Sample records for cryo magnetic separation

  1. A Method to Estimate the Optimum Temperature for the Cryo-Shattering Separation Using a Charpy Impact Tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagura, Yoshio; Watanabe, Hisahiko

    A cryo-shattering separation is a recently developed separation method which is applied to collect low-fat meat from fatty fish. This separation method needs to be operated at the optimum temperature for the cryo-shattering. Determining on optimum temperature needs much works and costs. In this study,an easy method to estimate the optimum temperature for cryo-shattering was proposed using a Charpy impact tester. Four kinds of characteristic temperatures observed through impact tests were used to construct a fracture-temperature-map. By use of the map,the optimum temperature for cryo-shattering was obtained without shattering/sieving experiments.

  2. Magnetic separation using superconducting magnets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takeshi Ohara; Hiroaki Kumakura; Hitoshi Wada

    2001-01-01

    Since the 1970s, magnetic separation has been increasingly used for purification of liquids, such as heavy-metal ion removal from laboratory waste water, purification of kaolin clay in the paper-coating industry, waste water recycling in the steel industry, and recycling of glass grinding sludge in cathode-ray tube polishing factories. In the 1980s, large superconducting magnets were adopted for the field coils

  3. Medical protein separation system using high gradient magnetic separation by superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamioka, Y.; Agatsuma, K.; Kajikawa, K.; Ueda, H.; Furuse, M.; Fuchino, S.; Iitsuka, T.; Nakamura, S.

    2014-01-01

    A high gradient magnetic separation system for medical protein using affinity magnetic nano-beads has been developed. Medical protein such as monoclonal antibody or immunoglobulin is an important substance as a medicine for cancer etc. However; the separation system of these medical protein has very low separation rate and the cost of product is extremely high. The developed system shows very high separation efficiency and can achieve low cost by large production rate compared to the system now using in this field. The system consists of a 3T superconducting magnet cooled by a cryo-cooler, a filter made of fine magnetic metal wires of about 30?m diameter and a demagnetization circuit and a liquid circulation pump for solvent containing medical protein. Affinity magnetic nano-beads is covered with the medical protein after agitation of solvent containing the protein and nano-beads, then the solvent flows through the system and the beads are trapped in the filters by high gradient magnetic field. The beads are released and flow out of the system by the AC demagnetization of the filters using LC resonance circuits after discharge of the magnet. The test results shows 97.8% of the magnetic nano-beads in pure water were captured and 94.1% of total beads were collected.

  4. Microfluidically Cryo-Cooled Planar Coils for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-print Network

    Koo, Chiwan

    2013-08-09

    High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is typically required for higher resolution and faster speed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Planar microcoils as receiver probes in MRI systems offer the potential to be configured into array elements for fast...

  5. EBV Immortalization of human B lymphocytes separated from small volumes of cryo-preserved whole blood.

    PubMed

    Amoli, M M; Carthy, D; Platt, H; Ollier, W E R

    2008-04-01

    EBV immortalized B lymphocyte cell lines have been extensively used as a source of biological material for functional and molecular studies and represent a potentially limitless source of genomic DNA. Current technologies for EBV transformation are costly and use relatively large volumes of peripheral blood. Alternative methods were examined to determine whether smaller volumes of cryo-preserved whole blood could be subsequently transformed and which could provide a more cost-effective strategy for large population-based studies such as UK Biobank. A successful method was established where viable B cells were positively selected from 0.5 ml cryo-preserved whole blood samples. These were EBV transformed in microtitre plates and subsequently expanded in culture. A pilot study within UK Biobank was performed, which confirmed its potential usefulness for this study. PMID:18381392

  6. Magnetic separation for soil decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; deAguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Tolt, T.L. (Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (United States))

    1993-01-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a physical separation process that is used to extract magnetic particles from mixtures. The technology is used on a large scale in the kaolin clay industry to whiten or brighten kaolin clay and increase its value. Because all uranium and plutonium compounds are slightly magnetic, HGMS can be used to separate these contaminants from non-magnetic soils. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was signed in 1992 between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) to develop HGMS for soil decontamination. This paper reports progress and describes the HGMS technology.

  7. Magnetic separation for soil decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; deAguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tolt, T.L. [Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (United States)

    1993-02-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a physical separation process that is used to extract magnetic particles from mixtures. The technology is used on a large scale in the kaolin clay industry to whiten or brighten kaolin clay and increase its value. Because all uranium and plutonium compounds are slightly magnetic, HGMS can be used to separate these contaminants from non-magnetic soils. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was signed in 1992 between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) to develop HGMS for soil decontamination. This paper reports progress and describes the HGMS technology.

  8. Continuous magnetic separator and process

    DOEpatents

    Oder, Robin R. (Export, PA); Jamison, Russell E. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    2008-04-22

    A continuous magnetic separator and process for separating a slurry comprising magnetic particles into a clarified stream and a thickened stream. The separator has a container with a slurry inlet, an overflow outlet for the discharge of the clarified slurry stream, and an underflow outlet for the discharge of a thickened slurry stream. Magnetic particles in the slurry are attracted to, and slide down, magnetic rods within the container. The slurry is thus separated into magnetic concentrate and clarified slurry. Flow control means can be used to control the ratio of the rate of magnetic concentrate to the rate of clarified slurry. Feed control means can be used to control the rate of slurry feed to the slurry inlet.

  9. Method of magnetic separation and apparatus therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oder, Robin R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for magnetically separating and collecting particulate matter fractions of a raw sample according to relative magnetic susceptibilities of each fraction so collected is disclosed. The separation apparatus includes a splitter which is used in conjunction with a magnetic separator for achieving the desired fractionation.

  10. Magnetic Separator Enhances Treatment Possibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Since the earliest missions in space, NASA specialists have performed experiments in low gravity. Protein crystal growth, cell and tissue cultures, and separation technologies such as electrophoresis and magnetophoresis have been studied on Apollo 14, Apollo 16, STS-107, and many other missions. Electrophoresis and magnetophoresis, respectively, are processes that separate substances based on the electrical charge and magnetic field of a molecule or particle. Electrophoresis has been studied on over a dozen space shuttle flights, leading to developments in electrokinetics, which analyzes the effects of electric fields on mass transport (atoms, molecules, and particles) in fluids. Further studies in microgravity will continue to improve these techniques, which researchers use to extract cells for various medical treatments and research.

  11. A fully integrated micromachined magnetic particle separator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chong H. Ahn; Mark G. Allen; W. Trimmer; Yong-Nam Jun; S. Erramilli

    1996-01-01

    A prototype micromachined magnetic particle separator that can separate magnetic particles from suspended liquid solutions has been realized on a silicon wafer. The requisite magnetic field gradients are generated by integrated inductive components in place of permanent magnets, which yields several advantages in design flexibility, compactness, electrical and optical monitoring, and integration feasibility (thus enabling mass production). Preliminary experiments have

  12. Superconducting discs as permanent magnets for magnetic separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. P. Watson; I. Younas

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic separation is used widely in the mineral processing industry to concentrate and recover valuable minerals. Superconducting discs offer the opportunity to produce stronger magnetic forces than are available from conventional permanent magnets. Permanent magnets have been used to provide fields and field gradients for drum separators in which magnetic forces are used to hold magnetisable mineral particles against the

  13. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among many. Cryo-imaging fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology, allowing one to image a mouse along the continuum from the mouse -> organ -> tissue structure -> cell -> sub-cellular domains. In this overview, we describe the technology and a variety of exciting applications. Enhancements to the system now enable tiled acquisition of high resolution images to cover an entire mouse. High resolution fluorescence imaging, aided by a novel subtraction processing algorithm to remove sub-surface fluorescence, makes it possible to detect fluorescently-labeled single cells. Multi-modality experiments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cryo-imaging of a whole mouse demonstrate superior resolution of cryo-images and efficiency of registration techniques. The 3D results demonstrate the novel true-color volume visualization tools we have developed and the inherent advantage of cryo-imaging in providing unlimited depth of field and spatial resolution. The recent results continue to demonstrate the value cryo-imaging provides in the field of small animal imaging research.

  14. Magnetic separation of antibiotics by electrochemical magnetic seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, I.; Toyoda, K.; Beneragama, N.; Umetsu, K.

    2009-03-01

    Magnetic separation of several classes of antibiotics was investigated using electrochemical magnetic seeding. Electrocoagulation with a sacrificial anode followed by addition of magnetite particles was applied for the magnetic seeding of antibiotics. With electrochemical magnetic seeding using an iron anode, tetracycline antibiotics (oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, doxycycline and tetracycline) and cephalosporin antibiotic (cefdinir) were rapidly removed from synthetic wastewater by magnetic separation using a neodymium magnet. Iron and aluminium anodes were suitable for magnetic seeding of the antibiotics. The results indicated that the ability of antibiotics to form strong complex with iron and aluminium allowed the higher removal by magnetic separation. This method would be appropriate for rapid treatment of antibiotics in wastewater.

  15. Nanolevel Magnetic Separation Model Considering Flow Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Cotten, Gregory Benedict; Eldredge, H Bradley; Eldredge, H. B.

    2002-01-01

    This work proposes an enhanced nanolevel magnetic separation model considering flow limitations using simplifying assumptions. The theoretical model builds on magnetic heteroflocculation models described in the literature and couples the magnetic and hydrodynamic forces between two spherical particles with different sizes and different magnetic properties under bulk fluid flow conditions. Separator performance figures are presented showing the relationship between input parameters such as applied magnetic field strength, flow rate, and matrix material size and composition, and output parameters such as Peclet number and capture propensity for various contaminant particle sizes. This purely predictive model work may be useful in estimating actual magnetic separator performance and serve as a starting point for experimental work or more accurate mathematical models. This work provides a simplified mathematical model to predict magnetic separator performance based on single magnetic matrix particle and single magnetic contaminant particle interactions. Local maxima, or transition points, between matrix and contaminant particle size and separator performance indicate magnetic separator performance can be optimized by the selection of appropriate magnetic matrix particle size. Evaluation of points of maximum particle capture force using the Peclet number provides limiting conditions for retention of particles under Stokes flow conditions.

  16. Magnetic separation of ferrihydrite from wastewater by magnetic seeding and high-gradient magnetic separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nuray Karapinar

    2003-01-01

    Ferrihydrite, a member of iron oxides family, has been used as an adsorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from industrial wastewater. The success of the operation depends mainly on the efficient removal of ferrihydrite from the aqueous phase. Hence, the emphasis of this study was given on the separation of ferrihydrite by high-gradient magnetic separator (HGMS) to overcome

  17. Magnetic separation of uranium from magnesium fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Hoegler, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The attraction or repulsion of particles by a magnetic gradient, based on the respective susceptibilities, provides the basis for physical separation of particles that are comprised predominantly of uranium from those that are predominantly magnesium fluoride (MgF/sub 2/). To determine the effectiveness of this approach, a bench-scale magnetic separator from the S.G. Frantz Co., Inc. was used. In the Frantz Model L-1, particles are fed through a funnel onto a vibration tray and through a magnetic field. The specific design of the Frantz magnet causes the magnetic field strength to vary along the width of the magnet, setting up a gradient. The tray in the magnetic field is split at a point about half way down its length so that the separated material does not recombine. A schematic is presented of Frantz Model L-1 CN - the same magnet configured for high gradient magnetic separation of liquid-suspended particles. Here different pole pieces create a uniform magnetic field, and stainless steel wood in the canister between the pole pieces creates the high gradient. 1 ref., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Magnetic separation in water pollution control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHRISTOPHER DE LATOUR

    1973-01-01

    Magnetic separation as applied to waterborne contaminants is successful in reducing the solids content of a water sample and in removing the dissolved orthophosphate from the aqueous slurry. The contaminants are chemically associated with a magnetic seeding material, and subsequent removal of this seed sweeps the pollutants from the system. The advantage of this form of treatment over conventional techniques

  19. Magnetic separation in water pollution control - II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher de Latour; Henry Kolm

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic separation in water purification uses a magnetically susceptible seeding material as a substrate for pollutant removal. The chemical bond between the seed and pollutant is normally achieved by the action of a chemical coagulant. There are cases, however, in which an additive is not necessary, as in the removal of algal cells from sea water. Under the proper chemical

  20. Recovery Improvement of Fine Magnetic Particles by Floc Magnetic Separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Subrata Roy

    2012-01-01

    The performance of floc magnetic separation (FMS) has been compared with wet high-intensity magnetic separator (WHIMS). This study was performed on low-grade iron ore slime contained 59.58% Fe with 4.57% silica and 3.78% alumina. Detailed characterization data indicated that a substantial amount of the slime was below 20 µm in size. Beneficiation studies indicated that the FMS process is effective to

  1. Particle acceleration at a reconnecting magnetic separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threlfall, J.; Neukirch, T.; Parnell, C. E.; Eradat Oskoui, S.

    2015-02-01

    Context. While the exact acceleration mechanism of energetic particles during solar flares is (as yet) unknown, magnetic reconnection plays a key role both in the release of stored magnetic energy of the solar corona and the magnetic restructuring during a flare. Recent work has shown that special field lines, called separators, are common sites of reconnection in 3D numerical experiments. To date, 3D separator reconnection sites have received little attention as particle accelerators. Aims: We investigate the effectiveness of separator reconnection as a particle acceleration mechanism for electrons and protons. Methods: We study the particle acceleration using a relativistic guiding-centre particle code in a time-dependent kinematic model of magnetic reconnection at a separator. Results: The effect upon particle behaviour of initial position, pitch angle, and initial kinetic energy are examined in detail, both for specific (single) particle examples and for large distributions of initial conditions. The separator reconnection model contains several free parameters, and we study the effect of changing these parameters upon particle acceleration, in particular in view of the final particle energy ranges that agree with observed energy spectra.

  2. Multistage Magnetic Separator of Cells and Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Ken; Ainsworth, Mark; Daily, Bruce; Dunn, Scott; Metz, Bill; Vellinger, John; Taylor, Brock; Meador, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    The multistage electromagnetic separator for purifying cells and magnetic particles (MAGSEP) is a laboratory apparatus for separating and/or purifying particles (especially biological cells) on the basis of their magnetic susceptibility and magnetophoretic mobility. Whereas a typical prior apparatus based on similar principles offers only a single stage of separation, the MAGSEP, as its full name indicates, offers multiple stages of separation; this makes it possible to refine a sample population of particles to a higher level of purity or to categorize multiple portions of the sample on the basis of magnetic susceptibility and/or magnetophoretic mobility. The MAGSEP includes a processing unit and an electronic unit coupled to a personal computer. The processing unit includes upper and lower plates, a plate-rotation system, an electromagnet, an electromagnet-translation system, and a capture-magnet assembly. The plates are bolted together through a roller bearing that allows the plates to rotate with respect to each other. An interface between the plates acts as a seal for separating fluids. A lower cuvette can be aligned with as many as 15 upper cuvette stations for fraction collection during processing. A two-phase stepping motor drives the rotation system, causing the upper plate to rotate for the collection of each fraction of the sample material. The electromagnet generates a magnetic field across the lower cuvette, while the translation system translates the electromagnet upward along the lower cuvette. The current supplied to the electromagnet, and thus the magnetic flux density at the pole face of the electromagnet, can be set at a programmed value between 0 and 1,400 gauss (0.14 T). The rate of translation can be programmed between 5 and 2,000 m/s so as to align all sample particles in the same position in the cuvette. The capture magnet can be a permanent magnet. It is mounted on an arm connected to a stepping motor. The stepping motor rotates the arm to position the capture magnet above the upper cuvette into which a fraction of the sample is collected. The electronic unit includes a power switch, power-supply circuitry that accepts 110-Vac input power, an RS-232 interface, and status lights. The personal computer runs the MAGSEP software and controls the operation of the MAGSEP through the RS-232 interface. The status of the power, the translating electromagnet, the capture magnet, and the rotation of the upper plate are indicated in a graphical user interface on the computer screen.

  3. Plasma separation from magnetic field lines in a magnetic nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, D. A.; Goodwin, D. G.; Sercel, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses conditions for separation of a plasma from the magnetic field of a magnetic nozzle. The analysis assumes a collisionless, quasineutral plasma, and therefore the results represent a lower bound on the amount of detachment possible for a given set of plasma conditions. We show that collisionless separation can occur because finite electron mass inhibits the flow of azimuthal currents in the nozzle. Separation conditions are governed by a parameter G which depends on plasma and nozzle conditions. Several methods of improving plasma detachment are presented, including moving the plasma generation zone downstream from the region of strongest magnetic field and using dual magnets to focus the plasma beam. Plasma detachment can be enhanced by manipulation of the nozzle configuration.

  4. Prediction of Separation Performance of Dry High Intensity Magnetic Separator for Processing of Para-Magnetic Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Veerendra; Suresh, Nikkam

    2015-03-01

    High intensity dry magnetic separators are gaining popularity for the separation of para-magnetic minerals due to the cost economic factor. Induced roll magnetic separator is found to be an effective dry separator for the separation of fine particles. Separation efficiency of this separator depends on mineral characteristics and the design features of equipment along with the optimization of process variables. Present investigation focuses on the prediction and validation of separation performance of minerals while treating in induced roll magnetic separator. Prediction of the separation is expressed in terms of separation angle at which a particle leaves the rotor surface by using a modified particle flow model derived by Cakir. The validation of the model is carried by capturing the particle trajectory using an image analyzer. It is found that Cakir's mathematical model produces reliable results and a new model is proposed to increase the reliability of separation angle prediction by including the particle shape factor.

  5. Study on magnetic separation of nanosized ferromagnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, R.; Matuo, Y.; Mishima, F.; Taguchi, T.; Nishijima, S.

    2009-03-01

    In recent researches in medicine and the pharmaceutical sciences, the magnetic separation technology using nanosized ferromagnetic particle is essential. For example, in the field of cell engineering, magnetic separation of nanosized ferromagnetic particles is necessary, but separation technology of nanosized particle using magnetic force has not been established. One of the reasons is that magnetic force acting on the object particles decreases as particle diameter becomes small, and makes magnetic separation difficult. In this study, magnetic force acting on the separation object was enlarged by the combination of superconducting magnet and the filter which consists of ferromagnetic particle. As a result of particle trajectory calculation and magnetic separation experiment, it was confirmed that the ferromagnetic particles of 15nm in diameter can be trapped in the magnetic filter under an external magnetic field of 0.5T. The ferromagnetic particles of 6nm in diameter which could not be separated under the same condition could also be trapped under 2.0T of external magnetic field.

  6. Fundamental study of phosphor separation by controlling magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kohei; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2013-11-01

    The phosphor wastes consist of phosphors with different emission colors, green (LAP), red (YOX), blue (BAM) and white (HP). It is required to recover and reuse the rare earth phosphors with high market value. In this study, we tried to separate the phosphor using the magnetic separation by HTS bulk magnet utilizing the differences of magnetic susceptibility by the type of phosphors. We succeeded in the successive separation of HP with low market value from YOX and BAM including the rare earth using the magnetic Archimedes method. In this method, vertical and radial components of the magnetic force were used.

  7. Magnetic separation of micro-spheres from viscous biological fluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Kaminski, M. D.; Xianqiao, L.; Caviness, P.; Torno, M.; Rosengart, A. J.; Dhar, P.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2007-02-21

    A magnetically based detoxification system is being developed as a therapeutic tool for selective and rapid removal of biohazards, i.e. chemicals and radioactive substances, from human blood. One of the key components of this system is a portable magnetic separator capable of separating polymer-based magnetic nano/micro-spheres from arterial blood flow in an ex vivo unit. The magnetic separator consists of an array of alternating and parallel capillary tubing and magnetizable wires, which is exposed to an applied magnetic field created by two parallel permanent magnets such that the magnetic field is perpendicular to both the wires and the fluid flow. In this paper, the performance of this separator was evaluated via preliminary in vitro flow experiments using a separator unit consisting of single capillary glass tubing and two metal wires. Pure water, ethylene glycol-water solution (v:v = 39:61 and v:v = 49:51) and human whole blood were used as the fluids. The results showed that when the viscosity increased from 1.0 cp to 3.0 cp, the capture efficiency (CE) decreased from 90% to 56%. However, it is still feasible to obtain >90% CE in blood flow if the separator design is optimized to create higher magnetic gradients and magnetic fields in the separation area.

  8. Magnetic separator having a multilayer matrix, method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kelland, David R. (Lexington, MA)

    1980-01-01

    A magnetic separator having multiple staggered layers of porous magnetic material positioned to intercept a fluid stream carrying magnetic particles and so placed that a bypass of each layer is effected as the pores of the layer become filled with material extracted from the fluid stream.

  9. ELECTRICAL AND MAGNETIC SEPARATION OF PARTICLES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lin Li

    2010-01-01

    Particle separation technologies have been utilized in many industrial fields, such as pigment and filler production, mineral processing, environmental protection, the food and beverage industry, and the chemical industry, as well as in biomedical application, such as cell biology, molecular genetics, biotechnological production, clinical diagnostics, and therapeutics. A lot of particle separation technologies using various mechanics in terms of the

  10. Optimizing colloidal dispersity of magnetic nanoparticles based on magnetic separation with magnetic nanowires array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianfei; He, Miaomiao; Liu, Xuan; Gu, Ning

    2015-02-01

    Based on sharp geometry of Ni nanowires, we developed a novel high-gradient magnetic separator that was composed of a nanowires array and a uniform magnetic field. When suspension of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) flowed through it, the relatively large nanoparticles or clusters were removed from the suspension so that the size distribution can be improved. The separation resulted from magnetic force so that extra molecules or solvents were unnecessary to add. The performance was proved by scanned electron microscopy characterization and dynamic light scattering measurement. The improvement in magnetic colloidal dispersivity is important for the biomedical application of MNPs. Our results may also play a role in microfluidic application and nanoparticle-based detection.

  11. Microstripes for transport and separation of magnetic particles

    PubMed Central

    Donolato, Marco; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple technique for creating an on-chip magnetic particle conveyor based on exchange-biased permalloy microstripes. The particle transportation relies on an array of stripes with a spacing smaller than their width in conjunction with a periodic sequence of four different externally applied magnetic fields. We demonstrate the controlled transportation of a large population of particles over several millimeters of distance as well as the spatial separation of two populations of magnetic particles with different magnetophoretic mobilities. The technique can be used for the controlled selective manipulation and separation of magnetically labelled species. PMID:22655020

  12. Development of micro immuno-magnetic cell sorting system with lamination mixer and magnetic separator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiromichi Inokuchi; Yuji Suzuki; Nobuhide Kasagi

    A novel micro immuno-magnetic cell sorting system has been developed for rare cell extraction. The present system consists of a lamination mixer for labeling target cells with magnetic beads, and a separator with an embedded coil, where continuous cell separation is accomplished. We have fabricated a prototype system using soft lithography, and evaluated the separation performance. We successfully achieved the

  13. Apparatus and method for continuous separation of magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluids

    DOEpatents

    Oder, Robin R. (Export, PA); Jamison, Russell E. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    2010-02-09

    A magnetic separator vessel (1) for separating magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluid includes a separation chamber having an interior and exterior wall, a top and bottom portion; a magnet (3) having first and second poles (2) positioned adjacent to the exterior wall, wherein the first pole is substantially diametrically opposed to the second pole; a inlet port (5) is directed into the top portion of the separation chamber, wherein the inlet port (5) is positioned adjacent to one of the first and second poles (2), wherein the inlet port (5) is adapted to transfer a mixture into the separation chamber; an underflow port (6) in communication with the bottom portion, wherein the underflow port (6) is adapted to receive the magnetic particles; and an overflow port (9) in communication with the separation chamber, wherein the overflow port (9) is adapted to receive the non-magnetic fluid.

  14. Rare Cell Separation and Analysis by Magnetic Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Zborowski, Maciej; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The separation and or isolation of rare cells using magnetic forces is commonly used and growing in use ranging from simple sample prep for further studies to a FDA approved, clinical diagnostic test. This grown is the result of both the demand to obtain homogeneous rare cells for molecular analysis and the dramatic increases in the power of permanent magnets that even allow the separation of some unlabeled cells based on intrinsic magnetic moments, such as malaria parasite-infected red blood cells. PMID:21812408

  15. Rare cell separation and analysis by magnetic sorting.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, Maciej; Chalmers, Jeffrey J

    2011-11-01

    The separation and or isolation of rare cells using magnetic forces are commonly used and growing in use ranging from simple sample prep for further studies to a FDA approved, clinical diagnostic test. This growth is the result of both the demand to obtain homogeneous rare cells for molecular analysis and the dramatic increases in the power of permanent magnets that even allow the separation of some unlabeled cells based on intrinsic magnetic moments, such as malaria parasite-infected red blood cells. PMID:21812408

  16. Development of magnetic separation methods of analysis: magnetic field flow fractionation

    E-print Network

    Garcia-Ramirez, Jaime

    1980-01-01

    DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNETIC SEPARATION METHODS OF ANALYSIS: MAGNETIC FIELD FLOW FRACTIONATION A Thesis by JAIME GARCIA-RAMIREZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Chemistry DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNETIC SEPARATION METHODS OF ANALYSIS: MAGNETIC FIELD FLOW FRACTIONATION A Thesis by JAIME GARCIA-RAMIREZ Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) 1...

  17. Microfabricated magnetic sifter for high-throughput and high-gradient magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earhart, Christopher M.; Wilson, Robert J.; White, Robert L.; Pourmand, Nader; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-05-01

    A microfabricated magnetic sifter has been designed and fabricated for applications in biological sample preparation. The device enables high-throughput, high-gradient magnetic separation of magnetic nanoparticles by utilizing columnar fluid flow through a dense array (˜5000/mm 2) of micropatterned slots in a magnetically soft membrane. The potential of the sifter for separation of magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with capture antibodies is demonstrated through quantitative separation experiments with CD138-labeled MACS nanoparticles. Capture efficiencies ranging from 28% to 37% and elution efficiencies greater than 73% were measured for a single pass through the sifter.

  18. Inverted Linear Halbach Array for Separation of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ijiri, Y.; Poudel, C.; Williams, P.S.; Moore, L.R.; Orita, T.; Zborowski, M.

    2014-01-01

    A linear array of Nd-Fe-B magnets has been designed and constructed in an inverted Halbach configuration for use in separating magnetic nanoparticles. The array provides a large region of relatively low magnetic field, yet high magnetic field gradient in agreement with finite element modeling calculations. The magnet assembly has been combined with a flow channel for magnetic nanoparticle suspensions, such that for an appropriate distance away from the assembly, nanoparticles of higher moment aggregate and accumulate against the channel wall, with lower moment nanoparticles flowing unaffected. The device is demonstrated for iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters of ~ 5 and 20 nm. In comparison to other approaches, the inverted Halbach array is more amenable to modeling and to scaling up to preparative quantities of particles. PMID:25382864

  19. Modeling high gradient magnetic separation from biological fluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Bockenfeld, D.; Chen, H.; Rempfer, D.; Kaminski, M. D.; Rosengart, A. J.; Chemical Engineering; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Univ. of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine

    2006-01-01

    A proposed portable magnetic separator consists of an array of biocompatible capillary tubing and magnetizable wires immersed in an externally applied homogeneous magnetic field. While subject to the homogeneous magnetic field, the wires create high magnetic field gradients, which aid in the collection of blood-borne magnetic nanospheres from blood flow. In this study, a 3-D numerical model was created using COMSOL Multiphysics 3.2 software to determine the configuration of the wire-tubing array from two possible configurations, one being an array with rows alternating between wires and tubing, and the other being an array where wire and tubing alternate in two directions. The results demonstrated that the second configuration would actually capture more of the magnetic spheres. Experimental data obtained by our group support this numerical result.

  20. Process to remove actinides from soil using magnetic separation

    DOEpatents

    Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Hill, Dallas D. (Los Alamos, NM); Prenger, F. Coyne (Los Alamos, NM); Stewart, Walter F. (Las Cruces, NM); Tolt, Thomas L. (Los Alamos, NM); Worl, Laura A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A process of separating actinide-containing components from an admixture including forming a slurry including actinide-containing components within an admixture, said slurry including a dispersion-promoting surfactant, adjusting the pH of the slurry to within a desired range, and, passing said slurry through a pretreated matrix material, said matrix material adapted to generate high magnetic field gradients upon the application of a strong magnetic field exceeding about 0.1 Tesla whereupon a portion of said actinide-containing components are separated from said slurry and remain adhered upon said matrix material is provided.

  1. Aptamer-modified magnetic beads in affinity separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guohong; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers are valuable alternative ligands for affinity separations. Here, we describe the aptamer-based affinity separation of His-tagged proteins using an aptamer directed against the His-tag. The immobilization of the aptamer to magnetic beads is described as well as the aptamer-based purification and proper methods for the characterization of the process. Moreover, indications for the transfer of the process to other aptamers are given. PMID:25749947

  2. Solvent Extraction and Emulsion Separation in Magnetic Fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Palyska; A. G. Chmielewski

    1993-01-01

    In two-phase emulsion separations, it is customary to employ large settling volumes (for mixer-settling apparatus) or large centrifugal forces (for centrifugal contactors). Improvement can sometimes be achieved by using an extractant with magnetic properties in the presence of a variable field. In the work reported in this paper, two different extractants (D-2EHPA and TBP) were employed in magnetic field experiments.

  3. Separation of feeble magnetic particles with magneto-Archimedes levitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y Ikezoe; T Kaihatsu; S Sakae; H Uetake; N Hirota; K Kitazawa

    2002-01-01

    Particles and solid substances with feeble magnetic susceptibility were levitated by magnetic fields with the aid of the “magneto-Archimedes levitation” method [Nature 393 (1998) 749]. A novel feature was found, namely that the initial particle mixture levitated underwent separation into each kind of the ingredient particle aggregates. The samples levitated were NaCl–KCl grain mixtures, and colored glass particles. The experiments

  4. Rapid and continuous magnetic separation in droplet microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Brouzes, Eric; Kruse, Travis; Kimmerling, Robert; Strey, Helmut H

    2015-01-22

    We present a droplet microfluidic method to extract molecules of interest from a droplet in a rapid and continuous fashion. We accomplish this by first marginalizing functionalized super-paramagnetic beads within the droplet using a magnetic field, and then splitting the droplet into one droplet containing the majority of magnetic beads and one droplet containing the minority fraction. We quantitatively analysed the factors which affect the efficiency of marginalization and droplet splitting to optimize the enrichment of magnetic beads. We first characterized the interplay between the droplet velocity and the strength of the magnetic field and its effect on marginalization. We found that marginalization is optimal at the midline of the magnet and that marginalization is a good predictor of bead enrichment through splitting at low to moderate droplet velocities. Finally, we focused our efforts on manipulating the splitting profile to improve the enrichment provided by asymmetric splitting. We designed asymmetric splitting forks that employ capillary effects to preferentially extract the bead-rich regions of the droplets. Our strategy represents a framework to optimize magnetic bead enrichment methods tailored to the requirements of specific droplet-based applications. We anticipate that our separation technology is well suited for applications in single-cell genomics and proteomics. In particular, our method could be used to separate mRNA bound to poly-dT functionalized magnetic microparticles from single cell lysates to prepare single-cell cDNA libraries. PMID:25501881

  5. Magnetic separation as a plutonium residue enrichment process

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; McFarlan, J.T.; Gallegos, U.F.

    1989-01-01

    We have subjected several plutonium contaminated residues to Open Gradient Magnetic Separation (OGMS) on an experimental scale. Separation of graphite, bomb reduction sand, and bomb reduction sand, and bomb reduction sand, slag, and crucible, resulted in a plutonium rich fraction and a plutonium lean fraction. The lean fraction varied between about 20% to 85% of the feed bulk. The plutonium content of the lean fraction can be reduced from about 2% in the feed to the 0.1% to 0.5% range dependent on the portion of the feed rejected to this lean fraction. These values are low enough in plutonium to meet economic discard limits and be considered for direct discard. Magnetic separation of direct oxide reduction and electrorefining pyrochemical salts gave less favorable results. While a fraction very rich in plutonium could be obtained, the plutonium content of the lean fraction was to high for direct discard. This may still have chemical processing applications. OGMS experiments at low magnetic field strength on incinerator ash did give two fractions but the plutonium content of each fraction was essentially identical. Thus, no chemical processing advantage was identified for magnetic separation of this residue. The detailed results of these experiments and the implications for OGMS use in recycle plutonium processing are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Magnetic Separations with Magnetite: Theory, Operation, and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    G. B. Cotten

    2000-08-01

    This dissertation documents the theory development and experimental plan followed to describe how a magnetite-based column under the influence of an external magnetic field functions as a magnetic separator. Theoretical simulations predict that weekly paramagnetic particles in the sub-micron range can be magnetically separated while diamagnetic particles as large as 2 microns in diameter may pass. Magnetite-based columns were evaluated as magnetically-controllable enhanced filtration devices. There was no evidence of enhanced filtration for diamagnetic particles by the magnetite-based bed. Magnetite-based magnetic separators have proven to be effective in specific laboratory experiments, indicating a potential feasibility for scale-up operations. Column media-filter type filtration effects indicate a magnetite-based column would not be suitable for treatment of a waste stream with a high diamagnetic solids content or high volume throughput requirements. Specific applications requiring removal of sub-micron para- or ferromagnetic particles under batch or Stokes flow conditions would be most applicable.

  7. Assessment of Alphamagnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Upper Experiment Structural Configuration Shielding Effectiveness Associated with Change from Cryo-Cooled Magnet to Permanent Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 2 (AMS-02) underwent a series of system level electromagnetic interference control measurements, followed by thermal vacuum testing. Shortly after completion of the thermal vacuum testing, the project decided to remove the cryogenically cooled superconducting magnet, and replace it with the original permanent magnet design employed in the earlier AMS- 01 assembly. Doing so necessitated several structural changes, as well as removal or modification of numerous electronic and thermal control devices and systems. At this stage, the project was rapidly approaching key milestone dates for hardware completion and delivery for launch, and had little time for additional testing or assessment of any impact to the electromagnetic signature of the AMS-02. Therefore, an analytical assessment of the radiated emissions behavioural changes associated with the system changes was requested.

  8. Tank waste remediation system milestone report magnetic separation of tank waste: Surrogate system separations report

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; Schake, A.R.; Padilla, D.D.; de Aguero, K.J.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D.

    1994-01-14

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in large underground storage tanks (UST) at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site since 1944. More than 253,000 m{sup 3} of waste have been accumulated in 177 tanks. The waste consists of many different chemicals and are in the form of liquids, slurries, salt cakes and sludges. A magnetic separation effort at Los Alamos National Laboratory is funded through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to explore the use of high-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) for tank waste segregation. The concept is to concentrate into a low volume waste stream, all or most of the magnetic components, which include actinide compounds, most of the fission products and precious metals. As a first step in this process investigations were made on surrogate systems. This milestone report discusses the HGMS results on these systems.

  9. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Wilson; Debashish Roy; Grant Steyer; Madhusudhana Gargesha; Meredith Stone; Eliot McKinley

    2008-01-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among

  10. Magnetically stabilized fluidized bed for gas separations: Olefin-paraffin separations by {pi}-complexation

    SciTech Connect

    Sikavitsas, V.I.; Yang, R.T. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Burns, M.A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Langenmayr, E.J. [Rohm and Haas Co., Spring House, PA (United States). Corporate Exploratory Research

    1995-08-01

    The feasibility of using magnetically stabilized fluidized beds (MSB) for olefin-paraffin separations by pressure swing adsorption (PSA) is studied by model simulation, and the results are compared directly with that using packed beds. The sorbent used for the separations is an Ag{sup +} exchanged resin that selectively forms {pi}-complexation bonds with olefins, with the heat of adsorption of {approximately} 10 kcal/mol. Superior separations are obtained with MSB for two reasons: high flow rates and small particle sizes that are allowed in MSBs resulting in high diffusion time constants (D{sub e}/R{sup 2}) (which are favorable for equilibrium separation). Lower temperature excursions compared to packed bed also favor the separation. The larger axial dispersion in the MSB has only minimal adverse effects on the PSA separation. For example: for a 14/86 ethane/ethylene feed mixture at the same feed throughput (120.8 L(STP))/[h (kg or sorbent)], an ethylene product at 99.9% purity is obtained at over 50% ethylene recovery from the MSBs whereas only 14% recovery at the same purity is obtained with the packed beds. Acceptable separation results are also achieved with MSBs for propane-propylene separation, but not with fixed beds.

  11. Experimental investigation of magnetically actuated separation using tangential microfluidic channels and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Munir, Ahsan; Zhu, Zanzan; Wang, Jianlong; Zhou, Hong Susan

    2014-06-01

    A novel continuous switching/separation scheme of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in a sub-microlitre fluid volume surrounded by neodymium permanent magnet is studied in this work using tangential microfluidic channels. Polydimethylsiloxane tangential microchannels are fabricated using a novel micromoulding technique that can be done without a clean room and at much lower cost and time. Negligible switching of MNPs is seen in the absence of magnetic field, whereas 90% of switching is observed in the presence of magnetic field. The flow rate of MNPs solution had dramatic impact on separation performance. An optimum value of the flow rate is found that resulted in providing effective MNP separation at much faster rate. Separation performance is also investigated for a mixture containing non-magnetic polystyrene particles and MNPs. It is found that MNPs preferentially moved from lower microchannel to upper microchannel resulting in efficient separation. The proof-of-concept experiments performed in this work demonstrates that microfluidic bioseparation can be efficiently achieved using functionalised MNPs, together with tangential microchannels, appropriate magnetic field strength and optimum flow rates. This work verifies that a simple low-cost magnetic switching scheme can be potentially of great utility for the separation and detection of biomolecules in microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:25014081

  12. Magnetic nano-sorbents for fast separation of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Huijin [Environmental Science Program, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Kaur, Maninder [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Qiang, You [Environmental Science Program, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In order to find a cost effective and environmentally benign technology to treat the liquid radioactive waste into a safe and stable form for resource recycling or ultimate disposal, this study investigates the separation of radioactive elements from aqueous systems using magnetic nano-sorbents. Our current study focuses on novel magnetic nano-sorbents by attaching DTPA molecules onto the surface of double coated magnetic nanoparticles (dMNPs), and performed preliminary sorption tests using heavy metal ions as surrogates for radionuclides. The results showed that the sorption of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) onto the dMNP-DTPA conjugates was fast, the equilibrium was reached in 30 min. The calculated sorption capacities were 8.06 mg/g for Cd and 12.09 mg/g for Pb. After sorption, the complex of heavy elements captured by nano-sorbents can be easily manipulated and separated from solution in less than 1 min by applying a small external magnetic field. In addition, the sorption results demonstrate that dMNP-DTPA conjugates have a very strong chelating power in highly diluted Cd and Pb solutions (1-10 ?g/L). Therefore, as a simple, fast, and compact process, this separation method has a great potential in the treatment of high level waste with low concentration of transuranic elements compared to tradition nuclear waste treatment. (authors)

  13. CryoTran user's manual, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowgill, Glenn R.; Chato, David J.; Saad, Ehab

    1989-01-01

    The development of cryogenic fluid management systems for space operation is a major portion of the efforts of the Cryogenic Fluids Technology Office (CFTO) at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Analytical models are a necessary part of experimental programs which are used to verify the results of experiments and are also used as a predictor for parametric studies. The CryoTran computer program is a bridge to obtain analytical results. The object of CryoTran is to coordinate these separate analyses into an integrated framework with a user-friendly interface and a common cryogenic property database. CryoTran is an integrated software system designed to help solve a diverse set of problems involving cryogenic fluid storage and transfer in both ground and low-g environments.

  14. Magnetic Separation for Nuclear Material Detection and Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Worl, L.A.; Devlin, D.; Hill, D.; Padilla, D.; Prenger, F.C.

    1998-08-01

    A high performance superconducting magnet is being developed for particle retrieval from field collected samples. Results show that maximum separation effectiveness is obtained when the matrix fiber diameter approaches the diameter of the particles to be captured. Experimentally, the authors obtained a single particle capture limit with 0.8{micro}m PuO{sub 2} particles with dodecane as a carrier fluid. The development of new matrix materials is being pursued through the controlled corrosion of stainless steel wool, or the deposition of nickel dendrites on the existing stainless steel matrix material. They have also derived a model from a continuity equation that uses empirically determined capture cross section values. This enables the prediction of high gradient magnetic separator performance for a variety of materials and applications. The model can be used to optimize the capture cross section and thus increase the capture efficiency.

  15. Enhanced shear separation for chiral magnetic colloidal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Carlos; Marques, Carlos; Thalmann, Fabrice

    2011-03-01

    We study the designing principles of the simplest colloidal propeller, an architecture built from four identical spheres that can couple translation with rotation to produce controlled drift motion. By considering superparamagnetic beads, we show that the simultaneous action of a magnetic field and a shear flow leads to the migration of the cluster in the vorticity direction. We investigate the dependence of the migration velocity on the geometrical parameters of the cluster, and find that significant cluster separation can be achieved under the typical operation conditions of microfluidic devices. Reference: C.I. Mendoza, C.M. Marques, and F. Thalmann, "Enhanced shear separation for chiral magnetic colloidal aggregates" arXiv:1011.1488

  16. Capture of metallic copper by high gradient magnetic separation system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. K. Andy Hong

    2011-01-01

    Valence copper was recovered from wastewater by chemical reduction and use of a high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system. Ammonia (NH3) and sodium dithionate (Na2S2O4) at a molar ratio of [Cu]:[NH3]:[Na2S2O4] = 1:4:3 at pH = 9.5 were used first to chemically reduce copper ion to metallic copper; the resultant metal solids were captured in an upflowing reactor space equipped

  17. Phosphate removal from solution using steel slag through magnetic separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jibing Xiong; Zhenli He; Qaisar Mahmood; Dan Liu; Xiaoe Yang; Ejazul Islam

    2008-01-01

    Steel slag with magnetic separation was used to remove phosphate from aqueous solutions. The influence of adsorbent dose, pH, and temperature on phosphate removal was investigated in a series of batch experiments. Phosphate removal increased with the increasing temperature, adsorbent dose and decreased with increasing initial phosphate concentrations, while it was at its peak at pH of 5.5. The phosphate

  18. Radiolysis and hydrolysis of magnetically assisted chemical separation particles

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B.A.; Nunez, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-05-01

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process is designed to separate transuranic (TRU) elements out of high-level waste (HLW) or TRU waste. Magnetic microparticles (1--25 {mu}m) were coated with octyl (phenyl)N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tributyl phosphate (TBP) and tested for removing TRU elements from acidic nitrate solutions. The particles were contacted with nitric acid solutions and Hanford plutonium finishing plant (PFP) simulant, irradiated with a high intensity {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source, and evaluated for effectiveness in removing TRU elements from 2m HNO{sub 3} solutions. The resistance of the coatings and magnetic cores to radiolytic damage and hydrolytic degradation was investigated by irradiating samples of particles suspended in a variety of solutions with doses of up to 5 Mrad. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), magnetic susceptibility measurements, and physical observations of the particles and suspension solutions were used to assess physical changes to the particles. Processes that affect the surface of the particles dramatically alter the binding sites for TRU in solution. Hydrolysis played a larger role than radiolysis in the degradation of the extraction capacity of the particles.

  19. Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage

    E-print Network

    Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular Applications October 30, 2006 .....................................................................................................................................................................8 APPENDIX A: Review of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems ......................................................................................18 APPENDIX C: Presentation to the FreedomCAR & Fuel Hydrogen Storage Technical Team

  20. One-step detection of pathogens and viruses: combining magnetic relaxation switching and magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Cha, Ruitao; Sun, Jiashu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-03-24

    We report a sensing methodology that combines magnetic separation (MS) and magnetic relaxation switching (MS-MRS) for one-step detection of bacteria and viruses with high sensitivity and reproducibility. We first employ a magnetic field of 0.01 T to separate the magnetic beads of large size (250 nm in diameter) from those of small size (30 nm in diameter) and use the transverse relaxation time (T2) of the water molecules around the 30 nm magnetic beads (MB30) as the signal readout of the immunoassay. An MS-MRS sensor integrates target enrichment, extraction, and detection into one step, and the entire immunoassay can be completed within 30 min. Compared with a traditional MRS sensor, an MS-MRS sensor shows enhanced sensitivity, better reproducibility, and convenient operation, thus providing a promising platform for point-of-care testing. PMID:25743636

  1. Kinetic approach for the purification of nucleotides with magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Tural, Servet; Tural, Bilsen; Ece, Mehmet ?akir; Yetkin, Evren; Özkan, Necati

    2014-11-01

    The isolation of ?-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide is of great importance since it is widely used in different scientific and technologic fields such as biofuel cells, sensor technology, and hydrogen production. In order to isolate ?-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, first 3-aminophenyboronic acid functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were prepared to serve as a magnetic solid support and subsequently they were used for reversible adsorption/desorption of ?-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in a batch fashion. The loading capacity of the 3-aminophenyboronic acid functionalized nanoparticles for ?-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide adsorption was 13.0 ?mol/g. Adsorption kinetic and isotherm studies showed that the adsorption process followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the experimental data can be represented using Langmuir isotherm model. The 3-aminophenyboronic acid functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were proposed as an alternative support for the ?-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide purification. The results elucidated the significance of magnetic separation as a fast, relatively simple, and low-cost technique. Furthermore, the magnetic supports can be reused at least five times for purification processes. PMID:25199632

  2. Photocatalytically active titanium dioxide nanopowders: Synthesis, photoactivity and magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkanen, J.-P.; Heinonen, S.; Huttunen Saarivirta, E.; Honkanen, M.; Levänen, E.

    2013-12-01

    Two approaches were used to obtain nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst powders. Firstly, low-temperature synthesis method and secondly liquid flame spraying. The structural properties of the produced powders were determined with X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption tests. The photocatalytic properties of the powders were studied with methylene blue (MB) discoloration tests. After discolorations tests, TiO2 was coagulated with magnetite particles using FeCl3·6 H2O at a fixed pH value. Magnetic separation of coagulated TiO2 and magnetite was carried out by a permanent magnet. The obtained results showed that the particle size of the powders synthesized at low-temperature was very small and the specific surface area high. The phase content of the powder was also shown to depend greatly on the acidity of the synthesis solution. Powder synthesized by liquid flame spraying was mixture of anatase and rutile phases with essentially larger particle size and lower specific surface area than those of low-temperature synthesized powders. The MB discoloration test showed that photocatalytic activity depends on the phase structure as well as the specific surface area of the synthesized TiO2 powder. The magnetic separation of TiO2-magnetite coagulate from solution proved to be efficient around pH:8.

  3. The Yale Gas-Filled Split Pole Magnetic Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cata-Danil, G.; Beausang, C. W.; Casten, R. F.; Chen, A.; Chubrich, N.; Cooper, J. R.; Krücken, R.; Liu, B.; Novak, J. R.; Visser, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    1998-10-01

    Design and construction of a gas-filled recoil separator is underway at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale University. By filling the magnetic field region of the existing Enge Split-Pole magnet with N2 or He2 gases in the 1 to 15 mbar pressure range a gradual focussing of discrete charge states has been measured. The incident ions were ^16O and ^35,37Cl with 49 MeV and 95 MeV energies, respectively. The process is understood as a result of coalescing of trajectories of different charge states around a trajectory defined by the mean charge state (q¯) of the ion in gas. Because q¯ depends on the atomic number Z and is roughly proportional with the ion velocity, the average magnetic rigidity (B¯?=Av/q¯) is almost independent of the velocity distribution of the incident ions. The ion trajectories will be therefore be mainly determined by the mass number A and the atomic number Z of the ion. Monte Carlo simulations with the code RAYTRACE closely reproduce the experimental behavior. We plan to use the Yale Mass Separator (YaMS) for nuclear structure studies in conjunction with high efficency gamma detectors (clover detectors) for enhancing weak reaction channels and fission background reduction. Work supported by the US-DOE under contract numbers DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  4. High gradient magnetic separation of motile and non-motile magnetotactic bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Bahaj; P. A. B. James; F. D. Moeschler

    1996-01-01

    Motile magnetotactic bacteria are normally separated from a solution by applying a low intensity (mT) orientating magnetic field. This constrains the bacteria to swim in the required direction. High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a well established method for the extraction of magnetic particles from solutions. This paper reports on the separation properties of both motile and non-motile magnetotactic bacteria

  5. Apparatus for magnetic separation of paramagnetic and diamagnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, R.D.

    1988-10-18

    The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for segregating paramagnetic from diamagnetic particles in particulate material and, in particular, to the open gradient magnetic separation of ash producing components and pyritic sulfur from coal. The apparatus includes a vertical cylinder and a rotatable vertical screw positioned within the cylinder, the screw having a helical blade angled downwardly and outwardly from the axis. Rotation of the vertical screw causes denser particles, which in the case of coal include pyritic sulfur and ash, which are paramagnetic, to migrate to the outside of the screw, and less dense particles, such as the low sulfur organic portion of the coal, which are diamagnetic, to migrate towards the center of the screw. A vibration mechanism attached to the screw causes the screw to vibrate during rotation, agitating and thereby accommodating further segregation of the particles. An open gradient magnetic field is applied circumferentially along the entire length of the screw by a superconducting quadrupole magnet. The open gradient magnetic field further segregates the paramagnetic particles from the diamagnetic particles. The paramagnetic particles may then be directed from the cylinder into a first storage bin, and the diamagnetic particles, which are suitable for relatively clean combustion, may be directed into a second storage bin. 5 figs.

  6. Apparatus for magnetic separation of paramagnetic and diamagnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, Richard D. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1988-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for segregating paramagnetic from diamagnetic particles in particulate material and, in particular, to the open gradient magnetic separation of ash producing components and pyritic sulfur from coal. The apparatus includes a vertical cylinder and a rotatable vertical screw positioned within the cylinder, the screw having a helical blade angled downwardly and outwardly from the axis. Rotation of the vertical screw causes denser particles, which in the case of coal include pyritic sulfur and ash, which are paramagnetic, to migrate to the outside of the screw, and less dense particles, such as the low sulfur organic portion of the coal, which are diamagnetic, to migrate towards the center of the screw. A vibration mechanism attached to the screw causes the screw to vibrate during rotation, agitating and thereby accommodating further segregation of the particles. An open gradient magnetic field is applied circumferentially along the entire length of the screw by a superconducting quadropole magnet. The open gradient magnetic field further segregates the paramagnetic particles from the diamagnetic particles. The paramagnetic particles may then be directed from the cylinder into a first storage bin, and the diamagnetic particles, which are suitable for relatively clean combustion, may be directed into a second storage bin.

  7. Apparatus for magnetic separation of paramagnetic and diamagnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, R.D.

    1986-07-24

    The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for segregating paramagnetic from diamagnetic particles in particulate material and, in particular, to the open gradient magnetic separation of ash producing components and pyritic sulfur from coal. The apparatus includes a vertical cylinder and a rotatable vertical screw positioned within the cylinder, the screw having a helical blade angled downwardly and outwardly from the axis. Rotation of the vertical screw causes denser particles, which in the case of coal include pyritic sulfur and ash, which are paramagnetic, to migrate to the outside of the screw, and less dense particles, such as the low sulfur organic portion of the coal, which are diamagnetic, to migrate towards the center of the screw. A vibration mechanism attached to the screw causes the screw to vibrate during rotation, agitating and thereby accommodating further segregation of the particles. An open gradient magnetic field is applied circumferentially along the entire length of the screw by a superconducting quadrupole magnet. The open gradient magnetic field further segregates the paramagnetic-particles from the diamagnetic particles. The paramagnetic particles may then be directed from the cylinder into a first storage bin, and the diamagnetic particles, which are suitable for relatively clean combustion, may be directed into a second storage bin. 5 figs.

  8. Primary beneficiation of tantalite using magnetic separation and acid leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nete, M.; Koko, F.; Theron, T.; Purcell, W.; Nel, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Primary beneficiation was successfully performed prior to dissolution of manganotantalite (sample A) and ferrotantalite (sample C) samples obtained from two different mines in the Naquissupa area, Mozambique. Magnetic separation removed the majority of iron and titanium, whereas H2SO4 leaching removed a large portion of thorium and uranium in these samples. Analytical results indicated that 64.14wt% and 72.04wt% of the total Fe and Ti, respectively, and ˜2wt% each of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 were removed from sample C (ferrotantalite) using the magnetic separation method, whereas only 9.64wt% and 8.66wt% of total Fe2O3 and TiO2, respectively, and ˜2wt% each of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 were removed from sample A (manganotantalite). A temperature of 50°C and a leaching time of 3 h in the presence of concentrated H2SO4 were observed to be the most appropriate leaching conditions for removal of radioactive elements from the tantalite ores. The results obtained for sample A under these conditions indicated that 64.14wt% U3O8 and 60.77wt% ThO2 were leached into the acidic solution, along with 4.45wt% and 0.99wt% of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5, respectively.

  9. Magnetic microgels, a promising candidate for enhanced magnetic adsorbent particles in bioseparation: synthesis, physicochemical characterization, and separation performance.

    PubMed

    Turcu, Rodica; Socoliuc, Vlad; Craciunescu, Izabell; Petran, Anca; Paulus, Anja; Franzreb, Matthias; Vasile, Eugeniu; Vekas, Ladislau

    2015-02-01

    For specific applications in the field of high gradient magnetic separation of biomaterials, magnetic nanoparticle clusters of controlled size and high magnetic moment in an external magnetic field are of particular interest. We report the synthesis and characterization of magnetic microgels designed for magnetic separation purposes, as well as the separation efficiency of the obtained microgel particles. High magnetization magnetic microgels with superparamagnetic behaviour were obtained in a two-step synthesis procedure by a miniemulsion technique using highly stable ferrofluid on a volatile nonpolar carrier. Spherical clusters of closely packed hydrophobic oleic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles were coated with cross linked polymer shells of polyacrylic acid, poly-N-isopropylacrylamide, and poly-3-acrylamidopropyl trimethylammonium chloride. The morphology, size distribution, chemical surface composition, and magnetic properties of the magnetic microgels were determined using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Magnetically induced phase condensation in aqueous suspensions of magnetic microgels was investigated by optical microscopy and static light scattering. The condensed phase consists of elongated oblong structures oriented in the direction of the external magnetic field and may grow up to several microns in thickness and tens or even hundreds of microns in length. The dependence of phase condensation magnetic supersaturation on the magnetic field intensity was determined. The experiments using high gradient magnetic separation show high values of separation efficiency (99.9-99.97%) for the magnetic microgels. PMID:25519891

  10. Hydrodynamic Separation of Magnetic Particles and Magnetically-Labeled Blood Cells in an Annular Channel in a Quadrupole Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Mauricio; Moore, Lee; McCloskey, Kara; Nakamura, Masayuki; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    1999-11-01

    A quadrupole magnetic field coupled with a flow in an axisymmetric annular thin channel is used for the continuous sorting of magnetic particles and of magnetically-labeled lymphocytes differing in magnetophoretic mobilities. The channel is composed of two concentric cylinders; in the thin annulus two flow splitters are placed at each extremity. The channel has two inlets and two outlets. Species and the carrier are injected at different inlets, and enriched and depleted species are recovered at both outlets. In order to evaluate the performance and to improve separations, we have used the pulse injection technique, common to chromatography. We investigated three different types of magnetic beads, and we have performed analyses of CD34+ magnetically labeled cells. The experimental results are compared with a theoretical model, and the validated model is then used for predicting the separator performance under various operating conditions.

  11. Study on magnetic separation for decontamination of cesium contaminated soil by using superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Susumu; Nomura, Naoki; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko

    2014-09-01

    The accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant caused the diffusion of radioactive cesium over the wide area. We examined the possibility of applying magnetic separation method using the superconducting magnet, which can process a large amount of the soil in high speed, to the soil decontamination and volume reduction of the radioactive cesium contaminated soil. Clay minerals are classified as 2:1 and 1:1 types by the difference of their layer structures, and these types of minerals are respectively paramagnetic and diamagnetic including some exception. It is known that most of the radioactive cesium is strongly adsorbed on the clay, especially on 2:1 type clay minerals. It is expected that the method which can separate only 2:1 type clay minerals selectively from the mixture clay minerals can enormously contribute to the volume reduction of the contaminated soil. In this study, the components in the clay before and after separation were evaluated to estimate the magnetic separation efficiency by using X-ray diffraction. From the results, the decontamination efficiency and the volume reduction ratio were estimated in order to examine the appropriate separation conditions for the practical decontamination of the soil.

  12. Magnetic Separation and Magnetic Properties of Low-Grade Manganese Carbonate Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Shi, B.; Ge, W.; Yan, C. J.; Yang, X.

