic pathway in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. These organelles have the particular ability to concentrate proteins and lipids obtained from medium together with the main proteolytic enzymes originated from the secretory pathway, being at the same time a storage organelle and the main site of protein degradation. Subcellular proteomics have been extensively used for profiling organelles in different cell types. Here, we combine cell fractionation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis to identify reservosome-resident proteins. Starting from a purified reservosome fraction, we established a protocol to isolate reservosome membranes. Transmission electron microscopy was applied to confirm the purity of the fractions. To achieve a better coverage of identified proteins we analyzed the fractions separately and combined the results. LC-MS/MS analysis identified in total 709 T. cruzi-specific proteins; of these, 456 had predicted function and 253 were classified as hypothetical proteins. We could confirm the presence of most of the proteins validated by previous work and identify new proteins from different classes such as enzymes, proton pumps, transport proteins and others. The definition of the reservosome protein profile is a good tool to assess their molecular signature, identify molecular markers, and understand their relationship with different organelles. PMID:19288526

  12. Contemporary cryptic sexuality in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Juan David; Guhl, Felipe; Messenger, Louisa A; Lewis, Michael D; Montilla, Marleny; Cucunuba, Zulma; Miles, Michael A; Llewellyn, Martin S

    2012-09-01

    Clonal propagation is considered to be the predominant mode of reproduction among many parasitic protozoa. However, this assumption may overlook unorthodox, infrequent or cryptic sexuality. Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas disease, is known to undergo non-Mendelian genetic exchange in the laboratory. In the field, evidence of extant genetic exchange is limited. In this study, we undertook intensive sampling of T. cruzi Discrete Typing Unit I in endemic eastern Colombia. Using Fluorescence-activated cell sorting, we generated 269 biological clones from 67 strains. Each clone was genotyped across 24 microsatellite loci. Subsequently, 100 representative clones were typed using 10 mitochondrial sequence targets (3.76 Kbp total). Clonal diversity among humans, reservoir hosts and vectors suggested complex patterns of superinfection and/or coinfection in oral and vector-borne Chagas disease cases. Clonal diversity between mother and foetus in a congenital case demonstrates that domestic TcI genotypes are infective in utero. Importantly, gross incongruence between nuclear and mitochondrial markers is strong evidence for widespread genetic exchange throughout the data set. Furthermore, a confirmed mosaic maxicircle sequence suggests intermolecular recombination between individuals as a further mechanism of genetic reassortment. Finally, robust dating based on mitochondrial DNA indicates that the emergence of a widespread domestic TcI clade that we now name TcI(DOM) (formerly TcIa/VEN(Dom)) occurred 23 000 ± 12 000 years ago and was followed by population expansion, broadly corresponding with the earliest human migration into the Americas. PMID:22774844

  13. The Uptake of GABA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Galvez Rojas, Robert L; Ahn, Il-Young; Suárez Mantilla, Brian; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pral, Elizabeth Mieko Furusho; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is widely known as a neurotransmitter and signal transduction molecule found in vertebrates, plants, and some protozoan organisms. However, the presence of GABA and its role in trypanosomatids is unknown. Here, we report the presence of intracellular GABA and the biochemical characterization of its uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Kinetic parameters indicated that GABA is taken up by a single transport system in pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms. Temperature dependence assays showed a profile similar to glutamate transport, but the effect of extracellular cations Na(+) , K(+) , and H(+) on GABA uptake differed, suggesting a different uptake mechanism. In contrast to reports for other amino acid transporters in T. cruzi, GABA uptake was Na(+) dependent and increased with pH, with a maximum activity at pH 8.5. The sensitivity to oligomycin showed that GABA uptake is dependent on ATP synthesis. These data point to a secondary active Na(+) /GABA symporter energized by Na(+) -exporting ATPase. Finally, we show that GABA occurs in the parasite's cytoplasm under normal culture conditions, indicating that it is regularly taken up from the culture medium or synthesized through an still undescribed metabolic pathway. PMID:25851259

  14. Phosphatidylinositol kinase activities in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Alba Marina; Gesumaría, María Celeste; Schoijet, Alejandra C; Alonso, Guillermo D; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Racagni, Graciela E; Machado, Estela E

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) metabolism through phosphatidylinositol kinase (PIKs) activities plays a central role in different signaling pathways. In Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, PIKs have been proposed as target for drug design in order to combat this pathogen. In this work, we studied the classes of PI4K, PIPK and PI3K that could participate in signaling pathways in T. cruzi epimastigote forms. For this reason, we analyzed their enzymatic parameters and detailed responses to avowed kinase inhibitors (adenosine, sodium deoxycholate, wortmannin and LY294002) and activators (Ca(2+), phosphatidic acid, spermine and heparin). Our results suggest the presence and activity of a class III PI4K, a class I PIPK, a class III PI3K previously described (TcVps34) and a class I PI3K. Class I PI3K enzyme, here named TcPI3K, was cloned and expressed in a bacterial system, and their product was tested for kinase activity. The possible participation of TcPI3K in central cellular events of the parasite is also discussed. PMID:26493613

  15. Immunopathological Aspects of Experimental Trypanosoma cruzi Reinfections

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Borges, Diego Costa; da Silva, Crislaine Aparecida; Ramirez, Luis Eduardo; dos Reis, Marlene Antônia; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Rodrigues, Denise Bertulucci Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Besides the host-related factors, such as immune response and genetic background, the parasite, strain, and occurrences of reinfection episodes, may influence disease outcome. Our results demonstrate that both the primary infection and the reinfection with the Colombiana strain are connected with lower survival rate of the mice. After reinfection, parasitaemia is approximately ten times lower than in primary infected animals. Only Colombiana, Colombiana/Colombiana, and Y/Colombiana groups presented amastigote nests in cardiac tissue. Moreover, the mice infected and/or reinfected with the Colombiana strain had more T. cruzi nests, more intense inflammatory infiltrate, and higher in situ expression of TNF-α and IFN-γ than Y strain. Antigen-stimulated spleen cells from infected and/or reinfected animals produced higher levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-10. Our results reinforce the idea that Chagas disease outcome is influenced by the strain of the infective parasite, being differentially modulated during reinfection episodes. It highlights the need of control strategies involving parasite strain characterization in endemic areas for Chagas disease. PMID:25050370

  16. Sarcocystis cruzi infection in wood bison (Bison bison athabascae).

    PubMed

    Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Verma, Shiv K; Seaton, C Tom; Sinnett, David; Ball, Erin; Dunams, Detiger; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dubey, Jitender P

    2015-05-30

    Endangered wood bison (Bison bison athabascae) is the largest terrestrial mammal in the American continent. Animal health is an important issue in their conservation, and Sarcocystis cruzi may be a cause of clinical disease in Bovidae. Hearts of eight wood bison from Alaska, USA were examined for sarcocysts by histology, transmission electron microscopy, pepsin digestion, and molecularly. Sarcocystis bradyzoites were found in pepsin digests of all eight and sarcocysts were found in histologic sections of myocardium of four bison. Sarcocysts were thin-walled and ultrastructurally consistent with S. cruzi. Characterization of DNA obtained from lysis of pepsin liberated bradyzoites by PCR-RFLP and subsequent phylogenetic analyses matched with that previously reported for S. cruzi infecting cattle in the USA. Collectively, data indicate that wood bison is a natural intermediate host for S. cruzi. PMID:25868849

  17. The evolution of Trypanosoma cruzi: the 'bat seeding' hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Patrick B; Teixeira, Marta M G; Stevens, Jamie R

    2012-04-01

    Recent discussions on the evolution of Trypanosoma cruzi have been dominated by the southern super-continent hypothesis, whereby T. cruzi and related parasites evolved in isolation in the mammals of South America, Antarctica and Australia. Here, we consider recent molecular evidence suggesting that T. cruzi evolved from within a broader clade of bat trypanosomes, and that bat trypanosomes have successfully made the switch into other mammalian hosts in both the New and Old Worlds. Accordingly, we propose an alternative hypothesis--the bat seeding hypothesis--whereby lineages of bat trypanosomes have switched into terrestrial mammals, thereby seeding the terrestrial lineages within the clade. One key implication of this finding is that T. cruzi may have evolved considerably more recently than previously envisaged. PMID:22365905

  18. Host metabolism regulates intracellular growth of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Kacey L; Engel, Juan C; Jacobi, David; Lee, Chih-Hao; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2013-01-16

    Metabolic coupling of intracellular pathogens with host cells is essential for successful colonization of the host. Establishment of intracellular infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi leads to the development of human Chagas' disease, yet the functional contributions of the host cell toward the infection process remain poorly characterized. Here, a genome-scale functional screen identified interconnected metabolic networks centered around host energy production, nucleotide metabolism, pteridine biosynthesis, and fatty acid oxidation as key processes that fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Additionally, the host kinase Akt, which plays essential roles in various cellular processes, was critical for parasite replication. Targeted perturbations in these host metabolic pathways or Akt-dependent signaling pathways modulated the parasite's replicative capacity, highlighting the adaptability of this intracellular pathogen to changing conditions in the host. These findings identify key cellular process regulating intracellular T. cruzi growth and illuminate the potential to leverage host pathways to limit T. cruzi infection. PMID:23332160

  19. Host metabolism regulates intracellular growth of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Kacey L.; Engel, Juan C.; Jacobi, David; Lee, Chih-Hao; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Metabolic coupling of intracellular pathogens with host cells is essential for successful colonization of the host. Establishment of intracellular infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi leads to the development of human Chagas disease, yet the functional contributions of the host cell toward the infection process remain poorly characterized. Here, a genome-scale functional screen identified interconnected metabolic networks centered around host energy production, nucleotide metabolism, pteridine biosynthesis, and fatty acid oxidation as key processes that fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Additionally, the host kinase Akt, which plays essential roles in various cellular processes, was critical for parasite replication. Targeted perturbations in these host metabolic pathways or Akt-dependent signaling pathways modulated the parasite’s replicative capacity, highlighting the adaptability of this intracellular pathogen to changing conditions in the host. These findings identify key cellular process regulating intracellular T. cruzi growth and illuminate the potential to leverage host pathways to limit T. cruzi infection. PMID:23332160

  20. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) as vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Renzo; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Tustin, Aaron W; Borrini-Mayorí, Katty; Náquira, César; Levy, Michael Z

    2015-02-01

    Populations of the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, have recently undergone explosive growth. Bed bugs share many important traits with triatomine insects, but it remains unclear whether these similarities include the ability to transmit Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Here, we show efficient and bidirectional transmission of T. cruzi between hosts and bed bugs in a laboratory environment. Most bed bugs that fed on experimentally infected mice acquired the parasite. A majority of previously uninfected mice became infected after a period of cohabitation with exposed bed bugs. T. cruzi was also transmitted to mice after the feces of infected bed bugs were applied directly to broken host skin. Quantitative bed bug defecation measures were similar to those of important triatomine vectors. Our findings suggest that the common bed bug may be a competent vector of T. cruzi and could pose a risk for vector-borne transmission of Chagas disease. PMID:25404068

  1. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  2. Preparation and applicability of Sarcocystis cruzi antigens and their anti-S. cruzi rabbit sera for serodiagnosis of bovine sarcocystosis.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Ohuchi, Y; Kobayashi, M; Haritani, M; Itagaki, H

    1994-06-01

    Sarcocystis cruzi antigens and their antisera were prepared for the seroimmunological diagnosis of bovine sarcocystosis. Fresh S. cruzi cysts directly removed from cardial muscle of slaughtered cattle were digested with trypsin to release bradyzoites. By twelve cycles of freezing at-22 degrees C and thawing at 37 degrees C, bradyzoites were let to leach out soluble material. The soluble antigens were inoculated four times to rabbits at a dose of 343 micrograms protein and anti-S. cruzi sera were prepared with blood of the rabbits. Gel immunodiffusion test showed no cross-reaction between the present antigens and any of anti-Toxoplasma gondii, -Hammondia hammondi and -Besnoitia wallacei rabbit sera. Avidin-biotin complex immunoperoxidase (ABC) technique with the present anti-S. curzi rabbit sera showed clear positive reaction against S. cruzi cysts in the muscular sections of infected cattle. PMID:7948400

  3. [Placental lesions in human Trypanosoma cruzi infection].

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Aguilar, Sergio; Lambot, Maria-Alexandra; Torrico, Faustino; Alonso-Vega, Cristina; Córdoba, Marysol; Suarez, Eduardo; Noël, Jean-Christophe; Carlier, Yves

    2005-01-01

    This histopathological study analyzes placentas of babies congenitally infected with T. cruzi (M+B+), or babies not infected but born from infected- (M+B-), or non infected-mothers (M-B-). Placentas M+B+ showed lesions of chorionitis, chorioamnionitis and cord edema with lymphocyte infiltration, whereas such lesions were infiltrated only with polymorphonuclear cells in M+B- and M-B- placentas. Parasites were found in M+B+ placentas, in fibroblasts and macrophages of chorion, membranes, chorionic plate, mainly in the area of membrane insertion, as well as in cells of Wharton jelly and myocytes of umbilical cord vessels. These results suggest that the materno-fetal transmission of parasites occurs mainly through the marginal sinus, spreading into the chorionic plate infecting fibroblasts and macrophages so far as to found a fetal vessel, inducing a fetal infection by hematogenous route. PMID:16482822

  4. Type I interferons increase host susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Chessler, Anne-Danielle C; Caradonna, Kacey L; Da'dara, Akram; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2011-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes human Chagas' disease, induces a type I interferon (IFN) (IFN-α/β) response during acute experimental infection in mice and in isolated primary cell types. To examine the potential impact of the type I IFN response in shaping outcomes in experimental T. cruzi infection, groups of wild-type (WT) and type I IFN receptor-deficient (IFNAR(-/-)) 129sv/ev mice were infected with two different T. cruzi strains under lethal and sublethal conditions and several parameters were measured during the acute stage of infection. The results demonstrate that type I IFNs are not required for early host protection against T. cruzi. In contrast, under conditions of lethal T. cruzi challenge, WT mice succumbed to infection whereas IFNAR(-/-) mice were ultimately able to control parasite growth and survive. T. cruzi clearance in and survival of IFNAR(-/-) mice were accompanied by higher levels of IFN-γ production by isolated splenocytes in response to parasite antigen. The suppression of IFN-γ in splenocytes from WT mice was independent of IL-10 levels. While the impact of type I IFNs on the production of IFN-γ and other cytokines/chemokines remains to be fully determined in the context of T. cruzi infection, our data suggest that, under conditions of high parasite burden, type I IFNs negatively impact IFN-γ production, initiating a detrimental cycle that contributes to the ultimate failure to control infection. These findings are consistent with a growing theme in the microbial pathogenesis field in which type I IFNs can be detrimental to the host in a variety of nonviral pathogen infection models. PMID:21402764

  5. Transcriptional and phenotypical heterogeneity of Trypanosoma cruzi cell populations.

    PubMed

    Seco-Hidalgo, Víctor; De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Osuna, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex life cycle comprising pools of cell populations which circulate among humans, vectors, sylvatic reservoirs and domestic animals. Recent experimental evidence has demonstrated the importance of clonal variations for parasite population dynamics, survival and evolution. By limiting dilution assays, we have isolated seven isogenic clonal cell lines derived from the Pan4 strain of T. cruzi. Applying different molecular techniques, we have been able to provide a comprehensive characterization of the expression heterogeneity in the mucin-associated surface protein (MASP) gene family, where all the clonal isogenic populations were transcriptionally different. Hierarchical cluster analysis and sequence comparison among different MASP cDNA libraries showed that, despite the great variability in MASP expression, some members of the transcriptome (including MASP pseudogenes) are conserved, not only in the life-cycle stages but also among different strains of T. cruzi. Finally, other important aspects for the parasite, such as growth, spontaneous metacyclogenesis or excretion of different catabolites, were also compared among the clones, demonstrating that T. cruzi populations of cells are also phenotypically heterogeneous. Although the evolutionary strategy that sustains the MASP expression polymorphism remains unknown, we suggest that MASP clonal variability and phenotypic heterogeneities found in this study might provide an advantage, allowing a rapid response to environmental pressure or changes during the life cycle of T. cruzi. PMID:26674416

  6. Mechanisms of host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Kacey L; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    One of the more accepted concepts in our understanding of the biology of early Trypanosoma cruzi-host cell interactions is that the mammalian-infective trypomastigote forms of the parasite must transit the host cell lysosomal compartment in order to establish a productive intracellular infection. The acidic environment of the lysosome provides the appropriate conditions for parasite-mediated disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and release of T. cruzi into the host cell cytosol, where replication of intracellular amastigotes occurs. Recent findings indicate a level of redundancy in the lysosome-targeting process where T. cruzi trypomastigotes exploit different cellular pathways to access host cell lysosomes in non-professional phagocytic cells. In addition, the reversible nature of the host cell penetration process was recently demonstrated when conditions for fusion of the nascent parasite vacuole with the host endosomal-lysosomal system were not met. Thus, the concept of parasite retention as a critical component of the T. cruzi invasion process was introduced. Although it is clear that host cell recognition, attachment and signalling are required to initiate invasion, integration of this knowledge with our understanding of the different routes of parasite entry is largely lacking. In this chapter, we focus on current knowledge of the cellular pathways exploited by T. cruzi trypomastigotes to invade non-professional phagocytic cells and to gain access to the host cell lysosome compartment. PMID:21884886

  7. Identification of the nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Niño, Carlos H; Forero-Baena, Nicolás; Contreras, Luis E; Sánchez-Lancheros, Diana; Figarella, Katherine; Ramírez, María H

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, a public health concern with an increasing incidence rate. This increase is due, among other reasons, to the parasite's drug resistance mechanisms, which require nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Furthermore, this molecule is involved in metabolic and intracellular signalling processes necessary for the survival of T. cruzi throughout its life cycle. NAD+ biosynthesis is performed by de novo and salvage pathways, which converge on the step that is catalysed by the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT) (enzyme commission number: 2.7.7.1). The identification of the NMNAT of T. cruzi is important for the development of future therapeutic strategies to treat Chagas disease. In this study, a hypothetical open reading frame (ORF) for NMNAT was identified in the genome of T. cruzi. The corresponding putative protein was analysed by simulating structural models. The ORF was amplified from genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction and was further used for the construction of a corresponding recombinant expression vector. The expressed recombinant protein was partially purified and its activity was evaluated using enzymatic assays. These results comprise the first identification of an NMNAT in T. cruzi using bioinformatics and experimental tools and hence represent the first step to understanding NAD+ metabolism in these parasites. PMID:26560979

  8. Transcriptional and phenotypical heterogeneity of Trypanosoma cruzi cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Seco-Hidalgo, Víctor; De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Osuna, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex life cycle comprising pools of cell populations which circulate among humans, vectors, sylvatic reservoirs and domestic animals. Recent experimental evidence has demonstrated the importance of clonal variations for parasite population dynamics, survival and evolution. By limiting dilution assays, we have isolated seven isogenic clonal cell lines derived from the Pan4 strain of T. cruzi. Applying different molecular techniques, we have been able to provide a comprehensive characterization of the expression heterogeneity in the mucin-associated surface protein (MASP) gene family, where all the clonal isogenic populations were transcriptionally different. Hierarchical cluster analysis and sequence comparison among different MASP cDNA libraries showed that, despite the great variability in MASP expression, some members of the transcriptome (including MASP pseudogenes) are conserved, not only in the life-cycle stages but also among different strains of T. cruzi. Finally, other important aspects for the parasite, such as growth, spontaneous metacyclogenesis or excretion of different catabolites, were also compared among the clones, demonstrating that T. cruzi populations of cells are also phenotypically heterogeneous. Although the evolutionary strategy that sustains the MASP expression polymorphism remains unknown, we suggest that MASP clonal variability and phenotypic heterogeneities found in this study might provide an advantage, allowing a rapid response to environmental pressure or changes during the life cycle of T. cruzi. PMID:26674416

  9. Infection of Kissing Bugs with Trypanosoma cruzi, Tucson, Arizona, USA

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Gena; Guerenstein, Pablo G.; Gregory, Teresa; Dotson, Ellen; Hildebrand, John G.

    2010-01-01

    Triatomine insects (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), commonly known as kissing bugs, are a potential health problem in the southwestern United States as possible vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Although this disease has been traditionally restricted to Latin America, a small number of vector-transmitted autochthonous US cases have been reported. Because triatomine bugs and infected mammalian reservoirs are plentiful in southern Arizona, we collected triatomines inside or around human houses in Tucson and analyzed the insects using molecular techniques to determine whether they were infected with T. cruzi. We found that 41.5% of collected bugs (n = 164) were infected with T. cruzi, and that 63% of the collection sites (n = 22) yielded >1 infected specimens. Although many factors may contribute to the lack of reported cases in Arizona, these results indicate that the risk for infection in this region may be higher than previously thought. PMID:20202413

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi invasion is associated with trogocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shankar; Mukhopadhyay, Aparna; Andriani, Grasiella; Machado, Fabiana Simño; Ashton, Anthony W.; Huang, Huan; Weiss, Louis M; Tanowitz, Herbert B

    2014-01-01

    Trogocytosis was originally thought to be restricted to the interaction of cells of the immune system and interactions of these cells with cancer cells. Such membrane exchanges are probably a general process in cell biology, and membrane exchange has been demonstrated to occur between non-immune cells within an organism. Herein, we report that membrane and protein exchange, consistent with trogocytosis, between Trypanosoma cruzi (both the Brazil and Tulahuen strains) and the mammalian cells it infects. Transfer of labeled membrane patches was monitored by labeling of either parasites or host cells, i.e. human foreskin fibroblasts and rat myoblasts. Trypomastigotes and amastigotes transferred specific surface glycoproteins to the host cells along with membranes. Exchange of membranes between the parasite and host cells occurred during successful invasion. Extracellular amastigotes did not transfer membrane patches and heat killed trypomastigotes were did not transfer either membranes or proteins to the host cells. Membrane exchange was also found to occur between interacting epimastigotes in cell-free culture and may be important in parasite-parasite interactions as well. Further studies should provide new insights into pathogenesis and provide targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25448052

  11. Cruzipain Promotes Trypanosoma cruzi Adhesion to Rhodnius prolixus Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Lívia Almeida; Moreira, Otacílio C.; Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Azambuja, Patrícia; Lima, Ana Paula Cabral Araujo; Britto, Constança; dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Branquinha, Marta Helena; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini

    2012-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Cysteine peptidases are relevant to several aspects of the T. cruzi life cycle and are implicated in parasite-mammalian host relationships. However, little is known about the factors that contribute to the parasite-insect host interaction. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we have investigated whether cruzipain could be involved in the interaction of T. cruzi with the invertebrate host. We analyzed the effect of treatment of T. cruzi epimastigotes with anti-cruzipain antibodies or with a panel of cysteine peptidase inhibitors (cystatin, antipain, E-64, leupeptin, iodocetamide or CA-074-OMe) on parasite adhesion to Rhodnius prolixus posterior midgut ex vivo. All treatments, with the exception of CA074-OMe, significantly decreased parasite adhesion to R. prolixus midgut. Cystatin presented a dose-dependent reduction on the adhesion. Comparison of the adhesion rate among several T. cruzi isolates revealed that the G isolate, which naturally possesses low levels of active cruzipain, adhered to a lesser extent in comparison to Dm28c, Y and CL Brener isolates. Transgenic epimastigotes overexpressing an endogenous cruzipain inhibitor (pCHAG), chagasin, and that have reduced levels of active cruzipain adhered to the insect gut 73% less than the wild-type parasites. The adhesion of pCHAG parasites was partially restored by the addition of exogenous cruzipain. In vivo colonization experiments revealed low levels of pCHAG parasites in comparison to wild-type. Parasites isolated after passage in the insect presented a drastic enhancement in the expression of surface cruzipain. Conclusions/Significance These data highlight, for the first time, that cruzipain contributes to the interaction of T. cruzi with the insect host. PMID:23272264

  12. Aspirin treatment exacerbates oral infections by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cossentini, Luana Aparecida; Da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; De Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2016-05-01

    Oral transmission of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has been documented in Latin American countries. The reported cases of infection were due to the ingestion of contaminated fresh fruit, juices, or sugar cane juice. There have been few studies on the physiopathology of the disease in oral transmission cases. Gastritis is a common ailment that can be caused by poor dietary habits, intake of alcohol or other gastric irritants, bacterial infection, or by the widespread use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This study investigated in a mouse model whether gastric mucosal injury, induced by aspirin, would affect the course of disease in animals infected with T. cruzi by the oral route. The CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi, both of low infectivity, were used. To this end, groups of BALB/c mice were treated during 5 days with aspirin (100 mg kg(-1)) before oral infection with T. cruzi metacyclic forms (4 × 10(5) or 5 × 10(7) parasites/mouse). Histological analysis and determination of nitric oxide and TNF-α were performed in gastric samples obtained 5 days after infection. Parasitemia was monitored from the thirteenth day after infection. The results indicate that aspirin treatment of mice injured their gastric mucosa and facilitated invasion by both CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi. Strain CL14 caused more severe infection compared to the G strain, as larger numbers of amastigote nests were found in the stomach and parasitemia levels were higher. Our study is novel in that it shows that gastric mucosal damage caused by aspirin, a commonly used NSAID, facilitates T. cruzi infection by the oral route. PMID:26826555

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi Differentiates and Multiplies within Chimeric Parasitophorous Vacuoles in Macrophages Coinfected with Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Carina Carraro; Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Rabinovitch, Michel; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Real, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The trypanosomatids Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi are excellent models for the study of the cell biology of intracellular protozoan infections. After their uptake by mammalian cells, the parasitic protozoan flagellates L. amazonensis and T. cruzi lodge within acidified parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs). However, whereas L. amazonensis develops in spacious, phagolysosome-like PVs that may enclose numerous parasites, T. cruzi is transiently hosted within smaller vacuoles from which it soon escapes to the host cell cytosol. To investigate if parasite-specific vacuoles are required for the survival and differentiation of T. cruzi, we constructed chimeric vacuoles by infection of L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages with T. cruzi epimastigotes (EPIs) or metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs). These chimeric vacuoles, easily observed by microscopy, allowed the entry and fate of T. cruzi in L. amazonensis PVs to be dynamically recorded by multidimensional imaging of coinfected cells. We found that although T. cruzi EPIs remained motile and conserved their morphology in chimeric vacuoles, T. cruzi MTs differentiated into amastigote-like forms capable of multiplying. These results demonstrate that the large adaptive vacuoles of L. amazonensis are permissive to T. cruzi survival and differentiation and that noninfective EPIs are spared from destruction within the chimeric PVs. We conclude that T. cruzi differentiation can take place in Leishmania-containing vacuoles, suggesting this occurs prior to their escape into the host cell cytosol. PMID:26975994

  14. Curcumin treatment provides protection against Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dazhi; Weiss, Louis M.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, causes an acute myocarditis and chronic cardiomyopathy. The current therapeutic agents for this disease are not always effective and often have severe side effects. Curcumin, a plant polyphenol, has demonstrated a wide range of potential therapeutic effects. In this study, we examined the effect of curcumin on T. cruzi infection in vitro and in vivo. Curcumin pretreatment of fibroblasts inhibited parasite invasion. Treatment reduced the expression of the low density lipoprotein receptor, which is involved in T. cruzi host cell invasion. Curcumin treatment of T. cruzi-infected CD1 mice reduced parasitemia and decreased the parasitism of infected heart tissue. This was associated with a significant reduction in macrophage infiltration and inflammation in both the heart and liver; moreover, curcumin-treated infected mice displayed a 100% survival rate in contrast to the 60% survival rate commonly observed in untreated infected mice. These data are consistent with curcumin modulating infection-induced changes in signaling pathways involved in inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. These data suggest that curcumin and its derivatives could be a suitable drug for the amelioration of chagasic heart disease. PMID:22215192

  15. Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi present distinct DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Juliana B F; Rocha, João P Vieira da; Costa-Silva, Héllida M; Alves, Ceres L; Machado, Carlos R; Cruz, Angela K

    2016-05-01

    Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi are medically relevant parasites and interesting model organisms, as they present unique biological processes. Despite increasing data regarding the mechanisms of gene expression regulation, there is little information on how the DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in trypanosomatids. We found that L. major presented a higher radiosensitivity than T. cruzi. L. major showed G1 arrest and displayed high mortality in response to ionizing radiation as a result of the inefficient repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Conversely, T. cruzi exhibited arrest in the S/G2 cell cycle phase, was able to efficiently repair DSBs and did not display high rates of cell death after exposure to gamma irradiation. L. major showed higher resistance to alkylating DNA damage, and only L. major was able to promote DNA repair and growth recovery in the presence of MMS. ASF1c overexpression did not interfere with the efficiency of DNA repair in either of the parasites but did accentuate the DNA damage checkpoint response, thereby delaying cell fate after damage. The observed differences in the DNA damage responses of T. cruzi and L. major may originate from the distinct preferred routes of genetic plasticity of the two parasites, i.e., DNA recombination versus amplification. PMID:27188657

  16. Purification and Partial characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, S C; Meirelles, M N; Pacheco, R S; De Simone, S G

    1998-01-01

    The enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TPI, EC 5.3.1.1) was purified from extracts of epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. The purification steps included: hydrophobic interaction chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, CM-Sepharose, and high performance liquid gel filtration chromatography. The CM-Sepharose material contained two bands (27 and 25 kDa) with similar isoelectric points (pI 9.3-9.5) which could be separated by gel filtration in high performance liquid chromatography. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the porcine TPI detected one single polypeptide on western blot with a molecular weight (27 kDa) identical to that purified from T. cruzi. These antibodies also recognized only one band of identical molecular weight in western blots of several other trypanosomatids (Blastocrithidia culicis, Crithidia desouzai, Phytomonas serpens, Herpertomonas samuelpessoai). The presence of only one enzymatic form of TPI in T. cruzi epimastigotes was confirmed by agarose gel activity assay and its localization was established by immunocytochemical analysis. The T. cruzi purified TPI (as well as other trypanosomatid' TPIs) is a dimeric protein, composed of two identical subunits with an approximate mw of 27,000 and it is resolved on two dimensional gel electrophoresis with a pI of 9.3. Sequence analysis of the N-terminal portion of the 27 kDa protein revealed a high homology to Leishmania mexicana and T. brucei proteins. PMID:9698898

  17. Environment, interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi and its host, and health.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio R L; Gomes, Clever; Lozzi, Silene P; Hecht, Mariana M; Rosa, Ana de Cássia; Monteiro, Pedro S; Bussacos, Ana Carolina; Nitz, Nadjar; McManus, Concepta

    2009-01-01

    An epidemiological chain involving Trypanosoma cruzi is discussed at the environmental level, and in terms of fine molecular interactions in invertebrate and vertebrate hosts dwelling in different ecosystems. This protozoan has a complex, genetically controlled plasticity, which confers adaptation to approximately 40 blood-sucking triatomine species and to over 1,000 mammalian species, fulfilling diverse metabolic requirements in its complex life-cycle. The Tr. cruzi infections are deeply embedded in countless ecotypes, where they are difficult to defeat using the control methods that are currently available. Many more field and laboratory studies are required to obtain data and information that may be used for the control and prevention of Tr. cruzi infections and their various disease manifestations. Emphasis should be placed on those sensitive interactions at cellular and environmental levels that could become selected targets for disease prevention. In the short term, new technologies for social mobilization should be used by people and organizations working for justice and equality through health information and promotion. A mass media directed program could deliver education, information and communication to protect the inhabitants at risk of contracting Tr. cruzi infections. PMID:19287864

  18. Molecular Typing of Trypanosoma cruzi Isolates, United States

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Emily L.; Barnabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel; Steurer, Frank J.; Yabsley, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Studies have characterized Trypanosoma cruzi from parasite-endemic regions. With new human cases, increasing numbers of veterinary cases, and influx of potentially infected immigrants, understanding the ecology of this organism in the United States is imperative. We used a classic typing scheme to determine the lineage of 107 isolates from various hosts. PMID:18598637

  19. Preferential brain homing following intranasal administration of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Kacey; Pereiraperrin, Mercio

    2009-04-01

    The Chagas' disease parasite Trypanosoma cruzi commonly infects humans through skin abrasions or mucosa from reduviid bug excreta. Yet most studies on animal models start with subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injections, a distant approximation of the skin abrasion route. We show here that atraumatic placement of T. cruzi in the mouse nasal cavity produced low parasitemia, high survival rates, and preferential brain invasion compared to the case with subcutaneously injected parasites. Brain invasion was particularly prominent in the basal ganglia, peaked at a time when parasitemia was no longer detectable, and elicited a relatively large number of inflammatory foci. Yet, based on motor behavioral parameters and staining with Fluoro-Jade C, a dye that specifically recognizes apoptotic and necrotic neurons, brain invasion did not cause neurodegenerative events, in contrast to the neurodegeneration in the enteric nervous system. The results indicate that placement of T. cruzi on the mucosa in the mouse nasal cavity establishes a systemic infection with a robust yet harmless infection of the brain, seemingly analogous to disease progression in humans. The model may facilitate studies designed to understand mechanisms underlying T. cruzi infection of the central nervous system. PMID:19168740

  20. Early Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Reprograms Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiribao, María Laura; Libisch, Gabriela; Parodi-Talice, Adriana; Robello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, has the peculiarity, when compared with other intracellular parasites, that it is able to invade almost any type of cell. This property makes Chagas a complex parasitic disease in terms of prophylaxis and therapeutics. The identification of key host cellular factors that play a role in the T. cruzi invasion is important for the understanding of disease pathogenesis. In Chagas disease, most of the focus is on the response of macrophages and cardiomyocytes, since they are responsible for host defenses and cardiac lesions, respectively. In the present work, we studied the early response to infection of T. cruzi in human epithelial cells, which constitute the first barrier for establishment of infection. These studies identified up to 1700 significantly altered genes regulated by the immediate infection. The global analysis indicates that cells are literally reprogrammed by T. cruzi, which affects cellular stress responses (neutrophil chemotaxis, DNA damage response), a great number of transcription factors (including the majority of NFκB family members), and host metabolism (cholesterol, fatty acids, and phospholipids). These results raise the possibility that early host cell reprogramming is exploited by the parasite to establish the initial infection and posterior systemic dissemination. PMID:24812617

  1. Surface electrical charge of bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi strains.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, M A

    1983-01-01

    Bloodstream trypomastigotes of some Trypanosoma cruzi strains were processed through DEAE-cellulose columns under standardized conditions. The results obtained suggest mainly that these strains present different surface charges, that there are subpopulations of bloodstream trypomastigotes as regards electrical charges and that the broad forms are less negative than the slender ones. PMID:6443631

  2. CD8+ T Cells in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tarleton, Rick L.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection and Chagas disease remains among the most neglected of the neglected tropical diseases. Despite this, studies of the immune response to T. cruzi have provided new insights in immunology and guidance for approaches for prevention and treatment of the disease. T. cruzi represents one of the very best systems in which to study CD8+ T cell biology; Mice, dogs, and primates (and many other mammals) are all natural hosts for this parasite, the robust T cell responses generated in these hosts can be readily monitored using the full range of cutting edge techniques, and the parasite can be easily modified to express (or not) a variety of tags, reporters, immune enhances and endogenous or model antigens. The infection in most hosts is characterized by vigorous and largely effective immune responses, including CD8+ T cells capable of controlling T. cruzi at the level of the infected host cells. However this immune control is only partially effective and most hosts maintain a low level infection for life. This review addresses the interplay of highly effective CD8+ T cell responses with elaborate pathogen immune evasion mechanisms, including the generation and simultaneous expression of highly variant CD8+ T cell targets and a host cell invasion mechanisms that largely eludes innate immune detection. PMID:25921214

  3. Comparative studies confirm natural infections of buffaloes by Sarcocystis cruzi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controversy exists concerning whether cattle and water buffalo sustain infections with cysts distinct arrays species in the genus Sarcocystis. In particular, morphologically similar parasites have been alternately ascribed to S. cruzi or to S. levinei, depending on their occurrence in cattle and wa...

  4. Nitric oxide-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabra, A. B.; Kitice, N. A.; Pelegrino, M. T.; Lancheros, C. A. C.; Yamauchi, L. M.; Pinge-Filho, P.; Yamada-Ogatta, S. F.

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), and the disease remains a major health problem in many Latin American countries. Several papers report that the killing of the parasite is dependent on the production of nitric oxide (NO). The endogenous free radical NO is an important cellular signalling molecule that plays a key role in the defense against pathogens, including T. cruzi. As T. cruzi is able to compromise host macrophages decreasing endogenous NO production, the administration of exogenous NO donors represents an interesting strategy to combat Chagas disease. Thus, the aims of this study were to prepare and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of NO-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against T. cruzi. Biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles composed of chitosan/sodium tripolyphosphate(TPP) were prepared and used to encapsulate mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), which is a thiol-containing molecule. Nitrosation of free thiols (SH) groups of MSA were performed by the addition of equimolar amount of sodium nitrite (NaNO2), leading to the formation of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles. These polymeric nanoparticles act as spontaneous NO donors, with free NO release. The results show the formation of nanoparticles with average hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 270 to 500 nm, average of polydispersity index of 0.35, and encapsulation efficiency in the range of 99%. The NO release kinetics from the S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles showed sustained and controlled NO release over several hours. The microbicidal activity of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles was evaluated by incubating NO-releasing nanoparticles (200 - 600 μg/mL) with replicative and non-infective epimastigote, and non-replicative and infective trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. In addition, a significant decrease in the percentage of macrophage-infected (with amastigotes) and

  5. Landscape ecology of Trypanosoma cruzi in the southern Yucatan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    López-Cancino, Sury Antonio; Tun-Ku, Ezequiel; De la Cruz-Felix, Himmler Keynes; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos Napoleón; Izeta-Alberdi, Amaia; Pech-May, Angélica; Mazariegos-Hidalgo, Carlos Jesús; Valdez-Tah, Alba; Ramsey, Janine M

    2015-11-01

    Landscape interactions of Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) with Triatoma dimidiata (Td) depend on the presence and relative abundance of mammal hosts. This study analyzed a landscape adjacent to the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve, composed of conserved areas, crop and farming areas, and the human community of Zoh Laguna with reported Chagas disease cases. Sylvatic mammals of the Chiroptera, Rodentia, and Marsupialia orders were captured, and livestock and pets were sampled along with T. dimidiata in all habitats. Infection by T. cruzi was analyzed using mtDNA markers, while lineage and DTU was analyzed using the mini-exon. 303 sylvatic specimens were collected, corresponding to 19 species during the rainy season and 114 specimens of 18 species during dry season. Five bats Artibeus jamaicensis, Artibeus lituratus, Sturnira lilium, Sturnira ludovici, Dermanura phaeotis (Dp) and one rodent Heteromys gaumeri were collected in the three habitats. All but Dp, and including Carollia brevicauda and Myotis keaysi, were infected with predominately TcI in the sylvatic habitat and TcII in the ecotone. Sigmodon hispidus was the rodent with the highest prevalence of infection by T. cruzi I and II in ecotone and domestic habitats. Didelphis viginiana was infected only with TcI in both domestic and sylvatic habitats; the only two genotyped human cases were TcII. Two main clades of T. cruzi, lineages I (DTU Ia) and II (DTU VI), were found to be sympatric (all habitats and seasons) in the Zoh-Laguna landscape, suggesting that no species-specific interactions occur between the parasite and any mammal host, in any habitat. We have also found mixed infections of the two principal T. cruzi clades in individuals across modified habitats, particularly in livestock and pets, and in both haplogroups of T. dimidiata. Results are contradictory to the dilution hypothesis, although we did find that most resilient species had an important role as T. cruzi hosts. Our study detected some complex trends in

  6. The potential of canine sentinels for reemerging Trypanosoma cruzi transmission

    PubMed Central

    Neyra, Ricardo Castillo; Chu, Lily Chou; Quispe-Machaca, Victor; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Malaga Chavez, Fernando S.; Mazuelos, Milagros Bastos; Naquira, Cesar; Bern, Caryn; Gilman, Robert H.; Levy, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, a vector-borne disease transmitted by triatomine bugs and caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, affects millions of people in the Americas. In Arequipa, Peru, indoor residual insecticide spraying campaigns are routinely conducted to eliminate Triatoma infestans, the only vector in this area. Following insecticide spraying, there is risk of vector return and reinitiation of parasite transmission. Dogs are important reservoirs of T. cruzi and may play a role in reinitiating transmission in previously sprayed areas. Dogs may also serve as indicators of reemerging transmission. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional serological screening to detect T. cruzi antibodies in dogs, in conjunction with an entomological vector collection survey at the household level, in a disease endemic area that had been treated with insecticide 13 years prior. Spatial clustering of infected animals and vectors was assessed using Ripley’s K statistic, and the odds of being seropositive for dogs proximate to infected colonies was estimated with multivariate logistic regression. Results There were 106 triatomine-infested houses (41.1%), and 45 houses infested with T. cruzi-infected triatomine insects (17.4%). Canine seroprevalence in the area was 12.3% (n=154); all seropositive dogs were 9 months old or older. We observed clustering of vectors carrying the parasite, but no clustering of seropositive dogs. The age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio between seropositivity to T. cruzi and proximity to an infected triatomine (≤50m) was 5.67 (95% CI: 1.12 – 28.74; p=0.036). Conclusions Targeted control of reemerging transmission can be achieved by improved understanding of T. cruzi in canine populations. Our results suggest that dogs may be useful sentinels to detect re-initiation of transmission following insecticide treatment. Integration of canine T. cruzi blood sampling into existing interventions for zoonotic disease control (e.g. rabies vaccination programs

  7. Should Trypanosoma cruzi be called "cruzi" complex? a review of the parasite diversity and the potential of selecting population after in vitro culturing and mice infection.

    PubMed

    Devera, Rodolfo; Fernandes, Octavio; Coura, José Rodrigues

    2003-01-01

    Morpho-biological diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi has been known since Chagas' first works in 1909. Several further studies confirmed the morphological differences among the parasite strains, which were isolated from different reservoirs and vectors, as well as from human beings. In the early sixties, antigenic differences were found in the parasite strains from various sources. These differences, coupled to the observation of regional variations of the disease, led to the proposal of the term cruzi complex to designate the taxon T. cruzi. Since then this protozoan has been typed in distinct biodemes, zymodemes and lineages which were consensually grouped into T. cruzi I, T. cruzi II and into non-grouped strains. T. cruzi genotypic characterization, initially carried out by schizodeme analysis and more recently by various other techniques, has shown a great diversity of the parasite strains. In fact, T. cruzi is formed by groups of heterogeneous sub-population, which present specific characteristics, including distinct histotropism. The interaction of the different infecting clones of the cruzi complex and the human host will determine the morbidity of the disease. PMID:12700855

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae) genotypes in neotropical bats in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Cristiane Varella; Pinho, Ana Paula; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Gerhardt, Marconny; Cupolillo, Elisa; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2008-10-01

    Few studies have been conducted to investigate the role played by the order Chiroptera in the sylvatic transmission cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi or their putative association with the main genotypes of the parasite. Here, the purpose was to enlarge the knowledge of this issue, in this sense, 93 specimens of bats included in 4 families, respectively Molossidae, Noctilionidae, Phyllostomidae and Vespertilionidae collected in distinct regions of Brazil were submitted to fresh blood smears and hemocultures. No patent parasitemia was observed but positive hemocultures by T. cruzi were observed in 14% (13/93) of examined samples. The majority of the parasite isolates were obtained from Phyllostomus hastatus (80%) captured in one same buriti hollow palm tree in the Cerrado region. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) analyses showed that the genetic distance among these isolates was 0.35, almost the same observed when all the isolates (excluding the reference strains) were analyzed (0.40). No correlation of zymodeme with bat genera, species or geographic region of its origin could be observed, moreover, correlation of zymodeme and genotype of the parasite was not strict. Ten out of 14 T. cruzi isolates obtained from bats corresponded to the TCII genotype. Chiropterans with TCI, TCII/TCIII mixed infection as well as Trypanosoma rangeli in single or mixed infections were observed. These results show that bats may harbor and are probably important maintainers of the main genotypes (TCI, TCII, TCIII/Z3) of T. cruzi. These results support the absence of an association of TCII with any mammal order and show that bats, mainly P. hastatus, may act as amplifier hosts of TCII subpopulations of T. cruzi. PMID:18650015

  9. Bioenergetic profiling of Trypanosoma cruzi life stages using Seahorse extracellular flux technology.

    PubMed

    Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Pereira, Camila F A; Dumoulin, Peter C; Caradonna, Kacey L; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2016-08-01

    Energy metabolism is an attractive target for the development of new therapeutics against protozoan pathogens, including Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of human Chagas disease. Despite emerging evidence that mitochondrial electron transport is essential for the growth of intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes in mammalian cells, fundamental knowledge of mitochondrial energy metabolism in this parasite life stage remains incomplete. The Clark-type electrode, which measures the rate of oxygen consumption, has served as the traditional tool to study mitochondrial energetics and has contributed to our understanding of it in T. cruzi. Here, we evaluate the Seahorse XF(e)24 extracellular flux platform as an alternative method to assess mitochondrial bioenergetics in isolated T. cruzi parasites. We report optimized assay conditions used to perform mitochondrial stress tests with replicative life cycle stages of T. cruzi using the XF(e)24 instrument, and discuss the advantages and potential limitations of this methodology, as applied to T. cruzi and other trypanosomatids. PMID:27392747

  10. The characterization of anti-T. cruzi activity relationships between ferrocenyl, cyrhetrenyl complexes and ROS release.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, César; Romero, Valentina; Arancibia, Rodrigo; Klahn, Hugo; Montorfano, Ignacio; Armisen, Ricardo; Borgna, Vincenzo; Simon, Felipe; Ramirez-Tagle, Rodrigo

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) is the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Nifurtimox is the most used drug against the T. cruzi, this drug increases intermediaries nitro group, being mainly responsible for the high toxicity component, for this reason it is important to study new organic compounds and thus improve therapeutic strategies against Chagas disease. The electronic effects of ferrocenyl and cyrhetrenyl fragments were investigated by DFT calculation. A close correlation was found between HOMO-LUMO gap of nitro radical NO 2 (-) with the experimental reduction potential found for nitro group and IC50 of two forms the T. cruzi (epimastigote and trypomastigote). The IC50 on human hepatoma cells is higher for both compounds compared to IC50 demonstrated in the two forms the T. cruzi, and additionally show reactive oxygen species release. The information obtained in this paper could generate two new drugs with anti-T. cruzi activity, but additional studies are needed. PMID:27460450

  11. Experimental infection of raccoon dogs with Sarcocystis cruzi and S. miescheriana.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Itagaki, H

    1994-08-01

    Raccoon dogs were successfully infected with Sarcocystis cruzi and S. miescheriana by oral inoculation of infected cardiac muscle of cattle and pigs slaughtered in Saitama and Okinawa prefectures, respectively. Oocysts and sporocysts passed by raccoon dogs were similar in measurements and morphological features as reported of S. cruzi and S. miescheriana respectively. The prepatent and patent periods of both S. cruzi and S. miescheriana were 9 and 66-72 days respectively in raccoon dogs. PMID:7999889

  12. A cardiac myosin-specific autoimmune response is induced by immunization with Trypanosoma cruzi proteins.

    PubMed

    Leon, Juan S; Daniels, Melvin D; Toriello, Krista M; Wang, Kegiang; Engman, David M

    2004-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' heart disease, a potentially fatal cardiomyopathy prevalent in Central and South America. Infection with T. cruzi induces cardiac myosin autoimmunity in susceptible humans and mice, and this autoimmunity has been suggested to contribute to cardiac inflammation. To address how T. cruzi induces cardiac myosin autoimmunity, we investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce cardiac myosin-specific autoimmunity in the absence of live parasites. We immunized A/J mice with a T. cruzi Brazil-derived protein extract emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant and found that these mice developed cardiac myosin-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and autoantibodies in the absence of detectable cardiac damage. The induction of autoimmunity was specific since immunization with extracts of the related protozoan parasite Leishmania amazonensis did not induce myosin autoimmunity. The immunogenetic makeup of the host was important for this response, since C57BL/6 mice did not develop cardiac myosin DTH upon immunization with T. cruzi extract. Perhaps more interesting, mice immunized with cardiac myosin developed T. cruzi-specific DTH and antibodies. This DTH was also antigen specific, since immunization with skeletal myosin and myoglobin did not induce T. cruzi-specific immunity. These results suggest that immunization with cardiac myosin or T. cruzi antigen can induce specific, bidirectionally cross-reactive immune responses in the absence of detectable cardiac damage. PMID:15155647

  13. Recent, Independent and Anthropogenic Origins of Trypanosoma cruzi Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michael D.; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Yeo, Matthew; Acosta, Nidia; Gaunt, Michael W.; Miles, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The single celled eukaryote Trypanosoma cruzi, a parasite transmitted by numerous species of triatomine bug in the Americas, causes Chagas disease in humans. T. cruzi generally reproduces asexually and appears to have a clonal population structure. However, two of the six major circulating genetic lineages, TcV and TcVI, are TcII-TcIII inter-lineage hybrids that are frequently isolated from humans in regions where chronic Chagas disease is particularly severe. Nevertheless, a prevalent view is that hybridisation events in T. cruzi were evolutionarily ancient and that active recombination is of little epidemiological importance. We analysed genotypes of hybrid and non-hybrid T. cruzi strains for markers representing three distinct evolutionary rates: nuclear GPI sequences (n = 88), mitochondrial COII-ND1 sequences (n = 107) and 28 polymorphic microsatellite loci (n = 35). Using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic approaches we dated key evolutionary events in the T. cruzi clade including the emergence of hybrid lineages TcV and TcVI, which we estimated to have occurred within the last 60,000 years. We also found evidence for recent genetic exchange between TcIII and TcIV and between TcI and TcIV. These findings show that evolution of novel recombinants remains a potential epidemiological risk. The clearly distinguishable microsatellite genotypes of TcV and TcVI were highly heterozygous and displayed minimal intra-lineage diversity indicative of even earlier origins than sequence-based estimates. Natural hybrid genotypes resembled typical meiotic F1 progeny, however, evidence for mitochondrial introgression, absence of haploid forms and previous experimental crosses indicate that sexual reproduction in T. cruzi may involve alternatives to canonical meiosis. Overall, the data support two independent hybridisation events between TcII and TcIII and a recent, rapid spread of the hybrid progeny in domestic transmission cycles concomitant with, or as a

  14. Dealing with environmental challenges: mechanisms of adaptation in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Protozoan parasites have a significant impact upon global health, infecting millions of people around the world. With limited therapeutic options and no vaccines available, research efforts are focused upon unraveling cellular mechanisms essential for parasite survival. During its life cycle, Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas disease, is exposed to multiple external conditions and different hosts. Environmental cues are linked to the differentiation process allowing the parasite to complete its life cycle. Successful transmission depends on the ability of the cells to trigger adaptive responses and cope with stressors while regulating proliferation and transition to different life stages. This review focuses upon different aspects of the stress response in T. cruzi, proposing new hypotheses regarding cross-talk and cross-tolerance with respect to environmental changes and discussing open questions and future directions. PMID:24508488

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes Subjected to Heat Shock

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto; Hurtado, Gerardo; Martínez-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Espinoza, Bertha

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is exposed to sudden temperature changes during its life cycle. Adaptation to these variations is crucial for parasite survival, reproduction, and transmission. Some of these conditions may change the pattern of genetic expression of proteins involved in homeostasis in the course of stress treatment. In the present study, the proteome of T. cruzi epimastigotes subjected to heat shock and epimastigotes grow normally was compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. Twenty-four spots differing in abundance were identified. Of the twenty-four changed spots, nineteen showed a greater intensity and five a lower intensity relative to the control. Several functional categories of the identified proteins were determined: metabolism, cell defense, hypothetical proteins, protein fate, protein synthesis, cellular transport, and cell cycle. Proteins involved in the interaction with the cellular environment were also identified, and the implications of these changes are discussed. PMID:22287837

  16. Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Segura-Valdez, María De L.; Jiménez-García, Luis F.

    2005-08-01

    The nucleolus is the main site for synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA in eukaryotes. In mammals, plants, and yeast the nucleolus has been extensively characterized by electron microscopy, but in the majority of the unicellular eukaryotes no such studies have been performed. Here we used ultrastructural cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques as well as three-dimensional reconstruction to analyze the nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is an early divergent eukaryote of medical importance. In T. cruzi epimastigotes the nucleolus is a spherical intranuclear ribonucleoprotein organelle localized in a relatively central position within the nucleus. Dense fibrillar and granular components but not fibrillar centers were observed. In addition, nuclear bodies resembling Cajal bodies were observed associated to the nucleolus in the surrounding nucleoplasm. Our results provide additional morphological data to better understand the synthesis and processing of the ribosomal RNA in kinetoplastids.

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi: single cell live imaging inside infected tissues.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Bianca Lima; Orikaza, Cristina Mary; Cordero, Esteban Mauricio; Mortara, Renato Arruda

    2016-06-01

    Although imaging the live Trypanosoma cruzi parasite is a routine technique in most laboratories, identification of the parasite in infected tissues and organs has been hindered by their intrinsic opaque nature. We describe a simple method for in vivo observation of live single-cell Trypanosoma cruzi parasites inside mammalian host tissues. BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice infected with DsRed-CL or GFP-G trypomastigotes had their organs removed and sectioned with surgical blades. Ex vivo organ sections were observed under confocal microscopy. For the first time, this procedure enabled imaging of individual amastigotes, intermediate forms and motile trypomastigotes within infected tissues of mammalian hosts. PMID:26639617

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi in Persons without Serologic Evidence of Disease, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Basquiera, Ana L.; Sembaj, Adela; Aguerri, Ana M.; Reyes, María E.; Omelianuk, Mirtha; Fernández, Ruth A.; Enders, Julio; Palma, Atilio; Barral, José Moreno; Madoery, Roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    Current diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease relies on serologic detection of specific immunoglobulin G against Trypanosoma cruzi. However, the presence of parasites detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in patients without positive conventional serologic testing has been observed. We determined the prevalence and clinical characteristics of persons with seronegative results for T. cruzi DNA detected by PCR in a population at high risk for chronic American trypanosomiasis. We studied a total of 194 persons from two different populations: 110 patients were recruited from an urban cardiology clinic, and 84 persons were nonselected citizens from a highly disease-endemic area. Eighty (41%) of persons had negative serologic findings; 12 (15%) had a positive PCR. Three patients with negative serologic findings and positive PCR results had clinical signs and symptoms that suggested Chagas cardiomyopathy. This finding challenges the current recommendations for Chagas disease diagnosis, therapy, and blood transfusion policies. PMID:14720396

  19. Repertoire, genealogy and genomic organization of cruzipain and homologous genes in Trypanosoma cruzi, T. cruzi-like and other trypanosome species.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luciana; Ortiz, Paola A; da Silva, Flávia Maia; Alves, João Marcelo P; Serrano, Myrna G; Cortez, Alane P; Alfieri, Silvia C; Buck, Gregory A; Teixeira, Marta M G

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is a complex of genetically diverse isolates highly phylogenetically related to T. cruzi-like species, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei and Trypanosoma dionisii, all sharing morphology of blood and culture forms and development within cells. However, they differ in hosts, vectors and pathogenicity: T. cruzi is a human pathogen infective to virtually all mammals whilst the other two species are non-pathogenic and bat restricted. Previous studies suggest that variations in expression levels and genetic diversity of cruzipain, the major isoform of cathepsin L-like (CATL) enzymes of T. cruzi, correlate with levels of cellular invasion, differentiation, virulence and pathogenicity of distinct strains. In this study, we compared 80 sequences of genes encoding cruzipain from 25 T. cruzi isolates representative of all discrete typing units (DTUs TcI-TcVI) and the new genotype Tcbat and 10 sequences of homologous genes from other species. The catalytic domain repertoires diverged according to DTUs and trypanosome species. Relatively homogeneous sequences are found within and among isolates of the same DTU except TcV and TcVI, which displayed sequences unique or identical to those of TcII and TcIII, supporting their origin from the hybridization between these two DTUs. In network genealogies, sequences from T. cruzi clustered tightly together and closer to T. c. marinkellei than to T. dionisii and largely differed from homologues of T. rangeli and T. b. brucei. Here, analysis of isolates representative of the overall biological and genetic diversity of T. cruzi and closest T. cruzi-like species evidenced DTU- and species-specific polymorphisms corroborating phylogenetic relationships inferred with other genes. Comparison of both phylogenetically close and distant trypanosomes is valuable to understand host-parasite interactions, virulence and pathogenicity. Our findings corroborate cruzipain as valuable target for drugs, vaccine

  20. Repertoire, Genealogy and Genomic Organization of Cruzipain and Homologous Genes in Trypanosoma cruzi, T. cruzi-Like and Other Trypanosome Species

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luciana; Ortiz, Paola A.; da Silva, Flávia Maia; Alves, João Marcelo P.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Cortez, Alane P.; Alfieri, Silvia C.; Buck, Gregory A.; Teixeira, Marta M. G.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is a complex of genetically diverse isolates highly phylogenetically related to T. cruzi-like species, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei and Trypanosoma dionisii, all sharing morphology of blood and culture forms and development within cells. However, they differ in hosts, vectors and pathogenicity: T. cruzi is a human pathogen infective to virtually all mammals whilst the other two species are non-pathogenic and bat restricted. Previous studies suggest that variations in expression levels and genetic diversity of cruzipain, the major isoform of cathepsin L-like (CATL) enzymes of T. cruzi, correlate with levels of cellular invasion, differentiation, virulence and pathogenicity of distinct strains. In this study, we compared 80 sequences of genes encoding cruzipain from 25 T. cruzi isolates representative of all discrete typing units (DTUs TcI-TcVI) and the new genotype Tcbat and 10 sequences of homologous genes from other species. The catalytic domain repertoires diverged according to DTUs and trypanosome species. Relatively homogeneous sequences are found within and among isolates of the same DTU except TcV and TcVI, which displayed sequences unique or identical to those of TcII and TcIII, supporting their origin from the hybridization between these two DTUs. In network genealogies, sequences from T. cruzi clustered tightly together and closer to T. c. marinkellei than to T. dionisii and largely differed from homologues of T. rangeli and T. b. brucei. Here, analysis of isolates representative of the overall biological and genetic diversity of T. cruzi and closest T. cruzi-like species evidenced DTU- and species-specific polymorphisms corroborating phylogenetic relationships inferred with other genes. Comparison of both phylogenetically close and distant trypanosomes is valuable to understand host-parasite interactions, virulence and pathogenicity. Our findings corroborate cruzipain as valuable target for drugs, vaccine

  1. Novel drug design for Chagas disease via targeting Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin: Homology modeling and binding pocket prediction on Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition by naphthoquinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ogindo, Charles O; Khraiwesh, Mozna H; George, Matthew; Brandy, Yakini; Brandy, Nailah; Gugssa, Ayele; Ashraf, Mohammad; Abbas, Muneer; Southerland, William M; Lee, Clarence M; Bakare, Oladapo; Fang, Yayin

    2016-08-15

    Chagas disease, also called American trypanosomiasis, is a parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Recent findings have underscored the abundance of the causative organism, (T. cruzi), especially in the southern tier states of the US and the risk burden for the rural farming communities there. Due to a lack of safe and effective drugs, there is an urgent need for novel therapeutic options for treating Chagas disease. We report here our first scientific effort to pursue a novel drug design for treating Chagas disease via the targeting of T. cruzi tubulin. First, the anti T. cruzi tubulin activities of five naphthoquinone derivatives were determined and correlated to their anti-trypanosomal activities. The correlation between the ligand activities against the T. cruzi organism and their tubulin inhibitory activities was very strong with a Pearson's r value of 0.88 (P value <0.05), indicating that this class of compounds could inhibit the activity of the trypanosome organism via T. cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition. Subsequent molecular modeling studies were carried out to understand the mechanisms of the anti-tubulin activities, wherein, the homology model of T. cruzi tubulin dimer was generated and the putative binding site of naphthoquinone derivatives was predicted. The correlation coefficient for ligand anti-tubulin activities and their binding energies at the putative pocket was found to be r=0.79, a high correlation efficiency that was not replicated in contiguous candidate pockets. The homology model of T. cruzi tubulin and the identification of its putative binding site lay a solid ground for further structure based drug design, including molecular docking and pharmacophore analysis. This study presents a new opportunity for designing potent and selective drugs for Chagas disease. PMID:27345756

  2. Transcriptome Remodeling in Trypanosoma cruzi and Human Cells during Intracellular Infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Okrah, Kwame; Belew, A Trey; Choi, Jungmin; Caradonna, Kacey L; Padmanabhan, Prasad; Ndegwa, David M; Temanni, M Ramzi; Corrada Bravo, Héctor; El-Sayed, Najib M; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2016-04-01

    Intracellular colonization and persistent infection by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, underlie the pathogenesis of human Chagas disease. To obtain global insights into the T. cruzi infective process, transcriptome dynamics were simultaneously captured in the parasite and host cells in an infection time course of human fibroblasts. Extensive remodeling of the T. cruzi transcriptome was observed during the early establishment of intracellular infection, coincident with a major developmental transition in the parasite. Contrasting this early response, few additional changes in steady state mRNA levels were detected once mature T. cruzi amastigotes were formed. Our findings suggest that transcriptome remodeling is required to establish a modified template to guide developmental transitions in the parasite, whereas homeostatic functions are regulated independently of transcriptomic changes, similar to that reported in related trypanosomatids. Despite complex mechanisms for regulation of phenotypic expression in T. cruzi, transcriptomic signatures derived from distinct developmental stages mirror known or projected characteristics of T. cruzi biology. Focusing on energy metabolism, we were able to validate predictions forecast in the mRNA expression profiles. We demonstrate measurable differences in the bioenergetic properties of the different mammalian-infective stages of T. cruzi and present additional findings that underscore the importance of mitochondrial electron transport in T. cruzi amastigote growth and survival. Consequences of T. cruzi colonization for the host include dynamic expression of immune response genes and cell cycle regulators with upregulation of host cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways, which may serve to fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Thus, in addition to the biological inferences gained from gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes in parasite and host, our

  3. Transcriptome Remodeling in Trypanosoma cruzi and Human Cells during Intracellular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Okrah, Kwame; Belew, A. Trey; Choi, Jungmin; Caradonna, Kacey L.; Padmanabhan, Prasad; Ndegwa, David M.; Temanni, M. Ramzi; Corrada Bravo, Héctor; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular colonization and persistent infection by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, underlie the pathogenesis of human Chagas disease. To obtain global insights into the T. cruzi infective process, transcriptome dynamics were simultaneously captured in the parasite and host cells in an infection time course of human fibroblasts. Extensive remodeling of the T. cruzi transcriptome was observed during the early establishment of intracellular infection, coincident with a major developmental transition in the parasite. Contrasting this early response, few additional changes in steady state mRNA levels were detected once mature T. cruzi amastigotes were formed. Our findings suggest that transcriptome remodeling is required to establish a modified template to guide developmental transitions in the parasite, whereas homeostatic functions are regulated independently of transcriptomic changes, similar to that reported in related trypanosomatids. Despite complex mechanisms for regulation of phenotypic expression in T. cruzi, transcriptomic signatures derived from distinct developmental stages mirror known or projected characteristics of T. cruzi biology. Focusing on energy metabolism, we were able to validate predictions forecast in the mRNA expression profiles. We demonstrate measurable differences in the bioenergetic properties of the different mammalian-infective stages of T. cruzi and present additional findings that underscore the importance of mitochondrial electron transport in T. cruzi amastigote growth and survival. Consequences of T. cruzi colonization for the host include dynamic expression of immune response genes and cell cycle regulators with upregulation of host cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways, which may serve to fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Thus, in addition to the biological inferences gained from gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes in parasite and host, our

  4. Interactions Between Trypanosoma cruzi the Chagas Disease Parasite and Naturally Infected Wild Mepraia Vectors of Chile.

    PubMed

    Campos-Soto, Ricardo; Ortiz, Sylvia; Cordova, Ivan; Bruneau, Nicole; Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Solari, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    Chagas disease, which ranks among the world's most neglected diseases, is a chronic, systemic, parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Mepraia species are the wild vectors of this parasite in Chile. Host-parasite interactions can occur at several levels, such as co-speciation and ecological host fitting, among others. Thus, we are exploring the interactions between T. cruzi circulating in naturally infected Mepraia species in all areas endemic of Chile. We evaluated T. cruzi infection rates of 27 different haplotypes of the wild Mepraia species and identified their parasite genotypes using minicircle PCR amplification and hybridization tests with genotype-specific DNA probes. Infection rates were lower in northern Chile where Mepraia gajardoi circulates (10-35%); in central Chile, Mepraia spinolai is most abundant, and infection rates varied in space and time (0-55%). T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI, TcII, TcV, and Tc VI were detected. Mixed infections with two or more DTUs are frequently found in highly infected insects. T. cruzi DTUs have distinct, but not exclusive, ecological and epidemiological associations with their hosts. T. cruzi infection rates of M. spinolai were higher than in M. gajardoi, but the presence of mixed infection with more than one T. cruzi DTU was the same. The same T. cruzi DTUs (TcI, TcII, TcV, and TcVI) were found circulating in both vector species, even though TcI was not equally distributed. These results suggest that T. cruzi DTUs are not associated with any of the two genetically related vector species nor with the geographic area. The T. cruzi vectors interactions are discussed in terms of old and recent events. By exploring T. cruzi DTUs present in Mepraia haplotypes and species from northern to central Chile, we open the analysis on these invertebrate host-parasite interactions. PMID:26771702

  5. Optimized Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) Scheme for Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Diosque, Patricio; Tomasini, Nicolás; Lauthier, Juan José; Messenger, Louisa Alexandra; Monje Rumi, María Mercedes; Ragone, Paula Gabriela; Alberti-D'Amato, Anahí Maitén; Pérez Brandán, Cecilia; Barnabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel; Lewis, Michael David; Llewellyn, Martin Stephen; Miles, Michael Alexander; Yeo, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease possess extensive genetic diversity. This has led to the development of a plethora of molecular typing methods for the identification of both the known major genetic lineages and for more fine scale characterization of different multilocus genotypes within these major lineages. Whole genome sequencing applied to large sample sizes is not currently viable and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, the previous gold standard for T. cruzi typing, is laborious and time consuming. In the present work, we present an optimized Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) scheme, based on the combined analysis of two recently proposed MLST approaches. Here, thirteen concatenated gene fragments were applied to a panel of T. cruzi reference strains encompassing all known genetic lineages. Concatenation of 13 fragments allowed assignment of all strains to the predicted Discrete Typing Units (DTUs), or near-clades, with the exception of one strain that was an outlier for TcV, due to apparent loss of heterozygosity in one fragment. Monophyly for all DTUs, along with robust bootstrap support, was restored when this fragment was subsequently excluded from the analysis. All possible combinations of loci were assessed against predefined criteria with the objective of selecting the most appropriate combination of between two and twelve fragments, for an optimized MLST scheme. The optimum combination consisted of 7 loci and discriminated between all reference strains in the panel, with the majority supported by robust bootstrap values. Additionally, a reduced panel of just 4 gene fragments displayed high bootstrap values for DTU assignment and discriminated 21 out of 25 genotypes. We propose that the seven-fragment MLST scheme could be used as a gold standard for T. cruzi typing, against which other typing approaches, particularly single locus approaches or systematic PCR assays based on amplicon size, could be compared. PMID:25167160

  6. Functional Characterization of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Isabela Cecília; de Moura, Michelle Barbi; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Franco, Glória Regina; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Van Houten, Bennett; Machado, Carlos Renato

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative lesion 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is removed during base excision repair by the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1). This lesion can erroneously pair with adenine, and the excision of this damaged base by Ogg1 enables the insertion of a guanine and prevents DNA mutation. In this report, we identified and characterized Ogg1 from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (TcOgg1), the causative agent of Chagas disease. Like most living organisms, T. cruzi is susceptible to oxidative stress, hence DNA repair is essential for its survival and improvement of infection. We verified that the TcOGG1 gene encodes an 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase by complementing an Ogg1-defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Heterologous expression of TcOGG1 reestablished the mutation frequency of the yeast mutant ogg1−/− (CD138) to wild type levels. We also demonstrate that the overexpression of TcOGG1 increases T. cruzi sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Analysis of DNA lesions using quantitative PCR suggests that the increased susceptibility to H2O2 of TcOGG1-overexpressor could be a consequence of uncoupled BER in abasic sites and/or strand breaks generated after TcOgg1 removes 8-oxoG, which are not rapidly repaired by the subsequent BER enzymes. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that TcOGG1-overexpressors have reduced levels of 8-oxoG both in the nucleus and in the parasite mitochondrion. The localization of TcOgg1 was examined in parasite transfected with a TcOgg1-GFP fusion, which confirmed that this enzyme is in both organelles. Taken together, our data indicate that T. cruzi has a functional Ogg1 ortholog that participates in nuclear and mitochondrial BER. PMID:22876325

  7. [Digestive tract dilation in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi].

