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Sample records for cryo magnetic separation

  1. A Magnetic Resonance (MR) Microscopy System using a Microfluidically Cryo-Cooled Planar Coil

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Chiwan; Godley, Richard F.; Park, Jaewon; McDougall, Mary P.; Wright, Steven M.; Han, Arum

    2011-01-01

    We present the development of a microfluidically cryo-cooled planar coil for magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy. Cryogenically cooling radiofrequency (RF) coils for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the experiment. Conventional cryostats typically use a vacuum gap to keep samples to be imaged, especially biological samples, at or near room temperature during cryo-cooling. This limits how close a cryo-cooled coil can be placed to the sample. At the same time, a small coil-to-sample distance significantly improves the MR imaging capability due to the limited imaging depth of planar MR microcoils. These two conflicting requirements pose challenges to the use of cryo-cooling in MR microcoils. The use of a microfluidic based cryostat for localized cryo-cooling of MR microcoils is a step towards eliminating these constraints. The system presented here consists of planar receive-only coils with integrated cryo-cooling microfluidic channels underneath, and an imaging surface on top of the planar coils separated by a thin nitrogen gas gap. Polymer microfluidic channel structures fabricated through soft lithography processes were used to flow liquid nitrogen under the coils in order to cryo-cool the planar coils to liquid nitrogen temperature (?196°C). Two unique features of the cryo-cooling system minimize the distance between the coil and the sample: 1) The small dimension of the polymer microfluidic channel enables localized cooling of the planar coils, while minimizing thermal effects on the nearby imaging surface. 2) The imaging surface is separated from the cryo-cooled planar coil by a thin gap through which nitrogen gas flows to thermally insulate the imaging surface, keeping it above 0°C and preventing potential damage to biological samples. The localized cooling effect was validated by simulations, bench testing, and MR imaging experiments. Using this cryo-cooled planar coil system inside a 4.7 Tesla MR system resulted in an average image SNR enhancement of 1.47 ± 0.11 times relative to similar room-temperature coils. PMID:21603723

  2. A Method to Estimate the Optimum Temperature for the Cryo-Shattering Separation Using a Charpy Impact Tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagura, Yoshio; Watanabe, Hisahiko

    A cryo-shattering separation is a recently developed separation method which is applied to collect low-fat meat from fatty fish. This separation method needs to be operated at the optimum temperature for the cryo-shattering. Determining on optimum temperature needs much works and costs. In this study,an easy method to estimate the optimum temperature for cryo-shattering was proposed using a Charpy impact tester. Four kinds of characteristic temperatures observed through impact tests were used to construct a fracture-temperature-map. By use of the map,the optimum temperature for cryo-shattering was obtained without shattering/sieving experiments.

  3. Medical protein separation system using high gradient magnetic separation by superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamioka, Y.; Agatsuma, K.; Kajikawa, K.; Ueda, H.; Furuse, M.; Fuchino, S.; Iitsuka, T.; Nakamura, S.

    2014-01-01

    A high gradient magnetic separation system for medical protein using affinity magnetic nano-beads has been developed. Medical protein such as monoclonal antibody or immunoglobulin is an important substance as a medicine for cancer etc. However; the separation system of these medical protein has very low separation rate and the cost of product is extremely high. The developed system shows very high separation efficiency and can achieve low cost by large production rate compared to the system now using in this field. The system consists of a 3T superconducting magnet cooled by a cryo-cooler, a filter made of fine magnetic metal wires of about 30?m diameter and a demagnetization circuit and a liquid circulation pump for solvent containing medical protein. Affinity magnetic nano-beads is covered with the medical protein after agitation of solvent containing the protein and nano-beads, then the solvent flows through the system and the beads are trapped in the filters by high gradient magnetic field. The beads are released and flow out of the system by the AC demagnetization of the filters using LC resonance circuits after discharge of the magnet. The test results shows 97.8% of the magnetic nano-beads in pure water were captured and 94.1% of total beads were collected.

  4. Fiber Bragg Grating Cryo-Sensors for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    E-print Network

    Chiuchiolo, A; Perez, J; Bajas, H; Consales, M; Giordano, M; Breglio, G; Cusano, A

    2014-01-01

    The design, fabrication and tests of the new generation of superconducting magnets for the High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL - LHC) require the support of an adequate sensing technology able to assure the integrity of the strain sensitive and brittle superconducting cables through the whole service life of the magnet: assembly up to 150 MPa, cool down to 1.9 K and powering up to about 16 kA. A precise temperature monitoring is also needed in order to guarantee the safe working condition of the superconducting cables in the power transmission lines (SC - Link) designed to feed the magnet over long distance. Temperature and strain FBGs based monitoring systems have been implemented in the first SC-Link prototype and in two subscale dipole magnets and tested in the cryogenic test facility at CERN at 30 K, 77 K and 1.9 K.

  5. Microfluidically Cryo-Cooled Planar Coils for Magnetic Resonance Imaging 

    E-print Network

    Koo, Chiwan

    2013-08-09

    High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is typically required for higher resolution and faster speed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Planar microcoils as receiver probes in MRI systems offer the potential to be configured into array elements for fast...

  6. Magnetic Separation Dynamics of Colloidal Magnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Zhang, Huijin; Qiang, You

    2013-08-14

    Surface functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are appealing candidates for analytical separation of heavy metal ions from waste water and separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. This work studies the separation dynamics and investigates the appropriate magnetic-field gradients. A dynamic study of colloidal MNPs was performed for steady-state flow. Measurements were conducted to record the separation time of particles as a function of magnetic field gradient. The drag and magnetic forces play a significant role on the separation time. A drop in saturation magnetization and variation of particle size occurs after surface functionalization of the MNPs; these are the primary factors that affect the separation time and velocity of the MNPs. The experimental results are correlated to a theoretical one-dimensional model.

  7. Magnetic separation for soil decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; deAguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D.; Tolt, T.L.

    1993-02-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a physical separation process that is used to extract magnetic particles from mixtures. The technology is used on a large scale in the kaolin clay industry to whiten or brighten kaolin clay and increase its value. Because all uranium and plutonium compounds are slightly magnetic, HGMS can be used to separate these contaminants from non-magnetic soils. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was signed in 1992 between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) to develop HGMS for soil decontamination. This paper reports progress and describes the HGMS technology.

  8. Magnetic separation for soil decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; deAguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D. ); Tolt, T.L. )

    1993-01-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a physical separation process that is used to extract magnetic particles from mixtures. The technology is used on a large scale in the kaolin clay industry to whiten or brighten kaolin clay and increase its value. Because all uranium and plutonium compounds are slightly magnetic, HGMS can be used to separate these contaminants from non-magnetic soils. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was signed in 1992 between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) to develop HGMS for soil decontamination. This paper reports progress and describes the HGMS technology.

  9. Continuous magnetic separator and process

    DOEpatents

    Oder, Robin R. (Export, PA); Jamison, Russell E. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    2008-04-22

    A continuous magnetic separator and process for separating a slurry comprising magnetic particles into a clarified stream and a thickened stream. The separator has a container with a slurry inlet, an overflow outlet for the discharge of the clarified slurry stream, and an underflow outlet for the discharge of a thickened slurry stream. Magnetic particles in the slurry are attracted to, and slide down, magnetic rods within the container. The slurry is thus separated into magnetic concentrate and clarified slurry. Flow control means can be used to control the ratio of the rate of magnetic concentrate to the rate of clarified slurry. Feed control means can be used to control the rate of slurry feed to the slurry inlet.

  10. Magnetic separation for environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Schake, A.R.; Avens, L.R.; Hill, D.D.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Romero, D.A.; Worl, L.A.; Tolt, T.L.

    1994-11-01

    High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) is a form of magnetic separation used to separate solids from other solids, liquids or gases. HGMS uses large magnetic field gradients to separate ferromagnetic and paramagnetic particles from diamagnetic host materials. The technology relies only on physical properties, and therefore separations can be achieved while producing a minimum of secondary waste. Actinide and fission product wastes within the DOE weapons complex pose challenging problems for environmental remediation. Because the majority of actinide complexes and many fission products are paramagnetic, while most host materials are diamagnetic, HGMS can be used to concentrate the contaminants into a low volume waste stream. The authors are currently developing HGMS for applications to soil decontamination, liquid waste treatment, underground storage tank waste treatment, and actinide chemical processing residue concentration. Application of HGMS usually involves passing a slurry of the contaminated mixture through a magnetized volume. Field gradients are produced in the magnetized volume by a ferromagnetic matrix material, such as steel wool, expanded metal, iron shot, or nickel foam. The matrix fibers become trapping sites for ferromagnetic and paramagnetic particles in the host material. The particles with a positive susceptibility are attracted toward an increasing magnetic field gradient and can be extracted from diamagnetic particles, which react in the opposite direction, moving away from the areas of high field gradients. The extracted paramagnetic contaminants are flushed from the matrix fibers when the magnetic field is reduced to zero or when the matrix canister is removed from the magnetic field. Results are discussed for the removal of uranium trioxide from water, PuO{sub 2}, U, and Pu from various soils (Fernald, Nevada Test Site), and the waste water treatment of Pu and Am isotopes using HGMS.

  11. 293 K - 1.9 K supporting systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) cryo-magnets

    E-print Network

    Mathieu, M; Renaglia, T; Rohmig, P; Williams, L R

    1998-01-01

    The LHC machine will incorporate some 2000 main ring super-conducting magnets cooled at 1.9 K by super-fluid pressurized helium, mainly 15m-long dipoles with their cryostats and 6m-long quadrupoles housed in the Short Straight Section (SSS) units. This paper presents the design of the support system of the LHC arc cryo-magnets between 1.9 K at the cold mass and 293 K at the cryostat vacuum vessel. The stringent positioning precision for magnet alignment and the high thermal performance for cryogenic efficiency are the main conflicting requirements, which have lead to a trade-off design. The systems retained for LHC are based on column-type supports positioned in the vertical plane of the magnets inside the cryostats. An ad-hoc design has been achieved both for cryo-dipoles and SSS. Each column is composed of a main tubular thin-walled structure in composite material (glass-fibre/epoxy resin, for its low thermal conductivity properties), interfaced to both magnet and cryostat via stainless steel flanges. The t...

  12. Magnetic Enhancement in High Gradient Magnetic Separation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelland, David Ross

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. An effective way to improve the performance of High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) is to increase the magnetization of small particulates. An example in which this can be demonstrated is in the use of HGMS to desulfurize coal. Part of the sulfur in coal occurs as finely divided pyrite. Is removal before combustion would reduce SO_2 emission with a subsequent reduction in acid rain. Experiments on direct heating of mineral pyrite achieved enhanced pyrite magnetization in several different atmospheres; this increase in magnetization was measured on a vibrating sample magnetometer. Mossbauer and electron microprobe analysis have identified the converted mineral as ferrimagnetic monoclinic pyrrhotite along with iron oxides and even iron. Selective heating of the pyrite in coal. To save energy by not heating the coal itself, was accomplished by employing high power density microwave irradiation. Thermal reflectance measurements clearly showed that the final temperature reached in the heated pyrite was higher than that in the coal. Then the improvement in HGMS separations of the partially converted pyrite from coals was demonstrated in samples irradiated at a frequency of 2.45 gigahertz and 5.4 kW of power. Pyrite removal was improved as much as 30-40% (at constant heating value recovery) over that with HGMS alone. In addition to this improvement in HGMS performance, the work provides a microscopic insight into the process of magnetic conversion.

  13. Separation of magnetic field lines

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-11-15

    The field lines of magnetic fields that depend on three spatial coordinates are shown to have a fundamentally different behavior from those that depend on two coordinates. Unlike two-coordinate cases, a flux tube in a magnetic field that depends on all three spatial coordinates that has a circular cross section at one location along the tube characteristically has a highly distorted cross section at other locations. In an ideal evolution of a magnetic field, the current densities typically increase. Crudely stated, if the current densities increase by a factor {sigma}, the ratio of the long to the short distance across a cross section of a flux tube characteristically increases by e{sup 2{sigma}}, and the ratio of the longer distance to the initial radius increases as e{sup {sigma}}. Electron inertia prevents a plasma from isolating two magnetic field structures on a distance scale shorter than c/{omega}{sub pe}, which is about 10 cm in the solar corona, and reconnection must be triggered if {sigma} becomes sufficiently large. The radius of the sun, R{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }=7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm is about e{sup 23} times larger, so when {sigma} Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 23, two lines separated by c/{omega}{sub pe} at one location can be separated by the full scale of any magnetic structures in the corona at another. The conditions for achieving a large exponentiation, {sigma}, are derived, and the importance of exponentiation is discussed.

  14. Method of magnetic separation and apparatus therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oder, Robin R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for magnetically separating and collecting particulate matter fractions of a raw sample according to relative magnetic susceptibilities of each fraction so collected is disclosed. The separation apparatus includes a splitter which is used in conjunction with a magnetic separator for achieving the desired fractionation.

  15. Magnetic Separator Enhances Treatment Possibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Since the earliest missions in space, NASA specialists have performed experiments in low gravity. Protein crystal growth, cell and tissue cultures, and separation technologies such as electrophoresis and magnetophoresis have been studied on Apollo 14, Apollo 16, STS-107, and many other missions. Electrophoresis and magnetophoresis, respectively, are processes that separate substances based on the electrical charge and magnetic field of a molecule or particle. Electrophoresis has been studied on over a dozen space shuttle flights, leading to developments in electrokinetics, which analyzes the effects of electric fields on mass transport (atoms, molecules, and particles) in fluids. Further studies in microgravity will continue to improve these techniques, which researchers use to extract cells for various medical treatments and research.

  16. Magnetic separation of antibiotics by electrochemical magnetic seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, I.; Toyoda, K.; Beneragama, N.; Umetsu, K.

    2009-03-01

    Magnetic separation of several classes of antibiotics was investigated using electrochemical magnetic seeding. Electrocoagulation with a sacrificial anode followed by addition of magnetite particles was applied for the magnetic seeding of antibiotics. With electrochemical magnetic seeding using an iron anode, tetracycline antibiotics (oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, doxycycline and tetracycline) and cephalosporin antibiotic (cefdinir) were rapidly removed from synthetic wastewater by magnetic separation using a neodymium magnet. Iron and aluminium anodes were suitable for magnetic seeding of the antibiotics. The results indicated that the ability of antibiotics to form strong complex with iron and aluminium allowed the higher removal by magnetic separation. This method would be appropriate for rapid treatment of antibiotics in wastewater.

  17. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among many. Cryo-imaging fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology, allowing one to image a mouse along the continuum from the mouse -> organ -> tissue structure -> cell -> sub-cellular domains. In this overview, we describe the technology and a variety of exciting applications. Enhancements to the system now enable tiled acquisition of high resolution images to cover an entire mouse. High resolution fluorescence imaging, aided by a novel subtraction processing algorithm to remove sub-surface fluorescence, makes it possible to detect fluorescently-labeled single cells. Multi-modality experiments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cryo-imaging of a whole mouse demonstrate superior resolution of cryo-images and efficiency of registration techniques. The 3D results demonstrate the novel true-color volume visualization tools we have developed and the inherent advantage of cryo-imaging in providing unlimited depth of field and spatial resolution. The recent results continue to demonstrate the value cryo-imaging provides in the field of small animal imaging research.

  18. A PURPOSE ORIENTED MAGNETIC SEPARATOR: SKIMMER

    SciTech Connect

    Salih Ersayin

    2005-08-09

    A magnetic separator was designed to selectively separate fine-liberated magnetite. The conceptual design was simulated using CFD techniques. A separator tank was fabricated and a magnetic drum was used to capture magnetic particles. The initial tank design was modified to eliminate application oriented problems. The new separator was able to produce a fine product as a concentrate at relatively high feed rates. A plant simulation showed that such a device could lower circulating loads around ball mills by 16%, thereby creating room for a 5-8% increase in throughput at the same energy level. However, it was concluded that further improvements in terms of both size and mineral selectivity are needed to have a marketable product.

  19. HTS High Gradient Magnetic Separation system

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, M.A.; Coulter, J.Y.; Hults, W.L.

    1996-09-01

    We report on the assembly, characterization and operation of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic separator. The magnet is made of 624 m of Silver/BSCCO superconducting wire and has overall dimensions of 18 cm OD, 15.5 cm height and 5 cm ID. The HTS current leads are designed to operate with the warm end at 75 K and the cold end cooled by a two stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The upper stage of the cryocooler cools the thermal shield and two heat pipe thermal intercepts. The lower stage of the cryocooler cools the HTS magnet and the bottom end of the HTS current leads. The HTS magnet was initially characterized in liquid cryogens. We report on the current- voltage (I-V) characteristics of the HTS magnet at temperatures ranging from 15 to 40 K. At 40 K the magnet can generate a central field of 2.0 T at a current of 120 A.

  20. Purification of condenser water in thermal power station by superconducting magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, D. W.; Kwon, J. M.; Baik, S. K.; Lee, Y. J.; Han, K. S.; Ko, R. K.; Sohn, M. H.; Seong, K. C.

    2011-11-01

    Thermal power station is made up of a steam turbine and a steam condenser which need a lot of water. The water of steam condenser should be replaced, since scales consisting of iron oxide mainly are accumulated on the surface of condenser pipes as it goes. Superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system has merits to remove paramagnetic substance like iron oxides because it can generate higher magnetic field strength than electromagnet or permanent magnet. In this paper, cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet that can generate up to 6 T was used for HGMS systems. Magnetic filters were designed by the analysis of magnetic field distribution at superconducting magnets. The result of X-ray analysis showed contaminants were mostly ?-Fe 2O 3 (hematite) and ?-Fe 2O 3 (maghemite). The higher magnetic field was applied up to 6 T, the more iron oxides were removed. As the wire diameter of magnetic filter decreased, the turbidity removal of the sample was enhanced.

  1. Multistage Magnetic Separator of Cells and Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Ken; Ainsworth, Mark; Daily, Bruce; Dunn, Scott; Metz, Bill; Vellinger, John; Taylor, Brock; Meador, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    The multistage electromagnetic separator for purifying cells and magnetic particles (MAGSEP) is a laboratory apparatus for separating and/or purifying particles (especially biological cells) on the basis of their magnetic susceptibility and magnetophoretic mobility. Whereas a typical prior apparatus based on similar principles offers only a single stage of separation, the MAGSEP, as its full name indicates, offers multiple stages of separation; this makes it possible to refine a sample population of particles to a higher level of purity or to categorize multiple portions of the sample on the basis of magnetic susceptibility and/or magnetophoretic mobility. The MAGSEP includes a processing unit and an electronic unit coupled to a personal computer. The processing unit includes upper and lower plates, a plate-rotation system, an electromagnet, an electromagnet-translation system, and a capture-magnet assembly. The plates are bolted together through a roller bearing that allows the plates to rotate with respect to each other. An interface between the plates acts as a seal for separating fluids. A lower cuvette can be aligned with as many as 15 upper cuvette stations for fraction collection during processing. A two-phase stepping motor drives the rotation system, causing the upper plate to rotate for the collection of each fraction of the sample material. The electromagnet generates a magnetic field across the lower cuvette, while the translation system translates the electromagnet upward along the lower cuvette. The current supplied to the electromagnet, and thus the magnetic flux density at the pole face of the electromagnet, can be set at a programmed value between 0 and 1,400 gauss (0.14 T). The rate of translation can be programmed between 5 and 2,000 m/s so as to align all sample particles in the same position in the cuvette. The capture magnet can be a permanent magnet. It is mounted on an arm connected to a stepping motor. The stepping motor rotates the arm to position the capture magnet above the upper cuvette into which a fraction of the sample is collected. The electronic unit includes a power switch, power-supply circuitry that accepts 110-Vac input power, an RS-232 interface, and status lights. The personal computer runs the MAGSEP software and controls the operation of the MAGSEP through the RS-232 interface. The status of the power, the translating electromagnet, the capture magnet, and the rotation of the upper plate are indicated in a graphical user interface on the computer screen.

  2. Magnetic phase separation in ordered alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos, Jordi; Vives, Eduard; Castan, Teresa

    2001-06-01

    We present a lattice model to study the equilibrium phase diagram of ordered alloys with one magnetic component that exhibits a low temperature phase separation between paramagnetic and ferromagnetic phases. The model is constructed from the experimental facts observed in Cu{sub 3{minus}x}AlMn{sub x} and it includes coupling between configurational and magnetic degrees of freedom that are appropriate for reproducing the low temperature miscibility gap. The essential ingredient for the occurrence of such a coexistence region is the development of ferromagnetic order induced by the long-range atomic order of the magnetic component. A comparative study of both mean-field and Monte Carlo solutions is presented. Moreover, the model may enable the study of the structure of ferromagnetic domains embedded in the nonmagnetic matrix. This is relevant in relation to phenomena such as magnetoresistance and paramagnetism.

  3. Magnetic force on a magnetic particle within a high gradient magnetic separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, S. K.; Ha, D. W.; Kwon, J. M.; Lee, Y. J.; Ko, R. K.

    2013-01-01

    HGMS (High Gradient Magnetic Separator) uses matrix to make high magnetic field gradient so that ferro- or para-magnetic particles can be attracted to them by high magnetic force. The magnetic force generated by the field gradient is several thousand times larger than that by background magnetic field alone. So the HGMS shows excellent performance compared with other magnetic separators. These matrixes are usually composed of stainless steel wires having high magnetization characteristics. This paper deals with superconducting HGMS which is aimed for purifying waste water by using stainless steel matrix. Background magnetic field up to 6 T is generated by a superconducting solenoid and the stainless steel matrixes are arranged inside of the solenoid. Based on magnetic field calculated by FEM (Finite Element Method), we could calculate magnetic force acting on a magnetic particle such as hematite and maghemite consisting of major impurities in the condenser water of a thermal power station.

  4. Magnetic separation techniques in diagnostic microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Olsvik, O; Popovic, T; Skjerve, E; Cudjoe, K S; Hornes, E; Ugelstad, J; Uhlén, M

    1994-01-01

    The principles of magnetic separation aided by antibodies or other specific binding molecules have been used for isolation of specific viable whole organisms, antigens, or nucleic acids. Whereas growth on selective media may be helpful in isolation of a certain bacterial species, immunomagnetic separation (IMS) technology can isolate strains possessing specific and characteristic surface antigens. Further separation, cultivation, and identification of the isolate can be performed by traditional biochemical, immunologic, or molecular methods. PCR can be used for amplification and identification of genes of diagnostic importance for a target organism. The combination of IMS and PCR reduces the assay time to several hours while increasing both specificity and sensitivity. Use of streptavidin-coated magnetic beads for separation of amplified DNA fragments, containing both biotin and a signal molecule, has allowed for the conversion of the traditional PCR into an easy-to-read microtiter plate format. The bead-bound PCR amplicons can also easily be sequenced in an automated DNA sequencer. The latter technique makes it possible to obtain sequence data of 300 to 600 bases from 20 to 30 strains, starting with clinical samples, within 12 to 24 h. Sequence data can be used for both diagnostic and epidemiologic purposes. IMS has been demonstrated to be a useful method in diagnostic microbiology. Most recent publications describe IMS as a method for enhancing the specificity and sensitivity of other detection systems, such as PCR, and providing considerable savings in time compared with traditional diagnostic systems. The relevance to clinical diagnosis has, however, not yet been fully established for all of these new test principles. In the case of PCR, for example, the presence of specific DNA in a food sample does not demonstrate the presence of a live organism capable of inducing a disease. However, all tests offering increased sensitivity and specificity of detection, combined with reduced time of analysis, have to be seriously evaluated. Images PMID:8118790

  5. Prediction of Separation Performance of Dry High Intensity Magnetic Separator for Processing of Para-Magnetic Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Veerendra; Suresh, Nikkam

    2015-10-01

    High intensity dry magnetic separators are gaining popularity for the separation of para-magnetic minerals due to the cost economic factor. Induced roll magnetic separator is found to be an effective dry separator for the separation of fine particles. Separation efficiency of this separator depends on mineral characteristics and the design features of equipment along with the optimization of process variables. Present investigation focuses on the prediction and validation of separation performance of minerals while treating in induced roll magnetic separator. Prediction of the separation is expressed in terms of separation angle at which a particle leaves the rotor surface by using a modified particle flow model derived by Cakir. The validation of the model is carried by capturing the particle trajectory using an image analyzer. It is found that Cakir's mathematical model produces reliable results and a new model is proposed to increase the reliability of separation angle prediction by including the particle shape factor.

  6. High-gradient magnetic separation using ferromagnetic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podoynitsyn, Sergey N.; Sorokina, Olga N.; Kovarski, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic separator with the membrane separating unit made of laser-perforated thick ferromagnetic foil was tested using composite water suspension of magnetic nanoparticles adsorbed on hydroxylapatite microparticles. The average sizes of the particles in the suspension and the magnetic moment of the suspension were measured by dynamic light scattering and electron magnetic resonance correspondingly to evaluate the efficiency of the separation. It was shown experimentally that the separation is effected by the membrane type and the flow rate. Magnetic coarse grains (larger than 1 ?m) were captured by the membrane preferably and the magnetic moment of the suspension decreased by 20-25% after the separation. The magnetic field simulation and experimental results demonstrate the higher separation efficiency for thicker membranes.

  7. Separation of magnetic susceptibility components from magnetization curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosareva, L.; Nourgaliev, D.; Kuzina, D.; Spassov, S.; Fattakhov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Modern lake sediments are a unique source of information for climate changes, regionally and globally, because all environmental variations are recorded by these sediments with high resolution. The magnetic properties of Chernyshov Bay (Aral Sea) sediments we investigated from core number 4 (N45o57'04.2''; E59o17'14.3'') are taken at far water depth of 9.5 m. The length of the core is 4.16 m. Samples for measurements were taken to plastic sample boxes with internal dimensions 2x2x2 cm. Remanent magnetization curves were measured by coercivity spectrometer for the separate determination of the different contributions to the total bulk magnetic susceptibility. There was measured also magnetic susceptibility using MS2 susceptibility meter. Those operations were done for data comparison between 2 susceptibilities obtained from different equipment. Our goal is to decipher the magnetic susceptibility signal in lake sediments by decomposing the bulk susceptibility signal of a lake sediment sequence into ferromagnetic (?f), dia-/paramagnetic (?p) and superparamagnetic (?sp) components using data from remanent and indused magnetization curves Each of these component has a different origin: paramagnetic minerals are usually attributed to terrigenous sediment input, ferromagnetics are of biogenic origin, and superparamagnetic minerals may be of either biogenic or terrigenous origin. Comparison between susceptibility measurements of MS2-Bartington susceptometer and of the coercivity spectrometer has shown good correlation. The susceptibility values measured in two different equipment are fairly close and indicate thus the reliability the proposed method. In research also has shown water level changes in Aral Sea based on magnetic susceptibility. The work is performed according to the Russian Government Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University also by RFBR research projects No. 14-05-31376 - ?, 14-05-00785- ?.

  8. Magnet/Syringe Separation Issues V.B. Graves

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    1 Magnet/Syringe Separation Issues V.B. Graves 8/12/05 This document is an initial response or separate the cylinders from the magnet. Since the cost of stainless cylinders is prohibitively high indicated that 1m would be a sufficient separation distance, in our subsequent phone conversation we thought

  9. Magnetic separation for treatment of caustic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, D.D.; Worl, L.A.; Hill, D.D.

    1996-10-01

    Magnetic Separation can be applied to selectively extract actinide contaminants from liquid waste streams and to concentrate these toxic materials into a low volume waste stream. LANL`s Plutonium Processing Facility generates more than 80% of the total radioactive containing liquid waste treated at the LANL Waste Water Treatment Facility. This effluent is then combined with other liquid waste for continued treatment. Preliminary experimental results on contaminated waste water indicate that 99 to 99.9% extraction of Pu activity can be achieved using HGMS. This represents decontamination levels of {approximately}3 orders of magnitude to levels of 200 to 10 pCi/L. This technology could potentially reduce the Plutonium Facility radioactive waste stream effluents to levels acceptable for industrial waste stream limits.

  10. Fundamental study of phosphor separation by controlling magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kohei; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2013-11-01

    The phosphor wastes consist of phosphors with different emission colors, green (LAP), red (YOX), blue (BAM) and white (HP). It is required to recover and reuse the rare earth phosphors with high market value. In this study, we tried to separate the phosphor using the magnetic separation by HTS bulk magnet utilizing the differences of magnetic susceptibility by the type of phosphors. We succeeded in the successive separation of HP with low market value from YOX and BAM including the rare earth using the magnetic Archimedes method. In this method, vertical and radial components of the magnetic force were used.

  11. High gradient magnetic separation applied to environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D.; Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; Schake, A.; de Aguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Tolt, T.L.

    1993-08-01

    High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) is an application of superconducting magnet technology to the separation of magnetic solids from other solids, liquids, or gases. The production of both high magnetic fields (>4 T) and large field gradients using superconducting magnet technology has made it possible to separate a previously unreachable but large family of paramagnetic materials. This is a powerful technique that can be used to separate widely dispersed contaminants from a host material and may be the only technique available for separating material in the colloidal state. Because it is a physical separation process, no additional waste is generated. We are applying this technology to the treatment of radioactive wastes for environmental remediation. We have conducted tests examining slurries containing nonradioactive, magnetic surrogates. Results from these studies were used to verify our analytical model of the separation process. The model describes the rate process for magnetic separation and is based on a force balance on the paramagnetic species. This model was used to support bench scale experiments and prototype separator design.

  12. High gradient magnetic separation applied to environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D.; Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; Schake, A.; Aguero, K.J. de; Padilla, D.D.; Tolt, T.L.

    1994-12-31

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is an application of superconducting magnet technology to the separation of magnetic solids from other solids, liquids, or gases. The production of both high magnetic fields (>4 T) and large field gradients using superconducting magnet technology has made it possible to separate a previously unreachable but large family of paramagnetic materials. This powerful technique can be used to separate widely dispersed contaminants from a host material, and it may be the only technique available for separating material in the colloidal state. Because it is a physical separation process, no additional waste is generated. The authors are applying this technology to the treatment of radioactive wastes for environmental remediation. They have conducted tests examining slurries containing nonradioactive, magnetic surrogates. Results from these studies were used to verify their analytical model of the separation process. The model describes the rate process for magnetic separation and is based on a force balance on the paramagnetic species. This model was used to support bench scale experiments and prototype separator designs.

  13. Magnetic separator having a multilayer matrix, method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kelland, David R. (Lexington, MA)

    1980-01-01

    A magnetic separator having multiple staggered layers of porous magnetic material positioned to intercept a fluid stream carrying magnetic particles and so placed that a bypass of each layer is effected as the pores of the layer become filled with material extracted from the fluid stream.

  14. Remediation of Hanford tank waste using magnetic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Worl, L.A.; Avens, L.R.; de Aguero, K.J.; Coyne Prenger, F.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D.

    1992-12-31

    Large volumes of high-level radioactive waste are stored at the Department of Energy`s Hanford site. Magnetic separation, a physical separation, process, can be used to segregate actinides and certain fission products from the waste. High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) tests have been performed successfully using a simulated, nonradioactive underground storage tank (UST) waste. Variations in HGMS test parameters included separator matrix material, magnetic field strength, slurry surfactant, and slurry solids loading. Cerium was added to the simulated tank waste to act as a uranium surrogate. Results show that over 77% of the uranium surrogate can be captured and concentrated from the original bulk with a simple procedure. The results of these tests and the feasibility of magnetic separation for pretreatment of UST waste are discussed.

  15. Remediation of Hanford tank waste using magnetic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Worl, L.A.; Avens, L.R.; de Aguero, K.J.; Coyne Prenger, F.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Large volumes of high-level radioactive waste are stored at the Department of Energy's Hanford site. Magnetic separation, a physical separation, process, can be used to segregate actinides and certain fission products from the waste. High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) tests have been performed successfully using a simulated, nonradioactive underground storage tank (UST) waste. Variations in HGMS test parameters included separator matrix material, magnetic field strength, slurry surfactant, and slurry solids loading. Cerium was added to the simulated tank waste to act as a uranium surrogate. Results show that over 77% of the uranium surrogate can be captured and concentrated from the original bulk with a simple procedure. The results of these tests and the feasibility of magnetic separation for pretreatment of UST waste are discussed.

  16. Optimizing colloidal dispersity of magnetic nanoparticles based on magnetic separation with magnetic nanowires array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianfei; He, Miaomiao; Liu, Xuan; Gu, Ning

    2014-09-01

    Based on sharp geometry of Ni nanowires, we developed a novel high-gradient magnetic separator that was composed of a nanowires array and a uniform magnetic field. When suspension of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) flowed through it, the relatively large nanoparticles or clusters were removed from the suspension so that the size distribution can be improved. The separation resulted from magnetic force so that extra molecules or solvents were unnecessary to add. The performance was proved by scanned electron microscopy characterization and dynamic light scattering measurement. The improvement in magnetic colloidal dispersivity is important for the biomedical application of MNPs. Our results may also play a role in microfluidic application and nanoparticle-based detection.

  17. Optimizing colloidal dispersity of magnetic nanoparticles based on magnetic separation with magnetic nanowires array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianfei; He, Miaomiao; Liu, Xuan; Gu, Ning

    2015-02-01

    Based on sharp geometry of Ni nanowires, we developed a novel high-gradient magnetic separator that was composed of a nanowires array and a uniform magnetic field. When suspension of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) flowed through it, the relatively large nanoparticles or clusters were removed from the suspension so that the size distribution can be improved. The separation resulted from magnetic force so that extra molecules or solvents were unnecessary to add. The performance was proved by scanned electron microscopy characterization and dynamic light scattering measurement. The improvement in magnetic colloidal dispersivity is important for the biomedical application of MNPs. Our results may also play a role in microfluidic application and nanoparticle-based detection.

  18. Analytical methods for separating and isolating magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Jason R; Beveridge, Jacob S; Williams, Mary Elizabeth

    2012-03-14

    Despite the large body of literature describing the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, few analytical tools are commonly used for their purification and analysis. Due to their unique physical and chemical properties, magnetic nanoparticles are appealing candidates for biomedical applications and analytical separations. Yet in the absence of methods for assessing and assuring their purity, the ultimate use of magnetic particles and heterostructures is likely to be limited. In this review, we summarize the separation techniques that have been initially used for this purpose. For magnetic nanoparticles, it is the use of an applied magnetic flux or field gradient that enables separations. Flow based techniques are combined with applied magnetic fields to give methods such as magnetic field flow fractionation and high gradient magnetic separation. Additional techniques have been explored for manipulating particles in microfluidic channels and in mesoporous membranes. Further development of these and new analytical tools for separation and analysis of colloidal particles is critically important to enable the practical use of these, particularly for medicinal purposes. PMID:22306911

  19. Apparatus and method for continuous separation of magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluids

    DOEpatents

    Oder, Robin R. (Export, PA); Jamison, Russell E. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    2010-02-09

    A magnetic separator vessel (1) for separating magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluid includes a separation chamber having an interior and exterior wall, a top and bottom portion; a magnet (3) having first and second poles (2) positioned adjacent to the exterior wall, wherein the first pole is substantially diametrically opposed to the second pole; a inlet port (5) is directed into the top portion of the separation chamber, wherein the inlet port (5) is positioned adjacent to one of the first and second poles (2), wherein the inlet port (5) is adapted to transfer a mixture into the separation chamber; an underflow port (6) in communication with the bottom portion, wherein the underflow port (6) is adapted to receive the magnetic particles; and an overflow port (9) in communication with the separation chamber, wherein the overflow port (9) is adapted to receive the non-magnetic fluid.

  20. MAGNETITE RECOVERY IN COAL WASHING BY HIGH GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a demonstration of the successful recovery of magnetite from mixtures of magnetite and coal, like those found in a coal-washing circuit, by High Gradient Magnetic Separation. The demonstration was part of a research program at Francis Bitter National Magnet L...

  1. The role of magnetic separators in solar flare particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, D.; Metcalf, T. R.

    2003-05-01

    In recent years, the development of theoretical models of separatrices, separators, and quasi-separatrix layers, coupled to observations of flare brightenings, have led to the notion that these topological structures are the natural locations for current sheets to form and magnetic reconnection to occur. We report on correlated hard X-ray and vector magnetic field data from RHESSI and Mees IVM which show the detailed spatial and temporal relationships between the magnetic topology and the expected sites of reconnection.

  2. Use of high gradient magnetic separation for actinide application

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; Padilla, D.D.

    1996-08-01

    Decontamination of materials such as soils or waste water that contain radioactive isotopes, heavy metals, or hazardous components is a subject of great interest. Magnetic separation is a physical separation process that segregates materials on the basis of magnetic susceptibility. Because the process relies on physical properties, separations can be achieved while producing a minimum of secondary waste. Most traditional physical separation processes effectively treat particles larger than 70 microns. In many situations, the radioactive contaminants are found concentrated in the fine particle size fraction of less than 20 microns. For effective decontamination of the fine particle size fraction most current operations resort to chemical dissolution methods for treatment. High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is able to effectively treat particles from 90 to {approximately}0.1 micron in diameter. The technology is currently used on the 60 ton per hour scale in the kaolin clay industry. When the field gradient is of sufficiently high intensity, paramagnetic particles can be physically captured and separated from extraneous nonmagnetic material. Because all actinide compounds are paramagnetic, magnetic separation of actinide containing mixtures is feasible. The advent of reliable superconducting magnets also makes magnetic separation of weakly paramagnetic species attractive. HGMS work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is being developed for soil remediation, waste water treatment and treatment of actinide chemical processing residues. LANL and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) have worked on a co-operative research and development agreement (CRADA) to develop HGMS for radioactive soil decontamination. The program is designed to transfer HGMS from the laboratory and other industries for the commercial treatment of radioactive contaminated materials. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Process to remove actinides from soil using magnetic separation

    DOEpatents

    Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Hill, Dallas D. (Los Alamos, NM); Prenger, F. Coyne (Los Alamos, NM); Stewart, Walter F. (Las Cruces, NM); Tolt, Thomas L. (Los Alamos, NM); Worl, Laura A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A process of separating actinide-containing components from an admixture including forming a slurry including actinide-containing components within an admixture, said slurry including a dispersion-promoting surfactant, adjusting the pH of the slurry to within a desired range, and, passing said slurry through a pretreated matrix material, said matrix material adapted to generate high magnetic field gradients upon the application of a strong magnetic field exceeding about 0.1 Tesla whereupon a portion of said actinide-containing components are separated from said slurry and remain adhered upon said matrix material is provided.

  4. Silica coated magnetic nanoparticles for separation of nuclear acidic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Han, H.; Kaur, M.; Qiang, Y.; Johnson, A.; Paszczynski, A.; Kaczor, J.

    2010-05-15

    Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been coated with silica, followed by covalent attachment of the actinide specific chelators to separate nuclear waste in acidic conditions. A general model is developed to relate the surface coating to the particle's magnetization change, providing an alternative way to characterize the size-distribution/aggregation of MNPs. The optimized silica coating protects the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MNPs from iron leaching under highly acidic conditions, facilitates the dispersion of MNPs, and dramatically increases the loading capacity of chelator onto the MNPs. Compared with the uncoated counterparts, the silica coated MNPs show enhanced actinide separation efficiency.

  5. Effect of reverse flotation on magnetic separation concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, S. O.; Afolabi, A. S.; Makhula, M. J.

    2012-08-01

    Reverse flotation studies on magnetite samples have revealed that the use of starch as a depressant of Fe-oxides has a hydrophilic effect on the surface of Fe-bearing silicates and significantly decreases Fe in the silica-rich stream when used in combination with an amine (Lilaflot D817M). In this study, the effect of reverse flotation on the optimization of products obtained from magnetic separation was investigated. Two different magnetic samples, zones 1 and 2, were milled to <75 ?m and then subjected to low intensity magnetic separation (LIMS). The LIMS test conducted on the <75 ?m shown an upgrade of 46.40wt% Fe, 28.40wt% SiO2 and 2.61wt% MnO for zone 1 and 47.60wt% Fe, 29.17wt% SiO2 and 0.50wt% MnO for zone 2. Further milling of the ore to <25 ?m resulted in a higher magnetic-rich product after magnetic separation. Reverse flotation tests were conducted on the agitated magnetic concentrate feed, and the result shows a significant upgrade of Fe compared to that obtained from the non-agitated feed. Iron concentrations greater than 69%, and SiO2 concentrations less than 2% with overall magnetite recoveries greater than 67% and 71% were obtained for zones 1 and 2, respectively.

  6. TREATMENT OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOWS BY HIGH GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seeded water treatment by high gradient magnetic separation techniques was carried out on combined storm overflows and raw sewage influents. Both bench-type and continuous pilot plant tests were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the process in purifying waste waters. Cri...

  7. Magnetic Separations with Magnetite: Theory, Operation, and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    G. B. Cotten

    2000-08-01

    This dissertation documents the theory development and experimental plan followed to describe how a magnetite-based column under the influence of an external magnetic field functions as a magnetic separator. Theoretical simulations predict that weekly paramagnetic particles in the sub-micron range can be magnetically separated while diamagnetic particles as large as 2 microns in diameter may pass. Magnetite-based columns were evaluated as magnetically-controllable enhanced filtration devices. There was no evidence of enhanced filtration for diamagnetic particles by the magnetite-based bed. Magnetite-based magnetic separators have proven to be effective in specific laboratory experiments, indicating a potential feasibility for scale-up operations. Column media-filter type filtration effects indicate a magnetite-based column would not be suitable for treatment of a waste stream with a high diamagnetic solids content or high volume throughput requirements. Specific applications requiring removal of sub-micron para- or ferromagnetic particles under batch or Stokes flow conditions would be most applicable.

  8. Particle acceleration at 3D reconnecting magnetic separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threlfall, James; Neukirch, Thomas; Parnell, Clare; Stevenson, Julie

    2015-04-01

    We present results of test particle orbit calculations in three different environments which model separator reconnection in three dimensions. The test particle (electron and proton) orbits are calculated using the relativistic guiding centre approximation. We investigate test particle orbits in a time-dependent (analytical) electro-magnetic field configuration [detailed in Threlfall et al. (A&A, in press); arXiv:1410.6465]. These results are also compared with orbits based upon large-scale 3D MHD simulations of both a single reconnecting magnetic separator and an observationally driven 3D model of a solar active region which contains several topological features of interest, including separators. We discuss how the test-particle orbits and the energy gain depend on the initial conditions, and how observations (for example, of solar flares) may be used to constrain model parameters.

  9. Tank waste remediation system milestone report magnetic separation of tank waste: Surrogate system separations report

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; Schake, A.R.; Padilla, D.D.; de Aguero, K.J.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D.

    1994-01-14

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in large underground storage tanks (UST) at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site since 1944. More than 253,000 m{sup 3} of waste have been accumulated in 177 tanks. The waste consists of many different chemicals and are in the form of liquids, slurries, salt cakes and sludges. A magnetic separation effort at Los Alamos National Laboratory is funded through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to explore the use of high-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) for tank waste segregation. The concept is to concentrate into a low volume waste stream, all or most of the magnetic components, which include actinide compounds, most of the fission products and precious metals. As a first step in this process investigations were made on surrogate systems. This milestone report discusses the HGMS results on these systems.

  10. Dispersion and Aggregation of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Nuclear Waste Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, H.; Singh, M. Kaur T.; Qiang, Y.; Johnson, A.; Paszczynski, A.

    2009-05-01

    A novel method of nuclear waste separation using conjugates of actinide chelators and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is developed. The fast separation can be facilitated by the high magnetic moments of core-shell MNPs. Highly uniform dispersion of MNPs in solutions is required for the efficient conjugation. However, stabilization of well dispersed MNPs hinders fast magnetic collection of the conjugates. To address this dilemma, the dispersion and aggregation of the MNPs has been investigated in both mechanical and chemical approaches. In the mechanical approach, continuous ultrasonic dispersed the MNPs, whereas they re-aggregated after up to 20 minutes treatment. Bead beating method improved the MNPs' suspension time by up to two factors. Nevertheless, the magnetization of MNPs dropped sharply due to the generation of non-magnetic beads' residual. Chemical method using electrolyte and agents with different polarizations had significant effects on the suspension and aggregation of the various sized MNPs. The fine balance of Van de Waals, Brownian forces, magnetic dipole and Coulomb interactions are discussed.

  11. Experimental investigation of magnetically actuated separation using tangential microfluidic channels and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Munir, Ahsan; Zhu, Zanzan; Wang, Jianlong; Zhou, Hong Susan

    2014-06-01

    A novel continuous switching/separation scheme of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in a sub-microlitre fluid volume surrounded by neodymium permanent magnet is studied in this work using tangential microfluidic channels. Polydimethylsiloxane tangential microchannels are fabricated using a novel micromoulding technique that can be done without a clean room and at much lower cost and time. Negligible switching of MNPs is seen in the absence of magnetic field, whereas 90% of switching is observed in the presence of magnetic field. The flow rate of MNPs solution had dramatic impact on separation performance. An optimum value of the flow rate is found that resulted in providing effective MNP separation at much faster rate. Separation performance is also investigated for a mixture containing non-magnetic polystyrene particles and MNPs. It is found that MNPs preferentially moved from lower microchannel to upper microchannel resulting in efficient separation. The proof-of-concept experiments performed in this work demonstrates that microfluidic bioseparation can be efficiently achieved using functionalised MNPs, together with tangential microchannels, appropriate magnetic field strength and optimum flow rates. This work verifies that a simple low-cost magnetic switching scheme can be potentially of great utility for the separation and detection of biomolecules in microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:25014081

  12. Magnetic nano-sorbents for fast separation of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Huijin; Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You

    2013-07-01

    In order to find a cost effective and environmentally benign technology to treat the liquid radioactive waste into a safe and stable form for resource recycling or ultimate disposal, this study investigates the separation of radioactive elements from aqueous systems using magnetic nano-sorbents. Our current study focuses on novel magnetic nano-sorbents by attaching DTPA molecules onto the surface of double coated magnetic nanoparticles (dMNPs), and performed preliminary sorption tests using heavy metal ions as surrogates for radionuclides. The results showed that the sorption of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) onto the dMNP-DTPA conjugates was fast, the equilibrium was reached in 30 min. The calculated sorption capacities were 8.06 mg/g for Cd and 12.09 mg/g for Pb. After sorption, the complex of heavy elements captured by nano-sorbents can be easily manipulated and separated from solution in less than 1 min by applying a small external magnetic field. In addition, the sorption results demonstrate that dMNP-DTPA conjugates have a very strong chelating power in highly diluted Cd and Pb solutions (1-10 ?g/L). Therefore, as a simple, fast, and compact process, this separation method has a great potential in the treatment of high level waste with low concentration of transuranic elements compared to tradition nuclear waste treatment. (authors)

  13. Ramp rate testing of an HTS high gradient magnetic separation magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, M.A.; Roth, E.W.; Daney, D.E.; Hill, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report on the ramp rate testing of a prototype high temperature superconducting (HTS) high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) magnet. HGMS magnets are ramped from full field to zero field to clean the separation matrix. The time spent ramping the magnet is unavailable for processing and must therefore be kept to a minimum. Existing commercial low temperature superconducting HGMS magnets are immersed in a liquid helium bath and are designed to ramp from zero to full current in one minute. The HTS magnet in the system is conductively cooled and operates in a vacuum at a temperature of approximately 30 K. Heat generated during ramping is not as readily removed from the conductively cooled magnet as a bath cooled magnet. To verify that the conductive cooling can adequately remove heat generated during ramping they recorded magnet temperatures and voltages while ramping at rates of up to 4.8 A/second. The magnet can accommodate ramps from zero to 100 A (1.6 Tesla) in 21 seconds with no degradation in performance. The average magnet temperature rises a maximum of 1 K during ramping. Using temperatures recorded during ramps they have made rough estimates of the ac losses generated in the magnet.

  14. Dynamics of magnetic particles in cylindrical Halbach array: implications for magnetic cell separation and drug targeting.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Babinec P; Krafcík A; Babincová M; Rosenecker J

    2010-08-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for therapy and diagnosis are at the leading edge of the rapidly developing field of bionanotechnology. In this study, we have theoretically studied motion of magnetic nano- as well as micro-particles in the field of cylindrical Halbach array of permanent magnets. Magnetic flux density was modeled as magnetostatic problem by finite element method and particle motion was described using system of ordinary differential equations--Newton law. Computations were done for nanoparticles Nanomag-D with radius 65 nm, which are often used in magnetic drug targeting, as well as microparticles DynaBeads-M280 with radius 1.4 microm, which can be used for magnetic separation. Analyzing snapshots of trajectories of hundred magnetite particles of each size in the water as well as in the air, we have found that optimally designed magnetic circuits of permanent magnets in quadrupolar Halbach array have substantially shorter capture time than simple blocks of permanent magnets commonly used in experiments, therefore, such a Halbach array may be useful as a potential source of magnetic field for magnetic separation and targeting of magnetic nanoparticles as well as microparticles for delivery of drugs, genes, and cells in various biomedical applications.

  15. Assessment of Alphamagnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Upper Experiment Structural Configuration Shielding Effectiveness Associated with Change from Cryo-Cooled Magnet to Permanent Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 2 (AMS-02) underwent a series of system level electromagnetic interference control measurements, followed by thermal vacuum testing. Shortly after completion of the thermal vacuum testing, the project decided to remove the cryogenically cooled superconducting magnet, and replace it with the original permanent magnet design employed in the earlier AMS- 01 assembly. Doing so necessitated several structural changes, as well as removal or modification of numerous electronic and thermal control devices and systems. At this stage, the project was rapidly approaching key milestone dates for hardware completion and delivery for launch, and had little time for additional testing or assessment of any impact to the electromagnetic signature of the AMS-02. Therefore, an analytical assessment of the radiated emissions behavioural changes associated with the system changes was requested.

  16. [Development of new magnetic bead separation and purification instrument].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingyuan; Chen, Yi

    2014-05-01

    The article describes the development of new magnetic bead separation and purification instrument. The main application of the instrument is to capture tubercle bacillus from sputum. It is a pretreatment instrument and provides a new platform to help doctors to diagnose bacillary phthisis. Not only could it be used for tubercle bacillus capturing, but also for gene, protein and cell separating and purification. Because the controller of the instrument is 16-bit single chip microcomputer, the cost could be greatly reduced and it will be widely used in China. PMID:25241516

  17. Tagged-particle separation The technique of magnetic separation is a successful method to select cells with a desired

    E-print Network

    Kurchan, Jorge

    1 Tagged-particle separation The technique of magnetic separation is a successful method to select a field pulls from the magnetised particles, which are then driven into a separate path and collected. Several people in PMMH (M Hoyos, M. Martin,...) have been involved in separation techniques. Fast

  18. Feasibility study of iron mineral separation from red mud by high gradient superconducting magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiran; Wang, Jun; Wang, Xiaojun; Wang, Baoqiang; Luan, Zhaokun

    2011-02-01

    The disposal of bayer red mud tailings now seriously threats the environment safety. Reduction and recycling of red mud is now an urgent work in aluminum industry. High gradient superconducting magnetic separation (HGSMS) system was applied to separate the extreme fine RM particles (<100 ?m) into high iron content part and low iron content part. Two sorts of RM were fed in the HGSMS. The iron oxide contents in concentrates were about 65% and 45% when RM 1# and RM 2# were fed respectively. Meanwhile, the residues contained 52.0% or 14.1% iron oxide in residues after eight separation stages when RM 1# and RM 2# were fed respectively. The mass recovery of iron concentrates was about 10% after once separation process regardless of RM 1# or RM 2# was fed. Extreme fine particles (<10 ?m) could be captured in the HGSMS. Intergrowth of Fe and other elements is disadvantages for iron mineral separation from RM by HGSMS. Some improvement should be studied to enhance the efficiency of iron separation. It is possible for HGSMS to separate RM into high iron content part and low iron content part, the former part could be used in iron-making furnace and the later part could be recycling to sintering process for alumina production or used as construction material.

  19. Beneficiation of Turkish lignites by thermal treatment and magnetic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, G.; Renda, D.; Mustafaev, I.; Dogan, Z.

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, the improvement of Turkish lignites by semi-coking and REMS magnetic separation, in two stages, is discussed. The oxidation and decomposition of pyrite through the thermal treatment result in the formation of iron oxide and pyrrhotite on the surface. In addition to pyrite, part of the organic sulfur is also removed. After thermal treatment of lignites at temperatures ranging from 370 to 650 C, the application of REMS magnetic separator produces a product higher in calorific value and lower in sulfur content. The product can be utilized after briquetting. The volatile gases can also be used after sulfur removal. This process appears to be feasible as a clean coal manufacture from the point of energy efficiency. A short economic analysis is also presented.

  20. Magnetic Separation for Nuclear Material Detection and Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Worl, L.A.; Devlin, D.; Hill, D.; Padilla, D.; Prenger, F.C.

    1998-08-01

    A high performance superconducting magnet is being developed for particle retrieval from field collected samples. Results show that maximum separation effectiveness is obtained when the matrix fiber diameter approaches the diameter of the particles to be captured. Experimentally, the authors obtained a single particle capture limit with 0.8{micro}m PuO{sub 2} particles with dodecane as a carrier fluid. The development of new matrix materials is being pursued through the controlled corrosion of stainless steel wool, or the deposition of nickel dendrites on the existing stainless steel matrix material. They have also derived a model from a continuity equation that uses empirically determined capture cross section values. This enables the prediction of high gradient magnetic separator performance for a variety of materials and applications. The model can be used to optimize the capture cross section and thus increase the capture efficiency.

  1. Development of magnetic separator for deironing of paint industrial stock

    SciTech Connect

    Bohm, J.; Csoke, B.; Antal, G.

    1995-12-31

    From the waste material of the production of aluminum foil aluminum pigment is produced for the paint industry by grinding it in white spirit. During grinding 1--2% iron impurity gets into the product, weakening its quality, from the war of the mill armor and the grinding bodies and from the contamination of the raw material. For deironing the product, a stage-operated electrically induced magnetic filter separator was developed and put into operation. The separator was sited in an explosive environment and therefore required a special design and safety system. The paper describes the results of the development work, the device that was developed, the safety system as well as the results of and experiences with the operation of the separator.

  2. Differential blood cell separation using a high gradient magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Paul, F; Roath, S; Melville, D

    1978-02-01

    A technique for the separation of erythrocytes from whole blood is described which exploits the magnetic property of haemoglobin in the reduced state. The technique is characterized by the use of a filter consisting of a cylinder, containing stainless steel wire mesh, placed between the jaws of an electro magnet. When activated, the electromagnet induces a magnetic field gradient in the vicinity of each of the constituent wires, sufficient to attract and trap erythrocytes in suspension. The number of erythrocytes captured varies with the applied field (0-1.4 Tesla in these experiments) and flow rate (1.9-12.9 x 10(-4) m s-1). The capture process does not cause haemolysis or observable surface damage to the erythrocytes and neither leucocytes nor platelets are retained by the filter. PMID:638075

  3. Radiolysis and hydrolysis of magnetically assisted chemical separation particles

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B.A.; Nunez, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-05-01

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process is designed to separate transuranic (TRU) elements out of high-level waste (HLW) or TRU waste. Magnetic microparticles (1--25 {mu}m) were coated with octyl (phenyl)N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tributyl phosphate (TBP) and tested for removing TRU elements from acidic nitrate solutions. The particles were contacted with nitric acid solutions and Hanford plutonium finishing plant (PFP) simulant, irradiated with a high intensity {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source, and evaluated for effectiveness in removing TRU elements from 2m HNO{sub 3} solutions. The resistance of the coatings and magnetic cores to radiolytic damage and hydrolytic degradation was investigated by irradiating samples of particles suspended in a variety of solutions with doses of up to 5 Mrad. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), magnetic susceptibility measurements, and physical observations of the particles and suspension solutions were used to assess physical changes to the particles. Processes that affect the surface of the particles dramatically alter the binding sites for TRU in solution. Hydrolysis played a larger role than radiolysis in the degradation of the extraction capacity of the particles.

  4. Rapid microfluidic separation of magnetic beads through dielectrophoresis and magnetophoresis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Jegatha Nambi; Kim, Choong; Park, Hyun Jik; Kang, Ji Yoon; Kim, Tae Song; Kim, Sang Kyung

    2009-05-01

    We present the design and fabrication of a new microfluidic device in which the dielectrophoresis and magnetophoresis phenomena were used for the separation of the superparamagnetic microbeads of different sizes. By exploiting the fact that two different particles can exhibit different dielectrophoretic force-frequency spectra, we utilize this device to perform multiplex detection from a single sample solution. We found the transition frequency range for 1, 2.8, and 4.5 microm magnetic beads using our device. Bead-based analysis revealed that a high separation efficiency ( approximately 90%) could be obtained from a single sample solution containing both 4.5 and 2.8 microm beads. The average flow velocity of the beads was maintained at 9.8 mm/s, enabling fast analysis with a smaller amount of reagents. The magnetic field distribution on the beads and the bead flow at the channel cross section for different dielectrophoretic conditions was obtained using CFD-ACE(+) simulation. Issues relating to the fabrication and operation of the device are discussed in detail. Finally, we demonstrated the feasibility of parallel detection/trapping of different beads on the same chip. This separation approach offers the performance of multiplex analysis in lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:19425001

  5. The Yale Gas-Filled Split Pole Magnetic Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cata-Danil, G.; Beausang, C. W.; Casten, R. F.; Chen, A.; Chubrich, N.; Cooper, J. R.; Krücken, R.; Liu, B.; Novak, J. R.; Visser, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    1998-10-01

    Design and construction of a gas-filled recoil separator is underway at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale University. By filling the magnetic field region of the existing Enge Split-Pole magnet with N2 or He2 gases in the 1 to 15 mbar pressure range a gradual focussing of discrete charge states has been measured. The incident ions were ^16O and ^35,37Cl with 49 MeV and 95 MeV energies, respectively. The process is understood as a result of coalescing of trajectories of different charge states around a trajectory defined by the mean charge state (q¯) of the ion in gas. Because q¯ depends on the atomic number Z and is roughly proportional with the ion velocity, the average magnetic rigidity (B¯?=Av/q¯) is almost independent of the velocity distribution of the incident ions. The ion trajectories will be therefore be mainly determined by the mass number A and the atomic number Z of the ion. Monte Carlo simulations with the code RAYTRACE closely reproduce the experimental behavior. We plan to use the Yale Mass Separator (YaMS) for nuclear structure studies in conjunction with high efficency gamma detectors (clover detectors) for enhancing weak reaction channels and fission background reduction. Work supported by the US-DOE under contract numbers DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  6. CryoTran user's manual, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowgill, Glenn R.; Chato, David J.; Saad, Ehab

    1989-01-01

    The development of cryogenic fluid management systems for space operation is a major portion of the efforts of the Cryogenic Fluids Technology Office (CFTO) at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Analytical models are a necessary part of experimental programs which are used to verify the results of experiments and are also used as a predictor for parametric studies. The CryoTran computer program is a bridge to obtain analytical results. The object of CryoTran is to coordinate these separate analyses into an integrated framework with a user-friendly interface and a common cryogenic property database. CryoTran is an integrated software system designed to help solve a diverse set of problems involving cryogenic fluid storage and transfer in both ground and low-g environments.

  7. Enhanced shear separation for chiral magnetic colloidal aggregates

    E-print Network

    C. I. Mendoza; C. M. Marques; F. Thalmann

    2010-11-05

    We study the designing principles of the simplest colloidal propeller, an architecture built from four identical spheres that can couple translation with rotation to produce controlled drift motion. By considering superparamagnetic beads, we show that the simultaneous action of a magnetic field and a shear flow leads to the migration of the cluster in the vorticity direction. We investigate the dependence of the migration velocity on the geometrical parameters of the cluster, and find that significant cluster separation can be achieved under the typical operation conditions of microfluidic devices.

  8. Apparatus for magnetic separation of paramagnetic and diamagnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, R.D.

    1986-07-24

    The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for segregating paramagnetic from diamagnetic particles in particulate material and, in particular, to the open gradient magnetic separation of ash producing components and pyritic sulfur from coal. The apparatus includes a vertical cylinder and a rotatable vertical screw positioned within the cylinder, the screw having a helical blade angled downwardly and outwardly from the axis. Rotation of the vertical screw causes denser particles, which in the case of coal include pyritic sulfur and ash, which are paramagnetic, to migrate to the outside of the screw, and less dense particles, such as the low sulfur organic portion of the coal, which are diamagnetic, to migrate towards the center of the screw. A vibration mechanism attached to the screw causes the screw to vibrate during rotation, agitating and thereby accommodating further segregation of the particles. An open gradient magnetic field is applied circumferentially along the entire length of the screw by a superconducting quadrupole magnet. The open gradient magnetic field further segregates the paramagnetic-particles from the diamagnetic particles. The paramagnetic particles may then be directed from the cylinder into a first storage bin, and the diamagnetic particles, which are suitable for relatively clean combustion, may be directed into a second storage bin. 5 figs.

  9. Apparatus for magnetic separation of paramagnetic and diamagnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, R.D.

    1988-10-18

    The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for segregating paramagnetic from diamagnetic particles in particulate material and, in particular, to the open gradient magnetic separation of ash producing components and pyritic sulfur from coal. The apparatus includes a vertical cylinder and a rotatable vertical screw positioned within the cylinder, the screw having a helical blade angled downwardly and outwardly from the axis. Rotation of the vertical screw causes denser particles, which in the case of coal include pyritic sulfur and ash, which are paramagnetic, to migrate to the outside of the screw, and less dense particles, such as the low sulfur organic portion of the coal, which are diamagnetic, to migrate towards the center of the screw. A vibration mechanism attached to the screw causes the screw to vibrate during rotation, agitating and thereby accommodating further segregation of the particles. An open gradient magnetic field is applied circumferentially along the entire length of the screw by a superconducting quadrupole magnet. The open gradient magnetic field further segregates the paramagnetic particles from the diamagnetic particles. The paramagnetic particles may then be directed from the cylinder into a first storage bin, and the diamagnetic particles, which are suitable for relatively clean combustion, may be directed into a second storage bin. 5 figs.

  10. Apparatus for magnetic separation of paramagnetic and diamagnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, Richard D. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1988-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for segregating paramagnetic from diamagnetic particles in particulate material and, in particular, to the open gradient magnetic separation of ash producing components and pyritic sulfur from coal. The apparatus includes a vertical cylinder and a rotatable vertical screw positioned within the cylinder, the screw having a helical blade angled downwardly and outwardly from the axis. Rotation of the vertical screw causes denser particles, which in the case of coal include pyritic sulfur and ash, which are paramagnetic, to migrate to the outside of the screw, and less dense particles, such as the low sulfur organic portion of the coal, which are diamagnetic, to migrate towards the center of the screw. A vibration mechanism attached to the screw causes the screw to vibrate during rotation, agitating and thereby accommodating further segregation of the particles. An open gradient magnetic field is applied circumferentially along the entire length of the screw by a superconducting quadropole magnet. The open gradient magnetic field further segregates the paramagnetic particles from the diamagnetic particles. The paramagnetic particles may then be directed from the cylinder into a first storage bin, and the diamagnetic particles, which are suitable for relatively clean combustion, may be directed into a second storage bin.

  11. Exploiting Size-Dependent Drag and Magnetic Forces for Size-Specific Separation of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Hunter B; Anani, Tareq; Choi, Young Suk; Beyers, Ronald J; David, Allan E

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the full potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in nanomedicine requires the optimization of their physical and chemical properties. Elucidation of the effects of these properties on clinical diagnostic or therapeutic properties, however, requires the synthesis or purification of homogenous samples, which has proved to be difficult. While initial simulations indicated that size-selective separation could be achieved by flowing magnetic nanoparticles through a magnetic field, subsequent in vitro experiments were unable to reproduce the predicted results. Magnetic field-flow fractionation, however, was found to be an effective method for the separation of polydisperse suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 nm. While similar methods have been used to separate magnetic nanoparticles before, no previous work has been done with magnetic nanoparticles between 20 and 200 nm. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were used to confirm the size of the MNPs. Further development of this work could lead to MNPs with the narrow size distributions necessary for their in vitro and in vivo optimization. PMID:26307980

  12. Exploiting Size-Dependent Drag and Magnetic Forces for Size-Specific Separation of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Hunter B.; Anani, Tareq; Choi, Young Suk; Beyers, Ronald J.; David, Allan E.

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the full potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in nanomedicine requires the optimization of their physical and chemical properties. Elucidation of the effects of these properties on clinical diagnostic or therapeutic properties, however, requires the synthesis or purification of homogenous samples, which has proved to be difficult. While initial simulations indicated that size-selective separation could be achieved by flowing magnetic nanoparticles through a magnetic field, subsequent in vitro experiments were unable to reproduce the predicted results. Magnetic field-flow fractionation, however, was found to be an effective method for the separation of polydisperse suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 nm. While similar methods have been used to separate magnetic nanoparticles before, no previous work has been done with magnetic nanoparticles between 20 and 200 nm. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were used to confirm the size of the MNPs. Further development of this work could lead to MNPs with the narrow size distributions necessary for their in vitro and in vivo optimization. PMID:26307980

  13. Primary beneficiation of tantalite using magnetic separation and acid leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nete, M.; Koko, F.; Theron, T.; Purcell, W.; Nel, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Primary beneficiation was successfully performed prior to dissolution of manganotantalite (sample A) and ferrotantalite (sample C) samples obtained from two different mines in the Naquissupa area, Mozambique. Magnetic separation removed the majority of iron and titanium, whereas H2SO4 leaching removed a large portion of thorium and uranium in these samples. Analytical results indicated that 64.14wt% and 72.04wt% of the total Fe and Ti, respectively, and ˜2wt% each of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 were removed from sample C (ferrotantalite) using the magnetic separation method, whereas only 9.64wt% and 8.66wt% of total Fe2O3 and TiO2, respectively, and ˜2wt% each of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 were removed from sample A (manganotantalite). A temperature of 50°C and a leaching time of 3 h in the presence of concentrated H2SO4 were observed to be the most appropriate leaching conditions for removal of radioactive elements from the tantalite ores. The results obtained for sample A under these conditions indicated that 64.14wt% U3O8 and 60.77wt% ThO2 were leached into the acidic solution, along with 4.45wt% and 0.99wt% of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5, respectively.