    2015-02-01

    The relation between the magnetic separation behavior and magnetic properties of a low-grade manganese ore was analyzed before and after treatment by direct reduction with coal. It was found that raw ore with an initial average grade of 10.39% Mn and consisting of diamagnetic and paramagnetic minerals can be concentrated by high-intensity magnetic separation to produce a salable product with a grade of 22.75% Mn and a recovery of 89.88%. In contrast, direct reduction of the ore results in a new Mn-Fe oxide phase formed with a combination of ferromagnetic and paramagnetic properties, thereby increasing the magnetic susceptibilities of the ore by almost two orders of magnitude. The grade of Mn for the roasted ore could only be concentrated to 15.49% with a recovery of 66.67%. Therefore, it is concluded that the low-grade manganese ores with antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic (or diamagnetic, but not strongly ferromagnetic) properties could be efficiently beneficiated via high-intensity magnetic separation.

  13. The Development of the Separation Apparatus of Phosphor by Controlling the Magnetic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, K.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    The phosphor wastes contain the multiple kinds of rare-earth phosphors with high market value. Because of increasing demand for rare-earth, the technique to recover and reuse the rare-earth in the phosphor wastes is required. In this study, we focused on the difference of physical property such as magnetic susceptibility and density for each type of phosphor and tried to separate and recover the phosphors by using the magnetic separation technique utilizing the difference of the traction force to the magnet acting on the particles. Magneto-Archimedes method is method separation technique utilizi g the difference of magnetic susceptibility and density. We developed the magnetic separation apparatus by applying this technique. To develop the practical separation apparatus, the continuous process is required. Hence the fundamental experiment utilizing High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) Bulk Magnet which can generate the strong magnetic force was conducted. As a result, we succeeded the continuous separation of the phosphor wastes.

  14. Demonstration of magnetically activated and guided isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Thomas R.; Klappauf, Bruce; Raizen, Mark G.

    2014-08-01

    Enriched isotopes are widely used in medicine, basic science and energy production, and the need will only grow in the future. The main method for enriching stable isotopes today, the calutron, dates back over eighty years and has an uncertain future, creating an urgent need, especially in nuclear medicine. We report here the experimental realization of a general and efficient method for isotope separation that presents a viable alternative to the calutron. Combining optical pumping and a unique magnet geometry, we observe substantial depletion of Li-6 throughput in a lithium atomic beam produced by an evaporation source over a range of flux. These results demonstrate the viability of our method to yield large degrees of enrichment in a manner that is amenable to industrial scale-up and the production of commercially relevant quantities.

  15. Magnetic separation - Advanced nanotechnology for future nuclear fuel recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, M.; Zhang, H.; Qiang, Y. [Department of Physics and Environmental Science, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Martin, L.; Todd, T. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), such as their extremely small size and high surface area to volume ratio, provide better kinetics for the adsorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions. In this work, we demonstrated the separation of minor actinides using complex conjugates of MNPs with diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) chelator. The sorption results show the strong affinity of DTPA towards Am (III) and Pu (IV) by extracting 97% and 80% of actinides, respectively. It is shown that the extraction process is highly dependent on the pH of the solution. If these long-term heat generating actinides can be efficiently removed from the used fuel raffinates, the volume of material that can be placed in a given amount of repository space can be significantly increased. (authors)

  16. Resonance Free Regions in Magnetic Scattering by Two Solenoidal Fields at Large Separation

    E-print Network

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    Resonance Free Regions in Magnetic Scattering by Two Solenoidal Fields at Large Separation Ivana the problem of quantum resonances in magnetic scattering by two solenoidal fields at large separation in two : Resonances for scattering by solenoidal fields Keywords : Resonances; magnetic scattering; solenoidal fields

  17. Physical Coal Cleaning Of Midwestern Coals By Open-gradient Magnetic Separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. D; C. D. Livengood

    1990-01-01

    Open-Gradient Magnetic Separation (OGMS) using superconducting quadrupole magnets offers a novel beneficiation techology for removing pyritic sulfur from pulverized dry coal. It is estimated to have a power demand 75% lower than techniques using conventional electro-magnets, while achieving higher separation forces. Additionally, the system operates in a continuous mode and uses no chemicals. Because OGMS is specifically applicable to finely

  18. Theoretical analysis of a new, efficient microfluidic magnetic bead separator based on magnetic structures on multiple length scales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristian Smistrup; Minqiang Bu; Anders Wolff; Henrik Bruus; Mikkel Fougt Hansen

    2008-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of a new design for microfluidic magnetic bead separation. It combines an external array\\u000a of mm-sized permanent magnets with magnetization directions alternating between up and down with ?m-sized soft magnetic structures\\u000a integrated in the bottom of the separation channel. The concept is studied analytically for simple representative geometries\\u000a and by numerical simulation of an experimentally

  19. IMPROVEMENT OF IMMUNOMAGNETIC SEPARATION FOR ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 DETECTION BY THE PICKPEN MAGNETIC PARTICLE SEPARATION DEVICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional immunomagnetic separation (IMS) procedures, which use an external magnetic source to capture magnetic particles against the side of a test tube, are labor intensive and can have poor sensitivity for the target organism due to high background microflora that is not effectively washed awa...

  20. Magnetic separation studies on ferruginous chromite fine to enhance Cr:Fe ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sunil Kumar; Banerjee, P. K.; Suresh, Nikkam

    2015-03-01

    The Cr:Fe ratio (chromium-to-iron mass ratio) of chromite affects the production of chrome-based ferroalloys. Although the literature contains numerous reports related to the magnetic separation of different minerals, limited work concerning the application of magnetic separation to fine chromite from the Sukinda region of India to enhance its Cr:Fe ratio has been reported. In the present investigation, magnetic separation and mineralogical characterization studies of chromite fines were conducted to enhance the Cr:Fe ratio. Characterization studies included particle size and chemical analyses, X-ray diffraction analysis, automated mineral analysis, sink-and-float studies, and magnetic susceptibility measurements, whereas magnetic separation was investigated using a rare earth drum magnetic separator, a rare earth roll magnetic separator, an induced roll magnetic separator, and a wet high-intensity magnetic separator. The fine chromite was observed to be upgraded to a Cr:Fe ratio of 2.2 with a yield of 55.7% through the use of an induced roll magnetic separator and a feed material with a Cr:Fe ratio of 1.6.

  1. Removal of ferriferous dolomite by magnetic separation from the Egyptian Abu Tartur phosphate ore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Blazy; E. A Jdid

    1997-01-01

    The Abu Tartur phosphate deposit is characterized by the presence of ferriferous dolomite, containing 60 to 70% of MgO, which allows the use of magnetic separation to reduce the MgO content of certain fractions. In fact, wet magnetic separation on a High Gradient Magnetic Separator (HGMS), applied to the [210–74] and [74–38] ?m fractions, which assay, respectively, 2.6 and 5.8%

  2. SUPERCONDUCTING OPEN-GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION FOR THE PRETREATMENT OF RADIOACTIVE OR MIXED WASTE VITRIFICATION FEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists need to gain a better understanding of the magnetic separation processes that can be used to separate deleterious constituents (crystalline, amorphous, and colloidal) in vitrification feed streams for borosilicate glass production without adding chemicals or generating...

  3. Method and apparatus for separating materials magnetically. [Patent application; iron pyrite from coal

    DOEpatents

    Hise, E.C. Jr.; Holman, A.S.; Friedlaender, F.J.

    1980-11-06

    Magnetic and nonmagnetic materials are separated by passing stream thereof past coaxial current-carrying coils which produce a magnetic field wherein intensity varies sharply with distance radially of the axis of the coils.

  4. Lab on a chip for continuous-flow magnetic cell separation.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Li, Weihua; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2015-02-21

    Separation of cells is a key application area of lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices. Among the various methods, magnetic separation of cells utilizing microfluidic devices offers the merits of biocompatibility, efficiency, and simplicity. This review discusses the fundamental physics involved in using magnetic force to separate particles, and identifies the optimisation parameters and corresponding methods for increasing the magnetic force. The paper then elaborates the design considerations of LOC devices for continuous-flow magnetic cell separation. Examples from the recently published literature illustrate these state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:25537573

  5. Development of high-gradient and open-gradient magnetic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Hise, E C

    1981-01-01

    This paper was prepared: to review the accomplishments in both high-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) and open-gradient magnetic separation (OGMS) by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) group during the past three years; to show, through the medium of motion pictures, the operation of the various separation methods and devices used and developed; to show qualitative results of the separation performed; and to make available, to those interested, detailed reports of the experimental procedures and the resulting data. The qualitative separation of pyritic sulfur and ash forming minerals from fine coal by high gradient magnetic separation has been demonstrated at feed rates up to one ton per hour, and in a machine that is commercially produced in sizes for feed rates up to several hundred tons per hour. The quantitative separation of pyritic sulfur and ash forming minerals from fine coal by free fall open gradient magnetic separation has been demonstrated at a laboratory scale and at 300 kg per hour in a solenoidal magnet configuration. A magnet modeling analysis has shown that an optimum magnet can be designed with practical physical constraints which can generate separating forces two to three times those of the existing solenoidal configuration and with a large processing capacity. The analytical predictions of the behavior of particles traversing these separating forces have been experimentally confirmed within 15% in existing magnets.

  6. Permanent magnet systems with strong stray magnetic fields and very high gradients for material separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'Yashenko, E. I.; Glebov, V. A.; Glebov, A. V.; Skjeltorp, A. T.; Johansen, T. H.

    2006-05-01

    The system consisting of permanent magnets of Kittel open domain structure with a mask made of thin sheets of soft magnetic material is described. The simulations showed that the maximal value of induction for system consisting of two neodymium-iron-boron magnets in presence of a mask is increased from 3 T (without a mask) up to 4 T. In this case the product BB on the distance of 0.01 mm achieves a value of 4.2 × 1011 mT2/m. The experimental device with a mask made of low carbon steel sheets is shown to be useful for separation of paramagnetic substances such as dysprosium sulfate, europium chloride and copper chloride.

  7. Application of high temperature superconductors to high-gradient magnetic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, M.A.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Worl, L.W.; Schake, A.R.; Padilla, D.D.

    1994-06-01

    High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) is a powerful technique which can be used to separate widely dispersed contaminants from a host material, This technology can separate magnetic solids from other solids, liquids or gases. As the name implies HGMS uses large magnetic field gradients to separate ferromagnetic and paramagnetic particles. HGMS separators usually consist of a high-field solenoid magnet, the bore of which contains a fine-structured, ferromagnetic matrix material. The matrix material locally distorts the magnetic field and creates large field gradients in the vicinity of the matrix elements. These elements then become trapping sites for magnetic particles and are the basis for the magnetic separation. In this paper we discuss the design and construction of a prototype HGMS unit using a magnet made with high temperature superconductors (HTS). The prototype consists of an outer vacuum vessel which contains the HTS solenoid magnet The magnet is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield and multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets. The magnet, thermal shield and current leads all operate in a vacuum and are cooled by a cryocooler. High temperature superconducting current leads are used to reduce the heat leak from the ambient environment to the HTS magnet.

  8. Phosphate removal from solution using steel slag through magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jibing; He, Zhenli; Mahmood, Qaisar; Liu, Dan; Yang, Xiaoe; Islam, Ejazul

    2008-03-21

    Steel slag with magnetic separation was used to remove phosphate from aqueous solutions. The influence of adsorbent dose, pH, and temperature on phosphate removal was investigated in a series of batch experiments. Phosphate removal increased with the increasing temperature, adsorbent dose and decreased with increasing initial phosphate concentrations, while it was at its peak at pH of 5.5. The phosphate removal predominantly occurred through ion exchange. The specific surface area of the steel slag was 2.09m2/g. The adsorption of phosphate followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum adsorption capacity of the steel slag was 5.3mgP/g. The removal rates of total phosphorus (TP) and dissolved phosphorus (DP) from secondary effluents were 62-79% and 71-82%, respectively. Due to their low cost and high capability, it was concluded that the steel slag may be an efficient adsorbent to remove phosphate both from solution and wastewater. PMID:17703877

  9. Conjugates of Actinide Chelator-Magnetic Nanoparticles for Used Fuel Separation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, You; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Rao, Linfeng

    2011-10-30

    The actinide separation method using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) functionalized with actinide specific chelators utilizes the separation capability of ligand and the ease of magnetic separation. This separation method eliminated the need of large quantity organic solutions used in the liquid-liquid extraction process. The MNPs could also be recycled for repeated separation, thus this separation method greatly reduces the generation of secondary waste compared to traditional liquid extraction technology. The high diffusivity of MNPs and the large surface area also facilitate high efficiency of actinide sorption by the ligands. This method could help in solving the nuclear waste remediation problem.

  10. Cryo-electron microscopy of viruses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Adrian; Jacques Dubochet; Jean Lepault; Alasdair W. McDowall

    1984-01-01

    Thin vitrified layers of unfixed, unstained and unsupported virus suspensions can be prepared for observation by cryo-electron microscopy in easily controlled conditions. The viral particles appear free from the kind of damage caused by dehydration, freezing or adsorption to a support that is encountered in preparing biological samples for conventional electron microscopy. Cryo-electron microscopy of vitrified specimens offers possibilities for

  11. Cryo-electron microscopy: A primer for the non-microscopist

    PubMed Central

    Milne, Jacqueline L. S.; Borgnia, Mario J.; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Tran, Erin E. H.; Earl, Lesley A.; Schauder, David M.; Lengyel, Jeffrey; Pierson, Jason; Patwardhan, Ardan; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is increasingly becoming a mainstream technology for studying the architecture of cells, viruses and protein assemblies at molecular resolution. Recent developments in microscope design and imaging hardware, paired with enhanced image processing and automation capabilities, appear poised to further advance the effectiveness of cryo-EM methods. These developments promise to increase the speed and extent of automation and to improve the resolutions that can be achieved, rendering this technology capable of determining a wide variety of biological structures. Additionally, established modalities for structure determination, such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, are being routinely integrated with cryo-EM density maps to achieve atomic-resolution models of complex, dynamic molecular assemblies. In this review, which is directed towards readers who are not experts in cryo-EM methodology, we provide an overview of emerging themes in the application of this technology to the investigation of diverse questions in biology and medicine. We discuss the ways in which these methods are being used to study structures of macromolecular assemblies that range in size from whole cells to small proteins. Finally, we include a description of how the structural information obtained by cryo-EM is deposited and archived in a publicly accessible database. PMID:23181775

  12. Development of magnetically separable polyaniline nanofibers for enzyme immobilization and recovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gowoun Lee; Jungbae Kim; Jung-heon Lee

    2008-01-01

    Magnetically separable polyaniline nanofibers were synthesized using a mixture of aniline solution and iron oxide; the nanofibers comprised of crosslinked linear polymers that could be separated from the reaction solution by using magnets. The covalently attached and aggregated lipases retained a high degree of stability, were easily recovered from the enzyme solution, and could be used repeatedly. The enzyme activity

  13. Aligning effect of magnetic field on PDLC films during the phase separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. G. Nazarov; A. M. Parshin; V. Y. Zyryanov; V. F. Shabanov; V. I. Lapanik; V. S. Bezborodov

    2007-01-01

    The results ofthe study ofthe uniaxially oriented PDLC films prepared by solvent induced phase separation (SIPS) method are presented. The samples were obtained applying a longitudinal magnetic field while the phase separation of the liquid crystal and polymer occurs due to the evaporation of common solvent from the uniform solution. In the presence of magnetic field the nematic liquid crystals

  14. Development of GM Cryocooler-Cooled Bi2223 High Temperature Superconducting Magnetic Separator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qiuliang Wang; Yingming Dai; Xinning Hu; Shouseng Song; Yuanzhong Lei; Chuan He; Luguang Yan

    2007-01-01

    We have built a magnetic separator based on the conduction-cooled high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet. In the paper, the high temperature superconducting magnet is made of Bi-2223 pancakes, and has inner and outer coil diameters of 120 mm and 212 mm and coil height of 111.8 mm. The magnet is conduction-cooled to generate a magnetic field of 3.22 T at

  15. Application of coal petrography to the evaluation of magnetically separated dry crushed coals

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, L.A.; Hise, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    In the present study the open gradient magnetic separation method has been used to beneficiate the -30 + 100 mesh fraction of two high volatile bituminous coals. The evaluation of the effectiveness of the magnetic separation for cleaning these coals is the subject of this paper. Coal petrography in combination with scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the magnetically separated coal fractions. These analyses revealed that the majority of the pyrite and non-pyrite minerals were concentrated in the positive magnetic susceptibility fractions. The bulk of the starting samples (approx. 80 weight percent) were located in the negative magnetic susceptibility fractions and showed significant reductions in pyrite and non-pyritic minerals. The magnetic separation appears to effectively split the samples into relatively clean coal and refuse.

  16. A smart fully integrated micromachined separator with soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays for cell isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tao; Su, Qianhua; Yang, Zhaochu; Zhang, Yulong; Egeland, Eirik B.; Gu, Dan D.; Calabrese, Paolo; Kapiris, Matteo J.; Karlsen, Frank; Minh, Nhut T.; Wang, K.; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2010-11-01

    A smart fully integrated micromachined separator with soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays has been developed and demonstrated, which can merely employ one independent lab-on-chip to realize cell isolation. The simulation, design, microfabrication and test for the new electromagnetic micro separator were executed. The simulation results of the electromagnetic field in the separator show that special soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays can amplify and redistribute the electromagnetic field generated by the micro-coils. The separator can be equipped with a strong magnetic field to isolate the target cells with a considerably low input current. The micro separator was fabricated by micro-processing technology. An electroplating bath was hired to deposit NiCo/NiFe to fabricate the micro-pillar arrays. An experimental system was set up to verify the function of the micro separator by isolating the lymphocytes, in which the human whole blood mixed with Dynabeads® FlowComp Flexi and monoclonal antibody MHCD2704 was used as the sample. The results show that the electromagnetic micro separator with an extremely low input current can recognize and capture the target lymphocytes with a high efficiency, the separation ratio reaching more than 90% at a lower flow rate. For the electromagnetic micro separator, there is no external magnetizing field required, and there is no extra cooling system because there is less Joule heat generated due to the lower current. The magnetic separator is totally reusable, and it can be used to separate cells or proteins with common antigens.

  17. Efficiency of heavy liquid separation to concentrate magnetic particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Franke; Thomas Frederichs; Mark J. Dekkers

    2007-01-01

    Low-temperature rock magnetic measurements have distinct diagnostic value. However, in most bulk marine sediments the concentration of ferrimagnetic and antiferromagnetic minerals is extremely low, so even sensitive instrumentation often responds to the paramagnetic contribution of the silicate matrix in the residual field of the magnetometer. Analysis of magnetic extracts is usually performed to solve the problems raised by low magnetic

  18. Separation of Uranium from Nitric and Hydrochloric-Acid Solutions with Extractant-Coated Magnetic Microparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. KAMINSKI; L. NUÑEZ

    2000-01-01

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process utilizes selective magnetic microparticle composites to separate dissolved metals from solution. In this study, MACS particles were coated with neutral and acidic organophosphorus extractants,octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO), tributyl phosphate (TBP), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), and bis(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA or HDEHP) and were evaluated for the separation of uranyl ions from nitric- and hydrochloric-acid solutions.

  19. Low magnetic-field separation system for metal-loaded magnetotactic bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Bahaj; P. A. B. James; F. D. Moeschler

    1998-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) offer a unique approach to metal accumulation and separation from water systems. This paper proposes an integrated separator design, for the production of MTB, the metal uptake phase and their subsequent separation. Applied magnetic fields are used to orientate the bacteria, so that they swim in a direction resulting in their removal.

  20. Magnetic field effect on laser isotope separation of gadolinium and zirconium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hideaki Niki; Iwao Kitazima

    2000-01-01

    In laser isotope separation based on polarization selection rules the effect of magnetic field on isotopic selectivity was investigated. Excitation dynamics of atoms by linearly polarized lasers were numerically analyzed for J equals 2 yields 2 yields 1 yields 0 stepwise excitation under a magnetic field. Time evolution of the population in each magnetic substrate was calculated by solving the

  1. HIGH-GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION FOR REMOVAL OF SULFUR FROM COAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a thorough physical, chemical, and magnetic characterization of a Pennsylvania coal from the Upper Freeport seam. The powdered coal was then subjected to high-gradient magnetic separations, as a function of magnetic field and fluid velocity, in both a ...

  2. Magnetite/CdTe magnetic-fluorescent composite nanosystem for magnetic separation and bio-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Anup; Kale, Sonia; Yadav, Prasad; Gholap, Haribhau; Pasricha, Renu; Jog, J. P.; Lefez, Benoit; Hannoyer, Béatrice; Shastry, Padma; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2011-06-01

    A new synthesis protocol is described to obtain a CdTe decorated magnetite bifunctional nanosystem via dodecylamine (DDA) as cross linker. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and fluorescence microscopy are used to characterize the constitution, size, composition and physical properties of these superparamagnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles. These CdTe decorated magnetite nanoparticles were then functionalized with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody to specifically target cells expressing this receptor. The EGFR is a transmembrane glycoprotein and is expressed on tumor cells from different tissue origins including human leukemic cell line Molt-4 cells. The magnetite-CdTe composite nanosystem is shown to perform excellently for specific selection, magnetic separation and fluorescent detection of EGFR positive Molt-4 cells from a mixed population. Flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy results show that this composite nanosystem has great potential in antibody functionalized magnetic separation and imaging of cells using cell surface receptor antibody.

  3. Cryo-electron tomography of bacterial viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C. [Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)] [Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Wright, Elizabeth R., E-mail: erwrigh@emory.edu [Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)

    2013-01-05

    Bacteriophage particles contain both simple and complex macromolecular assemblages and machines that enable them to regulate the infection process under diverse environmental conditions with a broad range of bacterial hosts. Recent developments in cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) make it possible to observe the interactions of bacteriophages with their host cells under native-state conditions at unprecedented resolution and in three-dimensions. This review describes the application of cryo-ET to studies of bacteriophage attachment, genome ejection, assembly and egress. Current topics of investigation and future directions in the field are also discussed.

  4. Chiral magnetic microspheres purified by centrifugal field flow fractionation and microspheres magnetic chiral chromatography for benzoin racemate separation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ailin; Qi, Jing; Liu, Yating; Wang, Fengkang; Ito, Yoichiro; Wei, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Separation of enantiomers still remains a challenge due to their identical physical and chemical properties in a chiral environment, and the research on specific chiral selector along with separation techniques continues to be conducted to resolve individual enantiomers. In our laboratory the promising magnetic chiral microspheres Fe3O4@SiO2@cellulose-2, 3-bis (3, 5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) have been developed to facilitate the resolution using both its magnetic property and chiral recognition ability. In our present studies this magnetic chiral selector was first purified by centrifuge field flow fractionation, and then used to separate benzoin racemate by a chromatographic method. Uniform-sized and masking-impurity-removed magnetic chiral selector was first obtained by field flow fractionation with ethanol through a spiral column mounted on the type-J planetary centrifuge, and using the purified magnetic chiral selector, the final chromatographic separation of benzoin racemate was successfully performed by eluting with ethanol through a coiled tube (wound around the cylindrical magnet to retain the magnetic chiral selector as a stationary phase) submerged in dry ice. In addition, an external magnetic field facilitates the recycling of the magnetic chiral selector. PMID:23891368

  5. Magnetic properties and loss separation in iron-silicone-MnZn ferrite soft magnetic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shen; Sun, Aizhi; Xu, Wenhuan; Zou, Chao; Yang, Jun; Dong, Juan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2013-12-16

    This paper investigates the magnetic and structural properties of iron-based soft magnetic composites coated with silicone-MnZn ferrite hybrid. The organic silicone resin was added to improve the flexibility of the insulated iron powder and causes better adhesion between particles to increase the mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscopy and distribution maps show that the iron particle surface is covered with a thin layer of silicone-MnZn ferrite. Silicone-MnZn ferrite coated samples have higher permeability when compared with the non-magnetic silicone resin coated compacts. The real part of permeability increases by 34.18% when compared with the silicone resin coated samples at 20 kHz. In this work, a formula for calculating the total loss component by loss separation method is presented and finally the different parts of total losses are calculated. The results show that the eddy current loss coefficient is close to each other for the silicone-MnZn ferrite, silicone resin and MnZn ferrite coated samples (0.0078

  6. Highly sensitive and rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa based on magnetic enrichment and magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongjun; Zou, Jun; Ma, Chao; Ali, Zeeshan; Li, Zhiyang; Li, Xiaolong; Ma, Ninging; Mou, Xianbo; Deng, Yan; Zhang, Liming; Li, Kai; Lu, Guangming; Yang, Haowen; He, Nongyue

    2013-01-01

    A method for highly sensitive and rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, based on magnetic enrichment and magnetic separation, is described in this paper. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were applied to adsorb genome DNA after the sample was lysed. The DNA binding MNPs were directly subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify gyrB specific sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The biotin labeled PCR products were detected by chemiluminescence when they were successively incubated with the probes-modified MNPs and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) labeled streptavidin (SA). Agarose gel electrophoresis analyses approved the method of in situ PCR to be highly reliable. The factors which could affect the chemiluminiscence were studied in detail. The results showed that the MNPs of 400 nm in diameter are beneficial to the detection. The sequence length and the binding site of the probe with a target sequence have obvious effects on the detection. The optimal concentration of the probes, hybridization temperature and hybridization time were 10 ?M, 60 ºC and 60 mins, respectively. The method of in situ PCR based on MNPs can greatly improve the utilization rate of the DNA template ultimately enhancing the detection sensitivity. Experiment results proved that the primer and probe had high specificity, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was successfully detected with detection limits as low as 10 cfu/mL by this method, while the detection of a single Pseudomonas aeruginosa can also be achieved. PMID:23424183

  7. D0 Cryo CC Heater Installation

    SciTech Connect

    Urbin, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-03-16

    Nine pairs of heaters are installed in the bottom of the CC pressure vessel.The physical layout is shown in the CC internal development drawing, D0 dwg. 3740.510-ME-255523. Electrically the heater system is a delta configuration. Electrical details are found on D0 dwg. 3740.515EC-273761. The feedthrough connectors for power to the heaters are located in the instrumentation box. Connector positions are found on D0 dwg.3740.515-EC-273760. Original sketches for the above named drawings are included in this document. The heaters and wiring were cleaned various times prior to and after installation with ethyl a1chohol. At various stages in the installation hi-pot and continuity tests were successfully accomplished to verify the integrity of the system. The fmal hi-pot numbers are included in the documentation. The heaters and wiring are kept separated from thermometry and purity cell wiring by SS sheetmetal barriers. The fabrication, testing and installation was completed by M. Hentges and his crew from AD/Cryo.

  8. Living Planet: CryoSat-2

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an overview of the CryoSat program, a radar altimetry mission by the European Space Agency (ESA). The mission measures variations in the thickness of the Earth's continental ice sheets and marine ice cover in an effort to determine whether arctic ice is thinning due to global warming. Topics include an introduction to the mission, news articles, science objectives, data products, and links to CryoSat publications.

  9. Magnetically separable nanoferrite-anchored glutathione: Aqueous homocoupling of arylboronic acids under microwave irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A highly active, stable and magnetically separable glutathione based organocatalyst provided good to excellent yields to symmetric biaryls in the homocoupling of arylboronic acids under microwave irradiation. Symmetrical biaryl motifs are present in a wide range of natural p...

  10. High gradient magnetic separation of iron oxide minerals from soil clays

    E-print Network

    Schulze, Darrell Gene

    1977-01-01

    HIGH GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION OF IRON OXIDE MINERALS FROM SOIL CLAYS A Thesis by DARRELL GENE SCHULZE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1977 Major Subject: Soil Science HIGH GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION OF IRON OXIDE MINERALS FROM SOIL CLAYS A Thesis DARRELL GENE SCHULZE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of C ittee) epartm t) j (Member) (Membe December 1977...

  11. On-chip separation of magnetic particles with different magnetophoretic mobilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chengxun Liu; Liesbet Lagae; Roel Wirix-Speetjens; Gustaaf Borghs

    2007-01-01

    Recent integrations of giant magnetoresistive sensor into laboratory-on-a-chip systems enable the direct detection of biological entities such as cells coated with magnetic particles on chip. However, before detection the different biological entities need to be separated. As a model system, we investigated the separation of two types of magnetic particles (4.5 and 2 mum in diameter). The motion of the

  12. Development of cryogenic cooling system using a double G-M cryo-cooler for NMR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Okada, M.; Saho, N.; Saitoh, K.; Kitaguchi, H.

    2008-02-01

    The sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer is limited by thermal noise. To increase the signal-noise-ratio (SNR), cryogenically cooled probes with cryo-coolers have been used. In order to cool RF coils in the probe below 10K, Gifford- McMahon/Joule-Thomson (G-M/J-T) cryo-coolers are used. But, the G-M/J-T cryo-coolers aren't suitable for a long time operation. On the other hand, G-M cryo-coolers have high reliability. We designed a cryogenically cooled probe system using a double G-M cryo-cooler with an RF coil and preamplifiers that could be cooled below 5 and 50K, respectively. This probe system consists of a probe unit, a transfer unit and a cryo-cooling unit. The cryo-cooling unit consists of two G-M cryo-coolers, two counter-flow heat exchangers, helium gas lines, etc.,. Compressed helium gas is cooled by the cooling stages of G-M cryo-coolers and two heat exchangers. The cooled helium gas is supplied to the probe unit through the 2.5m long transfer unit which consists of a 45mm diameter flexible vacuum vessel containing four helium gas lines. Cold stages for the RF coil and the preamplifiers in the probe unit are cooled by the cryogenically cooled helium gas. Experimental results showed that the cold stage temperature for the RF coil and for preamplifiers after 12 hours was 5.29 and 40.3K, respectively.

  13. Separation of Earth's magnetic field internal component from observed data by means of Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozzi, Roberta; De Michelis, Paola; Consolini, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The need to separate the magnetic field recorded at the Earth's surface into as many components as the sources are, has led to develop different methods of internal/external magnetic field separation. For this purpose, we have recently tested Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) over magnetic data registered by a few European observatories. Here we show an extension of the previous work using EMD to separate the internal component from data observed at a larger number of magnetic observatories from low to high latitudes. With respect to the methods used so far to achieve internal/external separation of Earth's magnetic field, EMD has many advantages as, for instance, to give the opportunity to be applied on data from a single observatory or also to be suitable to be implemented for real time internal/external separation. So, EMD has been applied to monthly means of X, Y and Z components of the geomagnetic field measured at the selected observatories and, after the evaluation of the properties of the EMD single monocomponents, the separation of the Earth's magnetic field internal contribution has been achieved. The internal component derived in this way has then been compared with the internal field provided not only by CM4 model, as in the previous test, but also with that provided by CHAOS4 model and by the more recently developed COV-OBS model. Encouraging results have been obtained.

  14. Development of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) cryo-microplasma: generation and diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Daisuke; Noma, Yuri; Stauss, Sven; Sai, Masaki; Tomai, Takaaki; Terashima, Kazuo

    2008-08-01

    We developed a cryo-microplasma, which can continuously control gas temperature below room temperature and below the freezing point of water. To develop the cryo-microplasma, we first developed an atmospheric-pressure low-temperature microplasma that can suppress the increase in its gas temperature. Helium gas was employed, which was generated in open air. The average estimated electron density and temperature were 108-109 cm-3 and 4-5 eV, respectively, independent of the applied voltage. Then, helium gas, which was the working gas of the atmospheric-pressure low-temperature microplasma, was cooled by liquid nitrogen to generate an atmospheric-pressure cryo-microplasma in open air. We observed the generation of frost around the quartz tube in which the plasma was generated and an increase in atomic oxygen emission by optical emission spectroscopy. Finally, to avoid the generation of frost, a cryo-microplasma was generated in a reactor chamber separated from open air. Helium, nitrogen and oxygen were employed as working gases. Using thermocouples and by estimation from the nitrogen rotational temperature, we verified that the gas temperature of the cryo-microplasma was much lower (Tg ? 180-300 K) than that of the conventional atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma (above 300 K).

  15. A novel high-gradient magnetic separator (HGMS) design for biotech applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Hoffmann; M. Franzreb; W. H. Holl

    2002-01-01

    A novel high-gradient magnetic separator (HGMS) has been designed to meet the strong requirements of biotech processes to grant high product yield, efficient cleanability and low operating costs. The novel design using a rotary permanent magnet leads to an \\

  16. On-chip magnetic separation of superparamagnetic beads for integrated molecular analysis

    PubMed Central

    Florescu, Octavian; Wang, Kevan; Au, Patrick; Tang, Jimmy; Harris, Eva; Beatty, P. Robert; Boser, Bernhard E.

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated a postprocessed complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit (IC) capable of on-chip magnetic separation, i.e., removing via magnetic forces the nonspecifically bound magnetic beads from the detection area on the surface of the chip. Initially, 4.5 ?m wide superparamagnetic beads sedimenting out of solution due to gravity were attracted to the detection area by a magnetic concentration force generated by flowing current through a conductor embedded in the IC. After sedimentation, the magnetic beads that did not bind strongly to the functionalized surface of the IC through a specific biochemical complex were removed by a magnetic separation force generated by flowing current through another conductor placed laterally to the detection area. As the spherical bead pivoted on the surface of the chip, the lateral magnetic force was further amplified by mechanical leveraging, and 50 mA of current flowing through the separation conductor placed 18 ?m away from the bead resulted in 7.5 pN of tensile force on the biomolecular tether immobilizing the bead. This force proved high enough to break nonspecific interactions while leaving specific antibody-antigen bonds intact. A sandwich capture immunoassay on purified human immunoglobulin G showed strong correlation with a control enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and a detection limit of 10 ng?ml or 70 pM. The beads bound to the detection area after on-chip magnetic separation were detected optically. To implement a fully integrated molecular diagnostics platform, the on-chip magnetic separation functionality presented in this work can be readily combine with state-of-the art CMOS-based magnetic bead detection technology. PMID:20368988

  17. A Novel Blind Separation Method in Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianbin; Xia, Qi; Yin, Lixue; Zhou, Ji; Du, Li

    2014-01-01

    A novel global search algorithm based method is proposed to separate MR images blindly in this paper. The key point of the method is the formulation of the new matrix which forms a generalized permutation of the original mixing matrix. Since the lowest entropy is closely associated with the smooth degree of source images, blind image separation can be formulated to an entropy minimization problem by using the property that most of neighbor pixels are smooth. A new dataset can be obtained by multiplying the mixed matrix by the inverse of the new matrix. Thus, the search technique is used to searching for the lowest entropy values of the new data. Accordingly, the separation weight vector associated with the lowest entropy values can be obtained. Compared with the conventional independent component analysis (ICA), the original signals in the proposed algorithm are not required to be independent. Simulation results on MR images are employed to further show the advantages of the proposed method. PMID:24707318

  18. Aligning effect of magnetic field on PDLC films during the phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, V. G.; Parshin, A. M.; Zyryanov, V. Y.; Shabanov, V. F.; Lapanik, V. I.; Bezborodov, V. S.

    2007-05-01

    The results ofthe study ofthe uniaxially oriented PDLC films prepared by solvent induced phase separation (SIPS) method are presented. The samples were obtained applying a longitudinal magnetic field while the phase separation of the liquid crystal and polymer occurs due to the evaporation of common solvent from the uniform solution. In the presence of magnetic field the nematic liquid crystals 4-n-pentyl-4' -cyanophenylcyclohexane (5PCH), the 4-n-pentyl-4'- cyanobiphenyl (SCB) and nematic mixture LN-394 form the separate droplets in polyvinylbutyral (PVB) matrix. At that, the nematics 5PCH and LN-394 form always the stable bipolar structures with the order parameter of the droplet axes depending on the value of the applied field. In 5CB droplets the bipolar structure is realized only in a weak magnetic field and the radial one is formed in a strong magnetic field. At intermediate field the non-equilibrium structures are appeared that are characterized by the flickering textures.

  19. Interaction of Separated Ferromagnetic Domains in a Hole-Doped Manganite Achieved by a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, J. H.; Murakami, Y.; Shindo, D.; Atou, T.; Kikuchi, M.

    2004-07-01

    We report the change in the magnetic microstructure with the application of a magnetic field to a hole-doped manganite La0.81Sr0.19MnO3 in the mixed-phase state, in which ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases coexist. In situ observations by electron holography have revealed that the applied magnetic field generates a “channel” of the magnetic flux in the paramagnetic phase region, thereby connecting the separated ferromagnetic domains. The magnetic flux density of this channel is estimated at 0.33T, which is comparable with that of the ferromagnetic domains. The connection of the separated ferromagnetic domains appears to promote the conduction in the mixed-phase state as predicted for many manganites exhibiting the magnetoresistance effect.

  20. Hour-glass magnetic excitations induced by nanoscopic phase separation in cobalt oxides.

    PubMed

    Drees, Y; Li, Z W; Ricci, A; Rotter, M; Schmidt, W; Lamago, D; Sobolev, O; Rütt, U; Gutowski, O; Sprung, M; Piovano, A; Castellan, J P; Komarek, A C

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic excitations in the cuprate superconductors might be essential for an understanding of high-temperature superconductivity. In these cuprate superconductors the magnetic excitation spectrum resembles an hour-glass and certain resonant magnetic excitations within are believed to be connected to the pairing mechanism, which is corroborated by the observation of a universal linear scaling of superconducting gap and magnetic resonance energy. So far, charge stripes are widely believed to be involved in the physics of hour-glass spectra. Here we study an isostructural cobaltate that also exhibits an hour-glass magnetic spectrum. Instead of the expected charge stripe order we observe nano phase separation and unravel a microscopically split origin of hour-glass spectra on the nano scale pointing to a connection between the magnetic resonance peak and the spin gap originating in islands of the antiferromagnetic parent insulator. Our findings open new ways to theories of magnetic excitations and superconductivity in cuprate superconductors. PMID:25534540

  1. Hour-glass magnetic excitations induced by nanoscopic phase separation in cobalt oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drees, Y.; Li, Z. W.; Ricci, A.; Rotter, M.; Schmidt, W.; Lamago, D.; Sobolev, O.; Rütt, U.; Gutowski, O.; Sprung, M.; Piovano, A.; Castellan, J. P.; Komarek, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic excitations in the cuprate superconductors might be essential for an understanding of high-temperature superconductivity. In these cuprate superconductors the magnetic excitation spectrum resembles an hour-glass and certain resonant magnetic excitations within are believed to be connected to the pairing mechanism, which is corroborated by the observation of a universal linear scaling of superconducting gap and magnetic resonance energy. So far, charge stripes are widely believed to be involved in the physics of hour-glass spectra. Here we study an isostructural cobaltate that also exhibits an hour-glass magnetic spectrum. Instead of the expected charge stripe order we observe nano phase separation and unravel a microscopically split origin of hour-glass spectra on the nano scale pointing to a connection between the magnetic resonance peak and the spin gap originating in islands of the antiferromagnetic parent insulator. Our findings open new ways to theories of magnetic excitations and superconductivity in cuprate superconductors.

  2. Measuring Thermal Conductivity and Moisture Absorption of Cryo-Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    NASA is seeking to develop thermal insulation material systems suitable for withstanding both extremely high temperatures encountered during atmospheric re-entry heating and aero- braking maneuvers, as well as extremely low temperatures existing in liquid fuel storage tanks. Currently, materials used for the high temperature insulation or Thermal Protection System (TPS) are different from the low temperature, or cryogenic insulation. Dual purpose materials are necessary to the development of reusable launch vehicles (RLV). The present Space Shuttle (or Space Transportation System, STS) employs TPS materials on the orbiter and cryo-insulation materials on the large fuel tank slung under the orbiter. The expensive fuel tank is jettisoned just before orbit is achieved and it burns up while re-entering over the Indian Ocean. A truly completely reusable launch vehicle must store aR cryogenic fuel internally. The fuel tanks will be located close to the outer surface. In fact the outer skin of the craft will probably also serve as the fuel tank enclosure, as in jet airliners. During a normal launch the combined TPS/cryo-insulation system will serve only as a low temperature insulator, since aerodynamic heating is relatively minimal during ascent to orbit. During re-entry, the combined TPS/cryo-insulation system will serve only as a high temperature insulator, since all the cryogenic fuel will have been expended in orbit. However, in the event of an.aborted launch or a forced/emergency early re-entry, the tanks will still contain fuel, and the TPS/cryo-insulation will have to serve as both low and high temperature insulation. Also, on long duration missions, such as to Mars, very effective cryo-insulation materials are needed to reduce bod off of liquid propellants, thereby reducing necessary tankage volume, weight, and cost. The conventional approach to obtaining both low and high temperature insulation, such as is employed for the X-33 and X-34 spacecraft, is to use separate TPS and cryo-insulation materials, which are connected by means of adhesives or stand-offs (spacers). Three concepts are being considered: (1) the TPS is bonded directly to the cryo-insulation which, in turn, is bonded to the exterior of the tank, (2) stand-offs are used to make a gap between the TPS and the cryo-insulation, which is bonded externally to the tank, (3) TPS is applied directly or with stand-offs to the exterior so the tank, and cryo-insulation is applied directly to the interior of the tank. Many potential problems are inherent in these approaches. For example, mismatch between coefficients of thermal expansion of the TPS and cryo-insulation, as well as aerodynamic loads, could lead to failure of the bond. Internal cryo-insulation must be prevent from entering the sump of the fuel turbo-pump. The mechanical integrity of the stand-off structure (if used) must withstand multiple missions. During ground hold (i.e., prior to launch) moisture condensation must be minimized in the gap between the cryo-insulation and the TPS. The longer term solution requires the development of a single material to act as cryo- insulation during ground hold and as TPS during re-entry. Such a material minimizes complexity and weight while improving reliability and reducing cost.

  3. Removal of freshwater microalgae by a magnetic separation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergini, Sofia S.; Aravantinou, Andriana F.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2013-04-01

    Some species of microalgae, with high growth rate and high lipid content, appear to be attractive alternatives as a feedstock for biodiesel production. The high-energy input for harvesting biomass and removing the water from the algae makes current commercial microalgal biodiesel production cost expensive. The major techniques currently employed in microalgae harvesting and recovery include centrifugation, coagulation-flocculation, bio-flocculation, filtration and screening, gravity sedimentation, and flotation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the harvesting of microalgae cells by coagulation using magnetic activated carbon, magnetite (FeO4) nanoparticles, and common chemical coagulants. Scenedesmus rubescens was selected and cultivated in 10 L flasks under continuous artificial light. Samples were taken at different operation intervals. Jar tests were conducted to investigate the effect of adsorption of microalgae on the magnetic material. The removal efficiency of microalgae was affected by the coagulants dose, stirring time and speed, and the initial microalgae concentration. The recovery of microalgae was greater in cultures with high initial microalgae concentration compared to cultures with low microalgae concentrations.

  4. Hollow mesoporous carbon spheres with magnetic cores and their performance as separable bilirubin adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Guo, Limin; Cui, Xiangzhi; Li, Yongsheng; He, Qianjun; Zhang, Lingxia; Bu, Wenbo; Shi, Jianlin

    2009-09-01

    Hollow mesoporous carbon spheres with magnetic cores are directly replicated from hollow mesoporous aluminosilicate spheres with hematite cores by a simple incipient-wetness impregnation technique. The amount of magnetic cores and the saturation magnetization value can be easily tuned by changing the concentration of iron nitrate solution used in the synthesis procedure. As-prepared hollow mesoporous carbon spheres with magnetic cores are used as separable bilirubin adsorbents and show very good adsorptive properties. The characteristics of as-prepared composites are examined by XRD, N(2) sorption, TEM, vibrating-sample magnetometry, and UV/Vis spectroscopy. PMID:19582733

  5. Ferronickel enrichment by fine particle reduction and magnetic separation from nickel laterite ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Run-zao; Yao, Li; Ji, Zhi-jun; Zhang, Yan-ting; Li, Shi-qi

    2014-10-01

    Ferronickel enrichment and extraction from nickel laterite ore were studied through reduction and magnetic separation. Reduction experiments were performed using hydrogen and carbon monoxide as reductants at different temperatures (700-1000°C). Magnetic separation of the reduced products was conducted using a SLon-100 cycle pulsating magnetic separator (1.2 T). Composition analysis indicates that the nickel laterite ore contains a total iron content of 22.50wt% and a total nickel content of 1.91wt%. Its mineral composition mainly consists of serpentine, hortonolite, and goethite. During the reduction process, the grade of nickel and iron in the products increases with increasing reduction temperature. Although a higher temperature is more favorable for reduction, the temperature exceeding 1000°C results in sintering of the products, preventing magnetic separation. After magnetic separation, the maximum total nickel and iron concentrations are 5.43wt% and 56.86wt%, and the corresponding recovery rates are 84.38% and 53.76%, respectively.

  6. Research on red mud treatment by a circulating superconducting magnetic separator.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiran; Chen, Haoshu; Wang, Jun; Xu, Fengyu; Zhang, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    Red mud (RM) accumulated over the years and caused a serious environmental problem. Iron-rich fraction separation is a cost-effective way to reduce the amount of disposal RM. A circulating high-gradient superconducting magnetic separator was produced in this work. Steel wool was filled in the circulating boxes. The boxes were connected by two chains, which moved in and out the magnetic field by a drive motor. The efficiency of iron-rich RM separation by the superconducting magnetic separator was investigated. An amount of 25% (w/w) iron-rich RM fractions with a grade of 65% were separated from the 56% iron content raw RM. The parameters of the steel wool matrix were important in controlling the iron-rich RM magnetic separation. Finer steel wool increased the iron recovery ratio, but decreased the grade of the iron-rich RM concentrates. Microscopic photographs of the RM particles showed that opaque mineral particles were enriched in the collected RM. The particle size distributions of raw, concentrate and residue RM were measured. The increased particle size of concentrate RM implied that large particles were entrapped in the steel wool matrix. PMID:24701921

  7. Optimisation of magnetic separation: a case study for soil washing at a heavy metals polluted site.

    PubMed

    Sierra, C; Martínez-Blanco, D; Blanco, Jesús A; Gallego, J R

    2014-07-01

    Sandy loam soil polluted with heavy metals (As, Cu, Pb and Zn) from an ancient Mediterranean Pb mining and metallurgy site was treated by means of wet high-intensity magnetic separation to remove some of the pollutants therein. The treated fractions were chemically analysed and then subjected to magnetic characterisation, which determined the high-field specific (mass), magnetic susceptibility (?) and the specific (mass) saturation magnetisation (?S), through isothermal remanent magnetisation (IRM) curves. From the specific values of ? and ?S, a new expression to assess the performance of the magnetic separation operation was formulated and verified by comparison with the results obtained by traditional chemical analysis. The magnetic study provided valuable information for the exhaustive explanation of the operation, and the deduced mathematical expression was found to be appropriate to estimate the performance of the separation operation. From these results we determined that magnetic soil washing was effective for the treatment of the contaminated soil, concentrating the majority of the heavy metals and peaking its separation capacity at 60% of the maximum output voltage. PMID:24418067

  8. EFFICIENCY ENHANCEMENTS THROUGH THE USE OF MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT IN ORIENTATION MAGNETIC SEPARATION FOR THE REMOVAL OF POLLUTANTS BY MAGNETOTACTIC BACTERIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Bahaj; P. A. B. James; F. D. Moeschler

    2002-01-01

    Orientation magnetic separation (OMS) represents a simple method that permits motile, field-susceptible magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) to be separated from water. Such an approach can be used to decontaminate polluted water through uptake of contaminants by the bacteria and their subsequent removal by the application of magnetic fields. In OMS, a separation channel through which an MTB culture is flowing is

  9. Magnetophoresis 'meets' viscoelasticity: deterministic separation of magnetic particles in a modular microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Francesco; Madadi, Hojjat; Villone, Massimiliano M; D'Avino, Gaetano; Cusano, Angela M; Vecchione, Raffaele; Ventre, Maurizio; Maffettone, Pier Luca; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-03-31

    The deflection of magnetic beads in a microfluidic channel through magnetophoresis can be improved if the particles are somehow focused along the same streamline in the device. We design and fabricate a microfluidic device made of two modules, each one performing a unit operation. A suspension of magnetic beads in a viscoelastic medium is fed to the first module, which is a straight rectangular-shaped channel. Here, the magnetic particles are focused by exploiting fluid viscoelasticity. Such a channel is one inlet of the second module, which is a H-shaped channel, where a buffer stream is injected in the second inlet. A permanent magnet is used to displace the magnetic beads from the original to the buffer stream. Experiments with a Newtonian suspending fluid, where no focusing occurs, are carried out for comparison. When viscoelastic focusing and magnetophoresis are combined, magnetic particles can be deterministically separated from the original streamflow to the buffer, thus leading to a high deflection efficiency (up to ~96%) in a wide range of flow rates. The effect of the focusing length on the deflection of particles is also investigated. Finally, the proposed modular device is tested to separate magnetic and non-magnetic beads. PMID:25732596

  10. Closed-loop magnetic separation of nanoparticles on a packed bed of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnet, Cécilia; Akouala, Mesferdon; Kuzhir, Pavel; Bossis, Georges; Zubarev, Andrey; Wereley, Norman M.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we consider magnetic separation of iron oxide nanoparticles when a nanoparticle suspension (diluted ferrofluid) passes through a closed-loop filter composed of a packed bed of micro-beads magnetized by an externally applied magnetic field. We show that the capture of nanoparticles of a size as small as 60 nm is easily achieved at low-to-moderate magnetic fields (16-32 kA/m) thanks to relatively strong magnetic interactions between them. The key parameter governing the capture process is the Mason number—the ratio of hydrodynamic-to-magnetic forces exerted to nanoparticles. The filter efficiency, ?, defined through the ratio of the inlet-to-outlet concentration shows a power-law dependency on Mason number, ??M a-0.83 , in the range of 102magnetic nanoparticles, followed by magnetic separation of the nanoparticles.

  11. Flow enhanced non-linear magnetophoretic separation of beads based on magnetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Kilinc, Devrim; Ran, Ying-Fen; Lee, Gil U

    2013-11-21

    Magnetic separation provides a rapid and efficient means of isolating biomaterials from complex mixtures based on their adsorption on superparamagnetic (SPM) beads. Flow enhanced non-linear magnetophoresis (FNLM) is a high-resolution mode of separation in which hydrodynamic and magnetic fields are controlled with micron resolution to isolate SPM beads with specific physical properties. In this article we demonstrate that a change in the critical frequency of FNLM can be used to identify beads with magnetic susceptibilities between 0.01 and 1.0 with a sensitivity of 0.01 Hz(-1). We derived an analytical expression for the critical frequency that explicitly incorporates the magnetic and non-magnetic composition of a complex to be separated. This expression was then applied to two cases involving the detection and separation of biological targets. This study defines the operating principles of FNLM and highlights the potential for using this technique for multiplexing diagnostic assays and isolating rare cell types. PMID:24061548

  12. Thermal diffusion of magnetic nanoparticles in ferrocolloids: Experiments on particle separation in vertical columns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elmars Blums; Ansis Mezulis; Michail Maiorov; Gunars Kronkalns

    1997-01-01

    Experiments on nonstationary separation of nanometer-sized Fe3O4 particles of hydrocarbon-based ferrocolloids in a flat vertical thermal diffusion column are performed. By using a modified separation theory which accounts for an one-dimensional mixed (thermal and concentration) convection in the column, the Soret coefficient of magnetic nanoparticles are calculated. It is shown that particles are transferred in the direction of decreasing temperature.

  13. Conceptual design of integrated microfluidic system for magnetic cell separation, electroporation, and transfection.

    PubMed

    Durdík, Š; Kraf?ík, A; Babincová, M; Babinec, P

    2013-09-01

    For the purposes of a successful ex vivo gene therapy we have proposed and analyzed a new concept of an integrated microfluidic system for combined magnetic cell separation, electroporation, and magnetofection. For the analysis of magnetic and electric field distribution (given by Maxwell equations) as well as dynamics of magnetically labeled cell and transfection complex, we have used finite element method directly interfaced to the Matlab routine solving Newton dynamical equations of motion. Microfluidic chamber has been modeled as a channel with height and length 1 mm and 1 cm, respectively. Bottom electrode consisted of 100 parallel ferromagnetic straps and the upper electrode was plate of diamagnetic copper. From the dynamics of magnetic particle motion we have found that the characteristic time-scales for the motion of cells (mean capture time ? 4 s) and gene complexes (mean capture time ? 3 min), when permanent magnets are used, are in the range suitable for efficient cell separation and gene delivery. The largest electric field intensity (?10 kV/m) was observed at the edges of the microelectrodes, in the close proximity of magnetically separated cells, which is optimal for subsequent cell electroporation. PMID:23260767

  14. A new magnetic bead-based, filterless bio-separator with planar electromagnet surfaces for integrated bio-detection systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin-Woo Choi; Chong H Ahn; Shekhar Bhansali; H. Thurman Henderson

    2000-01-01

    A new filterless bio-separator separating magnetic microbeads from a carrier fluid has been designed, fabricated, and characterized as a core component of biological cell sampling and detecting systems. To maximize the sampling capability, a planar electromagnet surface with a serpentine coil and semi-encapsulated permalloy has been realized. Using this bio-separator, antibody-coated magnetic beads have been successfully separated from the bio-buffer

  15. New High Performance Magnet Structures for Bead Based MolecularSeparation

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, David

    2005-06-01

    New High Performance Magnet Structures for Bead Based Molecular Separation David Humphries Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, D.O.E. Joint Genome Institute Abstract High performance Hybrid magnetic separation technology is under continuing development at the D.O.E. Joint Genome Institute and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for general laboratory and high throughput automated applications. This technology has broad applicability for molecular separation in genomics, proteomics and other areas. It s applicability ranges from large and small scale microtiter plate and flow separation processes to single molecule DNA manipulation. It is currently an enabling purification technology for very high throughput production sequencing at the D.O.E. Joint Genome Institute. This technology incorporates hybrid magnetic structures that combine linear permanent magnet material and ferromagnetic material to produce significantly higher fields and gradients than those of currently available commercial devices. These structures incorporate ferromagnetic poles that can be easily shaped to produce complex field distributions for specialized applications. The higher maximum fields and strong gradients of the hybrid structures result in greater holding forces on magnetized targets that are being processed as well as faster extraction. Current development versions of these magnet plates have exhibited fields in excess of 1.0 tesla and gradients approaching 1000.0 tesla/meter. Second generation Hybrid magnet plates have now been developed for both 384 and 96-well applications. This technology is currently being made available to industry through the Tech Transfer Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy's Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program and the by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under contract No. DE-AC03-6SF00098 and Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  16. Design of large aperture superferric quadrupole magnets for an in-flight fragment separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Aziz; Kim, Dogyun; Kim, Jangyoul; Kim, Mijung; Kim, Myeongjin; Yun, Chongcheoul; Kim, Jongwon

    2014-01-01

    Superferric quadrupole magnets to be used for in-flight fragment separator have been designed. A quadrupole magnet triplet for beam focusing is placed in a cryostat together with superconducting correction coils. To maximize acceptance of rare isotope beams produced by projectile fragmentation, it is essential to use large-aperture quadrupole magnets. The pole tip radius is 17 cm in the current design, and we tried to enlarge the aperture with 3D analysis on magnetic fields. In the front end of the separator, where a target and beam dump are located, we plan to use two sets of quadrupole triplets made of high-Tc superconductor (HTS) operating at 20-50 K considering high radiation heat load. The HTS magnet will use warm iron poles. Both low-Tc and high-Tc superconductors are acquired for test winding, and two kinds of dewar and cryostat are under construction to perform the coil and magnet tests. The magnetic design of superferric quadrupole is mainly discussed.

  17. Investigation for Magnetic Separation of Oxygen from Supercritical Air Near the Maxcondentherm Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, A.; Shiraishi, M.

    2004-06-01

    In an effort to develop a highly effective separation technology for oxygen operating in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) temperature range, the magnetic separation of oxygen from supercritical air was investigated using a laser holography interferometer. The experiment was carried out near the maxcondentherm (MC) point. For purposes of comparison, the same operation was carried out using supercritical nitrogen. Here, a neodymium magnet was used and the magnetic force was conducted into the experimental cell through a magnetic alloy rod. Density variation caused by the magnetic force was observed in this study. In the case of supercritical air, the density gradient was formed around the tip of the rod, whereas in the case of supercritical nitrogen, no density gradient was observed. This fact strongly suggested that oxygen was attracted by the magnetic force and highly condensed on the surface at the tip of the rod, leading us to suppose that it might be exploited in a new purification system of gaseous oxygen using magnetic force.