    PubMed

    Guillén-Pernía, B; Lugo-Yarbuh, A; Moreno, E

    2001-09-01

    This paper will analyze alterations in the digestive tract (DT) of mice with chronic Chagas' disease infection produced by Trypanosoma cruzi from different sources. X-rays of the DT of 18 mice infected with T. cruzi and 6 control mice were compared after the ingestion of a barium sulfate solution over a period of 6 hours. 120 days post-infection (pi) the X-rays of the DT of the 5 mice of group 1A infected with trypanosomes DMI isolated from the opossum Didelphis marsupialis, and 4 mice in group 2A infected with the isolate EP taken from a patient with acute Chagas' disease, showed swelling of the stomach and the colon (C). 180 days pi, the X-rays of the DT of the 5 mice of group 1B infected with isolated DMI and the 4 mice in group 2B infected with isolate EP, showed an even greater swelling of the C. Histological examination of the DT of all infected mice showed extensive changes of the intestinal muscle layer, such as the diminution of the muscular and mucous layers and the loss of colonic folds and myoenteric plexus. These results suggest that T. cruzi populations caused severe alterations in the digestive system of the mice used in the experiment, and that the same alterations could occur in the digestive organs of humans, especially those living in areas where Chagas' disease is endemic, but where these abnormalities have not yet been reported. PMID:11552508

  8. Oxidative stress fuels Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Claudia N.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Dutra, Fabianno F.; Carneiro, Vitor C.; Freitas, Guilherme B.; Alves, Letícia S.; Mesquita, Jacilene; Fortes, Guilherme B.; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T.; Souza, Heitor S.P.; Fantappié, Marcelo R.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage contributes to microbe elimination during macrophage respiratory burst. Nuclear factor, erythroid-derived 2, like 2 (NRF2) orchestrates antioxidant defenses, including the expression of heme-oxygenase–1 (HO-1). Unexpectedly, the activation of NRF2 and HO-1 reduces infection by a number of pathogens, although the mechanism responsible for this effect is largely unknown. We studied Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice in which NRF2/HO-1 was induced with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP). CoPP reduced parasitemia and tissue parasitism, while an inhibitor of HO-1 activity increased T. cruzi parasitemia in blood. CoPP-induced effects did not depend on the adaptive immunity, nor were parasites directly targeted. We also found that CoPP reduced macrophage parasitism, which depended on NRF2 expression but not on classical mechanisms such as apoptosis of infected cells, induction of type I IFN, or NO. We found that exogenous expression of NRF2 or HO-1 also reduced macrophage parasitism. Several antioxidants, including NRF2 activators, reduced macrophage parasite burden, while pro-oxidants promoted it. Reducing the intracellular labile iron pool decreased parasitism, and antioxidants increased the expression of ferritin and ferroportin in infected macrophages. Ferrous sulfate reversed the CoPP-induced decrease in macrophage parasite burden and, given in vivo, reversed their protective effects. Our results indicate that oxidative stress contributes to parasite persistence in host tissues and open a new avenue for the development of anti–T. cruzi drugs. PMID:22728935

  9. Conservation and divergence within the clathrin interactome of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Ligia Cristina; Frederico, Yohana Camila A; Boehm, Cordula; Moreira, Claudia Maria do Nascimento; Soares, Maurilio José; Field, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasitic protozoa with a significant burden on human health. African and American trypanosomes are causative agents of Nagana and Chagas disease respectively, and speciated about 300 million years ago. These parasites have highly distinct life cycles, pathologies, transmission strategies and surface proteomes, being dominated by the variant surface glycoprotein (African) or mucins (American) respectively. In African trypanosomes clathrin-mediated trafficking is responsible for endocytosis and post-Golgi transport, with several mechanistic aspects distinct from higher organisms. Using clathrin light chain (TcCLC) and EpsinR (TcEpsinR) as affinity handles, we identified candidate clathrin-associated proteins (CAPs) in Trypanosoma cruzi; the cohort includes orthologs of many proteins known to mediate vesicle trafficking, but significantly not the AP-2 adaptor complex. Several trypanosome-specific proteins common with African trypanosomes, were also identified. Fluorescence microscopy revealed localisations for TcEpsinR, TcCLC and TcCHC at the posterior region of trypomastigote cells, coincident with the flagellar pocket and Golgi apparatus. These data provide the first systematic analysis of clathrin-mediated trafficking in T. cruzi, allowing comparison between protein cohorts and other trypanosomes and also suggest that clathrin trafficking in at least some life stages of T. cruzi may be AP-2-independent. PMID:27502971

  10. Sarcocystis cruzi: First Molecular Identification from Cattle in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Narges; Bayani, Masomeh; Ghaffari, Salman

    2013-01-01

    Sarcocystis is a genus of cyst-forming parasites infecting both animals and human. This study aimed to isolate coccidian tissue cysts from muscle of infected animals by a simple method in addition to molecular identification of Sarcocystis cruzi from the samples. The samples were obtained from commercial source in Babol, Northern Iran. Five grams of calf muscle was cut into 2-3 pieces in 30 ml of phosphate-buffered saline containing 0.1% Tween 80 and homogenized with IKA T25, DIGITAL ULTRA-TURRAX. The homogenate was filtrated twice and used for microscopy examination and molecular analysis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and partial sequence analysis of the 18S ribosomal gene were used to identify the Sarcocystis species. Giemsa stain of the filtrated calf muscle samples showed that the sample had ellipse to around tissue cysts contained crescent-shaped bodies. The PCR of the 18SrDNA yielded an 1100 bp DNA band on agarose gel and sequence analysis of the DNA confirmed the isolate as S. cruzi. The sequence was deposited in GenBank by Accession No.KC508514. This is the first molecular identification of an isolate of S. cruzi in Iran. PMID:24551802

  11. Conservation and divergence within the clathrin interactome of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Ligia Cristina; Frederico, Yohana Camila A.; Boehm, Cordula; Moreira, Claudia Maria do Nascimento; Soares, Maurilio José; Field, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasitic protozoa with a significant burden on human health. African and American trypanosomes are causative agents of Nagana and Chagas disease respectively, and speciated about 300 million years ago. These parasites have highly distinct life cycles, pathologies, transmission strategies and surface proteomes, being dominated by the variant surface glycoprotein (African) or mucins (American) respectively. In African trypanosomes clathrin-mediated trafficking is responsible for endocytosis and post-Golgi transport, with several mechanistic aspects distinct from higher organisms. Using clathrin light chain (TcCLC) and EpsinR (TcEpsinR) as affinity handles, we identified candidate clathrin-associated proteins (CAPs) in Trypanosoma cruzi; the cohort includes orthologs of many proteins known to mediate vesicle trafficking, but significantly not the AP-2 adaptor complex. Several trypanosome-specific proteins common with African trypanosomes, were also identified. Fluorescence microscopy revealed localisations for TcEpsinR, TcCLC and TcCHC at the posterior region of trypomastigote cells, coincident with the flagellar pocket and Golgi apparatus. These data provide the first systematic analysis of clathrin-mediated trafficking in T. cruzi, allowing comparison between protein cohorts and other trypanosomes and also suggest that clathrin trafficking in at least some life stages of T. cruzi may be AP-2-independent. PMID:27502971

  12. Gene Discovery through Expressed Sequence Tag Sequencing in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Verdun, Ramiro E.; Di Paolo, Nelson; Urmenyi, Turan P.; Rondinelli, Edson; Frasch, Alberto C. C.; Sanchez, Daniel O.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) constitutes a useful approach for gene identification that, in the case of human pathogens, might result in the identification of new targets for chemotherapy and vaccine development. As part of the Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, we have partially sequenced the 5′ ends of 1,949 clones to generate ESTs. The clones were randomly selected from a normalized CL Brener epimastigote cDNA library. A total of 14.6% of the clones were homologous to previously identified T. cruzi genes, while 18.4% had significant matches to genes from other organisms in the database. A total of 67% of the ESTs had no matches in the database, and thus, some of them might be T. cruzi-specific genes. Functional groups of those sequences with matches in the database were constructed according to their putative biological functions. The two largest categories were protein synthesis (23.3%) and cell surface molecules (10.8%). The information reported in this paper should be useful for researchers in the field to analyze genes and proteins of their own interest. PMID:9784549

  13. Altered Cardiomyocyte Function and Trypanosoma cruzi Persistence in Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jader Santos; Santos-Miranda, Artur; Sales-Junior, Policarpo Ademar; Monti-Rocha, Renata; Campos, Paula Peixoto; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Roman-Campos, Danilo

    2016-05-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the triatominae Trypanosoma cruzi, is one of the leading causes of heart malfunctioning in Latin America. The cardiac phenotype is observed in 20-30% of infected people 10-40 years after their primary infection. The cardiac complications during Chagas disease range from cardiac arrhythmias to heart failure, with important involvement of the right ventricle. Interestingly, no studies have evaluated the electrical properties of right ventricle myocytes during Chagas disease and correlated them to parasite persistence. Taking advantage of a murine model of Chagas disease, we studied the histological and electrical properties of right ventricle in acute (30 days postinfection [dpi]) and chronic phases (90 dpi) of infected mice with the Colombian strain of T. cruzi and their correlation to parasite persistence. We observed an increase in collagen deposition and inflammatory infiltrate at both 30 and 90 dpi. Furthermore, using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, we detected parasites at 90 dpi in right and left ventricles. In addition, we observed action potential prolongation and reduced transient outward K(+) current and L-type Ca(2+) current at 30 and 90 dpi. Taking together, our results demonstrate that T. cruzi infection leads to important modifications in electrical properties associated with inflammatory infiltrate and parasite persistence in mice right ventricle, suggesting a causal role between inflammation, parasite persistence, and altered cardiomyocyte function in Chagas disease. Thus, arrhythmias observed in Chagas disease may be partially related to altered electrical function in right ventricle. PMID:26976879

  14. Blood viscosity changes in experimentally Trypanosoma cruzi-infected rats.

    PubMed

    Berra, H H; Piaggio, E; Revelli, S S; Luquita, A

    2005-01-01

    Microcirculatory alterations would explain focal lesions found in Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection induces host blood properties modifications and defensive responses capable of producing blood hyperviscosity, an ischemic risk factor able to affect microvascular blood flow. We studied whole blood viscosity (eta(b)) and plasmatic and cellular factors influencing it in rats, 7 and 14 days after experimental infection with T. cruzi. Increased plasma viscosity (eta(p)) was found in infected versus control rats and it was correlated with high blood parasite levels at 7 days and enhanced gamma-globulin fraction concentration at 14 days. The hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and eta(b) were higher in 14 days infected rats vs. 7 days and control animals. Also, electron microscopy observation showed morphological changes in red blood cells (RBC) at 7 and 14 days post-infection, with increased proportion of echinocyte and stomatocyte shapes transformation. In our rat model of Chagas' disease, BPL, increased plasmatic protein concentration, enhanced MCV and RBC shapes transformation would determine blood hyperviscosity, cause of microvascular blood flow abnormalities. PMID:15851836

  15. [Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in the placenta and fetuses of mice with Chagasic acute infection].

    PubMed

    Alarcón, Maritza; Pérez, Mary Carmen; Villarreal, Juana; Araujo, Sonia; Goncalves, Loredana; González, Anajulia; Moreno, Elio; Lugo-Yarbuh, Ana

    2009-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to detect the presence of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in the placenta and fetal tissues of NMRI mice (Mus musculus) inoculated with 22 x 10(3) trypomastigotes metacyclic of the M/HOM/BRA/53/Y strain by intraperitoneal route. Mice were pregnant in the acute phase of the infection. The course of patent parasitemia by T. cruzi was evaluated before mating and during pregnancy. At day twenty of gestation, animals were sacrificed and the fetuses and their placentas were removed to evaluate T. cruzi infection. Samples of fetal placenta, heart and skeletal muscle were fixed in 10%, formalin, included in paraffin and stained with hematoxilin and eosin (HE). The histopathological study of sections of fetal tissues revealed inflammatory infiltrates with mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells and without parasitism in these tissues. The amplification of T. cruzi DNA by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) showed a positive reaction in 18% of placental tissue of pregnant infected mice. The samples of heart and skeletal muscle of the fetuses of mothers infected with T. cruzi did not show the presence T. cruzi DNA. The placenta and skeletal muscle of the fetuses analyzed by Peroxidase anti Peroxidase inmunostaining showed T. cruzi antigens in those tissues. Negative results by PCR in fetal tissues might be related with the virulence and tropism associated with the biological and genetic characteristic Of the T. cruzi strain used in the experimental infection of female mice. PMID:19961056

  16. Relationship between biological behaviour and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA profiles of Trypanosoma cruzi strains.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Díaz, R A; Escario, J A; Nogal-Ruiz, J J; Gómez-Barrio, A

    2001-02-01

    Once known some biological characteristics of six Trypanosoma cruzi strains, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was made. Cluster analysis by UPGMA (unweighted pair group method analysis) was then applied both to biological parameters and RAPD profiles. Inspection of the UPGMA phenograms indicates identical clusters, so supporting that usefulness of biological parameters to characterization of T. cruzi strains still remains. PMID:11285506

  17. Thrombospondin-1 interacts with Trypanosoma cruzi surface calreticulin to enhance cellular infection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Candice A; Kleshchenko, Yulia Y; Ikejiani, Adaeze O; Udoko, Aniekanabasi N; Cardenas, Tatiana C; Pratap, Siddharth; Duquette, Mark A; Lima, Maria F; Lawler, Jack; Villalta, Fernando; Nde, Pius N

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which is a neglected tropical disease that produces severe pathology and mortality. The mechanisms by which the parasite invades cells are not well elucidated. We recently reported that T. cruzi up-regulates the expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) to enhance the process of cellular invasion. Here we characterize a novel TSP-1 interaction with T. cruzi that enhances cellular infection. We show that labeled TSP-1 interacts specifically with the surface of T. cruzi trypomastigotes. We used TSP-1 to pull down interacting parasite surface proteins that were identified by mass spectrometry. We also show that full length TSP-1 and the N-terminal domain of TSP-1 (NTSP) interact with T. cruzi surface calreticulin (TcCRT) and other surface proteins. Pre-exposure of recombinant NTSP or TSP-1 to T. cruzi significantly enhances cellular infection of wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) compared to the C-terminal domain of TSP-1, E3T3C1. In addition, blocking TcCRT with antibodies significantly inhibits the enhancement of cellular infection mediated by the TcCRT-TSP-1 interaction. Taken together, our findings indicate that TSP-1 interacts with TcCRT on the surface of T. cruzi through the NTSP domain and that this interaction enhances cellular infection. Thus surface TcCRT is a virulent factor that enhances the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection through TSP-1, which is up-regulated by the parasite. PMID:22808206

  18. Sequence variation in the IL4 gene and resistance to Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Bolivians

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado Arnez, Lucia Elena; Venegas, Evaristo N.; Ober, Carole; Thompson, Emma E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Variation in the IL4 gene has been associated with parastic infections, but has not been studied in Bolivians infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Our results suggest that variation at IL4 influences susceptibility to T. cruzi infection in Bolivians. PMID:21211660

  19. Thrombospondin-1 Interacts with Trypanosoma cruzi Surface Calreticulin to Enhance Cellular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Candice A.; Kleshchenko, Yulia Y.; Ikejiani, Adaeze O.; Udoko, Aniekanabasi N.; Cardenas, Tatiana C.; Pratap, Siddharth; Duquette, Mark A.; Lima, Maria F.; Lawler, Jack; Villalta, Fernando; Nde, Pius N.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which is a neglected tropical disease that produces severe pathology and mortality. The mechanisms by which the parasite invades cells are not well elucidated. We recently reported that T. cruzi up-regulates the expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) to enhance the process of cellular invasion. Here we characterize a novel TSP-1 interaction with T. cruzi that enhances cellular infection. We show that labeled TSP-1 interacts specifically with the surface of T. cruzi trypomastigotes. We used TSP-1 to pull down interacting parasite surface proteins that were identified by mass spectrometry. We also show that full length TSP-1 and the N-terminal domain of TSP-1 (NTSP) interact with T. cruzi surface calreticulin (TcCRT) and other surface proteins. Pre-exposure of recombinant NTSP or TSP-1 to T. cruzi significantly enhances cellular infection of wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) compared to the C-terminal domain of TSP-1, E3T3C1. In addition, blocking TcCRT with antibodies significantly inhibits the enhancement of cellular infection mediated by the TcCRT-TSP-1 interaction. Taken together, our findings indicate that TSP-1 interacts with TcCRT on the surface of T. cruzi through the NTSP domain and that this interaction enhances cellular infection. Thus surface TcCRT is a virulent factor that enhances the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection through TSP-1, which is up-regulated by the parasite. PMID:22808206

  20. Shotgun Sequencing Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi I Sylvio X10/1 and Comparison with T. cruzi VI CL Brener

    PubMed Central

    Franzén, Oscar; Ochaya, Stephen; Sherwood, Ellen; Lewis, Michael D.; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Miles, Michael A.; Andersson, Björn

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, which affects more than 9 million people in Latin America. We have generated a draft genome sequence of the TcI strain Sylvio X10/1 and compared it to the TcVI reference strain CL Brener to identify lineage-specific features. We found virtually no differences in the core gene content of CL Brener and Sylvio X10/1 by presence/absence analysis, but 6 open reading frames from CL Brener were missing in Sylvio X10/1. Several multicopy gene families, including DGF, mucin, MASP and GP63 were found to contain substantially fewer genes in Sylvio X10/1, based on sequence read estimations. 1,861 small insertion-deletion events and 77,349 nucleotide differences, 23% of which were non-synonymous and associated with radical amino acid changes, further distinguish these two genomes. There were 336 genes indicated as under positive selection, 145 unique to T. cruzi in comparison to T. brucei and Leishmania. This study provides a framework for further comparative analyses of two major T. cruzi lineages and also highlights the need for sequencing more strains to understand fully the genomic composition of this parasite. PMID:21408126

  1. Detection and classification of Trypanosoma cruzi by DNA hybridization with nonradioactive probes.

    PubMed

    Solari, A; Venegas, J; Gonzalez, E; Vasquez, C

    1991-01-01

    Total or kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) from 72 isolates and clones of Trypanosoma cruzi as well as from nine related trypanosomatids were analyzed by dot hybridization using nonradioactive kDNA or cloned minicircle fragments as probes. Biotinylated-kDNA probes generated by nick-translation proved reliable for distinguishing Zymodeme 1 and Zymodeme 2bol of T. cruzi parasites. In contrast, digoxigenin-labeled kDNA obtained by random-priming did not distinguish among T. cruzi isolates but did distinguish among New World leishmanias. Cloned minicircle fragments labeled with digoxigenin gave the same results as digoxigenin-labeled kDNA, except for a 10-fold decrease in sensitivity. Digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes proved useful in unambiguously detecting T. cruzi from different geographic regions of America. However, T. rangeli and T. cruzi marinkellei were not distinguished by these probes. PMID:1667933

  2. The diversity and expansion of the trans-sialidase gene family is a common feature in Trypanosoma cruzi clade members.

    PubMed

    Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Cortez, Danielle R; Lima, Fábio M; Cortez, Caroline; Ramírez, José Luis; Martins, Andre G; Serrano, Myrna G; Teixeira, Marta M G; da Silveira, José Franco

    2016-01-01

    Trans-sialidase (TS) is a polymorphic protein superfamily described in members of the protozoan genus Trypanosoma. Of the eight TS groups recently described, TS group I proteins (some of which have catalytic activity) are present in the distantly related Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi phylogenetic clades, whereas other TS groups have only been described in some species belonging to the T. cruzi clade. In the present study we analyzed the repertoire, distribution and phylogenetic relationships of TS genes among species of the T. cruzi clade based on sequence similarity, multiple sequence alignment and tree-reconstruction approaches using TS sequences obtained with the aid of PCR-based strategies or retrieved from genome databases. We included the following representative isolates of the T. cruzi clade from South America: T. cruzi, T. cruzi Tcbat, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii, Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma conorhini. The cloned sequences encoded conserved TS protein motifs Asp-box and VTVxNVxLYNR but lacked the FRIP motif (conserved in TS group I). The T. conorhini sequences were the most divergent. The hybridization patterns of TS probes with chromosomal bands confirmed the abundance of these sequences in species in the T. cruzi clade. Divergence and relationship analysis placed most of the TS sequences in the groups defined in T. cruzi. Further examination of members of TS group II, which includes T. cruzi surface glycoproteins implicated in host cell attachment and invasion, showed that sequences of T. cruzi Tcbat grouped with those of T. cruzi genotype TcI. Our analysis indicates that different members of the T. cruzi clade, with different vertebrate hosts, vectors and pathogenicity, share the extensive expansion and sequence diversification of the TS gene family. Altogether, our results are congruent with the evolutionary history of the T. cruzi clade and represent a contribution to the understanding of the molecular

  3. Cellular signaling during the macrophage invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Mauricio; Dutra, Juliana M F; Carvalho, Tecia M U; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa L; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Souza, Wanderley

    2002-12-01

    We have reported that protein tyrosine kinases play an important role in the invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi into primary resident macrophages. In the present study we carry out immunofluorescence assays, using monoclonal anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, to reveal an accumulation of tyrosine-phosphorylated residues at the site of parasite association with the macrophage surface, colocalizing with host cell F-actin-rich domains. SDS-PAGE analysis of macrophage cell line IC-21 tyrosine phosphoproteins, labeled with [(35)S] L-methionine, revealed several peptides with increased levels of phosphorylation upon interaction with the parasite. Among them, were detected bands of 140, 120, 112, 94, 73, 67, and 56 kDa that match the molecular weights of proteins described as being tyrosine phosphorylated during events that lead to actin assembly in mononuclear phagocytes. The pretreatment of IC-21 macrophages with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostin 23 inhibited trypomastigote uptake showing that tyrosine phosphorylation is important for the parasite penetration in this particular cell line. Immunofluorescence microscopy, using antibodies against p85, the regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), placed this enzyme also in the same sites, in accordance to what is reported for phagocytosis. We suggest that once the components of T. cruzi trypomastigotes surface are recognized by macrophage receptors, they trigger the activation of a tyrosine phosphorylation cascade, PI 3-kinase recruitment, and assembly of actin filaments at the site of initial cell-to-cell contact, resembling the events described during phagocytosis. These achievements support the model for a phagocytic-like actin-dependent invasion mechanism for T. cruzi trypomastigotes into macrophages. PMID:12483314

  4. Polyamine depletion inhibits the autophagic response modulating Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Vanrell, María C.; Cueto, Juan A.; Barclay, Jeremías J.; Carrillo, Carolina; Colombo, María I.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Romano, Patricia S.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cell process that in normal conditions serves to recycle cytoplasmic components and aged or damaged organelles. The autophagic pathway has been implicated in many physiological and pathological situations, even during the course of infection by intracellular pathogens. Many compounds are currently used to positively or negatively modulate the autophagic response. Recently it was demonstrated that the polyamine spermidine is a physiological inducer of autophagy in eukaryotic cells. We have previously shown that the etiological agent of Chagas disease, the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, interacts with autophagic compartments during host cell invasion and that preactivation of autophagy significantly increases host cell colonization by this parasite. In the present report we have analyzed the effect of polyamine depletion on the autophagic response of the host cell and on T. cruzi infectivity. Our data showed that depleting intracellular polyamines by inhibiting the biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) suppressed the induction of autophagy in response to starvation or rapamycin treatment in two cell lines. This effect was associated with a decrease in the levels of LC3 and ATG5, two proteins required for autophagosome formation. As a consequence of inhibiting host cell autophagy, DFMO impaired T. cruzi colonization, indicating that polyamines and autophagy facilitate parasite infection. Thus, our results point to DFMO as a novel autophagy inhibitor. While other autophagy inhibitors such as wortmannin and 3-methyladenine are nonspecific and potentially toxic, DFMO is an FDA-approved drug that may have value in limiting autophagy and the spread of the infection in Chagas disease and possibly other pathological settings. PMID:23697944

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Response to Ionizing Radiation Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Helaine Graziele Santos; Grynberg, Priscila; Bitar, Mainá; Pires, Simone da Fonseca; Hilário, Heron Oliveira; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Machado, Carlos Renato; de Andrade, Hélida Monteiro; Franco, Glória Regina

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, enduring up to 1.5 kGy of gamma rays. Ionizing radiation can damage the DNA molecule both directly, resulting in double-strand breaks, and indirectly, as a consequence of reactive oxygen species production. After a dose of 500 Gy of gamma rays, the parasite genome is fragmented, but the chromosomal bands are restored within 48 hours. Under such conditions, cell growth arrests for up to 120 hours and the parasites resume normal growth after this period. To better understand the parasite response to ionizing radiation, we analyzed the proteome of irradiated (4, 24, and 96 hours after irradiation) and non-irradiated T. cruzi using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. A total of 543 spots were found to be differentially expressed, from which 215 were identified. These identified protein spots represent different isoforms of only 53 proteins. We observed a tendency for overexpression of proteins with molecular weights below predicted, indicating that these may be processed, yielding shorter polypeptides. The presence of shorter protein isoforms after irradiation suggests the occurrence of post-translational modifications and/or processing in response to gamma radiation stress. Our results also indicate that active translation is essential for the recovery of parasites from ionizing radiation damage. This study therefore reveals the peculiar response of T. cruzi to ionizing radiation, raising questions about how this organism can change its protein expression to survive such a harmful stress. PMID:24842666

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi contains two galactokinases; molecular and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Lobo-Rojas, Ángel E; González-Marcano, Eglys B; Valera-Vera, Edward A; Acosta, Héctor R; Quiñones, Wilfredo A; Burchmore, Richard J S; Concepción, Juan L; Cáceres, Ana J

    2016-10-01

    Two different putative galactokinase genes, found in the genome database of Trypanosoma cruzi were cloned and sequenced. Expression of the genes in Escherichia coli resulted for TcGALK-1 in the synthesis of a soluble and active enzyme, and in the case of TcGALK-2 gene a less soluble protein, with predicted molecular masses of 51.9kDa and 51.3kDa, respectively. The Km values determined for the recombinant proteins were for galactose 0.108mM (TcGALK-1) and 0.091mM (TcGALK-2) and for ATP 0.36mM (TcGALK-1) and 0.1mM (TcGALK-2). Substrate inhibition by ATP (Ki 0.414mM) was only observed for TcGALK-2. Gel-filtration chromatography showed that natural TcGALKs and recombinant TcGALK-1 are monomeric. In agreement with the possession of a type-1 peroxisome-targeting signal by both TcGALKs, they were found to be present inside glycosomes using two different methods of subcellular fractionation in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Both genes are expressed in epimastigote and trypomastigote stages since the respective proteins were immunodetected by western blotting. The T. cruzi galactokinases present their highest (52-47%) sequence identity with their counterpart from Leishmania spp., followed by prokaryotic galactokinases such as those from E. coli and Lactococcus lactis (26-23%). In a phylogenetic analysis, the trypanosomatid galactokinases form a separate cluster, showing an affiliation with bacteria. Epimastigotes of T. cruzi can grow in glucose-depleted LIT-medium supplemented with 20mM of galactose, suggesting that this hexose, upon phosphorylation by a TcGALK, could be used in the synthesis of UDP-galactose and also as a possible carbon and energy source. PMID:27312997

  7. Synergistic Effect of Lupenone and Caryophyllene Oxide against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Polanco-Hernández, Glendy; Escalante-Erosa, Fabiola; García-Sosa, Karlina; Rosado, María E.; Guzmán-Marín, Eugenia; Acosta-Viana, Karla Y.; Giménez-Turba, Alberto; Salamanca, Efraín; Peña-Rodríguez, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro trypanocidal activity of a 1 : 4 mixture of lupenone and caryophyllene oxide confirmed a synergistic effect of the terpenoids against epimastigotes forms of T. cruzi (IC50 = 10.4 μg/mL, FIC = 0.46). In addition, testing of the terpenoid mixture for its capacity to reduce the number of amastigote nests in cardiac tissue and skeletal muscle of infected mice showed a reduction of more than 80% at a dose level of 20.8 mg·kg−1·day−1. PMID:23762135

  8. Toxicity and properties of the extract from Sarcocystis cruzi cysts.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Taguchi, K; Shibata, Y; Kobayashi, T; Shimura, K; Itagaki, H

    1995-12-01

    The extract from Sarcocystis cruzi cysts in bovine muscle was subcutaneously injected to mice, guinea pigs, chickens, and rabbits to detect its toxicity. Only rabbits showed reactions after administration of the extract at a dose of 25 micrograms. The main clinical signs of the rabbits were depression, reduction in body temperature and intermittent diarrhea and the hematological findings observed were elevation in WBC, RBC, PCV, TP, BUN, AST, AUT and creatinine values and reduction in glucose, K+ and pH of blood. The extract, crude toxin, was a water soluble, acid-alkali stable and thermolabile protein and estimated to be a molecular mass of 15-16 kd. PMID:8720045

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in B-cell-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, A M; Santoro, F; Afchain, D; Bazin, H; Capron, A

    1981-01-01

    The effect of neonatally initiated injections of anti-mu rabbit antiserum on immunity of rats against Trypanosoma cruzi infection was investigated in vivo. Anti-mu treatment resulted in a loss of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG2a synthesis and, subsequently, of antibody production. These rats so treated were shown to be significantly more susceptible to the acute phase of the infection than the control rats treated with normal rabbit serum, as measured by increased parasitemia and mortality. These results indicate the essential role of antibodies, probably in association with complement or effector cells or both, in immunity to acute Chagas' disease. PMID:6783543

  10. Identifying four Trypanosoma cruzi I isolate haplotypes from different geographic regions in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Claudia; Bargues, M Dolores; Fajardo, Anabella; Montilla, Marleny; Triana, Omar; Vallejo, Gustavo Adolfo; Guhl, Felipe

    2007-07-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has been classified into the groups T. cruzi I and T. cruzi II. The latter is subdivided into five smaller lineages based on multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and random amplified polymorphic DNA, designated as IIa-IIe, which shows correspondence with rRNA/mini-exon lineages. Twelve previously characterised T. cruzi isolates from different hosts, including humans, Didelphis marsupialis, and triatomines were analysed to establish genetic variability in T. cruzi group T. cruzi I isolates from different geographical regions of Colombia. DNA samples were sequenced based on the mini-exon gene intergenic region. Sequences were analysed using Clustal W, Staden 1.5 and MEGA3 software, and using reported sequences from the GenBank as reference. The genetic distances were analysed using Kimura's two-parameter model. The isolates' joint alignment was of 350bp, and the calculated nucleotide divergence was of 17.5%. The differences consisted of 23 transitions (7.2%), 14 transversions (4.4%) and 19 insertion-deletions (5.9%). The Colombian T cruzi I isolates revealed sufficient genetic variability for us to propose the existence of four haplotypes identified through single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and insertion/deletion found in the mini-exon gene's non-transcribed spacer intergenic region. PMID:17287152

  11. Is the Antitumor Property of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Mediated by Its Calreticulin?

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Toloza, Galia; Abello, Paula; Ferreira, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Eight to 10 million people in 21 endemic countries are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. However, only 30% of those infected develop symptoms of Chagas’ disease, a chronic, neglected tropical disease worldwide. Similar to other pathogens, T. cruzi has evolved to resist the host immune response. Studies, performed 80 years ago in the Soviet Union, proposed that T. cruzi infects tumor cells with similar capacity to that displayed for target tissues such as cardiac, aortic, or digestive. An antagonistic relationship between T. cruzi infection and cancer development was also proposed, but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained largely unknown. Probably, a variety of T. cruzi molecules is involved. This review focuses on how T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), exteriorized from the endoplasmic reticulum, targets the first classical complement component C1 and negatively regulates the classical complement activation cascade, promoting parasite infectivity. We propose that this C1-dependent TcCRT-mediated virulence is critical to explain, at least an important part, of the parasite capacity to inhibit tumor development. We will discuss how TcCRT, by directly interacting with venous and arterial endothelial cells, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth. Thus, these TcCRT functions not only illustrate T. cruzi interactions with the host immune defensive strategies, but also illustrate a possible co-evolutionary adaptation to privilege a prolonged interaction with its host. PMID:27462315

  12. Nucleotide sequences provide evidence of genetic exchange among distantly related lineages of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Carlos A.; Ayala, Francisco J.

    2001-01-01

    Simple phylogenetic tests were applied to a large data set of nucleotide sequences from two nuclear genes and a region of the mitochondrial genome of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease. Incongruent gene genealogies manifest genetic exchange among distantly related lineages of T. cruzi. Two widely distributed isoenzyme types of T. cruzi are hybrids, their genetic composition being the likely result of genetic exchange between two distantly related lineages. The data show that the reference strain for the T. cruzi genome project (CL Brener) is a hybrid. Well-supported gene genealogies show that mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences from T. cruzi cluster, respectively, in three or four distinct clades that do not fully correspond to the two previously defined major lineages of T. cruzi. There is clear genetic differentiation among the major groups of sequences, but genetic diversity within each major group is low. We estimate that the major extant lineages of T. cruzi have diverged during the Miocene or early Pliocene (3–16 million years ago). PMID:11416213

  13. Is the Antitumor Property of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Mediated by Its Calreticulin?

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Toloza, Galia; Abello, Paula; Ferreira, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Eight to 10 million people in 21 endemic countries are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. However, only 30% of those infected develop symptoms of Chagas' disease, a chronic, neglected tropical disease worldwide. Similar to other pathogens, T. cruzi has evolved to resist the host immune response. Studies, performed 80 years ago in the Soviet Union, proposed that T. cruzi infects tumor cells with similar capacity to that displayed for target tissues such as cardiac, aortic, or digestive. An antagonistic relationship between T. cruzi infection and cancer development was also proposed, but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained largely unknown. Probably, a variety of T. cruzi molecules is involved. This review focuses on how T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), exteriorized from the endoplasmic reticulum, targets the first classical complement component C1 and negatively regulates the classical complement activation cascade, promoting parasite infectivity. We propose that this C1-dependent TcCRT-mediated virulence is critical to explain, at least an important part, of the parasite capacity to inhibit tumor development. We will discuss how TcCRT, by directly interacting with venous and arterial endothelial cells, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth. Thus, these TcCRT functions not only illustrate T. cruzi interactions with the host immune defensive strategies, but also illustrate a possible co-evolutionary adaptation to privilege a prolonged interaction with its host. PMID:27462315

  14. Is the infectiousness of dogs naturally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi associated with poly-parasitism?

    PubMed

    Enriquez, G F; Garbossa, G; Macchiaverna, N P; Argibay, H D; Bua, J; Gürtler, R E; Cardinal, M V

    2016-06-15

    Interactions among different species of parasites co-infecting the same host could be synergistic or antagonistic. These interactions may modify both the frequency of infected hosts and their infectiousness, and therefore impact on transmission dynamics. This study determined the infectiousness of Trypanosoma cruzi-seropositive dogs (using xenodiagnosis) and their parasite load (quantified by qPCR), and tested the association between both variables and the presence of concomitant endoparasites. A cross-sectional serosurvey conducted in eight rural villages from Pampa del Indio and neighboring municipalities (northeastern Argentina) detected 32 T. cruzi-seropositive dogs out of 217 individuals examined for infection. Both the infectiousness to the vector Triatoma infestans and parasite load of T. cruzi-seropositive dogs examined were heterogeneous. A statistically significant, nine-fold higher mean infectiousness was registered in T. cruzi-seropositive dogs co-infected with Ancylostoma caninum and a trematode than in T. cruzi-seropositive dogs without these infections. The median parasite load of T. cruzi was also significantly higher in dogs co-infected with these helminths. An opposite trend was observed in T. cruzi-seropositive dogs that were serologically positive to Toxoplasma gondii or Neospora caninum relative to dogs seronegative for these parasites. Using multiple logistic regression analysis with random effects, we found a positive and significant association between the infectiousness of T. cruzi-seropositive dogs and co-infections with A. caninum and a trematode. Our results suggest that co-infections may be a modifier of host infectiousness in dogs naturally infected with T. cruzi. PMID:27198799

  15. Serum Cytokines as Biomarkers of Early Trypanosoma cruzi infection by Congenital Exposure.

    PubMed

    Volta, Bibiana J; Bustos, Patricia L; Cardoni, Rita L; De Rissio, Ana M; Laucella, Susana A; Bua, Jacqueline

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, leads to an activation of the immune system in congenitally infected infants. In this study, we measured a set of cytokines/chemokines and the levels of parasitemia by quantitative PCR in the circulation of neonates born to T. cruzi-infected mothers to evaluate the predictive value of these mediators as biomarkers of congenital transmission. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 35 infants with congenital T. cruzi infection, of which 15 and 10 infants had been diagnosed by detection of parasites by microscopy in the first and sixth month after delivery, respectively, and the remaining 10 had been diagnosed by the presence of T. cruzi-specific Abs at 10-12 mo old. Uninfected infants born to either T. cruzi-infected or uninfected mothers were also evaluated as controls. The plasma levels of IL-17A, MCP-1, and monokine induced by IFN-γ were increased in infants congenitally infected with T. cruzi, even before they developed detectable parasitemia or seroconversion. Infants diagnosed between 6 and 12 mo old also showed increased levels of IL-6 and IL-17F at 1 mo of age. Conversely, infants who did not develop congenital T. cruzi infection had higher levels of IFN-γ than infected infants born to uninfected mothers. Monokine induced by IFN-γ, MCP-1, and IFN-γ production induced in T. cruzi-infected infants correlated with parasitemia, whereas the plasma levels of IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-6 were less parasite load dependent. These findings support the existence of a distinct profile of cytokines and chemokines in the circulation of infants born to T. cruzi-infected mothers, which might predict congenital infection. PMID:27183607

  16. First report of human Trypanosoma cruzi infection attributed to TcBat genotype.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, J D; Hernández, C; Montilla, M; Zambrano, P; Flórez, A C; Parra, E; Cucunubá, Z M

    2014-11-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic disease of the American continent caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and divided into six discrete typing units (TcI - TcVI). Nearly 10 million people harbour the infection representing a serious issue in public health. Epidemiological surveillance allowed us to detect a bat-related T. cruzi genotype (henceforth named TcBat) in a 5-year-old female living in a forest area in northwestern Colombia. Molecular tools determined a mixed infection of T. cruzi I and TcBat genotypes. This represents the first report of TcBat infection in humans; the epidemiological consequences of this finding are discussed herein. PMID:25285940

  17. Prospects for T. cruzi lineage-specific serological surveillance of wild mammals.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Mills, Emily A; Jansen, Ana Maria; Miles, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    Sequence diversity in the Trypanosoma cruzi small surface molecule TSSA has yielded antigens for serology to investigate the T. cruzi lineage-specific infection history of patients with Chagas disease. Synthetic peptides can be used as the lineage-specific antigens. Here we consider the rationale, feasibility and potential of applying peptide-based lineage-specific serology to naturally infected wild mammals. The commercial availability of appropriate secondary antibodies encourages this further development, for discovery of new reservoir host species and to reveal the wider ecological distribution of T. cruzi lineages, currently hindered by the need to recover live isolates or to attempt genotyping of DNA extracted from blood samples. PMID:26116784

  18. Drug discovery for Chagas disease should consider Trypanosoma cruzi strain diversity

    PubMed Central

    Zingales, Bianca; Miles, Michael A; Moraes, Carolina B; Luquetti, Alejandro; Guhl, Felipe; Schijman, Alejandro G; Ribeiro, Isabela

    2014-01-01

    This opinion piece presents an approach to standardisation of an important aspect of Chagas disease drug discovery and development: selecting Trypanosoma cruzi strains for in vitro screening. We discuss the rationale for strain selection representing T. cruzi diversity and provide recommendations on the preferred parasite stage for drug discovery, T. cruzi discrete typing units to include in the panel of strains and the number of strains/clones for primary screens and lead compounds. We also consider experimental approaches for in vitro drug assays. The Figure illustrates the current Chagas disease drug-discovery and development landscape. PMID:25317712

  19. Regulation and use of the extracellular matrix by Trypanosoma cruzi during early infection

    PubMed Central

    Nde, Pius N.; Lima, Maria F.; Johnson, Candice A.; Pratap, Siddharth; Villalta, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease, which was once thought to be confined to endemic regions of Latin America, has now gone global becoming a new worldwide challenge. For more than a century since its discovery, it has remained neglected with no effective drugs or vaccines. The mechanisms by which Trypanosoma cruzi regulates and uses the extracellular matrix (ECM) to invade cells and cause disease are just beginning to be understood. Here we critically review and discuss the regulation of the ECM interactome by T. cruzi, the use of the ECM by T. cruzi and analyze the molecular ECM/T. cruzi interphase during the early process of infection. It has been shown that invasive trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi use and modulate components of the ECM during the initial process of infection. Infective trypomastigotes up-regulate the expression of laminin γ-1 (LAMC1) and thrombospondin (THBS1) to facilitate the recruitment of trypomastigotes to enhance cellular infection. Silencing the expression of LAMC1 and THBS1 by stable RNAi dramatically reduces trypanosome infection. T. cruzi gp83, a ligand that mediates the attachment of trypanosomes to cells to initiate infection, up-regulates LAMC1 expression to enhance cellular infection. Infective trypomastigotes use Tc85 to interact with laminin, p45 mucin to interact with LAMC1 through galectin-3 (LGALS3), a human lectin, and calreticulin (TcCRT) to interact with TSB1 to enhance cellular infection. Silencing the expression of LGALS3 also reduces cellular infection. Despite the role of the ECM in T. cruzi infection, almost nothing is known about the ECM interactome networks operating in the process of T. cruzi infection and its ligands. Here, we present the first elucidation of the human ECM interactome network regulated by T. cruzi and its gp83 ligand that facilitates cellular infection. The elucidation of the human ECM interactome regulated by T. cruzi and the dissection of the molecular ECM/T. cruzi interphase using systems biology approaches are

  20. Phospholipid and glycolipid composition of acidocalcisomes of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Salto, María Laura; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark; de Lederkremer, Rosa M.; Docampo, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Highly purified acidocalcisomes from Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes were obtained by differential centrifugation and iodixanol gradient ultracentrifugation. Lipid analysis of acidocalcisomes revealed the presence of low amounts of 3β-hydroxysterols and predominance of phospholipids. Alkylacyl phosphatidylinositol (16:0/18:2), diacyl phosphatidylinositol (18:0/18:2), diacyl phosphatidylcholine (16:0/18:2; 16:1/18:2; 16:2/18:2, 18:1/18:2, and 18:2/18:2), and diacyl phosphatidylethanolamine (16:0/18:2 and 16:1/18:2) were the only phospholipids characterized by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Incubation of epimastigotes with [3H]-mannose and isolation of acidocalcisomes allowed the detection of a glycoinositolphospholipid (GIPL) in these organelles. The sugar content of the acidocalcisomal GIPL was similar to that of the GIPL present in a microsomal fraction but the amount of galactofuranose and inositol with respect to the other monosaccharides was lower, suggesting a different chemical structure. Taken together, these results indicate that acidocalcisomes of T. cruzi have a distinct lipid and carbohydrate composition. PMID:18207579

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653

  2. Restricted genetic diversity in the ubiquitous cattle parasite, Sarcocystis cruzi.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dunams, Detiger B; Pritt, Bobbi

    2008-09-01

    Although parasites of the genus Sarcocystis have likely cycled between bovine herbivores and canine carnivores for tens of millions of years, humans may have profoundly influenced the ecology and evolution of those prevalent in domesticated dogs and cattle. To preliminarily assess the possibility of such anthropogenic effects, we surveyed genetic variation in conserved (18S small subunit) and variable (ITS-1) portions of ribosomal DNA from a large sample of Sarcocystis cruzi occurring in taurine beef cattle raised in the United States and Uruguay, and compared these data to available homologues, including those reported from zebu cattle, water buffalo, and bison. For additional context, we compared the apparent diversity of cattle parasites to that reported from congeneric parasites in other hosts. We find that the S. cruzi of taurine cattle, whether derived from the Americas or Asia, are devoid of variability in the sequenced portion (80%) of the small subunit rDNA. By contrast, geographically limited samples of related parasites in other hosts, including those of wildlife, are more variable. At the adjacent ITS-1 locus, allelic distribution patterns did not indicate any regional barriers to gene flow, suggesting that the parasite may have been introduced to the Americas via a common source such as domesticated dogs or cattle. Thus, human impact on this parasite's distribution and diversification would seem to have been great. PMID:18501682

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi: adaptation to its vectors and its hosts

    PubMed Central

    Noireau, François; Diosque, Patricio; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2009-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis is a parasitic zoonosis that occurs throughout Latin America. The etiological agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, is able to infect almost all tissues of its mammalian hosts and spreads in the environment in multifarious transmission cycles that may or not be connected. This biological plasticity, which is probably the result of the considerable heterogeneity of the taxon, exemplifies a successful adaptation of a parasite resulting in distinct outcomes of infection and a complex epidemiological pattern. In the 1990s, most endemic countries strengthened national control programs to interrupt the transmission of this parasite to humans. However, many obstacles remain to the effective control of the disease. Current knowledge of the different components involved in elaborate system that is American trypanosomiasis (the protozoan parasite T. cruzi, vectors Triatominae and the many reservoirs of infection), as well as the interactions existing within the system, is still incomplete. The Triatominae probably evolve from predatory reduvids in response to the availability of vertebrate food source. However, the basic mechanisms of adaptation of some of them to artificial ecotopes remain poorly understood. Nevertheless, these adaptations seem to be associated with a behavioral plasticity, a reduction in the genetic repertoire and increasing developmental instability. PMID:19250627

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653

  5. Characterization of inositolphospholipids in Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote forms.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, M L; Couto, A S; Colli, W; de Lederkremer, R M

    1996-05-20

    In vivo labeling experiments with [3H]palmitic acid, [3H]inositol, and [3H]glucose allowed the identification of two main classes of inositolphospholipids (IPLs) from the trypomastigote stage of Trypanosoma cruzi. Purification of these compounds was achieved by ion-exchange chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography and thin layer chromatography. Specific phosphatidyl-inositol phospholipase C digestion, dephosphorylation and acid methanolysis showed a ceramide structure for the lower migrating IPL1. Palmitoyldihydrosphingosine and palmitoylsphingosine were detected by reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography. On the other hand, IPL2 showed to be a mixture of diacylglycero- and alkylacylglycero-phospholipids in a 1:1 ratio. After PI-PLC digestion, the lipids were separated by preparative TLC and individually analysed. The diacylglycerol contained mainly C18:0 fatty acid together with a low amount of C16:0. Hexadecylglycerol esterified with the C18:0 fatty acid was the only alkylacylglycerol detected. The C18:2 and C18:1 fatty acids, preponderant in the PI molecules of epimastigote forms, were not detected in trypomastigote forms. This is the first report on inositol phospholipids, putative precursors of lipid anchors in the infective stage of T. cruzi. PMID:8679689

  6. The effect of placental subfractions on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Frank, F; Sartori, M J; Asteggiano, C; Lin, S; de Fabro, S P; Fretes, R E

    2000-10-01

    Five subfractions were collected from six term placentas by mincing and differential centrifugation: homogenate, nuclear, mitochondrial, lysosomal, and supernatant. The effect of each subfraction on Trypanosoma cruzi was assessed by trypan blue exclusion, relative infectivity of mice, and penetration of susceptible cultured VERO cells. Ultrastructural changes in trypomastigotes were identified after high cell mortality was shown by dye exclusion following treatment with lysosomal and supernatant fractions. Trypomastigotes treated with other subfractions or preheated subfractions, those recovered from infected VERO cells, and controls remained unaffected. This was confirmed by the ability of treated trypomastigotes to infect mice or to penetrate susceptible cultured VERO cells. There were a 48% decrease in parasitemia and fewer myocardial lesions in Balb/c mice following treatment with the lysosomal subfraction compared to homogenate and controls. VERO cells were invaded about half as often after lysosomal treatment compared to controls (P < 0. 05); an 11% decrease in cell invasion following homogenate treatment was not significant. Placental lysosomal enzyme activity was unaffected by trypomastigotes. Human placentas contain one or more heat-labile substances in lysosomal and supernatant subfractions which inhibit or injure trypomastigotes of T. cruzi in cell-free systems. PMID:11001862

  7. Retrospective distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    León, Cielo M; Hernández, Carolina; Montilla, Marleny; Ramírez, Juan David

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, which affects approximately eight million people in the Americas. This parasite exhibits genetic variability, with at least six discrete typing units broadly distributed in the American continent. T. cruzi I (TcI) shows remarkable genetic diversity; a genotype linked to human infections and a domestic cycle of transmission have recently been identified, hence, this strain was named TcIDom. The aim of this work was to describe the spatiotemporal distribution of TcI subpopulations across humans, insect vectors and mammalian reservoirs in Colombia by means of molecular typing targeting the spliced leader intergenic region of mini-exon gene. We analysed 101 TcI isolates and observed a distribution of sylvatic TcI in 70% and TcIDom in 30%. In humans, the ratio was sylvatic TcI in 60% and TcIDom in 40%. In mammal reservoirs, the distribution corresponded to sylvatic TcI in 96% and TcIDom in 4%. Among insect vectors, sylvatic TcI was observed in 48% and TcIDom in 52%. In conclusion, the circulation of TcIDom is emerging in Colombia and this genotype is still adapting to the domestic cycle of transmission. The epidemiological and clinical implications of these findings are discussed herein. PMID:25946157

  8. [Control of the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in Argentina 1999].

    PubMed

    Segura, E L; Sosa Estani, S; Esquivel, M L; Gómez, A; Salomon, O D

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 2 million people in Argentina are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, thereby constituting the major tropical disease in the country. As in other six Southern Cone countries, Triatoma infestans is the only or major vector of T. cruzi among human and domestic animals. In Argentina, a vertically structured National Chagas Control Program was established in 1962. Such a program pursued the elimination of domestic and peri-domestic populations of T. infestans through insecticidal spraying, and the serological control of blood donors to prevent transfusion-related infections. This program strongly reduced the nation-wide serological prevalence of T. cruzi in the population. For example, in 18 or 20 year-old men drafted into military service, the seroprevalence decreased from 10.1% in 1964 for those who had been born in 1944 to 1.9% in 1993 for those born in 1975. However, the vertical strategy failed to reach and sustain the surveillance phase in widespread rural areas with disperse populations due to its intrinsic limitations and the reduced priority level assigned to rural health programs. An alternative, horizontally-structured control strategy of T. infestans was developed and assayed in the Province of Santiago del Estero between 1985-1989, and 1991-1992. The projects demonstrated that insecticidal spraying carried out with community participation combined effectiveness and commitment in such a way as to produce a strong impact on house reinfestation and the extension of the area under entomological surveillance. This experience has been transferred in a chain of responsibilities to the personnel of the National Chagas Control Program, using participating workshops, procedural guidelines, and practical training. This personnel transferred the strategy using similar methods to the field health care agents and volunteers chosen by their own communities (community leaders). After the workshops, the leaders received all

  9. The Role of Heme and Reactive Oxygen Species in Proliferation and Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Marcia Cristina; Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; de Souza, Cíntia Fernandes; Nogueira, Natália Pereira de Almeida; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle comprehending two distinct hosts and a series of morphological and functional transformations. Hemoglobin degradation inside the insect vector releases high amounts of heme, and this molecule is known to exert a number of physiological functions. Moreover, the absence of its complete biosynthetic pathway in T. cruzi indicates heme as an essential molecule for this trypanosomatid survival. Within the hosts, T. cruzi has to cope with sudden environmental changes especially in the redox status and heme is able to increase the basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can be also produced as byproducts of the parasite aerobic metabolism. In this regard, ROS sensing is likely to be an important mechanism for the adaptation and interaction of these organisms with their hosts. In this paper we discuss the main features of heme and ROS susceptibility in T. cruzi biology. PMID:22007287

  10. Oral Exposure to Phytomonas serpens Attenuates Thrombocytopenia and Leukopenia during Acute Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rosiane V.; Malvezi, Aparecida D.; Augusto, Leonardo da Silva; Kian, Danielle; Tatakihara, Vera Lúcia H.; Yamauchi, Lucy M.; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F.; Rizzo, Luiz V.; Schenkman, Sergio; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2013-01-01

    Mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, rapidly develop anemia and thrombocytopenia. These effects are partially promoted by the parasite trans-sialidase (TS), which is shed in the blood and depletes sialic acid from the platelets, inducing accelerated platelet clearance and causing thrombocytopenia during the acute phase of disease. Here, we demonstrate that oral immunization of C57BL/6 mice with Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate parasite that shares common antigens with T. cruzi but has no TS activity, reduces parasite burden and prevents thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Immunization also reduces platelet loss after intraperitoneal injection of TS. In addition, passive transfer of immune sera raised in mice against P. serpens prevented platelet clearance. Thus, oral exposure to P. serpens attenuates the progression of thrombocytopenia induced by TS from T. cruzi. These findings are not only important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection but also for developing novel approaches of intervention in Chagas disease. PMID:23844182

  11. Oral exposure to Phytomonas serpens attenuates thrombocytopenia and leukopenia during acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rosiane V; Malvezi, Aparecida D; Augusto, Leonardo da Silva; Kian, Danielle; Tatakihara, Vera Lúcia H; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F; Rizzo, Luiz V; Schenkman, Sergio; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2013-01-01

    Mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, rapidly develop anemia and thrombocytopenia. These effects are partially promoted by the parasite trans-sialidase (TS), which is shed in the blood and depletes sialic acid from the platelets, inducing accelerated platelet clearance and causing thrombocytopenia during the acute phase of disease. Here, we demonstrate that oral immunization of C57BL/6 mice with Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate parasite that shares common antigens with T. cruzi but has no TS activity, reduces parasite burden and prevents thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Immunization also reduces platelet loss after intraperitoneal injection of TS. In addition, passive transfer of immune sera raised in mice against P. serpens prevented platelet clearance. Thus, oral exposure to P. serpens attenuates the progression of thrombocytopenia induced by TS from T. cruzi. These findings are not only important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection but also for developing novel approaches of intervention in Chagas disease. PMID:23844182

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi: sequence analysis of the variable region of kinetoplast minicircles.

    PubMed

    Telleria, Jenny; Lafay, Bénédicte; Virreira, Myrna; Barnabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel; Svoboda, Michal

    2006-12-01

    The comparisons of 170 sequences of kinetoplast DNA minicircle hypervariable region obtained from 19 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi and 2 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi marenkellei showed that only 56% exhibited a significant homology one with other sequences. These sequences could be grouped into homology classes showing no significant sequence similarity with any other homology group. The 44% remaining sequences thus corresponded to unique sequences in our data set. In the DTU I ("Discrete Typing Units") 51% of the sequences were unique. In contrast, in the DTU IId, 87.5% of sequences were distributed into three classes. The results obtained for T. cruzi marinkellei, showed that all sequences were unique, without any similarity between them and T. cruzi sequences. Analysis of palindromes in all sequence sets show high frequency of the EcoRI site. Analysis of repetitive sequences suggested a common ancestral origin of the kDNA. The editing mechanism that occurs in kinetoplastidae is discussed. PMID:16730709

  13. Phylogenetic character mapping of proteomic diversity shows high correlation with subspecific phylogenetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Telleria, Jenny; Biron, David G; Brizard, Jean-Paul; Demettre, Edith; Séveno, Martial; Barnabé, Christian; Ayala, Francisco J; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2010-11-23

    We performed a phylogenetic character mapping on 26 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible for Chagas disease, and 2 stocks of the sister taxon T. cruzi marinkellei to test for possible associations between T. cruzi-subspecific phylogenetic diversity and levels of protein expression, as examined by proteomic analysis and mass spectrometry. We observed a high level of correlation (P < 10(-4)) between genetic distance, as established by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, and proteomic dissimilarities estimated by proteomic Euclidian distances. Several proteins were found to be specifically associated to T. cruzi phylogenetic subdivisions (discrete typing units). This study explores the previously uncharacterized links between infraspecific phylogenetic diversity and gene expression in a human pathogen. It opens the way to searching for new vaccine and drug targets and for identification of specific biomarkers at the subspecific level of pathogens. PMID:21059959

  14. Mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi Placenta Invasion and Infection: The Use of Human Chorionic Villi Explants

    PubMed Central

    Fretes, Ricardo E.; Kemmerling, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease, endemic in Latin America, is associated with premature labor and miscarriage. During vertical transmission the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) crosses the placental barrier. However, the exact mechanism of the placental infection remains unclear. We review the congenital transmission of T. cruzi, particularly the role of possible local placental factors that contribute to the vertical transmission of the parasite. Additionally, we analyze the different methods available for studying the congenital transmission of the parasite. In that context, the ex vivo infection with T. cruzi trypomastigotes of human placental chorionic villi constitutes an excellent tool for studying parasite infection strategies as well as possible local antiparasitic mechanisms. PMID:22701129

  15. Regional Variation in the Correlation of Antibody and T-Cell Responses to Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Diana L.; Marks, Morgan; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Gilman, Robert H.; Goodhew, Brook; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Halperin, Anthony; Sanchez, Gerardo; Verastegui, Manuela; Escalante, Patricia; Naquira, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z.; Bern, Caryn

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Central and South America. Geographic variations in the sensitivity of serologic diagnostic assays to T. cruzi may reflect differences in T. cruzi exposure. We measured parasite-specific T-cell responses among seropositive individuals in two populations from South America with widely varying antibody titers against T. cruzi. Antibody titers among seropositive individuals were significantly lower in Arequipa, Peru compared with Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Similarly, the proportion of seropositive individuals with positive T-cell responses was lower in Peru than Bolivia, resulting in overall lower frequencies of interferon-γ (IFNγ)-secreting cells from Peruvian samples. However, the magnitude of the IFNγ response was similar among the IFNγ responders in both locations. These data indicate that immunological discrepancies based on geographic region are reflected in T-cell responses as well as antibody responses. PMID:24710614

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi parasites fight for control of the JAK-STAT pathway by disarming their host

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Philipp; Schwarz, Ralph T; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Meyer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The zoonotic Chagas’ disease is caused by infections with the hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) which is endemic in Latin America. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, the underlying molecular processes involved in host-parasite interactions are only poorly understood. In particular, the mechanisms for parasite persistence in host cells remain largely unknown. Cytokine-driven transcription factors from the family of STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins appear to play a central role in the fight against T. cruzi infection. However, amastigotes proliferating in the cytoplasm of infected host cells develop effective strategies to circumvent the attack executed by STAT proteins. This review highlights the interactions between T. cruzi parasites and human host cells in terms of cytokine signaling and, in particular, discusses the impact of STATs on the balance between parasite invasion and clearance. PMID:26413423

  17. Risk Factors and Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection of Dutch Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Slot, Ed; Hogema, Boris M.; Molier, Michel; Bart, Aldert; Zaaijer, Hans L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Blood donors unaware of Trypanosoma cruzi infection may donate infectious blood. Risk factors and the presence of T. cruzi antibodies in at-risk Dutch blood donors were studied to assess whether specific blood safety measures are warranted in the Netherlands. Methodology Birth in a country endemic for Chagas disease (CEC), having a mother born in a CEC, or having resided for at least six continuous months in a CEC were considered risk factors for T. cruzi infection. From March through September 2013, risk factor questions were asked to all donors who volunteered to donate blood or blood components. Serum samples were collected from donors reporting one or more risk factors, and screened for IgG antibodies to T. cruzi by EIA. Results Risk factors for T. cruzi infection were reported by 1,426 of 227,278 donors (0.6%). Testing 1,333 at-risk donors, none (0.0%; 95%, CI 0.0–0.4%) was seroreactive for IgG antibodies to T. cruzi. A total of 472 donors were born in a CEC; 553 donors reported their mother being born in a CEC; and 1,121 donors reported a long-term stay in a CEC. The vast majority of reported risk factors were related to Suriname and Brazil. Overall, the participants resided for 7,694 years in CECs, which equals 2.8 million overnight stays. Of those, 1.9 million nights were spent in Suriname. Conclusions/Significance Asymptomatic T. cruzi infection appears to be extremely rare among Dutch blood donors. Blood safety interventions to mitigate the risk of T. cruzi transmission by transfusion would be highly cost-ineffective in the Netherlands, and are thus not required. PMID:26950434

  18. Genetic immunization converts the trypanosoma cruzi B-Cell mitogen proline racemase to an effective immunogen.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Marianne A; Norris, Karen A

    2010-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. Acute T. cruzi infection results in polyclonal B-cell activation and delayed specific humoral immunity. T. cruzi proline racemase (TcPRAC), a T. cruzi B-cell mitogen, may contribute to this dysfunctional humoral response. Stimulation of murine splenocytes with recombinant protein (rTcPRAC) induced B-cell proliferation, antibody secretion, interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, and upregulation of CD69 and CD86 on B cells. Marginal zone (MZ) B cells are more responsive to T-cell-independent (TI) rTcPRAC stimulation than are follicular mature (FM) B cells in terms of proliferation, antibody secretion, and IL-10 production. During experimental T. cruzi infection, TcPRAC-specific IgG remained undetectable when responses to other T. cruzi antigens developed. Conversely, intradermal genetic immunization via gene gun (GG) delivered TcPRAC as an immunogen, generating high-titer TcPRAC-specific IgG without B-cell dysfunction. TcPRAC GG immunization led to antigen-specific splenic memory B-cell and bone marrow plasma cell formation. TcPRAC-specific IgG bound mitogenic rTcPRAC, decreasing subsequent B-cell activation. GG immunization with rTcPRAC DNA was nonmitogenic and did not affect the generation of specific IgG to another T. cruzi antigen, complement regulatory protein (CRP). These data demonstrate the utility of genetic immunization for the conversion of a protein mitogen to an effective antigen. Furthermore, coimmunization of TcPRAC with another T. cruzi antigen indicates the usefulness of this approach for multivalent vaccine development. PMID:19917711

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of the Biological Activity of Novel Arylimidamides against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    De Araújo, J. S.; Da Silva, C. F.; Batista, D. G. J.; Da Silva, P. B.; Meuser, M. B.; Aiub, C. A. F.; da Silva, M. F. V.; Araújo-Lima, C. F.; Banerjee, M.; Farahat, A. A.; Stephens, C. E.; Kumar, A.; Boykin, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    Fifteen novel arylimidamides (AIAs) (6 bis-amidino and 9 mono-amidino analogues) were assayed against Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro and in vivo. All the bis-AIAs were more effective than the mono-AIAs, and two analogues, DB1967 and DB1989, were further evaluated in vivo. Although both of them reduced parasitemia, protection against mortality was not achieved. Our results show that the number of amidino-terminal units affects the efficacy of arylimidamides against T. cruzi. PMID:24590476

  20. In vitro and in vivo studies of the biological activity of novel arylimidamides against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    De Araújo, J S; Da Silva, C F; Batista, D G J; Da Silva, P B; Meuser, M B; Aiub, C A F; da Silva, M F V; Araújo-Lima, C F; Banerjee, M; Farahat, A A; Stephens, C E; Kumar, A; Boykin, D W; Soeiro, M N C

    2014-07-01

    Fifteen novel arylimidamides (AIAs) (6 bis-amidino and 9 mono-amidino analogues) were assayed against Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro and in vivo. All the bis-AIAs were more effective than the mono-AIAs, and two analogues, DB1967 and DB1989, were further evaluated in vivo. Although both of them reduced parasitemia, protection against mortality was not achieved. Our results show that the number of amidino-terminal units affects the efficacy of arylimidamides against T. cruzi. PMID:24590476

  1. CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Single-Gene and Gene Family Disruption in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Duo; Kurup, Samarchith P.; Yao, Phil Y.; Minning, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite of humans and animals, affecting 10 to 20 million people and innumerable animals, primarily in the Americas. Despite being the largest cause of infection-induced heart disease worldwide, even among the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) T. cruzi is considered one of the least well understood and understudied. The genetic complexity of T. cruzi as well as the limited set of efficient techniques for genome engineering contribute significantly to the relative lack of progress in and understanding of this pathogen. Here, we adapted the CRISPR-Cas9 system for the genetic engineering of T. cruzi, demonstrating rapid and efficient knockout of multiple endogenous genes, including essential genes. We observed that in the absence of a template, repair of the Cas9-induced double-stranded breaks (DSBs) in T. cruzi occurs exclusively by microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) with various-sized deletions. When a template for DNA repair is provided, DSB repair by homologous recombination is achieved at an efficiency several orders of magnitude higher than that in the absence of CRISPR-Cas9-induced DSBs. We also demonstrate the high multiplexing capacity of CRISPR-Cas9 in T. cruzi by knocking down expression of an enzyme gene family consisting of 65 members, resulting in a significant reduction of enzymatic product with no apparent off-target mutations. Lastly, we show that Cas9 can mediate disruption of its own coding sequence, rescuing a growth defect in stable Cas9-expressing parasites. These results establish a powerful new tool for the analysis of gene functions in T. cruzi, enabling the study of essential genes and their functions and analysis of the many large families of related genes that occupy a substantial portion of the T. cruzi genome. PMID:25550322

  2. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  3. Protective immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi provided by oral immunization with Phytomonas serpens: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Pinge-Filho, P; Peron, J P S; de Moura, T R; Menolli, R A; Graça, V K; Estevão, D; Tadokoro, C E; Jankevicius, J V; Rizzo, L V

    2005-01-31

    We have previously demonstrated that Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoa that causes Chagas' disease. These antigens are recognized by human sera and induce protective immunity in Balb/c mice. In the present study, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) knockout (KO) mice and C57BL/6 mice treated with the nitric oxide inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG, 50 mg kg(-1)) infected with T. cruzi, were used to demonstrate the role of nitric oxide (NO) to host protection against T. cruzi infection achieved by oral immunization with live P. serpens. A reduction in parasitaemia and an increase in survival were observed in C57BL/6 infected mice and previously immunized with P. serpens, when compared to non-immunized mice. iNOS (KO) mice immunized and C57BL/6 immunized and treated with AG presented parasitaemia and mortality rates comparable to those of infected and non-immunized mice. By itself, immunization with P. serpens did not induce inflammation in the myocardium, but C57BL/6 mice so immunized showed fewer amastigotes nests in the heart following an acute T. cruzi infection than those in non-immunized mice. These results suggest that protective immunity against T. cruzi infection induced by immunization with P. serpens is dependent upon enhanced NO production during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. PMID:15585334

  4. The trans-sialidase, the major Trypanosoma cruzi virulence factor: Three decades of studies.

    PubMed

    Freire-de-Lima, L; Fonseca, L M; Oeltmann, T; Mendonça-Previato, L; Previato, J O

    2015-11-01

    Chagas' disease is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the description of Chagas'disease in 1909 extensive research has identified important events in the disease in order to understand the biochemical mechanism that modulates T. cruzi-host cell interactions and the ability of the parasite to ensure its survival in the infected host. Exactly 30 years ago, we presented evidence for the first time of a trans-sialidase activity in T. cruzi (T. cruzi-TS). This enzyme transfers sialic acid from the host glycoconjugates to the terminal β-galactopyranosyl residues of mucin-like molecules on the parasite's cell surface. Thenceforth, many articles have provided convincing data showing that T. cruzi-TS is able to govern relevant mechanisms involved in the parasite's survival in the mammalian host, such as invasion, escape from the phagolysosomal vacuole, differentiation, down-modulation of host immune responses, among others. The aim of this review is to cover the history of the discovery of T. cruzi-TS, as well as some well-documented biological effects encompassed by this parasite's virulence factor, an enzyme with potential attributes to become a drug target against Chagas disease. PMID:26224786

  5. Differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 and Trypanosoma vespertilionis Battaglia, 1904 by various lectins.

    PubMed

    Schottelius, J; Koch, O; Uhlenbruck, G

    1983-06-01

    Four-days-old culture forms of Trypanosoma cruzi (strain Téhuantépéc, Guatemala) and Trypanosoma vespertilionis (strain P-14, P-9) were tested by 19 carbohydrate-specific agglutinins. The T. cruzi strains are interspecifically distinguishable with the lectins from Euonymus europaeus, Tridacna crocea, Tridacna maxima and the human blood-group testserum anti-B from the T. vespertilionis strains. While the T. vespertilionis strains did react with anti-B and E. europaeus, the T. cruzi strains did not agglutinate. The T. cruzi strains were agglutinated by the lectins from T. crocea and T: maxima while the bat-trypanosomes showed no reactions. Using these lectins it was not possible to distinguish the bat-flagellates intraspecifically. With the lectins from Triticum vulgaris and Arachis hypogaea the T. cruzi strains could be distinguished. While the Ténuantépéc strain did agglutinate with A. hypogaea, T. cruzi strain Guatemala did react only with the lectin from T. vulgaris. The bat-trypanosomes were agglutinated only by A. hypogaea but not by T. vulgaris. The reactions of these trypanosome-species with A. papillata and T. vulgaris demonstrate that both trypanosome species have N-acetylneuraminic acid on their cell surfaces. PMID:6349060

  6. Developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi-like flagellates in Cavernicola pilosa.

    PubMed

    Marinkelle, C J

    1982-11-01

    The developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi ssp., found in the intestinal tract of Cavernicola pilosa, are described and measurements given for nine life stages. The frequencies of the various stages in foregut, midgut and hindgut of the triatomines are provided; parasites were rare in the foregut and metatrypomastigotes were seen only in the mid- and hindguts. All adult bugs examined harboured intestinal infections of T. cruzi-like flagellates, large clumps of amastigotes were frequently observed in the midgut. The faeces of C. pilosa, containing metacyclic trypomastigotes, did not produce patent parasitaemia when inoculated into mice. Inoculated mice were not protected against subsequent challenge infections with the highly virulent Tulahuen stock of T. c. cruzi. The blood of bats also failed to produce parasitaemia when inoculated into mice, nor were the mice protected against subsequent challenges with T. c. cruzi. Although the developmental stages described were very similar to those of T. c. cruzi it is presumed that they were stages of T. c. marinkellei because of their failure to infect mice and Rhodnius prolixus, and their failure to protect inoculated mice against challenge with T. c. cruzi. PMID:6820697

  7. Identification of six Trypanosoma cruzi lineages by sequence-characterised amplified region markers.

    PubMed

    Brisse, S; Dujardin, J C; Tibayrenc, M

    2000-11-01

    Six discrete phylogenetic lineages were recently identified in Trypanosoma cruzi, on the basis of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) characterisation. The objective of the present study was to develop specific PCR-based markers for the identification of each of the six lineages. Eighty-seven T. cruzi stocks representative of all the lineages were characterised by RAPD with three primers, resulting in the identification of three fragments that were specifically amplified in the given sets of lineages. After cloning and sequencing these fragments, three pairs of sequence-characterised amplified region (SCAR) primers were designed. After PCR amplification using the SCAR primers, the initial polymorphism was retained either as the presence or absence of amplification, or as size variation between the PCR products. Although most PCR products, taken individually, were distributed across several lineages, the combination of the three SCAR markers resulted in characteristic patterns that were distinct in the six lineages. Furthermore, T. cruzi lineages were distinguished from Trypanosoma rangeli, T. cruzi marinkellei and T. cruzi-like organisms. The excellent correspondence of these new PCR markers with the phylogenetic lineages, allied with their sensitivity, makes them reliable tools for lineage identification and strain characterisation in T. cruzi. The approach described here could be generalised to any species of microorganism harbouring clear-cut phylogenetic subdivisions. PMID:11087920

  8. Studying nanotoxic effects of CdTe quantum dots in Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, C. V.; Almeida, D. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Fontes, A.; Menna-Barreto, R. F. S.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Cesar, C. L.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.