  14. On-chip Magnetic Separation and Cell Encapsulation in Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Byvank, T.; Bharde, A.; Miller, B. L.; Chalmers, J. J.; Sooryakumar, R.; Chang, W.-J.; Bashir, R.

    2012-02-01

    The demand for high-throughput single cell assays is gaining importance because of the heterogeneity of many cell suspensions, even after significant initial sorting. These suspensions may display cell-to-cell variability at the gene expression level that could impact single cell functional genomics, cancer, stem-cell research and drug screening. The on-chip monitoring of individual cells in an isolated environment could prevent cross-contamination, provide high recovery yield and ability to study biological traits at a single cell level These advantages of on-chip biological experiments contrast to conventional methods, which require bulk samples that provide only averaged information on cell metabolism. We report on a device that integrates microfluidic technology with a magnetic tweezers array to combine the functionality of separation and encapsulation of objects such as immunomagnetically labeled cells or magnetic beads into pico-liter droplets on the same chip. The ability to control the separation throughput that is independent of the hydrodynamic droplet generation rate allows the encapsulation efficiency to be optimized. The device can potentially be integrated with on-chip labeling and/or bio-detection to become a powerful single-cell analysis device.

  15. Correlations, spin-charge separation, and magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, Ralph; Manchanda, Priyanka

    2015-03-01

    Much of the physics of condensed matter reflects electron-electron correlations. On an independent-electron level, correlations are described by a single Slater determinant with broken spin symmetry. This approach includes Hund's rule correlations as well the LSDA and LSDA+U approximations to density-functional theory (DFT). However, from Kondo and heavy-fermion systems it is known that the independent-electron approach fails to describe spin-charge separation in strongly correlated systems, necessitating the use of two or more Slater determinants. Using first-principle and model calculations, we show that spin-charge separation strongly affects the leading rare-earth anisotropy contribution in top-end permanent magnet materials such as Nd2Fe14B and SmCo5. Explicit correlation results are obtained for two limiting cases. First, we derive the density functional for tripositive rare-earth ions in a Bethe-type crystal field. The potential looks very different from the LSDA(+U) potentials, including gradient corrections. Second, we use a simple model to show that Kondo-type spin-charge separation yield a rare-earth anisotropy contribution absent in the independent-electron approach. This research is supported by DOE (DE-FG02-04ER46152).

  16. Study on magnetic separation for decontamination of cesium contaminated soil by using superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Susumu; Nomura, Naoki; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko

    2014-09-01

    The accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant caused the diffusion of radioactive cesium over the wide area. We examined the possibility of applying magnetic separation method using the superconducting magnet, which can process a large amount of the soil in high speed, to the soil decontamination and volume reduction of the radioactive cesium contaminated soil. Clay minerals are classified as 2:1 and 1:1 types by the difference of their layer structures, and these types of minerals are respectively paramagnetic and diamagnetic including some exception. It is known that most of the radioactive cesium is strongly adsorbed on the clay, especially on 2:1 type clay minerals. It is expected that the method which can separate only 2:1 type clay minerals selectively from the mixture clay minerals can enormously contribute to the volume reduction of the contaminated soil. In this study, the components in the clay before and after separation were evaluated to estimate the magnetic separation efficiency by using X-ray diffraction. From the results, the decontamination efficiency and the volume reduction ratio were estimated in order to examine the appropriate separation conditions for the practical decontamination of the soil.

  17. Magnetic Separation and Magnetic Properties of Low-Grade Manganese Carbonate Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Shi, B.; Ge, W.; Yan, C. J.; Yang, X.

    2015-02-01

    The relation between the magnetic separation behavior and magnetic properties of a low-grade manganese ore was analyzed before and after treatment by direct reduction with coal. It was found that raw ore with an initial average grade of 10.39% Mn and consisting of diamagnetic and paramagnetic minerals can be concentrated by high-intensity magnetic separation to produce a salable product with a grade of 22.75% Mn and a recovery of 89.88%. In contrast, direct reduction of the ore results in a new Mn-Fe oxide phase formed with a combination of ferromagnetic and paramagnetic properties, thereby increasing the magnetic susceptibilities of the ore by almost two orders of magnitude. The grade of Mn for the roasted ore could only be concentrated to 15.49% with a recovery of 66.67%. Therefore, it is concluded that the low-grade manganese ores with antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic (or diamagnetic, but not strongly ferromagnetic) properties could be efficiently beneficiated via high-intensity magnetic separation.

  18. Development of a high gradient magnetic separator using high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Prenger, F.C.; Daney, D.; Daugherty, M.; Hill, D.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). High-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is an application of superconducting magnet technology to the process of magnetic separation of solids from other solids, liquids, or gases. The production of both high magnetic fields and large field gradients using superconducting magnet technology has made it possible to separate a previously unreachable but large family of paramagnetic materials. It is possible to separate more than half of the elements in the periodic table using this method. Because HGMS is a physical separation process, no additional or mixed waste is generated. This project sought to develop a high-gradient magnetic separator using a high-temperature superconducting magnet.

  19. Magnetic separation - Advanced nanotechnology for future nuclear fuel recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, M.; Zhang, H.; Qiang, Y.; Martin, L.; Todd, T.

    2013-07-01

    The unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), such as their extremely small size and high surface area to volume ratio, provide better kinetics for the adsorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions. In this work, we demonstrated the separation of minor actinides using complex conjugates of MNPs with diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) chelator. The sorption results show the strong affinity of DTPA towards Am (III) and Pu (IV) by extracting 97% and 80% of actinides, respectively. It is shown that the extraction process is highly dependent on the pH of the solution. If these long-term heat generating actinides can be efficiently removed from the used fuel raffinates, the volume of material that can be placed in a given amount of repository space can be significantly increased. (authors)

  20. Demonstration of magnetically activated and guided isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Thomas R.; Klappauf, Bruce; Raizen, Mark G.

    2014-08-01

    Enriched isotopes are widely used in medicine, basic science and energy production, and the need will only grow in the future. The main method for enriching stable isotopes today, the calutron, dates back over eighty years and has an uncertain future, creating an urgent need, especially in nuclear medicine. We report here the experimental realization of a general and efficient method for isotope separation that presents a viable alternative to the calutron. Combining optical pumping and a unique magnet geometry, we observe substantial depletion of Li-6 throughput in a lithium atomic beam produced by an evaporation source over a range of flux. These results demonstrate the viability of our method to yield large degrees of enrichment in a manner that is amenable to industrial scale-up and the production of commercially relevant quantities.

  1. IMPROVEMENT OF IMMUNOMAGNETIC SEPARATION FOR ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 DETECTION BY THE PICKPEN MAGNETIC PARTICLE SEPARATION DEVICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional immunomagnetic separation (IMS) procedures, which use an external magnetic source to capture magnetic particles against the side of a test tube, are labor intensive and can have poor sensitivity for the target organism due to high background microflora that is not effectively washed awa...

  2. Ferritin as a label for high-gradient magnetic separation.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, C S; Lindsay, J G

    1983-01-01

    In three model systems, particles the size of cells or smaller have been surface labeled with ferritin to make them slightly paramagnetic, by virtue of the iron in the ferritin. In each case it was possible to show that labeled particles could be magnetically removed from a flowing suspension by the high-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) technique. The first system of particles consisted of small (1 micron) carboxylate-modified latex spheres to which ferritin was covalently bound to create stable paramagnetic particles analogous to a ferritin-labeled subcellular membrane preparation. In the second system polyacrylamide beads that more closely approximated whole cells in size (5-50 microns) were labeled with immunoferritin. The third system was a biomembrane preparation: erythrocyte ghosts labeled with a ferritin-lectin conjugate. A field of 7 T (tesla) (70 kG) was used in each case, along with buffer flow rates through the HGMS column in the range 0.1-1.0 ml/min. PMID:6860772

  3. Mercury removal from solution by superconducting magnetic separation with nanostructured magnetic adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T.; Tachibana, S.; Miura, O.; Takeuchi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Recently, mercury Hg concentration in human blood increases due to expanding the global mercury contamination. Excess mercury bioaccumulation poses a significant health risk. In order to decrease mercury concentration in the environment and human blood, we have developed two different kinds of nanostructured magnetic adsorbents for mercury to apply them to superconducting magnetic separation instead of conventional filtration. One is magnetic beads (MBs) which have nanosize magnetite particles in the core and a lot of SH radicals on the surface to adsorb Hg ions effectively. MBs were developed mainly to remove mercury from human blood. The maximum amount of the adsorption for MBs is 6.3 mg/g in the solution in less than a minute. Dithiothreitol can easily remove mercury adsorbed to MBs, hence MBs can be reusable. The other is nanostructured magnetic activated carbon (MAC) which is activated carbon with mesopores and nanosize magnetite. The maximum amount of the adsorption for MAC is 38.3 mg/g in the solution. By heat-treatment mercury can be easily removed from MAC. We have studied superconducting magnetic separation using each adsorbent for mercury removal from solution.

  4. SUPERCONDUCTING OPEN-GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION FOR THE PRETREATMENT OF RADIOACTIVE OR MIXED WASTE VITRIFICATION FEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists need to gain a better understanding of the magnetic separation processes that can be used to separate deleterious constituents (crystalline, amorphous, and colloidal) in vitrification feed streams for borosilicate glass production without adding chemicals or generating...

  5. Method and apparatus for separating materials magnetically. [Patent application; iron pyrite from coal

    DOEpatents

    Hise, E.C. Jr.; Holman, A.S.; Friedlaender, F.J.

    1980-11-06

    Magnetic and nonmagnetic materials are separated by passing stream thereof past coaxial current-carrying coils which produce a magnetic field wherein intensity varies sharply with distance radially of the axis of the coils.

  6. Application of high temperature superconductors to high-gradient magnetic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, M.A.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Worl, L.W.; Schake, A.R.; Padilla, D.D.

    1994-06-01

    High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) is a powerful technique which can be used to separate widely dispersed contaminants from a host material, This technology can separate magnetic solids from other solids, liquids or gases. As the name implies HGMS uses large magnetic field gradients to separate ferromagnetic and paramagnetic particles. HGMS separators usually consist of a high-field solenoid magnet, the bore of which contains a fine-structured, ferromagnetic matrix material. The matrix material locally distorts the magnetic field and creates large field gradients in the vicinity of the matrix elements. These elements then become trapping sites for magnetic particles and are the basis for the magnetic separation. In this paper we discuss the design and construction of a prototype HGMS unit using a magnet made with high temperature superconductors (HTS). The prototype consists of an outer vacuum vessel which contains the HTS solenoid magnet The magnet is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield and multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets. The magnet, thermal shield and current leads all operate in a vacuum and are cooled by a cryocooler. High temperature superconducting current leads are used to reduce the heat leak from the ambient environment to the HTS magnet.

  7. Pulsed critical current measurements of NbTi in perpendicular and parallel pulsed magnetic fields using the new Cryo-BI-Pulse System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehr, V.; Tan, K. S.; Hopkins, S. C.; Glowacki, B. A.; de Keyser, A.; van Bockstal, L.; Deschagt, J.

    2006-06-01

    Rapid transport current versus high magnetic field characterisation of high-irreversibility type II superconductors is important to maximise their critical parameters. HTS conductors are already used to produce insert coils that increase the fields of conventional magnets made from NbTi, (Nb, Ta)3Sn and Nb3Al wires. There is fundamental interest in the study of HTS tapes and wires in magnetic fields higher than 21T, the current limit of superconducting magnets producing a DC field. Such fields can be obtained by using pulse techniques. High critical currents cannot be routinely measured with a continuous current applied at liquid helium, hydrogen or neon temperatures because of thermal and mechanical effects. A newly developed pulsed magnetic field and pulsed current system which allows rapid Jc(B, T) measurements of the whole range of superconducting materials was tested with a multifilamentary NbTi wire in perpendicular and parallel orientations.

  8. Conjugates of Actinide Chelator-Magnetic Nanoparticles for Used Fuel Separation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, You; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Rao, Linfeng

    2011-10-30

    The actinide separation method using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) functionalized with actinide specific chelators utilizes the separation capability of ligand and the ease of magnetic separation. This separation method eliminated the need of large quantity organic solutions used in the liquid-liquid extraction process. The MNPs could also be recycled for repeated separation, thus this separation method greatly reduces the generation of secondary waste compared to traditional liquid extraction technology. The high diffusivity of MNPs and the large surface area also facilitate high efficiency of actinide sorption by the ligands. This method could help in solving the nuclear waste remediation problem.

  9. Magnetic separation of particles and cells in ferrofluid flow through a straight microchannel using two offset magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jian; Deng, Yanxiang; Vedantam, Pallavi; Tzeng, Tzuen-Rong; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2013-11-01

    The separation of particles and cells is critical in many chemical and biological applications. This work presents a simple idea for utilizing a pair of permanent magnets to continuously separate diamagnetic particles and cells in ferrofluid flow through a straight microchannel. The first magnet is placed close to the microchannel for focusing the particle mixture to a single stream without the use of a sheath flow. The second magnet, which is offset from the first magnet and placed farther from the channel, is to displace the aligned particles to dissimilar flow paths for a continuous sorting. This idea is first demonstrated through the separation of 3 ?m- and 10 ?m-diameter polystyrene particles, where the effects of flow speed and magnet distance are both examined. The experimental data are found to fit well with the predictions of an analytical model. Furthermore, a continuous separation of live yeast cells from 10 ?m polystyrene particles is implemented in the same device.

  10. Application of coal petrography to the evaluation of magnetically separated dry crushed coals

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, L.A.; Hise, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    In the present study the open gradient magnetic separation method has been used to beneficiate the -30 + 100 mesh fraction of two high volatile bituminous coals. The evaluation of the effectiveness of the magnetic separation for cleaning these coals is the subject of this paper. Coal petrography in combination with scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the magnetically separated coal fractions. These analyses revealed that the majority of the pyrite and non-pyrite minerals were concentrated in the positive magnetic susceptibility fractions. The bulk of the starting samples (approx. 80 weight percent) were located in the negative magnetic susceptibility fractions and showed significant reductions in pyrite and non-pyritic minerals. The magnetic separation appears to effectively split the samples into relatively clean coal and refuse.

  11. HIGH-GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION FOR REMOVAL OF SULFUR FROM COAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a thorough physical, chemical, and magnetic characterization of a Pennsylvania coal from the Upper Freeport seam. The powdered coal was then subjected to high-gradient magnetic separations, as a function of magnetic field and fluid velocity, in both a ...

  12. In search of chiral magnetic effect: separating flow-driven background effects and quantifying anomaly-induced charge separations

    E-print Network

    Huang, Xu-Guang; Liao, Jinfeng

    2015-01-01

    We report our recent progress on the search of Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) by developing new measurements as well as by hydrodynamic simulations of CME and background effects, with both approaches addressing the pressing issue of separating flow-driven background contributions and possible CME signal in current heavy ion collision measurements.

  13. Magnetite/CdTe magnetic-fluorescent composite nanosystem for magnetic separation and bio-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Anup; Kale, Sonia; Yadav, Prasad; Gholap, Haribhau; Pasricha, Renu; Jog, J. P.; Lefez, Benoit; Hannoyer, Béatrice; Shastry, Padma; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2011-06-01

    A new synthesis protocol is described to obtain a CdTe decorated magnetite bifunctional nanosystem via dodecylamine (DDA) as cross linker. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and fluorescence microscopy are used to characterize the constitution, size, composition and physical properties of these superparamagnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles. These CdTe decorated magnetite nanoparticles were then functionalized with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody to specifically target cells expressing this receptor. The EGFR is a transmembrane glycoprotein and is expressed on tumor cells from different tissue origins including human leukemic cell line Molt-4 cells. The magnetite-CdTe composite nanosystem is shown to perform excellently for specific selection, magnetic separation and fluorescent detection of EGFR positive Molt-4 cells from a mixed population. Flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy results show that this composite nanosystem has great potential in antibody functionalized magnetic separation and imaging of cells using cell surface receptor antibody.

  14. Magnetic properties and loss separation in iron-silicone-MnZn ferrite soft magnetic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shen; Sun, Aizhi; Xu, Wenhuan; Zou, Chao; Yang, Jun; Dong, Juan

    2013-12-16

    This paper investigates the magnetic and structural properties of iron-based soft magnetic composites coated with silicone-MnZn ferrite hybrid. The organic silicone resin was added to improve the flexibility of the insulated iron powder and causes better adhesion between particles to increase the mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscopy and distribution maps show that the iron particle surface is covered with a thin layer of silicone-MnZn ferrite. Silicone-MnZn ferrite coated samples have higher permeability when compared with the non-magnetic silicone resin coated compacts. The real part of permeability increases by 34.18% when compared with the silicone resin coated samples at 20 kHz. In this work, a formula for calculating the total loss component by loss separation method is presented and finally the different parts of total losses are calculated. The results show that the eddy current loss coefficient is close to each other for the silicone-MnZn ferrite, silicone resin and MnZn ferrite coated samples (0.0078

  15. CryoFree Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, M

    2006-11-07

    CryoFree, a gamma-ray spectrometer, has been built and successfully tested. This instrument is based on a planar germanium semiconductor detector and is optimized for high-resolution spectroscopy in the range of a 30 keV to a few hundred keV to detect U and Pu. The spectrometer is cooled with a mechanical cryocooler that obviates the need for liquid cryogen. Furthermore, the instrument is battery powered. The combination of mechanical cooling and battery operation allows high-resolution spectroscopy in a highly-portable field instrument. A description of the instrument along with its performance is given.

  16. CryoSat-2 and the CryoSat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, R.; Cullen, R.

    2009-04-01

    CryoSat was chosen as the first of ESA's Earth Explorer Opportunity missions in late 1999, following a competitive selection process. Its goal is the measurement of secular change in the cryosphere, particularly in the elevation of the ice caps and the thickness of sea ice. The required accuracy corresponds to about half of the variation expected due to natural variability, over reasonable scales for the surfaces concerned. The selected technique is radar altimetry, although the instrument has been modified to provide the enhanced capabilities needed to significantly extend the spatial coverage of previous altimetry missions, particularly ERS and EnviSat. Thus the radar includes a synthetic aperture mode which enables the along- track resolution to be improved to about 250 m. This will enable detection of leads in sea-ice which are narrower than those detected hitherto, so that operation deeper into pack-ice can be achieved with a consequent reduction in errors due to omission. Altimetry over the steep edges of ice caps is hampered by the irregular topography which, since the radar ranging is performed to the closest reflector rather than the point directly below, introduces uncertainty into the exactitude of repeat measurements. CryoSat's radar includes a second antenna and receiver chain so that interferometry may be used to determine the arrival angle of the echo and so improve localisation of the reflection. The satellite payload, which includes a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination and a set of star trackers to measure the orientation of the interferometer, is quite complex and demanding. The satellite was launched on 8 October 2005, just less than 6 years after the start of the programme. Unfortunately the launch vehicle, a Rockot launcher derived from the Russian SS-19 ICBM, suffered an anomaly at the end of its second-stage flight, with the result that the satellite was lost, the debris falling close to the North pole. Determination to rebuild the satellite and carry out the mission was extremely widespread: within 6 months all of the necessary funding issues, legal procedures, industrial commitments and resource demands had been solved and the programme restarted. The new satellite, inevitably called CryoSat-2, includes a large number of improvements compared to its predecessor, although many are internal changes to improve the reliability and ease of operations. More significantly, the expected lifetime has been increased. The satellite measurements will be supported by a comprehensive set of validation data, collected on the surface and from airborne platforms. These validation data, designed to specifically address the uncertainties in the interpretation of the radar echoes, have been collected during a series of carefully co- ordinated measurement campaigns over several years. Additionally, techniques to enable the collocation of surface and satellite measurements over the moving sea-ice have been developed and rehearsed, ready to support the dedicated validation campaigns during the mission. CryoSat-2 is near completion, less than 3 years after the start of the industrial contract. Launch was originally planned for March 2009, again with a Rockot. But lack of availability of this vehicle (more specifically, the versatile third stage added to the ICBM) has induced a change to the Dnepr launcher, also an ICBM: the SS- 18. As a result of this change the launch is now planned for November 2009. So finally, about 10 years after it was first selected, the CryoSat mission will start collecting data.

  17. CryoSat-2 and the CryoSat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, R.; Cullen, R.

    2008-12-01

    CryoSat was chosen as the first of ESA's Earth Explorer Opportunity missions in late 1999, following a competitive selection process. Its goal is the measurement of secular change in the cryosphere, particularly in the elevation of the ice caps and the thickness of sea ice. The required accuracy corresponds to about half of the variation expected due to natural variability, over reasonable scales for the surfaces concerned. The selected technique is radar altimetry, although the instrument has been modified to provide the enhanced capabilities needed to significantly extend the spatial coverage of previous altimetry missions, particularly ERS and EnviSat. Thus the radar includes a synthetic aperture mode which enables the along- track resolution to be improved to about 250 m. This will enable detection of leads in sea-ice which are narrower than those detected hitherto, so that operation deeper into pack-ice can be achieved with a consequent reduction in errors due to omission. Altimetry over the steep edges of ice caps is hampered by the irregular topography which, since the radar ranging is performed to the closest reflector rather than the point directly below, introduces uncertainty into the exactitude of repeat measurements. CryoSat's radar includes a second antenna and receiver chain so that interferometry may be used to determine the arrival angle of the echo and so improve localisation of the reflection. The satellite payload, which includes a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination and a set of star trackers to measure the orientation of the interferometer, is quite complex and demanding. The satellite was launched on 8 October 2005, just less than 6 years after the start of the programme. Unfortunately the launch vehicle, a Rockot launcher derived from the Russian SS-19 ICBM, suffered an anomaly at the end of its second-stage flight, with the result that the satellite was lost, the debris falling close to the North pole. Determination to rebuild the satellite and carry out the mission was extremely widespread: within 6 months all of the necessary funding issues, legal procedures, industrial commitments and resource demands had been solved and the programme restarted. The new satellite, inevitably called CryoSat-2, includes a large number of improvements compared to its predecessor, although many are internal changes to improve the reliability and ease of operations. More significantly, the expected lifetime has been increased. The satellite measurements will be supported by a comprehensive set of validation data, collected on the surface and from airborne platforms. These validation data, designed to specifically address the uncertainties in the interpretation of the radar echoes, have been collected during a series of carefully co- ordinated measurement campaigns over several years. Additionally, techniques to enable the collocation of surface and satellite measurements over the moving sea-ice have been developed and rehearsed, ready to support the dedicated validation campaigns during the mission. CryoSat-2 is near completion, less than 3 years after the start of the industrial contract. Launch was originally planned for March 2009, again with a Rockot. But lack of availability of this vehicle (more specifically, the versatile third stage added to the ICBM) has induced a change to the Dnepr launcher, also an ICBM: the SS- 18. As a result of this change the launch is now planned for November 2009. So finally, about 10 years after it was first selected, the CryoSat mission will start collecting data.

  18. Magnetic separation technique for groundwater by five HTS melt-processed bulk magnets arranged in a line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, T.; Seki, H.; Kimura, T.; Mimura, D.; Fukui, S.; Ogawa, J.; Sato, T.; Ooizumi, M.; Fujishiro, H.; Hayashi, H.; Yokoyama, K.; Stiehler, C.

    2011-11-01

    A magnetic separation study for groundwater purification has been practically conducted by using the multi-pole magnet system. The magnetic pole was composed of 10 open magnetic spaces by arranging five HTS melt-processed bulk magnets in a line in a vacuum sheath. The individual bulk magnets were activated by feeding intense pulsed magnetic fields up to 6 T. The magnetic field distribution was estimated with respect to various pole arrangements. The actual groundwater samples of Sanjo City were processed so as to form large precipitates by adding the coagulant and pH controlling. The maximum separation ratio of the iron-bearing precipitates has exceeded over 70% when slurry water was exposed to 10 magnetic poles of up to 2.5 T at a flowing rate of less than 4.8 l/min. An obvious attraction of flocks to the magnetic poles was observed even when the water contains no magnetite powder at the flow rate of 1.01 l/min. This implies the validity of the multi-pole magnet system with respect to the actual application to water purification.

  19. Cryo-planing of frozen-hydrated samples using cryo triple ion gun milling (CryoTIGM™).

    PubMed

    Chang, Irene Y T; Joester, Derk

    2015-12-01

    Cryo-SEM is a high throughput technique for imaging biological ultrastructure in its most pristine state, i.e. without chemical fixation, embedding, or drying. Freeze fracture is routinely used to prepare internal surfaces for cryo-SEM imaging. However, the propagation of the fracture plane is highly dependent on sample properties, and the resulting surface frequently shows substantial topography, which can complicate image analysis and interpretation. We have developed a broad ion beam milling technique, called cryogenic triple ion gun milling (CryoTIGM™ ['kr?-?-,t?m]), for cryo-planing frozen-hydrated biological specimens. Comparing sample preparation by CryoTIGM™ and freeze fracture in three model systems, Baker's yeast, mouse liver tissue, and whole sea urchin embryos, we find that CryoTIGM™ yields very large (?700,000?m(2)) and smooth sections that present ultrastructural details at similar or better quality than freeze-fractured samples. A particular strength of CryoTIGM™ is the ability to section samples with hard-soft contrast such as brittle calcite (CaCO3) spicules in the sea urchin embryo. PMID:26549007

  20. Magnetically separable nanoferrite-anchored glutathione: Aqueous homocoupling of arylboronic acids under microwave irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A highly active, stable and magnetically separable glutathione based organocatalyst provided good to excellent yields to symmetric biaryls in the homocoupling of arylboronic acids under microwave irradiation. Symmetrical biaryl motifs are present in a wide range of natural p...

  1. Magnetically Separable Fe3O4@DOPA-Pd: A Heterogeneous Catalyst for Aqueous Heck Reaction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetically separable Fe3O4@DOPA-Pd catalyst has been synthesized via anchoring of palladium over dopamine-coated magnetite via non-covalent interaction and the catalyst is utilized for expeditious Heck coupling in aqueous media.

  2. Optimization of Yield in Magnetic Cell Separations Using Nickel Nanowires of Different Lengths

    E-print Network

    Chen, Christopher S.

    Optimization of Yield in Magnetic Cell Separations Using Nickel Nanowires of Different Lengths Anne. Magnetic nanoparticles have found wide utility as a means of applying force to biological systems of cells are superparamagnetic beads, an alternative type of nanoparticle with considerable poten- tial

  3. Magnetic mineral separation: a timeless challenge for an experimental rock magnetist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagroix, France; Guyodo, Yohan; Till, Jessica L.; Nova Naess, Live

    2014-05-01

    One timeless challenge in rock magnetic studies, inclusive of paleomagnetism and environmental magnetism, is decomposing a sample's bulk magnetic behaviour into its individual magnetic mineral components. One approach consists of physically separating the bulk into its components prior to magnetic characterization. Both dry magnetic based or wet magnetic or gravity based techniques are routinely used. A second approach consists of chemical separation where certain components may be preferentially dissolved. Component characterization is achieved by comparing before and after magnetic data. Both physical and chemical approaches have shortcomings biasing the separation towards a physical behavior which may encompass more than one mineral species. A third approach calls for numerical unmixing of magnetic data such as hysteresis loops and remanence (e.g. ARM, IRM) acquisition of demagnetization curves. Here the main drawback is that a priori knowledge of the expected behavior of each mineral component is required. When considering how dependent the magnetic behavior of a mineral is on, for example, grain size, stoichiometry, concentration (i.e. magnetic interactions); the a priori bases functions required become a significant limitation of numerical unmixing techniques. We present a method permitting to decompose the magnetic behavior of a bulk sample experimentally and at low temperature avoiding any ambiguities in data interpretation due to heating induced alteration. A single instrument is used to measure the temperature dependence of the remanent magnetization and to apply different steps of AF demagnetizations and thermal demagnetization. The experimental method is validated on synthetic mixtures of magnetite, hematite, goethite as well as on natural loess samples where the contributions of magnetite, goethite, hematite and maghemite are successfully isolated. The experimental protocol can be adapted to target other iron bearing minerals relevant to the rock or sediment under study. One limitation rests on the fact that the method is based on remanent magnetization. Consequently, a quantitative decomposition of absolute concentration of individual components remains unachievable without assumptions.

  4. Cryo-electron tomography of bacterial viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C.; Wright, Elizabeth R.

    2013-01-05

    Bacteriophage particles contain both simple and complex macromolecular assemblages and machines that enable them to regulate the infection process under diverse environmental conditions with a broad range of bacterial hosts. Recent developments in cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) make it possible to observe the interactions of bacteriophages with their host cells under native-state conditions at unprecedented resolution and in three-dimensions. This review describes the application of cryo-ET to studies of bacteriophage attachment, genome ejection, assembly and egress. Current topics of investigation and future directions in the field are also discussed.

  5. Elastic oscillations of bubbles separated from an air cavity in a magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polunin, V. M.; Shabanova, I. A.; Karpova, G. V.; Kobelev, N. S.; Ryabtsev, K. S.; Platonov, V. B.; Aref'ev, I. M.

    2015-07-01

    The elastic oscillations of air bubbles separated from an air cavity compressed by the ponderomotive forces of a magnetic field in a magnetic fluid are accompanied by the appearance of an alternating magnetic field component. The frequency of the alternating component corresponds to the frequency of radial bubble oscillations, and this fact is used to determine the bubble size. A great body of experimental data has been obtained from six magnetic fluid samples with different viscosities. Based on these data, histograms illustrating the bubble radius distribution are plotted. The appearance of the alternating magnetic field component caused by bubble oscillations in a magnetized magnetic fluid can be used to develop a fundamentally new method for supplying small metered gas shots to a reactor, as well as to study the boiling process in a magnetic fluid.

  6. ELECTRON TRANSPORT IN CORONAL LOOPS: THE INFLUENCE OF THE EXPONENTIAL SEPARATION OF MAGNETIC FIELD LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bitane, R.; Zimbardo, G.; Veltri, P.

    2010-08-20

    Observations by the TRACE spacecraft have shown that coronal emission in the extreme ultraviolet is characterized by filamentary structures within coronal loops, with transverse sizes close to the instrumental resolution. Starting from the observed filament widths and using the concepts of braided magnetic fields, an estimate of the turbulence level in the coronal loops can be obtained. Magnetic turbulence in the presence of a background magnetic field can be strongly anisotropic, and such anisotropy influences the separation of magnetic field lines, as well as the magnetic field line diffusion coefficient. Careful computations of the magnetic field line diffusion coefficient D{sub m} and of the rate of exponential separation of magnetic field lines h, also allowing for the possibility of anisotropic magnetic turbulence, enable computation of the effective perpendicular diffusion coefficient for electrons. When compared with observations this yields magnetic turbulence levels on the order of {delta}B/B {sub 0} = 0.05-0.7, which are larger than previous estimates. These values of the magnetic fluctuation level support the idea that magnetic turbulence can contribute to coronal heating by means of MHD turbulence dissipation. It is also found that field line transport is not governed by the quasilinear regime, but by a nonlinear regime which includes an intermediate and the percolation regimes.

  7. Magnetic separation of algae genetically modified for increased intracellular iron uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Amy; Moore, Lee R.; Lane, Christopher D.; Kumar, Anil; Stroff, Clayton; White, Nicolas; Xue, Wei; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2015-04-01

    Algae were investigated in the past as a potential source of biofuel and other useful chemical derivatives. Magnetic separation of algae by iron oxide nanoparticle binding to cells has been proposed by others for dewatering of cellular mass prior to lipid extraction. We have investigated feasibility of magnetic separation based on the presence of natural iron stores in the cell, such as the ferritin in Auxenochlorella protothecoides (A. protothecoides) strains. The A. protothecoides cell constructs were tested for inserted genes and for increased intracellular iron concentration by inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption (ICP-AA). They were grown in Sueoka's modified high salt media with added vitamin B1 and increasing concentration of soluble iron compound (FeCl3 EDTA, from 1× to 8× compared to baseline). The cell magnetic separation conditions were tested using a thin rectangular flow channel pressed against interpolar gaps of a permanent magnet forming a separation system of a well-defined fluid flow and magnetic fringing field geometry (up to 2.2 T and 1000 T/m) dubbed "magnetic deposition microscopy", or MDM. The presence of magnetic cells in suspension was detected by formation of characteristic deposition bands at the edges of the magnet interpolar gaps, amenable to optical scanning and microscopic examination. The results demonstrated increasing cellular Fe uptake with increasing Fe concentration in the culture media in wild type strain and in selected genetically-modified constructs, leading to magnetic separation without magnetic particle binding. The throughput in this study is not sufficient for an economical scale harvest.

  8. On-chip magnetic separation of superparamagnetic beads for integrated molecular analysis

    PubMed Central

    Florescu, Octavian; Wang, Kevan; Au, Patrick; Tang, Jimmy; Harris, Eva; Beatty, P. Robert; Boser, Bernhard E.

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated a postprocessed complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit (IC) capable of on-chip magnetic separation, i.e., removing via magnetic forces the nonspecifically bound magnetic beads from the detection area on the surface of the chip. Initially, 4.5 ?m wide superparamagnetic beads sedimenting out of solution due to gravity were attracted to the detection area by a magnetic concentration force generated by flowing current through a conductor embedded in the IC. After sedimentation, the magnetic beads that did not bind strongly to the functionalized surface of the IC through a specific biochemical complex were removed by a magnetic separation force generated by flowing current through another conductor placed laterally to the detection area. As the spherical bead pivoted on the surface of the chip, the lateral magnetic force was further amplified by mechanical leveraging, and 50 mA of current flowing through the separation conductor placed 18 ?m away from the bead resulted in 7.5 pN of tensile force on the biomolecular tether immobilizing the bead. This force proved high enough to break nonspecific interactions while leaving specific antibody-antigen bonds intact. A sandwich capture immunoassay on purified human immunoglobulin G showed strong correlation with a control enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and a detection limit of 10 ng?ml or 70 pM. The beads bound to the detection area after on-chip magnetic separation were detected optically. To implement a fully integrated molecular diagnostics platform, the on-chip magnetic separation functionality presented in this work can be readily combine with state-of-the art CMOS-based magnetic bead detection technology. PMID:20368988

  9. On-chip magnetic separation of superparamagnetic beads for integrated molecular analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florescu, Octavian; Wang, Kevan; Au, Patrick; Tang, Jimmy; Harris, Eva; Beatty, P. Robert; Boser, Bernhard E.

    2010-03-01

    We have demonstrated a postprocessed complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit (IC) capable of on-chip magnetic separation, i.e., removing via magnetic forces the nonspecifically bound magnetic beads from the detection area on the surface of the chip. Initially, 4.5 ?m wide superparamagnetic beads sedimenting out of solution due to gravity were attracted to the detection area by a magnetic concentration force generated by flowing current through a conductor embedded in the IC. After sedimentation, the magnetic beads that did not bind strongly to the functionalized surface of the IC through a specific biochemical complex were removed by a magnetic separation force generated by flowing current through another conductor placed laterally to the detection area. As the spherical bead pivoted on the surface of the chip, the lateral magnetic force was further amplified by mechanical leveraging, and 50 mA of current flowing through the separation conductor placed 18 ?m away from the bead resulted in 7.5 pN of tensile force on the biomolecular tether immobilizing the bead. This force proved high enough to break nonspecific interactions while leaving specific antibody-antigen bonds intact. A sandwich capture immunoassay on purified human immunoglobulin G showed strong correlation with a control enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and a detection limit of 10 ng/ml or 70 pM. The beads bound to the detection area after on-chip magnetic separation were detected optically. To implement a fully integrated molecular diagnostics platform, the on-chip magnetic separation functionality presented in this work can be readily combine with state-of-the art CMOS-based magnetic bead detection technology.

  10. Biomedical applications of high gradient magnetic separation: progress towards therapeutic haeomofiltration.

    PubMed

    Frodsham, George; Pankhurst, Quentin A

    2015-10-01

    High gradient magnetic separation is a well-established technology in the mineral processing industry, and has been used for decades in the bioprocessing industry. Less well known is the increasing role that high gradient magnetic separation is playing in biomedical applications, for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. We review here the state of the art in this emerging field, with a focus on therapeutic haemofiltration, the key enabling technologies relating to the functionalisation of magnetic nanoparticles with target-specific binding agents, and the development of extra-corporeal circuits to enable the in situ filtering of human blood. PMID:26439594

  11. Versatile fabrication of magnetic carbon fiber aerogel applied for bidirectional oil-water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Zhu, Xiaotao; Ge, Bo; Men, Xuehu; Li, Peilong; Zhang, Zhaozhu

    2015-09-01

    Fabricating functional materials that can solve environmental problems resulting from oil or organic solvent pollution is highly desired. However, expensive materials or complicated procedures and unidirectional oil-water separation hamper their applications. Herein, a magnetic superhydrophobic carbon fiber aerogel with high absorption capacity was developed by one-step pyrolysis of Fe(NO3)3-coated cotton in an argon atmosphere. The obtained aerogel can selectively collect oils from oil-polluted region by a magnet bar owing to its magnetic properties and achieves fast oil-water separation for its superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity. Furthermore, the aerogel performs recyclable oil absorption capacity even after ten cycles of oil-water separation and bears organic solvent immersion. Importantly, the obtained aerogel turns to superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic after thermal treatment, allowing it as a promising and efficient material for bidirectional oil-water separation and organic contaminants removal.

  12. D0 Cryo CC Heater Installation

    SciTech Connect

    Urbin, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-03-16

    Nine pairs of heaters are installed in the bottom of the CC pressure vessel.The physical layout is shown in the CC internal development drawing, D0 dwg. 3740.510-ME-255523. Electrically the heater system is a delta configuration. Electrical details are found on D0 dwg. 3740.515EC-273761. The feedthrough connectors for power to the heaters are located in the instrumentation box. Connector positions are found on D0 dwg.3740.515-EC-273760. Original sketches for the above named drawings are included in this document. The heaters and wiring were cleaned various times prior to and after installation with ethyl a1chohol. At various stages in the installation hi-pot and continuity tests were successfully accomplished to verify the integrity of the system. The fmal hi-pot numbers are included in the documentation. The heaters and wiring are kept separated from thermometry and purity cell wiring by SS sheetmetal barriers. The fabrication, testing and installation was completed by M. Hentges and his crew from AD/Cryo.

  13. Circular Halbach array for fast magnetic separation of hyaluronan-expressing tissue progenitors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Powrnima; Williams, P Stephen; Moore, Lee R; Caralla, Tonya; Boehm, Cynthia; Muschler, George; Zborowski, Maciej

    2015-10-01

    Connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) are a promising therapeutic agent for bone repair. Hyaluronan, a high molecular mass glycosaminoglycan, has been shown by us to be a suitable biomarker for magnetic separation of CTPs from bone marrow aspirates in a canine model. For the therapy to be applicable in humans, the magnetic separation process requires scale-up without compromising the viability of the cells. The scaled-up device presented here utilizes a circular Halbach array of diametrically magnetized, cylindrical permanent magnets. This allows precise control of the magnetic field gradient driving the separation, with theoretical analysis favoring a hexapole field. The separation vessel has the external diameter of a 50 mL conical centrifuge tube and has an internal rod that excludes cells from around the central axis. The magnet and separation vessel (collectively dubbed the hexapole magnet separator or HMS) was tested on four human and four canine bone marrow aspirates. Each CTP-enriched cell product was tested using cell culture bioassays as surrogates for in vivo engraftment quality. The magnetically enriched cell fractions showed statistically significant, superior performance compared to the unenriched and depleted cell fractions for all parameters tested, including CTP prevalence (CTPs per 10(6) nucleated cells), proliferation by colony forming unit (CFU) counts, and differentiation by staining for the presence of osteogenic and chondrogenic cells. The simplicity and speed of the HMS operation could allow both CTP isolation and engraftment during a single surgical procedure, minimizing trauma to patients and lowering cost to health care providers. PMID:26368657

  14. Launch and Early Orbit Operations for CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardel, Nic; Marchese, Franco

    2010-12-01

    CryoSat-2 was launched from Baikonur on 8th of April 2010 aboard a modified Dnepr ICBM, the so-called SS18 Satan. Following the ascent and separation from the launch vehicle the Flight Operations Segment (FOS) in ESOC, Darmstadt started the operations to configure the satellite into the correct mode to acquire science; switching on units, configuring software and ensuring that the satellite health and performance was as expected. This paper will describe the operations performed by the FOS during the first weeks in orbit, including the unexpected problems encountered, their implications and solutions.

  15. Characterization of domain wall-based traps for magnetic beads separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donolato, M.; Lofink, F.; Hankemeier, S.; Porro, J. M.; Oepen, H. P.; Vavassori, P.

    2012-04-01

    We characterize the magnetic behavior of an array of magnetic bead traps based on domain walls (DWs) formed in zig-zag permalloy wires patterned on a Si substrate. Using magnetic force and magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy, we study the nucleation and annihilation of DWs for two different wire widths. Through scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis, we analyze in detail the magnetization configuration of the DWs in the presence of a magnetic bead previously trapped by the DW stray field. Finally, we patterned the magnetic nanostructures directly on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, and we show that the functionality of the device is completely maintained. These results pave the way to the integration of DW-based devices in a PDMS lab-on-a-chip system for magnetic bead separation.

  16. High gradient magnetic separation versus expanded bed adsorption: a first principle comparison.

    PubMed

    Hubbuch, J J; Matthiesen, D B; Hobley, T J; Thomas, O R

    2001-01-01

    A robust new adsorptive separation technique specifically designed for direct product capture from crude bioprocess feedstreams is introduced and compared with the current bench mark technique, expanded bed adsorption. The method employs product adsorption onto sub-micron sized non-porous superparamagnetic supports followed by rapid separation of the 'loaded' adsorbents from the feedstock using high gradient magnetic separation technology. For the recovery of Savinase from a cell-free Bacillus clausii fermentation liquor using bacitracin-linked adsorbents, the integrated magnetic separation system exhibited substantially enhanced productivity over expanded bed adsorption when operated at processing velocities greater than 48 m h(-1). Use of the bacitracin-linked magnetic supports for a single cycle of batch adsorption and subsequent capture by high gradient magnetic separation at a processing rate of 12 m h(-1) resulted in a 2.2-fold higher productivity relative to expanded bed adsorption, while an increase in adsorbent collection rate to 72 m h(-1) raised the productivity to 10.7 times that of expanded bed adsorption. When the number of batch adsorption cycles was then increased to three, significant drops in both magnetic adsorbent consumption (3.6 fold) and filter volume required (1.3 fold) could be achieved at the expense of a reduction in productivity from 10.7 to 4.4 times that of expanded bed adsorption. PMID:11787803

  17. Ferronickel enrichment by fine particle reduction and magnetic separation from nickel laterite ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Run-zao; Yao, Li; Ji, Zhi-jun; Zhang, Yan-ting; Li, Shi-qi

    2014-10-01

    Ferronickel enrichment and extraction from nickel laterite ore were studied through reduction and magnetic separation. Reduction experiments were performed using hydrogen and carbon monoxide as reductants at different temperatures (700-1000°C). Magnetic separation of the reduced products was conducted using a SLon-100 cycle pulsating magnetic separator (1.2 T). Composition analysis indicates that the nickel laterite ore contains a total iron content of 22.50wt% and a total nickel content of 1.91wt%. Its mineral composition mainly consists of serpentine, hortonolite, and goethite. During the reduction process, the grade of nickel and iron in the products increases with increasing reduction temperature. Although a higher temperature is more favorable for reduction, the temperature exceeding 1000°C results in sintering of the products, preventing magnetic separation. After magnetic separation, the maximum total nickel and iron concentrations are 5.43wt% and 56.86wt%, and the corresponding recovery rates are 84.38% and 53.76%, respectively.

  18. High Temperature Superconducting Reciprocating Magnetic Separator Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Maguire

    2008-06-05

    In 2001, under DOE's Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI), E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. (Dupont) was awarded a cost-share contract to build a fully functional full-scale model high temperature superconducting reciprocating magnet unit specifically designed for the koalin clay industry. After competitive bidding, American Superconductor (AMSC) was selected to provide the coil for the magnet. Dupont performed the statement of work until September 2004, when it stopped work, with the concurrence of DOE, due to lack of federal funds. DOE had paid all invoices to that point, and Dupont had provided all cost share. At this same time, Dupont determined that this program did not fit with its corporate strategies and notified DOE that it was not interesting in resuming the program when funding became available. AMSC expressed interest in assuming performance of the Agreement to Dupont and DOE, and in March 2005, this project was transferred to AMSC by DOE amendment to the original contract and Novation Agreement between AMSC and Dupont. Design drawings and some hardware components and subassemblies were transferred to AMSC. However, no funding was obligated by DOE and AMSC never performed work on the project. This report contains a summary of the work performed by Dupont up to the September 04 timeframe.

  19. Removal of freshwater microalgae by a magnetic separation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergini, Sofia S.; Aravantinou, Andriana F.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2013-04-01

    Some species of microalgae, with high growth rate and high lipid content, appear to be attractive alternatives as a feedstock for biodiesel production. The high-energy input for harvesting biomass and removing the water from the algae makes current commercial microalgal biodiesel production cost expensive. The major techniques currently employed in microalgae harvesting and recovery include centrifugation, coagulation-flocculation, bio-flocculation, filtration and screening, gravity sedimentation, and flotation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the harvesting of microalgae cells by coagulation using magnetic activated carbon, magnetite (FeO4) nanoparticles, and common chemical coagulants. Scenedesmus rubescens was selected and cultivated in 10 L flasks under continuous artificial light. Samples were taken at different operation intervals. Jar tests were conducted to investigate the effect of adsorption of microalgae on the magnetic material. The removal efficiency of microalgae was affected by the coagulants dose, stirring time and speed, and the initial microalgae concentration. The recovery of microalgae was greater in cultures with high initial microalgae concentration compared to cultures with low microalgae concentrations.

  20. Research on red mud treatment by a circulating superconducting magnetic separator.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiran; Chen, Haoshu; Wang, Jun; Xu, Fengyu; Zhang, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    Red mud (RM) accumulated over the years and caused a serious environmental problem. Iron-rich fraction separation is a cost-effective way to reduce the amount of disposal RM. A circulating high-gradient superconducting magnetic separator was produced in this work. Steel wool was filled in the circulating boxes. The boxes were connected by two chains, which moved in and out the magnetic field by a drive motor. The efficiency of iron-rich RM separation by the superconducting magnetic separator was investigated. An amount of 25% (w/w) iron-rich RM fractions with a grade of 65% were separated from the 56% iron content raw RM. The parameters of the steel wool matrix were important in controlling the iron-rich RM magnetic separation. Finer steel wool increased the iron recovery ratio, but decreased the grade of the iron-rich RM concentrates. Microscopic photographs of the RM particles showed that opaque mineral particles were enriched in the collected RM. The particle size distributions of raw, concentrate and residue RM were measured. The increased particle size of concentrate RM implied that large particles were entrapped in the steel wool matrix. PMID:24701921

  1. Effect of desliming on the magnetic separation of low-grade ferruginous manganese ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sunil Kumar; Banerjee, P. K.; Suresh, Nikkam

    2015-07-01

    In the present investigation, magnetic separation studies using an induced roll magnetic separator were conducted to beneficiate low-grade ferruginous manganese ore. The feed ore was assayed to contain 22.4% Mn and 35.9% SiO2, with a manganese-to-iron mass ratio (Mn:Fe ratio) of 1.6. This ore was characterized in detail using different techniques, including quantitative evaluation of minerals by scanning electron microscopy, which revealed that the ore is extremely siliceous in nature and that the associated gangue minerals are more or less evenly distributed in almost all of the size fractions in major proportion. Magnetic separation studies were conducted on both the as-received ore fines and the classified fines to enrich their manganese content and Mn:Fe ratio. The results indicated that the efficiency of separation for deslimed fines was better than that for the treated unclassified bulk sample. On the basis of these results, we proposed a process flow sheet for the beneficiation of low-grade manganese ore fines using a Floatex density separator as a pre-concentrator followed by two-stage magnetic separation. The overall recovery of manganese in the final product from the proposed flow sheet is 44.7% with an assay value of 45.8% and the Mn:Fe ratio of 3.1.

  2. Magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process: Preparation and optimization of particles for removal of transuranic elements

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.; Bradley, C.; Buchholz, B.A.; Aase, S.B.; Tuazon, H.E.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Landsberger, S.

    1995-05-01

    The Magnetically Assisted Chemical Separation (MACS) process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractants with magnetic separation by using specially coated magnetic particles to provide a more efficient chemical separation of transuranic (TRU) elements, other radionuclides, and heavy metals from waste streams. Development of the MACS process uses chemical and physical techniques to elucidate the properties of particle coatings and the extent of radiolytic and chemical damage to the particles, and to optimize the stages of loading, extraction, and particle regeneration. This report describes the development of a separation process for TRU elements from various high-level waste streams. Polymer-coated ferromagnetic particles with an adsorbed layer of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) diluted with tributyl phosphate (TBP) were evaluated for use in the separation and recovery of americium and plutonium from nuclear waste solutions. Due to their chemical nature, these extractants selectively complex americium and plutonium contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the solution by using a magnet. The partition coefficients were larger than those expected based on liquid[liquid extractions, and the extraction proceeded with rapid kinetics. Extractants were stripped from the particles with alcohols and 400-fold volume reductions were achieved. Particles were more sensitive to acid hydrolysis than to radiolysis. Overall, the optimization of a suitable NMCS particle for TRU separation was achieved under simulant conditions, and a MACS unit is currently being designed for an in-lab demonstration.

  3. Separating the ferromagnetic and glassy behavior within the metal-organic magnet Ni (TCNQ) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlie, Adam; Terry, Ian; Szablewski, Marek; Giblin, Sean R.

    2015-11-01

    An in-depth study of the metal-organic magnet Ni (TCNQ) 2 was conducted where the deuterated form was synthesised both to attempt to alter the magnetic properties of the material and to be advantageous in techniques such as neutron scattering and muon spectroscopy. Deuteration saw a 3 K increase in TC with magnetization and heat capacity measurements demonstrating a spin wave contribution at low temperatures confirming the 3D nature of the ferromagnetic state shown by Ni (TCNQ-D4)2 . AC susceptibility results suggest there is a glassy component associated with the magnetically ordered state, though muon spectroscopy measurements did not support the presence of a spin glass state. Instead muon spectroscopy at zero magnetic field indicated the presence of two magnetic transitions, one at 20 K and another below 6 K; the latter is likely due to the system entering a quasistatic regime, similar to what one might expect of a superspin or cluster glass. Neutron diffraction measurements further supported this by revealing very weak magnetic Bragg peaks suggesting that the magnetism may have a short coherence length and be confined to small grains or clusters. The separation of the ferromagnetic and glassy magnetic components of the material's properties suggest that this system may show promise as a metal-organic magnet which is easily modified to change its magnetic properties, providing larger grain sizes can be synthesized.

  4. Simulating Chiral Magnetic and Separation Effects with Spin-Orbit Coupled Atomic Gases

    E-print Network

    Xu-Guang Huang

    2015-06-11

    The chiral magnetic and chiral separation effects---quantum-anomaly-induced electric current and axial current along an external magnetic field in parity-odd quark-gluon plasma---have received intense studies in the community of heavy-ion collision physics. We show that analogous effects occur in rotating trapped Fermi gases with Weyl-Zeeman spin-orbit coupling where the rotation plays the role of an external magnetic field. These effects can induce a mass quadrupole in the atomic cloud along the rotation axis which may be tested in future experiments. Similar effects also exist in rotating trapped Bose gases with Weyl-Zeeman spin orbit coupling. Our results suggest that the spin-orbit coupled atomic gases are potential simulators of the chiral magnetic and separation effects.

  5. Simulating Chiral Magnetic and Separation Effects with Spin-Orbit Coupled Atomic Gases

    E-print Network

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    The chiral magnetic and chiral separation effects---quantum-anomaly-induced electric current and axial current along an external magnetic field in parity-odd quark-gluon plasma---have received intense studies in the community of heavy-ion collision physics. We show that analogous effects occur in rotating trapped Fermi gases with Weyl-Zeeman spin-orbit coupling where the rotation plays the role of an external magnetic field. These effects can induce a mass quadrupole in the atomic cloud along the rotation axis which may be tested in future experiments. Similar effects also exist in rotating trapped Bose gases with Weyl-Zeeman spin orbit coupling. Our results suggest that the spin-orbit coupled atomic gases are potential simulators of the chiral magnetic and separation effects.

  6. Closed-loop magnetic separation of nanoparticles on a packed bed of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnet, Cécilia; Akouala, Mesferdon; Kuzhir, Pavel; Bossis, Georges; Zubarev, Andrey; Wereley, Norman M.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we consider magnetic separation of iron oxide nanoparticles when a nanoparticle suspension (diluted ferrofluid) passes through a closed-loop filter composed of a packed bed of micro-beads magnetized by an externally applied magnetic field. We show that the capture of nanoparticles of a size as small as 60 nm is easily achieved at low-to-moderate magnetic fields (16-32 kA/m) thanks to relatively strong magnetic interactions between them. The key parameter governing the capture process is the Mason number—the ratio of hydrodynamic-to-magnetic forces exerted to nanoparticles. The filter efficiency, ?, defined through the ratio of the inlet-to-outlet concentration shows a power-law dependency on Mason number, ??M a-0.83 , in the range of 102magnetic nanoparticles, followed by magnetic separation of the nanoparticles.

  7. Magnetophoresis 'meets' viscoelasticity: deterministic separation of magnetic particles in a modular microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Francesco; Madadi, Hojjat; Villone, Massimiliano M; D'Avino, Gaetano; Cusano, Angela M; Vecchione, Raffaele; Ventre, Maurizio; Maffettone, Pier Luca; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-04-21

    The deflection of magnetic beads in a microfluidic channel through magnetophoresis can be improved if the particles are somehow focused along the same streamline in the device. We design and fabricate a microfluidic device made of two modules, each one performing a unit operation. A suspension of magnetic beads in a viscoelastic medium is fed to the first module, which is a straight rectangular-shaped channel. Here, the magnetic particles are focused by exploiting fluid viscoelasticity. Such a channel is one inlet of the second module, which is a H-shaped channel, where a buffer stream is injected in the second inlet. A permanent magnet is used to displace the magnetic beads from the original to the buffer stream. Experiments with a Newtonian suspending fluid, where no focusing occurs, are carried out for comparison. When viscoelastic focusing and magnetophoresis are combined, magnetic particles can be deterministically separated from the original streamflow to the buffer, thus leading to a high deflection efficiency (up to ~96%) in a wide range of flow rates. The effect of the focusing length on the deflection of particles is also investigated. Finally, the proposed modular device is tested to separate magnetic and non-magnetic beads. PMID:25732596

  8. Magnetic Separation-Assistant Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Inhibition for Highly Sensitive Probing of Nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Ran; Liu, Qian; Hong, Zhangyong; Wang, He-Fang

    2015-12-15

    For the widely used "off-on" fluorescence (or phosphorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET or PRET) system, the separation of donors and acceptors species was vital for enhancing the sensitivity. To date, separation of free donors from FRET/PRET inhibition systems was somewhat not convenient, whereas separation of the target-induced far-between acceptors has hardly been reported yet. We presented here a novel magnetic separation-assistant fluorescence resonance energy transfer (MS-FRET) inhibition strategy for highly sensitive detection of nucleolin using Cy5.5-AS1411 as the donor and Fe3O4-polypyrrole core-shell (Fe3O4@PPY) nanoparticles as the NIR quenching acceptor. Due to hydrophobic interaction and ?-? stacking of AS1411 and PPY, Cy5.5-AS1411 was bound onto the surface of Fe3O4@PPY, resulting in 90% of fluorescence quenching of Cy5.5-AS1411. Owing to the much stronger specific interaction of AS1411 and nucleolin, the presence of nucleolin could take Cy5.5-AS1411 apart from Fe3O4@PPY and restore the fluorescence of Cy5.5-AS1411. The superparamagnetism of Fe3O4@PPY enabled all separations and fluorescence measurements complete in the same quartz cell, and thus allowed the convenient but accurate comparison of the sensitivity and fluorescence recovery in the cases of separation or nonseparation. Compared to nonseparation FRET inhibition, the separation of free Cy5.5-AS1411 from Cy5.5-AS1411-Fe3O4@PPY solution (the first magnetic separation, MS-1) had as high as 25-fold enhancement of the sensitivity, whereas further separation of the nucleolin-inducing far-between Fe3O4@PPY from the FRET inhibition solution (the second magnetic separation, MS-2) could further enhance the sensitivity to 35-fold. Finally, the MS-FRET inhibition assay displayed the linear range of 0.625-27.5 ?g L(-1) (8.1-359 pM) and detection limit of 0.04 ?g L(-1) (0.05 pM) of nucleolin. The fluorescence intensity recovery (the percentage ratio of the final restoring fluorescence intensity to the quenched fluorescence intensity of Cy5.5-AS1411 solution by 0.09 g L(-1) Fe3O4@PPY) was enhanced from 36% (for nonseparation) to 56% (for two magnetic separations). This is the first accurate evaluation for the effect of separating donor/acceptor species on the FRET inhibition assay. PMID:26558409

  9. Measuring Thermal Conductivity and Moisture Absorption of Cryo-Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    NASA is seeking to develop thermal insulation material systems suitable for withstanding both extremely high temperatures encountered during atmospheric re-entry heating and aero- braking maneuvers, as well as extremely low temperatures existing in liquid fuel storage tanks. Currently, materials used for the high temperature insulation or Thermal Protection System (TPS) are different from the low temperature, or cryogenic insulation. Dual purpose materials are necessary to the development of reusable launch vehicles (RLV). The present Space Shuttle (or Space Transportation System, STS) employs TPS materials on the orbiter and cryo-insulation materials on the large fuel tank slung under the orbiter. The expensive fuel tank is jettisoned just before orbit is achieved and it burns up while re-entering over the Indian Ocean. A truly completely reusable launch vehicle must store aR cryogenic fuel internally. The fuel tanks will be located close to the outer surface. In fact the outer skin of the craft will probably also serve as the fuel tank enclosure, as in jet airliners. During a normal launch the combined TPS/cryo-insulation system will serve only as a low temperature insulator, since aerodynamic heating is relatively minimal during ascent to orbit. During re-entry, the combined TPS/cryo-insulation system will serve only as a high temperature insulator, since all the cryogenic fuel will have been expended in orbit. However, in the event of an.aborted launch or a forced/emergency early re-entry, the tanks will still contain fuel, and the TPS/cryo-insulation will have to serve as both low and high temperature insulation. Also, on long duration missions, such as to Mars, very effective cryo-insulation materials are needed to reduce bod off of liquid propellants, thereby reducing necessary tankage volume, weight, and cost. The conventional approach to obtaining both low and high temperature insulation, such as is employed for the X-33 and X-34 spacecraft, is to use separate TPS and cryo-insulation materials, which are connected by means of adhesives or stand-offs (spacers). Three concepts are being considered: (1) the TPS is bonded directly to the cryo-insulation which, in turn, is bonded to the exterior of the tank, (2) stand-offs are used to make a gap between the TPS and the cryo-insulation, which is bonded externally to the tank, (3) TPS is applied directly or with stand-offs to the exterior so the tank, and cryo-insulation is applied directly to the interior of the tank. Many potential problems are inherent in these approaches. For example, mismatch between coefficients of thermal expansion of the TPS and cryo-insulation, as well as aerodynamic loads, could lead to failure of the bond. Internal cryo-insulation must be prevent from entering the sump of the fuel turbo-pump. The mechanical integrity of the stand-off structure (if used) must withstand multiple missions. During ground hold (i.e., prior to launch) moisture condensation must be minimized in the gap between the cryo-insulation and the TPS. The longer term solution requires the development of a single material to act as cryo- insulation during ground hold and as TPS during re-entry. Such a material minimizes complexity and weight while improving reliability and reducing cost.

  10. Investigation for Magnetic Separation of Oxygen from Supercritical Air Near the Maxcondentherm Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, A.; Shiraishi, M.

    2004-06-01

    In an effort to develop a highly effective separation technology for oxygen operating in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) temperature range, the magnetic separation of oxygen from supercritical air was investigated using a laser holography interferometer. The experiment was carried out near the maxcondentherm (MC) point. For purposes of comparison, the same operation was carried out using supercritical nitrogen. Here, a neodymium magnet was used and the magnetic force was conducted into the experimental cell through a magnetic alloy rod. Density variation caused by the magnetic force was observed in this study. In the case of supercritical air, the density gradient was formed around the tip of the rod, whereas in the case of supercritical nitrogen, no density gradient was observed. This fact strongly suggested that oxygen was attracted by the magnetic force and highly condensed on the surface at the tip of the rod, leading us to suppose that it might be exploited in a new purification system of gaseous oxygen using magnetic force.

  11. Design of large aperture superferric quadrupole magnets for an in-flight fragment separator

    SciTech Connect

    Zaghloul, Aziz; Kim, Dogyun; Kim, Jangyoul; Kim, Mijung; Kim, Myeongjin; Yun, Chongcheoul; Kim, Jongwon

    2014-01-29

    Superferric quadrupole magnets to be used for in-flight fragment separator have been designed. A quadrupole magnet triplet for beam focusing is placed in a cryostat together with superconducting correction coils. To maximize acceptance of rare isotope beams produced by projectile fragmentation, it is essential to use large-aperture quadrupole magnets. The pole tip radius is 17 cm in the current design, and we tried to enlarge the aperture with 3D analysis on magnetic fields. In the front end of the separator, where a target and beam dump are located, we plan to use two sets of quadrupole triplets made of high-Tc superconductor (HTS) operating at 20-50 K considering high radiation heat load. The HTS magnet will use warm iron poles. Both low-Tc and high-Tc superconductors are acquired for test winding, and two kinds of dewar and cryostat are under construction to perform the coil and magnet tests. The magnetic design of superferric quadrupole is mainly discussed.

  12. APPLICATION OF HIGH-GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION TO FINE PARTICLE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an assessment of the potential use of high-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) as a means of collecting gas stream particulates. The assessment included both experiments and analyses of theoretical models. Phase I included evaluations of theoretical ex...

  13. Two-dimensional plasma expansion in a magnetic nozzle: Separation due to electron inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Ahedo, Eduardo; Merino, Mario

    2012-08-15

    A previous axisymmetric model of the supersonic expansion of a collisionless, hot plasma in a divergent magnetic nozzle is extended here in order to include electron-inertia effects. Up to dominant order on all components of the electron velocity, electron momentum equations still reduce to three conservation laws. Electron inertia leads to outward electron separation from the magnetic streamtubes. The progressive plasma filling of the adjacent vacuum region is consistent with electron-inertia being part of finite electron Larmor radius effects, which increase downstream and eventually demagnetize the plasma. Current ambipolarity is not fulfilled and ion separation can be either outwards or inwards of magnetic streamtubes, depending on their magnetization. Electron separation penalizes slightly the plume efficiency and is larger for plasma beams injected with large pressure gradients. An alternative nonzero electron-inertia model [E. Hooper, J. Propul. Power 9, 757 (1993)] based on cold plasmas and current ambipolarity, which predicts inwards electron separation, is discussed critically. A possible competition of the gyroviscous force with electron-inertia effects is commented briefly.

  14. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in a Finger-tapping Task Separates Motor from Timing

    E-print Network

    Moses, Elisha

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in a Finger- tapping Task Separates Motor from Timing Mechanisms and Induces Frequency Doubling Nava Levit-Binnun1 , Nestor Z. Handzy1 , Avi Peled2,3 , Ilan Modai2 the motor processes in charge of execution of the motor commands. We speculate that the TMS is causing

  15. Separation and enrichment of enantiopure from racemic compounds using magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaochuan; Wong, Shin Yee; Bwambok, David K; Atkinson, Manza B J; Zhang, Xi; Whitesides, George M; Myerson, Allan S

    2014-07-18

    Crystallization of a solution with high enantiomeric excess can generate a mixture of crystals of the desired enantiomer and the racemic compound. Using a mixture of S-/RS-ibuprofen crystals as a model, we demonstrated that magnetic levitation (MagLev) is a useful technique for analysis, separation and enantioenrichment of chiral/racemic products. PMID:24875274

  16. Removal of less biodegradable dissolved organic matters in water by superconducting magnetic separation with magnetic mesoporous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Jin, T.; Miura, O.

    2010-11-01

    Less biodegradable dissolved organic matters in water as typified by humic substances are known as precursors of carcinogenic trihalomethanes, and are removed about 60% by current advanced water treatments. However, further increase of the removal ratio is demand. In this study, magnetic mesoporous carbon (MMPC), which can adsorb the substances physically and be efficiently collected by using superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS), has been synthesized with coconut-shell-based activated carbon and ferric nitrate solution by the gas activation method. The MMPC has the maximum magnetization value of 30.7 emu/g and an adsorption ability of 87% to 10 mg/L humic acid in a short time. The standard MMPC having a magnetization of 6.43 emu/g was able to be separated at magnetic field of 2 T. Used MMPC regained the adsorption ability to 93.1% by N 2 reactivation heat treatment. These results show promise for application of current water treatments by superconducting HGMS, which is suitable for high-speed water treatment without secondary wastes.

  17. Magnetic separation of Dy(III) ions from homogeneous aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pulko, B. Yang, X.; Lei, Z.; Odenbach, S.; Eckert, K.

    2014-12-08

    The possibility to enrich paramagnetic dysprosium(III) ions in a magnetic field gradient is proved by means of interferometry, which may open the route for a magnetic separation of rare earth ions from aqueous solutions. The separation dynamics are studied for three different concentrations of DyCl{sub 3} and compared with those found recently in a sulphate solution of the 3d ion Mn(II). In view of the similar-sized hydration spheres for Dy(III) and Mn(II), the slower separation dynamics in DyCl{sub 3} is attributed to both a higher densification coefficient and the strong impact of Brownian motion due to the absence of ion-pair clusters.