  18. Design of large aperture superferric quadrupole magnets for an in-flight fragment separator

    SciTech Connect

    Zaghloul, Aziz; Kim, Dogyun; Kim, Jangyoul; Kim, Mijung; Kim, Myeongjin; Yun, Chongcheoul; Kim, Jongwon [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29

    Superferric quadrupole magnets to be used for in-flight fragment separator have been designed. A quadrupole magnet triplet for beam focusing is placed in a cryostat together with superconducting correction coils. To maximize acceptance of rare isotope beams produced by projectile fragmentation, it is essential to use large-aperture quadrupole magnets. The pole tip radius is 17 cm in the current design, and we tried to enlarge the aperture with 3D analysis on magnetic fields. In the front end of the separator, where a target and beam dump are located, we plan to use two sets of quadrupole triplets made of high-Tc superconductor (HTS) operating at 20-50 K considering high radiation heat load. The HTS magnet will use warm iron poles. Both low-Tc and high-Tc superconductors are acquired for test winding, and two kinds of dewar and cryostat are under construction to perform the coil and magnet tests. The magnetic design of superferric quadrupole is mainly discussed.

  19. Imaging endosomes and autophagosomes in whole mammalian cells using correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-soft X-ray microscopy (cryo-CLXM)?

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Elizabeth M.H.; Razi, Minoo; Weston, Anne; Guttmann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Henzler, Katja; Schneider, Gerd; Tooze, Sharon A.; Collinson, Lucy M.

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) is a powerful imaging technique that can extract ultrastructural information from whole, unstained mammalian cells as close to the living state as possible. Subcellular organelles including the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and mitochondria have been identified by morphology alone, due to the similarity in contrast to transmission electron micrographs. In this study, we used cryo-SXT to image endosomes and autophagosomes, organelles that are particularly susceptible to chemical fixation artefacts during sample preparation for electron microscopy. We used two approaches to identify these compartments. For early and recycling endosomes, which are accessible to externally-loaded markers, we used an anti-transferrin receptor antibody conjugated to 10 nm gold particles. For autophagosomes, which are not accessible to externally-applied markers, we developed a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-SXT workflow (cryo-CLXM) to localise GFP-LC3 and RFP-Atg9. We used a stand-alone cryo-fluorescence stage in the home laboratory to localise the cloned fluorophores, followed by cryo-soft X-ray tomography at the synchrotron to analyse cellular ultrastructure. We mapped the 3D ultrastructure of the endocytic and autophagic structures, and discovered clusters of omegasomes arising from ‘hotspots’ on the ER. Thus, immunogold markers and cryo-CLXM can be used to analyse cellular processes that are inaccessible using other imaging modalities. PMID:24238600

  20. Practical workflow for cryo focused-ion-beam milling of tissues and cells for cryo-TEM tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chyongere; Schmelzer, Thomas; Kishchenko, Gregory; Wagenknecht, Terence; Marko, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Vitreous freezing offers a way to study cells and tissue in a near-native state by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), which is important when structural information at the macromolecular level is required. Many cells -- especially those in tissue -- are too thick to study intact in the cryo-TEM. Cryo focused-ion-beam (cryo-FIB) milling is being used in a few laboratories to thin vitreously frozen specimens, thus avoiding the artifacts and difficulties of cryo-ultramicrotomy. However, the technique is challenging because of the need to avoid devitrification and frost accumulation during the entire process, from the initial step of freezing to the final step of loading the specimen into the cryo-TEM. We present a robust workflow that makes use of custom fixtures and devices that can be used for high-pressure-frozen bulk tissue samples as well as for samples frozen on TEM grids. PMID:24211822

  1. Magnetic field effect on laser isotope separation of gadolinium based on polarization selection rules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Tokita; Y. Izawa; H. Niki

    2003-01-01

    In the laser isotope separation based on the polarization selection rules, the dependence of magnetic field strength on the isotopic selectivity was experimentally measured by using atomic Gd vapor. The Lande factor for the high-lying exited level was newly determined.

  2. Magnetic separation of colloidal nanoparticle mixtures using a material specific peptide.

    PubMed

    Essinger-Hileman, Elizabeth R; Popczun, Eric J; Schaak, Raymond E

    2013-06-18

    A material specific peptide bound to Fe2O3 facilitates the selective sequestration of Au from a colloidal mixture of Au and CdS nanoparticles; the Au-Fe2O3 precipitate can then be magnetically separated from the colloidal CdS, and the Au nanoparticles can be recovered upon release from the Fe2O3. PMID:23661051

  3. APPLICATION OF HIGH-GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION TO FINE PARTICLE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an assessment of the potential use of high-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) as a means of collecting gas stream particulates. The assessment included both experiments and analyses of theoretical models. Phase I included evaluations of theoretical ex...

  4. Two-dimensional plasma expansion in a magnetic nozzle: Separation due to electron inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Ahedo, Eduardo; Merino, Mario [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    A previous axisymmetric model of the supersonic expansion of a collisionless, hot plasma in a divergent magnetic nozzle is extended here in order to include electron-inertia effects. Up to dominant order on all components of the electron velocity, electron momentum equations still reduce to three conservation laws. Electron inertia leads to outward electron separation from the magnetic streamtubes. The progressive plasma filling of the adjacent vacuum region is consistent with electron-inertia being part of finite electron Larmor radius effects, which increase downstream and eventually demagnetize the plasma. Current ambipolarity is not fulfilled and ion separation can be either outwards or inwards of magnetic streamtubes, depending on their magnetization. Electron separation penalizes slightly the plume efficiency and is larger for plasma beams injected with large pressure gradients. An alternative nonzero electron-inertia model [E. Hooper, J. Propul. Power 9, 757 (1993)] based on cold plasmas and current ambipolarity, which predicts inwards electron separation, is discussed critically. A possible competition of the gyroviscous force with electron-inertia effects is commented briefly.

  5. Superconducting open-gradient magnetic separation for the pretreatment of radioactive or mixed waste vitrification feeds. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R.D.; Nunez, L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US); Crawford, C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (US); Ritter, J. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (US); Landsberger, S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US)

    1998-06-01

    'The objective is to reduce the volume and cost of high-level waste glass produced during US DOE remediation activities by demonstrating that magnetic separation can separate crystalline, amorphous, and colloidal constituents in vitrification feed streams known to be deleterious to the production of borosilicate glass. Magnetic separation will add neither chemicals nor generate secondary waste streams. The project includes the systematic study of magnetic interactions of waste constituents under controlled physical and chemical conditions (e.g., hydration, oxidation, temperature) to identify mechanisms that control the magnetic properties. Partitioning of radionuclides to determine their sorption mechanisms is also being studied. The identification of fundamental magnetic properties within the microscopic chemical environment in combination with hydrodynamic and electrodynamic models provides insights into the design of a system for optimal separation. Following this, experimental studies using superconducting open-gradient magnetic separation (OGMS) will be conducted to validate its effectiveness as a pretreatment technique.'

  6. Removal of less biodegradable dissolved organic matters in water by superconducting magnetic separation with magnetic mesoporous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Jin, T.; Miura, O.

    2010-11-01

    Less biodegradable dissolved organic matters in water as typified by humic substances are known as precursors of carcinogenic trihalomethanes, and are removed about 60% by current advanced water treatments. However, further increase of the removal ratio is demand. In this study, magnetic mesoporous carbon (MMPC), which can adsorb the substances physically and be efficiently collected by using superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS), has been synthesized with coconut-shell-based activated carbon and ferric nitrate solution by the gas activation method. The MMPC has the maximum magnetization value of 30.7 emu/g and an adsorption ability of 87% to 10 mg/L humic acid in a short time. The standard MMPC having a magnetization of 6.43 emu/g was able to be separated at magnetic field of 2 T. Used MMPC regained the adsorption ability to 93.1% by N 2 reactivation heat treatment. These results show promise for application of current water treatments by superconducting HGMS, which is suitable for high-speed water treatment without secondary wastes.

  7. ?-Detected NMR Search for Magnetic Phase Separation in Epitaxial GaAs:Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Q.; Chow, K. H.; Miller, R. I.; Fan, I.; Hossain, M. D.; Kiefl, R. F.; Morris, G. D.; Kreitzman, S. R.; Levy, C. D. P.; Parolin, T. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Salman, Z.; Saadaoui, H.; Smadella, M.; Wang, D.; Yu, K. M.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J. K.; MacFarlane, W. A.

    To test for the microscopic magnetic phase separation in the dilute magnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMnxAs sug-gested by low energy muon spin rotation measurements[1], we present a detailed analysis of the amplitudes of the 8Li ?-detected nuclear magnetic resonance in an epitaxially grown thin film of x = 5.4% Mn doped GaAs on a semi-insulating GaAs substrate with magnetic transition temperature TC =72 K. The spectrum at 100 K corresponds to 73% of the full room temperature amplitude, and at 60 K to about 62%. The 11% loss of signal through the magnetic tran-sition is much smaller than that ? 50% found by low energy ?SR[1], and may be entirely due to an amplitude change intrinsic to GaAs. This lack of evidence for phase separation is, however, consistent with the full volume fraction magnetism found by a second low energy ?SR measurement on a different sample using weak transverse field[2].

  8. Magnetic materials as sorbents for metal/metalloid preconcentration and/or separation. A review.

    PubMed

    Giakisikli, Georgia; Anthemidis, Aristidis N

    2013-07-30

    The use of magnetic materials in solid phase extraction has received considerable attention in recent years taking into account many advantages arising from the inherent characteristics of magnetic particles. Magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) methodology overcomes problems such as column packing and phase separation, which can be easily performed by applying an external magnetic field. The use of magnetic particles in automatic systems is growing over the last few years making the on-line operation of MSPE a promising technique in the frame of green chemistry. This article aims to provide all recent progress in the research of novel magnetic materials as sorbents for metal preconcentration and determination coupled with different detection systems as well as their implementation in sequential injection and microfluidic systems. In addition, a description of preparation, characterization as well as applications of various types of magnetic materials, either with organic or inorganic coating of the magnetic core, is presented. Concluding remarks and future trends are also commented. PMID:23856225

  9. Separation Nanotechnology of Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid Bonded Magnetic Nanoparticles for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States); Johnson, Andrew [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States); Tian, Guoxin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jiang, Weilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rao, Linfeng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Paszczynski, Andrzej [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States); Qiang, You [Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States)

    2013-01-15

    A nanomagnetic separation method based on Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) conjugated with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is studied for application in spent nuclear fuel separation. The high affinity of DTPA towards actinides aids in separation from the highly acidic medium of nuclear waste. The solubility and magnetization of particles at low pH is protected by encapsulating them in silica layer. Surface functionalization of silica coated particles with polyamines enhances the loading capacity of the chelators on MNPs. The particles were characterized before and after surface modification using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry, and X-ray diffractometry. The coated and uncoated samples were studied using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) to understand the change in magnetic properties due to the influence of the surface functionalization. The hydrodynamic size and surface charge of the particles are investigated using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The uptake behavior of Am(III), Pu(IV), U(VI), and Np(V) from 0.1M NaNO3 solution was investigated. The sorption result shows the strong affinity of DTPA towards Am(III) and Pu(IV) by extracting 97% and 80% of actinides, respectively. The high removal efficiency and fast uptake of actinides make the chelator conjugated MNPs an effective method for spent nuclear fuel separation.

  10. Coal characterization and high gradient magnetic separation studies of coal fines from Paradise, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, C.C.; Dazhen, T.; Daniel, N. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Carson, W.R. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Five coal slurry ponds at the TVA Paradise facility in Western Kentucky were characterized and high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) studies were conducted on selected samples. The objective was to determine whether or not HGMS is an effective technique to remove pyritic sulfur and ash from coal fines. Lateral changes in particle size distribution within individual ponds reflect temporal changes in the hydrology within the ponds. Where material was dredged and stacked at the side of the pond, the particle size was coarser and the material was more acidic, due to oxidation of pyrite. Wet HGMS studies were conducted over a range of concentrations, and at different field strengths of up to 2 Tesla (20,000 gauss). Various matrices were used in the magnet including relatively coarse screens and fine particle size magnetic stainless steel wool. Grinding to finer particle sizes liberates the pyrite and ash-forming minerals, enhancing their separation in the magnet. At particle sizes greater than 200 mesh ( 75 micrometers) clogging occurred within the magnet when the finer wool matrix was used. Tests are currently underway at higher field strengths of 6 Tesla. By a single pass through the magnet the sulfur content of the coal fines was reduced by between 1.5 and 2% while the ash content also reduced by several percent. Additional sulfur removal could be achieved by second and third passes but the sulfur reductions were less. Excessive abundances of ash - forming minerals (above 40% ) limited the effectiveness of the magnet. A front end process (such as flotation) to remove the majority of the ash-forming minerals and provide a fine (<200 mesh) feed for the magnet, would likely enhance the effectiveness of HGMS. In this respect, HGMS may be more effective as a polishing step following more conventional coal cleaning technologies.

  11. Removal of malaria-infected red blood cells using magnetic cell separators: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongho; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F; Gandini, Alberto

    2012-02-15

    High gradient magnetic field separators have been widely used in a variety of biological applications. Recently, the use of magnetic separators to remove malaria-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) from blood circulation in patients with severe malaria has been proposed in a dialysis-like treatment. The capture efficiency of this process depends on many interrelated design variables and constraints such as magnetic pole array pitch, chamber height, and flow rate. In this paper, we model the malaria-infected RBCs (pRBCs) as paramagnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid. Trajectories of the infected cells are numerically calculated inside a micro-channel exposed to a periodic magnetic field gradient. First-order stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the trajectory of particles under periodic magnetic fields due to an array of wires are solved numerically using the 1(st) -5(th) order adaptive step Runge-Kutta solver. The numerical experiments show that in order to achieve a capture efficiency of 99% for the pRBCs it is required to have a longer length than 80 mm; this implies that in principle, using optimization techniques the length could be adjusted, i.e., shortened to achieve 99% capture efficiency of the pRBCs. PMID:22345827

  12. Removal of malaria-infected red blood cells using magnetic cell separators: A computational study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongho; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F.; Gandini, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    High gradient magnetic field separators have been widely used in a variety of biological applications. Recently, the use of magnetic separators to remove malaria-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) from blood circulation in patients with severe malaria has been proposed in a dialysis-like treatment. The capture efficiency of this process depends on many interrelated design variables and constraints such as magnetic pole array pitch, chamber height, and flow rate. In this paper, we model the malaria-infected RBCs (pRBCs) as paramagnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid. Trajectories of the infected cells are numerically calculated inside a micro-channel exposed to a periodic magnetic field gradient. First-order stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the trajectory of particles under periodic magnetic fields due to an array of wires are solved numerically using the 1st –5th order adaptive step Runge-Kutta solver. The numerical experiments show that in order to achieve a capture efficiency of 99% for the pRBCs it is required to have a longer length than 80 mm; this implies that in principle, using optimization techniques the length could be adjusted, i.e., shortened to achieve 99% capture efficiency of the pRBCs. PMID:22345827

  13. Haloing in bimodal magnetic colloids: the role of field-induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Magnet, C; Kuzhir, P; Bossis, G; Meunier, A; Suloeva, L; Zubarev, A

    2012-07-01

    If a suspension of magnetic micrometer-sized and nanosized particles is subjected to a homogeneous magnetic field, the nanoparticles are attracted to the microparticles and form thick anisotropic halos (clouds) around them. Such clouds can hinder the approach of microparticles and result in effective repulsion between them [M. T. López-López, A. Yu. Zubarev, and G. Bossis, Soft Matter 6, 4346 (2010)]. In this paper, we present detailed experimental and theoretical studies of nanoparticle concentration profiles and of the equilibrium shapes of nanoparticle clouds around a single magnetized microsphere, taking into account interactions between nanoparticles. We show that at a strong enough magnetic field, the ensemble of nanoparticles experiences a gas-liquid phase transition such that a dense liquid phase is condensed around the magnetic poles of a microsphere while a dilute gas phase occupies the rest of the suspension volume. Nanoparticle accumulation around a microsphere is governed by two dimensionless parameters--the initial nanoparticle concentration (?(0)) and the magnetic-to-thermal energy ratio (?)--and the three accumulation regimes are mapped onto a ?-?(0) phase diagram. Our local thermodynamic equilibrium approach gives a semiquantitative agreement with the experiments on the equilibrium shapes of nanoparticle clouds. The results of this work could be useful for the development of the bimodal magnetorheological fluids and of the magnetic separation technologies used in bioanalysis and water purification systems. PMID:23005414

  14. Measurement of the magnetic interaction between two bound electrons of two separate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Navon, Nir; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-06-01

    Electrons have an intrinsic, indivisible, magnetic dipole aligned with their internal angular momentum (spin). The magnetic interaction between two electronic spins can therefore impose a change in their orientation. Similar dipolar magnetic interactions exist between other spin systems and have been studied experimentally. Examples include the interaction between an electron and its nucleus and the interaction between several multi-electron spin complexes. The challenge in observing such interactions for two electrons is twofold. First, at the atomic scale, where the coupling is relatively large, it is often dominated by the much larger Coulomb exchange counterpart. Second, on scales that are substantially larger than the atomic, the magnetic coupling is very weak and can be well below the ambient magnetic noise. Here we report the measurement of the magnetic interaction between the two ground-state spin-1/2 valence electrons of two 88Sr+ ions, co-trapped in an electric Paul trap. We varied the ion separation, d, between 2.18 and 2.76 micrometres and measured the electrons' weak, millihertz-scale, magnetic interaction as a function of distance, in the presence of magnetic noise that was six orders of magnitude larger than the magnetic fields the electrons apply on each other. The cooperative spin dynamics was kept coherent for 15 seconds, during which spin entanglement was generated, as verified by a negative measured value of -0.16 for the swap entanglement witness. The sensitivity necessary for this measurement was provided by restricting the spin evolution to a decoherence-free subspace that is immune to collective magnetic field noise. Our measurements show a d-3.0(4) distance dependence for the coupling, consistent with the inverse-cube law.

  15. Preparation of thermosensitive polymer magnetic particles and their application in protein separations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ling; Zhang, Hong-Su; Liu, Yan; Ha, Wei; Li, Luo-Hao; Gong, Xiao-Lei; Li, Bang-Jing; Zhang, Sheng

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a kind of thermoresponsive polymeric magnetic particles for protein separations. The magnetofluids were directly encapsulated in hollow particles constructed by self-assembly of rod-coil poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/?-cyclodextrin (PEG-PNIPAM/?-CD) complexes. The resulting particles showed reversible protein absorption/desorption capacity because the reversible thermo-sensitivity of PNIPAM. Above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAM, these particles showed high absorptive capacities and adsorption was done at lower temperature. The protein-laden particles are readily removed from the feed solution in a magnetic field. PMID:25222511

  16. High gradient magnetic separation of a biologically produced FeS adsorbent using sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, B.T.; Gerber, R. [Univ. of Salford (United Kingdom)] [Univ. of Salford (United Kingdom); Witts, D. [BNFL Capenhurst, Cheshire (United Kingdom). Product Development Centre] [BNFL Capenhurst, Cheshire (United Kingdom). Product Development Centre

    1998-07-01

    A High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) technique has been used to selectively recover biologically produced iron sulfide (FeS) particles with adsorbed heavy metal ions, from a soil remediation effluent stream. The HGMS system has been optimized and its performance investigated as a function of the magnetic field, flow rate and concentration of biological particles, with time. Results have shown that an efficiency of over 95% can be obtained, proving that HGMS is a valuable method for the concentration of heavy metal contaminated soils, especially when the adsorbed heavy metals are toxic and difficult to handle by other means.

  17. The role of magnetic fields on the membrane-based separation of aqueous electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, S.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular simulations using the method of molecular dynamics have been carried out to examine the role that external magnetic fields can play in the transport of water via reverse osmosis (RO) across membranes. Our results show that magnetic fields can increase the transport rate of water across such membranes significantly. These observations can have an important impact on making RO separation processes that involve the removal of water from solutions more efficient, since low flux rates across membranes is an important problem encountered in most current RO processes. We are aware of no experimental studies of such effects.

  18. Separation of electrostatic and magnetic phase shifts using a modified transport-of-intensity equation.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, E; Phatak, C; Petford-Long, A K; De Graef, M

    2014-04-01

    We introduce a new approach for the separation of the electrostatic and magnetic components of the electron wave phase shift, based on the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) formalism. We derive two separate TIE-like equations, one for each of the phase shift components. We use experimental results on FeCoB and Permalloy patterned islands to illustrate how the magnetic and electrostatic longitudinal derivatives can be computed. The main advantage of this new approach is the fact that the differences in the power spectra of the two phase components (electrostatic phase shifts often have significant power in the higher frequencies) can be accommodated by the selection of two different Tikhonov regularization parameters for the two phase reconstructions. The extra computational demands of the method are more than compensated by the improved phase reconstruction results. PMID:24513573

  19. Fingerprints of intrinsic phase separation in magnetically-doped 2DEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terletska, Hanna; Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    We theoretically study the properties of a recently observed [1] inhomogeneous phase preceding the metal-insulator transition in a magnetically-doped two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). We show that, due to competition between (ferromagnetic) double-exchange and (anti-ferromagnetic) super-exchange, at very low carrier density such a system is unstable toward intrinsic phase separation (PS). Here, ferromagnetic carrier-rich (metallic) ``droplets'' emerge within a magnetically disordered carrier-poor (insulating) matrix. Our calculations indicate that this regime should display very unusual transport, featuring colossal magneto-resistance with exceptionally weak density dependence - in striking agreement with experiments [1] on CdMnTe quantum wells. Such exotic transport properties - we argue - should be considered as ``fingerprints'' for intrinsic phase separation, a behavior very different from situations where phase coexistence is driven by disorder due to extrinsic impurities or defects. [1] J. Jaroszyñski et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 045322 (2007).

  20. Fluorescent and superparamagnetic hybrid quantum clusters for magnetic separation and imaging of cancer cells from blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgadas, C. V.; Sharma, Chandra P.; Sreenivasan, K.

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate here the generation of fluorescent superparamagnetic quantum clusters through a greener aqueous route by fusing highly fluorescent gold clusters with superparamagnetic nanoparticles. We conjugated transferrin onto the hybrid clusters to get cell accessibility and assessed their hemocompatibility and cytotoxicity. The ability of the clusters to selectively remove cancer cell lines (C6 glioma cells) from fluids including blood and the fluorescent imaging of the separated cells is demonstrated. The pattering of the clusters in response to an external magnetic field is also shown. Efficient cancer cell separation, imaging and magnetic pattering can be realized by the highly hemocompatible and noncytotoxic hybrid clusters reported here. It seems the probe has potential for further exploration in multimodal imaging of circulating cancer cells.We demonstrate here the generation of fluorescent superparamagnetic quantum clusters through a greener aqueous route by fusing highly fluorescent gold clusters with superparamagnetic nanoparticles. We conjugated transferrin onto the hybrid clusters to get cell accessibility and assessed their hemocompatibility and cytotoxicity. The ability of the clusters to selectively remove cancer cell lines (C6 glioma cells) from fluids including blood and the fluorescent imaging of the separated cells is demonstrated. The pattering of the clusters in response to an external magnetic field is also shown. Efficient cancer cell separation, imaging and magnetic pattering can be realized by the highly hemocompatible and noncytotoxic hybrid clusters reported here. It seems the probe has potential for further exploration in multimodal imaging of circulating cancer cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: HRTEM, FTIR spectra, XRD of the samples and fluorescent microscope images are showed in supporting information in the order they discussed in the text. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10900f

  1. Design of a cellular-uptake-shielding magnetic catcher for cancer cell separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Zhang, Jing; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Yang, Juan; Qin, Si-Yong; Liu, Chen-Wei; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescent-magnetic-biotargeting multifunctional microcapsules (FMBMMs) are designed and fabricated via layer-by-layer assembly. It is found that the arginine-glycine-aspartate-modified FMBMMs were capable of sensitively detecting and efficiently isolating approximately 80% target cancer cells within 20 min. More importantly, FMBMMs present a general template for identifying and separating multiple types of cancer cells simply by altering the recognition motif. PMID:22965892

  2. Magnetic properties and loss separation in iron powder soft magnetic composite materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc de Wulf; Ljubomir Anestiev; Luc Dupré; Ludo Froyen; Jan Melkebeek

    2002-01-01

    New developments in powder metallurgical composites make soft magnetic composite (SMC) material interesting for application in electrical machines, when combined with new machine design rules and new production techniques. In order to establish these design rules, one must pay attention to electromagnetic loss characteristics of SMC material. In this work, five different series of iron based SMCs are produced and

  3. Maximizing Capture Efficiency and Specificity of Magnetic Separation for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Cells ?

    PubMed Central

    Foddai, Antonio; Elliott, Christopher T.; Grant, Irene R.

    2010-01-01

    In order to introduce specificity for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis prior to a phage amplification assay, various magnetic-separation approaches, involving either antibodies or peptides, were evaluated in terms of the efficiency of capture (expressed as a percentage) of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells and the percentage of nonspecific binding by other Mycobacterium spp. A 50:50 mixture of MyOne Tosylactivated Dynabeads coated with the chemically synthesized M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific peptides biotinylated aMp3 and biotinylated aMptD (i.e., peptide-mediated magnetic separation [PMS]) proved to be the best magnetic-separation approach for achieving 85 to 100% capture of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and minimal (<1%) nonspecific recovery of other Mycobacterium spp. (particularly if beads were blocked with 1% skim milk before use) from broth samples containing 103 to 104 CFU/ml. When PMS was coupled with a recently optimized phage amplification assay and used to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in 50-ml volumes of spiked milk, the mean 50% limit of detection (LOD50) was 14.4 PFU/50 ml of milk (equivalent to 0.3 PFU/ml). This PMS-phage assay represents a novel, rapid method for the detection and enumeration of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms in milk, and potentially other sample matrices, with results available within 48 h. PMID:20851966

  4. Selective separation of lambdacyhalothrin by porous/magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers prepared by Pickering emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hang, Hui; Li, Chunxiang; Pan, Jianming; Li, Linzi; Dai, Jiangdong; Dai, Xiaohui; Yu, Ping; Feng, Yonghai

    2013-10-01

    Porous/magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (PM-MIPs) were prepared by Pickering emulsion polymerization. The reaction was carried out in an oil/water emulsion using magnetic halloysite nanotubes as the stabilizer instead of a toxic surfactant. In the oil phase, the imprinting process was conducted by radical polymerization of functional and cross-linked monomers, and porogen chloroform generated steam under the high reaction temperature, which resulted in some pores decorated with easily accessible molecular binding sites within the as-made PM-MIPs. The characterization demonstrated that the PM-MIPs were porous and magnetic inorganic-polymer composite microparticles with magnetic sensitivity (M(s) = 0.7448 emu/g), thermal stability (below 473 K) and magnetic stability (over the pH range of 2.0-8.0). The PM-MIPs were used as a sorbent for the selective binding of lambdacyhalothrin (LC) and rapidly separated under an external magnetic field. The Freundlich isotherm model gave a good fit to the experimental data. The adsorption kinetics of the PM-MIPs was well described by pseudo-second-order kinetics, indicating that the chemical process could be the rate-limiting step in the adsorption of LC. The selective recognition experiments exhibited the outstanding selective adsorption effect of the PM-MIPs for target LC. Moreover, the PM-MIPs regeneration without significant loss in adsorption capacity was demonstrated by at least four repeated cycles. PMID:23894024

  5. Conjugates of magnetic nanoparticle-actinide specific chelator for radioactive waste separation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Maninder; Zhang, Huijin; Martin, Leigh; Todd, Terry; Qiang, You

    2013-11-01

    A novel nanotechnology for the separation of radioactive waste that uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) conjugated with actinide specific chelators (MNP-Che) is reviewed with a focus on design and process development. The MNP-Che separation process is an effective way of separating heat generating minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) from spent nuclear fuel solution to reduce the radiological hazard. It utilizes coated MNPs to selectively adsorb the contaminants onto their surfaces, after which the loaded particles are collected using a magnetic field. The MNP-Che conjugates can be recycled by stripping contaminates into a separate, smaller volume of solution, and then become the final waste form for disposal after reusing number of times. Due to the highly selective chelators, this remediation method could be both simple and versatile while allowing the valuable actinides to be recovered and recycled. Key issues standing in the way of large-scale application are stability of the conjugates and their dispersion in solution to maintain their unique properties, especially large surface area, of MNPs. With substantial research progress made on MNPs and their surface functionalization, as well as development of environmentally benign chelators, this method could become very flexible and cost-effective for recycling used fuel. Finally, the development of this nanotechnology is summarized and its future direction is discussed. PMID:24070142

  6. Conjugates of Magnetic Nanoparticle -- Actinide Specific Chelator for Radioactive Waste Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Maninder Kaur; Huijin Zhang; Leigh Martin; Terry Todd; You Qiang

    2013-11-01

    A novel nanotechnology for the separation of radioactive waste that uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) conjugated with actinide specific chelators (MNP-Che) is reviewed with a focus on design and process development. The MNP-Che separation process is an effective way of separating heat generating minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) from spent nuclear fuel solution to reduce the radiological hazard. It utilizes coated MNPs to selectively adsorb the contaminants onto their surfaces, after which the loaded particles are collected using a magnetic field. The MNP-Che conjugates can be recycled by stripping contaminates into a separate, smaller volume of solution, and then become the final waste form for disposal after reusing number of times. Due to the highly selective chelators, this remediation method could be both simple and versatile while allowing the valuable actinides to be recovered and recycled. Key issues standing in the way of large-scale application are stability of the conjugates and their dispersion in solution to maintain their unique properties, especially large surface area, of MNPs. With substantial research progress made on MNPs and their surface functionalization, as well as development of environmentally benign chelators, this method could become very flexible and cost-effective for recycling used fuel. Finally, the development of this nanotechnology is summarized and its future direction is discussed.

  7. Controlled Synthesis of Fe3 O4 /ZIF-8 Nanoparticles for Magnetically Separable Nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Pang, Fei; He, Mingyuan; Ge, Jianping

    2015-04-27

    Fe3 O4 /ZIF-8 nanoparticles were synthesized through a room-temperature reaction between 2-methylimidazolate and zinc nitrate in the presence of Fe3 O4 nanocrystals. The particle size, surface charge, and magnetic loading can be conveniently controlled by the dosage of Zn(NO3 )2 and Fe3 O4 nanocrystals. The as-prepared particles show both good thermal stability (stable to 550?°C) and large surface area (1174?m(2) g(-1) ). The nanoparticles also have a superparamagnetic response, so that they can strongly respond to an external field during magnetic separation and disperse back into the solution after withdrawal of the magnetic field. For the Knoevenagel reaction, which is catalyzed by alkaline active sites on external surface of catalyst, small Fe3 O4 /ZIF-8 nanoparticles show a higher catalytic activity. At the same time, the nanocatalysts can be continuously used in multiple catalytic reactions through magnetic separation, activation, and redispersion with little loss of activity. PMID:25766136

  8. Cesium separation from contaminated milk using magnetic particles containing crystalline silicotitantes.

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.; Chemical Engineering

    2000-11-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster in 1986 contaminated vast regions of prime grazing land. Subsequently, milk produced in the region has been contaminated with small amounts of the long-lived fission product cesium-137, and the Ukraine is seeking to deploy a simple separation process that will remove the Cs and preserve the nutritional value of the milk. Tiny magnetic particles containing crystalline silicotitanates (CST) have been manufactured and tested to this end. The results show that partitioning efficiency is optimized with low ratios of particle mass to volume. To achieve 90% Cs decontamination in a single-stage process, <3 g of magnetic CST per l milk is sufficient with a 30-min mixing time. A two-stage process would utilize <0.4 g/l per stage. The modeling of the magnetic CST system described herein can be achieved rather simply which is important for deployment in the affected Ukraine region.

  9. Structural studies, magnetic properties and loss separation in iron–phenolicsilane soft magnetic composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. Taghvaei; H. Shokrollahi; K. Janghorban

    2010-01-01

    In this work, six different series of iron based soft magnetic composites are produced and studied: (1) passive iron powder; (2) passive iron powder-0.7% resin with coupling agent; (3) passive iron powder-0.7% resin without coupling agent; (4) passive iron powder-1.5% resin with coupling agent; (5) passive iron powder-1.5% resin without coupling agent; (6) pure iron-1.5% resin. The specimens were shaped

  10. Synthesis of magnetically separable Sn doped magnetite/silica core-shell structure and photocatalytic property

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei-Wei, E-mail: weiweiwangsd@yahoo.com.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, 12 Zhang Zhou Road, Zibo, Shandong 255049 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, 12 Zhang Zhou Road, Zibo, Shandong 255049 (China); Yao, Jia-Liang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, 12 Zhang Zhou Road, Zibo, Shandong 255049 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, 12 Zhang Zhou Road, Zibo, Shandong 255049 (China)

    2010-06-15

    Sn doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} core-shell structures with the magnetic and photocatalytic properties have been successfully synthesized using Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} microspheres as the precursor. The morphology, phase and structure of the bifunctional products were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of the amount and hydrolysis rate of tetraethyl orthosilicate on the preparation of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} core-shell structures were investigated. Low concentration and slow hydrolysis rate of tetraethyl orthosilicate were useful to obtain the uniform silica coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The magnetic measurements indicated that the Sn doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} core-shell structures showed ferromagnetic property and the magnetic saturation value slightly decreased after coated the silica layer. The magnetic Sn doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} core-shell structures exhibited good photocatalytic activity in the degradation of methyl orange and could be separated by applying an appropriate magnetic field.

  11. The Inverse Problem of Cryo-Electron Microsopy Amit Singer

    E-print Network

    Science October 2, 2012 Amit Singer (Princeton University) October 2012 1 / 14 #12;Single Particle Cryo-Electron Microscopy: Model Projection Pi Molecule Electronsource Ri = | | | R1 i R2 i R3 i | | | SO(3 of the molecule. Cryo-EM problem: Find and R1, . . . , Rn given P1, . . . , Pn. Amit Singer (Princeton

  12. THE DETECTION OF NUMEROUS MAGNETIC SEPARATORS IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODEL OF SOLAR EMERGING FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, C. E.; Maclean, R. C.; Haynes, A. L., E-mail: clare@mcs.st-and.ac.u [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, The North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-20

    Magnetic separators in three-dimensional (3D) magnetic fields are believed to be often associated with locations of magnetic reconnection. In this preliminary study, we investigate this relationship using data from a numerical resistive 3D MHD experiment of a solar flux emergence event. For the first time separators are detected in complex magnetic fields resulting from a 3D resistive MHD model of flux emergence. Two snapshots of the model, taken from different stages of its evolution, are analyzed. Numerous separators are found in both snapshots, and their properties, including their geometry, length, relationship to the magnetic null points, and integrated parallel electric field are studied. The separators reside at the junctions between the emerging flux, the overlying field, and two other flux domains that are newly formed by reconnection. The long separators, which connect clusters of nulls that lie either side of the emerging flux, pass through spatially localized regions of high parallel electric field and correspond to local maxima in integrated parallel electric field. These factors indicate that strong magnetic reconnection takes place along many of the separators, and that separators play a key role during the interaction of emerging and overlying flux.

  13. An isobar separation method with Q3D magnetic spectrometer for AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chaoli; He, Ming; Jiang, Shan; Li, Shizhuo; Gong, Jie; Liu, Jiancheng; Wang, Wei; He, GuoZhu; Wu, Shaoyong; Dong, Kejun; Wang, Xianggao; Shen, Hongtao

    2010-10-01

    Isobar interference is the main obstacle for AMS measurement, especially in the case of very strong isobaric interference, such as in the measurement of 32Si, 53Mn, 60Fe, 63Ni, etc. An isobar separation method with Q3D magnetic spectrometer was developed aiming at AMS measurements for the above-mentioned nuclides. Based on a method of (?E-Q3D) the isobaric events can be largely rejected from the region of the nuclide of interest on the focal plane of a Q3D magnetic spectrometer. As a result, the isobaric interference can be reduced by more than three orders of magnitude. Further reduction of isobaric interference can be achieved by the use of a multi-anode ionization chamber placed at the position of collecting the nuclide of interest. The performance of the ?E-Q3D system for isobar separation was tested by the above-mentioned nuclides with atomic numbers from 14 to 42. The results showed that ?E-Q3D method has strong capability for separating isobars, as detailed in this paper.

  14. Three-dimensional modeling of a portable medical device for magnetic separation of particles from biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haitao; Bockenfeld, Danny; Rempfer, Dietmar; Kaminski, Michael D; Rosengart, Axel J

    2007-09-01

    A portable separator has been developed to quantitatively separate blood-borne magnetic spheres in potentially high-flow regimes for the human detoxification purpose. In the separator design, an array of biocompatible capillary tubing and magnetizable wires is immersed in an external magnetic field that is generated by two permanent magnets. The wires are magnetized and the high magnetic field gradient from the magnetized wires helps to collect blood-borne magnetic nano/micro-spheres from the blood flow. In this study, a 3D numerical model was created and the effect of tubing-wire configurations on the capture efficiency of the system was analyzed using COMSOL Multiphysics 3.3(R). The results showed that the configuration characterized by bi-directionally alternating wires and tubes was the best design with respect to the four starting configurations. Preliminary in vitro experiments verified the numerical predictions. The results helped us to optimize a prototype portable magnetic separator that is suitable for rapid sequestration of magnetic nano/micro-spheres from the human blood stream while accommodating necessary clinical boundary conditions. PMID:17762081

  15. Colouring cryo-cooled crystals: online microspectrophotometry

    PubMed Central

    McGeehan, John; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Murray, James W.; Owen, Robin Leslie; Cipriani, Florent; McSweeney, Sean; Weik, Martin; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2009-01-01

    X-rays can produce a high concentration of radicals within cryo-cooled macromolecular crystals. Some radicals have large extinction coefficients in the visible (VIS) range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and can be observed optically and spectrally. An online microspectrophotometer with high temporal resolution has been constructed that is capable of measuring UV/VIS absorption spectra (200–1100?nm) during X-ray data collection. The typical X-ray-induced blue colour that is characteristic of a wide range of cryo-conditions has been identified as trapped solvated electrons. Disulphide-containing proteins are shown to form disulphide radicals at millimolar concentrations, with absorption maxima around 400?nm. The solvated electrons and the disulphide radicals seem to have a lifetime in the range of seconds up to minutes at 100?K. The temperature dependence of the kinetics of X-ray-induced radical formation is different for the solvated electrons compared with the disulphide radicals. The online microspectrophotometer provides a technique complementary to X-ray diffraction for analysing and characterizing intermediates and redox states of proteins and enzymes. PMID:19240328

  16. Non-isothermal separation of ferrofluid particles through grids: Abnormal magnetic Soret effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blums, Elmars; Sints, Viesturs; Kronkalns, Gunars; Mezulis, Ansis

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticle transport through thin non-isothermal ferrofluid layer between permeable walls is investigated. The transient mass flux is determined from measurements of particle concentration changes in two fluid chambers of different temperatures which are attached on both sides of the layer. Experiments are performed employing fluid samples of small ordinary magnetic Soret effect, which is detected by thermal grating technique. The separation measurements say that a magnetic field, aligned along a temperature gradient, causes a remarkable increase in the mass diffusion coefficient and a simultaneous decrease in particle thermodiffusion mobility. It is proposed that the observed effects may be evoked by specific microconvective mass transfer induced by nonmagnetic grid elements of the permeable walls.

  17. Preparation of quantum dot-coated magnetic polystyrene nanospheres for cancer cell labelling and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Maoquan; Song, Xin; Cheng, Duo; Liu, Shupeng; Zhu, Jian

    2006-07-01

    CdTe-coated magnetic polystyrene nanospheres (MPN) were prepared via a stepwise electrostatic self-assembly approach, and the conjugation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to the MPN/CdTe core-shell nanocomposites was prepared by using 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethylamino propyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) as a cross-linking reagent. The MPN/CdTe and their bioconjugates yielded not only emitted bright fluorescence, but also exhibited superparamagnetism. The human breast cancer MDA-MB-435S cells could be labelled and rapidly separated by the MPN/CdTe-EGF bioconjugates. These magnetofluorescent nanospheres, consisting of magnetic spheres and quantum dots (QDs), may be of special interest for many biomedical applications.

  18. Avian ultraviolet/violet cones as magnetoreceptors: The problem of separating visual and magnetic information.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Hans-Joachim; Nießner, Christine; Peichl, Leo; Wiltschko, Roswitha; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    In a recent paper, we described the localization of cryptochrome 1a in the retina of domestic chickens, Gallus gallus, and European robins, Erithacus rubecula: Cryptochrome 1a was found exclusively along the membranes of the disks in the outer segments of the ultraviolet/violet single cones. Cryptochrome has been suggested to act as receptor molecule for the avian magnetic compass, which would mean that the UV/V cones have a double function: they mediate vision in the short-wavelength range and, at the same time, magnetic directional information. This has important implications and raises a number of questions, in particular, how the two types of input are separated. Here, we point out several possibilities how this could be achieved.  PMID:22446535

  19. Magnetic resonance assessment of iron overload by separate measurement of tissue ferritin and hemosiderin iron

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ed X.; Kim, Daniel; Tosti, Christina L.; Tang, Haiying; Jensen, Jens H.; Cheung, Jerry S.; Feng, Li; Au, Wing-Yan; Ha, Shau-Yin; Sheth, Sujit S.; Brown, Truman R.; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    With transfusional iron overload, almost all the excess iron is sequestered intracellularly as rapidly mobilizable, dispersed, soluble, ferritin iron, and as aggregated, insoluble hemosiderin iron for long-term storage. Established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicators of tissue iron (R2, R2*) are principally influenced by hemosiderin iron and change slowly, even with intensive iron chelation. Intracellular ferritin iron is evidently in equilibrium with the low-molecular-weight cytosolic iron pool that can change rapidly with iron chelation. We have developed a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method to separately measure ferritin and hemosiderin iron, based on the non-monoexponential signal decay induced by aggregated iron in multiple-spin-echo sequences. We have initially validated the method in agarose phantoms and in human liver explants and shown the feasibility of its application in patients with thalassemia major. Measurement of tissue ferritin iron is a promising new means to rapidly evaluate the effectiveness of iron-chelating regimens. PMID:20712781

  20. Chemical separation of primordial Li+ during structure formation caused by nanogauss magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    During the structure formation, charged and neutral chemical species may have separated from each other at the gravitational contraction in primordial magnetic field (PMF). A gradient in the PMF in a direction perpendicular to the field direction leads to the Lorentz force on the charged species. Resultantly, an ambipolar diffusion occurs, and charged species can move differently from neutral species, which collapses gravitationally during the structure formation. We assume a gravitational contraction of neutral matter in a spherically symmetric structure, and calculate fluid motions of charged and neutral species. It is shown that the charged fluid, i.e. proton, electron, and 7Li+, can significantly decouple from the neutral fluid depending on the field amplitude. The charged species can, therefore, escape from the gravitational collapse. We take the structure mass, the epoch of the gravitational collapse, and the comoving Lorenz force as parameters. We then identify a parameter region for an effective chemical separation. This type of chemical separation can reduce the abundance ratio of Li/H in early structures because of inefficient contraction of 7Li+ ion. Therefore, it may explain Li abundances of Galactic metal-poor stars which are smaller than the prediction in standard big bang nucleosynthesis model. Amplitudes of the PMFs are controlled by a magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The upper limit on the field amplitude derived from the turbulence effect is close to the value required for the chemical separation.

  1. Simultaneous determination of ten organophosphate pesticide residues in fruits by gas chromatography coupled with magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qinghua; Wang, Xilong; Yu, Fan; Qiao, Xuguang; Xu, Zhixiang

    2014-04-01

    In this study, ?-Fe2 O3 /chitosan magnetic microspheres were synthesized and evaluated by X-ray diffraction, SEM, thermogravimetric analysis, and static and kinetic adsorption experiments. Results showed that the magnetic microspheres exhibited good adsorption ability, and offered fast kinetics for the adsorption of trichlorfon, methamidophos, malathion, methyl parathion, dimethoate, omethoate, phosphamidon, phorate, isocarbophos, and chlorpyrifos. Based on magnetic separation, a simple method of magnetic SPE coupled to GC for the simultaneous determination of ten trace organophosphate pesticide residues was developed. Under the optimal conditions, the enrichment factor for ten organophosphorus pesticides was 10.1-364.7 and linear range was 0.001-10.0 mg/L. The LOD (S/N = 3) of the method for the ten pesticides was 0.31-3.59 ?g/kg. The RSD for three replicate extractions of spiked samples was between 2.5 and 6.3%. The pear and apple samples spiked with ten organophosphate pesticides at 20 and 200 ?g/kg levels were extracted and determined by this method with good recoveries ranging from 79.9 to 98.7%. Moreover, the method has been successfully applied for the determination of the ten organophosphate pesticide residues in peach samples. PMID:24470377

  2. Magnetic Field Distribution of Permanent Magnet Magnetized by Static Magnetic Field Generated by HTS Bulk Magnet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuo Oka; Nobutaka Kawasaki; Satoshi Fukui; Jun Ogawa; Takao Sato; Toshihisa Terasawa; Yoshitaka Itoh; Ryohei Yabuno

    2012-01-01

    Demagnetized rare earth magnets (Nd-Fe-B) can be fully magnetized by scanning them in the intense static fields over 3 T of a HTS bulk magnet which was cooled to the temperature range lower than 77K with use of cryo-coolers and activated by the field of 5 T. We precisely examined the magnetic field distributions of magnetized permanent magnets. The magnetic

  3. Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-07-20

    A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known pressure swing adsorption'' technique utilizing the same sorption material. 1 fig.

  4. Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R. (9917 Rainbow Dr., Knoxville, TN 37922); Burchell, Timothy D. (109 Greywood Pl., Oak Ridge, TN 37830)

    1999-01-01

    A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known "pressure swing adsorption" technique utilizing the same sorption material.

  5. TREATMENT OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOWS BY HIGH GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION. ON-SITE TESTING WITH MOBILE PILOT PLANT TRAILER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seeded water treatment using a SALA high gradient magnetic separator pilot plant system was conducted on combined sewer overflows and raw sewage at SALA Magnetics in Cambridge, MA and at on-site locations in the Boston area. Special emphasis was placed on specific design and oper...

  6. IMPROVEMENT OF MAGNETICALLY SEPARATED FERROUS CONCENTRATE BY SHREDDING: A PERFORMANCE TEST. TEST NO. 4.07, RECOVERY 1, NEW ORLEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a series of test runs in which ferrous product magnetically recovered from municipal waste was further shredded in a small (50 hp) hammermill to free attached or entrapped contaminant. A belt magnet was then used to separate metal from the liberated contamin...

  7. Dynamics of the latitude structure of the solar large-scale magnetic field at separate longitude intervals during 1915 - 1965

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. I. Makarov; M. V. Kushnir

    1990-01-01

    Dynamics of background magnetic fields has been studied on the basis of H-alpha synoptic charts for 1915 - 1965 at separate longitude intervals. Peculiarities of the polarity reversal of the magnetic field latitude migration of the zonal structures in dependence on the phase of the cycle is analyzed.

  8. Upgrading of PVC rich wastes by magnetic density separation and hyperspectral imaging quality control.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Valentina; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Rem, Peter; Serranti, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) is one of the most produced polymers in Europe, with a share of 11% in terms of mass (8 milliontons) of total polymer consumption, but in 2010 only 5% of the total PVC production came from recycled materials, where other polymer recycling achieves a level of 15% on average. In order to find an innovative process to extract PVC from window frames waste, a combination of two innovative technologies was tested: magnetic density separation (MDS) and hyperspectral imaging (HSI). By its nature, MDS is a flexible high precision density separation technology that is applicable to any mixture of polymers and contaminants with non-overlapping densities. As PVC has a very distinctive high density, this technology was tested to obtain high-grade PVC pre-concentrates from window frame waste. HSI was used to perform a quality control of the products obtained by MDS showing that PVC was clearly discriminated from unwanted rubber particles of different colors. The results showed that the combined application of MDS and HSI techniques allowed to separate and to check the purity of PVC from window frame waste. PMID:25458764

  9. Temperature dependence of iron local magnetic moment in phase-separated superconducting chalcogenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonelli, L.; Mizokawa, T.; Sala, M. Moretti; Takeya, H.; Mizuguchi, Y.; Takano, Y.; Garbarino, G.; Monaco, G.; Saini, N. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have studied local magnetic moment and electronic phase separation in superconducting KxFe2 -ySe2 by x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy. Detailed temperature-dependent measurements at the Fe K-edge have revealed coexisting electronic phases and their correlation with the transport properties. By cooling down, the local magnetic moment of Fe shows a sharp drop across the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) and the coexisting phases exchange spectral weights with the low-spin state, gaining intensity at the expense of the higher-spin state. After annealing the sample across the iron-vacancy order temperature, the system does not recover the initial state and the spectral weight anomaly at Tc as well as superconductivity disappear. The results clearly underline that the coexistence of the low-spin and high-spin phases and the transitions between them provide unusual magnetic fluctuations and have a fundamental role in the superconducting mechanism of the electronically inhomogeneous KxFe2 -ySe2 system.

  10. CryoSat Data Quality Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzinac, C.; Femenias, P.; Parrinello, T.; Fornari, M.; Mannan, R.

    2012-04-01

    CryoSat data are routinely controlled by ESA-ESRIN-SPPA office with various tools and with the support of the IDEAS industrial consortium. This presentation introduces to the structure of the data products, the available quality tools (Quality Checks and Monitoring Facility) and methodology, and shows the main statistical results from the data acquired since the end of the commissioning phase (January 2011). Due to some anomalies still present in the data, ESA is planning to operate a new version of the processors by February 2012, followed by a full reprocessing campaign in 2012. This presentation details the reprocessing schedule and the main improvements expected from the new release of the specialized processors at Level 1b and at Level 2.

  11. CryoSat Data Quality Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzinac, C.; Parrinello, T.; Féménias, P.; Fornari, M.; Mannan, R.

    2011-12-01

    CryoSat data are routinely controlled by ESA-ESRIN-SPPA office with various tools and with the support of the IDEAS industrial consortium. This poster introduces to the structure of the data products, the available quality tools (Quality Checks and Monitoring Facility) and methodology, and shows the main statistical results from the data acquired since the end of the commissioning phase (January 2011). Due to some anomalies still present in the data, ESA is planning to operate a new version of the processors by the end of 2011, followed by a full reprocessing campaign in 2012. This poster presents the reprocessing schedule and the main improvements expected from the new release of the specialized processors at Level 1b and at Level 2.

  12. Magnetism of perovskite oxides: The effect of strain and phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changkun

    The magnetic properties of perovskite oxides can be affected by various conditions such as doping concentration, finite size limitation, and mechanical strain, which are associated with a range of intriguing physical phenomena in highly correlated electron systems such as colossal magnetoresistance, high temperature superconductivity, and phase inhomogeneities. In this thesis, we studied several topics concerning the cobaltates and nickelates which are associated with magnetism in perovskite oxides. La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 is a ferromagnetic material with Curie temperature TC of 250 K. In a form of thin films, we studied strain effect on its ferromagnetism. However, ferromagnetism in thin films is affected by both finite size effect and strain effect. We have used a series of films of different thicknesses and on different substrates to quantitatively determine the change in TC contributed by each effect. The phase diagram of TC versus in-plane strain suggests that TC is suppressed by tensile strain and enhanced by compressive strain. The general method of separating strain and finite thickness effects should be applicable to any ordering phase transition in thin films. The local structure of LSCO thin films was investigated by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure technique. Our results suggest that the tensile strain elongates the Co-O bond length, while compressive strain shortens the bond length. The change of bond length is mainly responsible for the modulation of TC upon strain. This is contrary to assumptions generally used in literature on strained manganite films. Current double exchange model is not adequate to describe the ferromagnetic mechanism for cobaltate. In a case of no La, we studied the magnetic properties of SrCoO 2.5+x. SrCoO2.5 is an antiferromaget with Neel temperature of 570 K. With a starting material of SrCoO 2.88, we have carried out oxidization and reduction experiments through an electrochemical method. The hole doping introduced into SrCoO2.5 by oxygen has shown to play a crucial role in determining the materials' ferromagnetic characters such as Curie temperature, spin state, magnetic saturation moment, etc. A magnetic phase diagram of SrCoO2.5+x is thus proposed for the first time. The striking feature of the diagram is the existence of several line phases which contain antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic phases. In high contrast with La1-ySryCoO 3, SrCoO2.5+x can be phase separated into a number of magnetic regions for which each one has a unique oxygen/hole concentration such as x = 0, 0.25, 0.375, and 0.5, respectively. Our results suggest that the mobile holes are playing a key role in ferromagnetism and phase separation in the system. For perovskite nickelate, we have successfully grown high-quality epitaxial La1.67Sr0.33NiO4 films using pulsed laser deposition. For the first time, the x-ray diffraction superlattice peaks associated with charge stripe phase have been successfully observed in films. By studying the evolution of the stripe phase as the film thicknesses are decreased, we provide direct evidence for suppression of the stripe phase in thinner samples with thicknesses of less than 2600 A. A scenario of short-range ordered stripes due to a lattice clamping effect is proposed to account for the suppression in light of a model of electronic stripe-glass.

  13. D0 Cryo Ventilation Fan Controls and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1990-02-15

    This engineering note describes how exhaust fan 6 (EF-6) and exhaust fan 7 (EF-7) are controlled and monitored. Since these two fans are a vital link in the ODH safety system, they will be monitored, controlled and periodically operated by the programmable logic controller (PLC). If there should be a fault in the ventilation system, the PLC will print a warning message to the cryo control room printer and flash a descriptive warning on the ODH/ventilation graphics page. This fault is also logged to the Xpresslink graphics alarm page and to an alarm history hard disk file. The ventilation failure is also an input to the auto dialer which will continue it's automatic sequence until acknowledged. EF-6 delivers 13000 C.F.M. and is considered emergency ventilation. EF-7 delivers 4500 C.F.M. and will run 24 hrs a day. Both ventilation fans are located in an enclosed closet in the TRD gas room. Their ductwork, both inlets and outlets run along side the pipe chase, but are separated by an airtight wall. Their combination motor control starter cabinets are located in the TRD room in plain visible sight of the fans with the closet door open. The fans have signs that state they are automatically controlled and can energize at any time.

  14. Collaborative computational project for electron cryo-microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom; Patwardhan, Ardan; Scheres, Sjors; Topf, Maya; Roseman, Alan; Winn, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed. PMID:25615866

  15. Wave-driven rotation and mass separation in rotating magnetic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.

    Axisymmetric mirrors are attractive for fusion because of their simplicity, high plasma pressure at a given magnetic pressure, and steady state operation. Their subclass, rotating mirrors, are particularly interesting because they have increased parallel confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and a natural heating mechanism. This thesis finds and explores an unusual effect in supersonically rotating plasmas: particles are diffused by waves in both potential energy and kinetic energy. Extending the alpha channeling concept to rotating plasmas, the alpha particles may be removed at low energy through the loss cone, and the energy lost may be transferred to the radial electric field. This eliminates the need for electrodes in the mirror throat, which have presented serious technical issues in past rotating plasma devices. A high azimuthal mode number perturbation on the magnetic field is a particularly simple way to achieve the latter effect. In the rotating frame, this perturbation is seen as a wave near the alpha particle cyclotron harmonic, and can break the azimuthal symmetry and magnetic moment conservation without changing the particles total energy. The particle may exit if it reduces its kinetic energy and becomes more trapped if it gains kinetic energy, leading to a steady state current that maintains the field. Simulations of single particles in rotating mirrors show that a stationary wave can extract enough energy from alpha particles for a reactor to be self-sustaining. In the same way, rotation can be produced in non-fusion plasmas. Waves are identified to produce rotation in plasma centrifuges, which separate isotopes based on their mass difference. Finally, a new high throughput mass filter which is well suited to separating nuclear waste is presented. The new filter, the magnetic centrifugal mass filter (MCMF), has well confined output streams and less potential for nuclear proliferation than competing technologies. To assess the usefulness of the MCMF, a metric for comparing mass filters is developed. With this metric, the MCMF is compared with other mass filters such as the Ohkawa filter and the conventional plasma centrifuge.