    2010-02-01

    Many studies have been done in order to verify the possible nanotoxicity of quantum dots in some cellular types. Protozoan pathogens as Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas1 disease is transmitted to humans either by blood-sucking triatomine vectors, blood transfusion, organs transplantation or congenital transmission. The study of the life cycle, biochemical, genetics, morphology and others aspects of the T. cruzi is very important to better understand the interactions with its hosts and the disease evolution on humans. Quantum dot, nanocrystals, highly luminescent has been used as tool for experiments in in vitro and in vivo T. cruzi life cycle development in real time. We are now investigating the quantum dots toxicity on T. cruzi parasite cells using analytical methods. In vitro experiments were been done in order to test the interference of this nanoparticle on parasite development, morphology and viability (live-death). Ours previous results demonstrated that 72 hours after parasite incubation with 200 μM of CdTe altered the development of T. cruzi and induced cell death by necrosis in a rate of 34%. QDs labeling did not effect: (i) on parasite integrity, at least until 7 days; (ii) parasite cell dividing and (iii) parasite motility at a concentration of 2 μM CdTe. This fact confirms the low level of cytotoxicity of these QDs on this parasite cell. In summary our results is showing T. cruzi QDs labeling could be used for in vivo cellular studies in Chagas disease.

  9. Antiangiogenic and Antitumor Effects of Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin

    PubMed Central

    López, Nandy C.; Valck, Carolina; Ramírez, Galia; Rodríguez, Margarita; Ribeiro, Carolina; Orellana, Juana; Maldonado, Ismael; Albini, Adriana; Anacona, Daniel; Lemus, David; Aguilar, Lorena; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Ferreira, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Background In Latin America, 18 million people are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, with the greatest economic burden. Vertebrate calreticulins (CRT) are multifunctional, intra- and extracellular proteins. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) they bind calcium and act as chaperones. Since human CRT (HuCRT) is antiangiogenic and suppresses tumor growth, the presence of these functions in the parasite orthologue may have consequences in the host/parasite interaction. Previously, we have cloned and expressed T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT) and shown that TcCRT, translocated from the ER to the area of trypomastigote flagellum emergence, promotes infectivity, inactivates the complement system and inhibits angiogenesis in the chorioallantoid chicken egg membrane. Most likely, derived from these properties, TcCRT displays in vivo inhibitory effects against an experimental mammary tumor. Methodology and Principal Findings TcCRT (or its N-terminal vasostatin-like domain, N-TcCRT) a) Abrogates capillary growth in the ex vivo rat aortic ring assay, b) Inhibits capillary morphogenesis in a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) assay, c) Inhibits migration and proliferation of HUVECs and the human endothelial cell line Eahy926. In these assays TcCRT was more effective, in molar terms, than HuCRT: d) In confocal microscopy, live HUVECs and EAhy926 cells, are recognized by FITC-TcCRT, followed by its internalization and accumulation around the host cell nuclei, a phenomenon that is abrogated by Fucoidin, a specific scavenger receptor ligand and, e) Inhibits in vivo the growth of the murine mammary TA3 MTXR tumor cell line. Conclusions/Significance We describe herein antiangiogenic and antitumor properties of a parasite chaperone molecule, specifically TcCRT. Perhaps, by virtue of its capacity to inhibit angiogenesis (and the complement system), TcCRT is anti-inflammatory, thus impairing the antiparasite immune response. The TcCRT antiangiogenic

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi-Trypanosoma rangeli co-infection ameliorates negative effects of single trypanosome infections in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer K; Graham, Andrea L; Elliott, Ryan J; Dobson, Andrew P; Triana Chávez, Omar

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, co-infects its triatomine vector with its sister species Trypanosoma rangeli, which shares 60% of its antigens with T. cruzi. Additionally, T. rangeli has been observed to be pathogenic in some of its vector species. Although T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infections are common, their effect on the vector has rarely been investigated. Therefore, we measured the fitness (survival and reproduction) of triatomine species Rhodnius prolixus infected with just T. cruzi, just T. rangeli, or both T. cruzi and T. rangeli. We found that survival (as estimated by survival probability and hazard ratios) was significantly different between treatments, with the T. cruzi treatment group having lower survival than the co-infected treatment. Reproduction and total fitness estimates in the T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatments were significantly lower than in the co-infected and control groups. The T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatment group fitness estimates were not significantly different from each other. Additionally, co-infected insects appeared to tolerate higher doses of parasites than insects with single-species infections. Our results suggest that T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infection could ameliorate negative effects of single infections of either parasite on R. prolixus and potentially help it to tolerate higher parasite doses. PMID:27174360

  11. Differential Gene Expression in Benznidazole-Resistant Trypanosoma cruzi Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Diana; Nirdé, Philippe; Hide, Mallorie; Barnabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the differential gene expression among representative Trypanosoma cruzi stocks in relation to benznidazole exposures using a random differentially expressed sequences (RADES) technique. Studies were carried out with drug pressure both at the natural susceptibility level of the wild-type parasite (50% inhibitory concentration for the wild type) and at different resistance levels. The pattern of differential gene expression performed with resistant stocks was compared to the population structure of this parasite, established by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. A RADES band polymorphism was observed, and over- or underexpression was linked to the resistance level of the stock. The analysis of RADES bands suggested that different products may be involved in benznidazole resistance mechanisms. No significant association was found between phylogenetic clustering and benznidazole susceptibility. Benznidazole resistance may involve several mechanisms, depending on the level of drug exposure. PMID:15980339

  12. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  13. Identification of contractile vacuole proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Paul N; Jimenez, Veronica; Park, Miyoung; Martins, Vicente P; Atwood, James; Moles, Kristen; Collins, Dalis; Rohloff, Peter; Tarleton, Rick; Moreno, Silvia N J; Orlando, Ron; Docampo, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Contractile vacuole complexes are critical components of cell volume regulation and have been shown to have other functional roles in several free-living protists. However, very little is known about the functions of the contractile vacuole complex of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, other than a role in osmoregulation. Identification of the protein composition of these organelles is important for understanding their physiological roles. We applied a combined proteomic and bioinfomatic approach to identify proteins localized to the contractile vacuole. Proteomic analysis of a T. cruzi fraction enriched for contractile vacuoles and analyzed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS resulted in the addition of 109 newly detected proteins to the group of expressed proteins of epimastigotes. We also identified different peptides that map to at least 39 members of the dispersed gene family 1 (DGF-1) providing evidence that many members of this family are simultaneously expressed in epimastigotes. Of the proteins present in the fraction we selected several homologues with known localizations in contractile vacuoles of other organisms and others that we expected to be present in these vacuoles on the basis of their potential roles. We determined the localization of each by expression as GFP-fusion proteins or with specific antibodies. Six of these putative proteins (Rab11, Rab32, AP180, ATPase subunit B, VAMP1, and phosphate transporter) predominantly localized to the vacuole bladder. TcSNARE2.1, TcSNARE2.2, and calmodulin localized to the spongiome. Calmodulin was also cytosolic. Our results demonstrate the utility of combining subcellular fractionation, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatic approaches for localization of organellar proteins that are difficult to detect with whole cell methodologies. The CV localization of the proteins investigated revealed potential novel roles of these organelles in phosphate metabolism

  14. Sialic Acid Glycobiology Unveils Trypanosoma cruzi Trypomastigote Membrane Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Andrés B.; Carlevaro, Giannina; Araoz, Beatriz; Ruiz Diaz, Pablo; Camara, María de los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A.; Bossi, Mariano; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Mucci, Juan; Campetella, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the flagellate protozoan agent of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis, is unable to synthesize sialic acids de novo. Mucins and trans-sialidase (TS) are substrate and enzyme, respectively, of the glycobiological system that scavenges sialic acid from the host in a crucial interplay for T. cruzi life cycle. The acquisition of the sialyl residue allows the parasite to avoid lysis by serum factors and to interact with the host cell. A major drawback to studying the sialylation kinetics and turnover of the trypomastigote glycoconjugates is the difficulty to identify and follow the recently acquired sialyl residues. To tackle this issue, we followed an unnatural sugar approach as bioorthogonal chemical reporters, where the use of azidosialyl residues allowed identifying the acquired sugar. Advanced microscopy techniques, together with biochemical methods, were used to study the trypomastigote membrane from its glycobiological perspective. Main sialyl acceptors were identified as mucins by biochemical procedures and protein markers. Together with determining their shedding and turnover rates, we also report that several membrane proteins, including TS and its substrates, both glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, are separately distributed on parasite surface and contained in different and highly stable membrane microdomains. Notably, labeling for α(1,3)Galactosyl residues only partially colocalize with sialylated mucins, indicating that two species of glycosylated mucins do exist, which are segregated at the parasite surface. Moreover, sialylated mucins were included in lipid-raft-domains, whereas TS molecules are not. The location of the surface-anchored TS resulted too far off as to be capable to sialylate mucins, a role played by the shed TS instead. Phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase-C activity is actually not present in trypomastigotes. Therefore, shedding of TS occurs via microvesicles instead of as a fully soluble form. PMID

  15. Sialic Acid Glycobiology Unveils Trypanosoma cruzi Trypomastigote Membrane Physiology.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Andrés B; Carlevaro, Giannina; Araoz, Beatriz; Ruiz Diaz, Pablo; Camara, María de Los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A; Bossi, Mariano; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Mucci, Juan; Campetella, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the flagellate protozoan agent of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis, is unable to synthesize sialic acids de novo. Mucins and trans-sialidase (TS) are substrate and enzyme, respectively, of the glycobiological system that scavenges sialic acid from the host in a crucial interplay for T. cruzi life cycle. The acquisition of the sialyl residue allows the parasite to avoid lysis by serum factors and to interact with the host cell. A major drawback to studying the sialylation kinetics and turnover of the trypomastigote glycoconjugates is the difficulty to identify and follow the recently acquired sialyl residues. To tackle this issue, we followed an unnatural sugar approach as bioorthogonal chemical reporters, where the use of azidosialyl residues allowed identifying the acquired sugar. Advanced microscopy techniques, together with biochemical methods, were used to study the trypomastigote membrane from its glycobiological perspective. Main sialyl acceptors were identified as mucins by biochemical procedures and protein markers. Together with determining their shedding and turnover rates, we also report that several membrane proteins, including TS and its substrates, both glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, are separately distributed on parasite surface and contained in different and highly stable membrane microdomains. Notably, labeling for α(1,3)Galactosyl residues only partially colocalize with sialylated mucins, indicating that two species of glycosylated mucins do exist, which are segregated at the parasite surface. Moreover, sialylated mucins were included in lipid-raft-domains, whereas TS molecules are not. The location of the surface-anchored TS resulted too far off as to be capable to sialylate mucins, a role played by the shed TS instead. Phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase-C activity is actually not present in trypomastigotes. Therefore, shedding of TS occurs via microvesicles instead of as a fully soluble form. PMID

  16. Analyses of 32 Loci Clarify Phylogenetic Relationships among Trypanosoma cruzi Lineages and Support a Single Hybridization prior to Human Contact

    PubMed Central

    Flores-López, Carlos A.; Machado, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetic diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has been traditionally divided in two major groups, T. cruzi I and II, corresponding to discrete typing units TcI and TcII-VI under a recently proposed nomenclature. The two major groups of T. cruzi seem to differ in important biological characteristics, and are thus thought to represent a natural division relevant for epidemiological studies and development of prophylaxis. To understand the potential connection between the different manifestations of Chagas disease and variability of T. cruzi strains, it is essential to have a correct reconstruction of the evolutionary history of T. cruzi. Methodology/Principal Findings Nucleotide sequences from 32 unlinked loci (>26 Kilobases of aligned sequence) were used to reconstruct the evolutionary history of strains representing the known genetic variability of T. cruzi. Thorough phylogenetic analyses show that the original classification of T. cruzi in two major lineages does not reflect its evolutionary history and that there is only strong evidence for one major and recent hybridization event in the history of this species. Furthermore, estimates of divergence times using Bayesian methods show that current extant lineages of T. cruzi diverged very recently, within the last 3 million years, and that the major hybridization event leading to hybrid lineages TcV and TcVI occurred less than 1 million years ago, well before the contact of T. cruzi with humans in South America. Conclusions/Significance The described phylogenetic relationships among the six major genetic subdivisions of T. cruzi should serve as guidelines for targeted epidemiological and prophylaxis studies. We suggest that it is important to reconsider conclusions from previous studies that have attempted to uncover important biological differences between the two originally defined major lineages of T. cruzi especially if those conclusions were obtained from single

  17. Development of a Novel Multiplex Immunoassay Multi-cruzi for the Serological Confirmation of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Granjon, Elodie; Dichtel-Danjoy, Marie-Laure; Saba, Esber; Sabino, Ester; Campos de Oliveira, Lea; Zrein, Maan

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is due to the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, a protist disseminated by a Triatome vector. This disease is endemic to Latin America and considered by WHO as one of the 17 world’s neglected diseases. In Europe and in North America, imported cases are also detected, due to migration of population outside of the endemic region. Diagnosis of T. cruzi infection is usually made indirectly by the detection of specific antibodies to T. cruzi antigens. Following initial diagnostic evaluation or screening test (qualifying or discarding blood donation), a confirmation test is performed for samples initially reactive. The test presented in this study aims at the confirmation/refutation of the infectious status of human blood samples and will permit taking appropriate clinical measures. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed a novel array of twelve antigens and printed these antigens onto 96-well plates. We tested 248 positive samples T. cruzi, 94 unscreened blood donors’ samples from non-endemic area, 49 seronegative blood donors, 7 false-positive and 3 doubtful samples. The observed reactivities were analyzed to propose a decision-tree algorithm that correctly classifies all the samples, with the potential to discriminate false-positive results and sticky samples. We observed that antibodies levels (Sum of all antigens) was significantly higher for PCR positive than for PCR negative samples in all studied groups with Multi-cruzi. Conclusion/Significance The results described in this study indicate that the Multi-cruzi improves the serological confirmation of Chagas disease. Moreover the “sum of all antigens” detected by Multi-cruzi could reflect parasitemia level in patients–like PCR signals does—and could serve as an indicator of parasite clearance in longitudinal follow-ups. Validation of this assay is still required on an independent large collection of well characterized samples including typical false-reactive samples such as

  18. Type I Interferons Increase Host Susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection▿†

    PubMed Central

    Chessler, Anne-Danielle C.; Caradonna, Kacey L.; Da'dara, Akram; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes human Chagas' disease, induces a type I interferon (IFN) (IFN-α/β) response during acute experimental infection in mice and in isolated primary cell types. To examine the potential impact of the type I IFN response in shaping outcomes in experimental T. cruzi infection, groups of wild-type (WT) and type I IFN receptor-deficient (IFNAR−/−) 129sv/ev mice were infected with two different T. cruzi strains under lethal and sublethal conditions and several parameters were measured during the acute stage of infection. The results demonstrate that type I IFNs are not required for early host protection against T. cruzi. In contrast, under conditions of lethal T. cruzi challenge, WT mice succumbed to infection whereas IFNAR−/− mice were ultimately able to control parasite growth and survive. T. cruzi clearance in and survival of IFNAR−/− mice were accompanied by higher levels of IFN-γ production by isolated splenocytes in response to parasite antigen. The suppression of IFN-γ in splenocytes from WT mice was independent of IL-10 levels. While the impact of type I IFNs on the production of IFN-γ and other cytokines/chemokines remains to be fully determined in the context of T. cruzi infection, our data suggest that, under conditions of high parasite burden, type I IFNs negatively impact IFN-γ production, initiating a detrimental cycle that contributes to the ultimate failure to control infection. These findings are consistent with a growing theme in the microbial pathogenesis field in which type I IFNs can be detrimental to the host in a variety of nonviral pathogen infection models. PMID:21402764

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi extracts elicit protective immune response against chemically induced colon and mammary cancers.

    PubMed

    Ubillos, Luis; Freire, Teresa; Berriel, Edgardo; Chiribao, María Laura; Chiale, Carolina; Festari, María Florencia; Medeiros, Andrea; Mazal, Daniel; Rondán, Mariella; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Robello, Carlos; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease, has anticancer effects mediated, at least in part, by parasite-derived products which inhibit growth of tumor cells. We investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce antitumor activity, using two rat models which reproduce human carcinogenesis: colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and mammary cancer induced by N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We found that vaccination with T. cruzi epimastigote lysates strongly inhibits tumor development in both animal models. Rats immunized with T. cruzi antigens induce activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and splenocytes from these animals showed higher cytotoxic responses against tumors as compared to rats receiving adjuvant alone. Tumor-associated immune responses included increasing number of CD11b/c(+) His48(-) MHC II(+) cells corresponding to macrophages and/or dendritic cells, which exhibited augmented NADPH-oxidase activity. We also found that T. cruzi lysate vaccination developed antibodies specific for colon and mammary rat cancer cells, which were capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies cross-reacted with human colon and breast cancer cell lines and recognized 41/60 (68%) colon cancer and 38/63 (60%) breast cancer samples in a series of 123 human tumors. Our results suggest that T. cruzi antigens can evoke an integrated antitumor response involving both the cellular and humoral components of the immune response and provide novel insights into the understanding of the intricate relationship between parasite infection and tumor growth. PMID:26519949

  20. Machine Learning Models and Pathway Genome Data Base for Trypanosoma cruzi Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Laura-Isobel; Sarker, Malabika; Yadav, Maneesh; Ponder, Elizabeth L.; Kallel, E. Adam; Kellar, Danielle; Chen, Steven; Arkin, Michelle; Bunin, Barry A.; McKerrow, James H.; Talcott, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) caused by the eukaryotic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The current clinical and preclinical pipeline for T. cruzi is extremely sparse and lacks drug target diversity. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we developed a computational approach that utilized data from several public whole-cell, phenotypic high throughput screens that have been completed for T. cruzi by the Broad Institute, including a single screen of over 300,000 molecules in the search for chemical probes as part of the NIH Molecular Libraries program. We have also compiled and curated relevant biological and chemical compound screening data including (i) compounds and biological activity data from the literature, (ii) high throughput screening datasets, and (iii) predicted metabolites of T. cruzi metabolic pathways. This information was used to help us identify compounds and their potential targets. We have constructed a Pathway Genome Data Base for T. cruzi. In addition, we have developed Bayesian machine learning models that were used to virtually screen libraries of compounds. Ninety-seven compounds were selected for in vitro testing, and 11 of these were found to have EC50 < 10μM. We progressed five compounds to an in vivo mouse efficacy model of Chagas disease and validated that the machine learning model could identify in vitro active compounds not in the training set, as well as known positive controls. The antimalarial pyronaridine possessed 85.2% efficacy in the acute Chagas mouse model. We have also proposed potential targets (for future verification) for this compound based on structural similarity to known compounds with targets in T. cruzi. Conclusions/ Significance We have demonstrated how combining chemoinformatics and bioinformatics for T. cruzi drug discovery can bring interesting in vivo active molecules to light that may have been overlooked. The approach we have taken is broadly applicable to other

  1. Genetic Variability and Phylogenetic Relationships within Trypanosoma cruzi I Isolated in Colombia Based on Miniexon Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Claudia; Guhl, Felipe; Falla, Alejandra; Fajardo, Anabella; Montilla, Marleny; Adolfo Vallejo, Gustavo; Bargues, M. Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic studies of Trypanosoma cruzi have identified the existence of two groups: T. cruzi I and T. cruzi II. There are aspects that still remain unknown about the genetic variability within the T. cruzi I group. Given its epidemiological importance, it is necessary to have a better understanding of T. cruzi transmission cycles. Our purpose was to corroborate the existence of haplotypes within the T. cruzi I group and to describe the genetic variability and phylogenetic relationships, based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the miniexon gene intergenic region, for the isolates from different hosts and epidemiological transmission cycles in Colombian regions. 31 T. cruzi isolates were molecularly characterized. Phylogenetic relationships within T. cruzi I isolates showed four haplotype groups (Ia–Id), associated with their transmission cycle. In previous studies, we reported that haplotype Ia is mainly associated with the domestic cycle and domiciliated Rhodnius prolixus. Haplotype Ib is associated with the domestic cycle and peridomestic cycle, haplotype Ic is closely related with the peridomestic cycle, and haplotype Id is strongly associated with the sylvatic cycle. The phylogenetic methodologies applied in this study are tools that bolster the associations among isolates and thus shed light on Chagas disease epidemiology. PMID:20798881

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Didelphis marsupialis in Santa Catarina and Arvoredo Islands, southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Grisard, E C; Carvalho-Pinto, C J; Scholz, A F; Toma, H K; Schlemper, B R; Steindel, M

    2000-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1993 the prevalence of the Trypanosoma cruzi infection in opossums (Didelphis marsupialis) was studied in Santa Catarina and Arvoredo Islands, State of Santa Catarina, Brazil. The association of the triatomine bug Panstrongylus megistus with opossums nests and the infection rate of these triatomines by T. cruzi was also studied. Thirteen different locations were studied in Santa Catarina Island (SCI), in which 137 D. marsupialis were collected. Sixty two opossums were collected at the Arvoredo Island (AI), located 12 miles north from SCI. All captured animals were submitted to parasitological examinations that revealed the presence of T. cruzi in 21.9% of the opossums captured in SCI and 45.2% among opossums captured in the AI. The presence of P. megistus was detected in most of the D. marsupialis nests collected in the SCI, however, in the non-inhabited AI only eight triatomines were collected during the whole study. The presence of T. cruzi-infected D. marsupialis associated with P. megistus in human dwellings in the SCI, and the high infection rate of D. marsupilais by T. cruzi in the absence of a high vector density are discussed. PMID:11080763

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi in the sylvatic environment: distinct transmission cycles involving two sympatric marsupials.

    PubMed

    Pinho, A P; Cupolillo, E; Mangia, R H; Fernandes, O; Jansen, A M

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-five specimens of Philander frenata and 36 Didelphis marsupialis were captured in the same Atlantic forest area of Brazil between 1992 and 1994. Haemocultures showed that 50% of P. frenata and 60% of D. marsupialis were infected with Trypansoma cruzi. Biological, biochemical and molecular characterization of the isolates suggested 2 distinct transmission cycles of T. cruzi occurred between these 2 sympatric didelphids. The T. cruzi isolates could be distinguished according to their association with each marsupial species. Biochemical characterization (multilocus enzyme electrophoresis) revealed 15 zymodemes; more variability was observed among the P. frenata isolates than among the isolates from D. marsupialis. The course of natural and experimental infection in D. marsupialis and P. frenata was different and suggested that D. marsupialis was more resistant to infection than P. frenata. In the studied area, P. frenata seems to be a more important reservoir of T. cruzi than D. marsupialis, since 40% of the characterized isolates from P. frenata belonged to the T. cruzi II group, which is associated with human infections. PMID:11132378

  4. Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Telomere Association Correlates with Redox Status in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  5. The Trypanosoma cruzi Protein TcHTE Is Critical for Heme Uptake.

    PubMed

    Merli, Marcelo L; Pagura, Lucas; Hernández, Josefina; Barisón, María Julia; Pral, Elizabeth M F; Silber, Ariel M; Cricco, Julia A

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, presents nutritional requirements for several metabolites. It requires heme for the biosynthesis of several heme-proteins involved in essential metabolic pathways like mitochondrial cytochromes and respiratory complexes, as well as enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids. However, this parasite lacks a complete route for its synthesis. In view of these facts, T. cruzi has to incorporate heme from the environment during its life cycle. In other words, their hosts must supply the heme for heme-protein synthesis. Although the acquisition of heme is a fundamental issue for the parasite's replication and survival, how this cofactor is imported and distributed is poorly understood. In this work, we used different fluorescent heme analogs to explore heme uptake along the different life-cycle stages of T. cruzi, showing that this parasite imports it during its replicative stages: the epimastigote in the insect vector and the intracellular amastigote in the mammalian host. Also, we identified and characterized a T. cruzi protein (TcHTE) with 55% of sequence similarity to LHR1 (protein involved in L. amazonensis heme transport), which is located in the flagellar pocket, where the transport of nutrients proceeds in trypanosomatids. We postulate TcHTE as a protein involved in improving the efficiency of the heme uptake or trafficking in T. cruzi. PMID:26752206

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi: In vitro effect of aspirin with nifurtimox and benznidazole.

    PubMed

    López-Muñoz, Rodrigo; Faúndez, Mario; Klein, Sebastián; Escanilla, Sebastián; Torres, Gloria; Lee-Liu, Dasfne; Ferreira, Jorge; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Orellana, Myriam; Morello, Antonio; Ferreira, Arturo; Maya, Juan D

    2010-02-01

    Nifurtimox and benznidazole are the only active drugs against Trypanosoma cruzi; however, they have limited efficacy and severe side effects. During primoinfection, T. cruzi infected macrophages mount an antiparasitic response, which the parasite evades through an increase of tumor growth factor beta and PGE(2) activation as well as decreased iNOS activity. Thus, prostaglandin synthesis inhibition with aspirin might increase macrophage antiparasitic activity and increase nifurtimox and benznidazole effect. Aspirin alone demonstrated a low effect upon macrophage antiparasitic activity. However, isobolographic analysis of the combined effects of aspirin, nifurtimox and benznidazole indicated a synergistic effect on T. cruzi infection of RAW cells, with combinatory indexes of 0.71 and 0.61, respectively. The observed effect of aspirin upon T. cruzi infection was not related with the PGE(2) synthesis inhibition. Nevertheless, NO() levels were restored by aspirin in T. cruzi-infected RAW cells, contributing to macrophage antiparasitic activity improvement. Thus, the synergy of aspirin with nifurtimox and benznidazole is due to the capability of aspirin to increase antiparasitic activity of macrophages. PMID:19735656

  7. Risk factors associated with Trypanosoma cruzi exposure in domestic dogs from a rural community in Panama.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, Azael; Calzada, José E; Pineda, Vanessa; Perea, Milixa; Rigg, Chystrie; González, Kadir; Santamaria, Ana Maria; Gottdenker, Nicole L; Chaves, Luis F

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is a zoonosis of humans, wild and domestic mammals, including dogs. In Panama, the main T. cruzi vector is Rhodnius pallescens, a triatomine bug whose main natural habitat is the royal palm, Attalea butyracea. In this paper, we present results from three T. cruzi serological tests (immunochromatographic dipstick, indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA) performed in 51 dogs from 24 houses in Trinidad de Las Minas, western Panama. We found that nine dogs were seropositive (17.6% prevalence). Dogs were 1.6 times more likely to become T. cruzi seropositive with each year of age and 11.6 times if royal palms where present in the peridomiciliary area of the dog's household or its two nearest neighbours. Mouse-baited-adhesive traps were employed to evaluate 12 peridomestic royal palms. All palms were found infested with R. pallescens with an average of 25.50 triatomines captured per palm. Of 35 adult bugs analysed, 88.6% showed protozoa flagellates in their intestinal contents. In addition, dogs were five times more likely to be infected by the presence of an additional domestic animal species in the dog's peridomiciliary environment. Our results suggest that interventions focused on royal palms might reduce the exposure to T. cruzi infection. PMID:26560985

  8. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-telomere association correlates with redox status in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  9. Trans-sialidase inhibition assay detects Trypanosoma cruzi infection in different wild mammal species.

    PubMed

    Sartor, Paula A; Ceballos, Leonardo A; Orozco, Marcela M; Cardinal, Marta V; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Leguizamón, María S

    2013-08-01

    The detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mammals is crucial for understanding the eco-epidemiological role of the different species involved in parasite transmission cycles. Xenodiagnosis (XD) and hemoculture (HC) are routinely used to detect T. cruzi in wild mammals. Serological methods are much more limited because they require the use of specific antibodies to immunoglobulins of each mammalian species susceptible to T. cruzi. In this study we detected T. cruzi infection by trans-sialidase (TS) inhibition assay (TIA). TIA is based on the antibody neutralization of a recombinant TS that avoids the use of anti-immunoglobulins. TS activity is not detected in the co-endemic protozoan parasites Leishmania spp and T. rangeli. In the current study, serum samples from 158 individuals of nine wild mammalian species, previously tested by XD, were evaluated by TIA. They were collected from two endemic areas in northern Argentina. The overall TIA versus XD co-reactivity was 98.7% (156/158). All 18 samples from XD-positive mammals were TIA-positive (co-positivity, 100%) and co-negativity was 98.5% (138/140). Two XD-negative samples from a marsupial (Didelphis albiventris) and an edentate (Dasypus novemcinctus) were detected by TIA. TIA could be used as a novel tool for serological detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in a wide variety of sylvatic reservoir hosts. PMID:23930975

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi and Its Soluble Antigens Induce NET Release by Stimulating Toll-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Larissa Figueiredo Alves; Souza, Priscila Silva Sampaio; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Toledo, Karina Alves

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils release fibrous traps of DNA, histones, and granule proteins known as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which contribute to microbicidal killing and have been implicated in autoimmunity. The role of NET formation in the host response to nonbacterial pathogens is not well-understood. In this study, we investigated the release of NETs by human neutrophils upon their interaction with Trypanosoma cruzi (Y strain) parasites. Our results showed that human neutrophils stimulated by T. cruzi generate NETs composed of DNA, histones, and elastase. The release occurred in a dose-, time-, and reactive oxygen species-dependent manner to decrease trypomastigote and increase amastigote numbers of the parasites without affecting their viability. NET release was decreased upon blocking with antibodies against Toll-like receptors 2 and 4. In addition, living parasites were not mandatory in the release of NETs induced by T. cruzi, as the same results were obtained when molecules from its soluble extract were tested. Our results increase the understanding of the stimulation of NETs by parasites, particularly T. cruzi. We suggest that contact of T. cruzi with NETs during Chagas’s disease can limit infection by affecting the infectivity/pathogenicity of the parasite. PMID:26431537

  11. Activity of P536, a UDP-glucose analog, against Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Alcina, A.; Fresno, M.; Alarcon, B.

    1988-09-01

    P536, a UDP-glucose analog which was previously described as an antiviral agent, has a potent and selective activity against the intracellular and extracellular stages of Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro. It had a 50% inhibitory concentration of less than 5 micrograms/ml for T. cruzi extracellular cultured forms (epimastigote) and of 25 micrograms/ml for T. cruzi intracellular forms (amastigote) growing inside J774G8 macrophage-like cells. In contrast, the 50% inhibitory concentration was 100 micrograms/ml or greater for cultured mammalian cells and 180 micrograms/ml for the proliferation of mouse spleen lymphocytes. Furthermore, the addition of P536 (50 micrograms/ml) to T. cruzi-infected J774G8 cells cured the infected macrophages, making them able to grow and function normally. Studies on the mechanism of action of this drug indicated that it inhibited incorporation of (TVS)methionine, (TH)thymidine, (TH)mannose, ( UC)-N-acetylglucosamine, and (TH)uridine into macromolecules by T. cruzi epimastigotes, the last being the most sensitive.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of potent inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Schormann, Norbert; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Murugesan, Srinivasan; Senkovich, Olga; Walker, Kiera; Chenna, Bala C.; Shinkre, Bidhan; Desai, Amar; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2010-09-17

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) is a potential target for developing drugs to treat Chagas disease. We have undertaken a detailed structure-activity study of this enzyme. We report here synthesis and characterization of six potent inhibitors of the parasitic enzyme. Inhibitory activity of each compound was determined against T. cruzi and human DHFR. One of these compounds, ethyl 4-(5-[(2,4-diamino-6-quinazolinyl)methyl]amino-2-methoxyphenoxy)butanoate (6b) was co-crystallized with the bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase enzyme of T. cruzi and the crystal structure of the ternary enzyme:cofactor:inhibitor complex was determined. Molecular docking was used to analyze the potential interactions of all inhibitors with T. cruzi DHFR and human DHFR. Inhibitory activities of these compounds are discussed in the light of enzyme-ligand interactions. Binding affinities of each inhibitor for the respective enzymes were calculated based on the experimental or docked binding mode. An estimated 60-70% of the total binding energy is contributed by the 2,4-diaminoquinazoline scaffold.

  13. Activities of Psilostachyin A and Cynaropicrin against Trypanosoma cruzi In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Cristiane França; Batista, Denise da Gama Jaen; De Araújo, Julianna Siciliano; Batista, Marcos Meuser; Lionel, Jessica; de Souza, Elen Mello; Hammer, Erica Ripoll; da Silva, Patricia Bernardino; De Mieri, Maria; Adams, Michael; Zimmermann, Stefanie; Hamburger, Matthias; Brun, Reto; Schühly, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo activities against Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated for two sesquiterpene lactones: psilostachyin A and cynaropicrin. Cynaropicrin had previously been shown to potently inhibit African trypanosomes in vivo, and psilostachyin A had been reported to show in vivo effects against T. cruzi, albeit in another test design. In vitro data showed that cynaropicrin was more effective than psilostachyin A. Ultrastructural alterations induced by cynaropicrin included shedding events, detachment of large portions of the plasma membrane, and vesicular bodies and large vacuoles containing membranous structures, suggestive of parasite autophagy. Acute toxicity studies showed that one of two mice died at a cynaropicrin dose of 400 mg/kg of body weight given intraperitoneally (i.p.). Although no major plasma biochemical alterations could be detected, histopathology demonstrated that the liver was the most affected organ in cynaropicrin-treated animals. Although cynaropicrin was as effective as benznidazole against trypomastigotes in vitro, the treatment (once or twice a day) of T. cruzi-infected mice (up to 50 mg/kg/day cynaropicrin) did not suppress parasitemia or protect against mortality induced by the Y and Colombiana strains. Psilostachyin A (0.5 to 50 mg/kg/day given once a day) was not effective in the acute model of T. cruzi infection (Y strain), reaching 100% animal mortality. Our data demonstrate that although it is very promising against African trypanosomes, cynaropicrin does not show efficacy compared to benznidazole in acute mouse models of T. cruzi infection. PMID:23939901

  14. Mechanisms of vascular dysfunction in acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Josiane F; Capettini, Luciano S A; da Silva, José F P; Sales-Junior, Policarpo; Cruz, Jader Santos; Cortes, Steyner F; Lemos, Virginia S

    2016-07-01

    Vascular disorders have a direct link to mortality in the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. However, the underlying mechanisms of vascular dysfunction in this phase are largely unknown. We hypothesize that T. cruzi invades endothelial cells causing dysfunction in contractility and relaxation of the mouse aorta. Immunodetection of T. cruzi antigen TcRBP28 was observed in endothelial cells. There was a decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived NO-dependent vascular relaxation, and increased vascular contractility accompanied by augmented superoxide anions production. Endothelial removal, inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), blockade of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) TP receptors, and scavenger of superoxide normalized the contractile response. COX-2, thromboxane synthase, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), p65 NFκB subunit and p22(phox) of NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX) subunit expressions were increased in vessels of chagasic animals. Serum TNF-α was augmented. Basal NO production, and nitrotyrosine residue expression were increased. It is concluded that T. cruzi invades mice aorta endothelial cells and increases TXA2/TP receptor/NOX-derived superoxide formation. Alongside, T. cruzi promotes systemic TNF-α increase, which stimulates iNOS expression in vessels and nitrosative stress. In light of the heart failure that develops in the chronic phase of the disease, to understand the mechanism involved in the increased contractility of the aorta is crucial. PMID:26988253

  15. Antiparasitic evaluation of betulinic acid derivatives reveals effective and selective anti-Trypanosoma cruzi inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meira, Cássio Santana; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Lanfredi-Rangel, Adriana; Guimarães, Elisalva Teixeira; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2016-07-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid with several biological properties already described, including antiparasitic activity. Here, the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of betulinic acid and its semi-synthetic amide derivatives (BA1-BA8) was investigated. The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity and selectivity were enhanced in semi-synthetic derivatives, specially on derivatives BA5, BA6 and BA8. To understand the mechanism of action underlying betulinic acid anti-T. cruzi activity, we investigated ultrastructural changes by electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies showed that trypomastigotes incubated with BA5 had membrane blebling, flagella retraction, atypical cytoplasmic vacuoles and Golgi cisternae dilatation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that parasite death is mainly caused by necrosis. Treatment with derivatives BA5, BA6 or BA8 reduced the invasion process, as well as intracellular parasite development in host cells, with a potency and selectivity similar to that observed in benznidazole-treated cells. More importantly, the combination of BA5 and benznidazole revealed synergistic effects on trypomastigote and amastigote forms of T. cruzi. In conclusion, we demonstrated that BA5 compound is an effective and selective anti-T. cruzi agent. PMID:27080160

  16. The Trypanosoma cruzi Protein TcHTE Is Critical for Heme Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Josefina; Barisón, María Julia; Pral, Elizabeth M. F.; Silber, Ariel M.; Cricco, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, presents nutritional requirements for several metabolites. It requires heme for the biosynthesis of several heme-proteins involved in essential metabolic pathways like mitochondrial cytochromes and respiratory complexes, as well as enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids. However, this parasite lacks a complete route for its synthesis. In view of these facts, T. cruzi has to incorporate heme from the environment during its life cycle. In other words, their hosts must supply the heme for heme-protein synthesis. Although the acquisition of heme is a fundamental issue for the parasite’s replication and survival, how this cofactor is imported and distributed is poorly understood. In this work, we used different fluorescent heme analogs to explore heme uptake along the different life-cycle stages of T. cruzi, showing that this parasite imports it during its replicative stages: the epimastigote in the insect vector and the intracellular amastigote in the mammalian host. Also, we identified and characterized a T. cruzi protein (TcHTE) with 55% of sequence similarity to LHR1 (protein involved in L. amazonensis heme transport), which is located in the flagellar pocket, where the transport of nutrients proceeds in trypanosomatids. We postulate TcHTE as a protein involved in improving the efficiency of the heme uptake or trafficking in T. cruzi. PMID:26752206

  17. Risk factors associated with Trypanosoma cruzi exposure in domestic dogs from a rural community in Panama

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, Azael; Calzada, José E; Pineda, Vanessa; Perea, Milixa; Rigg, Chystrie; González, Kadir; Santamaria, Ana Maria; Gottdenker, Nicole L; Chaves, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is a zoonosis of humans, wild and domestic mammals, including dogs. In Panama, the main T. cruzi vector is hodnius pallescens, a triatomine bug whose main natural habitat is the royal palm, Attalea butyracea. In this paper, we present results from three T. cruzi serological tests (immunochromatographic dipstick, indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA) performed in 51 dogs from 24 houses in Trinidad de Las Minas, western Panama. We found that nine dogs were seropositive (17.6% prevalence). Dogs were 1.6 times more likely to become T. cruzi seropositive with each year of age and 11.6 times if royal palms where present in the peridomiciliary area of the dog's household or its two nearest neighbours. Mouse-baited-adhesive traps were employed to evaluate 12 peridomestic royal palms. All palms were found infested with R. pallescens with an average of 25.50 triatomines captured per palm. Of 35 adult bugs analysed, 88.6% showed protozoa flagellates in their intestinal contents. In addition, dogs were five times more likely to be infected by the presence of an additional domestic animal species in the dog's peridomiciliary environment. Our results suggest that interventions focused on royal palms might reduce the exposure to T. cruzi infection. PMID:26560985

  18. Purification and characterization of an 80-kilodalton Trypanosoma cruzi urinary antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Corral, R S; Orn, A; Freilij, H L; Bergman, T; Grinstein, S

    1989-01-01

    A Trypanosoma cruzi antigen eliminated in the urine of experimentally infected dogs was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay between 9 and 28 days after infection. The parasite urinary antigen (UAg) was purified by affinity chromatography with polyclonal antibodies to T. cruzi. The eluate of the antibody column was subjected to high-performance liquid chromatography and showed a single peak of A280. This antigen was the only parasite component found in the urine of infected dogs during the course of acute T. cruzi infection. Antigen characterization was performed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, lectin affinity chromatography, proteolytic digestion, and Western blotting (immunoblotting). The isolated UAg exhibited a relative molecular size of 80 kilodaltons (kDa), an isoelectric point of 6.2 to 6.8, binding to concanavalin A, and sensitivity to trypsin. The parasite antigen was electroeluted from polyacrylamide gels and subjected to acid hydrolysis and amino acid analysis by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The 80-kDa glycoprotein was recognized by serum antibodies from a wide variety of T. cruzi-infected hosts. The UAg proved to be a highly antigenic component present in different strains of T. cruzi. This 80-kDa polypeptide resembles one of the parasite antigens previously found in the urine of patients with acute Chagas' disease. Images PMID:2643616

  19. Comparative karyotyping as a tool for genome structure analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Branche, Carole; Ochaya, Stephen; Aslund, Lena; Andersson, Björn

    2006-05-01

    As a part of the Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, 239 genetic markers were hybridised to PFGE separated DNA from T. cruzi, in order to determine the number and size of chromosomes and to aid the assembly of the genome sequence. We used three strains, T. cruzi IIe CL Brener (the genome project reference strain) and two T. cruzi I strains, Sylvio X10/7 and CAI/72, to perform a comparative study of their karyotypes and to determine marker linkage. A densitometry analysis of the separations estimated the total chromosome numbers to be 55 in CL Brener and 57 in the two other strains. In all, 45 markers hybridised to single chromosomal bands and 103 markers to two bands in CL Brener, while the number of markers in Sylvio X10/7 and CAI/72 were 102/68 and 61/105, respectively. Size differences between homologous chromosomes were often large, up to 1900 kb (173%). The average difference was 36% for CL Brener and 23.5% for the T. cruzi I strains. Larger differences in CL Brener are consistent with a recent hybrid origin. Forty markers distributed into 15 linkage groups were found to identify specific chromosomes or chromosomes pairs. While the same markers are generally linked in all three strains, the sizes of the chromosomes vary extensively, indicating large chromosomal rearrangements. These data provide valuable information for the finishing of the CL Brener genome sequence. PMID:16481054

  20. The multiple and complex and changeable scenarios of the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycle in the sylvatic environment.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Ana Maria; Xavier, Samanta C C; Roque, André Luiz R

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report and discuss the results generated from over 20 years of studies of the Trypanosoma cruzi sylvatic transmission cycle. Our results have uncovered new aspects and reviewed old concepts on issues including reservoirs, true generalist species, association of mammalian species with distinct discrete typing units - DTUs, distribution of T. cruzi genotypes in the wild, mixed infections, and T. cruzi transmission ecology. Using parasitological and serological tests, we examined T. cruzi infection in 7,285 mammalian specimens from nine mammalian orders dispersed all over the Brazilian biomes. The obtained T. cruzi isolates were characterized by mini-exon gene sequence polymorphism and PCR RFLP to identify DTUs. Infection by T. cruzi was detected by serological methods in 20% of the examined animals and isolated from 41% of those infected, corresponding to 8% of all the examined mammals. Each mammal taxon responded uniquely to T. cruzi infection. Didelphis spp. are able to maintain high and long-lasting parasitemias (positive hemocultures) caused by TcI but maintain and rapidly control parasitemias caused by TcII to almost undetectable levels. In contrast, the tamarin species Leontopithecus rosalia and L. chrysomelas maintain long-lasting and high parasitemias caused by TcII similarly to Philander sp. The coati Nasua nasua maintains high parasitemias by both parental T. cruzi DTUs TcI or TcII and by TcII/TcIV (formerly Z3) at detectable levels. Wild and domestic canidae seem to display only a short period of reservoir competence. T. cruzi infection was demonstrated in the wild canid species Cerdocyon thous and Chrysocyon brachyurus, and positive hemoculture was obtained in one hyper carnivore species (Leopardus pardalis), demonstrating that T. cruzi transmission is deeply immersed in the trophic net. T. cruzi DTU distribution in nature did not exhibit any association with a particular biome or habitat. TcI predominates throughout (58% of the T. cruzi

  1. Emerging Chagas disease: trophic network and cycle of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi from palm trees in the Amazon.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, A. R.; Monteiro, P. S.; Rebelo, J. M.; Argañaraz, E. R.; Vieira, D.; Lauria-Pires, L.; Nascimento, R.; Vexenat, C. A.; Silva, A. R.; Ault, S. K.; Costa, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A trophic network involving molds, invertebrates, and vertebrates, ancestrally adapted to the palm tree (Attalaea phalerata) microhabitat, maintains enzootic Trypanosoma cruzi infections in the Amazonian county Paço do Lumiar, state of Maranhão, Brazil. We assessed seropositivity for T. cruzi infections in the human population of the county, searched in palm trees for the triatomines that harbor these infections, and gathered demographic, environmental, and socioeconomic data. Rhodnius pictipes and R. neglectus in palm-tree frond clefts or in houses were infected with T. cruzi (57% and 41%, respectively). Human blood was found in 6.8% of R. pictipes in houses, and 9 of 10 wild Didelphis marsupialis had virulent T. cruzi infections. Increasing human population density, rain forest deforestation, and human predation of local fauna are risk factors for human T. cruzi infections. PMID:11266300

  2. Bioluminescent imaging of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Usually the analysis of the various developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi in the experimentally infected vertebrate and invertebrate hosts is based on the morphological observations of tissue fragments from animals and insects. The development of techniques that allow the imaging of animals infected with parasites expressing luciferase open up possibilities to follow the fate of bioluminescent parasites in infected vectors. Methods D-luciferin (60 μg) was injected into the hemocoel of the whole insect before bioluminescence acquisition. In dissected insects, the whole gut was incubated with D-luciferin in PBS (300 μg/ml) for ex vivo bioluminescence acquisition in the IVIS® Imaging System, Xenogen. Results Herein, we describe the results obtained with the luciferase gene integrated into the genome of the Dm28c clone of T. cruzi, and the use of these parasites to follow, in real time, the infection of the insect vector Rhodnius prolixus, by a non- invasive method. The insects were evaluated by in vivo bioluminescent imaging on the feeding day, and on the 7 th, 14 th, 21 st and 28 th days after feeding. To corroborate the bioluminescent imaging made in vivo, and investigate the digestive tract region, the insects were dissected. The bioluminescence emitted was proportional to the number of protozoans in regions of the gut. The same digestive tracts were also macerated to count the parasites in distinct morphological stages with an optical microscope, and for bioluminescence acquisition in a microplate using the IVIS® Imaging System. A positive correlation of parasite numbers and bioluminescence in the microplate was obtained. Conclusions This is the first report of bioluminescent imaging in Rhodnius prolixus infected with trypomastigotes of the Dm28c-luc stable strain, expressing firefly luciferase. In spite of the distribution limitations of the substrate (D-luciferin) in the insect body, longitudinal evaluation of infected insects by

  3. JVG9, a benzimidazole derivative, alters the surface and cytoskeleton of Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Chiguer, Dylan L; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Castillo, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Ambrosio, Javier R

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a particular cytoskeleton that consists of a subpellicular network of microtubules and actin microfilaments. Therefore, it is an excellent target for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. Benzimidazole 2-carbamates, a class of well-known broad-spectrum anthelmintics, have been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of many protozoa. Therefore, to find efficient anti-trypanosomal (trypanocidal) drugs, our group has designed and synthesised several benzimidazole derivatives. One, named JVG9 (5-chloro-1H-benzimidazole-2-thiol), has been found to be effective against T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we present the in vitro effects observed by laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Changes in the surface and the distribution of the cytoskeletal proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the trypanocidal activity of JVG9 involves the cytoskeleton as a target. PMID:25317703

  4. ORC1/CDC6 and MCM7 distinct associate with chromatin through Trypanosoma cruzi life cycle.

    PubMed

    Calderano, Simone; Godoy, Patricia; Soares, Daiane; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo Augusto; Schenkman, Sergio; Elias, M Carolina

    2014-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi alternates between replicative and non-replicative stages. We analyzed the expression of components of the pre-replication machinery TcORC1/CDC6 and TcMCM7 and their interaction with DNA in all T. cruzi stages. TcORC1/CDC6 remains in the nuclear space during all stages of the life cycle and interacts with DNA in the replicative stages; however, it does not bind to DNA in the non-replicative forms. Moreover, TcMCM7 is not present in the non-replicative stages. These data suggest that the lacking of DNA replication during the T. cruzi life cycle may be a consequence of the blocking of TcORC1/CDC6-DNA interaction and of the down regulation of the TcMCM7 expression. PMID:24681203

  5. Seroprevalence and risk factors for Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the Amazon region of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Grijalva, Mario J; Escalante, Luis; Paredes, Rodrigo A; Costales, Jaime A; Padilla, Alberto; Rowland, Edwin C; Aguilar, H Marcelo; Racines, Jose

    2003-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the Ecuadorian Amazon region has recently been reported. A seroepidemiologic survey conducted in four provinces in this region indicates a seroprevalence rate of 2.4% among the 6,866 samples collected in 162 communities. Among children < OR = 10 years of age, 1.2% were seropositive. Risk factors for T. cruzi seropositivity were having been born and remaining in the Ecuadorian Amazon provinces, age, living in a house with a thatch roof and open or mixed wall construction, recognizing the vector insects, and reporting being bitten by a triatomine bug. These data suggest active transmission of Chagas' disease in the Ecuadorian Amazon region is associated with poor housing conditions, and highlight the need for further studies aimed at understanding the biology of the insect vectors, reservoir species, and the clinical impact of T. cruzi infection as the basis for future educational and control programs in this region. PMID:14640497

  6. The isolation and identification of Trypanosoma cruzi from raccoons in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walton, B.C.; Bauman, P.M.; Diamond, L.S.; Herman, C.M.

    1958-01-01

    Five raccoons trapped at Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, Maryland, were found to have trypanosomes in the blood which were morphologically indistinguishable from Trypanosoma cruzi on stained smears. The organism grew well in culture. It developed and reproduced in Triatoma protracta, T. infestans, T. phyllosoma, and Rhodnius prolixus. Experimental infections were produced in raccoons, opossums, mice, rats, and monkeys by inoculation of blood, culture, and triatome forms. Typical leishmaniform bodies were found in tissue sections of cardiac muscle fibers from naturally and experimentally infected animals. Cross agglutinations carried out with Iiving cultural forms and rabbit antisera demonstrated a close antigenic relationship between the raccoon trypanosome and T. cruzi (Brazil strain). On the basis of (1) morphology, (2) presence of leishmaniform tissue stages, (3) development in triatomes, (4) infectivity to a variety of mammals, (5) culture characteristics, and (6) cross reactions in serological tests, this parasite is considered conspecific with Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas, 1909), the causative agent of American human trypanosomiasis.

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi P21: a potential novel target for chagasic cardiomyopathy therapy

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; Alves da Silva, Aline; Teixeira, Samuel Cota; Borges, Bruna Cristina; dos Santos, Marlus Alves; Martins, Flávia Alves; Brígido, Paula Cristina; Rodrigues, Adele Aud; Notário, Ana Flávia Oliveira; Ferreira, Bruno Antônio; Servato, João Paulo Silva; Deconte, Simone Ramos; Lopes, Daiana Silva; Ávila, Veridiana Melo Rodrigues; Araújo, Fernanda de Assis; Tomiosso, Tatiana Carla; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, which is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America. It is estimated that 10%–30% of all infected individuals will acquire chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). The etiology of CCC is multifactorial and involves parasite genotype, host genetic polymorphisms, immune response, signaling pathways and autoimmune progression. Herein we verified the impact of the recombinant form of P21 (rP21), a secreted T. cruzi protein involved in host cell invasion, on progression of inflammatory process in a polyester sponge-induced inflammation model. Results indicated that rP21 can recruit immune cells induce myeloperoxidase and IL-4 production and decrease blood vessels formation compared to controls in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, T. cruzi P21 may be a potential target for the development of P21 antagonist compounds to treat chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26574156

  8. New 1,3-thiazole derivatives and their biological and ultrastructural effects on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    de Moraes Gomes, Paulo André Teixeira; de Oliveira Barbosa, Miria; Farias Santiago, Edna; de Oliveira Cardoso, Marcos Veríssimo; Capistrano Costa, Natáli Tereza; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; da Silva, Aline Caroline; Dos Santos, Thiago André Ramos; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves; Brayner Dos Santosd, Fábio André; do Nascimento Pereira, Glaécia Aparecida; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima

    2016-10-01

    In previous studies, the compound 3-(bromopropiophenone) thiosemicarbazone was described as a potent anti-Trypanosoma cruzi and cruzain inhibitor. In view to optimize this activity, 1,3-thiazole core was used as building-block strategy to access new lead generation of anti T. cruzi agents. In this way a series of thiazole derivatives were synthesized and most of these derivatives exhibited antiparasitic activity similar to benznidazole (Bzd). Among them, compounds (1c) and (1g) presented better selective index (SI) than Bzd. In addition, compounds showed inhibitory activity against the cruzain protease. As observed by electron microscopy, compound (1c) treatment caused irreversible and specific morphological changes on ultrastructure organization of T. cruzi, demonstrating that this class of compounds is killing parasites. PMID:27295485

  9. Phylogenetic character mapping of proteomic diversity shows high correlation with subspecific phylogenetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Telleria, Jenny; Biron, David G.; Brizard, Jean-Paul; Demettre, Edith; Séveno, Martial; Barnabé, Christian; Ayala, Francisco J.; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2010-01-01

    We performed a phylogenetic character mapping on 26 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible for Chagas disease, and 2 stocks of the sister taxon T. cruzi marinkellei to test for possible associations between T. cruzi–subspecific phylogenetic diversity and levels of protein expression, as examined by proteomic analysis and mass spectrometry. We observed a high level of correlation (P < 10−4) between genetic distance, as established by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, and proteomic dissimilarities estimated by proteomic Euclidian distances. Several proteins were found to be specifically associated to T. cruzi phylogenetic subdivisions (discrete typing units). This study explores the previously uncharacterized links between infraspecific phylogenetic diversity and gene expression in a human pathogen. It opens the way to searching for new vaccine and drug targets and for identification of specific biomarkers at the subspecific level of pathogens. PMID:21059959

  10. Circulation of Tc Ia discrete type unit Trypanosoma cruzi in Yucatan Mexico.

    PubMed

    Monteón, Victor; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana; Pennignton, Pamela; Ramos-Ligonio, Ángel; Acosta, Karla; Lopez, Ruth

    2016-06-01

    The etiologic agent Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) has been grouped into six discrete type units (DTU I-VI); within DTU-I exists four subgroups defined Ia-Id. In Colombia, the genotype Ia is associated with human infection and domiciliated Rhodnius vector. In the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, the main vector involved in T. cruzi transmission is Triatoma dimidiata predominantly via sylvatic and peridomiciliated cycles. In this study, multiple sequence analysis of mini-exon intergenic regions of T. cruzi isolates obtained from T. dimidiata in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico revealed they belonged to Tc Ia DTU along with two additional Mexican strains located 1,570 km away from Yucatan. In conclusion Tc Ia circulates in the Yucatan peninsula in T. dimidiata vector and likewise in the northwest region of Mexico. PMID:27413339

  11. Computational and Investigative Study of Flavonoids Active Against Typanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Frederico F; Junior, Francisco J B M; da Silva, Marcelo S; Scotti, Marcus Tullius; Scotti, Luciana

    2015-06-01

    Flavonoid compounds active against Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania species were submitted to several methodologies in silico: docking with the enzymes cruzain and trypanothione reductase (from T. cruzi), and N-myristoyltransferase, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, and trypanothiona reductase (from Leishmania spp). Molecular maps of the complexes and the ligands were calculated. In order to compare and evaluate the antioxidant activity of the flavonoids with their antiprotozoal activity, quantum parameters were calculated. Considering the energies, interactions, and hydrophobic surfaces calculated, the flavonoids chrysin dimethyl ether against T. cruzi, and ladanein against Leishmania sp. presented the best results. The antioxidant activity did not show any correlation with anti-parasitic activity; only chrysin and its dimethyl ether showed favorable anti-parasitic results. This study hopes to contribute to existing research on these natural products against these tropical parasites. PMID:26197515

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi and its components as exogenous mediators of inflammation recognized through Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Marco A; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2004-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease, a parasitic disease of enormous importance in Latin America. Herein we review the studies that revealed the receptors from innate immunity that are involved in the recognition of this protozoan parasite. We showed that the recognition of T. cruzi and its components occurs through Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2/CD14. Further, we showed in vivo the importance of the myeloid differentiation factor (MyD88), an adapter protein essential for the function of TLRs, in determining the parasitemia and mortality rate of mice infected with T. cruzi. We also discuss the implications of these findings in the pathophysiology of Chagas' disease. PMID:15223603

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes in Mepraia gajardoi from Wild Ecotopes in Northern Chile

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Andrea; Vergara, Fernanda; Campos, Ricardo; Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Ortiz, Sylvia; Coronado, Ximena; Solari, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated Trypanosoma cruzi infection in 397 wild Mepraia gajardoi specimens from five coastal localities in northern Chile by detection of minicircle DNA by polymerase chain reaction. The wild capture sites were classified into two ecotopes: a fully wild ecotope (ecotope 1) and a wild ecotope near human dwellings (ecotope 2). Infection rates varied between 11% and 27%. Minicircle hybridization assays showed that T. cruzi lineages Tc II and Tc VI were commonly detected in ecotope 1 and ecotope 2, respectively. These results are discussed in the context of insect proximity to human dwellings, the alimentary profile of Mepraia sp., T. cruzi lineages detected in the past in the same disease-endemic area circulating in humans, and Triatoma infestans. PMID:23249691

  14. Factors associated with Trypanosoma cruzi exposure among domestic canines in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Meghan E; Maloney, Jenny; Cohen, Sara; Yabsley, Michael J; Huang, Junjun; Kranz, Melissa; Green, Alice; Dunn, John R; Carpenter, L Rand; Jones, Timothy F; Moncayo, Abelardo C

    2010-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi , the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease, is enzootic in animal populations of the southeastern United States. In the United States, T. cruzi prevalence has been reported for over 20 different wildlife species, and 7 autochthonous human cases have been documented since 1955. Previous canine (Canis familiaris) serosurveys have been limited either by small sample size or confined geographic reporting areas. In this study, we report a seroprevalence of 6.4% among 860 canines from 31 counties and 5 ecoregions throughout Tennessee, using an indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA). Statistically significant associations between seropositivity and age, weight, and outdoor living were noted. Differences in seropositivity were not seen based on American Kennel Club (AKC) group, sex, habitat, land cover, and ecoregion. Greater attention should be given to possible T. cruzi transmission in Tennessee and veterinarians should consider Chagas' disease as a differential diagnosis with compatible signs. PMID:20557201

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi, the Causal Agent of Chagas Disease: Boundaries between Wild and Domestic Cycles in Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Leidi

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi the etiological agent of American Trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease (ChD) is transmitted by triatomines vectors between mammals including man. T. cruzi has existed for circa 150 Ma in the Americas and nearly 10 million people are currently infected. The overlap between wild and domestic ecotopes where T. cruzi circulates is increasing. Host–parasite interactions have been determined by infection patterns in these cycles, all under natural or laboratorial conditions. This mini-review describes specific parasite niches, such as plant communities or biological corridors between domestic and wild landscapes, in order to help identify risk factors for ChD and define the boundaries between wild and domestic transmission cycles, with an emphasis on research undertaken in Venezuela. PMID:25506587

  16. Evidence and importance of genetic exchange among field populations of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, Louisa A.; Miles, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Many eukaryotic pathogenic microorganisms that were previously assumed to propagate clonally have retained cryptic sexual cycles. The principal reproductive mode of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, remains a controversial topic. Despite the existence of two recent natural hybrid lineages, a pervasive view is that recombination has been restrained at an evolutionary scale and is of little epidemiological relevance to contemporary parasite populations. This article reviews the growing number of field studies which indicate that natural hybridization in T. cruzi may be frequent, non-obligatory and idiosyncratic; potentially involving independent exchange of kinetoplast and nuclear genetic material as well as canonical meiotic mechanisms. Together these observations now challenge the traditional paradigm of preponderate clonal evolution in T. cruzi and highlight the need for additional, intensive and appropriately sampled field surveys, complemented by high resolution, combined nuclear and mitochondrial population genetics analyses. PMID:26188331

  17. Role of Trypanosoma cruzi Trans-sialidase on the Escape from Host Immune Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Nardy, Ana F. F. R.; Freire-de-Lima, Celio G.; Pérez, Ana R.; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, affecting millions of people throughout Latin America. The parasite dampens host immune response causing modifications in diverse lymphoid compartments, including the thymus. T. cruzi trans-sialidase (TS) seems to play a fundamental role in such immunopathological events. This unusual enzyme catalyses the transference of sialic acid molecules from host glycoconjugates to acceptor molecules placed on the parasite surface. TS activity mediates several biological effects leading to the subversion of host immune system, hence favoring both parasite survival and the establishment of chronic infection. This review summarizes current findings on the roles of TS in the immune response during T. cruzi infection. PMID:27047464

  18. Transcriptomic alterations in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Regina Coeli dos Santos; Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Iacobas, Sanda; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; de Azevedo Fortes, Fabio da Silva; Vairo, Leandro; Nagajyothi, Fnu; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Spray, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection is a major cause of cardiomyopathy. Previous gene profiling studies of infected mouse hearts have revealed prominent changes in gene expression within many functional pathways. This variety of transcriptomic changes in infected mice raises the question of whether gene expression alterations in whole hearts are due to changes in infected cardiac myocytes or other cells or even to systemic effects of the infection on the heart. We employed microarrays to examine infected cardiac myocyte cultures 48 h post-infection. Statistical comparison of gene expression levels of 7624 well annotated unigenes in four independent cultures of infected and uninfected myocytes detected substantial (≥1.5 absolute fold changes) in 420 (5.5%) of the sampled genes. Major categories of affected genes included those involved in immune response, extracellular matrix and cell adhesion. These findings on infected cardiac myocytes in culture reveal that alterations in cardiac gene expression described in Chagas disease are the consequence of both direct infection of the myocytes themselves as well as resulting from the presence of other cell types in the myocardium and systemic effects of infection. PMID:19729072

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi: histopathology of endocrine system in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, K. S.; Lagrange, P. H.; da Costa, S. C.

    1994-01-01

    Naturally immunocompromised athymic mice, neonatal mice and adult outbred OFI mice treated with the immunosuppressive agents cyclophosphamide (CY), dexamethasone (DM) and indomethacin (IM) were infected with trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi Y and CL strains. 10(4) parasites were used, except in the case of IM treatment, where mice received 10(3) trypomastigotes in one group and 10(5) in another. The course of parasitaemia, tissue distribution of amastigotes and time of mortality were compared with an infected thymus intact control group. Neonate and indomethacin treated mice presented the same pattern of parasitaemia. Death occurred as early as 9-10 days after infection. A single dose of CY 200 mg/kg given 5 days after infection enhanced the parasitaemia and increased the number of parasites in the tissues. All groups were similar in terms of colonization of the endocrine system by parasites and the adrenals showed the highest density of amastigotes nests. The thyroid gland (analysed only in neonates) showed intense amastigote accumulation. Colonization of the ovary was observed with amastigotes in both the theca interna and in the stroma. The testes (also examined only in the neonate) showed that the interstitial cells, the tunica albuginea of the seminiferous tubules and the loose connective tissue were infected. Athymic nude mice showed the most intense parasite colonization of the islets of Langerhans. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7734334

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi. Surface antigens of blood and culture forms

    SciTech Connect

    Nogueira, N.; Chaplan, S.; Tydings, J.D.; Unkeless, J.; Cohn, Z.

    1981-03-01

    The surface polypeptides of both cultured and blood forms of Trypanosoma cruzi were iodinated by the glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase technique. Blood-form trypomastigotes (BFT) isolated form infected mice displayed a major 90,000-Mr component. In contrast, both epimastigotes and trypomastigotes obtained form acellular cultures expressed a smaller 75,000-Mr peptide. Both major surface components were presumably glycoproteins in terms of their binding to concanavalin A-Sepharose 4B. Within a 3-h period, both blood and culture forms synthesized their respective surface glycoproteins (90,000 Mr and 75,000 Mr, respectively in vitro. (/sub 35/S)methionine-labeled surface peptides were immunoprecipitated with immune sera of both human and murine origin. A panel of sera form patients with chronic Chagas' disease and hyperimmunized mice recognized similar surface peptides. These immunogens were the same components as the major iodinated species. The major BFT surface peptide was readily removed by trypsin treatment of the parasites, although the procedure did not affect the 75,000-Mr peptide from the culture forms. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the 90,000-Mr peptide found on BFT was an acidic protein of isoelectric point (pI) 5.0, whereas, the 75,000-Mr peptide form culture-form trypomastigotes has a pI of 7.2. The 90,000-Mr component is thought to be responsible for the anti-phagocytic properties of the BFT (1).

  1. Crystal Structure of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Hexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiu-Gong; Maldonado, Ernesto; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Tuena de Gomez-Puyou, Marietta; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Rodriguez-Romero, Adela

    1999-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms of enzyme catalysis in organic solvents, the x-ray structure of some monomeric enzymes in organic solvents was determined. However, it remained to be explored whether the structure of oligomeric proteins is also amenable to such analysis. The field acquired new perspectives when it was proposed that the x-ray structure of enzymes in nonaqueous media could reveal binding sites for organic solvents that in principle could represent the starting point for drug design. Here, a crystal of the dimeric enzyme triosephosphate isomerase from the pathogenic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi was soaked and diffracted in hexane and its structure solved at 2- angstrom resolution. Its overall structure and the dimer interface were not altered by hexane. However, there were differences in the orientation of the side chains of several amino acids, including that of the catalytic Glu-168 in one of the monomers. No hexane molecules were detected in the active site or in the dimer interface. However, three hexane molecules were identified on the surface of the protein at sites, which in the native crystal did not have water molecules. The number of water molecules in the hexane structure was higher than in the native crystal. Two hexanes localized at <4 angstrom from residues that form the dimer interface; they were in close proximity to a site that has been considered a potential target for drug design.