  18. Double-Layer Magnetic Nanoparticle-Embedded Silica Particles for Efficient Bio-Separation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Homan; Cho, Hong-Jun; Park, Sung-Jun; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Kim, Sehoon; Kim, Hyung-Mo; Jun, Bong-Hyun; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) based nanomaterials have been exploited in various biotechnology fields including biomolecule separation. However, slow accumulation of Fe3O4 NPs by magnets may limit broad applications of Fe3O4 NP-based nanomaterials. In this study, we report fabrication of Fe3O4 NPs double-layered silica nanoparticles (DL MNPs) with a silica core and highly packed Fe3O4 NPs layers. The DL MNPs had a superparamagnetic property and efficient accumulation kinetics under an external magnetic field. Moreover, the magnetic field-exposed DL MNPs show quantitative accumulation, whereas Fe3O4 NPs single-layered silica nanoparticles (SL MNPs) and silica-coated Fe3O4 NPs produced a saturated plateau under full recovery of the NPs. DL MNPs are promising nanomaterials with great potential to separate and analyze biomolecules. PMID:26599084

  19. Selection of a matrix for the recovery of uranium by wet high-intensity magnetic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Svoboda, J.

    1985-05-30

    The concentration, by wet high-intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS), of gold and uranium in materials resulting from the cyanidation of Witwatersrand ores was tested on an industrial scale on two South African gold mines, and the results are discussed in detail. The mechanical and metallurgical performance of the carousel magnetic separators was found to be satisfactory, but, for the large-scale application of WHIMS in the South African mining industry, a more cost-effective machine is required. It was decided that, in the present work, the information contained in several unpublished internal Mintek communications should be summarized and used as guidelines in the selection of matrices that would be suitable for the recovery of finely dispersed, weakly magnetic minerals.

  20. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs.

    PubMed

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K; Rüegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A; Sefat, Athena S; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p???3.5?kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p???7?kbar. At 3.5?kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc???1.2?K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5 < or ~??p?< or ~?7?kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (?s). A scaling of ?s with Tc(3.2) as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs. PMID:26346548

  1. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    PubMed Central

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Rüegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p??3.5?kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p??7?kbar. At 3.5?kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc??1.2?K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5??p??7?kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (?s). A scaling of ?s with as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs. PMID:26346548

  2. Pressure-induced electronic phase separation of magnetism and superconductivity in CrAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanov, Rustem; Guguchia, Zurab; Eremin, Ilya; Luetkens, Hubertus; Amato, Alex; Biswas, Pabitra K.; Rüegg, Christian; Susner, Michael A.; Sefat, Athena S.; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    2015-09-01

    The recent discovery of pressure (p) induced superconductivity in the binary helimagnet CrAs has raised questions on how superconductivity emerges from the magnetic state and on the mechanism of the superconducting pairing. In the present work the suppression of magnetism and the occurrence of superconductivity in CrAs were studied by means of muon spin rotation. The magnetism remains bulk up to p??3.5?kbar while its volume fraction gradually decreases with increasing pressure until it vanishes at p??7?kbar. At 3.5?kbar superconductivity abruptly appears with its maximum Tc??1.2?K which decreases upon increasing the pressure. In the intermediate pressure region (3.5??p??7?kbar) the superconducting and the magnetic volume fractions are spatially phase separated and compete for phase volume. Our results indicate that the less conductive magnetic phase provides additional carriers (doping) to the superconducting parts of the CrAs sample thus leading to an increase of the transition temperature (Tc) and of the superfluid density (?s). A scaling of ?s with as well as the phase separation between magnetism and superconductivity point to a conventional mechanism of the Cooper-pairing in CrAs.

  3. Magnetic materials as sorbents for metal/metalloid preconcentration and/or separation. A review.

    PubMed

    Giakisikli, Georgia; Anthemidis, Aristidis N

    2013-07-30

    The use of magnetic materials in solid phase extraction has received considerable attention in recent years taking into account many advantages arising from the inherent characteristics of magnetic particles. Magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) methodology overcomes problems such as column packing and phase separation, which can be easily performed by applying an external magnetic field. The use of magnetic particles in automatic systems is growing over the last few years making the on-line operation of MSPE a promising technique in the frame of green chemistry. This article aims to provide all recent progress in the research of novel magnetic materials as sorbents for metal preconcentration and determination coupled with different detection systems as well as their implementation in sequential injection and microfluidic systems. In addition, a description of preparation, characterization as well as applications of various types of magnetic materials, either with organic or inorganic coating of the magnetic core, is presented. Concluding remarks and future trends are also commented. PMID:23856225

  4. Magnetic and transport properties of phase-separated manganite BiLaCaMnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. R.; Kuang, G. L.; Zhao, B. C.; Sun, Y. P.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the magnetic and transport properties of Bi 0.1La 0.5Ca 0.4MnO 3 manganite, systematically. Four distinct feature temperature points in the temperature dependence of the magnetization curve M(T) occurring at ˜218 K, ˜181 K,˜112 K and ˜38 K are observed; these are suggested to be related to charge ordered (CO), weak ferromagnetic (FM), strong FM, and blocked metastable state. These temperature points can be changed by applying magnetic fields. The field-cooled (FC) M(T) curves show an obvious thermal hysteresis between the FC cooling (FCC) and FC warming (FCW) measuring process. The large variation between the FC and zero-field-cooled (ZFC) magnetization curves at low temperatures reflects the existence of blocked metastable states separated by high energy barriers. The blocked state can be weakened or eventually destroyed by applying magnetic fields. The field dependence of the magnetization and resistivity at both 5 K and 130 K shows that the magnetic and electrical transport properties are tightly correlated with the same critical field. The results indicate that CO and FM phases coexist in the sample at low temperatures. The local lattice distortion induced by the Bi 3+ doping may play an important role in the complex magnetic and transport properties of the sample.

  5. Separation Nanotechnology of Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid Bonded Magnetic Nanoparticles for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Johnson, Andrew; Tian, Guoxin; Jiang, Weilin; Rao, Linfeng; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Qiang, You

    2013-01-01

    A nanomagnetic separation method based on Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) conjugated with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is studied for application in spent nuclear fuel separation. The high affinity of DTPA towards actinides aids in separation from the highly acidic medium of nuclear waste. The solubility and magnetization of particles at low pH is protected by encapsulating them in silica layer. Surface functionalization of silica coated particles with polyamines enhances the loading capacity of the chelators on MNPs. The particles were characterized before and after surface modification using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry, and X-ray diffractometry. The coated and uncoated samples were studied using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) to understand the change in magnetic properties due to the influence of the surface functionalization. The hydrodynamic size and surface charge of the particles are investigated using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The uptake behavior of Am(III), Pu(IV), U(VI), and Np(V) from 0.1M NaNO3 solution was investigated. The sorption result shows the strong affinity of DTPA towards Am(III) and Pu(IV) by extracting 97% and 80% of actinides, respectively. The high removal efficiency and fast uptake of actinides make the chelator conjugated MNPs an effective method for spent nuclear fuel separation.

  6. High-gradient magnetic separation in blood and bone marrow processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roath, S.; Smith, A. Richards; Watson, J. H. P.

    1990-04-01

    High-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) has been succesful in capturing red blood cells from whole blood. This is due to the paramagnetic property of the haemoglobin contained in red blood cells when it is in the deoxygenated state. The captured red blood cells and the processed white blood cells and platelets appear to be functionally undamaged by separation. The capture depends on field gradient, flow rate, dilution of the blood, size of filter and a number of other factors. Malarial parasite-containing red cells have been captured using this technique and elsewhere lymphocyte/red cell rosettes have been retained in the filter of a system using a field gradient produced by a superconducting magnet. The ex vivo processing of human bone marrow is currently under study. Removal of targetted cells from bone marrow, such as tumour cells or T-lymphocytes prior to reinfusion is currently practiced. Positive cell rescue, however, is not practicable as the present techniques mostly damage the targetted cells. We are applying high-gradient magnetic separation, using an antibody complex linked to the surface of red blood cells, which should recognise target cells within bone marrow. The whole complex is then liable to retention in a sufficiently high-gradient magnetic field and the target cell made available by red-blood-cell lysis.

  7. Coal characterization and high gradient magnetic separation studies of coal fines from Paradise, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, C.C.; Dazhen, T.; Daniel, N.; Carson, W.R.

    1997-07-01

    Five coal slurry ponds at the TVA Paradise facility in Western Kentucky were characterized and high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) studies were conducted on selected samples. The objective was to determine whether or not HGMS is an effective technique to remove pyritic sulfur and ash from coal fines. Lateral changes in particle size distribution within individual ponds reflect temporal changes in the hydrology within the ponds. Where material was dredged and stacked at the side of the pond, the particle size was coarser and the material was more acidic, due to oxidation of pyrite. Wet HGMS studies were conducted over a range of concentrations, and at different field strengths of up to 2 Tesla (20,000 gauss). Various matrices were used in the magnet including relatively coarse screens and fine particle size magnetic stainless steel wool. Grinding to finer particle sizes liberates the pyrite and ash-forming minerals, enhancing their separation in the magnet. At particle sizes greater than 200 mesh ( 75 micrometers) clogging occurred within the magnet when the finer wool matrix was used. Tests are currently underway at higher field strengths of 6 Tesla. By a single pass through the magnet the sulfur content of the coal fines was reduced by between 1.5 and 2% while the ash content also reduced by several percent. Additional sulfur removal could be achieved by second and third passes but the sulfur reductions were less. Excessive abundances of ash - forming minerals (above 40% ) limited the effectiveness of the magnet. A front end process (such as flotation) to remove the majority of the ash-forming minerals and provide a fine (<200 mesh) feed for the magnet, would likely enhance the effectiveness of HGMS. In this respect, HGMS may be more effective as a polishing step following more conventional coal cleaning technologies.

  8. Just in time-selection: A rapid semiautomated SELEX of DNA aptamers using magnetic separation and BEAMing.

    PubMed

    Hünniger, Tim; Wessels, Hauke; Fischer, Christin; Paschke-Kratzin, Angelika; Fischer, Markus

    2014-11-01

    A semiautomated two-step method for in vitro selection of DNA aptamers using magnetic separation and solid-phase emulsion polymerase chain reaction has been developed. The application of a magnetic separator allows the simultaneous processing of up to 12 SELEXs (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) with different targets or buffer conditions. Using a magnetic separator and covalent target immobilization on magnetic beads, the selection process was simplified and the substeps of aptamer/target incubation, washing, and elution of the aptamers were merged into one automated procedure called "FISHing". Without further processing the resulting FISHing eluates are suitable for BEAMing (beads, emulsion, amplification, and magnetics), which includes the amplification by emPCR (emulsion polymerase chain reaction) and strand separation by the implementation of covalently immobilized reverse primers on magnetic beads. The novel selection process has been proved and validated by selecting and characterization of aptamers to the wine fining agent lysozyme. PMID:25286022

  9. Removal of malaria-infected red blood cells using magnetic cell separators: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongho; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F; Gandini, Alberto

    2012-02-15

    High gradient magnetic field separators have been widely used in a variety of biological applications. Recently, the use of magnetic separators to remove malaria-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) from blood circulation in patients with severe malaria has been proposed in a dialysis-like treatment. The capture efficiency of this process depends on many interrelated design variables and constraints such as magnetic pole array pitch, chamber height, and flow rate. In this paper, we model the malaria-infected RBCs (pRBCs) as paramagnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid. Trajectories of the infected cells are numerically calculated inside a micro-channel exposed to a periodic magnetic field gradient. First-order stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the trajectory of particles under periodic magnetic fields due to an array of wires are solved numerically using the 1(st) -5(th) order adaptive step Runge-Kutta solver. The numerical experiments show that in order to achieve a capture efficiency of 99% for the pRBCs it is required to have a longer length than 80 mm; this implies that in principle, using optimization techniques the length could be adjusted, i.e., shortened to achieve 99% capture efficiency of the pRBCs. PMID:22345827

  10. Removal of malaria-infected red blood cells using magnetic cell separators: A computational study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongho; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F.; Gandini, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    High gradient magnetic field separators have been widely used in a variety of biological applications. Recently, the use of magnetic separators to remove malaria-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) from blood circulation in patients with severe malaria has been proposed in a dialysis-like treatment. The capture efficiency of this process depends on many interrelated design variables and constraints such as magnetic pole array pitch, chamber height, and flow rate. In this paper, we model the malaria-infected RBCs (pRBCs) as paramagnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid. Trajectories of the infected cells are numerically calculated inside a micro-channel exposed to a periodic magnetic field gradient. First-order stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the trajectory of particles under periodic magnetic fields due to an array of wires are solved numerically using the 1st –5th order adaptive step Runge-Kutta solver. The numerical experiments show that in order to achieve a capture efficiency of 99% for the pRBCs it is required to have a longer length than 80 mm; this implies that in principle, using optimization techniques the length could be adjusted, i.e., shortened to achieve 99% capture efficiency of the pRBCs. PMID:22345827

  11. Automated Filament Finding and Selection from Cryo

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Automated Filament Finding and Selection from Cryo Electron Micrographs Y. Zhu, B. Carragher, and C N Mathews Urbana, IL 61801 techreports@itg.uiuc.edu http://www.itg.uiuc.edu #12;AUTOMATED FILAMENT and selecting filamentous structures from images of this kind. Images are acquired in defocus pairs; a near

  12. Haloing in bimodal magnetic colloids: The role of field-induced phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnet, C.; Kuzhir, P.; Bossis, G.; Meunier, A.; Suloeva, L.; Zubarev, A.

    2012-07-01

    If a suspension of magnetic micrometer-sized and nanosized particles is subjected to a homogeneous magnetic field, the nanoparticles are attracted to the microparticles and form thick anisotropic halos (clouds) around them. Such clouds can hinder the approach of microparticles and result in effective repulsion between them [M. T. López-López, A. Yu. Zubarev, and G. Bossis, Soft Matter10.1039/c0sm00261e 6, 4346 (2010)]. In this paper, we present detailed experimental and theoretical studies of nanoparticle concentration profiles and of the equilibrium shapes of nanoparticle clouds around a single magnetized microsphere, taking into account interactions between nanoparticles. We show that at a strong enough magnetic field, the ensemble of nanoparticles experiences a gas-liquid phase transition such that a dense liquid phase is condensed around the magnetic poles of a microsphere while a dilute gas phase occupies the rest of the suspension volume. Nanoparticle accumulation around a microsphere is governed by two dimensionless parameters—the initial nanoparticle concentration (?0) and the magnetic-to-thermal energy ratio (?)—and the three accumulation regimes are mapped onto a ?-?0 phase diagram. Our local thermodynamic equilibrium approach gives a semiquantitative agreement with the experiments on the equilibrium shapes of nanoparticle clouds. The results of this work could be useful for the development of the bimodal magnetorheological fluids and of the magnetic separation technologies used in bioanalysis and water purification systems.

  13. Haloing in bimodal magnetic colloids: the role of field-induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Magnet, C; Kuzhir, P; Bossis, G; Meunier, A; Suloeva, L; Zubarev, A

    2012-07-01

    If a suspension of magnetic micrometer-sized and nanosized particles is subjected to a homogeneous magnetic field, the nanoparticles are attracted to the microparticles and form thick anisotropic halos (clouds) around them. Such clouds can hinder the approach of microparticles and result in effective repulsion between them [M. T. López-López, A. Yu. Zubarev, and G. Bossis, Soft Matter 6, 4346 (2010)]. In this paper, we present detailed experimental and theoretical studies of nanoparticle concentration profiles and of the equilibrium shapes of nanoparticle clouds around a single magnetized microsphere, taking into account interactions between nanoparticles. We show that at a strong enough magnetic field, the ensemble of nanoparticles experiences a gas-liquid phase transition such that a dense liquid phase is condensed around the magnetic poles of a microsphere while a dilute gas phase occupies the rest of the suspension volume. Nanoparticle accumulation around a microsphere is governed by two dimensionless parameters--the initial nanoparticle concentration (?(0)) and the magnetic-to-thermal energy ratio (?)--and the three accumulation regimes are mapped onto a ?-?(0) phase diagram. Our local thermodynamic equilibrium approach gives a semiquantitative agreement with the experiments on the equilibrium shapes of nanoparticle clouds. The results of this work could be useful for the development of the bimodal magnetorheological fluids and of the magnetic separation technologies used in bioanalysis and water purification systems. PMID:23005414

  14. Review and evaluation of extractants for strontium removal using magnetically assisted chemical separation

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, C.B.; Rogers, R.D.; Nunez, L.; Ziemer, M.D.; Pleune, T.T.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    A literature review on extractants for strontium removal was initially performed at Northern Illinois University to assess their potential in magnetically assisted chemical separation. A series of potential strontium extractants was systematically evaluated there using radioanalytical methods. Initial experiments were designed to test the uptake of strontium from nitric acid using several samples of magnetic extractant particles that were coated with various crown ether ligands. High partition coefficient (K{sub d}) values for stimulant tank waste were obtained. Further studies demonstrated that the large partitioning was due to uncoated particles.

  15. Phase transitions in a ferrofluid at magnetic-field-induced microphase separation D. Lacoste and T. C. Lubensky

    E-print Network

    Lacoste, David

    perpendicular to a thin sample layer, a suspension of magnetic colloidal particles ferrofluid can form spatially of these suspensions in which particle concentration and magnetization, determined by the degree of alignmentPhase transitions in a ferrofluid at magnetic-field-induced microphase separation D. Lacoste and T

  16. Imaging endosomes and autophagosomes in whole mammalian cells using correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-soft X-ray microscopy (cryo-CLXM).

    PubMed

    Duke, Elizabeth M H; Razi, Minoo; Weston, Anne; Guttmann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Henzler, Katja; Schneider, Gerd; Tooze, Sharon A; Collinson, Lucy M

    2014-08-01

    Cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) is a powerful imaging technique that can extract ultrastructural information from whole, unstained mammalian cells as close to the living state as possible. Subcellular organelles including the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and mitochondria have been identified by morphology alone, due to the similarity in contrast to transmission electron micrographs. In this study, we used cryo-SXT to image endosomes and autophagosomes, organelles that are particularly susceptible to chemical fixation artefacts during sample preparation for electron microscopy. We used two approaches to identify these compartments. For early and recycling endosomes, which are accessible to externally-loaded markers, we used an anti-transferrin receptor antibody conjugated to 10nm gold particles. For autophagosomes, which are not accessible to externally-applied markers, we developed a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-SXT workflow (cryo-CLXM) to localise GFP-LC3 and RFP-Atg9. We used a stand-alone cryo-fluorescence stage in the home laboratory to localise the cloned fluorophores, followed by cryo-soft X-ray tomography at the synchrotron to analyse cellular ultrastructure. We mapped the 3D ultrastructure of the endocytic and autophagic structures, and discovered clusters of omegasomes arising from 'hotspots' on the ER. Thus, immunogold markers and cryo-CLXM can be used to analyse cellular processes that are inaccessible using other imaging modalities. PMID:24238600

  17. Imaging endosomes and autophagosomes in whole mammalian cells using correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-soft X-ray microscopy (cryo-CLXM)?

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Elizabeth M.H.; Razi, Minoo; Weston, Anne; Guttmann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Henzler, Katja; Schneider, Gerd; Tooze, Sharon A.; Collinson, Lucy M.

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) is a powerful imaging technique that can extract ultrastructural information from whole, unstained mammalian cells as close to the living state as possible. Subcellular organelles including the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and mitochondria have been identified by morphology alone, due to the similarity in contrast to transmission electron micrographs. In this study, we used cryo-SXT to image endosomes and autophagosomes, organelles that are particularly susceptible to chemical fixation artefacts during sample preparation for electron microscopy. We used two approaches to identify these compartments. For early and recycling endosomes, which are accessible to externally-loaded markers, we used an anti-transferrin receptor antibody conjugated to 10 nm gold particles. For autophagosomes, which are not accessible to externally-applied markers, we developed a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-SXT workflow (cryo-CLXM) to localise GFP-LC3 and RFP-Atg9. We used a stand-alone cryo-fluorescence stage in the home laboratory to localise the cloned fluorophores, followed by cryo-soft X-ray tomography at the synchrotron to analyse cellular ultrastructure. We mapped the 3D ultrastructure of the endocytic and autophagic structures, and discovered clusters of omegasomes arising from ‘hotspots’ on the ER. Thus, immunogold markers and cryo-CLXM can be used to analyse cellular processes that are inaccessible using other imaging modalities. PMID:24238600

  18. Practical workflow for cryo focused-ion-beam milling of tissues and cells for cryo-TEM tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chyongere; Schmelzer, Thomas; Kishchenko, Gregory; Wagenknecht, Terence; Marko, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Vitreous freezing offers a way to study cells and tissue in a near-native state by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), which is important when structural information at the macromolecular level is required. Many cells -- especially those in tissue -- are too thick to study intact in the cryo-TEM. Cryo focused-ion-beam (cryo-FIB) milling is being used in a few laboratories to thin vitreously frozen specimens, thus avoiding the artifacts and difficulties of cryo-ultramicrotomy. However, the technique is challenging because of the need to avoid devitrification and frost accumulation during the entire process, from the initial step of freezing to the final step of loading the specimen into the cryo-TEM. We present a robust workflow that makes use of custom fixtures and devices that can be used for high-pressure-frozen bulk tissue samples as well as for samples frozen on TEM grids. PMID:24211822

  19. Practical workflow for cryo focused-ion-beam milling of tissues and cells for cryo-TEM tomography.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chyongere; Schmelzer, Thomas; Kishchenko, Gregory; Wagenknecht, Terence; Marko, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Vitreous freezing offers a way to study cells and tissue in a near-native state by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), which is important when structural information at the macromolecular level is required. Many cells - especially those in tissue - are too thick to study intact in the cryo-TEM. Cryo focused-ion-beam (cryo-FIB) milling is being used in a few laboratories to thin vitreously frozen specimens, thus avoiding the artifacts and difficulties of cryo-ultramicrotomy. However, the technique is challenging because of the need to avoid devitrification and frost accumulation during the entire process, from the initial step of freezing to the final step of loading the specimen into the cryo-TEM. We present a robust workflow that makes use of custom fixtures and devices that can be used for high-pressure-frozen bulk tissue samples as well as for samples frozen on TEM grids. PMID:24211822

  20. Rock Magnetic Mineral Assemblage in Mineral Separates from Xenoliths of Continental Lithospheric Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakhalova, E.; Feinberg, J. M.; Ionov, D. A.; Ferre, E. C.; Friedman, S. A.; Hernandez, F. M.; Neal, C. R.; Conder, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Studies of aeromagnetic anomalies suggest that the lithospheric mantle may contribute to long wavelength features. Examination of unaltered mantle xenoliths may reveal the mineralogical sources of these aeromagnetic anomalies. Prior work has reported microscopic inclusions of magnetic minerals in mantle silicates. Here we explore the magnetism of pure olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and spinel separated from peridotite xenoliths from the Dariganga and Tariat localities in Mongolia that sample the lithospheric mantle. All separates were leached with HF and HCl to remove secondary minerals adhering to the surface of the grains or in cracks. Separates were then mounted in cement to create monomineralic specimens for investigation using hysteresis loops, first order reversal curves (FORC), alternating field and thermal demagnetization of a 1T IRM, and low-temperature magnetometry. All specimens showed trace concentrations of ferromagnetic inclusions with Ms values of ~10-3 Am2kg-1. Thermal demagnetization showed a range of unblocking temperatures with median destructive temperatures of 300-400°C. Two specimens showed a dramatic demagnetization at 585°C, consistent with pure magnetite (Mt). The presence of Mt was confirmed by observations of the Verwey transition at 100-120K and by backfield remanence acquisition curves that plateau at ~300 mT. The median destructive alternating field was ~20 mT and 40-80 mT for specimens from Dariganga and Tariat, respectively. FORC diagrams show single-domain-like behavior with a median Hc of ~20 mT. The demagnetization experiments suggest that Mt inclusions in the lattice of olivine, opx, cpx and spinel carry magnetic remanence. Thus, the lithospheric mantle may exhibit in-situ ferromagnetism carried by Mt below 585°C. The magnetization of separates varies between xenolith localities but is consistent amongst minerals of the same locality. Future work will address whether the Mt formed before or during xenolith ascent.

  1. Characterization of magnetic ion-exchange composites for protein separation from biosuspensions.

    PubMed

    Käppler, Tobias E; Hickstein, Birgit; Peuker, Urs A; Posten, Clemens

    2008-06-01

    Downstream processing is a major issue in biotechnological production. A multitude of unit operations with nonsatisfying yield are often used to reach the desired product purity. Direct recovery technologies such as high-gradient magnetic fishing (HGMF) are advantageous because of their ability to separate the desired product in early stages from crude cultivation broths. However, the use of magnetic particles to capture valuable biotechnological products is often linked to the drawback that support particles are expensive and not available in greater quantities. This current work presents new composite magnetic particles that can be used in biotechnology. They are manufactured by a spray drying process. During this process, the nanosized magnetite particles as well as functional ion-exchange nanoparticles are integrated into one particle in which they are linked by a matrix polymer. The production procedure is flexible, scalable, and therefore economical. These particles have good adsorption capacities of up to 85 mg/g adsorbed protein and good binding kinetics. They are resistant to harsh conditions such as short ultrasonic treatment or extreme pHs. In order to test their usefulness in biosuspensions, model proteins were separated using these particles. The anion and cation exchanger particles separated lysozyme (LZ) or BSA from cultivation suspensions. The selectivity of recovery was dependent on other proteins present as is usual for ion-exchange binding mechanisms. PMID:18640596

  2. SERS-fluorescence joint spectral encoded magnetic nanoprobes for multiplex cancer cell separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuyuan; Zong, Shenfei; Chen, Hui; Wang, Chunlei; Xu, Shuhong; Cui, Yiping

    2014-11-01

    A new kind of cancer cell separation method is demonstrated, using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescence dual-encoded magnetic nanoprobes. The designed nanoprobes can realize SERS-fluorescence joint spectral encoding (SFJSE) and greatly improve the multiplexing ability. The nanoprobes have four main components, that is, the magnetic core, SERS generator, fluorescent agent, and targeting antibody. These components are assembled with a multi-layered structure to form the nanoprobes. Specifically, silica-coated magnetic nanobeads (MBs) are used as the inner core. Au core-Ag shell nanorods (Au@Ag NRs) are employed as the SERS generators and attached on the silica-coated MBs. After burying these Au@Ag NRs with another silica layer, CdTe quantum dots (QDs), that is, the fluorescent agent, are anchored onto the silica layer. Finally, antibodies are covalently linked to CdTe QDs. SFJSE is fulfilled by using different Raman molecules and QDs with different emission wavelengths. By utilizing four human cancer cell lines and one normal cell line as the model cells, the nanoprobes can specifically and simultaneously separate target cancer cells from the normal ones. This SFJSE-based method greatly facilitates the multiplex, rapid, and accurate cancer cell separation, and has a prosperous potential in high-throughput analysis and cancer diagnosis. PMID:24862088

  3. Carboxyl modified magnetic nanoparticles coated open tubular column for capillary electrochromatographic separation of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wentao; Xiao, Xing; Chen, Jia; Jia, Li

    2015-09-11

    Carboxyl modified magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4-COOH MNPs) coated open tubular (OT) columns were prepared for capillary electrochromatography. The Fe3O4-COOH MNPs coatings were constructed on the surface of positively charged poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) modified capillaries through electrostatic self-assembly approach. The as-prepared PDDA@Fe3O4-COOH MNPs coated OT columns were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and electroosmotic flow measurement. The electrochromatographic characterization of the OT columns was evaluated by separation of amino acids, dipeptides and proteins. The influences of background solution pH, concentration, and organic modifier content on separation were investigated. The separation of these analytes was primarily based on the electrophoretic mechanism in combination with chromatographic mechanism. The Fe3O4-COOH MNPs coatings improved the separation resolution of these analytes due to their large surface area. Three variants of bovine serum albumin, two variants of ?-lactoglobulin and nine glycoisoforms of ovalbumin were successfully separated. The relative standard deviations of migration times of analytes representing run-to-run, day-to-day and column-to-column were less than 4.3%. Furthermore, the feasibility of the PDDA@Fe3O4-COOH MNPs coated OT column was verified by successful separation of acidic proteins in egg white. PMID:26265004

  4. Tailored functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI, drug delivery, magnetic separation and immobilization of biosubstances.

    PubMed

    Hola, Katerina; Markova, Zdenka; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Tucek, Jiri; Zboril, Radek

    2015-11-01

    In this critical review, we outline various covalent and non-covalent approaches for the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). Tuning the surface chemistry and design of magnetic nanoparticles are described in relation to their applicability in advanced medical technologies and biotechnologies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, targeted drug delivery, magnetic separations and immobilizations of proteins, enzymes, antibodies, targeting agents and other biosubstances. We review synthetic strategies for the controlled preparation of IONPs modified with frequently used functional groups including amine, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups as well as the preparation of IONPs functionalized with other species, e.g., epoxy, thiol, alkane, azide, and alkyne groups. Three main coupling strategies for linking IONPs with active agents are presented: (i) chemical modification of amine groups on the surface of IONPs, (ii) chemical modification of bioactive substances (e.g. with fluorescent dyes), and (iii) the activation of carboxyl groups mainly for enzyme immobilization. Applications for drug delivery using click chemistry linking or biodegradable bonds are compared to non-covalent methods based on polymer modified condensed magnetic nanoclusters. Among many challenges, we highlight the specific surface engineering allowing both therapeutic and diagnostic applications (theranostics) of IONPs and magnetic/metallic hybrid nanostructures possessing a huge potential in biocatalysis, green chemistry, magnetic bioseparations and bioimaging. PMID:25689073

  5. Separation of uranium from nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions with extractant-coated magnetic microparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M. D.; Nunez, L.; Chemical Engineering

    2000-01-01

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process utilizes selective magnetic microparticle composites to separate dissolved metals from solution. In this study, MACS particles were coated with neutral and acidic organophosphorus extractants,octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO), tributyl phosphate (TBP), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), and bis(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid (D{sub 2}EHPA or HDEHP) and were evaluated for the separation of uranyl ions from nitric- and hydrochloric-acid solutions. The results suggest that a synergistic interaction between the particle surface and solvent coating may explain why the particles display, in some cases, orders of magnitude of higher partitioning coefficients than are estimated from solvent-extraction measurements. Particles coated with TBP and those coated with a combination of TOPO and D{sub 2}EHPA displayed the most desirable characteristics for removing uranium from dilute acid environments typical of contaminated groundwater. Uranium separation from moderate to highly acidic waste streams typical of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear wastes is best accomplished using particles coated with a combination of CMPO and TBP.

  6. Conjugates of magnetic nanoparticle-actinide specific chelator for radioactive waste separation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Maninder; Zhang, Huijin; Martin, Leigh; Todd, Terry; Qiang, You

    2013-01-01

    A novel nanotechnology for the separation of radioactive waste that uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) conjugated with actinide specific chelators (MNP-Che) is reviewed with a focus on design and process development. The MNP-Che separation process is an effective way of separating heat generating minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) from spent nuclear fuel solution to reduce the radiological hazard. It utilizes coated MNPs to selectively adsorb the contaminants onto their surfaces, after which the loaded particles are collected using a magnetic field. The MNP-Che conjugates can be recycled by stripping contaminates into a separate, smaller volume of solution, and then become the final waste form for disposal after reusing number of times. Due to the highly selective chelators, this remediation method could be both simple and versatile while allowing the valuable actinides to be recovered and recycled. Key issues standing in the way of large-scale application are stability of the conjugates and their dispersion in solution to maintain their unique properties, especially large surface area, of MNPs. With substantial research progress made on MNPs and their surface functionalization, as well as development of environmentally benign chelators, this method could become very flexible and cost-effective for recycling used fuel. Finally, the development of this nanotechnology is summarized and its future direction is discussed. PMID:24070142

  7. Conjugates of Magnetic Nanoparticle -- Actinide Specific Chelator for Radioactive Waste Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Maninder Kaur; Huijin Zhang; Leigh Martin; Terry Todd; You Qiang

    2013-11-01

    A novel nanotechnology for the separation of radioactive waste that uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) conjugated with actinide specific chelators (MNP-Che) is reviewed with a focus on design and process development. The MNP-Che separation process is an effective way of separating heat generating minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) from spent nuclear fuel solution to reduce the radiological hazard. It utilizes coated MNPs to selectively adsorb the contaminants onto their surfaces, after which the loaded particles are collected using a magnetic field. The MNP-Che conjugates can be recycled by stripping contaminates into a separate, smaller volume of solution, and then become the final waste form for disposal after reusing number of times. Due to the highly selective chelators, this remediation method could be both simple and versatile while allowing the valuable actinides to be recovered and recycled. Key issues standing in the way of large-scale application are stability of the conjugates and their dispersion in solution to maintain their unique properties, especially large surface area, of MNPs. With substantial research progress made on MNPs and their surface functionalization, as well as development of environmentally benign chelators, this method could become very flexible and cost-effective for recycling used fuel. Finally, the development of this nanotechnology is summarized and its future direction is discussed.

  8. Separation of ferromagnetic components by analyzing the hysteresis loops of remanent magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosareva, L. R.; Utemov, E. V.; Nurgaliev, D. K.; Shcherbakov, V. P.; Kosarev, V. E.; Yasonov, P. G.

    2015-09-01

    The new method is suggested for separating ferromagnetic components in sediments through analyzing the coercivity spectra of the samples by the continuous wavelet transform with the Gaussian-based wavelet (MHAT). A total of 1056 samples of Lake Khuvsgul's sediments (Mongolia) are studied. At least four groups of magnetic components are identified based on the analysis of their magnetization and remagnetization curves. Almost all samples are found to contain two components of bacterial origin which are represented by the assemblages of the interacting single-domain grains and differ by the grain compositions (magnetite and greigite). The applicability of the magnetic data for diagnosing magnetotactic bacteria in sediments and building paleoecological and paleoclimatic reconstructions is demonstrated.

  9. Cesium separation from contaminated milk using magnetic particles containing crystalline silicotitantes.

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.; Chemical Engineering

    2000-11-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster in 1986 contaminated vast regions of prime grazing land. Subsequently, milk produced in the region has been contaminated with small amounts of the long-lived fission product cesium-137, and the Ukraine is seeking to deploy a simple separation process that will remove the Cs and preserve the nutritional value of the milk. Tiny magnetic particles containing crystalline silicotitanates (CST) have been manufactured and tested to this end. The results show that partitioning efficiency is optimized with low ratios of particle mass to volume. To achieve 90% Cs decontamination in a single-stage process, <3 g of magnetic CST per l milk is sufficient with a 30-min mixing time. A two-stage process would utilize <0.4 g/l per stage. The modeling of the magnetic CST system described herein can be achieved rather simply which is important for deployment in the affected Ukraine region.

  10. Detection of Cronobacter species in powdered infant formula by probe-magnetic separation PCR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Li, Peng; Ming, Xing; Yang, Dong; Xu, Hengyi; Wu, Xiaoli; Shah, Nagendra P; Wei, Hua

    2014-10-01

    Cronobacter species are opportunistic foodborne pathogens associated with serious infections in preterm neonates and infants. Based on the epidemiological research, infant formula products are considered to be the main source of infections from this organism. Therefore, accurate methods are required for detection of Cronobacter species. In this study, the specific probe and primers for detection of this organism were designed and verified. The probe-magnetic beads were prepared for sequence capture, followed by PCR assay to detect the target gene. This probe-magnetic separation PCR assay could detect as few as 10(3) cfu/mL of Cronobacter in artificially contaminated infant formulas in less than 4 h. The combination of magnetic beads and PCR showed the potential for the detection of Cronobacter in infant formulas and may have applications in the dairy industry. PMID:25108865

  11. Temperature-Switchable Agglomeration of Magnetic Particles Designed for Continuous Separation Processes in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Anja S; Heinzler, Raphael; Ooi, Huey Wen; Franzreb, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was the synthesis and characterization of thermally switchable magnetic particles for use in biotechnological applications such as protein purification and enzymatic conversions. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization was employed to synthesize poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes via a "graft-from" approach on the surface of magnetic microparticles. The resulting particles were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis and their temperature-dependent agglomeration behavior was assessed. The influence of several factors on particle agglomeration (pH, temperature, salt type, and particle concentration) was evaluated. The results showed that a low pH value (pH 3-4), a kosmotropic salt (ammonium sulfate), and a high particle concentration (4 g/L) resulted in improved agglomeration at elevated temperature (40 °C). Recycling of particles and reversibility of the temperature-switchable agglomeration were successfully demonstrated for ten heating-cooling cycles. Additionally, enhanced magnetic separation was observed for the modified particles. Ionic monomers were integrated into the polymer chain to create end-group functionalized particles as well as two- and three-block copolymer particles for protein binding. The adsorption of lactoferrin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme to these ion exchange particles was evaluated and showed a binding capacity of up to 135 mg/g. The dual-responsive particles combined magnetic and thermoresponsive properties for switchable agglomeration, easy separability, and efficient protein adsorption. PMID:26069936

  12. Controlled synthesis of Fe3O4/ZIF-8 nanoparticles for magnetically separable nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Pang, Fei; He, Mingyuan; Ge, Jianping

    2015-04-27

    Fe3O4/ZIF-8 nanoparticles were synthesized through a room-temperature reaction between 2-methylimidazolate and zinc nitrate in the presence of Fe3O4 nanocrystals. The particle size, surface charge, and magnetic loading can be conveniently controlled by the dosage of Zn(NO3)2 and Fe3O4 nanocrystals. The as-prepared particles show both good thermal stability (stable to 550?°C) and large surface area (1174?m(2) g(-1)). The nanoparticles also have a superparamagnetic response, so that they can strongly respond to an external field during magnetic separation and disperse back into the solution after withdrawal of the magnetic field. For the Knoevenagel reaction, which is catalyzed by alkaline active sites on external surface of catalyst, small Fe3O4/ZIF-8 nanoparticles show a higher catalytic activity. At the same time, the nanocatalysts can be continuously used in multiple catalytic reactions through magnetic separation, activation, and redispersion with little loss of activity. PMID:25766136

  13. Recovery of iron from vanadium tailings with coal-based direct reduction followed by magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huifen; Jing, Lili; Zhang, Baogang

    2011-01-30

    A technique with coal-based direct reduction followed by magnetic separation is presented in this study for recovering and reusing iron otherwise wasted in vanadium tailings. Process parameters such as usage of additives, tailings/reductant/additives ratio, reduction temperature and time, as well as particle size were experimentally determined. The optimum process parameters were proposed as follows: using lime as the additive, lignite as the reductant, weight ratios of vanadium tailings/lignite/lime at 100:30:10, reduction roasting at 1200 °C for 60 min, and particle size of 98% less than 30 ?m in the final roasted product feeding to magnetic separation. Under these conditions, a magnetic concentrate containing 90.31% total iron and 89.76% metallization iron with a total iron recovery rate of 83.88% was obtained. In addition, mineralography of vanadium tailings, coal-based reduction product and magnetic concentrate were studied by X-ray powder diffraction technique (XRD). The microstructures of above products were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to help understand the mechanism. PMID:21071144

  14. Origin of ferromagnetism and nano-scale phase separations in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietl, Tomasz

    2006-12-01

    This paper reviews various origins of ferromagnetic response that has been detected in diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS). Particular attention is paid to those ferromagnetic DMS in which no precipitation of other crystallographic phases has been observed. It is argued that these materials can be divided into three categories. The first consists of (Ga,Mn)As and related compounds. In these solid solutions the theory built on p-d Zener's model of hole-mediated ferromagnetism and the Kohn-Luttinger kp theory of semiconductors describes quantitatively thermodynamic, micromagnetic, optical, and transport properties. Moreover, the understanding of these materials has provided a basis for the development of novel methods enabling magnetisation manipulation and switching. To the second group belong compounds, in which a competition between long-range ferromagnetic and short-range antiferromagnetic interactions and/or the proximity of the localisation boundary lead to an electronic nano-scale phase separation that results in characteristics similar to colossal magnetoresistance oxides. Finally, in a number of compounds a chemical nano-scale phase separation into the regions with small and large concentrations of the magnetic constituent is present. It has recently been suggested that this spinodal decomposition can be controlled by the charge state of relevant magnetic impurities. This constitutes a new perspective method for 3D self-organised growth of coherent magnetic nanocrystals embedded by the semiconductor matrix.

  15. A comparative analysis of the cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage methods

    SciTech Connect

    Petitpas, G; Benard, P; Klebanoff, L E; Xiao, J; Aceves, S M

    2014-07-01

    While conventional low-pressure LH? dewars have existed for decades, advanced methods of cryogenic hydrogen storage have recently been developed. These advanced methods are cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage, which operate best in the temperature range 30–100 K. We present a comparative analysis of both approaches for cryogenic hydrogen storage, examining how pressure and/or sorbent materials are used to effectively increase onboard H? density and dormancy. We start by reviewing some basic aspects of LH? properties and conventional means of storing it. From there we describe the cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage methods, and then explore the relationship between them, clarifying the materials science and physics of the two approaches in trying to solve the same hydrogen storage task (~5–8 kg H?, typical of light duty vehicles). Assuming that the balance of plant and the available volume for the storage system in the vehicle are identical for both approaches, the comparison focuses on how the respective storage capacities, vessel weight and dormancy vary as a function of temperature, pressure and type of cryo-adsorption material (especially, powder MOF-5 and MIL-101). By performing a comparative analysis, we clarify the science of each approach individually, identify the regimes where the attributes of each can be maximized, elucidate the properties of these systems during refueling, and probe the possible benefits of a combined “hybrid” system with both cryo-adsorption and cryo-compression phenomena operating at the same time. In addition the relationships found between onboard H? capacity, pressure vessel and/or sorbent mass and dormancy as a function of rated pressure, type of sorbent material and fueling conditions are useful as general designing guidelines in future engineering efforts using these two hydrogen storage approaches.

  16. Evolutionary bidirectional expansion for the tracing of alpha helices in cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions

    E-print Network

    Wriggers, Willy

    Evolutionary bidirectional expansion for the tracing of alpha helices in cryo-electron microscopy a b s t r a c t Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) enables the imaging of macromolecular complexes. 1. Introduction The continuing progress in the field of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) due

  17. The CryoCapsule: Simplifying correlative light to electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Heiligenstein, Xavier; Heiligenstein, Jérôme; Delevoye, Cédric; Hurbain, Ilse; Bardin, Sabine; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Régnier, Gilles; Salamero, Jean; Antony, Claude; Raposo, Graca

    2014-01-01

    Correlating complementary multiple scale images of the same object is a straightforward means to decipher biological processes. Light and electron microscopy are the most commonly used imaging techniques, yet despite their complementarity, the experimental procedures available to correlate them are technically complex. We designed and manufactured a new device adapted to many biological specimens, the CryoCapsule, that simplifies the multiple sample preparation steps, which at present separate live cell fluorescence imaging from contextual high-resolution electron microscopy, thus opening new strategies for full correlative light to electron microscopy. We tested the biological application of this highly optimized tool on three different specimens: the in-vitro Xenopus laevis mitotic spindle, melanoma cells over-expressing YFP-langerin sequestered in organized membranous subcellular organelles and a pigmented melanocytic cell in which the endosomal system was labeled with internalized fluorescent transferrin. PMID:24533564

  18. Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Cryo-worked Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettinali, Livio; Tosti, Silvano; Pizzuto, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    For manufacturing the magnets of fusion machines pure copper of both high mechanical resistance and electrical conductivity is required. Though high purity copper guarantees high electrical conductivity, its mechanical properties may be not suitable for the applications in tokamaks. In this view, a new procedure developed for obtaining high purity copper with excellent mechanical strength is described in this work. Samples of oxygen free copper (OFC) have been worked by pressing in liquid nitrogen (77 K). It has been verified that the mechanical properties of the worked metal are strongly dependent on the strain rate. Very low strain rates permitted to attain values of tensile yield strength (550 MPa) significantly higher than those obtained by traditional cold-working at room temperature (450 MPa). The electrical conductivity of the cryo-worked Cu decreases with the tensile yield strength even though the hardest samples of tensile yield strength of 550 MPa exhibit still acceptable values of conductivity (about 94 % IACS at room temperature).

  19. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Schorb, Martin; Briggs, John A G

    2014-08-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. PMID:24275379

  20. Lipid-Based Immuno-Magnetic Separation of Archaea from a Mixed Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frickle, C. M.; Bailey, J.; Lloyd, K. G.; Shumaker, A.; Flood, B.

    2014-12-01

    Despite advancing techniques in microbiology, an estimated 98% of all microbial species on Earth have yet to be isolated in pure culture. Natural samples, once transferred to the lab, are commonly overgrown by "weed" species whose metabolic advantages enable them to monopolize available resources. Developing new methods for the isolation of thus-far uncultivable microorganisms would allow us to better understand their ecology, physiology and genetic potential. Physically separating target organisms from a mixed community is one approach that may allow enrichment and growth of the desired strain. Here we report on a novel method that uses known physiological variations between taxa, in this case membrane lipids, to segregate the desired organisms while keeping them alive and viable for reproduction. Magnetic antibodies bound to the molecule squalene, which is found in the cell membranes of certain archaea, but not bacteria, enable separation of archaea from bacteria in mixed samples. Viability of cells was tested by growing the separated fractions in batch culture. Efficacy and optimization of the antibody separation technique are being evaluated using qPCR and cell counts. Future work will apply this new separation technique to natural samples.

  1. Preparation of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers for separating rutin from Chinese medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huan; Wang, Yuzhi; Nie, Chan; Kong, Jinhuan; Liu, Xiaojie

    2012-05-21

    The preparation of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) which can be used for the separation and purification of rutin from Chinese medicinal plants has been proposed. By applying the improved co-precipitation method, magnetic Fe(3)O(4) particles were easily prepared, followed by the modification of TEOS and functionalization with -CH=CH(2). Using functionalized Fe(3)O(4) particles as the magnetic cores, rutin as the template, and acrylamide as the functional monomer, MMIPs were synthesized by surface-imprinted polymerization under the protection of nitrogen gas and successive mechanical stirring at 60 °C for 24 h. Magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (MNIPs) were also prepared with the same synthesis procedure as with MMIPs only without the presence of rutin. Magnetic particles were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, and TG analysis. And the selectivity of MMIPs was also investigated in detail. In addition, the performance of the MMIPs for the adsorption of rutin in the analysis of Chinese medicinal plants was assessed. The mean recoveries were 84.33% (RSD: 3.22%, n = 3) for Saururus chinensis (Lour.) Bail and 85.20% (RSD: 3.58%, n = 3) for Flos Sophorae, respectively, which showed that the prepared MMIPs with many advantages possess the value of practical application. PMID:22489285

  2. Magnetic design and field optimization of a superferric dipole for the RISP fragment separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, D. G.; Jo, H. C.; Kim, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    The in-flight fragment separator of the Rare Isotope Science Project requires eight dipole magnets to produce a gap field of 1.7 T in a deflection sector of 30 degree with a 6-m central radius. If the beam-optics requirements are to be met, an integral field homogeneity of a few units (1 unit = 10-4) must be achieved. A superferric dipole magnet has been designed by using the Low-Temperature Superconducting wire NbTi and soft iron of grade SAE1010. The 3D magnetic design and field optimization have been performed using the Opera code. The length and the width of the air slots in the poles have been determined in an optimization process that considered not only the uniformity of the field in the straight section but also the field errors in the end regions. The field uniformity has also been studied for a range of operation of the dipole magnet from 0.4 T to 1.7 T. The magnetic design and field uniformity are discussed.

  3. D0 Cryo System Control System Autodialer

    SciTech Connect

    Urbin, J.; /Fermilab

    1990-04-17

    The DO cryogenic system is controlled by a TI565-PLC based control system. This allows the system to be unmanned when in steady state operation. System experts will need to be contacted when system parameters exceed normal operating points and reach alarm setpoints. The labwide FIRUS system provides one alarm monitor and communication link. An autodialer provides a second and more flexible alarm monitor and communication link. The autodialer monitors contact points in the control system and after receiving indication of an alarm accesses a list of experts which it calls until it receives an acknowledgement. There are several manufacturers and distributors of autodialer systems. This EN explains the search process the DO cryo group used to fmd an autodialer system that fit the cryo system's needs and includes information and specs for the unit we chose.

  4. Physical and Structural Studies on the Cryo-cooling of Insulin Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, J.; Bellamy, H.; Snell, E. H.; Borgstahl, G.

    2003-01-01

    Reflection profiles were analyzed from microgravity-(mg) and earth-grown insulin crystals to measure mosaicity (h) and to reveal mosaic domain structure and composition. The effects of cryocooling on single and multi-domain crystals were compared. The effects of cryocooling on insulin structure were also re-examined. Microgravity crystals were larger, more homogeneous, and more perfect than earth crystals. Several mg crystals contained primarily a single mosaic domain with havg of 0.005deg. The earth crystals varied in quality and all contained multiple domains with havg of 0.031deg. Cryocooling caused a 43-fold increase in h for mg crystals (havg=0.217deg) and an %fold increase for earth crystals (havg=0.246deg). These results indicate that very well-ordered crystals are not completely protected from the stresses associated with cryocooling, especially when structural perturbations occur. However, there were differences in the reflection profiles. For multi-mosaic domain crystals, each domain individually broadened and separated from the other domains upon cryo-cooling. Cryo-cooling did not cause an increase in the number of domains. A crystal composed of a single domain retained this domain structure and the reflection profiles simply broadened. Therefore, an improved signal-to-noise ratio for each reflection was measured from cryo-cooled single domain crystals relative to cryo-cooled multi-domain crystals. This improved signal, along with the increase in crystal size, facilitated the measurement of the weaker high- resolution reflections. The observed broadening of reflection profiles indicates increased variation in unit cell dimensions which may be linked to cryo-cooling-associated structural changes and disorder.

  5. AMSD Reaction Structure Cryo Deformation Test Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Hraba, John; Thornton, Gary; Baker, Mark; Haight, Harlan; Hadaway, James; Blackwell, Lisa; Stahl, Phil (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The method developed for measuring both in-plane & out-of-plane cryo deformations of AMSD reaction structures at the XRCF will be presented. For in-plane measurements, a theodolite is used to track the positions of several (up to ten) targets on the reaction structure. For out-of-plane measurements, the Leica ADM is used to measure the change in distance to several (up to ten) corner cubes attached to the reaction structure.

  6. Accessible and green manufacturing of magnetite (ferrous ferric oxide) nanocrystals and their use in magnetic separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Cafer Tayyar

    This work describes the first size dependent magnetic separation in nanoscale. Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanocrystals of high quality and uniform size were synthesized with monodispersity below 10%. Magnetite nanocrystals of 4 nm to 33 nm (average diameter) were produced. Batch synthesis was shown to go up to 20 grams which is more than 10 times of a standard nanocrystal synthesis, without loosing the quality and monodispersity. Reactor design for mass (1 gram per hour) production of magnetite nanocrystals is reported for the first time. The cost of a kg of lab purity magnetite nanocrystals was shown to be 2600. A green synthesis that utilizes rust and edible oils was developed. The cost of a kg was brought down to 22. Size dependency of magnetism was shown in nanoscale for the first time. Reversible aggregation theory was developed to explain the low field magnetic separation and solution behavior of magnetite nanocrystals. Arsenic was removed from drinking water with magnetite nanocrystals 200 times better than commercial adsorbents. Silica coating was successfully applied to enable the known silica related biotechnologies. Magnetite-silica nanoshells were functionalized with amino groups. For the first time, silver was coated on the magnetite-silica nanoshells to produce triple multishells. Anti-microbial activity of multishells is anticipated.

  7. Effective antifouling using quorum-quenching acylase stabilized in magnetically-separable mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoungsoo; Yeon, Kyung-Min; Shim, Jongmin; Kim, Sang-Ryoung; Lee, Chung-Hak; Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Jungbae

    2014-04-14

    Highly effective antifouling was achieved by immobilizing and stabilizing an acylase, disrupting bacterial cell-to-cell communication, in the form of cross-linked enzymes in magnetically separable mesoporous silica. This so-called "quorum-quenching" acylase (AC) was adsorbed into spherical mesoporous silica (S-MPS) with magnetic nanoparticles (Mag-S-MPS), and further cross-linked for the preparation of nanoscale enzyme reactors of AC in Mag-S-MPS (NER-AC/Mag-S-MPS). NER-AC effectively stabilized the AC activity under rigorous shaking at 200 rpm for 1 month, while free and adsorbed AC lost more than 90% of their initial activities in the same condition within 1 and 10 days, respectively. When applied to the membrane filtration for advanced water treatment, NER-AC efficiently alleviated the biofilm maturation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 on the membrane surface, thereby enhancing the filtration performance by preventing membrane fouling. Highly stable and magnetically separable NER-AC, as an effective and sustainable antifouling material, has a great potential to be used in the membrane filtration for water reclamation. PMID:24601563

  8. Chiral separation and chiral magnetic effects in a slab: the role of boundaries

    E-print Network

    Gorbar, E V; Shovkovy, I A; Sukhachov, P O

    2015-01-01

    We study the chiral separation and chiral magnetic effects in a slab of Dirac semimetal of finite thickness, placed in a constant magnetic field perpendicular to its surfaces. We utilize the Bogolyubov boundary conditions with a large Dirac mass outside the slab. We find that a finite thickness of the slab leads to a quantization of the axial current density, which is seen in its stepped shape dependence on the fermion chemical potential and a sawtooth shape dependence on the thickness of the slab. As expected, in the limit of a large thickness, the result reduces to the well known expression for the chiral separation effect. On the other hand, in the same slab geometry, we find that a nonzero chiral chemical potential induces no electric current, as might have been expected from the chiral magnetic effect. We argue that this outcome is natural and points to the truly non-static nature of the latter. By taking into account a nonzero electric field of double layer near the boundaries of the slab, we find that ...

  9. Correlated cryogenic photoactivated localization microscopy and cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Songye; Tocheva, Elitza I; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Löbach, Stephanie; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Jensen, Grant J

    2014-07-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) produces three-dimensional images of cells in a near-native state at macromolecular resolution, but identifying structures of interest can be challenging. Here we describe a correlated cryo-PALM (photoactivated localization microscopy)-CET method for localizing objects within cryo-tomograms to beyond the diffraction limit of the light microscope. Using cryo-PALM-CET, we identified multiple and new conformations of the dynamic type VI secretion system in the crowded interior of Myxococcus xanthus. PMID:24813625

  10. Novel polydopamine imprinting layers coated magnetic carbon nanotubes for specific separation of lysozyme from egg white.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruixia; Zhang, Lili; Hao, Yi; Cui, Xihui; Liu, Dechun; Zhang, Min; Tang, Yuhai

    2015-11-01

    Novel core-shell nanocomposites, consisting of magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) core surrounded by a thin polydopamine (PDA) imprinting shell for specific recognition of lysozyme (Lyz), were fabricated for the first time. The obtained products were characterized and the results showed that the PDA layer was successfully attached onto the surface of MCNTs and the corresponding thickness of imprinting layer was just about 10nm which could enable the template access the recognition cavities easily. The polymerization conditions and adsorption performance of the resultant nanomaterials were investigated in detail. The results indicated that the obtained imprinted polymers showed fast kinetic and high affinity towards Lyz and could be used to specifically separate Lyz from real egg white. In addition, the prepared materials had excellent stability and no obvious deterioration after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. Easy preparation, rapid separation, high binding capacity, and satisfactory selectivity for the template protein make this polymer attractive in biotechnology and biosensors. PMID:26452937

  11. Charge separation effects in magnetized electron-ion plasma expansion into a vacuum

    E-print Network

    Kazumi Nishimura; Edison Liang; S. Peter Gary

    2003-07-25

    Charge separation effects in the expansion of magnetized relativistic electron-ion plasmas into a vacuum are examined using 2-1/2-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations. The electrostatic field at the plasma surface decelerates electrons and accelerates ions. A fraction of the surface electrons are trapped and accelerated by the pondermotive force of the propagating electromagnetic pulse, a mechanism we call the DRPA (diamagnetic relativistic pulse accelerator). This charge separation is enhanced as the initial plasma temperature is decreased. The overall energy gain of the plasma particles through the expansion strongly depends on the initial plasma temperature. Moreover, the electrons become relatively less energized and the ions more energized as the plasma temperature decreases.

  12. Desulphurization of lignites by slow, fast, and flash pyrolysis and high intensity dry magnetic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Koca, H.; Kockar, O.M.; Koca, S.

    2007-07-01

    Slow, fast and flash pyrolysis followed by high intensity dry magnetic (HIDM) separation experiments were conducted to obtain improved solid fuels. Pyrolysis experiments were performed in three different apparatus, and important parameters of processes, temperature, particle size, residence time and heating rate were studied to determine the optimum conditions. Desulphurization of lignites by flash pyrolysis is more successful than slow and fast pyrolysis. At optimum conditions of pyrolysis, up to 58.15, 60.24, and 62.31% sulphur reductions were obtained in slow, fast and flash pyrolysis, respectively. Char, obtained from the pyrolysis experiments, was further cleaned by a Permroll HIDM separator. Sulphur reduction enhanced up to 82.68, 84.40, and 86.55% in the char of slow, fast and flash pyrolysis, respectively.

  13. Magnetic resonance assessment of iron overload by separate measurement of tissue ferritin and hemosiderin iron

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ed X.; Kim, Daniel; Tosti, Christina L.; Tang, Haiying; Jensen, Jens H.; Cheung, Jerry S.; Feng, Li; Au, Wing-Yan; Ha, Shau-Yin; Sheth, Sujit S.; Brown, Truman R.; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    With transfusional iron overload, almost all the excess iron is sequestered intracellularly as rapidly mobilizable, dispersed, soluble, ferritin iron, and as aggregated, insoluble hemosiderin iron for long-term storage. Established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicators of tissue iron (R2, R2*) are principally influenced by hemosiderin iron and change slowly, even with intensive iron chelation. Intracellular ferritin iron is evidently in equilibrium with the low-molecular-weight cytosolic iron pool that can change rapidly with iron chelation. We have developed a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method to separately measure ferritin and hemosiderin iron, based on the non-monoexponential signal decay induced by aggregated iron in multiple-spin-echo sequences. We have initially validated the method in agarose phantoms and in human liver explants and shown the feasibility of its application in patients with thalassemia major. Measurement of tissue ferritin iron is a promising new means to rapidly evaluate the effectiveness of iron-chelating regimens. PMID:20712781

  14. Concentration of low-grade lignites by multi-stage processing (washing, semicoking, magnetic separation)

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, G.; Renda, D.; Dogan, Z.

    1999-07-01

    Tavanl-Omerler lignite deposit with a reserve of 264 million tons forms an important section of Turkish lignites. This lignitic coal was subjected to washing, semi-coking and magnetic separation so that the total sulphur and ash contents were reduced from 4.08 % to 1.27 and 15.64 % to 8.5 % respectively. The calorific value of the solid fuel was raised from 5030 Kcal/kg to 6727 Kcal/kg and the volatiles can also be used after sulphur removal. This process appears to be feasible as a clean coal production from the point of energy efficiency. A short economic analysis is also presented.

  15. Affinity Selection of Peptide Binders with Magnetic Beads via Organic Phase Separation (MOPS).

    PubMed

    Murai, Ryuichi; Nogi, Taiki; Tateoka, Komei; Sato, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new method for affinity selection of peptide binders for soluble protein targets using magnetic beads via organic phase separation (MOPS) from a phage display library. As a model target molecule, a mouse monoclonal antibody against human integrin ?9?1 (Y9A2) immobilized onto protein G magnetic beads was incubated with a 15-mer or 20-mer random peptide phage-display library. The suspensions containing the phage-magnetic beads conjugates were then transferred onto the organic phase and centrifuged in order to recover the Y9A2 bound phage immobilized on the protein G magnetic beads in the lower organic phase. After three rounds of biopanning, we were able to isolate specific phage clones that could not be obtained by the conventional approach. Furthermore, this new approach was found to be highly effective for isolating phage-binders for Fc-fusion constructs; indeed, enrichment of specific phage-binders was observed after only the first panning cycle. Thus, MOPS can improve the selection of specific phage-binders for soluble protein targets mainly due to the removal of non-specific binders. PMID:26521834

  16. Near-surface epigenetic magnetic indicators of buried hydrocarbons and separation of spurious signals

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, T.J.; O'Brien, D.P.; Bryan, J.G.; Shepherd, M.A.

    1986-05-01

    Significant geochemical alteration zones occurring over buried hydrocarbon deposits can be recognized and mapped by geophysical methods. The authors believe near-surface secondary magnetic minerals formed as a result of seeping hydrocarbons and associated compounds interacting with constituents of the overlying rocks. A new method is described to identify anomalous magnetic signatures associated with this mineralization, and to differentiate that signal from cultural interference and other surface shallow, and intermediate-depth geologic sources. Using low-altitude, high-sensitivity aeromagnetic data, the separation involves detailed spectral analysis, subsequent band-pass filtering, and analytic signal transformation of the filtered data. Depicted in contour form, the analytic signal minimizes spatial aliasing and allows us to map the areal distribution of subtle, near-surface anomalies related to probable epigenetic magnetic mineralization. This method is illustrated using data from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and Cook Inlet, Alaska, and from offshore Texas, where high-resolution seismic data support the aeromagnetic interpretation and suggest important structural controls. Correlations of published detailed gravimeter and low-altitude aeromagnetic data at the Cement oil field, Oklahoma, were coupled with interactive modeling studies. Except for the obvious extreme high wave-number spikes, cultural contamination cannot be responsible for the high wave-number signal there, and the epigenetic magnetic mineralization may be more extensive vertically than originally suggested.

  17. Effects of filter shapes on the capture efficiency of a superconducting high-gradient magnetic separation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. G.; Song, J. B.; Yang, D. G.; Lee, J. S.; Park, Y. J.; Kang, D. H.; Lee, H. G.

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports experimental and analytical studies on the capture efficiency of a superconducting high-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system, employing ferromagnetic filters with various wire diameters and packing fractions. The magnetization force was inversely proportional to wire diameter because the magnetic field gradient increased with decreasing wire diameter. In addition, the capture efficiency of the HGMS system was increased with decreasing wire diameter and increasing packing fraction. The experimental results from the filtration tests via the superconducting HGMS system were in reasonably good agreement with the capture efficiency using the magnetization force obtained by magnetic field analysis.

  18. Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R. (9917 Rainbow Dr., Knoxville, TN 37922); Burchell, Timothy D. (109 Greywood Pl., Oak Ridge, TN 37830)

    1999-01-01

    A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known "pressure swing adsorption" technique utilizing the same sorption material.

  19. Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-07-20

    A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known pressure swing adsorption'' technique utilizing the same sorption material. 1 fig.

  20. TREATMENT OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOWS BY HIGH GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION. ON-SITE TESTING WITH MOBILE PILOT PLANT TRAILER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seeded water treatment using a SALA high gradient magnetic separator pilot plant system was conducted on combined sewer overflows and raw sewage at SALA Magnetics in Cambridge, MA and at on-site locations in the Boston area. Special emphasis was placed on specific design and oper...

  1. IMPROVEMENT OF MAGNETICALLY SEPARATED FERROUS CONCENTRATE BY SHREDDING: A PERFORMANCE TEST. TEST NO. 4.07, RECOVERY 1, NEW ORLEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a series of test runs in which ferrous product magnetically recovered from municipal waste was further shredded in a small (50 hp) hammermill to free attached or entrapped contaminant. A belt magnet was then used to separate metal from the liberated contamin...

  2. Theoretical study of moving magnetic beads on an inclined plane and its application in the ratchet separation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, M. M.; Johnson, S.; Yang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    For first time, motion of a magnetic bead ascending an inclined surface is investigated. The translational and rotational velocities of magnetic beads traveling on an inclined plane in the creeping flow regime are studied. The governing equations considering lift force and magnetic torque are obtained. Rolling and slipping cases are studied in detail. It is shown that the lift force effect is critical for large values of sedimentation Reynolds number (Res) and negligible for small values of Res. This method is applicable for neutrally buoyant and heavy magnetic bead motion. Practical application of this study is implemented in the ratchet configuration for separation of magnetic beads with different sizes. This is applicable for novel applications such as drug delivery, magnetic tweezers, and magnetic actuated stiffness testing systems which require accurate magnetic bead sizes for accurate function.

  3. X-25 Cryo-ready In-vacuum Undulator at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Toshiya; Ablett, James; Berman, Lonny; Harder, David A.; Hulbert, Steve; Lehecka, Mike; Rakowsky, George; Skaritka, John; Deyhim, Alex; Johnson, Eric; Kulesza, Joe; Waterman, Dave

    2007-01-19

    The existing 15-year-old hybrid wiggler at the NSLS has been replaced by a state-of-the-art, cryo-ready in-vacuum undulator optimized for a dedicated macromolecular crystallography program. The device is a 1m long, 18mm period, hybrid PM-type with a minimum operating gap of 5.6mm, and has provision for cryo-cooling to 150K. Unlike the original SPring-8 cryo-PM undulator proposal, we use a new high-remanence, high-temperature grade of NdFeB (NEOMAX 42AH with Br=1.3T and Hcj=24 kOe) that can be baked to 100 deg. C to be UHV-ready in case of cooling system failure. A novel optical gap measurement system using a LED-based product ensures gap accuracy of {+-}2 micro meter. A friction stir welding technique is used for the first time in an accelerator UHV device to minimize stress and deformation of the magnet arrays due to temperature gradients. This paper describes design issues of the device and other considerations such as magnetic measurement at low temperature.

  4. Development program for magnetically assisted chemical separation: Evaluation of cesium removal from Hanford tank supernatant

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, L.; Buchholz, B.A.; Ziemer, M.; Dyrkacz, G.; Kaminski, M.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Atkins, K.J.; Bos, F.M.; Elder, G.R.; Swift, C.A.