  16. Superparamagnetic magnesium ferrite nanoadsorbent for effective arsenic (III, V) removal and easy magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenshu; Su, Yu; Li, Qi; Gao, Shian; Shang, Jian Ku

    2013-07-01

    By doping a proper amount of Mg(2+) (~10%) into ?-Fe2O3 during a solvent thermal process, ultrafine magnesium ferrite (Mg0.27Fe2.50O4) nanocrystallites were successfully synthesized with the assistance of in situ self-formed NaCl "cage" to confine their crystal growth. Their ultrafine size (average size of ~3.7 nm) and relatively low Mg-content conferred on them a superparamagnetic behavior with a high saturation magnetization (32.9 emu/g). The ultrafine Mg0.27Fe2.50O4 nanoadsorbent had a high specific surface area of ~438.2 m(2)/g, and demonstrated a superior arsenic removal performance on both As(III) and As(V) at near neutral pH condition. Its adsorption capacities on As(III) and As(V) were found to be no less than 127.4 mg/g and 83.2 mg/g, respectively. Its arsenic adsorption mechanism was found to follow the inner-sphere complex mechanism, and abundant hydroxyl groups on its surface played the major role in its superior arsenic adsorption performance. It could be easily separated from treated water bodies with magnetic separation, and could be easily regenerated and reused while maintaining a high arsenic removal efficiency. This novel superparamagnetic magnesium ferrite nanoadsorbent may offer a simple single step adsorption treatment option to remove arsenic contamination from water without the pre-/post-treatment requirement for current industrial practice. PMID:23726698

  17. Recovery of metallic copper by integrated chemical reduction and high gradient magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wan-I; Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Hong, Andy P K; Lin, Cheng-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The recovery of metals from waste effluents is necessary for pollution prevention and sustainable practice. High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is seen as a viable method. We investigated the capture of valence copper from aqueous copper ion by HGMS in combination with a chemical reduction process. When a copper solution (3.9 or 15.6 mM) was exposed to excess of dithionite (mole ratio of 1:3) in the presence of ammonia (mole ratio of 4) and amended with MnCl2 (2.5 g/L) and the mixture passed through a flow reactor under a strong magnetic field (10000 Gauss), valence copper was obtained and captured in the reactor with well over 95% yields. The chemical reduction reactions were unaffected by the presence of MnCl2 while the amount of MnCl2 (0, 20 and 32 mM) has significantly varied the copper recovery efficiency, especially in the case of high initial copper ion concentration (15.6 mM). Formation of MnO2 flocs was found to have a detrimental effect on copper removal efficiency. The HGMS method offers a tool of resource recovery for copper from waste effluents. PMID:21879556

  18. Templated synthesis of monodisperse mesoporous maghemite/silica microspheres for magnetic separation of genomic DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Shi, Ruobing; Xue, Yun; Chen, Lei; Wan, Qian-Hong

    2010-08-01

    A novel method is described for the preparation of superparamagnetic mesoporous maghemite (?-Fe 2O 3)/silica (SiO 2) composite microspheres to allow rapid magnetic separation of DNA from biological samples. With magnetite (Fe 3O 4) and silica nanoparticles as starting materials, such microspheres were synthesized by the following two consecutive steps: (1) formation of monodispersed organic/inorganic hybrid microspheres through urea-formaldedyde (UF) polymerization and (2) removal of the organic template and phase transformation of Fe 3O 4 to ?-Fe 2O 3 by calcination at elevated temperatures. The as-synthesized particles obtained by heating at temperature 300 °C feature spherical shape and uniform particle size ( dparticle=1.72 ?m), high saturation magnetization ( Ms=17.22 emu/g), superparamagnetism ( Mr/ Ms=0.023), high surface area ( SBET=240 m 2/g), and mesoporosity ( dpore=6.62 nm). The composite microsphere consists of interlocked amorphous SiO 2 nanoparticles, in which cubic ?-Fe 2O 3 nanocrystals are homogeneously dispersed and thermally stable against ?- to ?-phase transformation at temperatures up to 600 °C. With the exposed iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a thin layer of silica shell, the magnetic microspheres were used as a solid-phase adsorbent for rapid extraction of genomic DNA from plant samples. The results show that the DNA templates isolated from pea and green pepper displayed single bands with molecular weights greater than 8 kb and A260/ A280 values of 1.60-1.72. The PCR amplification of a fragment encoding the endogenous chloroplast ndhB gene confirmed that the DNA templates obtained were inhibitor-free and amenable to sensitive amplification-based DNA technologies.

  19. Blood progenitor cell separation from clinical leukapheresis product by magnetic nanoparticle binding and magnetophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ying; Moore, Lee R; Williams, P Stephen; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Farag, Sherif S; Bolwell, Brian; Zborowski, Maciej

    2007-04-15

    Positive selection of CD34+ blood progenitor cells from circulation has been reported to improve patient recovery in applications of autologous transplantation. Current magnetic separation methods rely on cell capture and release on solid supports rather than sorting from flowing suspensions, which limits the range of therapeutic applications and the process scale up. We tested CD34+ cell immunomagnetic labeling and isolation from fresh leukocyte fraction of peripheral blood (leukapheresis) using the continuous quadrupole magnetic flow sorter (QMS), consisting of a flow channel (SHOT, Greenville, IN) and a quadrupole magnet with a maximum field intensity (B(o)) of 1.42 T and a mean force field strength (S(m)) of 1.45 x 10(8) TA/m(2). Both the sample magnetophoretic mobility (m) and the inlet and outlet flow patterns highly affect the QMS performance. Seven commercial progenitor cell labeling reagent combinations were quantitatively evaluated by measuring magnetophoretic mobility of a high CD34 expression cell line, KG-1a, using the cell tracking velocimeter (CTV). The CD34 Progenitor Cell Isolation Kit (Miltenyi Biotec, Bergisch Gladbach, Germany) showed the strongest labeling of KG-1a cells and was selected for progenitor cell enrichment from 11 fresh and 11 cryopreserved clinical leukapheresis samples derived from different donors. The CD34+ cells were isolated with a purity of 60-96%, a recovery of 18-60%, an enrichment rate of 12-169, and a throughput of (1.7-9.3) x 10(4) cells/s. The results also showed a highly regular dependence of the QMS performance on the flow conditions that agreed with the theoretical predictions based on the CD34+ cell magnetophoretic mobility. PMID:17009321

  20. Vector-current correlation and charge separation via the chiral-magnetic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Seung-Il

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the vector-current correlation ??? (VCC) in the presence of a strong external magnetic field (B=B0z^) at low temperature (T?Tc?) with P and CP violations, indicated by the nonzero chiral-chemical potential (???0), i.e. the chiral-magnetic effect (CME). For this purpose, we employ the instanton-vacuum configuration at finite T with nonzero topological charge (Qt?0). We also consider a simple estimation for the nonzero-mode contributions to the quark propagator, in addition to the zero-mode approximation. From the numerical calculations, it turns out that the longitudinal component of the connected VCC is linear in B0 and shows a bump, representing a corresponding vector meson at |Q|=(300˜400)MeV for T=0. The bump becomes enhanced as T increases and the bump position shifts to a lager |Q| value. In the limit of |Q|?0, the transverse component of the connected VCC disappears, whereas the longitudinal one remains finite and becomes insensitive to B0 with respect to T, due to diluting instanton contributions. Considering the simple collision geometry of heavy-ion collision and some assumptions on the induced magnetic field and screening effect, we can estimate the charge separation as a function of centrality using the present results for the VCC. The numerical results show a qualitative agreement with experiments for the Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions. These results are almost independent on the source of the CME, instanton, or sphaleron, as long as the CME current is linear in B0.

  1. Arctic experiments to support CryoSat-2 validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, R.; Davidson, M. W. J.

    2009-04-01

    Validating the elevation retrievals from a phase coherent pulse-width limited polar observing radar altimeter such as the Synthestic/interferometric radar altimeter (SIRAL), the primary payload of CryoSat, is not a simple one. In order to fully understand all the respective error co-variances it is necessary to acquire and correlate many different types of in-situ measurements (GPR, neutron probe density profiles, drilled and electromagnetic derived sea-ice thicknesses, for example) in highly inhospitable regions of the cryosphere at key times of the year. In order to correlate retrievals from CryoSat with other airborne and in-situ data it was decided early in the CryoSat development that an aircraft borne radar altimeter with similar functionality to SIRAL would provide the necessary link, albeit on the smaller scale, and provide pre-launch incite into expected performances and logistical difficulties. In 2001 ESA commenced the development of its own prototype radar altimeter that mimics the functionality of SIRAL. Similar to SIRAL, but with subtle functional differences, the airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS). has now been the centre piece instrument for a number of large scale land and sea ice field campaigns in the Arctic during spring and autumn 2004, 2006 and 2008 known as CryoVEx (CryoSat validation experiment). Additional smaller science/test campaigns have taken place in March 2003 (Svalbard), March 2005 (Bay of Bothnia), March 2006 (Western Greenland), April 2007 (CryoVEx 2007 in Svalbard). It is a credit to all international parties in the CryoSat Validation and Retrieval Team (CVRT) for the coordination, planning, acquisition of in-situ and airborne measurements and the subsequent processing and distributing of its data for analysis. The CVRT has an infrastructure ready for validating CryoSat-2. This paper describes the different measurements acquired, the key science results and stresses the importance of the campaigns to date (despite the loss of CryoSat-1 in Oct 2005 due to launcher failure) and those planned following CryoSat-2 launch in 2009.

  2. Cryo-electron tomography of vaccinia virus

    PubMed Central

    Cyrklaff, Marek; Risco, Cristina; Fernández, Jose Jesús; Jiménez, Maria Victoria; Estéban, Mariano; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Carrascosa, José L.

    2005-01-01

    The combination of cryo-microscopy and electron tomographic reconstruction has allowed us to determine the structure of one of the more complex viruses, intracellular mature vaccinia virus, at a resolution of 4–6 nm. The tomographic reconstruction allows us to dissect the different structural components of the viral particle, avoiding projection artifacts derived from previous microscopic observations. A surface-rendering representation revealed brick-shaped viral particles with slightly rounded edges and dimensions of ?360 × 270 × 250 nm. The outer layer was consistent with a lipid membrane (5–6 nm thick), below which usually two lateral bodies were found, built up by a heterogeneous material without apparent ordering or repetitive features. The internal core presented an inner cavity with electron dense coils of presumptive DNA–protein complexes, together with areas of very low density. The core was surrounded by two layers comprising an overall thickness of ?18–19 nm; the inner layer was consistent with a lipid membrane. The outer layer was discontinuous, formed by a periodic palisade built by the side interaction of T-shaped protein spikes that were anchored in the lower membrane and were arranged into small hexagonal crystallites. It was possible to detect a few pore-like structures that communicated the inner side of the core with the region outside the layer built by the T-shaped spike palisade. PMID:15699328

  3. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 63, NO. 2 (MARCH-APRIL 1998); P. 431439, 13 FIGS. Separation of regional and residual magnetic field data

    E-print Network

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    is concerned with gravity data, but many of the methods can be extended to magnetic data processing and residual magnetic field data Yaoguo Li and Douglas W. Oldenburg ABSTRACT Wepresentamethodforseparatingregionalandresid- ual magnetic fields using a 3-D magnetic inversion al- gorithm. The separation is achieved

  4. Fabrication of anisotropic porous silica monoliths by means of magnetically controlled phase separation in sol-gel processes.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Marco; Lattuada, Marco

    2012-08-28

    Sol-gel accompanied by phase separation is an established method for the preparation of porous silica monoliths with well-defined macroporosity, which find numerous applications. In this work, we demonstrate how the addition of (superpara)magnetic nanocolloids as templates to a system undergoing a sol-gel transition with phase separation leads to the creation of monoliths with a strongly anisotropic structure. It is known that magnetic nanocolloids respond to the application of an external magnetic field by self-assembling into columnar structures. The application of a magnetic field during the chemically driven spinodal decomposition induced by the sol-gel transition allows one to break the symmetry of the system and promote the growth of elongated needle-like silica domains incorporating the magnetic nanocolloids, aligned in the direction of the field. It is found that this microstructure imparts a strong mechanical anisotropy to the materials, with a ratio between the Young's modulus values measured in a direction parallel and perpendicular to the one of the field as high as 150, and an overall smaller average macropores size as compared to isotropic monoliths. The microstructure and properties of the porous monoliths can be controlled by changing both the system composition and the strength of the applied magnetic field. Our monoliths represent the first example of materials prepared by magnetically controlling a phase transition occurring via spinodal decomposition. PMID:22849804

  5. In situ magnetic separation of antibody fragments from Escherichia coli in complex media

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In situ magnetic separation (ISMS) has emerged as a powerful tool to overcome process constraints such as product degradation or inhibition of target production. In the present work, an integrated ISMS process was established for the production of his-tagged single chain fragment variable (scFv) D1.3 antibodies (“D1.3”) produced by E. coli in complex media. This study investigates the impact of ISMS on the overall product yield as well as its biocompatibility with the bioprocess when metal-chelate and triazine-functionalized magnetic beads were used. Results Both particle systems are well suited for separation of D1.3 during cultivation. While the triazine beads did not negatively impact the bioprocess, the application of metal-chelate particles caused leakage of divalent copper ions in the medium. After the ISMS step, elevated copper concentrations above 120 mg/L in the medium negatively influenced D1.3 production. Due to the stable nature of the model protein scFv D1.3 in the biosuspension, the application of ISMS could not increase the overall D1.3 yield as was shown by simulation and experiments. Conclusions We could demonstrate that triazine-functionalized beads are a suitable low-cost alternative to selectively adsorb D1.3 fragments, and measured maximum loads of 0.08 g D1.3 per g of beads. Although copper-loaded metal-chelate beads did adsorb his-tagged D1.3 well during cultivation, this particle system must be optimized by minimizing metal leakage from the beads in order to avoid negative inhibitory effects on growth of the microorganisms and target production. Hereby, other types of metal chelate complexes should be tested to demonstrate biocompatibility. Such optimized particle systems can be regarded as ISMS platform technology, especially for the production of antibodies and their fragments with low stability in the medium. The proposed model can be applied to design future ISMS experiments in order to maximize the overall product yield while the amount of particles being used is minimized as well as the number of required ISMS steps. PMID:23688064

  6. Enhanced magnetic separation and photocatalytic activity of nitrogen doped titania photocatalyst supported on strontium ferrite.

    PubMed

    Abd Aziz, Azrina; Yong, Kok Soon; Ibrahim, Shaliza; Pichiah, Saravanan

    2012-01-15

    An enhanced ferromagnetic property, visible light active TiO(2) photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by supporting strontium ferrite (SrFe(12)O(19)) onto TiO(2) doped with nitrogen (N) and compared with N-doped TiO(2). The synthesized catalysts were further characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), BET surface area analysis, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and visible light spectroscopy analysis for their respective properties. The XRD and EDS revealed the structural and inorganic composition of N-TiO(2) supported on SrFe(12)O(19). The supported N-TiO(2) exhibited a strong ferromagnetic property with tremendous stability against magnetic property losses. It also resulted in reduced band gap (2.8 eV) and better visible light absorption between 400 and 800 nm compared to N-doped TiO(2). The photocatalytic activity was investigated with a recalcitrant phenolic compound namely 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) as a model pollutant under direct bright and diffuse sunlight exposure. A complete degradation of 2,4-DCP was achieved with an initial concentration of 50mg/L for both photocatalysts in 180 min and 270 min respectively under bright sunlight. Similarly the diffuse sunlight study resulted in complete degradation for supported N-TiO(2) and >85% degradation N-TiO(2), respectively. Finally the supported photocatalyst was separated under permanent magnetic field with a mass recovery ? 98% for further reuse. PMID:22100220

  7. Steady-State Theory of a Discharge Column in a Magnetic Field: Separable Solutions for a Finite Cylinder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. B. Ilic´; S. A. Self

    1972-01-01

    The problem of the steady state of a magnetized discharge of the positive column type, in the case of a finite cylinder, is shown to have separable solutions for the radial and axial dependence of plasma density, potential, and electron and ion velocities. Consequently, the results of the corresponding one-dimensional theory may be directly applied to the two-dimensional case. In

  8. Magnetically separable nanocomposites with photocatalytic activity under visible light for the selective transformation of biomass-derived platform molecules

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel magnetically separable TiO2-guanidine-(Ni,Co)Fe2O4 nanomaterials were prepared and characterised by a series of techniques including XRD, SEM, TEM, N2 physisorption as well as XPS and subsequently tested for their photocatalytic activities in the selective transformation of...

  9. Cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Brost, Alexander; Jakob, Carolin; Mewes, Philip W.; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation has become the preferred treatment option for atrial fibrillation. Although the standard ablation procedure involves ablation points set by radio-frequency catheters, cryo-balloon catheters have even been reported to be more advantageous in certain cases. As electro-anatomical mapping systems do not support cryo-balloon ablation procedures, X-ray guidance is needed. However, current methods to provide support for cryo-balloon catheters in fluoroscopically guided ablation procedures rely heavily on manual user interaction. To improve this, we propose a first method for automatic cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images based on a blob detection algorithm. Our method is evaluated on 24 clinical images from 17 patients. The method successfully detected the cryoballoon in 22 out of 24 images, yielding a success rate of 91.6 %. The successful localization achieved an accuracy of 1.00 mm +/- 0.44 mm. Even though our methods currently fails in 8.4 % of the images available, it still offers a significant improvement over manual methods. Furthermore, detecting a landmark point along the cryo-balloon catheter can be a very important step for additional post-processing operations.

  10. Ferrimagnetism and magnetic phase separation in Nd1-xYxMnO3 studied by magnetization and high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Harikrishnan S.; Yadav, Ruchika; Adiga, Shilpa; Rao, S. S.; van Tol, Johan; Elizabeth, Suja

    2015-01-01

    Ferrimagnetism and metamagnetic features tunable by composition are observed in the magnetic response of Nd1-xYxMnO3, for x=0.1-0.5. For all values of x in the series, the compound crystallizes in orthorhombic Pbnm space group similar to NdMnO3. Magnetization studies reveal a phase transition of the Mn-sublattice below T N Mn ? 80 K for all compositions, which, decreases up on diluting the Nd-site with Yttrium. For x=0.35, ferrimagnetism is observed. At 5 K, metamagnetic transition is observed for all compositions x < 0.4. The evolution of magnetic ground states and appearance of ferrimagnetism in Nd1-xYxMnO3 can be accounted for by invoking the scenario of magnetic phase separation. The high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on x=0.4 sample, which is close to the critical composition for phase separation, revealed complex temperature dependent lineshapes clearly supporting the assumption of magnetic phase separation.

  11. CryoEDM: A cryogenic experiment to measure the neutron electric dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grinten, M. G. D.; CryoEDM Collaboration; Balashov, S. N.; Francis, V.; Green, K.; Iaydjiev, P. S.; Ivanov, S. N.; Khazov, A.; Tucker, M. A. H.; Wark, D. L.; Davidson, A.; Hardiman, M.; Harris, P. G.; Katsika, K.; Pendlebury, J. M.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Shiers, D. B.; Smith, P.; Townsley, C.; Wardell, I.; Clarke, C.; Henry, S.; Kraus, H.; McCann, M.; Geltenbort, P.; Yoshiki, Y.

    2009-12-01

    CryoEDM is an experiment that aims to measure the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron to a precision of 10 -28 e cm. A description of CryoEDM, the apparatus, technologies and commissioning is presented.

  12. 76 FR 4338 - Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshops

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ...Compressed & Cryo- Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshops AGENCY: Fuel Cell...Laboratory, in conjunction with the Hydrogen Storage team of the EERE Fuel Cell Technologies...compressed and cryo-compressed hydrogen storage in the Washington, DC...

  13. Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic activity of magnetically separable hexagonal Ni/ZnO nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Samarpita; Srivastava, Suneel K; Singh, Shiv B

    2012-10-21

    The hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel (Ni/ZnO) nanostructure photocatalyst has successfully been prepared by the reduction of nickel chloride hexahydrate using hydrazine hydrate through the solvothermal process at 140 °C followed by surface modification of the product by the reflux method at 110 °C for 1 h. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed that the 'as prepared' sample consists of face centered cubic Ni and hexagonal wurtzite ZnO without any traces of impurity. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the formation of nickel nanoparticles under solvothermal conditions. These nickel nanoparticles, when subjected to reflux, formed the hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel nanostructure. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, photoluminescence (PL) and Raman studies also confirmed the presence of zinc oxide in the hybrid nanostructure. The growth mechanism for the development of the hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel (Ni/ZnO) nanostructure has also been proposed. The appearance of the hysteresis loop, in the as-prepared Ni/ZnO hybrid nanostructure, demonstrated its ferromagnetic character at room temperature. The hexagonal Ni/ZnO nanostructure also acts as an efficient photocatalyst in the degradation of methylene blue under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is observed that the catalytic efficiency of the hybrid nanocatalyst is better compared to pure zinc oxide. Most importantly, the Ni/ZnO catalyst could also be easily separated, simply by applying an external magnetic field, and reused. PMID:22975724

  14. On-chip magnetic separation and encapsulation of cells in droplets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aaron; Byvank, Tom; Chang, Woo-Jin; Bharde, Atul; Vieira, Greg; Miller, Brandon L; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Bashir, Rashid; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham

    2013-03-21

    Single cell study is gaining importance because of the cell-to-cell variation that exists within cell population, even after significant initial sorting. Analysis of such variation at the gene expression level could impact single cell functional genomics, cancer, stem-cell research, and drug screening. The on-chip monitoring of individual cells in an isolated environment would prevent cross-contamination, provide high recovery yield, and enable study of biological traits at a single cell level. These advantages of on-chip biological experiments is a significant improvement for a myriad of cell analyses methods, compared to conventional methods, which require bulk samples and provide only averaged information on cell structure and function. We report on a device that integrates a mobile magnetic trap array with microfluidic technology to provide the possibility of separation of immunomagnetically labeled cells and their encapsulation with reagents into picoliter droplets for single cell analysis. The simultaneous reagent delivery and compartmentalization of the cells immediately following sorting are all performed seamlessly within the same chip. These steps offer unique advantages such as the ability to capture cell traits as originated from its native environment, reduced chance of contamination, minimal use of the reagents, and tunable encapsulation characteristics independent of the input flow. Preliminary assay on cell viability demonstrates the potential for the device to be integrated with other up- or downstream on-chip modules to become a powerful single-cell analysis tool. PMID:23370785

  15. The synthesis, characterization and application of iron oxide nanocrystals in magnetic separations for arsenic and uranium removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, John Thomas

    Arsenic and uranium in the environment are hazardous to human health and require better methods for detection and remediation. Nanocrystalline iron oxides offer a number of advantages as sorbents for water purification and environmental remediation. First, highly uniform and crystalline iron oxide nanocrystals (nMAG) were prepared using thermal decomposition of iron salts in organic solutions; for the applications of interest in this thesis, a central challenge was the adaptation of these conventional synthetic methods to the needs of low infrastructure and economically disadvantaged settings. We show here that it is possible to form highly uniform and magnetically responsive nanomaterials using starting reagents and equipment that are readily available and economical. The products of this approach, termed the 'Kitchen Synthesis', are of comparable quality and effectiveness to laboratory materials. The narrow size distributions of the iron oxides produced in the laboratory synthesis made it possible to study the size-dependence of the magnetic separation efficiency of nanocrystals; generally as the diameter of particles increased they could be removed under lower applied magnetic fields. In this work we take advantage of this size-dependence to use magnetic separation as a tool to separate broadly distributed populations of magnetic materials. Such work makes it possible to use these materials in multiplexed separation and sensing schemes. With the synthesis and magnetic separation studies of these materials completed, it was possible to optimize their applications in water purification and environmental remediation. These materials removed both uranium and arsenic from contaminated samples, and had remarkably high sorption capacities --- up to 12 wt% for arsenic and 30 wt% for uranium. The contaminated nMAG is removed from the drinking water by either retention in a sand column, filter, or by magnetic separation. The uranium adsorption process was also utilized for the enhanced detection of uranium in environmental matrices. By relying on alpha-particle detection in well-formed and dense nMAG films, it was possible to improve soil detection of uranium by more than ten-thousand-fold. Central for this work was a detailed understanding of the chemistry at the iron oxide interface, and the role of the organic coatings in mediating the sorption process.

  16. Fluorescence cryo-microscopy: current challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Rainer; Hagen, Christoph; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Studying biological structures with fine details does not only require a microscope with high resolution, but also a sample preparation process that preserves the structures in a near-native state. Live-cell imaging is restricted mostly to the field of light microscopy. For studies requiring much higher resolution, fast freezing techniques (vitrification) are successfully used to immobilize the sample in a near-native state for imaging with electron and X-ray cryo-microscopy. Fluorescence cryo-microscopy combines imaging of vitrified samples with the advantages of fluorescence labeling of biological structures. Technical considerations as well as the behavior of fluorophores at low temperatures have to be taken into account for developing or adapting super-resolution methods under cryo conditions to exploit the full potential of this technique. PMID:24951858

  17. Analyses of Subnanometer Resolution Cryo-EM Density Maps

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew L.; Baker, Mariah R.; Hryc, Corey F.; DiMaio, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Today, electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) can routinely achieve subnanometer resolutions of complex macromolecular assemblies. From a density map, one can extract key structural and functional information using a variety of computational analysis tools. At subnanometer resolution, these tools make it possible to isolate individual subunits, identify secondary structures, and accurately fit atomic models. With several cryo-EM studies achieving resolutions beyond 5 Å, computational modeling and feature recognition tools have been employed to construct backbone and atomic models of the protein components directly from a density map. In this chapter, we describe several common classes of computational tools that can be used to analyze and model subnanometer resolution reconstructions from cryo-EM. A general protocol for analyzing subnanometer resolution density maps is presented along with a full description of steps used in analyzing the 4.3 Å resolution structure of Mm-cpn. PMID:20888467

  18. CRUCIAL: CryoSat+ Land and Inland Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Philippa; Smith, Richard; Salloway, Mark; Lucas, Bruno Manuel; Dinardo, Salvatore; Benveniste, Jérôme

    2013-04-01

    The CryoSat-2 SIRAL altimeter presents a unique opportunity for inland water height retrieval. In order to maximise the potential of this new dataset the ESA CRUCIAL (CryoSat+ Land and Inland Water) contract has been set up to investigate the application of CryoSat-2 data over land and inland water. When operating in SAR mode CryoSat-2 obtains waveforms at an unprecedented resolution alongtrack, allowing far smaller inland water targets then previously possible to be acquired. Prior work performed with the Envisat Individual echoes has shown that a high Pulse Repetition Frequency (PRF) allows successful measurements to be obtained from river targets as small as 25m across. SAR Full Bit Rate (FBR) data are acquired over the Mekong River area, including the Mekong Delta itself. This region provides the ideal test-bed for obtaining small target inland water measurements and early results of FBR waveform reconstruction and analysis are presented within this paper. Whilst FBR data over land are available in a few test regions, over much of the Earth's land surface measurements are acquired in Low Resolution Mode. These data are comparable to those obtained by conventional altimeters, such as ERS-2 and EnviSat. The non-repeat orbit of CryoSat-2 presents a new challenge to inland water measurement by satellite radar altimetry, as repeat time-series are no longer possible. However, CryoSat-2 data produce stage measurements from along the course of rivers more regularly than the 35-days of previous ESA missions. New methodologies must be investigated to allow hydrologists to harness the full benefit of these new data. This paper presents initial findings of investigations over major river systems captured in LRM mode and a first look at results over the Mekong area from SAR FBR. This additional data will also be used to enhance and improve the Altimetry Corrected Elevations (ACE2) Global Digital Elevation Models.

  19. Boundary-value problem for a counterrotating electrical discharge in an axial magnetic field. [plasma centrifuge for isotope separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. H.; Wilhelm, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    An electrical discharge between two ring electrodes embedded in the mantle of a cylindrical chamber is considered, in which the plasma in the anode and cathode regions rotates in opposite directions under the influence of an external axial magnetic field. The associated boundary-value problem for the coupled partial differential equations describing the azimuthal velocity and radial current-density fields is solved in closed form. The velocity, current density, induced magnetic induction, and electric fields are presented for typical Hartmann numbers, magnetic Reynolds numbers, and geometry parameters. The discharge is shown to produce anodic and cathodic plasma sections rotating at speeds of the order 1,000,000 cm/sec for conventional magnetic field intensities. Possible application of the magnetoactive discharge as a plasma centrifuge for isotope separation is discussed.

  20. Superconducting open-gradient magnetic separation for the pretreatment of radioactive or mixed waste vitrification feeds. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R.; Nunez, L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US); Cicero-Herman, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (US). Savannah River Technology Center; Ritter, J.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (US). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Landsberger, S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US). Nuclear Engineering Dept.

    1997-01-01

    'Vitrification has been selected as a final waste form technology in the US for long-term storage of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). However, a foreseeable problem during vitrification in some waste feed streams lies in the presence of elements (e.g., transition metals) in the HLW that may cause instabilities in the final glass product. The formation of spinel compounds, such as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and FeCrO{sub 4}, results in glass phase separation and reduces vitrifier lifetime, and durability of the final waste form. A superconducting open gradient magnetic separation (OGMS) system maybe suitable for the removal of the deleterious transition elements (e.g. Fe, Co, and Ni) and other elements (lanthanides) from vitrification feed streams due to their ferromagnetic or paramagnetic nature. The OGMS systems are designed to deflect and collect paramagnetic minerals as they interact with a magnetic field gradient. This system has the potential to reduce the volume of HLW for vitrification and ensure a stable product. In order to design efficient OGMS and High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) processes, a fundamental understanding of the physical and chemical properties of the waste feed streams is required. Using HLW simulant and radioactive fly ash and sludge samples from the Savannah River Technology Center, Rocky Flats site, and the Hanford reservation, several techniques were used to characterize and predict the separation capability for a superconducting OGMS system.'

  1. Validation Experiments supporting the CryoSat-2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, R.; Davidson, M.; Wingham, D.

    2009-12-01

    The primary goals of CryoSat are to derive improved estimates of the rates of change concerning land ice elevation and sea ice thickness and freeboard of the Earth’s land and marine ice fields. Validating such retrievals derived from a phase coherent pulse-width limited polar observing radar altimeter such as SIRAL, the primary payload of CryoSat, is not a simple one. In order to understand all the respective error co-variances it is necessary to acquire many different types of in-situ measurements (GPR, neutron probe density profiles, drilled and electromagnetic derived sea-ice thicknesses, for example) in highly inhospitable regions of the cryosphere at times of the year to detect relevant signals. In order to correlate retrievals from CryoSat with the in-situ data it was decided early in the CryoSat development that an aircraft borne radar altimeter with similar functionality to SIRAL would provide the necessary link, albeit on the smaller scale, and provide pre-launch incite into expected performances. In 2001 ESA commenced the development of its own prototype radar altimeter that mimics the functionality of SIRAL to be operated along-side an airborne laser scanner. Similar to SIRAL, but with subtle functional differences, the airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) has now been the centre piece instrument for a number of large scale land and sea ice field campaigns in the Arctic during spring and autumn 2004 and 2006 and 2008. Additional smaller science/test campaigns have taken place in March 2003 (Svalbard), March 2005 (Bay of Bothnia), March 2006 (Western Greenland) and April 2007 (CryoVEx 2007 in Svalbard). It is a credit to all parties that constitute the CryoSat Validation and Retrieval Team (CVRT) for the coordination, planning, acquisition of in-situ and airborne measurements and the subsequent processing and distributing of its data for analysis. CVRT has a robust infrastructure in place for validating and providing measures of uncertainty for its level 2 products derived from an operational CryoSat-2. This paper describes the different types of measurements, the key science results to date and we stress the importance of the next campaigns following the CryoSat-2 launch early in 2010.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic activity of magnetically separable hexagonal Ni/ZnO nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senapati, Samarpita; Srivastava, Suneel K.; Singh, Shiv B.

    2012-09-01

    The hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel (Ni/ZnO) nanostructure photocatalyst has successfully been prepared by the reduction of nickel chloride hexahydrate using hydrazine hydrate through the solvothermal process at 140 °C followed by surface modification of the product by the reflux method at 110 °C for 1 h. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed that the `as prepared' sample consists of face centered cubic Ni and hexagonal wurtzite ZnO without any traces of impurity. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the formation of nickel nanoparticles under solvothermal conditions. These nickel nanoparticles, when subjected to reflux, formed the hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel nanostructure. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, photoluminescence (PL) and Raman studies also confirmed the presence of zinc oxide in the hybrid nanostructure. The growth mechanism for the development of the hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel (Ni/ZnO) nanostructure has also been proposed. The appearance of the hysteresis loop, in the as-prepared Ni/ZnO hybrid nanostructure, demonstrated its ferromagnetic character at room temperature. The hexagonal Ni/ZnO nanostructure also acts as an efficient photocatalyst in the degradation of methylene blue under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is observed that the catalytic efficiency of the hybrid nanocatalyst is better compared to pure zinc oxide. Most importantly, the Ni/ZnO catalyst could also be easily separated, simply by applying an external magnetic field, and reused.The hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel (Ni/ZnO) nanostructure photocatalyst has successfully been prepared by the reduction of nickel chloride hexahydrate using hydrazine hydrate through the solvothermal process at 140 °C followed by surface modification of the product by the reflux method at 110 °C for 1 h. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed that the `as prepared' sample consists of face centered cubic Ni and hexagonal wurtzite ZnO without any traces of impurity. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the formation of nickel nanoparticles under solvothermal conditions. These nickel nanoparticles, when subjected to reflux, formed the hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel nanostructure. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, photoluminescence (PL) and Raman studies also confirmed the presence of zinc oxide in the hybrid nanostructure. The growth mechanism for the development of the hexagonal zinc oxide coated nickel (Ni/ZnO) nanostructure has also been proposed. The appearance of the hysteresis loop, in the as-prepared Ni/ZnO hybrid nanostructure, demonstrated its ferromagnetic character at room temperature. The hexagonal Ni/ZnO nanostructure also acts as an efficient photocatalyst in the degradation of methylene blue under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is observed that the catalytic efficiency of the hybrid nanocatalyst is better compared to pure zinc oxide. Most importantly, the Ni/ZnO catalyst could also be easily separated, simply by applying an external magnetic field, and reused. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1 Ni/ZnO hybrid nanostructure prepared using (a) 0.195 and (b) 0.25 M [Zn2+] at 90 °C Fig. S2 FTIR spectra of nickel nanoparticles prepared at 140 °C (a), and Ni/ZnO hybrid nanostructure prepared using (b) 0.063, (c) 0.125, (d) 0.195 and (e) 0.25 M [Zn2+]; Fig. S3 Raman spectra of Ni/ZnO nanostructure prepared using (a) 0.063, (b) 0.125, (c) 0.195 and (d) 0.25 M [Zn2+]; Fig. S4 Room temperature PL spectra of (a) ZnO and (b) Ni/ZnO nanostructure prepared using 0.25 M [Zn2+]. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31831h

  3. Separation Anxiety

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Julie Yu

    2007-01-01

    In this activity, learners discover the primary physical properties used to separate pure substances from mixtures. Learners use test tubes, beakers, magnets, and other tools to separate a mixture of sand, iron filings, salt, popcorn kernels, and poppyseeds. This activity introduces learners to the basic properties of size, magnetism, density and solubility while emphasizing that chemistry involves separating out substances either to understand what they are or to use the pure components to create new substances.

  4. Separation and correlation of structural and magnetic roughness in a Ni thin film by polarized off-specular neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Basu, Saibal

    2009-02-01

    Diffuse (off-specular) neutron and x-ray reflectometry has been used extensively for the determination of interface morphology in solids and liquids. For neutrons, a novel possibility is off-specular reflectometry with polarized neutrons to determine the morphology of a magnetic interface. There have been few such attempts due to the lower brilliance of neutron sources, though magnetic interaction of neutrons with atomic magnetic moments is much easier to comprehend and easily tractable theoretically. We have obtained a simple and physically meaningful expression, under the Born approximation, for analyzing polarized diffuse (off-specular) neutron reflectivity (PDNR) data. For the first time PDNR data from a Ni film have been analyzed and separate chemical and magnetic morphologies have been quantified. Also specular polarized neutron reflectivity measurements have been carried out to measure the magnetic moment density profile of the Ni film. The fit to PDNR data results in a longer correlation length for in-plane magnetic roughness than for chemical (structural) roughness. The magnetic interface is smoother than the chemical interface. PMID:21817297

  5. Continuous sheath-free magnetic separation of particles in a U-shaped microchannel

    E-print Network

    Xuan, Xiangchun "Schwann"

    in microfluidic devices, among which electric,1,2 magnetic,3,4 acoustic,5,6 and opti- cal7,8 forces are the most issues (if permanent magnets are used) which accom- pany nearly all other methods, and is therefore well, an external magnetic force acts on the suspended particles and deflects them to different flow paths

  6. Towards an electro-magnetic field separation of deposited material implemented in an ion beam sputter process

    SciTech Connect

    Malobabic, Sina; Jupe, Marco; Ristau, Detlev [Laser Component Department, Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, 30149 Hannover (Germany) [Laser Component Department, Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, 30149 Hannover (Germany); Quest: Centre of Quantum Engineering and Space-Time Research, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Hannover (Germany)

    2013-06-03

    Nowadays, Ion Beam Sputter (IBS) processes are very well optimized on an empirical basis. To achieve further progresses, a modification of the IBS process by guiding the coating material using an axial magnetic field and an additional electrical field has been studied. The electro-magnetic (EM) field leads to a significant change in plasma properties and deposition rate distributions, whereas an increase in deposition rate along the centerline of the axial EM field around 150% was observed. These fundamental studies on the prototype are the basis for the development of an applicable and workable design of a separation device.

  7. Magnetically activated and guided isotope separation This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-print Network

    Raizen, Mark G.

    inefficient due to the low probability of electron-bombardment ionization. Later, laser isotope separation (LIS) was proposed [5]. In recent years isotope separation by laser ionization (AVLIS) has beenMagnetically activated and guided isotope separation This article has been downloaded from

  8. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-print Network

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-07-15

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect (CME). The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this paper, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39 and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy, and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. The implications of these results for the CME will be discussed.

  9. Development of magnetically separable immobilized lipase by using cellulose derivatives and their application in enantioselective esterification of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gowoun; Joo, Hongil; Kim, Jungbae; Lee, Jung-Heon

    2008-03-01

    Highly active, stable, and magnetically separable immobilized enzymes were developed using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and diethylaminoethyl cellulose DEAE-C; hereafter designated "DEAE" as supporting materials. Iron oxide nanoparticles penetrated the micropores of the supporting materials, rendering them magnetically separable. Lipase (LP) was immobilized on the surface of the supporting materials by using cross-linked enzyme aggregation (CLEA) by glutaraldehyde. The activity of enzyme aggregates coated on DEAE was approximately 2 times higher than that of enzyme aggregates coated on CMC. This is explained by the fact that enzyme aggregates with amine residues are more efficient than those with carboxyl residues. After a 96-h enantioselective ibuprofen esterification reaction, 6% ibuprofen propyl ester was produced from the racemic mixture of ibuprofen by using DEAE-LP, and 2.8% using CMC-LP. PMID:18388463

  10. Beam-Energy Dependence of Charge Separation along the Magnetic Field in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.

    2014-08-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a quark-gluon plasma which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect. The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this Letter, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au +Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. This implies the dominance of hadronic interactions over partonic ones at lower collision energies.

  11. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a quark-gluon plasma which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect. The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this Letter, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. This implies the dominance of hadronic interactions over partonic ones at lower collision energies. PMID:25126911

  12. Natural circulation loop using liquid nitrogen for cryo-detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yeon Suk [Korea Basic Science Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29

    The natural circulation loop is designed for the cryogenic insert in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Sensitivity is the key parameter of a FTICR mass spectrometer and the cryo-cooling of the pre-amplifier can reduce the thermal noise level and thereby improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The pre-amplifier consisted of non-magnetic materials is thermally connected to the cooling loop which is passing through the flange maintaining ultra-high vacuum in the ion cell. The liquid nitrogen passes through inside of the loop to cool the pre-amplifier indirectly. At the end, a cryocooler is located to re-condense nitrogen vapor generated due to the heat from the pre-amplifier. The circulating fluid removes heat from the pre-amplifier and transports it to the cryocooler or heat sink. In this paper the natural circulation loop for cryogenic pre-amplifier is introduced for improving the sensitivity of cryo-detector. In addition, the initial cool-down of the system by a cryocooler is presented and the temperature of the radiation shield is discussed with respect to the thickness of shield and the thermal radiation load.

  13. Separating subspectra from cross-polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra by proton spin relaxation editing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger H. Newman; Leo M. Condron

    1995-01-01

    Differences in proton spin relaxation time constants can be exploited to edit cross-polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CP-MAS NMR) spectra of heterogeneous mixtures of different types of organic matter. This paper describes an extension of the editing procedure from two-component to three-component mixtures. Clean separation of 13C NMR subspectra was achieved for three synthetic polymers mixed as powders. Applying

  14. Correlative cryo-electron tomography and optical microscopy of cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peijun

    2013-10-01

    The biological processes occurring in a cell are complex and dynamic, and to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, both temporal and spatial information is required. While cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) provides three-dimensional (3D) still pictures of near-native state cells and organelles at molecular resolution, fluorescence light microscopy (fLM) offers movies of dynamic cellular processes in living cells. Combining and integrating these two commonly used imaging modalities (termed correlative microscopy) provides a powerful means to not only expand the imaging scale and resolution but also to complement the dynamic information available from optical microscopy with the molecular-level, 3D ultrastructure detail provided by cryoET. As such, a correlative approach performed on a given specimen can provide high resolution snapshots of dynamic cellular events. In this article, I review recent advances in correlative light microscopy and cryoET and discuss major findings made available by applying this method. PMID:23962486

  15. NASA Perspectives on Cryo H2 DOE Hydrogen Storage Workshop

    E-print Network

    NASA Perspectives on Cryo H2 Storage DOE Hydrogen Storage Workshop Marriott Crystal Gateway Arlington, VA February 15, 2011 David J. Chato NASA Glenn Research Center Michael P. Doherty NASA Glenn Research Center #12;2 Objectives Purposes of this Presentation · To show the role of Cryogenics in NASA

  16. TESLA Report 2001-38 THE TESLA CRYO-PLANTS

    E-print Network

    TESLA Report 2001-38 THE TESLA CRYO-PLANTS H. Quack, M. Kauschke, C. Haberstroh, TU Dresden, 01062 out that concerning the four most frequent sources of unavailability the effect of multiple plants of vacuum or oil spill into the cold box piping, there would be a clear advantage of multiple refrigerators

  17. Using size-selected gold clusters on graphene oxide films to aid cryo-transmission electron tomography alignment.

    PubMed

    Arkill, Kenton P; Mantell, Judith M; Plant, Simon R; Verkade, Paul; Palmer, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction of a nano-scale aqueous object can be achieved by taking a series of transmission electron micrographs tilted at different angles in vitreous ice: cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography. Presented here is a novel method of fine alignment for the tilt series. Size-selected gold clusters of ~2.7?nm (Au561 ± 14), ~3.2?nm (Au923 ± 22), and ~4.3?nm (Au2057 ± 45) in diameter were deposited onto separate graphene oxide films overlaying holes on amorphous carbon grids. After plunge freezing and subsequent transfer to cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography, the resulting tomograms have excellent (de-)focus and alignment properties during automatic acquisition. Fine alignment is accurate when the evenly distributed 3.2?nm gold particles are used as fiducial markers, demonstrated with a reconstruction of a tobacco mosaic virus. Using a graphene oxide film means the fiducial markers are not interfering with the ice bound sample and that automated collection is consistent. The use of pre-deposited size-selected clusters means there is no aggregation and a user defined concentration. The size-selected clusters are mono-dispersed and can be produced in a wide size range including 2-5?nm in diameter. The use of size-selected clusters on a graphene oxide films represents a significant technical advance for 3D cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:25783049

  18. Using size-selected gold clusters on graphene oxide films to aid cryo-transmission electron tomography alignment

    PubMed Central

    Arkill, Kenton P.; Mantell, Judith M.; Plant, Simon R.; Verkade, Paul; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction of a nano-scale aqueous object can be achieved by taking a series of transmission electron micrographs tilted at different angles in vitreous ice: cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography. Presented here is a novel method of fine alignment for the tilt series. Size-selected gold clusters of ~2.7?nm (Au561 ± 14), ~3.2?nm (Au923 ± 22), and ~4.3?nm (Au2057 ± 45) in diameter were deposited onto separate graphene oxide films overlaying holes on amorphous carbon grids. After plunge freezing and subsequent transfer to cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography, the resulting tomograms have excellent (de-)focus and alignment properties during automatic acquisition. Fine alignment is accurate when the evenly distributed 3.2?nm gold particles are used as fiducial markers, demonstrated with a reconstruction of a tobacco mosaic virus. Using a graphene oxide film means the fiducial markers are not interfering with the ice bound sample and that automated collection is consistent. The use of pre-deposited size-selected clusters means there is no aggregation and a user defined concentration. The size-selected clusters are mono-dispersed and can be produced in a wide size range including 2–5?nm in diameter. The use of size-selected clusters on a graphene oxide films represents a significant technical advance for 3D cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:25783049

  19. Using size-selected gold clusters on graphene oxide films to aid cryo-transmission electron tomography alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkill, Kenton P.; Mantell, Judith M.; Plant, Simon R.; Verkade, Paul; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-03-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction of a nano-scale aqueous object can be achieved by taking a series of transmission electron micrographs tilted at different angles in vitreous ice: cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography. Presented here is a novel method of fine alignment for the tilt series. Size-selected gold clusters of ~2.7 nm (Au561 +/- 14), ~3.2 nm (Au923 +/- 22), and ~4.3 nm (Au2057 +/- 45) in diameter were deposited onto separate graphene oxide films overlaying holes on amorphous carbon grids. After plunge freezing and subsequent transfer to cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography, the resulting tomograms have excellent (de-)focus and alignment properties during automatic acquisition. Fine alignment is accurate when the evenly distributed 3.2 nm gold particles are used as fiducial markers, demonstrated with a reconstruction of a tobacco mosaic virus. Using a graphene oxide film means the fiducial markers are not interfering with the ice bound sample and that automated collection is consistent. The use of pre-deposited size-selected clusters means there is no aggregation and a user defined concentration. The size-selected clusters are mono-dispersed and can be produced in a wide size range including 2-5 nm in diameter. The use of size-selected clusters on a graphene oxide films represents a significant technical advance for 3D cryo-electron microscopy.

  20. Fast characterisation of cell-derived extracellular vesicles by nanoparticles tracking analysis, cryo-electron microscopy, and Raman tweezers microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tatischeff, Irène; Larquet, Eric; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M.; Turpin, Pierre-Yves; Kruglik, Sergei G.

    2012-01-01

    The joint use of 3 complementary techniques, namely, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) and Raman tweezers microspectroscopy (RTM), is proposed for a rapid characterisation of extracellular vesicles (EVs) of various origins. NTA is valuable for studying the size distribution and concentration, Cryo-EM is outstanding for the morphological characterisation, including observation of vesicle heterogeneity, while RTM provides the global chemical composition without using any exogenous label. The capabilities of this approach are evaluated on the example of cell-derived vesicles of Dictyostelium discoideum, a convenient general model for eukaryotic EVs. At least 2 separate species differing in chemical composition (relative amounts of DNA, lipids and proteins, presence of carotenoids) were found for each of the 2 physiological states of this non-pathogenic microorganism, that is, cell growth and starvation-induced aggregation. These findings demonstrate the specific potency of RTM. In addition, the first Raman spectra of human urinary exosomes are reported, presumably constituting the primary step towards Raman characterisation of EVs for the purpose of human diseases diagnoses. PMID:24009887

  1. Non-infectious cryoglobulinemia vasculitis (CryoVas): update on clinical and therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Perez-Alamino, Rodolfo; Espinoza, Luis R

    2014-05-01

    CryoVas is a small vessel vasculitis associated with the presence of circulating cryoglobulins. In the absence of HCV infection, several disorders have been identified in association of CryoVas. Although evidence is limited, a few studies have recently described the clinical presentation, prognosis, and therapeutic management of non-infectious CryoVas. Patients with type I CryoVas, especially associated with hematologic malignancies, have shown a worse clinical presentation. Recent studies have also identified prognostic factors in mixed CryoVas. Therapeutic management in non-infectious CryoVas remains to be defined. Overall, treatment options should be individualized based on severity of involvement. In this setting, new data have emerged regarding the role of biologic therapy in non-infectious CryoVas. Off-label use of rituximab should be highlighted, based on the assessment of benefits and risks, especially infections. PMID:24647999

  2. Magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: an efficient adsorbent for the separation and removal of nitrate and nitrite ions from environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Ensieh; Sillanpää, Mika

    2015-01-01

    A novel type of magnetic nanosorbent, hydroxyapatite-coated Fe2O3 nanoparticles was synthesized and used for the adsorption and removal of nitrite and nitrate ions from environmental samples. The properties of synthesized magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction. After the adsorption process, the separation of ?-Fe2O3@hydroxyapatite nanoparticles from the aqueous solution was simply achieved by applying an external magnetic field. The effects of different variables on the adsorption efficiency were studied simultaneously using an experimental design. The variables of interest were amount of magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, sample volume, pH, stirring rate, adsorption time, and temperature. The experimental parameters were optimized using a Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology after a Plackett-Burman screening design. Under the optimum conditions, the adsorption efficiencies of magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles adsorbents toward NO3(-) and NO2(-) ions (100 mg/L) were in the range of 93-101%. The results revealed that the magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles adsorbent could be used as a simple, efficient, and cost-effective material for the removal of nitrate and nitrite ions from environmental water and soil samples. PMID:25376506

  3. Magnetic Field Effect on Laser Isotope Separation Based on Polarization Selection Rules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hideaki Niki; Iwao Kitazima; Yasukazu Izawa

    1998-01-01

    Excitation dynamics of atoms by linearly polarized lasers were analyzed for J=2-->2-->1-->0 multistep transition under a magnetic field. The time evolution of the population in each magnetic substate was calculated by solving the rate equations under the condition where the atomic alignment is gradually destroyed by the precession motion of the angular momentum around the magnetic field. Isotopic selectivity in

  4. Pathogen detection in complex samples by quartz crystal microbalance sensor coupled to aptamer functionalized core-shell type magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Ozalp, Veli C; Bayramoglu, Gulay; Erdem, Zehra; Arica, M Yakup

    2015-01-01

    A quartz crystal microbalance sensor (QCM) was developed for sensitive and specific detection of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium cells in food samples by integrating a magnetic bead purification system. Although many sensor formats based on bioaffinity agents have been developed for sensitive and specific detection of bacterial cells, the development of robust sensor applications for food samples remained a challenging issue. A viable strategy would be to integrate QCM to a pre-purification system. Here, we report a novel and sensitive high throughput strategy which combines an aptamer-based magnetic separation system for rapid enrichment of target pathogens and a QCM analysis for specific and real-time monitoring. As a proof-of-concept study, the integration of Salmonella binding aptamer immobilized magnetic beads to the aptamer-based QCM system was reported in order to develop a method for selective detection of Salmonella. Since our magnetic separation system can efficiently capture cells in a relatively short processing time (less than 10 min), feeding captured bacteria to a QCM flow cell system showed specific detection of Salmonella cells at 100 CFU mL(-1) from model food sample (i.e., milk). Subsequent treatment of the QCM crystal surface with NaOH solution regenerated the aptamer-sensor allowing each crystal to be used several times. PMID:25467500

  5. CryoSat Plus For Oceans: an ESA Project for CryoSat-2 Data Exploitation Over Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, J.; Cotton, D.; Clarizia, M.; Roca, M.; Gommenginger, C. P.; Naeije, M. C.; Labroue, S.; Picot, N.; Fernandes, J.; Andersen, O. B.; Cancet, M.; Dinardo, S.; Lucas, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    The ESA CryoSat-2 mission is the first space mission to carry a space-borne radar altimeter that is able to operate in the conventional pulsewidth-limited (LRM) mode and in the novel Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode. Although the prime objective of the Cryosat-2 mission is dedicated to monitoring land and marine ice, the SAR mode capability of the Cryosat-2 SIRAL altimeter also presents the possibility of demonstrating significant potential benefits of SAR altimetry for ocean applications, based on expected performance enhancements which include improved range precision and finer along track spatial resolution. With this scope in mind, the "CryoSat Plus for Oceans" (CP4O) Project, dedicated to the exploitation of CryoSat-2 Data over ocean, supported by the ESA STSE (Support To Science Element) programme, brings together an expert European consortium comprising: DTU Space, isardSAT, National Oceanography Centre , Noveltis, SatOC, Starlab, TU Delft, the University of Porto and CLS (supported by CNES),. The objectives of CP4O are: - to build a sound scientific basis for new scientific and operational applications of Cryosat-2 data over the open ocean, polar ocean, coastal seas and for sea-floor mapping. - to generate and evaluate new methods and products that will enable the full exploitation of the capabilities of the Cryosat-2 SIRAL altimeter , and extend their application beyond the initial mission objectives. - to ensure that the scientific return of the Cryosat-2 mission is maximised. In particular four themes will be addressed: -Open Ocean Altimetry: Combining GOCE Geoid Model with CryoSat Oceanographic LRM Products for the retrieval of CryoSat MSS/MDT model over open ocean surfaces and for analysis of mesoscale and large scale prominent open ocean features. Under this priority the project will also foster the exploitation of the finer resolution and higher SNR of novel CryoSat SAR Data to detect short spatial scale open ocean features. -High Resolution Polar Ocean Altimetry: Combination of GOCE Geoid Model with CryoSat Oceanographic SAR Products over polar oceans for the retrieval of CryoSat MSS/MDT and currents circulations system improving the polar tides models and studying the coupling between blowing wind and current pattern. -High Resolution Coastal Zone Altimetry: Exploitation of the finer resolution and higher SNR of novel CryoSat SAR Data to get the radar altimetry closer to the shore exploiting the SARIn mode for the discrimination of off-nadir land targets (e.g. steep cliffs) in the radar footprint from nadir sea return. -High Resolution Sea-Floor Altimetry: Exploitation of the finer resolution and higher SNR of novel CryoSat SAR Data to resolve the weak short-wavelength sea surface signals caused by sea-floor topography elements and to map uncharted sea-mounts/trenches. One of the first project activities is the consolidation of preliminary scientific requirements for the four themes under investigation. This paper will present the CP4O project content and objectives and will address the first initial results from the on-going work to define the scientific requirements.

  6. Orthorhombic distortion and novel magnetic phase separation in Pr0.5Eu0.5MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, A.; Majumdar, S.; Giri, S.

    2011-09-01

    Structural and magnetic measurements were done on polycrystalline manganite, Pr0.5 Eu0.5 MnO3. The Rietveld refinement of the x-ray powder diffraction pattern at room temperature suggests considerable Jahn-Teller distortion due to ionic size mismatch of the isovalent ions. Dc and ac magnetometry suggest a disordered antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, exhibiting glassy magnetic behavior at low temperature. Cooling in a static magnetic field reveals a considerable shift of the magnetic hysteresis loops, a typical manifestation of exchange bias. Interestingly, we observe the absence of training effect in exchange bias. The temperature, cooling field dependent study of exchange bias, and absence of exchange bias in La0.5 Eu0.5 MnO3 suggest a novel low temperature phase separation between a disordered AFM phase induced by the Mn moments and another highly anisotropic phase involving ordering related to the rare-earth moments. It appears that this unique magnetic ground state exhibiting exchange bias is a consequence of the structural distortion inherent in the system.

  7. High-resolution structure of the Shigella type-III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Kumar Vasa, Suresh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the type-III secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4?Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent data set of 691 ssNMR constraints and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N terminus, which occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation. PMID:25264107

  8. High-resolution structure of the Shigella type-III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Kumar Vasa, Suresh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the type-III secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4?Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent data set of 691 ssNMR constraints and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N terminus, which occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation.