  2. Specific antibodies induce apoptosis in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Presas, Ana María; Tato, Patricia; Becker, Ingeborg; Solano, Sandra; Copitin, Natalia; Kopitin, Natalia; Berzunza, Miriam; Willms, Kaethe; Hernández, Joselin; Molinari, José Luis

    2010-05-01

    The susceptibility of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes to lysis by normal or immune sera in a complement-dependent reaction has been reported. Mouse immune sera depleted complement-induced damage in epimastigotes characterized by morphological changes and death. The purpose of this work was to study the mechanism of death in epimastigotes exposed to decomplemented mouse immune serum. Epimastigotes were maintained in RPMI medium. Immune sera were prepared in mice by immunization with whole crude epimastigote extracts. Viable epimastigotes were incubated with decomplemented normal or immune sera at 37 degrees C. By electron microscopy, agglutinated parasites showed characteristic patterns of membrane fusion between two or more parasites; this fusion also produced interdigitation of the subpellicular microtubules. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and annexin V assays. Nuclear features were examined by 4'-,6-diamidino-2'-phenylindole diHCI cytochemistry that demonstrated apoptotic nuclear condensation. Caspase activity was also measured. TUNEL results showed that parasites incubated with decomplemented immune sera took up 26% of specific fluorescence as compared to 1.3% in parasites incubated with decomplemented normal sera. The Annexin-V-Fluos staining kit revealed that epimastigotes incubated with decomplemented immune sera exposed phosphatidylserine on the external leaflet of the plasma membrane. The incubation of parasites with immune sera showed caspase 3 activity. We conclude that specific antibodies are able to induce agglutination and apoptosis in epimastigotes, although the pathway is not elucidated. PMID:20237802

  3. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, R M; Mesri, E; Esteva, M; Torres, H N; Téllez-Iñón, M T

    1988-01-01

    A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized. Cytosolic extracts were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns, giving two peaks of kinase activity, which were eluted at 0.15 M- and 0.32 M-NaCl respectively. The second activity peak was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of cyclic AMP. In addition, a cyclic AMP-binding protein co-eluted with the second kinase activity peak. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was further purified by gel filtration, affinity chromatography on histone-agarose and cyclic AMP-agarose, as well as by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. The enzyme ('holoenzyme') could be partially dissociated into two different components: 'catalytic' and 'regulatory'. The 'regulatory' component had specific binding for cyclic AMP, and it inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the homologous 'catalytic component' or of the 'catalytic subunit' from bovine heart. Cyclic AMP reversed these inhibitions. A 'holoenzyme preparation' was phosphorylated in the absence of exogenous phosphate acceptor and analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A 56 kDa band was phosphorylated. The same preparation was analysed by Western blotting, by using polyclonal antibodies to the regulatory subunits of protein kinases type I or II. Both antibodies reacted with the 56 kDa band. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2848508

  4. Early Regulation of Profibrotic Genes in Primary Human Cardiac Myocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Dykan, Andrey; Rachakonda, Girish; Villalta, Fernando; Mandape, Sammed N.; Lima, Maria F.; Pratap, Siddharth; Nde, Pius N.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of Trypanosoma cruzi induced cardiac fibrosis remains to be elucidated. Primary human cardiomyoctes (PHCM) exposed to invasive T. cruzi trypomastigotes were used for transcriptome profiling and downstream bioinformatic analysis to determine fibrotic-associated genes regulated early during infection process (0 to 120 minutes). The identification of early molecular host responses to T. cruzi infection can be exploited to delineate important molecular signatures that can be used for the classification of Chagasic patients at risk of developing heart disease. Our results show distinct gene network architecture with multiple gene networks modulated by the parasite with an incline towards progression to a fibrogenic phenotype. Early during infection, T. cruzi significantly upregulated transcription factors including activator protein 1 (AP1) transcription factor network components (including FOSB, FOS and JUNB), early growth response proteins 1 and 3 (EGR1, EGR3), and cytokines/chemokines (IL5, IL6, IL13, CCL11), which have all been implicated in the onset of fibrosis. The changes in our selected genes of interest did not all start at the same time point. The transcriptome microarray data, validated by quantitative Real-Time PCR, was also confirmed by immunoblotting and customized Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) array showing significant increases in the protein expression levels of fibrogenic EGR1, SNAI1 and IL 6. Furthermore, phosphorylated SMAD2/3 which induces a fibrogenic phenotype is also upregulated accompanied by an increased nuclear translocation of JunB. Pathway analysis of the validated genes and phospho-proteins regulated by the parasite provides the very early fibrotic interactome operating when T. cruzi comes in contact with PHCM. The interactome architecture shows that the parasite induces both TGF-β dependent and independent fibrotic pathways, providing an early molecular foundation for Chagasic cardiomyopathy

  5. Evasion of the Immune Response by Trypanosoma cruzi during Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Mariana S.; Reis-Cunha, João Luís; Bartholomeu, Daniella C.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease that affects millions of people mainly in Latin America. To establish a life-long infection, T. cruzi must subvert the vertebrate host’s immune system, using strategies that can be traced to the parasite’s life cycle. Once inside the vertebrate host, metacyclic trypomastigotes rapidly invade a wide variety of nucleated host cells in a membrane-bound compartment known as the parasitophorous vacuole, which fuses to lysosomes, originating the phagolysosome. In this compartment, the parasite relies on a complex network of antioxidant enzymes to shield itself from lysosomal oxygen and nitrogen reactive species. Lysosomal acidification of the parasitophorous vacuole is an important factor that allows trypomastigote escape from the extremely oxidative environment of the phagolysosome to the cytoplasm, where it differentiates into amastigote forms. In the cytosol of infected macrophages, oxidative stress instead of being detrimental to the parasite, favors amastigote burden, which then differentiates into bloodstream trypomastigotes. Trypomastigotes released in the bloodstream upon the rupture of the host cell membrane express surface molecules, such as calreticulin and GP160 proteins, which disrupt initial and key components of the complement pathway, while others such as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-mucins stimulate immunoregulatory receptors, delaying the progression of a protective immune response. After an immunologically silent entry at the early phase of infection, T. cruzi elicits polyclonal B cell activation, hypergammaglobulinemia, and unspecific anti-T. cruzi antibodies, which are inefficient in controlling the infection. Additionally, the coexpression of several related, but not identical, epitopes derived from trypomastigote surface proteins delays the generation of T. cruzi-specific neutralizing antibodies. Later in the infection, the establishment of an anti-T. cruzi

  6. [Immune responses of non-infected neonates of mothers infected with Trypanosoma cruzi].

    PubMed

    Truyens, Carine; Hermann, Emmanuel; Alonso-Vega, Cristina; Rodriguez, Patricia; Vekemans, Johan; Torrico, Faustino; Carlier, Yves

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated if maternal T. cruzi infection could induce in utero innate and/or adaptive immune responses in uninfected neonates by measuring specific IgM and IgA antibodies in cord blood plasma, and by performing phenotypic and functional studies of umbilical cord blood cells of their newborns (M+B- group). We detected T. cruzi-specific IgM and IgA antibodies in M+B- cord blood, indicating they had mounted in utero a strong B cell response, although they are not infected. On the other hand, circulating T cells of such uninfected neonates displayed a low level of activation, as seen bya slightly increased expression of the activation markers CD45RO on CD4+ T cells and HLA-DR on CD8+ T cells, although the proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was unmodified as compared to newborns from uninfected mothers (MB- group). This activation did not give rise to a proliferative response upon stimulation by T. cruzi antigens in vitro. However, M+B- cells produced low levels of lymphokines (IFN-gamma and IL-13) upon mitogenic stimulation, which was not the case of M-B- newborn cells. Beside this, M+B- blood cells produced higher levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1b, IL-6, TNF-alpha) than M-B- cells when stimulated with the T. cruzi lysate or LPS, suggesting the over-activation of the innate response in M+B- newborns. Monocytes participated in such inflammatory response since M+B- purified cord blood monocytes produced higher levels of TNF- when incubated with LPS or a T. cruzi lysate than M-B- cells. Altogether, these results show that, even in the absence of congenital infection, maternal T. cruzi infection triggers in utero both adaptive and innate immune responses in their babies. This indicates that parasite circulating antigens have been transferred from mothers to their fetuses. PMID:16482825

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi Needs a Signal Provided by Reactive Oxygen Species to Infect Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Goes, Grazielle R.; Rocha, Peter S.; Diniz, Aline R. S.; Aguiar, Pedro H. N.; Machado, Carlos R.; Vieira, Leda Q.

    2016-01-01

    Background During Trypanosoma cruzi infection, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a process called respiratory burst. Several works have aimed to elucidate the role of ROS during T. cruzi infection and the results obtained are sometimes contradictory. T. cruzi has a highly efficiently regulated antioxidant machinery to deal with the oxidative burst, but the parasite macromolecules, particularly DNA, may still suffer oxidative damage. Guanine (G) is the most vulnerable base and its oxidation results in formation of 8-oxoG, a cellular marker of oxidative stress. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the contribution of ROS in T. cruzi survival and infection, we utilized mice deficient in the gp91phox (Phox KO) subunit of NADPH oxidase and parasites that overexpress the enzyme EcMutT (from Escherichia coli) or TcMTH (from T. cruzi), which is responsible for removing 8-oxo-dGTP from the nucleotide pool. The modified parasites presented enhanced replication inside murine inflammatory macrophages from C57BL/6 WT mice when compared with control parasites. Interestingly, when Phox KO macrophages were infected with these parasites, we observed a decreased number of all parasites when compared with macrophages from C57BL/6 WT. Scavengers for ROS also decreased parasite growth in WT macrophages. In addition, treatment of macrophages or parasites with hydrogen peroxide increased parasite replication in Phox KO mice and in vivo. Conclusions Our results indicate a paradoxical role for ROS since modified parasites multiply better inside macrophages, but proliferation is significantly reduced when ROS is removed from the host cell. Our findings suggest that ROS can work like a signaling molecule, contributing to T. cruzi growth inside the cells. PMID:27035573

  8. Congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in Argentina, Honduras, and Mexico: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi has been divided into Discrete Typing Units I and non-I (II-VI). T. cruzi I is predominant in Mexico and Central America, while non-I is predominant in most of South America, including Argentina. Little is known about congenital transmission of T. cruzi I. The specific aim of this study is to determine the rate of congenital transmission of T. cruzi I compared to non-I. Methods/design We are conducting a prospective study to enroll at delivery, 10,000 women in Argentina, 7,500 women in Honduras, and 13,000 women in Mexico. We are measuring transmitted maternal T. cruzi antibodies by performing two rapid tests in cord blood (Stat-Pak, Chembio, Medford, New York, and Trypanosoma Detect, InBios, Seattle, Washington). If at least one of the results is positive, we are identifying infants who are congenitally infected by performing parasitological examinations on cord blood and at 4–8 weeks, and serological follow-up at 10 months. Serological confirmation by ELISA (Wiener, Rosario, Argentina) is performed in cord and maternal blood, and at 10 months. We also are performing T. cruzi standard PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and genotyping on maternal venous blood and on cord blood, and serological examinations on siblings. Data are managed by a Data Center in Montevideo, Uruguay. Data are entered online at the sites in an OpenClinica data management system, and digital pictures of data forms are sent to the Data Center for quality control. Weekly reports allow for rapid feedback to the sites. Trial registration Observational study with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01787968 PMID:24119247

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi Experimental Infection Impacts on the Thymic Regulatory T Cell Compartment.

    PubMed

    González, Florencia Belén; Calmon-Hamaty, Flavia; Nô Seara Cordeiro, Synara; Fernández Bussy, Rodrigo; Spinelli, Silvana Virginia; D'Attilio, Luciano; Bottasso, Oscar; Savino, Wilson; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Villar, Silvina Raquel; Pérez, Ana Rosa

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of regulatory T cells in the course of Trypanosoma cruzi infection is still debated. We previously demonstrated that acute murine T. cruzi infection results in an impaired peripheral CD4+Foxp3+ T cell differentiation due to the acquisition of an abnormal Th1-like phenotype and altered functional features, negatively impacting on the course of infection. Moreover, T. cruzi infection induces an intense thymic atrophy. As known, the thymus is the primary lymphoid organ in which thymic-derived regulatory T cells, known as tTregs, differentiate. Considering the lack of available data about the effect of T. cruzi infection upon tTregs, we examined tTreg dynamics during the course of disease. We confirmed that T. cruzi infection induces a marked loss of tTreg cell number associated to cell precursor exhaustion, partially avoided by glucocorticoid ablation- and IL-2 survival factor depletion. At the same time, tTregs accumulate within the CD4 single-positive compartment, exhibiting an increased Ki-67/Annexin V ratio compared to controls. Moreover, tTregs enhance after the infection the expression of signature markers (CD25, CD62L and GITR) and they also display alterations in the expression of migration-associated molecules (α chains of VLAs and chemokine receptors) such as functional fibronectin-driven migratory disturbance. Taken together, we provide data demonstrating profound alterations in tTreg compartment during acute murine T. cruzi infection, denoting that their homeostasis is significantly affected. The evident loss of tTreg cell number may compromise the composition of tTreg peripheral pool, and such sustained alteration over time may be partially related to the immune dysregulation observed in the chronic phase of the disease. PMID:26745276

  10. Development of an Aptamer-Based Concentration Method for the Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Rana; Bist, Vaibhav; Sun, Sirena; Fortes de Araujo, Fernanda; Nakhasi, Hira L.; Debrabant, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, a blood-borne parasite, is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. T. cruzi trypomastigotes, the infectious life cycle stage, can be detected in blood of infected individuals using PCR-based methods. However, soon after a natural infection, or during the chronic phase of Chagas disease, the number of parasites in blood may be very low and thus difficult to detect by PCR. To facilitate PCR-based detection methods, a parasite concentration approach was explored. A whole cell SELEX strategy was utilized to develop serum stable RNA aptamers that bind to live T. cruzi trypomastigotes. These aptamers bound to the parasite with high affinities (8–25 nM range). The highest affinity aptamer, Apt68, also demonstrated high specificity as it did not interact with the insect stage epimastigotes of T. cruzi nor with other related trypanosomatid parasites, L. donovani and T. brucei, suggesting that the target of Apt68 was expressed only on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Biotinylated Apt68, immobilized on a solid phase, was able to capture live parasites. These captured parasites were visible microscopically, as large motile aggregates, formed when the aptamer coated paramagnetic beads bound to the surface of the trypomastigotes. Additionally, Apt68 was also able to capture and aggregate trypomastigotes from several isolates of the two major genotypes of the parasite. Using a magnet, these parasite-bead aggregates could be purified from parasite-spiked whole blood samples, even at concentrations as low as 5 parasites in 15 ml of whole blood, as detected by a real-time PCR assay. Our results show that aptamers can be used as pathogen specific ligands to capture and facilitate PCR-based detection of T. cruzi in blood. PMID:22927983

  11. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N.; Martins, Rafael M.; Braz, Gloria R.C.; Tanaka, Aparecida S.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi Evades the Protective Role of Interferon-Gamma-Signaling in Parasite-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Philipp; Ruppert, Volker; Schwarz, Ralph T.; Meyer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is responsible for the zoonotic Chagas disease, a chronic and systemic infection in humans and warm-blooded animals typically leading to progressive dilated cardiomyopathy and gastrointestinal manifestations. In the present study, we report that the transcription factor STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 1) reduces the susceptibility of human cells to infection with T. cruzi. Our in vitro data demonstrate that interferon -γ (IFNγ) pre-treatment causes T. cruzi-infected cells to enter an anti-parasitic state through the activation of the transcription factor STAT1. Whereas stimulation of STAT1-expressing cells with IFNγ significantly impaired intracellular replication of parasites, no protective effect of IFNγ was observed in STAT1-deficient U3A cells. The gene encoding indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (ido) was identified as a STAT1-regulated target gene engaged in parasite clearance. Exposure of cells to T. cruzi trypomastigotes in the absence of IFNγ resulted in both sustained tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and its increased DNA binding. Furthermore, we found that in response to T. cruzi the total amount of intracellular STAT1 increased in an infectious dose-dependent manner, both at the mRNA and protein level. While STAT1 activation is a potent strategy of the host in the fight against the invading pathogen, amastigotes replicating intracellularly antagonize this pathway by specifically promoting the dephosphorylation of STAT1 serine 727, thereby partially circumventing its protective effects. These findings point to the crucial role of the IFNγ/STAT1 signal pathway in the evolutionary combat between T. cruzi parasites and their host. PMID:25340519

  13. Evasion of the Immune Response by Trypanosoma cruzi during Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Mariana S; Reis-Cunha, João Luís; Bartholomeu, Daniella C

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease that affects millions of people mainly in Latin America. To establish a life-long infection, T. cruzi must subvert the vertebrate host's immune system, using strategies that can be traced to the parasite's life cycle. Once inside the vertebrate host, metacyclic trypomastigotes rapidly invade a wide variety of nucleated host cells in a membrane-bound compartment known as the parasitophorous vacuole, which fuses to lysosomes, originating the phagolysosome. In this compartment, the parasite relies on a complex network of antioxidant enzymes to shield itself from lysosomal oxygen and nitrogen reactive species. Lysosomal acidification of the parasitophorous vacuole is an important factor that allows trypomastigote escape from the extremely oxidative environment of the phagolysosome to the cytoplasm, where it differentiates into amastigote forms. In the cytosol of infected macrophages, oxidative stress instead of being detrimental to the parasite, favors amastigote burden, which then differentiates into bloodstream trypomastigotes. Trypomastigotes released in the bloodstream upon the rupture of the host cell membrane express surface molecules, such as calreticulin and GP160 proteins, which disrupt initial and key components of the complement pathway, while others such as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-mucins stimulate immunoregulatory receptors, delaying the progression of a protective immune response. After an immunologically silent entry at the early phase of infection, T. cruzi elicits polyclonal B cell activation, hypergammaglobulinemia, and unspecific anti-T. cruzi antibodies, which are inefficient in controlling the infection. Additionally, the coexpression of several related, but not identical, epitopes derived from trypomastigote surface proteins delays the generation of T. cruzi-specific neutralizing antibodies. Later in the infection, the establishment of an anti-T. cruzi CD8

  14. Early Regulation of Profibrotic Genes in Primary Human Cardiac Myocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Udoko, Aniekanabassi N; Johnson, Candice A; Dykan, Andrey; Rachakonda, Girish; Villalta, Fernando; Mandape, Sammed N; Lima, Maria F; Pratap, Siddharth; Nde, Pius N

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of Trypanosoma cruzi induced cardiac fibrosis remains to be elucidated. Primary human cardiomyoctes (PHCM) exposed to invasive T. cruzi trypomastigotes were used for transcriptome profiling and downstream bioinformatic analysis to determine fibrotic-associated genes regulated early during infection process (0 to 120 minutes). The identification of early molecular host responses to T. cruzi infection can be exploited to delineate important molecular signatures that can be used for the classification of Chagasic patients at risk of developing heart disease. Our results show distinct gene network architecture with multiple gene networks modulated by the parasite with an incline towards progression to a fibrogenic phenotype. Early during infection, T. cruzi significantly upregulated transcription factors including activator protein 1 (AP1) transcription factor network components (including FOSB, FOS and JUNB), early growth response proteins 1 and 3 (EGR1, EGR3), and cytokines/chemokines (IL5, IL6, IL13, CCL11), which have all been implicated in the onset of fibrosis. The changes in our selected genes of interest did not all start at the same time point. The transcriptome microarray data, validated by quantitative Real-Time PCR, was also confirmed by immunoblotting and customized Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) array showing significant increases in the protein expression levels of fibrogenic EGR1, SNAI1 and IL 6. Furthermore, phosphorylated SMAD2/3 which induces a fibrogenic phenotype is also upregulated accompanied by an increased nuclear translocation of JunB. Pathway analysis of the validated genes and phospho-proteins regulated by the parasite provides the very early fibrotic interactome operating when T. cruzi comes in contact with PHCM. The interactome architecture shows that the parasite induces both TGF-β dependent and independent fibrotic pathways, providing an early molecular foundation for Chagasic cardiomyopathy

  15. Galectin-1 Prevents Infection and Damage Induced by Trypanosoma cruzi on Cardiac Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benatar, Alejandro F.; García, Gabriela A.; Bua, Jacqeline; Cerliani, Juan P.; Postan, Miriam; Tasso, Laura M.; Scaglione, Jorge; Stupirski, Juan C.; Toscano, Marta A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is the result of a pathologic process starting during the acute phase of parasite infection. Among different factors, the specific recognition of glycan structures by glycan-binding proteins from the parasite or from the mammalian host cells may play a critical role in the evolution of the infection. Methodology and Principal Findings Here we investigated the contribution of galectin–1 (Gal–1), an endogenous glycan-binding protein abundantly expressed in human and mouse heart, to the pathophysiology of T. cruzi infection, particularly in the context of cardiac pathology. We found that exposure of HL–1 cardiac cells to Gal–1 reduced the percentage of infection by two different T. cruzi strains, Tulahuén (TcVI) and Brazil (TcI). In addition, Gal–1 prevented exposure of phosphatidylserine and early events in the apoptotic program by parasite infection on HL–1 cells. These effects were not mediated by direct interaction with the parasite surface, suggesting that Gal–1 may act through binding to host cells. Moreover, we also observed that T. cruzi infection altered the glycophenotype of cardiac cells, reducing binding of exogenous Gal–1 to the cell surface. Consistent with these data, Gal–1 deficient (Lgals1-/-) mice showed increased parasitemia, reduced signs of inflammation in heart and skeletal muscle tissues, and lower survival rates as compared to wild-type (WT) mice in response to intraperitoneal infection with T. cruzi Tulahuén strain. Conclusion/Significance Our results indicate that Gal–1 modulates T. cruzi infection of cardiac cells, highlighting the relevance of galectins and their ligands as regulators of host-parasite interactions. PMID:26451839

  16. Medicinal plants of Chile: evaluation of their anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Orlando M; Maya, Juan D; Ferreira, Jorge; Christen, Philippe; San Martin, José; López-Muñoz, Rodrigo; Morello, Antonio; Kemmerling, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    The extracts of several plants of Central Chile exhibited anti-Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes activity. Most active extracts were those obtained from Podanthus ovatifolius, Berberis microphylla, Kageneckia oblonga, and Drimys winteri. The active extract of Drimys winteri (IC50 51.2 microg/mL) was purified and three drimane sesquiterpenes were obtained: polygodial, drimenol, and isodrimenin. Isodrimenin and drimenol were found to be active against the trypomastigote form of T. cruzi with IC50 values of 27.9 and 25.1 microM, respectively. PMID:23923616

  17. AFAP-1L1-mediated actin filaments crosslinks hinder Trypanosoma cruzi cell invasion and intracellular multiplication.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Karine Canuto Loureiro; Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; da Silva, Aline Alves; Quintal, Amanda Pifano Neto; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Host actin cytoskeleton polymerization has been shown to play an important role during Trypanosoma cruzi internalization into mammalian cell. The structure and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in cells are regulated by a vast number of actin-binding proteins. Here we aimed to verify the impact of AFAP-1L1, during invasion and multiplication of T. cruzi. Knocking-down AFAP-1L1 increased parasite cell invasion and intracellular multiplication. Thus, we have shown that the integrity of the machinery formed by AFAP-1L1 in actin cytoskeleton polymerization is important to hinder parasite infection. PMID:27349187

  18. In vitro activity of Rutaceae species against the trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Mafezoli, J; Vieira, P C; Fernandes, J B; da Silva, M F; de Albuquerque, S

    2000-11-01

    The activity of crude plant extracts of nine species of Rutaceae against the trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi was evaluated at 4 mg/ml. Thirty-two crude extracts were tested and eight of them showed significant activity (>80%). The most active extract was obtained from the stems of Pilocarpus spicatus (97.3%). Fractionation of the active crude extracts provided 25 fractions which were tested against the trypomastigote form of T. cruzi at 2 mg/ml. Of these six showed significant activity (>80%). The most active fractions (100%) were obtained from the leaves of Almeidea coerulea (butanol fraction) and Conchocarpus inopinatus (dichloromethane fraction). PMID:11025175

  19. Real time monitoring of drug action on T. cruzi parasites using a biospeckle laser method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. Z.; Grassi, H. C.; Cabrera, H.; Andrades, E. D. J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report on a biospeckle laser method used to monitor a specific drug action on T. cruzi parasites. Experimental results from fast biospeckle monitoring of the parasites’ activity under the influence of the drug demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. We measure the speckle parameters such as spatiotemporal correlation and speckle grain size to assess the immediate action of the drug on the parasites during a very short incubation period. From a practical point of view, this aproach allows us to validate biospeckle as a fast, non-invasive and alternative method to test candidate drugs on T. cruzi parasites.

  20. Molecular Diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi Detected in the Vector Triatoma protracta from California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Shender, Lisa A.; Lewis, Michael D.; Rejmanek, Daniel; Mazet, Jonna A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, is a vector-borne zoonotic protozoan parasite that can cause fatal cardiac disease. While recognized as the most economically important parasitic infection in Latin America, the incidence of Chagas disease in the United States of America (US) may be underreported and even increasing. The extensive genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Latin America is well-documented and likely influences disease progression, severity and treatment efficacy; however, little is known regarding T. cruzi strains endemic to the US. It is therefore important to expand our knowledge on US T. cruzi strains, to improve upon the recognition of and response to locally acquired infections. Methodology/Principle Findings We conducted a study of T. cruzi molecular diversity in California, augmenting sparse genetic data from southern California and for the first time investigating genetic sequences from northern California. The vector Triatoma protracta was collected from southern (Escondido and Los Angeles) and northern (Vallecito) California regions. Samples were initially screened via sensitive nuclear repetitive DNA and kinetoplast minicircle DNA PCR assays, yielding an overall prevalence of approximately 28% and 55% for southern and northern California regions, respectively. Positive samples were further processed to identify discrete typing units (DTUs), revealing both TcI and TcIV lineages in southern California, but only TcI in northern California. Phylogenetic analyses (targeting COII-ND1, TR and RB19 genes) were performed on a subset of positive samples to compare Californian T. cruzi samples to strains from other US regions and Latin America. Results indicated that within the TcI DTU, California sequences were similar to those from the southeastern US, as well as to several isolates from Latin America responsible for causing Chagas disease in humans. Conclusions/Significance Triatoma protracta populations

  1. Evidence for the existence of an Ns-type regulatory protein in Trypanosoma cruzi membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C D; Paladini, A A; Molina y Vedia, L; Torres, H N; Flawiá, M M

    1986-01-01

    The existence of a GTP-binding protein of the Ns type in Trypanosoma cruzi was explored. Epimastigote membranes were labelled by cholera toxin in the presence of [adenine-14C]NAD+. After SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of extracted membrane proteins, a single labelled polypeptide band of apparent Mr approx. 45,000 was detected. Epimastigote cells were treated with N-ethylmaleimide and electrofused to lymphoma S49 cells lacking the Ns protein. Evidence indicates that in such electrofusion-generated cell hybrids a heterologous adenylate cyclase system was reconstituted with the Ns protein provided by T. cruzi epimastigotes. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3099761

  2. Structural and Functional Analysis of a Platelet-Activating Lysophosphatidylcholine of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Oliveira, Mauricio M.; Hoelz, Lucas V. B.; Vieira, Danielle P.; Marques, Alexandre F.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Gomes, Marta T.; Salloum, Nasim G.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Monteiro, Robson Q.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of the life-threatening Chagas disease, in which increased platelet aggregation related to myocarditis is observed. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent intercellular lipid mediator and second messenger that exerts its activity through a PAF-specific receptor (PAFR). Previous data from our group suggested that T. cruzi synthesizes a phospholipid with PAF-like activity. The structure of T. cruzi PAF-like molecule, however, remains elusive. Methodology/Principal findings Here, we have purified and structurally characterized the putative T. cruzi PAF-like molecule by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Our ESI-MS/MS data demonstrated that the T. cruzi PAF-like molecule is actually a lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), namely sn-1 C18:1(delta 9)-LPC. Similar to PAF, the platelet-aggregating activity of C18:1-LPC was abrogated by the PAFR antagonist, WEB 2086. Other major LPC species, i.e., C16:0-, C18:0-, and C18:2-LPC, were also characterized in all T. cruzi stages. These LPC species, however, failed to induce platelet aggregation. Quantification of T. cruzi LPC species by ESI-MS revealed that intracellular amastigote and trypomastigote forms have much higher levels of C18:1-LPC than epimastigote and metacyclic trypomastigote forms. C18:1-LPC was also found to be secreted by the parasite in extracellular vesicles (EV) and an EV-free fraction. A three-dimensional model of PAFR was constructed and a molecular docking study was performed to predict the interactions between the PAFR model and PAF, and each LPC species. Molecular docking data suggested that, contrary to other LPC species analyzed, C18:1-LPC is predicted to interact with the PAFR model in a fashion similar to PAF. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our data indicate that T. cruzi synthesizes a bioactive C18:1-LPC, which aggregates platelets via PAFR. We propose that C18:1-LPC might be an important lipid mediator in the

  3. Genome-Wide Screening and Identification of New Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens with Potential Application for Chronic Chagas Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Reis-Cunha, João Luís; Mendes, Tiago Antônio de Oliveira; de Almeida Lourdes, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Daihana Rodrigues dos Santos; Machado-de-Avila, Ricardo Andrez; de Oliveira Tavares, Maykon; Lemos, Denise Silveira; Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Olórtegui, Carlos Chavez; de Lana, Marta; da Cunha Galvão, Lúcia Maria; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira

    2014-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, an infection that afflicts approximately 8 million people in Latin America. Diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is currently based on serological tests because this condition is usually characterized by high anti-T. cruzi IgG titers and low parasitemia. The antigens used in these assays may have low specificity due to cross reactivity with antigens from related parasite infections, such as leishmaniasis, and low sensitivity caused by the high polymorphism among T. cruzi strains. Therefore, the identification of new T. cruzi-specific antigens that are conserved among the various parasite discrete typing units (DTUs) is still required. In the present study, we have explored the hybrid nature of the T. cruzi CL Brener strain using a broad genome screening approach to select new T. cruzi antigens that are conserved among the different parasite DTUs and that are absent in other trypanosomatid species. Peptide arrays containing the conserved antigens with the highest epitope prediction scores were synthesized, and the reactivity of the peptides were tested by immunoblot using sera from C57BL/6 mice chronically infected with T. cruzi strains from the TcI, TcII or TcVI DTU. The two T. cruzi proteins that contained the most promising peptides were expressed as recombinant proteins and tested in ELISA experiments with sera from chagasic patients with distinct clinical manifestations: those infected with T. cruzi from different DTUs and those with cutaneous or visceral leishmaniasis. These proteins, named rTc_11623.20 and rTc_N_10421.310, exhibited 94.83 and 89.66% sensitivity, 98.2 and 94.6% specificity, respectively, and a pool of these 2 proteins exhibited 96.55% sensitivity and 98.18% specificity. This work led to the identification of two new antigens with great potential application in the diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease. PMID:25225853

  4. Aptamer Based, Non-PCR, Non-Serological Detection of Chagas Disease Biomarkers in Trypanosoma cruzi Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Rana; de Araujo, Fernanda Fortes; Gupta, Charu; Debrabant, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease affects about 5 million people across the world. The etiological agent, the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), can be diagnosed using microscopy, serology or PCR based assays. However, each of these methods has their limitations regarding sensitivity and specificity, and thus to complement these existing diagnostic methods, alternate assays need to be developed. It is well documented that several parasite proteins called T. cruzi Excreted Secreted Antigens (TESA), are released into the blood of an infected host. These circulating parasite antigens could thus be used as highly specific biomarkers of T. cruzi infection. In this study, we have demonstrated that, using a SELEx based approach, parasite specific ligands called aptamers, can be used to detect TESA in the plasma of T. cruzi infected mice. An Enzyme Linked Aptamer (ELA) assay, similar to ELISA, was developed using biotinylated aptamers to demonstrate that these RNA ligands could interact with parasite targets. Aptamer L44 (Apt-L44) showed significant and specific binding to TESA as well as T. cruzi trypomastigote extract and not to host proteins or proteins of Leishmania donovani, a related trypanosomatid parasite. Our result also demonstrated that the target of Apt-L44 is conserved in three different strains of T. cruzi. In mice infected with T. cruzi, Apt-L44 demonstrated a significantly higher level of binding compared to non-infected mice suggesting that it could detect a biomarker of T. cruzi infection. Additionally, Apt-L44 could detect these circulating biomarkers in both the acute phase, from 7 to 28 days post infection, and in the chronic phase, from 55 to 230 days post infection. Our results show that Apt-L44 could thus be used in a qualitative ELA assay to detect biomarkers of Chagas disease. PMID:24454974

  5. Mouse Macrophage Galactose-type Lectin (mMGL) is Critical for Host Resistance against Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Alicia; de Dios Ruiz-Rosado, Juan; Terrazas, Luis I.; Juárez, Imelda; Gomez-Garcia, Lorena; Calleja, Elsa; Camacho, Griselda; Chávez, Ana; Romero, Miriam; Rodriguez, Tonathiu; Espinoza, Bertha; Rodriguez-Sosa, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The C-type lectin receptor mMGL is expressed exclusively by myeloid antigen presenting cells (APC) such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (Mφ), and it mediates binding to glycoproteins carrying terminal galactose and α- or β-N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) residues. Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) expresses large amounts of mucin (TcMUC)-like glycoproteins. Here, we show by lectin-blot that galactose moieties are also expressed on the surface of T. cruzi. Male mMGL knockout (-/-) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice were infected intraperitoneally with 104 T. cruzi trypomastigotes (Queretaro strain). Following T. cruzi infection, mMGL-/- mice developed higher parasitemia and higher mortality rates compared with WT mice. Although hearts from T. cruzi-infected WT mice presented few amastigote nests, mMGL-/- mice displayed higher numbers of amastigote nests. Compared with WT, Mφ from mMGL-/- mice had low production of nitric oxide (NO), interleukin (IL)-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in response to soluble T. cruzi antigens (TcAg). Interestingly, upon in vitro T. cruzi infection, mMGL-/- Mφ expressed lower levels of MHC-II and TLR-4 and harbored higher numbers of parasites, even when mMGL-/- Mφ were previously primed with IFN-γ or LPS/IFN-γ. These data suggest that mMGL plays an important role during T. cruzi infection, is required for optimal Mφ activation, and may synergize with TLR-4-induced pathways to produce TNF-α, IL-1β and NO during the early phase of infection. PMID:25170304

  6. Frequency of IFNγ-producing T cells correlates with seroreactivity and activated T cells during canine Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Ashley N; Cooley, Gretchen; Gwyn, Sarah; Orozco, Marcela M; Tarleton, Rick L

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines to prevent Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans or animals are not available, and in many settings, dogs are an important source of domestic infection for the insect vector. Identification of infected canines is crucial for evaluating peridomestic transmission dynamics and parasite control strategies. As immune control of T. cruzi infection is dependent on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, we aimed to define a serodiagnostic assay and T cell phenotypic markers for identifying infected dogs and studying the canine T. cruzi-specific immune response. Plasma samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from forty-two dogs living in a T. cruzi-endemic region. Twenty dogs were known to be seropositive and nine seronegative by conventional serologic tests two years prior to our study. To determine canine seroreactivity, we tested sera or plasma samples in a multiplex bead array against eleven recombinant T. cruzi proteins. Ninety-four percent (17/18) of dogs positive by multiplex serology were initially positive by conventional serology. The frequency of IFNγ-producing cells in PBMCs responding to T. cruzi correlated to serological status, identifying 95% of multiplex seropositive dogs. Intracellular staining identified CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations as the sources of T. cruzi lysate-induced IFNγ. Low expression of CCR7 and CD62L on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells suggested a predominance of effector/effector memory T cells in seropositive canines. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to correlate T. cruzi-specific antibody responses with T cell responses in naturally infected dogs and validate these methods for identifying dogs exposed to T. cruzi. PMID:24456537

  7. Widespread, focal copy number variations (CNV) and whole chromosome aneuploidies in Trypanosoma cruzi strains revealed by array comparative genomic hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite and the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, an important public health problem in Latin America. T. cruzi is diploid, almost exclusively asexual, and displays an extraordinarily diverse population structure both genetically and phenotypically. Yet, to date the genotypic diversity of T. cruzi and its relationship, if any, to biological diversity have not been studied at the whole genome level. Results In this study, we used whole genome oligonucleotide tiling arrays to compare gene content in biologically disparate T. cruzi strains by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). We observed that T. cruzi strains display widespread and focal copy number variations (CNV) and a substantially greater level of diversity than can be adequately defined by the current genetic typing methods. As expected, CNV were particularly frequent in gene family-rich regions containing mucins and trans-sialidases but were also evident in core genes. Gene groups that showed little variation in copy numbers among the strains tested included those encoding protein kinases and ribosomal proteins, suggesting these loci were less permissive to CNV. Moreover, frequent variation in chromosome copy numbers were observed, and chromosome-specific CNV signatures were shared by genetically divergent T. cruzi strains. Conclusions The large number of CNV, over 4,000, reported here uphold at a whole genome level the long held paradigm of extraordinary genome plasticity among T. cruzi strains. Moreover, the fact that these heritable markers do not parse T. cruzi strains along the same lines as traditional typing methods is strongly suggestive of genetic exchange playing a major role in T. cruzi population structure and biology. PMID:21385342

  8. Comparison of the infectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi insect-derived metacyclic trypomastigotes after mucosal and cutaneous contaminative challenges

    PubMed Central

    Eickhoff, Christopher Steven; Dunn, Brian Anthony; Sullivan, Nicole Lea; Hoft, Daniel Fredric

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infects humans when infected triatomine vector excreta contaminate breaks in skin or mucosal surfaces. T. cruzi insect-derived metacyclic trypomastigotes (IMT) invade through gastric mucosa after oral challenges without any visible inflammatory changes, while cutaneous and conjunctival infections result in obvious local physical signs. In this study we compared the infectivity of T. cruzi IMT in mice after cutaneous and oral contaminative challenges simulating natural infections. The 50% infective dose (ID50) for oral challenge was 100 fold lower than the ID50for cutaneous challenge, indicating that oral mucosal transmission is more efficient than cutaneous transmission. PMID:23828001

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi Entrance through Systemic or Mucosal Infection Sites Differentially Modulates Regional Immune Response Following Acute Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Meis, Juliana; Barreto de Albuquerque, Juliana; Silva dos Santos, Danielle; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Savino, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is characterized by a systemic infection that leads to the strong activation of the adaptive immune response. Outbreaks of oral contamination by the infective protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi are frequent in Brazil and other Latin American countries, and an increased severity of clinical manifestations and mortality is observed in infected patients. These findings have elicited questions about the specific responses triggered after T. cruzi entry via mucosal sites, possibly modulating local immune mechanisms, and further impacting regional and systemic immunity. Here, we provide evidence for the existence of differential lymphoid organ responses in experimental models of acute T. cruzi infection. PMID:23898334

  10. Application of core-shell PEGylated CdS/Cd(OH) 2 quantum dots as biolabels of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, C. R.; Fontes, A.; Farias, P. M. A.; Santos, B. S.; de Menezes, F. D.; Ferreira, R. C.; Cesar, C. L.; Galembeck, A.; Figueiredo, R. C. B. Q.

    2008-11-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are a promising class of materials in the labeling of biological systems. In the present study we show the marking pattern of Trypanosoma cruzi ( T. cruzi) live parasites using PEGylated CdS/Cd(OH) 2 fluorescent nanocrystals. The analysis obtained by confocal fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicates that only the endocytic paths of parasites were labeled. The parasites were alive after the incubation with the CdS/Cd(OH) 2-PEG suspension. Labeling the T. cruzi with quantum dots can help to better understand the endocytosis process and also the cellular differentiation.

  11. Fluctuations in Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing unit composition in two naturally infected triatomines: Mepraia gajardoi and M. spinolai after laboratory feeding.

    PubMed

    Egaña, Camila; Pinto, Raquel; Vergara, Fernanda; Ortiz, Sylvia; Campos, Ricardo; Solari, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    Mepraia species are hematophagous insects and the most important wild vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease in southeastern South America. Because the domestic Triatoma infestans is already controlled, the transmission of different T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) by Mepraia species deserves attention. Our aim is to gather information on the diversity of T. cruzi DTUs circulating in natural insect populations. Two groups of naturally infected bugs 21 Mepraia gajardoi and 26 Mepraia spinolai were followed-up after two or more laboratory feedings by means of minicircle-PCR assays to evaluate the composition of four T. cruzi DTUs by hybridization tests. Fluctuations from positive T. cruzi detection to negative and the converse, as well as single to mixed infections with different T. cruzi DTUs and the opposite were frequent observations after laboratory feeding in both Mepraia species. Single and mixed infections with more than two T. cruzi DTUs were detected after the first feeding; however mainly mixed infections prevailed after the second feeding. Laboratory feeding on three or more occasions resulted in a decreasing trend of the parasite burden. In a comparison with 28 infected and fed M. gajardoi collected one year before from the same vector colony T. cruzi DTUs composition changed, indicating that temporal variations occur in T. cruzi. Natural populations of Mepraia species can transmit complex mixtures T. cruzi DTUs which fluctuate over time after feeding, with a tendency to eliminate the parasitism after prolonged feeding. PMID:27109041

  12. Nitrofuran drugs as common subversive substrates of Trypanosoma cruzi lipoamide dehydrogenase and trypanothione reductase.

    PubMed

    Blumenstiel, K; Schöneck, R; Yardley, V; Croft, S L; Krauth-Siegel, R L

    1999-12-01

    Lipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH), trypanothione reductase (TR), and glutathione reductase (GR) catalyze the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of disulfide substrates. TR occurs exclusively in trypanosomatids which lack a GR. Besides their physiological reactions, the flavoenzymes catalyze the single-electron reduction of nitrofurans with the concomitant generation of superoxide anions. Here, we report on the interaction of clinically used antimicrobial nitrofurans with LipDH and TR from Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease (South American trypanosomiasis), in comparison to mammalian LipDH and GR. The compounds were studied as inhibitors and as subversive substrates of the enzymes. None of the nitrofurans inhibited LipDH, although they did interfere with the disulfide reduction of TR and GR. When the compounds were studied as substrates, T. cruzi LipDH showed a high rate of nitrofuran reduction and was even more efficient than its mammalian counterpart. Several derivatives were also effective subversive substrates of TR, but the respective reaction with human GR was negligible. Nifuroxazide, nifuroxime, and nifurprazine proved to be the most promising derivatives since they were redox-cycled by both T. cruzi LipDH and TR and had pronounced antiparasitic effects in cultures of T. cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei. The results suggest that those nitrofuran derivatives which interact with both parasite flavoenzymes should be revisited as trypanocidal drugs. PMID:10571254

  13. Minichromosomal repetitive DNA in Trypanosoma cruzi: its use in a high-sensitivity parasite detection assay.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, A; Prediger, E; Huecas, M E; Nogueira, N; Lizardi, P M

    1984-01-01

    We have isolated genomic clones containing members of a tandemly repeated DNA family from Trypanosoma cruzi. This family, which contains a 195-base pair (bp) repeating unit, is the most abundant repetitive DNA in this organism. DNA sequencing analysis of three adjacent tandem repeats as well as two independent nonadjacent repeats showed relatively little sequence heterogeneity. Surprisingly, the three tandem elements contained a 585-bp open reading frame. However, blot hybridization of RNA from epimastigotes as well as blood-form trypomastigotes failed to show evidence for transcription of these sequences. Fractionation of whole T. cruzi DNA in sucrose gradients or in agarose gels followed by hybridization with appropriate radioactive probes showed that the size distribution of DNA bearing the 195-bp repetitive element is distinct from that of kinetoplast DNA as well as from that of DNA bearing tubulin genes. Hybridization of the 195-bp element probe with DNA from six different T. cruzi strains was positive; hybridization with DNA of other protozoa was negative with the single exception of Leptomonas collosoma , which displayed a weak cross-hybridization signal. Clones bearing this repetitive element are shown to be useful as probes for identification and counting of T. cruzi cells by dot-blot hybridization. The sensitivity of this assay permits detection of the DNA of 30 parasites in blood samples. Images PMID:6427769

  14. Effects of habitat fragmentation on wild mammal infection by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Vaz, V C; D'Andrea, P S; Jansen, A M

    2007-11-01

    Expansion of human activities frequently results in habitat fragmentation, a phenomenon that has been widely recognized in the last decades as one of the major threats to world's biodiversity. The transformation of a continuous forest into a fragmented area results in a hyper-dynamic landscape with unpredictable consequences to overall ecosystem health. The effect of the fragmentation process on Trypanosoma cruzi infection among small wild mammals was studied in an Atlantic Rain Forest landscape. Comparing continous forest to fragmented habitat, marsupials were less abundant than rodents in the continuous landscape. An overall decrease in small wild mammal richness was observed in the smaller fragments. An anti-T. cruzi seroprevalence of 18% (82/440) was deteced by immunofluorescence assay. Moreover, this seroprevalence was higher in the fragmented habitat than in the continuous forest. According to the collected data, 3 main factors seem to modulate infection by T. cruzi in small wild mammals: (i) habitat fragmentation; (ii) biodiversity loss; (iii) increase of marsupial abundance in mammal communities. Furthermore, an extremely mild controlled infection by T. cruzi was detected since no patent parasitaemia could be detected in fresh blood samples, and no parasites were isolated by haemoculture. PMID:17651530

  15. Oral transmission of Chagas disease: importance of Trypanosoma cruzi biodeme in the intragastric experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Camandaroba, Edson Luiz P; Pinheiro Lima, Clarissa M; Andrade, Sonia G

    2002-01-01

    Oral transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi has been suspected when epidemic episodes of acute infection were observed in areas devoid of domiciled insect vectors. Considering that the distribution of T. cruzi biodemes differs in sylvatic and domestic cycles, results of studies on biodemes can be of interest regarding oral transmission. The infectivity of T. cruzi strains of different biodemes was tested in mice subjected to infection by the digestive route (gavage). Swiss mice were infected either with the Peruvian strain (Biodeme Type I, Z2b) or the Colombian strain (Biodeme Type III, Z1, or T. cruzi I); for control, intraperitoneal inoculation was performed in a group of mice. The Colombian strain revealed a similar high infectivity and pathogenicity when either route of infection was used. However, the Peruvian strain showed contrasting levels of infectivity and pathogenicity, being high by intraperitoneal inoculation and low when the gastric route was used. The higher infectivity of the Colombian strain (Biodeme Type III) by gastric inoculation is in keeping with its role in the epidemic episodes of acute Chagas disease registered in the literature, since strains belonging to Biodeme III are most often found in sylvatic hosts. PMID:12048547

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi Polyamine Transporter: Its Role on Parasite Growth and Survival Under Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reigada, Chantal; Sayé, Melisa; Vera, Edward Valera; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Polyamines are polycationic compounds that play a critical role as regulators of cell growth and differentiation. In contrast with other protozoa, T. cruzi is auxotrophic for polyamines because of its inability to synthesize putrescine due to the lack of both, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase; therefore, the intracellular availability of polyamines depends exclusively on transport processes. In this work, the polyamine transporter TcPAT12 was overexpressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes demonstrating that growth rates at different concentrations of polyamines strongly depend on the regulation of the polyamine transport. In addition, parasites overexpressing TcPAT12 showed a highly increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide and the trypanocidal drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole, which act by oxidative stress and interfering the synthesis of polyamine derivatives, respectively. Finally, the presence of putative polyamine transporters was analyzed in T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania major genomes identifying 3-6 genes in these trypanosomatids. PMID:26983938

  17. Identification and Characterization of the Trypanosoma cruzi B-cell Superantigen Tc24.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Sarah M; Jones, Kathryn M; Zhan, Bin; Essigmann, Heather T; Murray, Kristy O; Garcia, Melissa N; Gorchakov, Rodion; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Brown, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes life-long disease after infection and leads to cardiac disease in 30% of infected individuals. After infection, the parasites are readily detectable in the blood during the first few days before disseminating to infect numerous cell types. Preliminary data suggested that the Tc24 protein that localizes to the T. cruzi membrane during all life stages possesses B-cell superantigenic properties. These antigens facilitate immune escape by interfering with antibody-mediated responses, particularly the avoidance of catalytic antibodies. These antibodies are an innate host defense mechanism present in the naive repertoire, and catalytic antibody-antigen binding results in hydrolysis of the target. We tested the B-cell superantigenic properties of Tc24 by comparing the degree of Tc24 hydrolysis by IgM purified from either Tc24 unexposed or exposed mice and humans. Respective samples were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, silver stained, and the degree of hydrolysis was measured. Data presented in this report suggest that the T. cruzi Tc24 is a B-cell superantigen based on the observations that 1) Tc24 was hydrolyzed by IgM present in serum of unexposed mice and humans and 2) exposure to Tc24 eliminated catalytic activity as early as 4 days after T. cruzi infection. PMID:26598565

  18. The seroprevalence of cysticercosis, malaria, and Trypanosoma cruzi among North Carolina migrant farmworkers.

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, S; Seed, J R; Estrada, J; Wrenn, E

    1993-01-01

    A seroprevalence study of cysticercosis, Trypanosoma cruzi, and plasmodia species and screening for active malaria was conducted among a randomly selected group of 138 Hispanic and Haitian migrant farmworkers. A random sample of labor camps in eastern North Carolina was selected. Blood samples were tested by Indirect Fluorescent Antibody techniques for plasmodial antibody and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for cysticerci and T. cruzi antibodies. Questionnaires collected demographic data and medical history of the workers and family. Blood films stained with Leukostat stain were examined for plasmodia species. The seroprevalence of cysticercosis was 10 percent, T. cruzi 2 percent, and plasmodia species 4.4 percent. One case of active malaria (Plasmodium vivax) was demonstrated. The clinical significance of seropositivity was not determined, but these results suggest that a small but significant number of farmworkers are infected with cysticercosis, T. cruzi, and malaria. Migrant health clinicians should be aware of the possible presence of these infections. Greater observance and enforcement of sanitation regulations in farmwork is needed to prevent transmission of cysticercosis. PMID:8265758

  19. Isolation, mouse pathogenicity, and genotyping of Trypanosoma cruzi from an English Cocker Spaniel from Virginia, USA.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jay M; Rosypal, Alexa C; Zimmerman, Kurt L; Monroe, William E; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Zajac, Anne M; Yabsley, Michael J; Lindsay, David S

    2012-07-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi was demonstrated in blood smears and heart tissue from a 5-year old, female, English Cocker Spaniel that had never been outside of the state of Virginia, USA. Plasma from the dog was positive in a commercially available immunochromatographic dipstick assay for T. cruzi and negative in an immunochromatographic dipstick assay for visceral Leishmania spp. The plasma from the dog had an indirect immunofluorescent antibody titer of 1:800 against epimastigotes of T. cruzi while the titer was 1:50 against promastigotes of L. infantum. The parasite was isolated from the blood in vitro from the dog (TcVT-1 isolate) and used to experimentally infect female C3H and ICR mice. The parasite was nonpathogenic for experimentally inoculated mice. DNA was isolated from parasites grown in vitro and used to determine that the genotype of T. cruzi present in the dog was genotype TcIV. This genotype is common in raccoons, Procyon lotor, in North America and suggests that raccoons may serve as reservoirs for canine infection. PMID:22341614

  20. Enhanced resistance to acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi in mice treated with an interferon inducer.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Kipnis, T L; Sher, A; Hoff, R

    1982-01-01

    For an exploration of the effects of interferon-inducible resistance mechanisms in acute American trypanosomiasis, the synthetic interferon inducer tilerone hydrochloride was administered to mice of the C57BL/6J strain, which is highly resistant to Trypanosoma cruzi, 18 to 24 h before infection with a potentially lethal dose of bloodstream trypomastigotes. Although all of the control mice died within 30 days of the acute infection, approximately 50% of the tilerone-treated animals were able to survive indefinitely (P less than 0.05). The tilerone-treated mice demonstrated significant levels of serum interferon and splenic natural killer cells at the time of infection. Macrophages isolated from the peritoneal cavities of tilerone-treated C57BL/6J mice appeared to kill significant numbers of trypanosomes during 2 to 3 days of in vitro culture, indicating that activated macrophages may contribute to the enhanced resistance to T. cruzi infection in these mice. Beige mice treated with tilerone did not survive T. cruzi infection as well as tilerone-treated heterozygotes did, suggesting a role for natural killer cells in interferon-induced resistance. These results suggest that interferon or effector mechanisms enhanced by interferon induction can play a significant role in influencing resistance to T. cruzi infection. PMID:6173326

  1. Markers of oxidative stress in adipose tissue during Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jian-Jun; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Machado, Fabiana S.; Weiss, Louis M.; Scherer, Philipp E.

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease. Cardiac and adipose tissues are among the early targets of infection and are sites of persistent infection. In the heart and adipose tissue, T. cruzi infection results in an upregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators. In the heart, infection is associated with an increase in the markers of oxidative stress. To date, markers of oxidative stress have not been evaluated in adipose tissue in this infection. Brown and white adipose tissues were obtained from CD-1 mice infected with the Brazil strain of T. cruzi for 15, 30, and 130 days post infection. Protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation assays were performed on these samples. There was an upregulation of these markers of oxidative stress at all time-points in both white and brown adipose tissue. Determinants of anti-oxidative stress were downregulated at similar time-points. This increase in oxidative stress during T. cruzi infection most likely has a deleterious effect on host metabolism and on the heart. PMID:24948102

  2. Mannose-Binding Lectin Regulates Host Resistance and Pathology during Experimental Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Roffê, Ester; Gibson, Amanda; Cheever, Allen W.; Ezekowitz, R. Alan B.; Takahashi, Kazue; Steindel, Mario; Sher, Alan; Báfica, André

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a humoral pattern-recognition molecule important for host defense. Although recent genetic studies suggest an involvement of MBL/MASP2-associated pathways in Chagas’ disease, it is currently unknown whether MBL plays a role in host resistance to the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. In this study we employed MBL−/− mice to assess the role of MBL in resistance to experimental infection with T. cruzi. T. cruzi infection enhanced tissue expression of MBL both at the mRNA and protein level. Similarly, symptomatic acute Chagas’ disease patients displayed increased serum concentrations of MBL compared to patients with indeterminate, asymptomatic forms of the disease. Furthermore, increased parasite loads in the blood and/or tissue were observed in MBL−/− mice compared to WT controls. This was associated with reduced systemic levels of IL-12/23p40 in MBL−/− mice. Importantly, MBL−/− mice infected with a cardiotropic strain of T. cruzi displayed increased myocarditis and cardiac fibrosis compared to WT controls. The latter was accompanied by elevated hydroxyproline content and mRNA levels of collagen-1 and -6 in the heart. These observations point to a previously unappreciated role for MBL in regulating host resistance and cardiac inflammation during infection with a major human pathogen. PMID:23139754

  3. Mannose-binding lectin regulates host resistance and pathology during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Roffê, Ester; Gibson, Amanda; Cheever, Allen W; Ezekowitz, R Alan B; Takahashi, Kazue; Steindel, Mario; Sher, Alan; Báfica, André

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a humoral pattern-recognition molecule important for host defense. Although recent genetic studies suggest an involvement of MBL/MASP2-associated pathways in Chagas' disease, it is currently unknown whether MBL plays a role in host resistance to the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. In this study we employed MBL(-/-) mice to assess the role of MBL in resistance to experimental infection with T. cruzi. T. cruzi infection enhanced tissue expression of MBL both at the mRNA and protein level. Similarly, symptomatic acute Chagas' disease patients displayed increased serum concentrations of MBL compared to patients with indeterminate, asymptomatic forms of the disease. Furthermore, increased parasite loads in the blood and/or tissue were observed in MBL(-/-) mice compared to WT controls. This was associated with reduced systemic levels of IL-12/23p40 in MBL(-/-) mice. Importantly, MBL(-/-) mice infected with a cardiotropic strain of T. cruzi displayed increased myocarditis and cardiac fibrosis compared to WT controls. The latter was accompanied by elevated hydroxyproline content and mRNA levels of collagen-1 and -6 in the heart. These observations point to a previously unappreciated role for MBL in regulating host resistance and cardiac inflammation during infection with a major human pathogen. PMID:23139754

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Biological Effects of Novel Arylimidamide Derivatives against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Bruno Lisboa; da Silva, Patrícia Bernadino; Batista, Marcos Meuser; da Silva, Francisca Hildemagna Guedes; da Silva, Cristiane França; Tidwell, Richard R.; Patrick, Donald A.; Jones, Susan Kilgore; Bakunov, Stanislav A.; Bakunova, Svetlana M.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD), a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health problem in several Latin American countries. The available chemotherapies for CD have limited efficacy and exhibit undesirable side effects. Aromatic diamidines and arylimidamides (AIAs) have shown broad-spectrum activity against intracellular parasites, including T. cruzi. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the biological activity of eight novel AIAs (16DAP002, 16SAB079, 18SAB075, 23SMB022, 23SMB026, 23SMB054, 26SMB070, and 27SMB009) against experimental models of T. cruzi infection in vitro and in vivo. Our data show that none of the compounds induced a loss of cellular viability up to 32 μM. Two AIAs, 18SAB075 and 16DAP002, exhibited good in vitro activity against different parasite strains (Y and Tulahuen) and against the two relevant forms of the parasite for mammalian hosts. Due to the excellent selective indexes of 18SAB075, this AIA was moved to in vivo tests for acute toxicity and parasite efficacy; nontoxic doses (no-observed-adverse-effect level [NOAEL], 50 mg/kg) were employed in the tests for parasite efficacy. In experimental models of acute T. cruzi infection, 18SAB075 reduced parasitemia levels only up to 50% and led to 40% protection against mortality (at 5 mg/kg of body weight), being less effective than the reference drug, benznidazole. PMID:24752263

  5. Genetic immunization based on the ubiquitin-fusion degradation pathway against Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Bin; Hiromatsu, Kenji; Hisaeda, Hajime; Duan, Xuefeng; Imai, Takashi; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2010-02-12

    Cytotoxic CD8{sup +} T cells are particularly important to the development of protective immunity against the intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. We have developed a new effective strategy of genetic immunization by activating CD8{sup +} T cells through the ubiquitin-fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. We constructed expression plasmids encoding the amastigote surface protein-2 (ASP-2) of T. cruzi. To induce the UFD pathway, a chimeric gene encoding ubiquitin fused to ASP-2 (pUB-ASP-2) was constructed. Mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 presented lower parasitemia and longer survival period, compared with mice immunized with pASP-2 alone. Depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells abolished protection against T. cruzi in mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 while depletion of CD4{sup +} T cells did not influence the effective immunity. Mice deficient in LMP2 or LMP7, subunits of immunoproteasomes, were not able to develop protective immunity induced. These results suggest that ubiquitin-fused antigens expressed in antigen-presenting cells were effectively degraded via the UFD pathway, and subsequently activated CD8{sup +} T cells. Consequently, immunization with pUB-ASP-2 was able to induce potent protective immunity against infection of T. cruzi.

  6. Identification and Characterization of the Trypanosoma cruzi B-cell Superantigen Tc24

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Sarah M.; Jones, Kathryn M.; Zhan, Bin; Essigmann, Heather T.; Murray, Kristy O.; Garcia, Melissa N.; Gorchakov, Rodion; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J.; Brown, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes life-long disease after infection and leads to cardiac disease in 30% of infected individuals. After infection, the parasites are readily detectable in the blood during the first few days before disseminating to infect numerous cell types. Preliminary data suggested that the Tc24 protein that localizes to the T. cruzi membrane during all life stages possesses B-cell superantigenic properties. These antigens facilitate immune escape by interfering with antibody-mediated responses, particularly the avoidance of catalytic antibodies. These antibodies are an innate host defense mechanism present in the naive repertoire, and catalytic antibody–antigen binding results in hydrolysis of the target. We tested the B-cell superantigenic properties of Tc24 by comparing the degree of Tc24 hydrolysis by IgM purified from either Tc24 unexposed or exposed mice and humans. Respective samples were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, silver stained, and the degree of hydrolysis was measured. Data presented in this report suggest that the T. cruzi Tc24 is a B-cell superantigen based on the observations that 1) Tc24 was hydrolyzed by IgM present in serum of unexposed mice and humans and 2) exposure to Tc24 eliminated catalytic activity as early as 4 days after T. cruzi infection. PMID:26598565

  7. ORAL TRANSMISSION OF TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI WITH OPPOSING EVIDENCE FOR THE THEORY OF CARNIVORY

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Angela E.; Yabsley, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first demonstration of oral transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to raccoons (Procyon lotor), a natural reservoir host in the United States, by ingestion of trypomastigotes and infected bugs, but not infected tissue. To investigate an alternative, non-vector–based transmission method, we tested the hypothesis that raccoons scavenging on infected hosts results in patent infection. Macerated tissue from selected organs infected with amastigote stages of T. cruzi was orally administered to experimental groups of raccoons (n = 2/group) at 2, 12, or 24 hr after collection of the tissue samples. Additionally, raccoons (n = 1) in control groups were inoculated intravenously or per os with trypomastigotes. To further elucidate transmission routes of T. cruzi to raccoons, infected Rhodnius prolixus were fed to raccoons (n = 2). Raccoons did not become infected after ingestion of amastigote-infected tissues as evidenced by negative polymerase chain reaction results from blood and tissue, lack of seroconversion, and negative parasitemias. However, per os transmission can occur by ingestion of the infective trypomastigote stage or infected reduviid bugs. We conclude from these findings that oral transmission of T. cruzi may be a route of infection for wildlife in sylvatic cycles, but the scavenging behavior of animals is not likely a significant transmission route. PMID:18763853

  8. Extracellular amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi are potent inducers of phagocytosis in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Flannery, Andrew R; Andrews, Norma; Mortara, Renato A

    2013-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas' disease, has two infective life cycle stages, trypomastigotes and amastigotes. While trypomastigotes actively enter mammalian cells, highly infective extracellular amastigotes (type I T. cruzi) rely on actin-mediated uptake, which is generally inefficient in non-professional phagocytes. We found that extracellular amastigotes (EAs) of T. cruzi G strain (type I), but not Y strain (type II), were taken up 100-fold more efficiently than inert particles. Mammalian cell lines showed levels of parasite uptake comparable to macrophages, and extensive actin recruitment and polymerization was observed at the site of entry. EA uptake was not dependent on parasite-secreted molecules and required the same molecular machinery utilized by professional phagocytes during large particle phagocytosis. Transcriptional silencing of synaptotagmin VII and CD63 significantly inhibited EA internalization, demonstrating that delivery of supplemental lysosomal membrane to form the phagosome is involved in parasite uptake. Importantly, time-lapse live imaging using fluorescent reporters revealed phagosome-associated modulation of phosphoinositide metabolism during EA uptake that closely resembles what occurs during phagocytosis by macrophages. Collectively, our results demonstrate that T. cruzi EAs are potent inducers of phagocytosis in non-professional phagocytes, a process that may facilitate parasite persistence in infected hosts. PMID:23241026

  9. Enhancing effects of gamma interferon on phagocytic cell association with and killing of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirth, J. J.; Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Zlotnik, A.

    1985-01-01

    Results are reported from a study of the influence gamma interferon (GIFN) and interleukin 2 (IL2) have on the capability of P388D1 cells and mouse resident peritoneal macrophages (MPM) to attach to the blood-resident parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and kill them. Cultures of trypomastigote forms of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi grown in bovine serum were introduced into peritoneal cells of mice, along with P388D1 cells incubated with GIFN, IL2 and both. Control cells were also maintained. Statistical analysis were then performed on data on counts of the number of dead T. Cruzi cells. The GIFN enhanced the interaction of MPM and P388D1 cells with the surface of T. Cruzi, provided the interaction was given over 12 hr to take place. A depression of the cytotoxicity of P388D1 cells was attributed to mediation by H2O2, an effect partially offset by incubation with the lymphokine GIFN.

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Trypanosoma cruzi and Triatoma dimidiata in costal Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yim Yan; Sornosa Macias, Karen Jeniffer; Guale Martínez, Doris; Solorzano, Luis F; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Herrera, Claudia; Dumonteil, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. In Ecuador, Triatoma dimidiata and Rhodnius ecuadoriensis are the main vector species, responsible for over half of the cases of T. cruzi infection in the country. T. dimidiata is believed to have been introduced in Ecuador during colonial times, and its elimination from the country is thus believed to be feasible. We investigated here the molecular ecology of T. dimidiata and T. cruzi in costal Ecuador to further guide control efforts. Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS-2) of 23 specimens from Progreso, Guayas, unambiguously supported the likely importation of T. dimidiata from Central America to Ecuador. The observation of a very high parasite infection rate (54%) and frequent feeding on humans (3/5) confirmed a continued risk of transmission to humans. All genotyped parasites corresponded to TcI DTU and Trypanosoma rangeli was not detected in T. dimidiata. TcI subgroups corresponded to TcIa (25%), and mixed infections with TcIa and TcId (75%). Further studies should help clarify T. cruzi genetic structure in the country, and the possible impact of the introduction of T. dimidiata on the circulating parasite strains. The elevated risk posed by this species warrants continuing efforts for its control, but its apparent mobility between peridomestic and domestic habitats may favor reinfestation following insecticide spraying. PMID:27079265

  11. Natural populations of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, have a complex multiclonal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tibayrenc, M.; Ward, P.; Moya, A.; Ayala, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have studied 15 gene loci coding for enzymes in 121 Trypanosoma cruzi stocks from a wide geographic range - from the US and Mexico to Chile and southern Brazil. T.cruzi is diploid but reproduction is basically clonal, with very little if any sexuality remaining at present. They have identified 43 different clones by their genetic composition; the same genetic clone is often found in very distant places and in diverse hosts. There is much genetic heterogeneity among the different clones, and they cannot be readily classified into a few discrete groups that might represent natural taxa. These findings imply that the biological and medical characteristics need to be ascertained separately for each natural clone. The evidence indicates that clonal evolution is very ancient in T.cruzi. The authors propose two alternative hypotheses concerning the relationship between the biochemical diversity and the heterogeneity in other biological and medical characteristics of T. cruzi. One hypothesis is that the degree of diversity between strains simply reflects the time elapsed since their last common ancestor. The second hypothesis is that biological and medical heterogeneity is recent and reflects adaptation to different transmission cycles. A decision between the two hypotheses can be reached with appropriate studies, with important medical consequences.

  12. cAMP phosphodiesterase and activator protein of mammalian cAMP phosphodiesterase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, M F; Zingales, B; Colli, W

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi contain a soluble cAMP phosphodiesterase. Optimal activity was found at pH 8.0 and in the presence of 5 mM Mn2+. Other cations were less efficient and did not give rise to an additional stimulation when added in the presence of optimal concentrations of Mn2+. The enzyme is not Ca2+ dependent. The apparent Km of the enzyme for the substrate is 40 microM and no kinetic evidence for the existence of two enzymes has been found. Theophylline and caffein did not inhibit the T. cruzi cAMP phosphodiesterase. The enzyme activity does not change during cell growth suggesting that the fluctuation observed in the levels of cAMP are largely a response to variations in adenylyl cyclase activity. The intracellular concentrations of cAMP ranged between 0.04--0.15 microM. No evidence that the T. cruzi cAMP phosphodiesterase is regulated by an endogenous activator could be found. However, T. cruzi contains a heat-stable, low molecular weight, non-dialysable protein that activates mammalian cAMP phosphodiesterase in the presence of Ca2+. The properties so far studied of such an activator suggest that it might be equivalent to other Ca2+-dependent regulators described in vertebrate and invertebrate species. PMID:6255327

  13. Strain-specific protective immunity following vaccination against experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Haolla, Filipe A; Claser, Carla; de Alencar, Bruna C G; Tzelepis, Fanny; de Vasconcelos, José Ronnie; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silvério, Jaline C; Machado, Alexandre V; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Soares, Milena B P; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2009-09-18

    Immunisation with Amastigote Surface Protein 2 (asp-2) and trans-sialidase (ts) genes induces protective immunity in highly susceptible A/Sn mice, against infection with parasites of the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Based on immunological and biological strain variations in T. cruzi parasites, our goal was to validate our vaccination results using different parasite strains. Due to the importance of the CD8(+) T cells in protective immunity, we initially determined which strains expressed the immunodominant H-2K(k)-restricted epitope TEWETGQI. We tested eight strains, four of which elicited immune responses to this epitope (Y, G, Colombian and Colombia). We selected the Colombian and Colombia strains for our studies. A/Sn mice were immunised with different regimens using both T. cruzi genes (asp-2 and ts) simultaneously and subsequently challenged with blood trypomastigotes. Immune responses before the challenge were confirmed by the presence of specific antibodies and peptide-specific T cells. Genetic vaccination did not confer protective immunity against acute infection with a lethal dose of the Colombian strain. In contrast, we observed a drastic reduction in parasitemia and a significant increase in survival, following challenge with an otherwise lethal dose of the Colombia strain. In many surviving animals with late-stage chronic infection, we observed alterations in the heart's electrical conductivity, compared to naive mice. In summary, we concluded that immunity against T. cruzi antigens, similar to viruses and bacteria, may be strain-specific and have a negative impact on vaccine development. PMID:19635607

  14. Enhancing effects of gamma interferon on phagocytic cell association with and killing of Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, J.J.; Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Zlotnik, A.

    1985-07-01

    Results are reported from a study of the influence gamma interferon (GIFN) and interleukin 2 (IL2) have on the capability of P388D1 cells and mouse resident peritoneal macrophages (MPM) to attach to the blood-resident parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and kill them. Cultures of trypomastigote forms of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi grown in bovine serum were introduced into peritoneal cells of mice, along with P388D1 cells incubated with GIFN, IL2 and both. Control cells were also maintained. Statistical analysis were then performed on data on counts of the number of dead T. Cruzi cells. The GIFN enhanced the interaction of MPM and P388D1 cells with the surface of T. Cruzi, provided the interaction was given over 12 hr to take place. A depression of the cytotoxicity of P388D1 cells was attributed to mediation by H2O2, an effect partially offset by incubation with the lymphokine GIFN. 23 references.

  15. Importation of Hybrid Human-Associated Trypanosoma cruzi Strains of Southern South American Origin, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Juan David; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Guhl, Felipe; Miles, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi of southern South American origin among humans, domestic vectors, and peridomestic hosts in Colombia using high-resolution nuclear and mitochondrial genotyping. Expanding our understanding of the geographic range of lineage TcVI, which is associated with severe Chagas disease, will help clarify risk of human infection for improved disease control. PMID:27434772

  16. Ultrastructural damage of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes exposed to decomplemented immune sera.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Presas, A M; Zavala, J T; Fauser, I B; Merchant, M T; Guerrero, L R; Willms, K

    2001-08-01

    The susceptibility of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes to lysis by normal or immune sera in a complement-dependent reaction has been reported, but the effects induced directly by immune serum depleted of complement remain unstudied. The aim of this work was to study the ultrastructural alterations induced in T. cruzi epimastigotes by immune mouse or rabbit sera with or without complement. A local isolate of T. cruzi (Queretaro) was used in all experiments. Immune sera were raised in both mouse and rabbit by immunization with T. cruzi epimastigote antigens. Light microscopy showed intense agglutination of epimastigotes when incubated with decomplemented mouse or rabbit immune sera. A distinctive ultrastructural feature of this agglutination pattern was the fusion of plasma membranes and a pattern of intercrossing between subpellicular microtubules. Agglutination was associated with fragmentation of nuclear membranes and swelling of cytoplasm, Golgi cisternae, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and kinetoplast membranes. Agglutinated parasites also incorporated trypan blue stain. Results of [3H]-thymidine incorporation confirmed that epimastigotes exposed to specific antibodies in the absence of complement were incapable of proliferating. Ultrastructural changes observed in epimastigote micrographs incubated with decomplemented immune mouse sera were statistically significant (P<0.001) when compared with results obtained from images after incubation with decomplemented normal mouse sera. PMID:11510997

  17. Rhodnius prolixus Life History Outcomes Differ when Infected with Different Trypanosoma cruzi I Strains

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jennifer K.; Graham, Andrea L.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Chávez, Omar Triana

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a parasite on the life history of its vector is important for understanding and predicting disease transmission. Chagas disease agent Trypanosoma cruzi is a generalist parasite that is diverse across scales from its genetic diversity to the 100s of mammal and vector species it infects. Its vertebrate hosts show quite variable responses to infection, however, to date there are no studies looking at how T. cruzi variability might result in variable outcomes in its invertebrate host. Therefore, we investigated the effect of different T. cruzi I strains on Rhodnius prolixus survival and development. We found significant variation between insects infected with different strains, with some strains having no effect, as compared with uninfected insects, and others with significantly lower survival and development. We also found that different variables had varying importance between strains, with the effect of time postinfection and the blood:weight ratio of the infective meal significantly affecting the survival of insects infected with some strains, but not others. Our results suggest that T. cruzi can be pathogenic not only to its vertebrate hosts but also to its invertebrate hosts. PMID:26078316

  18. Importation of Hybrid Human-Associated Trypanosoma cruzi Strains of Southern South American Origin, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Louisa A; Ramirez, Juan David; Llewellyn, Martin S; Guhl, Felipe; Miles, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    We report the characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi of southern South American origin among humans, domestic vectors, and peridomestic hosts in Colombia using high-resolution nuclear and mitochondrial genotyping. Expanding our understanding of the geographic range of lineage TcVI, which is associated with severe Chagas disease, will help clarify risk of human infection for improved disease control. PMID:27434772

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Elche (Spain): comparison of the seroprevalence in immigrants from Paraguay and Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, José M; Ponce, Yamileth; Gallegos, Ingrid; Flóres-Chávez, María; Cañavate, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is a global public health problem due to the recent emigration of people from Latin America to other regions, including Europe. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection among Paraguayans and Bolivians living in Elche (Spain), a city located in the Mediterranean Coast of Spain. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Capillary blood samples were obtained through a finger prick, and collected on filter paper. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect immunofluorescence tests were performed to search for anti-T. cruzi IgG antibodies in the filter papers. Thirteen out of 201 participants were infected with T. cruzi in this study, seven out of 73 Bolivians and six out of 128 Paraguayans, corresponding to seroprevalences of 9.59% (95%CI, 4.72–18.5%) and 4.69% (95%CI, 2.17–9.85%), respectively. Palpitation, chest pain, and migration from rural endemic areas were the most common clinical and epidemiological risk factors associated with T. cruzi infection detected in the Paraguayan group. This study highlights that Chagas disease is no longer limited to the Bolivian population living in Spain. It is important to note this wider prevalence and, therefore, not discount Paraguayans in the screening for Chagas disease in Spain. Indeed, this should be considered for all immigrants from Latin America. PMID:22943545

  20. High Trypanosoma cruzi infection prevalence associated with minimal cardiac pathology among wild carnivores in central Texas.