    1994-12-01

    Magnetic particles (MAG*SEP{sup SM}) coated with various absorbents were evaluated for the separation and recovery of low concentrations of cesium from nuclear waste solutions. The MAG*SEP{sup SM} particles were coated with (1) clinoptilolite, (2) transylvanian volcanic tuff, (3) resorcinol formaldehyde, and (4) crystalline silico-titanate, and then were contacted with a Hanford supernatant simulant. Particles coated with the crystalline silico-titanate were identified by Bradtec as having the highest capacity for cesium removal under the conditions tested (variation of pH, ionic strength, cesium concentration, and absorbent/solution ratio). The MAG*SEP{sup SM} particles coated with resorcinol formaldehyde had high distribution ratios values and could also be used to remove cesium from Hanford supernant simulant. Gamma irradiation studies were performed on the MAG*SEP{sup SM} particles with a gamma dose equivalent to 100 cycles of use. This irradiation decreased the loading capacity and distribution ratios for the particles by greater than 75%. The particles demonstrated high sensitivity to radiolytic damage due to the degradation of the polymeric regions. These results were supported by optical microscopy measurements. Overall, use of magnetic particles for cesium separation under nuclear waste conditions was found to be marginally effective.

  5. Imaging of magnetic colloids under the influence of magnetic field by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinsong; Aslam, M.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2008-08-01

    The application of superparamagnetic nanoparticles for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) under external ac magnetic field has attracted considerable research efforts in recent years. However, it is unclear how superparamagnetic nanostructures arrange themselves in fluidic environment under external magnetic field. Here, we report direct visualization of the effect of applied magnetic field to the ferrofluids (about 6 nm superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticle "colloidal" suspension) using the cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). While long dipole chains (up to millimeter range) of the magnetite along the magnetic lines are found in samples dried inside the magnetic field, only short dipole chains (within tens of nanometer scale) with random orientations are observed in the wet sample observed by cryo-TEM. In the wet sample, aggregations of medium-length dipole chains (up to hundreds of nanometer) can be observed at the areas where the nanoparticles are "solidified" when phase separation occurs. In situ formation of flux-closure rings is observed at the edge where vitreous ice sublimes due to high-energy electron radiation that leaves magnetite nanoparticles isolated in the vacuum. Such observations may help elucidate the nature of magnetic field-induced assembly in fluidic environment as in the physiological aqueous conditions in MRI and related applications.

  6. Detecting Particles in Cryo-EM Micrographs using Learned Features

    E-print Network

    Kriegman, David J.

    Detecting Particles in Cryo-EM Micrographs using Learned Features Satya P. Mallick1 Yuanxin Zhu2 learning-based approach is presented for particle detection in cryo-electron micro- graphs using of the particle's appearance using a set of training examples of the particles and a set of images that do

  7. Upgrading of PVC rich wastes by magnetic density separation and hyperspectral imaging quality control.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Valentina; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Rem, Peter; Serranti, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) is one of the most produced polymers in Europe, with a share of 11% in terms of mass (8 milliontons) of total polymer consumption, but in 2010 only 5% of the total PVC production came from recycled materials, where other polymer recycling achieves a level of 15% on average. In order to find an innovative process to extract PVC from window frames waste, a combination of two innovative technologies was tested: magnetic density separation (MDS) and hyperspectral imaging (HSI). By its nature, MDS is a flexible high precision density separation technology that is applicable to any mixture of polymers and contaminants with non-overlapping densities. As PVC has a very distinctive high density, this technology was tested to obtain high-grade PVC pre-concentrates from window frame waste. HSI was used to perform a quality control of the products obtained by MDS showing that PVC was clearly discriminated from unwanted rubber particles of different colors. The results showed that the combined application of MDS and HSI techniques allowed to separate and to check the purity of PVC from window frame waste. PMID:25458764

  8. Adsorption mechanism of magnetically separable Fe3O4/graphene oxide hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Ke; Zhu, Chuanhe; Zhao, Ya; Wang, Leichao; Xie, Shan; Wang, Qun

    2015-11-01

    A reclaimable Fe3O4/graphene oxide (GO) magnetic hybrid was successfully synthesized via a facile one-pot polyol approach and employed as a recyclable adsorbent for Bisphenol A (BPA) in aqueous solutions. The maximum adsorption capacity (qm) of the Fe3O4/GO hybrid for BPA was 72.80 mg/g at 273 K. The kinetics of the adsorption process and the adsorption isotherm data were fitted using the Freundlich equation and a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results of the thermodynamic parameters ?H°, ?S° and ?G° showed that the adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous. Furthermore, the reusability of the samples was investigated, and the results indicated that the samples exhibited high stability. The magnetic characterization demonstrated that hybrids were superparamagnetic and could be recovered conveniently by magnetic separation. The strong ?-? interaction was determined to be the predominant driving force behind the adsorption of BPA onto the Fe3O4/GO hybrid. Therefore, the Fe3O4/GO hybrid could be regarded as a potential adsorbent for wastewater treatment and purification processes.

  9. Colouring cryo-cooled crystals: online microspectrophotometry

    PubMed Central

    McGeehan, John; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Murray, James W.; Owen, Robin Leslie; Cipriani, Florent; McSweeney, Sean; Weik, Martin; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2009-01-01

    X-rays can produce a high concentration of radicals within cryo-cooled macromolecular crystals. Some radicals have large extinction coefficients in the visible (VIS) range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and can be observed optically and spectrally. An online microspectrophotometer with high temporal resolution has been constructed that is capable of measuring UV/VIS absorption spectra (200–1100?nm) during X-ray data collection. The typical X-ray-induced blue colour that is characteristic of a wide range of cryo-conditions has been identified as trapped solvated electrons. Disulphide-containing proteins are shown to form disulphide radicals at millimolar concentrations, with absorption maxima around 400?nm. The solvated electrons and the disulphide radicals seem to have a lifetime in the range of seconds up to minutes at 100?K. The temperature dependence of the kinetics of X-ray-induced radical formation is different for the solvated electrons compared with the disulphide radicals. The online microspectrophotometer provides a technique complementary to X-ray diffraction for analysing and characterizing intermediates and redox states of proteins and enzymes. PMID:19240328

  10. Separation of semiconducting and ferromagnetic FeSi2-nanoparticles by magnetic filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigner, Willi; Niesar, Sabrina; Mehmedovic, Ervin; Opel, Matthias; Wagner, Friedrich E.; Wiggers, Hartmut; Stutzmann, Martin

    2013-10-01

    We have investigated the potential of solution-processed ?-phase iron disilicide (FeSi2) nanoparticles as a novel semiconducting material for photovoltaic applications. Combined ultraviolet-visible absorption and photothermal deflection spectroscopy measurements have revealed a direct band gap of 0.85 eV and, therefore, a particularly high absorption in the near infrared. With the help of Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we have observed that exposure to air primarily leads to the formation of a silicon oxide rather than iron oxide. Mössbauer measurements have confirmed that the nanoparticles possess a phase purity of more than 99%. To diminish the small fraction of metallic iron impurities, which were detected by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and which would act as unwanted Auger recombination centers, we present a novel concept to magnetically separate the FeSi2 nanoparticles (NPs). This process leads to a reduction of more than 95% of the iron impurities.

  11. Bio-inspired durable, superhydrophobic magnetic particles for oil/water separation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Li, Lili; Dang, Zhi-Min

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, superhydrophobic and superoleophilic microparticles with magnetic property were fabricated by combining the oxidation and self-polymerization of dopamine and formation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the surface of the polydopamine (PDA) particles, followed by modification with low surface energy material. The modified PDA/Fe3O4 particles showed high water repellency with contact angle (CA) measured at 153.7±1.6° and high oil affinity. The superhydrophobic microparticles preserved high water CA after aging test, showing excellent durability. The microparticles were employed to effectively remove oil from water in different routes. Superhydrophobic sponge was prepared by modifying with the achieved microparticles. The sponge exhibited high absorption capability of oil, with weight gains ranging from 1348% to 7268%. The results suggest this work might provide a promising candidate for oily pollutants/water separation and transportation. PMID:26550784

  12. Recovering metals from red mud by thermal treatment and magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plescia, Paolo; Maccari, Dante

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with an alternative treatment for recovering metals from goethite red mud (RM), which occurs as a by-product at zinc leaching plants. It is derived from the hydrometallurgical treatment of sphalerite, which involves roasting followed by acid attack and subsequent recovery of the zinc by electrodeposition. The leaching mud contains various oxides and hydroxides of iron plus lesser amounts of sulfates of Pb, Zn, Ca, Cd, Ag, In, Se, and other metals. In recent years, numerous attempts have been made to recover the RM or render it inert, particularly by such processes as vitrification or lithification for the production of glass ceramics. The work reported here proposes a treatment involving reduction and magnetic separation to permit the extraction of pure zinc, a high percentage of a pure magnetite, and a harmless slag containing mixed silicates of zinc and lead as well as oxides of minor elements.

  13. From Vesicle Size Distributions to Bilayer Elasticity via Cryo-Transmission and Freeze-Fracture Electron

    E-print Network

    Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    From Vesicle Size Distributions to Bilayer Elasticity via Cryo-Transmission and Freeze scattering (QLS), freeze-fracture electron microscopy (FF-TEM), and cryo-transmission electron microscopy equilibrium vesicles measured by cryo- transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), freeze- fracture electron

  14. Structure determination of clathrin coats to subnanometer resolution by single particle cryo-electron microscopy

    E-print Network

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    , the structures of clathrin lattices have been studied by single particle cryo-electron microscopy, which probed resolution by single particle cryo-electron microscopy. Keywords Clathrin coats; Clathrin cages; Cryo-electronStructure determination of clathrin coats to subnanometer resolution by single particle cryo-electron

  15. REPRESENTATION THEORETIC PATTERNS IN THREE DIMENSIONAL CRYO-ELECTRON MICROSCOPY III -

    E-print Network

    Gurevich, Shamgar

    REPRESENTATION THEORETIC PATTERNS IN THREE DIMENSIONAL CRYO-ELECTRON MICROSCOPY III - PRESENCE-dimensional structure determination of large biological molecules from cryo-electron microscopy pro- jection images and function of the ribosome. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM for short) is a promising approach to three

  16. Structural characterization of components of protein assemblies by comparative modeling and electron cryo-microscopy

    E-print Network

    Sali, Andrej

    and electron cryo-microscopy Maya Topf a , Matthew L. Bakerb , Bino Johnc , Wah Chiub , Andrej Salia characterization of protein assemblies by a combination of electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM) and com- parative: Protein structure prediction; Comparative modeling; Electron cryo-microscopy; Fitting 1. Introduction

  17. Structure of the Blm1020 S Proteasome Complex by Cryo-electron Microscopy.

    E-print Network

    Hill, Chris

    Structure of the Blm10­20 S Proteasome Complex by Cryo-electron Microscopy. Insights author Keywords: Blm10; PA200; proteasome activator; cryo-electron microscopy; three S proteasome. The two ends of the Abbreviations used: cryo-EM, cryo-electron microscopy; WT, wild-type; ORF

  18. Magnetic orderings and phase separations in a simple model of insulating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapcia, Konrad Jerzy; Murawski, Szymon; K?obus, Waldemar; Robaszkiewicz, Stanis?aw

    2015-11-01

    A simple effective model for a description of magnetically ordered narrow-band insulators is studied. The Hamiltonian considered consists of the effective on-site interaction (U) and intersite magnetic exchange interactions (Jz, Jxy) between nearest-neighbours. The phase diagrams and properties of this model for arbitrary chemical potential ? and arbitrary electron density n have been determined within several approaches: (i) the variational method (which treats the on-site interaction term exactly and the intersite interactions within the mean-field approximation) for any Jz ,Jxy ? 0 (exact in the limit of infinite dimensions), (ii) the Monte Carlo simulations on a square lattice with periodic boundary conditions for Jxy = 0, and (iii) other approximate methods (inter alia: random phase approximation and spin-wave approximation) as well as (iv) rigorous treatment to obtain results concerning the ground state phase diagrams (the two last also for Jz ,Jxy ? 0). The investigations of the general case show that, depending on the values of interaction parameters and electron concentration n, the system can exhibit not only homogeneous phases: (anti-)ferromagnetic (F?, ? = z , xy) and nonordered (NO), but also phase separated states (PS?: F?/NO). For a fixed n one finds the following phase transitions (both continuous and discontinuous ones) and their sequences, which can occur with increasing temperature: F? ? NO, PS? ? NO, PS? ?F? ? NO, PS? ?F? ?PS? ? NO. The system analysed exhibits also tricritical behaviour.

  19. Facile synthesis of magnetically separable reduced graphene oxide/magnetite/silver nanocomposites with enhanced catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhenyuan; Shen, Xiaoping; Yue, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Hu; Yang, Juan; Wang, Yuqin; Ma, Lianbo; Chen, Kangmin

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the combination of magnetite (Fe3O4) with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) generates a new hybrid substrate for the dispersion of noble metal nanoparticles. Well-dispersed silver (Ag) nanoparticles loaded on the surface of Fe3O4 modified RGO are achieved by an efficient two-step approach. Through reducing Ag(+) ions, highly dispersed Ag nanoparticles are in-situ formed on the RGO/Fe3O4 substrate. It is found that the existence of Fe3O4 nanocrystals can significantly improve the dispersity and decrease the particle size of the in-situ formed Ag nanoparticles. Magnetic study reveals that the as-prepared RGO/Fe3O4/Ag ternary nanocomposites display room-temperature superparamagnetic behavior. The catalytic properties of the RGO/Fe3O4/Ag ternary nanocomposites were evaluated with the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol as a model reaction. The as-synthesized RGO/Fe3O4/Ag ternary catalysts exhibit excellent catalytic stability and much higher catalytic activity than the corresponding RGO/Ag catalyst. Moreover, the RGO/Fe3O4/Ag catalysts can be easily magnetically separated for reuse. This study further demonstrates that nanoparticles modified graphene can act as an effective hybrid substrate for the synthesis of multi-component and multifunctional graphene-based composites. PMID:26263498

  20. Fabrication of chiral amino acid ionic liquid modified magnetic multifunctional nanospheres for centrifugal chiral chromatography separation of racemates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yating; Tian, Ailin; Wang, Xiong; Qi, Jing; Wang, Fengkang; Ma, Ying; Ito, Yoichiro; Wei, Yun

    2015-06-26

    As the rapid development of nanotechnology, the magnetic nanospheres modified with special chiral selective ligands show a great potentiality in enantiomeric separation. In this study, magnetic nanospheres modified with task-specific chiral ionic liquid were designed for the separation of chiral amino acids. These modified magnetic nanospheres were effective in a direct chiral separation of five racemic amino acids (D- and L-cysteine, D- and L-arginine, D- and L-leucine, D- and L-glutamine and D- and L-tryptophan). Furthermore, a new online method for complete separation of the enantiomers via the magnetic nanospheres was established with centrifugal chiral chromatography using a spiral tube assembly mounted on a type-J coil planet centrifuge. One kind of chiral compounds, D- and L-tryptophan was resolved well using this method. These results demonstrated that the modified nanospheres display a good chiral recognition ability, and can be used as a potential material for chiral separation of various racemates. PMID:25976126

  1. CryoSat: ready to launch (again)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, R.; Wingham, D.; Cullen, R.

    2009-12-01

    Over the last ten years the relationship between climate change and the cryosphere has become increasingly important. Evidence of change in the polar regions is widespread, and the subject of public discussion. During this same ten years ESA has been preparing its CryoSat mission, specifically designed to provide measurements to determine the overall change in the mass balance of all of the ice caps and of change in the volume of sea-ice (rather than simply its extent). In fact the mission was ready for launch in October 2005, but a failure in the launch vehicle led to a loss of the satellite some 6 minutes after launch. The determination to rebuild the satellite and complete the mission was widespread in the relevant scientific, industrial and political entities, and the decision to redirect financial resources to the rebuild was sealed with a scientific report confirming that the mission was even more important in 2005 than at its original selection in 1999. The evolution of the cryosphere since then has emphasised that conclusion. In order to make a meaningful measurement of the secular change of the surface legation of ice caps and the thickness of sea-ice, the accuracy required has been specified as about half of the variation expected due to natural variability, over reasonable scales for the surfaces concerned. The selected technique is radar altimetry. Previous altimeter missions have pioneered the method: the CryoSat instrument has been modified to provide the enhanced capabilities needed to significantly extend the spatial coverage of these earlier missions. Thus the radar includes a synthetic aperture mode which enables the along-track resolution to be improved to about 250 m. This will will allow detection of leads in sea-ice which are narrower than those detected hitherto, so that operation deeper into pack-ice can be achieved with a consequent reduction in errors due to omission. Altimetry over the steep edges of ice caps is hampered by the irregular topography which, since the radar ranging is performed to the closest reflector rather than the point directly below, introduces uncertainty into the exactitude of repeat measurements. CryoSat's radar includes a second antenna and receiver chain so that interferometry may be used to determine the arrival angle of the echo and so improve localisation of the reflection. The new satellite was approved in late February 2006, less than 6 months after the failure, and development started almost immediately. In September 2009 the development was completed and the satellite placed into storage awaiting a launch vehicle: the launch, using a Dnepr vehicle (a converted SS-18 ICBM) is anticipated in late February 2010.

  2. NASA IN-STEP Cryo System Experiment flight test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, S. C.; Sugimura, R. S.

    The Cryo System Experiment (CSE), a NASA In-Space Technology Experiments Program (IN-STEP) flight experiment, was flown on Space Shuttle Discovery (STS 63) in February 1995. The experiment was developed by Hughes Aircraft Company to validate in zero- g space a 65 K cryogenic system for focal planes, optics, instruments or other equipment (gamma-ray spectrometers and infrared and submillimetre imaging instruments) that requires continuous cryogenic cooling. The CSE is funded by the NASA Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology's IN-STEP and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The overall goal of the CSE was to validate and characterize the on-orbit performance of the two thermal management technologies that comprise a hybrid cryogenic system. These thermal management technologies consist of (1) a second-generation long-life, low-vibration, Stirling-cycle 65 K cryocooler that was used to cool a simulated thermal energy storage device (TRP) and (2) a diode oxygen heat pipe thermal switch that enables physical separation between a cryogenic refrigerator and a TRP. All CSE experiment objectives and 100% of the experiment success criteria were achieved. The level of confidence provided by this flight experiment is an important NASA and Department of Defense (DoD) milestone prior to multi-year mission commitment. Presented are generic lessons learned from the system integration of cryocoolers for a flight experiment and the recorded zero- g performance of the Stirling cryocooler and the diode oxygen heat pipe.

  3. In situ magnetic separation of antibody fragments from Escherichia coli in complex media

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In situ magnetic separation (ISMS) has emerged as a powerful tool to overcome process constraints such as product degradation or inhibition of target production. In the present work, an integrated ISMS process was established for the production of his-tagged single chain fragment variable (scFv) D1.3 antibodies (“D1.3”) produced by E. coli in complex media. This study investigates the impact of ISMS on the overall product yield as well as its biocompatibility with the bioprocess when metal-chelate and triazine-functionalized magnetic beads were used. Results Both particle systems are well suited for separation of D1.3 during cultivation. While the triazine beads did not negatively impact the bioprocess, the application of metal-chelate particles caused leakage of divalent copper ions in the medium. After the ISMS step, elevated copper concentrations above 120 mg/L in the medium negatively influenced D1.3 production. Due to the stable nature of the model protein scFv D1.3 in the biosuspension, the application of ISMS could not increase the overall D1.3 yield as was shown by simulation and experiments. Conclusions We could demonstrate that triazine-functionalized beads are a suitable low-cost alternative to selectively adsorb D1.3 fragments, and measured maximum loads of 0.08 g D1.3 per g of beads. Although copper-loaded metal-chelate beads did adsorb his-tagged D1.3 well during cultivation, this particle system must be optimized by minimizing metal leakage from the beads in order to avoid negative inhibitory effects on growth of the microorganisms and target production. Hereby, other types of metal chelate complexes should be tested to demonstrate biocompatibility. Such optimized particle systems can be regarded as ISMS platform technology, especially for the production of antibodies and their fragments with low stability in the medium. The proposed model can be applied to design future ISMS experiments in order to maximize the overall product yield while the amount of particles being used is minimized as well as the number of required ISMS steps. PMID:23688064

  4. Within the DFG-funded project Time-Space Multiscale Separation of Ocean Tide Generated Magnetic Signals, we offer a

    E-print Network

    Wien, Universität

    Within the DFG-funded project Time-Space Multiscale Separation of Ocean Tide Generated Magnetic.csc.univie.ac.at/index.php?page=ocean tides. The position is limited to 3 years and payment is according to the collective bargaining

  5. Magnetically separable nanocomposites with photocatalytic activity under visible light for the selective transformation of biomass-derived platform molecules

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel magnetically separable TiO2-guanidine-(Ni,Co)Fe2O4 nanomaterials were prepared and characterised by a series of techniques including XRD, SEM, TEM, N2 physisorption as well as XPS and subsequently tested for their photocatalytic activities in the selective transformation of...

  6. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom; Patwardhan, Ardan; Scheres, Sjors; Topf, Maya; Roseman, Alan; Winn, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallo­graphy, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed. PMID:25615866

  7. A primer to single-particle cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yifan; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Penczek, Pawel A; Walz, Thomas

    2015-04-23

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of single-particle specimens is used to determine the structure of proteins and macromolecular complexes without the need for crystals. Recent advances in detector technology and software algorithms now allow images of unprecedented quality to be recorded and structures to be determined at near-atomic resolution. However, compared with X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM is a young technique with distinct challenges. This primer explains the different steps and considerations involved in structure determination by single-particle cryo-EM to provide an overview for scientists wishing to understand more about this technique and the interpretation of data obtained with it, as well as a starting guide for new practitioners. PMID:25910204

  8. Role of cryo-ET in membrane bioenergetics research.

    PubMed

    Davies, Karen M; Daum, Bertram

    2013-10-01

    To truly understand bioenergetic processes such as ATP synthesis, membrane-bound substrate transport or flagellar rotation, systems need to be analysed in a cellular context. Cryo-ET (cryo-electron tomography) is an essential part of this process, as it is currently the only technique which can directly determine the spatial organization of proteins at the level of both the cell and the individual protein complexes. The need to assess bioenergetic processes at a cellular level is becoming more and more apparent with the increasing interest in mitochondrial diseases. In recent years, cryo-ET has contributed significantly to our understanding of the molecular organization of mitochondria and chloroplasts. The present mini-review first describes the technique of cryo-ET and then discusses its role in membrane bioenergetics specifically in chloroplasts and mitochondrial research. PMID:24059512

  9. Proposal for electrical detection of spin separation with in-plane magnetic field in mesoscopic Stern-Gerlach spin filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohda, M.; Ohe, J.; Sanada, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Ohtsuki, T.; Nitta, J.

    2010-02-01

    In two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), spatial gradient of effective magnetic field due to spin orbit interaction yields spin dependent force. By taking this advantage, Stern-Gerlach spin filter in 2DEG has been proposed for generating spin polarized currents without any external magnetic fields and ferromagnetic materials [Phys. Rev. B 72, 041308(R) (2005)]. In order to demonstrate the spin filtering effect, detection of spin polarized electrons becomes crucial importance. Here, we propose an electrical detection of spin filtering by introducing an in-plane magnetic field in mesoscopic Stern-Gerlach spin filter. In-plane magnetic field induces spin polarized electrons due to Zeeman splitting, generating the imbalance between up-spin and down-spin currents after the spin separation. Calculated spin separation angle becomes 20º based on experimentally accessible parameters. Time evolution of wave packet shows the spin separation as well as the charge imbalance under the in-plane magnetic field. By fabricating Y-branch shaped narrow wire structure with two split gate electrodes at the junction, spin filtering effect can be detected as the magnitude difference of each branch currents. Gate bias dependence of each branch current is measured in Bex= +/-15 T at T=4.2 K.

  10. Metal organic framework derived magnetically separable 3-dimensional hierarchical Ni@C nanocomposites: Synthesis and adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yixuan; Qiang, Tingting; Ye, Ming; Ma, Qiuyang; Fang, Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Design an effective absorbent that has high surface area, and perfect recyclable is imperative for pollution elimination. Herein, we report a facile two-step strategy to fabricate magnetically separable 3-dimensional (3D) hierarchical carbon-coated nickel (Ni@C) nanocomposites by calcinating nickel based metal organic framework (Ni3(OH)2(C8H4O4)2(H2O)4). SEM and TEM images illuminate that the nanocomposites were constructed by 8 nm nickel nanoparticle encapsulated in 3D flake like carbon. The specific surface area of the obtained nanocomposites is up to 120.38 m2 g-1. Room temperature magnetic measurement indicates the nanocomposites show soft magnetism property, which endows the nanocomposites with an ideal fast magnetic separable property. The maximum adsorption capacity of the nanocomposites for rhodamine B is 84.5 mg g-1. Furthermore, the nanocomposites also exhibit a high adsorption capacity for heavy metal ions. The adsorbent can be very easily separated from the solution by using a common magnet without exterior energy. The as-prepared Ni@C nanocomposites can apply in waste water treatment on a large-scale as a new adsorbent with high efficiency and excellent recyclability.

  11. A highly-efficient imprinted magnetic nanoparticle for selective separation and detection of 17?-estradiol in milk.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruixia; Cui, Xihui; Hao, Yi; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Dechun; Tang, Yuhai

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we prepared molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) combining surface molecular imprinting technique and magnetic separation for separation and determination of 17?-estradiol (E2) from milk. During the synthesis process, the acryloyl chloride was specially used to graft double bonds on Fe3O4 nanoparticles and served as co-functional monomer cooperating with acrylamide. The morphology, structure property, and the best polymerization and adsorption conditions of the prepared magnetic nanoparticles were investigated in detail. The obtained nanomaterials displayed high adsorption capacity of 12.62mg/g, fast equilibrium time of 10min, and satisfactory selectivity for target molecule. What's more, the MIPs was successfully applied as sorbents to specifically separate and enrich E2 from milk with a relatively high recovery (88.9-92.1%), demonstrating the potential application of the MIPs as solid phase extractant for rapid, highly-efficient, and cost-effective sample analysis. PMID:26471651

  12. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom; Patwardhan, Ardan; Scheres, Sjors; Topf, Maya; Roseman, Alan; Winn, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed.

  13. Design and performance of magnetic composite particles for the separation of heavy metals from water.

    PubMed

    Phanapavudhikul, P; Waters, J A; Perez de Ortiz, E S

    2003-01-01

    Composite particles have been made by combining nanosized polymer particles with magnetite microparticles using a ball-mill process. The magnetite particle cores were included to facilitate the composite particles separation by use of a magnetic field. Polymer particles carried carboxylic groups as ion-exchange vehicles. The composite particles were used in the extraction/stripping of Zn, Cu, Ni, and Cr from aqueous solutions in a stirred batch reactor of laboratory scale. The extraction behavior of these metals was studied as a function of initial metal concentrations of up to 25 mM, ionic strength at pH (5-7), and temperature (1-80 degrees C). Experimental results showed that the process was very fast and yielded complete metal removal when the initial concentrations of metals were very low. The selectivity series was Cu > Cr > Zn > Ni. The effect of ionic strength was immaterial at pH 7. However, extraction decreased with increasing ionic strength at pH 5. Extraction increased with increasing temperature. A series of extraction/ stripping experiments indicated that the particles can be reused without significant loss in their extraction capacity. PMID:14524681

  14. Zernike Phase Contrast Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Tomography for Structure Determination at Nanometer and Subnanometer Resolutions

    E-print Network

    Murata, Kazuyoshi

    Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy (ZPC-cryoEM) is an emerging technique that is capable of producing higher image contrast than conventional cryoEM. By combining this technique with advanced image processing ...

  15. Folic acid conjugated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for nondestructive separation and detection of ovarian cancer cells from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenting; Nie, Liju; Li, Fulai; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Xu, Hong; Xiong, Yonghua; Fu, Fen; Xu, Hengyi

    2015-12-15

    Because of the lack of early screening strategies, ovarian cancer is the most deadly cause of gynecologic malignancies. This paper describes an effective method for the separation and detection of ovarian cancer cells from female whole blood, using folic acid (FA) conjugated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IO-FA nanoparticles). The IO nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomposition and then covalently conjugated with FA. The IO-FA nanoparticles were stably attached to the surface of ovarian cancer cells by coupling to the over-expressed folate receptor (FR), thereby making the cells magnetic. These "magnetic cells" were separated from the complex blood matrix without destruction under a magnetic field. The separation efficiency was as high as 61.3% when the abundance of spiked ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells was as low as 5 × 10(-5)%. We also successfully detected five (5) out of ten (10) metastatic ovarian cancer patients' whole blood. This study suggested the feasibility of early detecting of metastatic ovarian cancer cells, which may potentially improve the ovarian cancers patients' overall survival rate for clinical applications. PMID:26478922

  16. In Situ Characterization of Binary Mixed Polymer Brush-Grafted Silica Nanoparticles in Aqueous and Organic Solvents by Cryo-Electron Tomography.

    PubMed

    Fox, Tara L; Tang, Saide; Horton, Jonathan M; Holdaway, Heather A; Zhao, Bin; Zhu, Lei; Stewart, Phoebe L

    2015-08-11

    We present an in situ cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) study of mixed poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)/polystyrene (PS) brush-grafted 67 nm silica nanoparticles in organic and aqueous solvents. These organic-inorganic nanoparticles are predicted to be environmentally responsive and adopt distinct brush layer morphologies in different solvent environments. Although the self-assembled morphology of mixed PAA/PS brush-grafted particles has been studied previously in a dried state, no direct visualization of microphase separation was achieved in the solvent environment. CryoEM allows the sample to be imaged in situ, that is, in a frozen solvated state, at the resolution of a transmission electron microscope. Cryo-electron tomograms (cryoET) were generated for mixed PAA/PS brush-grafted nanoparticles in both N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF, a nonselective good solvent) and water (a selective solvent for PAA). Different nanostructures for the mixed brushes were observed in these two solvents. Overall, the brush layer is more compact in water, with a thickness of 18 nm, as compared with an extended layer of 27 nm in DMF. In DMF, mixed PAA/PS brushes are observed to form laterally separated microdomains with a ripple wavelength of 13.8 nm. Because of its lower grafting density than that of PAA, PS domains form more or less cylindrical or truncated cone-shaped domains in the PAA matrix. In water, PAA chains are found to form a more complete shell around the nanoparticle to maximize their interaction with water, whereas PS chains collapse into the core of surface-tethered micelles near the silica core. The cryoET results presented here confirm the predicted environmentally responsive nature of PAA/PS mixed brush-grafted nanoparticles. This experimental approach may be useful for the design of future mixed brush-grafted nanoparticles for nano- and biotechnology applications. PMID:26174179

  17. Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic activity of magnetically separable hexagonal Ni/ZnO nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senapati, Samarpita; Srivastava, Suneel K.; Singh, Shiv B.

    2012-09-01

    The hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel (Ni/ZnO) nanostructure photocatalyst has successfully been prepared by the reduction of nickel chloride hexahydrate using hydrazine hydrate through the solvothermal process at 140 °C followed by surface modification of the product by the reflux method at 110 °C for 1 h. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed that the `as prepared' sample consists of face centered cubic Ni and hexagonal wurtzite ZnO without any traces of impurity. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the formation of nickel nanoparticles under solvothermal conditions. These nickel nanoparticles, when subjected to reflux, formed the hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel nanostructure. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, photoluminescence (PL) and Raman studies also confirmed the presence of zinc oxide in the hybrid nanostructure. The growth mechanism for the development of the hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel (Ni/ZnO) nanostructure has also been proposed. The appearance of the hysteresis loop, in the as-prepared Ni/ZnO hybrid nanostructure, demonstrated its ferromagnetic character at room temperature. The hexagonal Ni/ZnO nanostructure also acts as an efficient photocatalyst in the degradation of methylene blue under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is observed that the catalytic efficiency of the hybrid nanocatalyst is better compared to pure zinc oxide. Most importantly, the Ni/ZnO catalyst could also be easily separated, simply by applying an external magnetic field, and reused.The hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel (Ni/ZnO) nanostructure photocatalyst has successfully been prepared by the reduction of nickel chloride hexahydrate using hydrazine hydrate through the solvothermal process at 140 °C followed by surface modification of the product by the reflux method at 110 °C for 1 h. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed that the `as prepared' sample consists of face centered cubic Ni and hexagonal wurtzite ZnO without any traces of impurity. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the formation of nickel nanoparticles under solvothermal conditions. These nickel nanoparticles, when subjected to reflux, formed the hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel nanostructure. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, photoluminescence (PL) and Raman studies also confirmed the presence of zinc oxide in the hybrid nanostructure. The growth mechanism for the development of the hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel (Ni/ZnO) nanostructure has also been proposed. The appearance of the hysteresis loop, in the as-prepared Ni/ZnO hybrid nanostructure, demonstrated its ferromagnetic character at room temperature. The hexagonal Ni/ZnO nanostructure also acts as an efficient photocatalyst in the degradation of methylene blue under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is observed that the catalytic efficiency of the hybrid nanocatalyst is better compared to pure zinc oxide. Most importantly, the Ni/ZnO catalyst could also be easily separated, simply by applying an external magnetic field, and reused. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1 Ni/ZnO hybrid nanostructure prepared using (a) 0.195 and (b) 0.25 M [Zn2+] at 90 °C Fig. S2 FTIR spectra of nickel nanoparticles prepared at 140 °C (a), and Ni/ZnO hybrid nanostructure prepared using (b) 0.063, (c) 0.125, (d) 0.195 and (e) 0.25 M [Zn2+]; Fig. S3 Raman spectra of Ni/ZnO nanostructure prepared using (a) 0.063, (b) 0.125, (c) 0.195 and (d) 0.25 M [Zn2+]; Fig. S4 Room temperature PL spectra of (a) ZnO and (b) Ni/ZnO nanostructure prepared using 0.25 M [Zn2+]. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31831h

  18. Antiferromagnetism, ferromagnetism and magnetic phase separation in Bi?Sr?O?â??[delta

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Kennedy Jessica, 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Neutron scattering, magnetization and transport measurements were performed on single crystals of Bi2Sr2CoO6+[delta] to study the evolution of the magnetic properties as a function of the oxygen content . The oxygen content ...

  19. Cryo-electron tomography of vaccinia virus

    PubMed Central

    Cyrklaff, Marek; Risco, Cristina; Fernández, Jose Jesús; Jiménez, Maria Victoria; Estéban, Mariano; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Carrascosa, José L.

    2005-01-01

    The combination of cryo-microscopy and electron tomographic reconstruction has allowed us to determine the structure of one of the more complex viruses, intracellular mature vaccinia virus, at a resolution of 4–6 nm. The tomographic reconstruction allows us to dissect the different structural components of the viral particle, avoiding projection artifacts derived from previous microscopic observations. A surface-rendering representation revealed brick-shaped viral particles with slightly rounded edges and dimensions of ?360 × 270 × 250 nm. The outer layer was consistent with a lipid membrane (5–6 nm thick), below which usually two lateral bodies were found, built up by a heterogeneous material without apparent ordering or repetitive features. The internal core presented an inner cavity with electron dense coils of presumptive DNA–protein complexes, together with areas of very low density. The core was surrounded by two layers comprising an overall thickness of ?18–19 nm; the inner layer was consistent with a lipid membrane. The outer layer was discontinuous, formed by a periodic palisade built by the side interaction of T-shaped protein spikes that were anchored in the lower membrane and were arranged into small hexagonal crystallites. It was possible to detect a few pore-like structures that communicated the inner side of the core with the region outside the layer built by the T-shaped spike palisade. PMID:15699328

  20. Towards an electro-magnetic field separation of deposited material implemented in an ion beam sputter process

    SciTech Connect

    Malobabic, Sina; Jupe, Marco; Ristau, Detlev; Quest: Centre of Quantum Engineering and Space-Time Research, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Hannover

    2013-06-03

    Nowadays, Ion Beam Sputter (IBS) processes are very well optimized on an empirical basis. To achieve further progresses, a modification of the IBS process by guiding the coating material using an axial magnetic field and an additional electrical field has been studied. The electro-magnetic (EM) field leads to a significant change in plasma properties and deposition rate distributions, whereas an increase in deposition rate along the centerline of the axial EM field around 150% was observed. These fundamental studies on the prototype are the basis for the development of an applicable and workable design of a separation device.

  1. Low-Field Magnetic Separation of Monodisperse Fe3O4 Nanocrystals

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    , their magnetic tractive forces in a field gradient will not be large enough to overcome Brownian mo- tion to the process is the generation of magnetic forces on particles large enough to overcome opposing forces. Such material opti- mization, however, is not generally practical, because the magnetic force acting

  2. Beam-Energy Dependence of Charge Separation along the Magnetic Field in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.

    2014-08-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a quark-gluon plasma which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect. The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this Letter, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au +Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. This implies the dominance of hadronic interactions over partonic ones at lower collision energies.

  3. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-print Network

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect (CME). The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this paper, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39 and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy, and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. The implications of these results for the CME will be discussed.

  4. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-print Network

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-07-15

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect (CME). The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this paper, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39 and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy, and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. The implications of these results for the CME will be discussed.

  5. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a quark-gluon plasma which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect. The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this Letter, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. This implies the dominance of hadronic interactions over partonic ones at lower collision energies. PMID:25126911

  6. Graphene supported silver@silver chloride & ferroferric oxide hybrid, a magnetically separable photocatalyst with high performance under visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Suting; Jiang, Wei; Han, Mei; Liu, Gongzong; Zhang, Na; Lu, Yue

    2015-08-01

    A stable magnetic separable plasmonic photocatalyst was successfully fabricated by grafting silver@silver chloride (Ag@AgCl) and ferroferric oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles on graphene sheets. The composite exhibited high activity degrading methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine B (RB) under visible light irradiation: decomposition 97.4% of MB in 100 min and 97.9% of RB in 120 min. The enhanced photocatalytic activities can be attributed to synergistic effect between Ag@AgCl and graphene: the effective charge transfer from Ag@AgCl to graphene thus promotes the separation of electron-hole pairs. Moreover, the excellent magnetic property gives a more convenient way to recycle the photocatalysts.

  7. Cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Brost, Alexander; Jakob, Carolin; Mewes, Philip W.; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation has become the preferred treatment option for atrial fibrillation. Although the standard ablation procedure involves ablation points set by radio-frequency catheters, cryo-balloon catheters have even been reported to be more advantageous in certain cases. As electro-anatomical mapping systems do not support cryo-balloon ablation procedures, X-ray guidance is needed. However, current methods to provide support for cryo-balloon catheters in fluoroscopically guided ablation procedures rely heavily on manual user interaction. To improve this, we propose a first method for automatic cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images based on a blob detection algorithm. Our method is evaluated on 24 clinical images from 17 patients. The method successfully detected the cryoballoon in 22 out of 24 images, yielding a success rate of 91.6 %. The successful localization achieved an accuracy of 1.00 mm +/- 0.44 mm. Even though our methods currently fails in 8.4 % of the images available, it still offers a significant improvement over manual methods. Furthermore, detecting a landmark point along the cryo-balloon catheter can be a very important step for additional post-processing operations.

  8. Progressive Stochastic Reconstruction Technique (PSRT) for cryo electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Turo?ová, Beata; Marsalek, Lukas; Davidovi?, Tomáš; Slusallek, Philipp

    2015-03-01

    Cryo Electron Tomography (cryoET) plays an essential role in Structural Biology, as it is the only technique that allows to study the structure of large macromolecular complexes in their close to native environment in situ. The reconstruction methods currently in use, such as Weighted Back Projection (WBP) or Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT), deliver noisy and low-contrast reconstructions, which complicates the application of high-resolution protocols, such as Subtomogram Averaging (SA). We propose a Progressive Stochastic Reconstruction Technique (PSRT) - a novel iterative approach to tomographic reconstruction in cryoET based on Monte Carlo random walks guided by Metropolis-Hastings sampling strategy. We design a progressive reconstruction scheme to suit the conditions present in cryoET and apply it successfully to reconstructions of macromolecular complexes from both synthetic and experimental datasets. We show how to integrate PSRT into SA, where it provides an elegant solution to the region-of-interest problem and delivers high-contrast reconstructions that significantly improve template-based localization without any loss of high-resolution structural information. Furthermore, the locality of SA is exploited to design an importance sampling scheme which significantly speeds up the otherwise slow Monte Carlo approach. Finally, we design a new memory efficient solution for the specimen-level interior problem of cryoET, removing all associated artifacts. PMID:25659894

  9. Experimental cryo-irrigation of the knee joint.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S C; Helal, B; Revell, P A; Brocklehurst, R; Currey, H L

    1986-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to test the feasibility of using cryo-irrigation as a means of ablating the synovium in the rheumatoid knee joint. Cryo-irrigation was performed by a cooling machine and pump, which circulated cold 200/10 centistoke (cSt) silicone through the knee joint of rabbits anaesthetised with intravenous (IV) 'Saffan'. Fluid left the joint at -5 to -10 degrees C. Sixteen normal New Zealand rabbits received cryo-irrigation of one knee joint for 10-20 minutes and were killed at one day, and one, two, and 12 weeks thereafter. Judged by radioactive sulphate incorporation there was no impairment of chondrocyte function in the articular cartilage of irrigated joints. Histological examination showed mild synovitis and some loss of staining of superficial cartilage in 6/16 irrigated joints (v 1/16 control joints). Similar treatment of rabbit joints in which the Glynn model of synovitis had been induced showed marked reduction of synovitis 14-45 days after silicone treatment. Nine of 26 animals in which synovitis was induced in both knees and cryo-irrigation performed in one knee died either immediately postoperatively or during the next week. These deaths remain unexplained. A single dog received cryo-irrigation of one knee (-6 to -9 degrees C for 22 min) and remained perfectly well up to sacrifice at six months, when the joint appeared histologically completely normal. Images PMID:3789821

  10. CryoEDM: A cryogenic experiment to measure the neutron electric dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grinten, M. G. D.; CryoEDM Collaboration; Balashov, S. N.; Francis, V.; Green, K.; Iaydjiev, P. S.; Ivanov, S. N.; Khazov, A.; Tucker, M. A. H.; Wark, D. L.; Davidson, A.; Hardiman, M.; Harris, P. G.; Katsika, K.; Pendlebury, J. M.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Shiers, D. B.; Smith, P.; Townsley, C.; Wardell, I.; Clarke, C.; Henry, S.; Kraus, H.; McCann, M.; Geltenbort, P.; Yoshiki, Y.

    2009-12-01

    CryoEDM is an experiment that aims to measure the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron to a precision of 10 -28 e cm. A description of CryoEDM, the apparatus, technologies and commissioning is presented.

  11. 76 FR 4338 - Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshops

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ...Strategies for Compressed & Cryo- Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshops AGENCY: Fuel Cell...Laboratory, in conjunction with the Hydrogen Storage team of the EERE Fuel Cell Technologies...workshops on compressed and cryo-compressed hydrogen storage in the Washington, DC...

  12. Magnetic nanohybrids loaded with bimetal core-shell-shell nanorods for bacteria capture, separation, and near-infrared photothermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Wang, Ning; Han, Lu; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-04-20

    A novel antimicrobial nanohybrid based on near-infrared (NIR) photothermal conversion is designed for bacteria capture, separation, and sterilization (killing). Positively charged magnetic reduced graphene oxide with modification by polyethylenimine (rGO-Fe3 O4 -PEI) is prepared and then loaded with core-shell-shell Au-Ag-Au nanorods to construct the nanohybrid rGO-Fe3 O4 -Au-Ag-Au. NIR laser irradiation melts the outer Au shell and exposes the inner Ag shell, which facilitates controlled release of the silver shell. The nanohybrids combine physical photothermal sterilization as a result of the outer Au shell with the antibacterial effect of the inner Ag shell. In addition, the nanohybrid exhibits high heat conductivity because of the rGO and rapid magnetic-separation capability that is attributable to Fe3 O4 . The nanohybrid provides a significant improvement of bactericidal efficiency with respect to bare Au-Ag-Au nanorods and facilitates the isolation of bacteria from sample matrixes. A concentration of 25 ?g mL(-1) of nanohybrid causes 100 % capture and separation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (1×10(8) cfu mL(-1) ) from an aqueous medium in 10 min. In addition, it causes a 22 °C temperature rise for the surrounding solution under NIR irradiation (785 nm, 50 mW cm(-2) ) for 10 min. With magnetic separation, 30 ?g mL(-1) of nanohybrid results in a 100 % killing rate for E. coli O157:H7 cells. The facile bacteria separation and photothermal sterilization is potentially feasible for environmental and/or clinical treatment. PMID:25754902

  13. Magnetically separable Ag3PO4/NiFe2O4 composites with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Patil, Santosh S; Tamboli, Mohaseen S; Deonikar, Virendrakumar G; Umarji, Govind G; Ambekar, Jalindar D; Kulkarni, Milind V; Kolekar, Sanjay S; Kale, Bharat B; Patil, Deepak R

    2015-12-21

    Magnetically separable Ag3PO4/NiFe2O4 (APO/NFO) composites were prepared by an in situ precipitation method. The photocatalytic activity of photocatalysts consisting of different APO/NFO mass ratios was evaluated by degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. The excellent photocatalytic activity was observed using APO/NFO5 (5% NFO) composites with good cycling stability which is higher than that of pure Ag3PO4 and NiFe2O4. All the APO/NFO composites showed good magnetic behavior, which makes them magnetically separable after reaction and reusable for several experiments. Photoconductivities of pure and composite samples were examined to study the photoresponse characteristics. The current intensity greatly enhanced by loading NFO to APO. Furthermore, the photocatalytic performance of the samples is correlated with the conductivity of the samples. The enhancement in the photocatalytic activity of APO/NFO composites for MB degradation is attributed to the excellent conductivity of APO/NFO composites through the co-catalytic effect of NFO by providing accelerated charge separation through the n-n interface. PMID:26508302

  14. Pathogen detection in complex samples by quartz crystal microbalance sensor coupled to aptamer functionalized core-shell type magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Ozalp, Veli C; Bayramoglu, Gulay; Erdem, Zehra; Arica, M Yakup

    2015-01-01

    A quartz crystal microbalance sensor (QCM) was developed for sensitive and specific detection of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium cells in food samples by integrating a magnetic bead purification system. Although many sensor formats based on bioaffinity agents have been developed for sensitive and specific detection of bacterial cells, the development of robust sensor applications for food samples remained a challenging issue. A viable strategy would be to integrate QCM to a pre-purification system. Here, we report a novel and sensitive high throughput strategy which combines an aptamer-based magnetic separation system for rapid enrichment of target pathogens and a QCM analysis for specific and real-time monitoring. As a proof-of-concept study, the integration of Salmonella binding aptamer immobilized magnetic beads to the aptamer-based QCM system was reported in order to develop a method for selective detection of Salmonella. Since our magnetic separation system can efficiently capture cells in a relatively short processing time (less than 10 min), feeding captured bacteria to a QCM flow cell system showed specific detection of Salmonella cells at 100 CFU mL(-1) from model food sample (i.e., milk). Subsequent treatment of the QCM crystal surface with NaOH solution regenerated the aptamer-sensor allowing each crystal to be used several times. PMID:25467500

  15. Training effects induced by cycling of magnetic field in ferromagnetic rich phase-separated nanocomposite manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kalipada; Das, I.

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out an experimental investigation of magneto-transport and magnetic properties of charge-ordered Pr0.67Ca0.33MnO3 (PCMO) and ferromagnetic La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) nanoparticles along with a nanocomposite consisting of those two types of nanoparticles. From the magneto-transport measurements, clear irreversibility is observed in the field dependence of resistance due to magnetic field cycling in the case of PCMO nanoparticles. The value of resistance increases during such a field cycling. However such an irreversibility is absent in the case of LSMO nanoparticles as well as nanocomposites. On the other hand, the magnetic measurements indicate the gradual growth of antiferromagnetic phases in all samples leading to a decrease in magnetization. These inconsistencies between magneto-transport and magnetic behaviors are attributed to the magnetic training effects.

  16. Monitoring the Stability of Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions by Cryo-TEM Image Analysis and Dynamic Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Grapentin, Christoph; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFC-NE) are disperse systems consisting of nanoscale liquid perfluorocarbon droplets stabilized by an emulsifier, usually phospholipids. Perfluorocarbons are chemically inert and non-toxic substances that are exhaled after in vivo administration. The manufacture of PFC-NE can be done in large scales by means of high pressure homogenization or microfluidization. Originally investigated as oxygen carriers for cases of severe blood loss, their application nowadays is more focused on using them as marker agents in 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging (19F MRI). 19F is scarce in organisms and thus PFC-NE are a promising tool for highly specific and non-invasive imaging of inflammation via 19F MRI. Neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages phagocytize PFC-NE and subsequently migrate to inflamed tissues. This technique has proven feasibility in numerous disease models in mice, rabbits and mini pigs. The translation to clinical trials in human needs the development of a stable nanoemulsion whose droplet size is well characterized over a long storage time. Usually dynamic light scattering (DLS) is applied as the standard method for determining particle sizes in the nanometer range. Our study uses a second method, analysis of transmission electron microscopy images of cryo-fixed samples (Cryo-TEM), to evaluate stability of PFC-NE in comparison to DLS. Four nanoemulsions of different composition are observed for one year. The results indicate that DLS alone cannot reveal the changes in particle size, but can even mislead to a positive estimation of stability. The combination with Cryo-TEM images gives more insight in the particulate evolution, both techniques supporting one another. The study is one further step in the development of analytical tools for the evaluation of a clinically applicable perfluorooctylbromide nanoemulsion. PMID:26098661

  17. 3D Structure Determination of Native Mammalian Cells using Cryo-FIB and Cryo-electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Strunk, Korrinn; Zhao, Gongpu; Gray, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Peijun

    2012-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) has enabled high resolution three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis of virus and host cell interactions and many cell signaling events; these studies, however, have largely been limited to very thin, peripheral regions of eukaryotic cells or to small prokaryotic cells. Recent efforts to make thin, vitreous sections using cryo-ultramicrotomy have been successful, however, this method is technically very challenging and with many artifacts. Here, we report a simple and robust method for creating in situ, frozen-hydrated cell lamellas using a focused ion beam at cryogenic temperature (cryo-FIB), allowing access to any interior cellular regions of interest. We demonstrate the utility of cryo-FIB with high resolution 3D cellular structures from both bacterial cells and large mammalian cells. The method will not only facilitate high-throughput 3D structural analysis of biological specimens, but is also broadly applicable to sample preparation of thin films and surface materials without the need for FIB “lift-out”. PMID:22796867

  18. Fluorescence cryo-microscopy: current challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Rainer; Hagen, Christoph; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Studying biological structures with fine details does not only require a microscope with high resolution, but also a sample preparation process that preserves the structures in a near-native state. Live-cell imaging is restricted mostly to the field of light microscopy. For studies requiring much higher resolution, fast freezing techniques (vitrification) are successfully used to immobilize the sample in a near-native state for imaging with electron and X-ray cryo-microscopy. Fluorescence cryo-microscopy combines imaging of vitrified samples with the advantages of fluorescence labeling of biological structures. Technical considerations as well as the behavior of fluorophores at low temperatures have to be taken into account for developing or adapting super-resolution methods under cryo conditions to exploit the full potential of this technique. PMID:24951858

  19. Biological Cryo-Atomic Force Microscopy: Instrumentation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Sitong; Shao, Zhifeng

    1998-06-01

    Although atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been successfully applied to a number of biological specimens under aqueous solution, its resolving power has been limited due to specimen deformation or damage induced by the scanning tip, especially with large flexible and heterogeneous specimens. To further expand the capabilities of the AFM, a cryo-AFM was recently developed to operate under ambient pressure in liquid nitrogen vapor. The operating principle of this novel system is discussed, and some of the most recent applications of the cryo-AFM to various biological specimens are reviewed. These results have clearly demonstrated the power of the cryo-AFM in the study of biological structures, and at the same time, have revealed novel structural information of several important molecules.

  20. Cryo-Electron-Microscopy Reconstruction of Partially Symmetric Objects Michael G. Rossmann1 and Yizhi Tao

    E-print Network

    Tao, Yizhi Jane

    Cryo-Electron-Microscopy Reconstruction of Partially Symmetric Objects Michael G. Rossmann1. 1999 Academic Press Key Words: electron microscopy; image reconstruc- tion; noncrystallographic the advent of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo- EM). A vast amount of information has been gath- ered

  1. The Structure of the Aquaporin-1 Water Channel: A Comparison between Cryo-electron Microscopy and

    E-print Network

    de Groot, Bert

    The Structure of the Aquaporin-1 Water Channel: A Comparison between Cryo-electron Microscopy and X been solved by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo- EM) during the last two years. Recently, the structure for the channel structure, when three groups independently presented low resolution (electron microscopy

  2. JWST pathfinder telescope risk reduction cryo test program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Scorse, Thomas R.; Spina, John A.; Noël, Darin M.; Havey, Keith A.; Huguet, Jesse A.; Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Walker, Chanda B.; Lunt, Sharon; Hadaway, James B.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee D.; Voyton, Mark F.; Lander, Juli A.; Marsh, James M.

    2015-08-01

    In 2014, the Optical Ground Support Equipment was integrated into the large cryo vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center (JSC) and an initial Chamber Commissioning Test was completed. This insured that the support equipment was ready for the three Pathfinder telescope cryo tests. The Pathfinder telescope which consists of two primary mirror segment assemblies and the secondary mirror was delivered to JSC in February 2015 in support of this critical risk reduction test program prior to the flight hardware. This paper will detail the Chamber Commissioning and first optical test of the JWST Pathfinder telescope.

  3. Structural analysis of multicellular organisms with cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Harapin, Jan; Börmel, Mandy; Sapra, K Tanuj; Brunner, Damian; Kaech, Andres; Medalia, Ohad

    2015-07-01

    We developed a method for visualizing tissues from multicellular organisms using cryo-electron tomography. Our protocol involves vitrifying samples with high-pressure freezing, thinning them with cryo-FIB-SEM (focused-ion-beam scanning electron microscopy) and applying fiducial gold markers under cryogenic conditions to the lamellae post-milling. We applied this protocol to acquire tomograms of vitrified Caenorhabditis elegans embryos and worms, which showed the intracellular organization of selected tissues at particular developmental stages in otherwise intact specimens. PMID:25961413

  4. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoshells: combining two-photon luminescence imaging, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiulong; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Shanshan; Kong, Ni; Xu, Hong; Fu, Qihua; Gu, Hongchen; Ye, Jian

    2014-11-01

    With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have constructed a novel type of core-shell superparamagnetic nanoshell (Fe?O?@SiO?@Au), composed of a Fe?O? cluster core, a thin Au shell and a SiO? layer in between. The obtained multifunctional nanoparticles combine the magnetic properties and plasmonic optical properties effectively, which were well investigated by a number of experimental characterization methods and theoretical simulations. We have demonstrated that Fe?O?@SiO?@Au nanoparticles can be utilized for two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering (NIR SERS) and cell collection by magnetic separation. The TPL intensity could be further greatly enhanced through the plasmon coupling effect in the self-assembled nanoparticle chains, which were triggered by an external magnetic field. In addition, Fe?O?@SiO?@Au nanoparticles may have great potential applications such as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photo-thermotherapy. Successful combination of multifunctions including magnetic response, biosensing and bioimaging in single nanoparticles allows further manipulation, real-time tracking, and intracellular molecule analysis of live cells at a single-cell level. PMID:25329447

  5. Purification of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) using magnetic ion exchange adsorbents in combination with high-gradient magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Heidenreich, Elena; Franzreb, Matthias; Frankenfeld, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Current purification of the glycoprotein equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) from horse serum includes consecutive precipitation steps beginning with metaphosphoric acid pH fractionation, two ethanol precipitation steps, and dialysis followed by a numerous of fixed-bed chromatography steps up to the specific activity required. A promising procedure for a more economic purification procedure represents a simplified precipitation process requiring only onethird of the solvent, followed by the usage of magnetic ion exchange adsorbents employed together with a newly designed 'rotor-stator' type High Gradient Magnetic Fishing (HGMF) system for large-scale application, currently up to 100 g of magnetic adsorbents. Initially, the separation process design was optimized for binding and elution conditions for the target protein in mL scale. Subsequently, the magnetic filter for particle separation was characterized. Based on these results, a purification process for eCG was designed consisting of (i) pretreatment of the horse serum; (ii) binding of the target protein to magnetic ion exchange adsorbents in a batch reactor; (iii) recovery of loaded functionalized adsorbents from the pretreated solution using HGMF; (iv) washing of loaded adsorbents to remove unbound proteins; (v) elution of the target protein. Finally, the complete HGMF process was automated and conducted with either multiple single-cycles or multicycle operation of four sequential cycles, using batches of pretreated serum of up to 20 L. eCG purification with yields of approximately 53% from single HGMF cycles and up to 80% from multicycle experiments were reached, with purification and concentration factors of around 2,500 and 6.7, respectively. PMID:25393845

  6. Influence of magnetic nanoparticle size on the particle dispersion and phase separation in an ABA triblock copolymer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinrong; Li, Hui; Wu, Siduo; Huang, Guangsu; Xing, Wang; Tang, Maozhu; Fu, Qiang

    2014-02-27

    Oleic acid modified iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) with different sizes were synthesized and mixed with styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer (SBS) with a lamellar structure. The octadecene segments on the oleic acid molecules have chemical affinity with the polybutadiene (PB) blocks, which makes IONs tend to be selectively confined in the microphase-separated PB domains. However, the dispersion state strongly depends on the ratio of the particle diameter (d) to the lamellar thickness (l) of the PB domains, which further changes the phase separation of SBS. When d/l ?0.5, most of IONs are concentrated in the middle of the PB layers at low particle loading. Upon increasing the particle loading, part of IONs contact each other to form long strings due to their strong magnetic interactions. Away from the strings, IONs are either selectively dispersed in the middle and at the interfaces of the PB domains, or randomly distributed at some regions in which the phase separation of SBS is suppressed. The phase separation of SBS transforms from the lamellar structure to a cylinder structure when the IONs loading is higher than 16.7 wt %. As d is comparable to l, IONs aggregate to form clusters of 100 to 300 nm in size, but within the clusters IONs are still selectively dispersed in the PB domains instead of forming macroscopic phase separation. It is interpreted in terms of the relatively small conformational entropy of the middle blocks of SBS; thus, incorporation of nanoparticles does not lead to much loss of conformational entropy. Although incorporation of IONs with d/l ?1 significantly increases the interfacial curvature and roughness, it has less influence on the phase separation structure of SBS due to the inhomogeneous dispersion. When d is larger than l, IONs are macroscopically separated from the SBS matrix to form clusters of hundreds of nanometers to several micrometers. More interestingly, the phase separation of SBS transforms from the lamellar structure to a two-phase co-continuous structure, probably due to the rearrangement of SBS molecules to cover the clusters with PB segments and the strong magnetic interaction exerting additional force on the SBS matrix during the evaporation of the solvent and the subsequent thermal annealing process. PMID:24479376

  7. Spinel type CoFe oxide porous nanosheets as magnetic adsorbents with fast removal ability and facile separation.

    PubMed

    Ge, X; Gu, C D; Wang, X L; Tu, J P

    2015-09-15

    Adsorption is often time consuming due to slow diffusion kinetic. Sizing he adsorbent down might help to accelerate adsorption. For CoFe spinel oxide, a magnetically separable adsorbent, the preparation of nanosheets faces many challenges including phase separation, grain growth and difficulty in preparing two-dimensional materials. In this work, we prepared porous CoFe oxide nanosheet with chemical formula of Co2.698Fe0.302O4 through topochemical transformation of a CoFe precursor, which has a layered double hydroxide (LDH) analogue structure and a large interlayer spacing. The LDH precursor was synthesized from a cheap deep eutectic solvent (DES) system. The calcined Co2.698Fe0.302O4 has small grain size (10-20nm), nanosheet morphology, and porous structure, which contribute to a large specific surface area of 79.5m(2)g(-1). The Co2.698Fe0.302O4 nanosheets show fast removal ability and good adsorption capacity for both organic waste (305mgg(-1) in 5min for Congo red) and toxic heavy metal ion (5.27mgg(-1) in 30min for Cr (VI)). Furthermore, the Co2.698Fe0.302O4 can be separated magnetically. Considering the precursor can be prepared through a fast, simple, surfactant-free and high-yield synthetic strategy, this work should have practical significance in fabricating adsorbents. PMID:26005799

  8. 3.88 A structure of cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuekui; Jin, Lei; Zhou, Z Hong

    2008-05-15

    Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (CPV) is unique within the Reoviridae family in having a turreted single-layer capsid contained within polyhedrin inclusion bodies, yet being fully capable of cell entry and endogenous RNA transcription. Biochemical data have shown that the amino-terminal 79 residues of the CPV turret protein (TP) is sufficient to bring CPV or engineered proteins into the polyhedrin matrix for micro-encapsulation. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of CPV at 3.88 A resolution using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. Our map clearly shows the turns and deep grooves of alpha-helices, the strand separation in beta-sheets, and densities for loops and many bulky side chains; thus permitting atomic model-building effort from cryo-electron microscopy maps. We observed a helix-to-beta-hairpin conformational change between the two conformational states of the capsid shell protein in the region directly interacting with genomic RNA. We have also discovered a messenger RNA release hole coupled with the mRNA capping machinery unique to CPV. Furthermore, we have identified the polyhedrin-binding domain, a structure that has potential in nanobiotechnology applications. PMID:18449192

  9. Cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wang, HongWei

    2015-08-01

    Recently, significant technical breakthroughs in both hardware equipment and software algorithms have enabled cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to become one of the most important techniques in biological structural analysis. The technical aspects of cryo-EM define its unique advantages and the direction of development. As a rapidly emerging field, cryo-EM has benefitted from highly interdisciplinary research efforts. Here we review the current status of cryo-EM in the context of structural biology and discuss the technical challenges. It may eventually merge structural and cell biology at multiple scales. PMID:25894285

  10. Natural circulation loop using liquid nitrogen for cryo-detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yeon Suk

    2014-01-29

    The natural circulation loop is designed for the cryogenic insert in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Sensitivity is the key parameter of a FTICR mass spectrometer and the cryo-cooling of the pre-amplifier can reduce the thermal noise level and thereby improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The pre-amplifier consisted of non-magnetic materials is thermally connected to the cooling loop which is passing through the flange maintaining ultra-high vacuum in the ion cell. The liquid nitrogen passes through inside of the loop to cool the pre-amplifier indirectly. At the end, a cryocooler is located to re-condense nitrogen vapor generated due to the heat from the pre-amplifier. The circulating fluid removes heat from the pre-amplifier and transports it to the cryocooler or heat sink. In this paper the natural circulation loop for cryogenic pre-amplifier is introduced for improving the sensitivity of cryo-detector. In addition, the initial cool-down of the system by a cryocooler is presented and the temperature of the radiation shield is discussed with respect to the thickness of shield and the thermal radiation load.

  11. Navigation for fluoroscopy-guided cryo-balloon ablation procedures of atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourier, Felix; Brost, Alexander; Kleinoeder, Andreas; Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Koch, Martin; Kiraly, Attila; Schneider, Hans-Juergen; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert; Kurzidim, Klaus

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common arrhythmia, has been identified as a major cause of stroke. The current standard in interventional treatment of AFib is the pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). PVI is guided by fluoroscopy or non-fluoroscopic electro-anatomic mapping systems (EAMS). Either classic point-to-point radio-frequency (RF)- catheter ablation or so-called single-shot-devices like cryo-balloons are used to achieve electrically isolation of the pulmonary veins and the left atrium (LA). Fluoroscopy-based systems render overlay images from pre-operative 3-D data sets which are then merged with fluoroscopic imaging, thereby adding detailed 3-D information to conventional fluoroscopy. EAMS provide tracking and visualization of RF catheters by means of electro-magnetic tracking. Unfortunately, current navigation systems, fluoroscopy-based or EAMS, do not provide tools to localize and visualize single shot devices like cryo-balloon catheters in 3-D. We present a prototype software for fluoroscopy-guided ablation procedures that is capable of superimposing 3-D datasets as well as reconstructing cyro-balloon catheters in 3-D. The 3-D cyro-balloon reconstruction was evaluated on 9 clinical data sets, yielded a reprojected 2-D error of 1.72 mm +/- 1.02 mm.

  12. Manipulation of magnetic phase separation and orbital occupancy in manganites by strain engineering and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Bin; Song, Cheng; Pan, Feng; Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE) Team

    2015-03-01

    The modification of electronic phases in correlated oxides is one of the core issues of condensed matter. We report the reversible control of ferromagnetic phase transition in manganite films by ionic liquid gating, replicating the La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSMO) phase diagram. The formation and annihilation of an insulating and magnetically hard phase in the soft magnetic matrix, which randomly nucleates and grows across the film, is directly observed under different gate voltages (VG) . The realization of reversible metal-insulator transition in colossal magnetoresistance materials can lead to the development of four-state memories. The orbital occupancy and magnetic anisotropy of LSMO films are manipulated by VG in a reversible and quantitative manner. Positive and negative VG increases and reduces the occupancy of the orbital and magnetic anisotropy that were initially favored by strain (irrespective of tensile and compressive), respectively. This finding fills in the blank of electrical manipulation of four degrees of freedom in correlated system.

  13. Investigation of Cryo-Cooled Microcoils for MRI 

    E-print Network

    Godley, Richard Franklin

    2012-10-19

    (microcoils) can be easily fabricated on chip and placed adjacent to a sample under test. However, the high series resistance of microcoils limits the SNR due to the thermal noise generated in the copper. Cryo-cooling is a potential technique to reduce thermal...