  9. Capture and separation of biomolecules using magnetic beads in a simple microfluidic channel without an external flow device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Morabito, Kenneth; Erkers, Tom; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2013-11-01

    The use of microfluidic devices and magnetic beads for applications in biotechnology has been extensively explored over the past decade. Many elaborate microfluidic chips have been used in efficient systems for biological assays. However most fail to achieve the ideal point of care (POC) status, as they require larger conventional external devices in conjunction with the microchip. This paper presents a simple technique to capture and separate biomolecules using magnetic bead movement on a microchip without the use of an external flow device. This microchip consisted of two well reservoirs (W1 and W2) connected via a tapered microchannel. Beads were dragged through the microchannel between the two wells at an equivalent speed to a permanent magnet that moved alongside the microchip. More than 95% of beads were transferred from W1 to W2 within 2 min at an average velocity of 0.7 mm s(-1). Enzymatic reactions were employed to test our microchip. Specifically, three assays were performed using the streptavidin coated magnetic beads as a solid support to capture and transfer biomolecules: (1) non-specific adsorption of the substrate, 6-8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (DiFMUP), (2) capture of the enzyme, biotinylated alkaline phosphatase (AP), and (3) separation of AP from DiFMUP. Our non-specific adsorption assay indicated that the microchip was capable of transferring the beads with less than 0.002% carryover of DiFMUP. Our capture assay indicated efficient capture and transfer of AP with beads to W2 containing DiFMUP, where the transferred AP converted 100% of DiFMUP to DiFMU within 15 minutes. Our separation assay showed effective separation of AP from DiFMUP and elucidated the binding capacity of the beads for AP. The leftover unbound AP in W1 converted 100% of DiFMUP within 10 minutes and samples with less than the full bead capacity of AP (i.e. all AP was transferred) did not convert any of the DiFMUP. The immobilization of AP on the bead surface resulted in 32% reduced enzymatic speed compared to that of free AP in solution, as a result of altered protein conformation and/or steric hindrance of the catalytic site. Overall, this microfluidic platform was established as a simple, efficient and effective approach for separating biomolecules without any flow apparatus. PMID:24051541

  10. Purification of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) using magnetic ion exchange adsorbents in combination with high-gradient magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Heidenreich, Elena; Franzreb, Matthias; Frankenfeld, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Current purification of the glycoprotein equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) from horse serum includes consecutive precipitation steps beginning with metaphosphoric acid pH fractionation, two ethanol precipitation steps, and dialysis followed by a numerous of fixed-bed chromatography steps up to the specific activity required. A promising procedure for a more economic purification procedure represents a simplified precipitation process requiring only onethird of the solvent, followed by the usage of magnetic ion exchange adsorbents employed together with a newly designed 'rotor-stator' type High Gradient Magnetic Fishing (HGMF) system for large-scale application, currently up to 100 g of magnetic adsorbents. Initially, the separation process design was optimized for binding and elution conditions for the target protein in mL scale. Subsequently, the magnetic filter for particle separation was characterized. Based on these results, a purification process for eCG was designed consisting of (i) pretreatment of the horse serum; (ii) binding of the target protein to magnetic ion exchange adsorbents in a batch reactor; (iii) recovery of loaded functionalized adsorbents from the pretreated solution using HGMF; (iv) washing of loaded adsorbents to remove unbound proteins; (v) elution of the target protein. Finally, the complete HGMF process was automated and conducted with either multiple single-cycles or multicycle operation of four sequential cycles, using batches of pretreated serum of up to 20 L. eCG purification with yields of approximately 53% from single HGMF cycles and up to 80% from multicycle experiments were reached, with purification and concentration factors of around 2,500 and 6.7, respectively. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 31:78-89, 2015. PMID:25393845

  11. Development of magnetic separation and quantum dots labeled immunoassay for the detection of mercury in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hubo; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Jilong; Tian, Mi; Wang, Hui; Sun, Zhiwei; Huang, Peili

    2015-04-01

    A rapid and sensitive immunoassays of mercury (Hg) in biological samples was developed using quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic beads (MBs) as fluorescent and separated probes, respectively. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognizes an Hg detection antigen (BSA-DTPA-Hg) complex was produced by the injection of BALB/c mice with an Hg immunizing antigen (KLH-DTPA-Hg). Then the ascites monoclonal antibodies were purified. The Hg monoclonal antibody (Hg-mAb) is conjugated with MBs to separate Hg from biological samples, and the other antibody, which is associated with QDs, is used to detect the fluorescence. The Hg in biological samples can be quantified using the relationship between the QDs fluorescence intensity and the concentration of Hg in biological samples following magnetic separation. In this method, the detection linear range is 1-1000ng/mL, and the minimum detection limit is 1ng/mL. The standard addition recovery rate was 94.70-101.18%. The relative standard deviation values were 2.76-7.56%. Furthermore, the Hg concentration can be detected in less than 30min, the significant interference of other heavy metals can be avoided, and the simultaneous testing of 96 samples can be performed. These results indicate that the method could be used for rapid monitoring Hg in the body. PMID:25744508

  12. Application of magnetic poly(styrene-glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres for immunomagnetic separation of bone marrow cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ting-Hao; Chang, Jing-Yi; Lee, Wen-Chien

    2009-05-01

    Surface-functionalized magnetic poly(styrene-glycidyl methacrylate) (PS-GMA) microspheres were prepared and coupled with Sca-1 antibody for cell selection from murine bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNCs). Biotinylated Sca-1 antibody could be directly coupled to avidin-bound magnetic microspheres. Alternatively, oxidized goat anti-mouse antibody was covalently bound onto the amino group-containing magnetic microspheres in a site-directed manner, and the resultant conjugate was coupled with non-modified Sca-1 antibody. Using the indirect antibody-bound magnetic microspheres, the purity of isolated Sca-1 + cells increased with bead-to-cell ratio. Using a bead-to-cell ratio of 10 beads/cell, a purity of 85% Sca-1 + cells corresponding to a 17-fold enrichment was achieved.

  13. Enthalpy and entropy of nanoparticle association from temperature-dependent cryo-TEM.

    PubMed

    van Rijssel, Jos; Erné, Ben H; Meeldijk, Johannes D; Casavola, Marianna; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël; Meijerink, Andries; Philipse, Albert P

    2011-07-28

    Quantum dots form equilibrium structures in liquid dispersions, due to thermodynamic forces that are often hard to quantify. Analysis of these structures, visualized using cryogenic electron microscopy, yields their formation free energy. Here we show that the nanoparticle interaction free energy can be further separated into the enthalpic and entropic contributions, using the temperature dependence of the assembled structures. Monodisperse oleic acid-capped PbSe nanoparticles dispersed in decalin were used as a model system, and the temperature-dependent equilibrium structures were imaged by cryo-TEM, after quenching from different initial temperatures. The interaction enthalpy and entropy follow from van 't Hoff's exact equation for the temperature dependence of thermodynamic equilibria, now applied to associating nanoparticles. The enthalpic component gives the magnitude of the contact interaction, which is crucial information in understanding the energetics of the self-assembly of nanoparticles into ordered structures. PMID:21687863

  14. Protein separation and identification using magnetic beads encoded with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bong-Hyun Jun; Mi Suk Noh; Gunsung Kim; Homan Kang; Jong-Ho Kim; Woo-Jae Chung; Min-Soo Kim; Yong-Kweon Kim; Myung-Haing Cho; Dae Hong Jeong; Yoon-Sik Lee

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a prototype of a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-encoded magnetic bead of 8?m diameter. The core part of the bead is composed of a magnetic nanoparticle (NP)-embedded sulfonated polystyrene bead. The outer part of the bead is embedded with Ag NPs on which labeling molecules generating specific SERS bands are adsorbed. A silica shell is fabricated for further

  15. Cryo-EM model validation using independent map reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    DiMaio, Frank; Zhang, Junjie; Chiu, Wah; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) density maps are being generated with suitable resolution to trace the protein backbone and guide sidechain placement. Generating and evaluating atomic models based on such maps would be greatly facilitated by independent validation metrics for assessing the fit of the models to the data. We describe such a metric based on the fit of atomic models with independent test maps from single particle reconstructions not used in model refinement. The metric provides a means to determine the proper balance between the fit to the density and model energy and stereochemistry during refinement, and is likely to be useful in determining values of model building and refinement metaparameters quite generally. PMID:23592445

  16. New high performance hybrid magnet plates for DNA separation andbio-technology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, David; Pollard, Martin; Elkin, Chris; Petermann, Karl; Reiter, Charles; Cepeda, Mario

    2004-08-02

    A new class of magnet plates for biological and industrial applications has recently been developed at the D.O.E. Joint Genome Institute and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (JGI/LBNL). These devices utilize hybrid technology that combines linear permanent magnet material and ferromagnetic material to produce significantly higher fields and gradients than currently available commercial magnet plates. These hybrid structures incorporate ferromagnetic poles that can be easily shaped to produce complex field distributions for specialized applications. The higher maximum fields and strong gradients of the hybrid structures result in greater holding forces on magnetized targets that are being processed as well as faster draw-down. Current development versions of these magnet plates have exhibited maximum fields in excess of 9000.0 Gauss. The design of these structures is easily scalable to allow for field increases to significantly above 1.0 tesla (10000.0gauss). Author's note: 11000.0 Gauss peak fields have been achieved as of January 2005.

  17. Separation of circumferential magnetic components from MI spectra in laser-annealed Co-based amorphous microwires

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. S. Yoon; B. S. Lee; Y. W. Rheem; S. J. Ahn; C. G. Kim; C. O. Kim

    2003-01-01

    A commercial glass-covered Co-based amorphous microwire (Co66Fe3.8Ni1.4B11.5Si14.6Mo1.7) with metallic core diameter of 17 ?m was annealed in air by illuminating the pulsed Nd:YAG laser beams under longitudinal and transverse annealing fields, denoted by Hl and Ht, respectively. The static susceptibilities by domain-wall motion and magnetization rotation, ?dw and ?rot, were separated from the circumferential complex permeability extracted from impedance spectra.

  18. Covariance Matrix Estimation for the Cryo-EM Heterogeneity Problem*

    PubMed Central

    Katsevich, E.; Katsevich, A.; Singer, A.

    2015-01-01

    In cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), a microscope generates a top view of a sample of randomly oriented copies of a molecule. The problem of single particle reconstruction (SPR) from cryo-EM is to use the resulting set of noisy two-dimensional projection images taken at unknown directions to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the molecule. In some situations, the molecule under examination exhibits structural variability, which poses a fundamental challenge in SPR. The heterogeneity problem is the task of mapping the space of conformational states of a molecule. It has been previously suggested that the leading eigenvectors of the covariance matrix of the 3D molecules can be used to solve the heterogeneity problem. Estimating the covariance matrix is challenging, since only projections of the molecules are observed, but not the molecules themselves. In this paper, we formulate a general problem of covariance estimation from noisy projections of samples. This problem has intimate connections with matrix completion problems and high-dimensional principal component analysis. We propose an estimator and prove its consistency. When there are finitely many heterogeneity classes, the spectrum of the estimated covariance matrix reveals the number of classes. The estimator can be found as the solution to a certain linear system. In the cryo-EM case, the linear operator to be inverted, which we term the projection covariance transform, is an important object in covariance estimation for tomographic problems involving structural variation. Inverting it involves applying a filter akin to the ramp filter in tomography. We design a basis in which this linear operator is sparse and thus can be tractably inverted despite its large size. We demonstrate via numerical experiments on synthetic datasets the robustness of our algorithm to high levels of noise. PMID:25699132

  19. Cryo-balloon catheter position planning using AFiT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinoeder, Andreas; Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common heart arrhythmia. In certain situations, it can result in life-threatening complications such as stroke and heart failure. For paroxsysmal AFib, pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) by catheter ablation is the recommended choice of treatment if drug therapy fails. During minimally invasive procedures, electrically active tissue around the pulmonary veins is destroyed by either applying heat or cryothermal energy to the tissue. The procedure is usually performed in electrophysiology labs under fluoroscopic guidance. Besides radio-frequency catheter ablation devices, so-called single-shot devices, e.g., the cryothermal balloon catheters, are receiving more and more interest in the electrophysiology (EP) community. Single-shot devices may be advantageous for certain cases, since they can simplify the creation of contiguous (gapless) lesion sets around the pulmonary vein which is needed to achieve PVI. In many cases, a 3-D (CT, MRI, or C-arm CT) image of a patient's left atrium is available. This data can then be used for planning purposes and for supporting catheter navigation during the procedure. Cryo-thermal balloon catheters are commercially available in two different sizes. We propose the Atrial Fibrillation Planning Tool (AFiT), which visualizes the segmented left atrium as well as multiple cryo-balloon catheters within a virtual reality, to find out how well cryo-balloons fit to the anatomy of a patient's left atrium. First evaluations have shown that AFiT helps physicians in two ways. First, they can better assess whether cryoballoon ablation or RF ablation is the treatment of choice at all. Second, they can select the proper-size cryo-balloon catheter with more confidence.

  20. Rapid purification and characterization of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from lizard fish protein hydrolysates with magnetic affinity separation.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiongdiao; Liao, Dankui; Wu, Shanguang; Wang, Feng; Sun, Jianhua; Tong, Zhangfa

    2015-09-01

    In this study, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from lizard fish protein hydrolysate with neutral protease were purified through magnetic affinity separation. Magnetic agarose microsphere was prepared by reverse-phase microemulsion method, and its surface was modified with epoxy groups to immobilize ACE as a magnetic affinity medium (MAM-ACE) and then mixed with lizard fish ultrafiltration hydrolysate (<5kDa). The MAM-ACE was recovered by a magnet. The bound peptides were released by 1M NaCl and further purified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The amino acid sequence of the peptide with the highest ACE inhibitory activity was identified as Gly-Met-Lys-Cys-Ala-Phe, and its IC50 was 45.7±1.1?M. The result indicates that MAM-ACE is a faster and more efficient method for purifying micro-bioactive peptides from food protein complex mixtures compared with ion exchange and gel chromatography. PMID:25842319

  1. Separation and enrichment of six indicator polychlorinated biphenyls from real waters using a novel magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotube composite absorbent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiabin; Gan, Ning; Pan, Muyun; Lin, Saichai; Cao, Yuting; Wu, Dazhen; Long, Nengbing

    2015-03-01

    A novel and effective magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotube composite for the separation and enrichment of polychlorinated biphenyls was developed. Fe3 O4 @SiO2 core-shell structured nanoparticles were first synthesized, then the poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) was laid on its surface to prepare the polyanionic magnetic nanoparticles. The above materials were then grafted with polycationic multiwalled carbon nanotubes, which were modified by polydiallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride through the layer-by-layer self-assembly approach. Its performance was tested by magnetic solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry for the determination of six kinds of indicator polychlorinated biphenyls in water samples. Under optimal conditions, the spiked recoveries of several real samples for six kinds of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB28, PCB52, PCB101, PCB138, PCB153, PCB180) were in the range of 73.4-99.5% with relative standard deviations varying from 1.5 to 8.4%. All target compounds showed good linearities in the tested range with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9993. The limits of quantification for six kinds of indicator polychlorinated biphenyls were between 0.018 and 0.039 ng/mL. The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze polychlorinated biphenyls in real water samples. Satisfactory results were obtained using the effective magnetic absorbent. PMID:25556922

  2. Cryo-EM modeling by the molecular dynamics flexible fitting method

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwok-Yan; Trabuco, Leonardo G.; Schreiner, Eduard; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The increasing power and popularity of cryo-electron (cryo-EM) microscopy in structural biology brought about the development of so-called hybrid methods, which permit the interpretation of cryo-EM density maps beyond their nominal resolution in terms of atomic models. The Cryo-EM Modeling Challenge 2010 is the first community effort to bring together developers of hybrid methods as well as cryo-EM experimentalists. Participating in the challenge, the molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) method was applied to a number of cryo-EM density maps. The results are described here with special emphasis on the use of symmetry-based restraints to improve the quality of atomic models derived from density maps of symmetric complexes; on a comparison of the stereochemical quality of atomic models resulting from different hybrid methods; and on application of MDFF to electron crystallography data. PMID:22696404

  3. Viewing Direction Estimation in Cryo-EM Using Synchronization*

    PubMed Central

    Shkolnisky, Yoel; Singer, Amit

    2013-01-01

    A central task in recovering the structure of a macromolecule from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) images is to determine a three-dimensional model of the macromolecule given many of its two-dimensional projection images. The direction from each image taken the images which was is unknown, and are small and extremely noisy. The goal is to determine the direction from which each image was taken and then to combine the images into a three-dimensional model of the molecule. We present an algorithm for determining the viewing direction of all cryo-EM images at once, which is robust to high levels of noise. The algorithm is based on formulating the problem as a synchronization problem; that is, we estimate the relative spatial configuration of pairs of images and then estimate a global assignment of orientations that maximizes the number of satisfied pairwise relations. Information about the spatial relation between pairs of images is extracted from common lines between triplets of images. These noisy pairwise relations are combined into a single consistent assignment of orientations by constructing a matrix whose entries encode the pairwise relations. This matrix is shown to have rank 3, and its nontrivial eigenspace is shown to reveal the projection orientation of each image. In particular, we show that the nontrivial eigenvectors encode the rotation matrix that corresponds to each image. PMID:24363820

  4. Nanostructuring of Undoped ZnSb by Cryo-Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Valset, K.; Graff, J. S.; Thøgersen, A.; Gunnæs, A. E.; Luxsacumar, S.; Løvvik, O. M.; Snyder, G. J.; Finstad, T. G.

    2015-03-01

    We report the preparation of nanosized ZnSb powder by cryo-milling. The effect of cryo-milling then hot-pressing of undoped ZnSb was investigated and compared with that of room temperature ball-milling and hot-pressing under different temperature conditions. ZnSb is a semiconductor with favorable thermoelectric properties when doped. We used undoped ZnSb to study the effect of nanostructuring on lattice thermal conductivity, and with little contribution at room temperature from electronic thermal conductivity. Grain growth was observed to occur during hot-pressing, as observed by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The thermal conductivity was lower for cryo-milled samples than for room-temperature ball-milled samples. The thermal conductivity also depended on hot-pressing conditions. The thermal conductivity could be varied by a factor of two by adjusting the process conditions and could be less than a third that of single-crystal ZnSb.

  5. Low-Cost Cryo-Light Microscopy Stage Fabrication for Correlated Light/Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, David B.; Evans, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The coupling of cryo-light microscopy (cryo-LM) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) poses a number of advantages for understanding cellular dynamics and ultrastructure. First, cells can be imaged in a near native environment for both techniques. Second, due to the vitrification process, samples are preserved by rapid physical immobilization rather than slow chemical fixation. Third, imaging the same sample with both cryo-LM and cryo-EM provides correlation of data from a single cell, rather than a comparison of "representative samples". While these benefits are well known from prior studies, the widespread use of correlative cryo-LM and cryo-EM remains limited due to the expense and complexity of buying or building a suitable cryogenic light microscopy stage. Here we demonstrate the assembly, and use of an inexpensive cryogenic stage that can be fabricated in any lab for less than $40 with parts found at local hardware and grocery stores. This cryo-LM stage is designed for use with reflected light microscopes that are fitted with long working distance air objectives. For correlative cryo-LM and cryo-EM studies, we adapt the use of carbon coated standard 3-mm cryo-EM grids as specimen supports. After adsorbing the sample to the grid, previously established protocols for vitrifying the sample and transferring/handling the grid are followed to permit multi-technique imaging. As a result, this setup allows any laboratory with a reflected light microscope to have access to direct correlative imaging of frozen hydrated samples. PMID:21673645

  6. Self-assembled monolayers improve protein distribution on holey carbon cryo-EM supports

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Joel R.; Rao, Prashant; Kumar, Janesh; Chittori, Sagar; Banerjee, Soojay; Pierson, Jason; Mayer, Mark L.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Poor partitioning of macromolecules into the holes of holey carbon support grids frequently limits structural determination by single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Here, we present a method to deposit, on gold-coated carbon grids, a self-assembled monolayer whose surface properties can be controlled by chemical modification. We demonstrate the utility of this approach to drive partitioning of ionotropic glutamate receptors into the holes, thereby enabling 3D structural analysis using cryo-EM methods. PMID:25403871

  7. Microcystin-LR removal from aqueous solutions using a magnetically separable N-doped TiO2 nanocomposite under visible light irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of magnetically separable N-doped TiO2 was found to be significantly improved when compared with a non-magnetic N-doped TiO2 for the aqueous removal of cyanotoxin Microcystin-LR. The observed enhanced photocatalytic activity may be related to the presence of ferri...

  8. Vapor-liquid phase separator studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, Y. I.; Hepler, W. A.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1983-01-01

    Porous plugs serve as both entropy rejection devices and phase separation components separating the vapor phase on the downstream side from liquid Helium 2 upstream. The liquid upstream is the cryo-reservoir fluid needed for equipment cooling by means of Helium 2, i.e Helium-4 below its lambda temperature in near-saturated states. The topics outlined are characteristic lengths, transport equations and plug results.

  9. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoshells: combining two-photon luminescence imaging, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiulong; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Shanshan; Kong, Ni; Xu, Hong; Fu, Qihua; Gu, Hongchen; Ye, Jian

    2014-11-01

    With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have constructed a novel type of core-shell superparamagnetic nanoshell (Fe3O4@SiO2@Au), composed of a Fe3O4 cluster core, a thin Au shell and a SiO2 layer in between. The obtained multifunctional nanoparticles combine the magnetic properties and plasmonic optical properties effectively, which were well investigated by a number of experimental characterization methods and theoretical simulations. We have demonstrated that Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles can be utilized for two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering (NIR SERS) and cell collection by magnetic separation. The TPL intensity could be further greatly enhanced through the plasmon coupling effect in the self-assembled nanoparticle chains, which were triggered by an external magnetic field. In addition, Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles may have great potential applications such as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photo-thermotherapy. Successful combination of multifunctions including magnetic response, biosensing and bioimaging in single nanoparticles allows further manipulation, real-time tracking, and intracellular molecule analysis of live cells at a single-cell level.With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have constructed a novel type of core-shell superparamagnetic nanoshell (Fe3O4@SiO2@Au), composed of a Fe3O4 cluster core, a thin Au shell and a SiO2 layer in between. The obtained multifunctional nanoparticles combine the magnetic properties and plasmonic optical properties effectively, which were well investigated by a number of experimental characterization methods and theoretical simulations. We have demonstrated that Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles can be utilized for two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering (NIR SERS) and cell collection by magnetic separation. The TPL intensity could be further greatly enhanced through the plasmon coupling effect in the self-assembled nanoparticle chains, which were triggered by an external magnetic field. In addition, Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles may have great potential applications such as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photo-thermotherapy. Successful combination of multifunctions including magnetic response, biosensing and bioimaging in single nanoparticles allows further manipulation, real-time tracking, and intracellular molecule analysis of live cells at a single-cell level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04111a

  10. Development of an aptamer-based impedimetric bioassay using microfluidic system and magnetic separation for protein detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixian; Ye, Zunzhong; Ping, Jianfeng; Jing, Shunru; Ying, Yibin

    2014-09-15

    An aptamer-based impedimetric bioassay using the microfluidic system and magnetic separation was developed for the sensitive and rapid detection of protein. The microfluidic impedance device was fabricated through integrating the gold interdigitated array microelectrode into a flow cell made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Aptamer modified magnetic beads were used to capture and separate the target protein, and concentrated into a suitable volume. Then the complexes were injected into the microfluidic flow cell for impedance measurement. To demonstrate the high performance of this novel detection system, thrombin was employed as the target protein. The results showed that the impedance signals at the frequency of 90 kHz have a good linearity with the concentrations of thrombin in a range from 0.1 nM to 10nM and the detection limit is 0.01 nM. Compared with the reported impedimetric aptasensors for thrombin detection, this method possesses several advantages, such as the increasing sensitivity, improving reproducibility, reducing sample volume and assay time. All these demonstrate the proposed detection system is an alternative way to enable sensitive, rapid and specific detection of protein. PMID:24709326

  11. Well-defined nanostructured surface-imprinted polymers for highly selective magnetic separation of fluoroquinolones in human urine.

    PubMed

    He, Yonghuan; Huang, Yanyan; Jin, Yulong; Liu, Xiangjun; Liu, Guoquan; Zhao, Rui

    2014-06-25

    The construction of molecularly imprinted polymers on magnetic nanoparticles gives access to smart materials with dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the superparamagnetic surface-molecularly imprinted nanoparticles were prepared via surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using ofloxacin (OFX) as template for the separation of fluoroquinolones (FQs). Benefiting from the living/controlled nature of RAFT reaction, distinct core-shell structure was successfully constructed. The highly uniform nanoscale MIP layer was homogeneously grafted on the surface of RAFT agent TTCA modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, which favors the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The target binding assays demonstrate the desirable adsorption capacity and imprinting efficiency of Fe3O4@MIP. High selectivity of Fe3O4@MIP toward FQs (ofloxacin, pefloxacin, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and gatifloxacin) was exhibited by competitive binding assay. The Fe3O4@MIP nanoparticles were successfully applied for the direct enrichment of five FQs from human urine. The spiked human urine samples were determined and the recoveries ranging from 83.1 to 103.1% were obtained with RSD of 0.8-8.2% (n = 3). This work provides a versatile approach for the fabrication of well-defined MIP on nanomaterials for the analysis of complicated biosystems. PMID:24853973

  12. Separating surface magnetic effects in sunspot seismology: new time-distance helioseismic diagnostics

    E-print Network

    S. P. Rajaguru

    2008-02-20

    Time-distance helioseismic measurements in surface- and deep-focus geometries for wave-paths that distinguish surface magnetic contributions from those due to deeper perturbations beneath a large sunspot are presented and analysed. Travel times showing an increased wave speed region extending down to about 18 Mm beneath the spot are detected in deep-focus geometry that largely avoids use of wave field within the spot. Direction (in- or out-going wave) and surface magnetic field (or focus depth) dependent changes in frequency dependence of travel times are shown and identified to be signatures of wave absorption and conversion in near surface layers rather than that of shallowness of sunspot induced perturbations.

  13. Synthetic ligand-coated magnetic nanoparticles for microfluidic bacterial separation from blood.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Jae; Jeong, Kyung Jae; Hashimoto, Michinao; Kwon, Albert H; Rwei, Alina; Shankarappa, Sahadev A; Tsui, Jonathan H; Kohane, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis is a serious clinical condition that can lead to multiple organ dysfunction and death despite timely treatment with antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. We have developed an approach to clearing bacteria and endotoxin from the bloodstream, using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) modified with bis-Zn-DPA, a synthetic ligand that binds to both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Magnetic microfluidic devices were used to remove MNPs bound to Escherichia coli , a Gram-negative bacterium commonly implicated in bacterial sepsis, from bovine whole blood at flows as high as 60 mL/h, resulting in almost 100% clearance. Such devices could be adapted to clear bacteria from septicemic patients. PMID:23367876

  14. CALCULATING SEPARATE MAGNETIC FREE ENERGY ESTIMATES FOR ACTIVE REGIONS PRODUCING MULTIPLE FLARES: NOAA AR11158

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana; Millhouse, Margaret [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    It is well known that photospheric flux emergence is an important process for stressing coronal fields and storing magnetic free energy, which may then be released during a flare. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured the entire emergence of NOAA AR 11158. This region emerged as two distinct bipoles, possibly connected underneath the photosphere, yet characterized by different photospheric field evolutions and fluxes. The combined active region complex produced 15 GOES C-class, two M-class, and the X2.2 Valentine's Day Flare during the four days after initial emergence on 2011 February 12. The M and X class flares are of particular interest because they are nonhomologous, involving different subregions of the active region. We use a Magnetic Charge Topology together with the Minimum Current Corona model of the coronal field to model field evolution of the complex. Combining this with observations of flare ribbons in the 1600 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO, we propose a minimization algorithm for estimating the amount of reconnected flux and resulting drop in magnetic free energy during a flare. For the M6.6, M2.2, and X2.2 flares, we find a flux exchange of 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, and 21.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, respectively, resulting in free energy drops of 3.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg, 2.62 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg, and 1.68 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg.

  15. Calculating Separate Magnetic Free Energy Estimates for Active Regions Producing Multiple Flares: NOAA AR11158

    E-print Network

    Tarr, Lucas A; Millhouse, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that photospheric flux emergence is an important process for stressing coronal fields and storing magnetic free energy, which may then be released during a flare. The \\emph{Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager} (HMI) onboard the \\emph{Solar Dynamics Observatory} (SDO) captured the entire emergence of NOAA AR 11158. This region emerged as two distinct bipoles, possibly connected underneath the photosphere, yet characterized by different photospheric field evolutions and fluxes. The combined active region complex produced 15 GOES C--class, 2 M--class, and the X2.2 Valentine's Day Flare during the four days after initial emergence on February 12th, 2011. The M and X class flares are of particular interest because they are nonhomologous, involving different subregions of the active region. We use a Magnetic Charge Topology together with the Minimum Current Corona model of the coronal field to model field evolution of the complex. Combining this with observations of flare ribbons in the 1600\\AA\\ chann...

  16. Dual-responsive magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for nonviral gene delivery and cell separation.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Alexander P; Schallon, Anja; Jérôme, Valérie; Freitag, Ruth; Müller, Axel H E; Schmalz, Holger

    2012-03-12

    We present the synthesis of dual-responsive (pH and temperature) magnetic core-shell nanoparticles utilizing the grafting-from approach. First, oleic acid stabilized superparamagnetic maghemite (?-Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles (NPs), prepared by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl, were surface-functionalized with ATRP initiating sites bearing a dopamine anchor group via ligand exchange. Subsequently, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) was polymerized from the surface by ATRP, yielding dual-responsive magnetic core-shell NPs (?-Fe(2)O(3)@PDMAEMA). The attachment of the dopamine anchor group on the nanoparticle's surface is shown to be reversible to a certain extent, resulting in a grafting density of 0.15 chains per nm(2) after purification. Nevertheless, the grafted NPs show excellent long-term stability in water over a wide pH range and exhibit a pH- and temperature-dependent reversible agglomeration, as revealed by turbidimetry. The efficiency of ?-Fe(2)O(3)@PDMAEMA hybrid nanoparticles as a potential transfection agent was explored under standard conditions in CHO-K1 cells. Remarkably, ?-Fe(2)O(3)@PDMAEMA led to a 2-fold increase in the transfection efficiency without increasing the cytotoxicity, as compared to polyethyleneimine (PEI), and yielded on average more than 50% transfected cells. Moreover, after transfection with the hybrid nanoparticles, the cells acquired magnetic properties that could be used for selective isolation of transfected cells. PMID:22296556

  17. Greek "red mud" residue: a study of microwave reductive roasting followed by magnetic separation for a metallic iron recovery process.

    PubMed

    Samouhos, Michail; Taxiarchou, Maria; Tsakiridis, Petros E; Potiriadis, Konstantinos

    2013-06-15

    The present research work is focused on the development of an alternative microwave reductive roasting process of red mud using lignite (30.15 wt.%Cfix), followed by wet magnetic separation, in order to produce a raw material suitable for sponge or cast iron production. The reduction degree of iron was controlled by both the reductive agent content and the microwave heating time. The reduction followed the Fe?O? ? Fe?O? ? FeO ? Fe sequence. The dielectric constants [real (?') and imaginary (??) permittivities] of red mud-lignite mixture were determined at 2.45 GHz, in the temperature range of 25-1100 °C. The effect of parameters such as temperature, intensity of reducing conditions, intensity of magnetic field and dispersing agent addition rate on the result of both processes was investigated. The phase's transformations in reduction process with microwave heating were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) in combination with thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA). The microstructural and morphological characterization of the produced calcines was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At the optimum conditions a magnetic concentrate with total iron concentration of 35.15 and 69.3 wt.% metallization degree was obtained. PMID:23611801

  18. Preparation of quantum dot-coated magnetic polystyrene nanospheres for cancer cell labelling and separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maoquan Chu; Xin Song; Duo Cheng; Shupeng Liu; Jian Zhu

    2006-01-01

    CdTe-coated magnetic polystyrene nanospheres (MPN) were prepared via a stepwise electrostatic self-assembly approach, and the conjugation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to the MPN\\/CdTe core-shell nanocomposites was prepared by using 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethylamino propyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) as a cross-linking reagent. The MPN\\/CdTe and their bioconjugates yielded not only emitted bright fluorescence, but also exhibited superparamagnetism. The human breast cancer MDA-MB-435S cells could be

  19. Cryo-technical design aspects of the superconducting SIS100 quadrupole doublet modules

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, J. P.; Bleile, A.; Fischer, E.; Hess, G.; Macavei, J.; Spiller, P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-29

    The FAIR project was initiated to build an international accelerator and experimental facility for basic research activities in various fields of modern physics. The core component of the project will be the SIS100 heavy ion accelerator, producing heavy ion beams of uniquely high intensities and qualities. The superconducting main quadrupoles and corrector magnets are assembled within complex quadrupole doublet modules (QDMs), combining two superconducting quadrupole (focusing and defocusing), sextupole and steering magnets in one cryostat. In addition a cryo-catcher, a beam position monitor and a cold beam pipe will be integrated. In accordance with the magnet lattice structure, the QDM series for the SIS100 consists of four main families composed of eleven different configurations. The common technical feature of all configurations is a sophisticated common girder structure, mechanically integrating all functional components in one cold mass and being suspended in a corresponding cryostat system. The requirements to position preservation during thermal cycling are to be fulfilled by a precise and stable support of the functional elements, as well as by a reliable, reproducible and stable cold mass suspension system. The main design aspects of the QDMs will be discussed as a result of these requirements.

  20. Cryo-technical design aspects of the superconducting SIS100 quadrupole doublet modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, J. P.; Bleile, A.; Fischer, E.; Hess, G.; Macavei, J.; Spiller, P.

    2014-01-01

    The FAIR project was initiated to build an international accelerator and experimental facility for basic research activities in various fields of modern physics. The core component of the project will be the SIS100 heavy ion accelerator, producing heavy ion beams of uniquely high intensities and qualities. The superconducting main quadrupoles and corrector magnets are assembled within complex quadrupole doublet modules (QDMs), combining two superconducting quadrupole (focusing and defocusing), sextupole and steering magnets in one cryostat. In addition a cryo-catcher, a beam position monitor and a cold beam pipe will be integrated. In accordance with the magnet lattice structure, the QDM series for the SIS100 consists of four main families composed of eleven different configurations. The common technical feature of all configurations is a sophisticated common girder structure, mechanically integrating all functional components in one cold mass and being suspended in a corresponding cryostat system. The requirements to position preservation during thermal cycling are to be fulfilled by a precise and stable support of the functional elements, as well as by a reliable, reproducible and stable cold mass suspension system. The main design aspects of the QDMs will be discussed as a result of these requirements.

  1. Improvement of the separation of tumour cells from peripheral blood cells using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalbe, M.; Pachmann, K.; Höffken, K.; Clement, J. H.

    2006-09-01

    Circulating tumour cells are a key challenge in tumour therapy. Numerous approaches are on the way to achieving the elimination of these potential sources of metastasis formation. Antibody-directed magnetic cell sorting is supposed to enrich tumour cells with high selectivity, but low efficiency. The short term application of carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) coated magnetit/maghemit nanoparticles allows the discrimination of tumour cells from leukocytes. In the present work we show that the interaction of CMD nanoparticles is cell-type specific and time dependent. The breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and the CML cell line K-562 are characterized by a rapid and high interaction rate, whereas leukocytes exhibit a decelerated behaviour. The addition of carboxymethyl dextran or glucose stimulated the magnetic labelling of leukocytes. The variation of the degree of substitution of dextran with carboxymethyl groups did not affect the labelling profile of leukocytes and MCF-7 cells. In order to verify the in vitro results, whole blood samples from 13 cancer patients were analysed ex vivo. Incubation of the purified leukocyte fraction with CMD nanoparticles in the presence of low amounts of plasma reduced the overall cell content in the positive fraction. In contrast, the absolute number of residual tumour cells in the positive fraction was 90% of the initial amount.

  2. Levitation Performance of Two Opposed Permanent Magnet Pole-Pair Separated Conical Bearingless Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Peter; Jansen, Ralph; Dever, Timothy; Nagorny, Aleksandr; Loparo, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    In standard motor applications, rotor suspension with traditional mechanical bearings represents the most economical solution. However, in certain high performance applications, rotor suspension without contacting bearings is either required or highly beneficial. Examples include applications requiring very high speed or extreme environment operation, or with limited access for maintenance. This paper expands upon a novel bearingless motor concept, in which two motors with opposing conical air-gaps are used to achieve full five-axis levitation and rotation of the rotor. Force in this motor is created by deliberately leaving the motor s pole-pairs unconnected, which allows the creation of different d-axis flux in each pole pair. This flux imbalance is used to create lateral force. This approach is different than previous bearingless motor designs, which require separate windings for levitation and rotation. This paper examines the predicted and achieved suspension performance of a fully levitated prototype bearingless system.

  3. Local CP-violation and electric charge separation by magnetic fields from lattice QCD

    E-print Network

    G. S. Bali; F. Bruckmann; G. Endrodi; Z. Fodor; S. D. Katz; A. Schafer

    2014-03-31

    We study local CP-violation on the lattice by measuring the local correlation between the topological charge density and the electric dipole moment of quarks, induced by a constant external magnetic field. This correlator is found to increase linearly with the external field, with the coefficient of proportionality depending only weakly on temperature. Results are obtained on lattices with various spacings, and are extrapolated to the continuum limit after the renormalization of the observables is carried out. This renormalization utilizes the gradient flow for the quark and gluon fields. Our findings suggest that the strength of local CP-violation in QCD with physical quark masses is about an order of magnitude smaller than a model prediction based on nearly massless quarks in domains of constant gluon backgrounds with topological charge. We also show numerical evidence that the observed local CP-violation correlates with spatially extended electric dipole structures in the QCD vacuum.

  4. 3D reconstruction and comparison of shapes of DNA minicircles observed by cryo-electron microscopy

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Nadir

    3D reconstruction and comparison of shapes of DNA minicircles observed by cryo-electron microscopy, 2006 ABSTRACT We use cryo-electron microscopy to compare 3D shapes of 158 bp long DNA minicircles activator protein binding site. We present a sorting algorithm that correlates the reconstructed shapes

  5. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers?

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. PMID:24262358

  6. Capturing enveloped viruses on affinity grids for downstream cryo-electron microscopy applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electron microscopy cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography are essential techniques used for characterizing basic virus morphology and determining the three-dimensional structure of viruses. Enveloped viruses, which contain an outer lipoprotein coat, constitute the largest group of pa...

  7. The baking process of wheat rolls followed by cryo scanning electron microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Rojas; C. M. Rosell; C. Benedito de Barber; I. Pérez-Munuera; M. A. Lluch

    2000-01-01

    The evolution that the microstructure of the main components of wheat flour undergoes during the bread-making process was analysed by cryo scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). The microstructure of wheat flour preserved some characteristics of the intact endosperm and consisted of aggregates of protein in which were embedded groups of cellular components. At the mixing stage, the dough appeared as a

  8. Bio-inspired cryo-ink preserves red blood cell phenotype and function during nanoliter vitrification.

    PubMed

    El Assal, Rami; Guven, Sinan; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Gozen, Irep; Shafiee, Hadi; Dalbeyler, Sedef; Abdalla, Noor; Thomas, Gawain; Fuld, Wendy; Illigens, Ben M W; Estanislau, Jessica; Khoory, Joseph; Kaufman, Richard; Zylberberg, Claudia; Lindeman, Neal; Wen, Qi; Ghiran, Ionita; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-09-01

    Current red-blood-cell cryopreservation methods utilize bulk volumes, causing cryo-injury of cells, which results in irreversible disruption of cell morphology, mechanics, and function. An innovative approach to preserve human red-blood-cell morphology, mechanics, and function following vitrification in nanoliter volumes is developed using a novel cryo-ink integrated with a bioprinting approach. PMID:25047246

  9. Evidence for Two Separate but Interlaced Components of the Chromospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardom, K. P.; Wang, Y.-M.; Muglach, K.; Warren, H. P.

    2011-01-01

    Chromospheric fibrils are generally thought to trace out low-lying, mainly horizontal magnetic elds that fan out from flux concentrations in the photosphere. A high-resolution (approximately 0.1" per pixel) image, taken in the core of the Ca II 854.2 nm line and covering an unusually large area, shows the dark brils within an active region remnant as fine, looplike features that are aligned parallel to each other and have lengths comparable to a supergranular diameter. Comparison with simultaneous line-of-sight magnetograms confirms that the fibrils are centered above intranetwork areas (supergranular cell interiors), with one end rooted just inside the neighboring plage or strong unipolar network but the other endpoint less clearly defined. Focusing on a particular arcade-like structure lying entirely on one side of a lament channel (large-scale polarity inversion), we find that the total amount of positive-polarity flux underlying this "fibril arcade" is approximately 50 times greater than the total amount of negative-polarity flux. Thus, if the brils represent closed loops, they must consist of very weak fields (in terms of total magnetic flux), which are interpenetrated by a more vertical field that contains most of the flux. This surprising result suggests that the fibrils in unipolar regions connect the network to the nearby intranetwork flux, while the bulk of the network flux links to remote regions of the opposite polarity, forming a second, higher canopy above the fibril canopy. The chromospheric field near the edge of the network thus has an interlaced structure resembling that in sunspot penumbrae.

  10. Serum peptidome patterns of hepatocellular carcinoma based on magnetic bead separation and mass spectrometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in the world,and the identification of biomarkers for the early detection is a relevant target. The purpose of the study is to discover specific low molecular weight (LMW) serum peptidome biomarkers and establish a diagnostic pattern for HCC. Methods We undertook this pilot study using a combined application of magnetic beads with Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) technique and ClinPro Tools v2.2 to detect 32 patients with HCC, 16 patients with chronic hepatitis (CH), 16 patients with liver cirrhosis (LC) and 16 healthy volunteers. Results The results showed 49, 33 and 37 differential peptide peaks respectively appeared in HCC, LC and CH groups. A Supervised Neural Network (SNN) algorithm was used to set up the classification model. Eleven of the identified peaks at m/z 5247.62, 7637.05, 1450.87, 4054.21, 1073.37, 3883.64, 5064.37, 4644.96, 5805.51, 1866.47 and 6579.6 were used to construct the peptides patterns. According to the model, we could clearly distinguish between HCC patients and healthy controls as well as between LC or CH patients and healthy controls. Conclusions The study demonstrated that a combined application of magnetic beads with MALDI-TOF MB technique was suitable for identification of potential serum biomarkers for HCC and it is a promising way to establish a diagnostic pattern. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1503629821958720. PMID:23915185

  11. A flexible lab-on-a-chip for the synthesis and magnetic separation of magnetite decorated with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Flávio C; Melo, Antonio F A A; de Souza, João C P; Job, Aldo E; Crespilho, Frank N

    2015-03-31

    Magnetite decorated with gold nanoparticles (Fe3O4-AuNPs) is a ferrimagnetic material with unprecedented applications in immunosensors, as a contrast agent for imaging diagnosis, and for the photothermal ablation of tumor cells. Here, we show the preparation of controlled amounts of Fe3O4-AuNPs without organic solvents, surfactants, or heat treatment. For this, we have developed a customized natural-rubber-based microfluidic device (NRMD) as a flexible lab-on-a-chip for the decoration of Fe3O4 with AuNPs. With a novel NRMD configuration, monodisperse Fe3O4-NPs (? = 10 nm) decorated with AuNPs (? = 4 nm) were readily obtained. The AuNPs were homogenous in terms of their size and their distribution on the Fe3O4-NP surfaces. Furthermore, the lab-on-a-chip was projected with an internal system for magnetic separation, an innovation in terms of aqueous/carrier phase separation. Finally, the nanomaterials produced with this NRMD are free of organic solvents and surfactants, allowing them to be used directly for medical applications. PMID:25723569

  12. Separation and purification of Si from solidification of hypereutectic Al-Si melt under rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, J. C.; Zou, Q. C.; Wang, H. W.; Sun, J. L.; Lu, Y. P.; Wang, T. M.; Li, T. J.

    2014-08-01

    A low-cost and high-efficiency method to purify Si directly from cheap MG-Si at low temperature was proposed and demonstrated in this paper, which used power frequency rotating magnetic field (RMF) to separate the primary Si from a hypereutectic Al-Si alloy and was followed by the acid peeling. The separation mechanism was based on the flow characteristic of melt under RMF and the cooling condition of the liquid metal. A Si-rich layer with Si content of 65-59 wt% was formed in the periphery of alloy, while the inner microstructure of the alloy was mainly the Al-Si eutectic structure. The refined silicon was collected after aqua regia leaching, and had much fewer typical impurities (Fe, Ti, Ca, B, P) than those in MG-Si, and the metallic impurities besides Al had removal fraction higher than 98%, which is mainly ascribed to the segregation effect of Al-30Si alloy during solidification under RMF.

  13. Cryo-fixation by self-pressurized rapid freezing.

    PubMed

    Grabenbauer, Markus; Han, Hong-Mei; Huebinger, Jan

    2014-01-01

    High-pressure freeze fixation is the method of choice to arrest instantly all dynamic and physiological processes inside cells, tissues, and small organisms. Embedded in vitreous ice, such samples can be further processed by freeze substitution or directly analyzed in their fully hydrated state by cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS) to explore cellular ultrastructure as close as possible to the native state. Here, we describe the procedure of self-pressurized rapid freezing as fast, easy-to-use, and low-cost freeze fixation method, avoiding the usage of a high-pressure freezing (HPF) apparatus. Cells or small organisms are placed in capillary metal tubes, which are tightly closed and plunged directly into liquid ethane cooled by liquid nitrogen. In parts of the tube, crystalline ice is formed and builds up pressure sufficient for the liquid-glass transition of the remaining specimen. The quality of samples is equivalent to preparations by conventional HPF apparatus, allowing for high-resolution cryo-EM applications or for freeze substitution and plastic embedding. PMID:24357364

  14. Assessment of Lead Discrimination from CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, S. K.; Connor, L. N.; Newman, T.; Farrell, S. L.; Smith, W. H.; Forsberg, R.

    2012-12-01

    Sea ice is strongly affecting the global climate, and the sea ice extent has been monitored by satellites since 1979. To estimate the Arctic sea ice volume, ice thickness must be determined. The measurements of sea ice thickness are however more difficult to achieve, and encounter limitations due to spatial and temporal variability. The measurements of sea ice freeboard may be used to estimate sea ice thickness, when combined with examination of leads between ice floes to determine the local sea surface height. With CryoSat-2 (CS), we have the opportunity to measure much more of the Arctic Ocean due to its high sampling rate and geographical coverage to 88 oN/S. Validation of the CS retrievals are very important to verify the derived sea ice thickness and understand the associated error sources. We present a comparative analysis of CryoSat-2 elevations with the Operation IceBridge Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) laser altimeter data gathered on April 2, 2012, where the NASA P-3 completed an underflight of CS orbit number 10520, north of Alert, Nunavut, Canada. We present a new lead detecting algorithm which was developed using the CS Level1b (L1b) waveforms, and we analyze its capabilities via comparisons with IceBridge imagery and ATM elevations. In addition,using CS L1b waveforms we have developed a method to find misplaced CS Level 2 elevations and correct them to remove any elevation bias.

  15. Evidence for Two Separate but Interlaced Components of the Chromospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muglach, K.; Reardon, K. P.; Wang, Y.-M.; Warren, H. P.

    2012-01-01

    Chromospheric fibrils are generally thought to trace out horizontal magnetic fields that fan out from flux concentrations in the photosphere. A high-resolution (0.2") image taken in the core of the Ca IJ854.2 nm line shows the dark fibrils within an active region remnant as fine, loop-like features that are aligned parallel to each other and have lengths on the order of a supergranular diameter (approx.30 Mm). Comparison with a line-of-sight magnetogram confirms that the fibrils are centered above intranetwork areas, with one end rooted just inside the neighboring plage or strong unipolar network but the other endpoint less clearly defined. Focusing on a particular arcade-like structure lying entirely on one side of a filament channel (large-scale polarity inversion), we find that the total amount of positive-polarity flux underlying this "fibril arcade' is 50 times greater than the total amount of negative-polarity flux. Thus, if the fibrils represent closed loops, they must consist of very weak fields (in terms of flux density), which are interpenetrated by a more vertical field that contains most of the flux. This surprising result suggests that the fibrils in unipolar regions connect the network to the nearby intranetwork flux, while the bulk of the network flux is diverted upward into the corona and connects to remote regions of the opposite polarity. We conclude that the chromospheric field near the edge of the network has an interlaced structure resembling that in sunspot penumbrae, with the fibrils representing the low-lying horizontal flux that remains trapped within the highly nonpotential chromospheric layer.

  16. Spatiotemporally separating electron and phonon thermal transport in L1{sub 0} FePt films for heat assisted magnetic recording

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, D. B., E-mail: dongbin.xu@seagate.com [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); Sun, C. J., E-mail: cjsun@aps.anl.gov, E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg; Ho, P.; Chen, J. S.; Chow, G. M., E-mail: cjsun@aps.anl.gov, E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); Brewe, D. L.; Heald, S. M.; Zhang, X. Y. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Han, S.-W. [Department of Physics Education and Institute of Fusion Science, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-28

    We report the spatio-temporal separation of electron and phonon thermal transports in nanostructured magnetic L1{sub 0} FePt films at the nanometer length scale and the time domain of tens of picosecond, when heated with a pulsed laser. We demonstrate that lattice dynamics measured using the picosecond time-resolved laser pump/X-ray probe method on the FePt (002) and Ag (002) Bragg reflections from different layers provided the information of nanoscale thermal transport between the layers. We also describe how the electron and phonon thermal transports in nanostructured magnetic thin films were separated.

  17. Chemically Driven Nanoscopic Magnetic Phase Separation at the SrTiO(3)(001)/La(1-x)Sr(x)CoO(3) Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Torija, Maria [University of Minnesota; Sharma, M [University of Minnesota; Gazquez Alabart, Jaume [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; He, C. [University of Minnesota; Schmitt, J. [University of Minnesota; Borchers, J.A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Laver, M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); El-Khatib, S. [University of Minnesota; Leighton, chris [University of Minnesota

    2011-01-01

    The degradation in magnetic properties in very thin film complex oxides is studied using SrTiO(3)(001)/La(1-x)Sr(x)CoO(3), providing unequivocal evidence for nanoscopic interfacial magnetic phase separation. Electron microscopy and spectroscopy reveal that this occurs due to inhomogeneity in local hole doping, driven by subtle, depthwise variations in the Sr and O stoichiometry. Simple thermodynamic and structural arguments for the origin of these variations are provided.

  18. From CryoSat-2 to Sentinel-3 and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, R.

    2011-12-01

    CryoSat-2 carried into Earth orbit the first altimeter using SAR principles, although similar techniques had been used on earlier Venusian missions. Furthermore, it carries a second antenna and receive chain, and has been very carefully calibrated, allowing interferometry between these antennas. The results of the SAR mode and of the interferometer have met all expectations, with handsome margins. Even before the launch of CryoSat-2 the further development of this concept was underway with the radar for the oceanography mission Sentinel-3. While this radar, named SRAL (SAR Radar Altimeter) does not have the interferometer capability of CryoSat-2's SIRAL (SAR Interferometric Radar Altimeter), it does have a second frequency, to enable direct measurement of the delay induced by the ionospheric electron content. Sentinel-3 will have a sun-synchronous orbit, like ERS and EnviSat, and will have a similar latitudinal range: about 82° north and south, compared to CryoSat's 88°. Sentinel-3 will operate its radar altimeter in the high-resolution SAR mode over coastal oceans and inland water, and will revert to the more classical pulse-width limited mode over the open oceans. The SAR mode generates data at a high rate, so the major limiting factor is the amount of on-board storage. The power consumption is also higher, imposing less critical constraints. For sizing purposes the coastal oceans are defined as waters within 300 km of the continental shorelines. Sentinel-3 is expected to be launched in 2013 and be followed 18 months later by a second satellite of the same design. The next step in the development of this family of radar altimeters is Jason-CS, which will provide Continuity of Service to the existing Jason series of operational oceanography missions. Jason-CS has a very strong heritage from CryoSat but will fly the traditional Jason orbit, which covers latitudes up to 66° from a high altitude of 1330 km. The new radar is called Poseidon-4, to emphasise the connection to Jason, but its concept owes more to Sentinel-3's SRAL. It retains SRAL's dual frequencies and its SAR mode, but adds some further refinements. Most notably, an operating mode in which SAR operations and full performance pulse-width limited mode are available simultaneously, is under study. This would enable the benefits of SAR mode to be achieved over all ocean areas if the volume of data generated could be stored and downlinked to the ground. This problem only becomes tractable if an on-board processing system can be introduced to perform the first level of SAR processing, reducing the data volume by several orders of magnitude. This is also under study. The architecture of the radar has a further improvement, in the extension of digital technology further into the domain of analog radio-frequency electronics. While this is essentially invisible to the scientific user, it will yield an instrument with higher quality and markedly superior stability. The Jason-CS missions (at least two satellites are planned) are currently in a study phase with an implementation decision expected at the end of 2012. The planned launch date for the first mission is 2017.

  19. Microchannel liquid-flow focusing and cryo-polymerization preparation of supermacroporous cryogel beads for bioseparation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Junxian; Tu, Changming; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Xu, Linhong; Guo, Yantao; Shen, Shaochuan; Zhang, Songhong; Yao, Kejian; Guan, Yi-Xin; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2012-07-20

    Polymeric cryogels are sponge-like materials with supermacroporous structure, allowing them to be of interest as new chromatographic supports, cell scaffolds and drug carriers in biological and biomedical areas. The matrices of cryogels are always prepared in the form of monoliths by cryo-polymerization under frozen conditions. However, there are limited investigations on the production of cryogels in the form of adsorbent beads suitable for bioseparation. In this work, we provide a new approach by combining the microchannel liquid-flow focusing with cryo-polymerization for the preparation of polyacrylamide-based supermacroporous cryogel beads with a narrow particle size distribution. The present method was achieved by introducing the aqueous phase solution containing monomer, cross-linker and redox initiators, and the water-immiscible organic oil phase containing surfactant simultaneously into a microchannel with a cross-shaped junction, where the aqueous drops with uniform sizes were generated by the liquid shearing and the segmentation due to the steady flow focusing of the immiscible phase streams. These liquid drops were in situ suspended into the freezing bulk oil phase for cryo-polymerization and the cryogel matrix beads were obtained by thawing after the achievement of polymerization. By grafting the polymer chains containing sulfo binding groups onto these matrix beads, the cation-exchange cryogel beads for protein separation were produced. The results showed that at the aqueous phase velocities from 0.5 to 2.0 cm/s and the total velocities of the water-immiscible phase from 2.0 to 6.0 cm/s, the obtained cryogel beads by the present method have narrow size distributions with most of the bead diameters in the range from 800 to 1500 ?m with supermacropores in sizes of about 3-50 ?m. These beads also have high porosities with the averaged maximum porosity of 96.9% and the mean effective porosity of 86.2%, which are close to those of the polyacrylamide-based cryogel monoliths. The packed bed using the cryogel beads with mean diameter of 1248 ?m, as an example, has reasonable and acceptable liquid dispersion, but high water permeability (4.29 × 10?¹? m²) and high bed voidage (90.2%) owing to the supermacropores within the beads, enhanced the rapid binding and separation of protein from the feedstock even at high flow velocities. The purity of the obtained lysozyme from chicken egg white by one-step chromatography using the packed bed was in the range of about 78-92% at the flow velocities of 0.5-15 cm/min, indicating that the present cryogel beads could be an effective chromatographic adsorbent for primary bioseparation. PMID:22695698

  20. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic hexacyanoferrate (II) polymeric nanocomposite for separation of cesium from radioactive waste solutions.