    PubMed

    Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Lewis, Barbara C; Hamer, Sarah A

    2016-08-01

    Infection with the zoonotic vector-borne protozoal parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease in humans and dogs throughout the Americas. Despite the recognized importance of various wildlife species for perpetuating Trypanosoma cruzi in nature, relatively little is known about the development of cardiac disease in infected wildlife. Using a cross-sectional study design, we collected cardiac tissue and blood from hunter-donated wildlife carcasses- including raccoon (Procyon lotor), coyote (Canis latrans), gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and bobcat (Lynx rufus) - from central Texas, a region with established populations of infected triatomine vectors and increasing diagnoses of Chagas disease in domestic dogs. Based on PCR analysis, we found that 2 bobcats (14.3%), 12 coyotes (14.3%), 8 foxes (13.8%), and 49 raccoons (70.0%) were positive for T. cruzi in at least one sample (right ventricle, apex, and/or blood clot). Although a histologic survey of right ventricles showed that 21.1% of 19 PCR-positive hearts were characterized by mild lymphoplasmocytic infiltration, no other lesions and no amastigotes were observed in any histologic section. DNA sequencing of the TcSC5D gene revealed that raccoons were infected with T. cruzi strain TcIV, and a single racoon harbored a TcI/TcIV mixed infection. Relative to other wildlife species tested here, our data suggest that raccoons may be important reservoirs of TcIV in Texas and a source of infection for indigenous triatomine bugs. The overall high level of infection in this wildlife community likely reflects high levels of vector contact, including ingestion of bugs. Although the relationship between the sylvatic cycle of T. cruzi transmission and human disease risk in the United States has yet to be defined, our data suggest that hunters and wildlife professionals should take precautions to avoid direct contact with potentially infected wildlife tissues. PMID:27330982

  1. Biochemical characterization of new strains of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli isolates from Peru and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, Isabel; Marín, Clotilde; Hitos, Ana Belén; Rosales, María Jose; Gutierrez-Sánchez, Ramón; Sánchez-Moreno, Manuel

    2004-10-01

    Seven trypanosome stocks isolated have been characterized by lectin agglutination, isoenzyme analysis, and the end products excreted. The stocks were isolated from different geographic areas-one from Mexico (TM5), and six from Peru, four of these isolated from different species of triatoma (TP504, TP702, TP704 and TP706), the other two isolated from the salivary glands of Rhodnius ecuadorensis (TRa605 and TRa606). Additionally, one strain of Trypanosoma cruzi isolated from a human case (strain TC-Maracay) and one strain of T. rangeli (TRa, Cajamarca-Peru strain), characterized and maintained in our laboratory, were used as reference strains. According to statistical study, the stocks were grouped into three clusters: (1) cluster I included the reference strain of T. cruzi (TC-Maracay); (2) cluster II was subdivided into two groups-subcluster IIA for the Mexican isolate (TM5) and subcluster IIB for the Peruvian ones, isolated from the salivary glands of Rhodnius ecuadorensis (TRa 605 and TRa 606) and the reference strain T. rangeli (TRa); these two new isolates were classified as T. rangeli; and (3) cluster III for the rest of the Peruvian isolates, which should be considered at least as a different strain from the T. cruzi strain Maracay. We show that the identification of T. cruzi and T. rangeli in mixed infections is readily achieved by biochemical methods. These findings identified three clusters of Mexican and Peruvian stocks that correlate with geographic origin, although assignment to a T. cruzi linage was not possible. PMID:15368126

  2. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Contributes to Host Defense against Acute Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José L.; Terrazas, Luis I.; Espinoza, Bertha; Cruz-Robles, David; Soto, Virgilia; Rivera-Montoya, Irma; Gómez-García, Lorena; Snider, Heidi; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is involved in the host defense against several pathogens. Here we used MIF−/− mice to determine the role of endogenous MIF in the regulation of the host immune response against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. MIF−/− mice displayed high levels of blood and tissue parasitemia, developed severe heart and skeletal muscle immunopathology, and succumbed to T. cruzi infection faster than MIF+/+ mice. The enhanced susceptibility of MIF−/− mice to T. cruzi was associated with reduced levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-18, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and IL-1β, in their sera and reduced production of IL-12, IFN-γ, and IL-4 by spleen cells during the early phase of infection. At all time points, antigen-stimulated splenocytes from MIF+/+ and MIF−/− mice produced comparable levels of IL-10. MIF−/− mice also produced significantly less Th1-associated antigen-specific immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) throughout the infection, but both groups produced comparable levels of Th2-associated IgG1. Lastly, inflamed hearts from T. cruzi-infected MIF−/− mice expressed increased transcripts for IFN-γ, but fewer for IL-12 p35, IL-12 p40, IL-23, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, compared to MIF+/+ mice. Taken together, our findings show that MIF plays a role in controlling acute T. cruzi infection. PMID:16714544

  3. Metabolic Signatures of Triatomine Vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi Unveiled by Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Luis Caetano M.; Han, Jun; Pan, Jingxi; Moreira, Carlos J. C.; Azambuja, Patrícia; Borchers, Christoph H.; Carels, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is a trypanosomiasis whose causative agent is the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to humans by hematophagous insects known as triatomines and affects a large proportion of South America. The digestive tract of the insect vectors in which T. cruzi develops constitutes a dynamic environment that affects the development of the parasite. Thus, we set out to investigate the chemical composition of the triatomine intestinal tract through a metabolomics approach. We performed Direct Infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry on fecal samples of three triatomine species (Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus) fed with rabbit blood. We then identified groups of metabolites whose frequencies were either uniform in all species or enriched in each of them. By querying the Human Metabolome Database, we obtained putative identities of the metabolites of interest. We found that a core group of metabolites with uniform frequencies in all species represented approximately 80% of the molecules detected, whereas the other 20% varied among triatomine species. The uniform core was composed of metabolites of various categories, including fatty acids, steroids, glycerolipids, nucleotides, sugars, and others. Nevertheless, the metabolic fingerprint of triatomine feces differs depending on the species considered. The variable core was mainly composed of prenol lipids, amino acids, glycerolipids, steroids, phenols, fatty acids and derivatives, benzoic acid and derivatives, flavonoids, glycerophospholipids, benzopyrans, and quinolines. Triatomine feces constitute a rich and varied chemical medium whose constituents are likely to affect T. cruzi development and infectivity. The complexity of the fecal metabolome of triatomines suggests that it may affect triatomine vector competence for specific T. cruzi strains. Knowledge of the chemical environment of T. cruzi in its invertebrate host is likely to

  4. Enzymes of the antioxidant network as novel determiners of Trypanosoma cruzi virulence

    PubMed Central

    Piacenza, L.; Zago, M.P.; Peluffo, G.; Alvarez, M.N.; Basombrio, M.A.; Radi, R.

    2013-01-01

    Virulence of Trypanosoma cruzi depends on a variety of genetic and biochemical factors. It has been proposed that components of the parasites' antioxidant system may play a key part in this process by pre-adapting the pathogen to the oxidative environment encountered during host cell invasion. Using several isolates (10 strains) belonging to the two major phylogenetic lineages (T. cruzi-I and T. cruzi-II), we investigated whether there was an association between virulence (ranging from highly aggressive to attenuated isolates at the parasitemia and histopathological level) and the antioxidant enzyme content. Antibodies raised against trypanothione synthetase (TcTS), ascorbate peroxidase (TcAPX), mitochondrial and cytosolic tryparedoxin peroxidases (TcMPX and TcCPX) and trypanothione reductase (TcTR) were used to evaluate the antioxidant enzyme levels in epimastigote and metacyclic trypomastigote forms in the T. cruzi strains. Levels of TcCPX, TcMPX and TcTS were shown to increase during differentiation from the non-infective epimastigote to the infective metacyclic trypomastigote stage in all parasite strains examined. Peroxiredoxins were found to be present at higher levels in the metacyclic infective forms of the virulent isolates compared with the attenuated strains. Additionally, an increased resistance of epimastigotes from virulent T. cruzi populations to hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite challenge was observed. In mouse infection models, a direct correlation was found between protein levels of TcCPX, TcMPX and TcTS, and the parasitemia elicited by the different isolates studied (Pearson's coefficient: 0.617, 0.771, 0.499; respectively, P < 0.01). No correlation with parasitemia was found for TcAPX and TcTR proteins in any of the strains analyzed. Our data support that enzymes of the parasite antioxidant armamentarium at the onset of infection represent new virulence factors involved in the establishment of disease. PMID:19505468

  5. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) for Lineage Assignment and High Resolution Diversity Studies in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Matthew; Mauricio, Isabel L.; Messenger, Louisa A.; Lewis, Michael D.; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Acosta, Nidia; Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Diosque, Patricio; Carrasco, Hernan J.; Miles, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is a powerful and highly discriminatory method for analysing pathogen population structure and epidemiology. Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan agent of American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease), has remarkable genetic and ecological diversity. A standardised MLST protocol that is suitable for assignment of T. cruzi isolates to genetic lineage and for higher resolution diversity studies has not been developed. Methodology/Principal Findings We have sequenced and diplotyped nine single copy housekeeping genes and assessed their value as part of a systematic MLST scheme for T. cruzi. A minimum panel of four MLST targets (Met-III, RB19, TcGPXII, and DHFR-TS) was shown to provide unambiguous assignment of isolates to the six known T. cruzi lineages (Discrete Typing Units, DTUs TcI-TcVI). In addition, we recommend six MLST targets (Met-II, Met-III, RB19, TcMPX, DHFR-TS, and TR) for more in depth diversity studies on the basis that diploid sequence typing (DST) with this expanded panel distinguished 38 out of 39 reference isolates. Phylogenetic analysis implies a subdivision between North and South American TcIV isolates. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data revealed high levels of heterozygosity among DTUs TcI, TcIII, TcIV and, for three targets, putative corresponding homozygous and heterozygous loci within DTUs TcI and TcIII. Furthermore, individual gene trees gave incongruent topologies at inter- and intra-DTU levels, inconsistent with a model of strict clonality. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate the value of systematic MLST diplotyping for describing inter-DTU relationships and for higher resolution diversity studies of T. cruzi, including presence of recombination events. The high levels of heterozygosity will facilitate future population genetics analysis based on MLST haplotypes. PMID:21713026

  6. The Potential Economic Value of a Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas Disease) Vaccine in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Bacon, Kristina M.; Connor, Diana L.; Willig, Alyssa M.; Bailey, Rachel R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), is the leading etiology of non-ischemic heart disease worldwide, with Latin America bearing the majority of the burden. This substantial burden and the limitations of current interventions have motivated efforts to develop a vaccine against T. cruzi. Methodology/Principal Findings We constructed a decision analytic Markov computer simulation model to assess the potential economic value of a T. cruzi vaccine in Latin America from the societal perspective. Each simulation run calculated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), or the cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) avoided, of vaccination. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the impact of varying key model parameters such as vaccine cost (range: $0.50–$200), vaccine efficacy (range: 25%–75%), the cost of acute-phase drug treatment (range: $10–$150 to account for variations in acute-phase treatment regimens), and risk of infection (range: 1%–20%). Additional analyses determined the incremental cost of vaccinating an individual and the cost per averted congestive heart failure case. Vaccination was considered highly cost-effective when the ICER was ≤1 times the GDP/capita, still cost-effective when the ICER was between 1 and 3 times the GDP/capita, and not cost-effective when the ICER was >3 times the GDP/capita. Our results showed vaccination to be very cost-effective and often economically dominant (i.e., saving costs as well providing health benefits) for a wide range of scenarios, e.g., even when risk of infection was as low as 1% and vaccine efficacy was as low as 25%. Vaccinating an individual could likely provide net cost savings that rise substantially as risk of infection or vaccine efficacy increase. Conclusions/Significance Results indicate that a T. cruzi vaccine could provide substantial economic benefit, depending on the cost of the vaccine, and support continued efforts to develop a human vaccine

  7. Association of Trypanosoma cruzi infection with risk factors and electrocardiographic abnormalities in northeast Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background American trypanosomiasis is a major disease and public health issue, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The prevalence of T. cruzi has not been fully documented, and there are few reports of this issue in Nuevo Leon. The aim of this study was to update the seroprevalence rate of T. cruzi infection, including an epidemiological analysis of the risk factors associated with this infection and an electrocardiographic (ECG) evaluation of those infected. Methods Sera from 2,688 individuals from 10 municipalities in the state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico, were evaluated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an indirect hemagglutination assay. An ECG case–control study was performed in subjects seropositive for T. cruzi and the results were matched by sex and age to seronegative residents of the same localities. A univariate analysis with χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests was used to determine the association between seropositivity and age (years), sex, and ECG changes. A multivariate analysis was then performed to calculate the odd ratios between T. cruzi seropositivity and the risk factors. Results The seropositive rate was 1.93% (52/2,688). In the ECG study, 22.85% (8/35) of the infected individuals exhibited ECG abnormalities. Triatoma gerstaeckeri was the only vector reported. The main risk factors were ceiling construction material (P ≤ 0.0024), domestic animals (P ≤ 0.0001), and living in rural municipalities (P ≤ 0.0025). Conclusions These findings demonstrate a 10-fold higher prevalence of Chagas disease than previously reported (0.2%), which implies a serious public health threat in northeastern Mexico. The epidemiological profile established in this study differs from that found in the rest of Mexico, where human populations live in close proximity to domiciliary triatomines. PMID:24580840

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor p55-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Castaños-Velez, Esmeralda; Maerlan, Stephanie; Osorio, Lyda M.; Åberg, Frederik; Biberfeld, Peter; Örn, Anders; Rottenberg, Martín E.

    1998-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor p55 (TNFRp55) mediates host resistance to several pathogens by allowing microbicidal activities of phagocytes. In the studies reported here, TNFRp55−/− mice infected with the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi showed clearly higher parasitemia and cumulative mortality than wild-type (WT) controls did. However, gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-activated macrophages from TNFRp55−/− mice produced control levels of nitric oxide and killed the parasite efficiently in vitro. Trypanocidal mechanisms of nonphagocytic cells (myocardial fibroblasts) from both TNFRp55−/− and WT mice were also activated by IFN-γ in a dose-dependent way. However, IFN-γ-activated TNFRp55−/− nonphagocytes showed less effective killing of T. cruzi than WT control nonphagocytes, even when interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was added as a costimulator. In vivo, T. cruzi-infected TNFRp55−/− mice and WT mice released similar levels of NO and showed similar levels of IFN-γ mRNA and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA in their tissues. Instead, increased susceptibility to T. cruzi of TNFRp55−/− mice was associated with reduced levels of parasite-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) (but not IgM) antibodies during infection, which is probably linked to abnormal B-cell differentiation in secondary lymphoid tissues of the mutant mice. Surprisingly, T. cruzi-infected TNFRp55−/− mice showed increased inflammatory and necrotic lesions in several tissues, especially in skeletal muscles, indicating that TNFRp55 plays an important role in controlling the inflammatory process. Accordingly, levels of Mn2+ superoxide dismutase mRNA, a TNF-induced enzyme which protects the cell from the toxic effects of superoxide, were lower in mutant than in WT infected mice. PMID:9596773

  9. Vaccination of dogs with Trypanosoma rangeli induces antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in a rural area of Córdoba, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Beatriz; Marini, Vanina; Gauna, Diego; Frias, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Dogs play a major role in the domestic cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, acting as reservoirs. In a previous work we have developed a model of vaccination of dogs in captivity with nonpathogenic Trypanosoma rangeli epimastigotes, resulting in the production of protective antibodies against T. cruzi, with dramatic decrease of parasitaemia upon challenge with 100,000 virulent forms of this parasite. The aim of this work was to evaluate the immunogenicity of this vaccine in dogs living in a rural area. Domestic dogs, free from T. cruziinfection, received three immunisations with fixed T. rangeliepimastigotes. Dogs were not challenged with T. cruzi, but they were left in their environment. This immunisation induced antibodies againstT. cruzi for more than three years in dogs in their natural habitat, while control dogs remained serologically negative. PMID:27074257

  10. Effect of elevated environmental temperature on the antibody response of mice to Trypanosoma cruzi during the acute phase of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Dimock, K A; Davis, C D; Kuhn, R E

    1991-01-01

    When held at 36 degrees C, Trypanosoma cruzi-infected C3H mice survive an otherwise lethal infection with significantly decreased parasitemia levels and enhanced immune responsiveness. Treatment of T. cruzi-infected mice with the immunosuppressive agent cyclophosphamide indicated that the positive effects of increased environmental temperature were primarily due to enhancement of immunity. A parasite-specific, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot analysis were used to examine the effect of elevated environmental temperature on the production of anti-T. cruzi antibodies. Both the reactivity and diversity of anti-T. cruzi antibodies were found to be lower in infected mice held at 36 degrees C than in infected mice held at room temperature. However, reactivity and diversity could be enhanced by vaccination with culture forms of the parasite. Images PMID:1937796

  11. Short communication: Genetic variants of Sarcocystis cruzi in infected Malaysian cattle based on 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yit Han; Fong, Mun Yik; Subramaniam, Vellayan; Shahari, Shahhaziq; Lau, Yee Ling

    2015-12-01

    Sarcocystis species are pathogenic parasites that infect a wide range of animals, including cattle. A high prevalence of cattle sarcocystosis has been reported worldwide, but its status is unknown in Malaysia. This study focused on utilizing 18S rDNA to identify Sarcocystis species in Malaysian cattle and to determine their genetic variants. In this study, only Sarcocystis cruzi was detected in Malaysian cattle. The intra-species S. cruzi phylogenetic tree analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), respectively displayed two minor groups among the parasite isolates. This finding was supported by high Wright FST value (FST=0.647). The definitive hosts (dogs) may play a fundamental role in the development of S. cruzi genetic variants. Additionally, the existence of microheterogeneity within the S. cruzi merozoites and/or distinct genetic variants arisen from independent merozoites in mature sarcocysts, possibly contributed to the existence of intra-species variations within the population. PMID:26679818

  12. Prevalence and Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in People of Rural Communities of the High Jungle of Northern Peru

    PubMed Central

    Alroy, Karen A.; Huang, Christine; Gilman, Robert H.; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R.; Marks, Morgan A.; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Hillyard, Miranda; Verastegui, Manuela; Sanchez, Gerardo; Cabrera, Lilia; Vidal, Elisa; Billig, Erica M. W.; Cama, Vitaliano A.; Náquira, César; Bern, Caryn; Levy, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vector-borne transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi is seen exclusively in the Americas where an estimated 8 million people are infected with the parasite. Significant research in southern Peru has been conducted to understand T. cruzi infection and vector control, however, much less is known about the burden of infection and epidemiology in northern Peru. Methodology A cross-sectional study was conducted to estimate the seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection in humans (n=611) and domestic animals [dogs (n=106) and guinea pigs (n=206)] in communities of Cutervo Province, Peru. Sampling and diagnostic strategies differed according to species. An entomological household study (n=208) was conducted to identify the triatomine burden and species composition, as well as the prevalence of T. cruzi in vectors. Electrocardiograms (EKG) were performed on a subset of participants (n=90 T. cruzi infected participants and 170 age and sex-matched controls). The seroprevalence of T. cruzi among humans, dogs, and guinea pigs was 14.9% (95% CI: 12.2 – 18.0%), 19.8% (95% CI: 12.7- 28.7%) and 3.3% (95% CI: 1.4 – 6.9%) respectively. In one community, the prevalence of T. cruzi infection was 17.2% (95% CI: 9.6 - 24.7%) among participants < 15 years, suggesting recent transmission. Increasing age, positive triatomines in a participant's house, and ownership of a T. cruzi positive guinea pig were independent correlates of T. cruzi infection. Only one species of triatomine was found, Panstrongylus lignarius, formerly P. herreri. Approximately forty percent (39.9%, 95% CI: 33.2 - 46.9%) of surveyed households were infested with this vector and 14.9% (95% CI: 10.4 - 20.5%) had at least one triatomine positive for T. cruzi. The cardiac abnormality of right bundle branch block was rare, but only identified in seropositive individuals. Conclusions Our research documents a substantial prevalence of T. cruzi infection in Cutervo and highlights a need for greater attention and vector

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi and myoid cells from seminiferous tubules: interaction and relation with fibrous components of extracellular matrix in experimental Chagas' disease

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Luiz Otávio Pereira; Abreu-Silva, Ana Lucia; Hardoim, Daiana de Jesús; Tedesco, Roberto Carlos; Mendes, Verônica Gonçalves; da Costa, Sylvio Celso Gonçalves; Calabrese, Kátia da Silva

    2009-01-01

    The main transmission route of Trypanosoma cruzi is by triatomine bugs. However, T. cruzi is also transmitted through blood transfusion, organ transplantation, ingestion of contaminated food or fluids, or is congenital. Sexual transmission, although suggested since the discovery of Chagas’ disease, has remained unproven. Sexual transmission would require T. cruzi to be located at the testes and ovaries. Here we investigated whether T. cruzi is present in the gonads of mice infected with 104 T. cruzi trypomastigotes from the CL strain. Fourteen days after experimental infection, histopathological examination showed alterations in the extracellular matrix of the lamina propria of the seminiferous tubules. Furthermore, amastigotes were present in seminiferous tubules, within myoid cells, and in the adjacencies of the basal compartment. These results indicate that T. cruzi is able to reach seminiferous tubule lumen, thus suggesting that Chagas’ disease could potentially be transmitted through sexual intercourse. Complementary studies are required to demonstrate that Chagas’ disease can be transmitted by coitus. PMID:19200251

  14. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi Among Eleven Potential Reservoir Species from Six States Across the Southern United States

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Emily L.; Roellig, Dawn M.; Gompper, Matthew E.; Monello, Ryan J.; Wenning, Krista M.; Gabriel, Mourad W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, is a substantial public health concern in Latin America. Although rare in humans and domestic animals in the United States, T. cruzi is commonly detected in some wildlife species, most commonly raccoons (Procyon lotor) and Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana). To increase our understanding of the reservoir host species range and geographic distribution, 11 species of mammals from six states spanning the known range of T. cruzi (Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Missouri, and Virginia) were tested for antibodies to T. cruzi using indirect immunofluorescent antibody testing. In addition, culture isolation attempts were conducted on a limited number of animals from Georgia and Florida. Evidence of T. cruzi was found in every state except California; however, low numbers of known reservoirs were tested in California. In general, the highest seroprevalence rates were found in raccoons (0–68%) and opossums (17–52%), but antibodies to T. cruzi were also detected in small numbers of striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) from Arizona and Georgia, bobcats (Lynx rufus) from Georgia, two coyotes (Canis latrans) from Georgia and Virginia, and a ringtail (Bassariscus astutus) from Arizona. Culture-based prevalence rates for raccoons were significantly greater than those for opossums; however, seroprevalences of raccoons and opossums from several geographic locations in Georgia and Florida were not different, indicating that exposure rates of these two species are similar within these areas. For both raccoons and opossums, seroprevalence was significantly higher in females than in males. No difference was detected in seroprevalence between adults and juveniles and between animals caught in urban and rural locations. Our results indicate that T. cruzi prevalence varies by host species, host characteristics, and geographic region and provides data to guide future studies on the natural history of T. cruzi

  15. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi among eleven potential reservoir species from six states across the southern United States.

    PubMed

    Brown, Emily L; Roellig, Dawn M; Gompper, Matthew E; Monello, Ryan J; Wenning, Krista M; Gabriel, Mourad W; Yabsley, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, is a substantial public health concern in Latin America. Although rare in humans and domestic animals in the United States, T. cruzi is commonly detected in some wildlife species, most commonly raccoons (Procyon lotor) and Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana). To increase our understanding of the reservoir host species range and geographic distribution, 11 species of mammals from six states spanning the known range of T. cruzi (Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Missouri, and Virginia) were tested for antibodies to T. cruzi using indirect immunofluorescent antibody testing. In addition, culture isolation attempts were conducted on a limited number of animals from Georgia and Florida. Evidence of T. cruzi was found in every state except California; however, low numbers of known reservoirs were tested in California. In general, the highest seroprevalence rates were found in raccoons (0-68%) and opossums (17-52%), but antibodies to T. cruzi were also detected in small numbers of striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) from Arizona and Georgia, bobcats (Lynx rufus) from Georgia, two coyotes (Canis latrans) from Georgia and Virginia, and a ringtail (Bassariscus astutus) from Arizona. Culture-based prevalence rates for raccoons were significantly greater than those for opossums; however, seroprevalences of raccoons and opossums from several geographic locations in Georgia and Florida were not different, indicating that exposure rates of these two species are similar within these areas. For both raccoons and opossums, seroprevalence was significantly higher in females than in males. No difference was detected in seroprevalence between adults and juveniles and between animals caught in urban and rural locations. Our results indicate that T. cruzi prevalence varies by host species, host characteristics, and geographic region and provides data to guide future studies on the natural history of T. cruzi in the

  16. The in vitro activity of fatty diamines and amino alcohols against mixed amastigote and trypomastigote Trypanosoma cruzi forms

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Policarpo Ademar; Rezende, Celso Oliveira; Le Hyaric, Mireille; de Almeida, Mauro Vieira; Romanha, Alvaro José

    2014-01-01

    Four diamines and three amino alcohols derived from 1-decanol, 1-dodecanol and 1,2-dodecanediol were evaluated in an in vitro assay against a mixture of trypomastigote and intracellular amastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Two of these compounds (6 and 7) showed better activity against both proliferative stages of T. cruzi than the positive control benznidazole, three were of similar potency (1, 2 and 5) and two were less active (3 and 4). PMID:24831550

  17. Trypanosoma Cruzi Cyp51 Inhibitor Derived from a Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Screen Hit

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiung-Kuang; Doyle, Patricia S.; Yermalitskaya, Liudmila V.; Mackey, Zachary B.; Ang, Kenny K.H.; McKerrow, James H.; Podust, Larissa M.

    2009-02-18

    The two front-line drugs for chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections are limited by adverse side-effects and declining efficacy. One potential new target for Chagas disease chemotherapy is sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in biosynthesis of membrane sterols. In a screening effort targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis CYP51 (CYP51{sub Mt}), we previously identified the N-[4-pyridyl]-formamide moiety as a building block capable of delivering a variety of chemotypes into the CYP51 active site. In that work, the binding modes of several second generation compounds carrying this scaffold were determined by high-resolution co-crystal structures with CYP51{sub Mt}. Subsequent assays against the CYP51 orthologue in T. cruzi, CYP51{sub Tc}, demonstrated that two of the compounds tested in the earlier effort bound tightly to this enzyme. Both were tested in vitro for inhibitory effects against T. cruzi and the related protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. One of the compounds had potent, selective anti-T. cruzi activity in infected mouse macrophages. Cure of treated host cells was confirmed by prolonged incubation in the absence of the inhibiting compound. Discrimination between T. cruzi and T. brucei CYP51 by the inhibitor was largely based on the variability (phenylalanine versus isoleucine) of a single residue at a critical position in the active site. CYP51{sub Mt}-based crystal structure analysis revealed that the functional groups of the two tightly bound compounds are likely to occupy different spaces in the CYP51 active site, suggesting the possibility of combining the beneficial features of both inhibitors in a third generation of compounds to achieve more potent and selective inhibition of CYP51{sub Tc}. Enzyme sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51) is a well-established target for anti-fungal therapy and is a prospective target for Chagas disease therapy. We previously identified a

  18. Survey of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp. in gray and red fox populations from North Carolina and Virginia.

    PubMed

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Tripp, Shanesha; Lewis, Samantha; Francis, Joy; Stoskopf, Michael K; Larsen, R Scott; Lindsay, David S

    2010-12-01

    American trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis are caused by related hemoflagellate parasites, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp., which share several common host species. Both zoonotic protozoans are endemic in the United States. Canines, including domestic and wild canids, are reservoir hosts for human infections with T. cruzi and Leishmania spp. The present study examined the seroprevalence of T. cruzi and Leishmania spp. in wild canids from North Carolina and Virginia. Wild canine species tested in this work included 49 gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and 5 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes). Overall, sera samples from 54 foxes (North Carolina  =  43; Virginia  =  11) were tested by immunochromatographic strip assays (ICT). Antibodies to T. cruzi were found in 4 (9%) gray foxes from North Carolina and 2 (18%) gray foxes from Virginia. Antibodies to Leishmania spp. were detected in 1 (2%) gray fox from North Carolina. Our results indicate that wild canids are exposed more frequently to T. cruzi in North Carolina than Leishmania spp. and only T. cruzi in Virginia. PMID:21158642

  19. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; Souza, Wayner Vieira de; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  20. Phlebotomine fauna, natural infection rate and feeding habits of Lutzomyia cruzi in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Brito, Veruska Nogueira; de Almeida, Arleana do Bom Parto Ferreira; Nakazato, Luciano; Duarte, Rosemere; Souza, Cladson de Oliveira; Sousa, Valéria Régia Franco

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil is transmitted by the phlebotomine Lutzomyia longipalpis and in some midwestern regions by Lutzomyia cruzi. Studies of the phlebotomine fauna, feeding habits and natural infection rate by Leishmania contribute to increased understanding of the epidemiological chain of leishmaniases and their vectorial capacity. Collections were performed in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso from 2010-2013, during which time 2,011 phlebotomines (23 species) were captured (68.70% Lu. cruzi and 20.52% Lutzomyia whitmani). Lu. cruzi females were identified by observing the shapes of the cibarium (a portion of the mouthpart) and spermatheca, from which samples were obtained for polymerase chain reaction to determine the rates of natural infection. Engorged phlebotomines were assessed to identify the blood-meal host by ELISA. A moderate correlation was discovered between the number of Lu. cruzi and the temperature and the minimum rate of infection was 6.10%. Twenty-two females were reactive to the antisera of bird (28%), dog (3.30%) and skunk (1.60%). We conclude that Lu. cruzi and Lu. whitmani have adapted to the urban environment in this region and that Lu. cruzi is the most likely vector of VL in Jaciara. Moreover, maintenance of Leishmania in the environment is likely aided by the presence of birds and domestic and synanthropic animals. PMID:25410993

  1. Ecological diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Amazon basin. The main scenaries in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Coura, J R; Junqueira, A C V

    2015-11-01

    The ecological diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Brazilian Amazon region is directly interlinked with the parasite's extensive reservoir, composed of 33 species of wild mammals within the following orders: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Xenarthra, Carnivora and Primates; and of 16 species of wild triatomines, of which ten may be infected with T. cruzi. Four scenarios for the diversity of T. cruzi transmission in the Brazilian Amazon region are evident: (i) T. cruzi transmission between vectors and wild mammals, which is characterized as a wild enzooty encompassing the entire Amazon basin; (ii) accidental T. cruzi transmission from vectors and wild mammals to humans, when they invade the wild ecotope or when these vectors and wild mammals invade human homes; (iii) occupational Chagas disease among piassava (Leopoldinia piassaba) palm fiber gatherers, transmitted by the vector Rhodnius brethesi, for which these palm trees are the specific ecotope; (IV) oral T. cruzi transmission to humans through food contamination, particularly in juices from plants such as assai, which today is considered to be endemic in the Brazilian Amazon region, with more than 1500 cases notified. PMID:26254002

  2. Phlebotomine fauna, natural infection rate and feeding habits of Lutzomyia cruzi in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brito, Veruska Nogueira de; Almeida, Arleana do Bom Parto Ferreira de; Nakazato, Luciano; Duarte, Rosemere; Souza, Cladson de Oliveira; Sousa, Valéria Régia Franco

    2014-10-14

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil is transmitted by the phlebotomine Lutzomyia longipalpis and in some midwestern regions by Lutzomyia cruzi. Studies of the phlebotomine fauna, feeding habits and natural infection rate by Leishmania contribute to increased understanding of the epidemiological chain of leishmaniases and their vectorial capacity. Collections were performed in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso from 2010-2013, during which time 2,011 phlebotomines (23 species) were captured (68.70% Lu. cruzi and 20.52% Lutzomyia whitmani). Lu. cruzi females were identified by observing the shapes of the cibarium (a portion of the mouthpart) and spermatheca, from which samples were obtained for polymerase chain reaction to determine the rates of natural infection. Engorged phlebotomines were assessed to identify the blood-meal host by ELISA. A moderate correlation was discovered between the number of Lu. cruzi and the temperature and the minimum rate of infection was 6.10%. Twenty-two females were reactive to the antisera of bird (28%), dog (3.30%) and skunk (1.60%). We conclude that Lu. cruzi and Lu. whitmani have adapted to the urban environment in this region and that Lu. cruzi is the most likely vector of VL in Jaciara. Moreover, maintenance of Leishmania in the environment is likely aided by the presence of birds and domestic and synanthropic animals. PMID:25338156

  3. Phlebotomine fauna, natural infection rate and feeding habits of Lutzomyia cruzi in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brito, Veruska Nogueira de; Almeida, Arleana do Bom Parto Ferreira de; Nakazato, Luciano; Duarte, Rosemere; Souza, Cladson de Oliveira; Sousa, Valéria Régia Franco

    2014-11-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil is transmitted by the phlebotomine Lutzomyia longipalpis and in some midwestern regions by Lutzomyia cruzi. Studies of the phlebotomine fauna, feeding habits and natural infection rate by Leishmania contribute to increased understanding of the epidemiological chain of leishmaniases and their vectorial capacity. Collections were performed in Jaciara, state of Mato Grosso from 2010-2013, during which time 2,011 phlebotomines (23 species) were captured (68.70% Lu. cruzi and 20.52% Lutzomyia whitmani). Lu. cruzi females were identified by observing the shapes of the cibarium (a portion of the mouthpart) and spermatheca, from which samples were obtained for polymerase chain reaction to determine the rates of natural infection. Engorged phlebotomines were assessed to identify the blood-meal host by ELISA. A moderate correlation was discovered between the number of Lu. cruzi and the temperature and the minimum rate of infection was 6.10%. Twenty-two females were reactive to the antisera of bird (28%), dog (3.30%) and skunk (1.60%). We conclude that Lu. cruzi and Lu. whitmani have adapted to the urban environment in this region and that Lu. cruzi is the most likely vector of VL in Jaciara. Moreover, maintenance of Leishmania in the environment is likely aided by the presence of birds and domestic and synanthropic animals. PMID:25410993

  4. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  5. Survey of Feral Swine ( Sus scrofa ) Infection with the Agent of Chagas Disease ( Trypanosoma cruzi ) in Texas, 2013-14.

    PubMed

    Comeaux, Juliette M; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Lewis, Barbara C; Cummings, Kevin J; Mesenbrink, Brian T; Leland, Bruce R; Bodenchuk, Michael J; Hamer, Sarah A

    2016-07-01

    : Feral swine ( Sus scrofa ) are an invasive species and reservoir of numerous zoonotic pathogens in the US, and Texas leads the nation in the estimated population size of feral hogs. Texas also harbors enzootic transmission cycles of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi , agent of Chagas disease. Given previous evidence that swine can serve as reservoirs of T. cruzi in Latin America and new evidence of triatomines (kissing bugs) feeding on swine in Texas, we measured the prevalence of T. cruzi infection in feral swine in Texas. From 2013 to 2014, we sampled blood and/or cardiac tissue from 78 feral swine across 14 Texas counties (seven with and seven without prior documentation of kissing bug occurrence) and used PCR and histopathology to detect T. cruzi infection. We determined an overall infection prevalence of 6% (3 of 54) based on PCR evaluation of cardiac tissue, and no blood samples were positive (n=72). All three positive pigs were from counties where kissing bugs are documented. No T. cruzi amastigotes were noted on histopathology (n=54). Sarcocysts were observed in 10 (18%) of the samples, five of which also had mild focal areas of degeneration and inflammatory cell infiltration. Eco-epidemiologic investigations can provide an assessment of contributions of feral hogs to maintenance of T. cruzi across a landscape to help protect human and animal health. PMID:27224214

  6. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection and vector control activities in rural communities of the southern Gran Chaco (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Moreno, Mariana Laura; Moretti, Edgardo; Basso, Beatriz; Céspedes, Maria Frias; Catalá, Silvia S; Gorla, David E

    2010-03-01

    We compared age-related seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection with history of vector control interventions and social and ecological changes in three historically endemic departments of Cordoba province, Argentina, covering an area of 42,600 km(2) of the Gran Chaco region. Using a cross sectional design, blood samples of 5240 people between 6 months and 40 years of age, living in 192 rural communities were analyzed to detect T. cruzi infection using ELISA tests, and confirmed with indirect immunofluorescent antibody test and indirect haemoagglutination. Overall seroprevalence was 5.4%, 7.9% and 7.5% in the north, northwest and west studied areas (average for all areas 6.95%). Seroprevalence for T cruzi increased with population age, especially in age classes older than 15 years of age. Communities of the north and west areas showed 0.59% seroprevalence for T. cruzi in children below 15 years of age, whereas children of the same age in the northwest region showed a seroprevalence of 3.08%. Comparative analyses indicate that vector control activities and land use changes during the last decades are the most likely causes of the overall reduction of T. cruzi prevalence. Results suggest that the vectorial transmission of T. cruzi has been strongly reduced and probably interrupted in the north and west areas, but it is still active in the northwestern rural settlements of Córdoba province. PMID:19945420

  7. Oral Exposure to Trypanosoma cruzi Elicits a Systemic CD8+ T Cell Response and Protection against Heterotopic Challenge ▿

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Matthew H.; Craft, Julie M.; Bustamante, Juan M.; Tarleton, Rick L.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infects millions of people in Latin America and often leads to the development of Chagas disease. T. cruzi infection can be acquired at or near the bite site of the triatomine vector, but per os infection is also a well-documented mode of transmission, as evidenced by recent microepidemics of acute Chagas disease attributed to the consumption of parasite-contaminated foods and liquids. It would also be convenient to deliver vaccines for T. cruzi by the oral route, particularly live parasite vaccines intended for the immunization of reservoir hosts. For these reasons, we were interested in better understanding immunity to T. cruzi following oral infection or oral vaccination, knowing that the route of infection and site of antigen encounter can have substantial effects on the ensuing immune response. Here, we show that the route of infection does not alter the ability of T. cruzi to establish infection in muscle tissue nor does it impair the generation of a robust CD8+ T cell response. Importantly, oral vaccination with attenuated parasites provides protection against wild-type (WT) T. cruzi challenge. These results strongly support the development of whole-organism-based vaccines targeting reservoir species as a means to alleviate the burden of Chagas disease in affected regions. PMID:21628516

  8. Treatment Success in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Is Predicted by Early Changes in Serially Monitored Parasite-Specific T and B Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Gretchen; Albareda, María C.; Viotti, Rodolfo; Perez-Mazliah, Damián E.; Lococo, Bruno; Castro Eiro, Melisa; Laucella, Susana A.; Tarleton, Rick L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is the highest impact parasitic disease in Latin America. We have proposed that changes in Trypanosoma cruzi-specific immune responses might serve as surrogate indicators of treatment success. Herein, we addressed in a long-term follow-up study whether cure achieved after treatment can be predicted by changes in non-conventional indexes of anti-parasite serological and T cell activities. Methodology/Principal Findings T. cruzi-specific T cell responses, as measured by interferon-γ ELISPOT and T. cruzi-specific antibodies assessed by ELISA, hemagglutination and immunofluorescence tests as well as by a multiplex assay incorporating 14 recombinant T. cruzi proteins were measured in 33 patients at 48–150 months post-benznidazole treatment. Cure — as assessed by conventional serological tests — was associated with an early decline in T. cruzi-specific IFN-γ-producing T cells and in antibody titers measured by the multiplex serological assay. Changes in the functional status and potential of T. cruzi-specific T cells, indicative of reduced antigen stimulation, provided further evidence of parasitological cure following benznidazole treatment. Patients showing a significant reduction in T. cruzi-specific antibodies had higher pre-therapy levels of T. cruzi-specific IFN-γ- producing T cells compared to those with unaltered humoral responses post-treatment. Conclusions/Significance Monitoring of appropriate immunological responses can provide earlier and robust measures of treatment success in T. cruzi infection. PMID:27128444

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Wilson, Leslie; Novelo-Garza, Barbara; Valiente-Banuet, Leopoldo; Ramsey, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico’s national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years of Mexico

  10. Anatomy and evolution of telomeric and subtelomeric regions in the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The subtelomeres of many protozoa are highly enriched in genes with roles in niche adaptation. T. cruzi trypomastigotes express surface proteins from Trans-Sialidase (TS) and Dispersed Gene Family-1 (DGF-1) superfamilies which are implicated in host cell invasion. Single populations of T. cruzi may express different antigenic forms of TSs. Analysis of TS genes located at the telomeres suggests that chromosome ends could have been the sites where new TS variants were generated. The aim of this study is to characterize telomeric and subtelomeric regions of T. cruzi available in TriTrypDB and connect the sequences of telomeres to T. cruzi working draft sequence. Results We first identified contigs carrying the telomeric repeat (TTAGGG). Of 49 contigs identified, 45 have telomeric repeats at one end, whereas in four contigs the repeats are located internally. All contigs display a conserved telomeric junction sequence adjacent to the hexamer repeats which represents a signature of T. cruzi chromosome ends. We found that 40 telomeric contigs are located on T. cruzi chromosome-sized scaffolds. In addition, we were able to map several telomeric ends to the chromosomal bands separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The subtelomeric sequence structure varies widely, mainly as a result of large differences in the relative abundance and organization of genes encoding surface proteins (TS and DGF-1), retrotransposon hot spot genes (RHS), retrotransposon elements, RNA-helicase and N-acetyltransferase genes. While the subtelomeric regions are enriched in pseudogenes, they also contain complete gene sequences matching both known and unknown expressed genes, indicating that these regions do not consist of nonfunctional DNA but are instead functional parts of the expressed genome. The size of the subtelomeric regions varies from 5 to 182 kb; the smaller of these regions could have been generated by a recent chromosome breakage and telomere healing event

  11. Mitochondrial Gene Expression Is Responsive to Starvation Stress and Developmental Transition in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Aubie K.; Kalem, Murat C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Trypanosoma cruzi parasites causing Chagas disease are passed between mammals by the triatomine bug vector. Within the insect, T. cruzi epimastigote-stage cells replicate and progress through the increasingly nutrient-restricted digestive tract, differentiating into infectious, nonreplicative metacyclic trypomastigotes. Thus, we evaluated how nutrient perturbations or metacyclogenesis affects mitochondrial gene expression in different insect life cycle stages. We compared mitochondrial RNA abundances in cultures containing fed, replicating epimastigotes, differentiating cultures containing both starved epimastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes and epimastigote starvation cultures. We observed increases in mitochondrial rRNAs and some mRNAs in differentiating cultures. These increases predominated only for the edited CYb mRNA in cultures enriched for metacyclic trypomastigotes. For the other transcripts, abundance increases were linked to starvation and were strongest in culture fractions with a high population of starved epimastigotes. We show that loss of both glucose and amino acids results in rapid increases in RNA abundances that are quickly reduced when these nutrients are returned. Furthermore, the individual RNAs exhibit distinct temporal abundance patterns, suggestive of multiple mechanisms regulating individual transcript abundance. Finally, increases in mitochondrial respiratory complex subunit mRNA abundances were not matched by increases in abundances of nucleus-encoded subunit mRNAs, nor were there statistically significant increases in protein levels of three nucleus-encoded subunits tested. These results show that, similarly to that in T. brucei, the mitochondrial genome in T. cruzi has the potential to alter gene expression in response to environmental or developmental stimuli but for an as-yet-unknown purpose. IMPORTANCE Chagas disease is caused by insect-transmitted Trypanosoma cruzi. Halting T. cruzi’s life cycle in one of its

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Wilson, Leslie; Novelo-Garza, Barbara; Valiente-Banuet, Leopoldo; Ramsey, Janine M

    2016-03-01

    An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico's national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years of Mexico's mandated

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi: circulating polysaccharide factors excreted in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Martín, U O; Afchain, D; Loyens, M; Maidana, C; Caprón, A

    1989-01-01

    An antigen factor (EF), thermostable and soluble in trichloroacetic acid was detected in the supernatant fluid of epimastigote cultures of Trypanosoma cruzi and in the sera of patients with acute Chagas disease. An hyperimmune antiserum to this antigenic factor was obtained in rabbits. The EF was revealed on the fibroblast surface membranes of rats infected with trypomastigotes, using the indirect immunofluorescence technique. The presence of EF in the sera of patients with acute Chagas disease as well as in the supernatant of epimastigotes culture at logarithmic phase, leads to its association with a process of parasite proliferation. Being EF a component of the parasite, its origin both in vitro and in vivo could be the result of an excretion-secretion of parasite or simply a result of the parasite's death. It can be postulated that the same as in other protozoic infection, EF could be used by T. cruzi in the process of cell penetration. PMID:2517138

  14. Guidelines on the treatment of chronic coinfection by Trypanosoma cruzi and HIV outside endemic areas.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Molina, José A; Rodríguez-Guardado, Azucena; Soriano, Antonio; Pinazo, María-Jesús; Carrilero, Bartolomé; García-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Salas, Joaquín; Torrús, Diego; Soler-Ferrer, Cristina; Puente, Sabino; Haro-González, Juan Luís; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Gascon, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    As a result of population migration, Chagas disease is no longer limited to the North and South American continents. In HIV-infected patients, chronic infection by Trypanosoma cruzi behaves as an opportunistic infection in severely immunosuppressed patients and is responsible for high morbidity and mortality. Unlike other opportunistic infections, information on the natural history, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Chagas disease is scarce. Spain has the highest number of cases of Chagas disease outside the North and South American continents, and coinfection with HIV is increasingly prevalent. In this article, the Spanish Society for Tropical Medicine and International Health (Sociedad Española de Medicina Tropical y Salud Internacional) reviews the current situation of coinfection with HIV and T. cruzi infection and provides guidelines on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention in areas where Chagas disease is not endemic. It also identifies areas of uncertainty where additional research is necessary. PMID:22189148

  15. Proteomic analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi developmental stages using isotope-coded affinity tag reagents.

    PubMed

    Paba, Jaime; Ricart, Carlos A O; Fontes, Wagner; Santana, Jaime M; Teixeira, Antonio R L; Marchese, Jason; Williamson, Brian; Hunt, Tony; Karger, Barry L; Sousa, Marcelo V

    2004-01-01

    Comparative proteome analysis of developmental stages of the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi was carried out by isotope-coded affinity tag technology (ICAT) associated with liquid cromatography-mass spectrometry peptide sequencing (LC-MS/MS). Protein extracts of the protozoan trypomastigote and amastigote stages were labeled with heavy (D8) and light (D0) ICAT reagents and subjected to cation exchange and avidin affinity chromatographies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. High confidence sequence information and expression levels for 41 T. cruzi polypeptides, including metabolic enzymes, paraflagellar rod components, tubulins, and heat-shock proteins were reported. Twenty-nine proteins displayed similar levels of expression in both forms of the parasite, nine proteins presented higher levels in trypomastigotes, whereas three were more expressed in amastigotes. PMID:15253433

  16. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Tokuoka, Keiji; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Okamoto, Naoki; Okano, Yousuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Inaka, Koji; Urade, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2007-10-01

    Old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Old yellow enzyme (OYE) is an NADPH oxidoreductase that contains a flavin mononucleotide as a prosthetic group. The OYE from Trypanosoma cruzi, which produces prostaglandin F{sub 2α}, a potent mediator of various physiological and pathological processes, from prostaglandin H2. The protein was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.3, b = 78.8, c = 78.8 Å, β = 93.4° and two molecules per asymmetric unit. The crystals were suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies and diffracted to 1.70 Å resolution. A Patterson search method is in progress using the structure of OYE from Pseudomonas putida as a starting model.

  17. Experimental and Mathematical-Modeling Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigote Motility

    PubMed Central

    Arias-del-Angel, Jorge A.; Dévora-Canales, Diego; Manning-Cela, Rebeca G.; Santana-Solano, Jesús; Santillán, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed at characterizing the motility of parasite T. cruzi in its epimastigote form. To that end, we recorded the trajectories of two strains of this parasite (a wild-type strain and a stable transfected strain, which contains an ectopic copy of LYT1 gene and whose motility is known to be affected). We further extracted parasite trajectories from the recorded videos, and statistically analysed the following trajectory-step features: step length, angular change of direction, longitudinal and transverse displacements with respect to the previous step, and mean square displacement. Based on the resulting observations, we developed a mathematical model to simulate parasite trajectories. The fact that the model predictions closely match most of the experimentally observed parasite-trajectory characteristics, allows us to conclude that the model is an accurate description of T. cruzi motility. PMID:26544863

  18. TcSNP: a database of genetic variation in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Alejandro A.; Carmona, Santiago J.; Agüero, Fernán

    2009-01-01

    The TcSNP database (http://snps.tcruzi.org) integrates information on genetic variation (polymorphisms and mutations) for different stocks, strains and isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. The database incorporates sequences (genes from the T. cruzi reference genome, mRNAs, ESTs and genomic sequences); multiple sequence alignments obtained from these sequences; and single-nucleotide polymorphisms and small indels identified by scanning these multiple sequence alignments. Information in TcSNP can be readily interrogated to arrive at gene sets, or SNP sets of interest based on a number of attributes. Sequence similarity searches using BLAST are also supported. This first release of TcSNP contains nearly 170 000 high-confidence candidate SNPs, derived from the analysis of annotated coding sequences. As new sequence data become available, TcSNP will incorporate these data, mapping new candidate SNPs onto the reference genome sequences. PMID:18974180

  19. Frequency of the Congenital Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Elizabeth J.; Xiong, Xu; Carlier, Yves; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Buekens, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and endemic in much of Latin America. With increased globalization and immigration, it is a risk in any country due in part to congenital transmission. The frequency of congenital transmission is unclear. Objective To assess the frequency of congenital transmission of T. cruzi. Search Strategy PubMed, Journals@Ovid Full Text, EMBASE, CINAHL, Fuente Academica and BIREME databases were searched using seven search terms related to Chagas disease or Trypanosoma cruzi and congenital transmission. Selection Criteria The inclusion criteria were the following: Dutch, English, French, Portuguese or Spanish language; case report, case series or observational study; original data on congenital T. cruzi infection in humans; congenital infection rate reported or it could be derived. This systematic review included 13 case reports/series and 51 observational studies. Data Collection and Analysis Two investigators independently collected data on study characteristics, diagnosis and congenital infection rate. The principal summary measure – the congenital transmission rate – is defined as the number of congenitally infected infants divided by the number of infants born to infected mothers. A random effects model was utilized. Main Results The pooled congenital transmission rate was 4.7% (95% confidence interval: 3.9–5.6%). Endemic countries had a higher rate of congenital transmission compared to non-endemic (5.0% vs. 2.7%). Conclusions Congenital transmission of Chagas disease is a global problem. Overall risk of congenital infection in infants born to infected mothers is about 5%. The congenital mode of transmission requires targeted screening to prevent future cases of Chagas disease. PMID:23924273

  20. Field application of polymerase chain reaction diagnosis and strain typing of Trypanosoma cruzi in Bolivian triatomines.

    PubMed

    Breniere, S F; Bosseno, M F; Telleria, J; Carrasco, R; Vargas, F; Yaksic, N; Noireau, F

    1995-08-01

    A new approach for direct identification and characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi stocks in biological samples was tested for field applicability on an extensive sample of feces collected from triatomine vectors from four different species found in Bolivia. The first step of the technique is polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the hypervariable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi parasites. In this report, 345 fecal samples were analyzed and the PCR results were compared with microscopic examination. For Triatoma infestans, the principal Bolivian vector, both techniques were in concordance 85.3% of the time. For the three other species, Rhodnius pictipes, Eratyrus mucronatus, and Triatoma sordida, the fecal samples were all negative by microscopic examination whereas PCR results showed several T. cruzi-infected insects in each species. The second step of the procedure is the characterization of the T. cruzi clones by means of hybridization of the PCR products with clone-specific probes generated by the PCR. We used two probes corresponding to major clones circulating in high frequency in Bolivia (as shown by previous population genetic studies using isoenzyme characterization). We obtained four primary results: 1) we confirm the importance of two major clones in Bolivia in two distinct regions; 2) we report high rates of mixed infections (multiple clones in a single vector) in Triatoma infestans, up to 22% and 35% in Cochabamba and La Paz departments, respectively; 3) the results favor the absence of interaction between different clones; and 4) we find, for the first time, evidence of the major clones circulating in three species of triatomines that are known as mainly sylvatic species.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7677221

  1. Expression and the Peculiar Enzymatic Behavior of the Trypanosoma cruzi NTH1 DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Ormeño, Fernando; Barrientos, Camila; Ramirez, Santiago; Ponce, Iván; Valenzuela, Lucía; Sepúlveda, Sofía; Bitar, Mainá; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Machado, Carlos Renato; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Galanti, Norbel

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, presents three cellular forms (trypomastigotes, epimastigotes and amastigotes), all of which are submitted to oxidative species in its hosts. However, T. cruzi is able to resist oxidative stress suggesting a high efficiency of its DNA repair machinery.The Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway is one of the main DNA repair mechanisms in other eukaryotes and in T. cruzi as well. DNA glycosylases are enzymes involved in the recognition of oxidative DNA damage and in the removal of oxidized bases, constituting the first step of the BER pathway. Here, we describe the presence and activity of TcNTH1, a nuclear T. cruzi DNA glycosylase. Surprisingly, purified recombinant TcNTH1 does not remove the thymine glycol base, but catalyzes the cleavage of a probe showing an AP site. The same activity was found in epimastigote and trypomastigote homogenates suggesting that the BER pathway is not involved in thymine glycol DNA repair. TcNTH1 DNA-binding properties assayed in silico are in agreement with the absence of a thymine glycol removing function of that parasite enzyme. Over expression of TcNTH1 decrease parasite viability when transfected epimastigotes are submitted to a sustained production of H2O2.Therefore, TcNTH1 is the only known NTH1 orthologous unable to eliminate thymine glycol derivatives but that recognizes and cuts an AP site, most probably by a beta-elimination mechanism. We cannot discard that TcNTH1 presents DNA glycosylase activity on other DNA base lesions. Accordingly, a different DNA repair mechanism should be expected leading to eliminate thymine glycol from oxidized parasite DNA. Furthermore, TcNTH1 may play a role in the AP site recognition and processing. PMID:27284968

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi response to sterol biosynthesis inhibitors: morphophysiological alterations leading to cell death.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Rafael Luis; Soares, Maurilio José; Probst, Christian Macagnan; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2013-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi displays similarities to fungi in terms of its sterol lipid biosynthesis, as ergosterol and other 24-alkylated sterols are its principal endogenous sterols. The sterol pathway is thus a potential drug target for the treatment of Chagas disease. We describe here a comparative study of the growth inhibition, ultrastructural and physiological changes leading to the death of T. cruzi cells following treatment with the sterol biosynthesis inhibitors (SBIs) ketoconazole and lovastatin. We first calculated the drug concentration inhibiting epimastigote growth by 50% (EC(50)/72 h) or killing all cells within 24 hours (EC(100)/24 h). Incubation with inhibitors at the EC(50)/72 h resulted in interesting morphological changes: intense proliferation of the inner mitochondrial membrane, which was corroborated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy of the parasites stained with rhodamine 123, and strong swelling of the reservosomes, which was confirmed by acridine orange staining. These changes to the mitochondria and reservosomes may reflect the involvement of these organelles in ergosterol biosynthesis or the progressive autophagic process culminating in cell lysis after 6 to 7 days of treatment with SBIs at the EC(50)/72 h. By contrast, treatment with SBIs at the EC(100)/24 h resulted in rapid cell death with a necrotic phenotype: time-dependent cytosolic calcium overload, mitochondrial depolarization and reservosome membrane permeabilization (RMP), culminating in cell lysis after a few hours of drug exposure. We provide the first demonstration that RMP constitutes the "point of no return" in the cell death cascade, and propose a model for the necrotic cell death of T. cruzi. Thus, SBIs trigger cell death by different mechanisms, depending on the dose used, in T. cruzi. These findings shed new light on ergosterol biosynthesis and the mechanisms of programmed cell death in this ancient protozoan parasite. PMID:23383204

  3. Host Cell Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase Is Crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C.; Schlesinger, Mariana; Kevorkian, María L.; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Alonso, Guillermo D.; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, has a complex life cycle which involves the invasion of mammalian host cells, differentiation and intracellular replication. Here we report the first insights into the biological role of a poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase in a trypanosomatid (TcPARG). In silico analysis of the TcPARG gene pointed out the conservation of key residues involved in the catalytic process and, by Western blot, we demonstrated that it is expressed in a life stage-dependant manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy using an anti-TcPARG antibody showed that this enzyme is localized in the nucleus independently of the presence of DNA damage or cell cycle stage. The addition of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors ADP-HPD (adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol) or DEA (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate monohydrate) to the culture media, both at a 1 µM concentration, reduced in vitro epimastigote growth by 35% and 37% respectively, when compared to control cultures. We also showed that ADP-HPD 1 µM can lead to an alteration in the progression of the cell cycle in hydroxyurea synchronized cultures of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Outstandingly, here we demonstrate that the lack of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity in Vero and A549 host cells, achieved by chemical inhibition or iRNA, produces the reduction of the percentage of infected cells as well as the number of amastigotes per cell and trypomastigotes released, leading to a nearly complete abrogation of the infection process. We conclude that both, T. cruzi and the host, poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activities are important players in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of Chagas’ disease. PMID:23776710

  4. Combined Treatment of Heterocyclic Analogues and Benznidazole upon Trypanosoma cruzi In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Denise da Gama Jaén; Batista, Marcos Meuser; de Oliveira, Gabriel Melo; Britto, Constança Carvalho; Rodrigues, Ana Carolina Mondaine; Stephens, Chad E.; Boykin, David W.; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré Correia

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in Latin America but no vaccines or safe chemotherapeutic agents are available. Combined therapy is envisioned as an ideal approach since it may enhance efficacy by acting upon different cellular targets, may reduce toxicity and minimize the risk of drug resistance. Therefore, we investigated the activity of benznidazole (Bz) in combination with the diamidine prodrug DB289 and in combination with the arylimidamide DB766 upon T. cruzi infection in vivo. The oral treatment of T.cruzi-infected mice with DB289 and Benznidazole (Bz) alone reduced the number of circulating parasites compared with untreated mice by about 70% and 90%, respectively. However, the combination of these two compounds decreased the parasitemia by 99% and protected against animal mortality by 100%, but without providing a parasitological cure. When Bz (p.o) was combined with DB766 (via ip route), at least a 99.5% decrease in parasitemia levels was observed. DB766+Bz also provided 100% protection against mice mortality while Bz alone provided about 87% protection. This combined therapy also reduced the tissular lesions induced by T. cruzi infection: Bz alone reduced GPT and CK plasma levels by about 12% and 78% compared to untreated mice group, the combination of Bz with DB766 resulted in a reduction of GPT and CK plasma levels of 56% and 91%. Cure assessment through hemocultive and PCR approaches showed that Bz did not provide a parasitological cure, however, DB766 alone or associated with Bz cured ≥13% of surviving animals. PMID:21814568

  5. Production of MMP-9 and inflammatory cytokines by Trypanosoma cruzi-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    de Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; da Silva, Wellington Seguins; de Castro Côrtes, Luzia Monteiro; da Silva Vasconcelos Sousa, Periela; de Araujo Soares, Renata Oliveira; Alves, Carlos Roberto

    2014-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a large family of Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) dependent endopeptidases implicated in tissue remodeling and chronic inflammation. MMPs also play key roles in the activation of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines produced by many cell types, including lymphocytes, granulocytes, and, in particular, activated macrophages. Their synthesis and secretion appear to be important in a number of physiological processes, including the inflammatory process. Here, we investigated the interaction between human and mouse macrophages with T. cruzi Colombian and Y strains to characterize MMP-9 and cytokine production in this system. Supernatants and total extract of T. cruzi infected human and mouse macrophages were obtained and used to assess MMP-9 profile and inflammatory cytokines. The presence of metalloproteinase activity was determined by zymography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting assays. The effect of cytokines on MMP-9 production in human macrophages was verified by previous incubation of cytokines on these cells in culture, and analyzed by zymography. We detected an increase in MMP-9 production in the culture supernatants of T. cruzi infected human and mouse macrophages. The addition of IL-1β or TNF-α to human macrophage cultures increased MMP-9 production. In contrast, MMP-9 production was down-modulated when human macrophage cultures were treated with IFN-γ or IL-4 before infection. Human macrophages infected with T. cruzi Y or Colombian strains produced increased levels of MMP-9, which was related to the production of cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. PMID:25448360

  6. Isolation and purification of a neutral alpha(1,2)-mannosidase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bonay, P; Fresno, M

    1999-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an obligatory intracellular protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease in humans. Although a fair amount is known about the biochemistry of certain trypanosomes, very little is known about the enzymic complement of synthesis and processing of glycoproteins and/or functions of the subcellular organelles in this parasite. There have been very few reports on the presence of acid and neutral hydrolases in Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report the first purification and characterization of a neutral mannosidase from the epimastigote stage of Trypanosoma cruzi. The neutral mannosidase was purified nearly 800-fold with an 8% recovery to apparent homogeneity from a CHAPS extract of epimastigotes by the following procedures: (1) metal affinity chromatography on Co+2-Sepharose, (2) anion exchange, and (3) hydroxylapatite. The purified enzyme has a native molecular weight of 150-160 kDa and is apparently composed of two subunits of 76 kDa. The purified enzyme exhibits a broad pH profile with a maximum at pH 5.9-6.3. It is inhibited by swainsonine (Ki, 0.1 microM), D-mannono-delta-lactam (Ki, 20 microM), kifunensine (Ki, 60 microM) but not significantly by deoxymannojirimycin. The enzyme is activated by Co2+and Ni2+and strongly inhibited by EDTA and Fe2+. The purified enzyme is active against p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-mannoside (km = 87 microM). High-mannose Man9GlcNAc substrate was hydrolyzed by the purified enzyme to Man7GlcNAc at pH 6.1. The purified enzyme does not show activity against alpha1,3- or alpha1,6-linked mannose residues. Antibodies against the recently purified lysosomal alpha-mannosidase from T.cruzi did not react with the neutral mannosidase reported here. PMID:10207175

  7. Cruzipain Activates Latent TGF-β from Host Cells during T. cruzi Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ferrão, Patrícia Mello; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini; Araujo-Jorge, Tania Cremonini; Degrave, Wim Maurits; Gonçalves, Antônio da Silva; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Lima, Ana Paula; Feige, Jean Jacques; Bailly, Sabine; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Waghabi, Mariana Caldas

    2015-01-01

    Several studies indicate that the activity of cruzipain, the main lysosomal cysteine peptidase of Trypanosoma cruzi, contributes to parasite infectivity. In addition, the parasitic invasion process of mammalian host cells is described to be dependent on the activation of the host TGF-β signaling pathway by T. cruzi. Here, we tested the hypothesis that cruzipain could be an important activator of latent TGF-β and thereby trigger TGF-β-mediated events crucial for the development of Chagas disease. We found that live epimastigotes of T. cruzi, parasite lysates and purified cruzipain were able to activate latent TGF-β in vitro. This activation could be inhibited by the cysteine peptidase inhibitor Z-Phe-Ala-FMK. Moreover, transfected parasites overexpressing chagasin, a potent endogenous cruzipain inhibitor, prevented latent TGF-β activation. We also observed that T. cruzi invasion, as well as parasite intracellular growth, were inhibited by the administration of Z-Phe-Ala-FMK or anti-TGF-β neutralizing antibody to Vero cell cultures. We further demonstrated that addition of purified cruzipain enhanced the invasive activity of trypomastigotes and that this effect could be completely inhibited by addition of a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the activities of cruzipain and TGF-β in the process of cell invasion are functionally linked. Our data suggest that cruzipain inhibition is an interesting chemotherapeutic approach for Chagas disease not only because of its trypanocidal activity, but also due to the inhibitory effect on TGF-β activation. PMID:25938232

  8. Cruzipain Activates Latent TGF-β from Host Cells during T. cruzi Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ferrão, Patrícia Mello; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini; Araujo-Jorge, Tania Cremonini; Degrave, Wim Maurits; Gonçalves, Antônio da Silva; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Lima, Ana Paula; Feige, Jean Jacques; Bailly, Sabine; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Waghabi, Mariana Caldas

    2015-01-01

    Several studies indicate that the activity of cruzipain, the main lysosomal cysteine peptidase of Trypanosoma cruzi, contributes to parasite infectivity. In addition, the parasitic invasion process of mammalian host cells is described to be dependent on the activation of the host TGF-β signaling pathway by T. cruzi. Here, we tested the hypothesis that cruzipain could be an important activator of latent TGF-β and thereby trigger TGF-β-mediated events crucial for the development of Chagas disease. We found that live epimastigotes of T. cruzi, parasite lysates and purified cruzipain were able to activate latent TGF-β in vitro. This activation could be inhibited by the cysteine peptidase inhibitor Z-Phe-Ala-FMK. Moreover, transfected parasites overexpressing chagasin, a potent endogenous cruzipain inhibitor, prevented latent TGF-β activation. We also observed that T. cruzi invasion, as well as parasite intracellular growth, were inhibited by the administration of Z-Phe-Ala-FMK or anti-TGF-β neutralizing antibody to Vero cell cultures. We further demonstrated that addition of purified cruzipain enhanced the invasive activity of trypomastigotes and that this effect could be completely inhibited by addition of a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the activities of cruzipain and TGF-β in the process of cell invasion are functionally linked. Our data suggest that cruzipain inhibition is an interesting chemotherapeutic approach for Chagas disease not only because of its trypanocidal activity, but also due to the inhibitory effect on TGF-β activation. PMID:25938232

  9. Digestion of human immunoglobulin G by the major cysteine proteinase (cruzipain) from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, E; Cazzulo, J J

    1990-08-01

    The major cysteine proteinase (cruzipain) from Trypanosoma cruzi was able to digest human IgG, as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of SDS, and by gel filtration on a Superose 12 column, in a FPLC system. The Fab fragment of IgG was only slightly degraded, but Fc was extensively hydrolyzed to small peptides. The results suggest that cruzipain might be involved in the defense mechanisms of the parasite against the immune response of the host. PMID:2227369

  10. Influence of Ecto-Nucleoside Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase Activity on Trypanosoma cruzi Infectivity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ramon F.; Pôssa, Marcela A. S.; Bastos, Matheus S.; Guedes, Paulo M. M.; Almeida, Márcia R.; DeMarco, Ricardo; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Bahia, Maria T.; Fietto, Juliana L. R.