  14. A Magnetically Separable, Highly Stable Enzyme System Based on Nanocomposites of Enzymes and Magnetic Nanoparticles Shipped in Hierarchically Ordered, Mesocellular, Mesoporous Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungbae; Lee, Jinwoo; Na, Hyon Bin; Kim, Byoung Chan; Youn, Jongkyu; Kwak, Ja Hun; Moon, Karam; Lee, Eunwoong; Kim, Jaeyun; Park, Jongnam; Dohnalkova, Alice; Park, Hyun-Gyu; Gu, Man Bock; Chang, Ho Nam; Grate, Jay W.; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2005-12-01

    Enzymes are versatile nanoscale biocatalysts, and find increasing applications in many areas, including organic synthesis[1-3] and bioremediation.[4-5] However, the application of enzymes is often hampered by the short catalytic lifetime of enzymes and by the difficulty in recovery and recycling. To solve these problems, there have been a lot of efforts to develop effective enzyme immobilization techniques. Recent advances in nanotechnology provide more diverse materials and approaches for enzyme immobilization. For example, mesoporous materials offer potential advantages as a host of enzymes due to their well-controlled porosity and large surface area for the immobilization of enzymes.[6,7] On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that enzymes attached on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can be easily recovered using a magnet and recycled for iterative uses.[8] In this paper, we report the development of magnetically-separable and highly-stable enzyme system by the combined use of two different kinds of nanostructured materials: magnetic nanoparticles and mesoporous silica.

  15. Interplay of magnetic order, pairing, and phase separation in a one-dimensional spin-fermion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenjian; Scalettar, Richard T.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2015-09-01

    We consider a lattice model of itinerant electrons coupled to an array of localized classical Heisenberg spins. The nature of the ground-state-ordered magnetic phases that result from the indirect spin-spin coupling mediated by the electrons is determined as a function of density and the spin-fermion coupling J . At a fixed chemical potential, spiral phases exist only up to values of J which are less than roughly half the electronic bandwidth. At a fixed electron density and near half filling, the system phase-separates into a half-filled antiferromagnetic phase and a spiral phase. The ferromagnetic phases are shown to be fully polarized, while the spiral phases have equal admixture of up and down spins. Phase separation survives in the presence of weak pairing field ? but disappears when ? exceeds a critical value ?c. If pairing fields are large enough, an additional spiral state arises at strong coupling J . The relevance of this study, especially the phase separation, to artificially engineered systems of adjacent itinerant electrons and localized spins is discussed. In particular, we propose a method which might allow for the braiding of Majorana fermions by changing the density and moving their location as they are pulled along by a phase separation boundary.

  16. Magnetic separation for a continuous solar-two-step thermochemical cycle for solar hydrogen/CO production using ferrites

    E-print Network

    Arias, Francisco J.; Parks, Geoffrey T.

    2015-05-21

    of windings r Radial distance t Time S Separation ratio T Temperature V Volume of particle z Axial coordinate Greek symbols a Ratio of Zeeman energy to thermal energy l0 Vacuum permeability lB Bohr magneton q Density particle H Curie temperature Subscripts c... particles crossing the small cavity between the top and bottom chambers, the maximum dis- placement of the magnetic particles during the combined effect of these forces must be less than the characteristic length of the cavity, or mathematically: F~g þ F...

  17. Rapid purification and characterization of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from lizard fish protein hydrolysates with magnetic affinity separation.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiongdiao; Liao, Dankui; Wu, Shanguang; Wang, Feng; Sun, Jianhua; Tong, Zhangfa

    2015-09-01

    In this study, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from lizard fish protein hydrolysate with neutral protease were purified through magnetic affinity separation. Magnetic agarose microsphere was prepared by reverse-phase microemulsion method, and its surface was modified with epoxy groups to immobilize ACE as a magnetic affinity medium (MAM-ACE) and then mixed with lizard fish ultrafiltration hydrolysate (<5 kDa). The MAM-ACE was recovered by a magnet. The bound peptides were released by 1M NaCl and further purified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The amino acid sequence of the peptide with the highest ACE inhibitory activity was identified as Gly-Met-Lys-Cys-Ala-Phe, and its IC50 was 45.7 ± 1.1 ?M. The result indicates that MAM-ACE is a faster and more efficient method for purifying micro-bioactive peptides from food protein complex mixtures compared with ion exchange and gel chromatography. PMID:25842319

  18. New high performance hybrid magnet plates for DNA separation andbio-technology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, David; Pollard, Martin; Elkin, Chris; Petermann, Karl; Reiter, Charles; Cepeda, Mario

    2004-08-02

    A new class of magnet plates for biological and industrial applications has recently been developed at the D.O.E. Joint Genome Institute and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (JGI/LBNL). These devices utilize hybrid technology that combines linear permanent magnet material and ferromagnetic material to produce significantly higher fields and gradients than currently available commercial magnet plates. These hybrid structures incorporate ferromagnetic poles that can be easily shaped to produce complex field distributions for specialized applications. The higher maximum fields and strong gradients of the hybrid structures result in greater holding forces on magnetized targets that are being processed as well as faster draw-down. Current development versions of these magnet plates have exhibited maximum fields in excess of 9000.0 Gauss. The design of these structures is easily scalable to allow for field increases to significantly above 1.0 tesla (10000.0gauss). Author's note: 11000.0 Gauss peak fields have been achieved as of January 2005.

  19. Magnetically separable Cu2O/chitosan-Fe3O4 nanocomposites: Preparation, characterization and visible-light photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chunhua; Xiao, Ling; Chen, Chunhua; Cao, Qihua

    2015-04-01

    A novel magnetically-separable visible-light-induced photocatalyst, Cu2O/chitosan-Fe3O4 nanocomposite (Cu2O/CS-Fe3O4 NC), was prepared via a facile one-step precipitation-reduction process by using magnetic chitosan chelating copper ions as precursor. The structure and properties of Cu2O/CS-Fe3O4 NCs were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, SEM, HRTEM, SAED, EDS, BET, VSM, XPS and UV-vis/DRS. The photocatalytic activity of Cu2O/CS-Fe3O4 NCs was evaluated by decolorization of reactive brilliant red X-3B (X-3B) under visible light irradiation. The characterization results indicated that Cu2O/CS-Fe3O4 NCs exhibited relatively large specific surface areas and special dimodal pore structure because Cu2O was wrapped in chitosan matrix embedded with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The tight combination of magnetic Fe3O4 and semiconductor Cu2O through chitosan made the nanocomposites show good superparamagnetism and photocatalytic activity. It was found that X-3B could be decolorized more efficiently in acidic media than in neutral or alkaline media. The decolorization of X-3B was ascribed to the synergistic effect of photocatalysis and adsorption. Cu2O/CS-Fe3O4 NCs could be easily separated from the solution by an external magnet, and the decolorization rates of X-3B were still above 87% after five reaction cycles, indicating that Cu2O/CS-Fe3O4 NCs had excellent reusability and stability.

  20. Microcystin-LR removal from aqueous solutions using a magnetically separable N-doped TiO2 nanocomposite under visible light irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of magnetically separable N-doped TiO2 was found to be significantly improved when compared with a non-magnetic N-doped TiO2 for the aqueous removal of cyanotoxin Microcystin-LR. The observed enhanced photocatalytic activity may be related to the presence of ferri...

  1. Magnetic and noble metal nanocomposites for separation and optical detection of biological species.

    PubMed

    Bagga, K; Brougham, D F; Keyes, T E; Brabazon, D

    2015-11-14

    Nanoalloys and nanocomposites are widely studied classes of nanomaterials within the context of biological systems. They are of immense interest because of the possibility of tuning the optical, magnetic, electronic and chemical properties through particle composition and internal architecture. In principle these properties can therefore be optimized for application in biological detections such as of DNA sequences, bacteria, viruses, antibodies, antigens, and cancer cells. This article presents an overview of methods currently used for nanoalloy and nanocomposite synthesis and characterisation, focusing on Au-Ag and FexOy@Au structures as primary components in detection platforms for plasmonic and magnetically enabled plasmonic bio-sensing. PMID:26024367

  2. High-resolution structure of the Shigella type-III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Kumar Vasa, Suresh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the type-III secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4?Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent data set of 691 ssNMR constraints and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N terminus, which occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation.

  3. Studies in matter antimatter separation and in the origin of lunar magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, W. A.; Greeley, R.; Parkin, C.; Aggarwal, H.; Schultz, P.

    1975-01-01

    A progress report, covering lunar and planetary research is introduced. Data cover lunar ionospheric models, lunar and planetary geology, and lunar magnetism. Wind tunnel simulations of Mars aeolian problems and a comparative study of basaltic analogs of Lunar and Martial volcanic features was discussed.

  4. CryoSat Plus For Oceans: an ESA Project for CryoSat-2 Data Exploitation Over Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, J.; Cotton, D.; Clarizia, M.; Roca, M.; Gommenginger, C. P.; Naeije, M. C.; Labroue, S.; Picot, N.; Fernandes, J.; Andersen, O. B.; Cancet, M.; Dinardo, S.; Lucas, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    The ESA CryoSat-2 mission is the first space mission to carry a space-borne radar altimeter that is able to operate in the conventional pulsewidth-limited (LRM) mode and in the novel Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode. Although the prime objective of the Cryosat-2 mission is dedicated to monitoring land and marine ice, the SAR mode capability of the Cryosat-2 SIRAL altimeter also presents the possibility of demonstrating significant potential benefits of SAR altimetry for ocean applications, based on expected performance enhancements which include improved range precision and finer along track spatial resolution. With this scope in mind, the "CryoSat Plus for Oceans" (CP4O) Project, dedicated to the exploitation of CryoSat-2 Data over ocean, supported by the ESA STSE (Support To Science Element) programme, brings together an expert European consortium comprising: DTU Space, isardSAT, National Oceanography Centre , Noveltis, SatOC, Starlab, TU Delft, the University of Porto and CLS (supported by CNES),. The objectives of CP4O are: - to build a sound scientific basis for new scientific and operational applications of Cryosat-2 data over the open ocean, polar ocean, coastal seas and for sea-floor mapping. - to generate and evaluate new methods and products that will enable the full exploitation of the capabilities of the Cryosat-2 SIRAL altimeter , and extend their application beyond the initial mission objectives. - to ensure that the scientific return of the Cryosat-2 mission is maximised. In particular four themes will be addressed: -Open Ocean Altimetry: Combining GOCE Geoid Model with CryoSat Oceanographic LRM Products for the retrieval of CryoSat MSS/MDT model over open ocean surfaces and for analysis of mesoscale and large scale prominent open ocean features. Under this priority the project will also foster the exploitation of the finer resolution and higher SNR of novel CryoSat SAR Data to detect short spatial scale open ocean features. -High Resolution Polar Ocean Altimetry: Combination of GOCE Geoid Model with CryoSat Oceanographic SAR Products over polar oceans for the retrieval of CryoSat MSS/MDT and currents circulations system improving the polar tides models and studying the coupling between blowing wind and current pattern. -High Resolution Coastal Zone Altimetry: Exploitation of the finer resolution and higher SNR of novel CryoSat SAR Data to get the radar altimetry closer to the shore exploiting the SARIn mode for the discrimination of off-nadir land targets (e.g. steep cliffs) in the radar footprint from nadir sea return. -High Resolution Sea-Floor Altimetry: Exploitation of the finer resolution and higher SNR of novel CryoSat SAR Data to resolve the weak short-wavelength sea surface signals caused by sea-floor topography elements and to map uncharted sea-mounts/trenches. One of the first project activities is the consolidation of preliminary scientific requirements for the four themes under investigation. This paper will present the CP4O project content and objectives and will address the first initial results from the on-going work to define the scientific requirements.

  5. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoshells: combining two-photon luminescence imaging, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiulong; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Shanshan; Kong, Ni; Xu, Hong; Fu, Qihua; Gu, Hongchen; Ye, Jian

    2014-11-01

    With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have constructed a novel type of core-shell superparamagnetic nanoshell (Fe3O4@SiO2@Au), composed of a Fe3O4 cluster core, a thin Au shell and a SiO2 layer in between. The obtained multifunctional nanoparticles combine the magnetic properties and plasmonic optical properties effectively, which were well investigated by a number of experimental characterization methods and theoretical simulations. We have demonstrated that Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles can be utilized for two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering (NIR SERS) and cell collection by magnetic separation. The TPL intensity could be further greatly enhanced through the plasmon coupling effect in the self-assembled nanoparticle chains, which were triggered by an external magnetic field. In addition, Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles may have great potential applications such as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photo-thermotherapy. Successful combination of multifunctions including magnetic response, biosensing and bioimaging in single nanoparticles allows further manipulation, real-time tracking, and intracellular molecule analysis of live cells at a single-cell level.With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have constructed a novel type of core-shell superparamagnetic nanoshell (Fe3O4@SiO2@Au), composed of a Fe3O4 cluster core, a thin Au shell and a SiO2 layer in between. The obtained multifunctional nanoparticles combine the magnetic properties and plasmonic optical properties effectively, which were well investigated by a number of experimental characterization methods and theoretical simulations. We have demonstrated that Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles can be utilized for two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering (NIR SERS) and cell collection by magnetic separation. The TPL intensity could be further greatly enhanced through the plasmon coupling effect in the self-assembled nanoparticle chains, which were triggered by an external magnetic field. In addition, Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles may have great potential applications such as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photo-thermotherapy. Successful combination of multifunctions including magnetic response, biosensing and bioimaging in single nanoparticles allows further manipulation, real-time tracking, and intracellular molecule analysis of live cells at a single-cell level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04111a

  6. Well-defined nanostructured surface-imprinted polymers for highly selective magnetic separation of fluoroquinolones in human urine.

    PubMed

    He, Yonghuan; Huang, Yanyan; Jin, Yulong; Liu, Xiangjun; Liu, Guoquan; Zhao, Rui

    2014-06-25

    The construction of molecularly imprinted polymers on magnetic nanoparticles gives access to smart materials with dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the superparamagnetic surface-molecularly imprinted nanoparticles were prepared via surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using ofloxacin (OFX) as template for the separation of fluoroquinolones (FQs). Benefiting from the living/controlled nature of RAFT reaction, distinct core-shell structure was successfully constructed. The highly uniform nanoscale MIP layer was homogeneously grafted on the surface of RAFT agent TTCA modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, which favors the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The target binding assays demonstrate the desirable adsorption capacity and imprinting efficiency of Fe3O4@MIP. High selectivity of Fe3O4@MIP toward FQs (ofloxacin, pefloxacin, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and gatifloxacin) was exhibited by competitive binding assay. The Fe3O4@MIP nanoparticles were successfully applied for the direct enrichment of five FQs from human urine. The spiked human urine samples were determined and the recoveries ranging from 83.1 to 103.1% were obtained with RSD of 0.8-8.2% (n = 3). This work provides a versatile approach for the fabrication of well-defined MIP on nanomaterials for the analysis of complicated biosystems. PMID:24853973

  7. Direct visualization of dispersed lipid bicontinuous cubic phases by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Demurtas, Davide; Guichard, Paul; Martiel, Isabelle; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Hébert, Cécile; Sagalowicz, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Bulk and dispersed cubic liquid crystalline phases (cubosomes), present in the body and in living cell membranes, are believed to play an essential role in biological phenomena. Moreover, their biocompatibility is attractive for nutrient or drug delivery system applications. Here the three-dimensional organization of dispersed cubic lipid self-assembled phases is fully revealed by cryo-electron tomography and compared with simulated structures. It is demonstrated that the interior is constituted of a perfect bicontinuous cubic phase, while the outside shows interlamellar attachments, which represent a transition state between the liquid crystalline interior phase and the outside vesicular structure. Therefore, compositional gradients within cubosomes are inferred, with a lipid bilayer separating at least one water channel set from the external aqueous phase. This is crucial to understand and enhance controlled release of target molecules and calls for a revision of postulated transport mechanisms from cubosomes to the aqueous phase. PMID:26573367

  8. Direct visualization of dispersed lipid bicontinuous cubic phases by cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Demurtas, Davide; Guichard, Paul; Martiel, Isabelle; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Hébert, Cécile; Sagalowicz, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Bulk and dispersed cubic liquid crystalline phases (cubosomes), present in the body and in living cell membranes, are believed to play an essential role in biological phenomena. Moreover, their biocompatibility is attractive for nutrient or drug delivery system applications. Here the three-dimensional organization of dispersed cubic lipid self-assembled phases is fully revealed by cryo-electron tomography and compared with simulated structures. It is demonstrated that the interior is constituted of a perfect bicontinuous cubic phase, while the outside shows interlamellar attachments, which represent a transition state between the liquid crystalline interior phase and the outside vesicular structure. Therefore, compositional gradients within cubosomes are inferred, with a lipid bilayer separating at least one water channel set from the external aqueous phase. This is crucial to understand and enhance controlled release of target molecules and calls for a revision of postulated transport mechanisms from cubosomes to the aqueous phase. PMID:26573367

  9. Direct visualization of dispersed lipid bicontinuous cubic phases by cryo-electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demurtas, Davide; Guichard, Paul; Martiel, Isabelle; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Hébert, Cécile; Sagalowicz, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Bulk and dispersed cubic liquid crystalline phases (cubosomes), present in the body and in living cell membranes, are believed to play an essential role in biological phenomena. Moreover, their biocompatibility is attractive for nutrient or drug delivery system applications. Here the three-dimensional organization of dispersed cubic lipid self-assembled phases is fully revealed by cryo-electron tomography and compared with simulated structures. It is demonstrated that the interior is constituted of a perfect bicontinuous cubic phase, while the outside shows interlamellar attachments, which represent a transition state between the liquid crystalline interior phase and the outside vesicular structure. Therefore, compositional gradients within cubosomes are inferred, with a lipid bilayer separating at least one water channel set from the external aqueous phase. This is crucial to understand and enhance controlled release of target molecules and calls for a revision of postulated transport mechanisms from cubosomes to the aqueous phase.

  10. Separating surface magnetic effects in sunspot seismology: new time-distance helioseismic diagnostics

    E-print Network

    S. P. Rajaguru

    2008-02-20

    Time-distance helioseismic measurements in surface- and deep-focus geometries for wave-paths that distinguish surface magnetic contributions from those due to deeper perturbations beneath a large sunspot are presented and analysed. Travel times showing an increased wave speed region extending down to about 18 Mm beneath the spot are detected in deep-focus geometry that largely avoids use of wave field within the spot. Direction (in- or out-going wave) and surface magnetic field (or focus depth) dependent changes in frequency dependence of travel times are shown and identified to be signatures of wave absorption and conversion in near surface layers rather than that of shallowness of sunspot induced perturbations.

  11. Mass separation of a multicomponent plasma flow in a curvilinear magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Papernyi, V. L.; Krasov, V. I.

    2011-11-15

    The motion of a metal plasma flow of a vacuum-arc discharge in a transportation plasma-optical system with a curvilinear magnetic field is studied experimentally and numerically. The flow position at the output of the system is shown to depend on the cathode material, which determines the mass-to-charge ratio of plasma ions. As a result, the flow with a greater ion mass-to-charge ratio moves along a trajectory with a larger radius. A similar effect is observed in the case of a multicomponent plasma flow generated by a composite cathode. The results of two-fluid MHD simulations of a plasma flow propagating in a curvilinear magnetic field agree qualitatively with the experimental data.

  12. Improving the technique of vitreous cryo-sectioning for cryo-electron tomography: electrostatic charging for section attachment and implementation of an anti-contamination glove box.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Jason; Fernández, José Jesús; Bos, Erik; Amini, Shoaib; Gnaegi, Helmut; Vos, Matthijn; Bel, Bennie; Adolfsen, Freek; Carrascosa, José L; Peters, Peter J

    2010-02-01

    Cryo-electron tomography of vitreous cryo-sections is the most suitable method for exploring the 3D organization of biological samples that are too large to be imaged in an intact state. Producing good quality vitreous cryo-sections, however, is challenging. Here, we focused on the major obstacles to success: contamination in and around the microtome, and attachment of the ribbon of sections to an electron microscopic grid support film. The conventional method for attaching sections to the grid has involved mechanical force generated by a crude stamping or pressing device, but this disrupts the integrity of vitreous cryo-sections. Furthermore, attachment is poor, and parts of the ribbon of sections are often far from the support film. This results in specimen instability during image acquisition and subsequent difficulty with aligning projection images. Here, we have implemented a protective glove box surrounding the cryo-ultramicrotome that reduces the humidity around and within the microtome during sectioning. We also introduce a novel way to attach vitreous cryo-sections to an EM grid support film using electrostatic charging. The ribbon of vitreous cryo-sections remains in place during transfer and storage and is devoid of stamping related artefacts. We illustrate these improvements by exploring the structure of putative cellular 80S ribosomes within 50nm, vitreous cryo-sections of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19822214

  13. ? SR study of real space magnetic phase separation in Mn3O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakjevskii, Alexander; Thaler, Alexander; Reig-I-Plessis, Dalmau; Brodsky, Isaac; Gim, Yewon; Aczel, Adam; Cooper, S. Lance; MacDougall, Gregory

    2015-03-01

    The material Mn3O4 is a magnetically frustrated spinel which exhibits three distinct magnetic transitions below 42 K. Recent work has shown that the lowest of these is accompanied by an orthorhombic structural distortion, implying strong magneto-elastic coupling. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements indicate a substantial region of phase coexistence below this transition, with domain walls that order on the mesoscale. It is further suggested that a tradeoff in ordered volume with field may play a role in the recent quantum phase transition reported in this material. To follow up on these ideas, we have performed a series of zero- and transverse-field muon spin rotation measurements on single-crystal Mn3O4. The zero-field data clearly show the co-existence of ordered and disorder volumes, consistent with MFM results. Here we report these data, and further attempts to vary the ordered volume with applied field. We will discuss both zero- and transverse-field results within the context of the current understanding of the material. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-FG02-07ER46453.

  14. Calculating Separate Magnetic Free Energy Estimates for Active Regions Producing Multiple Flares: NOAA AR11158

    E-print Network

    Tarr, Lucas A; Millhouse, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that photospheric flux emergence is an important process for stressing coronal fields and storing magnetic free energy, which may then be released during a flare. The \\emph{Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager} (HMI) onboard the \\emph{Solar Dynamics Observatory} (SDO) captured the entire emergence of NOAA AR 11158. This region emerged as two distinct bipoles, possibly connected underneath the photosphere, yet characterized by different photospheric field evolutions and fluxes. The combined active region complex produced 15 GOES C--class, 2 M--class, and the X2.2 Valentine's Day Flare during the four days after initial emergence on February 12th, 2011. The M and X class flares are of particular interest because they are nonhomologous, involving different subregions of the active region. We use a Magnetic Charge Topology together with the Minimum Current Corona model of the coronal field to model field evolution of the complex. Combining this with observations of flare ribbons in the 1600\\AA\\ chann...

  15. Greek "red mud" residue: a study of microwave reductive roasting followed by magnetic separation for a metallic iron recovery process.

    PubMed

    Samouhos, Michail; Taxiarchou, Maria; Tsakiridis, Petros E; Potiriadis, Konstantinos

    2013-06-15

    The present research work is focused on the development of an alternative microwave reductive roasting process of red mud using lignite (30.15 wt.%Cfix), followed by wet magnetic separation, in order to produce a raw material suitable for sponge or cast iron production. The reduction degree of iron was controlled by both the reductive agent content and the microwave heating time. The reduction followed the Fe?O? ? Fe?O? ? FeO ? Fe sequence. The dielectric constants [real (?') and imaginary (??) permittivities] of red mud-lignite mixture were determined at 2.45 GHz, in the temperature range of 25-1100 °C. The effect of parameters such as temperature, intensity of reducing conditions, intensity of magnetic field and dispersing agent addition rate on the result of both processes was investigated. The phase's transformations in reduction process with microwave heating were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) in combination with thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA). The microstructural and morphological characterization of the produced calcines was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At the optimum conditions a magnetic concentrate with total iron concentration of 35.15 and 69.3 wt.% metallization degree was obtained. PMID:23611801

  16. Vapor-liquid phase separator studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, Y. I.; Hepler, W. A.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1983-01-01

    Porous plugs serve as both entropy rejection devices and phase separation components separating the vapor phase on the downstream side from liquid Helium 2 upstream. The liquid upstream is the cryo-reservoir fluid needed for equipment cooling by means of Helium 2, i.e Helium-4 below its lambda temperature in near-saturated states. The topics outlined are characteristic lengths, transport equations and plug results.

  17. IDS120j WITHOUT RESISTIVE MAGNETS SEMGENTATION STUDIES FOR BEAM PIPE BEYOND FIRST CRYOSTAT

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120j WITHOUT RESISTIVE MAGNETS SEMGENTATION STUDIES FOR BEAM PIPE BEYOND FIRST CRYOSTAT ( 20 cmCRYO#3 CRYO#2 2 cm THICK STST BEAM PIPE BEAM PIPE EXTENDS HALF WAY UPSTREAM TO THE POOL SH#1 10 cm NOMINAL VALUES FOR THEIR THIKNESS. STRESS FORCES ANALYSIS, LOCAL DPD DISTRIBUTION AND ENGINEERING

  18. Concentration influences on recovery in a high gradient magnetic separation axial filter

    SciTech Connect

    Murariu, V.; Rezlescu, N.; Rotariu, O.; Badescu, V.

    1998-05-01

    The buildup differential equations for the case of a single wire in high gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF)-axial configuration taking into account the suspension concentration are solved. A new equation for the deposit contour surface at different moments and for different suspension concentrations are obtained. The existence of a particulate suspension concentration, for which the radial extension velocity of deposit is maximum, is evidenced. The recovery for an ordered ferromagnetic matrix is calculated. The influence of the solid particle concentration from suspension on the filtration efficiency is presented.

  19. Enhanced defluoridation and facile separation of magnetic nano-hydroxyapatite/alginate composite.

    PubMed

    Pandi, Kalimuthu; Viswanathan, Natrayasamy

    2015-09-01

    In this research study, a new magnetic biosorbent was developed by the fabrication of magnetic Fe3O4 particles on nano-hydroxyapatite(n-HAp)/alginate (Alg) composite (Fe3O4@n-HApAlg composite) for defluoridation in batch mode. The synthesized Fe3O4@n-HApAlg biocomposite possess an enhanced defluoridation capacity (DC) of 4050mgF(-)/kg when compare to n-HApAlg composite, Fe3O4@n-HAp composite, n-HAp and Fe3O4 which possesses the DCs of 3870, 2469, 1296 and 1050mgF(-)/kg respectively. The structural changes of the sorbent, before and after fluoride sorption were studied using FTIR, XRD and SEM with EDAX techniques. There are various physico-chemical parameters such as contact time, pH, co-existing anions, initial fluoride concentration and temperature were optimized for maximum fluoride removal. The equilibrium data was well modeled by Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Temkin isotherms. The present system follows Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm model. The thermodynamic parameters reveals that the feasibility, spontaneity and endothermic nature of fluoride sorption. The performance and efficiency of the adsorbent material was examined with water samples collected from fluoride endemic areas namely Reddiyarchatram and Ammapatti in Dindigul District of Tamil Nadu using standard protocols. PMID:26092170

  20. Magnetically separable polymer (Mag-MIP) for selective analysis of biotin in food samples.

    PubMed

    Uzuriaga-Sánchez, Rosario Josefina; Khan, Sabir; Wong, Ademar; Picasso, Gino; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Sotomayor, Maria Del Pilar Taboada

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an efficient method for the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles modified with molecularly imprinted polymers (Mag-MIP) through core-shell method for the determination of biotin in milk food samples. The functional monomer acrylic acid was selected from molecular modeling, EGDMA was used as cross-linking monomer and AIBN as radical initiator. The Mag-MIP and Mag-NIP were characterized by FTIR, magnetic hysteresis, XRD, SEM and N2-sorption measurements. The capacity of Mag-MIP for biotin adsorption, its kinetics and selectivity were studied in detail. The adsorption data was well described by Freundlich isotherm model with adsorption equilibrium constant (KF) of 1.46 mL g(-1). The selectivity experiments revealed that prepared Mag-MIP had higher selectivity toward biotin compared to other molecules with different chemical structure. The material was successfully applied for the determination of biotin in diverse milk samples using HPLC for quantification of the analyte, obtaining the mean value of 87.4% recovery. PMID:26212997

  1. Covariance Matrix Estimation for the Cryo-EM Heterogeneity Problem*

    PubMed Central

    Katsevich, E.; Katsevich, A.; Singer, A.

    2015-01-01

    In cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), a microscope generates a top view of a sample of randomly oriented copies of a molecule. The problem of single particle reconstruction (SPR) from cryo-EM is to use the resulting set of noisy two-dimensional projection images taken at unknown directions to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the molecule. In some situations, the molecule under examination exhibits structural variability, which poses a fundamental challenge in SPR. The heterogeneity problem is the task of mapping the space of conformational states of a molecule. It has been previously suggested that the leading eigenvectors of the covariance matrix of the 3D molecules can be used to solve the heterogeneity problem. Estimating the covariance matrix is challenging, since only projections of the molecules are observed, but not the molecules themselves. In this paper, we formulate a general problem of covariance estimation from noisy projections of samples. This problem has intimate connections with matrix completion problems and high-dimensional principal component analysis. We propose an estimator and prove its consistency. When there are finitely many heterogeneity classes, the spectrum of the estimated covariance matrix reveals the number of classes. The estimator can be found as the solution to a certain linear system. In the cryo-EM case, the linear operator to be inverted, which we term the projection covariance transform, is an important object in covariance estimation for tomographic problems involving structural variation. Inverting it involves applying a filter akin to the ramp filter in tomography. We design a basis in which this linear operator is sparse and thus can be tractably inverted despite its large size. We demonstrate via numerical experiments on synthetic datasets the robustness of our algorithm to high levels of noise. PMID:25699132

  2. Cryo-balloon catheter position planning using AFiT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinoeder, Andreas; Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common heart arrhythmia. In certain situations, it can result in life-threatening complications such as stroke and heart failure. For paroxsysmal AFib, pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) by catheter ablation is the recommended choice of treatment if drug therapy fails. During minimally invasive procedures, electrically active tissue around the pulmonary veins is destroyed by either applying heat or cryothermal energy to the tissue. The procedure is usually performed in electrophysiology labs under fluoroscopic guidance. Besides radio-frequency catheter ablation devices, so-called single-shot devices, e.g., the cryothermal balloon catheters, are receiving more and more interest in the electrophysiology (EP) community. Single-shot devices may be advantageous for certain cases, since they can simplify the creation of contiguous (gapless) lesion sets around the pulmonary vein which is needed to achieve PVI. In many cases, a 3-D (CT, MRI, or C-arm CT) image of a patient's left atrium is available. This data can then be used for planning purposes and for supporting catheter navigation during the procedure. Cryo-thermal balloon catheters are commercially available in two different sizes. We propose the Atrial Fibrillation Planning Tool (AFiT), which visualizes the segmented left atrium as well as multiple cryo-balloon catheters within a virtual reality, to find out how well cryo-balloons fit to the anatomy of a patient's left atrium. First evaluations have shown that AFiT helps physicians in two ways. First, they can better assess whether cryoballoon ablation or RF ablation is the treatment of choice at all. Second, they can select the proper-size cryo-balloon catheter with more confidence.

  3. Nanostructuring of Undoped ZnSb by Cryo-Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Valset, K.; Graff, J. S.; Thøgersen, A.; Gunnæs, A. E.; Luxsacumar, S.; Løvvik, O. M.; Snyder, G. J.; Finstad, T. G.

    2015-08-01

    We report the preparation of nanosized ZnSb powder by cryo-milling. The effect of cryo-milling then hot-pressing of undoped ZnSb was investigated and compared with that of room temperature ball-milling and hot-pressing under different temperature conditions. ZnSb is a semiconductor with favorable thermoelectric properties when doped. We used undoped ZnSb to study the effect of nanostructuring on lattice thermal conductivity, and with little contribution at room temperature from electronic thermal conductivity. Grain growth was observed to occur during hot-pressing, as observed by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The thermal conductivity was lower for cryo-milled samples than for room-temperature ball-milled samples. The thermal conductivity also depended on hot-pressing conditions. The thermal conductivity could be varied by a factor of two by adjusting the process conditions and could be less than a third that of single-crystal ZnSb.

  4. Identification of new astatine isotopes using the gas-filled magnetic separator, SASSY

    SciTech Connect

    Yashita, S.

    1984-02-01

    A He-filled on-line mass separator system was built at the SuperHILAC and used to study the fusion products in the reaction /sup 56/Fe + /sup 141/Pr. The new neutron-deficient isotopes /sup 194/At and /sup 195/At were produced in this bombardment as three- and two- neutron-out products, respectively, and were identified by the ..cap alpha..-..cap alpha.. time-correlation technique. The measured ..cap alpha.. energies and half lives are 7.20 +- 0.02 MeV and 180 +- 80 msec for /sup 194/At, and 7.12 +- 0.02 MeV and 200 +- 100 msec for /sup 195/At. 66 references.

  5. Identification of new astatine isotopes using the gas-filled magnetic separator, Sassy

    SciTech Connect

    Yashita, S.

    1983-01-01

    A He-filled on-line separator system was built at the SuperHILAC and used to study the fusion products in the reaction /sup 56/Fe + /sup 141/Pr. The new neutron-deficient isotopes /sup 194/At and /sup 195/At were produced in this bombardment as three- and two-neutron-out products, respectively, and were identified by the ..cap alpha..-..cap alpha.. time-correlation technique. The measured ..cap alpha.. energies and half lives are 7.20 +/- 0.02 MeV and 180 +/- 80 msec for /sup 194/At, and 7.12 +/- 0.02 MeV and 200 +/- 100 msec for /sup 195/At.

  6. Levitation Performance of Two Opposed Permanent Magnet Pole-Pair Separated Conical Bearingless Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Peter; Jansen, Ralph; Dever, Timothy; Nagorny, Aleksandr; Loparo, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    In standard motor applications, rotor suspension with traditional mechanical bearings represents the most economical solution. However, in certain high performance applications, rotor suspension without contacting bearings is either required or highly beneficial. Examples include applications requiring very high speed or extreme environment operation, or with limited access for maintenance. This paper expands upon a novel bearingless motor concept, in which two motors with opposing conical air-gaps are used to achieve full five-axis levitation and rotation of the rotor. Force in this motor is created by deliberately leaving the motor s pole-pairs unconnected, which allows the creation of different d-axis flux in each pole pair. This flux imbalance is used to create lateral force. This approach is different than previous bearingless motor designs, which require separate windings for levitation and rotation. This paper examines the predicted and achieved suspension performance of a fully levitated prototype bearingless system.

  7. The effect of charge separation on nonlinear electrostatic waves in a magnetized dusty plasma with two-temperature ions

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Pillay, S. R.; Singh, S. V.; Reddy, R. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2008-09-07

    In view of the observations of parallel (to Earth's magnetic field) spiky electric field structures by the FAST satellite, a theoretical study is conducted using a dusty plasma model comprising Boltzmann distributed hot and cool ions, Boltzmann electrons and a negatively charged cold dust fluid to investigate the existence of similar low frequency nonlinear electrostatic waves in a dusty plasma which could have a similar appearance as the observed waveforms. Charge separation effects are incorporated into our model by the inclusion of Poisson's equation as opposed to assuming quasineutrality. The system of nonlinear equations is then numerically solved. The resulting electric field structure is examined as a function of various plasma parameters such as Mach number, driving electric field amplitude, bulk dust drift speed, particle densities and particle temperatures.

  8. Evidence for Two Separate but Interlaced Components of the Chromospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardom, K. P.; Wang, Y.-M.; Muglach, K.; Warren, H. P.

    2011-01-01

    Chromospheric fibrils are generally thought to trace out low-lying, mainly horizontal magnetic elds that fan out from flux concentrations in the photosphere. A high-resolution (approximately 0.1" per pixel) image, taken in the core of the Ca II 854.2 nm line and covering an unusually large area, shows the dark brils within an active region remnant as fine, looplike features that are aligned parallel to each other and have lengths comparable to a supergranular diameter. Comparison with simultaneous line-of-sight magnetograms confirms that the fibrils are centered above intranetwork areas (supergranular cell interiors), with one end rooted just inside the neighboring plage or strong unipolar network but the other endpoint less clearly defined. Focusing on a particular arcade-like structure lying entirely on one side of a lament channel (large-scale polarity inversion), we find that the total amount of positive-polarity flux underlying this "fibril arcade" is approximately 50 times greater than the total amount of negative-polarity flux. Thus, if the brils represent closed loops, they must consist of very weak fields (in terms of total magnetic flux), which are interpenetrated by a more vertical field that contains most of the flux. This surprising result suggests that the fibrils in unipolar regions connect the network to the nearby intranetwork flux, while the bulk of the network flux links to remote regions of the opposite polarity, forming a second, higher canopy above the fibril canopy. The chromospheric field near the edge of the network thus has an interlaced structure resembling that in sunspot penumbrae.

  9. Correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-scanning electron microscopy as a straightforward tool to study host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Martin; Elsterová, Jana; Schrenková, Jana; Vancová, Marie; Rego, Ryan O. M.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Nebesá?ová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an imaging technique that enables identification and targeting of fluorescently tagged structures with subsequent imaging at near-to-nanometer resolution. We established a novel correlative cryo-fluorescence microscopy and cryo-scanning electron microscopy workflow, which enables imaging of the studied object of interest very close to its natural state, devoid of artifacts caused for instance by slow chemical fixation. This system was tested by investigating the interaction of the zoonotic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi with two mammalian cell lines of neural origin in order to broaden our knowledge about the cell-association mechanisms that precedes the entry of the bacteria into the cell. This method appears to be an unprecedentedly fast (<3 hours), straightforward, and reliable solution to study the finer details of pathogen-host cell interactions and provides important insights into the complex and dynamic relationship between a pathogen and a host. PMID:26658551

  10. Correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-scanning electron microscopy as a straightforward tool to study host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Strnad, Martin; Elsterová, Jana; Schrenková, Jana; Vancová, Marie; Rego, Ryan O M; Grubhoffer, Libor; Nebesá?ová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an imaging technique that enables identification and targeting of fluorescently tagged structures with subsequent imaging at near-to-nanometer resolution. We established a novel correlative cryo-fluorescence microscopy and cryo-scanning electron microscopy workflow, which enables imaging of the studied object of interest very close to its natural state, devoid of artifacts caused for instance by slow chemical fixation. This system was tested by investigating the interaction of the zoonotic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi with two mammalian cell lines of neural origin in order to broaden our knowledge about the cell-association mechanisms that precedes the entry of the bacteria into the cell. This method appears to be an unprecedentedly fast (<3 hours), straightforward, and reliable solution to study the finer details of pathogen-host cell interactions and provides important insights into the complex and dynamic relationship between a pathogen and a host. PMID:26658551

  11. Separation of Intra- and Extramyocellular Lipid Signals in Proton MR Spectra by Determination of Their Magnetic Field Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidle, G.; Machann, J.; Claussen, C. D.; Schick, F.

    2002-02-01

    In skeletal musculature intramyocellular (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) are stored in compartments of different geometry and experience different magnetic field strengths due to geometrical susceptibility effects. The effect is strong enough to-at least partly-separate IMCL and EMCL contributions in 1H MR spectroscopy, despite IMCL and EMCL consisting of the same substances. The assessment of intramyocellular lipid stores in skeletal musculature by 1H MR spectroscopy plays an important role for studying physiological and pathological aspects of lipid metabolism. Therefore, a method using mathematical tools of Fourier analysis is developed to obtain the magnetic field distribution (MFD) from the measured spectra by deconvolution. A reference lipid spectrum is required which was recorded in tibial yellow bone marrow. It is shown that the separation of IMCL contributions can be performed more precisely-compared to other methods-based on the MFD. Examples of deconvolution in model systems elucidate the principle. Applications of the proposed approach on in vivo examinations in m. soleus and m. tibialis anterior are presented. Fitting the IMCL part of the MFD by a Gaussian lineshape with a linewidth kept fixed with respect to the linewidth of creatine and with the assumption of a smooth but not necessarily symmetrical shape for the EMCL part, the only free fit parameter, the amplitude of the IMCL part, is definite and subtraction leads to the EMCL part in the MFD. This procedure is especially justified for the soleus muscle showing a severely asymmetrical distribution which might lead to a marked overestimation of IMCL using common line fitting procedures.

  12. Initial exploration of application of open-gradient magnetic separation of coal to beneficiation of liquefaction feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, M.L.; Harris, L.A.; Hise, E.C.; Wham, R.M.; Wortman, J.E.

    1983-02-01

    Finely divided multi-component solids can be separated into multiple fractions by Open-Gradient Magnetic Separation if differences in magnetic susceptibility exist among the components. This technique has now been applied to several crushed coals, in particular to the 30-100 mesh cut. Coal fractions have been characterized by petrographic, mineralogical, and analytical data. As one proceeds from the most diamagnetic to the most paramagnetic fractions, there is a progressive decrease in the content of the reactive vitrinite macerals and an increase in the content of the unreactive inertinite macerals, the pyrite, and the nonpyritic minerals. The fact that the inertinite macerals tend to report to the paramagnetic fractions apparently results from epigenetic pyrite cell inclusions. There is also a size discrimination for pyrite with the diamagnetic coal fractions tending to contain the smaller syngenetic fractions tending to contain the larger particles from cleat fill. One set of 9 fractions from the 30-100 mesh cut of a precleaned Kentucky No. 9 coal was subjected to liquefaction conditions in a Short Contact Time solvent for 5 min at 425/sup 0/C. Considerable discrimination was observed in the values of the maf conversion based on pyridine solubility. The conversion of the most diamagnetic fraction (43% of the feed coal; 89% conversion) exceeded that of the feed coal (79% conversion). Conversion levels of successive fractions gradually decreased to approx. 50% before an abrupt increase to 71% for the most paramagnetic fraction. These encouraging initial experimental observations suggest the need for further laboratory studies and for process considerations of the potential benefits.

  13. Colorimetric aptasensing of ochratoxin A using Au@Fe3O4 nanoparticles as signal indicator and magnetic separator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengquan; Qian, Jing; Wang, Kun; Yang, Xingwang; Liu, Qian; Hao, Nan; Wang, Chengke; Dong, Xiaoya; Huang, Xingyi

    2016-03-15

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) doped Fe3O4 (Au@Fe3O4) NPs have been synthesized by a facile one-step solvothermal method. The peroxidase-like activity of Au@Fe3O4 NPs was effectively enhanced due to the synergistic effect between the Fe3O4 NPs and Au NPs. On this basis, an efficient colorimetric aptasensor has been developed using the intrinsic dual functionality of the Au@Fe3O4 NPs as signal indicator and magnetic separator. Initially, the amino-modified aptamer specific for a typical mycotoxin, ochratoxin A (OTA), was surface confined on the amino-terminated glass beads surafce using glutaraldehyde as a linker. Subsequently, the amino-modified capture DNA (cDNA) was labeled with the amino-functionalized Au@Fe3O4 NPs and the aptasensor was thus fabricated through the hybridization reaction between cDNA and the aptamers. While upon OTA addition, aptamers preferred to form the OTA-aptamer complex and the Au@Fe3O4 NPs linked on the cDNA were released into the bulk solution. Through a simple magnetic separation, the collected Au@Fe3O4 NPs can produce a blue colored solution in the presence of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and H2O2. When the reaction was terminated by addition of H(+) ions, the blue product could be changed into a yellow one with higher absorption intensity. This colorimetric aptasensor can detect as low as 30pgmL(-1) OTA with high specificity. To the best of our knowledge, the present colorimetric aptasensor is the first attempt to use the peroxidase-like activity of nanomaterial for OTA detection, which may provide an acttractive path toward routine quality control of food safety. PMID:26583358

  14. CryoSat-2: A new perspective on the Cryosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, A.; Armitage, T.; Briggs, K.; Flament, T.; Hogg, A. E.; McMillan, M.; Muir, A.; Ridout, A.; Sundal, A.; Tilling, R.; Wingham, D.

    2014-12-01

    CryoSat-2 is ESA's first satellite mission dedicated to measuring changes in the polar land ice and sea ice cover. Following its launch in April 2010, we have examined the performance of the instrument over the continental ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland, the Artic Ocean, and, for the purposes of calibration, over the oceans. We have confirmed the engineering performance at system level of the interferometer demonstrating that it measures across-track surface slopes with a precision of 25 micro-radians and an accuracy of 10 micro-radians, greatly exceeding the pre-launch specifications (100 micro-radians). Over the polar ice sheets, we have examined the performance of the range estimation, and determined the range precision to be 19 cm RMS at 20 Hz. We have examined the retrieval of the phase information over the ice sheets, and found the phase estimates to be robust and little affected by the uncertain ice sheet topography. Based on the calibration of the interferometer, the contribution of the across track slope error is, at 0.4 mm, negligible. Over marine sea ice, we have verified the discrimination of sea ice and ocean lead returns using contemporaneous SAR imagery from ENVISAT, and we have estimated the precision of individual (20 Hz) measurements to be 2 cm. In summary, with the corrected data products, we are able to confirm that the system performance of CryoSat-2 will meet or exceed its specification over the continental and marine ice sheets. This presenetation sumamrises the key outcomes of the mission performance, and presents a series of example case studies where CryoSat-2 data have been applied to study changes in Earth's land and sea ice cover. We show that in 4 years CryoSat has been able to detect changes in the mass of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets with an accuracy comparable to that of the past 20 years of conventional satellite altimetry and that important changes have occured in these regions, we show that CryoSat has been able to quantify changes in the volume of sea ice across the entire northern hemisphere for the first time and that unexpected changes have occurred, and we show that the mission has been able to detect changes in the volume of rugged, glaciated terrain, that were beyond the capability of past altiemter missions and that are in places extreme in comparison to past observations.

  15. An investigation of artificial biasing in detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology due to magnetic separation in sample preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircombe, Keith N.; Stern, Richard A.

    2002-07-01

    The application of detrital zircon geochronology for provenance analysis is complicated by the presence of biases induced by natural processes and sample preparation. The biasing of age distributions as a result of magnetic susceptibility is illustrated using sensitive high resolution ion microprobe dating of detrital zircon from a metaquartzite sample partitioned using a Frantz magnetic barrier separator. The relationship of paramagnetism with U content, ?-dose, and discordance is demonstrated, but no relationship between grain size and discordance or age is found. The data also demonstrate that previous limits of zircon survival in sedimentary processes based on U content alone are too simplistic. Two age modes at ˜3150 and ˜2960 Ma are present in all the paramagnetic fractions; there is a bias toward the ˜3150 Ma mode being more prominent in the least-paramagnetic fractions. While the ˜2960 Ma is present in the least-paramagnetic fraction, it is argued that such fortuitous representation cannot be assumed before analysis. Such "there or not" provenance interpretations are considered simplistic, and at the very least there is no harm in broadening the range of paramagnetic fractions sampled for analysis. The results indicate a compromise between broad representation and analytical efficiency (avoiding discordant and thus unreliable results) can be made with a Frantz setting of ˜1.8 A and 10° side-slope.

  16. Semi-continuous in situ magnetic separation for enhanced extracellular protease production-modeling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Cerff, Martin; Scholz, Alexander; Käppler, Tobias; Ottow, Kim E; Hobley, Tim J; Posten, Clemens

    2013-08-01

    In modern biotechnology proteases play a major role as detergent ingredients. Especially the production of extracellular protease by Bacillus species facilitates downstream processing because the protease can be directly harvested from the biosuspension. In situ magnetic separation (ISMS) constitutes an excellent adsorptive method for efficient extracellular protease removal during cultivation. In this work, the impact of semi-continuous ISMS on the overall protease yield has been investigated. Results reveal significant removal of the protease from Bacillus licheniformis cultivations. Bacitracin-functionalized magnetic particles were successfully applied, regenerated and reused up to 30 times. Immediate reproduction of the protease after ISMS proved the biocompatibility of this integrated approach. Six subsequent ISMS steps significantly increased the overall protease yield up to 98% because proteolytic degradation and potential inhibition of the protease in the medium could be minimized. Furthermore, integration of semi-continuous ISMS increased the overall process efficiency due to reduction of the medium consumption. Process simulation revealed a deeper insight into protease production, and was used to optimize ISMS steps to obtain the maximum overall protease yield. PMID:23475553

  17. A rapid method for detection of genetically modified organisms based on magnetic separation and surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Guven, Burcu; Boyac?, ?smail Hakk?; Tamer, Ugur; Çal?k, P?nar

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a new method combining magnetic separation (MS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was developed to detect genetically modified organisms (GMOs). An oligonucleotide probe which is specific for 35 S DNA target was immobilized onto gold coated magnetic nanospheres to form oligonucleotide-coated nanoparticles. A self assembled monolayer was formed on gold nanorods using 5,5'-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) and the second probe of the 35 S DNA target was immobilized on the activated nanorod surfaces. Probes on the nanoparticles were hybridized with the target oligonucleotide. Optimization parameters for hybridization were investigated by high performance liquid chromatography. Optimum hybridization parameters were determined as: 4 ?M probe concentration, 20 min immobilization time, 30 min hybridization time, 55 °C hybridization temperature, 750 mM buffer salt concentration and pH: 7.4. Quantification of the target concentration was performed via SERS spectra of DTNB on the nanorods. The correlation between the target concentration and the SERS signal was found to be linear within the range of 25-100 nM. The analyses were performed with only one hybridization step in 40 min. Real sample analysis was conducted using Bt-176 maize sample. The results showed that the developed MS-SERS assay is capable of detecting GMOs in a rapid and selective manner. PMID:22049365

  18. Coupling Underwater Superoleophobic Membranes with Magnetic Pickering Emulsions for Fouling-Free Separation of Crude Oil/Water Mixtures: An Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Dudchenko, Alexander V; Rolf, Julianne; Shi, Lucy; Olivas, Liana; Duan, Wenyan; Jassby, David

    2015-10-27

    Oil/water separations have become an area of great interest, as growing oil extraction activities are increasing the generation of oily wastewaters as well as increasing the risk of oil spills. Here, we demonstrate a membrane-based and fouling-free oil/water separation method that couples carbon nanotube-poly(vinyl alcohol) underwater superoleophobic ultrafiltration membranes with magnetic Pickering emulsions. We demonstrate that this process is insensitive to low water temperatures, high ionic strength, or crude oil loading, while allowing operation at high permeate fluxes and producing high quality permeate. Furthermore, we develop a theoretical framework that analyzes the stability of Pickering emulsions under filtration mechanics, relating membrane surface properties and hydrodynamic conditions in the Pickering emulsion cake layer to membrane performance. Finally, we demonstrate the recovery and recyclability of the nanomagnetite used to form the Pickering emulsions through a magnetic separation step, resulting in an environmentally friendly, continuous process for oil/water separation. PMID:26422748

  19. Spatiotemporally separating electron and phonon thermal transport in L1{sub 0} FePt films for heat assisted magnetic recording

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, D. B.; Sun, C. J. E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg; Ho, P.; Chen, J. S.; Chow, G. M. E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg; Brewe, D. L.; Heald, S. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Han, S.-W.

    2014-06-28

    We report the spatio-temporal separation of electron and phonon thermal transports in nanostructured magnetic L1{sub 0} FePt films at the nanometer length scale and the time domain of tens of picosecond, when heated with a pulsed laser. We demonstrate that lattice dynamics measured using the picosecond time-resolved laser pump/X-ray probe method on the FePt (002) and Ag (002) Bragg reflections from different layers provided the information of nanoscale thermal transport between the layers. We also describe how the electron and phonon thermal transports in nanostructured magnetic thin films were separated.

  20. Magnetic-optical nanohybrids for targeted detection, separation, and photothermal ablation of drug-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ondera, Thomas J; Hamme Ii, Ashton T

    2015-12-01

    A rapid, sensitive and quantitative immunoassay for the targeted detection and decontamination of E. coli based on Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and plasmonic popcorn-shaped gold nanostructure attached single-walled carbon nanotubes (AuNP@SWCNT) is presented. The MNPs were synthesized as the support for a monoclonal antibody (mAb@MNP). E. coli (49979) was captured and rapidly preconcentrated from the sample with the mAb@MNP, followed by binding with Raman-tagged concanavalin A-AuNP@SWCNTs (Con A-AuNP@SWCNTs) as detector nanoprobes. A Raman tag 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) generated a Raman signal upon 670 nm laser excitation enabling the detection and quantification of E. coli concentration with a limit of detection of 10(2) CFU mL(-1) and a linear logarithmic response range of 1.0 × 10(2) to 1.0 × 10(7) CFU mL(-1). The mAb@MNP could remove more than 98% of E. coli (initial concentration of 1.3 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1)) from water. The potential of the immunoassay to detect E. coli bacteria in real water samples was investigated and the results were compared with the experimental results from the classical count method. There was no statistically significant difference between the two methods (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the MNP/AuNP@SWCNT hybrid system exhibits an enhanced photothermal killing effect. The sandwich-like immunoassay possesses potential for rapid bioanalysis and the simultaneous biosensing of multiple pathogenic agents. PMID:26469636

  1. Evidence for Two Separate but Interlaced Components of the Chromospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muglach, K.; Reardon, K. P.; Wang, Y.-M.; Warren, H. P.

    2012-01-01

    Chromospheric fibrils are generally thought to trace out horizontal magnetic fields that fan out from flux concentrations in the photosphere. A high-resolution (0.2") image taken in the core of the Ca IJ854.2 nm line shows the dark fibrils within an active region remnant as fine, loop-like features that are aligned parallel to each other and have lengths on the order of a supergranular diameter (approx.30 Mm). Comparison with a line-of-sight magnetogram confirms that the fibrils are centered above intranetwork areas, with one end rooted just inside the neighboring plage or strong unipolar network but the other endpoint less clearly defined. Focusing on a particular arcade-like structure lying entirely on one side of a filament channel (large-scale polarity inversion), we find that the total amount of positive-polarity flux underlying this "fibril arcade' is 50 times greater than the total amount of negative-polarity flux. Thus, if the fibrils represent closed loops, they must consist of very weak fields (in terms of flux density), which are interpenetrated by a more vertical field that contains most of the flux. This surprising result suggests that the fibrils in unipolar regions connect the network to the nearby intranetwork flux, while the bulk of the network flux is diverted upward into the corona and connects to remote regions of the opposite polarity. We conclude that the chromospheric field near the edge of the network has an interlaced structure resembling that in sunspot penumbrae, with the fibrils representing the low-lying horizontal flux that remains trapped within the highly nonpotential chromospheric layer.

  2. Cryo-technical design aspects of the superconducting SIS100 quadrupole doublet modules

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, J. P.; Bleile, A.; Fischer, E.; Hess, G.; Macavei, J.; Spiller, P.

    2014-01-29

    The FAIR project was initiated to build an international accelerator and experimental facility for basic research activities in various fields of modern physics. The core component of the project will be the SIS100 heavy ion accelerator, producing heavy ion beams of uniquely high intensities and qualities. The superconducting main quadrupoles and corrector magnets are assembled within complex quadrupole doublet modules (QDMs), combining two superconducting quadrupole (focusing and defocusing), sextupole and steering magnets in one cryostat. In addition a cryo-catcher, a beam position monitor and a cold beam pipe will be integrated. In accordance with the magnet lattice structure, the QDM series for the SIS100 consists of four main families composed of eleven different configurations. The common technical feature of all configurations is a sophisticated common girder structure, mechanically integrating all functional components in one cold mass and being suspended in a corresponding cryostat system. The requirements to position preservation during thermal cycling are to be fulfilled by a precise and stable support of the functional elements, as well as by a reliable, reproducible and stable cold mass suspension system. The main design aspects of the QDMs will be discussed as a result of these requirements.

  3. Cryo-technical design aspects of the superconducting SIS100 quadrupole doublet modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, J. P.; Bleile, A.; Fischer, E.; Hess, G.; Macavei, J.; Spiller, P.

    2014-01-01

    The FAIR project was initiated to build an international accelerator and experimental facility for basic research activities in various fields of modern physics. The core component of the project will be the SIS100 heavy ion accelerator, producing heavy ion beams of uniquely high intensities and qualities. The superconducting main quadrupoles and corrector magnets are assembled within complex quadrupole doublet modules (QDMs), combining two superconducting quadrupole (focusing and defocusing), sextupole and steering magnets in one cryostat. In addition a cryo-catcher, a beam position monitor and a cold beam pipe will be integrated. In accordance with the magnet lattice structure, the QDM series for the SIS100 consists of four main families composed of eleven different configurations. The common technical feature of all configurations is a sophisticated common girder structure, mechanically integrating all functional components in one cold mass and being suspended in a corresponding cryostat system. The requirements to position preservation during thermal cycling are to be fulfilled by a precise and stable support of the functional elements, as well as by a reliable, reproducible and stable cold mass suspension system. The main design aspects of the QDMs will be discussed as a result of these requirements.

  4. About the consistency between Envisat and CryoSat-2 radar freeboard retrieval over Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwegmann, S.; Rinne, E.; Ricker, R.; Hendricks, S.; Helm, V.

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge about Antarctic sea-ice volume and its changes over the past decades has been sparse due to the lack of systematic sea-ice thickness measurements in this remote area. Recently, first attempts have been made to develop a sea-ice thickness product over the Southern Ocean from space-borne radar altimetry and results look promising. Today, more than 20 years of radar altimeter data are potentially available for such products. However, data come from different sources, and the characteristics of individual sensors differ. Hence, it is important to study the consistency between single sensors in order to develop long and consistent time series over the potentially available measurement period. Here, the consistency between freeboard measurements of the Radar Altimeter 2 on-board Envisat and freeboard measurements from the Synthetic-Aperture Interferometric Radar Altimeter on-board CryoSat-2 is tested for their overlap period in 2011. Results indicate that mean and modal values are comparable over the sea-ice growth season (May-October) and partly also beyond. In general, Envisat data shows higher freeboards in the seasonal ice zone while CryoSat-2 freeboards are higher in the perennial ice zone and near the coasts. This has consequences for the agreement in individual sectors of the Southern Ocean, where one or the other ice class may dominate. Nevertheless, over the growth season, mean freeboard for the entire (regional separated) Southern Ocean differs generally by not more than 2 cm (5 cm, except for the Amundsen/Bellingshausen Sea) between Envisat and CryoSat-2, and the differences between modal freeboard lie generally within ±10 cm and often even below.

  5. Bio-inspired Cryo-ink Preserves Red Blood Cell Phenotype and Function during Nanoliter Vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Assal, Rami El; Guven, Sinan; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Gozen, Irep; Shafiee, Hadi; Dalbeyber, Sedef; Abdalla, Noor; Thomas, Gawain; Fuld, Wendy; Illigens, Ben M.W.; Estanislau, Jessica; Khoory, Joseph; Kaufman, Richard; Zylberberg, Claudia; Lindeman, Neal; Wen, Qi; Ghiran, Ionita; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Current red blood cell cryopreservation methods utilize bulk volumes, causing cryo-injury of cells, which results in irreversible disruption of cell morphology, mechanics, and function. An innovative approach to preserve human red blood cell morphology, mechanics, and function following vitrification in nanoliter volumes is developed using a novel cryo-ink integrated with a bio-printing approach. PMID:25047246

  6. 76 FR 4338 - Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshops

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo- Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshops AGENCY: Fuel... Laboratory, in conjunction with the Hydrogen Storage team of the EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program, will be hosting two days of workshops on compressed and cryo-compressed hydrogen storage in the Washington,...

  7. Capturing enveloped viruses on affinity grids for downstream cryo-electron microscopy applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electron microscopy cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography are essential techniques used for characterizing basic virus morphology and determining the three-dimensional structure of viruses. Enveloped viruses, which contain an outer lipoprotein coat, constitute the largest group of pa...

  8. Image formation modeling in cryo-electron microscopy Milos Vulovic a,b

    E-print Network

    Rieger, Bernd

    Image formation modeling in cryo-electron microscopy Milos Vulovic´ a,b , Raimond B.G. Ravelli b of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft, The Netherlands b Electron Microscopy Section, Molecular Cell 14 May 2013 Available online xxxx Keywords: Cryo-electron microscopy Phase contrast Amplitude

  9. Image formation modeling in cryo-electron microscopy Milos Vulovic a,b

    E-print Network

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Image formation modeling in cryo-electron microscopy Milos Vulovic´ a,b , Raimond B.G. Ravelli b of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft, The Netherlands b Electron Microscopy Section, Molecular Cell 14 May 2013 Available online 25 May 2013 Keywords: Cryo-electron microscopy Phase contrast Amplitude

  10. Cryo-SEM of hydrated high temperature proton exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Kelly A; More, Karren Leslie; Walker, Larry R; Benicewicz, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Alternative energy technologies, such as high temperature fuel cells and hydrogen pumps, rely on proton exchange membranes (PEM). A chemically and thermally stable PEM with rapid proton transport is sol-gel phosphoric acid (PA)-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes. It is believed that the key to the high ionic conductivity of PA-doped PBI membranes is related to the gel morphology. However, the gel structure and general morphology of this PA-doped PBI membrane has not been widely investigated. In an effort to understand the gel morphology, two SEM sample preparation methodologies have been developed for PA-doped PBI membranes. Due to the high vacuum environment of conventional SEM, the beam-sensitivity of these membranes was reduced with a mild 120 C heat treatment to remove excess water without structural rearrangement (as verified from wide angle X-ray scattering). Cryo-SEM has also been implemented for both initial and heated membranes. Cryo-SEM is known to prevent dehydration of the specimen and reduce beam-sensitivity. The SEM cross-section image (Fig. 1A) of the heated samples exhibit 3{micro}m spheroidal features that are elongated in the direction of the casting blade. These features are distorted to 2{micro}m under conventional SEM conditions (Fig. 1B). The fine-scale gel morphology image (Fig. 2) is composed of 65nm diameter domains and 30nm walls, which resembles a cellular structure. In the future, the PA-doped PBI membranes will be cryo-microtomed and cryotransferred for elemental analysis in a TEM.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic hexacyanoferrate (II) polymeric nanocomposite for separation of cesium from radioactive waste solutions.

    PubMed

    Sheha, Reda R

    2012-12-15

    Nanocrystalline potassium zinc hexacyanoferrate loaded on nanoscale magnetite substrate was successfully synthesized for significantly enhanced removal of cesium from low-level radioactive wastes. A description was given for preparation and properties of these precursors. The physicochemical properties of these nanocomposites were determined using different techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Data clarified that supporting potassium zinc hexacyanoferrates on iron ferrite nanoparticles increased their thermal stability. Further, Fourier transform infrared spectra confirmed that the nanocomposites were well coordinated and incorporated in the polymer matrix. The average particle sizes, of these nanoparticles, determined by SEM had a good agreement with XRD results. Based on characterization data, the prepared zinc hexacyanoferrates were proposed to have a zeolitic rhombohedral structure with cavities can host alkali metal ions and water molecules. The magnetic analysis showed a super-paramagnetic behavior. Batch technique was applied to evaluate the influences of initial pH value, contact time, and competing cations on the efficiency of cesium removal. The sorption process was fast initially, and maximum separation was attained within 2h of contact. Cesium exchange was independent from pH value and deviate from ideal exchange phenomena. In neutral solutions, Cs(+) was retained through exchange with K(+); however, in acidic solution, phase transformation was proposed. Sorption capacity of these materials attained values amounted 1965 mg g(-1). The synthesized nanocomposites exhibited different affinities toward Cs(I), Co(II), and Eu(III) elements and showed a good ability to separate them from each other. PMID:23000210

  12. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers for the selective separation and determination of metronidazole in cosmetic samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Li, Xiao-Yan; Li, Jun-Jie; Su, Xiao-Meng; Wu, Zong-Yuan; Li, Peng-Fei; Lei, Fu-Hou; Tan, Xue-Cai; Shi, Zhan-Wang

    2015-05-01

    In this study, novel magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) were developed as a sorbent for solid-phase extraction (SPE) and used for the selective separation of metronidazole (MNZ) in cosmetics; MNZ was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). First, magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by the co-precipitation of Fe(2+)and Fe(3+) ions in an ammonia solution; then oleic acid (OA) was modified onto the surface of Fe3O4NPs. Finally, the MMIP was prepared by aqueous suspension polymerization, involving the copolymerization of Fe3O4NPs@OA with MNZ as the template molecule, methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol maleic rosinate acrylate (EGMRA) as the cross-linking agent, and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator. The MMIP materials showed high selective adsorption capacity and fast binding kinetics for MNZ; the maximum adsorption amount of the MMIP to MNZ was 46.7 mg/g. The assay showed a linear range from 0.1 to 20.0 ?g/mL for MNZ with the correlation coefficient 0.999. The relative standard deviations (RSD) of intra- and inter-day ranging from 0.71 to 2.45% and from 1.06 to 5.20% were obtained. The MMIP can be applied to the enrichment and determination of MNZ in cosmetic products with the recoveries of spiked toner, powder, and cream cosmetic samples ranging from 90.6 to 104.2, 84.1 to 91.4, and 90.3 to 100.4%, respectively, and the RSD was <3.54%. PMID:25749799

  13. Sample preparation induced artifacts in cryo-electron tomographs.

    PubMed

    Plevka, Pavel; Battisti, Anthony J; Winkler, Dennis C; Tars, Kaspars; Holdaway, Heather A; Bator, Carol M; Rossmann, Michael G

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the effects of sample preparation and of the exposure to an electron beam on particles in cryo-electron tomographs. Various virus particles with icosahedral symmetry were examined, allowing a comparison of symmetrically related components that should be identical in structure but might be affected differently by these imaging artifacts. Comparison of tomographic reconstructions with previously determined structures established by an independent method showed that neither freezing nor electron beam exposure produced a significant amount of shrinkage along the z axis (thickness). However, we observed damage to regions of the particles located close to the surface of the vitreous ice. PMID:23040048

  14. Ultrasonic-assisted preparation of novel ternary ZnO/AgI/Fe3O4 nanocomposites as magnetically separable visible-light-driven photocatalysts with excellent activity.