    PubMed

    Sheha, Reda R

    2012-12-15

    Nanocrystalline potassium zinc hexacyanoferrate loaded on nanoscale magnetite substrate was successfully synthesized for significantly enhanced removal of cesium from low-level radioactive wastes. A description was given for preparation and properties of these precursors. The physicochemical properties of these nanocomposites were determined using different techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Data clarified that supporting potassium zinc hexacyanoferrates on iron ferrite nanoparticles increased their thermal stability. Further, Fourier transform infrared spectra confirmed that the nanocomposites were well coordinated and incorporated in the polymer matrix. The average particle sizes, of these nanoparticles, determined by SEM had a good agreement with XRD results. Based on characterization data, the prepared zinc hexacyanoferrates were proposed to have a zeolitic rhombohedral structure with cavities can host alkali metal ions and water molecules. The magnetic analysis showed a super-paramagnetic behavior. Batch technique was applied to evaluate the influences of initial pH value, contact time, and competing cations on the efficiency of cesium removal. The sorption process was fast initially, and maximum separation was attained within 2h of contact. Cesium exchange was independent from pH value and deviate from ideal exchange phenomena. In neutral solutions, Cs(+) was retained through exchange with K(+); however, in acidic solution, phase transformation was proposed. Sorption capacity of these materials attained values amounted 1965 mg g(-1). The synthesized nanocomposites exhibited different affinities toward Cs(I), Co(II), and Eu(III) elements and showed a good ability to separate them from each other. PMID:23000210

  1. Magnetic, Durable, and Superhydrophobic Polyurethane@Fe3O4@SiO2@Fluoropolymer Sponges for Selective Oil Absorption and Oil/Water Separation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Li, Lingxiao; Li, Bucheng; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Aiqin

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic polyurethane (PU) sponges were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) to bind the Fe3O4 nanoparticles tightly on the sponge and then dip-coating in a fluoropolymer (FP) aqueous solution. The sponges were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and other analytical techniques. The effects of CVD time of TEOS and FP concentration on wettability, mechanical properties, oil absorbency, and oil/water selectivity of the sponges were also investigated. The sponges exhibit fast magnetic responsivity and excellent superhydrophobicity/superoleophilicity (CAwater = 157° and CAoil ? 0°). The sponges also show very high efficiency in oil/water separation and could, driven by a magnet, quickly absorb floating oils on the water surface and heavy oils under water. Moreover, the PU@Fe3O4@SiO2@FP sponges could be used as membranes for oil/water separation and for continuous separation of large amounts of oil pollutants from the water surface with the help of a pump. The in turn binding of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, SiO2, and FP can also improve mechanical properties of the PU sponge. The sponges maintain the superhydrophobicity even when they are stretched with 200% strain or compressed with 50% strain. The sponges also show excellent mechanical stability, oil stability, and reusability in terms of superhydrophobicity and oil absorbency. The magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic PU sponges are very promising materials for practical oil absorption and oil/water separation. PMID:25671386

  2. Proceedings of the 22nd sensor symposium, Oct. 20-21, 2005, Tokyo, pp 125 -128 Micro Magnetic Separator for Stem Cell Sorting System

    E-print Network

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    Separator for Stem Cell Sorting System Hiromichi Inokuchi Yuji Suzuki Nobuhide Kasagi Naoki Shikazono sorting (uIMCS) system for ex- tracting stem cells from peripheral blood. In this report, micro magnetic, in which pluripotent stem cells extracted from a patient's body are cultured to differen- tiate

  3. MAGNETIC DRUM SEPARATOR PERFORMANCE SCALPING SHREDDED TROMMEL OVERFLOW AT NOMINAL DESIGN CONDITIONS. TEST NO. 4.03, RECOVERY 1, NEW ORLEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the first test of the shredded trommel overs magnetic drum separator at the New Orleans, Louisiana, resource recovery facility. Shredded trommel overs refers to waste which reports to the oversize discharge from the trommel and is subsequently shredded. For ...

  4. Thermal-Structural Coupled Analysis of ITER Torus Cryo-Pump Housing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Songke; Song, Yuntao; Xie, Han; Lei, Mingzhun

    2012-11-01

    An ITER torus cryo-pump housing (TCPH), which encloses a torus cryo-pump, is connected to a vacuum vessel (VV) by a set of associated double bellows. There are complicated loads due to two different operating states (pumping and regeneration) and foreseeable accidents with the cryo-pump. This paper describes a thermal-structural coupled analysis of the present TCPH according to the allowable stress criteria of RCC-MR, in which the worst cases and outcomes of various load combinations are obtained. Meanwhile, optimization of the structure has been carried out to obtain positive analysis results and an adequate safety margin.

  5. High Resolution CryoFESEM of Microbial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsen, Stanley; Lei, Ming; Martin-Lacave, Ines; Dunny, Gary; Wells, Carol

    2003-08-01

    The outer surfaces of three microorganisms, Giardia lamblia, Enterococcus faecalis, and Proteus mirabilis, were investigated by cryo-immobilization followed by sublimation of extracellular ice and cryocoating with either Pt alone or Pt plus carbon. Cryocoated samples were examined at [minus sign]125°C in either an in-lens field emission SEM or a below-the-lens field emission SEM. Cryocoating with Pt alone was sufficient for low magnification observation, but attempts to do high-resolution imaging resulted in radiolysis and cracking of the specimen surface. Double coating with Pt and carbon, in combination with high resolution backscatter electron detectors, enabled high-resolution imaging of the glycocalyx of bacteria, revealing a sponge-like network over the surface. High resolution examination of bacterial flagella also revealed a periodic substructure. Common artifacts included radiolysis leading to “cracking” of the surface, and insufficient deposition of Pt resulting in the absence of detectable surface topography.

  6. Energetic particle induced desorption of water vapor cryo-condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Owen, L.W.; Simpkins, J.E.; Uckan, T.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    An in-vessel cryo-condensation pump is being designed for the Advanced Divertor configuration of the DIII-D tokamak. To assess the importance of possible desorption of water vapor from the cryogenic surfaces of the pump due to impingement of energetic particles from the plasma, a 77 K surface on which a thin layer of water vapor was condensed was exposed to a tenuous plasma (density = 2 {times} 10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}3}, electron temperature = 3 eV). Significant desorption of the condensate occurred, suggesting that impingement of energeticparticles (10 eV) at flux levels of {approximately}10{sup 16} cm{sup 2}s{sup {minus}1} on cryogenic surfaces could potentially induce impurity problems in the tokamak plasma. A pumping configuration is presented in which this problem is minimized without sacrificing the pumping speed.

  7. Preparation of anionic polyelectrolyte modified magnetic nanoparticles for rapid and efficient separation of lysozyme from egg white.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Lin, Yuexin; Jia, Li

    2015-04-01

    Poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) modified magnetic nanoparticles (PSS-MNPs) were successfully synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, zeta potential, vibrating sample magnetometry, and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry. The PSS-MNPs were found to enable effective separation of lysozyme from egg white. The impacts of solution pH, ionic strength, and contact time on the adsorption process were investigated. The adsorption kinetic data were well fitted using a pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the adsorption equilibrium can be reached in 3min. The adsorption isotherm data could be well described by the Langmuir equation. The maximum adsorption capacity of PSS-MNPs for lysozyme was calculated to be 476.2mgg(-1) according to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The fast and efficient adsorption of lysozyme by PSS-MNPs was mainly based on electrostatic interactions between them. The adsorbed lysozyme can be eluted using 20mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) containing 1.0M NaCl with a recovery of 96%. The extracted lysozyme from egg white demonstrated high purity, retaining about 90.7% of total lysozyme activity. PMID:25728660

  8. Nitride Fuel Development Using Cryo-process Technique

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Brandi M; Windes, William E

    2007-06-01

    A new cryo-process technique has been developed for the fabrication of advanced fuel for nuclear systems. The process uses a new cryo-processing technique whereby small, porous microspheres (<2000 µm) are formed from sub-micron oxide powder. A simple aqueous particle slurry of oxide powder is pumped through a microsphere generator consisting of a vibrating needle with controlled amplitude and frequency. As the water-based droplets are formed and pass through the microsphere generator they are frozen in a bath of liquid nitrogen and promptly vacuum freeze-dried to remove the water. The resulting porous microspheres consist of half micron sized oxide particles held together by electrostatic forces and mechanical interlocking of the particles. Oxide powder microspheres ranging from 750 µm to 2000 µm are then converted into a nitride form using a high temperature fluidized particle bed. Carbon black can be added to the oxide powder before microsphere formation to augment the carbothermic reaction during conversion to a nitride. Also, the addition of ethyl alcohol to the aqueous slurry reduces the surface tension energy of the droplets resulting in even smaller droplets forming in the microsphere generator. Initial results from this new process indicate a lower impurity contamination in the final nitrides due to the single feed stream of particles, material handling and conversion are greatly simplified, a minimum of waste and personnel exposure are anticipated, and finally the conversion kinetics may be greatly increased because of the small oxide powder size (sub-micron) forming the porous microsphere. Thus far the fabrication process has been successful in demonstrating all of these improvements with surrogate ZrO2 powder. Further tests will be conducted in the future using the technique on UO2 powders.

  9. CryoSat-2 SIRAL Calibration: Strategy, Application and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrinello, T.; Fornari, M.; Bouzinac, C.; Scagliola, M.; Tagliani, N.

    2012-04-01

    The main payload of CryoSat-2 is a Ku band pulsewidth limited radar altimeter, called SIRAL (Synthetic interferometric radar altimeter), that transmits pulses at a high pulse repetition frequency thus making the received echoes phase coherent and suitable for azimuth processing. This allows to reach an along track resolution of about 250 meters which is an important improvement over traditional pulse-width limited altimeters. Due to the fact that SIRAL is a phase coherent pulse-width limited radar altimeter, a proper calibration approach has been developed. In fact, not only the corrections for transfer function amplitude with respect to frequency, gain and instrument path delay have to be computed but it is also needed to provide corrections for transfer function phase with respect to frequency and AGC setting as well as the phase variation across bursts of pulses. As a consequence, SIRAL performs regularly four types of calibrations: (1) CAL1 in order to calibrate the internal path delay and peak power variation, (2) CAL2 in order to compensate the instrument transfer function, (3) CAL4 to calibrate the interferometer and (4) AutoCal, a specific sequence in order to calibrate the gain and phase difference for each AGC setting. Commissioning phase results (April-December 2010) revealed high stability of the instrument, which made possible to reduce the calibration frequency during Operations. Internal calibration data are processed on ground by the CryoSat-2 Instrument Processing Facility (IPF1) and then applied to the science data. In this poster we will describe as first the calibration strategy and then how the four different types of calibration are applied to science data. Moreover the calibration results over almost 2 years of mission will be presented, analyzing their temporal evolution in order to highlight the stability of the instrument over its life.

  10. The ultrastructure of Chlorobaculum tepidum revealed by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Kudryashev, Misha; Aktoudianaki, Aikaterini; Dedoglou, Dimitrios; Stahlberg, Henning; Tsiotis, Georgios

    2014-10-01

    Chlorobaculum (Cba) tepidum is a green sulfur bacterium that oxidizes sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate for photosynthetic growth. As other anoxygenic green photosynthetic bacteria, Cba tepidum synthesizes bacteriochlorophylls for the assembly of a large light-harvesting antenna structure, the chlorosome. Chlorosomes are sac-like structures that are connected to the reaction centers in the cytoplasmic membrane through the BChl ?-containing Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein. Most components of the photosynthetic machinery are known on a biophysical level, however, the structural integration of light harvesting with charge separation is still not fully understood. Despite over two decades of research, gaps in our understanding of cellular architecture exist. Here we present an in-depth analysis of the cellular architecture of the thermophilic photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium of Cba tepidum by cryo-electron tomography. We examined whole hydrated cells grown under different electron donor conditions. Our results reveal the distribution of chlorosomes in 3D in an unperturbed cell, connecting elements between chlorosomes and the cytoplasmic membrane and the distribution of reaction centers in the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:24950126

  11. Mechanical Property Characterization of Cryo-Rolled Copper by Miniaturized Disk Bend and Nanoindentation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Garima; Chatterjee, Arnomitra; Kapoor, Rajeev; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2014-09-01

    The present study reports mechanical behavior of severe plastically deformed pure Cu under cryogenic conditions by miniaturized disk bend test (MDBT) and nanoindentation technique. MDBT is a useful technique to determine mechanical property of miniature samples under multiaxial state of stress. The samples were severely deformed by cryo-rolling upto 75% and 95% reduction. Microstructure evolution of cryo-rolled samples has been characterized using optical and EBSD technique. MDBT was performed on cryo-rolled 10-mm disk of ~200-?m thickness. Nanoindentation tests were also performed on the cryo-rolled samples. The hardness values obtained from nanoindentation tests were compared with yield stress obtained from MDBT. The present study established a good quantitative correlation between the two techniques. Mechanical dynamic parameters; strain rate sensitivity (m) and activation volume (V*) determined by MDBT and nanoindentation techniques showed close agreement in the results.

  12. Mechanical Property Characterization of Cryo-Rolled Copper by Miniaturized Disk Bend and Nanoindentation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Garima; Chatterjee, Arnomitra; Kapoor, Rajeev; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    The present study reports mechanical behavior of severe plastically deformed pure Cu under cryogenic conditions by miniaturized disk bend test (MDBT) and nanoindentation technique. MDBT is a useful technique to determine mechanical property of miniature samples under multiaxial state of stress. The samples were severely deformed by cryo-rolling upto 75% and 95% reduction. Microstructure evolution of cryo-rolled samples has been characterized using optical and EBSD technique. MDBT was performed on cryo-rolled 10-mm disk of ~200-?m thickness. Nanoindentation tests were also performed on the cryo-rolled samples. The hardness values obtained from nanoindentation tests were compared with yield stress obtained from MDBT. The present study established a good quantitative correlation between the two techniques. Mechanical dynamic parameters; strain rate sensitivity ( m) and activation volume ( V*) determined by MDBT and nanoindentation techniques showed close agreement in the results.

  13. Validated near-atomic resolution structure of bacteriophage epsilon15 derived from cryo-EM

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    Validated near-atomic resolution structure of bacteriophage epsilon15 derived from cryo important contribu- tions to modern structural biology. Bacteriophages, the most diverse and abundant previous electron cryomicroscopy structure of Salmonella bacteriophage epsilon15, achieving a resolution

  14. Viewing Angle Classification of Cryo-Electron Microscopy Images Using Eigenvectors

    PubMed Central

    Singer, A.; Zhao, Z.; Shkolnisky, Y.; Hadani, R.

    2012-01-01

    The cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction problem is to find the three-dimensional structure of a macromolecule given noisy versions of its two-dimensional projection images at unknown random directions. We introduce a new algorithm for identifying noisy cryo-EM images of nearby viewing angles. This identification is an important first step in three-dimensional structure determination of macromolecules from cryo-EM, because once identified, these images can be rotationally aligned and averaged to produce “class averages” of better quality. The main advantage of our algorithm is its extreme robustness to noise. The algorithm is also very efficient in terms of running time and memory requirements, because it is based on the computation of the top few eigenvectors of a specially designed sparse Hermitian matrix. These advantages are demonstrated in numerous numerical experiments. PMID:22506089

  15. Segmentation and registration of molecular components in 3-dimensional density maps from cryo-electron microscopy

    E-print Network

    Pintilie, Grigore Dimitrie, 1976-

    2010-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy is a method that produces 3D density maps of macromolecular complexes. Segmentation and registration methods are heavily used to extract structural information from such density maps. Segmentation ...

  16. Cryo-EM of macromolecular assemblies at near-atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Baker, Matthew L; Zhang, Junjie; Ludtke, Steven J; Chiu, Wah

    2010-09-01

    With single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM), it is possible to visualize large, macromolecular assemblies in near-native states. Although subnanometer resolutions have been routinely achieved for many specimens, state of the art cryo-EM has pushed to near-atomic (3.3-4.6 Å) resolutions. At these resolutions, it is now possible to construct reliable atomic models directly from the cryo-EM density map. In this study, we describe our recently developed protocols for performing the three-dimensional reconstruction and modeling of Mm-cpn, a group II chaperonin, determined to 4.3 Å resolution. This protocol, utilizing the software tools EMAN, Gorgon and Coot, can be adapted for use with nearly all specimens imaged with cryo-EM that target beyond 5 Å resolution. Additionally, the feature recognition and computational modeling tools can be applied to any near-atomic resolution density maps, including those from X-ray crystallography. PMID:20885381

  17. Exploring conformational modes of macromolecular assemblies by multi-particle cryo-EM

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Christian M.T.; Penczek, Pawel A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a technique aimed at structure determination of large macromolecular complexes in their unconstrained, physiological conditions. The power of the method has been demonstrated in selected studies where for highly symmetric molecules the resolution attained permitted backbone tracing. However, most molecular complexes appear to exhibit intrinsic conformational variability necessary to perform their functions. Therefore, it is now increasingly recognized that sample heterogeneity constitutes a major methodological challenge for cryo-EM. To overcome it dedicated experimental and particularly computational multi-particle approaches have been developed. Their applications point to the future of cryo-EM as an experimental method uniquely suited to visualize the conformational modes of large macromolecular complexes and machines. PMID:19767196

  18. Cryo-electron microscopy of microstructures in self-assembled colloidal systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yi Zheng

    2000-01-01

    Direct imaging transmission electron microscopy at cryogenic temperature (Cryo-TEM) is in many instances the most powerful probe of microstructures of self-assembled, i.e. equilibrium, colloidal systems. It is the only technique that allows model-independent, real-space imaging at high resolution. Continuing our group's two decades devoted research with Cryo-TEM, my thesis extends the technique to new territories. An on-the-grid deformation-and-relaxation sample preparation

  19. Near-atomic resolution reconstructions of icosahedral viruses from electron cryo-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    Nine different near-atomic resolution structures of icosahedral viruses, determined by electron cryo-microscopy and published between early 2008 and late 2010, fulfill predictions made 15 years ago that single-particle cryo-EM techniques could visualize molecular detail at 3 – 4 Å resolution. This review summarizes technical developments, both in instrumentation and in computation, that have led to the new structures, which advance our understanding of virus assembly and cell entry. PMID:21333526

  20. Cryo Electron Microscopy Reconstructions of the Leviviridae Unveil the Densest Icosahedral RNA Packing Possible

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roman I. Koning; Hans J. Warmenhoven; Henk K. Koerten; Jan van Duin

    2006-01-01

    We solved the structures of the single-stranded RNA bacteriophages Q?, PP7 and AP205 by cryo-electron microscopy. On the outside, the symmetrized electron density maps resemble the previously described cryo-electron microscopy structure of MS2. RNA density is present inside the capsids, suggesting that the genomic RNA of Q?, PP7 and AP205, analogous to MS2, contains many coat protein-binding sites in addition

  1. Step by step manipulation of the CryoCapsule with HPM high pressure freezers.

    PubMed

    Heiligenstein, Xavier; Hurbain, Ilse; Delevoye, Cédric; Salamero, Jean; Antony, Claude; Raposo, Graca

    2014-01-01

    The CryoCapsule is a tool dedicated to correlative light to electron microscopy experiments. Focused on simplifying the specimen manipulation throughout the entire workflow from live-cell imaging to freeze substitution following cryofixation by high pressure freezing, we introduce here a step by step procedure to use the CryoCapsule either with the high pressure freezing machines: HPM010 or the HPM100. PMID:25287845

  2. Cryo-imaging of 70+GB mice: Image processing\\/visualization challenges and biotechnology applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Wilson; Madhusudhana Gargesha; Debashish Roy; Mohammed Q. Qutaish; Ganapathi Krishnamurthi; Kristin Sullivant; Patiwet Wuttisarnwattana; Hong Lu; Benjamin Moore; Christian Anderson

    2011-01-01

    The Case whole mouse cryo-imaging system is a sectionand-image system which provides microscopic, information rich, whole mouse color brightfield and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging creates extremely large data sets (>70GB color brightfield) and presents a multitude of instrumentation and image processing\\/visualization challenges. Precise mechanical control was required to move a 50 lb microscope payload for tiled

  3. Single-particle cryo-EM of the ryanodine receptor channel in an aqueous environment

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Mariah R.; Fan, Guizhen; Serysheva, Irina I.

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are tetrameric ligand-gated Ca2+ release channels that are responsible for the increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration leading to muscle contraction. Our current understanding of RyR channel gating and regulation is greatly limited due to the lack of a high-resolution structure of the channel protein. The enormous size and unwieldy shape of Ca2+ release channels make X-ray or NMR methods difficult to apply for high-resolution structural analysis of the full-length functional channel. Single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) is one of the only effective techniques for the study of such a large integral membrane protein and its molecular interactions. Despite recent developments in cryo-EM technologies and break-through single-particle cryo-EM studies of ion channels, cryospecimen preparation, particularly the presence of detergent in the buffer, remains the main impediment to obtaining atomic-resolution structures of ion channels and a multitude of other integral membrane protein complexes. In this review we will discuss properties of several detergents that have been successfully utilized in cryo-EM studies of ion channels and the emergence of the detergent alternative amphipol to stabilize ion channels for structure-function characterization. Future structural studies of challenging specimen like ion channels are likely to be facilitated by cryo-EM amenable detergents or alternative surfactants.

  4. Direct observation of liquid crystals using cryo-TEM: specimen preparation and low-dose imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min; Kim, Young-Ki; Zhang, Cuiyu; Borshch, Volodymyr; Zhou, Shuang; Park, Heung-Shik; Jákli, Antal; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Tamba, Maria-Gabriela; Kohlmeier, Alexandra; Mehl, Georg H; Weissflog, Wolfgang; Studer, Daniel; Zuber, Benoît; Gnägi, Helmut; Lin, Fang

    2014-10-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) represent a challenging group of materials for direct transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies due to the complications in specimen preparation and the severe radiation damage. In this paper, we summarize a series of specimen preparation methods, including thin film and cryo-sectioning approaches, as a comprehensive toolset enabling high-resolution direct cryo-TEM observation of a broad range of LCs. We also present comparative analysis using cryo-TEM and replica freeze-fracture TEM on both thermotropic and lyotropic LCs. In addition to the revisits of previous practices, some new concepts are introduced, e.g., suspended thermotropic LC thin films, combined high-pressure freezing and cryo-sectioning of lyotropic LCs, and the complementary applications of direct TEM and indirect replica TEM techniques. The significance of subnanometer resolution cryo-TEM observation is demonstrated in a few important issues in LC studies, including providing direct evidences for the existence of nanoscale smectic domains in nematic bent-core thermotropic LCs, comprehensive understanding of the twist-bend nematic phase, and probing the packing of columnar aggregates in lyotropic chromonic LCs. Direct TEM observation opens ways to a variety of TEM techniques, suggesting that TEM (replica, cryo, and in situ techniques), in general, may be a promising part of the solution to the lack of effective structural probe at the molecular scale in LC studies. PMID:25045045

  5. Targeted nano analysis of water and ions in the nucleus using cryo-correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nolin, Frédérique; Ploton, Dominique; Wortham, Laurence; Tchelidze, Pavel; Bobichon, Hélène; Banchet, Vincent; Lalun, Nathalie; Terryn, Christine; Michel, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus is a crowded volume in which the concentration of macromolecules is high. These macromolecules sequester most of the water molecules and ions which, together, are very important for stabilization and folding of proteins and nucleic acids. To better understand how the localization and quantity of water and ions vary with nuclear activity, it is necessary to study them simultaneously by using newly developed cell imaging approaches. Some years ago, we showed that dark-field cryo-Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-STEM) allows quantification of the mass percentages of water, dry matter, and elements (among which are ions) in freeze-dried ultrathin sections. To overcome the difficulty of clearly identifying nuclear subcompartments imaged by STEM in ultrathin cryo-sections, we developed a new cryo correlative light and STEM imaging procedure. This combines fluorescence imaging of nuclear GFP-tagged proteins to identify, within cryo ultrathin sections, regions of interest which are then analyzed by STEM for quantification of water and identification and quantification of ions. In this chapter we describe the new setup we have developed to perform this cryo-correlative light and STEM imaging approach, which allows a targeted nano analysis of water and ions in nuclear compartments. PMID:25311128

  6. O-Allylation of phenols with allylic acetates in aqueous media using a magnetically separable catalytic system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Allylic ethers were synthesized in water using magnetically recoverable heterogeneous Pd catalyst via O-allylation of phenols with allylic acetates under ambient conditions. Aqueous reaction medium, easy recovery of the catalyst using an external magnet, efficient recycling, and ...

  7. Low-frequency resistance fluctuations in a single nanowire (diameter ? 45 nm) of a complex oxide and its relation to magnetic transitions and phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Subarna; Samanta, Sudeshna; Ghosh, Barnali; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2014-08-01

    We report measurement of low frequency resistance noise spectroscopy in a single strand of a nanowire (NW) (diameter ? 45 nm) of a complex oxide manganite La0.5Sr0.5MnO3, that showed ferromagnetic transition (TC ? 315 K), an antiferromagnetic transition (TN ? 210 K) and a phase-separated region below TN. We demonstrated that noise spectroscopy in a single NW can cleanly detect the magnetic transitions including the phase-coexistence that may not be possible to do by magnetic measurements. The normalized noise in the single NW is an order less than that reported in ultralow-noise Si Junction Field Effect Transistor.

  8. Cryo-Electron Microscopy Structure of Lactococcal Siphophage 1358 Virion

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Silvia; Bebeacua, Cecilia; Orlov, Igor; Tremblay, Denise; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lactococcus lactis, a Gram+ lactic acid-producing bacterium used for the manufacture of several fermented dairy products, is subject to infection by diverse virulent tailed phages, leading to industrial fermentation failures. This constant viral risk has led to a sustained interest in the study of their biology, diversity, and evolution. Lactococcal phages now constitute a wide ensemble of at least 10 distinct genotypes within the Caudovirales order, many of them belonging to the Siphoviridae family. Lactococcal siphophage 1358, currently the only member of its group, displays a noticeably high genomic similarity to some Listeria phages as well as a host range limited to a few L. lactis strains. These genomic and functional characteristics stimulated our interest in this phage. Here, we report the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the complete 1358 virion. Phage 1358 exhibits noteworthy features, such as a capsid with dextro handedness and protruding decorations on its capsid and tail. Observations of the baseplate of virion particles revealed at least two conformations, a closed and an open, activated form. Functional assays uncovered that the adsorption of phage 1358 to its host is Ca2+ independent, but this cation is necessary to complete its lytic cycle. Taken together, our results provide the complete structural picture of a unique lactococcal phage and expand our knowledge on the complex baseplate of phages of the Siphoviridae family. IMPORTANCE Phages of Lactococcus lactis are investigated mainly because they are sources of milk fermentation failures in the dairy industry. Despite the availability of several antiphage measures, new phages keep emerging in this ecosystem. In this study, we provide the cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of a unique lactococcal phage that possesses genomic similarity to particular Listeria phages and has a host range restricted to only a minority of L. lactis strains. The capsid of phage 1358 displays the almost unique characteristic of being dextro handed. Its capsid and tail exhibit decorations that we assigned to nonspecific sugar binding modules. We observed the baseplate of 1358 in two conformations, a closed and an open form. We also found that the adsorption to its host, but not infection, is Ca2+ independent. Overall, this study advances our understanding of the adhesion mechanisms of siphophages. PMID:24872584

  9. Cryo-electron tomography of plunge-frozen whole bacteria and vitreous sections to analyze the recently described bacterial cytoplasmic structure, the Stack.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Lidia; Martínez, Gema; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Mercadé, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) of plunge-frozen whole bacteria and vitreous sections (CETOVIS) were used to revise and expand the structural knowledge of the "Stack", a recently described cytoplasmic structure in the Antarctic bacterium Pseudomonas deceptionensis M1(T). The advantages of both techniques can be complementarily combined to obtain more reliable insights into cells and their components with three-dimensional imaging at different resolutions. Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) and CET of frozen-hydrated P. deceptionensis M1(T) cells confirmed that Stacks are found at different locations within the cell cytoplasm, in variable number, separately or grouped together, very close to the plasma membrane (PM) and oriented at different angles (from 35° to 90°) to the PM, thus establishing that they were not artifacts of the previous sample preparation methods. CET of plunge-frozen whole bacteria and vitreous sections verified that each Stack consisted of a pile of oval disc-like subunits, each disc being surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane and separated from each other by a constant distance with a mean value of 5.2±1.3nm. FM4-64 staining and confocal microscopy corroborated the lipid nature of the membrane of the Stacked discs. Stacks did not appear to be invaginations of the PM because no continuity between both membranes was visible when whole bacteria were analyzed. We are still far from deciphering the function of these new structures, but a first experimental attempt links the Stacks with a given phase of the cell replication process. PMID:25617813

  10. Influence of the static high magnetic field on the liquid-liquid phase separation during solidifying the hyper-monotectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhong, Y. B.; Fautrelle, Y.; Zheng, T. X.; Li, F.; Ren, Z. M.; Debray, F.

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic in-situ quenching refers to fixing and quenching the sample at a static high magnetic field (SHMF) up to 18 T; it has been achieved by a specially designed facility. Zn-7wt%Bi and Zn-10wt%Bi hyper-monotectic melts were quenched under different magnetic flux densities to investigate the influence of SHMF on the liquid-liquid phase separation process in solidifying hyper-monotectic alloys. Because this separation is mainly caused by the growth of minority phase droplets (Bi droplets in the present study), and such growth is attributed to the diffusion of Bi element and the coalescence between the droplets, the influence of SHMF on the growth of Bi droplets was analyzed. Results show that the imposed SHMF prevented the formation of layered structure in the Zn-10wt%Bi alloy and refined the Bi particles in the Zn-7wt%Bi alloy, which indicates that the SHMF retarded the liquid-liquid phase separation during solidifying the hyper-monotectic alloys. Indeed, the two motions of droplets in determining the coalescence, Marangoni migration and Stocks sedimentation, were slowed down by the applied SHMF. Analytical estimations of the magnitude of such damping effect have been made and show that the 18 T SHMF could reduce the speed of Stokes sedimentation and Marangoni migration of the minority phase droplets by about 95.5 % and 62.4 %, respectively.

  11. CRYOGENIC SYSTEM FOR BEPCII SRF CAVITY, IR QUADRUPOLE AND DETECTOR SOLENOID MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,J.X.; WANG.L.

    2004-05-11

    Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPCII) requires three types of superconducting facilities, including one pair of SRF cavities, one pair of interaction region quadrupole magnets, and one detector solenoid magnet. The cryo-plant for BEPCII has a total cooling capacity of 1kW at 4.5K, which is composed of two separate helium refrigerators of 500W each. Two refrigerators share the same gas storage and recovery system. The engineering design for the cryogenic systems, including power leads, control dewars, subcooler, cryogenic valve boxes, cryogenic transfer-lines and cryogenic controls, is completed. The production of its subsystem is under way. This paper summarizes the progress in cryogenics of the BEPCII project.

  12. A cylindrical specimen holder for electron cryo-tomography

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Colin M.; Löwe, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The use of slab-like flat specimens for electron cryo-tomography restricts the range of viewing angles that can be used. This leads to the “missing wedge” problem, which causes artefacts and anisotropic resolution in reconstructed tomograms. Cylindrical specimens provide a way to eliminate the problem, since they allow imaging from a full range of viewing angles around the tilt axis. Such specimens have been used before for tomography of radiation-insensitive samples at room temperature, but never for frozen-hydrated specimens. Here, we demonstrate the use of thin-walled carbon tubes as specimen holders, allowing the preparation of cylindrical frozen-hydrated samples of ribosomes, liposomes and whole bacterial cells. Images acquired from these cylinders have equal quality at all viewing angles, and the accessible tilt range is restricted only by the physical limits of the microscope. Tomographic reconstructions of these specimens demonstrate that the effects of the missing wedge are substantially reduced, and could be completely eliminated if a full tilt range was used. The overall quality of these tomograms is still lower than that obtained by existing methods, but improvements are likely in future. PMID:24275523

  13. Computational Resources for Cryo-Electron Tomography in Bsoft

    PubMed Central

    Heymann, J. Bernard; Cardone, Giovanni; Winkler, Dennis C.; Steven, Alasdair C.

    2008-01-01

    The Bsoft package (Heymann and Belnap JSB 2007, 157, 3) has been enhanced by adding utilities for processing electron tomographic (ET) data; in particular, cryo-ET data characterized by low contrast and high noise. To handle the high computational load efficiently, a workflow was developed, based on the database-like parameter handling in Bsoft, aimed at minimizing user interaction and facilitating automation. To the same end, scripting elements distribute the processing among multiple processors on the same or different computers. The resolution of a tomogram depends on the precision of projection alignment, which is usually based on pinpointing fiducial markers (electron-dense gold particles). Alignment requires accurate specification of the tilt axis, and our protocol includes a procedure for determining it to adequate accuracy. Refinement of projection alignment provides information that allows assessment of its precision, as well as projection quality control. We implemented a reciprocal space algorithm that affords an alternative to back-projection or real space algorithms for calculating tomograms Resources are also included that allow resolution assessment by cross-validation (NLOO2D); denoising and interpretation; and the extraction, mutual alignment, and averaging of tomographic subvolumes. PMID:17869539

  14. Cryo-electron tomography of nanoparticle transmigration into liposome.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, Olivier; Bonnafous, Pierre; Marak, Laszlo; Bickel, Thomas; Trépout, Sylvain; Mornet, Stéphane; De Haas, Felix; Talbot, Hugues; Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Lambert, Olivier

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticle transport across cell membrane plays a crucial role in the development of drug delivery systems as well as in the toxicity response induced by nanoparticles. As hydrophilic nanoparticles interact with lipid membranes and are able to induce membrane perturbations, hypothetic mechanisms based on membrane curvature or hole formation have been proposed for activating their transmigration. We report on the transport of hydrophilic silica nanoparticles into large unilamellar neutral DOPC liposomes via an internalization process. The strong adhesive interactions of lipid membrane onto the silica nanoparticle triggered liposome deformation until the formation of a curved neck. Then the rupture of this membrane neck led to the complete engulfment of the nanoparticle. Using cryo-electron tomography we determined 3D architectures of intermediate steps of this process unveiling internalized silica nanoparticles surrounded by a supported lipid bilayer. This engulfing process was achieved for a large range of particle size (from 30 to 200 nm in diameter). These original data provide interesting highlights for nanoparticle transmigration and could be applied to biotechnology development. PMID:19596070

  15. Morphology of the pore space in claystones - evidence from BIB/FIB ion beam sectioning and cryo-SEM observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.; Kukla, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Mudrocks and clay-rich fault gouges are important mechanical elements in the Earth’s crust and form seals for crustal fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Other fields of interest are the storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and radioactive waste in geologic formations. In addition, coupled flows, capillary processes, and associated deformation are of importance in many applied fields. A key factor to understanding these processes is a detailed understanding of the morphology of the pore space. Classic studies of porosity in fine grained materials are performed on dried or freeze dried samples and include metal injection methods, magnetic susceptibility measurement, SEM and TEM imaging, neutron scattering, NMR spectroscopy, and ESEM. Confocal microscopy and X-ray tomography are used to image porosity in coarse grained sediments but the resolution of these techniques is not sufficient at present for applications to mudrocks or clay-rich fault gouges. Therefore, observations and interpretations remain difficult because none of these approaches is able to directly describe the in-situ porosity at the pore scale. In addition, some methods require dried samples in which the natural structure of pores may have been damaged to some extent due to desiccation and dehydration of the clay minerals. A recently developed alternative is to study wet samples using a cryo-SEM, which allows stabilization of wet media at cryo-temperature, in-situ sample preparation by ion beam cross-sectioning (BIB, FIB) and observations of the stabilized microstructure at high resolution. We report on a study of Boom clay from a proposed disposal site of radioactive waste (Mol site, Belgium) using cryo-SEM at cryogenic temperature, with ion beam cross-sectioning to prepare smooth, damage free surfaces. Pores commonly have crack-like tips, preferred orientation parallel to bedding and power law size distribution. We define a number of pore types depending on shape and location in the microstructure. 3-D reconstruction by serial cross-sectioning shows 3-D connectivity of the pore space. These findings offer a new insight into the morphology of pores down to nano-scale and provide the basis for microstructure-based models of transport in clays. SEM image (SE) of a Broad Ion Beam polished cross-section performed on dry Boom clay (Mol site, Belgium) showing the 2D apparent porosity (26.3%). The cross-section is perpendicular to the bedding.

  16. Novel Phase Separation and Magnetic Volume Tuning in Underdoped NaFe1-xCoxAs (x ˜0.01)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Long; Dai, J.; Lu, X. R.; Tan, Guotai; Song, Yu; Dai, Pengcheng; Zhang, C. L.; Normand, B.; Yu, Weiqiang

    2013-03-01

    NaFeAs is a quasi-2D pnictide parent compound with a weak magnetic moment and separate structural and antiferromagnetic transitions. Because Co doping leads to a superconductor with Tc˜20 K at a very low optimal doping of x = 0.02, NaFe1-xCoxAs is uniquely suited to sensitive studies of the cohabitation and competition between magnetism and superconductivity. Using NMR as a local probe of both antiferromagnetic order and superconductivity, we have compared Knight shifts and relaxation rates on the Na, As, and Co nuclei. Above Tc, we find weak doping inhomogeneity, in the form of residual paramagnetic regions with differing TN values, and a strongly field-controlled magnetic volume. Below Tc, we observe a strong competition between antiferromagnetism and superconductivity, in which the temperature is the dominant control parameter, suppressing the magnetic volume fraction very significantly in favor of the superconducting one, while the external field suppresses Tc. Our results suggest both a microscale phase separation in real space and in reciprocal space a competition between two order parameters requiring the same electrons on the quasi-2D Fermi surface.

  17. Recent advances in the application of core-shell structured magnetic materials for the separation and enrichment of proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Man; Xie, Yiqin; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2014-08-29

    Many endogenous proteins/peptides and proteins/peptides with post-translational modifications (PTMs) are presented at extremely low abundance, and they usually suffer strong interference with highly abundant proteins/peptides as well as other contaminants, resulting in low ionization efficiency in MS analysis. Therefore, the separation and enrichment of proteins/peptides from complex mixtures is of great importance to the successful identification of them. Core-shell structured magnetic microspheres have been widely used in the enrichment and isolation of proteins/peptides, thanks to unique properties such as strong magnetic responsiveness, outstanding binding capacity, excellent biocompatibility, robust mechanical strength and admirable recoverability. The aim of this review is to update the advances in the application of core-shell structured magnetic materials for proteomics analysis, including the separation and enrichment of low-concentration proteins/peptides, the selective enrichment of phosphoproteins and the selective enrichment of glycoproteins, and to compare the enrichment performance of magnetic microspheres with different kinds of functionalization. PMID:24835765

  18. Study on the Effect of Melt Convection on Phase Separation Structures in Undercooled CuCo Alloys Using an Electromagnetic Levitator Superimposed with a Static Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Takamitsu; Kitahara, Tsubasa; Kurosawa, Ryo; Kubo, Masaki; Tsukada, Takao; Uchikoshi, Masahito; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2014-08-01

    We studied the effect of melt convection on phase separation structures in undercooled Cu80Co20 alloys by using an electromagnetic levitator, where a static magnetic field was applied to control convection in the molten alloys. It was found that, when the static magnetic field was relatively small, dispersed structures with relatively fine Co-rich spheres distributed in the matrix of the Cu-rich phase were observed. However, a few large, coalesced Co-rich phases appeared in the Cu-rich matrix when the magnetic field exceeded a certain value, i.e., approximately 1.5 T in this study. The mean diameter of the droplet-shaped Co-rich phases distributed in the matrix of the Cu-rich phase increased gradually with the magnetic field and increased rapidly at approximately 1.5 T. Moreover, it was speculated from the result of periodic laser heating that the marked change in the phase separation structures at approximately 1.5 T might be due to a convective transition from turbulent flow to laminar flow in the molten sample, where the time variation of temperature in the lower part of the electromagnetically levitated molten sample was measured when the upper part of the sample was periodically heated.

  19. Simple synthesis of functionalized superparamagnetic magnetite/silica core/shell nanoparticles and their application as magnetically separable high-performance biocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jinwoo; Lee, Youjin; Youn, Jongkyu; Na, Hyon Bin; Yu, Taekyung; Kim, Hwan O.; Lee, Sang-mok; Koo, Yoon-mo; Kwak, Ja Hun; Park, Hyun-Gyu; Chang, Ho Nam; Hwang, Misun; Park, Je-Geun; Kim, Jungbae; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2008-01-01

    We report on the facile large-scale synthesis of magnetite@silica core-shell nanoparticles by a simple addition of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) into reverse micelles during the formation of uniformly-sized magnetite nanoparticles. The size of magnetic core was determined by the ratio of solvent and surfactant in reverse micelle solution while the thickness of silica shell could be easily controlled by adjusting the amount of added TEOS. Amino group functional groups were grafted to the magnetic nanoparticles, and crosslinked enzyme clusters (CEC) were fabricated on the surface of magnetite@silica nanoparticles. The resulting hybrid materials of magnetite and CEC were magnetically separable, highly active, and stable enough to show no decrease of enzyme activity under rigorous shaking for more than 15 days.

  20. Magnetic field dependence of the magnetic phase separation in Pr1-xCaxMnO3 manganites studied by small-angle neutron scattering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Damien Saurel; Annie Brûlet; André Heinemann; Christine Martin; Silvana Mercone; Charles Simon

    2006-01-01

    Transport properties of manganese oxides suggest that their colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) is due to percolation between ferromagnetic metallic (FM) clusters in an antiferromagnetic insulating (AFI) matrix. We have studied small-angle neutron scattering under an applied magnetic field in CMR Pr1-xCaxMnO3 crystals for x around 0.33 . Quantitative analysis of the small-angle magnetic neutron scattering shows that the magnetic heterogeneities take

  1. Electronic phase separation due to magnetic polaron formation in the semimetallic ferromagnet EuB6 — A weakly-nonlinear-transport study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amyan, Adham; Das, Pintu; Müller, Jens; Fisk, Zachary

    2013-05-01

    We report measurements of weakly nonlinear electronic transport, as measured by third-harmonic voltage generation V 3?, in the low-carrier density semimetallic ferromagnet EuB6, which exhibits an unusual magnetic ordering with two consecutive transitions at T_{c_1 } = 15.6K and T_{c_2 } = 12.5K. In contrast to the linear resistivity, the third-harmonic voltage is sensitive to the microgeometry of the electronic system. Our measurements provide evidence for magnetically-driven electronic phase separation consistent with the picture of percolation of magnetic polarons (MP), which form highly conducting magnetically ordered clusters in a paramagnetic and less conducting background. Upon cooling in zero magnetic field through the ferromagnetic transition, the dramatic drop in the linear resistivity at the upper transition T_{c_1 } coincides with the onset of nonlinearity, and upon further cooling is followed by a pronounced peak in V 3? at the lower transition T_{c_2 } . Likewise, in the paramagnetic regime, a drop of the material's magnetoresistance R( H) precedes a magnetic-fieldinduced peak in nonlinear transport. A striking observation is a linear temperature dependence of V {3?/peak}. We suggest a picture where at the upper transition T_{c_1 } the coalescing MP form a conducting path giving rise to a strong decrease in the resistance. The MP formation sets in at around T* ˜ 35K below which these entities are isolated and strongly fluctuating, while growing in number. The MP then start to form links at T_{c_1 } , where percolative electronic transport is observed. The MP merge and start forming a continuum at the threshold T_{c_2 } . In the paramagnetic temperature regime T_{c_1 } < T < T*, MP percolation is induced by a magnetic field, and the threshold accompanied by charge carrier delocalization occurs at a single critical magnetization.

  2. Structural characterization of amphiphilic homopolymer micelles using light scattering, SANS, and cryo-TEM.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Joseph P; Kelley, Elizabeth G; Murphy, Ryan P; Moughton, Adam O; Robin, Mathew; Lu, Annhelen; Colombani, Olivier; Chassenieux, Christophe; Cheung, David; Sullivan, Millicent O; Epps, Thomas H; O'Reilly, Rachel K

    2013-08-13

    We report the aqueous solution self-assembly of a series of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) polymers end-functionalized with a hydrophobic sulfur-carbon-sulfur (SCS) pincer ligand. Although the hydrophobic ligand accounted for <5 wt% of the overall homopolymer mass, the polymers self-assembled into well-defined spherical micelles in aqueous solution, and these micelles are potential precursors to solution-assembled nanoreactors for small molecule catalysis applications. The micelle structural details were investigated using light scattering, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Radial density profiles extracted from the cryo-TEM micrographs suggested that the PNIPAM chains formed a diffuse corona with a radially decreasing corona density profile and provided valuable a priori information about the micelle structure for SANS data modeling. SANS analysis indicated a similar profile in which the corona surrounded a small hydrophobic core containing the pincer ligand. The similarity between the SANS and cryo-TEM results demonstrated that detailed information about the micelle density profile can be obtained directly from cryo-TEM and highlighted the complementary use of scattering and cryo-TEM in the structural characterization of solution-assemblies, such as the SCS pincer-functionalized homopolymers described here. PMID:24058209

  3. Structural characterization of amphiphilic homopolymer micelles using light scattering, SANS, and cryo-TEM

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Joseph P.; Kelley, Elizabeth G.; Murphy, Ryan P.; Moughton, Adam O.; Robin, Mathew; Lu, Annhelen; Colombani, Olivier; Chassenieux, Christophe; Cheung, David; Sullivan, Millicent O.

    2013-01-01

    We report the aqueous solution self-assembly of a series of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) polymers end-functionalized with a hydrophobic sulfur-carbon-sulfur (SCS) pincer ligand. Although the hydrophobic ligand accounted for <5 wt% of the overall homopolymer mass, the polymers self-assembled into well-defined spherical micelles in aqueous solution, and these micelles are potential precursors to solution-assembled nanoreactors for small molecule catalysis applications. The micelle structural details were investigated using light scattering, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Radial density profiles extracted from the cryo-TEM micrographs suggested that the PNIPAM chains formed a diffuse corona with a radially decreasing corona density profile and provided valuable a priori information about the micelle structure for SANS data modeling. SANS analysis indicated a similar profile in which the corona surrounded a small hydrophobic core containing the pincer ligand. The similarity between the SANS and cryo-TEM results demonstrated that detailed information about the micelle density profile can be obtained directly from cryo-TEM and highlighted the complementary use of scattering and cryo-TEM in the structural characterization of solution-assemblies, such as the SCS pincer-functionalized homopolymers described here. PMID:24058209

  4. Philosophy of stress-strain measurement for proto-type cryo-line of ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Vaghela, H.; Shah, N.; Badgujar, S.; Sarkar, B.

    2010-02-01

    Large and complicated network of cryo-lines are required for the ITER cryogenic system, connecting cryo-plant, cryo-distribution system and applications. Fixed support, sliding support and vacuum barrier are the integral part of the design of the cryo-lines. These supports, apart from the purpose of supporting the dead weight of internal process pipes, take care of different forces generated due to the thrust, spring and the thermal load. Therefore, stresses are generated on them. In order to have a measurement of the stress, experiments are done with strain gages mounted on these components. For the proto-type cryo-line of ITER, stress analysis has been carried out and the contours of stress on these components are available. The measurement with strain gages will be done to validate the design as well as to get the idea of the absolute values of the stresses expected to generate. The temperature zones will be in the range of 4.5 K to 80 K. Therefore, special strain gage and its measurement have been planned for this purpose. The paper will discuss mounting process of the strain gages, the basis of deciding the location of gages, measurement procedure with error compensation and correction as well as data acquisition techniques.

  5. Capturing enveloped viruses on affinity grids for downstream cryo-electron microscopy applications

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gabriella; Chen, Xuemin; Brindley, Melinda A.; Campbell, Patricia; Afonso, Claudio L.; Ke, Zunlong; Holl, Jens M.; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C.; Byrd-Leotis, Lauren A.; Steel, John; Steinhauer, David A.; Plemper, Richard K.; Kelly, Deborah F.; Spearman, Paul W.; Wright, Elizabeth R.

    2014-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM), cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) are essential techniques used for characterizing basic virus morphology and determining the three-dimensional structure of viruses. Enveloped viruses, which contain an outer lipoprotein coat, constitute the largest group of pathogenic viruses to humans. The purification of enveloped viruses from cell culture presents certain challenges. Specifically, the inclusion of host-membrane derived vesicles, the complete destruction of the viruses, and the disruption of the internal architecture of individual virus particles. Here, we present a strategy for capturing enveloped viruses on affinity grids for use in both conventional EM and cryo-EM/ET applications. We examined the utility of affinity grids for the selective capture of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virus-like particles (VLPs), influenza A, and measles virus (MeV). We applied Nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) lipid layers in combination with molecular adaptors to selectively adhere the viruses to the affinity grid surface. This further development of the affinity grid method may prove essential for the gentle and selective purification of enveloped viruses directly onto EM grids for ultrastructural analysis. PMID:24279992

  6. The making of frozen-hydrated, vitreous lamellas from cells for cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hayles, Michael F; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Schneijdenberg, Chris T W M; Meeldijk, Johannes D; Luecken, Uwe; Persoon, Hans; de Water, Jeroen; de Jong, Frank; Humbel, Bruno M; Verkleij, Arie J

    2010-11-01

    There has been a long standing desire to produce thick (up to 500 nm) cryo-sections of fully hydrated cells and tissue for high-resolution analysis in their natural state by cryo-transmission electron microscopy. Here, we present a method that can successfully produce sections (lamellas in FIB-SEM terminology) of fully hydrated, unstained cells from high-pressure frozen samples by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The samples are therefore placed in thin copper tubes and vitrified by high-pressure freezing. For transfer, handling and subsequent milling, the tubes are placed in a novel connective device (ferrule) that protects the sample from devitrification and contamination and passes through all operation steps. A piezo driven sample positioning stage (cryo-nano-bench, CNB) with three degrees of freedom was additionally developed to enable accurate milling of frozen-hydrated lamellas. With the CNB, high-pressure frozen samples can be milled to produce either thin lamellas (<100 nm), for direct imaging by high-resolution cryo-TEM or thicker lamellas (300-500 nm) for cryo-electron tomography. The sample remains vitreous throughout the process by using the presented tools and methods. The results are an important step towards investigating larger cells and even tissue in there natural state which in the end will enable us to gain better insights into cellular processes. PMID:20638479

  7. Electron cryo-tomographic structure of cystovirus {phi}12

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Guobin [Structural Biology Program, Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Wei Hui [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, City College of New York, NY 10031 (United States); Rice, William J. [New York Structural Biology Center, 89 Convent Avenue, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Stokes, David L. [Structural Biology Program, Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); New York Structural Biology Center, 89 Convent Avenue, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Gottlieb, Paul [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, City College of New York, NY 10031 (United States); Ph.D. Program in Biology, Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York, NY 10016 (United States)], E-mail: pgottl@med.cuny.edu

    2008-03-01

    Bacteriophage {phi}12 is a member of the Cystoviridae virus family and contains a genome consisting of three segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). This virus family contains eight identified members, of which four have been classified in regard to their complete genomic sequence and encoded viral proteins. A phospholipid envelope that contains the integral proteins P6, P9, P10, and P13 surrounds the viral particles. In species {phi}6, host infection requires binding of a multimeric P3 complex to type IV pili. In species {phi}8, {phi}12, and {phi}13, the attachment apparatus is a heteromeric protein assembly that utilizes the rough lipopolysaccharide (rlps) as a receptor. In {phi}8 the protein components are designated P3a and P3b while in species {phi}12 proteins P3a and P3c have been identified in the complex. The phospholipid envelope of the cystoviruses surrounds a nucleocapsid (NC) composed of two shells. The outer shell is composed of protein P8 with a T = 13 icosahedral lattice while the primary component of the inner shell is a dodecahedral frame composed of dimeric protein P1. For the current study, the 3D architecture of the intact {phi}12 virus was obtained by electron cryo-tomography. The nucleocapsid appears to be centered within the membrane envelope and possibly attached to it by bridging structures. Two types of densities were observed protruding from the membrane envelope. The densities of the first type were elongated, running parallel, and closely associated to the envelope outer surface. In contrast, the second density was positioned about 12 nm above the envelope connected to it by a flexible low-density stem. This second structure formed a torroidal structure termed 'the donut' and appears to inhibit BHT-induced viral envelope fusion.

  8. Magnetically separable ternary hybrid of ZnFe2O4-Fe2O3-Bi2WO6 hollow nanospheres with enhanced visible photocatalytic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junqi; Liu, Zhenxing; Zhu, Zhenfeng

    2014-11-01

    Magnetically separable ternary hybrid ZnFe2O4-Fe2O3-Bi2WO6 hollow nanospheres were designed and synthesized by an effective three-step approach. Specifically, using phenolic formaldehyde microspheres (PFS) as template direct the sequential coating of ?-Fe2O3/ZnFe2O4 layer and subsequent Bi2WO6 layer via impregnating-calcination process. The photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation is in the order of ZnFe2O4-Fe2O3-Bi2WO6 > ZnFe2O4-Bi2WO6 > Bi2WO6 > ZnFe2O4-Fe2O3 > ZnFe2O4. The enhanced activity could be attributed to the cascade electron transfer from ZnFe2O4 to ?-Fe2O3 then to Bi2WO6 through the interfacial potential gradient in the ternary hybrid conduction bands, which facilitate the charge separation and retard the charge pair recombination. Furthermore, the ternary hybrid ZnFe2O4-Fe2O3-Bi2WO6 hollow nanospheres could be conveniently separated by using an external magnetic field, and be chemically and optically stable after several repetitive tests. The study also provides a general and effective method in the composite hollow nanomaterials with sound heterojunctions that may show a variety of applications.

  9. Bifunctional magnetic nanobeads for sensitive detection of avian influenza A (H7N9) virus based on immunomagnetic separation and enzyme-induced metallization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen; Zhou, Chuan-Hua; Chen, Jian-Jun; Xiong, Chaochao; Chen, Ze; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ling

    2015-06-15

    Bifunctional magnetic nanobeads (bi-MBs) were fabricated by co-immobilizing target recognition molecules and signal molecules on a magnetic nanobead surface, which were used as both separation and enrichment carriers and signal carriers. The bi-MBs could capture and separate avian influenza A (H7N9) virus (H7N9 AIV) from complex samples efficiently based on the specific reaction between antigen-antibody and their good magnetic response, which simplified sample pretreatment and saved the detection time. Taking advantages of their high surface to volume ratio and rich surface functional groups, multiple alkaline phosphatase (ALP) signal molecules were tethered on the surface of bi-MBs which greatly amplified the detection signal. As an efficient signal amplification strategy, enzyme-induced metallization had been integrated with bi-MBs and anodic stripping voltammetry to construct an ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor for H7N9 AIV detection. Under the optimal conditions, the introduction of bi-MBs could amplify the detection signal in about four times compared with the same immunoassay without MBs, and the method showed a wide linear range of 0.01-20ng/mL with a detection limit of 6.8pg/mL. The electrochemical immunosensor provides a simple and reliable platform with high sensitivity and selectivity which shows great potential in early diagnosis of diseases. PMID:25643598

  10. Structure de la chromatine et du chromosome eucaryote par CEMOVIS (CryoElectron Microscopy Of VItrous Sections)

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud 11, Université de

    Structure de la chromatine et du chromosome eucaryote par CEMOVIS (CryoElectron Microscopy: Structure de la chromatine et du chromosome eucaryote par CEMOVIS (CryoElectron Microscopy Of VItrous oeuvre ces méthodes pour étudier à haute résolution la structure de la chromatine et du chromosome

  11. The capsid of small papova viruses contains 72 pentameric capsomeres: direct evidence from cryo-electron-microscopy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Timothy S.

    The capsid of small papova viruses contains 72 pentameric capsomeres: direct evidence from cryo-electron structures: image analysis of electron micrographs of frozen- hydrated samples (SV40 virions from cryo-electron microscopy supports the correctness of the polyoma structure solved

  12. Reconstructing virus structures from nanometer to near-atomic resolutions with cryo-electron microscopy and tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Juan; Liu, Xiangan; Rochat, Ryan H.; Baker, Matthew L.; Chiu, Wah

    2014-01-01

    The past few decades have seen tremendous advances in single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM). The field has matured to the point that near-atomic resolution density maps can be generated for icosahedral viruses without the need for crystallization. In parallel, substantial progress has been made in determining the structures of non-icosahedrally arranged proteins in viruses by employing either single particle cryo-EM or cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Implicit in this course has been the availability of a new generation of electron cryo-microscopes and the development of the computational tools that are essential for generating these maps and models. This methodology has enabled structural biologists to analyze structures in increasing detail for virus particles that are in different morphogenetic and biochemical states. Furthermore, electron imaging of frozen, hydrated cells, in the process of being infected by viruses, has also opened up a new avenue for studying virus structures “in situ”. Here we present the common techniques used to acquire and process cryo-EM and cryo-ET data and discuss their implications for structural virology both now and in the future. PMID:22297510

  13. A novel magnetically separable TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofiber with high photocatalytic activity under UV-vis light

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Cong-Ju, E-mail: congjuli@gmail.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Clothing Materials R and D and Assessment, Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)] [Beijing Key Laboratory of Clothing Materials R and D and Assessment, Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Jiao-Na; Wang, Bin [Beijing Key Laboratory of Clothing Materials R and D and Assessment, Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)] [Beijing Key Laboratory of Clothing Materials R and D and Assessment, Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Gong, Jian Ru, E-mail: gongjr@nanoctr.cn [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, China, 11 Zhongguancun Beiyitiao, Beijing 100190 (China); Lin, Zhang [Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fujian 350002 (China)] [Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel magnetically separable composite photocatalyst TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofiber was prepared by sol-gel method and electrospinning technique, which can be reclaimed with a magnet, and the decolorizing efficiency of MB solution reached 95.87%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composite TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofibers with diameter of 110 {+-} 28 nm have been successfully synthesized by the combination of sol-gel method and electrospinning technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of Co{sup 2+} or/and Fe{sup 3+} ions may occupy some of the lattice sites of TiO{sub 2} to form an iron-titanium solid solution and narrow the band gap, which broadens the response region of visible light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The resultant nanofibers not only have high decomposition efficiency with methylene blue (MB) under the UV irradiation, which is close to that of Degussa P25, but also can be separated with a magnet and avoid the secondary pollution of the treated water. -- Abstract: A novel magnetically separable heterogeneous photocatalyst TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofiber was prepared by sol-gel method and electrospinning technology, followed by heat treatment at 550 Degree-Sign C for 2 h. The phase structure, morphology and magnetic property of the composite nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometer analysis. The photocatalytic studies of TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} fibers suggested that the presence of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} not only enhanced the absorbance of UV light, but also broadened the response region to visible light. The decolorizing efficiency of methylene blue (MB) solution reaches 95.87% over TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofibers under 300 W Hg lamp after 5 h, which is close to that of Degussa P25. Furthermore, these fibers can be collected with a magnet for reuse and effectively avoid the secondary pollution of the treated water.