    2009-01-01

    Background The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. There are no vaccines or effective treatment, especially in the chronic phase when most patients are diagnosed. There is a clear necessity to develop new drugs and strategies for the control and treatment of Chagas disease. Recent papers have suggested the ecto-nucleotidases (from CD39 family) from pathogenic agents as important virulence factors. In this study we evaluated the influence of Ecto-Nucleoside-Triphosphate-Diphosphohydrolase (Ecto-NTPDase) activity on infectivity and virulence of T. cruzi using both in vivo and in vitro models. Methodology/Principal Findings We followed Ecto-NTPDase activities of Y strain infective forms (trypomastigotes) obtained during sequential sub-cultivation in mammalian cells. ATPase/ADPase activity ratios of cell-derived trypomastigotes decreased 3- to 6-fold and infectivity was substantially reduced during sequential sub-cultivation. Surprisingly, at third to fourth passages most of the cell-derived trypomastigotes could not penetrate mammalian cells and had differentiated into amastigote-like parasites that exhibited 3- to 4-fold lower levels of Ecto-NTPDase activities. To evidence the participation of T. cruzi Ecto-NTPDase1 in the infective process, we evaluated the effect of known Ecto-ATPDase inhibitors (ARL 67156, Gadolinium and Suramin), or anti-NTPDase-1 polyclonal antiserum on ATPase and ADPase hydrolytic activities in recombinant T. cruzi NTPDase-1 and in live trypomastigotes. All tests showed a partial inhibition of Ecto-ATPDase activities and a marked inhibition of trypomastigotes infectivity. Mice infections with Ecto-NTPDase-inhibited trypomastigotes produced lower levels of parasitemia and higher host survival than with non-inhibited control parasites. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that Ecto-ATPDases act as facilitators of infection and virulence in vitro and in vivo and emerge as target candidates in chemotherapy

  11. Mode of Action of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Psilostachyin and Psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Papademetrio, Daniela; Batlle, Alcira; Martino, Virginia S.; Frank, Fernanda M.; Lombardo, María E.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas’ disease, which is a major endemic disease in Latin America and is recognized by the WHO as one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases in the world. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C, two sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Ambrosia spp., have been demonstrated to have trypanocidal activity. Considering both the potential therapeutic targets present in the parasite, and the several mechanisms of action proposed for sesquiterpene lactones, the aim of this work was to characterize the mode of action of psilostachyin and psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi and to identify the possible targets for these molecules. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C were isolated from Ambrosia tenuifolia and Ambrosia scabra, respectively. Interaction of sesquiterpene lactones with hemin, the induction of oxidative stress, the inhibition of cruzipain and trypanothione reductase and their ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis were evaluated. The induction of cell death by apoptosis was also evaluated by analyzing phosphatidylserine exposure detected using annexin-V/propidium iodide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, assessed with Rhodamine 123 and nuclear DNA fragmentation evaluated by the TUNEL assay. Both STLs were capable of interacting with hemin. Psilostachyin increased about 5 times the generation of reactive oxygen species in Trypanosoma cruzi after a 4h treatment, unlike psilostachyin C which induced an increase in reactive oxygen species levels of only 1.5 times. Only psilostachyin C was able to inhibit the biosynthesis of ergosterol, causing an accumulation of squalene. Both sesquiterpene lactones induced parasite death by apoptosis. Upon evaluating the combination of both compounds, and additive trypanocidal effect was observed. Despite their structural similarity, both sesquiterpene lactones exerted their anti-T. cruzi activity through interaction with different targets. Psilostachyin accomplished its

  12. Influence of Parasite Load on Renal Function in Mice Acutely Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Ricardo Cambraia; Miguel, Renata Botelho; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre; Oliveira, Carlo Jose Freire; Chica, Javier Emilio Lazo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Despite the vast number of studies evaluating the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, the influence of parasite burden on kidney lesions remains unclear. Thus, the main goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of T. cruzi infection on renal function and determine whether there was a correlation between parasite load and renal injury using an acute experimental model of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Low, medium and high parasite loads were generated by infecting C57BL/6 mice with 300 (low), 3,000 (medium) or 30,000 (high) numbers of “Y” strain trypomastigotes. We found that mice infected with T. cruzi trypomastigotes show increased renal injury. The infection resulted in reduced urinary excretion and creatinine clearance. We also observed a marked elevation in the ratio of urine volume to kidney and body weight, blood urea nitrogen, chloride ion, nitric oxide, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and the number of leukocytes in the blood and/or renal tissues of infected mice. Additionally, we observed the presence of the parasite in the cortical/medullary and peri-renal region, an increase of inflammatory infiltrate and of vascular permeability of the kidney. Overall, most renal changes occurred mainly in animals infected with high parasitic loads. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that T. cruzi impairs kidney function, and this impairment is more evident in mice infected with high parasitic loads. Moreover, these data suggest that, in addition to the extensively studied cardiovascular effects, renal injury should be regarded as an important indicator for better understanding the pan-infectivity of the parasite and consequently for understanding the disease in experimental models. PMID:23951243

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi: Entry into Mammalian Host Cells and Parasitophorous Vacuole Formation

    PubMed Central

    Barrias, Emile Santos; de Carvalho, Tecia Maria Ulisses; De Souza, Wanderley

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. This protozoan is an obligate intracellular parasite. The infective forms of the parasite are the metacyclic trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and bloodstream trypomastigotes. The recognition between the parasite and mammalian host cell, involves numerous molecules present in both cell types, and similar to several intracellular pathogens, T. cruzi is internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways. Morphological studies demonstrated that after the interaction of the infective forms of T. cruzi with phagocytic or non-phagocytic cell types, plasma membrane (PM) protrusions can form, showing similarity with those observed during canonical phagocytosis or macropinocytic events. Additionally, several molecules known to be molecular markers of membrane rafts, macropinocytosis, and phagocytosis have been demonstrated to be present at the invasion site. These events may or may not depend on the host cell lysosomes and cytoskeleton. In addition, after penetration, components of the host endosomal-lysosomal system, such as early endosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes, participate in the formation of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole (PV). Dynamin, a molecule involved in vesicle formation, has been shown to be involved in the PV release from the host cell PM. This review focuses on the multiple pathways that T. cruzi can use to enter the host cells until complete PV formation. We will describe different endocytic processes, such as phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, and endocytosis using membrane microdomains and clathrin-dependent endocytosis and show results that are consistent with their use by this smart parasite. We will also discuss others mechanisms that have been described, such as active penetration and the process that takes advantage of cell membrane wound repair. PMID:23914186

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi: Antiproliferative effect of indole phytoalexins on intracellular amastigotes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mezencev, Roman; Galizzi, Melina; Kutschy, Peter; Docampo, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) continues to be a significant public health problem, and the therapeutic potential of current antichagasic agents (nifurtimox and benznidazole) is rather limited. Here we report on the antitrypanosomal effect of 1-methoxyspirobrassinol and other indole phytoalexins - secondary metabolites produced by Cruciferous plants. These compounds, that previously demonstrated antimicrobial and anticancer properties, displayed significant antiproliferative effects on intracellular amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi and may be prospective candidates for antichagasic drug design and development. PMID:19545522

  15. Interferon-γ-Induced Nitric Oxide Causes Intrinsic Intestinal Denervation in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, Rosa M.E.; Marche, Homero H.F.; Bahia, Maria T.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Rossi, Marcos A.; Silva, João S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in neuronal destruction during acute-phase Trypanosoma cruzi infection was evaluated in male C57BL/6 (WT, wild-type) mice and knockout mice [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)−/− and interferon (IFN)−/−]. Selected animals were infected by intraperitoneal injection of 100 trypomastigote forms of the Y strain of T. cruzi. Others were injected intraperitoneally with an equal volume of saline solution and served as controls. Our findings support those of previous studies regarding myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection. In addition, we clearly demonstrate that, despite the fact that parasite nests and similar inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall were more pronounced in infected iNOS−/− mice than in infected WT mice, the former presented no reduction in myenteric plexus neuron numbers. Neuronal nerve profile expression, as revealed by the general nerve marker PGP 9.5, was preserved in all knockout animals. Infected IFN−/− mice suffered no significant neuronal loss and there was no inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall. On days 5 and 10 after infection, iNOS activity was greater in infected WT mice than in controls, whereas iNOS activity in infected knockout mice remained unchanged. These findings clearly demonstrate that neuronal damage does not occur in NO-impaired infected knockout mice, regardless of whether inflammatory infiltrate is present (iNOS−/−) or absent (IFN−/−). In conclusion, our observations strongly indicate that myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection is because of IFN-γ-elicited NO production resulting from iNOS activation in the inflammatory foci along the intestinal wall. PMID:15039223

  16. Farnesyl diphosphate synthase localizes to the cytoplasm of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei.

    PubMed

    Ferella, Marcela; Li, Zhu-Hong; Andersson, Björn; Docampo, Roberto

    2008-06-01

    The farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) has previously been characterized in trypanosomes as an essential enzyme for their survival and as the target for bisphosphonates, drugs that are effective both in vitro and in vivo against these parasites. Enzymes from the isoprenoid pathway have been assigned to different compartments in eukaryotes, including trypanosomatids. We here report that FPPS localizes to the cytoplasm of both Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei, and is not present in other organelles such as the mitochondria and glycosomes. PMID:18406406

  17. Frequent House Invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Triatomines in a Suburban Area of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Jr., Gilmar; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Reis, Renato Barbosa; dos Santos, Carlos Gustavo Silva; Amorim, Alekhine; Andrade, Sônia Gumes; Reis, Mitermayer G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The demographic transition of populations from rural areas to large urban centers often results in a disordered occupation of forest remnants and increased economic pressure to develop high-income buildings in these areas. Ecological and socioeconomic factors associated with these urban transitions create conditions for the potential transmission of infectious diseases, which was demonstrated for Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed 930 triatomines, mainly Triatoma tibiamaculata, collected in artificial and sylvatic environments (forests near houses) of a suburban area of the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil between 2007 and 2011. Most triatomines were captured at peridomiciles. Adult bugs predominated in all studied environments, and nymphs were scarce inside houses. Molecular analyses of a randomly selected sub-sample (n=212) of triatomines showed Trypanosoma cruzi infection rates of 65%, 50% and 56% in intradomestic, peridomestic and sylvatic environments, respectively. We detected the T. cruzi lineages I and II and mixed infections. We also showed that T. tibiamaculata fed on blood from birds (50%), marsupials (38%), ruminants (7%) and rodents (5%). The probability of T. cruzi infection was higher in triatomines that fed on marsupial blood (odds ratio (OR) = 1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.22-3.11). Moreover, we observed a protective effect against infection in bugs that fed on bird blood (OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.30-0.73). Conclusions/Significance The frequent invasion of houses by infected triatomines indicates a potential risk of T. cruzi transmission to inhabitants in this area. Our results reinforce that continuous epidemiological surveillance should be performed in areas where domestic transmission is controlled but enzootic transmission persists. PMID:25909509

  18. Long-term reduction of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in sylvatic mammals following deforestation and sustained vector surveillance in northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, L.A.; Cardinal, M.V.; Vazquez-Prokopec, G.M.; Lauricella, M.A.; Orozco, M.M.; Cortinas, R.; Schijman, A.G.; Levin, M.J.; Kitron, U.; Gürtler, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Long-term variations in the dynamics and intensity of sylvatic transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi were investigated around eight rural villages in the semiarid Argentine Chaco in 2002–2004 and compared to data collected locally in 1984–1991. Of 501 wild mammals from 13 identified species examined by xenodiagnosis, only 3 (7.9%) of 38 Didelphis albiventris opossums and 1 (1.1%) of 91 Conepatus chinga skunks were infected by T. cruzi. The period prevalence in opossums was four-fold lower in 2002–2004 than in 1984–1991 (32–36%). The infection prevalence of skunks also decreased five-fold from 4.1–5.6% in 1984–1991 to 1.1% in 2002–2004. Infection in opossums increased with age and from summer to spring in both study periods. The force of infection per 100 opossum-months after weaning declined more than six-fold from 8.2 in 1988–1991 to 1.2 in 2002–2004. Opossums were mainly infected by T. cruzi lineage I and secondarily by lineage IId in 1984–1991, and only by T. cruzi I in 2002–2004; skunks were infected by T. cruzi IId in 1984–1991 and by IIc in 2002–2004. The striking decline of T. cruzi infection in opossums and skunks occurred in parallel to community-wide insecticide spraying followed by selective sprays leading to very low densities of infected Triatoma infestans in domestic and peridomestic habitats since 1992; to massive deforestation around one of the villages or selective extraction of older trees, and apparent reductions in opossum abundance jointly with increases in foxes and skunks. These factors may underlie the dramatic decrease of T. cruzi infection in wild reservoir hosts. PMID:16839513

  19. Ecological Connectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi Reservoirs and Triatoma pallidipennis Hosts in an Anthropogenic Landscape with Endemic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Janine M.; Gutiérrez-Cabrera, Ana E.; Salgado-Ramírez, Liliana; Peterson, A. Townsend; Sánchez-Cordero, Victor; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos N.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for Chagas disease prevention are targeted at domestic vector reduction, as well as control of transfusion and maternal-fetal transmission. Population connectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected vectors and hosts, among sylvatic, ecotone and domestic habitats could jeopardize targeted efforts to reduce human exposure. This connectivity was evaluated in a Mexican community with reports of high vector infestation, human infection, and Chagas disease, surrounded by agricultural and natural areas. We surveyed bats, rodents, and triatomines in dry and rainy seasons in three adjacent habitats (domestic, ecotone, sylvatic), and measured T. cruzi prevalence, and host feeding sources of triatomines. Of 12 bat and 7 rodent species, no bat tested positive for T. cruzi, but all rodent species tested positive in at least one season or habitat. Highest T. cruzi infection prevalence was found in the rodents, Baiomys musculus and Neotoma mexicana. In general, parasite prevalence was not related to habitat or season, although the sylvatic habitat had higher infection prevalence than by chance, during the dry season. Wild and domestic mammals were identified as bloodmeals of T. pallidipennis, with 9% of individuals having mixed human (4.8% single human) and other mammal species in bloodmeals, especially in the dry season; these vectors tested >50% positive for T. cruzi. Overall, ecological connectivity is broad across this matrix, based on high rodent community similarity, vector and T. cruzi presence. Cost-effective T. cruzi, vector control strategies and Chagas disease transmission prevention will need to consider continuous potential for parasite movement over the entire landscape. This study provides clear evidence that these strategies will need to include reservoir/host species in at least ecotones, in addition to domestic habitats. PMID:23049923

  20. The sylvatic transmission cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in a rural area in the humid Chaco of Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Otegui, J.A.; Ceballos, L.A.; Orozco, M.M.; Enriquez, G.F.; Cardinal, M.V.; Cura, C.; Schijman, A.G.; Kitron, U.; Gürtler, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the sylvatic transmission cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Gran Chaco ecoregion. We conducted surveys to identify the main sylvatic hosts of T. cruzi, parasite discrete typing units and vector species involved in Pampa del Indio, a rural area in the humid Argentinean Chaco. A total of 44 mammals from 14 species was captured and examined for infection by xenodiagnosis and polymerase chain reaction amplification of the hyper-variable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi (kDNA-PCR). Ten (22.7%) mammals were positive by xenodiagnosis or kDNA-PCR. Four of 11 (36%) Didelphis albiventris (white-eared opossums) and six of nine (67%) Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillos) were positive by xenodiagnosis and or kDNA-PCR. Rodents, other armadillo species, felids, crab-eating raccoons, hares and rabbits were not infected. Positive animals were highly infectious to the bugs that fed upon them as determined by xenodiagnosis. All positive opossums were infected with T. cruzi I and all positive nine-banded armadillos with T. cruzi III. Extensive searches in sylvatic habitats using 718 Noireau trap-nights only yielded Triatoma sordida whereas no bug was collected in 26 light-trap nights. Four armadillos or opossums fitted with a spool-and-line device were successfully tracked to their refuges; only one Panstrongylus geniculatus was found in an armadillo burrow. No sylvatic triatomine was infected with T. cruzi by microscopical examination or kDNA-PCR. Our results indicate that two independent sylvatic transmission cycles of T. cruzi occur in the humid Chaco. The putative vectors of both cycles need to be identified conclusively. PMID:22771688

  1. Ecological connectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi reservoirs and Triatoma pallidipennis hosts in an anthropogenic landscape with endemic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Janine M; Gutiérrez-Cabrera, Ana E; Salgado-Ramírez, Liliana; Peterson, A Townsend; Sánchez-Cordero, Victor; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos N

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for Chagas disease prevention are targeted at domestic vector reduction, as well as control of transfusion and maternal-fetal transmission. Population connectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected vectors and hosts, among sylvatic, ecotone and domestic habitats could jeopardize targeted efforts to reduce human exposure. This connectivity was evaluated in a Mexican community with reports of high vector infestation, human infection, and Chagas disease, surrounded by agricultural and natural areas. We surveyed bats, rodents, and triatomines in dry and rainy seasons in three adjacent habitats (domestic, ecotone, sylvatic), and measured T. cruzi prevalence, and host feeding sources of triatomines. Of 12 bat and 7 rodent species, no bat tested positive for T. cruzi, but all rodent species tested positive in at least one season or habitat. Highest T. cruzi infection prevalence was found in the rodents, Baiomys musculus and Neotoma mexicana. In general, parasite prevalence was not related to habitat or season, although the sylvatic habitat had higher infection prevalence than by chance, during the dry season. Wild and domestic mammals were identified as bloodmeals of T. pallidipennis, with 9% of individuals having mixed human (4.8% single human) and other mammal species in bloodmeals, especially in the dry season; these vectors tested >50% positive for T. cruzi. Overall, ecological connectivity is broad across this matrix, based on high rodent community similarity, vector and T. cruzi presence. Cost-effective T. cruzi, vector control strategies and Chagas disease transmission prevention will need to consider continuous potential for parasite movement over the entire landscape. This study provides clear evidence that these strategies will need to include reservoir/host species in at least ecotones, in addition to domestic habitats. PMID:23049923

  2. The sylvatic transmission cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in a rural area in the humid Chaco of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Otegui, J A; Ceballos, L A; Orozco, M M; Enriquez, G F; Cardinal, M V; Cura, C; Schijman, A G; Kitron, U; Gürtler, R E

    2012-10-01

    Little is known about the sylvatic transmission cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Gran Chaco ecoregion. We conducted surveys to identify the main sylvatic hosts of T. cruzi, parasite discrete typing units and vector species involved in Pampa del Indio, a rural area in the humid Argentinean Chaco. A total of 44 mammals from 14 species were captured and examined for infection by xenodiagnosis and polymerase chain reaction amplification of the hyper-variable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi (kDNA-PCR). Ten (22.7%) mammals were positive by xenodiagnosis or kDNA-PCR. Four of 11 (36%) Didelphis albiventris (white-eared opossums) and six of nine (67%) Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillos) were positive by xenodiagnosis and or kDNA-PCR. Rodents, other armadillo species, felids, crab-eating raccoons, hares and rabbits were not infected. Positive animals were highly infectious to the bugs that fed upon them as determined by xenodiagnosis. All positive opossums were infected with T. cruzi I and all positive nine-banded armadillos with T. cruzi III. Extensive searches in sylvatic habitats using 718 Noireau trap-nights only yielded Triatoma sordida whereas no bug was collected in 26 light-trap nights. Four armadillos or opossums fitted with a spool-and-line device were successfully tracked to their refuges; only one Panstrongylus geniculatus was found in an armadillo burrow. No sylvatic triatomine was infected with T. cruzi by microscopical examination or kDNA-PCR. Our results indicate that two independent sylvatic transmission cycles of T. cruzi occur in the humid Chaco. The putative vectors of both cycles need to be identified conclusively. PMID:22771688

  3. Automated High-Content Assay for Compounds Selectively Toxic to Trypanosoma cruzi in a Myoblastic Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Cotillo, Ignacio; Presa, Jesús L.; Cantizani, Juan; Peña, Imanol; Bardera, Ana I.; Martín, Jose J.; Rodriguez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, represents a very important public health problem in Latin America where it is endemic. Although mostly asymptomatic at its initial stage, after the disease becomes chronic, about a third of the infected patients progress to a potentially fatal outcome due to severe damage of heart and gut tissues. There is an urgent need for new drugs against Chagas disease since there are only two drugs available, benznidazole and nifurtimox, and both show toxic side effects and variable efficacy against the chronic stage of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Genetically engineered parasitic strains are used for high throughput screening (HTS) of large chemical collections in the search for new anti-parasitic compounds. These assays, although successful, are limited to reporter transgenic parasites and do not cover the wide T. cruzi genetic background. With the aim to contribute to the early drug discovery process against Chagas disease we have developed an automated image-based 384-well plate HTS assay for T. cruzi amastigote replication in a rat myoblast host cell line. An image analysis script was designed to inform on three outputs: total number of host cells, ratio of T. cruzi amastigotes per cell and percentage of infected cells, which respectively provides one host cell toxicity and two T. cruzi toxicity readouts. The assay was statistically robust (Z´ values >0.6) and was validated against a series of known anti-trypanosomatid drugs. Conclusions/Significance We have established a highly reproducible, high content HTS assay for screening of chemical compounds against T. cruzi infection of myoblasts that is amenable for use with any T. cruzi strain capable of in vitro infection. Our visual assay informs on both anti-parasitic and host cell toxicity readouts in a single experiment, allowing the direct identification of compounds selectively targeted to the parasite. PMID:25615687

  4. Biological characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi stocks from domestic and sylvatic vectors in Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Téllez-Meneses, Jair; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana María; Triana-Chávez, Omar

    2008-10-01

    Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta is one of the most endemic regions of Chagas disease in Colombia. In this study, we compared the biological behavior and genetic features of Trypanosoma cruzi stocks that were isolated from domestic and sylvatic insects in this area. Rhodnius prolixus (from domestic environments) and Triatoma dimidiata (from sylvatic, peridomestic and domestic environments) are the most important vectors in this region. Genetic characterization showed that all stocks corresponded to T. cruzi I, but LSSP-PCR analyses indicated that some genotypes were present in both environments. Biological characterization in vitro showed a low growth rate in sylvatic T. cruzi stocks and in some domestic T. cruzi stocks, possibly indicating the presence of stocks with similar behavior in both transmission cycles. In parallel, in vivo behavioral analysis also indicated that T. cruzi stocks are variable and this species did not show a correlation between the environments where they were isolated. In addition, all stocks demonstrated a low mortality rate and histopathological lesions in heart, skeletal muscle and colon tissue. Moreover, our data indicated that experimentally infected chagasic mice displayed a relation between their myocardial inflammation intensity, parasitism tissue and parasite load using the qPCR. In conclusion, our results indicate that the T. cruzi stocks present in SNSM have similar biological behavior and do not show a correlation with the different transmission cycles. This could be explained by the complex transmission dynamics of T. cruzi in Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta, where hosts, vectors (e.g., T. dimidiata) and reservoirs circulate in both environments due to the close contact between the two transmission cycles, favoring environment overlapping. This knowledge is an important key to understanding the epidemiology and pathology of Chagas disease in this Colombian region. Furthermore, our findings could be of significant use in the design of

  5. Experimental transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi through the genitalia of albino mice.

    PubMed

    Herrera, L; Urdaneta-Morales, S

    2001-07-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is usually transmitted by contact with the excreta of infected Triatominae; among non-vectorial infections, direct transmission through coitus has been proposed. We investigated this possibility by instilling, through the external meatus of the vagina and the penis of previously anesthetized NMRI albino mice, blood of mice infected with strains isolated from Didelphis marsupialis (opossum, strain CO57), Rattus rattus (rat, strain CO22) and human (strain EP). Some animals were allowed to copulate the same day of the instillation. In other experiments, the strains were inoculated in the scrotum. To determine the effect of immunosuppression, some mice were treated with cyclophosphamide 30 days post-instillation. Controls were instilled orally and ocularly. Vaginal instillation with strain CO22 produced systemic infection with tropism to the heart, skeletal muscle, skin, duodenum, pancreas, ovary and sternum. Scrotal inoculation with strain EP likewise invaded liver, spleen, lung, lymph nodes and urogenital organs; while strain CO57 invaded skeletal and cardiac muscle, pancreas, testis, and vas deferens. Penile infection with strain CO22 was detected by xenodiagnosis. Immunosuppression did not increase parasitemia of vaginally infected mice or controls. Mating did not produce infection. Our results show that contact of blood trypomastigotes of T. cruzi with genital mucosa can produce blood and tissue infections. These results are discussed in relation to reports of frequent experimental tropism of T. cruzi toward urogenital organs. PMID:11500777

  6. How Trypanosoma cruzi handles cell cycle arrest promoted by camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zuma, Aline Araujo; Mendes, Isabela Cecília; Reignault, Lissa Catherine; Elias, Maria Carolina; de Souza, Wanderley; Machado, Carlos Renato; Motta, Maria Cristina M

    2014-02-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, which affects approximately 8 million people in Latin America. This parasite contains a single nucleus and a kinetoplast, which harbors the mitochondrial DNA (kDNA). DNA topoisomerases act during replication, transcription and repair and modulate DNA topology by reverting supercoiling in the DNA double-strand. In this work, we evaluated the effects promoted by camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor that promotes protozoan proliferation impairment, cell cycle arrest, ultrastructure alterations and DNA lesions in epimastigotes of T. cruzi. The results showed that inhibition of cell proliferation was reversible only at the lowest drug concentration (1μM) used. The unpacking of nuclear heterochromatin and mitochondrion swelling were the main ultrastructural modifications observed. Inhibition of parasite proliferation also led to cell cycle arrest, which was most likely caused by nuclear DNA lesions. Following camptothecin treatment, some of the cells restored their DNA, whereas others entered early apoptosis but did not progress to late apoptosis, indicating that the protozoa stay alive in a "senescence-like" state. This programmed cell death may be associated with a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, these results indicate that the inhibition of T. cruzi proliferation is related to events capable of affecting cell cycle, DNA organization and mitochondrial activity. PMID:24530483

  7. Dibenzylideneacetones Are Potent Trypanocidal Compounds That Affect the Trypanosoma cruzi Redox System

    PubMed Central

    Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Martins, Solange Cardoso; Ribeiro, Fabianne Martins; Ud Din, Zia; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2015-01-01

    Despite ongoing efforts, the available treatments for Chagas' disease are still unsatisfactory, especially in the chronic phase of the disease. Our previous study reported the strong trypanocidal activity of the dibenzylideneacetones A3K2A1 and A3K2A3 against Trypanosoma cruzi (Z. Ud Din, T. P. Fill, F. F. de Assis, D. Lazarin-Bidóia, V. Kaplum, F. P. Garcia, C. V. Nakamura, K. T. de Oliveira, and E. Rodrigues-Filho, Bioorg Med Chem 22:1121–1127, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmc.2013.12.020). In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of action of these compounds that are involved in parasite death. We showed that A3K2A1 and A3K2A3 induced oxidative stress in the three parasitic forms, especially trypomastigotes, reflected by an increase in oxidant species production and depletion of the endogenous antioxidant system. This oxidative imbalance culminated in damage in essential cell structures of T. cruzi, reflected by lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation. Consequently, A3K2A1 and A3K2A3 induced vital alterations in T. cruzi, leading to parasite death through the three pathways, apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis. PMID:26596953

  8. Biochemical Characterization of Branched Chain Amino Acids Uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Manchola, Nubia C; Rapado, Ludmila N; Barisón, María J; Silber, Ariel M

    2016-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. During its life cycle, it alternates among vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. Metabolic flexibility is a main biochemical characteristic of this parasite, which is able to obtain energy by oxidizing a variety of nutrients that can be transported from the extracellular medium. Moreover, several of these metabolites, more specifically amino acids, have a variety of functions beyond being sources of energy. Branched chain amino acids (BCAA), beyond their role in ATP production, are involved in sterol biosynthesis; for example, leucine is involved as a negative regulator of the parasite differentiation process occurring in the insect midgut. BCAA are essential metabolites in most nonphotosynthetic eukaryotes, including trypanosomes. In view of this, the metabolism of BCAA in T. cruzi depends mainly on their transport into the cell. In this work, we kinetically characterized the BCAA transport in T. cruzi epimastigotes. Our data point to BCAA as being transported by a single saturable transport system able to recognize leucine, isoleucine and valine. In view of this, we used leucine to further characterize this system. The transport increased linearly with temperature from 10 to 45 °C, allowing the calculation of an activation energy of 51.30 kJ/mol. Leucine uptake was an active process depending on ATP production and a H(+) gradient, but not on a Na(+) or K(+) gradient at the cytoplasmic membrane level. PMID:26496801

  9. Evidence for the Role of Vacuolar Soluble Pyrophosphatase and Inorganic Polyphosphate in Trypanosoma cruzi Persistence*

    PubMed Central

    Galizzi, Melina; Bustamante, Juan M.; Fang, Jianmin; Miranda, Kildare; Medeiros, Lia C. Soares; Tarleton, Rick L.; Docampo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Summary Trypanosoma cruzi infection leads to development of a chronic disease but the mechanisms that the parasite utilizes to establish a persistent infection despite activation of a potent immune response by the host are currently unknown. Unusual characteristics of T. cruzi are that it possesses cellular levels of pyrophosphate (PPi) at least ten times higher than those of ATP and molar levels of inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) within acidocalcisomes. We characterized an inorganic soluble EF-hand containing pyrophosphatase from T. cruzi (TcVSP) that, depending on the pH and cofactors, can hydrolyze either pyrophosphate (PPi) or polyphosphate (polyP). The enzyme is localized to both acidocalcisomes and cytosol. Overexpression of TcVSP (TcVSP-OE) resulted in a significant decrease in cytosolic PPi, and short and long chain polyP levels. Additionally, the TcVSP-OE parasites showed a significant growth defect in fibroblasts, less responsiveness to hyperosmotic stress, and reduced persistence in tissues of mice, suggesting that PPi and polyP are essential for the parasite to resist the stressful conditions in the host and to maintain a persistent infection. PMID:24033456

  10. Uptake of Host Cell Transforming Growth Factor-β by Trypanosoma cruzi Amastigotes in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Waghabi, Mariana C.; Keramidas, Michelle; Bailly, Sabine; Degrave, Wim; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C.; Meirelles, Maria de Nazareth L.; Paciornik, Sidnei; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C.; Feige, Jean-Jacques

    2005-01-01

    The cytokine transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays various functions in the control of Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity and in the progression of Chagas’ disease. When we immunostained T. cruzi-infected cardiomyocytes (after either in vivo or in vitro infections) for TGF-β, we observed stronger immunoreactivity in parasites than in host cells. TGF-β immunoreactivity evolved during parasite cycle progression, with intense staining in amastigotes versus very faint staining in trypomastigotes. TGF-β was present on the surface of amastigotes, in the flagellar pocket, and in intraparasitic vesicles as revealed by electron microscopy. However, no ortholog TGF-β gene could be identified in the genome of T. cruzi by in silico analysis or by extensive polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction studies. Immunoreactive TGF-β was most probably taken up by the parasite from the host cell cytoplasm because such an internalization process of biotinylated TGF-β could be observed in axenic amastigotes in vitro. These observations represent the first example of a novel mechanism by which a primitive unicellular protozoan can use host cell TGF-β to control its own intracellular life cycle. PMID:16192635

  11. Dibenzylideneacetones Are Potent Trypanocidal Compounds That Affect the Trypanosoma cruzi Redox System.

    PubMed

    Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Martins, Solange Cardoso; Ribeiro, Fabianne Martins; Ud Din, Zia; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2016-02-01

    Despite ongoing efforts, the available treatments for Chagas' disease are still unsatisfactory, especially in the chronic phase of the disease. Our previous study reported the strong trypanocidal activity of the dibenzylideneacetones A3K2A1 and A3K2A3 against Trypanosoma cruzi (Z. Ud Din, T. P. Fill, F. F. de Assis, D. Lazarin-Bidóia, V. Kaplum, F. P. Garcia, C. V. Nakamura, K. T. de Oliveira, and E. Rodrigues-Filho, Bioorg Med Chem 22:1121-1127, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmc.2013.12.020). In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of action of these compounds that are involved in parasite death. We showed that A3K2A1 and A3K2A3 induced oxidative stress in the three parasitic forms, especially trypomastigotes, reflected by an increase in oxidant species production and depletion of the endogenous antioxidant system. This oxidative imbalance culminated in damage in essential cell structures of T. cruzi, reflected by lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation. Consequently, A3K2A1 and A3K2A3 induced vital alterations in T. cruzi, leading to parasite death through the three pathways, apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis. PMID:26596953

  12. New scenarios of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Orinoco region of Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Rendón, Lina María; Guhl, Felipe; Cordovez, Juan Manuel; Erazo, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Rhodnius prolixus, a blood-sucking triatomine with domiciliary anthropophilic habits, is the main vector of Chagas disease. The current paradigm of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in Columbia includes a sylvatic and domiciliary cycle co-existing with domestic and sylvatic populations of reservoirs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the population densities and relative abundance of triatomines and mammals that may be involved in the sylvatic cycle of Chagas disease to clarify the epidemiological scenario in an endemic area in the province of Casanare. Insect vectors on Attalea butyracea palms were captured using both manual searches and bait traps. The capture of mammals was performed using Sherman and Tomahawk traps. We report an infestation index of 88.5% in 148 palms and an index of T. cruzi natural infection of 60.2% in 269 dissected insects and 11.9% in 160 captured mammals. High population densities of triatomines were observed in the sylvatic environment and there was a high relative abundance of reservoirs in the area, suggesting a stable enzootic cycle. We found no evidence of insect domiciliation. Taken together, these observations suggest that eco-epidemiological factors shape the transmission dynamics of T. cruzi, creating diverse scenarios of disease transmission. PMID:25830543

  13. Multi-epitope proteins for improved serological detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection and Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Malcolm S; Guderian, Jeffery A; Vallur, Aarthy C; Misquith, Ayesha; Liang, Hong; Mohamath, Raodoh; Luquetti, Alejandro O; Carter, Darrick; Tavares, Suelene N B; Reed, Steven G

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported that tandem repeat (TR) proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi could serve as targets of the antibody response and be useful as diagnostic indicators. To optimize reagents for detecting T. cruzi infection we evaluated individual TR proteins and identified several that were recognized by the majority of Chagas patient's sera collected from individuals form Brazil. We then produced novel, recombinant fusion proteins to combine the reactive TR proteins into a single diagnostic product. Direct comparison of the antibody response of serum samples that were readily detected by the established fusion antigen used in commercial detection of Chagas disease, TcF, revealed strong responses to TcF43 and TcF26 proteins. While the TcF43 and TcF26 antigens enhanced detection and strength of signal, they did not compromise the specificity of detection compared to that obtained with TcF. Finally, it was apparent by testing against a panel of 84 serum samples assembled on the basis of moderate or weak reactivity against TcF (mostly signal:noise <5) that TcF43 and TcF26 could more strongly detected by many of the sera that had low TcF antibody levels. Taken together, these data indicate that TcF43 and TcF26 could be used to enhance the detection of T. cruzi infection as well as supporting a diagnosis of Chagas disease. PMID:26658314

  14. The C-terminal region of Trypanosoma cruzi MASPs is antigenic and secreted via exovesicles.

    PubMed

    De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Díaz Lozano, Isabel María; Jercic, Maria Isabel; Quinzada, Markela; Giménez, Maria José; Calabuig, Eva; Espino, Ana Margarita; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Osuna, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a neglected and emerging tropical disease, endemic to South America and present in non-endemic regions due to human migration. The MASP multigene family is specific to T. cruzi, accounting for 6% of the parasite's genome and plays a key role in immune evasion. A common feature of MASPs is the presence of two conserved regions: an N-terminal region codifying for signal peptide and a C-terminal (C-term) region, which potentially acts as GPI-addition signal peptide. Our aim was the analysis of the presence of an immune response against the MASP C-term region. We found that this region is highly conserved, released via exovesicles (EVs) and has an associated immune response as revealed by epitope affinity mapping, IFA and inhibition of the complement lysis assays. We also demonstrate the presence of a fast IgM response in Balb/c mice infected with T. cruzi. Our results reveal the presence of non-canonical secreted peptides in EVs, which can subsequently be exposed to the immune system with a potential role in evading immune system targets in the parasite. PMID:27270330

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi strain TcI is associated with chronic Chagas disease in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease in the Amazon region is considered an emerging anthropozoonosis with a predominance of the discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI and TcIV. These DTUs are responsible for cases of acute disease associated with oral transmission. Chronic disease cases have been detected through serological surveys. However, the mode of transmission could not be determined, or any association of chronic disease with a specific T. cruzi DTU’s. The aim of this study was to characterize Trypanosoma cruzi in patients with chronic Chagas disease in the State of Amazonas, Brazil. Methods Blood culture and xenodiagnosis were performed in 36 patients with positive serology for Chagas disease who participated in a serological survey performed in urban and rural areas of Manaus, Amazonas. DNA samples were extracted from the feces of triatomines used for xenodiagnosis, and the nontranscribed spacer of the mini-exon gene and the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase subunit II (COII) were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Results Blood culture and xenodiagnosis were negative in 100% of samples; however, molecular techniques revealed that in 13 out of 36 (36%) fecal samples from xenodiagnosis, T. cruzi was characterized as the DTU TcI, and different haplotypes were identified within the same DTU. Conclusion The DTU TcI, which is mainly associated with acute cases of Chagas disease in the Amazon region, is also responsible for chronic infection in patients from a region in the State of Amazonas. PMID:24916362

  16. A human astrocytoma cell line is highly susceptible to infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Zambrano, Juan Camilo; Lasso, Paola; Cuellar, Adriana; Puerta, Concepción Judith; González, John Mario

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes play a vital role in neuronal protection, homeostasis, vascular interchange and the local immune response. Some viruses and parasites can cross the blood-brain barrier and infect glia. Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, can seriously compromise the central nervous system, mainly in immune-suppressed individuals, but also during the acute phase of the infection. In this report, the infective capacity of T. cruzi in a human astrocyte tumour-derived cell line was studied. Astrocytes exposed to trypomastigotes (1:10 ratio) produced intracellular amastigotes and new trypomastigotes emerged by day 4 post-infection (p.i.). At day 6 p.i., 93% of the cells were infected. Using flow cytometry, changes were observed in both the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and II molecules and the chemokine secretion pattern of astrocytes exposed to the parasite. Blocking the low-density lipoprotein receptor on astrocytes did not reduce parasite intracellular infection. Thus, T. cruzi can infect astrocytes and modulate the immune response during central nervous system infection. PMID:23579802

  17. Optical detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in blood samples for diagnosis purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanis, Elvio; Romero, Graciela; Alvarez, Liliana; Martinez, Carlos C.; Basombrio, Miguel A.

    2004-10-01

    An optical method for detection of Trypanosoma Cruzi (T. cruzi) parasites in blood samples of mice infected with Chagas disease is presented. The method is intended for use in human blood, for diagnosis purposes. A thin layer of blood infected by T. cruzi parasites, in small concentrations, is examined in an interferometric microscope in which the images of the vision field are taken by a CCD camera and temporarily stored in the memory of a host computer. The whole sample is scanned displacing the microscope plate by means of step motors driven by the computer. Several consecutive images of the same field are taken and digitally processed by means of image temporal differentiation in order to detect if a parasite is eventually present in the field. Each field of view is processed in the same fashion, until the full area of the sample is covered or until a parasite is detected, in which case an acoustical warning is activated and the corresponding image is displayed permitting the technician to corroborate the result visually. A discussion of the reliability of the method as well as a comparison with other well established techniques are presented.

  18. Elevated IgG antibody to Sarcocystis cruzi associated with eosinophilic myositis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Ely, R W; Fox, J C

    1989-01-01

    Blood sera, skeletal muscle, and cardiac muscle from 24 bovine carcasses condemned for eosinophilic myositis by US Department of Agriculture meat inspection veterinarians were compared with similar specimens from 35 random carcasses passed for human consumption. Fluorescence values determined by using a fluorometric immunoassay system were used to measure the specific antibodies to Sarcocystis cruzi. The values were significantly elevated in carcasses condemned for eosinophilic myositis as compared to carcasses passed for human consumption. The elevated fluorescence values appeared to be more than coincidental, suggesting that S. cruzi may be a causative agent of eosinophilic myositis. Microscopic examination of affected muscle revealed lesions typical of eosinophilic myositis. Lesions were characterized by extensive multifocal areas of myofiber hyaline degeneration, necrosis with sarcoplasmic fragmentation, mineralization of occasional myofibers, and atrophy of fibers with varied stages of fibrosis. Inflammatory cell exudates were predominantly eosinophils, with some macrophages and lymphocytes, and extravasated erythrocytes within, and adjacent to, affected myofibers. Affected muscles contained more S. cruzi than unaffected muscle from passed carcasses. However, a distinct cause and effect relationship could not be determined between the parasite and the presence of eosinophilic myositis. PMID:2518705

  19. The Dialogue of the Host-Parasite Relationship: Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Carlos Gustavo Vieira; Castro Lima, Ana Karina; dos Santos, Rosiane Freire; Da-Silva, Silvia Amaral Gonçalves; Dutra, Patrícia Maria Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular protozoa Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi and the causative agents of Leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, belong to the Trypanosomatidae family. Together, these two neglected tropical diseases affect approximately 25 million people worldwide. Whether the host can control the infection or develops disease depends on the complex interaction between parasite and host. Parasite surface and secreted molecules are involved in triggering specific signaling pathways essential for parasite entry and intracellular survival. The recognition of the parasite antigens by host immune cells generates a specific immune response. Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have a multifaceted repertoire of strategies to evade or subvert the immune system by interfering with a range of signal transduction pathways in host cells, which causes the inhibition of the protective response and contributes to their persistence in the host. The current therapeutic strategies in leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are very limited. Efficacy is variable, toxicity is high, and the emergence of resistance is increasingly common. In this review, we discuss the molecular basis of the host-parasite interaction of Leishmania and Trypanosoma cruzi infection and their mechanisms of subverting the immune response and how this knowledge can be used as a tool for the development of new drugs. PMID:26090399

  20. Evaluation of the in vivo therapeutic properties of (-)-cubebin and (-)-hinokinin against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Esperandim, Viviane Rodrigues; da Silva Ferreira, Daniele; Rezende, Karen Cristina Souza; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Saraiva, Juliana; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; e Silva, Márcio Luis Andrade; de Albuquerque, Sérgio

    2013-04-01

    Even though the Chagas' disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, was described 100years ago by Carlos Chagas, it still represents a major public health concern and is found in 18 developing countries in South and Central America. In Brazil, Benznidazole (Rochagan) is the only drug with trypanocidal activity available in the market, despite its several side effects and limited efficacy in the chronic phase of the infection. In view of the need for new substances displaying biological activity against T. cruzi, there has been growing interest in research toward the attainment of compounds capable of acting on the parasite while being devoid of serious side effects. In this context, this study aims to evaluate the in vivo therapeutic activity of dibenzylbutyrolactone lignans (-)-cubebin and (-)-hinokinin during the acute phase of infection by T. cruzi. As a study criterion, animals with acute parasitemia were investigated by tissue morphometric analysis. There was significant parasitemia reduction in the groups of animals treated with (-)-cubebin or (-)-hinokin oral administration, compared to the negative control. Values close to those of the uninfected control were found in the groups treated with (-)-cubebin and (-)-hinokinin via kariometry, showing that there was positive cellular response compared to the infected control. PMID:23274812

  1. The Trypanosoma cruzi Diamine Transporter Is Essential for Robust Infection of Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasne, Marie-Pierre; Soysa, Radika; Ullman, Buddy

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is incapable of synthesizing putrescine or cadaverine de novo, and, therefore, salvage of polyamines from the host milieu is an obligatory nutritional function for the parasite. A high-affinity diamine transporter (TcPOT1) from T. cruzi has been identified previously that recognizes both putrescine and cadaverine as ligands. In order to assess the functional role of TcPOT1 in intact parasites, a Δtcpot1 null mutant was constructed by targeted gene replacement and characterized. The Δtcpot1 mutant lacked high-affinity putrescine-cadaverine transport capability but retained the capacity to transport diamines via a non-saturable, low-affinity mechanism. Transport of spermidine and arginine was not impacted by the Δtcpot1 lesion. The Δtcpot1 cell line exhibited a significant but not total defect in its ability to subsist in Vero cells, although initial infection rates were not affected by the lesion. These findings reveal that TcPOT1 is the sole high-affinity diamine permease in T. cruzi, that genetic obliteration of TcPOT1 impairs the ability of the parasite to maintain a robust infection in mammalian cells, and that a secondary low-affinity uptake mechanism for this key parasite nutrient is operative but insufficient for optimal infection. PMID:27050410

  2. The revised Trypanosoma cruzi subspecific nomenclature: rationale, epidemiological relevance and research applications.

    PubMed

    Zingales, Bianca; Miles, Michael A; Campbell, David A; Tibayrenc, Michel; Macedo, Andrea M; Teixeira, Marta M G; Schijman, Alejandro G; Llewellyn, Martin S; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Machado, Carlos R; Andrade, Sonia G; Sturm, Nancy R

    2012-03-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, its mammalian reservoirs, and vectors have existed in nature for millions of years. The human infection, named Chagas disease, is a major public health problem for Latin America. T. cruzi is genetically highly diverse and the understanding of the population structure of this parasite is critical because of the links to transmission cycles and disease. At present, T. cruzi is partitioned into six discrete typing units (DTUs), TcI-TcVI. Here we focus on the current status of taxonomy-related areas such as population structure, phylogeographical and eco-epidemiological features, and the correlation of DTU with natural and experimental infection. We also summarize methods for DTU genotyping, available for widespread use in endemic areas. For the immediate future multilocus sequence typing is likely to be the gold standard for population studies. We conclude that greater advances in our knowledge on pathogenic and epidemiological features of these parasites are expected in the coming decade through the comparative analysis of the genomes from isolates of various DTUs. PMID:22226704

  3. Effects of camptothecin derivatives and topoisomerase dual inhibitors on Trypanosoma cruzi growth and ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease that is an endemic disease in Latin America and affects about 8 million people. This parasite belongs to the Trypanosomatidae family which contains a single mitochondrion with an enlarged region, named kinetoplast that harbors the mitochondrial DNA (kDNA). The kinetoplast and the nucleus present a great variety of essential enzymes involved in DNA replication and topology, including DNA topoisomerases. Such enzymes are considered to be promising molecular targets for cancer treatment and for antiparasitic chemotherapy. In this work, the proliferation and ultrastructure of T. cruzi epimastigotes were evaluated after treatment with eukaryotic topoisomerase I inhibitors, such as topotecan and irinotecan, as well as with dual inhibitors (compounds that block eukaryotic topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II activities), such as baicalein, luteolin and evodiamine. Previous studies have shown that such inhibitors were able to block the growth of tumor cells, however most of them have never been tested on trypanosomatids. Results Considering the effects of topoisomerase I inhibitors, our results showed that topotecan decreased cell proliferation and caused unpacking of nuclear heterochromatin, however none of these alterations were observed after treatment with irinotecan. The dual inhibitors baicalein and evodiamine decreased cell growth; however the nuclear and kinetoplast ultrastructures were not affected. Conclusions Taken together, our data showed that camptothecin is more efficient than its derivatives in decreasing T. cruzi proliferation. Furthermore, we conclude that drugs pertaining to a certain class of topoisomerase inhibitors may present different efficiencies as chemotherapeutical agents. PMID:24917086

  4. Domestic dogs and cats as sources of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rural northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    GÜRTLER, R. E.; CECERE, M. C.; LAURICELLA, M. A.; CARDINAL, M. V.; KITRON, U.; COHEN, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The reservoir capacity of domestic cats and dogs for Trypanosoma cruzi infection and the host-feeding patterns of domestic Triatoma infestans were assessed longitudinally in 2 infested rural villages in north-western Argentina. A total of 86 dogs and 38 cats was repeatedly examined for T. cruzi infection by serology and/or xenodiagnosis. The composite prevalence of infection in dogs (60%), but not in cats, increased significantly with age and with the domiciliary density of infected T. infestans. Dogs and cats had similarly high forces of infection, prevalence of infectious hosts (41–42%), and infectiousness to bugs at a wide range of infected bug densities. The infectiousness to bugs of seropositive dogs declined significantly with increasing dog age and was highly aggregated. Individual dog infectiousness to bugs was significantly autocorrelated over time. Domestic T. infestans fed on dogs showed higher infection prevalence (49%) than those fed on cats (39%), humans (38%) or chickens (29%) among 1085 bugs examined. The basic reproduction number of T. cruzi in dogs was at least 8·2. Both cats and dogs are epidemiologically important sources of infection for bugs and householders, dogs nearly 3 times more than cats. PMID:17032467

  5. Screening of Potential anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Candidates: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C; de Castro, Solange Lisboa

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD), caused by the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is a parasitic illness endemic in Latin America. In the centennial after CD discovery by Carlos Chagas (1909), although it still represents an important public health problem in these affected areas, the existing chemotherapy, based on benznidazole and nifurtimox (both introduced more than four decades ago), is far from being considered ideal due to substantial toxicity, variable effect on different parasite stocks and well-known poor activity on the chronic phase. CD is considered one of the major “neglected” diseases of the world, as commercial incentives are very limited to guarantee investments for developing and discovering novel drugs. In this context, our group has been pursuing, over the last years, the efficacy, selectivity, toxicity, cellular targets and mechanisms of action of new potential anti-T. cruzi candidates screened from an in-house compound library of different research groups in the area of medicinal chemistry. A brief review regarding these studies will be discussed, mainly related to the effect on T. cruzi of (i) diamidines and related compounds, (ii) natural naphthoquinone derivatives, and (iii) megazol derivatives. PMID:21629508

  6. Apoptotic CD8 T-lymphocytes disable macrophage-mediated immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Cabral-Piccin, M P; Guillermo, L V C; Vellozo, N S; Filardy, A A; Pereira-Marques, S T; Rigoni, T S; Pereira-Manfro, W F; DosReis, G A; Lopes, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. CD8 T-lymphocytes help to control infection, but apoptosis of CD8 T cells disrupts immunity and efferocytosis can enhance parasite infection within macrophages. Here, we investigate how apoptosis of activated CD8 T cells affects M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes. First, we found that CD8 T-lymphocytes and inflammatory monocytes/macrophages infiltrate peritoneum during acute T. cruzi infection. We show that treatment with anti-Fas ligand (FasL) prevents lymphocyte apoptosis, upregulates type-1 responses to parasite antigens, and reduces infection in macrophages cocultured with activated CD8 T cells. Anti-FasL skews mixed M1/M2 macrophage profiles into polarized M1 phenotype, both in vitro and following injection in infected mice. Moreover, inhibition of T-cell apoptosis induces a broad reprogramming of cytokine responses and improves macrophage-mediated immunity to T. cruzi. The results indicate that disposal of apoptotic CD8 T cells increases M2-macrophage differentiation and contributes to parasite persistence. PMID:27195678

  7. Kinetic and molecular characterization of the pyruvate phosphate dikinase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    González-Marcano, Eglys; Acosta, Héctor; Mijares, Alfredo; Concepción, Juan Luis

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, like other trypanosomatids analyzed so far, can use both glucose and amino acids as carbon and energy source. In these parasites, glycolysis is compartmentalized in glycosomes, authentic but specialized peroxisomes. The major part of this pathway, as well as a two-branched glycolytic auxiliary system, are present in these organelles. The first enzyme of one branch of this auxiliary system is the PPi-dependent pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) that converts phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) and AMP into pyruvate, inorganic phosphate (Pi) and ATP, thus contributing to the ATP/ADP balance within the glycosomes. In this work we cloned, expressed and purified the T. cruzi PPDK. It kinetic parameters were determined, finding KM values for PEP, PPi and AMP of 320, 70 and 17 μM, respectively. Using molecular exclusion chromatography, two native forms of the enzyme were found with estimated molecular weights of 200 and 100 kDa, corresponding to a homodimer and monomer, respectively. It was established that T. cruzi PPDK's specific activity can be enhanced up to 2.6 times by the presence of ammonium in the assay mixture. During growth of epimastigotes in batch culture an apparent decrease in the specific activity of PPDK was observed. However, when its activity is normalized for the presence of ammonium in the medium, no significant modification of the enzyme activity per cell in time was found. PMID:27003459

  8. New scenarios of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Orinoco region of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rendón, Lina María; Guhl, Felipe; Cordovez, Juan Manuel; Erazo, Diana

    2015-05-01

    Rhodnius prolixus, a blood-sucking triatomine with domiciliary anthropophilic habits, is the main vector of Chagas disease. The current paradigm of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in Columbia includes a sylvatic and domiciliary cycle co-existing with domestic and sylvatic populations of reservoirs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the population densities and relative abundance of triatomines and mammals that may be involved in the sylvatic cycle of Chagas disease to clarify the epidemiological scenario in an endemic area in the province of Casanare. Insect vectors on Attalea butyracea palms were captured using both manual searches and bait traps. The capture of mammals was performed using Sherman and Tomahawk traps. We report an infestation index of 88.5% in 148 palms and an index of T. cruzi natural infection of 60.2% in 269 dissected insects and 11.9% in 160 captured mammals. High population densities of triatomines were observed in the sylvatic environment and there was a high relative abundance of reservoirs in the area, suggesting a stable enzootic cycle. We found no evidence of insect domiciliation. Taken together, these observations suggest that eco-epidemiological factors shape the transmission dynamics of T. cruzi, creating diverse scenarios of disease transmission. PMID:25830543

  9. Apoptotic CD8 T-lymphocytes disable macrophage-mediated immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Piccin, M P; Guillermo, L V C; Vellozo, N S; Filardy, A A; Pereira-Marques, S T; Rigoni, T S; Pereira-Manfro, W F; DosReis, G A; Lopes, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. CD8 T-lymphocytes help to control infection, but apoptosis of CD8 T cells disrupts immunity and efferocytosis can enhance parasite infection within macrophages. Here, we investigate how apoptosis of activated CD8 T cells affects M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes. First, we found that CD8 T-lymphocytes and inflammatory monocytes/macrophages infiltrate peritoneum during acute T. cruzi infection. We show that treatment with anti-Fas ligand (FasL) prevents lymphocyte apoptosis, upregulates type-1 responses to parasite antigens, and reduces infection in macrophages cocultured with activated CD8 T cells. Anti-FasL skews mixed M1/M2 macrophage profiles into polarized M1 phenotype, both in vitro and following injection in infected mice. Moreover, inhibition of T-cell apoptosis induces a broad reprogramming of cytokine responses and improves macrophage-mediated immunity to T. cruzi. The results indicate that disposal of apoptotic CD8 T cells increases M2-macrophage differentiation and contributes to parasite persistence. PMID:27195678

  10. Structural Insights into Inhibition of Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase in the Human Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Anderson, Spencer; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Furtak, Vyacheslav; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R.

    2010-09-02

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), which threatens the lives of millions of people and remains incurable in its chronic stage. The antifungal drug posaconazole that blocks sterol biosynthesis in the parasite is the only compound entering clinical trials for the chronic form of this infection. Crystal structures of the drug target enzyme, Trypanosoma cruzi sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), complexed with posaconazole, another antifungal agent fluconazole and an experimental inhibitor, (R)-4{prime}-chloro-N-(1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imid-azol-1-yl)ethyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (VNF), allow prediction of important chemical features that enhance the drug potencies. Combined with comparative analysis of inhibitor binding parameters, influence on the catalytic activity of the trypanosomal enzyme and its human counterpart, and their cellular effects at different stages of the Trypanosoma cruzi life cycle, the structural data provide a molecular background to CYP51 inhibition and azole resistance and enlighten the path for directed design of new, more potent and selective drugs to develop an efficient treatment for Chagas disease.

  11. Swimming against the current: genetic vaccination against Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Mauricio M; de Alencar, Bruna C; Claser, Carla; Tzelepis, Fanny; Silveira, Eduardo L; Haolla, Filipe A; Dominguez, Mariana R; Vasconcelos, José Ronnie

    2009-07-01

    Vaccines have had an unquestionable impact on public health during the last century. The most likely reason for the success of vaccines is the robust protective properties of specific antibodies. However, antibodies exert a strong selective pressure and many microorganisms, such as the obligatory intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, have been selected to survive in their presence. Although the host develops a strong immune response to T. cruzi, they do not clear the infection and instead progress to the chronic phase of the disease. Parasite persistence during the chronic phase of infection is now considered the main factor contributing to the chronic symptoms of the disease. Based on this finding, containment of parasite growth and survival may be one method to avoid the immunopathology of the chronic phase. In this context, vaccinologists have looked over the past 20 years for other immune effector mechanisms that could eliminate these antibody-resistant pathogens. We and others have tested the hypothesis that non-antibody-mediated cellular immune responses (CD4+ Th1 and CD8+ Tc1 cells) to specific parasite antigens/genes expressed by T. cruzi could indeed be used for the purpose of vaccination. This hypothesis was confirmed in different mouse models, indicating a possible path for vaccine development. PMID:19753486

  12. Domestic Pig (Sus scrofa) as an Animal Model for Experimental Trypanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    Yauri, Verónica; Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E; Verastegui, Manuela; Angulo, Noelia; Recuenco, Fernando; Cabello, Ines; Malaga, Edith; Bern, Caryn; Gavidia, Cesar M; Gilman, Robert H

    2016-05-01

    Pigs were infected with a Bolivian strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (genotype I) and evaluated up to 150 days postinoculation (dpi) to determine the use of pigs as an animal model of Chagas disease. Parasitemia was observed in the infected pigs during the acute phase (15-40 dpi). Anti-T. cruzi immunoglobulin M was detected during 15-75 dpi; high levels of anti-T. cruzi immunoglobulin G were detected in all infected pigs from 75 to 150 dpi. Parasitic DNA was observed by western blot (58%, 28/48) and polymerase chain reaction (27%, 13/48) in urine samples, and in the brain (75%, 3/4), spleen (50%, 2/4), and duodenum (25%, 1/4), but no parasitic DNA was found in the heart, colon, and kidney. Parasites were not observed microscopically in tissues samples, but mild inflammation, vasculitis, and congestion was observed in heart, brain, kidney, and spleen. This pig model was useful for the standardization of the urine test because of the higher volume that can be obtained as compared with other small animal models. However, further experiments are required to observe pathological changes characteristic of Chagas disease in humans. PMID:26928841

  13. Eco-epidemiological aspects of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli and their vector (Rhodnius pallescens) in Panama.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Ana Maria de; Samudio, Franklyn E; Saldaña, Azael; Paz, Hector M; Calzada, José E

    2004-01-01

    The eco-epidemiology of T. cruzi infection was investigated in the Eastern border of the Panama Canal in Central Panama. Between 1999 and 2000, 1110 triatomines were collected: 1050 triatomines (94.6%) from palm trees, 27 (2.4%) from periurban habitats and 33 (3.0%) inside houses. All specimens were identified as R. pallescens. There was no evidence of vector domiciliation. Salivary glands from 380 R. pallescens revealed a trypanosome natural infection rate of 7.6%, while rectal ampoule content from 373 triatomines was 45%. Isoenzyme profiles on isolated trypanosomes demonstrated that 85.4% (n = 88) were T. cruzi and 14.6% (n = 15) were T. rangeli. Blood meal analysis from 829 R. pallescens demonstrated a zoophilic vector behavior, with opossums as the preferential blood source. Seroprevalence in human samples from both study sites was less than 2%. Our results demonstrate that T. cruzi survives in the area in balanced association with R. pallescens, and with several different species of mammals in their natural niches. However, the area is an imminent risk of infection for its population, consequently it is important to implement a community educational program regarding disease knowledge and control measures. PMID:15361974

  14. Hysteresis and positive cooperativity as possible regulatory mechanisms of Trypanosoma cruzi hexokinase activity.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Héctor; Cáceres, Ana; González-Marcano, Eglys; Quiñones, Wilfredo; Avilán, Luisana; Dubourdieu, Michel; Concepción, Juan Luis

    2014-12-01

    In Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas disease, the first six or seven steps of glycolysis are compartmentalized in glycosomes, which are authentic but specialized peroxisomes. Hexokinase (HK), the first enzyme in the glycolytic pathway, has been an important research object, particularly as a potential drug target. Here we present the results of a specific kinetics study of the native HK from T. cruzi epimastigotes; a sigmoidal behavior was apparent when the velocity of the reaction was determined as a function of the concentration of its substrates, glucose and ATP. This behavior was only observed at low enzyme concentration, while at high concentration classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics was displayed. The progress curve of the enzyme's activity displays a lag phase of which the length is dependent on the protein concentration, suggesting that HK is a hysteretic enzyme. The hysteretic behavior may be attributed to slow changes in the conformation of T. cruzi HK as a response to variations of glucose and ATP concentrations in the glycosomal matrix. Variations in HK's substrate concentrations within the glycosomes may be due to variations in the trypanosome's environment. The hysteretic and cooperative behavior of the enzyme may be a form of regulation by which the parasite can more readily adapt to these environmental changes, occurring within each of its hosts, or during the early phase of transition to a new host. PMID:25683029

  15. A Key Role for Old Yellow Enzyme in the Metabolism of Drugs by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Kabututu, Zakayi; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Munday, Craig J.; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; Lazarus, Michael; Maruyama, Toshihiko; Martin, Samuel K.; Duszenko, Michael; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2002-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. So far, first choice anti-chagasic drugs in use have been shown to have undesirable side effects in addition to the emergence of parasite resistance and the lack of prospect for vaccine against T. cruzi infection. Thus, the isolation and characterization of molecules essential in parasite metabolism of the anti-chagasic drugs are fundamental for the development of new strategies for rational drug design and/or the improvement of the current chemotherapy. While searching for a prostaglandin (PG) F2α synthase homologue, we have identified a novel “old yellow enzyme” from T. cruzi (TcOYE), cloned its cDNA, and overexpressed the recombinant enzyme. Here, we show that TcOYE reduced 9,11-endoperoxide PGH2 to PGF2α as well as a variety of trypanocidal drugs. By electron spin resonance experiments, we found that TcOYE specifically catalyzed one-electron reduction of menadione and β-lapachone to semiquinone-free radicals with concomitant generation of superoxide radical anions, while catalyzing solely the two-electron reduction of nifurtimox and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide drugs without free radical production. Interestingly, immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that anti-TcOYE polyclonal antibody abolished major reductase activities of the lysates toward these drugs, identifying TcOYE as a key drug-metabolizing enzyme by which quinone drugs have their mechanism of action. PMID:12417633

  16. The C-terminal region of Trypanosoma cruzi MASPs is antigenic and secreted via exovesicles

    PubMed Central

    De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Díaz Lozano, Isabel María; Jercic, Maria Isabel; Quinzada, Markela; Giménez, Maria José; Calabuig, Eva; Espino, Ana Margarita; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Osuna, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a neglected and emerging tropical disease, endemic to South America and present in non-endemic regions due to human migration. The MASP multigene family is specific to T. cruzi, accounting for 6% of the parasite’s genome and plays a key role in immune evasion. A common feature of MASPs is the presence of two conserved regions: an N-terminal region codifying for signal peptide and a C-terminal (C-term) region, which potentially acts as GPI-addition signal peptide. Our aim was the analysis of the presence of an immune response against the MASP C-term region. We found that this region is highly conserved, released via exovesicles (EVs) and has an associated immune response as revealed by epitope affinity mapping, IFA and inhibition of the complement lysis assays. We also demonstrate the presence of a fast IgM response in Balb/c mice infected with T. cruzi. Our results reveal the presence of non-canonical secreted peptides in EVs, which can subsequently be exposed to the immune system with a potential role in evading immune system targets in the parasite. PMID:27270330

  17. The Trypanosoma cruzi genome; conserved core genes and extremely variable surface molecule families.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Björn

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is an important but neglected pathogen that causes chagas disease, which affects millions of people, mainly in latin America. The population structure and epidemiology of the parasite are complex, with much variability among strains. The genome sequence of a reference strain, CL Brener, was published in 2005, and the availability of this sequence has both revealed the complexity of the parasite genome and greatly facilitated research into parasite biology and pathogenesis, by making the sequences of more than 8000 core genes available. The T. cruzi genome is highly repetitive, which has resulted in inaccuracies in the genome sequence, and attempts have been made to provide a deeper analysis of repeated genes as a complement to the genome sequence. The genome was found to be organized in stable core regions containing housekeeping and other genes, surrounded by highly repetitive, often sub-telomeric highly variable regions containing multiple members of large families of surface molecule genes. Comparative sequencing of T. cruzi strains has been initiated and the results show that the core gene content of the parasite is highly conserved, but that much sequence variability, 3-4% difference at the DNA level on average between strains in coding regions, is present. The additional genomes will improve the understanding of parasite biology and epidemiology. PMID:21624458

  18. The population genetics of Trypanosoma cruzi revisited in the light of the predominant clonal evolution model.

    PubMed

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-11-01

    Comparing the population structure of Trypanosoma cruzi with that of other pathogens, including parasitic protozoa, fungi, bacteria and viruses, shows that the agent of Chagas disease shares typical traits with many other species, related to a predominant clonal evolution (PCE) pattern: statistically significant linkage disequilibrium, overrepresented multilocus genotypes, near-clades (genetic subdivisions somewhat blurred by occasional genetic exchange/hybridization) and "Russian doll" patterns (PCE is observed, not only at the level of the whole species, but also, within the near-clades). Moreover, T. cruzi population structure exhibits linkage with the diversity of several strongly selected genes, with gene expression profiles, and with some major phenotypic traits. We discuss the evolutionary significance of these results, and their implications in terms of applied research (molecular epidemiology/strain typing, analysis of genes of interest, vaccine and drug design, immunological diagnosis) and of experimental evolution. Lastly, we revisit the long-term debate of describing new species within the T. cruzi taxon. PMID:26188332

  19. Decoding the Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Action of HIV Peptidase Inhibitors Using Epimastigotes as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Sangenito, Leandro S.; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; d′Avila-Levy, Claudia M.; Branquinha, Marta H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspartic peptidase inhibitors have shown antimicrobial action against distinct microorganisms. Due to an increase in the occurrence of Chagas' disease/AIDS co-infection, we decided to explore the effects of HIV aspartic peptidase inhibitors (HIV-PIs) on Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. Methodology and Principal Findings HIV-PIs presented an anti-proliferative action on epimastigotes of T. cruzi clone Dm28c, with IC50 values ranging from 0.6 to 14 µM. The most effective inhibitors, ritonavir, lopinavir and nelfinavir, also had an anti-proliferative effect against different phylogenetic T. cruzi strains. The HIV-PIs induced some morphological alterations in clone Dm28c epimastigotes, as reduced cell size and swollen of the cellular body. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the flagellar membrane, mitochondrion and reservosomes are the main targets of HIV-PIs in T. cruzi epimastigotes. Curiously, an increase in the epimastigote-into-trypomastigote differentiation process of clone Dm28c was observed, with many of these parasites presenting morphological alterations including the detachment of flagellum from the cell body. The pre-treatment with the most effective HIV-PIs drastically reduced the interaction process between epimastigotes and the invertebrate vector Rhodnius prolixus. It was also noted that HIV-PIs induced an increase in the expression of gp63-like and calpain-related molecules, and decreased the cruzipain expression in epimastigotes as judged by flow cytometry and immunoblotting assays. The hydrolysis of a cathepsin D fluorogenic substrate was inhibited by all HIV-PIs in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the aspartic peptidase could be a possible target to these drugs. Additionally, we verified that ritonavir, lopinavir and nelfinavir reduced drastically the viability of clone Dm28c trypomastigotes, causing many morphological damages. Conclusions and Significance The results contribute to understand

  20. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi's Discrete Typing Units in a cohort of Latin American migrants in Spain.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Perez, Angela; Poveda, Cristina; Ramírez, Juan David; Norman, Francesca; Gironés, Núria; Guhl, Felipe; Monge-Maillo, Begoña; Fresno, Manuel; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. This is an endemic disease in the Americas, but increased migration to Europe has made it emerge in countries where it was previously unknown, being Spain the second non endemic country in number of patients. T. cruzi is a parasite with a wide genetic diversity, which has been grouped by consensus into 6 Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) affecting humans. Some authors have linked these DTUs either to a specific epidemiological context or to the different clinical presentations. Our main objective was to describe the T. cruzi DTUs identified from a population of chronically infected Latin American migrants attending a reference clinic in Madrid. 149 patients meeting this condition were selected for the study. Molecular characterization was performed by an algorithm that combines PCR of the intergenic region of the mini exon-gene, the 24Sα and 18S regions of rDNA and the variable region of the satellite DNA. A descriptive analysis was performed and associations between geographical/clinical data and the different DTUs were tested. DTUs could be determined in 105 out of 149 patients, 93.3% were from Bolivia, 67.7% were women and median age was 35 years (IQR 29-44). The most common DTU found was TcV (58; 55.2%), followed by TcIV (17; 16.2%), TcII (10; 9.5%) and TcI (4; 3.8%). TcIII and TcVI were not identified from any patient, and 15.2% patients presented mixed infections. In addition, we determined DTUs after treatment in a subset of patients. In 57% patients had different DTUs before and after treatment. DTUs distribution from this study indicates active transmission of T. cruzi is occurring in Bolivia, in both domestic and sylvatic cycles. TcIV was confirmed as a cause of chronic human disease. The current results indicate no correlation between DTU and any specific clinical presentation associated with Chagas disease, nor with geographical origin. Treatment with benznidazole does not always clear T. cruzi

  1. Chagas Cardiomyopathy Manifestations and Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes Circulating in Chronic Chagasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Juan David; Guhl, Felipe; Rendón, Lina María; Rosas, Fernando; Marin-Neto, Jose A.; Morillo, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is a complex disease that is endemic and an important problem in public health in Latin America. The T. cruzi parasite is classified into six discrete taxonomic units (DTUs) based on the recently proposed nomenclature (TcI, TcII, TcIII, TcIV, TcV and TcVI). The discovery of genetic variability within TcI showed the presence of five genotypes (Ia, Ib, Ic, Id and Ie) related to the transmission cycle of Chagas disease. In Colombia, TcI is more prevalent but TcII has also been reported, as has mixed infection by both TcI and TcII in the same Chagasic patient. The objectives of this study were to determine the T. cruzi DTUs that are circulating in Colombian chronic Chagasic patients and to obtain more information about the molecular epidemiology of Chagas disease in Colombia. We also assessed the presence of electrocardiographic, radiologic and echocardiographic abnormalities with the purpose of correlating T. cruzi genetic variability and cardiac disease. Molecular characterization was performed in Colombian adult chronic Chagasic patients based on the intergenic region of the mini-exon gene, the 24Sα and 18S regions of rDNA and the variable region of satellite DNA, whereby the presence of T.cruzi I, II, III and IV was detected. In our population, mixed infections also occurred, with TcI-TcII, TcI-TcIII and TcI-TcIV, as well as the existence of the TcI genotypes showing the presence of genotypes Ia and Id. Patients infected with TcI demonstrated a higher prevalence of cardiac alterations than those infected with TcII. These results corroborate the predominance of TcI in Colombia and show the first report of TcIII and TcIV in Colombian Chagasic patients. Findings also indicate that Chagas cardiomyopathy manifestations are more correlated with TcI than with TcII in Colombia. PMID:21152056