    PubMed

    Shekofteh-Gohari, Maryam; Habibi-Yangjeh, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The present work demonstrates preparation of novel ternary ZnO/AgI/Fe3O4 nanocomposites, as magnetically separable visible-light-driven photocatalysts using ultrasonic irradiation method. The XRD, EDX, SEM, TEM, UV-vis DRS, FT-IR, PL, and VSM techniques was applied for characterization of structure, purity, morphology, optical, and magnetic properties of the resultant samples. The superior activity was seen for the nanocomposite with 8 weight ratio of ZnO/AgI to Fe3O4 in degradation of rhodamine B under visible-light irradiation. Photocatalytic activity of this nanocomposite in degradation of rhodamine B, methylene blue, and methyl orange is about 32, 6, and 5-fold higher than that of the ZnO/Fe3O4 nanocomposite. The highly enhanced activity of the ternary magnetic photocatalyst was mainly attributed to more visible-light absorption ability and efficiently separation of the charge carriers. Furthermore, it was revealed that the ultrasonic irradiation time and calcination temperature affect largely on the photocatalytic activity. Finally, the magnetic photocatalyst was successfully separated from the treated solution using external magnetic field. PMID:26397921

  15. A Comparison of Coarse-Grained Flexible Fitting Methods Used in Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekpinar, Mustafa

    2015-03-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has emerged as an important structural biology tool in recent years. It can be used to detect new protein conformations when combined with computational methods. The methods that utilize all-atom potentials for flexible fitting of cryo-EM maps can be computationally expensive depending on system size. On the other hand, coarse-grained (CG) flexible fitting methods can produce results within a short amount of time even with a generic personal computer. Due to this advantage, CG flexible fitting methods are widely used in cryo-EM studies. There are many methods that apply different CG flexible fitting strategies to determine an unknown protein conformation from an initial structure and a cryo-EM map. In this study, we compared some of these methods such as NMFF, iMoDFit, EMFF and DireX. We reported accuracy of them at different resolutions as well as their computational performances.

  16. Usefulness of two-point Dixon fat-water separation technique in gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Rao, Sheng-Xiang; Chen, Cai-Zhong; Li, Ren-Chen; Zeng, Meng-Su

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare differences between volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) using two-point Dixon fat-water separation (Dixon-VIBE) and chemically selective fat saturation (FS-VIBE) with magnetic resonance imaging examination. METHODS: Forty-nine patients were included, who were scanned with two VIBE sequences (Dixon-VIBE and FS-VIBE) in hepatobiliary phase after gadoxetic acid administration. Subjective evaluations including sharpness of tumor, sharpness of vessels, strength and homogeneity of fat suppression, and artifacts that were scored using a 4-point scale. The liver-to-lesion contrast was also calculated and compared. RESULTS: Dixon-VIBE with water reconstruction had significantly higher subjective scores than FS-VIBE in strength and homogeneity of fat suppression (< 0.0001) but lower scores in sharpness of tumor (P < 0.0001), sharpness of vessels (P = 0.0001), and artifacts (P = 0.034). The liver-to-lesion contrast on Dixon-VIBE images was significantly lower than that on FS-VIBE (16.6% ± 9.4% vs 23.9% ± 12.1%, P = 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Dixon-VIBE provides stronger and more homogenous fat suppression than FS-VIBE, while has lower clarity of focal liver lesions in hepatobiliary phase after gadoxetic acid administration. PMID:25945017

  17. Magnetically Separable Fe3O 4/AgBr Hybrid Materials: Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Activity and Good Stability.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuhui; Li, Chen; Li, Junli; Li, Qiuye; Yang, Jianjun

    2015-12-01

    Magnetically separable Fe3O4/AgBr hybrid materials with highly efficient photocatalytic activity were prepared by the precipitation method. All of them exhibited much higher photocatalytic activity than the pure AgBr in photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible light irradiation. When the loading amount of Fe3O4 was 0.5 %, the hybrid materials displayed the highest photocatalytic activity, and the degradation yield of MO reached 85 % within 12 min. Silver halide often suffers serious photo-corrosion, while the stability of the Fe3O4/AgBr hybrid materials improved apparently than the pure AgBr. Furthermore, depositing Fe3O4 onto the surface of AgBr could facilitate the electron transfer and thereby leading to the elevated photocatalytic activity. The morphology, phase structure, and optical properties of the composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS), and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. PMID:26058513

  18. Filming the formation and fluctuation of skyrmion domains by cryo-Lorentz transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Jayaraman; Huang, Ping; Mancini, Giulia Fulvia; Murooka, Yoshie; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; McGrouther, Damien; Cantoni, Marco; Baldini, Edoardo; White, Jonathan Stuart; Magrez, Arnaud; Giamarchi, Thierry; Rønnow, Henrik Moodysson; Carbone, Fabrizio

    2015-11-17

    Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices thanks to their robustness, guaranteed by the topological protection, and their nanometric size. Currently, little is known about the influence of parameters such as disorder, defects, or external stimuli on the long-range spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. Here, using a large ([Formula: see text]) single-crystal nanoslice (150 nm thick) of Cu2OSeO3, we image up to 70,000 skyrmions by means of cryo-Lorentz transmission electron microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. The emergence of the skyrmion lattice from the helimagnetic phase is monitored, revealing the existence of a glassy skyrmion phase at the phase transition field, where patches of an octagonally distorted skyrmion lattice are also discovered. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the emergence and switching between domains with different lattice orientations, and the temporal fluctuation of these domains is filmed. These results demonstrate the importance of direct-space and real-time imaging of skyrmion domains for addressing both their long-range topology and stability. PMID:26578765

  19. Filming the formation and fluctuation of skyrmion domains by cryo-Lorentz transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rajeswari, Jayaraman; Huang, Ping; Mancini, Giulia Fulvia; Murooka, Yoshie; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; McGrouther, Damien; Cantoni, Marco; Baldini, Edoardo; White, Jonathan Stuart; Magrez, Arnaud; Giamarchi, Thierry; Rønnow, Henrik Moodysson; Carbone, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices thanks to their robustness, guaranteed by the topological protection, and their nanometric size. Currently, little is known about the influence of parameters such as disorder, defects, or external stimuli on the long-range spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. Here, using a large (7.3×7.3??m2) single-crystal nanoslice (150 nm thick) of Cu2OSeO3, we image up to 70,000 skyrmions by means of cryo-Lorentz transmission electron microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. The emergence of the skyrmion lattice from the helimagnetic phase is monitored, revealing the existence of a glassy skyrmion phase at the phase transition field, where patches of an octagonally distorted skyrmion lattice are also discovered. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the emergence and switching between domains with different lattice orientations, and the temporal fluctuation of these domains is filmed. These results demonstrate the importance of direct-space and real-time imaging of skyrmion domains for addressing both their long-range topology and stability. PMID:26578765

  20. Orthogonal Matrix Retrieval In Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bhamre, Tejal; Zhang, Teng; Singer, Amit

    2015-01-01

    In single particle reconstruction (SPR) from cryo-electron microscopy (EM), the 3D structure of a molecule needs to be determined from its 2D projection images taken at unknown viewing directions. Zvi Kam showed already in 1980 that the autocorrelation function of the 3D molecule over the rotation group SO(3) can be estimated from 2D projection images whose viewing directions are uniformly distributed over the sphere. The autocorrelation function determines the expansion coefficients of the 3D molecule in spherical harmonics up to an orthogonal matrix of size (2l + 1) × (2l + 1) for each l = 0,1,2,…. In this paper we show how techniques for solving the phase retrieval problem in X-ray crystallography can be modified for the cryo-EM setup for retrieving the missing orthogonal matrices. Specifically, we present two new approaches that we term Orthogonal Extension and Orthogonal Replacement, in which the main algorithmic components are the singular value decomposition and semidefinite programming. We demonstrate the utility of these approaches through numerical experiments on simulated data. PMID:26677402

  1. Enrichment of Rare Earth and Niobium from a REE-Nb-Fe Associated Ore via Reductive Roasting Followed by Magnetic Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mudan; You, Zhixiong; Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Xiang; Li, Guanghui

    2015-10-01

    REE-Nb-Fe ore is a typical refractory resource rich in valuable elements. In this article, coal-based reductive roasting followed by magnetic separation is proposed to recover rare earth element (REE), niobium (Nb), and powdered metallic iron (Fe) concentrate from a REE-Nb-Fe raw concentrate containing 31.9% total iron grade (TFe), 3.2% rare earth oxides (REO), and 2.9% Nb2O5. Sodium sulfate is employed to enhance the reduction of iron oxide and to facilitate the growth of metallic iron grains. A magnetic fraction with TFe of 89.3%, iron metallization of 95.8% and iron recovery of 91.5% is obtained by magnetic separation after the raw concentrate is reduced to 1100°C for 120 min in the presence of 15 wt.% sodium sulfate. The contents of rare earth and niobium in the nonmagnetic fraction are enriched to 5.4% (REO) and 4.6% (Nb2O5) with recoveries of 96.1% and 95.8%, respectively. The TFe in the nonmagnetic fraction obtained after the separation is decreased to 4.8% accordingly. The reactions between sodium sulfate and SiO2/Al2O3 enhance the reduction by destroying the mineral structure. The separation of iron from rare earth and niobium is highly improved as metallic iron grains grow markedly when roasted in the presence of sodium sulfate.

  2. Low cost, high performance processing of single particle cryo-electron microscopy data in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Cianfrocco, Michael A; Leschziner, Andres E

    2015-01-01

    The advent of a new generation of electron microscopes and direct electron detectors has realized the potential of single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) as a technique to generate high-resolution structures. Calculating these structures requires high performance computing clusters, a resource that may be limiting to many likely cryo-EM users. To address this limitation and facilitate the spread of cryo-EM, we developed a publicly available 'off-the-shelf' computing environment on Amazon's elastic cloud computing infrastructure. This environment provides users with single particle cryo-EM software packages and the ability to create computing clusters with 16-480+ CPUs. We tested our computing environment using a publicly available 80S yeast ribosome dataset and estimate that laboratories could determine high-resolution cryo-EM structures for $50 to $1500 per structure within a timeframe comparable to local clusters. Our analysis shows that Amazon's cloud computing environment may offer a viable computing environment for cryo-EM. PMID:25955969

  3. O-Allylation of phenols with allylic acetates in aqueous media using a magnetically separable catalytic system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Allylic ethers were synthesized in water using magnetically recoverable heterogeneous Pd catalyst via O-allylation of phenols with allylic acetates under ambient conditions. Aqueous reaction medium, easy recovery of the catalyst using an external magnet, efficient recycling, and ...

  4. Weak cation magnetic separation technology and MALDI-TOF-MS in screening serum protein markers in primary type I osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, X L; Li, C W; Liang, B C; He, K H; Li, X Y

    2015-01-01

    We investigated weak cation magnetic separation technology and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) in screening serum protein markers of primary type I osteoporosis. We selected 16 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and nine postmenopausal women as controls to find a new method for screening biomarkers and establishing a diagnostic model for primary type I osteoporosis. Serum samples were obtained from controls and patients. Serum protein was extracted with the WCX protein chip system; protein fingerprints were examined using MALDI-TOF-MS. The preprocessed and model construction data were handled by the ProteinChip system. The diagnostic models were established using a genetic arithmetic model combined with a support vector machine (SVM). The SVM model with the highest Youden index was selected. Combinations with the highest accuracy in distinguishing different groups of data were selected as potential biomarkers. From the two groups of serum proteins, 123 cumulative MS protein peaks were selected. Significant intensity differences in the protein peaks of 16 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis were screened. The difference in Youden index between the four groups of protein peaks showed that the highest peaks had mass-to-charge ratios of 8909.047, 8690.658, 13745.48, and 15114.52. A diagnosis model was established with these four markers as the candidates, and the model specificity and sensitivity were found to be 100%. Two groups of specimens in the SVM results on the scatterplot were distinguishable. We established a diagnosis model, and provided a new serological method for screening and diagnosis of osteoporosis with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26634492

  5. Initial assessment of CryoSat-2 Performance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingham, D.; Galin, N.; Ridout, A.; Cullen, R.; Giles, K. A.; Laxon, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    Following the launch of CryoSat-2 in April 2010, we have examined the performance of the CryoSat-2 SAR Interferometer over the continental ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland, the Artic Ocean, and, for the purposes of calibration, over the oceans. Our aim has been to provide confirmation of the engineering performance of the radar interferometer, and to provide an initial geophysical validation of the resulting elevation measurements. We have confirmed the engineering performance at system level of the interferometer through performing a sequence of satellite rolls over the oceans, which provide a surface of known behavior and surface gradient. The activity has identified some errors in the SARIN L1b data products presently issued by ESA. Once corrected, the ocean calibration has demonstrated that the interferometer measures across-track surface slopes with a precision of 25 micro-radians and an accuracy of 10 micro-radians, which may be compared with a pre-launch estimation of 100 micro-radians; in short, the engineering performance greatly its the specification. The elevation measurement over the ice sheets combines the interferometer measurement of across track slope with the range measurement deduced from the SAR echoes. We have examined the performance of the range estimation, and determined the range precision to be 19 cm RMS at 20 Hz. We have examined the retrieval of the phase information over the ice sheets, and found the phase estimates to be robust and little affected by the uncertain ice sheet topography. Based on the calibration of the interferometer, the contribution of the across track slope error is, at 0.4 mm, negligible. While the quantity of data available to us that contains the corrections identified by the interferometer is limited, we have been able to confirm the range precision values from a limited cross-over analysis. Over marine sea ice, we have verified the discrimination of sea ice and ocean lead returns using contemporaneous SAR imagery from ENVISAT. Using one month's of data, we have determined an initial dynamic topography that agrees with a high resolution region ocean model to 4 cm. We have estimated the precision of individual (20 Hz) measurements to be 2 cm. We have combined estimated the Arctic ice thickness for January and February 2011, and made a preliminary comparison with contemporaneous in-situ and air-borne estimates of thickness which agree to 20 cm. In summary, with the corrected data products, we are able to confirm that the system performance of CryoSat-2 will meet or exceed its specification over the continental and marine ice sheets.

  6. High Resolution CryoFESEM of Microbial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsen, Stanley; Lei, Ming; Martin-Lacave, Ines; Dunny, Gary; Wells, Carol

    2003-08-01

    The outer surfaces of three microorganisms, Giardia lamblia, Enterococcus faecalis, and Proteus mirabilis, were investigated by cryo-immobilization followed by sublimation of extracellular ice and cryocoating with either Pt alone or Pt plus carbon. Cryocoated samples were examined at [minus sign]125°C in either an in-lens field emission SEM or a below-the-lens field emission SEM. Cryocoating with Pt alone was sufficient for low magnification observation, but attempts to do high-resolution imaging resulted in radiolysis and cracking of the specimen surface. Double coating with Pt and carbon, in combination with high resolution backscatter electron detectors, enabled high-resolution imaging of the glycocalyx of bacteria, revealing a sponge-like network over the surface. High resolution examination of bacterial flagella also revealed a periodic substructure. Common artifacts included radiolysis leading to “cracking” of the surface, and insufficient deposition of Pt resulting in the absence of detectable surface topography.

  7. Energetic particle induced desorption of water vapor cryo-condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Owen, L.W.; Simpkins, J.E.; Uckan, T.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    An in-vessel cryo-condensation pump is being designed for the Advanced Divertor configuration of the DIII-D tokamak. To assess the importance of possible desorption of water vapor from the cryogenic surfaces of the pump due to impingement of energetic particles from the plasma, a 77 K surface on which a thin layer of water vapor was condensed was exposed to a tenuous plasma (density = 2 {times} 10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}3}, electron temperature = 3 eV). Significant desorption of the condensate occurred, suggesting that impingement of energeticparticles (10 eV) at flux levels of {approximately}10{sup 16} cm{sup 2}s{sup {minus}1} on cryogenic surfaces could potentially induce impurity problems in the tokamak plasma. A pumping configuration is presented in which this problem is minimized without sacrificing the pumping speed.

  8. Model-based particle picking for cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wong, H Chi; Chen, Jindong; Mouche, Fabrice; Rouiller, Isabelle; Bern, Marshall

    2004-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for finding particle images in cryo-EM micrographs. The algorithm starts from a crude 3D map of the target particle, computed from a relatively small number of manually picked images, and then projects the map in many different directions to give synthetic 2D templates. The templates are clustered and averaged and then cross-correlated with the micrographs. A probabilistic model of the imaging process then scores cross-correlation peaks to produce the final picks. We give quantitative results on two quite different target particles: keyhole limpet hemocyanin and p97 AAA ATPase. On these particles our automatic particle picker shows human performance level, as measured by the Fourier shell correlations of 3D reconstructions. PMID:15065683

  9. Combination of dynamic magnetophoretic separation and stationary magnetic trap for highly sensitive and selective detection of Salmonella typhimurium in complex matrix.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pei-Lin; Tang, Man; Hong, Shao-Li; Yu, Xu; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ling

    2015-12-15

    Foodborne illnesses have always been a serious problem that threats public health, so it is necessary to develop a method that can detect the pathogens rapidly and sensitively. In this study, we designed a magnetic controlled microfluidic device which integrated the dynamic magnetophoretic separation and stationary magnetic trap together for sensitive and selective detection of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium). Coupled with immunomagnetic nanospheres (IMNs), this device could separate and enrich the target pathogens and realize the sensitive detection of target pathogens on chip. Based on the principle of sandwich immunoassays, the trapped target pathogens identified by streptavidin modified QDs (SA-QDs) were detected under an inverted fluorescence microscopy. A linear range was exhibited at the concentration from 1.0×10(4) to 1.0×10(6) colony-forming units/mL (CFU/mL), the limit of detection (LOD) was as low as 5.4×10(3) CFU/mL in milk (considering the sample volume, the absolute detection limit corresponded to 540C FU). Compared with the device with stationary magnetic trap alone, the integrated device enhanced anti-interference ability and increased detection sensitivity through dynamic magnetophoretic separation, and made the detection in complex samples more accurate. In addition, it had excellent specificity and good reproducibility. The developed system provides a rapid, sensitive and accurate approach to detect pathogens in practice samples. PMID:26201979

  10. Magnetically separable ternary g-C3N4/Fe3O4/BiOI nanocomposites: Novel visible-light-driven photocatalysts based on graphitic carbon nitride.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Mitra; Habibi-Yangjeh, Aziz

    2016-03-01

    The present work demonstrates preparation of magnetically separable ternary g-C3N4/Fe3O4/BiOI nanocomposites as novel visible-light-driven photocatalysts. The resultant samples were characterized using XRD, EDX, SEM, TEM, UV-Vis DRS, FT-IR, PL, BET, and VSM techniques. The results revealed that weight percent of BiOI has considerable effect on photodegradation of rhodamine B under visible-light irradiation. Among the prepared samples, the g-C3N4/Fe3O4/BiOI (20%) nanocomposite has the best photocatalytic activity. The activity of this nanocomposite is about 10, 22, and 21-fold higher than that of the g-C3N4 sample in degradation of rhodamine B, methylene blue, and methyl orange under the visible-light irradiation. The excellent activity of the magnetic nanocomposite was attributed to more harvesting of the visible-light irradiation and efficiently separation of the electron-hole pairs. More importantly, the nanocomposite was magnetically separated after five successive cycles. PMID:26669494

  11. CRYOGENIC SYSTEM FOR BEPCII SRF CAVITY, IR QUADRUPOLE AND DETECTOR SOLENOID MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,J.X.; WANG.L.

    2004-05-11

    Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPCII) requires three types of superconducting facilities, including one pair of SRF cavities, one pair of interaction region quadrupole magnets, and one detector solenoid magnet. The cryo-plant for BEPCII has a total cooling capacity of 1kW at 4.5K, which is composed of two separate helium refrigerators of 500W each. Two refrigerators share the same gas storage and recovery system. The engineering design for the cryogenic systems, including power leads, control dewars, subcooler, cryogenic valve boxes, cryogenic transfer-lines and cryogenic controls, is completed. The production of its subsystem is under way. This paper summarizes the progress in cryogenics of the BEPCII project.

  12. In vivo labeling and specific magnetic bead separation of RNA for biofilm characterization and stress-induced gene expression analysis in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Nikolai; Gold, Andrea; Yüksel, Yousra; Berensmeier, Sonja; Schwartz, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    The method of in vivo labeling and separation of bacterial RNA was developed as an approach to elucidating the stress response of natural bacterial populations. This technique is based on the incorporation of digoxigenin-11-uridine-5'-triphosphate (DIG-11-UTP) in the RNA of active bacteria. The digoxigenin fulfills a dual role as a label of de novo synthesized RNA and a target for magnetic bead separation from a total RNA extract. Depending on the growth conditions and the population's composition, the assembly rate of DIG-11-UTP ranged from 1.2% to 12.5% of the total RNA in gram-positive and gram-negative reference bacteria as well as in natural biofilms from drinking water, surface water, and lake sediment. Separation of DIG-RNA from total RNA extracts was performed with a biotinylated anti-digoxigenin antibody and streptavidin-functionalized magnetic particles. The average separation yield from total RNA extracts was about 95% of labeled RNA. The unspecific bindings of non-labeled nucleic acids were smaller than 0.2%, as was evaluated by spiking experiments with an unmarked DNA amplicon. Applicability of the method developed was demonstrated by rRNA-directed PCR-DGGE population analysis of natural biofilms and expression profiling of two stress-induced genes (vanA and rpoS) in reference bacteria. PMID:19837116

  13. Annealing control of magnetic anisotropy and phase separation in CoFe2O4-BaTiO3 nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Herklotz, A.; Guo, E.-J.; Roth, R.; Schultz, L.; Dörr, K.; Manzoor, Sadia

    2013-12-01

    Multiferroic heteroepitaxial nanocomposite films of BaTiO3 and CoFe2O4 (CFO) have been grown by pulsed laser deposition employing alternating ablation of two ceramic targets. Films grown at temperatures between 650 °C and 710 °C contain columnar CFO grains about 10-20 nm in diameter embedded in a BaTiO3 matrix. The very strong vertical compression of these grains causes large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Post-growth annealing treatments above the growth temperature gradually release the compression. This allows one to tune the stress-induced magnetic anisotropy. Additionally, annealing leads to substantial enhancement of the saturation magnetization MS. Since MS of a pure CFO film remains unchanged by a similar annealing procedure, MS is proposed to depend on the volume fraction of the obtained CFO phase. We suggest that MS can be utilized to monitor the degree of phase separation in nanocomposite films.

  14. Synthesis of a thin-layer MnO? nanosheet-coated Fe?O? nanocomposite as a magnetically separable photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lishu; Lian, Jianshe; Wu, Longyun; Duan, Zhenrong; Jiang, Jun; Zhao, Lijun

    2014-06-17

    A facile hydrothermal method combined with a mild ultrasonic means has been developed for the fabrication of a magnetically recyclable thin-layer MnO2 nanosheet-coated Fe3O4 nanocomposite. The photocatalytic studies suggest that the MnO2/Fe3O4 nanocomposite shows excellent photocatalytic efficiency and stability simultaneously for the degradation of methylene blue under UV-vis light irradiation. Moreover, its good acid resistance and stable recyclability are very important for its future practical application as a photocatalyst. Magnetic measurements verify that the MnO2/Fe3O4 nanocomposite possesses a ferromagnetic nature, which can be effectively separated for reuse by simply applying an external magnetic field after the photocatalytic reaction. This novel composite material may have potential applications in water treatment, degradation of dye pollutants, and environmental cleaning. PMID:24856355

  15. A novel method for isolating specific endocytic vesicles using very fine ferrite particles coated with biological ligands and the high-gradient magnetic separation technique.

    PubMed

    Sato, S B; Sako, Y; Yamashina, S; Ohnishi, S

    1986-12-01

    We have developed a novel method for isolating specific endocytic vesicles using magnetic ligands and high-gradient magnetic separation. Ligands were prepared by coating extremely fine ferrite particles (10-20 nm) with bovine serum albumin and then conjugating asialoglycopeptides. These ligands were introduced into rat liver by perfusion at 16 or 37 degrees C, or by injection through the tail vein. The ligand particles were observed as electron-dense small grains in membrane-bound vesicles in Kupffer as well as parenchymal cells by electron microscopy. Livers were taken out, homogenized and lightly centrifuged. The supernatant was pumped into a separator glass tube filled with very fine ferritic stainless steel fibers and placed in a magnetic field of 0.9-2 T. Vesicles containing ferrite particles were collected with a high efficiency (ca. 70% of endocytosed magnetic ligands). About 70% of uptake appeared to be mediated by the asialoglycoprotein receptors. The captured vesicles were practically free from marker enzymes for plasma membranes, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi apparatus. Lysosomal enzyme activity of the vesicles increased with the time of perfusion at 37 degrees C but not at 16 degrees C. Protein composition of the captured vesicles was analyzed by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The composition changed characteristically with time on perfusion at 16 and 37 degrees C. The present method provides a powerful tool to collect prelysosomal endocytic vesicles containing specific ligands and lysosomes fused with these specific endocytic vesicles. PMID:3571183

  16. Study on the Effect of Melt Convection on Phase Separation Structures in Undercooled CuCo Alloys Using an Electromagnetic Levitator Superimposed with a Static Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Takamitsu; Kitahara, Tsubasa; Kurosawa, Ryo; Kubo, Masaki; Tsukada, Takao; Uchikoshi, Masahito; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2014-08-01

    We studied the effect of melt convection on phase separation structures in undercooled Cu80Co20 alloys by using an electromagnetic levitator, where a static magnetic field was applied to control convection in the molten alloys. It was found that, when the static magnetic field was relatively small, dispersed structures with relatively fine Co-rich spheres distributed in the matrix of the Cu-rich phase were observed. However, a few large, coalesced Co-rich phases appeared in the Cu-rich matrix when the magnetic field exceeded a certain value, i.e., approximately 1.5 T in this study. The mean diameter of the droplet-shaped Co-rich phases distributed in the matrix of the Cu-rich phase increased gradually with the magnetic field and increased rapidly at approximately 1.5 T. Moreover, it was speculated from the result of periodic laser heating that the marked change in the phase separation structures at approximately 1.5 T might be due to a convective transition from turbulent flow to laminar flow in the molten sample, where the time variation of temperature in the lower part of the electromagnetically levitated molten sample was measured when the upper part of the sample was periodically heated.

  17. Segmentation and registration of molecular components in 3-dimensional density maps from cryo-electron microscopy

    E-print Network

    Pintilie, Grigore Dimitrie, 1976-

    2010-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy is a method that produces 3D density maps of macromolecular complexes. Segmentation and registration methods are heavily used to extract structural information from such density maps. Segmentation ...

  18. Validated near-atomic resolution structure of bacteriophage epsilon15 derived from cryo-EM

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    Validated near-atomic resolution structure of bacteriophage epsilon15 derived from cryo important contribu- tions to modern structural biology. Bacteriophages, the most diverse and abundant previous electron cryomicroscopy structure of Salmonella bacteriophage epsilon15, achieving a resolution

  19. Detection of Secondary and Supersecondary Structures of Proteins from Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    E-print Network

    Detection of Secondary and Supersecondary Structures of Proteins from Cryo-Electron Microscopy in three-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) have enabled the quantitative visualization in proteins. Keywords: protein structures detection, electron microscopy, stable/unstable manifolds, critical

  20. River flood events in Thailand and Bangladesh observed by CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Karina; Villadsen, Heidi; Andersen, Ole; Stenseng, Lars; Knudsen, Per

    2015-04-01

    The high along track resolution of the SIRAL altimeter carried on-board CryoSat-2 offers a wide range of unique opportunities for satellite monitoring. This study focuses on the ability of CryoSat-2 to detect the effects of flood events such as increased river levels and inundation of land. Here we study two flood events; the Bangladesh flood event of June 2012 and the flooding in Thailand that lasted between July 2011 and January 2012. The flooding in these areas was caused by abnormal monsoonal rainfall and affected millions of people. We process CryoSat-2 level 1b SAR mode data to derive water levels for the areas and compare these levels before, during and after the flooding events. Other parameters such as the backscatter coefficient and pulse peakiness are also considered. To verify the extent of the flooding observed by CryoSat-2 we compare with independent sources such as Landsat images.

  1. The low-temperature magnetostructure and magnetic field response of Pr0.9Ca0.1MnO3: the roles of Pr spins and magnetic phase separation.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, J; Geilhufe, M; Frontzek, M; Hergert, W; Ernst, A; Paturi, P; Udby, L

    2016-01-27

    With the goal of elucidating the background of photoinduced ferromagnetism phenomena observed in the perovskite structured (Pr,Ca) manganites, the low-temperature magnetostructure of the material [Formula: see text] was revised using cold neutron powder diffraction, SQUID magnetometry and ab initio calculations. Particular emphasis was placed on determining the presence of nanoscale magnetic phase separation. Previously published results of a canted A-AFM average ground state were reproduced to a good precision both experimentally and theoretically, and complemented by investigating the effects of an applied magnetic field of 2.7 T on the magnetostructure. Explicit evidence of nanoscale magnetic clusters in the material was obtained based on high-resolution neutron diffractograms. Along with several supporting arguments, we present this finding as a justification for extending the nanoscale magnetic phase separation model of manganites to the material under discussion despite its very low Ca doping level in the context of the model. In the light of the new data, we also conclude that the low temperature magnetic moment of Pr must be ca. 300% larger than previously thought in this material, close to the high spin value of [Formula: see text] per formula unit. PMID:26732100

  2. Visualizing the global secondary structure of a viral RNA genome with cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garmann, Rees F; Gopal, Ajaykumar; Athavale, Shreyas S; Knobler, Charles M; Gelbart, William M; Harvey, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    The lifecycle, and therefore the virulence, of single-stranded (ss)-RNA viruses is regulated not only by their particular protein gene products, but also by the secondary and tertiary structure of their genomes. The secondary structure of the entire genomic RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was recently determined by selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). The SHAPE analysis suggested a single highly extended secondary structure with much less branching than occurs in the ensemble of structures predicted by purely thermodynamic algorithms. Here we examine the solution-equilibrated STMV genome by direct visualization with cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), using an RNA of similar length transcribed from the yeast genome as a control. The cryo-EM data reveal an ensemble of branching patterns that are collectively consistent with the SHAPE-derived secondary structure model. Thus, our results both elucidate the statistical nature of the secondary structure of large ss-RNAs and give visual support for modern RNA structure determination methods. Additionally, this work introduces cryo-EM as a means to distinguish between competing secondary structure models if the models differ significantly in terms of the number and/or length of branches. Furthermore, with the latest advances in cryo-EM technology, we suggest the possibility of developing methods that incorporate restraints from cryo-EM into the next generation of algorithms for the determination of RNA secondary and tertiary structures. PMID:25752599

  3. Direct observation of liquid crystals using cryo-TEM: specimen preparation and low-dose imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min; Kim, Young-Ki; Zhang, Cuiyu; Borshch, Volodymyr; Zhou, Shuang; Park, Heung-Shik; Jákli, Antal; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Tamba, Maria-Gabriela; Kohlmeier, Alexandra; Mehl, Georg H; Weissflog, Wolfgang; Studer, Daniel; Zuber, Benoît; Gnägi, Helmut; Lin, Fang

    2014-10-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) represent a challenging group of materials for direct transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies due to the complications in specimen preparation and the severe radiation damage. In this paper, we summarize a series of specimen preparation methods, including thin film and cryo-sectioning approaches, as a comprehensive toolset enabling high-resolution direct cryo-TEM observation of a broad range of LCs. We also present comparative analysis using cryo-TEM and replica freeze-fracture TEM on both thermotropic and lyotropic LCs. In addition to the revisits of previous practices, some new concepts are introduced, e.g., suspended thermotropic LC thin films, combined high-pressure freezing and cryo-sectioning of lyotropic LCs, and the complementary applications of direct TEM and indirect replica TEM techniques. The significance of subnanometer resolution cryo-TEM observation is demonstrated in a few important issues in LC studies, including providing direct evidences for the existence of nanoscale smectic domains in nematic bent-core thermotropic LCs, comprehensive understanding of the twist-bend nematic phase, and probing the packing of columnar aggregates in lyotropic chromonic LCs. Direct TEM observation opens ways to a variety of TEM techniques, suggesting that TEM (replica, cryo, and in situ techniques), in general, may be a promising part of the solution to the lack of effective structural probe at the molecular scale in LC studies. PMID:25045045

  4. Single-particle cryo-EM of the ryanodine receptor channel in an aqueous environment

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Mariah R.; Fan, Guizhen; Serysheva, Irina I.

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are tetrameric ligand-gated Ca2+ release channels that are responsible for the increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration leading to muscle contraction. Our current understanding of RyR channel gating and regulation is greatly limited due to the lack of a high-resolution structure of the channel protein. The enormous size and unwieldy shape of Ca2+ release channels make X-ray or NMR methods difficult to apply for high-resolution structural analysis of the full-length functional channel. Single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) is one of the only effective techniques for the study of such a large integral membrane protein and its molecular interactions. Despite recent developments in cryo-EM technologies and break-through single-particle cryo-EM studies of ion channels, cryospecimen preparation, particularly the presence of detergent in the buffer, remains the main impediment to obtaining atomic-resolution structures of ion channels and a multitude of other integral membrane protein complexes. In this review we will discuss properties of several detergents that have been successfully utilized in cryo-EM studies of ion channels and the emergence of the detergent alternative amphipol to stabilize ion channels for structure-function characterization. Future structural studies of challenging specimen like ion channels are likely to be facilitated by cryo-EM amenable detergents or alternative surfactants. PMID:25844145

  5. Studies of sheath characteristics in a double plasma device with a negatively biased separating grid and a magnetic filter field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B. K.; Chakraborty, M.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2012-09-01

    A double plasma device has two regions: Source region and target region. These two regions are divided by a magnetic filter field. A grid is placed coplanar to the magnetic filter. To study the sheath structure in the target region, a metallic plate is placed at the center, which can be biased with respect to the chamber (ground) potential. Plasma is created in the source region by filament discharge technique. Plasma diffusing from the source region to the target region is subjected to the magnetic filter field and also an electric field applied on the grid. Plasma thus obtained in the target region forms a sheath on the biased plate. The influence of both the magnetic filter field and the electric field, applied between the grid and the chamber wall, on the sheath structure formed on the biased plate is studied. It is found that the magnetic filter field and the electric field change the sheath structure in different ways.

  6. Studies of sheath characteristics in a double plasma device with a negatively biased separating grid and a magnetic filter field

    SciTech Connect

    Das, B. K.; Chakraborty, M.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2012-09-15

    A double plasma device has two regions: Source region and target region. These two regions are divided by a magnetic filter field. A grid is placed coplanar to the magnetic filter. To study the sheath structure in the target region, a metallic plate is placed at the center, which can be biased with respect to the chamber (ground) potential. Plasma is created in the source region by filament discharge technique. Plasma diffusing from the source region to the target region is subjected to the magnetic filter field and also an electric field applied on the grid. Plasma thus obtained in the target region forms a sheath on the biased plate. The influence of both the magnetic filter field and the electric field, applied between the grid and the chamber wall, on the sheath structure formed on the biased plate is studied. It is found that the magnetic filter field and the electric field change the sheath structure in different ways.

  7. Popcorn-shaped magnetic core-plasmonic shell multifunctional nanoparticles for the targeted magnetic separation and enrichment, label-free SERS imaging, and photothermal destruction of multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen; Senapati, Dulal; Khan, Sadia Afrin; Singh, Anant Kumar; Hamme, Ashton; Yust, Brian; Sardar, Dhiraj; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2013-02-18

    Over the last few years, one of the most important and complex problems facing our society is treating infectious diseases caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDRB), by using current market-existing antibiotics. Driven by this need, we report for the first time the development of the multifunctional popcorn-shaped iron magnetic core-gold plasmonic shell nanotechnology-driven approach for targeted magnetic separation and enrichment, label-free surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection, and the selective photothermal destruction of MDR Salmonella DT104. Due to the presence of the "lightning-rod effect", the core-shell popcorn-shaped gold-nanoparticle tips provided a huge field of SERS enhancement. The experimental data show that the M3038 antibody-conjugated nanoparticles can be used for targeted separation and SERS imaging of MDR Salmonella DT104. A targeted photothermal-lysis experiment, by using 670 nm light at 1.5 W cm(-2) for 10 min, results in selective and irreparable cellular-damage to MDR Salmonella. We discuss the possible mechanism and operating principle for the targeted separation, label-free SERS imaging, and photothermal destruction of MDRB by using the popcorn-shaped magnetic/plasmonic nanotechnology. PMID:23296491

  8. Magnetically separable ternary hybrid of ZnFe2O4-Fe2O3-Bi2WO6 hollow nanospheres with enhanced visible photocatalytic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junqi; Liu, Zhenxing; Zhu, Zhenfeng

    2014-11-01

    Magnetically separable ternary hybrid ZnFe2O4-Fe2O3-Bi2WO6 hollow nanospheres were designed and synthesized by an effective three-step approach. Specifically, using phenolic formaldehyde microspheres (PFS) as template direct the sequential coating of ?-Fe2O3/ZnFe2O4 layer and subsequent Bi2WO6 layer via impregnating-calcination process. The photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation is in the order of ZnFe2O4-Fe2O3-Bi2WO6 > ZnFe2O4-Bi2WO6 > Bi2WO6 > ZnFe2O4-Fe2O3 > ZnFe2O4. The enhanced activity could be attributed to the cascade electron transfer from ZnFe2O4 to ?-Fe2O3 then to Bi2WO6 through the interfacial potential gradient in the ternary hybrid conduction bands, which facilitate the charge separation and retard the charge pair recombination. Furthermore, the ternary hybrid ZnFe2O4-Fe2O3-Bi2WO6 hollow nanospheres could be conveniently separated by using an external magnetic field, and be chemically and optically stable after several repetitive tests. The study also provides a general and effective method in the composite hollow nanomaterials with sound heterojunctions that may show a variety of applications.

  9. Yolk-shell nanostructured Fe3O4@NiSiO3 for selective affinity and magnetic separation of His-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Guangchuan; Xiao, Yun; Yang, Yuling; Tang, Ruikang

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments of nanotechnology encourage novel materials for facile separations and purifications of recombinant proteins, which are of great importance in disease diagnoses and treatments. We find that Fe3O4@NiSiO3 with yolk-shell nanostructure can be used to specifically purify histidine-tagged (His-tagged) proteins from mixtures of lysed cells with a recyclable process. Each individual nanoparticle composes by a mesoporous nickel silicate shell and a magnetic Fe3O4 core in the hollow inner, which is featured by its great loading efficiency and rapid response toward magnetic fields. The abundant Ni(2+) cations on the shell provide docking sites for selective coordination of histidine and the reversible release is induced by excess imidazole solution. Because of the Fe3O4 cores, the separation, concentration, and recycling of the nanocomposites become feasible under the controls of magnets. These characteristics would be highly beneficial in nanoparticle-based biomedical applications for targeted-drug delivery and biosensors. PMID:25303145

  10. Ternary ZnO/Ag3VO4/Fe3O4 nanocomposites: Novel magnetically separable photocatalyst for efficiently degradation of dye pollutants under visible-light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekofteh-Gohari, Maryam; Habibi-Yangjeh, Aziz

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we successfully prepared a series of novel magnetically separable ZnO/Ag3VO4/Fe3O4 nanocomposites by a facile refluxing method using Fe3O4, zinc nitrate, silver nitrate, ammonium metavanadate, and sodium hydroxide as starting materials without using any post preparation treatments. The microstructure, purity, morphology, spectroscopic, and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were studied using XRD, EDX, SEM, TEM, UV-vis DRS, FT-IR, PL, and VSM techniques. The ZnO/Ag3VO4/Fe3O4 nanocomposite with 8:1 weight ratio of ZnO/Ag3VO4 to Fe3O4 has the superior activity in degradation of rhodamine B under visible-light irradiation. Photocatalytic activity of this nanocomposite is about 11.5-fold higher than that of the ZnO/Fe3O4 nanocomposite. The results showed that the preparation time and calcination temperature significantly affect on the photocatalytic activity. The trapping experiments revealed that superoxide ions and holes have major influence on the degradation reaction. Furthermore, the enhanced activity of the nanocomposite for degradation of two more dye pollutants was confirmed. Finally, the nanocomposite was magnetically separated from the treated solution after four successive cycles.

  11. A novel magnetically separable TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofiber with high photocatalytic activity under UV-vis light

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Cong-Ju; Wang, Jiao-Na; Wang, Bin; Gong, Jian Ru; Lin, Zhang

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel magnetically separable composite photocatalyst TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofiber was prepared by sol-gel method and electrospinning technique, which can be reclaimed with a magnet, and the decolorizing efficiency of MB solution reached 95.87%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composite TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofibers with diameter of 110 {+-} 28 nm have been successfully synthesized by the combination of sol-gel method and electrospinning technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of Co{sup 2+} or/and Fe{sup 3+} ions may occupy some of the lattice sites of TiO{sub 2} to form an iron-titanium solid solution and narrow the band gap, which broadens the response region of visible light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The resultant nanofibers not only have high decomposition efficiency with methylene blue (MB) under the UV irradiation, which is close to that of Degussa P25, but also can be separated with a magnet and avoid the secondary pollution of the treated water. -- Abstract: A novel magnetically separable heterogeneous photocatalyst TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofiber was prepared by sol-gel method and electrospinning technology, followed by heat treatment at 550 Degree-Sign C for 2 h. The phase structure, morphology and magnetic property of the composite nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometer analysis. The photocatalytic studies of TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} fibers suggested that the presence of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} not only enhanced the absorbance of UV light, but also broadened the response region to visible light. The decolorizing efficiency of methylene blue (MB) solution reaches 95.87% over TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofibers under 300 W Hg lamp after 5 h, which is close to that of Degussa P25. Furthermore, these fibers can be collected with a magnet for reuse and effectively avoid the secondary pollution of the treated water.

  12. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  13. Breaking the Radiation Damage Limit with Cryo-SAXS

    PubMed Central

    Meisburger, Steve P.; Warkentin, Matthew; Chen, Huimin; Hopkins, Jesse B.; Gillilan, Richard E.; Pollack, Lois; Thorne, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is a versatile and widely used technique for obtaining low-resolution structures of macromolecules and complexes. SAXS experiments measure molecules in solution, without the need for labeling or crystallization. However, radiation damage currently limits the application of SAXS to molecules that can be produced in microgram quantities; for typical proteins, 10–20 ?L of solution at 1 mg/mL is required to accumulate adequate signal before irreversible x-ray damage is observed. Here, we show that cryocooled proteins and nucleic acids can withstand doses at least two orders of magnitude larger than room temperature samples. We demonstrate accurate T = 100 K particle envelope reconstructions from sample volumes as small as 15 nL, a factor of 1000 smaller than in current practice. Cryo-SAXS will thus enable structure determination of difficult-to-express proteins and biologically important, highly radiation-sensitive proteins including light-activated switches and metalloenzymes. PMID:23332075

  14. An ultra-rapid cryo-technique for complex organisms.

    PubMed

    Irdani, T; Fortunato, A; Torre, R

    2015-12-01

    The soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an excellent research model in cell biology, human disease and developmental studies. In this study, a novel cryopreservation technique based on a rapid cooling procedure, previously established for juveniles, was applied to adult-worms. Here we demonstrated that adults of C. elegans, a complex metazoan organism, survive to a rapid cooling and storage in liquid nitrogen (-196 °C) with a very high survival percentage (85%). The procedure relies on a Low CryoProtectant Technique (LCPT) and Ultra Rapid Cooling (URC). The high cooling rate is achieved through the reduction of sample volumes and the effectiveness of a nylon carrier. Our technique complies with the requirements for vitrification to occur. The main distinctive characters of this cryopreservation technique compared to other methods, e.g. Slow Freezing and Vitrification, are presented. Our results show that this cryopreservation method is valid for both unicellular and multicellular organisms; it is suitable for short or long time storage in liquid-nitrogen. This technique promises to be a unique and simpler method for cryostorage of cells, organisms and tissues. PMID:26499841

  15. A self-consistent two-dimensional resistive fluid theory of field-aligned potential structures including charge separation and magnetic and velocity shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl

    1990-01-01

    A self-consistent two-fluid theory that includes the magnetic field and shear patterns is developed to model stationary electrostatic structures with field-aligned potential drops. Shear flow is also included in the theory since this seems to be a prominent feature of the structures of interest. In addition, Ohmic dissipation, a Hall term, and pressure gradients in a generalized Ohm's law, modified for cases without quasi-neutrality, are included. In the analytic theory, the electrostatic force is balanced by field-aligned pressure gradients (i.e., thermal effects in the direction of the magnetic field) and by pressure gradients and magnetic stresses in the perpendicular direction. Within this theory, simple examples of applications are presented to demonstrate the kind of solutions resulting from the model. The results show how the effects of charge separation and shear in the magnetic field and the velocity can be combined to form self-consistent structures such as are found to exist above the aurora, suggested also in association with solar flares.

  16. MERIT Magnet Testing Status Wednesday March 8 2006 VRVS

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    MERIT Magnet Testing Status Wednesday March 8 2006 VRVS Peter H. Titus, MIT Plasma Science components are cut, many are welded. Roof sleeve has been installed. Cryogenic lines have been run. We. (Long Stem Cryo Valve) Cryogenic System ­ Connection to the magnet is complete, Some gas lines

  17. Description and comparison of algorithms for correcting anisotropic magnification in cryo-EM images.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianhua; Brubaker, Marcus A; Benlekbir, Samir; Rubinstein, John L

    2015-11-01

    Single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows for structures of proteins and protein complexes to be determined from images of non-crystalline specimens. Cryo-EM data analysis requires electron microscope images of randomly oriented ice-embedded protein particles to be rotated and translated to allow for coherent averaging when calculating three-dimensional (3D) structures. Rotation of 2D images is usually done with the assumption that the magnification of the electron microscope is the same in all directions. However, due to electron optical aberrations, this condition is not met with some electron microscopes when used with the settings necessary for cryo-EM with a direct detector device (DDD) camera. Correction of images by linear interpolation in real space has allowed high-resolution structures to be calculated from cryo-EM images for symmetric particles. Here we describe and compare a simple real space method, a simple Fourier space method, and a somewhat more sophisticated Fourier space method to correct images for a measured anisotropy in magnification. Further, anisotropic magnification causes contrast transfer function (CTF) parameters estimated from image power spectra to have an apparent systematic astigmatism. To address this problem we develop an approach to adjust CTF parameters measured from distorted images so that they can be used with corrected images. The effect of anisotropic magnification on CTF parameters provides a simple way of detecting magnification anisotropy in cryo-EM datasets. PMID:26087140

  18. Structure of ?-galactosidase at 3.2-Å resolution obtained by cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Matthies, Doreen; Banerjee, Soojay; Merk, Alan; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    We report the solution structure of Escherichia coli ?-galactosidase (?465 kDa), solved at ?3.2-Å resolution by using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Densities for most side chains, including those of residues in the active site, and a catalytic Mg2+ ion can be discerned in the map obtained by cryo-EM. The atomic model derived from our cryo-EM analysis closely matches the 1.7-Å crystal structure with a global rmsd of ?0.66 Å. There are significant local differences throughout the protein, with clear evidence for conformational changes resulting from contact zones in the crystal lattice. Inspection of the map reveals that although densities for residues with positively charged and neutral side chains are well resolved, systematically weaker densities are observed for residues with negatively charged side chains. We show that the weaker densities for negatively charged residues arise from their greater sensitivity to radiation damage from electron irradiation as determined by comparison of density maps obtained by using electron doses ranging from 10 to 30 e?/Å2. In summary, we establish that it is feasible to use cryo-EM to determine near-atomic resolution structures of protein complexes (<500 kDa) with low symmetry, and that the residue-specific radiation damage that occurs with increasing electron dose can be monitored by using dose fractionation tools available with direct electron detector technology. PMID:25071206

  19. Structural characterization of amphiphilic homopolymer micelles using light scattering, SANS, and cryo-TEM

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Joseph P.; Kelley, Elizabeth G.; Murphy, Ryan P.; Moughton, Adam O.; Robin, Mathew; Lu, Annhelen; Colombani, Olivier; Chassenieux, Christophe; Cheung, David; Sullivan, Millicent O.

    2013-01-01

    We report the aqueous solution self-assembly of a series of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) polymers end-functionalized with a hydrophobic sulfur-carbon-sulfur (SCS) pincer ligand. Although the hydrophobic ligand accounted for <5 wt% of the overall homopolymer mass, the polymers self-assembled into well-defined spherical micelles in aqueous solution, and these micelles are potential precursors to solution-assembled nanoreactors for small molecule catalysis applications. The micelle structural details were investigated using light scattering, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Radial density profiles extracted from the cryo-TEM micrographs suggested that the PNIPAM chains formed a diffuse corona with a radially decreasing corona density profile and provided valuable a priori information about the micelle structure for SANS data modeling. SANS analysis indicated a similar profile in which the corona surrounded a small hydrophobic core containing the pincer ligand. The similarity between the SANS and cryo-TEM results demonstrated that detailed information about the micelle density profile can be obtained directly from cryo-TEM and highlighted the complementary use of scattering and cryo-TEM in the structural characterization of solution-assemblies, such as the SCS pincer-functionalized homopolymers described here. PMID:24058209

  20. Electron cryo-tomographic structure of cystovirus {phi}12

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Guobin; Wei Hui; Rice, William J.; Stokes, David L.; Gottlieb, Paul

    2008-03-01

    Bacteriophage {phi}12 is a member of the Cystoviridae virus family and contains a genome consisting of three segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). This virus family contains eight identified members, of which four have been classified in regard to their complete genomic sequence and encoded viral proteins. A phospholipid envelope that contains the integral proteins P6, P9, P10, and P13 surrounds the viral particles. In species {phi}6, host infection requires binding of a multimeric P3 complex to type IV pili. In species {phi}8, {phi}12, and {phi}13, the attachment apparatus is a heteromeric protein assembly that utilizes the rough lipopolysaccharide (rlps) as a receptor. In {phi}8 the protein components are designated P3a and P3b while in species {phi}12 proteins P3a and P3c have been identified in the complex. The phospholipid envelope of the cystoviruses surrounds a nucleocapsid (NC) composed of two shells. The outer shell is composed of protein P8 with a T = 13 icosahedral lattice while the primary component of the inner shell is a dodecahedral frame composed of dimeric protein P1. For the current study, the 3D architecture of the intact {phi}12 virus was obtained by electron cryo-tomography. The nucleocapsid appears to be centered within the membrane envelope and possibly attached to it by bridging structures. Two types of densities were observed protruding from the membrane envelope. The densities of the first type were elongated, running parallel, and closely associated to the envelope outer surface. In contrast, the second density was positioned about 12 nm above the envelope connected to it by a flexible low-density stem. This second structure formed a torroidal structure termed 'the donut' and appears to inhibit BHT-induced viral envelope fusion.

  1. Pulse-to-pulse correlation in CryoSat SAR mode radar altimeter echoes from the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. H.

    2012-12-01

    Serial correlation among successive radar echoes returned from the ocean surface is an important design constraint in satellite altimetry. Walsh [1974, 1982] established the conventional wisdom. Taking the radar footprint to be a uniformly radiating disk, he derived a theoretically expected echo decorrelation time of about 0.5 milliseconds. Following Walsh, ocean altimeters usually employ a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) around 2 kHz, in order to obtain statistically independent echoes at (so it is thought) the maximum possible rate. CryoSat, designed for ranging to ice surfaces, employs a PRF of 18.2 kHz in its SAR mode. CryoSat SAR echo sequences over ocean surfaces can be used to empirically determine the ocean echo decorrelation, and thus to test Walsh's model. Such a test is presented in this paper. The analysis begins by forming the ensemble average of complex cross products of pairs of echoes separated by a time lag L * PRI, where the pulse repetition interval (PRI) is 55 microseconds and the echo lag L runs from 0 to 32. The L = 0 case yields the conventional pulse-limited waveform, which is used to determine the sea state in each ensemble average. The averages of lagged echo cross products reveal the complex coherency, with sampling in both slow time (lag, L), and fast time (range, sampled in waveform gates). Data from many areas and sea states are analyzed, and the results are explained using a simple theory approximating the complex coherency expected from a Gaussian radar pulse. This theory generalizes the classical Brown [1977] waveform model to lagged echo cross products, and generalizes Walsh's work to the case of footprints with non-uniform illumination and diffuse edges. Phase is due to vertical motion of the antenna. Amplitude variations in fast time are due to horizontal motion of the antenna, and are independent of wave height; their functional form confirms Brown's assumption that scattering is independent of azimuth. In slow time, the amplitude decays with lag at a rate that depends on wave height, and without zero crossings. This is in contrast to Walsh's theory, which established the conventional wisdom based on the first zero crossing of Bessel function J1. These results may be applied to determine the optimally weighted average of SAR echoes that yields the best conventional waveform for inter-calibration of SAR and conventional measurements. This calibration is useful for CryoSat and will be necessary for Sentinel-3 and Jason-CS. The present work finds that a conventional altimeter may obtain useful data at rates as high as 9 kHz. This suggests that the interleaved mode option under consideration for Jason-CS could yield optimal conventional measurements as well as simultaneous SAR. I gratefully acknowledge Ron Abileah, Eric Leuliette, John Lillibridge, Laury Miller, Tom Newman and the CryoSat team for helpful discussions.

  2. Cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle 3D image reconstruction techniques have been used to examine a

    E-print Network

    Tao, Yizhi Jane

    616 Cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle 3D image reconstruction techniques have been used-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction has provided important insights into the function of many-coupled device CTF contrast transfer function ds double-stranded EM electron microscopy/microscope NCS

  3. The capsid of small papova viruses contains 72 pentameric capsomeres: direct evidence from cryo-electron-microscopy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Timothy S.

    The capsid of small papova viruses contains 72 pentameric capsomeres: direct evidence from cryo-electron-microscopy from cryo-electron microscopy supports the correctness of the polyoma structure solved structures: image analysis of electron micrographs of frozen- hydrated samples (SV40 virions

  4. Greenland 2012 melt event effects on CryoSat-2 radar altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Johan; Vallelonga, Paul; Simonsen, Sebastian B.; Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Forsberg, René; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hvidberg, Christine S.; Kjær, Helle A.; Satow, Kazuhide

    2015-05-01

    CryoSat-2 data are used to study elevation changes over an area in the interior part of the Greenland Ice Sheet during the extreme melt event in July 2012. The penetration of the radar signal into dry snow depends heavily on the snow stratigraphy, and the rapid formation of refrozen ice layers can bias the surface elevations obtained from radar altimetry. We investigate the change in CryoSat-2 waveforms and elevation estimates over the melt event and interpret the findings by comparing in situ surface and snow pit observations from the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling Project camp. The investigation shows a major transition of scattering properties around the area, and an apparent elevation increase of 56 ± 26 cm is observed in reprocessed CryoSat-2 data. We suggest that this jump in elevation can be explained by the formation of a refrozen melt layer that raised the reflective surface, introducing a positive elevation bias.

  5. Carotene location in processed food samples measured by cryo In-SEM Raman.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia; Schumm, Stephan; Pudney, Paul D A; Hazekamp, Johan

    2011-09-21

    Cryo In-SEM Raman has been used for the first time to localise carotene compounds in a food matrix. Raman spectra of lycopene and ?-carotene have been obtained from sampling oil droplets and plant cell structures visualised with cryo-SEM in tomato and carrot based emulsions containing 5% oil. It was possible to identify the carotenoids in both the oil droplets and the cell walls. Furthermore our results gave some indication that the carotenoids were in the non-crystalline state. It has been suggested that a higher amount of carotenes solubilised into the oil phase of the food matrix would lead to a higher bioaccessibility, thus understanding the effect of processing conditions on micronutrients distribution in a food matrix might help the design of plant based food products with a better nutritional quality. This shows improved structural characterisation of the cryo-SEM with the molecular sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy as a promising approach for complex biological problems. PMID:21789314

  6. Phasing of the Triatoma virus diffraction data using a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Estrozi, L.F.; Neumann, E.; Squires, G.; Rozas-Dennis, G.; Costabel, M.; Rey, F.A.; Guerin, D.M.A. Navaza, J.

    2008-05-25

    The blood-sucking reduviid bug Triatoma infestans, one of the most important vector of American human trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) is infected by the Triatoma virus (TrV). TrV has been classified as a member of the Cripavirus genus (type cricket paralysis virus) in the Dicistroviridae family. This work presents the three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction of the TrV capsid at about 25 A resolution and its use as a template for phasing the available crystallographic data by the molecular replacement method. The main structural differences between the cryo-EM reconstruction of TrV and other two viruses, one from the same family, the cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) and the human rhinovirus 16 from the Picornaviridae family are presented and discussed.

  7. Coastal sea level from inland CryoSat-2 interferometric SAR altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulaitijiang, Adili; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Stenseng, Lars

    2015-03-01

    The European Space Agency's CryoSat-2 satellite can operate in a novel synthetic aperture radar interferometric (SARIn) mode where its nominal footprint (swath) is observed by two antennas and the phase difference between the signals is used to determination the exact location of the scatterer through an off-nadir correction. The potential of SARIn for sea level determination is investigated over the fjords of Eastern Greenland. In principle the satellite should only track sea level within its nominal footprint of 7 km across track, but we observe that scattering targets (fjords) within twice its nominal footprint are frequently observed but mislocated in CryoSat-2 due to phase wrapping. We devised a way to relocate the observations and correct the range accordingly. When CryoSat-2 is flying inland we consequently observed that the satellite occasionally provide valid sea level in fjords up to 13 km away in the across-track direction.

  8. Perceptual Organization as a Method for Detection and Selection of Filamentous Structures in Highly Noisy Images Acquired by Cryo-electron Microscopy

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Noisy Images Acquired by Cryo-electron Microscopy Yuanxin Zhu, Bridget Carragher, David Kriegman complexes, vaults, ribosomes, proteosomes, etc. Cryo-electron microscopy is an approach that can be used single particles and asymmetrical single particles). Cryo-electron microscopy as a technique does however

  9. Adsorption of phosphate from water by easily separable Fe3O4@SiO2 core/shell magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with hydrous lanthanum oxide.

    PubMed

    Lai, Li; Xie, Qiang; Chi, Lina; Gu, Wei; Wu, Deyi

    2016-03-01

    Hydrous lanthanum oxide was loaded onto the surface of Fe3O4@SiO2 core/shell magnetic nanoparticles to obtain an easily separable adsorbent (abbreviated as Fe-Si-La) for efficient separation of phosphate from water. Fe-Si-La was characterized with XRF, XRD, TEM, specific surface area and magnetization and their performance for phosphate removal was investigated. The Fe3O4@SiO2 core/shell structure was confirmed and the hydrous lanthanum oxide was successfully loaded onto its surface. The newly developed adsorbent had magnetization of 51.27emu/g. The Langmuir adsorption capacity of phosphate by Fe-Si-La reached 27.8mg/g by loading only 1mmol lanthanum per gram of magnetite. The adsorption was fast; nearly 99% of phosphate could be removed within 10min. The removal of phosphate was favored within the pH range 5.0-9.0. The adsorption on Fe-Si-La was not significantly influenced by ionic strength and by the coexistence of the anions of chloride and nitrate but sulfate, bicarbonate and humic acid showed slightly greater negative effects. Phosphate removal efficiency of higher than 95% was attained for real effluent of a wastewater treatment plant when the dose of adsorbent was >0.2kg/ton. The results showed that adsorbed phosphate could be nearly completely desorbed with NaOH solution for further use. In conclusion, Fe-Si-La is a promising adsorbent for the removal and recovery of phosphate from water. PMID:26641568

  10. Magnetic affinity microspheres with meso-/macroporous shells for selective enrichment and fast separation of phosphorylated biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Yan-Lin; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Ni, Jia-Zuan

    2013-04-24

    The flowerlike multifunctional affinity microspheres prepared by a facile solvothermal synthesis and subsequent calcination process consist of magnetic cores and hierarchical meso-/macroporous TiO2 shells. The hierarchical porous structure of the flowerlike affinity microspheres is constructed by the macroporous shell from the stacked mesoporous nanopetals which are assembled by small crystallites. The affinity microspheres have a relatively large specific surface area of 50.45 m(2) g(-1) and superparamagnetism with a saturation magnetization (Ms) value of 30.1 emu g(-1). We further demonstrate that they can be applied for rapid and effective purification of phosphoproteins, in virtue of their selective affinity, porous structure, and strong magnetism. In addition, the affinity microspheres can also be used for enrichment of phosphopeptides, and the selectivity is greatly improved due to the increase of mass transport and prevention of the possible "shadow effect" resulting from the smaller and deeper pores by taking advantage of the unique porous structure. Overall, this work will be highly beneficial for future applications in the isolation and identification of phosphorylated biomolecules. PMID:23514605

  11. Retrofit implementation of Zernike phase plate imaging for cryo-TEM

    PubMed Central

    Marko, Michael; Leith, ArDean; Hsieh, Chyongere; Danev, Radostin

    2011-01-01

    In-focus phase-plate imaging is particularly beneficial for cryo-TEM because it offers a substantial overall increase in image contrast, without an electron dose penalty, and it simplifies image interpretation. We show how phase-plate cryo-TEM can be implemented with an appropriate existing TEM, and provide a basic practical introduction to use of thin-film (carbon) phase plates. We point out potential pitfalls of phase-plate operation, and discuss solutions. We provide information on evaluating a particular TEM for its suitability. PMID:21272647

  12. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy imaging of the morphology of submicrometer aerosol containing organic acids and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Veghte, Daniel P; Bittner, Danielle Rae; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2014-03-01

    The effects of aerosol particles on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry and climate are determined in part by the internal arrangement of compounds within the particles. To characterize the morphology of internally mixed aerosol particles in the accumulation mode size regime, we have used cryo-transmission electron microscopy to investigate the phase separation behavior of dry, submicrometer particles composed of ammonium sulfate mixed with carboxylic acids (adipic, azelaic, citric, glutaric, malonic, pimelic, suberic, and succinic acid). Determining the morphology of dry particles is important for understanding laboratory studies of aerosol optical properties, reactivity, and cloud condensation nucleus activity, results from field instruments where aerosol particles are dried prior to analysis, and atmospheric processes like deposition mode heterogeneous ice nucleation that occur on dried particles. We observe homogeneous morphologies for highly soluble organic compounds. For organic compounds with limited aqueous solubility, partially engulfed structures are observed. At intermediate aqueous solubilities, small particles are homogeneous and larger particles are partially engulfed. Results are compared to previous studies of liquid-liquid phase separation in supermicrometer particles and the impact of these dry particle morphologies on aerosol-climate interactions are discussed. PMID:24502281

  13. Accuracy analysis of CryoSat-2 SARIn mode data over Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Bamber, Jonathan; Cheng, Xiao

    2015-04-01

    In 2010, CryoSat-2 was launched, carrying a unique satellite radar altimetry (SRA) instrument called SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter (SIRAL), with the aim of measuring and monitoring sea ice, ice sheets and mountain glaciers. The novel SAR Interferometric mode (SARInM) of CryoSat-2 is designed to improve the accuracy, resolution and geolocation of height measurements over the steeper margins of ice sheets and ice caps. Over these areas, it employs the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) capability to reduce the size of the footprint to effectively 450m along track and ~1km across track implemented from an airborne prototype originally termed a delay-Doppler altimeter. Additionally, CryoSat-2 used the phase difference between its two antennas to estimate surface slope in the across-track direction and identify the point of closed approach directly. The phase difference is 2pi for a surface slope of approximately 1deg. If the slope is above this threshold, the tracked surface in the returned waveform may be not the point of closed approach causing an error in slope correction. For this reason, the analysis was limited to slopes of 1deg or less in this study. We used extensive coverage of Antarctica provided by the ICESat laser altimeter mission between 2003 and 2009 to assess the accuracy of SARInM data. We corrected for changes in elevations due to the interval between the acquisition of the ICESat and CryoSat-2 data (from July 2010 and December 2013). Two methods were used: (1) the ICESat point was compared with a DEM derived from CryoSat-2 data (Point-to-DEM; PtoDEM), and (2) the ICESat point was compared with a CryoSat-2 point directly (Point-to-Point; PtoP). For PtoDEM, CryoSat-2 elevations were interpolated onto a regular 1km polar stereographic grid with a standard parallel of 71°S, using ordinary kriging. For PtoP, the maximum distance between a CryoSat-2 point location and ICESat point location was set to 35m. For the areas with slopes less than 0.2deg, the mean differences (ICESat minus CryoSat-2) are less than 1.5m, and standard derivation (?) below 3m. However, the mean differences over Filchner Ronne and Ross Ice Shelf are generally greater than 1m, and differences over Larsen C and Amery Ice Shelf are generally below 1m or negative. The known range biases amount to 0.67m from ESA. The remaining bias over the ice shelves of about 43-53cm is estimated as the average radar penetration depth for the retracker used in the ESA Level 2 processing chain, which is different over these four ice shelves. The strong relationship between firn density and remaining bias is appeared in the four ice shelves and the different backscattering power from the volume scattering in the tailing edge was found in four ice shelves from CryoSat-2 Level 1B data. The accuracy of CryoSat-2 SARInM data over Antarctica was related to the surface slope and roughness and decreased with the slope and roughness increasing.

  14. Systematics of the Electric and Magnetic Dipole Response in N=82 Isotones Below the Neutron Separation Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Kwan, E.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Hammond, S.; Kelley, J. H.; Tsoneva, N.; Lenske, H.

    2013-03-01

    In stable and weakly bound neutron-rich nuclei, a resonance-like concentration of dipole states has been observed for excitation energies around the neutron separation energy. This clustering of strong dipole states has been named the pygmy dipole resonance in contrast to the giant dipole resonance that dominates the E1 response. Understanding the pygmy resonance is presently of great interest in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. High-sensitivity studies of E1 and M1 transitions in N=82 nuclei using the quasi monoenergetic and 100% linearly-polarized photon beams from High-Intensity-Gamma-Ray Source facility is presented. The nuclear dipole-strength distribution of the pygmy resonance has been measured and novel information about the character of this mode of excitation has been obtained. The data are compared with predictions from statistical and quasiparticle random-phase approximation models.