  14. Super-Resolution Microscopy Using Standard Fluorescent Proteins in Intact Cells under Cryo-Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a super-resolution technique for fluorescence cryo-microscopy based on photoswitching of standard genetically encoded fluorescent marker proteins in intact mammalian cells at low temperature (81 K). Given the limit imposed by the lack of cryo-immersion objectives, current applications of fluorescence cryo-microscopy to biological specimens achieve resolutions between 400–500 nm only. We demonstrate that the single molecule characteristics of reversible photobleaching of mEGFP and mVenus at liquid nitrogen temperature are suitable for the basic concept of single molecule localization microscopy. This enabled us to perform super-resolution imaging of vitrified biological samples and to visualize structures in unperturbed fast frozen cells for the first time with a structural resolution of ?125 nm (average single molecule localization accuracy ?40 nm), corresponding to a 3–5 fold resolution improvement. PMID:24884378

  15. Structures of viral membrane proteins by high-resolution cryoEM.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z Hong

    2014-04-01

    Cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) has emerged as an excellent tool for resolving high-resolution three-dimensional structures of membrane proteins in a lipid-containing environment with interacting partners. The near atomic resolution structures of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus and dengue virus revealed transmembrane helices in lipid bilayers, receptor-binding glycosylation moieties, and functionally important interactions between their fusion protein and membrane-anchored chaperone protein. For pleomorphic enveloped viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus, glycoprotein complexes can be imaged in isolation to reveal molecular interactions at different states. These high-resolution cryoEM structures have clarified important domains not previously resolved by crystallography and illustrate exciting opportunities to visualize viral membrane proteins in their native and possibly transiently stable functional states, thus uncovering mechanisms of action and informing anti-viral strategies. PMID:24799302

  16. Phasing of the Triatoma virus diffraction data using a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Estrozi, L.F.; Neumann, E. [IBS, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel. CEA, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier. 41 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38027 Grenoble (France); Squires, G. [Institut Curie, 26, rue d'Ulm 75248 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Rozas-Dennis, G. [Departamento de Biologia, Bioquimica y Farmacia, U.N.S., San Juan 670, (8000) Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Costabel, M. [Grupo de Biofisica, Departamento de Fisica U.N.S., Av. Alem 1253, (8000) Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Rey, F.A. [Institut Pasteur, 25 rue du Dr. Roux, F-75724 Paris (France); Guerin, D.M.A. [Unidad de Biofisica (UPV/EHU-CSIC), P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain)], E-mail: diego.guerin@ehu.es; Navaza, J. [IBS, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel, CEA, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, 41 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38027 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: jorge.navaza@ibs.fr

    2008-05-25

    The blood-sucking reduviid bug Triatoma infestans, one of the most important vector of American human trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) is infected by the Triatoma virus (TrV). TrV has been classified as a member of the Cripavirus genus (type cricket paralysis virus) in the Dicistroviridae family. This work presents the three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction of the TrV capsid at about 25 A resolution and its use as a template for phasing the available crystallographic data by the molecular replacement method. The main structural differences between the cryo-EM reconstruction of TrV and other two viruses, one from the same family, the cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) and the human rhinovirus 16 from the Picornaviridae family are presented and discussed.

  17. Popcorn-shaped magnetic core-plasmonic shell multifunctional nanoparticles for the targeted magnetic separation and enrichment, label-free SERS imaging, and photothermal destruction of multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen; Senapati, Dulal; Khan, Sadia Afrin; Singh, Anant Kumar; Hamme, Ashton; Yust, Brian; Sardar, Dhiraj; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2013-02-18

    Over the last few years, one of the most important and complex problems facing our society is treating infectious diseases caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDRB), by using current market-existing antibiotics. Driven by this need, we report for the first time the development of the multifunctional popcorn-shaped iron magnetic core-gold plasmonic shell nanotechnology-driven approach for targeted magnetic separation and enrichment, label-free surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection, and the selective photothermal destruction of MDR Salmonella DT104. Due to the presence of the "lightning-rod effect", the core-shell popcorn-shaped gold-nanoparticle tips provided a huge field of SERS enhancement. The experimental data show that the M3038 antibody-conjugated nanoparticles can be used for targeted separation and SERS imaging of MDR Salmonella DT104. A targeted photothermal-lysis experiment, by using 670 nm light at 1.5 W cm(-2) for 10 min, results in selective and irreparable cellular-damage to MDR Salmonella. We discuss the possible mechanism and operating principle for the targeted separation, label-free SERS imaging, and photothermal destruction of MDRB by using the popcorn-shaped magnetic/plasmonic nanotechnology. PMID:23296491

  18. Pulse-to-pulse correlation in CryoSat SAR mode radar altimeter echoes from the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. H.

    2012-12-01

    Serial correlation among successive radar echoes returned from the ocean surface is an important design constraint in satellite altimetry. Walsh [1974, 1982] established the conventional wisdom. Taking the radar footprint to be a uniformly radiating disk, he derived a theoretically expected echo decorrelation time of about 0.5 milliseconds. Following Walsh, ocean altimeters usually employ a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) around 2 kHz, in order to obtain statistically independent echoes at (so it is thought) the maximum possible rate. CryoSat, designed for ranging to ice surfaces, employs a PRF of 18.2 kHz in its SAR mode. CryoSat SAR echo sequences over ocean surfaces can be used to empirically determine the ocean echo decorrelation, and thus to test Walsh's model. Such a test is presented in this paper. The analysis begins by forming the ensemble average of complex cross products of pairs of echoes separated by a time lag L * PRI, where the pulse repetition interval (PRI) is 55 microseconds and the echo lag L runs from 0 to 32. The L = 0 case yields the conventional pulse-limited waveform, which is used to determine the sea state in each ensemble average. The averages of lagged echo cross products reveal the complex coherency, with sampling in both slow time (lag, L), and fast time (range, sampled in waveform gates). Data from many areas and sea states are analyzed, and the results are explained using a simple theory approximating the complex coherency expected from a Gaussian radar pulse. This theory generalizes the classical Brown [1977] waveform model to lagged echo cross products, and generalizes Walsh's work to the case of footprints with non-uniform illumination and diffuse edges. Phase is due to vertical motion of the antenna. Amplitude variations in fast time are due to horizontal motion of the antenna, and are independent of wave height; their functional form confirms Brown's assumption that scattering is independent of azimuth. In slow time, the amplitude decays with lag at a rate that depends on wave height, and without zero crossings. This is in contrast to Walsh's theory, which established the conventional wisdom based on the first zero crossing of Bessel function J1. These results may be applied to determine the optimally weighted average of SAR echoes that yields the best conventional waveform for inter-calibration of SAR and conventional measurements. This calibration is useful for CryoSat and will be necessary for Sentinel-3 and Jason-CS. The present work finds that a conventional altimeter may obtain useful data at rates as high as 9 kHz. This suggests that the interleaved mode option under consideration for Jason-CS could yield optimal conventional measurements as well as simultaneous SAR. I gratefully acknowledge Ron Abileah, Eric Leuliette, John Lillibridge, Laury Miller, Tom Newman and the CryoSat team for helpful discussions.

  19. Comparative Cryo-SEM and AFM studies of hylid and rhacophorid tree frog toe pads.

    PubMed

    Barnes, W Jon P; Baum, Martina; Peisker, Henrik; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-12-01

    Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer new avenues for the study of the morphology of tree frog adhesive toe pads. Using these techniques, we compare toe pad microstructure in two distantly related species of tree frog, Litoria caerulea, White (Hylidae) and Rhacophorus prominanus, Smith (Rhacophoridae), in which the toe pads are considered to be convergent. AFM demonstrates the extraordinary similarity of both surface microstructures (largely hexagonal epithelial cells surrounded by deep channels) and nanostructures (an array of nanopillars, ca. 350 nm in diameter, all with a small dimple at the apex). The cryo-SEM studies examined the distribution of the fibrillar cytoskeleton within the different layers of the stratified toe pad epithelium, demonstrating that the cytoskeletal elements (keratin tonofilaments) that lie at an angle to the surface are relatively poorly developed in L. caerulea, clearly so in comparison to R. prominanus. Cryo-SEM also enabled the visualization of the fluid layer that is critical to a toe pad's adhesive function. This was achieved by examination of the frozen fluid residues left behind after removal of a toe within the cryo-SEM's experimental chamber. Such 'toeprints' demonstrated the presence of a wedge of fluid surrounding each toe pad, as well as fluid filling the channels that surround each epithelial cell. Cryo-SEM was used to examine epithelial cell shape. In a sample of 582 cells, 59.5% were hexagonal, the remainder being mainly pentagonal (23.1%) or heptagonal (16.1%). The distribution of differently-shaped cells was not random, but was not associated with either pad curvature or the distribution of mucous pores that provide fluid for the frogs' wet adhesion mechanism. Our main finding, the great similarity of toe pad structure in these two species, has important implications for biomimetics, for such convergent evolution suggests a good starting point for attempts to develop adhesives that will function in wet conditions. PMID:23999965

  20. Fine Ice Sheet margins topography from swath processing of CryoSat SARIn mode data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foresta, Luca; Gourmelen, Noel; Shepherd, Andrew; Escorihuela, Maria Jose; Muir, Alan; Briggs, Kate; Roca, Monica; Baker, Steven; Drinkwater, Mark; Nienow, Pete

    2014-05-01

    Reference and repeat-observations of Glacier and Ice Sheet Margin (GISM) topography are critical to identify changes in ice thickness, provide estimates of mass gain or loss and thus quantify the contribution of the cryosphere to sea level change. The lack of such sustained observations was identified in the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS) Cryosphere Theme Report as a major shortcoming. Conventional altimetry measurements over GISMs exist, but coverage has been sparse and characterized by coarse ground resolution. Additionally, and more importantly, they proved ineffective in the presence of steep slopes, a typical feature of GISM areas. Since the majority of Antarctic and Greenland ice sheet mass loss is estimated to lie within 100 km from the coast, but only about 10% is surveyed, there is the need for more robust and dense observations of GISMs, in both time and space. The ESA Altimetry mission CryoSat aims at gaining better insight into the evolution of the Cryosphere. CryoSat's revolutionary design features a Synthetic Interferometric Radar Altimeter (SIRAL), with two antennas for interferometry. The corresponding SAR Interferometer (SARIn) mode of operation increases spatial resolution while resolving the angular origin of off-nadir echoes occurring over sloping terrain. The SARIn mode is activated over GISMs and the elevation for the Point Of Closest Approach (POCA) is a standard product of the CryoSat mission. Here we present a new approach for more comprehensively exploiting the SARIn mode of CryoSat and produce an ice elevation product with enhanced spatial resolution compared to standard CryoSat-2 height products. In this so called L2-swath processing approach, the signal beyond the POCA is exploited when signal and surface characteristics are favourable. We will present the rationale, validation exercises and preliminary results from the STSE CryoTop study over selected test regions of the margins of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets.

  1. Cryo-EM Techniques to Resolve the Structure of HSV-1 Capsid-Associated Components

    PubMed Central

    Rochat, Ryan H.; Hecksel, Corey W.; Chiu, Wah

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryo-microscopy has become a routine technique to determine structure of biochemically purified herpes simplex virus capsid particles. This chapter describes the procedures of specimen preparation by cryopreservation; low dose and low temperature imaging in an electron cryo-microscope; and data processing for reconstruction. This methodology has yielded subnanometer resolution structures of the icosahedral capsid shell where alpha helices and beta sheets of individual subunits can be recognized. A relaxation of the symmetry in the reconstruction steps allows us to resolve the DNA packaging protein located at one of the 12 vertices in the capsid. PMID:24671690

  2. Retrofit implementation of Zernike phase plate imaging for cryo-TEM

    PubMed Central

    Marko, Michael; Leith, ArDean; Hsieh, Chyongere; Danev, Radostin

    2011-01-01

    In-focus phase-plate imaging is particularly beneficial for cryo-TEM because it offers a substantial overall increase in image contrast, without an electron dose penalty, and it simplifies image interpretation. We show how phase-plate cryo-TEM can be implemented with an appropriate existing TEM, and provide a basic practical introduction to use of thin-film (carbon) phase plates. We point out potential pitfalls of phase-plate operation, and discuss solutions. We provide information on evaluating a particular TEM for its suitability. PMID:21272647

  3. De novo protein structure determination from near-atomic-resolution cryo-EM maps.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Kudryashev, Mikhail; Li, Xueming; Egelman, Edward H; Basler, Marek; Cheng, Yifan; Baker, David; DiMaio, Frank

    2015-04-01

    We present a de novo model-building approach that combines predicted backbone conformations with side-chain fit to density to accurately assign sequence into density maps. This method yielded accurate models for six of nine experimental maps at 3.3- to 4.8-Å resolution and produced a nearly complete model for an unsolved map containing a 660-residue heterodimeric protein. This method should enable rapid and reliable protein structure determination from near-atomic-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) maps. PMID:25707029

  4. A self-consistent two-dimensional resistive fluid theory of field-aligned potential structures including charge separation and magnetic and velocity shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl

    1990-01-01

    A self-consistent two-fluid theory that includes the magnetic field and shear patterns is developed to model stationary electrostatic structures with field-aligned potential drops. Shear flow is also included in the theory since this seems to be a prominent feature of the structures of interest. In addition, Ohmic dissipation, a Hall term, and pressure gradients in a generalized Ohm's law, modified for cases without quasi-neutrality, are included. In the analytic theory, the electrostatic force is balanced by field-aligned pressure gradients (i.e., thermal effects in the direction of the magnetic field) and by pressure gradients and magnetic stresses in the perpendicular direction. Within this theory, simple examples of applications are presented to demonstrate the kind of solutions resulting from the model. The results show how the effects of charge separation and shear in the magnetic field and the velocity can be combined to form self-consistent structures such as are found to exist above the aurora, suggested also in association with solar flares.

  5. Magnetic Field Shaping Using High Temperature Superconducting Monoliths

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Bromberg; J. V. Minervini; J. H. Schultz

    The use of monolithic High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) for field shaping in stellarators and tokamaks is presented. Design issues relevant to stellarator magnets using single crystal or highly textured YBCO monoliths will be discussed. The excellent properties of YBCO operating at elevated temperatures (> 10 K) will be summarized. High field, cryo-stable, highly complex magnet field topologies can be generated

  6. Strain-induced oxygen defect formation and interfacial magnetic phase separation in SrTiO3(001)/La1-xSrxCoO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, Chris

    2012-02-01

    The remarkable functionality and epitaxial compatibility of complex oxides provides many opportunities for new physics and applications in oxide heterostructures. Perovskite manganites and cobaltites provide excellent examples, being of interest for solid oxide fuel cells, catalysis, ferroelectric RAM, gas sensing, resistive switching memory, and oxide spintronics. However, the same delicate balance between phases that provides this diverse functionality also leads to a serious problem - the difficulty of maintaining desired properties close to the interface with other oxides. Although this problem is widespread, manifests itself in several ways, and could present a significant roadblock to the development of heterostructured devices for oxide electronics, there is no consensus as to its origin, or even whether it is driven by electronic or chemical effects. In this work, using SrTiO3(001)/La1-xSrxCoO3 as a model system, we have combined epitaxial growth via high pressure oxygen sputtering with high resolution x-ray diffraction, atomic resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy, and detailed magnetic, transport, and neutron scattering measurements to determine the fundamental origin of the deterioration in interfacial transport and magnetism. The effect is found to be due to nanoscopic magnetic phase separation in the near-interface region driven by a significant depletion in interfacial hole doping due to accumulation of O vacancies. This occurs due to a novel mechanism for accommodation of lattice mismatch with the substrate based on formation and long-range ordering of O vacancies, thus providing a fundamental link between strain state and O vacancy density. Further impacts of the O vacancy ordering and interfacial magnetic phase separation, such as formation of a spin-state superlattice and an extraordinary coercivity enhancement, will also be discussed. Work in collaboration with M. Sharma, M. Torija, J. Schmitt, C. He, S. El-Khatib, J. Gazquez, M. Varela, M. Laver and J. Borchers.

  7. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy imaging of the morphology of submicrometer aerosol containing organic acids and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Veghte, Daniel P; Bittner, Danielle Rae; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2014-03-01

    The effects of aerosol particles on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry and climate are determined in part by the internal arrangement of compounds within the particles. To characterize the morphology of internally mixed aerosol particles in the accumulation mode size regime, we have used cryo-transmission electron microscopy to investigate the phase separation behavior of dry, submicrometer particles composed of ammonium sulfate mixed with carboxylic acids (adipic, azelaic, citric, glutaric, malonic, pimelic, suberic, and succinic acid). Determining the morphology of dry particles is important for understanding laboratory studies of aerosol optical properties, reactivity, and cloud condensation nucleus activity, results from field instruments where aerosol particles are dried prior to analysis, and atmospheric processes like deposition mode heterogeneous ice nucleation that occur on dried particles. We observe homogeneous morphologies for highly soluble organic compounds. For organic compounds with limited aqueous solubility, partially engulfed structures are observed. At intermediate aqueous solubilities, small particles are homogeneous and larger particles are partially engulfed. Results are compared to previous studies of liquid-liquid phase separation in supermicrometer particles and the impact of these dry particle morphologies on aerosol-climate interactions are discussed. PMID:24502281

  8. Magnetically-Separable and Highly-Stable Enzyme System Based on Crosslinked Enzyme Aggregates Shipped in Magnetite-Coated Mesoporous Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jinwoo; Na, Hyon Bin; Kim, Byoung Chan; Lee, Jin Hyung; Lee, Byoungsoo; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hwang, Yosun; Park, Je-Geun; Gu, Man Bock; Kim, Jaeyun; Joo, Jin; Shin, Chae-Ho; Grate, Jay W.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Jungbae

    2009-10-15

    Magnetically-separable and highly-stable enzyme system was developed by adsorption of enzymes in superparamagnetic hierarchically ordered mesocellular mesoporous silica (M-HMMS) and subsequent enzyme crosslinking. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles were homogeneously incorporated into hierarchically-ordered mesocellular mesoporous silica (HMMS) by the decomposition of preformed iron propionate complex. The size of incorporated superparamagnetic 15 nanoparticles was around 5 nm, generating a magnetically separable host with high pore volumes and large pores (M-HMMS). ?-chymotrypsin (CT) was adsorbed into M-HMMS with high loading (~30 wt%) in less than 30 minutes. Glutaraldehyde (GA) treatment of adsorbed CT resulted in nanometer scale crosslinked enzyme aggregates in M-HMMS (CLEA-M). The activity of these CT aggregates in M-HMMS (CLEA-M-CT) was 34 times than that of simply adsorbed CT in M20 HMMS, due to an effective prevention of enzyme leaching during washing via a ship-in-a-bottle approach. CLEA-M-CT maintained the intial activity not only under shaking (250 rpm) for 30 days, but also under recycled uses of 35 times. The same approach was employed for the synthesis of CLEA-M of lipase (CLEA-M-LP), and proven to be effective in improving the loading, activity, and stability of enzyme when compared to those of adsorbed LP in M-HMMS.

  9. A graph theory method for determination of cryo-EM image focuses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Guo, Fei; Liu, Zheng

    2012-11-01

    Accurate determination of micrograph focuses is essential for averaging multiple images to reach high-resolution 3-D reconstructions in electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM). Current methods use iterative fitting of focus-dependent simulated power spectra to the power spectra of experimental images, with the fitting performed independently for different images. Here we have developed a novel graph theory based method in which the rotational average focus and individual angular sector focuses of all images are determined simultaneously in closed form using the least square solution of overdetermined linear equations. The new method was shown to be fast, accurate, and robust in tests with large datasets of experimental low dose cryo-EM images. Its integration with three classic power spectra fitting methods also allows cross validation of the results by these vastly different methods. The new integrated focus determination method will improve reliability of automated focus determination for large-scale data processing that is increasingly common in the cryo-EM field. PMID:22842112

  10. Fitting Low-Resolution Cryo-EM Maps of Proteins Using Constrained Geometric Simulations?

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, Craig C.; Wells, Stephen A.; Fromme, Petra; Thorpe, M.F.

    2008-01-01

    Recent experimental advances in producing density maps from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) have challenged theorists to develop improved techniques to provide structural models that are consistent with the data and that preserve all the local stereochemistry associated with the biomolecule. We develop a new technique that maintains the local geometry and chemistry at each stage of the fitting procedure. A geometric simulation is used to drive the structure from some appropriate starting point (a nearby experimental structure or a modeled structure) toward the experimental density, via a set of small incremental motions. Structural motifs such as ?-helices can be held rigid during the fitting procedure as the starting structure is brought into alignment with the experimental density. After validating this procedure on simulated data for adenylate kinase and lactoferrin, we show how cryo-EM data for two different GroEL structures can be fit using a starting x-ray crystal structure. We show that by incorporating the correct local stereochemistry in the modeling, structures can be obtained with effective resolution that is significantly higher than might be expected from the nominal cryo-EM resolution. PMID:17993504

  11. Controlling protein adsorption on graphene for cryo-EM using low-energy hydrogen plasmas

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    Controlling protein adsorption on graphene for cryo-EM using low-energy hydrogen plasmas Christopher J. Russo1 and Lori A. Passmore1 1Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology taken before and after 80 s hydrogen plasma treatment used to measure change in lattice constant vis

  12. Single Particle Cryo-electron Microscopy and 3-D Reconstruction of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3–4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced. PMID:24357374

  13. The Structure of the Aquaporin-1 Water Channel: A Comparison between Cryo-electron Microscopy and

    E-print Network

    de Groot, Bert

    throughout nature, in species ranging from bacteria to humans, and more than 350 proteins have been Switzerland Three different medium-resolution structures of the human water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) have and limitations of state of the art cryo-EM methods. We present a detailed comparison between the different models

  14. Enhancing the Arctic Mean Sea Surface and Mean Dynamic Topography with CryoSat-2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenseng, Lars; Andersen, Ole B.; Knudsen, Per

    2014-05-01

    A reliable mean sea surface (MSS) is essential to derive a good mean dynamic topography (MDT) and for the estimation of short and long-term changes in the sea surface. The lack of satellite radar altimetry observations above 82 degrees latitude means that existing mean sea surface models have been unreliable in the Arctic Ocean. We here present the latest DTU mean sea surface and mean dynamic topography models that includes CryoSat-2 data to improve the reliability in the Arctic Ocean. In an attempt to extrapolate across the gap above 82 degrees latitude the previously models included ICESat data, gravimetrical geoids, ocean circulation models and various combinations hereof. Unfortunately cloud cover and the short periods of operation has a negative effect on the number of ICESat sea surface observations. DTU13MSS and DTU13MDT are the new generation of state of the art global high-resolution models that includes CryoSat-2 data to extend the satellite radar altimetry coverage up to 88 degrees latitude. Furthermore the SAR and SARin capability of CryoSat-2 dramatically increases the amount of useable sea surface returns in sea-ice covered areas compared to conventional radar altimeters like ENVISAT and ERS-1/2. With the inclusion of CryoSat-2 data the new mean sea surface is improved by more than 20 cm above 82 degrees latitude compared with the previous generation of mean sea surfaces.

  15. Cryo-EM of macromolecular assemblies at near-atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew L; Zhang, Junjie; Ludtke, Steven J; Chiu, Wah

    2011-01-01

    With single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-eM), it is possible to visualize large, macromolecular assemblies in near-native states. although subnanometer resolutions have been routinely achieved for many specimens, state of the art cryo-eM has pushed to near-atomic (3.3–4.6 Å) resolutions. at these resolutions, it is now possible to construct reliable atomic models directly from the cryo-eM density map. In this study, we describe our recently developed protocols for performing the three-dimensional reconstruction and modeling of Mm-cpn, a group II chaperonin, determined to 4.3 Å resolution. this protocol, utilizing the software tools eMan, Gorgon and coot, can be adapted for use with nearly all specimens imaged with cryo-eM that target beyond 5 Å resolution. additionally, the feature recognition and computational modeling tools can be applied to any near-atomic resolution density maps, including those from X-ray crystallography. PMID:20885381

  16. 70Cryo-testing the Webb Space Telescope ISIM The Webb Space Telescope, to

    E-print Network

    70Cryo-testing the Webb Space Telescope ISIM The Webb Space Telescope, to be launched in 2014 by the Webb Space Telescope in 2014. The instruments are very much like `high-tech' digital cameras that can, or the Integrated Science Instrument Module Flight Structure, will serve as the structural "heart" of the James Webb

  17. Protein Secondary Structure Determination by Constrained Single-Particle Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Lecumberry, Federico; Sapiro, Guillermo; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful technique for 3D structure determination of protein complexes by averaging information from individual molecular images. The resolutions that can be achieved with single-particle cryo-EM are frequently limited by inaccuracies in assigning molecular orientations based solely on 2D projection images. Tomographic data collection schemes, however, provide powerful constraints that can be used to more accurately determine molecular orientations necessary for 3D reconstruction. Here, we propose “constrained single-particle tomography” as a general strategy for 3D structure determination in cryo-EM. A key component of our approach is the effective use of images recorded in tilt series to extract high-resolution information and correct for the contrast transfer function. By incorporating geometric constraints into the refinement to improve orientational accuracy of images, we reduce model bias and overrefinement artifacts and demonstrate that protein structures can be determined at resolutions of ~8 Å starting from low-dose tomographic tilt series. PMID:23217682

  18. The general concept of signal–noise separation (SNS): mathematical aspects and implementation in magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dževad Belki?; Karen Belki?

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) are increasingly recognized as potentially key modalities\\u000a in cancer diagnostics. It is, therefore, urgent to overcome the shortcomings of current applications of MRS and MRSI. We explain\\u000a and substantiate why more advanced signal processing methods are needed, and demonstrate that the fast Padé transform (FPT),\\u000a as the quotient of two polynomials, is

  19. Fabrication of magnetically separable fluorescent terbium-based MOF nanospheres for highly selective trace-level detection of TNT.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jing-Jing; Qiu, Ling-Guang; Wang, Yi-Min; Yuan, Yu-Peng; Xie, An-Jian; Shen, Yu-Hua

    2014-03-14

    In this work, we present novel kinds of Fe3O4@Tb-BTC magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) nanospheres which possess both magnetic characteristics and fluorescent properties using a layer by layer assembly technique. The structure and morphology of the as-prepared Fe3O4@Tb-BTC were systematically characterized and it was applied in detection of nitroaromatic explosives, such as 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT), 2-nitrotoluene (2-NT), 4-nitrotoluene (4-NT), nitrobenzene (NB) and picric acid (PA). The results indicate that the fluorescence intensity of Fe3O4@Tb-BTC can be quenched by all analytes studied in the present work. Remarkably, the as-synthesized nanospheres exhibit high sensitivity for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) detection with Ksv value of (94?800 M(-1)). Besides, the magnetic nanospheres can be easily recycled, which makes it more convenient for reutilization and friendly to the environment. The results show that it has broad application prospects in the detection of nitroaromatic explosives. PMID:24452313

  20. Solid-solid grinding/templating route to magnetically separable nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon for the removal of Cu(2+) ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aibing; Yu, Yifeng; Zhang, Yue; Xing, Tingting; Wang, Yanyan; Zhang, Yexin; Zhang, Jian

    2014-08-30

    N-doped ordered mesoporous carbon materials (NOMC) with 2D hexagonal symmetry structure were synthesized via a facile solid-solid grinding/templating route, in which the ionic liquids (ILs) of 1-cyanoethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride and SBA-15 were employed as the precursor and hard template, respectively. The as-synthesized NOMC features with a uniform mesoporous size (3.5nm), ropes-like morphology (0.4-1?m in length) and high surface area (803m(2)/g). The quantitative analysis revealed the nitrogen content on the surface of NOMC is 5.5at%. Magnetic iron nanoparticles were successfully embedded into the carbon matrix by introducing iron chloride to the mixture of SBA-15 and ILs during the synthesis process. The NOMC-Fe composite possessed superior adsorption capacity of Cu(2+) ions (23.6mg/g). Kinetic and isothermal analysis demonstrated the strong interactions between Cu(2+) ion and the adsorbent. Furthermore, the composite was magnetically separable from solution under an external magnetic field and thus displayed a superior reusability in the recycling test. PMID:25072134

  1. Time series over the Brahmaputra River from CryoSat-2/SIRAL altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Heidi; Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Knudsen, Per; Nielsen, Karina; Stenseng, Lars

    2014-05-01

    CryoSat-2 was launched in 2010 with the purpose of monitoring polar ice caps, but the satellite has also proven to be useful for studies at lower latitudes. CryoSat-2 carries a new type of instrument, the SIRAL altimeter, which implements SAR and SARIn mode in addition to the standard LRM. In these modes the along-track resolution is 300m, giving rise to new opportunities for inland water altimetry, which requires a high along-track resolution in order to accurately capture the return signals from the water bodies. Here, we have investigated the possibilities for monitoring river water levels with CryoSat-2 as a part of the EU FP7 LOTUS (Preparing Land and Ocean Take Up from Sentinel-3). The LOTUS project will develop new methodologies, data processing chains, and applications of the SAR mode data for the inland water levels in rivers and lakes. Time series analysis for CryoSat-2 altimetry is not straightforward due to the satellite's very long repeat period of 369 days. It is therefore necessary to take new methods into use. Using slope correction, i.e. taking advantage of the drifting orbit, we have derived time series from retracked heights in all three modes of the CryoSat-2 altimeter over the Brahmaputra River. From the time series we can estimate the amplitude and the seasonal signal of the flow in the river. Presented here is a comparison of the results between modes and with Envisat time series.

  2. Imaging system for creating 3D block-face cryo-images of whole mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Debashish; Breen, Michael; Salvado, Olivier; Heinzel, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot; Wilson, David

    2006-03-01

    We developed a cryomicrotome/imaging system that provides high resolution, high sensitivity block-face images of whole mice or excised organs, and applied it to a variety of biological applications. With this cryo-imaging system, we sectioned cryo-preserved tissues at 2-40 ?m thickness and acquired high resolution brightfield and fluorescence images with microscopic in-plane resolution (as good as 1.2 ?m). Brightfield images of normal and pathological anatomy show exquisite detail, especially in the abdominal cavity. Multi-planar reformatting and 3D renderings allow one to interrogate 3D structures. In this report, we present brightfield images of mouse anatomy, as well as 3D renderings of organs. For BPK mice model of polycystic kidney disease, we compared brightfield cryo-images and kidney volumes to MRI. The color images provided greater contrast and resolution of cysts as compared to in vivo MRI. We note that color cryo-images are closer to what a researcher sees in dissection, making it easier for them to interpret image data. The combination of field of view, depth of field, ultra high resolution and color/fluorescence contrast enables cryo-image volumes to provide details that cannot be found through in vivo imaging or other ex vivo optical imaging approaches. We believe that this novel imaging system will have applications that include identification of mouse phenotypes, characterization of diseases like blood vessel disease, kidney disease, and cancer, assessment of drug and gene therapy delivery and efficacy and validation of other imaging modalities.

  3. The high Beta cryo-modules and the associated cryogenic system for the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delruelle, N.; Leclercq, Y.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Tibaron, P.; Vandoni, G.; Williams, L.

    2014-01-01

    The major upgrade of the energy and intensity of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facilities at CERN requires the replacement of most of the existing ISOLDE post-acceleration equipment by a superconducting linac based on quarter-wave resonators housed together with superconducting solenoids in a series of four high-? and two low-? cryo-modules. As well as providing optimum conditions for physics, the cryo-modules need to function under stringent vacuum and cryogenic conditions. We present the detail design and expected cryogenic performance of the high- ? cryo-module together with the cryogenic supply and distribution system destined to service the complete superconducting linac.

  4. The high Beta cryo-modules and the associated cryogenic system for the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Delruelle, N.; Leclercq, Y.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Tibaron, P.; Vandoni, G.; Williams, L. [CERN, CH1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-29

    The major upgrade of the energy and intensity of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facilities at CERN requires the replacement of most of the existing ISOLDE post-acceleration equipment by a superconducting linac based on quarter-wave resonators housed together with superconducting solenoids in a series of four high-? and two low-? cryo-modules. As well as providing optimum conditions for physics, the cryo-modules need to function under stringent vacuum and cryogenic conditions. We present the detail design and expected cryogenic performance of the high- ? cryo-module together with the cryogenic supply and distribution system destined to service the complete superconducting linac.

  5. Quantitative estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction from mitral valve E-point to septal separation and comparison to magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Jay R; Laffely, Nicholas H; Rifkin, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the mitral valve E point-to-septal separation (EPSS) can be used to quantify the left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) on a continuous scale rather than simply as "normal" or "reduced." After excluding 5 patients with mitral valve prostheses, asymmetric septal hypertrophy, or significant aortic insufficiency, EPSS was measured in 42 patients by 3 independent observers on a cardiac magnetic resonance image identical to the echocardiographic parasternal long-axis view. In each patient, the reference standard LVEF was calculated from the magnetic resonance short-axis cross-sectional stack images by Simpson's rule and ranged from 11% to 72%. For all 42 patients, linear regression revealed the relation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) LVEF = 75.5 - 2.5. EPSS (millimeters). Correlation between EPSS and the MRI LVEF for the 3 observers agreed closely, ranging from r = 0.78 to r = 0.82 (SEE 9 to 10), with similar regression coefficients. After blinded segmental wall motion scoring of the gated magnetic resonance cine images of the left ventricle in each patient, correlations, SEEs, and regression coefficients were found to be very similar in the 21 patients with the most homogenous wall motion, compared with the 21 patients with the most heterogenous wall motion. In conclusion, clinically useful quantitative prediction of the LVEF as a continuous variable can be obtained from the EPSS with a simple linear regression equation in a substantial portion of patients and may be a useful adjunct for assessment of LV function. PMID:16377299

  6. Low gravity phase separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Pope, W. L.; Smith, L. (inventors)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for phase separating a gas-liquid mixture as might exist in a subcritical cryogenic helium vessel for cooling a superconducting magnet at low gravity such as in planetary orbit, permitting conservation of the liquid and extended service life of the superconducting magnet.

  7. Separation and extraction of Co(II) using magnetic chitosan nanoparticles grafted with ?-cyclodextrin and determination by FAAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, Ali

    2014-12-01

    A novel and selective method for the fast determination of trace amounts of Co(II) ions in water samples has been developed. The procedure is based on the selective sorption of Co(II) ions using magnetic chitosan nanoparticles grafted with ?-cyclodextrin at different pH followed by elution with organic eluents and determination by atomic absorption spectrometry The preconcentration factor was 100 (1 mL elution volume) for a 100 mL sample volume. The limit of detection of the proposed method is 1.0 ng mL-1. The maximum sorption capacity of sorbent under optimum conditions has been found to be 5 mg of Co per gram of sorbent. The relative standard deviation under optimum conditions was 3.0% ( n = 10). Accuracy and applicability of the method was estimated using test samples of natural and model water with different amounts of Co(II).

  8. Crystal and cryoEM structural studies of a cell wall degrading enzyme in the bacteriophage [psi]29 tail

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Morais, Marc C.; Cohen, Daniel N.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue); (UMM)

    2009-08-28

    The small bacteriophage {phi}29 must penetrate the {approx}250-{angstrom} thick external peptidoglycan cell wall and cell membrane of the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, before ejecting its dsDNA genome through its tail into the bacterial cytoplasm. The tail of bacteriophage {phi}29 is noncontractile and {approx}380 {angstrom} long. A 1.8-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of gene product 13 (gp13) shows that this tail protein has spatially well separated N- and C-terminal domains, whose structures resemble lysozyme-like enzymes and metallo-endopeptidases, respectively. CryoEM reconstructions of the WT bacteriophage and mutant bacteriophages missing some or most of gp13 shows that this enzyme is located at the distal end of the {phi}29 tail knob. This finding suggests that gp13 functions as a tail-associated, peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme able to cleave both the polysaccharide backbone and peptide cross-links of the peptidoglycan cell wall. Comparisons of the gp13{sup -} mutants with the {phi}29 mature and emptied phage structures suggest the sequence of events that occur during the penetration of the tail through the peptidoglycan layer.

  9. Magnetism

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Windows to the Universe team

    2007-12-12

    This webpage is part of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Windows to the Universe program. It describes the nature and configuration of magnetic fields, which are the result of moving electric charges, including how they cause magnetic objects to orient themselves along the direction of the magnetic force points, which are illustrated as lines. Magnetic field lines by convention point outwards at the north magnetic pole and inward at the south magnetic pole. The site features text, scientific illustrations and an animation. Text and vocabulary are selectable for the beginning, intermediate, or advanced reader.

  10. Along-track Resolution of CryoSat Data for Marine Gravity Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, E. M.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2012-12-01

    The CryoSat mission's primary goal is to monitor elevation changes of ice-covered areas, but its excellent altimeter range precision and dense spatial coverage are providing major improvements to the accuracy of the marine gravity field. Development of optimal methods for combining CryoSat measurements with older altimetry data sets first requires an assessment of this new altimeter's spatial resolution capabilities. This is accomplished by performing a cross-spectral analysis of tracks that repeat to within about 1 kilometer apart. The spectral coherence is a measure of the ratio of the common geoid signal to the time varying oceanographic noise, as a function of spatial wavelength. The value of coherence is close to 1 at longer wavelengths where the signal dominates, and is small (< 0.2) where the noise dominates. A conservative estimate of the effective resolution is given by the wavelength at which the coherence level is 0.5. We conducted our analysis on CryoSat data acquired in two of its operating modes: the conventional pulse-limited mode (LRM), and also the novel beam-forming synthetic aperture mode (SAR). The waveform records were retracked using methods optimized for gravity recovery. The 369-day repeat tracks come from adjacent regions in the North Atlantic Ocean. To obtain statistically significant coherence estimates we used the Welch's modified periodogram method on multiple passes. The data were pre-whitened by taking the along-track derivative, resulting in along-track slope. We found that LRM slope acquisitions have a resolution limit of 28 kilometers, while for SAR, this was at 29 kilometers. In comparison, previously published values using a similar analysis in another area of the Atlantic quote a 33-kilometer resolution for Geosat, and 38-kilometer resolution for ERS-1 (Yale et al, 1995). These preliminary results suggest that the spatial resolution of CryoSat-derived gravity will be at least 1.2 times better than previous models. Additional improvements in resolution will come from averaging all available altimetry data, as well as additional repeat measurements by CryoSat. We note that the geoid signal and oceanographic noise are expected to vary throughout the global ocean. At the meeting, we will present a global investigation of the resolution of CryoSat data, and also a comparison of coherence levels with those from Envisat and Jason-1.

  11. CryoVEx 2011: In-situ sea ice measurements in the high Arctic Ocean for the validation of CryoSat-2 ice thickness retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, C.; Willatt, R. C.; Laxon, S. W.; Giles, K. A.; Beckers, J.; Hendricks, S.; Davidson, M.

    2011-12-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) CryoSat-2 satellite, which was launched in April 2010, is designed to measure changes in the thickness of the polar ice caps. By means of radar altimetry, CryoSat-2 performs accurate measurements of sea ice freeboard, the height of the ice surface above the water level, which is related to ice thickness via isostasy. From this, ice thickness can be estimated when assumptions are made about the density of snow and ice as well as about the thickness of snow and radar penetration into the snow. There are thus many sources of uncertainty related to the physical properties of snow and ice which may lead to significant errors in the satellite-retrieved ice thickness. Some of these uncertainties can be addressed through in-situ measurements. These were performed during CryoVEx 2011, an international project sponsored and coordinated by ESA and other funding agencies. Three sites with different ice and snow properties were studied between the coast of Ellesmere Island, Canada, and 85.5°N. These sites were visited by Twin Otter airplane landing on unprepared landing strips. At each site, corner reflectors to be used as references for airborne radar altimeter surveys were deployed and marked with drifting GPS buoys, and extensive snow and ice measurements were performed between the corner reflectors. Very high-resolution measurements were carried out in the immediate vicinity of the corner reflectors, including snow pit studies and measurements of radar penetration using a ground-based radar. Subsequently, the sites were overflown by aircraft carrying radar altimeters and ice thickness sensors. This presentation will review the validation concept implemented in the campaign and will summarize the snow and ice properties obtained at the different sites.

  12. Cryo-ablation improves anti-tumor immunity through recovering tumor educated dendritic cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiao-Zheng; Wang, Qi-Fu; Han, Shuai; Wang, Hui-Qing; Ye, Yong-Yi; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Shi-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background In addition to minimally invasive destruction of tumors, cryo-ablation of tumors to some extent modulated anti-tumor immunity. Cryo-ablated tumors in glioma mice models induced anti-tumor cellular immunologic response which increases the percentage of CD3+ and CD4+T cells in blood as well as natural killer cells. As a crucial role in triggering anti-tumor immunity, dendritic cells (DCs) were educated by tumors to adopt a tolerance phenotype which helps the tumor escape from immune monitoring. This study aims to study whether cryo-ablation could influence the tolerogenic DCs, and influence anti-tumor immunity in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs). Methods Using the GL261 subcutaneous glioma mouse model, we created a tumor bearing group, cryo-ablation group, and surgery group. We analyzed alteration in phenotype and function of tolerogenic DCs, and evaluated the factors of anti-tumor immunity inhibition. Results DCs in TDLNs in GL261 subcutaneous glioma mouse model expressed tolerogenic phenotype. In contrast to surgery, cryo-ablation improved the quantity and quality of these tolerogenic DCs. Moreover, the DCs decreased the expression of intracellular interleukin-10 (IL-10) and extra-cellular IL-10. In vitro, DCs from the cryo-ablation group recovered their specific function and induced potent anti-tumor immunity through triggering T cells. In vivo, cryo-ablation showed weak anti-tumor immunity, only inhibiting the growth of rechallenged tumors. But many IL-10-low DCs, rather than IL-10-high DCs, infiltrated the tumors. More importantly, Tregs inhibited the performance of these DCs; and depletion of Tregs greatly improved anti-tumor immunity in vivo. Conclusion Cryo-ablation could recover function of tumor induced tolerogenic DCs in vitro; and depletion of Tregs could improve this anti-tumor effect in vivo. The Tregs/CD4+T and Tregs/CD25+T cells in TDLNs inhibit DCs’ activity and function.

  13. The microstructure of dispersed and non-dispersed fresh cement pastes — New insight by cryo-microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anatol Zingg; Lorenz Holzer; Andres Kaech; Frank Winnefeld; Joachim Pakusch; Stefan Becker; Ludwig Gauckler

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to give new insights to the microstructural development of fresh cement pastes without and with polycarboxylate-type (PCE) of superplasticizers. Qualitative comparisons of the particulate structure of such cementitious systems were carried out by using cryo-FIB and cryo-SEM techniques. The natural structure of fresh cement pastes was preserved by high pressure freezing.It is illustrated that non-dispersed cement systems

  14. Optimization of a phase separation based magnetic-stirring salt-induced liquid-liquid microextraction method for determination of fluoroquinolones in food.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Wang, Huili; Ma, Meiping; Zhang, Yuna; Yin, Xiaohan; Dahlgren, Randy A; Du, Dongli; Wang, Xuedong

    2015-05-15

    Herein, we developed a novel integrated apparatus to perform phase separation based on magnetic-stirring, salt-induced, liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of five fluoroquinolones in animal-based foods by HPLC analysis. The novel integrated apparatus consisted of three simple HDPE (high density polyethylene) parts that were used to separate the solvent from the aqueous solution prior to retrieving the extractant. The extraction parameters were optimized using the response surface method based on central composite design: 791 ?L of acetone solvent, 2.5 g of Na2SO4, pH 1.7, 3.0 min of stir time, and 5.5 min centrifugation. The limits of detection were 0.07-0.53 ?g kg(-1) and recoveries were 91.6-105.0% for the five fluoroquinolones from milk, eggs and honey. This method is easily constructed from inexpensive materials, extraction efficiency is high, and the approach is compatible with HPLC analysis. Thus, it has excellent prospects for sample pre-treatment and analysis of fluoroquinolones in animal-based foods. PMID:25577068

  15. Ionic liquid coated magnetic core/shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles for the separation/analysis of linuron in food samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jieping; Zhu, Xiashi

    2015-02-01

    Three hydrophobic ionic liquids (ILs) including 1-butyl-3-methylimidazole hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM]PF6), 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazole hexafluorophosphate ([HMIM]PF6), and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazole hexafluoro-phosphate ([OMIM]PF6) coated Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles with core-shell structure to prepare magnetic solid phase extraction agent (Fe3O4@SiO2@ILs) and establish a new method of magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) coupled with UV spectrometry for separation/analysis of linuron. The results showed that linuron was adsorbed rapidly by Fe3O4@SiO2@[OMIM]PF6 and eluanted by ethanol. Under the optimal conditions, preconcentration factor of the proposed method was 10-fold. The linear range, detection limit, correlation coefficient (R) and relative standard deviation (RSD) were found to be 0.04-20.00 ?g mL-1, 5.0 ng mL-1, 0.9993 and 2.8% (n = 3, c = 4.00 ?g mL-1), respectively. The Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles could be used repeatedly for 10 times. This proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of linuron in food samples.

  16. Ionic liquid coated magnetic core/shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles for the separation/analysis of linuron in food samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jieping; Zhu, Xiashi

    2015-02-25

    Three hydrophobic ionic liquids (ILs) including 1-butyl-3-methylimidazole hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM]PF6), 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazole hexafluorophosphate ([HMIM]PF6), and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazole hexafluoro-phosphate ([OMIM]PF6) coated Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles with core-shell structure to prepare magnetic solid phase extraction agent (Fe3O4@SiO2@ILs) and establish a new method of magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) coupled with UV spectrometry for separation/analysis of linuron. The results showed that linuron was adsorbed rapidly by Fe3O4@SiO2@[OMIM]PF6 and eluanted by ethanol. Under the optimal conditions, preconcentration factor of the proposed method was 10-fold. The linear range, detection limit, correlation coefficient (R) and relative standard deviation (RSD) were found to be 0.04-20.00 ?g mL(-1), 5.0 ng mL(-1), 0.9993 and 2.8% (n=3, c=4.00 ?g mL(-1)), respectively. The Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles could be used repeatedly for 10 times. This proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of linuron in food samples. PMID:25238184

  17. Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

    2005-05-01

    Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

  18. Kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic investigations of phosphate adsorption onto core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs composites with easy magnetic separation assistance.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang-Guo; Yang, Kun; Shan, Ran-Ran; Yan, Tao; Wei, Jing; Yu, Shu-Jun; Yu, Hai-Qin; Du, Bin

    2015-06-15

    In this study, three different magnetic core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs composites, Fe3O4@Zn-Al-, Fe3O4@Mg-Al-, and Fe3O4@Ni-Al-LDH were prepared via a rapid coprecipitation method for phosphate adsorptive removal. The composites were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM, VSM and BET analyses. Characterization results proved the successful synthesis of core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs composites with good superparamagnetisms. Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption efficiency of phosphate. Optimal conditions for the phosphate adsorption were obtained: 0.05g of adsorbent, solution pH of 3, and contact time of 60min. Proposed mechanisms for the removal of phosphate species onto Fe3O4@LDHs composites at different initial solution pH were showed. The kinetic data were described better by the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and KASRA model. The adsorption isotherm curves showed a three-region behavior in the ARIAN model. It had a good fit with Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity followed the order of Fe3O4@Zn-Al-LDH>Fe3O4@Mg-Al-LDH>Fe3O4@Ni-Al-LDH. Thermodynamic analyses indicated that the phosphate adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. The three Fe3O4@LDHs composites could be easily separated from aqueous solution by the external magnetic field in 10s. These novel magnetic core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs adsorbents may offer a simple single step adsorption treatment option to remove phosphate from water without the requirement of pre-/post-treatment for current industrial practice. PMID:25778739

  19. Rapid ionic liquid-based ultrasound assisted dual magnetic microextraction to preconcentrate and separate cadmium-4-(2-thiazolylazo)-resorcinol complex from environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sumaira; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Soylak, Mustafa

    2014-04-01

    A rapid and innovative microextraction technique named as, ionic liquid-based ultrasound-assisted dual magnetic microextraction (IL-UA-DMME) was developed for the preconcentration and extraction of trace cadmium from environmental and biological samples, prior to analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The proposed method has many obvious advantages, including evading the use of organic solvents and achieved high extraction yields by the combination of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and magnetic mediated-solid phase extraction (MM-SPE). In this approach ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4mim][PF6] play an important role to extract the cadmium-4-(2-thiazolylazo)-resorcinol (Cd-TAR) complex from acid digested sample solutions and ultrasonic irradiation was applied to assist emulsification. After then, dispersed small amount of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in sample solutions to salvaged the IL and complete phase separation was attained. Some analytical parameters that influencing the efficiency of proposed (IL-UA-DMME) method, such as pH, volume of IL, ligand concentration, ultra-sonication time, amount of Fe3O4 MNPs, sample volume and matrix effect were optimized. Limit of detection (LOD) and enrichment factor (EF) of the method under optimal experimental conditions were found to be 0.40?gL(-1) and 100, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of 50?gL(-1) Cd was 4.29%. The validity and accuracy of proposed method, was assessed to analyzed certified reference materials of fortified lake water TMDA-54.4, SPS-WW2 waste water, spinach leaves 1570a and also checked by standard addition method. The obtained values showed good agreement with the certified values and sufficiently high recovery were found in the range of 98.1-101% for Cd. The proposed method was facile, rapid and successfully applied for the determination of Cd in environmental and different biological samples. PMID:24398463

  20. Cross-linking cellulose nanofibrils for potential elastic cryo-structured gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syverud, Kristin; Kirsebom, Harald; Hajizadeh, Solmaz; Chinga-Carrasco, Gary

    2011-12-01

    Cellulose nanofibrils were produced from P. radiata kraft pulp fibers. The nanofibrillation was facilitated by applying 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl-mediated oxidation as pretreatment. The oxidized nanofibrils were cross-linked with polyethyleneimine and poly N-isopropylacrylamide- co-allylamine- co-methylenebisacrylamide particles and were frozen to form cryo-structured gels. Samples of the gels were critical-point dried, and the corresponding structures were assessed with scanning electron microscopy. It appears that the aldehyde groups in the oxidized nanofibrils are suitable reaction sites for cross-linking. The cryo-structured materials were spongy, elastic, and thus capable of regaining their shape after a given pressure was released, indicating a successful cross-linking. These novel types of gels are considered potential candidates in biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  1. Development of a TES based Cryo-Anticoincidence for a large array of microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colasanti, L.; Macculi, C.; Piro, L.; Natalucci, L.; Gatti, F.; Ferrari, L.; Mineo, T.; Perinati, E.; Torrioli, G.; Bastia, P.; Barbera, M.

    2009-12-01

    The employment of large arrays of microcalorimeters in space missions (IXO, EDGE/XENIA)[1][2][3], requires the presence of an anticoincidence detector to remove the background due to the particles, with a rejection efficiency at least equal to Suzaku (98%) [1]. A new concept of anticoincidence is under development to match the very tight thermal requirements and to simplify the design of the electronic chain. The idea is to produce a Cryo-AntiCoincidence (Cryo-AC) based on a silicon absorber and read by a TES (Transition-Edge Sensor). This configuration would ensure very good performances in terms of efficiency, time response and signal to noise ratio. We present the results of estimations, simulations and preliminary measurement.

  2. RELION: Implementation of a Bayesian approach to cryo-EM structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Scheres, Sjors H.W.

    2012-01-01

    RELION, for REgularized LIkelihood OptimizatioN, is an open-source computer program for the refinement of macromolecular structures by single-particle analysis of electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) data. Whereas alternative approaches often rely on user expertise for the tuning of parameters, RELION uses a Bayesian approach to infer parameters of a statistical model from the data. This paper describes developments that reduce the computational costs of the underlying maximum a posteriori (MAP) algorithm, as well as statistical considerations that yield new insights into the accuracy with which the relative orientations of individual particles may be determined. A so-called gold-standard Fourier shell correlation (FSC) procedure to prevent overfitting is also described. The resulting implementation yields high-quality reconstructions and reliable resolution estimates with minimal user intervention and at acceptable computational costs. PMID:23000701

  3. Model of human low-density lipoprotein and bound receptor based on CryoEM

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Gang; Rudenko, Gabby; Ludtke, Steven J.; Deisenhofer, Johann; Chiu, Wah; Pownall, Henry J.

    2010-01-01

    Human plasma low-density lipoproteins (LDL), a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, transfer cholesterol from plasma to liver cells via the LDL receptor (LDLr). Here, we report the structures of LDL and its complex with the LDL receptor extracellular domain (LDL·LDLr) at extracellular pH determined by cryoEM. Difference imaging between LDL·LDLr and LDL localizes the site of LDLr bound to its ligand. The structural features revealed from the cryoEM map lead to a juxtaposed stacking model of cholesteryl esters (CEs). High density in the outer shell identifies protein-rich regions that can be accounted for by a single apolipoprotein (apo B-100, 500 kDa) leading to a model for the distribution of its ?-helix and ?-sheet rich domains across the surface. The structural relationship between the apo B-100 and CEs appears to dictate the structural stability and function of normal LDL. PMID:20080547

  4. Cryo-EM structures of two bovine adenovirus type 3 intermediates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lingpeng; Huang, Xiaoxing; Li, Xiaomin; Xiong, Wei; Sun, Wei; Yang, Chongwen; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ying; Liu, Hongrong; Huang, Xiaojun; Ji, Gang; Sun, Fei; Zheng, Congyi; Zhu, Ping

    2014-02-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) infect hosts from all vertebrate species and have been investigated as vaccine vectors. We report here near-atomic structures of two bovine Ad type 3 (BAd3) intermediates obtained by cryo-electron microscopy. A comparison between the two intermediate structures reveals that the differences are localized in the fivefold vertex region, while their facet structures are identical. The overall facet structure of BAd3 exhibits a similar structure to human Ads; however, BAd3 protein IX has a unique conformation. Mass spectrometry and cryo-electron tomography analyses indicate that one intermediate structure represents the stage during DNA encapsidation, whilst the other intermediate structure represents a later stage. These results also suggest that cleavage of precursor protein VI occurs during, rather than after, the DNA encapsidation process. Overall, our results provide insights into the mechanism of Ad assembly, and allow the first structural comparison between human and nonhuman Ads at backbone level. PMID:24503080

  5. Cryo electron microscopy reconstructions of the Leviviridae unveil the densest icosahedral RNA packing possible.

    PubMed

    van den Worm, Sjoerd H E; Koning, Roman I; Warmenhoven, Hans J; Koerten, Henk K; van Duin, Jan

    2006-11-01

    We solved the structures of the single-stranded RNA bacteriophages Qbeta, PP7 and AP205 by cryo-electron microscopy. On the outside, the symmetrized electron density maps resemble the previously described cryo-electron microscopy structure of MS2. RNA density is present inside the capsids, suggesting that the genomic RNA of Qbeta, PP7 and AP205, analogous to MS2, contains many coat protein-binding sites in addition to the hairpin on which assembly and packaging are initiated. All four bacteriophages harbour the same overall arrangement of the RNA, which is a unique combination of both triangles and pentagons. This combination has not been found in other icosahedral viruses, in which the RNA structures are either triangular or pentagonal. Strikingly, the unique RNA packing of the Leviviridae appears to deploy the most efficient method of RNA storage by obeying icosahedral symmetry. PMID:16989861

  6. Noise models and cryo-EM drift correction with a direct-electron camera.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, H; Sigworth, F J

    2013-08-01

    Blurring due to specimen-holder drift is a common occurrence in cryo-EM images. Cameras employing active-pixel sensors are capable of high frame rates such that a single low-dose exposure can be acquired as a series of frames. In this paper we consider the possibility of tracking and compensating for overall drift in typical single-particle specimens through the analysis of frame sequences. A problem that arises in tracking through cross-correlation of frames obtained with the DE-12 camera from Direct Electron LLC is the presence of "hot-pixel noise". This random pattern of bright pixels is highly correlated among frames. We show how a model of this noise can be employed to greatly reduce its effects. A filter function is derived that optimizes the tracking of image shifts by cross-correlation, and we demonstrate the tracking of specimen drift in typical cryo-EM specimens. PMID:23748163

  7. Development of a TES based Cryo-Anticoincidence for a large array of microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Colasanti, L.; Macculi, C.; Piro, L.; Natalucci, L. [INAF-IASF Rome, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Gatti, F.; Ferrari, L. [INFN-UniGe, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Mineo, T.; Perinati, E. [INAF-IASF Palermo, via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy); Torrioli, G. [IFN-CNR, Via Cineto Romano, 42 00156 Roma (Italy); Bastia, P. [Thales Alenia Space Italia S.p.A., s.s. Padana Superiore 290, 20090 Vimodrone, Milano (Italy); Barbera, M. [University of Palermo, via Archirafi 36 I, 90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2009-12-16

    The employment of large arrays of microcalorimeters in space missions (IXO, EDGE/XENIA), requires the presence of an anticoincidence detector to remove the background due to the particles, with a rejection efficiency at least equal to Suzaku (98%). A new concept of anticoincidence is under development to match the very tight thermal requirements and to simplify the design of the electronic chain. The idea is to produce a Cryo-AntiCoincidence (Cryo-AC) based on a silicon absorber and read by a TES (Transition-Edge Sensor). This configuration would ensure very good performances in terms of efficiency, time response and signal to noise ratio. We present the results of estimations, simulations and preliminary measurement.