  2. Trypanocide treatment of women infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and its effect on preventing congenital Chagas.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Diana L; Danesi, Emmaria; Olivera, Veronica; Codebó, Maria Olenka; Denner, Susana; Heredia, Cecilia; Streiger, Mirtha; Sosa-Estani, Sergio

    2014-11-01

    With the control of the vectorial and transfusional routes of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, congenital transmission has become an important source of new cases. This study evaluated the efficacy of trypanocidal therapy to prevent congenital Chagas disease and compared the clinical and serological evolution between treated and untreated infected mothers. We conducted a multicenter, observational study on a cohort of mothers infected with T. cruzi, with and without trypanocidal treatment before pregnancy. Their children were studied to detect congenital infection. Among 354 "chronically infected mother-biological child" pairs, 132 were treated women and 222 were untreated women. Among the children born to untreated women, we detected 34 infected with T. cruzi (15.3%), whose only antecedent was maternal infection. Among the 132 children of previously treated women, no infection with T. cruzi was found (0.0%) (p<0.05). Among 117 mothers with clinical and serological follow up, 71 had been treated and 46 were untreated. The women were grouped into three groups. Group A: 25 treated before 15 years of age; Group B: 46 treated at 15 or more years of age; Group C: untreated, average age of 29.2 ± 6.2 years at study entry. Follow-up for Groups A, B and C was 16.3 ± 5.8, 17.5 ± 9.2 and 18.6 ± 8.6 years respectively. Negative seroconversion: Group A, 64.0% (16/25); Group B, 32.6% (15/46); Group C, no seronegativity was observed. Clinical electrocardiographic alterations compatible with chagasic cardiomyopathy: Group A 0.0% (0/25); B 2.2% (1/46) and C 15.2% (7/46). The trypanocidal treatment of women with chronic Chagas infection was effective in preventing the congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to their children; it had also a protective effect on the women's clinical evolution and deparasitation could be demonstrated in many treated women after over 10 years of follow up. PMID:25411847

  3. Trypanocide Treatment of Women Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and Its Effect on Preventing Congenital Chagas

    PubMed Central

    Fabbro, Diana L.; Danesi, Emmaria; Olivera, Veronica; Codebó, Maria Olenka; Denner, Susana; Heredia, Cecilia; Streiger, Mirtha; Sosa-Estani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    With the control of the vectorial and transfusional routes of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, congenital transmission has become an important source of new cases. This study evaluated the efficacy of trypanocidal therapy to prevent congenital Chagas disease and compared the clinical and serological evolution between treated and untreated infected mothers. We conducted a multicenter, observational study on a cohort of mothers infected with T. cruzi, with and without trypanocidal treatment before pregnancy. Their children were studied to detect congenital infection. Among 354 “chronically infected mother-biological child” pairs, 132 were treated women and 222 were untreated women. Among the children born to untreated women, we detected 34 infected with T. cruzi (15.3%), whose only antecedent was maternal infection. Among the 132 children of previously treated women, no infection with T. cruzi was found (0.0%) (p<0.05). Among 117 mothers with clinical and serological follow up, 71 had been treated and 46 were untreated. The women were grouped into three groups. Group A: 25 treated before 15 years of age; Group B: 46 treated at 15 or more years of age; Group C: untreated, average age of 29.2±6.2 years at study entry. Follow-up for Groups A, B and C was 16.3±5.8, 17.5±9.2 and 18.6±8.6 years respectively. Negative seroconversion: Group A, 64.0% (16/25); Group B, 32.6% (15/46); Group C, no seronegativity was observed. Clinical electrocardiographic alterations compatible with chagasic cardiomyopathy: Group A 0.0% (0/25); B 2.2% (1/46) and C 15.2% (7/46). The trypanocidal treatment of women with chronic Chagas infection was effective in preventing the congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to their children; it had also a protective effect on the women's clinical evolution and deparasitation could be demonstrated in many treated women after over 10 years of follow up. PMID:25411847

  4. Bats, Trypanosomes, and Triatomines in Ecuador: New Insights into the Diversity, Transmission, and Origins of Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, C Miguel; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Tapia, Elicio E; Lobos, Simón E; Zurita, Alejandra P; Aguirre-Villacís, Fernanda; MacDonald, Amber; Villacís, Anita G; Lima, Luciana; Teixeira, Marta M G; Grijalva, Mario J; Perkins, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    The generalist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has two phylogenetic lineages associated almost exclusively with bats-Trypanosoma cruzi Tcbat and the subspecies T. c. marinkellei. We present new information on the genetic variation, geographic distribution, host associations, and potential vectors of these lineages. We conducted field surveys of bats and triatomines in southern Ecuador, a country endemic for Chagas disease, and screened for trypanosomes by microscopy and PCR. We identified parasites at species and genotype levels through phylogenetic approaches based on 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and conducted a comparison of nucleotide diversity of the cytb gene. We document for the first time T. cruzi Tcbat and T. c. marinkellei in Ecuador, expanding their distribution in South America to the western side of the Andes. In addition, we found the triatomines Cavernicola pilosa and Triatoma dispar sharing shelters with bats. The comparisons of nucleotide diversity revealed a higher diversity for T. c. marinkellei than any of the T. c. cruzi genotypes associated with Chagas disease. Findings from this study increased both the number of host species and known geographical ranges of both parasites and suggest potential vectors for these two trypanosomes associated with bats in rural areas of southern Ecuador. The higher nucleotide diversity of T. c. marinkellei supports a long evolutionary relationship between T. cruzi and bats, implying that bats are the original hosts of this important parasite. PMID:26465748

  5. Experimental transmission of the parasitic flagellates Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli between triatomine bugs or mice and captive neotropical bats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Maurice E; Rasweiler Iv, John J; D'Alessandro, Antonio

    2007-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli-like trypanosomes have been found in a variety of neotropical bat species. In this study, bats (Artibeus lituratus, Carollia perspicillata, Desmodus rotundus, Glossophaga soricina, Molossus molossus, Phyllostomus hastatus) were maintained under controlled conditions, and experiments were conducted to determine how they might become infected naturally with trypanosomes. All bats were first screened for existing infections by hemoculture and the examination of blood smears, and only apparently uninfected animals were then used in the experiments. Proof was obtained that the triatomine bug Rhodnius prolixus would readily feed upon some of the bats, and two species became infected after being bitten by bugs infected with T. rangeli. Some bats also became infected by ingesting R. prolixus carrying T. cruzi, or following subcutaneous or intragastic inoculation with fecal suspensions of R. prolixus containing T. cruzi. P. hastatus became infected after ingesting mice carrying T. cruzi. All of the bats studied inhabit roosts that may be occupied by triatomine bugs and, with the exception of D. rotundus, all also feed to at least some extent upon insects. These findings provide further evidence of how bats may play significant roles in the epidemiology of T. cruzi and T. rangeli in the New World tropics. PMID:17710299

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi-induced host immune system dysfunction: a rationale for parasite immunosuppressive factor(s) encoding gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    An intense suppression of T cell proliferation to mitogens and to antigens is observed in a large number of parasitic infections. The impairment of T cell proliferation also occurred during the acute phase of Chagas' disease, caused by the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. A wealth of evidence has accumulated that illustrates the ability of T. cruzi released molecules to influence directly a variety of diverse immunological functions. In this paper, we review the data concerning the immunoregulatory effects of T. cruzi Tc24 (a B cell activator antigen) and Tc52 (an immunosuppressive protein) released molecules on the host immune system. The gene targeting approach developed to further explore the biological function(s) of Tc52 molecule, revealed interesting unexpected functional properties. Indeed, in addition to its immunusuppressive activity a direct or indirect involvement of Tc52 gene product alone or in combination with other cellular components in T. cruzi differentiation control mechanisms have been evidenced. Moreover, targeted Tc52 replacement allowed the obtention of parasite mutants exhibiting low virulence in vitro and in vivo. Thus, the generation of a complete deficiency state of virulence factors by gene targeting should provide a means to assess the importance of these factors in the pathophysiological processes and disease progression. It is hoped that such approaches might allow rational design of tools to control T. cruzi infections. PMID:12488621

  7. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as Potential Chemotherapeutic Target in Mammal-Dwelling Stages of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Linda J.; Brand, Stephen; Santos, Andres; Nohara, Lilian L.; Harrison, Justin; Norcross, Neil R.; Thompson, Stephen; Smith, Victoria; Lema, Carolina; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Gilbert, Ian H.; Almeida, Igor C.; Maldonado, Rosa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, an endemic and debilitating illness in Latin America. Lately, owing to extensive population movements, this neglected tropical disease has become a global health concern. The two clinically available drugs for the chemotherapy of Chagas disease have rather high toxicity and limited efficacy in the chronic phase of the disease, and may induce parasite resistance. The development of new anti-T. cruzi agents is therefore imperative. The enzyme N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) has recently been biochemically characterized, shown to be essential in Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei, and T. cruzi¸ and proposed as promising chemotherapeutic target in these trypanosomatids. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, using high-content imaging we assayed eight known trypanosomatid NMT inhibitors, against mammal-dwelling intracellular amastigote and trypomastigote stages and demonstrated that three of them (compounds 1, 5, and 8) have potent anti-proliferative effect at submicromolar concentrations against T. cruzi, with very low toxicity against human epithelial cells. Moreover, metabolic labeling using myristic acid, azide showed a considerable decrease in the myristoylation of proteins in parasites treated with NMT inhibitors, providing evidence of the on-target activity of the inhibitors. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our data point out to the potential use of NMT inhibitors as anti-T. cruzi chemotherapy. PMID:27128971

  8. Reaching for the Holy Grail: insights from infection/cure models on the prospects for vaccines for Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Juan; Tarleton, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mammals likely depends on either prevention of the invading trypomastigotes from infecting host cells or the rapid recognition and killing of the newly infected cells by T. cruzi-specific T cells. We show here that multiple rounds of infection and cure (by drug therapy) fails to protect mice from reinfection, despite the generation of potent T cell responses. This disappointing result is similar to that obtained with many other vaccine protocols used in attempts to protect animals from T. cruzi infection. We have previously shown that immune recognition of T. cruzi infection is significantly delayed both at the systemic level and at the level of the infected host cell. The systemic delay appears to be the result of a stealth infection process that fails to trigger substantial innate recognition mechanisms while the delay at the cellular level is related to the immunodominance of highly variable gene family proteins, in particular those of the trans-sialidase family. Here we discuss how these previous studies and the new findings herein impact our thoughts on the potential of prophylactic vaccination to serve a productive role in the prevention of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease. PMID:25946159

  9. Host microtubule plus-end binding protein CLASP1 influences sequential steps in the Trypanosoma cruzi infection process

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Kumar, Praveen; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Caradonna, Kacey L.; Galjart, Niels; Teygong, Crystal; Blader, Ira; Wittmann, Torsten; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian cell invasion by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi involves host cell microtubule dynamics. Microtubules support kinesin-dependent anterograde trafficking of host lysosomes to the cell periphery where targeted lysosome exocytosis elicits remodeling of the plasma membrane and parasite invasion. Here, a novel role for microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) in the coordination of T. cruzi trypomastigote internalization and post-entry events is reported. Acute silencing of CLASP1, a +TIP that participates in microtubule stabilization at the cell periphery, impairs trypomastigote internalization without diminishing the capacity for calcium-regulated lysosome exocytosis. Subsequent fusion of the T. cruzi vacuole with host lysosomes and its juxtanuclear positioning are also delayed in CLASP1-depleted cells. These post-entry phenotypes correlate with a generalized impairment of minus-end directed transport of lysosomes in CLASP1 knockdown cells and mimic the effects of dynactin disruption. Consistent with GSK3β acting as a negative regulator of CLASP function, inhibition of GSK3β activity enhances T. cruzi entry in a CLASP1-dependent manner and expression of constitutively active GSK3β dampens infection. This study provides novel molecular insights into the T. cruzi infection process, emphasizing functional links between parasite-elicited signaling, host microtubule plus-end tracking proteins and dynein-based retrograde transport. Highlighted in this work is a previously unrecognized role for CLASPs in dynamic lysosome positioning, an important aspect of the nutrient sensing response in mammalian cells. PMID:23107073

  10. Host microtubule plus-end binding protein CLASP1 influences sequential steps in the Trypanosoma cruzi infection process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Kumar, Praveen; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Caradonna, Kacey L; Galjart, Niels; Teygong, Crystal; Blader, Ira; Wittmann, Torsten; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2013-04-01

    Mammalian cell invasion by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi involves host cell microtubule dynamics. Microtubules support kinesin-dependent anterograde trafficking of host lysosomes to the cell periphery where targeted lysosome exocytosis elicits remodelling of the plasma membrane and parasite invasion. Here, a novel role for microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) in the co-ordination of T. cruzi trypomastigote internalization and post-entry events is reported. Acute silencing of CLASP1, a +TIP that participates in microtubule stabilization at the cell periphery, impairs trypomastigote internalization without diminishing the capacity for calcium-regulated lysosome exocytosis. Subsequent fusion of the T. cruzi vacuole with host lysosomes and its juxtanuclear positioning are also delayed in CLASP1-depleted cells. These post-entry phenotypes correlate with a generalized impairment of minus-end directed transport of lysosomes in CLASP1 knock-down cells and mimic the effects of dynactin disruption. Consistent with GSK3β acting as a negative regulator of CLASP function, inhibition of GSK3β activity enhances T. cruzi entry in a CLASP1-dependent manner and expression of constitutively active GSK3β dampens infection. This study provides novel molecular insights into the T. cruzi infection process, emphasizing functional links between parasite-elicited signalling, host microtubule plus-end tracking proteins and dynein-based retrograde transport. Highlighted in this work is a previously unrecognized role for CLASPs in dynamic lysosome positioning, an important aspect of the nutrient sensing response in mammalian cells. PMID:23107073

  11. Microcavia australis (Caviidae, Rodentia), a new highly competent host of Trypanosoma cruzi I in rural communities of northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cecere, M Carla; Cardinal, Marta V; Arrabal, Juan P; Moreno, Claudio; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2015-02-01

    Rodents are well-known hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi but little is known on the role of some caviomorph rodents. We assessed the occurrence and prevalence of T. cruzi infection in Microcavia australis ("southern mountain, desert or small cavy") and its infectiousness to the vector Triatoma infestans in four rural communities of Tafí del Valle department, northwestern Argentina. Parasite detection was performed by xenodiagnosis and polymerase chain reaction amplification of the hyper-variable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi (kDNA-PCR) from blood samples. A total of 51 cavies was captured in traps set up along cavy paths in peridomestic dry-shrub fences located between 25 and 85 m from the nearest domicile. We document the first record of M. australis naturally infected by T. cruzi. Cavies presented a very high prevalence of infection (46.3%; 95% confidence interval, CI=33.0-59.6%). Only one (4%) of 23 cavies negative by xenodiagnosis was found infected by kDNA-PCR. TcI was the only discrete typing unit identified in 12 cavies with a positive xenodiagnosis. The infectiousness to T. infestans of cavies positive by xenodiagnosis or kDNA-PCR was very high (mean, 55.8%; CI=48.4-63.1%) and exceeded 80% in 44% of the hosts. Cavies are highly-competent hosts of T. cruzi in peridomestic habitats near human dwellings in rural communities of Tucumán province in northwestern Argentina. PMID:25447830

  12. Reaching for the Holy Grail: insights from infection/cure models on the prospects for vaccines for Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Juan; Tarleton, Rick

    2015-05-01

    Prevention of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mammals likely depends on either prevention of the invading trypomastigotes from infecting host cells or the rapid recognition and killing of the newly infected cells by T. cruzi-specific T cells. We show here that multiple rounds of infection and cure (by drug therapy) fails to protect mice from reinfection, despite the generation of potent T cell responses. This disappointing result is similar to that obtained with many other vaccine protocols used in attempts to protect animals from T. cruzi infection. We have previously shown that immune recognition of T. cruzi infection is significantly delayed both at the systemic level and at the level of the infected host cell. The systemic delay appears to be the result of a stealth infection process that fails to trigger substantial innate recognition mechanisms while the delay at the cellular level is related to the immunodominance of highly variable gene family proteins, in particular those of the trans-sialidase family. Here we discuss how these previous studies and the new findings herein impact our thoughts on the potential of prophylactic vaccination to serve a productive role in the prevention of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease. PMID:25946159

  13. Bottlenecks in domestic animal populations can facilitate the emergence of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Tustin, Aaron; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Mabud, Tarub S.; Levy, Katelyn; Barbu, Corentin M.; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R.; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Naquira-Velarde, Cesar; Ostfeld, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Faeces-mediated transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi (the aetiological agent of Chagas disease) by triatomine insects is extremely inefficient. Still, the parasite emerges frequently, and has infected millions of people and domestic animals. We synthesize here the results of field and laboratory studies of T. cruzi transmission conducted in and around Arequipa, Peru. We document the repeated occurrence of large colonies of triatomine bugs (more than 1000) with very high infection prevalence (more than 85%). By inoculating guinea pigs, an important reservoir of T. cruzi in Peru, and feeding triatomine bugs on them weekly, we demonstrate that, while most animals quickly control parasitaemia, a subset of animals remains highly infectious to vectors for many months. However, we argue that the presence of these persistently infectious hosts is insufficient to explain the observed prevalence of T. cruzi in vector colonies. We posit that seasonal rains, leading to a fluctuation in the price of guinea pig food (alfalfa), leading to annual guinea pig roasts, leading to a concentration of vectors on a small subpopulation of animals maintained for reproduction, can propel T. cruzi through vector colonies and create a considerable force of infection for a pathogen whose transmission might otherwise fizzle out. PMID:26085582

  14. Effects of Infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli on the Reproductive Performance of the Vector Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    Fellet, Maria Raquel; Lorenzo, Marcelo Gustavo; Elliot, Simon Luke; Carrasco, David; Guarneri, Alessandra Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    The insect Rhodnius prolixus is responsible for the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the etiological agent of Chagas disease in areas of Central and South America. Besides this, it can be infected by other trypanosomes such as Trypanosoma rangeli. The effects of these parasites on vectors are poorly understood and are often controversial so here we focussed on possible negative effects of these parasites on the reproductive performance of R. prolixus, specifically comparing infected and uninfected couples. While T. cruzi infection did not delay pre-oviposition time of infected couples at either temperature tested (25 and 30°C) it did, at 25°C, increase the e-value in the second reproductive cycle, as well as hatching rates. Meanwhile, at 30°C, T. cruzi infection decreased the e-value of insects during the first cycle and also the fertility of older insects. When couples were instead infected with T. rangeli, pre-oviposition time was delayed, while reductions in the e-value and hatching rate were observed in the second and third cycles. We conclude that both T. cruzi and T. rangeli can impair reproductive performance of R. prolixus, although for T. cruzi, this is dependent on rearing temperature and insect age. We discuss these reproductive costs in terms of potential consequences on triatomine behavior and survival. PMID:25136800

  15. Bats, Trypanosomes, and Triatomines in Ecuador: New Insights into the Diversity, Transmission, and Origins of Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, C. Miguel; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Tapia, Elicio E.; Lobos, Simón E.; Zurita, Alejandra P.; Aguirre-Villacís, Fernanda; MacDonald, Amber; Villacís, Anita G.; Lima, Luciana; Teixeira, Marta M. G.; Grijalva, Mario J.; Perkins, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    The generalist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has two phylogenetic lineages associated almost exclusively with bats—Trypanosoma cruzi Tcbat and the subspecies T. c. marinkellei. We present new information on the genetic variation, geographic distribution, host associations, and potential vectors of these lineages. We conducted field surveys of bats and triatomines in southern Ecuador, a country endemic for Chagas disease, and screened for trypanosomes by microscopy and PCR. We identified parasites at species and genotype levels through phylogenetic approaches based on 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and conducted a comparison of nucleotide diversity of the cytb gene. We document for the first time T. cruzi Tcbat and T. c. marinkellei in Ecuador, expanding their distribution in South America to the western side of the Andes. In addition, we found the triatomines Cavernicola pilosa and Triatoma dispar sharing shelters with bats. The comparisons of nucleotide diversity revealed a higher diversity for T. c. marinkellei than any of the T. c. cruzi genotypes associated with Chagas disease. Findings from this study increased both the number of host species and known geographical ranges of both parasites and suggest potential vectors for these two trypanosomes associated with bats in rural areas of southern Ecuador. The higher nucleotide diversity of T. c. marinkellei supports a long evolutionary relationship between T. cruzi and bats, implying that bats are the original hosts of this important parasite. PMID:26465748

  16. Transferability of Trypanosoma cruzi from mixed human host infection to Triatoma infestans and from insects to axenic culture.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Sylvia; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Saavedra, Miguel; Solari, Aldo

    2015-02-01

    The etiologic agent of Chagas disease is Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan whose life cycle involves obligatory passage through vertebrate and invertebrate hosts in a series of stages. The aim of this study was to explore the transferability of mixed discrete typing units (DTUs) of T. cruzi present in chronic chagasic patients when passed through an invertebrate host during xenodiagnosis (XD) and then when transferred to axenic cultures to obtain T. cruzi isolates. DTUs of T. cruzi present in these two hosts and axenic cultures were identified by kDNA PCR amplification and subsequent hybridization with DTU-specific probes. Mixtures of Tc I, Tc II, Tc V and Tc VI DTUs were detected in blood samples. However as a result of XD and axenic cultures it was possible to identify mostly Tc V. We conclude that the transferability of an isolate of T.cruzi derived from mixed DTUs present in human blood depends upon the starved invertebrate host used for xenodiagnosis. PMID:25240699

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Genetically Selected Mouse Lines: Genetic Linkage with Quantitative Trait Locus Controlling Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Vorraro, Francisca; Cabrera, Wafa H. K.; Ribeiro, Orlando G.; Jensen, José Ricardo; De Franco, Marcelo; Ibañez, Olga M.; Starobinas, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection was studied in mouse lines selected for maximal (AIRmax) or minimal (AIRmin) acute inflammatory reaction and for high (HIII) or low (LIII) antibody (Ab) responses to complex antigens. Resistance was associated with gender (females) and strain—the high responder lines AIRmax and HIII were resistant. The higher resistance of HIII as compared to LIII mice extended to higher infective doses and was correlated with enhanced production of IFN-γ and nitric oxide production by peritoneal and lymph node cells, in HIII males and females. We also analyzed the involvement of previously mapped Ab and T. cruzi response QTL with the survival of Selection III mice to T. cruzi infections in a segregating backcross [F1(HIII×LIII) ×LIII] population. An Ab production QTL marker mapping to mouse chromosome 1 (34.8 cM) significantly cosegregated with survival after acute T. cruzi infections, indicating that this region also harbors genes whose alleles modulate resistance to acute T. cruzi infection. PMID:25197170

  18. Cytokine-dependent and–independent gene expression changes and cell cycle block revealed in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected host cells by comparative mRNA profiling

    PubMed Central

    Costales, Jaime A; Daily, Johanna P; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Background The requirements for growth and survival of the intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi within mammalian host cells are poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling of the host cell response to infection serves as a rapid read-out for perturbation of host physiology that, in part, reflects adaptation to the infective process. Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide array analysis we identified common and disparate host cell responses triggered by T. cruzi infection of phenotypically diverse human cell types. Results We report significant changes in transcript abundance in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (2852, 2155 and 531 genes respectively; fold-change ≥ 2, p-value < 0.01) 24 hours post-invasion. A prominent type I interferon response was observed in each cell type, reflecting a secondary response to secreted cytokine in infected cultures. To identify a core cytokine-independent response in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts and endothelial cells transwell plates were used to distinguish cytokine-dependent and -independent gene expression profiles. This approach revealed the induction of metabolic and signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, amino acid catabolism and response to wounding as common themes in T. cruzi-infected cells. In addition, the downregulation of genes involved in mitotic cell cycle and cell division predicted that T. cruzi infection may impede host cell cycle progression. The observation of impaired cytokinesis in T. cruzi-infected cells, following nuclear replication, confirmed this prediction. Conclusion Metabolic pathways and cellular processes were identified as significantly altered at the transcriptional level in response to T. cruzi infection in a cytokine-independent manner. Several of these alterations are supported by previous studies of T. cruzi metabolic requirements or effects on the host. However, our methods also revealed a T. cruzi-dependent block in the host cell cycle, at

  19. Impact of Benznidazole on Infection Course in Mice Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi I, II, and IV

    PubMed Central

    Gruendling, Ana Paula; Massago, Miyoko; Teston, Ana Paula M.; Monteiro, Wuelton M.; Kaneshima, Edilson N.; Araújo, Silvana M.; Gomes, Mônica L.; Barbosa, Maria das Graças V.; Toledo, Max Jean O.

    2015-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis is an emerging zoonosis in the Brazilian Amazon. Studies on benznidazole (BZ) chemotherapy with Trypanosoma cruzi from this region have great relevance, given the different discrete typing units (DTUs) that infect humans in the Amazon and other regions of Brazil. We performed a parasitological, histopathological, and molecular analysis of mice inoculated with strains of T. cruzi I, II, and IV that were BZ-treated during the acute phase of infection. Groups of Swiss mice were inoculated; 13 received oral BZ, whereas the other 13 comprised the untreated controls. Unlike parasitemia, the infectivity and mortality did not vary among the DTUs. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was detected in all tissues analyzed and the proportion of organs parasitized varied with the parasite DTU. The BZ treatment reduced the most parasitological parameters, tissue parasitism and the inflammatory processes at all infection stages and for all DTUs. However, the number of significant reductions varied according to the DTU and infection phase. PMID:25940197

  20. Between a bug and a hard place: Trypanosoma cruzi genetic diversity and the clinical outcomes of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, Louisa A; Miles, Michael A; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, concomitant with successful transnational disease control programs across Latin America, Chagas disease has expanded from a neglected, endemic parasitic infection of the rural poor to an urbanized chronic disease, and now a potentially emergent global health problem. Trypanosoma cruzi infection has a highly variable clinical course, ranging from complete absence of symptoms to severe and often fatal cardiovascular and/or gastrointestinal manifestations. To date, few correlates of clinical disease progression have been identified. Elucidating a putative role for T. cruzi strain diversity in Chagas disease pathogenesis is complicated by the scarcity of parasites in clinical specimens and the limitations of our contemporary genotyping techniques. This article systematically reviews the historical literature, given our current understanding of parasite genetic diversity, to evaluate the evidence for any association between T. cruzi genotype and chronic clinical outcome, risk of congenital transmission or reactivation and orally transmitted outbreaks. PMID:26162928

  1. A high throughput analysis of cytokines and chemokines expression during the course of Trypanosoma cruzi experimental oral infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Adele A; Notário, Ana Flávia O; Teixeira, Thaise L; e Silva, Rebecca T; Quintal, Amanda P N; Alves, Rosiane N; Brígido, Paula C; Siqueira, Carla S; Martins, Flávia A; Machado, Fabrício C; Clemente, Tatiana M; da Silva, Aline A; Borges, Bruna C; Teixeira, Samuel C; dos Santos, Marlus A; da Silva, Claudio V

    2016-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has high biological and biochemical diversity and variable tissue tropism. Here we aimed to verify the kinetics of cytokine and chemokine in situ secretion in animals infected with two distinct T. cruzi strains after oral inoculation. Also, we investigated parasite migration, residence and pathological damage in stomach, heart and spleen. Our results showed that host immune response against T. cruzi infection is an intricate phenomenon that depends on the parasite strain, on the infected organ and on the time point of the infection. We believe that a wide comprehension of host immune response will potentially provide basis for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies in order to clear parasitism and minimize tissue injury. In this context, we find that KC poses as a possible tool to be used. PMID:26827742

  2. Intensification of acute Trypanosoma cruzi myocarditis in BALB/c mice pretreated with low doses of cyclophosphamide or gamma irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, J. S.; Rossi, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the development of acute myocarditis in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected BALB/c mice after they were treated with low doses of cylophosphamide or gamma irradiation. It has been claimed that, in mice, such treatments temporarily interfere with the host-immune suppressor network, but cause no immunodepression. A severe extensive and diffuse acute myocarditis developed in the treated mice infected with T. cruzi, whereas a slight to moderate focal or occasionally diffuse acute myocarditis developed in control mice infected with T. cruzi. It is very likely that the transient abolition of T-suppressor activity facilitates the anti-myocardium immune response in the acute phase of experimental Chagas' disease in mice. Images Fig. 3 PMID:2138024

  3. Genetic subdivisions within Trypanosoma cruzi (Discrete Typing Units) and their relevance for molecular epidemiology and experimental evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tibayrenc, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Background This paper summarizes the main results obtained on Trypanosoma cruzi genetic diversity and population structure since this parasite became the theme of many genetic and molecular studies in the early seventies. Results T. cruzi exibits a paradigmatic pattern of long-term, clonal evolution, which has structured its natural populations into several discrete genetic subdivisions or "Discrete Typing Units" (DTU). Rare hybridization events are nevertheless detectable in natural populations and have been recently obtained in the laboratory. Conclusions The DTUs and natural clones of T. cruzi constitute relevant units for molecular epidemiology and experimental evolution. Experimental mating opens the way to an in-depth knowledge of this parasite's formal genetics. PMID:14613498

  4. Early diagnosis of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection, using shed acute phase antigen, in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mallimaci, María Cristina; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Russomando, Graciela; Sanchez, Zunilda; Sijvarger, Carina; Alvarez, Isabel Marcela; Barrionuevo, Lola; Lopez, Carlos; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2010-01-01

    Chagas' disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanasoma cruzi. It is estimated that 15,000 new cases of congenital T. cruzi transmission occur in the Americas each year. The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of congenital T. cruzi infection in infants born to infected women living in Ushuaia, Argentina, as well to assess a serologic test using Shed Acute Phase Antigen (SAPA) for a timely diagnosis of congenital infection. The rate of congenital infection among children in the study was 4.4% (3/68). Our results show that for infants younger than 30 days of age, matched blood samples from mother and infant were capable of identifying congenital transmission of infection using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with SAPA. For infants older than 3 months, congenital infection could be ruled out using the same procedure. PMID:20064996

  5. Early Diagnosis of Congenital Trypanosoma cruzi Infection, Using Shed Acute Phase Antigen, in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Mallimaci, María Cristina; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Russomando, Graciela; Sanchez, Zunilda; Sijvarger, Carina; Alvarez, Isabel Marcela; Barrionuevo, Lola; Lopez, Carlos; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2010-01-01

    Chagas' disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanasoma cruzi. It is estimated that 15,000 new cases of congenital T. cruzi transmission occur in the Americas each year. The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of congenital T. cruzi infection in infants born to infected women living in Ushuaia, Argentina, as well to assess a serologic test using Shed Acute Phase Antigen (SAPA) for a timely diagnosis of congenital infection. The rate of congenital infection among children in the study was 4.4% (3/68). Our results show that for infants younger than 30 days of age, matched blood samples from mother and infant were capable of identifying congenital transmission of infection using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with SAPA. For infants older than 3 months, congenital infection could be ruled out using the same procedure. PMID:20064996

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi Circulating in the Southern Region of the State of Mexico (Zumpahuacan) Are Pathogenic: A Dog Model

    PubMed Central

    Barbabosa-Pliego, Alberto; Díaz-Albiter, Hector M.; Ochoa-García, Laucel; Aparicio-Burgos, Esteban; López-Heydeck, Sandra M.; Velásquez-Ordoñez, Valente; Fajardo-Muñoz, Raul C.; Díaz-González, Sandra; De Oca-Jimenez, Roberto Montes; Barbosa-Mireles, Marco; Guzmán-Bracho, Carmen; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.; Garg, Nisha Jain; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    Here we describe clinical and pathologic evidence of Chagas disease caused in dogs by circulating Trypanosoma cruzi from a newly recognized endemic area in Mexico. We show that the Zumpahuacan isolate, although less virulent than the Sylvio-X10 reference strain that caused acute myocarditis and death, was pathogenic in dogs. Dogs infected with the Zumpahuacan isolate exhibited electrocardiographic alterations, left- and right-ventricle dilation, and hydropericardium. Histologically, diffused perimysial and endomysial lymphoplasmacytic cell infiltration, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and amastigote nests were noted in Zumpahuacan-infected dogs. These findings suggest that the risk of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease is present in the State of Mexico, and further research is needed to identify the T. cruzi bio-types circulating in southern State of Mexico. PMID:19706902

  7. Experimental chemotherapy of Trypanosoma cruzi infection: persistence of parasite antigens and positive serology in parasitologically cured mice.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, S. G.; Freitas, L. A.; Peyrol, S.; Pimentel, A. R.; Sadigursky, M.

    1991-01-01

    Mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, but parasitologically cured after specific chemotherapy, continued to exhibit positive indirect immunofluorescence serological tests 3-6 months after the therapy. Treatment of trypanosome antigens with monospecific antisera produced in rabbits, and examination by immunoelectron-microscopy following peroxidase labelling disclosed the presence of membrane deposits in cell processes in the spleens of the mice. Similar deposits were observed in the external membranes of T. cruzi amastigotes in the spleens of acutely infected mice, but not in normal control mice. No reaction occurred in tissues not previously treated with the monospecific anti-T. cruzi serum. Positive cells in treated and cured mice, as well as in the not cured or untreated control mice, were located in germinal centres of the splenic white pulp and presented long and branching cytoplasmic processes, which are indicative of dendritic cells of the lymphoid follicles of the spleen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1907221

  8. Simple methodology to directly genotype Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units in single and mixed infections from human blood samples.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, Iván A; Bizai, María L; Ortiz, Sylvia; Manattini, Silvia; Fabbro, Diana; Solari, Aldo; Diez, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Different DNA markers to genotype Trypanosoma cruzi are now available. However, due to the low quantity of parasites present in biological samples, DNA markers with high copy number like kinetoplast minicircles are needed. The aim of this study was to complete a DNA assay called minicircle lineage specific-PCR (MLS-PCR) previously developed to genotype the T. cruzi DTUs TcV and TcVI, in order to genotype DTUs TcI and TcII and to improve TcVI detection. We screened kinetoplast minicircle hypervariable sequences from cloned PCR products from reference strains belonging to the mentioned DTUs using specific kDNA probes. With the four highly specific sequences selected, we designed primers to be used in the MLS-PCR to directly genotype T. cruzi from biological samples. High specificity and sensitivity were obtained when we evaluated the new approach for TcI, TcII, TcV and TcVI genotyping in twenty two T. cruzi reference strains. Afterward, we compared it with hybridization tests using specific kDNA probes in 32 blood samples from chronic chagasic patients from North Eastern Argentina. With both tests we were able to genotype 94% of the samples and the concordance between them was very good (kappa=0.855). The most frequent T. cruzi DTUs detected were TcV and TcVI, followed by TcII and much lower TcI. A unique T. cruzi DTU was detected in 18 samples meantime more than one in the remaining; being TcV and TcVI the most frequent association. A high percentage of mixed detections were obtained with both assays and its impact was discussed. PMID:27208806

  9. A new antimicrobial protein from the anterior midgut of Triatoma infestans mediates Trypanosoma cruzi establishment by controlling the microbiota.

    PubMed

    Buarque, Diego S; Gomes, Cícera M; Araújo, Ricardo N; Pereira, Marcos H; Ferreira, Roberta C; Guarneri, Alessandra A; Tanaka, Aparecida S

    2016-04-01

    The Reduviid Triatoma infestans is a vector for the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. The parasite must address the defense molecules and microbiota that colonize the anterior midgut of T. infestans. To obtain insight into T. cruzi - microbiota interactions in triatomine insects, we characterized a new antimicrobial product from the anterior midgut of T. infestans (TiAP) that may be involved in these relationships. The TiAP DNA fragment was cloned and expressed in a bacterial system, and the effect of the protein on bacteria and T. cruzi was evaluated by RNAi, qPCR and antimicrobial experiments. The number of T. cruzi in T. infestans anterior midguts was significantly lower in TiAP knockdown insects than in unsilenced groups. We also verified that the amount of bacteria in silenced T. infestans is approximately 600-fold higher than in unsilenced insects by qPCR. The 327-bp cDNA fragment that encodes mature TiAP was cloned into the pET-14b vector and expressed fused to a His-tag in Escherichia coli C43. The recombinant protein (rTiAP) was purified using an Ni-NTA column, followed by a HiTrap SP column. According to a trypanocidal assay, rTiAP did not interfere with the viability of T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Moreover, in antimicrobial experiments using E. coli and Micrococcus luteus, the protein was only bacteriostatic for Gram-negative bacteria. The data indicate that infection by T. cruzi increases the expression of TiAP to modulate the microbiota. The inhibition of microbiota growth by TiAP is important for parasite establishment in the T. infestans anterior midgut. PMID:26905205

  10. Dried Blood as an Alternative to Plasma or Serum for Trypanosoma cruzi IgG Detection in Screening Programs

    PubMed Central

    Holguín, Africa; Norman, Francesca; Martín, Leticia; Mateos, María Luisa; Chacón, Jesús; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi serological screening is recommended for people potentially exposed to this parasite in countries where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic and those where it is not endemic. Blood samples on filter paper may be a practical alternative to plasma/serum for antibody detection. Using the Architect Chagas assay, we detected the presence of IgG against T. cruzi in matched serum and dried blood spots (DBS) collected from 147 patients residing in Madrid, Spain, who had potential previous exposure to T. cruzi. The κ statistic for the DBS/serum proportion of agreement for the detection of antibodies against T. cruzi was 0.803, considering an S/CO (assay result unit; chemiluminescent signal from the sample [S] divided by the mean chemiluminescent signal for the three calibrators used in the test [CO]) cutoff value of ≥1.00. The relative sensitivity of the Architect test using DBS increased from 95.2% to 98.8% when the cutoff was lowered from ≥1.00 to ≥0.88, while the relative specificity decreased from 84.1% to 71.6%. Overall, the median S/CO values for DBS were significantly lower than those for serum (2.6 versus 6.5; P < 0.001). Discrepancies that occurred with the use of DBS included 10 false positives (with low S/CO values in 9 cases [median, 2.13]) and 4 false negatives, with mean S/CO values of 0.905 (gray zone). Using DBS plus a highly sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) may be a simple and reliable method for detecting IgG against T. cruzi when blood sampling by venipuncture is not feasible. This method may also reduce the false-negative rates observed with some rapid diagnostic tests. The lower relative sensitivity compared to the reference method may be increased by lowering the optical density threshold. PMID:23740927

  11. Immunization with Hexon Modified Adenoviral Vectors Integrated with gp83 Epitope Provides Protection against Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Nde, Pius N.; Pratap, Siddharth; Lima, Maria F.; Villalta, Fernando; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Chagas disease is an endemic infection that affects over 8 million people throughout Latin America and now has become a global challenge. The current pharmacological treatment of patients is unsuccessful in most cases, highly toxic, and no vaccines are available. The results of inadequate treatment could lead to heart failure resulting in death. Therefore, a vaccine that elicits neutralizing antibodies mediated by cell-mediated immune responses and protection against Chagas disease is necessary. Methodology/Principal Findings The “antigen capsid-incorporation” strategy is based upon the display of the T. cruzi epitope as an integral component of the adenovirus' capsid rather than an encoded transgene. This strategy is predicted to induce a robust humoral immune response to the presented antigen, similar to the response provoked by native Ad capsid proteins. The antigen chosen was T. cruzi gp83, a ligand that is used by T. cruzi to attach to host cells to initiate infection. The gp83 epitope, recognized by the neutralizing MAb 4A4, along with His6 were incorporated into the Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) vector to generate the vector Ad5-HVR1-gp83-18 (Ad5-gp83). This vector was evaluated by molecular and immunological analyses. Vectors were injected to elicit immune responses against gp83 in mouse models. Our findings indicate that mice immunized with the vector Ad5-gp83 and challenged with a lethal dose of T. cruzi trypomastigotes confer strong immunoprotection with significant reduction in parasitemia levels, increased survival rate and induction of neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions/Significance This data demonstrates that immunization with adenovirus containing capsid-incorporated T. cruzi antigen elicits a significant anti-gp83-specific response in two different mouse models, and protection against T. cruzi infection by eliciting neutralizing antibodies mediated by cell-mediated immune responses

  12. Proliferation and Differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi inside Its Vector Have a New Trigger: Redox Status

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Natália P.; Saraiva, Francis M. S.; Sultano, Pedro E.; Cunha, Paula R. B. B.; Laranja, Gustavo A. T.; Justo, Graça A.; Sabino, Kátia C. C.; Coelho, Marsen G. P.; Rossini, Ana; Atella, Georgia C.; Paes, Marcia C.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi proliferate and differentiate inside different compartments of triatomines gut that is the first environment encountered by T. cruzi. Due to its complex life cycle, the parasite is constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS). We tested the influence of the pro-oxidant molecules H2O2 and the superoxide generator, Paraquat, as well as, metabolism products of the vector, with distinct redox status, in the proliferation and metacyclogenesis. These molecules are heme, hemozoin and urate. We also tested the antioxidants NAC and GSH. Heme induced the proliferation of epimastigotes and impaired the metacyclogenesis. β-hematin, did not affect epimastigote proliferation but decreased parasite differentiation. Conversely, we show that urate, GSH and NAC dramatically impaired epimastigote proliferation and during metacyclogenesis, NAC and urate induced a significant increment of trypomastigotes and decreased the percentage of epimastigotes. We also quantified the parasite loads in the anterior and posterior midguts and in the rectum of the vector by qPCR. The treatment with the antioxidants increased the parasite loads in all midgut sections analyzed. In vivo, the group of vectors fed with reduced molecules showed an increment of trypomastigotes and decreased epimastigotes when analyzed by differential counting. Heme stimulated proliferation by increasing the cell number in the S and G2/M phases, whereas NAC arrested epimastigotes in G1 phase. NAC greatly increased the percentage of trypomastigotes. Taken together, these data show a shift in the triatomine gut microenvironment caused by the redox status may also influence T. cruzi biology inside the vector. In this scenario, oxidants act to turn on epimastigote proliferation while antioxidants seem to switch the cycle towards metacyclogenesis. This is a new insight that defines a key role for redox metabolism in governing the parasitic life cycle. PMID:25671543

  13. Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Sirtuins as Possible Drug Targets for Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; da Silva Augusto, Leonardo; Clemente, Tatiana Mordente; Antunes, Raysa Paes Pinto; Yoshida, Nobuko; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine is a major posttranslational modification of proteins and is catalyzed by lysine acetyltransferases, while lysine deacetylases remove acetyl groups. Among the deacetylases, the sirtuins are NAD+-dependent enzymes, which modulate gene silencing, DNA damage repair, and several metabolic processes. As sirtuin-specific inhibitors have been proposed as drugs for inhibiting the proliferation of tumor cells, in this study, we investigated the role of these inhibitors in the growth and differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease. We found that the use of salermide during parasite infection prevented growth and initial multiplication after mammalian cell invasion by T. cruzi at concentrations that did not affect host cell viability. In addition, in vivo infection was partially controlled upon administration of salermide. There are two sirtuins in T. cruzi, TcSir2rp1 and TcSir2rp3. By using specific antibodies and cell lines overexpressing the tagged versions of these enzymes, we found that TcSir2rp1 is localized in the cytosol and TcSir2rp3 in the mitochondrion. TcSir2rp1 overexpression acts to impair parasite growth and differentiation, whereas the wild-type version of TcSir2rp3 and not an enzyme mutated in the active site improves both. The effects observed with TcSir2rp3 were fully reverted by adding salermide, which inhibited TcSir2rp3 expressed in Escherichia coli with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) ± standard error of 1 ± 0.5 μM. We concluded that sirtuin inhibitors targeting TcSir2rp3 could be used in Chagas disease chemotherapy. PMID:26014945

  14. Purification of a Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote 60-kilodalton surface glycoprotein that primes and activates murine lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Villalta, F; Lima, M F; Howard, S A; Zhou, L; Ruiz-Ruano, A

    1992-01-01

    We have purified a glycoprotein with a relative molecular mass of 60 kDa and present on the surface of Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes and studied its ability to prime and stimulate the proliferation of murine spleen cells. T. cruzi trypomastigote membrane proteins were separated by preparative isoelectrofocusing. A trypomastigote 60-kDa surface protein with an isoelectric point of 4.2 was enriched by chromatofocusing and was readily purified in native form to homogeneity by gel filtration on a Superose column by use of a fast protein liquid chromatography system. Biotinylated wheat germ agglutinin, Ricinus communis agglutinin, and Datura stramonium agglutinin bound to blots containing the purified trypomastigote 60-kDa surface protein, indicating that this protein was glycosylated. The purified trypomastigote 60-kDa glycoprotein was recognized by antibodies produced during human infection, and immunoglobulin G against the purified glycoprotein immunoprecipitated a biotinylated 60-kDa molecule from the surface of trypomastigotes but not epimastigotes. Specific immunoglobulin G against the 60-kDa glycoprotein also increased the uptake of trypomastigotes and promoted parasite killing by macrophages. The purified 60-kDa glycoprotein was able to specifically activate primed lymphocytes, since there was a significant increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation by spleen cells obtained from CBA mice primed with this glycoprotein, with respect to control values. Furthermore, the 60-kDa glycoprotein did not stimulate unprimed spleen cells, indicating that the lymphoproliferation induced by this glycoprotein was specific and was not due to polyclonal activation. Our findings indicate that this T. cruzi trypomastigote 60-kDa surface glycoprotein primes and activates lymphocytes, which could lead to a beneficial immune response in the host. Images PMID:1639469

  15. Experimental infection of two South American reservoirs with four distinct strains of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Roellig, Dawn M; McMillan, Katherine; Ellis, Angela E; Vandeberg, John L; Champagne, Donald E; Yabsley, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc), the causative agent of Chagas disease, is a diverse species with 2 primary genotypes, TcI and TcII, with TcII further subdivided into 5 subtypes (IIa-e). This study evaluated infection dynamics of 4 genetically and geographically diverse T. cruzi strains in 2 South American reservoirs, degus (Octodon degus) and grey short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica). Based on prior suggestions of a genotype-host association, we hypothesized that degus (placental) would more readily become infected with TcII strains while short-tailed opossums (marsupial) would be a more competent reservoir for a TcI strain. Individuals (n=3) of each species were intraperitoneally inoculated with T. cruzi trypomastigotes of TcIIa [North America (NA)-raccoon (Procyon lotor) origin], TcI [NA-Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana)], TcIIb [South America (SA)-human], TcIIe (SA-Triatoma infestans), or both TcI and TcIIa. Parasitaemias in experimentally infected degus peaked earlier (7-14 days post-inoculation (p.i.)) compared with short-tailed opossums (21-84 days p.i.). Additionally, peak parasitaemias were higher in degus; however, the duration of detectable parasitaemias for all strains, except TcIIa, was greater in short-tailed opossums. Infections established in both host species with all genotypes, except for TcIIa, which did not establish a detectable infection in short-tailed opossums. These results indicate that both South American reservoirs support infections with these isolates from North and South America; however, infection dynamics differed with host and parasite strain. PMID:20128943

  16. Ecological, Social and Biological Risk Factors for Continued Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission by Triatoma dimidiata in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Dulce M.; De Urioste-Stone, Sandra M.; Juárez, José G.; Pennington, Pamela M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease transmission by Triatoma dimidiata persists in Guatemala and elsewhere in Central America under undefined ecological, biological and social (eco-bio-social) conditions. Methodology Eco-bio-social risk factors associated with persistent domiciliary infestation were identified by a cross-sectional survey and qualitative participatory methods. Quantitative and qualitative data were generated regarding Trypanosoma cruzi reservoirs and triatomine hosts. Blood meal analysis and infection of insects, dogs and rodents were determined. Based on these data, multimodel inference was used to identify risk factors for domestic infestation with the greatest relative importance (>0.75). Principal Findings Blood meal analysis showed that 64% of 36 bugs fed on chickens, 50% on humans, 17% on dogs; 24% of 34 bugs fed on Rattus rattus and 21% on Mus musculus. Seroprevalence among 80 dogs was 37%. Eight (17%) of 46 M. musculus and three (43%) of seven R. rattus from households with infected triatomines were infected with T. cruzi Distinct Typing Unit I. Results from interviews and participatory meetings indicated that vector control personnel and some householders perceived chickens roosting and laying eggs in the house as bug infestation risk factors. House construction practices were seen as a risk factor for bug and rodent infestation, with rodents being perceived as a pest by study participants. Multimodel inference showed that house infestation risk factors of high relative importance are dog density, mouse presence, interior wall plaster condition, dirt floor, tile roofing and coffee tree presence. Conclusions/Significance Persistent house infestation is closely related to eco-bio-social factors that maintain productive T. dimidiata habitats associated with dogs, chickens and rodents. Triatomine, dog and rodent infections indicate active T. cruzi transmission. Integrated vector control methods should include actions that consider the role of

  17. Predictive role of polymerase chain reaction in the early diagnosis of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Elsa B; Rivero, Rocío; De Rissio, Ana María; Malagrino, Nora; Esteva, Mónica I; Riarte, Adelina Rosa; Ruiz, Andrés Mariano

    2014-09-01

    The efficacy of specific chemotherapy in congenital Chagas disease before the first year of life ranges between 90 and 100%. Between this age and 15 years of age, the efficacy decreases to around 60%. Therefore, early infection detection is a priority in vertical transmission. The aim of this work was to assess whether polymerase chain reaction (PCR) plays a predictive role in the diagnosis of congenital Chagas disease as compared to conventional parasitological and serological methods. To this end, we studied a total of 468 children born to Trypanosoma cruzi seroreactive mothers came from Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay, who lived in the city of Buenos Aires and suburban areas (Argentina), a non-endemic area of this country. These children were assessed by PCR from 2004 to 2009 with the specific primers Tcz1 and Tcz2, and 121 and 122. PCR allowed detecting 49 T. cruzi-positive children. Eight of these 49 children were excluded from the analysis: six because they did not complete follow-up and two because the first control was performed after 12 months of age. Parasitological methods allowed detecting 25 positive children, 7 of whom had been earlier diagnosed by PCR (1.53±2.00 vs. 6.71±1.46 months; p=0.0002). Serological methods allowed detecting 16 positive children, 12 of whom had been earlier diagnosed by PCR (1.46±1.48 vs. 11.77±4.40 months; p<0.0001). None of the children negative by PCR was positive by serological or parasitological methods. This study shows that PCR allows early diagnosis in congenital Chagas disease. At present, an early positive PCR is not indicative for treatment. However, a positive PCR would alert the health system to search only those infected infants diagnosed by early PCR and thus generate greater efficiency in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital T. cruzi infection. PMID:24892867

  18. Global Metabolomic Profiling of Acute Myocarditis Caused by Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gironès, Núria; Carbajosa, Sofía; Guerrero, Néstor A.; Poveda, Cristina; Chillón-Marinas, Carlos; Fresno, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, being cardiomyopathy the more frequent manifestation. New chemotherapeutic drugs are needed but there are no good biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. There is growing evidence linking immune response and metabolism in inflammatory processes and specifically in Chagas disease. Thus, some metabolites are able to enhance and/or inhibit the immune response. Metabolite levels found in the host during an ongoing infection could provide valuable information on the pathogenesis and/or identify deregulated metabolic pathway that can be potential candidates for treatment and being potential specific biomarkers of the disease. To gain more insight into those aspects in Chagas disease, we performed an unprecedented metabolomic analysis in heart and plasma of mice infected with T. cruzi. Many metabolic pathways were profoundly affected by T. cruzi infection, such as glucose uptake, sorbitol pathway, fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis that were increased in heart tissue but decreased in plasma. Tricarboxylic acid cycle was decreased in heart tissue and plasma whereas reactive oxygen species production and uric acid formation were also deeply increased in infected hearts suggesting a stressful condition in the heart. While specific metabolites allantoin, kynurenine and p-cresol sulfate, resulting from nucleotide, tryptophan and phenylalanine/tyrosine metabolism, respectively, were increased in heart tissue and also in plasma. These results provide new valuable information on the pathogenesis of acute Chagas disease, unravel several new metabolic pathways susceptible of clinical management and identify metabolites useful as potential specific biomarkers for monitoring treatment and clinical severity in patients. PMID:25412247

  19. Putative Role of the Aldo-Keto Reductase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Benznidazole Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Patricia Andrea; Laverrière, Marc; Cannata, Joaquín J B; García, Gabriela Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Benznidazole (Bz), the drug used for treatment of Chagas' disease (caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi), is activated by a parasitic NADH-dependent type I nitroreductase (NTR I). However, several studies have shown that other enzymes are involved. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the aldo-keto reductase from T. cruzi (TcAKR), a NADPH-dependent oxido-reductase previously described by our group, uses Bz as the substrate. We demonstrated that both recombinant and native TcAKR enzymes reduce Bz by using NADPH, but not NADH, as a cofactor. TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes showed higher NADPH-dependent Bz reductase activity and a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for Bz 1.8-fold higher than that of the controls, suggesting that TcAKR is involved in Bz detoxification instead of activation. To understand the role of TcAKR in Bz metabolism, we studied TcAKR expression and NADPH/NADH-dependent Bz reductase activities in two T. cruzi strains with differential susceptibility to Bz: CL Brener and Nicaragua. Taking into account the results obtained with TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes, we expected the more resistant strain, Nicaragua, to have higher TcAKR levels than CL Brener. However, the results were the opposite. CL Brener showed 2-fold higher TcAKR expression and 5.7-fold higher NADPH-Bz reduction than the Nicaragua strain. In addition, NADH-dependent Bz reductase activity, characteristic of NTR I, was also higher in CL Brener than in Nicaragua. We conclude that although TcAKR uses Bz as the substrate, TcAKR activity is not a determinant of Bz resistance in wild-type strains and may be overcome by other enzymes involved in Bz activation, such as NADPH- and NADH-dependent reductases. PMID:26856844

  20. Altered Distribution of Peripheral Blood Memory B Cells in Humans Chronically Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Esteban R.; Olivera, Gabriela C.; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P.; González, Mariela N.; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L.; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S.; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans. PMID:25111833

  1. Global metabolomic profiling of acute myocarditis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Gironès, Núria; Carbajosa, Sofía; Guerrero, Néstor A; Poveda, Cristina; Chillón-Marinas, Carlos; Fresno, Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, being cardiomyopathy the more frequent manifestation. New chemotherapeutic drugs are needed but there are no good biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. There is growing evidence linking immune response and metabolism in inflammatory processes and specifically in Chagas disease. Thus, some metabolites are able to enhance and/or inhibit the immune response. Metabolite levels found in the host during an ongoing infection could provide valuable information on the pathogenesis and/or identify deregulated metabolic pathway that can be potential candidates for treatment and being potential specific biomarkers of the disease. To gain more insight into those aspects in Chagas disease, we performed an unprecedented metabolomic analysis in heart and plasma of mice infected with T. cruzi. Many metabolic pathways were profoundly affected by T. cruzi infection, such as glucose uptake, sorbitol pathway, fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis that were increased in heart tissue but decreased in plasma. Tricarboxylic acid cycle was decreased in heart tissue and plasma whereas reactive oxygen species production and uric acid formation were also deeply increased in infected hearts suggesting a stressful condition in the heart. While specific metabolites allantoin, kynurenine and p-cresol sulfate, resulting from nucleotide, tryptophan and phenylalanine/tyrosine metabolism, respectively, were increased in heart tissue and also in plasma. These results provide new valuable information on the pathogenesis of acute Chagas disease, unravel several new metabolic pathways susceptible of clinical management and identify metabolites useful as potential specific biomarkers for monitoring treatment and clinical severity in patients. PMID:25412247

  2. Temporizin and Temporizin-1 Peptides as Novel Candidates for Eliminating Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Kátia S.; Hardoim, Daiane J.; Taniwaki, Noemi; Alves, Luiz A.; De Simone, Salvatore G.

    2016-01-01

    Tropical diseases caused by parasitic infections continue to cause socioeconomic distress worldwide. Among these, Chagas disease has become a great concern because of globalization. Caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, there is an increasing need to discover new, more effective methods to manage infections that minimize disease onset. Antimicrobial peptides represent a possible solution to this challenge. As effector molecules of the innate immune response against pathogens, they are the first line of defense found in all multi-cellular organisms. In amphibians, temporins are a large family of antimicrobial peptides found in skin secretions. Their functional roles and modes of action present unique properties that indicate possible candidates for therapeutic applications. Here, we investigated the trypanocide activity of temporizin and temporizin-1. Temporizin is an artificial, hybrid peptide containing the N-terminal region of temporin A, the pore-forming region of gramicidin and a C-terminus consisting of alternating leucine and lysine. Temporizin-1 is a modification of temporizin with a reduction in the region responsible for insertion into membranes. Their activities were evaluated in a cell permeabilization assay by flow cytometry, an LDH release assay, electron microscopy, an MTT assay and patch clamp experiments. Both temporizin and temporizin-1 demonstrated toxicity against T. cruzi with temporizin displaying slightly more potency. At concentrations up to 100 μg/ ml, both peptides exhibited low toxicity in J774 cells, a macrophage lineage cell line, and no toxicity was observed in mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. In contrast, the peptides showed some toxicity in rat adenoma GH3 cells and Jurkat human lymphoma cells with temporizin-1 displaying lower toxicity. In summary, a shortened form of the hybrid temporizin peptide, temporizin-1, was efficient at killing T. cruzi and it has low toxicity in wild-type mammalian cells. These data suggest that temporizin-1

  3. Proliferation and differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi inside its vector have a new trigger: redox status.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Natália P; Saraiva, Francis M S; Sultano, Pedro E; Cunha, Paula R B B; Laranja, Gustavo A T; Justo, Graça A; Sabino, Kátia C C; Coelho, Marsen G P; Rossini, Ana; Atella, Georgia C; Paes, Marcia C

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi proliferate and differentiate inside different compartments of triatomines gut that is the first environment encountered by T. cruzi. Due to its complex life cycle, the parasite is constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS). We tested the influence of the pro-oxidant molecules H2O2 and the superoxide generator, Paraquat, as well as, metabolism products of the vector, with distinct redox status, in the proliferation and metacyclogenesis. These molecules are heme, hemozoin and urate. We also tested the antioxidants NAC and GSH. Heme induced the proliferation of epimastigotes and impaired the metacyclogenesis. β-hematin, did not affect epimastigote proliferation but decreased parasite differentiation. Conversely, we show that urate, GSH and NAC dramatically impaired epimastigote proliferation and during metacyclogenesis, NAC and urate induced a significant increment of trypomastigotes and decreased the percentage of epimastigotes. We also quantified the parasite loads in the anterior and posterior midguts and in the rectum of the vector by qPCR. The treatment with the antioxidants increased the parasite loads in all midgut sections analyzed. In vivo, the group of vectors fed with reduced molecules showed an increment of trypomastigotes and decreased epimastigotes when analyzed by differential counting. Heme stimulated proliferation by increasing the cell number in the S and G2/M phases, whereas NAC arrested epimastigotes in G1 phase. NAC greatly increased the percentage of trypomastigotes. Taken together, these data show a shift in the triatomine gut microenvironment caused by the redox status may also influence T. cruzi biology inside the vector. In this scenario, oxidants act to turn on epimastigote proliferation while antioxidants seem to switch the cycle towards metacyclogenesis. This is a new insight that defines a key role for redox metabolism in governing the parasitic life cycle. PMID:25671543

  4. Temporizin and Temporizin-1 Peptides as Novel Candidates for Eliminating Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Souza, André L A; Faria, Robson X; Calabrese, Kátia S; Hardoim, Daiane J; Taniwaki, Noemi; Alves, Luiz A; De Simone, Salvatore G

    2016-01-01

    Tropical diseases caused by parasitic infections continue to cause socioeconomic distress worldwide. Among these, Chagas disease has become a great concern because of globalization. Caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, there is an increasing need to discover new, more effective methods to manage infections that minimize disease onset. Antimicrobial peptides represent a possible solution to this challenge. As effector molecules of the innate immune response against pathogens, they are the first line of defense found in all multi-cellular organisms. In amphibians, temporins are a large family of antimicrobial peptides found in skin secretions. Their functional roles and modes of action present unique properties that indicate possible candidates for therapeutic applications. Here, we investigated the trypanocide activity of temporizin and temporizin-1. Temporizin is an artificial, hybrid peptide containing the N-terminal region of temporin A, the pore-forming region of gramicidin and a C-terminus consisting of alternating leucine and lysine. Temporizin-1 is a modification of temporizin with a reduction in the region responsible for insertion into membranes. Their activities were evaluated in a cell permeabilization assay by flow cytometry, an LDH release assay, electron microscopy, an MTT assay and patch clamp experiments. Both temporizin and temporizin-1 demonstrated toxicity against T. cruzi with temporizin displaying slightly more potency. At concentrations up to 100 μg/ ml, both peptides exhibited low toxicity in J774 cells, a macrophage lineage cell line, and no toxicity was observed in mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. In contrast, the peptides showed some toxicity in rat adenoma GH3 cells and Jurkat human lymphoma cells with temporizin-1 displaying lower toxicity. In summary, a shortened form of the hybrid temporizin peptide, temporizin-1, was efficient at killing T. cruzi and it has low toxicity in wild-type mammalian cells. These data suggest that temporizin-1

  5. Host Life History Strategy, Species Diversity, and Habitat Influence Trypanosoma cruzi Vector Infection in Changing Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Gottdenker, Nicole L.; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Calzada, José E.; Saldaña, Azael; Carroll, C. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic land use may influence transmission of multi-host vector-borne pathogens by changing diversity, relative abundance, and community composition of reservoir hosts. These reservoir hosts may have varying competence for vector-borne pathogens depending on species-specific characteristics, such as life history strategy. The objective of this study is to evaluate how anthropogenic land use change influences blood meal species composition and the effects of changing blood meal species composition on the parasite infection rate of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius pallescens in Panama. Methodology/Principal Findings R. pallescens vectors (N = 643) were collected in different habitat types across a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. Blood meal species in DNA extracted from these vectors was identified in 243 (40.3%) vectors by amplification and sequencing of a vertebrate-specific fragment of the 12SrRNA gene, and T. cruzi vector infection was determined by pcr. Vector infection rate was significantly greater in deforested habitats as compared to contiguous forests. Forty-two different species of blood meal were identified in R. pallescens, and species composition of blood meals varied across habitat types. Mammals (88.3%) dominated R. pallescens blood meals. Xenarthrans (sloths and tamanduas) were the most frequently identified species in blood meals across all habitat types. A regression tree analysis indicated that blood meal species diversity, host life history strategy (measured as rmax, the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase), and habitat type (forest fragments and peridomiciliary sites) were important determinants of vector infection with T. cruzi. The mean intrinsic rate of increase and the skewness and variability of rmax were positively associated with higher vector infection rate at a site. Conclusions/Significance In this study, anthropogenic landscape disturbance increased vector infection with T. cruzi, potentially

  6. Characterization of TcCYC6 from Trypanosoma cruzi, a gene with homology to mitotic cyclins.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, María Agostina; Laverrière, Marc; Schenkman, Sergio; Wehrendt, Diana Patricia; Tellez-Iñón, María Teresa; Potenza, Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is a protozoan parasite with a life cycle that alternates between replicative and non-replicative forms, but the components and mechanisms that regulate its cell cycle are poorly described. In higher eukaryotes, cyclins are proteins that activate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), by associating with them along the different stages of the cell cycle. These cyclin-CDK complexes exert their role as major modulators of the cell cycle by phosphorylating specific substrates. For the correct progression of the cell cycle, the mechanisms that regulate the activity of cyclins and their associated CDKs are diverse and must be controlled precisely. Different types of cyclins are involved in specific phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle, preferentially activating certain CDKs. In this work, we characterized TcCYC6, a putative coding sequence of T. cruzi which encodes a protein with homology to mitotic cyclins. The overexpression of this sequence, fused to a tag of nine amino acids from influenza virus hemagglutinin (TcCYC6-HA), showed to be detrimental for the proliferation of epimastigotes in axenic culture and affected the cell cycle progression. In silico analysis revealed an N-terminal segment similar to the consensus sequence of the destruction box, a hallmark for the degradation of several mitotic cyclins. We experimentally determined that the TcCYC6-HA turnover decreased in the presence of proteasome inhibitors, suggesting that TcCYC6 degradation occurs via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The results obtained in this study provide first evidence that TcCYC6 expression and degradation are finely regulated in T. cruzi. PMID:26709077

  7. Vesicles from different Trypanosoma cruzi strains trigger differential innate and chronic immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Paula M.; Ribeiro, Kleber; Silveira, Amanda C. O.; Campos, João H.; Martins-Filho, Olindo A.; Bela, Samantha R.; Campos, Marco A.; Pessoa, Natalia L.; Colli, Walter; Alves, Maria J. M.; Soares, Rodrigo P.; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas Disease, shed extracellular vesicles (EVs) enriched with glycoproteins of the gp85/trans-sialidase (TS) superfamily and other α-galactosyl (α-Gal)-containing glycoconjugates, such as mucins. Here, purified vesicles from T. cruzi strains (Y, Colombiana, CL-14 and YuYu) were quantified according to size, intensity and concentration. Qualitative analysis revealed differences in their protein and α-galactosyl contents. Later, those polymorphisms were evaluated in the modulation of immune responses (innate and in the chronic phase) in C57BL/6 mice. EVs isolated from YuYu and CL-14 strains induced in macrophages higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and nitric oxide via TLR2. In general, no differences were observed in MAPKs activation (p38, JNK and ERK 1/2) after EVs stimulation. In splenic cells derived from chronically infected mice, a different modulation pattern was observed, where Colombiana (followed by Y strain) EVs were more proinflammatory. This modulation was independent of the T. cruzi strain used in the mice infection. To test the functional importance of this modulation, the expression of intracellular cytokines after in vitro exposure was evaluated using EVs from YuYu and Colombiana strains. Both EVs induced cytokine production with the appearance of IL-10 in the chronically infected mice. A high frequency of IL-10 in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes was observed. A mixed profile of cytokine induction was observed in B cells with the production of TNF-α and IL-10. Finally, dendritic cells produced TNF-α after stimulation with EVs. Polymorphisms in the vesicles surface may be determinant in the immunopathologic events not only in the early steps of infection but also in the chronic phase. PMID:26613751

  8. Coinfection with Different Trypanosoma cruzi Strains Interferes with the Host Immune Response to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Claudiney Melquíades; Valadares, Helder Magno Silva; Francisco, Amanda Fortes; Arantes, Jerusa Marilda; Campos, Camila França; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Araujo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves; Chiari, Egler; Franco, Glória Regina; Machado, Carlos Renato; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Macedo, Andréa Mara

    2010-01-01

    A century after the discovery of Trypanosoma cruzi in a child living in Lassance, Minas Gerais, Brazil in 1909, many uncertainties remain with respect to factors determining the pathogenesis of Chagas disease (CD). Herein, we simultaneously investigate the contribution of both host and parasite factors during acute phase of infection in BALB/c mice infected with the JG and/or CL Brener T. cruzi strains. JG single infected mice presented reduced parasitemia and heart parasitism, no mortality, levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, CCL2, IL-6 and IFN-γ) similar to those found among naïve animals and no clinical manifestations of disease. On the other hand, CL Brener single infected mice presented higher parasitemia and heart parasitism, as well as an increased systemic release of pro-inflammatory mediators and higher mortality probably due to a toxic shock-like systemic inflammatory response. Interestingly, coinfection with JG and CL Brener strains resulted in intermediate parasitemia, heart parasitism and mortality. This was accompanied by an increase in the systemic release of IL-10 with a parallel increase in the number of MAC-3+ and CD4+ T spleen cells expressing IL-10. Therefore, the endogenous production of IL-10 elicited by coinfection seems to be crucial to counterregulate the potentially lethal effects triggered by systemic release of pro-inflammatory mediators induced by CL Brener single infection. In conclusion, our results suggest that the composition of the infecting parasite population plays a role in the host response to T. cruzi in determining the severity of the disease in experimentally infected BALB/c mice. The combination of JG and CL Brener was able to trigger both protective inflammatory immunity and regulatory immune mechanisms that attenuate damage caused by inflammation and disease severity in BALB/c mice. PMID:20967289

  9. Dynasore, a Dynamin Inhibitor, Inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi Entry into Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Barrias, Emile S.; Reignault, Lissa C.; De Souza, Wanderley; Carvalho, Tecia M. U.