  15. Characterization of flavonoid glycosides from rapeseed bee pollen using a combination of chromatography, spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance with a step-wise separation strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Qi, Yitao; Ritho, Joan; Zhang, Yongxin; Zheng, Xiaowei; Zhou, Jinhui; Sun, Liping

    2016-01-01

    To identify the structures of flavonoid glycosides in bee pollen collected from rapeseed plants (Brassica napus L.), we utilised an approach that combined liquid chromatography-diode array detector-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-ESI-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology with a step-wise separation strategy. We identified four constituents of high purity in rape bee pollen samples: (1) quercetin-3-O-?-D-glucosyl-(2?l)-?-glucoside, (2) kaempferol-3, 4'-di-O-?-D-glucoside, (3) 5, 7, 4'-trihydroxy-3'-methoxyflavone-3-O-?-D-sophoroside and (4) kaempferol-3-O-?-D-glucosyl-(2?l)-?-D-glucoside. This study will also provide useful reference standards for qualification and quantification of four flavonoid glycosides in natural products. PMID:25981986

  16. Low gravity phase separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Pope, W. L.; Smith, L. (inventors)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for phase separating a gas-liquid mixture as might exist in a subcritical cryogenic helium vessel for cooling a superconducting magnet at low gravity such as in planetary orbit, permitting conservation of the liquid and extended service life of the superconducting magnet.

  17. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@graphene oxide composite: A magnetically separable and efficient catalyst for the reduction of nitroarenes

    SciTech Connect

    He, Guangyu; Liu, Weifeng; Sun, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Qun; Wang, Xin; Chen, Haiqun

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ? The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO composite was prepared by a facile co-precipitation method. ? Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are well distributed on GO nanosheets. ? Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO was for the first time explored as a catalyst to reduce nitroarenes. ? Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO exhibits higher catalytic activity. ? The composite catalyst is easily recycled due to its magnetic separability. - Abstract: We reported a facile co-precipitation method to prepare a highly active Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@graphene oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO) composite catalyst, which was fully characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption measurements. The results demonstrated that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs) with a small diameter of around 12 nm were densely and evenly deposited on the graphene oxide (GO) sheets. The as-prepared Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO composite was explored as a catalyst to reduce a series of nitroarenes for the first time, which exhibited a great activity with a turnover frequency (TOF) of 3.63 min{sup ?1}, forty five times that of the commercial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. The dosages of catalyst and hydrazine hydrate are both less than those reported. Furthermore, the composite catalyst can be easily recovered due to its magnetic separability and high stability.

  18. COMPOSITE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT INC. CryoCoatTM UltraLightTM

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    : Adhesives Thermal Insulation Protective Coatings Each layer can be optimized gives best system performance Change to LHe Stop LHe Flow Insulation Thickness Approx. 1 1/2" LN2 Pre-Cool Thermal Time HistoryCOMPOSITE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT INC. CTD CryoCoatTM UltraLightTM Insulation presented by: Michael

  19. Single Particle Cryo-electron Microscopy and 3-D Reconstruction of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3–4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced. PMID:24357374

  20. Cryo-EM structure of a 3D DNA-origami object Xiao-chen Baia

    E-print Network

    Dietz, Hendrik

    scaffolds, but the level of attainable positional accuracy has been unclear. Here we report the cryo the positioning of user-defined structural motifs with an accuracy that is similar to that observed in natural- trolled domain movement. Designing such objects to meet precise structural specifications will benefit

  1. Description and comparison of algorithms for correcting anisotropic magnification in cryo-EM images

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Jianhua; Benlekbir, Samir; Rubinstein, John L

    2015-01-01

    Single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows for structures of proteins and protein complexes to be determined from images of non-crystalline specimens. Cryo-EM data analysis requires electron microscope images of randomly oriented ice-embedded protein particles to be rotated and translated to allow for coherent averaging when calculating three-dimensional (3-D) structures. Rotation of 2-D images is usually done with the assumption that the magnification of the electron microscope is the same in all directions, a condition that has been found to be untrue with some electron microscopes when used with the settings necessary for cryo-EM with a direct detector device (DDD) camera (Grant and Grigorieff, in preparation). Correction of images by linear interpolation in real space has allowed high-resolution structures to be calculated from cryo-EM images for symmetric particles (Grant and Grigorieff, in preparation). Here we describe and compare a simple real space method and a somewhat more sophisticat...

  2. 3D image reconstruction algorithms for cryo-electron-microscopy images of virus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    2000-11-01

    A statistical model for the object and the complete image formation process in cryo electron microscopy of viruses is presented. Using this model, maximum likelihood reconstructions of the 3D structure of viruses are computed using the expectation maximization algorithm and an example based on Cowpea mosaic virus is provided.

  3. Technical Notes NOAA/NESDIS LSA CryoSat Interim Geophysical Data Record (IGDR)

    E-print Network

    , not a Synthetic Aperture Radar or Delay-Doppler altimeter. Thus gaps in passes may occur where CryoSat-2 employs are produced by CLS Space Oceanography Division using the Mog2D model from Legos and distributed by Aviso. · all other geophysical corrections normally provided by RADS (Radar Altimeter Database System). Latency

  4. MSFC/UAH Full Aperture Cryo-Figure AMSD Modal Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Ted; Stahl, Phil; Geary, Joe; Russell, J. Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A full-aperture, interferometric method for measuring the modal characteristics of the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrators (AMSDs) will be presented. The method involves stroboscopic surface figure measurement using an interferometer capable of simultaneous phase-shift measurements. Results of bread-board experiments will be presented as well as the plan for cryo measurements of the AMSDs.

  5. Lessons Learned During the Integration Phase of the NASA IN-STEP Cryo System Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimura, R. S.; Russo, S. C.; Gilman, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    The Cryo System Experiment (CSE), a NASA In-Space Technology Experiments Proram (IN-STEP) Class D Flight Experiment, was developed by Hughes Aircraft Company (Hughes) to validate in zero-g space a 65 K cryogenic system for focal planes, optics, instruments, or other equipment (gramma-ray spectrometers and infrared and submillimeter imaging instruments) that require continuous cryogenic cooling.

  6. Molecular interactions in rotavirus assembly and uncoating seen by high-resolution cryo-EM

    E-print Network

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    Molecular interactions in rotavirus assembly and uncoating seen by high-resolution cryo-EM James Z, April 11, 2009 (sent for review March 19, 2009) Rotaviruses, major causes of childhood gastroenteritis cryomicroscopy and single-particle recon- struction, we have visualized a rotavirus particle comprising the inner

  7. Helium Cryo Testing of a SLMS(TM) (Silicon Lightweight Mirrors) Athermal Optical Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.; Stahl, H. Philip; Keys, Andrew S.; Reily, Jack C.; Eng, Ron; Hadaway, James B.; Hogue, William D.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Siler, Richard

    2003-01-01

    SLMS (TM) a thermal technology has been demonstrated in the small 4-foot helium cryogenic test chamber located at the NASA/MSFC X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF). A SLMS (TM) Ultraviolet Demonstrator Mirror (UVDM) produced by Schafer under a NASA/MSFC Phase I SBIR was helium cryo tested both free standing and bonded to a Schafer designed prototype carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide (Cesic) mount. Surface figure data was obtained with a test measurement system that featured an Instantaneous Phase Interferometer (IPI) by ADE Phase Shift. The test measurement system s minimum resolvable differential figure deformation and possible contributions from test chamber ambient to cryo window deformation are under investigation. The free standing results showed differential figure deformation of 10.4 nm rms from 295K to 27K and 3.9 nm rms after one cryo cycle. The surface figure of the UVDM degraded by lambda/70 rms HeNe once it was bonded to the prototype Cesic mount. The change was due to a small astigmatic aberration in the rototype Cesic mount due to lack of finish machining and not the bonding technique. This effect was seen in SLMST (TM) optical assembly results, which showed differential figure deformation of 46.5 nm rms from 294K to 27K, 42.9 nm rms from 294K to 77K, 28.0 nm rms from 294K to 193K and 6.2 nm rms after one cryo cycle.

  8. Dispersive solid phase microextraction with magnetic graphene oxide as the sorbent for separation and preconcentration of ultra-trace amounts of gold ions.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Elahe; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad

    2015-08-15

    A selective, simple and rapid dispersive solid phase microextraction was developed using magnetic graphene oxide (MGO) as an efficient sorbent for the separation and preconcentration of gold ions. The MGO was synthesized by means of the simple one step chemical coprecipitation method, characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Gold ions retained by the sorbent were eluted using 0.5mol L(-)(1) thiourea in 0.1mol L(-1) HCl solution and determined by the flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-FAAS). The factors affecting the separation and preconcentration of gold were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.02-100.0µg L(-)(1) with a detection limit of 4ng L(-1) and an enrichment factor of 500. The relative standard deviations of 3.2% and 4.7% (n=6) were obtained at 20µg L(-1) level of gold ions for the intra and the inter day analysis, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of gold ions in water and waste water samples as well as a certified reference material (CCU-1b, copper flotation concentrate). PMID:25966414

  9. Optimization of a phase separation based magnetic-stirring salt-induced liquid-liquid microextraction method for determination of fluoroquinolones in food.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Wang, Huili; Ma, Meiping; Zhang, Yuna; Yin, Xiaohan; Dahlgren, Randy A; Du, Dongli; Wang, Xuedong

    2015-05-15

    Herein, we developed a novel integrated apparatus to perform phase separation based on magnetic-stirring, salt-induced, liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of five fluoroquinolones in animal-based foods by HPLC analysis. The novel integrated apparatus consisted of three simple HDPE (high density polyethylene) parts that were used to separate the solvent from the aqueous solution prior to retrieving the extractant. The extraction parameters were optimized using the response surface method based on central composite design: 791 ?L of acetone solvent, 2.5 g of Na2SO4, pH 1.7, 3.0 min of stir time, and 5.5 min centrifugation. The limits of detection were 0.07-0.53 ?g kg(-1) and recoveries were 91.6-105.0% for the five fluoroquinolones from milk, eggs and honey. This method is easily constructed from inexpensive materials, extraction efficiency is high, and the approach is compatible with HPLC analysis. Thus, it has excellent prospects for sample pre-treatment and analysis of fluoroquinolones in animal-based foods. PMID:25577068

  10. Ionic liquid coated magnetic core/shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles for the separation/analysis of linuron in food samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jieping; Zhu, Xiashi

    2015-02-01

    Three hydrophobic ionic liquids (ILs) including 1-butyl-3-methylimidazole hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM]PF6), 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazole hexafluorophosphate ([HMIM]PF6), and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazole hexafluoro-phosphate ([OMIM]PF6) coated Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles with core-shell structure to prepare magnetic solid phase extraction agent (Fe3O4@SiO2@ILs) and establish a new method of magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) coupled with UV spectrometry for separation/analysis of linuron. The results showed that linuron was adsorbed rapidly by Fe3O4@SiO2@[OMIM]PF6 and eluanted by ethanol. Under the optimal conditions, preconcentration factor of the proposed method was 10-fold. The linear range, detection limit, correlation coefficient (R) and relative standard deviation (RSD) were found to be 0.04-20.00 ?g mL-1, 5.0 ng mL-1, 0.9993 and 2.8% (n = 3, c = 4.00 ?g mL-1), respectively. The Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles could be used repeatedly for 10 times. This proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of linuron in food samples.

  11. Hippocampal neurochemistry is involved in the behavioural effects of neonatal maternal separation and their reversal by post-weaning environmental enrichment: a magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Hui, Jiao-Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Liu, Shan-Shan; Xi, Guang-Jun; Zhang, Xiang-Rong; Teng, Gao-Jun; Chan, Kevin C; Wu, Ed X; Nie, Bin-Bin; Shan, Bao-Ci; Li, Ling-Jiang; Reynolds, Gavin P

    2011-02-01

    Exposure to early life stress results in behavioural changes, and these dysfunctions may persist throughout adulthood. In this study, we investigated whether hippocampus volume and neurochemical changes were involved in the appearance of these effects in the maternal separation (MS) animal model using the noninvasive techniques of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to MS for 180 min from postnatal days (PND) 2-14 demonstrated decreased sucrose preference, increased immobility in the forced swimming test (FST), and impaired memory in the Morris water maze in adulthood. Environmental enrichment (EE) (PND 21-60) could ameliorate the effects of MS on sucrose preference and learning and memory but not on immobility in the FST. In addition, EE significantly increased N-acetylaspartate (NAA) of MS animals. However, we did not find an effect of MS or EE on hippocampal volume. These results indicate the involvement of hippocampal neurochemistry in the behavioural changes that result from early stressful life events and their modification by post-weaning EE. Thus changes in NAA, as a measure of neuronal integrity, appear to be a sensitive correlate of these behavioural effects. PMID:20974193

  12. Kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic investigations of phosphate adsorption onto core-shell Fe?O?@LDHs composites with easy magnetic separation assistance.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang-guo; Yang, Kun; Shan, Ran-ran; Yan, Tao; Wei, Jing; Yu, Shu-jun; Yu, Hai-qin; Du, Bin

    2015-06-15

    In this study, three different magnetic core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs composites, Fe3O4@Zn-Al-, Fe3O4@Mg-Al-, and Fe3O4@Ni-Al-LDH were prepared via a rapid coprecipitation method for phosphate adsorptive removal. The composites were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM, VSM and BET analyses. Characterization results proved the successful synthesis of core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs composites with good superparamagnetisms. Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption efficiency of phosphate. Optimal conditions for the phosphate adsorption were obtained: 0.05 g of adsorbent, solution pH of 3, and contact time of 60 min. Proposed mechanisms for the removal of phosphate species onto Fe3O4@LDHs composites at different initial solution pH were showed. The kinetic data were described better by the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and KASRA model. The adsorption isotherm curves showed a three-region behavior in the ARIAN model. It had a good fit with Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity followed the order of Fe3O4@Zn-Al-LDH>Fe3O4@Mg-Al-LDH>Fe3O4@Ni-Al-LDH. Thermodynamic analyses indicated that the phosphate adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. The three Fe3O4@LDHs composites could be easily separated from aqueous solution by the external magnetic field in 10s. These novel magnetic core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs adsorbents may offer a simple single step adsorption treatment option to remove phosphate from water without the requirement of pre-/post-treatment for current industrial practice. PMID:25778739

  13. Imaging system for creating 3D block-face cryo-images of whole mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Debashish; Breen, Michael; Salvado, Olivier; Heinzel, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot; Wilson, David

    2006-03-01

    We developed a cryomicrotome/imaging system that provides high resolution, high sensitivity block-face images of whole mice or excised organs, and applied it to a variety of biological applications. With this cryo-imaging system, we sectioned cryo-preserved tissues at 2-40 ?m thickness and acquired high resolution brightfield and fluorescence images with microscopic in-plane resolution (as good as 1.2 ?m). Brightfield images of normal and pathological anatomy show exquisite detail, especially in the abdominal cavity. Multi-planar reformatting and 3D renderings allow one to interrogate 3D structures. In this report, we present brightfield images of mouse anatomy, as well as 3D renderings of organs. For BPK mice model of polycystic kidney disease, we compared brightfield cryo-images and kidney volumes to MRI. The color images provided greater contrast and resolution of cysts as compared to in vivo MRI. We note that color cryo-images are closer to what a researcher sees in dissection, making it easier for them to interpret image data. The combination of field of view, depth of field, ultra high resolution and color/fluorescence contrast enables cryo-image volumes to provide details that cannot be found through in vivo imaging or other ex vivo optical imaging approaches. We believe that this novel imaging system will have applications that include identification of mouse phenotypes, characterization of diseases like blood vessel disease, kidney disease, and cancer, assessment of drug and gene therapy delivery and efficacy and validation of other imaging modalities.

  14. The high Beta cryo-modules and the associated cryogenic system for the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Delruelle, N.; Leclercq, Y.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Tibaron, P.; Vandoni, G.; Williams, L.

    2014-01-29

    The major upgrade of the energy and intensity of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facilities at CERN requires the replacement of most of the existing ISOLDE post-acceleration equipment by a superconducting linac based on quarter-wave resonators housed together with superconducting solenoids in a series of four high-? and two low-? cryo-modules. As well as providing optimum conditions for physics, the cryo-modules need to function under stringent vacuum and cryogenic conditions. We present the detail design and expected cryogenic performance of the high- ? cryo-module together with the cryogenic supply and distribution system destined to service the complete superconducting linac.

  15. Sliding weight supports for W7-X magnet system: structural aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, V.; Fellinger, J.; Egorov, K.; Schauer, F.; Köppen, M.; Jenzsch, H.

    2015-05-01

    The Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator is presently under commissioning at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Greifswald. The coil system consisting of 70 superconducting coils of seven different types is supported by a massive central support structure (CSS), and thermally protected by the cryostat. The magnet system weight is borne by supports which are bolted to the cold CSS. These ten so-called cryo-legs penetrate through the cryostat wall to the warm machine base. The design of the cryo-legs incorporates glass-reinforced plastic tubes to guarantee relatively small thermal conductivity. In order to ensure free thermal shrinkage of the magnet system and to reduce stresses in the cryo-legs, sliding and rotating bearings are used as interfaces to the machine base. Tie-rods between the machine base and the warm ends of the cryo-legs prevent toroidal rotation of the magnet system, as well as any other horizontal shifts due to asymmetric loads. The assembly of the magnet system introduced some vertical imperfections in the cryo-leg positions causing considerable additional internal stresses which were not considered during the design stage. In addition, originally not planned trim coils induce unsymmetrical cyclic loads. Therefore, the previously used method to analyse one magnet system module with periodical boundary conditions is not applicable. Consequently, a model of the complete magnet system, including all five modules, was created and analysed. Fatigue analyses of the cryo-legs under the new cyclic loads, applied on top of the approximately 100 t static weight, have been performed in order to evaluate the lifetime. The paper presents the progress in structural analyses of the W7-X magnet system under the as-built conditions, loads due to the trim coil operation, and results of the weight support fatigue analysis.

  16. Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

    2005-05-01

    Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

  17. Crystal and cryoEM structural studies of a cell wall degrading enzyme in the bacteriophage [psi]29 tail

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Morais, Marc C.; Cohen, Daniel N.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-08-28

    The small bacteriophage {phi}29 must penetrate the {approx}250-{angstrom} thick external peptidoglycan cell wall and cell membrane of the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, before ejecting its dsDNA genome through its tail into the bacterial cytoplasm. The tail of bacteriophage {phi}29 is noncontractile and {approx}380 {angstrom} long. A 1.8-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of gene product 13 (gp13) shows that this tail protein has spatially well separated N- and C-terminal domains, whose structures resemble lysozyme-like enzymes and metallo-endopeptidases, respectively. CryoEM reconstructions of the WT bacteriophage and mutant bacteriophages missing some or most of gp13 shows that this enzyme is located at the distal end of the {phi}29 tail knob. This finding suggests that gp13 functions as a tail-associated, peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme able to cleave both the polysaccharide backbone and peptide cross-links of the peptidoglycan cell wall. Comparisons of the gp13{sup -} mutants with the {phi}29 mature and emptied phage structures suggest the sequence of events that occur during the penetration of the tail through the peptidoglycan layer.

  18. The Cryo-EM structure of the CorA channel from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii in low magnesium conditions.

    PubMed

    Cleverley, Robert M; Kean, James; Shintre, Chitra A; Baldock, Clair; Derrick, Jeremy P; Ford, Robert C; Prince, Stephen M

    2015-10-01

    CorA channels are responsible for the uptake of essential magnesium ions by bacteria. X-ray crystal structures have been resolved for two full-length CorA channels, each in a non-conducting state with magnesium ions bound to the protein: These structures reveal a homo-pentameric quaternary structure with approximate 5-fold rotational symmetry about a central pore axis. We report the structure of the detergent solubilized Methanocaldococcus jannaschii CorA channel determined by Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Single Particle Averaging, supported by Small Angle X-ray Scattering and X-ray crystallography. This structure also shows a pentameric channel but with a highly asymmetric domain structure. The asymmetry of the domains includes differential separations between the trans-membrane segments, which reflects mechanical coupling of the cytoplasmic domain to the trans-membrane domain. This structure therefore reveals an important aspect of the gating mechanism of CorA channels by providing an indication of how the absence of magnesium ions leads to major structural changes. PMID:26051127

  19. An automated system to mount cryo-cooled protein crystals on a synchrotron beam line, using compact sample cassettes and a small-scale robot

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Aina E.; Ellis, Paul J.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Phizackerley, R. Paul

    2014-01-01

    An automated system for mounting and dismounting pre-frozen crystals has been implemented at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). It is based on a small industrial robot and compact cylindrical cassettes, each holding up to 96 crystals mounted on Hampton Research sample pins. For easy shipping and storage, the cassette fits inside several popular dry-shippers and long-term storage Dewars. A dispensing Dewar holds up to three cassettes in liquid nitrogen adjacent to the beam line goniometer. The robot uses a permanent magnet tool to extract samples from, and insert samples into a cassette, and a cryo-tong tool to transfer them to and from the beam line goniometer. The system is simple, with few moving parts, reliable in operation and convenient to use. PMID:24899734

  20. 2.2 Å resolution cryo-EM structure of ?-galactosidase in complex with a cell-permeant inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Merk, Alan; Banerjee, Soojay; Matthies, Doreen; Wu, Xiongwu; Milne, Jacqueline L S; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2015-06-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is rapidly emerging as a powerful tool for protein structure determination at high resolution. Here we report the structure of a complex between Escherichia coli ?-galactosidase and the cell-permeant inhibitor phenylethyl ?-D-thiogalactopyranoside (PETG), determined by cryo-EM at an average resolution of ~2.2 angstroms (Å). Besides the PETG ligand, we identified densities in the map for ~800 water molecules and for magnesium and sodium ions. Although it is likely that continued advances in detector technology may further enhance resolution, our findings demonstrate that preparation of specimens of adequate quality and intrinsic protein flexibility, rather than imaging or image-processing technologies, now represent the major bottlenecks to routinely achieving resolutions close to 2 Å using single-particle cryo-EM. PMID:25953817

  1. A portable cryo-plunger for on-site intact cryogenic microscopy sample preparation in natural environments

    PubMed Central

    Comolli, Luis R.; Duarte, Robert; Baum, Dennis; Luef, Birgit; Downing, Kenneth H.; Larson, David M.; Csencsits, Roseann; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2014-01-01

    We present a modern, light portable device specifically designed for environmental samples for cryo-electron microscopy by on-site cryo-plunging. The power of cryogenic EM comes from preparation of artifact-free samples. However, in many studies the samples must be collected at remote field locations, and the time involved in transporting samples back to the laboratory for cryogenic preservation can lead to severe degradation artifacts. Thus, going back to the basics, we developed a simple mechanical device that is light and easy to transport on foot yet effective. With the system design presented here we are able to obtain cryo-samples of microbes and microbial communities not possible to culture, in their near-intact environmental conditions as well as in routine laboratory work, and in real time. This methodology thus enables us to bring the power of cryo-TEM to microbial ecology. PMID:22213355

  2. Monitoring Snow and Land Ice Using Satellite data in the GMES Project CryoLand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bippus, Gabriele; Nagler, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The main objectives of the project "CryoLand - GMES Service Snow and Land Ice" are to develop, implement and validate services for snow, glaciers and lake and river ice products as a Downstream Service within the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) program of the European Commission. CryoLand exploits Earth Observation data from current optical and microwave sensors and of the upcoming GMES Sentinel satellite family. The project prepares also the basis for the cryospheric component of the GMES Land Monitoring services. The CryoLand project team consists of 10 partner organisations from Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland and Romania and is funded by the 7th Framework Program of the European Commission. The CryoLand baseline products for snow include fractional snow extent from optical satellite data, the extent of melting snow from SAR data, and coarse resolution snow water equivalent maps from passive microwave data. Experimental products include maps of snow surface wetness and temperature. The products range from large scale coverage at medium resolution to regional products with high resolution, in order to address a wide user community. Medium resolution optical data (e.g. MODIS, in the near future Sentinel-3) and SAR (ENVISAT ASAR, in the near future Sentinel-1) are the main sources of EO data for generating large scale products in near real time. For generation of regional products high resolution satellite data are used. Glacier products are based on high resolution optical (e.g. SPOT-5, in the near future Sentinel-2) and SAR (TerraSAR-X, in the near future Sentinel-1) data and include glacier outlines, mapping of glacier facies, glacier lakes and ice velocity. The glacier products are generated on users demand. Current test areas are located in the Alps, Norway, Greenland and the Himalayan Mountains. The lake and river ice products include ice extent and its temporal changes and snow extent on ice. The algorithms for these products are in development. One major task of CryoLand is the performance assessment of the products, which is carried out in different environments, climate zones and land cover types, selected jointly with users. Accuracy assessment is done for test areas using in-situ data and very high resolution satellite data. This presentation gives an overview on the processing lines and demonstration products for snow, glacier and lake ice parameters including examples of the product accuracy assessment. An important point of the CryoLand project is the use of advanced information technology, which is applied to process and distribute snow and land ice products in near real time.

  3. Detection of hepatitis A virus in seeded oyster digestive tissue by ricin A-linked magnetic separation combined with reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Mu; Vaidya, Bipin; Kwon, Joseph; Lee, Hee-Min; Oh, Myung-Joo; Shin, Tai-Sun; Cho, Se-Young; Kim, Duwoon

    2015-05-01

    Outbreaks of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections are most frequently associated with the consumption of contaminated oysters. A rapid and selective concentration method is necessary for the recovery of HAV from contaminated oysters prior to detection using PCR. In this study, ricin extracted from castor beans (Ricinus communis) was tested as an alternative to antibody used in immunomagnetic separation while concentrating HAV prior to its detection using reverse transcription PCR. Initially, the extracted proteins from castor beans were fractionated into 13 fractions by gel filtration chromatography. Pretreatment of different protein fractions showed a variation in binding of HAV viral protein (VP) 1 to oyster digestive tissue in the range of 25.9 to 63.9%. The protein fraction, which caused the highest reduction in binding of VP1 to the tissue, was identified as ricin A by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Ricin A could significantly inhibit binding of VP1 to the tissue with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 4.5 ?g/ml and a maximal inhibitory concentration of 105.2%. The result showed that the rate of inhibition of HAV binding to tissue was higher compared to the rate of ricin itself binding to HAV (slope: 0.0029 versus 0.00059). However, ricin A concentration showed a higher correlation to the relative binding of ricin itself to HAV than the inhibition of binding of HAV to the tissue (coefficient of determination, R(2): 0.9739 versus 0.6804). In conclusion, ricin A-linked magnetic bead separation combined with reverse transcription PCR can successfully detect HAV in artificially seeded oyster digestive tissue up to a 10(-4) dilution of the virus stock (titer: 10(4) 50% tissue culture infective dose per ml). PMID:25951406

  4. Rapid and Specific Enrichment of Culturable Gram Negative Bacteria Using Non-Lethal Copper-Free Click Chemistry Coupled with Magnetic Beads Separation.

    PubMed

    Fugier, Emilie; Dumont, Audrey; Malleron, Annie; Poquet, Enora; Mas Pons, Jordi; Baron, Aurélie; Vauzeilles, Boris; Dukan, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Currently, identification of pathogenic bacteria present at very low concentration requires a preliminary culture-based enrichment step. Many research efforts focus on the possibility to shorten this pre-enrichment step which is needed to reach the minimal number of cells that allows efficient identification. Rapid microbiological controls are a real public health issue and are required in food processing, water quality assessment or clinical pathology. Thus, the development of new methods for faster detection and isolation of pathogenic culturable bacteria is necessary. Here we describe a specific enrichment technique for culturable Gram negative bacteria, based on non-lethal click chemistry and the use of magnetic beads that allows fast detection and isolation. The assimilation and incorporation of an analog of Kdo, an essential component of lipopolysaccharides, possessing a bio-orthogonal azido function (Kdo-N3), allow functionalization of almost all Gram negative bacteria at the membrane level. Detection can be realized through strain-promoted azide-cyclooctyne cycloaddition, an example of click chemistry, which interestingly does not affect bacterial growth. Using E. coli as an example of Gram negative bacterium, we demonstrate the excellent specificity of the technique to detect culturable E. coli among bacterial mixtures also containing either dead E. coli, or live B. subtilis (as a model of microorganism not containing Kdo). Finally, in order to specifically isolate and concentrate culturable E. coli cells, we performed separation using magnetic beads in combination with click chemistry. This work highlights the efficiency of our technique to rapidly enrich and concentrate culturable Gram negative bacteria among other microorganisms that do not possess Kdo within their cell envelope. PMID:26061695

  5. Rapid and Specific Enrichment of Culturable Gram Negative Bacteria Using Non-Lethal Copper-Free Click Chemistry Coupled with Magnetic Beads Separation

    PubMed Central

    Fugier, Emilie; Dumont, Audrey; Malleron, Annie; Poquet, Enora; Mas Pons, Jordi; Baron, Aurélie; Vauzeilles, Boris; Dukan, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Currently, identification of pathogenic bacteria present at very low concentration requires a preliminary culture-based enrichment step. Many research efforts focus on the possibility to shorten this pre-enrichment step which is needed to reach the minimal number of cells that allows efficient identification. Rapid microbiological controls are a real public health issue and are required in food processing, water quality assessment or clinical pathology. Thus, the development of new methods for faster detection and isolation of pathogenic culturable bacteria is necessary. Here we describe a specific enrichment technique for culturable Gram negative bacteria, based on non-lethal click chemistry and the use of magnetic beads that allows fast detection and isolation. The assimilation and incorporation of an analog of Kdo, an essential component of lipopolysaccharides, possessing a bio-orthogonal azido function (Kdo-N3), allow functionalization of almost all Gram negative bacteria at the membrane level. Detection can be realized through strain-promoted azide-cyclooctyne cycloaddition, an example of click chemistry, which interestingly does not affect bacterial growth. Using E. coli as an example of Gram negative bacterium, we demonstrate the excellent specificity of the technique to detect culturable E. coli among bacterial mixtures also containing either dead E. coli, or live B. subtilis (as a model of microorganism not containing Kdo). Finally, in order to specifically isolate and concentrate culturable E. coli cells, we performed separation using magnetic beads in combination with click chemistry. This work highlights the efficiency of our technique to rapidly enrich and concentrate culturable Gram negative bacteria among other microorganisms that do not possess Kdo within their cell envelope. PMID:26061695

  6. Immunochromatographic strip for rapid detection of Cronobacter in powdered infant formula in combination with silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles separation and 16S rRNA probe.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Ming, Xing; Chen, XingXing; Gan, Min; Wang, BaoGui; Xu, Feng; Wei, Hua

    2014-11-15

    Here we developed a sensitive, specific, and rapid immunochromatographic strip test for the detection of Cronobacter. Silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles were used to separate nucleic acid from Cronobacter lysate and eliminate the interference of food matrices successfully. A couple of 5'-end labeled probes, which was complementary to the 16S ribosomal DNA of Cronobacter, was used to hybridize with the nucleic acid. The hybrid product, labeled with digoxigenin on one side and biotin on the other side, was directly submitted to the immunochromatographic strip test and the anti-digoxigenin monoclonal antibody was immobilized on nitrocellulose membrane in the test line. The visualization was achieved by gold nanoparticles conjugated to streptavidin, and double red bands appearing in both test and control line indicated a positive result of the presence of Cronobacter in testing sample. The detection limit was 10(7) cfu mL(-1) in pure culture. After silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles treatment, the detection limit was 10(5) and 10(6) cfu mL(-1) in pure culture and powdered infant formula, respectively, and maintained stable even under the interference of 10(8) cfu mL(-1)Salmonella typhimurium. Furthermore, 100 positive powdered infant formula samples spiked 10(8) cfu mL(-1)Cronobacter and 20 negative samples with none bacteria were tested by the strip, and the sensitivity and specificity of the test were both as high as 100%. This approach showed promise for microbial detection concerning food safety or clinical diagnosis. PMID:24907538

  7. Cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of PBCV-1, an algal virus with T=169 lattice symmetry

    E-print Network

    Baker, Timothy S.

    Cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of PBCV-1, an algal virus with T=169 lattice with sectioned, negatively-stained, and metal-shadowed specimens [1,3]. We have used cryo-electron microscopy microscope at 2OOkV, at -2.2l..tm underfocus, and with an electron dose of 22OOe-/nm2(Fig. 1A). A total

  8. Nitrogen Separation and Liquefaction Apparatus for Medical Applications and Its Thermodynamic Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Piotrowska, A.; Polinski, J.

    2006-04-01

    Low temperature medicine is becoming a widely appreciated method in surgery, dermatology, gynecology and rheumatology. The cryomedical equipment is usually supplied with liquid nitrogen LN2 stored in a dewar and transferred to a tip, where it is evaporated providing a cooling power. LN2 in quantities sufficient for cryo-surgical and cryo-therapeutical applications can be first separated from air and then liquefied using a system combining polymer membrane gas separation technology and a Joule-Thomson closed-cycle refrigerator filled with a nitrogen-hydrocarbons gas mixture. Nitrogen is separated from the compressed air, then liquefied and throttled to atmospheric pressure. The paper analyzes the demanded cooling capacity of the system resulting from cryomedical treatment requirements. Thermal design and flow scheme of the apparatus are given. The system is thermodynamically optimized.

  9. Nanomechanical biosensing with immunomagnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icoz, Kutay; Savran, Cagri

    2010-09-01

    We report a biosensing method that combines immunomagnetic separation and nanomechanical detection. In this method, same magnetic beads that are used to "fish" biomolecules from complex mixtures enable deflection of a cantilever structure upon excitation by an oscillating magnetic field. Biotin-coated magnetic beads were used to capture and separate streptavidin from serum. Streptavidin loaded magnetic beads were exposed to a differential cantilever system whose sensing arm was functionalized with biotin. The magnetic force applied on the streptavidin-beads resulted in differential cantilever deflections that could be detected down to 0.26 Årms in air.

  10. Cryo-EM structure of the activated NAIP2-NLRC4 inflammasome reveals nucleated polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liman; Chen, Shuobing; Ruan, Jianbin; Wu, Jiayi; Tong, Alexander B; Yin, Qian; Li, Yang; David, Liron; Lu, Alvin; Wang, Wei Li; Marks, Carolyn; Ouyang, Qi; Zhang, Xinzheng; Mao, Youdong; Wu, Hao

    2015-10-23

    The NLR family apoptosis inhibitory proteins (NAIPs) bind conserved bacterial ligands, such as the bacterial rod protein PrgJ, and recruit NLR family CARD-containing protein 4 (NLRC4) as the inflammasome adapter to activate innate immunity. We found that the PrgJ-NAIP2-NLRC4 inflammasome is assembled into multisubunit disk-like structures through a unidirectional adenosine triphosphatase polymerization, primed with a single PrgJ-activated NAIP2 per disk. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction at subnanometer resolution revealed a ~90° hinge rotation accompanying NLRC4 activation. Unlike in the related heptameric Apaf-1 apoptosome, in which each subunit needs to be conformationally activated by its ligand before assembly, a single PrgJ-activated NAIP2 initiates NLRC4 polymerization in a domino-like reaction to promote the disk assembly. These insights reveal the mechanism of signal amplification in NAIP-NLRC4 inflammasomes. PMID:26449474

  11. Greenland ice sheet elevation changes estimated from CryoSat-2 observations from 2010-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, J.; Sandberg Sørensen, L.; Meister, R.; Barletta, V. R.; Forsberg, R.

    2014-12-01

    With more than 3.5 years of CryoSat-2 satellite data now available, the estimation of ice sheet wide elevation changes is now possible for the Greenland ice sheet. In this study we have developed novel LRM and SARin processing chains to produce elevation estimates from ESA level-1b data sets. From these estimates, ice sheet wide elevation changes were estimated using both the plane fitting principles and satellite crossovers. The accuracy of the results are evaluated using airborne NASA ATM and ESA CryoVEx data. The resulting elevation changes were then compared to results derived from Envisat and GRACE data. The results obtained are in line with previous observed spatial patterns of elevation change, where a clear negative signal can be detected along the ice sheet margins which decreases inwards to interior of the ice sheet, and confirms the dynamic behavior of the major outlet glaciers.

  12. Cross-linking cellulose nanofibrils for potential elastic cryo-structured gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syverud, Kristin; Kirsebom, Harald; Hajizadeh, Solmaz; Chinga-Carrasco, Gary

    2011-12-01

    Cellulose nanofibrils were produced from P. radiata kraft pulp fibers. The nanofibrillation was facilitated by applying 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl-mediated oxidation as pretreatment. The oxidized nanofibrils were cross-linked with polyethyleneimine and poly N-isopropylacrylamide- co-allylamine- co-methylenebisacrylamide particles and were frozen to form cryo-structured gels. Samples of the gels were critical-point dried, and the corresponding structures were assessed with scanning electron microscopy. It appears that the aldehyde groups in the oxidized nanofibrils are suitable reaction sites for cross-linking. The cryo-structured materials were spongy, elastic, and thus capable of regaining their shape after a given pressure was released, indicating a successful cross-linking. These novel types of gels are considered potential candidates in biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  13. Cryo-recanalization in a case of carcinoid tumor - An interesting case report

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Rakesh K; Madan, Arun; Chawla, Aditya; Arora, Harsh Nandini

    2015-01-01

    The term “cryotherapy” comes from the Greek cryo (????) meaning cold, and therapy (????????) meaning cure. Cryosurgery is the application of extreme cold to destroy abnormal or diseased tissue. Carcinoid tumors of the lung are a fascinating but uncommon group of pulmonary neoplasms. In the past, these tumors were grouped with benign or less aggressive malignant pulmonary tumors, namely bronchial adenomas. Recent studies have revealed that carcinoid lung tumors are the most indolent form of a spectrum of bronchopulmonary neuroendocrine tumors that, at its extreme, include small cell carcinoma of the lung as its most malignant member. They commonly present as endobronchial obstructions, and if complete, can be life-threatening and require immediate intervention.[1] Recently, we have treated a patient of carcinoid tumor of lung who was managed with cryo-recanalization with excellent response.

  14. RELION: implementation of a Bayesian approach to cryo-EM structure determination.

    PubMed

    Scheres, Sjors H W

    2012-12-01

    RELION, for REgularized LIkelihood OptimizatioN, is an open-source computer program for the refinement of macromolecular structures by single-particle analysis of electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) data. Whereas alternative approaches often rely on user expertise for the tuning of parameters, RELION uses a Bayesian approach to infer parameters of a statistical model from the data. This paper describes developments that reduce the computational costs of the underlying maximum a posteriori (MAP) algorithm, as well as statistical considerations that yield new insights into the accuracy with which the relative orientations of individual particles may be determined. A so-called gold-standard Fourier shell correlation (FSC) procedure to prevent overfitting is also described. The resulting implementation yields high-quality reconstructions and reliable resolution estimates with minimal user intervention and at acceptable computational costs. PMID:23000701

  15. Cryo-electron tomography and 3-D analysis of the intact flagellum in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Höög, Johanna L.; Bouchet-Marquis, Cédric; McIntosh, J. Richard; Hoenger, Andreas; Gull, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a uni-cellular protist that causes African sleeping sickness. These parasites have a flagellum that is attached to the cell body and is indispensible for its motility. The flagellum consists of a canonical 9 + 2 axoneme and a paraflagellar rod (PFR), an intricate tripartite, fibrous structure that is connected to the axoneme. In this paper we describe results from cryo-electron tomography of unperturbed flagella. This method revealed novel structures that are likely involved in attaching the flagellum to the cell. We also show the first cryo-electron tomographic images of a basal body in situ, revealing electron dense structures inside its triplet microtubules. Sub-tomogram averaging of the PFR revealed that its distal region is organized as an orthorhombic crystal. PMID:22285651

  16. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella in a quiescent state revealed by cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nicastro, Daniela; McIntosh, J. Richard; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    We have used cryo-electron tomography to investigate the 3D structure and macromolecular organization of intact, frozen-hydrated sea urchin sperm flagella in a quiescent state. The tomographic reconstructions provide information at a resolution better than 6 nm about the in situ arrangements of macromolecules that are key for flagellar motility. We have visualized the heptameric rings of the motor domains in the outer dynein arm complex and determined that they lie parallel to the plane that contains the axes of neighboring flagellar microtubules. Both the material associated with the central pair of microtubules and the radial spokes display a plane of symmetry that helps to explain the planar beat pattern of these flagella. Cryo-electron tomography has proven to be a powerful technique for helping us understand the relationships between flagellar structure and function and the design of macromolecular machines in situ. PMID:16246999

  17. Controlling protein adsorption on graphene for cryo-EM using low-energy hydrogen plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Christopher J.; Passmore, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its many favorable properties as a sample support for biological electron microscopy, graphene is not widely used because its hydrophobicity precludes reliable protein deposition. We describe a method to modify graphene using a low-energy hydrogen plasma, which reduces hydrophobicity without degrading the graphene lattice. We show that the use of plasma-treated graphene enables better control of protein distribution in ice for electron cryo-microscopy and improved image quality by reducing radiation-induced sample motion. PMID:24747813

  18. A Novel Approach to Identifying Physical Markers of Cryo-Damage in Bull Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sung-Jae; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Rahman, Md Saidur; Lee, June-Sub; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is an efficient way to store spermatozoa and plays a critical role in the livestock industry as well as in clinical practice. During cryopreservation, cryo-stress causes substantial damage to spermatozoa. In present study, the effects of cryo-stress at various cryopreservation steps, such as dilution / cooling, adding cryoprtectant, and freezing were studied in spermatozoa collected from 9 individual bull testes. The motility (%), motion kinematics, capacitation status, mitochondrial activity, and viability of bovine spermatozoa at each step of the cryopreservation process were assessed using computer-assisted sperm analysis, Hoechst 33258/chlortetracycline fluorescence, rhodamine 123 staining, and hypo-osmotic swelling test, respectively. The results demonstrate that the cryopreservation steps reduced motility (%), rapid speed (%), and mitochondrial activity, whereas medium/slow speed (%), and the acrosome reaction were increased (P < 0.05). Differences (?) of the acrosome reaction were higher in dilution/cooling step (P < 0.05), whereas differences (?) of motility, rapid speed, and non-progressive motility were higher in cryoprotectant and freezing as compared to dilution/cooling (P < 0.05). On the other hand, differences (?) of mitochondrial activity, viability, and progressive motility were higher in freezing step (P < 0.05) while the difference (?) of the acrosome reaction was higher in dilution/cooling (P < 0.05). Based on these results, we propose that freezing / thawing steps are the most critical in cryopreservation and may provide a logical ground of understanding on the cryo-damage. Moreover, these sperm parameters might be used as physical markers of sperm cryo-damage. PMID:25938413

  19. CryoSat-2 Arctic Sea-Ice Thickness: Uncertainties and Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricker, R.; Hendricks, S.; Helm, V.; Haas, C.; Davidson, M.

    2014-12-01

    The CryoSat-2 satellite is in the 4th year of its mission. It has collected a unique altimetry dataset with higher spatial resolution and a better coverage of Arctic sea ice than any previous radar altimeter mission. The along-track sharpened footprint allows resolving fine-scale features of the ice pack and the examination of retrievable information from the SAR waveforms is a field of ongoing research. Different methods can be applied to CryoSat-2 data: threshold retrackers that use the leading edge; or fitted forward models, which are applied to full waveforms. The uncertainty of these methods propagates into the uncertainty of the final sea-ice thickness estimate via the freeboard to thickness conversion. Theoretical considerations show that the magnitude of uncertainties in the radar retracking may be a major if not dominating contribution to the uncertainty budget of sea-ice thickness retrieval from CryoSat-2. We present a break-down of the uncertainty budget of CryoSat-2 Arctic sea-ice thickness of the threshold retracker based sea-ice thickness data product of the Alfred Wegener Institute. We discuss the differences in the radar waveform properties and the identification of leads in first-year and multi-year ice covered areas with the aim to mitigate ice type dependent biases. Though threshold retrackers are prone to a simplistic interpretation of the SAR waveforms we investigate the potential of this fast and robust method to retrieve additional physical properties at the sea ice surface.

  20. Crystallography of dispersed liquid crystalline phases studied by cryo-transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sagalowicz, L; Michel, M; Adrian, M; Frossard, P; Rouvet, M; Watzke, H J; Yaghmur, A; de Campo, L; Glatter, O; Leser, M E

    2006-02-01

    Low molecular weight surfactants, for example monoglycerides and phospholipids, form a multitude of self-assembled structures, such as inverted cubic or hexagonal mesophases, if brought into contact with water/oil. These mesophases can be dispersed in water using adequate surface-active materials such as low molecular weight surfactants or surface active polymers. In order to use such mesophase particles for incorporating drugs and aromas, it is essential to determine their internal crystallographic structure and to understand their mechanism of stabilization. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the internal structure of different dispersed particles at various temperatures and oil contents. It is shown here that cryo-transmission electron microscopy, in combination with fast Fourier transform and tilting experiments, is effective in obtaining information on crystallographic structure, space group and morphology of particles with reversed bicontinuous cubic and hexagonal structures. In particular, using the presence or the absence of the {111} reflections and viewing the same particle under different axes of observation allows one to discriminate between the Im3m and Pn3m space groups. A major advantage of cryo-transmission electron microscopy is the ability to analyse single particles. This allows the identification of particles present at very low concentrations and the coexistence of particles with different internal self-assembly structures. With this technique we have obtained strong evidence for the presence of two cubic internal self-assembly structures with different space groups within the same dispersion. In addition, we found that cryo-transmission electron microscopy combined with tilting experiments enables the analysis of internal particle morphology, allowing the discussion of mechanisms for hexosome stabilization. PMID:16499550

  1. A novel approach to identifying physical markers of cryo-damage in bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Jae; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Rahman, Md Saidur; Lee, June-Sub; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is an efficient way to store spermatozoa and plays a critical role in the livestock industry as well as in clinical practice. During cryopreservation, cryo-stress causes substantial damage to spermatozoa. In present study, the effects of cryo-stress at various cryopreservation steps, such as dilution / cooling, adding cryoprtectant, and freezing were studied in spermatozoa collected from 9 individual bull testes. The motility (%), motion kinematics, capacitation status, mitochondrial activity, and viability of bovine spermatozoa at each step of the cryopreservation process were assessed using computer-assisted sperm analysis, Hoechst 33258/chlortetracycline fluorescence, rhodamine 123 staining, and hypo-osmotic swelling test, respectively. The results demonstrate that the cryopreservation steps reduced motility (%), rapid speed (%), and mitochondrial activity, whereas medium/slow speed (%), and the acrosome reaction were increased (P < 0.05). Differences (?) of the acrosome reaction were higher in dilution/cooling step (P < 0.05), whereas differences (?) of motility, rapid speed, and non-progressive motility were higher in cryoprotectant and freezing as compared to dilution/cooling (P < 0.05). On the other hand, differences (?) of mitochondrial activity, viability, and progressive motility were higher in freezing step (P < 0.05) while the difference (?) of the acrosome reaction was higher in dilution/cooling (P < 0.05). Based on these results, we propose that freezing / thawing steps are the most critical in cryopreservation and may provide a logical ground of understanding on the cryo-damage. Moreover, these sperm parameters might be used as physical markers of sperm cryo-damage. PMID:25938413

  2. Evolutionary Bidirectional Expansion for the Tracing of Alpha Helices in Cryo-Electron Microscopy Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Rusu, Mirabela; Wriggers, Willy

    2011-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) enables the imaging of macromolecular complexes in near-native environments at resolutions that often permit the visualization of secondary structure elements. For example, alpha helices frequently show consistent patterns in volumetric maps, exhibiting rod-like structures of high density. Here, we introduce VolTrac (Volume Tracer) - a novel technique for the annotation of alpha-helical density in cryo-EM data sets. VolTrac combines a genetic algorithm and a bidirectional expansion with a tabu search strategy to trace helical regions. Our method takes advantage of the stochastic search by using a genetic algorithm to identify optimal placements for a short cylindrical template, avoiding exploration of already characterized tabu regions. These placements are then utilized as starting positions for the adaptive bidirectional expansion that characterizes the curvature and length of the helical region. The method reliably predicted helices with seven or more residues in experimental and simulated maps at intermediate (4–10 Å) resolution. The observed success rates, ranging from 70.6% to 100%, depended on the map resolution and validation parameters. For successful predictions, the helical axes were located within 2Å from known helical axes of atomic structures. PMID:22155667

  3. Structure of the mite-transmitted Blackcurrant reversion nepovirus using electron cryo-microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seitsonen, Jani J.T.; Susi, Petri; Lemmetty, Anne; Butcher, Sarah J.

    2008-08-15

    Blackcurrant reversion nepovirus (BRV; genus Nepovirus) has a single-stranded, bipartite RNA genome surrounded by 60 copies of a single capsid protein (CP). BRV is the most important mite-transmitted viral pathogen of the Ribes species. It is the causal agent of blackcurrant reversion disease. We determined the structure of BRV to 1.7 nm resolution using electron cryo- microscopy (cryoEM) and image reconstruction. The reconstruction reveals a pseudo T = 3 viral capsid similar to that of tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV). We modelled the BRV capsid protein to that of TRSV and fitted it into the cryoEM reconstruction. The fit indicated that the extended C-terminus of BRV-CP is located on the capsid surface and the N-terminus on the interior. We generated peptide antibodies to two putatively exposed C-terminal sequences and these reacted with the virus. Hence homology modelling may be useful for defining epitopes for antibody generation for diagnostic testing of BRV in commercial crops.

  4. Contrast transfer function correction applied to cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Giulia; Riches, James D.; Fuller, Stephen D.; Briggs, John A.G.

    2009-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography together with averaging of sub-tomograms containing identical particles can reveal the structure of proteins or protein complexes in their native environment. The resolution of this technique is limited by the contrast transfer function (CTF) of the microscope. The CTF is not routinely corrected in cryo-electron tomography because of difficulties including CTF detection, due to the low signal to noise ratio, and CTF correction, since images are characterised by a spatially variant CTF. Here we simulate the effects of the CTF on the resolution of the final reconstruction, before and after CTF correction, and consider the effect of errors and approximations in defocus determination. We show that errors in defocus determination are well tolerated when correcting a series of tomograms collected at a range of defocus values. We apply methods for determining the CTF parameters in low signal to noise images of tilted specimens, for monitoring defocus changes using observed magnification changes, and for correcting the CTF prior to reconstruction. Using bacteriophage PRD1 as a test sample, we demonstrate that this approach gives an improvement in the structure obtained by sub-tomogram averaging from cryo-electron tomograms. PMID:19666126

  5. Tools for macromolecular model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alan; Long, Fei; Nicholls, Robert A.; Toots, Jaan; Emsley, Paul; Murshudov, Garib

    2015-01-01

    A description is given of new tools to facilitate model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions. The recent rapid development of single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) now allows structures to be solved by this method at resolutions close to 3 Å. Here, a number of tools to facilitate the interpretation of EM reconstructions with stereochemically reasonable all-atom models are described. The BALBES database has been repurposed as a tool for identifying protein folds from density maps. Modifications to Coot, including new Jiggle Fit and morphing tools and improved handling of nucleic acids, enhance its functionality for interpreting EM maps. REFMAC has been modified for optimal fitting of atomic models into EM maps. As external structural information can enhance the reliability of the derived atomic models, stabilize refinement and reduce overfitting, ProSMART has been extended to generate interatomic distance restraints from nucleic acid reference structures, and a new tool, LIBG, has been developed to generate nucleic acid base-pair and parallel-plane restraints. Furthermore, restraint generation has been integrated with visualization and editing in Coot, and these restraints have been applied to both real-space refinement in Coot and reciprocal-space refinement in REFMAC.

  6. Visualization of adherent cell monolayers by cryo-electron microscopy: A snapshot of endothelial adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, Olivier; Decossas, Marion; Gontier, Etienne; Gerbod-Giannone, Marie-Christine; Lambert, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) allows the visualization of the cell architecture in its native state. We developed a robust solution to adapt cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS) to a monolayer of adherent cells using a functionalized polyacrylamide hydrogel growing substrate. We applied this method to reconstitute an endothelial cell monolayer to visualize the morphology of adherens junctions (AJs) which regulate permeability and integrity of the vascular barrier. The fine morphology and ultrastructure of AJs from cultured primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were analyzed in their native state by using CEMOVIS. Doxycycline and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are known as efficient regulators of endothelial permeability. Doxycycline and S1P treatments both led to a drastic morphological switch from very uneven to standardized 14-17nm wide AJs over several microns indicative of a better membrane tethering. Repetitive structures were occasionally noticed within the AJ cleft reflecting a local improved structural organization of VE-cadherin molecules. The ultrastructural stabilization of AJs observed upon treatment likely indicates a better adhesion and thus provides structural clues on the mechanism by which these treatments improve the endothelial barrier function. This method was also successfully extended to a thick epithelial barrier model. We expect our strategy to extend the reliable application of CEMOVIS to virtually any adherent cultured cell systems. PMID:26470813

  7. Automatic post-picking using MAPPOS improves particle image detection from cryo-EM micrographs.

    PubMed

    Norousi, Ramin; Wickles, Stephan; Leidig, Christoph; Becker, Thomas; Schmid, Volker J; Beckmann, Roland; Tresch, Achim

    2013-05-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) studies using single particle reconstruction are extensively used to reveal structural information on macromolecular complexes. Aiming at the highest achievable resolution, state of the art electron microscopes automatically acquire thousands of high-quality micrographs. Particles are detected on and boxed out from each micrograph using fully- or semi-automated approaches. However, the obtained particles still require laborious manual post-picking classification, which is one major bottleneck for single particle analysis of large datasets. We introduce MAPPOS, a supervised post-picking strategy for the classification of boxed particle images, as additional strategy adding to the already efficient automated particle picking routines. MAPPOS employs machine learning techniques to train a robust classifier from a small number of characteristic image features. In order to accurately quantify the performance of MAPPOS we used simulated particle and non-particle images. In addition, we verified our method by applying it to an experimental cryo-EM dataset and comparing the results to the manual classification of the same dataset. Comparisons between MAPPOS and manual post-picking classification by several human experts demonstrated that merely a few hundred sample images are sufficient for MAPPOS to classify an entire dataset with a human-like performance. MAPPOS was shown to greatly accelerate the throughput of large datasets by reducing the manual workload by orders of magnitude while maintaining a reliable identification of non-particle images. PMID:23454482

  8. Construction and Organization of a BSL-3 Cryo-Electron Microscopy Laboratory at UTMB

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Michael B.; Trujillo, Juan; Leahy, Ian; Razmus, Dennis; DeHate, Robert; Lorcheim, Paul; Czarneski, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Domenica; Newton, Je T’Aime M.; Haddow, Andrew D.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    A unique cryo-electron microscopy facility has been designed and constructed at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) to study the three-dimensional organization of viruses and bacteria classified as select agents at biological safety level (BSL)-3, and their interactions with host cells. A 200 keV high-end cryo-electron microscope was installed inside a BSL-3 containment laboratory and standard operating procedures were developed and implemented to ensure its safe and efficient operation. We also developed a new microscope decontamination protocol based on chlorine dioxide gas with a continuous flow system, which allowed us to expand the facility capabilities to study bacterial agents including spore-forming species. The new unified protocol does not require agent-specific treatment in contrast to the previously used heat decontamination. To optimize the use of the cryo-electron microscope and to improve safety conditions, it can be remotely controlled from a room outside of containment, or through a computer network world-wide. Automated data collection is provided by using JADAS (single particle imaging) and SerialEM (tomography). The facility has successfully operated for more than a year without an incident and was certified as a select agent facility by the Centers for Disease Control. PMID:23274136

  9. Beam-induced motion correction for sub-megadalton cryo-EM particles.

    PubMed

    Scheres, Sjors Hw

    2014-01-01

    In electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM), the electron beam that is used for imaging also causes the sample to move. This motion blurs the images and limits the resolution attainable by single-particle analysis. In a previous Research article (Bai et al., 2013) we showed that correcting for this motion by processing movies from fast direct-electron detectors allowed structure determination to near-atomic resolution from 35,000 ribosome particles. In this Research advance article, we show that an improved movie processing algorithm is applicable to a much wider range of specimens. The new algorithm estimates straight movement tracks by considering multiple particles that are close to each other in the field of view, and models the fall-off of high-resolution information content by radiation damage in a dose-dependent manner. Application of the new algorithm to four data sets illustrates its potential for significantly improving cryo-EM structures, even for particles that are smaller than 200 kDa. PMID:25122622

  10. Characterization of Antibiotic Peptide Pores Using Cryo-EM and Comparison to Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mikyung; Mei, Yuan; Khant, Htet; Ludtke, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Magainin, a 23-residue antibiotic peptide, interacts directly with the lipid bilayer leading to cell lysis in a strongly concentration-dependent fashion. Utilizing cryo-electron microscopy, we have directly observed magainin interacting with synthetic DMPC/DMPG membranes. Visual examination shows that visibly unperturbed vesicles are often found adjacent to vesicles that are lysed or porous, demonstrating that magainin disruption is a highly stochastic process. Quantitatively, power spectra of large numbers of porous vesicles can be averaged together to produce the equivalent of an electron scattering curve, which can be related to theory, simulation, and published neutron scattering experiments. We demonstrate that magainin-induced pores in lipid vesicles have a mean diameter of ?80 Å, compatible with earlier reported results in multilayer stacks. In addition to establishing a connection between experiments in multilayer stacks and vesicles, this also demonstrates that computed power spectra from windowed-out regions of cryo-EM images can be compared to neutron scattering data in a meaningful way, even though the pores of interest cannot yet be individually identified in images. Cryo-EM offers direct imaging of systems in configurations closely related to in vivo conditions, whereas neutron scattering has a greater variety of mechanisms for specific contrast variation via D2O and deuterated lipids. Combined, the two mechanisms support each other, and provide a clearer picture of such ‘soft’ systems than either could provide alone. PMID:19580754

  11. Cryo-EM and the elucidation of new macromolecular structures: Random Conical Tilt revisited

    PubMed Central

    Sorzano, C. O. S.; Alcorlo, M.; de la Rosa-Trevín, J. M.; Melero, R.; Foche, I.; Zaldívar-Peraza, A.; del Cano, L.; Vargas, J.; Abrishami, V.; Otón, J.; Marabini, R.; Carazo, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) of macromolecular complexes is a fundamental structural biology technique which is expanding at a very fast pace. Key to its success in elucidating the three-dimensional structure of a macromolecular complex, especially of small and non-symmetric ones, is the ability to start from a low resolution map, which is subsequently refined with the actual images collected at the microscope. There are several methods to produce this first structure. Among them, Random Conical Tilt (RCT) plays a prominent role due to its unbiased nature (it can create an initial model based on experimental measurements). In this article, we revise the fundamental mathematical expressions supporting RCT, providing new expressions handling all key geometrical parameters without the need of intermediate operations, leading to improved automation and overall reliability, essential for the success of cryo-EM when analyzing new complexes. We show that the here proposed RCT workflow based on the new formulation performs very well in practical cases, requiring very few image pairs (as low as 13 image pairs in one of our examples) to obtain relevant 3D maps. PMID:26390853

  12. Construction and organization of a BSL-3 cryo-electron microscopy laboratory at UTMB.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael B; Trujillo, Juan; Leahy, Ian; Razmus, Dennis; Dehate, Robert; Lorcheim, Paul; Czarneski, Mark A; Zimmerman, Domenica; Newton, Je T'aime M; Haddow, Andrew D; Weaver, Scott C

    2013-03-01

    A unique cryo-electron microscopy facility has been designed and constructed at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) to study the three-dimensional organization of viruses and bacteria classified as select agents at biological safety level (BSL)-3, and their interactions with host cells. A 200keV high-end cryo-electron microscope was installed inside a BSL-3 containment laboratory and standard operating procedures were developed and implemented to ensure its safe and efficient operation. We also developed a new microscope decontamination protocol based on chlorine dioxide gas with a continuous flow system, which allowed us to expand the facility capabilities to study bacterial agents including spore-forming species. The new unified protocol does not require agent-specific treatment in contrast to the previously used heat decontamination. To optimize the use of the cryo-electron microscope and to improve safety conditions, it can be remotely controlled from a room outside of containment, or through a computer network world-wide. Automated data collection is provided by using JADAS (single particle imaging) and SerialEM (tomography). The facility has successfully operated for more than a year without an incident and was certified as a select agent facility by the Centers for Disease Control. PMID:23274136

  13. Characterization of virus-like particles in GARDASIL® by cryo transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qinjian; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Lander, Gabriel; Sworen, Jaime; Towne, Victoria; Abraham, Dicky; Duncan, Paul; Washabaugh, Michael W; Sitrin, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryoTEM) is a powerful characterization method for assessing the structural properties of biopharmaceutical nanoparticles, including Virus Like Particle-based vaccines. We demonstrate the method using the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) VLPs in GARDASIL®. CryoTEM, coupled to automated data collection and analysis, was used to acquire images of the particles in their hydrated state, determine their morphological characteristics, and confirm the integrity of the particles when absorbed to aluminum adjuvant. In addition, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the VLPs, both alone and when interacting with neutralizing antibodies. Two modes of binding of two different neutralizing antibodies were apparent; for HPV type 11 saturated with H11.B2, 72 potential Fab binding sites were observed at the center of each capsomer, whereas for HPV 16 interacting with H16.V5, it appears that 60 pentamers (each neighboring 6 other pentamers) bind five Fabs per pentamer, for the total of 300 potential Fab binding sites per VLP. PMID:24299977

  14. Effect of cryo-induced microcracks on microindentation of hydrated cortical bone tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Ling; Venkatesan, Sudharshan; Webb, Daryl; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar; Qin Qinghua

    2009-08-15

    Microcracks accumulate in cortical bone tissue as a consequence of everyday cyclic loading. However, it remains unclear to what extent microdamage accumulation contributes to an increase in fracture risk. A cryo-preparation technique was applied to induce microcracks in cortical bone tissue. Microcracks with lengths up to approximately 20 {mu}m, which were initiated mainly on the boundaries of haversian canals, were observed with cryo-scanning electron microscopy. A microindentation technique was applied to study the mechanical loading effect on the microcracked hydrated bone tissue. The microindentation patterns were section-scanned using confocal laser scanning microscopy to understand the deformation and bone damage mechanisms made by mechanical loading. The results show that there was no significant difference with respect to microhardness between the original and microcracked hydrated cortical bone tissues (ANOVA, p > 0.05). The cryo-induced microcracks in the bone tissue were not propagated further under the mechanical loads applied. The deformation mechanism of the microcracked cortical bone tissue was plastic deformation, not brittle fracture.

  15. Ultracapacitor separator

    DOEpatents

    Wei, Chang (Niskayuna, NY); Jerabek, Elihu Calvin (Glenmont, NY); LeBlanc, Jr., Oliver Harris (Schenectady, NY)

    2001-03-06

    An ultracapacitor includes two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying the pores in the electrodes and separator. The electrolyte is a polar aprotic organic solvent and a salt. The porous separator comprises a wet laid cellulosic material.

  16. A Review Of CryoSat-2/SIRAL Applications For The Monitoring Of River Water Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercher, Nicolas; Dinardo, Salvatore; Lucas, Bruno Manuel; Fleury, Sara; Calmant, Stephane; Femenias, Pierre; Boy, Francois; Picot, Nicolas; Benveniste, Jerome

    2013-12-01

    Regarding hydrology applications and particularly the monitoring of river water levels from space, the CryoSat- 2 ice mission has two main valuable characteristics: (1) its geodetic orbit and (2) the altimeter's SAR and SARin modes. The benefits of the geodetic orbit of the satellite have been illustrated in the frame of the ”20 years of progress in radar altimetry” symposium (Venice, 2012) [2]. It has been shown that, with such an orbit, the way river water level was monitored using conventional altimeters had to be revisited. In particular, using LRM mode only, CryoSat-2 allowed us to build spatio-temporal time series of the river water level, to map river's topography and eventually derive pseudo-time series and pseudo-profiles of the river. This paper focuses on the new ways to use altimetry for the monitoring of river water levels. SIRAL's (CryoSat-2 altimeter) SAR and SARin modes have the ability to deliver surface heights with an unprecedented along-track resolution of about 300 m. Moreover, using the SARin mode (involving the satellite's two antennas), the cross- track angle of the retracked echo is also available in routine. These two aspects of the SARin mode (high resolution and cross-track angle) make it a new tool to distinguish whether the retracked echo came from the sur- face of interest (e.g., a river) or any other reflective object nearby the surface of interest (e.g., another river section, lakes or temporary lake after flooding events or any other specular surfaces). We introduce the multiple benefits of using the intermediate multi-look matrix (also known as stack matrix), among them: (1) to refine and select among the multiple Doppler-beam waveforms before averaging and retracking them, and (2) to be able to study the surfaces response according to their view angle. Custom products processed at ESA (ESRIN) by Dinardo et al. [7], in the perspective of Sentinel-3, as well as official CryoSat-2 L1b and L2 products were used to illustrate these perspectives. The paper mainly introduces the potential new applications brought by SIRAL's SAR and SARin modes. Finally, combined with its really dense geodetic orbit, CryoSat-2 can be seen as a topography mission that paves the way toward the SWOT mission.