    2010-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite that, like some other intracellular pathogens, targets specific proteins of the host cell vesicular transport machinery, leading to a modulation of host cell processes that results in the generation of unique phagosomes. In mammalian cells, several molecules have been identified that selectively regulate the formation of endocytic transport vesicles and the fusion of such vesicles with appropriate acceptor membranes. Among these, the GTPase dynamin plays an important role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and it was recently found that dynamin can participate in a phagocytic process. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a compound called dynasore that has the ability to block the GTPase activity of dynamin. Dynasore acts as a potent inhibitor of endocytic pathways by blocking coated vesicle formation within seconds of its addition. Here, we investigated whether dynamin is involved in the entry process of T. cruzi in phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells by using dynasore. In this aim, peritoneal macrophages and LLC-MK2 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of dynasore before interaction with trypomastigotes, amastigotes or epimastigotes. We observed that, in both cell lines, the parasite internalization was drastically diminished (by greater than 90% in LLC-MK2 cells and 70% in peritoneal macrophages) when we used 100 µM dynasore. The T. cruzi adhesion index, however, was unaffected in either cell line. Analyzing these interactions by scanning electron microscopy and comparing peritoneal macrophages to LLC-MK2 cells revealed differences in the stage at which cell entry was blocked. In LLC-MK2 cells, this blockade is observed earlier than it is in peritoneal macrophages. In LLC-MK2 cells, the parasites were only associated with cellular microvilli, whereas in peritoneal macrophages, trypomastigotes were not completely engulfed by a host cell plasma membrane. Conclusions/Significance Taken

  10. Immune Protection against Trypanosoma cruzi Induced by TcVac4 in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio-Burgos, José E.; Zepeda-Escobar, José A.; de Oca-Jimenez, Roberto Montes; Estrada-Franco, José G.; Barbabosa-Pliego, Alberto; Ochoa-García, Laucel; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Rivas, Nancy; Peñuelas-Rivas, Giovanna; Val-Arreola, Margarita; Gupta, Shivali; Salazar-García, Felix; Garg, Nisha J.; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in southern parts of the American continent. Herein, we have tested the protective efficacy of a DNA-prime/T. rangeli-boost (TcVac4) vaccine in a dog (Canis familiaris) model. Dogs were immunized with two-doses of DNA vaccine (pcDNA3.1 encoding TcG1, TcG2, and TcG4 antigens plus IL-12- and GM-CSF-encoding plasmids) followed by two doses of glutaraldehyde-inactivated T. rangeli epimastigotes (TrIE); and challenged with highly pathogenic T. cruzi (SylvioX10/4) isolate. Dogs given TrIE or empty pcDNA3.1 were used as controls. We monitored post-vaccination and post-challenge infection antibody response by an ELISA, parasitemia by blood analysis and xenodiagnosis, and heart function by electrocardiography. Post-mortem anatomic and pathologic evaluation of the heart was conducted. TcVac4 induced a strong IgG response (IgG2>IgG1) that was significantly expanded post-infection, and moved to a nearly balanced IgG2/IgG1 response in chronic phase. In comparison, dogs given TrIE or empty plasmid DNA only developed high IgG titers with IgG2 predominance in response to T. cruzi infection. Blood parasitemia, tissue parasite foci, parasite transmission to triatomines, electrocardiographic abnormalities were significantly lower in TcVac4-vaccinated dogs than was observed in dogs given TrIE or empty plasmid DNA only. Macroscopic and microscopic alterations, the hallmarks of chronic Chagas disease, were significantly decreased in the myocardium of TcVac4-vaccinated dogs. We conclude that TcVac4 induced immunity was beneficial in providing resistance to T. cruzi infection, evidenced by control of chronic pathology of the heart and preservation of cardiac function in dogs. Additionally, TcVac4 vaccination decreased the transmission of parasites from vaccinated/infected animals to triatomines. PMID:25853654

  11. Long-term preservation of blood samples for diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Pérez, A C; Cura, E; Subías, E; Lansetti, J C; Segura, E L

    1990-03-01

    Feasability and suitability for field research of a whole-blood preservation method was evaluated through the screening of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in 1209 samples under different conditions. Antibody reactivity of paired samples from preserved capillary blood (CBP) and sera from venous blood (VBS) were studied by specific techniques. Over 96% concordance was found on indoor studies carried out with samples without storage or after 15 or 30 days preservation of CBP at 37 degrees C and VBS at -20 degrees C. Outdoor studies performed at field conditions, achieved a 92.1% concordance. PMID:2111039

  12. Distantiae Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi: A New Epidemiological Feature of Acute Chagas Disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; Bilac, Daniele; de Araújo, Vitor Antônio Louzada; Neto, Sócrates Fraga da Costa; Lorosa, Elias Seixas; da Silva, Luiz Felipe Coutinho Ferreira; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The new epidemiological scenario of orally transmitted Chagas disease that has emerged in Brazil, and mainly in the Amazon region, needs to be addressed with a new and systematic focus. Belém, the capital of Pará state, reports the highest number of acute Chagas disease (ACD) cases associated with the consumption of açaí juice. Methodology/Principal Findings The wild and domestic enzootic transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated in the two locations (Jurunas and Val-de Cães) that report the majority of the autochthonous cases of ACD in Belém city. Moreover, we evaluated the enzootic cycle on the three islands that provide most of the açaí fruit that is consumed in these localities. We employed parasitological and serological tests throughout to evaluate infectivity competence and exposure to T. cruzi. In Val-de-Cães, no wild mammal presented positive parasitological tests, and 56% seroprevalence was observed, with low serological titers. Three of 14 triatomines were found to be infected (TcI). This unexpected epidemiological picture does not explain the high number of autochthonous ACD cases. In Jurunas, the cases of ACD could not be autochthonous because of the absence of any enzootic cycle of T. cruzi. In contrast, in the 3 island areas from which the açaí fruit originates, 66.7% of wild mammals and two dogs displayed positive hemocultures, and 15.6% of triatomines were found to be infected by T. cruzi. Genotyping by mini-exon gene and PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I) targeting revealed that the mammals and triatomines from the islands harbored TcI and Trypanosoma rangeli in single and mixed infections. Conclusion/Significance These findings show that cases of Chagas disease in the urban area of Belém may be derived from infected triatomines coming together with the açaí fruits from distant islands. We term this new epidemiological feature of Chagas disease as “Distantiae transmission”. PMID:24854494

  13. Active penetration of Trypanosoma cruzi into host cells: historical considerations and current concepts

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wanderley; de Carvalho, Tecia M. Ulisses

    2013-01-01

    In the present short review, we analyze past experiments that addressed the interactions of intracellular pathogenic protozoa (Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, and Plasmodium) with host cells and the initial use of the term active penetration to indicate that a protozoan “crossed the host cell membrane, penetrating into the cytoplasm.” However, the subsequent use of transmission electron microscopy showed that, for all of the protozoans and cell types examined, endocytosis, classically defined as involving the formation of a membrane-bound vacuole, took place during the interaction process. As a consequence, the recently penetrated parasites are always within a vacuole, designated the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). PMID:23355838

  14. Soulamarin Isolated from Calophyllum brasiliense (Clusiaceae) Induces Plasma Membrane Permeabilization of Trypanosoma cruzi and Mytochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Alexandre; Tempone, Andre G.; Pinto, Erika G.; Mesquita, Juliana T.; Rodrigues, Eliana; Silva, Luciana Grus M.; Sartorelli, Patricia; Lago, João Henrique G.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. It has high mortality as well as morbidity rates and usually affects the poorer sections of the population. The development of new, less harmful and more effective drugs is a promising research target, since current standard treatments are highly toxic and administered for long periods. Fractioning of methanol (MeOH) extract of the stem bark of Calophyllum brasiliense (Clusiaceae) resulted in the isolation of the coumarin soulamarin, which was characterized by one- and two-dimensional 1H- and 13C NMR spectroscopy as well as ESI mass spectrometry. All data obtained were consistent with a structure of 6-hydroxy-4-propyl-5-(3-hydroxy-2-methyl-1-oxobutyl)-6″,6″-dimethylpyrane-[2″,3″:8,7]-benzopyran-2-one for soulamarin. Colorimetric MTT assays showed that soulamarin induces trypanocidal effects, and is also active against trypomastigotes. Hemolytic activity tests showed that soulamarin is unable to induce any observable damage to erythrocytes (cmax. = 1,300 µM). The lethal action of soulamarin against T. cruzi was investigated by using amino(4-(6-(amino(iminio)methyl)-1H-indol-2-yl)phenyl)methaniminium chloride (SYTOX Green and 1H,5H,11H,15H-Xantheno[2,3,4-ij:5,6,7-i′j′]diquinolizin-18-ium, 9-[4-(chloromethyl)phenyl]-2,3,6,7,12,13,16,17-octahydro-chloride (MitoTracker Red) as fluorimetric probes. With the former, soulamarin showed dose-dependent permeability of the plasma membrane, relative to fully permeable Triton X-100-treated parasites. Spectrofluorimetric and fluorescence microscopy with the latter revealed that soulamarin also induced a strong depolarization (ca. 97%) of the mitochondrial membrane potential. These data demonstrate that the lethal action of soulamarin towards T. cruzi involves damages to the plasma membrane of the parasite and mitochondrial dysfunction without the additional generation of reactive oxygen species, which may have also contributed to the death of

  15. Expression, purification and kinetic characterization of His-tagged glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cheleski, Juliana; Freitas, Renato F; Wiggers, Helton José; Rocha, Josmar R; de Araújo, Ana Paula Ulian; Montanari, Carlos A

    2011-04-01

    Trypanosomes are flagellated protozoa responsible for serious parasitic diseases that have been classified by the World Health Organization as tropical sicknesses of major importance. One important drug target receiving considerable attention is the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (T. cruzi Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TcGAPDH); EC 1.2.1.12). TcGAPDH is a key enzyme in the glycolytic pathway of T. cruzi and catalyzes the oxidative phosphorylation of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (1,3-BPG) coupled to the reduction of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, (NAD(+)) to NADH, the reduced form. Herein, we describe the cloning of the T. cruzi gene for TcGAPDH into the pET-28a(+) vector, its expression as a tagged protein in Escherichia coli, purification and kinetic characterization. The His(6)-tagged TcGAPDH was purified by affinity chromatography. Enzyme activity assays for the recombinant His(6)-TcGAPDH were carried out spectrophotometrically to determine the kinetic parameters. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M)(app)) determined for D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and NAD(+) were 352±21 and 272±25 μM, respectively, which were consistent with the values for the untagged enzyme reported in the literature. We have demonstrated by the use of Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) that this vector modification resulted in activity preserved for a higher period. We also report here the use of response surface methodology (RSM) to determine the region of optimal conditions for enzyme activity. A quadratic model was developed by RSM to describe the enzyme activity in terms of pH and temperature as independent variables. According to the RMS contour plots and variance analysis, the maximum enzyme activity was at 29.1°C and pH 8.6. Above 37°C, the enzyme activity starts to fall, which may be related to previous

  16. Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi that are recognized by human sera and induce protective immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Breganó, José Wander; Picão, Renata Cristina; Graça, Viviane Krominski; Menolli, Rafael Andrade; Itow Jankevicius, Shiduca; Pinge Filho, P; Jankevicius, José Vítor

    2003-12-01

    The immune cross-reactivity between Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan that causes Chagas' disease, and Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid that infects tomatoes, was studied. Sera from patients with Chagas' disease presented a strong reactivity with P. serpens antigens by conventional serological assays such as indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and direct agglutination test (DAT), confirmed after cross-absorption experiments. The results show that this protozoan is highly immunogenic and that rabbit and mouse hyperimmune serum raised against T. cruzi or P. serpens was able to recognize both T. cruzi and P. serpens antigens in immunofluorescence and agglutination assays. The antigenic cross-reactivity between T. cruzi and P. serpens was also demonstrated in vivo. BALB/c mice immunized by the intraperitoneal or oral route with P. serpens and later challenged with a lethal inoculum of T. cruzi blood forms showed a significant decrease in parasitemia and increase in survival compared to controls. A practical implication of these findings is that the ingestion by humans or animals of living plant trypanosomatids present in naturally infected edible fruits could potentially prime the immune response to T. cruzi antigens and interfere with the development of T. cruzi infection. PMID:14642311

  17. Candidate targets for Multilocus Sequence Typing of Trypanosoma cruzi: validation using parasite stocks from the Chaco Region and a set of reference strains.

    PubMed

    Lauthier, Juan J; Tomasini, Nicolás; Barnabé, Christian; Rumi, María M Monje; D'Amato, Anahí M Alberti; Ragone, Paula G; Yeo, Matthew; Lewis, Michael D; Llewellyn, Martin S; Basombrío, Miguel A; Miles, Michael A; Tibayrenc, Michel; Diosque, Patricio

    2012-03-01

    A Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) scheme was designed and applied to a set of 20 Trypanosoma cruzi stocks belonging to three main discrete typing units (T. cruzi I, V and VI) from a geographically restricted Chagas disease endemic area in Argentina, 12 reference strains comprising two from each of the six main discrete typing units of the parasite (T. cruzi I-VI), and one T. cruzi marinkellei strain. DNA fragments (≅400-bp) from 10 housekeeping genes were sequenced. A total of 4178 bp were analyzed for each stock. In all, 154 polymorphic sites were identified. Ninety-five sites were heterozygous in at least one analyzed stock. Seventeen diploid sequence types were identified from 32 studied T. cruzi stocks (including the reference strains). All stocks were correctly assigned to their corresponding discrete typing units. We propose this MLST scheme as provisional, with scope for improvement by studying new gene targets on a more diverse sample of stocks, in order to define an optimized MLST scheme for T. cruzi. This approach is an excellent candidate to become the gold standard for T. cruzi genetic typing. We suggest that MLST will have a strong impact on molecular epidemiological studies of Chagas disease and the phylogenetics of its causative agent. PMID:22210092

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi TcI and TcII transmission among wild carnivores, small mammals and dogs in a conservation unit and surrounding areas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Fabiana Lopes; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; Arrais, Ricardo Corassa; Santos, Jean Pierre; Lima, Valdirene dos Santos; Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Cordeir-Estrela, Pedro; D'Andrea, Paulo Sérgio; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2013-02-01

    Aiming to better understand the ecological aspects of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycles, wild carnivores, small mammals and dogs were examined for T. cruzi infection in the Serra da Canastra National Park region, Brazil. Isolates were genotyped using mini-exon gene and PCR-RFLP (1f8 and H3) genomic targets. Trypanosoma cruzi transmission was well established in the area and occurred in both wild and peridomestic environments. Dog seroprevalence was 29·4% (63/214) and TcI and TcII genotypes, besides mixed infections were observed. Only TcI was detected in wild mammals. Marsupials displayed lower relative abundance, but a high prevalence of positive haemocultures (4/22), whereas rodents displayed positive haemocultures (9/113) mainly in the abundant Akodon montensis and Cerradomys subflavus species. The felid Leopardus pardalis was the only carnivore to display positive haemoculture and was captured in the same region where the small mammal prevalence of T. cruzi infection was high. Two canid species, Chrysocyon brachyurus and Cerdocyon thous, were serologically positive for T. cruzi infection (4/8 and 8/39, respectively), probably related to their capacity to exploit different ecological niches. Herein, dog infection not only signals T. cruzi transmission but also the genotypes present. Distinct transmission strategies of the T. cruzi genotypes are discussed. PMID:23062278

  19. Immunization of mice with a Trypanosoma cruzi-like strain isolated from a bat: predictive factors for involvement of eosinophiles in tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Nascentes, Gabriel Antonio Nogueira; Meira, Wendell Sérgio Ferreira; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Ramírez, Luis Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The granules of eosinophiles are cytotoxic to Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote and amastigote forms and to several cell types of the host, revealing their role in either parasite elimination or the production of tissue lesions. In this study, we evaluated the biological characteristics of T. cruzi infection that are responsible for the increase in tissue eosinophile levels in mice previously immunized with a bat isolated T. cruzi-like strain that does not infect mice. Nonisogeneic mice were divided into 24 groups that received from zero to three inoculations of T. cruzi-like RM1 strain, with or without adjuvant, followed by challenge with T. cruzi VIC or JG strains. Uni- and multivariate comparisons were performed comparing the tissue eosinophile levels with the parasitemia peak, severity of myositis in skeletal muscle, phase of infection, and the immunization strategies induced by the T. cruzi-like strain (adjuvant, number of reinoculations, and parasites). Although the severity of inflammation was higher in the acute phase, the score of tissue eosinophiles was similar in the acute and chronic phases of infection. In addition, there was a positive correlation among eosinophile levels and parasitemia peak. In the chronic phase, a greater eosinophile count was accompanied by an augmentation of myositis. Regardless of the phase of infection, we observed a positive correlation between the intensity of eosinophile infiltration and the number of sensitizations with T. cruzi-like strain. The multivariate analysis showed that the peak of parasitemia, number of inoculations with the T. cruzi-like strain, and severity of myositis were associated with greater tissue eosinophilia, in comparison with adjuvant, T. cruzi strains used in the challenge or tissue parasitism. Therefore, tissue eosinophile levels proved to be an important parameter in the pathogenesis of experimental Chagas disease in the acute and chronic phases of infection and might be related to reinfections

  20. Structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase of Trypanosoma cruzi in the folate-free state and in complex with two antifolate drugs, trimetrexate and methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Senkovich, Olga; Schormann, Norbert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2010-11-22

    The flagellate protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the pathogenic agent of Chagas disease (also called American trypanosomiasis), which causes approximately 50 000 deaths annually. The disease is endemic in South and Central America. The parasite is usually transmitted by a blood-feeding insect vector, but can also be transmitted via blood transfusion. In the chronic form, Chagas disease causes severe damage to the heart and other organs. There is no satisfactory treatment for chronic Chagas disease and no vaccine is available. There is an urgent need for the development of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of T. cruzi infection and therefore for the identification of potential drug targets. The dihydrofolate reductase activity of T. cruzi, which is expressed as part of a bifunctional enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS), is a potential target for drug development. In order to gain a detailed understanding of the structure-function relationship of T. cruzi DHFR, the three-dimensional structure of this protein in complex with various ligands is being studied. Here, the crystal structures of T. cruzi DHFR-TS with three different compositions of the DHFR domain are reported: the folate-free state, the complex with the lipophilic antifolate trimetrexate (TMQ) and the complex with the classical antifolate methotrexate (MTX). These structures reveal that the enzyme is a homodimer with substantial interactions between the two TS domains of neighboring subunits. In contrast to the enzymes from Cryptosporidium hominis and Plasmodium falciparum, the DHFR and TS active sites of T. cruzi lie on the same side of the monomer. As in other parasitic DHFR-TS proteins, the N-terminal extension of the T. cruzi enzyme is involved in extensive interactions between the two domains. The DHFR active site of the T. cruzi enzyme shows subtle differences compared with its human counterpart. These differences may be exploited for the development of

  1. First finding of Trypanosoma cruzi II in vampire bats from a district free of domestic vector-borne transmission in Northeastern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Argibay, Hernán D; Orozco, M Marcela; Cardinal, M Victoria; Rinas, Miguel A; Arnaiz, María; Mena Segura, Carlos; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2016-09-01

    Establishing the putative links between sylvatic and domestic transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is of public health relevance. We conducted three surveys to assess T. cruzi infection in wild mammals from a rural and a preserved area in Misiones Province, Northeastern Argentina, which had recently been declared free of vector- and blood-borne transmission of human T. cruzi infection. A total of 200 wild mammals were examined by xenodiagnosis (XD) and/or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the hyper-variable region of kinetoplast DNA minicircles of T. cruzi (kDNA-PCR). The overall prevalence of T. cruzi infection was 8%. Nine (16%) of 57 Didelphis albiventris opossums and two (7%) of 29 Desmodus rotundus vampire bats were positive by both XD and kDNA-PCR. Additionally, one D. rotundus positive for T. cruzi by kDNA-PCR tested positive by satellite-DNA-PCR (SAT-DNA-PCR). The T. cruzi-infected bats were captured indoors and in the yard of a vacant dwelling. All D. albiventris were infected with TcI and both XD-positive D. rotundus by TcII. Fifty-five opossum cubs within the marsupium were negative by XD. The mean infectiousness to the vector was 62% in D. albiventris and 50% in D. rotundus. Mice experimentally infected with a parasite isolate from a vampire bat displayed lesions typically caused by T. cruzi. Our study documents the presence of the genotype TcII in a sylvatic host for the first time in Argentina, and the occurrence of two transmission cycles of T. cruzi in a district free of domestic vector-borne transmission. PMID:27220254

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Triatoma sordida before and after community-wide residual insecticide spraying in the Argentinean Chaco.

    PubMed

    Macchiaverna, Natalia P; Gaspe, María S; Enriquez, Gustavo F; Tomassone, Laura; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Cardinal, Marta V

    2015-03-01

    Triatoma sordida is a secondary vector of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Gran Chaco and Cerrado eco-regions where it frequently infests peridomestic and domestic habitats. In a well-defined area of the humid Argentine Chaco, very few T. sordida were found infected when examined by optical microscopic examination (OM). In order to further assess the role of T. sordida and the relative magnitude of subpatent bug infections, we examined the insects for T. cruzi infection, parasite Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) and bloodmeal sources using various molecular techniques. Among 205 bugs with a negative or no OM-based diagnosis, the prevalence of infection determined by kDNA-PCR was nearly the same in bugs captured before (6.3%) and 4 months after insecticide spraying (6.4%). On average, these estimates were sixfold higher than the prevalence of infection based on OM (1.1%). Only TcI was identified, a DTU typically associated with opossums and rodents. Chickens and turkeys were the only bloodmeal sources identified in the infected specimens and the main local hosts at the bugs' capture sites. As birds are refractory to T. cruzi infection, further studies are needed to identify the infectious bloodmeal hosts. The persistent finding of infected T. sordida after community-wide insecticide spraying highlights the need of sustained vector surveillance to effectively prevent T. cruzi transmission in the domestic and peridomestic habitats. PMID:25579426

  3. Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma cruzi: molecular characterization of genes encoding putative calcium-binding proteins, highly conserved in trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Porcel, B M; Bontempi, E J; Henriksson, J; Rydåker, M; Aslund, L; Segura, E L; Pettersson, U; Ruiz, A M

    1996-12-01

    Genes encoding a 29-kDa flagellar calcium-binding protein (F29) in Trypanosoma cruzi, strongly homologous to EF-hand calcium-binding protein-encoding genes previously reported in this parasite, were isolated by immunoscreening. F29 is encoded by a number of very similar genes, highly conserved among different T. cruzi isolates. The genes are located on a pair of homologous chromosomes, arranged in one or two clusters of tandem repeats. PCR amplification of Trypanosoma rangeli genomic DNA, using primers derived from the T. cruzi F29 sequence made it possible to isolate the homologous gene in T. rangeli, encoding a 23-kDa protein called TrCaBP. Gene sequence comparisons showed homology to EF-hand calcium-binding proteins from T. cruzi (82.8%), Trypanosoma brucei brucei (60.2%), and Entamoeba histolytica (28.4%). Northern blot analysis revealed that the TrCaBP gene is expressed in T. rangeli as a polyadenylated transcript. The TrCaBP-encoding genes are present in at least 20 copies per cell, organized in tandem arrays, on large T. rangeli chromosomes in some isolates and on two smaller ones in others. This gene, however, seems to be absent from Leishmania. PMID:8948328

  4. New sylvatic hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi and their reservoir competence in the humid Chaco of Argentina: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Orozco, M Marcela; Enriquez, Gustavo F; Alvarado-Otegui, Julián A; Cardinal, M Victoria; Schijman, Alejandro G; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2013-05-01

    A four-year longitudinal study of the structure of sylvatic transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi, reservoir host competence and parasite discrete typing units was conducted in a disturbed rural area of the humid Chaco in Argentina. Among 190 mammals examined by xenodiagnosis and polymerase chain reaction amplification, the composite prevalence of infection was substantially higher in Dasypus novemcinctus armadillos (57.7%) and Didelphis albiventris opossums (38.1%) than in Euphractus sexcinctus (20.0%), Tolypeutes matacus (12.5%), and Chaetophractus vellerosus (6.3%) armadillos. Trypanosoma cruzi was detected for the first time in Thylamys pusilla small opossums and in two unidentified small rodents. Infection was spatially aggregated only in armadillos. All Didelphis were infected with T. cruzi I and all armadillo species were infected with T. cruzi III, implying two distinct sylvatic cycles with no inputs from the domestic cycle. Dasypus armadillos and Didelphis opossums were much more infectious to vectors than other armadillos, small opossums, or rodents. PMID:23530075

  5. CHICKEN COOPS, Triatoma dimidiata INFESTATION AND ITS INFECTION WITH Trypanosoma cruzi IN A RURAL VILLAGE OF YUCATAN, MEXICO

    PubMed Central

    KOYOC-CARDEÑA, Edgar; MEDINA-BARREIRO, Anuar; ESCOBEDO-ORTEGÓN, Francisco Javier; RODRÍGUEZ-BUENFIL, Jorge Carlos; BARRERA-PÉREZ, Mario; REYES-NOVELO, Enrique; CHABLÉ-SANTOS, Juan; SELEM-SALAS, Celia; VAZQUEZ-PROKOPEC, Gonzalo; MANRIQUE-SAIDE, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This study longitudinally investigated the association between Triatoma dimidiata infestation, triatomine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi and household/backyard environmental characteristics in 101 homesteads in Molas and Yucatan, Mexico, between November 2009 (rainy season) and May 2010 (dry season). Logistic regression models tested the associations between insect infestation/infection and potential household-level risk factors. A total of 200 T. dimidiata were collected from 35.6% of the homesteads, mostly (73%) from the peridomicile. Of all the insects collected, 48% were infected with T. cruzi. Infected insects were collected in 31.6% of the homesteads (54.1% and 45.9% intra- and peridomiciliary, respectively). Approximately 30% of all triatomines collected were found in chicken coops. The presence of a chicken coop in the backyard of a homestead was significantly associated with both the odds of finding T. dimidiata (OR = 4.10, CI 95% = 1.61-10.43, p = 0.003) and the presence of triatomines infected with T. cruzi (OR = 3.37, CI 95% = 1.36-8.33, p = 0.006). The results of this study emphasize the relevance of chicken coops as a putative source of T. dimidiata populations and a potential risk for T. cruzi transmission. PMID:26200970

  6. Role of CCL3/MIP-1α and CCL5/RANTES during acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rats

    PubMed Central

    Roffê, Ester; Oliveira, Fabiano; Souza, Adriano L.S.; Pinho, Vanessa; Souza, Danielle G.; Souza, Patrícia R.S.; Russo, Remo C.; Santiago, Helton C.; Romanha, Álvaro J.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Teixeira, Mauro M.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas’ disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection and is characterized by chronic fibrogenic inflammation and heart dysfunction. Chemokines are produced during infection and drive tissue inflammation. In rats, acute infection is characterized by intense myocarditis and regression of inflammation after control of parasitism. We investigated the role of CCL3 and CCL5 during infection by using DNA vaccination encoding for each chemokine separately or simultaneously. MetRANTES treatment was used to evaluate the role of CCR1 and CCR5, the receptors for CCL3 and CCL5. Vaccination with CCL3 or CCL5 increased heart parasitism and decreased local IFN-γ production, but did not influence intensity of inflammation. Simultaneous treatment with both plasmids or treatment with MetRANTES enhanced cardiac inflammation, fibrosis and parasitism. In conclusion, chemokines CCL3 and CCL5 are relevant, but not essential, for control of T. cruzi infection in rats. On the other hand, combined blockade of these chemokines or their receptors enhanced tissue inflammation and fibrosis, clearly contrasting with available data in murine models of T. cruzi infection. These data reinforce the important role of chemokines during T. cruzi infection but suggest that caution must be taken when expanding the therapeutic modulation of the chemokine system in mice to the human infection. PMID:20452453

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi Causes Paralyzing Systemic Necrotizing Vasculitis Driven by Pathogen-Specific Type I Immunity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Roffê, Ester; Marino, Ana Paula M P; Weaver, Joseph; Wan, Wuzhou; de Araújo, Fernanda F; Hoffman, Victoria; Santiago, Helton C; Murphy, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Infectious agents are often considered potential triggers of chronic inflammatory disease, including autoimmunity; however, direct evidence is usually lacking. Here we show that following control of acute infection of mice with the myotropic Colombiana strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, parasites persisted in tissue at low levels associated with development of systemic necrotizing vasculitis. Lesions occurred in many but not all organs and tissues, with skeletal muscle arteries being the most severely affected, and were associated with myositis, atrophy, paresis/paralysis, and death. Histopathology showed fibrinoid vascular necrosis, rare amastigote nests within skeletal muscle myocytes, and massive leukocyte infiltrates composed mainly of inflammatory monocytes, F4/80(+)macrophages, and T. cruzi tetramer-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes capable of producing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) but not interleukin-17 (IL-17). T. cruzi-specific IgG was detected in sera from infected mice, but antibody deposits and neutrophilic inflammation were not features of the lesions. Thus,T. cruzi infection of mice may be a specific infectious trigger of paralyzing systemic necrotizing vasculitis most severely affecting skeletal muscle, driven by pathogen-specific type I immune responses. PMID:26857570

  8. Critical importance of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway for Trypanosoma cruzi growth in the mammalian host cell cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Muneaki; Morales, Jorge; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Inoue, Syou; Inoue, Masayuki; Kita, Kiyoshi; Harada, Shigeharu; Tanaka, Akiko; Aoki, Takashi; Nara, Takeshi

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established Trypanosoma cruzi lacking the gene for carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of the cpsII gene significantly reduced the growth of epimastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In particular, the CPSII-null mutant severely retarded intracellular growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The de novo pyrimidine pathway is critical for the parasite growth in the host cell. -- Abstract: The intracellular parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. In general, pyrimidine nucleotides are supplied by both de novo biosynthesis and salvage pathways. While epimastigotes-an insect form-possess both activities, amastigotes-an intracellular replicating form of T. cruzi-are unable to mediate the uptake of pyrimidine. However, the requirement of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis for parasite growth and survival has not yet been elucidated. Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo biosynthetic pathway, and increased CPSII activity is associated with the rapid proliferation of tumor cells. In the present study, we showed that disruption of the T. cruzicpsII gene significantly reduced parasite growth. In particular, the growth of amastigotes lacking the cpsII gene was severely suppressed. Thus, the de novo pyrimidine pathway is important for proliferation of T. cruzi in the host cell cytoplasm and represents a promising target for chemotherapy against Chagas disease.

  9. Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) and Its Murine Functional Homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fabrício C.; Mendes-Junior, Celso T.; Silva, Maria C.; Tristão, Fabrine S. M.; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Soares, Edson G.; Menezes, Jean G.; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Roberto O.; Marin-Neto, José A.; Silva, João S.; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding) and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus) in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3′UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate). HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2) genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection. PMID:25688175

  10. The role of selenium in intestinal motility and morphology in a murine model of Typanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Andréa Pereira; Sieberg, Ryan; Li, Hua; Cahill, Hannah R.; Zhao, Dazhi; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2010-01-01

    Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi causes mega-syndromes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in humans and animals. In the present study, we employed magnetic resonance imaging to non-invasively monitor the effect of selenium supplementation on alterations in the GI tract of T. cruzi-infected mice. CD1 mice infected with T. cruzi (Brazil strain) exhibited dilatation of the intestines similar to that we recently reported in infected C57Bl/6 mice. The average intestine lumen diameter increased by 65% and the increase was reduced to 29% in mice supplemented with 2 ppm selenium in the drinking water. When supplemented with 3 ppm selenium in chow the lumen diameter was also significantly reduced although the difference between the infected and infected supplemented mice was smaller. Intestinal motility in infected mice fed with selenium-enriched chow was increased compared with infected mice fed with normal unsupplemented chow and was not significantly different from intestinal motility in uninfected mice. We suggest that Se may be used to modulate the inflammatory, immunological, and/or antioxidant responses involved in intestinal disturbances caused by T. cruzi infection. PMID:20195635

  11. Food web connections and the transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma evansi (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae) in the Pantanal Region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Herrera, H M; Rocha, F L; Lisboa, C V; Rademaker, V; Mourão, G M; Jansen, A M

    2011-07-01

    We examined by parasitological tests (hemocultures and buffy coat) infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi in blood samples from Leopardus pardalis, Cerdocyon thous and domestic dogs. Besides, 25 T. cruzi isolates previously derived from feral pigs and small wild mammals were here characterized by miniexon gene and demonstrated to be in the TcI genotype. Herein, we make an overall analysis of the transmission cycle of both trypanosome species in the light of the assemblage of data collected over the last seven years. The carnivore Nasua nasua was confirmed to play a major role in the transmission cycles of both T. cruzi and T. evansi since it was the species that had the higher prevalence and higher parasitemias by both flagellate species. In addition, our results show that both trypanosomatid species may be found throughout the Pantanal landscape, in all forest strata, as shown by the infection of carnivore, arboreal and terrestrial scansorial marsupial species in complex and seasonal transmission cycles. We propose that transmission of T. cruzi and T. evansi in the southern Pantanal region takes place via an intricate ecological trophic network involving generalist and specialist mammal species that are linked through a robust food-web connection. PMID:21600622

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi MSH2: Functional analyses on different parasite strains provide evidences for a role on the oxidative stress response☆

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Priscila C.; Silva, Viviane G.; Furtado, Carolina; Machado-Silva, Alice; DaRocha, Wanderson D.; Peloso, Eduardo F.; Gadelha, Fernanda R.; Medeiros, Marisa H.G.; Lana, Gustavo de Carvalho; Chen, Ying; Barnes, Rebecca L.; Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; McCulloch, Richard; Machado, Carlos Renato; Teixeira, Santuza M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Components of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway are major players in processes known to generate genetic diversity, such as mutagenesis and DNA recombination. Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease has a highly heterogeneous population, composed of a pool of strains with distinct characteristics. Studies with a number of molecular markers identified up to six groups in the T. cruzi population, which showed distinct levels of genetic variability. To investigate the molecular basis for such differences, we analyzed the T. cruzi MSH2 gene, which encodes a key component of MMR, and showed the existence of distinct isoforms of this protein. Here we compared cell survival rates after exposure to genotoxic agents and levels of oxidative stress-induced DNA in different parasite strains. Analyses of msh2 mutants in both T. cruzi and T. brucei were also used to investigate the role of Tcmsh2 in the response to various DNA damaging agents. The results suggest that the distinct MSH2 isoforms have differences in their activity. More importantly, they also indicate that, in addition to its role in MMR, TcMSH2 acts in the parasite response to oxidative stress through a novel mitochondrial function that may be conserved in T. brucei. PMID:21073906

  13. The Brighter (and Evolutionarily Older) Face of the Metabolic Syndrome: Evidence from Trypanosoma Cruzi Infection in CD-1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brima, Wunnie; Kurland, Irwin; Pessin, Jeffrey E.; Zima, Tomas; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Weiss, Louis M.

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, results in chronic infection that leads to cardiomyopathy with increased mortality and morbidity in endemic regions. In a companion study, our group found that a high fat diet protected mice from Trypanosoma cruzi-induced myocardial damage, and significantly reduced post-infection mortality. In the present study, the lethality of T. cruzi (Brazil strain) infection in CD-1 mice was reduced from 55% to 20% by an 8 week pre-feeding of a high fat diet (HFD) to induce obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The addition of metformin reduced mortality to 3%. It is an interesting observation as both the high fat diet and metformin, which are known to differentially attenuate host metabolism, effectively modified mortality in T. cruzi infected mice. In humans, the metabolic syndrome, as presently construed, produces immune activation and metabolic alterations that promote complications of obesity and diseases of later life, such as myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and cancer. Using an evolutionary approach, we hypothesized that for millions of years, the channeling of host resources into immune defenses starting early in life ameliorated the effects of infectious diseases, especially chronic infections, such as tuberculosis, and Chagas disease. In economically developed countries in recent times, with control of the common devastating infections, epidemic obesity, and lengthening of life span, the dwindling benefits of the immune activation in the first half of life have been overshadowed by the explosion of the syndrome's negative effects in later life. PMID:25613819

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi Immune Response Modulation Decreases Microbiota in Rhodnius prolixus Gut and Is Crucial for Parasite Survival and Development

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Daniele P.; Moraes, Caroline S.; Gonzalez, Marcelo S.; Ratcliffe, Norman A.; Azambuja, Patrícia; Garcia, Eloi S.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi in order to complete its development in the digestive tract of Rhodnius prolixus needs to overcome the immune reactions and microbiota trypanolytic activity of the gut. We demonstrate that in R. prolixus following infection with epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi clone Dm28c and, in comparison with uninfected control insects, the midgut contained (i) fewer bacteria, (ii) higher parasite numbers, and (iii) reduced nitrite and nitrate production and increased phenoloxidase and antibacterial activities. In addition, in insects pre-treated with antibiotic and then infected with Dm28c, there were also reduced bacteria numbers and a higher parasite load compared with insects solely infected with parasites. Furthermore, and in contrast to insects infected with Dm28c, infection with T. cruzi Y strain resulted in a slight decreased numbers of gut bacteria but not sufficient to mediate a successful parasite infection. We conclude that infection of R. prolixus with the T. cruzi Dm28c clone modifies the host gut immune responses to decrease the microbiota population and these changes are crucial for the parasite development in the insect gut. PMID:22574189

  15. Exploring the association between Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rural communities and environmental changes in the southern Gran Chaco.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Mariana Laura; Hoyos, Laura; Cabido, Marcelo; Catalá, Silvia Susana; Gorla, David Eladio

    2012-03-01

    The association between land use and land cover changes between 1979-2004 in a 2.26-million-hectare area south of the Gran Chaco region and Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rural communities was analysed. The extent of cultural land, open and closed forests and shrubland up to 3,000 m around rural communities in the north, northwest and west of the province of Córdoba was estimated using Landsat satellite imagery. The T. cruzi prevalence was estimated with a cross-sectional serological survey conducted in the rural communities. The land cover showed the same patterns in the 1979, 1999 and 2004 satellite imagery in both the northwest and west regions, with shrinking regions of cultured land and expanding closed forests away from the community. The closed forests and agricultural land coverage in the north region showed the same trend as in the northwest and west regions in 1979 but not in 1999 or 2004. In the latter two years, the coverage remote from the communities was either constant or changed in opposite ways from that of the northwest and west regions. The changes in closed forests and cultured vegetation alone did not have a significant, direct relationship with the occurrence of rural communities with at least one person infected by T. cruzi. This study suggests that the overall decrease in the prevalence of T. cruzi is a consequence of a combined effect of vector control activities and changes in land use and land cover. PMID:22415263

  16. Serological survey of Leishmania infantum and Trypanosoma cruzi in dogs from urban areas of Brazil and Colombia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leishmania infantum and Trypanosoma cruzi are zoonotic parasites that are endemic throughout many parts of Latin America. Infected dogs play an important role in transmission of both parasites to humans. A serological survey of Leishmania and Trypanosoma infection was conducted on 365 dogs from São ...

  17. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Schoolchildren and in Pregnant Women from an Amazonian Region in Orellana Province, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Carrera Vargas, Caty; Narváez, Alberto Orlando; Muzzio Aroca, Jenny; Shiguango, Gonzalo; Robles, Luiggi Martini; Herrera, Claudia; Dumonteil, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and about 230,000 persons are estimated to be infected in Ecuador. However, limited studies have been performed in the Amazon region, on the eastern side of the country. We evaluated here the seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in 12 rural villages of the Loreto canton, Orellana Province in schoolchildren aged 5-15 years and in pregnant women. A total of 1,649 blood samples were tested for Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect hemaglutination, and discordant samples were tested by indirect immunofluorescence assay. We detected a seroprevalence of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies of 1.3% in schoolchildren aged 5-15 years, indicating the persistence of a constant and active vectorial transmission in the Loreto County and confirming the need of the implementation of nonconventional vector control. We also observed a seroprevalence of 3.8% in pregnant women, indicating a clear risk of congenital transmission. Further studies should help define this risk more precisely and implement current international guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment, and care of these cases. PMID:26283751

  18. Toxicity and Loss of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Induced by Alkyl Gallates in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Andréo, Rogério; Regasini, Luís Octávio; Petrônio, Maicon Segalla; Chiari-Andréo, Bruna Galdorfini; Tansini, Aline; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; Cicarelli, Regina Maria Barretto

    2015-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease is a debilitating disease representing an important social problem that affects, approximately, 10 million people in the world. The main aggravating factor of this situation is the lack of an effective drug to treat the different stages of this disease. In this context, the search for trypanocidal substances isolated from plants, synthetic or semi synthetic molecules, is an important strategy. Here, the trypanocidal potential of gallates was assayed in epimastigotes forms of T. cruzi and also, the interference of these substances on the mitochondrial membrane potential of the parasites was assessed, allowing the study of the mechanism of action of the gallates in the T. cruzi organisms. Regarding the preliminary structure-activity relationships, the side chain length of gallates plays crucial role for activity. Nonyl, decyl, undecyl, and dodecyl gallates showed potent antitrypanosomal effect (IC50 from 1.46 to 2.90 μM) in contrast with benznidazole (IC50 = 34.0 μM). Heptyl gallate showed a strong synergistic activity with benznidazole, reducing by 105-fold the IC50 of benznidazole. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by these esters was revealed. Tetradecyl gallate induced a loss of 53% of the mitochondrial membrane potential, at IC50 value.

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi in the scent glands of Didelphis marsupialis: the kinetics of colonization.

    PubMed

    Carreira, J C; Jansen, A M; de Nazareth Meirelles, M; Costa e Silva, F; Lenzi, H L

    2001-03-01

    This study examined the dynamics of colonization of Trypanosoma cruzi in the scent glands of the opossum Didelphis marsupialis following direct inoculation with 10(5) epimastigotes of isolate G-49 (an opossum-derived strain). One, three, and five days, 1 month, and 1 year after inoculation, scent glands were fixed for analysis using brightfield and electron microscopies. One day after inoculation the parasites, mainly as epimastigotes, were randomly distributed into the lumen. From the third day on, the parasites still in the form of epimastigotes tended to concentrate closer to the epithelium. The flagellates reached the definitive distribution pattern on the fifth day, when they formed huge clusters deep into the foveae. In samples collected 1 month and 1 year after inoculation, the ratio of epimastigotes:trypomastigotes was 1:1, with epimastigotes predominating near the epithelium and trypomastigotes far from it. Our observations suggest that T. cruzi grows continuously in the scent glands and does not depend on adhesion to promote metacyclogenesis. Metacyclogenesis far from the epithelium seems to be an important selective advantage to both host and parasite, since it assures the elimination of the infective forms of the parasite when the host expels the glands' contents, which occurs in frightening situations or at times of stress. The morphological characteristics of infected and noninfected scent glands using transmission and scanning electron microscopies were also described. PMID:11312575

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi: correlations of biological aspects of the life cycle in mice and triatomines.

    PubMed

    Lima, V S; Mangia, R H; Carreira, J C; Marchevsky, R S; Marchewski, R S; Jansen, A M

    1999-01-01

    The infection pattern in Swiss mice and Triatomine bugs (Rhodnius neglectus) of eleven clones and the original stock of a Trypanosoma cruzi isolate, derived from a naturally infected Didelphis marsupialis, were biochemically and biologically characterized. The clones and the original isolate were in the same zymodeme (Z1) except that two clones were found to be in zymodeme 2 when tested with G6PDH. Although infective, neither the original isolate nor the clones were highly virulent for the mice and lesions were only observed in mice infected with the original stock and one of the clones (F8). All clones and the original isolate infected bugs well while only the original isolate and clones E2 and F3 yielded high metacyclogenesis rates. An observed correlation between absence of lesions in the mammal host and high metacyclogenesis rates in the invertebrate host suggest a evolutionary trade off i.e. a fitness increase in one trait which is accompanied by a fitness reduction in a different one. Our results suggest that in a species as heterogeneous as T. cruzi, a cooperation effect among the subpopulations should be considered. PMID:10348990

  1. An ecological overview on the factors that drives to Trypanosoma cruzi oral transmission.

    PubMed

    de Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón; González, Oscar Noya

    2015-11-01

    American trypanosomiasis is one of the few native parasites of this continent. As a zoonosis, Trypanosoma cruzi infects about 180 species out of 25 families of mammals. Its regular transmission is through triatomines, which can easily transmit parasites either by the skin route (contamination of mammals skin with their feces) or by oral route (ingestion of food contaminated with complete triatomines or their feces) and additionally through haematogenous via (congenital and transfusional) and by tissues (transplants). The oral route, which seems to be the ancestral form of transmission to wild and domestic mammals, has recently become more important after the success achieved in the control of domicile vectors using residual pesticides. From its initial diagnosis in 1967, tens of oral outbreaks have been diagnosed mostly in the Brazilian Amazon and subsequently in other four countries in South America. Environmental imbalance caused by man through the invasion and deforestation of woodlands, results in reduction of biodiversity of mammals as food source for triatomines, affecting the "dilution effect" of T. cruzi in the nature increasing the risk of human infection. On the other hand, triatomines invade houses looking for new blood sources. One of the consequences of domiciliated triatomines is the food contamination spread, especially in home-made juices, which has been the source of infection of most oral outbreaks. Other biotic and abiotic factors help to explain the recent increase of oral transmission outbreaks of Chagas disease, distributed in nine eco-regions of America. PMID:26066984

  2. Acute heart inflammation: ultrastructural and functional aspects of macrophages elicited by Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C N

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The heart is the main target organ of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas' disease, a significant public health issue and still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America. During the acute disease, tissue damage in the heart is related to the intense myocardium parasitism. To control parasite multiplication, cells of the monocytic lineage are highly mobilized. In response to inflammatory and immune stimulation, an intense migration and extravasation of monocytes occurs from the bloodstream into heart. Monocyte differentiation leads to the formation of tissue phagocytosing macrophages, which are strongly activated and direct host defence. Newly elicited monocyte-derived macrophages both undergo profound physiological changes and display morphological heterogeneity that greatly differs from originally non-inflammatory macrophages, and underlie their functional activities as potent inflammatory cells. Thus, activated macrophages play a critical role in the outcome of parasite infection. This review covers functional and ultrastructural aspects of heart inflammatory macrophages triggered by the acute Chagas' disease, including recent discoveries on morphologically distinct, inflammation-related organelles, termed lipid bodies, which are actively formed in vivo within macrophages in response to T. cruzi infection. These findings are defining a broader role for lipid bodies as key markers of macrophage activation during innate immune responses to infectious diseases and attractive targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapies. Modulation of macrophage activation may be central in providing therapeutic benefits for Chagas' disease control. PMID:18624767

  3. Acriflavine treatment promotes dyskinetoplasty in Trypanosoma cruzi as revealed by ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Manchester, Thiago; Cavalcanti, Danielle Pereira; Zogovich, Marcelo; DE Souza, Wanderley; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado

    2013-09-01

    Trypanosomatid mitochondrial DNA is structured as a giant network of thousands of interlocked DNA molecules enclosed within the kinetoplast. The structure and replication mechanism of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) is unique, thereby making it an excellent chemotherapeutic target. Alteration in the structural organization of kDNA can give rise to dyskinetoplastic (Dk) strains. In Dk cells, the kDNA is dispersed in clumps throughout the mitochondrial matrix and not organized into a network. In this work, Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes were treated with acriflavine, a DNA intercalating drug, which promoted a decrease in cell proliferation and induced the appearance of Dk protozoa. In treated cells, the kinetoplast lost its normal disc-shaped structure because the fibrillar arrangement was reduced to a compact, amorphous mass within the mitochondrion. Moreover, basic proteins associated with kDNA were redistributed throughout the Dk protozoal kinetoplast. We sought to understand how the disruption of the kDNA leads to the emergence of the Dk phenotype with atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of isolated networks. Our results demonstrate that the detachment of minicircles from the kDNA disk promotes the disassembly of the network, thereby generating Dk cells. Our data strongly suggest that acriflavine inhibits T. cruzi multiplication by interfering with kDNA replication. PMID:23965822

  4. Resveratrol inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi arginine kinase and exerts a trypanocidal activity.

    PubMed

    Valera Vera, Edward A; Sayé, Melisa; Reigada, Chantal; Damasceno, Flávia S; Silber, Ariel M; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-06-01

    Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible transphosphorylation between ADP and phosphoarginine which plays a critical role in the maintenance of cellular energy homeostasis. Arginine kinase from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, meets the requirements to be considered as a potential therapeutic target for rational drug design including being absent in its mammalian hosts. In this study a group of polyphenolic compounds was evaluated as potential inhibitors of arginine kinase using molecular docking techniques. Among the analyzed compounds with the lowest free binding energy to the arginine kinase active site (<-6.96kcal/mol), resveratrol was chosen for subsequent assays. Resveratrol inhibits 50% of recombinant arginine kinase activity at 325μM. The trypanocidal effect of resveratrol was evaluated on the T. cruzi trypomastigotes bursting from infected CHO K1 cells, with IC50=77μM. Additionally epimastigotes overexpressing arginine kinase were 5 times more resistant to resveratrol compared to controls. Taking into account that: (1) resveratrol is considered as completely nontoxic; (2) is easily accessible due to its low market price; and (3) has as a well-defined target enzyme which is absent in the mammalian host, it is a promising compound as a trypanocidal drug for Chagas disease. PMID:26976067

  5. Evaluation of a Recombinant Trypanosoma cruzi Mucin-Like Antigen for Serodiagnosis of Chagas' Disease ▿

    PubMed Central

    De Marchi, Claudia R.; Di Noia, Javier M.; Frasch, Alberto C. C.; Amato Neto, Vicente; Almeida, Igor C.; Buscaglia, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is one of the most important endemic problems in Latin America. Lately, it has also become a health concern in the United States and Europe. Currently, a diagnosis of Chagas' disease and the screening of blood supplies for antiparasite antibodies are achieved by conventional serological tests that show substantial variation in the reproducibility and reliability of their results. In addition, the specificity of these assays is curtailed by antigenic cross-reactivity with sera from patients affected by other endemic diseases, such as leishmaniasis. Here we used a highly sensitive chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CL-ELISA) to evaluate a recombinant protein core of a mucin-like molecule (termed trypomastigote small surface antigen [TSSA]) for the detection of specific serum antibodies in a broad panel of human sera. The same samples were evaluated by CL-ELISA using as the antigen either a mixture of native T. cruzi trypomastigote mucins or an epimastigote extract and, for further comparison, by conventional serologic tests, such as an indirect hemagglutination assay and indirect immunofluorescence assay. TSSA showed ∼87% sensitivity among the seropositive Chagasic panel, a value which was increased up to >98% when only parasitologically positive samples were considered. More importantly, TSSA showed a significant increase in specificity (97.4%) compared to those of currently used assays, which averaged 80 to 90%. Overall, our data demonstrate that recombinant TSSA may be a useful antigen for the immunodiagnosis of Chagas' disease. PMID:21880857

  6. Benznidazole-resistance in Trypanosoma cruzi: Evidence that distinct mechanisms can act in concert☆

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Mônica C.O.; Leon, Leonor L.; Taylor, Martin C.; Kelly, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Benznidazole is the main drug used to treat Trypanosoma cruzi infections. However, frequent instances of treatment failure have been reported. To better understand potential resistance mechanisms, we analysed three clones isolated from a single parasite population that had undergone benznidazole-selection. These clones exhibited differing levels of benznidazole-resistance (varying between 9 and 26-fold), and displayed cross-resistance to nifurtimox (2 to 4-fold). Each clone had acquired a stop-codon-generating mutation in the gene which encodes the nitroreductase (TcNTR) that is responsible for activating nitroheterocyclic pro-drugs. In addition, one clone had lost a copy of the chromosome containing TcNTR. However, these processes alone are insufficient to account for the extent and diversity of benznidazole-resistance. It is implicit from our results that additional mechanisms must also operate and that T. cruzi has an intrinsic ability to develop drug-resistance by independent sequential steps, even within a single population. This has important implications for drug development strategies. PMID:24462750

  7. Neolignans from plants in northeastern Brazil (Lauraceae) with activity against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cabral, M M O; Barbosa-Filho, J M; Maia, G L A; Chaves, M C O; Braga, M V; De Souza, W; Soares, R O A

    2010-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the ethiological agent for Chagas disease in Latin America. This study aimed to test the trypanocidal effect of licarin A and burchellin isolated from plants in northeastern Brazil. These neolignans were tested on T. cruzi and on peritoneal macrophages, to evaluate drug toxicity. Epimastigote growth was inhibited in 45% with licarin A and 20% with burchellin with an IC(50)/96 h of 462.7 microM and 756 microM, respectively. Epimastigotes treated with licarin A presented swollen mitochondria and disorganized mitochondrial cristae, kDNA and Golgi complex. When treated with burchellin, they presented enormous autophagosomes and chromatin disorganization. Licarin A and burchellin were able to induce trypomastigote death with IC(50)/24 h of 960 microM and 520 microM, respectively. Although licarin A presented an IC(50) for trypomastigotes higher than for epimastigotes, both substances acted as therapeutic trypanocidal agents, because they were able to kill parasites without affecting macrophages. Due to our results, burchellin and licarin A need to be further analysed to observe if they may be used as alternative blood additive prophylaxis against Chagas disease, since it has been established that blood transfusion is an important mechanism in the transmission process. PMID:19944690

  8. In vitro 3' end processing and poly(A) tailing of RNA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Zwierzynski, T A; Widmer, G; Buck, G A

    1989-01-01

    Pre-mRNA in kinetoplastids is processed to maturity following unique pathways requiring a transplicing event that links a common 39 nucleotide leader to the 5' termini of the mature mRNAs. The mechanisms of this reaction and other steps of mRNA processing; i.e., 5' capping and 3' cleavage and polyadenylation, have not been resolved. Herein, we describe a 3' polyadenylation activity in cell-free extracts prepared from nuclei isolated from Trypanosoma cruzi, the kinetoplastid agent of Chagas' Disease. Synthetic RNA transcripts incubated in these extracts in the presence of ATP are 3' polyadenylated. This polyadenylation activity is sensitive to heat or pre-treatment of the extract with Micrococcal nuclease, suggesting that an RNA-protein complex is required. As these are characteristics of polyadenylation activities in other eukaryotes, we believe that this activity may participate in the in vivo trypanosome mRNA polyadenylation system. Several other modification activities specific for RNA 3' termini, including terminal nucleotide transferases, a tRNA CCA maturation activity, and a 3' exonuclease were also identified in these T. cruzi nuclear extracts. Images PMID:2473439

  9. Use of a 24-kilodalton Trypanosoma cruzi recombinant protein to monitor cure of human Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Krautz, G M; Galvão, L M; Cançado, J R; Guevara-Espinoza, A; Ouaissi, A; Krettli, A U

    1995-01-01

    A 24-kDa recombinant protein from Trypanosoma cruzi (rTc24) was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot (immunoblot) tests to identify treated chagasic patients considered parasitologically cured on the basis of persistently negative tests of hemocultures and lytic antibodies. Some of these patients were termed dissociated because their sera, although negative by the complement-mediated lysis test, were positive by conventional serology. The negative lysis test indicates the absence of active infection after specific treatment, but this assay requires live and infectious parasites and cannot be used easily in a laboratory routine. Here we tested rTc24 by ELISA and Western blotting as an alternative for the complement-mediated lysis test. For the group of patients with active infection despite the treatment (uncured patients), all the sera tested recognized rTc24 in both tests. For the dissociated patients, approximately 80% of the sera did not react with rTc24 in the ELISA or in Western blots, in agreement with the negative complement-mediated lysis tests. Thus, the 24-kDa T. cruzi recombinant antigen, when used for initial trials to evaluate cure of chagasic patients submitted to specific treatment, will allow the identification of most, but not all, cases. PMID:7559953

  10. Proteomic analysis reveals the dynamic association of proteins with translated mRNAs in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Alves, Lysangela R; Avila, Andréa R; Correa, Alejandro; Holetz, Fabíola B; Mansur, Fernanda C B; Manque, Patrício A; de Menezes, Juliana P B; Buck, Gregory A; Krieger, Marco A; Goldenberg, Samuel

    2010-03-01

    Gene regulation is mainly post-transcriptional in trypanosomatids. The stability of mRNA and access to polysomes are thought to be tightly regulated, allowing Trypanosoma cruzi to adapt to the different environmental conditions during its life cycle. Post-transcriptional regulation requires the association between mRNAs and certain proteins to form mRNP complexes. We investigated the dynamic association between proteins and mRNAs, using poly(T) beads to isolate and characterize proteins and protein complexes bound to poly-A+ mRNAs. The protein content of these fractions was analyzed by mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We identified 542 protein component of the mRNP complexes associated with mRNAs. Twenty-four of the proteins obtained were present in all fractions, whereas some other proteins were exclusive to a particular fraction: epimastigote polysomal (0.37%) and post-polysomal (2.95%) fractions; stress polysomal (13.8%) and post-polysomal (40.78%) fractions. Several proteins known to be involved in mRNA metabolism were identified, and this was considered important as it made it possible to confirm the reliability of our mRNP isolation approach. This procedure allowed us to have a first insight into the composition and dynamics of mRNPs in T. cruzi. PMID:20060445

  11. Nitric oxide inhibits cruzipain, the major papain-like cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Venturini, G; Salvati, L; Muolo, M; Colasanti, M; Gradoni, L; Ascenzi, P

    2000-04-13

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pluripotent regulatory molecule showing, among others, an antiparasitic activity. Moreover, NO inhibits cysteine proteinase action by nitrosylating the Cys catalytic residue. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of the substrate N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginine-(7-amino-4-methyl coumarin) and of NO on the catalytic activity of cruzipain, the major papain-like cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi (the hemoflagellate protozoan parasite which causes the American trypanosomiasis), is reported. In particular, NO-donors S-nitroso-glutathione (GSNO), (+/-)-(E)-4-ethyl-2-[(E)-hydroxyimino]-5-nitro-3-hexenamide (NOR-3), 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), S-nitroso-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) dose-dependently inhibited cruzipain, this effect being likely attributable to the S-nitrosylation of the Cys25 catalytic residue. These results were analyzed in parallel with those concerning the inhibitory effect of the substrate and of NO on the catalytic activity of falcipain, the cruzipain-homologous cysteine proteinase from Plasmodium falciparum. The modulation of the cruzipain and falcipain activity by NO may be relevant in developing new strategies against T. cruzi and P. falciparum in human host. As a whole, the NO-mediated S-nitrosylation of pathogenic viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic cysteine proteinases may represent a general mechanism of antimicrobial and antiparasitic host defences. PMID:10753643

  12. Response of adipose tissue to early infection with Trypanosoma cruzi (Brazil strain).

    PubMed

    Nagajyothi, Fnu; Desruisseaux, Mahalia S; Machado, Fabiana S; Upadhya, Rajendra; Zhao, Dazhi; Schwartz, Gary J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Albanese, Chris; Lisanti, Michael P; Chua, Streamson C; Weiss, Louis M; Scherer, Philipp E; Tanowitz, Herbert B

    2012-03-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) and adipocytes are targets of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Adipose tissue obtained from CD-1 mice 15 days after infection, an early stage of infection revealed a high parasite load. There was a significant increase in macrophages in infected adipose tissue and a reduction in lipid accumulation, adipocyte size, and fat mass and increased expression of lipolytic enzymes. Infection increased levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and TLR9 and in the expression of components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ were increased in WAT, whereas protein and mRNA levels of adiponectin were significantly reduced in BAT and WAT. The mRNA levels of cytokines, chemokines, and their receptors were increased. Nuclear Factor Kappa B levels were increased in BAT, whereas Iκκ-γ levels increased in WAT. Adipose tissue is an early target of T. cruzi infection. PMID:22293433

  13. Selective Testing of At-Risk Blood Donors for Trypanosoma cruzi and Plasmodium spp. in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Niederhauser, Christoph; Gottschalk, Jochen; Tinguely, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Population migrations and overseas recreational travel to regions at risk for tropical diseases are increasing. A major challenge in non-endemic countries is to decrease the number of blood donor deferrals due those tropical disease pathogens, without compromising the high level of blood safety. The protozoans Trypanosoma cruzi and Plasmodium spp., the causative organisms of Chagas disease (CD) and malaria are becoming a major focus in the blood transfusion community. Methods: National guidelines of the Blood Transfusion Service of the Swiss Red Cross propose an algorithm for dealing with these pathogens, including a mandatory selective serological testing of donors at risk. Results 6,978 donors at risk for CD were tested. Three of them were confirmed anti-T. cruzi -positive, and in one case a transfusion-transmitted infection was highly possible. The specificity of the assay was 99.94%. For malaria 12,887 donors were at risk and 178 were confirmed positive. The specificity of the assays was 92.8%. Conclusion CD and malaria in non-endemic countries may represent a certain risk for blood transfusion. Switzerland chose a selective testing approach. The specificity of the assays is a crucial topic for this approach because it ensures a minimal loss of false-reactive donors and helps towards an easier counselling of implicated donors. PMID:27403088

  14. Digital holographic microscopy for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites in fresh blood mounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, G. G.; Monaldi, A. C.; Alanís, E. E.

    2012-03-01

    An off-axis holographic microscope, in a transmission mode, calibrated to automatically detect the presence of Trypanosoma cruzi in blood is developed as an alternative diagnosis tool for Chagas disease. Movements of the microorganisms are detected by measuring the phase shift they produce on the transmitted wave front. A thin layer of blood infected by Trypanosoma cruzi parasites is examined in the holographic microscope, the images of the visual field being registered with a CCD camera. Two consecutive holograms of the same visual field are subtracted point by point and a phase contrast image of the resulting hologram is reconstructed by means of the angular spectrum propagation algorithm. This method enables the measurement of phase distributions corresponding to temporal differences between digital holograms in order to detect whether parasites are present or not. Experimental results obtained using this technique show that it is an efficient alternative that can be incorporated successfully as a part of a fully automatic system for detection and counting of this type of microorganisms.

  15. Structure and Mechanism of the Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase from Trypanosoma cruzi: Implications for Drug Design

    SciTech Connect

    Gabelli,S.; McLellan, J.; Montalvetti, A.; Oldfield, E.; Docampo, R.; Amzel, L.

    2006-01-01

    Typanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, has recently been shown to be sensitive to the action of the bisphosphonates currently used in bone resorption therapy. These compounds target the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting farnesyl diphosphate synthase (farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, FPPS), the enzyme that condenses the diphosphates of C{sub 5} alcohols (isopentenyl and dimethylallyl) to form C{sub 10} and C{sub 15} diphosphates (geranyl and farnesyl). The structures of the T. cruzi FPPS (TcFPPS) alone and in two complexes with substrates and inhibitors reveal that following binding of the two substrates and three Mg2+ ions, the enzyme undergoes a conformational change consisting of a hinge-like closure of the binding site. In this conformation, it would be possible for the enzyme to bind a bisphosphonate inhibitor that spans the sites usually occupied by dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) and the homoallyl moiety of isopentenyl diphosphate. This observation may lead to the design of new, more potent anti-trypanosomal bisphosphonates, because existing FPPS inhibitors occupy only the DMAPP site. In addition, the structures provide an important mechanistic insight: after its formation, geranyl diphosphate can swing without leaving the enzyme, from the product site to the substrate site to participate in the synthesis of farnesyl diphosphate.

  16. Ultrastructural and transmission evidence of Sarcocystis cruzi associated with eosinophilic myositis in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Gajadhar, A A; Marquardt, W C

    1992-01-01

    Skeletal muscle, diaphragm, tongue, esophagus and heart of beef carcasses that were condemned for eosinophilic myositis and those that were unaffected were collected at an abattoir in Colorado and studied to determine the involvement of Sarcocystis spp. All affected carcasses contained similar granulomatous lesions with adjacent infiltrations of leukocytes. Intact or fragments of sarcocysts were found within 32 of 363 granulomas, and whole sarcocysts were present in nearby unaffected muscle cells. Light and electron microscopic examinations revealed that sarcocysts, affected or unaffected by cellular response in condemned carcasses, as well as those found in unaffected carcasses, were consistent with those of S. cruzi. Transmission experiments confirmed that S. cruzi were present in all carcasses, and that dogs, but not cats, were the definitive hosts. The results of pepsin-HCl digestion assays showed that unaffected carcasses that were approved for human consumption generally contained more infective parasites than carcasses that were condemned for eosinophilic myositis. This study provides evidence to support the suggestion that dogs, rather than cats, and unaffected rather than eosinophilic myositis-affected carcasses, have greater potential for contributing to the perpetuation of eosinophilic myositis in the cattle industry. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1586892

  17. Brazilian Green Propolis: Effects In Vitro and In Vivo on Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Salomão, Kelly; de Souza, Eniuce M.; Henriques-Pons, Andrea; Barbosa, Helene S.; de Castro, Solange L.

    2011-01-01

    The composition of a Brazilian green propolis ethanolic extract (Et-Bra) and its effect on Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes and other pathogenic microorganisms have already been reported. Here, we further investigated Et-Bra targets in T. cruzi and its effect on experimental infection of mice. The IC50/4 days for inhibition of amastigote proliferation was 8.5 ± 1.8 μg mL−1, with no damage to the host cells. In epimastigotes Et-Bra induced alterations in reservosomes, Golgi complex and mitochondrion. These effects were confirmed by flow cytometry analysis. In trypomastigotes, Et-Bra led to the loss of plasma membrane integrity. The in vitro studies indicate that Et-Bra interferes in the functionality of the plasma membrane in trypomastigotes and of reservosomes and mitochondrion in epimastigotes. Acutely infected mice were treated orally with Et-Bra and the parasitemia, mortality and GPT, GOT, CK and urea levels were monitored. The extract (25–300 mg kg−1 body weight/day for 10 days) reduced the parasitemia, although not at significant levels; increased the survival of the animals and did not induce any hepatic, muscular lesion or renal toxicity. Since Et-Bra was not toxic to the animals, it could be assayed in combination with other drugs. Et-Bra could be a potential metacyclogenesis blocker, considering its effect on reservosomes, which are an important energy source during parasite differentiation. PMID:19213854

  18. Heme-induced Trypanosoma cruzi proliferation is mediated by CaM kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, C.F.; Carneiro, A.B.; Silveira, A.B.; Laranja, G.A.T.; Silva-Neto, M.A.C.; Costa, S.C. Goncalves da; Paes, M.C.

    2009-12-18

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted through triatomine vectors during their blood-meal on vertebrate hosts. These hematophagous insects usually ingest approximately 10 mM of heme bound to hemoglobin in a single meal. Blood forms of the parasite are transformed into epimastigotes in the crop which initiates a few hours after parasite ingestion. In a previous work, we investigated the role of heme in parasite cell proliferation and showed that the addition of heme significantly increased parasite proliferation in a dose-dependent manner . To investigate whether the heme effect is mediated by protein kinase signalling pathways, parasite proliferation was evaluated in the presence of several protein kinase (PK) inhibitors. We found that only KN-93, a classical inhibitor of calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMKs), blocked heme-induced cell proliferation. KN-92, an inactive analogue of KN-93, was not able to block this effect. A T. cruzi CaMKII homologue is most likely the main enzyme involved in this process since parasite proliferation was also blocked when Myr-AIP, an inhibitory peptide for mammalian CaMKII, was included in the cell proliferation assay. Moreover, CaMK activity increased in parasite cells with the addition of heme as shown by immunological and biochemical assays. In conclusion, the present results are the first strong indications that CaMKII is involved in the heme-induced cell signalling pathway that mediates parasite proliferation.

  19. Evaluation of VDR gene polymorphisms in Trypanosoma cruzi infection and chronic Chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F David; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important modulator of the immune response. It acts over several immune cell types where the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed. Due to the high relevance of this signaling pathway, several studies have investigated the possible influence of genes involved in the metabolism of Vitamin D and its receptor in different human diseases. Here, we analyzed whether four single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the VDR gene (rs731236, rs7975232, rs1544410 and rs2228570) are involved in the susceptibility to infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and/or to chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) in a Colombian endemic population for this parasite. Our results showed that the rs2228570*A allele is associated with CCC development (P = 4.46E−03, OR = 1.51). In summary, the data presented in this report suggest that variation within the VDR gene may affect the immune response against T. cruzi, increasing the probability of cardiac complications in infected individuals. PMID:27502545

  20. Evaluation of VDR gene polymorphisms in Trypanosoma cruzi infection and chronic Chagasic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F David; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important modulator of the immune response. It acts over several immune cell types where the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed. Due to the high relevance of this signaling pathway, several studies have investigated the possible influence of genes involved in the metabolism of Vitamin D and its receptor in different human diseases. Here, we analyzed whether four single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the VDR gene (rs731236, rs7975232, rs1544410 and rs2228570) are involved in the susceptibility to infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and/or to chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) in a Colombian endemic population for this parasite. Our results showed that the rs2228570*A allele is associated with CCC development (P = 4.46E-03, OR = 1.51). In summary, the data presented in this report suggest that variation within the VDR gene may affect the immune response against T. cruzi, increasing the probability of cardiac complications in infected individuals. PMID:27502545

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi Proline Transport Presents a Cell Density-dependent Regulation.

    PubMed

    Sayé, Melisa; Miranda, Mariana R; Reigada, Chantal; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-07-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, uses proline as its main carbon source, essential for parasite growth and stage differentiation in epimastigotes and amastigotes. Since proline is mainly obtained from extracellular medium by transport proteins, in this work we studied the regulation of the T. cruzi proline transporter TcAAAP069. Proline uptake and intracellular concentration presented oscillations during epimastigote growth phases, increasing during the early exponential phase (322 pmol/min) and decreasing to undetectable levels during the late exponential phase. Transporter expression rate correlated with proline uptake, and its subcellular localization alternated from both, the plasma membrane and close to the flagellar pocket, when the transport is higher, to only the flagellar pocket region, when the transport decreased until proline uptake and TcAAAP069 protein became undetectable at the end of the growth curve. Interestingly, when parasites were treated with conditioned medium or were concentrated to artificially increase the culture density, the proline transport was completely abolished resembling the effects observed in late exponential phase. These data highlight for the first time the existence of a density-associated regulation of relevant physiological processes such as proline metabolism. PMID:26750517

  2. Rab32 is essential for maintaining functional acidocalcisomes, and for growth and infectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Niyogi, Sayantanee; Jimenez, Veronica; Girard-Dias, Wendell; de Souza, Wanderley; Miranda, Kildare; Docampo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The contractile vacuole complex (CVC) of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, collects and expels excess water as a mechanism of regulatory volume decrease after hyposmotic stress; it also has a role in cell shrinking after hyperosmotic stress. Here, we report that, in addition to its role in osmoregulation, the CVC of T. cruzi has a role in the biogenesis of acidocalcisomes. Expression of dominant-negative mutants of the CVC-located small GTPase