  17. Estimation of Arctic Sea Ice Freeboard and Thickness Using CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanggyun; Im, Jungho; yoon, Hyeonjin; Shin, Minso; Kim, Miae

    2014-05-01

    Arctic sea ice is one of the significant components of the global climate system as it plays a significant role in driving global ocean circulation, provides a continuous insulating layer at air-sea interface, and reflects a large portion of the incoming solar radiation in Polar Regions. Sea ice extent has constantly declined since 1980s. Its area was the lowest ever recorded on 16 September 2012 since the satellite record began in 1979. Arctic sea ice thickness has also been diminishing along with the decreasing sea ice extent. Because extent and thickness, two main characteristics of sea ice, are important indicators of the polar response to on-going climate change, there has been a great effort to quantify them using various approaches. Sea ice thickness has been measured with numerous field techniques such as surface drilling and deploying buoys. These techniques provide sparse and discontinuous data in spatiotemporal domain. Spaceborne radar and laser altimeters can overcome these limitations and have been used to estimate sea ice thickness. Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICEsat), a laser altimeter from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), provided data to detect polar area elevation change between 2003 and 2009. CryoSat-2 launched with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)/Interferometric Radar Altimeter (SIRAL) on April 2010 can provide data to estimate time-series of Arctic sea ice thickness. In this study, Arctic sea ice freeboard and thickness in 2012 and 2013 were estimated using CryoSat-2 SAR mode data that has sea ice surface height relative to the reference ellipsoid WGS84. In order to estimate sea ice thickness, freeboard height, elevation difference between the top of sea ice surface and leads should be calculated. CryoSat-2 profiles such as pulse peakiness, backscatter sigma-0, number of echoes, and significant wave height were examined to distinguish leads from sea ice. Several near-real time cloud-free MODIS images as CryoSat-2 data were used to identify leads. Rule-based machine learning approaches such as random forest and See5.0 and human-derived decision trees were used to produce rules to identify leads. With the freeboard height calculated from the lead analysis, sea ice thickness was finally estimated using the Archimedes' buoyancy principle with density of sea ice and sea water and the height of freeboard. The results were compared with Arctic sea ice thickness distribution retrieved from CryoSat-2 data by Alfred-Wegener-Institute.

  18. ESA-NASA collaboration in support of CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, T. G.; Davidson, M.; Schuettemeyer, D.; Perrera, A.; Armitage, T.; Bianchi, R.; Parrinello, T.; Fornari, M.; Skourup, H.

    2012-12-01

    In the framework of its Earth Observation Programmes the European Space Agency (ESA) carries out groundbased and airborne campaigns to support geophysical algorithm development, calibration/validation, simulation of future spaceborne earth observation missions, and applications development related to land, oceans and atmosphere. ESA has been conducting airborne and ground measurements campaigns since 1981 by deploying a broad range of active and passive instrumentation in both the optical and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum such as lidars, limb/nadir sounding interferometers/spectrometers, high-resolution spectral imagers, advanced synthetic aperture radars, altimeters and radiometers. These campaigns take place inside and outside Europe in collaboration with national research organisations in the ESA member states as well as with international organisations harmonising European campaign activities. For the different activities a rich variety of datasets has been recorded, are archived and users can access campaign data through the EOPI web portal [http://eopi.esa.int]. CryoSat-2, ESA's third Earth Explorer, is Europe's first mission dedicated to monitoring Earth's ice fields. The satellite carries a sophisticated radar altimeter that can measure the thickness of sea ice down to centimetres and also monitor changes in ice sheets, particularly around the edges where icebergs are calved from the vast ice sheets that cover Greenland and Antarctica. On order to gather data to help ensure the accuracy of ESA's ice mission, in yet another remarkable collaborative effort, ESA and NASA met up over the Arctic Ocean in April 2012 to perform some carefully coordinated flights directly under CryoSat orbiting above. The aim of this large-scale campaign was to record sea-ice thickness and conditions of the ice exactly along the line traced by ESA's CryoSat satellite orbiting high above. A range of sensors installed on the different aircraft was used to gather complementary information. These airborne instruments included simple cameras to get a visual record of the sea ice, laser scanners to clearly map the height of the ice, an ice-thickness sensor (EM-Bird), ESA's radar altimeter (ASIRAS) and NASA's snow and Ku-band radars, which mimic CryoSat's measurements but at a higher resolution. Preliminary results, obtained from the pooled flight time among teams of scientists from Europe, US and Canada, already show the capability to determine the amount of snow on the ice. Even more interestingly, from 700 km away, CryoSat is able to detect centimeter differences between sea-ice and thin ice/water, which in turn allow for the estimation of actual sea ice thickness at the time of the measurement.

  19. Ice elevation change from Swath Processing of CryoSat SARIn Mode Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foresta, Luca; Gourmelen, Noel; Shepherd, Andrew; Muir, Alan; Nienow, Pete

    2015-04-01

    Reference and repeat-observations of Glacier and Ice Sheet Margin (GISM) topography are critical to identify changes in ice elevation, provide estimates of mass gain or loss and thus quantify the contribution of the cryosphere to sea level rise (e.g. McMillan et al., 2014). The Synthetic Interferometric Radar Altimeter (SIRAL) onboard the ESA radar altimetry CryoSat (CS) mission has collected ice elevation measurements since 2010. The corresponding SARIn mode of operation, activated over GISM areas, provides high spatial resolution in the along-track direction while resolving the angular origin of echoes (i.e. across-track). The current ESA SARIn processor calculates the elevation of the Point Of Closest Approach (POCA) within each waveform and maps of elevation change in Antarctica and Greenland have been produced using the regular CS height product (McMillan et al., 2014; Helm et al., 2014). Data from the CS-SARIn mode has also been used to produce measurements of ice elevation beyond the POCA, also known as swath elevation (Hawley et al. 2009; Gray et al., 2013; ESA-STSE CryoTop project). Here we use the swath processing approach to generate maps of ice elevation change from selected regions around the margins of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets. We discuss the impact of the swath processing on the spatial resolution and precision of the resulting ice elevation field and compare our results to current dh/dt estimates. References: ESA STSE CryoTop project - http://www.stse-cryotop.org/ Gray L., Burgess D., Copland L., Cullen R., Galin N., Hawley R. and Helm V. Interferometric swath processing of Cryosat data for glacial ice topography. The Cryosphere, 7(6):1857-1867, December 2013. Hawley R.L., Shepherd A., Cullen R., Helm V. and WIngham D.J. Ice-sheet elevations from across-track processing of airborne interferometric radar altimetry. Geophysical Research Letters, 36(22):L22501, November 2009. Helm V., Humbert A. and Miller H. Elevation and elevation change of Greenland and Antarctica derived from CryoSat-2. The Cryosphere, 8(4):1539-1559, August 2014. McMillan M., Shepherd A., Sundal A., Briggs K., Muir A., Ridout A., Hogg A. and Wingham D. Increased ice losses from Antarctica detected by CryoSat-2. Geophysical Research Letters, pages 3899-3905, 2014.

  20. Superposition of DC magnetic fields by cascading multiple magnets in magnetic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2015-09-01

    A novel method that can effectively collect the DC magnetic field produced by multiple separated magnets is proposed. With the proposed idea of a magnetic loop, the DC magnetic field produced by these separated magnets can be effectively superimposed together. The separated magnets can be cascaded in series or in parallel. A novel nested magnetic loop is also proposed to achieve a higher DC magnetic field in the common air region without increasing the DC magnetic field in each magnetic loop. The magnetic loop can be made by a magnetic hose, which is designed by transformation optics and can be realized by the combination of super-conductors and ferromagnetic materials.

  1. Combining Envisat type and CryoSat-2 altimetry to inform hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Raphael; Nygaard Godiksen, Peter; Villadsen, Heidi; Madsen, Henrik; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Hydrological models are developed and used for flood forecasting and water resources management. Such models rely on a variety of input and calibration data. In general, and especially in data scarce areas, remote sensing provides valuable data for the parameterization and updating of such models. Satellite radar altimeters provide water level measurements of inland water bodies. So far, many studies making use of satellite altimeters have been based on data from repeat-orbit missions such as Envisat, ERS or Jason or on synthetic wide-swath altimetry data as expected from the SWOT mission. This work represents one of the first hydrologic applications of altimetry data from a drifting orbit satellite mission, using data from CryoSat-2. We present an application where CryoSat-2 data is used to improve a hydrodynamic model of the Ganges and Brahmaputra river basins in South Asia set up in the DHI MIKE 11 software. The model's parameterization and forcing is mainly based on remote sensing data, for example the TRMM 3B42 precipitation product and the SRTM DEM for river and subcatchment delineation. CryoSat-2 water levels were extracted over a river mask derived from Landsat 7 and 8 imagery. After calibrating the hydrological-hydrodynamic model against observed discharge, simulated water levels were fitted to the CryoSat-2 data, with a focus on the Brahmaputra river in the Assam valley: The average simulated water level in the hydrodynamic model was fitted to the average water level along the river's course as observed by CryoSat-2 over the years 2011-2013 by adjusting the river bed elevation. In a second step, the cross section shapes were adjusted so that the simulated water level dynamics matched those obtained from Envisat virtual station time series. The discharge calibration resulted in Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients of 0.86 and 0.94 for the Ganges and Brahmaputra. Using the Landsat river mask, the CryoSat-2 water levels show consistency along the river and are in good accordance with other products, such as the SRTM DEM. The adjusted hydrodynamic model reproduced the average water level profile along the river channel with a higher accuracy than a model based on the SRTM DEM. Furthermore, the amplitudes as observed in Envisat virtual station time series could be reproduced fitting simple triangular cross section shapes. A hydrodynamic model prepared in such a way provides water levels at any point along the river and any point in time, which are consistent with the multi-mission altimetric dataset. This means it can for example be updated by assimilation of near real-time water level measurements from CryoSat-2 improving its flood forecasting capability.

  2. Elevated Temperature Compressive Strength Properties of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened NiAl After Cryo-milling and Roasting in Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Grahle, Peter; Arzt, Eduard; Hebsur, Mohan

    1998-01-01

    In an effort to superimpose two different elevated temperature strengthening mechanisms in NiAl, several lots of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) NiAl powder have been cryo-milled in liquid nitrogen to introduce AlN particles at the grain boundaries. As an alternative to cryo-milling, one lot of ODS NiAl was roasted in nitrogen to produce AlN. Both techniques resulted in hot extruded AlN-strengthened, ODS NiAl alloys which were stronger than the base ODS NiAl between 1200 and 1400 K. However, neither the cryo-milled nor the N2-roasted ODS NiAl alloys were as strong as cryo-milled binary NiAl containing like amounts of AlN. The reason(s) for the relative weakness of cryo-milled ODS NiAl is not certain; however the lack of superior strength in N2-roasted ODS NiAl is probably due to its relatively large AlN particles.

  3. Closer to the native state. Critical evaluation of cryo-techniques for Transmission Electron Microscopy: preparation of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Mielanczyk, Lukasz; Matysiak, Natalia; Michalski, Marek; Buldak, Rafal; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    Over the years Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has evolved into a powerful technique for the structural analysis of cells and tissues at various levels of resolution. However, optimal sample preservation is required to achieve results consistent with reality. During the last few decades, conventional preparation methods have provided most of the knowledge about the ultrastructure of organelles, cells and tissues. Nevertheless, some artefacts can be introduced at all stagesofstandard electron microscopy preparation technique. Instead, rapid freezing techniques preserve biological specimens as close as possible to the native state. Our review focuses on different cryo-preparation approaches, starting from vitrification methods dependent on sample size. Afterwards, we discuss Cryo-Electron Microscopy Of VItreous Sections (CEMOVIS) and the main difficulties associated with this technique. Cryo-Focused Ion Beam (cryo-FIB) is described as a potential alternative for CEMOVIS. Another post-processing route for vitrified samples is freeze substitution and embedding in resin for structural analysis or immunolocalization analysis. Cryo-sectioning according to Tokuyasu is a technique dedicated to high efficiency immunogold labelling. Finally, we introduce hybrid techniques, which combine advantages of primary techniques originally dedicated to different approaches. Hybrid approaches permit to perform the study of difficult-to-fix samples and antigens or help optimize the sample preparation protocol for the integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy (iLEM) technique. PMID:24802956

  4. Environmentally-friendly oxygen-free roasting/wet magnetic separation technology for in situ recycling cobalt, lithium carbonate and graphite from spent LiCoO2/graphite lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Guangxu; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-01-25

    The definite aim of the present paper is to present some novel methods that use oxygen-free roasting and wet magnetic separation to in situ recycle of cobalt, Lithium Carbonate and Graphite from mixed electrode materials. The in situ recycling means to change waste into resources by its own components, which is an idea of "waste+waste?resources." After mechanical scraping the mixed electrode materials enrich powders of LiCoO2 and graphite. The possible reaction between LiCoO2 and graphite was obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The feasibility of the reaction at high temperature was studied with the simultaneous thermogravimetry analysis under standard atmospheric pressure. Then the oxygen-free roasting/wet magnetic separation method was used to transfer the low added value mixed electrode materials to high added value products. The results indicated that, through the serious technologies of oxygen-free roasting and wet magnetic separation, mixture materials consist with LiCoO2 and graphite powders are transferred to the individual products of cobalt, Lithium Carbonate and Graphite. Because there is not any chemical solution added in the process, the cost of treating secondary pollution can be saved. This study provides a theoretical basis for industrial-scale recycling resources from spent LIBs. PMID:26448495

  5. Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    According to f =d(mv)/dt=m(dv/dt)+ v(dm/dt), a same gravitational formula had been de-duced from the variance in physical mass of QFT and from the variance in mass of inductive energy-transfer of GR respectively: f QF T = f GR = -G (mM/r2 )((r/r)+(v/c)) when their interaction-constants are all taken the experimental values (H05-0029-08, E15-0039-08). f QF T is the quasi-Casimir pressure. f GR is equivalent to Einstein's equation, then more easy to solve it. The hypothesis of the equivalent principle is not used in f QF T , but required by f GR . The predictions of f QF T and f GR are identical except that f QF T has quantum effects but f GR has not and f GR has Lense-Thirring effect but f QF T has not. The quantum effects of gravitation had been verified by Nesvizhevsky et al with the ultracold neutrons falling in the earth's gravitational field in 2002. Yet Lense-Thirring effect had not been measured by GP-B. It shows that f QF T is essential but f GR is phenomenological. The macro-f QF T is the statistic average pressure collided by net virtual neutrinos ? 0 flux (after self-offset in opposite directions) and in direct proportion to the mass. But micro-f QF T is in direct proportion to the scattering section. The electric mass (in inverse proportion to de Broglie wavelength ?) far less than nucleonic mass and the electric scattering section (in direct proportion to ?2 ) far large than that of nucleon, then the net ? 0 flux pressure exerted to electron far large than that to nucleon and the electric displacement far large than that of nucleon, it causes the gravitational polarization of positive-negative charge center separation. Because the gravity far less than the electromagnetic binding force, in atoms the gravitational polarization only produces a little separation. But the net ? 0 flux can press a part freedom electrons in plasma of ionosphere into the earth's surface, the static electric force of redundant positive ions prevents electrons from further falling and till reach the equilibrium of stable spatial charge distribution, which is just the cause of the geomagnetic field and the geo-electric field (the observational value on the earth surface is about 120 V/m downward equivalent to 500000 Coulomb negative charges in the earth surface). All celestial bodies are gravitation sources and attract the molecules and ions in space to its circumference by the gravitation of own and other celestial bodies, e.g., all planets in the solar system have their own atmospheres. Therefore, the origin mechanism of geo-electric and geomagnetic fields caused by gravitation is very universal, at least it is appli-cable to all the planets in the solar system. For planets, the joint result of the gravitations of the planets and the sun makes the negative charges and dipolar charges distributed in the surfaces of the celestial bodies. The quicker the rotation is, the larger the angular momentum U is, then larger the accompanying current and magnetic moment P, it accord a experiential law found by subsistent observational data of all celestial bodies in solar system: P = -G 1/2 U cos ? / c (1), ? is the angle between the net ? 0 flux direction (mark by CMB) and the rotational axis of celestial body (Chen Shao-Guang, Chinese Science Bulletin, 26,233,1981). Uranian and Neptunian P predicted with Eq.(1) in 1981 are about -3.4•1028 Gs•cm3 and 1.9•1028 Gs•cm3 respectively (use new rotate speed measured by Voyager 2). The P measured by Voyager 2 in 1986 and 1989 are about -1.9 •1028 Gs•cm3 and 1.5•1028 Gs•cm3 respectively (the contribution of quadrupole P is converted into the contribution of dipole P alone). The neutron star pos-sesses much high density and rotational speed because of the conservation of the mass and the angular momentum during the course of the formation, then has strong gravity and largerU. From Eq.(1) there is a larger P and extremely strong surface magnetic field in neutron star. The origin mechanism of basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies will affect directly all fields refer

  6. Structure of the E. coli ribosome-EF-Tu complex at <3 Å resolution by Cs-corrected cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Niels; Neumann, Piotr; Konevega, Andrey L; Bock, Lars V; Ficner, Ralf; Rodnina, Marina V; Stark, Holger

    2015-04-23

    Single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) has recently made significant progress in high-resolution structure determination of macromolecular complexes due to improvements in electron microscopic instrumentation and computational image analysis. However, cryo-EM structures can be highly non-uniform in local resolution and all structures available to date have been limited to resolutions above 3 Å. Here we present the cryo-EM structure of the 70S ribosome from Escherichia coli in complex with elongation factor Tu, aminoacyl-tRNA and the antibiotic kirromycin at 2.65-2.9 Å resolution using spherical aberration (Cs)-corrected cryo-EM. Overall, the cryo-EM reconstruction at 2.9 Å resolution is comparable to the best-resolved X-ray structure of the E. coli 70S ribosome (2.8 Å), but provides more detailed information (2.65 Å) at the functionally important ribosomal core. The cryo-EM map elucidates for the first time the structure of all 35 rRNA modifications in the bacterial ribosome, explaining their roles in fine-tuning ribosome structure and function and modulating the action of antibiotics. We also obtained atomic models for flexible parts of the ribosome such as ribosomal proteins L9 and L31. The refined cryo-EM-based model presents the currently most complete high-resolution structure of the E. coli ribosome, which demonstrates the power of cryo-EM in structure determination of large and dynamic macromolecular complexes. PMID:25707802

  7. Spotiton: A prototype for an integrated inkjet dispense and vitrification system for cryo-TEM

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tilak; Sheehan, Patrick; Crum, John; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last three decades, Cryo-TEM has developed into a powerful technique for high-resolution imaging of biological macromolecules in their native vitrified state. However, the technique for vitrifying specimens onto EM grids is essentially unchanged – application of ~ 3 µL sample to a grid, followed by blotting and rapid plunge freezing into liquid ethane. Several trials are often required to obtain suitable thin (few hundred nanometers or less) vitrified layers amenable for cryo-TEM imaging, which results in waste of precious sample and resources. While commercially available instruments provide some level of automation to control the vitrification process in an effort to increase quality and reproducibility, obtaining satisfactory vitrified specimens remains a bottleneck in the Cryo-TEM pipeline. We describe here a completely novel method for EM specimen preparation based on small volume (picoliter to nanoliter) dispensing using inkjet technology. A first prototype system (Spotiton v0.5) demonstrates feasibility of this new approach for specimen vitrification. A piezo-electric inkjet dispenser is integrated with optical real-time cameras (100 Hz frame rate) to analyze picoliter to nanoliter droplet profiles in-flight and spreading dynamics on the grid, and thus provides a method to optimize timing of the process. Using TEM imaging and biochemical assays we demonstrate that the piezo-electric inkjet mechanism does not disrupt the structural or functional integrity of macromolecules. These preliminary studies provide insight into the factors and components that will need further development to enable a robust and repeatable technique for specimen vitrification using this novel approach. PMID:22569522

  8. Cryo X-ray microscope with flat sample geometry for correlative fluorescence and nanoscale tomographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gerd; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Werner, Stephan; Follath, Rolf

    2012-02-01

    X-ray imaging offers a new 3-D view into cells. With its ability to penetrate whole hydrated cells it is ideally suited for pairing fluorescence light microscopy and nanoscale X-ray tomography. In this paper, we describe the X-ray optical set-up and the design of the cryo full-field transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. Compared to previous TXM set-ups with zone plate condenser monochromator, the new X-ray optical layout employs an undulator source, a spherical grating monochromator and an elliptically shaped glass capillary mirror as condenser. This set-up improves the spectral resolution by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the partially coherent object illumination improves the contrast transfer of the microscope compared to incoherent conditions. With the new TXM, cells grown on flat support grids can be tilted perpendicular to the optical axis without any geometrical restrictions by the previously required pinhole for the zone plate monochromator close to the sample plane. We also developed an incorporated fluorescence light microscope which permits to record fluorescence, bright field and DIC images of cryogenic cells inside the TXM. For TXM tomography, imaging with multi-keV X-rays is a straightforward approach to increase the depth of focus. Under these conditions phase contrast imaging is necessary. For soft X-rays with shrinking depth of focus towards 10nm spatial resolution, thin optical sections through a thick specimen might be obtained by deconvolution X-ray microscopy. As alternative 3-D X-ray imaging techniques, the confocal cryo-STXM and the dual beam cryo-FIB/STXM with photoelectron detection are proposed. PMID:22273540

  9. Spotiton: a prototype for an integrated inkjet dispense and vitrification system for cryo-TEM.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tilak; Sheehan, Patrick; Crum, John; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S

    2012-07-01

    Over the last three decades, Cryo-TEM has developed into a powerful technique for high-resolution imaging of biological macromolecules in their native vitrified state. However, the method for vitrifying specimens onto EM grids is essentially unchanged - application of ?3 ?L sample to a grid, followed by blotting and rapid plunge freezing into liquid ethane. Several trials are often required to obtain suitable thin (few hundred nanometers or less) vitrified layers amenable for cryo-TEM imaging, which results in waste of precious sample and resources. While commercially available instruments provide some level of automation to control the vitrification process in an effort to increase quality and reproducibility, obtaining satisfactory vitrified specimens remains a bottleneck in the Cryo-TEM pipeline. We describe here a completely novel method for EM specimen preparation based on small volume (picoliter to nanoliter) dispensing using inkjet technology. A first prototype system (Spotiton v0.5) demonstrates feasibility of this new approach for specimen vitrification. A piezo-electric inkjet dispenser is integrated with optical real-time cameras (100 Hz frame rate) to analyze picoliter to nanoliter droplet profiles in-flight and spreading dynamics on the grid, and thus provides a method to optimize timing of the process. Using TEM imaging and biochemical assays we demonstrate that the piezo-electric inkjet mechanism does not disrupt the structural or functional integrity of macromolecules. These preliminary studies provide insight into the factors and components that will need further development to enable a robust and repeatable technique for specimen vitrification using this novel approach. PMID:22569522

  10. Gas-Assisted Annular Microsprayer for Sample Preparation for Time-Resolved Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Meng, Xing; Mannella, Carmen A.; Yassin, Aymen; Agrawal, Rajendra; Wagenknecht, Terence; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved cryo electron microscopy (TRCEM) has emerged as a powerful technique for transient structural characterization of isolated biomacromolecular complexes in their native state within the time scale of seconds to milliseconds. For TRCEM sample preparation, microfluidic device [9] has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to facilitate TRCEM biological sample preparation. It is capable of achieving rapidly aqueous sample mixing, controlled reaction incubation, and sample deposition on electron microscopy (EM) grids for rapid freezing. One of the critical challenges is to transfer samples to cryo-EM grids from the microfluidic device. By using microspraying method, the generated droplet size needs to be controlled to facilitate the thin ice film formation on the grid surface for efficient data collection, while not too thin to be dried out before freezing, i.e., optimized mean droplet size needs to be achieved. In this work, we developed a novel monolithic three dimensional (3D) annular gas-assisted microfluidic sprayer using 3D MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical System) fabrication techniques. The microsprayer demonstrated dense and consistent microsprays with average droplet size between 6-9 ?m, which fulfilled the above droplet size requirement for TRCEM sample preparation. With droplet density of around 12-18 per grid window (window size is 58×58 ?m), and the data collectible thin ice region of >50% total wetted area, we collected ~800-1000 high quality CCD micrographs in a 6-8 hour period of continuous effort. This level of output is comparable to what were routinely achieved using cryo-grids prepared by conventional blotting and manual data collection. In this case, weeks of data collection process with the previous device [9] has shortened to a day or two. And hundreds of microliter of valuable sample consumption can be reduced to only a small fraction. PMID:25530679

  11. Cryo FIB-SEM: volume imaging of cellular ultrastructure in native frozen specimens.

    PubMed

    Schertel, Andreas; Snaidero, Nicolas; Han, Hong-Mei; Ruhwedel, Torben; Laue, Michael; Grabenbauer, Markus; Möbius, Wiebke

    2013-11-01

    Volume microscopy at high resolution is increasingly required to better understand cellular functions in the context of three-dimensional assemblies. Focused ion beam (FIB) milling for serial block face imaging in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) is an efficient and fast method to generate such volume data for 3D analysis. Here, we apply this technique at cryo-conditions to image fully hydrated frozen specimen of mouse optic nerves and Bacillus subtilis spores obtained by high-pressure freezing (HPF). We established imaging conditions to directly visualize the ultrastructure in the block face at -150 °C by using an in-lens secondary electron (SE) detector. By serial sectioning with a focused ion beam and block face imaging of the optic nerve we obtained a volume as large as X=7.72 ?m, Y=5.79 ?m and Z=3.81 ?m with a lateral pixel size of 7.5 nm and a slice thickness of 30 nm in Z. The intrinsic contrast of membranes was sufficient to distinguish structures like Golgi cisternae, vesicles, endoplasmic reticulum and cristae within mitochondria and allowed for a three-dimensional reconstruction of different types of mitochondria within an oligodendrocyte and an astrocytic process. Applying this technique to dormant B. subtilis spores we obtained volumes containing numerous spores and discovered a bright signal in the core, which cannot be related to any known structure so far. In summary, we describe the use of cryo FIB-SEM as a tool for direct and fast 3D cryo-imaging of large native frozen samples including tissues. PMID:24121039

  12. Monolithic Microfluidic Mixing-Spraying Devices for Time-Resolved Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zonghuan; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Barnard, David; Meng, Xing; Mohamed, Hisham; Yassin, Aymen; Mannella, Carmen A.; Agrawal, Rajendra K.; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The goal of time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy is to determine structural models for transient functional states of large macromolecular complexes such as ribosomes and viruses. The challenge of time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy is to rapidly mix reactants, and then, following a defined time interval, to rapidly deposit them as a thin film and freeze the sample to the vitreous state. Here we describe a methodology in which reaction components are mixed and allowed to react, and are then sprayed onto an EM grid as it is being plunged into cryogen. All steps are accomplished by a monolithic, microfabricated silicon device that incorporates a mixer, reaction channel, and pneumatic sprayer in a single chip. We have found that microdroplets produced by air atomization spread to sufficiently thin films on a millisecond time scale provided that the carbon supporting film is made suitably hydrophilic. The device incorporates two T-mixers flowing into a single channel of four butterfly-shaped mixing elements that ensure effective mixing, followed by a microfluidic reaction channel whose length can be varied to achieve the desired reaction time. The reaction channel is flanked by two ports connected to compressed humidified nitrogen gas (at 50 psi) to generate the spray. The monolithic mixer-sprayer is incorporated into a computer-controlled plunging apparatus. To test the mixing performance and the suitability of the device for preparation of biological macromolecules for cryo-EM, ribosomes and ferritin were mixed in the device and sprayed onto grids. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the ribosomes demonstrated retention of native structure, and 30S and 50S subunits were shown to be capable of reassociation into ribosomes after passage through the device. PMID:19683579

  13. Cryo-EM reveals the conformation of a substrate analogue in the human 20S proteasome core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca, Paula C. A.; Morris, Edward P.

    2015-07-01

    The proteasome is a highly regulated protease complex fundamental for cell homeostasis and controlled cell cycle progression. It functions by removing a wide range of specifically tagged proteins, including key cellular regulators. Here we present the structure of the human 20S proteasome core bound to a substrate analogue inhibitor molecule, determined by electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and single-particle analysis at a resolution of around 3.5 Å. Our map allows the building of protein coordinates as well as defining the location and conformation of the inhibitor at the different active sites. These results open new prospects to tackle the proteasome functional mechanisms. Moreover, they also further demonstrate that cryo-EM is emerging as a realistic approach for general structural studies of protein-ligand interactions.

  14. Cryo-EM reveals the conformation of a substrate analogue in the human 20S proteasome core

    PubMed Central

    da Fonseca, Paula C.A.; Morris, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    The proteasome is a highly regulated protease complex fundamental for cell homeostasis and controlled cell cycle progression. It functions by removing a wide range of specifically tagged proteins, including key cellular regulators. Here we present the structure of the human 20S proteasome core bound to a substrate analogue inhibitor molecule, determined by electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and single-particle analysis at a resolution of around 3.5?Å. Our map allows the building of protein coordinates as well as defining the location and conformation of the inhibitor at the different active sites. These results open new prospects to tackle the proteasome functional mechanisms. Moreover, they also further demonstrate that cryo-EM is emerging as a realistic approach for general structural studies of protein–ligand interactions. PMID:26133119

  15. Surface molecular imprinting onto fluorescein-coated magnetic nanoparticlesvia reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization: A facile three-in-one system for recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Dong, Cunku; Chu, Jia; Qi, Jingyao; Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we present a general protocol for the making of surface-imprinted magnetic fluorescence beads viareversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The resulting composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized beads exhibited homogeneous polymer films (thickness of about 5.7 nm), spherical shape, high fluorescence intensity and magnetic property (Magnetization (Ms) = 3.67 emu g-1). The hybrids bind the original template 17?-estradiol with an appreciable selectivity over structurally related compounds. In addition, the resulting hybrids performed without obvious deterioration after five repeated cycles. This study therefore demonstrates the potential of molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals.In this study, we present a general protocol for the making of surface-imprinted magnetic fluorescence beads viareversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The resulting composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized beads exhibited homogeneous polymer films (thickness of about 5.7 nm), spherical shape, high fluorescence intensity and magnetic property (Magnetization (Ms) = 3.67 emu g-1). The hybrids bind the original template 17?-estradiol with an appreciable selectivity over structurally related compounds. In addition, the resulting hybrids performed without obvious deterioration after five repeated cycles. This study therefore demonstrates the potential of molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supplementary figure S1. The hysteresis loop of Fe3O4 (a), Fe3O4@SiO2 (b), and Fe3O4@SiO2-Dye-SiO2 (c). See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00614a

  16. COVARIANCE ESTIMATION USING CONJUGATE GRADIENT FOR 3D CLASSIFICATION IN CRYO-EM

    PubMed Central

    Andén, Joakim; Katsevich, Eugene; Singer, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Classifying structural variability in noisy projections of biological macromolecules is a central problem in Cryo-EM. In this work, we build on a previous method for estimating the covariance matrix of the three-dimensional structure present in the molecules being imaged. Our proposed method allows for incorporation of contrast transfer function and non-uniform distribution of viewing angles, making it more suitable for real-world data. We evaluate its performance on a synthetic dataset and an experimental dataset obtained by imaging a 70S ribosome complex. PMID:26682015

  17. CryoSat-2: Post launch performance of SIRAL-2 and its calibration/validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, Robert; Francis, Richard; Davidson, Malcolm; Wingham, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    1. INTRODUCTION The main payload of CryoSat-2 [1], SIRAL (Synthetic interferometric radar altimeter), is a Ku band pulse-width limited radar altimeter which transmits pulses at a high pulse repetition frequency thus making received echoes phase coherent and suitable for azimuth processing [2]. The azimuth processing in conjunction with correction for slant range improves along track resolution to about 250 meters which is a significant improvement over traditional pulse-width limited systems such as Envisat RA-2, [3]. CryoSat-2 will be launched on 25th February 2010 and this paper describes the pre and post launch measures of CryoSat/SIRAL performance and the status of mission validation planning. 2. SIRAL PERFORMANCE: INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL CALIBRATION Phase coherent pulse-width limited radar altimeters such as SIRAL-2 pose a new challenge when considering a strategy for calibration. Along with the need to generate the well understood corrections for transfer function amplitude with respect to frequency, gain and instrument path delay there is also a need to provide corrections for transfer function phase with respect to frequency and AGC setting, phase variation across bursts of pulses. Furthermore, since some components of these radars are temperature sensitive one needs to be careful when the deciding how often calibrations are performed whilst not impacting mission performance. Several internal calibration ground processors have been developed to model imperfections within the CryoSat-2 radar altimeter (SIRAL-2) hardware and reduce their effect from the science data stream via the use of calibration correction auxiliary products within the ground segment. We present the methods and results used to model and remove imperfections and describe the baseline for usage of SIRAL-2 calibration modes during the commissioning phase and the operational exploitation phases of the mission. Additionally we present early results derived from external calibration of SIRAL via the use of ocean calibration zones and radar transponders. 3. CRYOSAT-2 OVERALL PERFORMANCE & VALIDATION PLANNING Validating such retrievals derived from a phase coherent pulse-width limited polar observing radar altimeter, such as SIRAL, is not a simple one [4]. In order to fully understand all the respective error co-variances it is necessary to acquire many different types of in-situ measurements (GPR, neutron probe density profiles, drilled and electromagnetic derived sea-ice thicknesses, for example) in highly inhospitable regions of the cryosphere at key times of the year. In order to correlate retrievals from CryoSat with the in-situ data it was decided early in the CryoSat development that an aircraft borne radar altimeter with similar functionality to SIRAL would provide the necessary link, albeit on the smaller scale, and provide pre-launch incite into expected performances and issues. In 2001 ESA commenced the development of its own prototype radar altimeter that mimics the functionality of SIRAL. Similar to SIRAL, but with subtle functional differences, the airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) has now been the centre piece instrument for a number of large scale land and sea ice field campaigns in the Arctic during spring and autumn 2004, 2006 and 2008. Additional smaller science/test campaigns have taken place in March 2003 (Svalbard), March 2005 (Bay of Bothnia), March 2006 (Western Greenland) and April 2007 (CryoVEx 2007 in Svalbard). It is a credit to all parties that constitute the CryoSat Validation and Retrieval Team (CVRT) for the coordination, planning, acquisition of in-situ and airborne measurements and the subsequent processing and distributing of its data for analysis. CVRT has a robust infrastructure in place for validating its level 2 products derived from an operational CryoSat-2. 4. REFERENCES [1] http://www.esa.int/livingplanet/cryosat [2] Wingham, D. J., Francis, C. R., Baker, S., Bouzinac, C., Cullen, R., de Chateau-Thierry, P., Laxon, S. W., Mallow, U., Mavrocordatos, C., Phalippou, L., Ratier, G., Rey

  18. Cryo Cooler Induced Micro-Vibration Disturbances to the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrich, Nick; Zimbelman, Darrell; Turczyn, Mark; Sills, Joel; Voorhees, Carl; Clapp, Brian; Brumfield, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) Cryo Cooler (MCC) system, a description of the micro-vibration characterization testing performed, and a discussion of the simulated performance. The NCC is a reverse Brayton cycle system that employs micro turbo-machinery to provide cooling to the NICMOS instrument. Extensive testing was conducted to quantify the expected on-orbit disturbances caused by the micro turbo-machinery and provide input to a flexible-body dynamic simulation to demonstrate compliance with the HST 7 milli-arcsecond root mean square jitter requirement.

  19. Southern hemisphere sand furrows: spatial patterning and implications for the cryo-venting process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, Ciaran; Bourke, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Carbon dioxide is an important volatile on Mars. Seasonally, atmospheric CO2 condenses as ice on to the Martian surface and sublimates during the spring. Links have been made between a suite of observed surface features and the sublimation of surface CO2 ice; these include spider-like araneiform, gullies, and fans. Sand furrows are one such feature; suggested to form due to the erosive action of pressurised CO2 gas as it escapes through cracks in surficial ice (i.e. cryo-venting, Bourke, 2013). There are significant and important differences between the North and South Hemispheres, particularly in the seasonal CO2 deposits. Previous investigations into the formation and distribution of sand furrows on Mars have concentrated solely on the northern hemisphere. We present a study of furrows in the southern hemisphere which has yielded new data on their distribution and spatial patterning as well as providing insights into the cryo-venting process. A total of 221 dune sites were surveyed over the three Martian years' of available HiRISE data to establish the overall distribution of sand furrows. A more detailed study was carried out at eight sites using data from Mars Year 30. These sites represent a latitudinal sample of dunefields located between 40°S to 72°S. Surficial CO2 ice thickness was estimated using the Mars Climate Database (Millour et al., 2014). Our data show that sand furrows are significantly less numerous in the study region than in the northern hemisphere where data show they occur in 95% of surveyed sites. We found a strong correlation between latitude and furrow distribution. As one progresses polewards from 40°S, furrows become more numerous until 68°S. Furrows were not detected south of 72°S. Carbon dioxide ice thickness has been highlighted as a potentially important factor controlling furrow distribution in the northern hemisphere (Bourke and McGaley-Towle, 2014). Results from our investigation suggest there is a feedback mechanism between CO¬2 ice thickness and furrow formation; indicating a threshold thickness above which geomorphologically effective cryo-venting may not occur. Bourke, M. C., The Formation of Sand Furrows by Cryo-Venting on Martian Dunes. 44th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, 2013, pp. Abstract #2919. Bourke, M. C., McGaley-Towle, Why do sand furrows distributions vary in the North Polar latitudes on Mars? , European Geosciences Union, Vienna, Vol. 16, EGU2014-13626, 2014. Millour, E., et al., The Mars Climate Database (MCD version 5.1). Eighth International Conference on Mars. Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, 2014, pp. Abstract #1184.

  20. Radiation damage in single-particle cryo-electron microscopy: effects of dose and dose rate

    PubMed Central

    Karuppasamy, Manikandan; Karimi Nejadasl, Fatemeh; Vulovic, Milos; Koster, Abraham J.; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation damage is an important resolution limiting factor both in macromolecular X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Systematic studies in macromolecular X-ray crystallography greatly benefited from the use of dose, expressed as energy deposited per mass unit, which is derived from parameters including incident flux, beam energy, beam size, sample composition and sample size. In here, the use of dose is reintroduced for electron microscopy, accounting for the electron energy, incident flux and measured sample thickness and composition. Knowledge of the amount of energy deposited allowed us to compare doses with experimental limits in macromolecular X-ray crystallography, to obtain an upper estimate of radical concentrations that build up in the vitreous sample, and to translate heat-transfer simulations carried out for macromolecular X-ray crystallography to cryo-electron microscopy. Stroboscopic exposure series of 50–250 images were collected for different incident flux densities and integration times from Lumbricus terrestris extracellular hemoglobin. The images within each series were computationally aligned and analyzed with similarity metrics such as Fourier ring correlation, Fourier ring phase residual and figure of merit. Prior to gas bubble formation, the images become linearly brighter with dose, at a rate of approximately 0.1% per 10?MGy. The gradual decomposition of a vitrified hemoglobin sample could be visualized at a series of doses up to 5500?MGy, by which dose the sample was sublimed. Comparison of equal-dose series collected with different incident flux densities showed a dose-rate effect favoring lower flux densities. Heat simulations predict that sample heating will only become an issue for very large dose rates (50?e?Å?2?s?1 or higher) combined with poor thermal contact between the grid and cryo-holder. Secondary radiolytic effects are likely to play a role in dose-rate effects. Stroboscopic data collection combined with an improved understanding of the effects of dose and dose rate will aid single-particle cryo-electron microscopists to have better control of the outcome of their experiments. PMID:21525648

  1. Cryo-Vacuum Testing of the Integrated Science Instrument Module for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Davila, P. S.; Drury, M. P.; Glazer, S. D.; Krom, J. R.; Lundquist, R. A.; Mann, S. D.; McGuffey, D. B.; Perry, R. L.; Ramey, D. D.

    2012-01-01

    With delivery of the science instruments for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) expected in 2012, current plans call for the first cryo-vacuum test of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to be carried out at GSFC in early 2013. Plans are well underway for conducting this ambitious test, which will perform critical verifications of a number of optical, thermal, and operational requirements of the ISIM hardware, at its deep cryogenic operating temperature. We describe here the facilities, goals, methods, and timeline for this important Integration & Test milestone in the JWST program.

  2. CryoSat-2: Measuring fluctuations of land and marine ice fields from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Richard; Wingham, Duncan; Cullen, Robert

    2010-05-01

    1. INTRODUCTION CryoSat was chosen as the first of ESA's Earth Explorer Opportunity missions in late 1999, following a competitive selection process [1]. Unfortunately, the CryoSat satellite was lost as the result of a launch failure on 8 October 2005. The decision was made to rebuild the satellite in order to complete the mission, and as a result of this the new satellite, CryoSat-2, will be launched on 25 February 2010. 2. MISSION OBJECTIVES The mission goal of CryoSat is the measurement of secular change in the cryosphere, particularly in the elevation of the ice caps and the thickness of sea ice [2]. The required accuracy corresponds to about half of the variation expected due to natural variability, over reasonable scales for the surfaces concerned. The selected technique is radar altimetry, although the instrument has been modified to provide the enhanced capabilities needed to significantly extend the spatial coverage of previous altimetry missions, particularly ERS and EnviSat. Thus the radar includes a synthetic aperture mode which enables the along- track resolution to be improved to about 250 m. This will enable detection of leads in sea-ice which are narrower than those detected hitherto, so that operation deeper into pack-ice can be achieved with a consequent reduction in errors due to omission. Altimetry over the steep edges of ice caps is hampered by the irregular topography which, since the radar ranging is performed to the closest reflector rather than the point directly below, introduces uncertainty into the exactitude of repeat measurements. CryoSat's radar includes a second antenna and receiver chain so that interferometry may be used to determine the arrival angle of the echo and so improve localisation of the reflection. The satellite payload, which includes a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination and a set of star trackers to measure the orientation of the interferometer, is quite complex and demanding. 3. CRYOSAT-1 LAUNCH FAILURE AND THE MISSION RECOVERY WITH CRYOSAT-2 CryoSat was launched on 8 October 2005, just less than 6 years after the start of the programme. Unfortunately the launch vehicle, a Rockot launcher derived from the Russian SS-19 ICBM, suffered an anomaly at the end of its second-stage flight, with the result that the satellite was lost, the debris falling close to the North pole. Determination to rebuild the satellite and carry out the mission was extremely widespread: within 5 months all of the necessary funding issues, legal procedures, industrial commitments and resource demands had been solved and the programme restarted. The new satellite, inevitably called CryoSat-2, includes a large number of improvements compared to its predecessor, although many are internal changes to improve the reliability and ease of operations. More significantly, the expected lifetime has been increased. The satellite measurements will be supported by a comprehensive set of validation data, collected on the surface and from airborne platforms. These validation data, designed to specifically address the uncertainties in the interpretation of the radar echoes, have been collected during a series of carefully co-ordinated measurement campaigns over several years. Additionally, techniques to enable the collocation of surface and satellite measurements over the moving sea-ice have been developed and rehearsed, ready to support the dedicated validation campaigns during the mission. CryoSat-2 will be launched from Baikonur, Kazakhstan on 25 February 2010. Launch was originally planned for March 2009, again with a Rockot. But lack of availability of this vehicle (more specifically, the versatile third stage added to the ICBM) has induced a change to the Dnepr launcher, also an ICBM: the SS-18. So finally, about 11 years after it was first selected, the CryoSat mission will start collecting data. 4. REFERENCES [1] http://www.esa.int/livingplanet/cryosat [2] Wingham, D. J., Francis, C. R., Baker, S., Bouzinac, C., Cullen, R., de Chateau-Thierry, P., Laxon, S. W., Mallow, U., Mavrocordatos, C., Phalip

  3. First Cryo-Vacuum Test of the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Antonille, S. R.; Balzano, V.; Comber, B. J.; Davila, P. S.; Drury, M. D.; Glasse, A.; Glazer, S. D.; Lundquist, R.; Mann, S. D.; McGuffey, D. B.; Novo-Gradac, K. J.; Penanen, K.; Ramey, D. D.; Sullivan, J.; Van Campen, J.; Vila, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    The integration and test program for the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) calls for three cryo-vacuum tests of the ISIM hardware. The first is a risk-reduction test aimed at checking out the test hardware and procedures; this will be followed by two formal verification tests that will bracket other key aspects of the environmental test program (e.g. vibration and acoustics, EMI/EMC). The first of these cryo-vacuum tests, the risk-reduction test, was executed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center starting in late August, 2013. Flight hardware under test included two (of the eventual four) flight instruments, the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) and the Fine Guidance Sensor/Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (FGS/NIRISS), mounted to the ISIM structure, as well as the ISIM Electronics Compartment (IEC). The instruments were cooled to their flight operating temperatures 40K for FGS/NIRISS, ~6K for MIRI) and optically tested against a cryo-certified telescope simulator. Key goals for the risk reduction test included: 1) demonstration of controlled cooldown and warmup, stable control at operating temperature, and measurement of heat loads, 2) operation of the science instruments with ISIM electronics systems at temperature, 3) health trending of the science instruments against instrument-level test results, 4) measurement of the pupil positions and six degree of freedom alignment of the science instruments against the simulated telescope focal surface, 5) detailed optical characterization of the NIRISS instrument, 6) verification of the signal-to-noise performance of the MIRI, and 7) exercise of the Onboard Script System that will be used to operate the instruments in flight. In addition, the execution of the test is expected to yield invaluable logistical experience - development and execution of procedures, communications, analysis of results - that will greatly benefit the subsequent verification tests. At the time of this submission, the hardware had reached operating temperature and was partway through the cryo test program. We report here on the test configuration, the overall process, and the results that were ultimately obtained.

  4. Estimation of Arctic Sea Ice Freeboard and Thickness Using CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Im, J.; Kim, J. W.; Kim, M.; Shin, M.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is one of the significant components of the global climate system as it plays a significant role in driving global ocean circulation. Sea ice extent has constantly declined since 1980s. Arctic sea ice thickness has also been diminishing along with the decreasing sea ice extent. Because extent and thickness, two main characteristics of sea ice, are important indicators of the polar response to on-going climate change. Sea ice thickness has been measured with numerous field techniques such as surface drilling and deploying buoys. These techniques provide sparse and discontinuous data in spatiotemporal domain. Spaceborne radar and laser altimeters can overcome these limitations and have been used to estimate sea ice thickness. Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICEsat), a laser altimeter provided data to detect polar area elevation change between 2003 and 2009. CryoSat-2 launched with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)/Interferometric Radar Altimeter (SIRAL) in April 2010 can provide data to estimate time-series of Arctic sea ice thickness. In this study, Arctic sea ice freeboard and thickness between 2011 and 2014 were estimated using CryoSat-2 SAR and SARIn mode data that have sea ice surface height relative to the reference ellipsoid WGS84. In order to estimate sea ice thickness, freeboard, i.e., elevation difference between the top of sea ice surface should be calculated. Freeboard can be estimated through detecting leads. We proposed a novel lead detection approach. CryoSat-2 profiles such as pulse peakiness, backscatter sigma-0, stack standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis were examined to distinguish leads from sea ice. Near-real time cloud-free MODIS images corresponding to CryoSat-2 data measured were used to visually identify leads. Rule-based machine learning approaches such as See5.0 and random forest were used to identify leads. The proposed lead detection approach better distinguished leads from sea ice than the existing approaches. With the freeboard height calculated using the lead detection approach, sea ice thickness was finally estimated using the Archimedes' buoyancy principle. The estimated sea ice freeboard and thickness were validated using ESA airborne Ku-band interferometric radar and Airborne Electromagnetic (AEM) data.

  5. Cryo-Vacuum Testing of the Integrated Science Instrument Module for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Davila, P. S.; Drury, M. P.; Glazer, S. D.; Krom, J. R.; Lundquist, R. A.; Mann, S. D.; McGuffey, D. B.; Perry, R. L.; Ramey, D. D.

    2011-01-01

    With delivery of the science instruments for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) expected in 2012, current plans call for the first cryo-vacuum test of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to be carried out at GSFC in early 2013. Plans are well underway for conducting this ambitious test, which will perform critical verifications of a number of optical, thermal, and operational requirements of the IS 1M hardware, at its deep cryogenic operating temperature. We describe here the facilities, goals, methods, and timeline for this important Integration & Test milestone in the JWST program.

  6. De novo protein structure determination from near-atomic resolution cryo-EM maps

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Kudryashev, Mikhail; Li, Xueming; Egelman, Edward H.; Basler, Marek; Cheng, Yifan; Baker, David; DiMaio, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We present a de novo model building approach that combines predicted backbone conformations with side-chain density-fit to accurately assign sequence into density maps. We show this method yields accurate models for six experimental maps at 3.3–4.8 Å resolution, and produces a nearly complete model for an unsolved map containing a 660-residue hetero-dimeric protein. This method should enable rapid and reliable protein structure determination from near-atomic resolution cryo-EM maps. PMID:25707029

  7. Analytical model of batch magnetophoretic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashevsky, S. B.; Kashevsky, B. E.

    2013-06-01

    Magnetophoresis (the motion of magnetic particles driven by the nonuniform magnetic field), that for a long time has been used for extracting magnetically susceptible objects in diverse industries, now attracts interest to develop more sophisticated microfluidic and batch techniques for separation and manipulation of biological particles, and magnetically assisted absorption and catalysis in organic chemistry, biochemistry, and petrochemistry. A deficiency of magnetic separation science is the lack of simple analytical models imitating real processes of magnetic separation. We have studied the motion of superparamagnetic (generally, soft magnetic) particles in liquid in the three-dimensional field of the diametrically polarized permanent cylindrical magnet; this geometry is basically representative of the batch separation mode. In the limit of the infinite-length magnet, we found the particle magnetophoresis proceeds independently of the magnet polarization direction, following the simple analytical relation incorporating all the relevant physical and geometrical parameters of the particle-magnet system. In experiments with a finite-length magnet we have shown applicability of the developed theory as to analyze the performance of the real batch separation systems in the noncooperative mode, and finally, we have presented an example of such analysis for the case of immunomagnetic cell separation and developed a criterion of the model limitation imposed by the magnetic aggregation of particles.

  8. Long-term outcome of iron-endocytosing cultured corneal endothelial cell transplantation with magnetic attraction.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Tatsuya; Yamagami, Satoru; Usui, Tomohiko; Ishii, Yasuo; Ono, Kyoko; Yokoo, Seiich; Funatsu, Hideharu; Araie, Makoto; Amano, Shiro

    2005-02-01

    The long-term efficacy and safety of transplanting iron-endocytosing cultured corneal endothelial cells (CECs) with magnetic attraction were evaluated. Rabbit corneas were subjected to cryo-injury to detach CECs. Cultured rabbit CECs (RCEC) were exposed to spherical iron powder and then injected into the anterior chamber, after which a neogium magnet was fixed on the eyelid for 24 hr to attract the cells to Descemet's membrane (RCEC-iron group, n=4). An RCEC group (cryo-injury and injection of normal cultured RCEC, n=4) and a Cryo group (cryo-injury without injection of RCEC, n=4) served as controls. Intraocular pressure was measured for 12 months after surgery. Corneal findings on slit lamp biomicroscopy, RCEC density, the electro-retinogram (ERG), and residual iron in the ocular tissues were evaluated at final assessment. Intraocular pressure did not increase in any group throughout 12 months of observation. At the final assessment, the average corneal edema score of the RCEC-iron group was significantly lower than that of the RCEC or Cryo groups (p=0.021). The average CEC density of the RCEC-iron group was 2581+/-230 cells mm(-2) (mean+/-SD), whereas no CECs were observed on the inner surface of the central cornea in the RCEC and Cryo groups. No significant differences of the ERG (a- and b-wave amplitudes, and b-wave/a-wave ratio) were detected among the groups. Iron powder was not detected by Berlin blue staining in the ocular tissues of the RCEC-iron group. Apoptotic cells were not observed in the endothelium by terminal transferase-mediated nick-end labeling. Transplanted iron-endocytosing RCEC remained viable for 12 months after surgery. There were no detectable ocular complications after the transplantation of iron-endocytosing cultured RCEC. Magnetic attachment of iron-endocytosing CECs can be an effective and safe method for corneal endothelial repair. PMID:15670793

  9. Maximum-likelihood methods in cryo-EM. Part I: theoretical basis and overview of existing approaches

    PubMed Central

    Sigworth, Fred J.; Doerschuk, Peter C.; Carazo, Jose-Maria; Scheres, Sjors H.W.

    2010-01-01

    The maximum likelihood method provides a powerful approach for many problems in cryo-EM image processing. This contribution aims to provide an accessible introduction to the underlying theory and reviews existing applications in the field. In addition, current developments to reduce computational costs and to improve the statistical description of cryo-EM images are discussed. Combined with the increasing power of modern computers and yet unexplored possibilities provided by theory, these developments are expected to turn the statistical approach into an essential image processing tool for the electron microscopist. PMID:20888965

  10. Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  11. Tools for macromolecular model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alan; Long, Fei; Nicholls, Robert A.; Toots, Jaan; Emsley, Paul; Murshudov, Garib

    2015-01-01

    The recent rapid development of single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) now allows structures to be solved by this method at resolutions close to 3?Å. Here, a number of tools to facilitate the interpretation of EM reconstructions with stereochemically reasonable all-atom models are described. The BALBES database has been repurposed as a tool for identifying protein folds from density maps. Modifications to Coot, including new Jiggle Fit and morphing tools and improved handling of nucleic acids, enhance its functionality for interpreting EM maps. REFMAC has been modified for optimal fitting of atomic models into EM maps. As external structural information can enhance the reliability of the derived atomic models, stabilize refinement and reduce overfitting, ProSMART has been extended to generate interatomic distance restraints from nucleic acid reference structures, and a new tool, LIBG, has been developed to generate nucleic acid base-pair and parallel-plane restraints. Furthermore, restraint generation has been integrated with visualization and editing in Coot, and these restraints have been applied to both real-space refinement in Coot and reciprocal-space refinement in REFMAC. PMID:25615868

  12. Variability of Arctic sea ice thickness and volume from CryoSat-2.

    PubMed

    Kwok, R; Cunningham, G F

    2015-07-13

    We present our estimates of the thickness and volume of the Arctic Ocean ice cover from CryoSat-2 data acquired between October 2010 and May 2014. Average ice thickness and draft differences are within 0.16?m of measurements from other sources (moorings, submarine, electromagnetic sensors, IceBridge). The choice of parameters that affect the conversion of ice freeboard to thickness is discussed. Estimates between 2011 and 2013 suggest moderate decreases in volume followed by a notable increase of more than 2500?km(3) (or 0.34?m of thickness over the basin) in 2014, which could be attributed to not only a cooler summer in 2013 but also to large-scale ice convergence just west of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago due to wind-driven onshore drift. Variability of volume and thickness in the multiyear ice zone underscores the importance of dynamics in maintaining the thickness of the Arctic ice cover. Volume estimates are compared with those from ICESat as well as the trends in ice thickness derived from submarine ice draft between 1980 and 2004. The combined ICESat and CryoSat-2 record yields reduced trends in volume loss compared with the 5?year ICESat record, which was weighted by the record-setting ice extent after the summer of 2007. PMID:26032317

  13. D0 Silicon Upgrade: D0 Cryo to D0 Physics DAQ Communications Link

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, Dan; /Fermilab

    1995-03-07

    This engineering note documents a communication link between the D0 cryo/gas control system and the D0 physics data acquisition computer system. This note is being written well after the work has been completed, in order to document this communications link, and to satisfy needs of planned upgrades. These upgrades are the D0 Super Conducting Solenoid, VLPC system, and Silicon Detector System. The D0 cryo/gas control system is a Programmable Logic Controller based process control system. It is responsible for controlling many of the physical parameters of the D0 experiment, such as Calorimeter cooling, vacuum, Instrument air, TRD gas pressures and flows, W AMUS pressures and flows, SAMUS pressure and flows, etc. It works independent of the Physics DAQ system. There is a need for the Physics DAQ system to record some of these process values with the D0 physics data. This process data will later be used to calibrate certain features of the Physics data during reconstruction. The process data is also used to interlock (via the Physics DAQ system) some of the other D0 systems such as the TRD high voltage system. Some of the Process data values will be continuously monitored and will stop the Physics data taking of the experiment if it is out of tolerance.

  14. Cryo-electron microscopy study of bacteriophage T4 displaying anthrax toxin proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Bowman, Valorie D.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Li Qin; Chipman, Paul R.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2007-10-25

    The bacteriophage T4 capsid contains two accessory surface proteins, the small outer capsid protein (Soc, 870 copies) and the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc, 155 copies). As these are dispensable for capsid formation, they can be used for displaying proteins and macromolecular complexes on the T4 capsid surface. Anthrax toxin components were attached to the T4 capsid as a fusion protein of the N-terminal domain of the anthrax lethal factor (LFn) with Soc. The LFn-Soc fusion protein was complexed in vitro with Hoc{sup -}Soc{sup -}T4 phage. Subsequently, cleaved anthrax protective antigen heptamers (PA63){sub 7} were attached to the exposed LFn domains. A cryo-electron microscopy study of the decorated T4 particles shows the complex of PA63 heptamers with LFn-Soc on the phage surface. Although the cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction is unable to differentiate on its own between different proposed models of the anthrax toxin, the density is consistent with a model that had predicted the orientation and position of three LFn molecules bound to one PA63 heptamer.

  15. Native architecture of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast revealed by in situ cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Engel, Benjamin D; Schaffer, Miroslava; Kuhn Cuellar, Luis; Villa, Elizabeth; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast function is orchestrated by the organelle's intricate architecture. By combining cryo-focused ion beam milling of vitreous Chlamydomonas cells with cryo-electron tomography, we acquired three-dimensional structures of the chloroplast in its native state within the cell. Chloroplast envelope inner membrane invaginations were frequently found in close association with thylakoid tips, and the tips of multiple thylakoid stacks converged at dynamic sites on the chloroplast envelope, implicating lipid transport in thylakoid biogenesis. Subtomogram averaging and nearest neighbor analysis revealed that RuBisCO complexes were hexagonally packed within the pyrenoid, with ~15 nm between their centers. Thylakoid stacks and the pyrenoid were connected by cylindrical pyrenoid tubules, physically bridging the sites of light-dependent photosynthesis and light-independent carbon fixation. Multiple parallel minitubules were bundled within each pyrenoid tubule, possibly serving as conduits for the targeted one-dimensional diffusion of small molecules such as ATP and sugars between the chloroplast stroma and the pyrenoid matrix. PMID:25584625

  16. Estimating loop length from CryoEM images at medium resolutions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background De novo protein modeling approaches utilize 3-dimensional (3D) images derived from electron cryomicroscopy (CryoEM) experiments. The skeleton connecting two secondary structures such as ?-helices represent the loop in the 3D image. The accuracy of the skeleton and of the detected secondary structures are critical in De novo modeling. It is important to measure the length along the skeleton accurately since the length can be used as a constraint in modeling the protein. Results We have developed a novel computational geometric approach to derive a simplified curve in order to estimate the loop length along the skeleton. The method was tested using fifty simulated density images of helix-loop-helix segments of atomic structures and eighteen experimentally derived density data from Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB). The test using simulated density maps shows that it is possible to estimate within 0.5Å of the expected length for 48 of the 50 cases. The experiments, involving eighteen experimentally derived CryoEM images, show that twelve cases have error within 2Å. Conclusions The tests using both simulated and experimentally derived images show that it is possible for our proposed method to estimate the loop length along the skeleton if the secondary structure elements, such as ?-helices, can be detected accurately, and there is a continuous skeleton linking the ?-helices. PMID:24565041

  17. User requirements for the snow and land ice services - CryoLand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malnes, E.; Buanes, A.; Nagler, T.; Bippus, G.; Gustafsson, D.; Schiller, C.; Metsämäki, S.; Pulliainen, J.; Luojus, K.; Larsen, H. E.; Solberg, R.; Diamandi, A.; Wiesmann, A.

    2015-06-01

    CryoLand (2011-2015) is a project carried out within the 7th Framework of the European Commission aimed at developing downstream services for monitoring seasonal snow, glaciers and lake/river ice primarily based on satellite remote sensing. The services target private and public users from a wide variety of application areas, and aim to develop sustainable services after the project is completed. The project has performed a thorough user requirement survey in order to derive targeted requirements for the service and provide recommendations for the design and priorities of the service. In this paper we describe the methods used, the major findings in this user survey, and how we used the results to design and specify the CryoLand snow and land ice service. The user requirement analysis shows that a European operational snow and land ice service is required and that there exists developed cryosphere products that can meet the specific needs. The majority of the users were mainly interested not only in the snow services, but also the lake/river ice products and the glacier products were desired.

  18. Cryo-EM structure of isomeric molluscan hemocyanin triggered by viral infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongtao; Zhuang, Jun; Feng, Hongli; Liang, Rongfeng; Wang, Jiangyong; Xie, Lianhui; Zhu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Hemocyanins (Hcs) of arthropods and mollusks function not only as oxygen transporters, but also as phenoloxidases (POs). In invertebrates, PO is an important component in the innate immune cascade, where it functions as the initiator of melanin synthesis, a pigment involved in encapsulating and killing of pathogenic microbes. Although structures of Hc from several species of invertebrates have been reported, the structural basis for how PO activity is triggered by structural changes of Hc in vivo remains poorly understood. Here, we report a 6.8 Å cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the isomeric form of hemocyanin, which was isolated from Abalone Shriveling syndrome-associated Virus (AbSV) infected abalone (Halitotis diversicolor), and build a pseudoatomic model of isomeric H. diversicolor hemocyanin 1 (HdH1). Our results show that, compared with native form of HdH1, the architecture of isomeric HdH1 turns into a more relaxed form. The interactions between certain functional units (FUs) present in the native form of Hc either decreased or were totally abolished in the isomeric form of Hc. As a result of that, native state Hc switches to its isomeric form, enabling it to play its role in innate immune responses against invading pathogens. PMID:24887432

  19. High-resolution cryo-electron microscopy on macromolecular complexes and cell organelles.

    PubMed

    Hoenger, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy techniques and computational 3-D reconstruction of macromolecular assemblies are tightly linked tools in modern structural biology. This symbiosis has produced vast amounts of detailed information on the structure and function of biological macromolecules. Typically, one of two fundamentally different strategies is used depending on the specimens and their environment. A: 3-D reconstruction based on repetitive and structurally identical unit cells that allow for averaging, and B: tomographic 3-D reconstructions where tilt-series between approximately ± 60 and ± 70° at small angular increments are collected from highly complex and flexible structures that are beyond averaging procedures, at least during the first round of 3-D reconstruction. Strategies of group A are averaging-based procedures and collect large number of 2-D projections at different angles that are computationally aligned, averaged together, and back-projected in 3-D space to reach a most complete 3-D dataset with high resolution, today often down to atomic detail. Evidently, success relies on structurally repetitive particles and an aligning procedure that unambiguously determines the angular relationship of all 2-D projections with respect to each other. The alignment procedure of small particles may rely on their packing into a regular array such as a 2-D crystal, an icosahedral (viral) particle, or a helical assembly. Critically important for cryo-methods, each particle will only be exposed once to the electron beam, making these procedures optimal for highest-resolution studies where beam-induced damage is a significant concern. In contrast, tomographic 3-D reconstruction procedures (group B) do not rely on averaging, but collect an entire dataset from the very same structure of interest. Data acquisition requires collecting a large series of tilted projections at angular increments of 1-2° or less and a tilt range of ± 60° or more. Accordingly, tomographic data collection exposes its specimens to a large electron dose, which is particularly problematic for frozen-hydrated samples. Currently, cryo-electron tomography is a rapidly emerging technology, on one end driven by the newest developments of hardware such as super-stabile microscopy stages as well as the latest generation of direct electron detectors and cameras. On the other end, success also strongly depends on new software developments on all kinds of fronts such as tilt-series alignment and back-projection procedures that are all adapted to the very low-dose and therefore very noisy primary data. Here, we will review the status quo of cryo-electron microscopy and discuss the future of cellular cryo-electron tomography from data collection to data analysis, CTF-correction of tilt-series, post-tomographic sub-volume averaging, and 3-D particle classification. We will also discuss the pros and cons of plunge freezing of cellular specimens to vitrified sectioning procedures and their suitability for post-tomographic volume averaging despite multiple artifacts that may distort specimens to some degree. PMID:24390311

  20. CryoSat Plus for Oceans - analysis of the state-of-the-art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeije, Marc; Gommenginger, Christine; Moreau, Thomas; Cotton, David; Benveniste, Jerome; Dinardo Dinardo, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    The CryoSat Plus for Oceans (CP4O) project is an ESA initiative carried out by a European wide consortium of altimetry experts. It aims to build a sound scientific basis for new scientific and operational applications of data coming from CryoSat-2 over the open ocean, polar ocean, coastal seas and for seafloor mapping. It also generates and evaluates new methods and products that will enable the full exploitation of the capabilities of the CryoSat-2 SIRAL altimeter, and extend their application beyond the initial mission objectives. It therefore also acts as a preparation for the upcoming Sentinel and Jason SAR enabled altimetry missions. In this paper we address the review of the CryoSat state-of-the-art, relevant current initiatives, algorithms, models and Earth Observation based products and datasets that are relevant in the Cryosat+ ocean theme. Compared to conventional (pulse-limited) altimeter missions, Cryosat-2 is not a dedicated platform for ocean research: typically the microwave radiometer (MWR) for wet tropospheric corrections is lacking, as is the direct measurement of the first order ionospheric effect by means of a dual-frequency altimeter. Also the orbit of Cryosat-2 has a rather long repetition period, unsuited for collinear tracks analyses. These three particular features have been studied already in the HERACLES project on the eve of the first CryoSat launch. We revisit the outcome of this study, update to current understanding and perception, and ultimately develop what was, is and will be proposed in these problem areas. Clearly, we question the standard ionosphere corrections, the wet troposphere corrections and the accuracy of the mean sea surface (MSS) underlying the accuracy of derived sea level anomalies. In addition, Cryosat-2 provides the first innovative altimeter with SAR and SARIn modes. This raises the direct problem of "how to process these data", simply because this has not been done before. Compared to pulse-limited altimetry it is a totally different branch of sport. In our CP4O project we try to answer this. We build on the results that have come out of the SAMOSA study, which was initiated to investigate the improvements that SAR mode altimetry can offer in measurements over ocean, coastal and inland water surfaces, developing practical implementation of new theoretical models for the SAR echo waveform. It is clear that having specific processing for SAR and SARIn raises a number of new issues to be studied, such as RDSAR (reducing SAR to pseudo LRM data), sea state bias (SSB) in SAR mode, and land contamination, to name a few. The outcome of the analysis of the state-of-the-art culminates in the delivery of the Preliminary Analysis Report and the Development and Validation Plan (DVP). We present the summary of these documents.