  8. Magnetic state of the structural separated anion-deficient La{sub 0.70}Sr{sub 0.30}MnO{sub 2.85} manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Trukhanov, S. V., E-mail: truhanov@ifttp.bas-net.by; Trukhanov, A. V. [Scientific Practical Materials Research Centre of NAS of Belarus (Belarus); Vasiliev, A. N. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Balagurov, A. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Szymczak, H. [Institute of Physics, PAS (Poland)

    2011-11-15

    The results of neutron diffraction studies of the La{sub 0.70}Sr{sub 0.30}MnO{sub 2.85} compound and its behavior in an external magnetic field are stated. It is established that in the 4-300 K temperature range, two structural perovskite phases coexist in the sample, which differ in symmetry (groups R3-bar c and I4/mcm). The reason for the phase separation is the clustering of oxygen vacancies. The temperature (4-300 K) and field (0-140 kOe) dependences of the specific magnetic moment are measured. It is found that in zero external field, the magnetic state of La{sub 0.70}Sr{sub 0.30}MnO{sub 2.85} is a cluster spin glass, which is the result of frustration of Mn{sup 3+}-O-Mn{sup 3+} exchange interactions. An increase in external magnetic field up to 10 kOe leads to fragmentation of ferromagnetic clusters and then to an increase in the degree of polarization of local spins of manganese and the emergence of long-range ferromagnetic order. With increasing magnetic field up to 140 kOe, the magnetic ordering temperature reaches 160 K. The causes of the structural and magnetic phase separation of this composition and formation mechanism of its spin-glass magnetic state are analyzed.

  9. Correlative VIS-fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christoph; Guttmann, Peter; Klupp, Barbara; Werner, Stephan; Rehbein, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of vitreous samples is becoming a valuable tool in structural cell biology. Within the ‘water-window’ wavelength region (2.34–4.37 nm), it provides absorption contrast images with high signal to noise ratio and resolution of a few tens of nanometer. Soft X-rays with wavelengths close to the K-absorption edge of oxygen penetrate biological samples with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Here, we report on the application of a recently established extension of the transmission soft X-ray cryo-microscope (HZB TXM) at the beamline U41-XM of the BESSY II electron storage ring by an in-column epi-fluorescence and reflected light cryo-microscope. We demonstrate the new capability for correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of this instrument along a typical life science experimental approach – the correlation of a fluorophore-tagged protein (pUL34-GFP of pseudorabies virus, PrV, the nuclear membrane-anchored component of the nuclear egress complex of the Herpesviridae which interacts with viral pUL31) in PrV pUL34-GFP/pUL31 coexpressing mammalian cells, with virus-induced vesicular structures in the nucleus, expanding the nucleoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, our results demonstrate new possibilities to study the role of specific proteins in substructures of adherent cells, especially of the nucleus in toto, accessible to electron microscopy in thinned samples only. PMID:22210307

  10. Native cellular architecture of Treponema denticola revealed by cryo-electron tomography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacques Izard; Chyong-Ere Hsieh; Ronald J. Limberger; Carmen A. Mannella; Michael Marko

    2008-01-01

    Using cryo-electron tomography, we are developing a refined description of native cellular structures in the pathogenic spirochete Treponema denticola. Tightly organized bundles of periplasmic flagella were readily observed in intact plunge-frozen cells. The periplasmic space was measured in both wild-type and aflagellate strains, and found to widen by less than the diameter of flagella when the latter are present. This

  11. Controlling protein adsorption on graphene for cryo-EM using low-energy hydrogen plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Christopher J.; Passmore, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its many favorable properties as a sample support for biological electron microscopy, graphene is not widely used because its hydrophobicity precludes reliable protein deposition. We describe a method to modify graphene using a low-energy hydrogen plasma, which reduces hydrophobicity without degrading the graphene lattice. We show that the use of plasma-treated graphene enables better control of protein distribution in ice for electron cryo-microscopy and improved image quality by reducing radiation-induced sample motion. PMID:24747813

  12. Magnetism

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This radio broadcast discusses the history of magnetism from the time of its discovery by an apocryphal Greek sheperd until the late 16th century and the work of William Gilbert. There is also discussion of who pioneered the study of magnetism, what theories they constructed from its curious abilities, and how the power of the magnet was brought out of the realm of magic and into the service of science. The broadcast concludes with a discussion of why magnetism is still mysterious and how the modern search for the single magnetic pole, or magnetic monopole, could provide a fundamental unit of magnetism, essential for ultimate explanation. The broadcast is 41 minutes and 45 seconds in length.

  13. Characterization of virus-like particles in GARDASIL® by cryo transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qinjian; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Lander, Gabriel; Sworen, Jaime; Towne, Victoria; Abraham, Dicky; Duncan, Paul; Washabaugh, Michael W; Sitrin, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryoTEM) is a powerful characterization method for assessing the structural properties of biopharmaceutical nanoparticles, including Virus Like Particle-based vaccines. We demonstrate the method using the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) VLPs in GARDASIL®. CryoTEM, coupled to automated data collection and analysis, was used to acquire images of the particles in their hydrated state, determine their morphological characteristics, and confirm the integrity of the particles when absorbed to aluminum adjuvant. In addition, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the VLPs, both alone and when interacting with neutralizing antibodies. Two modes of binding of two different neutralizing antibodies were apparent; for HPV type 11 saturated with H11.B2, 72 potential Fab binding sites were observed at the center of each capsomer, whereas for HPV 16 interacting with H16.V5, it appears that 60 pentamers (each neighboring 6 other pentamers) bind five Fabs per pentamer, for the total of 300 potential Fab binding sites per VLP. PMID:24299977

  14. Application of cryo-compatible antibodies to human placenta paraffin sections.

    PubMed

    Blaschitz, Astrid; Gauster, Martin; Dohr, Gottfried

    2008-09-01

    The hepes-glutamic acid buffer-mediated organic solvent protection effect (HOPE) -fixation and paraffin embedding technique has been described to expand possibilities for immuno-labellings due to low denaturation of proteins. In this study, the issue was addressed as to whether the HOPE technique could be a useful tool in placenta tissue-based studies when only cryo-compatible antibodies are available. Such antibodies can be used on cryostat sections only, giving results of considerably inferior morphological detail as compared to routinely fixed paraffin embedded tissue sections. Commercially available, only cryo-compatible, monoclonal antibodies against a conformational epitope of HLA-G (clone MEM-G/9) and leukocyte differentiation antigens CD56, CD163 and CD34 III were selected and applied to frozen sections, routinely formalin-fixed and HOPE-fixed paraffin sections. All tested antibodies immunolocalized their antigen on cryo sections and on HOPE-fixed but not formalin-fixed paraffin sections. The HOPE technique provides an excellent preservation of protein antigenicity together with well presented morphological details in paraffin embedded placenta tissues. The detection of native or conformation-dependent epitopes in paraffin sections expands the immunolocalization possibilities in placenta research and reproductive immunology. PMID:18563432

  15. Beam-induced motion correction for sub-megadalton cryo-EM particles.

    PubMed

    Scheres, Sjors Hw

    2014-01-01

    In electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM), the electron beam that is used for imaging also causes the sample to move. This motion blurs the images and limits the resolution attainable by single-particle analysis. In a previous Research article (Bai et al., 2013) we showed that correcting for this motion by processing movies from fast direct-electron detectors allowed structure determination to near-atomic resolution from 35,000 ribosome particles. In this Research advance article, we show that an improved movie processing algorithm is applicable to a much wider range of specimens. The new algorithm estimates straight movement tracks by considering multiple particles that are close to each other in the field of view, and models the fall-off of high-resolution information content by radiation damage in a dose-dependent manner. Application of the new algorithm to four data sets illustrates its potential for significantly improving cryo-EM structures, even for particles that are smaller than 200 kDa. PMID:25122622

  16. Microstructure development in latex coatings: High-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Haiyan

    2005-07-01

    High-resolution cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) was used to investigate microstructure development in drying latex coatings: from a colloidal stable suspension into a coherent strong film by drying. Useful sample preparation artifacts during the freeze-fracture, i.e., pullouts were documented and analyzed. Pullouts indicate both physical properties of latex particles and the drying stages in latex coatings. The mechanism of pullout formation was studied both theoretically and experimentally. Latex coatings must possess satisfactory freeze-thaw stability to avoid problems during transportation and storage in cold winter. The behavior of latex particles during freeze-thaw cycles was visualized by Cryo-SEM. The images indicated that high concentration of polymerizable surfactant in a latex suspension improved its freeze-thaw stability. In film formation, skinning was captured from edge in and top down in coatings of 80nm diameter styrene-butadiene latex particles with exceptional low Tg (-65°C). Effects on skinning of drying conditions and the way the latex was initially stabilized against flocculation were investigated. A skinned pocket was unexpectedly found in the coating. The cause of such a skin around the air bubble was explained by both simple models calculating the dissolution time and force analysis on the particles. The film formation processes in conventional and low volatile organic compound (VOC) latex coatings were compared by time-sectioning Cryo-SEM. Some low-VOC latex coatings were found to dry as fast as conventional ones without deteriorating final good film properties.

  17. Construction and Organization of a BSL-3 Cryo-Electron Microscopy Laboratory at UTMB

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Michael B.; Trujillo, Juan; Leahy, Ian; Razmus, Dennis; DeHate, Robert; Lorcheim, Paul; Czarneski, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Domenica; Newton, Je T’Aime M.; Haddow, Andrew D.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    A unique cryo-electron microscopy facility has been designed and constructed at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) to study the three-dimensional organization of viruses and bacteria classified as select agents at biological safety level (BSL)-3, and their interactions with host cells. A 200 keV high-end cryo-electron microscope was installed inside a BSL-3 containment laboratory and standard operating procedures were developed and implemented to ensure its safe and efficient operation. We also developed a new microscope decontamination protocol based on chlorine dioxide gas with a continuous flow system, which allowed us to expand the facility capabilities to study bacterial agents including spore-forming species. The new unified protocol does not require agent-specific treatment in contrast to the previously used heat decontamination. To optimize the use of the cryo-electron microscope and to improve safety conditions, it can be remotely controlled from a room outside of containment, or through a computer network world-wide. Automated data collection is provided by using JADAS (single particle imaging) and SerialEM (tomography). The facility has successfully operated for more than a year without an incident and was certified as a select agent facility by the Centers for Disease Control. PMID:23274136

  18. Cryo ultra-low-angle microtomy for XPS-depth profiling of organic coatings.

    PubMed

    Greunz, T; Strauß, B; Schausberger, S E; Heise, B; Jachs, B; Stifter, D

    2013-09-01

    In X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) Ar(+) ion sputtering is usually used for depth profiling. However, for such samples as organic coatings, this is not feasible because of degradation. Also, measurement of a depth profile on a conventionally prepared cross-section is not possible if, for example, sample thickness is below the smallest available measurement spot size of the XPS system. In our approach we used a rotary microtome to cut samples under a shallow tilting angle of 0.5° to obtain an extended cross-section suitable for XPS investigations. We also used liquid nitrogen cooling to ensure an exposed area of higher quality: topography measurements with a novel optical 3D microscope and by atomic force microscopy revealed the linearity of the inclined sections. With our cryo ultra-low-angle microtomy (cryo-ULAM) preparation technique we were able to determine, by XPS, elemental and chemical gradients within a 25 ?m thick polyester-based organic coating deposited on steel. The gradients were related to, for example, depletion of the crosslinking agent in the sub-surface region. Complementary reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements performed on the cryo-ULAM sections also support the findings obtained from the XPS depth profiles. PMID:23529414

  19. Particle migration analysis in iterative classification of cryo-EM single-particle data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Shen, Bingxin; Frank, Joachim

    2014-12-01

    Recently developed classification methods have enabled resolving multiple biological structures from cryo-EM data collected on heterogeneous biological samples. However, there remains the problem of how to base the decisions in the classification on the statistics of the cryo-EM data, to reduce the subjectivity in the process. Here, we propose a quantitative analysis to determine the iteration of convergence and the number of distinguishable classes, based on the statistics of the single particles in an iterative classification scheme. We start the classification with more number of classes than anticipated based on prior knowledge, and then combine the classes that yield similar reconstructions. The classes yielding similar reconstructions can be identified from the migrating particles (jumpers) during consecutive iterations after the iteration of convergence. We therefore termed the method "jumper analysis", and applied it to the output of RELION 3D classification of a benchmark experimental dataset. This work is a step forward toward fully automated single-particle reconstruction and classification of cryo-EM data. PMID:25449317

  20. Vesicle-micelle transition of phosphatidylcholine and octyl glucoside elucidated by cryo-transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Vinson, P K; Talmon, Y; Walter, A

    1989-01-01

    Vesicle-micelle transition structures of egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) and octyl glucoside (OG) mixtures were observed in the vitrified hydrated state by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and correlated with the macroscopic and molecular changes previously associated with micellization monitored by 90 degrees light scattering and resonance energy transfer between fluorescent lipid probes. Several distinct structural changes occurred as OG was added to the PC vesicles. First, the average vesicle size decreased from 160 nm to less than 66 nm with no apparent change or decrease in optical density (OD). Then, associated with a small rise in OD, samples with open vesicles were observed coexisting with pieces of lamellae and long cylindrical micelles; more micelles were seen at higher [OG]. This mixture of vesicles and cylindrical micelles occurred in the region of the phase diagram previously attributed to vesicle opening, and possibly vesicle size increase. At higher [OG], small spheroidal micelles coexisting with cylindrical micelles correlated with a decrease in OD and changes in the fluorescence signal. At high [OG] when the solution appeared clear, spheroidal micelles were the dominant structure. By using cryo-TEM, a technique which preserves the original microstructure of fluid systems and provides direct images at 1 nm resolution, we have elucidated the vesicle-micelle transition and identified intermediates not known previously in the PC/OG system. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:2819233

  1. The superconducting OGMS separator optimization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tadeusz Janowski; Slawomir Kozak

    1993-01-01

    The constructional parameters of the electromagnet influence the efficiency of the OGMS (open gradient magnetic separation) process. An analysis of the relationships between the superconducting magnet dimensions and the efficiency of the separator for the paramagnetic (?=5e-3) and ferromagnetic (iron) particles with the diameters 20 ?m and 100 ?m for different medium velocities is presented. The mathematical model of the

  2. Nitrogen Separation and Liquefaction Apparatus for Medical Applications and Its Thermodynamic Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Piotrowska, A.; Polinski, J.

    2006-04-01

    Low temperature medicine is becoming a widely appreciated method in surgery, dermatology, gynecology and rheumatology. The cryomedical equipment is usually supplied with liquid nitrogen LN2 stored in a dewar and transferred to a tip, where it is evaporated providing a cooling power. LN2 in quantities sufficient for cryo-surgical and cryo-therapeutical applications can be first separated from air and then liquefied using a system combining polymer membrane gas separation technology and a Joule-Thomson closed-cycle refrigerator filled with a nitrogen-hydrocarbons gas mixture. Nitrogen is separated from the compressed air, then liquefied and throttled to atmospheric pressure. The paper analyzes the demanded cooling capacity of the system resulting from cryomedical treatment requirements. Thermal design and flow scheme of the apparatus are given. The system is thermodynamically optimized.

  3. In-situ integrity control of frozen-hydrated, vitreous lamellas prepared by the cryo-focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    de Winter, D A Matthijs; Mesman, Rob J; Hayles, Michael F; Schneijdenberg, Chris T W M; Mathisen, Cliff; Post, Jan A

    2013-07-01

    Recently a number of new approaches have been presented with the intention to produce electron beam transparent cryo-sections (lamellas in FIB-SEM terminology) from hydrated vitreously frozen cryo samples with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system, suitable for cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM). As the workflow is still challenging and time consuming, it is important to be able to determine the integrity and suitability (cells vs. no cells; vitreous vs. crystalline) of the lamellas. Here we present an in situ method that tests both conditions by using the cryo-Scanning Electron Microscope (cryo-SEM) in transmission mode (TSEM; Transmission Scanning Electron Microscope) once the FIB-made lamella is ready. Cryo-TSEM imaging of unstained cells yields strong contrast, enabling direct imaging of material present in the lamellas. In addition, orientation contrast is shown to be suitable for distinguishing crystalline lamellas from vitreous lamellas. Tilting the stage a few degrees results in changes of contrast between ice grains as a function of the tilt angle, whereas the contrast of areas with vitreous ice remains unchanged as a function of the tilt angle. This orientation contrast has subsequently been validated by cryo-Electron BackScattered Diffraction (EBSD) in transmission mode. Integration of the presented method is discussed and the role it can play in future developments for a new and innovative all-in-one cryo-FIB-SEM life sciences instrument. PMID:23742839

  4. Estimation of Arctic Sea Ice Freeboard and Thickness Using CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanggyun; Im, Jungho; yoon, Hyeonjin; Shin, Minso; Kim, Miae

    2014-05-01

    Arctic sea ice is one of the significant components of the global climate system as it plays a significant role in driving global ocean circulation, provides a continuous insulating layer at air-sea interface, and reflects a large portion of the incoming solar radiation in Polar Regions. Sea ice extent has constantly declined since 1980s. Its area was the lowest ever recorded on 16 September 2012 since the satellite record began in 1979. Arctic sea ice thickness has also been diminishing along with the decreasing sea ice extent. Because extent and thickness, two main characteristics of sea ice, are important indicators of the polar response to on-going climate change, there has been a great effort to quantify them using various approaches. Sea ice thickness has been measured with numerous field techniques such as surface drilling and deploying buoys. These techniques provide sparse and discontinuous data in spatiotemporal domain. Spaceborne radar and laser altimeters can overcome these limitations and have been used to estimate sea ice thickness. Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICEsat), a laser altimeter from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), provided data to detect polar area elevation change between 2003 and 2009. CryoSat-2 launched with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)/Interferometric Radar Altimeter (SIRAL) on April 2010 can provide data to estimate time-series of Arctic sea ice thickness. In this study, Arctic sea ice freeboard and thickness in 2012 and 2013 were estimated using CryoSat-2 SAR mode data that has sea ice surface height relative to the reference ellipsoid WGS84. In order to estimate sea ice thickness, freeboard height, elevation difference between the top of sea ice surface and leads should be calculated. CryoSat-2 profiles such as pulse peakiness, backscatter sigma-0, number of echoes, and significant wave height were examined to distinguish leads from sea ice. Several near-real time cloud-free MODIS images as CryoSat-2 data were used to identify leads. Rule-based machine learning approaches such as random forest and See5.0 and human-derived decision trees were used to produce rules to identify leads. With the freeboard height calculated from the lead analysis, sea ice thickness was finally estimated using the Archimedes' buoyancy principle with density of sea ice and sea water and the height of freeboard. The results were compared with Arctic sea ice thickness distribution retrieved from CryoSat-2 data by Alfred-Wegener-Institute.

  5. ESA-NASA collaboration in support of CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, T. G.; Davidson, M.; Schuettemeyer, D.; Perrera, A.; Armitage, T.; Bianchi, R.; Parrinello, T.; Fornari, M.; Skourup, H.

    2012-12-01

    In the framework of its Earth Observation Programmes the European Space Agency (ESA) carries out groundbased and airborne campaigns to support geophysical algorithm development, calibration/validation, simulation of future spaceborne earth observation missions, and applications development related to land, oceans and atmosphere. ESA has been conducting airborne and ground measurements campaigns since 1981 by deploying a broad range of active and passive instrumentation in both the optical and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum such as lidars, limb/nadir sounding interferometers/spectrometers, high-resolution spectral imagers, advanced synthetic aperture radars, altimeters and radiometers. These campaigns take place inside and outside Europe in collaboration with national research organisations in the ESA member states as well as with international organisations harmonising European campaign activities. For the different activities a rich variety of datasets has been recorded, are archived and users can access campaign data through the EOPI web portal [http://eopi.esa.int]. CryoSat-2, ESA's third Earth Explorer, is Europe's first mission dedicated to monitoring Earth's ice fields. The satellite carries a sophisticated radar altimeter that can measure the thickness of sea ice down to centimetres and also monitor changes in ice sheets, particularly around the edges where icebergs are calved from the vast ice sheets that cover Greenland and Antarctica. On order to gather data to help ensure the accuracy of ESA's ice mission, in yet another remarkable collaborative effort, ESA and NASA met up over the Arctic Ocean in April 2012 to perform some carefully coordinated flights directly under CryoSat orbiting above. The aim of this large-scale campaign was to record sea-ice thickness and conditions of the ice exactly along the line traced by ESA's CryoSat satellite orbiting high above. A range of sensors installed on the different aircraft was used to gather complementary information. These airborne instruments included simple cameras to get a visual record of the sea ice, laser scanners to clearly map the height of the ice, an ice-thickness sensor (EM-Bird), ESA's radar altimeter (ASIRAS) and NASA's snow and Ku-band radars, which mimic CryoSat's measurements but at a higher resolution. Preliminary results, obtained from the pooled flight time among teams of scientists from Europe, US and Canada, already show the capability to determine the amount of snow on the ice. Even more interestingly, from 700 km away, CryoSat is able to detect centimeter differences between sea-ice and thin ice/water, which in turn allow for the estimation of actual sea ice thickness at the time of the measurement.

  6. Cryo-EM Imaging of DNA-PK DNA Damage Repair Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Phoebe L. Stewart

    2005-06-27

    Exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that must be repaired for cell survival. Higher eukaryotes respond to DSBs by arresting the cell cycle, presumably to repair the DNA lesions before cell division. In mammalian cells, the nonhomologous end-joining DSB repair pathway is mediated by the 470 kDa DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) together with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. Mouse knock-out models of these three proteins are all exquisitely sensitive to low doses of ionizing radiation. In the presence of DNA ends, Ku binds to the DNA and then recruits DNA-PKcs. After formation of the complex, the kinase activity associated with DNA-PKcs becomes activated. This kinase activity has been shown to be essential for repairing DNA DSBs in vivo since expression of a kinase-dead form of DNA-PKcs in a mammalian cell line that lacks DNA-PKcs fails to complement the radiosensitive phenotype. The immense size of DNA-PKcs suggests that it may also serve as a docking site for other DNA repair proteins. Since the assembly of the DNA-PK complex onto DNA is a prerequisite for DSB repair, it is critical to obtain structural information on the complex. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle reconstruction methods provide a powerful way to image large macromolecular assemblies at near atomic (10-15 ?) resolution. We have already used cryo-EM methods to examine the structure of the isolated DNA-PKcs protein. This structure reveals numerous cavities throughout the protein that may allow passage of single or double-stranded DNA. Pseudo two-fold symmetry was found for the monomeric protein, suggesting that DNA-PKcs may interact with two DNA ends or two Ku heterodimers simultaneously. Here we propose to study the structure of the cross-linked DNA-PKcs/Ku/DNA complex. Difference imaging with our published DNA-PKcs structure will enable us to elucidate the architecture of the complex. A second objective is to locate the kinase domain of DNA-PKcs by determining the structure of a kinase deletion mutant both as an isolated protein and as part of a DNA-PKcs/Ku/DNA complex. A third objective is to pursue higher resolution studies of DNA-PKcs and the DNA-PKcs/Ku/DNA complex. If the crystal structure determination of DNA-PKcs is completed during the project period, the atomic coordinates of DNA-PKcs will be modeled within the cryo-EM structure of the complex. In order to achieve these goals, a collaborative effort is proposed between Dr. Phoebe Stewart at UCLA, whose laboratory has expertise in cryo-EM reconstruction methods, and Dr. David Chen at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, who has a long-standing interest in DNA repair. Advantages of the cryo-EM structural method include the fact that the sample is imaged in a frozen-hydrated and unstained state, avoiding artifacts associated with drying and staining in other EM approaches. Also crystals of the sample are not needed for the single particle reconstruction method and only microgram quantities of sample are required. Cryo-EM structural information of macromolecular assemblies is complementary to both atomic structures of individual component molecules, as well as low resolution information obtained from x-ray and neutron scattering. Knowledge of the geometrical arrangement of the complex, and the position of the essential DNA-PKcs kinase domain, should lead to a greater understanding of the molecular events in DNA double-strand break repair following exposure to low doses of radiation.

  7. Immunochromatographic strip for rapid detection of Cronobacter in powdered infant formula in combination with silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles separation and 16S rRNA probe.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Ming, Xing; Chen, XingXing; Gan, Min; Wang, BaoGui; Xu, Feng; Wei, Hua

    2014-11-15

    Here we developed a sensitive, specific, and rapid immunochromatographic strip test for the detection of Cronobacter. Silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles were used to separate nucleic acid from Cronobacter lysate and eliminate the interference of food matrices successfully. A couple of 5'-end labeled probes, which was complementary to the 16S ribosomal DNA of Cronobacter, was used to hybridize with the nucleic acid. The hybrid product, labeled with digoxigenin on one side and biotin on the other side, was directly submitted to the immunochromatographic strip test and the anti-digoxigenin monoclonal antibody was immobilized on nitrocellulose membrane in the test line. The visualization was achieved by gold nanoparticles conjugated to streptavidin, and double red bands appearing in both test and control line indicated a positive result of the presence of Cronobacter in testing sample. The detection limit was 10(7) cfu mL(-1) in pure culture. After silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles treatment, the detection limit was 10(5) and 10(6) cfu mL(-1) in pure culture and powdered infant formula, respectively, and maintained stable even under the interference of 10(8) cfu mL(-1)Salmonella typhimurium. Furthermore, 100 positive powdered infant formula samples spiked 10(8) cfu mL(-1)Cronobacter and 20 negative samples with none bacteria were tested by the strip, and the sensitivity and specificity of the test were both as high as 100%. This approach showed promise for microbial detection concerning food safety or clinical diagnosis. PMID:24907538

  8. Size-regulated group separation of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles using centrifuge and their magnetic resonance contrast properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs) have been the subject of extensive research over recent decades. The particle size of MNPs varies widely and is known to influence their physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. There are two commonly used methods for synthesizing MNPs, organometallic and aqueous solution coprecipitation. The former has the advantage of being able to control the particle size more effectively; however, the resulting particles require a hydrophilic coating in order to be rendered water soluble. The MNPs produced using the latter method are intrinsically water soluble, but they have a relatively wide particle size distribution. Size-controlled water-soluble MNPs have great potential as MRI CAs and in cell sorting and labeling applications. In the present study, we synthesized CoFe2O4 MNPs using an aqueous solution coprecipitation method. The MNPs were subsequently separated into four groups depending on size, by the use of centrifugation at different speeds. The crystal shapes and size distributions of the particles in the four groups were measured and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Using X-ray diffraction analysis, the MNPs were found to have an inverse spinel structure. Four MNP groups with well-selected semi-Gaussian-like diameter distributions were obtained, with measured T2 relaxivities (r2) at 4.7 T and room temperature in the range of 60 to 300 mM?1s?1, depending on the particle size. This size regulation method has great promise for applications that require homogeneous-sized MNPs made by an aqueous solution coprecipitation method. Any group of the CoFe2O4 MNPs could be used as initial base cores of MRI T2 CAs, with almost unique T2 relaxivity owing to size regulation. The methodology reported here opens up many possibilities for biosensing applications and disease diagnosis. PACS 75.75.Fk, 78.67.Bf, 61.46.Df PMID:24004536

  9. Size-regulated group separation of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles using centrifuge and their magnetic resonance contrast properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jongeun; Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Young-Nam; Yeom, Areum; Jeong, Heejeong; Lim, Yong Taik; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs) have been the subject of extensive research over recent decades. The particle size of MNPs varies widely and is known to influence their physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. There are two commonly used methods for synthesizing MNPs, organometallic and aqueous solution coprecipitation. The former has the advantage of being able to control the particle size more effectively; however, the resulting particles require a hydrophilic coating in order to be rendered water soluble. The MNPs produced using the latter method are intrinsically water soluble, but they have a relatively wide particle size distribution. Size-controlled water-soluble MNPs have great potential as MRI CAs and in cell sorting and labeling applications. In the present study, we synthesized CoFe2O4 MNPs using an aqueous solution coprecipitation method. The MNPs were subsequently separated into four groups depending on size, by the use of centrifugation at different speeds. The crystal shapes and size distributions of the particles in the four groups were measured and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Using X-ray diffraction analysis, the MNPs were found to have an inverse spinel structure. Four MNP groups with well-selected semi-Gaussian-like diameter distributions were obtained, with measured T2 relaxivities ( r 2) at 4.7 T and room temperature in the range of 60 to 300 mM-1s-1, depending on the particle size. This size regulation method has great promise for applications that require homogeneous-sized MNPs made by an aqueous solution coprecipitation method. Any group of the CoFe2O4 MNPs could be used as initial base cores of MRI T2 CAs, with almost unique T2 relaxivity owing to size regulation. The methodology reported here opens up many possibilities for biosensing applications and disease diagnosis.

  10. 2.8 Å resolution reconstruction of the Thermoplasma acidophilum 20S proteasome using cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Melody G; Veesler, David; Cheng, Anchi; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in detector hardware and image-processing software have revolutionized single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) and led to a wave of near-atomic resolution (typically ?3.3 Å) reconstructions. Reaching resolutions higher than 3 Å is a prerequisite for structure-based drug design and for cryoEM to become widely interesting to pharmaceutical industries. We report here the structure of the 700 kDa Thermoplasma acidophilum 20S proteasome (T20S), determined at 2.8 Å resolution by single-particle cryoEM. The quality of the reconstruction enables identifying the rotameric conformation adopted by some amino-acid side chains (rotamers) and resolving ordered water molecules, in agreement with the expectations for crystal structures at similar resolutions. The results described in this manuscript demonstrate that single particle cryoEM is capable of competing with X-ray crystallography for determination of protein structures of suitable quality for rational drug design. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06380.001 PMID:25760083

  11. 2.8 Å resolution reconstruction of the Thermoplasma acidophilum 20S proteasome using cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Melody G; Veesler, David; Cheng, Anchi; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in detector hardware and image-processing software have revolutionized single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) and led to a wave of near-atomic resolution (typically ?3.3 Å) reconstructions. Reaching resolutions higher than 3 Å is a prerequisite for structure-based drug design and for cryoEM to become widely interesting to pharmaceutical industries. We report here the structure of the 700 kDa Thermoplasma acidophilum 20S proteasome (T20S), determined at 2.8 Å resolution by single-particle cryoEM. The quality of the reconstruction enables identifying the rotameric conformation adopted by some amino-acid side chains (rotamers) and resolving ordered water molecules, in agreement with the expectations for crystal structures at similar resolutions. The results described in this manuscript demonstrate that single particle cryoEM is capable of competing with X-ray crystallography for determination of protein structures of suitable quality for rational drug design. PMID:25760083

  12. Elevated Temperature Compressive Strength Properties of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened NiAl After Cryo-milling and Roasting in Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Grahle, Peter; Arzt, Eduard; Hebsur, Mohan

    1998-01-01

    In an effort to superimpose two different elevated temperature strengthening mechanisms in NiAl, several lots of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) NiAl powder have been cryo-milled in liquid nitrogen to introduce AlN particles at the grain boundaries. As an alternative to cryo-milling, one lot of ODS NiAl was roasted in nitrogen to produce AlN. Both techniques resulted in hot extruded AlN-strengthened, ODS NiAl alloys which were stronger than the base ODS NiAl between 1200 and 1400 K. However, neither the cryo-milled nor the N2-roasted ODS NiAl alloys were as strong as cryo-milled binary NiAl containing like amounts of AlN. The reason(s) for the relative weakness of cryo-milled ODS NiAl is not certain; however the lack of superior strength in N2-roasted ODS NiAl is probably due to its relatively large AlN particles.

  13. Topical Adapalene in the Treatment of Plantar Warts; Randomized Comparative Open Trial in Comparison with Cryo-Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ramji; Gupta, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various therapeutic modalities, which are available for treating plantar wart, have not been successful every time. Aims: To evaluate topical adapalene under occlusion in the treatment of plantar warts and compare it with cryo-therapy. Materials and Methods: 50 patients with 424 plantar warts were included in this single center, two arm, prospective, randomized, control, open study. Patients were allocated randomly into two groups consisting of 25 patients each. Group A patients having 299 plantar warts were treated using adapalene gel 0.1% under occlusion while Group B patients having 125 warts were treated using cryo-therapy. All the patients were evaluated weekly till the clearance of all the warts and the results compared. Result: All the warts of 25 patients of Group A that were treated using adapalene gel 0.1% cleared in 36.71 ± 19.24 (55.95-17.47) days except those in one patient. In Group B, warts in all except one treated by cryo-therapy cleared in 52.17 ± 30.06 (82.23-22.11) days. There were no side effects like scar formation, irritation, erythema, or infections with adapalene group while in the cryo group scar was seen in 2 patients, pain in 24, erythema in 10, and infection in 3 patients. Conclusion: Adapalene gel 0.1% under occlusion is an effective, safe and easy to use treatment for plantar warts and may help clear lesions faster than cryo-therapy. PMID:25657417

  14. Magnetism

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Stern

    This overview of magnetism provides a brief history prior to 1600 and continues with the work of William Gilbert, Hans Christian Oersted, and Andre-Marie Ampere in describing and exploring the magnetosphere and learning the role that electric current plays in producing magnetism. Magnetic field lines are then discussed, citing the work of Michael Faraday. The work of James Clerk Maxwell and Heinrich Hertz is mentioned in a discussion of the relationship of light waves and radio waves as part of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  15. Cryo FIB-SEM: volume imaging of cellular ultrastructure in native frozen specimens.

    PubMed

    Schertel, Andreas; Snaidero, Nicolas; Han, Hong-Mei; Ruhwedel, Torben; Laue, Michael; Grabenbauer, Markus; Möbius, Wiebke

    2013-11-01

    Volume microscopy at high resolution is increasingly required to better understand cellular functions in the context of three-dimensional assemblies. Focused ion beam (FIB) milling for serial block face imaging in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) is an efficient and fast method to generate such volume data for 3D analysis. Here, we apply this technique at cryo-conditions to image fully hydrated frozen specimen of mouse optic nerves and Bacillus subtilis spores obtained by high-pressure freezing (HPF). We established imaging conditions to directly visualize the ultrastructure in the block face at -150 °C by using an in-lens secondary electron (SE) detector. By serial sectioning with a focused ion beam and block face imaging of the optic nerve we obtained a volume as large as X=7.72 ?m, Y=5.79 ?m and Z=3.81 ?m with a lateral pixel size of 7.5 nm and a slice thickness of 30 nm in Z. The intrinsic contrast of membranes was sufficient to distinguish structures like Golgi cisternae, vesicles, endoplasmic reticulum and cristae within mitochondria and allowed for a three-dimensional reconstruction of different types of mitochondria within an oligodendrocyte and an astrocytic process. Applying this technique to dormant B. subtilis spores we obtained volumes containing numerous spores and discovered a bright signal in the core, which cannot be related to any known structure so far. In summary, we describe the use of cryo FIB-SEM as a tool for direct and fast 3D cryo-imaging of large native frozen samples including tissues. PMID:24121039

  16. Visualization of the herpes simplex virus portal in situ by cryo-electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardone, Giovanni [Laboratory of Structural Biology Research, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Building 50, Rm 1517, MSC 8025, 50 South Drive, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-8025 (United States); Winkler, Dennis C. [Laboratory of Structural Biology Research, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Building 50, Rm 1517, MSC 8025, 50 South Drive, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-8025 (United States); Trus, Benes L. [Laboratory of Structural Biology Research, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Building 50, Rm 1517, MSC 8025, 50 South Drive, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-8025 (United States); Imaging Sciences Laboratory, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Cheng, Naiqian [Laboratory of Structural Biology Research, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Building 50, Rm 1517, MSC 8025, 50 South Drive, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-8025 (United States); Heuser, John E. [Department of Cell Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Newcomb, William W. [Department of Microbiology and Cancer Center, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); Brown, Jay C. [Department of Microbiology and Cancer Center, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); Steven, Alasdair C. [Laboratory of Structural Biology Research, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Building 50, Rm 1517, MSC 8025, 50 South Drive, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-8025 (United States)]. E-mail: Alasdair_Steven@nih.gov

    2007-05-10

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), the prototypical herpesvirus, has an icosahedral nucleocapsid surrounded by a proteinaceous tegument and a lipoprotein envelope. As in tailed bacteriophages, the icosahedral symmetry of the capsid is broken at one of the 12 vertices, which is occupied by a dodecameric ring of portal protein, UL6, instead of a pentamer of the capsid protein, UL19. The portal ring serves as a conduit for DNA entering and exiting the capsid. From a cryo-EM reconstruction of capsids immuno-gold-labeled with anti-UL6 antibodies, we confirmed that UL6 resides at a vertex. To visualize the portal in the context of the assembled capsid, we used cryo-electron tomography to determine the three-dimensional structures of individual A-capsids (empty, mature capsids). The similarity in size and overall shape of the portal and a UL19 pentamer - both are cylinders of {approx} 800 kDa - combined with residual noise in the tomograms, prevented us from identifying the portal vertices directly; however, this was accomplished by a computational classification procedure. Averaging the portal-containing subtomograms produced a structure that tallies with the isolated portal, as previously reconstructed by cryo-EM. The portal is mounted on the outer surface of the capsid floor layer, with its narrow end pointing outwards. This disposition differs from that of known phage portals in that the bulk of its mass lies outside, not inside, the floor. This distinction may be indicative of divergence at the level of portal-related functions other than its role as a DNA channel.

  17. Gas-assisted annular microsprayer for sample preparation for time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Meng, Xing; Mannella, Carmen A.; Yassin, Aymen S.; Agrawal, Rajendra K.; Wagenknecht, Terence; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy (TRCEM) has emerged as a powerful technique for transient structural characterization of isolated biomacromolecular complexes in their native state within the time scale of seconds to milliseconds. For TRCEM sample preparation, a microfluidic device has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to facilitate TRCEM biological sample preparation. It is capable of achieving rapidly aqueous sample mixing, controlled reaction incubation, and sample deposition on electron microscopy (EM) grids for rapid freezing. One of the critical challenges is to transfer samples to cryo-EM grids from the microfluidic device. By using a microspraying method, the generated droplet size needs to be controlled to facilitate thin ice film formation on the grid surface for efficient data collection, whilst not being so thin that it dries out before freezing, i.e. an optimized mean droplet size needs to be achieved. In this work, we developed a novel monolithic three dimensional (3D) annular gas-assisted microfluidic sprayer using 3D MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical System) fabrication techniques. The microsprayer demonstrated dense and consistent microsprays with average droplet size between 6 and 9??m, which fulfilled the droplet size requirement for TRCEM sample preparation. With droplet density of around 12–18 per grid window (window size 58? × ?58??m), and a data collectible thin ice region of >50% total wetted area, we collected ~800–1000 high quality CCD micrographs in a 6–8?h period of continuous effort. This level of output is comparable to what were routinely achieving using cryo-grids prepared by conventional blotting and manual data collection. In this case, weeks of data collection with the previous device has been shortened to a day or two. And hundreds of microliters of valuable sample consumption can be reduced to only a small fraction.

  18. Elevation and elevation change of Greenland and Antarctica derived from CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, V.; Humbert, A.; Miller, H.

    2014-03-01

    The ESA satellite CryoSat-2 has been observing Earth's polar regions since April 2010. It carries a sophisticated radar altimeter and aims for the detection of changes in sea ice thickness as well as surface elevation changes of Earth's land and marine ice sheets. This study focuses on the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, considering the contemporary elevation of their surfaces. Based on 2 years of CryoSat-2 data acquisition, elevation change maps and mass balance estimates are presented. Additionally, new digital elevation models (DEMs) and the corresponding error maps are derived. Due to the high orbit of CryoSat-2 (88° N/S) and the narrow across-track spacing, more than 99% of Antarctica's surface area is covered. In contrast, previous radar altimeter measurements of ERS1/2 and ENVISAT were limited to latitudes between 81.5° N and 81.5° S and to surface slopes below 1°. The derived DEMs for Greenland and Antarctica have an accuracy which is similar to previous DEMs obtained by satellite-based laser and radar altimetry (Liu et al., 2001; Bamber et al., 2009, 2013; Fretwell et al., 2013; Howat et al., 2014). Comparisons with ICESat data show that 80% of the CryoSat-2 DEMs have an error of less than 3 m ± 30 m. For both ice sheets the surface elevation change rates between 2011 and 2012 are presented at a resolution of 1 km. Negative elevation changes are concentrated at the west and south-east coast of Greenland and in the Amundsen Sea embayment in West Antarctica (e.g. Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers). They agree well with the dynamic mass loss observed by ICESat between 2003 and 2008 (Pritchard et al., 2009). Thickening occurs along the main trunk of Kamb Ice Stream and in Dronning Maud Land. While the former is a consequence of an ice stream stagnated ∼150 years ago (Rose, 1979; Retzlaff and Bentley, 1993), the latter represents a known large-scale accumulation event (Lenaerts et al., 2013). This anomaly partly compensates for the observed increased volume loss in West Antarctica. In Greenland the findings reveal an increased volume loss of a factor of 2 compared to the period 2003 to 2008. The combined volume loss of Greenland and Antarctica for the period 2011 and 2012 is estimated to be -448 ± 122 km3 yr-1.

  19. Cryo-banking of Prunus mume pollen and its application in cross-breeding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Li; Chen, Rui-Dan; Huang, Cui-Juan; Liu, Yan

    2009-01-01

    The Mei (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc.) is one of the most widely used landscape plants and important germplasm resources in China. The study of pollen cryopreservation and the construction of a pollen cryo-bank have great importance in Mei research. From 2003 to 2007 we cryopreserved pollen from 51 Mei cultivars. In vitro germination of cryopreserved pollen was not significantly different from that of fresh pollen, even after four years of storage in liquid nitrogen. Cryopreserved pollen of 19 cultivars was used successfully for intraspecific hybridizations at Wuhan and Beijing in 2005 and 2006. PMID:19750240

  20. Likelihood-based classification of cryo-EM images using FREALIGN

    PubMed Central

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Brilot, Axel F.; Theobald, Douglas L.; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    We describe an implementation of maximum likelihood classification for single particle electron cryo-microscopy that is based on the FREALIGN software. Particle alignment parameters are determined by maximizing a joint likelihood that can include hierarchical priors, while classification is performed by expectation maximization of a marginal likelihood. We test the FREALIGN implementation using a simulated dataset containing computer-generated projection images of three different 70S ribosome structures, as well as a publicly available dataset of 70S ribosomes. The results show that the mixed strategy of the new FREALIGN algorithm yields performance on par with other maximum likelihood implementations, while remaining computationally efficient. PMID:23872434

  1. CryoSat-2: Post launch performance of SIRAL-2 and its calibration/validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, Robert; Francis, Richard; Davidson, Malcolm; Wingham, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    1. INTRODUCTION The main payload of CryoSat-2 [1], SIRAL (Synthetic interferometric radar altimeter), is a Ku band pulse-width limited radar altimeter which transmits pulses at a high pulse repetition frequency thus making received echoes phase coherent and suitable for azimuth processing [2]. The azimuth processing in conjunction with correction for slant range improves along track resolution to about 250 meters which is a significant improvement over traditional pulse-width limited systems such as Envisat RA-2, [3]. CryoSat-2 will be launched on 25th February 2010 and this paper describes the pre and post launch measures of CryoSat/SIRAL performance and the status of mission validation planning. 2. SIRAL PERFORMANCE: INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL CALIBRATION Phase coherent pulse-width limited radar altimeters such as SIRAL-2 pose a new challenge when considering a strategy for calibration. Along with the need to generate the well understood corrections for transfer function amplitude with respect to frequency, gain and instrument path delay there is also a need to provide corrections for transfer function phase with respect to frequency and AGC setting, phase variation across bursts of pulses. Furthermore, since some components of these radars are temperature sensitive one needs to be careful when the deciding how often calibrations are performed whilst not impacting mission performance. Several internal calibration ground processors have been developed to model imperfections within the CryoSat-2 radar altimeter (SIRAL-2) hardware and reduce their effect from the science data stream via the use of calibration correction auxiliary products within the ground segment. We present the methods and results used to model and remove imperfections and describe the baseline for usage of SIRAL-2 calibration modes during the commissioning phase and the operational exploitation phases of the mission. Additionally we present early results derived from external calibration of SIRAL via the use of ocean calibration zones and radar transponders. 3. CRYOSAT-2 OVERALL PERFORMANCE & VALIDATION PLANNING Validating such retrievals derived from a phase coherent pulse-width limited polar observing radar altimeter, such as SIRAL, is not a simple one [4]. In order to fully understand all the respective error co-variances it is necessary to acquire many different types of in-situ measurements (GPR, neutron probe density profiles, drilled and electromagnetic derived sea-ice thicknesses, for example) in highly inhospitable regions of the cryosphere at key times of the year. In order to correlate retrievals from CryoSat with the in-situ data it was decided early in the CryoSat development that an aircraft borne radar altimeter with similar functionality to SIRAL would provide the necessary link, albeit on the smaller scale, and provide pre-launch incite into expected performances and issues. In 2001 ESA commenced the development of its own prototype radar altimeter that mimics the functionality of SIRAL. Similar to SIRAL, but with subtle functional differences, the airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) has now been the centre piece instrument for a number of large scale land and sea ice field campaigns in the Arctic during spring and autumn 2004, 2006 and 2008. Additional smaller science/test campaigns have taken place in March 2003 (Svalbard), March 2005 (Bay of Bothnia), March 2006 (Western Greenland) and April 2007 (CryoVEx 2007 in Svalbard). It is a credit to all parties that constitute the CryoSat Validation and Retrieval Team (CVRT) for the coordination, planning, acquisition of in-situ and airborne measurements and the subsequent processing and distributing of its data for analysis. CVRT has a robust infrastructure in place for validating its level 2 products derived from an operational CryoSat-2. 4. REFERENCES [1] http://www.esa.int/livingplanet/cryosat [2] Wingham, D. J., Francis, C. R., Baker, S., Bouzinac, C., Cullen, R., de Chateau-Thierry, P., Laxon, S. W., Mallow, U., Mavrocordatos, C., Phalippou, L., Ratier, G., Rey

  2. First Cryo-Vacuum Test of the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Antonille, S. R.; Balzano, V.; Comber, B. J.; Davila, P. S.; Drury, M. D.; Glasse, A.; Glazer, S. D.; Lundquist, R.; Mann, S. D.; McGuffey, D. B.; Novo-Gradac, K. J.; Penanen, K.; Ramey, D. D.; Sullivan, J.; Van Campen, J.; Vila, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    The integration and test program for the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) calls for three cryo-vacuum tests of the ISIM hardware. The first is a risk-reduction test aimed at checking out the test hardware and procedures; this will be followed by two formal verification tests that will bracket other key aspects of the environmental test program (e.g. vibration and acoustics, EMI/EMC). The first of these cryo-vacuum tests, the risk-reduction test, was executed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center starting in late August, 2013. Flight hardware under test included two (of the eventual four) flight instruments, the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) and the Fine Guidance Sensor/Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (FGS/NIRISS), mounted to the ISIM structure, as well as the ISIM Electronics Compartment (IEC). The instruments were cooled to their flight operating temperatures 40K for FGS/NIRISS, ~6K for MIRI) and optically tested against a cryo-certified telescope simulator. Key goals for the risk reduction test included: 1) demonstration of controlled cooldown and warmup, stable control at operating temperature, and measurement of heat loads, 2) operation of the science instruments with ISIM electronics systems at temperature, 3) health trending of the science instruments against instrument-level test results, 4) measurement of the pupil positions and six degree of freedom alignment of the science instruments against the simulated telescope focal surface, 5) detailed optical characterization of the NIRISS instrument, 6) verification of the signal-to-noise performance of the MIRI, and 7) exercise of the Onboard Script System that will be used to operate the instruments in flight. In addition, the execution of the test is expected to yield invaluable logistical experience - development and execution of procedures, communications, analysis of results - that will greatly benefit the subsequent verification tests. At the time of this submission, the hardware had reached operating temperature and was partway through the cryo test program. We report here on the test configuration, the overall process, and the results that were ultimately obtained.

  3. Cryo-Vacuum Testing of the Integrated Science Instrument Module for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Davila, P. S.; Drury, M. P.; Glazer, S. D.; Krom, J. R.; Lundquist, R. A.; Mann, S. D.; McGuffey, D. B.; Perry, R. L.; Ramey, D. D.

    2011-01-01

    With delivery of the science instruments for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) expected in 2012, current plans call for the first cryo-vacuum test of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to be carried out at GSFC in early 2013. Plans are well underway for conducting this ambitious test, which will perform critical verifications of a number of optical, thermal, and operational requirements of the IS 1M hardware, at its deep cryogenic operating temperature. We describe here the facilities, goals, methods, and timeline for this important Integration & Test milestone in the JWST program.

  4. CryoSat-2: Measuring fluctuations of land and marine ice fields from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Richard; Wingham, Duncan; Cullen, Robert

    2010-05-01

    1. INTRODUCTION CryoSat was chosen as the first of ESA's Earth Explorer Opportunity missions in late 1999, following a competitive selection process [1]. Unfortunately, the CryoSat satellite was lost as the result of a launch failure on 8 October 2005. The decision was made to rebuild the satellite in order to complete the mission, and as a result of this the new satellite, CryoSat-2, will be launched on 25 February 2010. 2. MISSION OBJECTIVES The mission goal of CryoSat is the measurement of secular change in the cryosphere, particularly in the elevation of the ice caps and the thickness of sea ice [2]. The required accuracy corresponds to about half of the variation expected due to natural variability, over reasonable scales for the surfaces concerned. The selected technique is radar altimetry, although the instrument has been modified to provide the enhanced capabilities needed to significantly extend the spatial coverage of previous altimetry missions, particularly ERS and EnviSat. Thus the radar includes a synthetic aperture mode which enables the along- track resolution to be improved to about 250 m. This will enable detection of leads in sea-ice which are narrower than those detected hitherto, so that operation deeper into pack-ice can be achieved with a consequent reduction in errors due to omission. Altimetry over the steep edges of ice caps is hampered by the irregular topography which, since the radar ranging is performed to the closest reflector rather than the point directly below, introduces uncertainty into the exactitude of repeat measurements. CryoSat's radar includes a second antenna and receiver chain so that interferometry may be used to determine the arrival angle of the echo and so improve localisation of the reflection. The satellite payload, which includes a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination and a set of star trackers to measure the orientation of the interferometer, is quite complex and demanding. 3. CRYOSAT-1 LAUNCH FAILURE AND THE MISSION RECOVERY WITH CRYOSAT-2 CryoSat was launched on 8 October 2005, just less than 6 years after the start of the programme. Unfortunately the launch vehicle, a Rockot launcher derived from the Russian SS-19 ICBM, suffered an anomaly at the end of its second-stage flight, with the result that the satellite was lost, the debris falling close to the North pole. Determination to rebuild the satellite and carry out the mission was extremely widespread: within 5 months all of the necessary funding issues, legal procedures, industrial commitments and resource demands had been solved and the programme restarted. The new satellite, inevitably called CryoSat-2, includes a large number of improvements compared to its predecessor, although many are internal changes to improve the reliability and ease of operations. More significantly, the expected lifetime has been increased. The satellite measurements will be supported by a comprehensive set of validation data, collected on the surface and from airborne platforms. These validation data, designed to specifically address the uncertainties in the interpretation of the radar echoes, have been collected during a series of carefully co-ordinated measurement campaigns over several years. Additionally, techniques to enable the collocation of surface and satellite measurements over the moving sea-ice have been developed and rehearsed, ready to support the dedicated validation campaigns during the mission. CryoSat-2 will be launched from Baikonur, Kazakhstan on 25 February 2010. Launch was originally planned for March 2009, again with a Rockot. But lack of availability of this vehicle (more specifically, the versatile third stage added to the ICBM) has induced a change to the Dnepr launcher, also an ICBM: the SS-18. So finally, about 11 years after it was first selected, the CryoSat mission will start collecting data. 4. REFERENCES [1] http://www.esa.int/livingplanet/cryosat [2] Wingham, D. J., Francis, C. R., Baker, S., Bouzinac, C., Cullen, R., de Chateau-Thierry, P., Laxon, S. W., Mallow, U., Mavrocordatos, C., Phalip

  5. Cryo Cooler Induced Micro-Vibration Disturbances to the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrich, Nick; Zimbelman, Darrell; Turczyn, Mark; Sills, Joel; Voorhees, Carl; Clapp, Brian; Brumfield, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) Cryo Cooler (MCC) system, a description of the micro-vibration characterization testing performed, and a discussion of the simulated performance. The NCC is a reverse Brayton cycle system that employs micro turbo-machinery to provide cooling to the NICMOS instrument. Extensive testing was conducted to quantify the expected on-orbit disturbances caused by the micro turbo-machinery and provide input to a flexible-body dynamic simulation to demonstrate compliance with the HST 7 milli-arcsecond root mean square jitter requirement.

  6. Prediction of separation process results in OGMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. L. Borzov; T. Yu. Dmitrievskaya; A. N. Piskunov; V. K. Fedorov; P. A. Cheremnykh; V. N. Yaremenko

    1990-01-01

    The wet magnetic separation of ore fine particles containing 32-40% of iron in the form of hematite is experimentally investigated. The extraction parameter distribution W(X) of particles is obtained at the open-gradient magnetic separator, X = kappaD2, kappa - being the relative magnetic susceptibility of a paramagnetic or diamagnetic particle, D, its size.

  7. Cryo-EM Structure of Isomeric Molluscan Hemocyanin Triggered by Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hongli; Liang, Rongfeng; Wang, Jiangyong; Xie, Lianhui; Zhu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Hemocyanins (Hcs) of arthropods and mollusks function not only as oxygen transporters, but also as phenoloxidases (POs). In invertebrates, PO is an important component in the innate immune cascade, where it functions as the initiator of melanin synthesis, a pigment involved in encapsulating and killing of pathogenic microbes. Although structures of Hc from several species of invertebrates have been reported, the structural basis for how PO activity is triggered by structural changes of Hc in vivo remains poorly understood. Here, we report a 6.8 Å cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the isomeric form of hemocyanin, which was isolated from Abalone Shriveling syndrome-associated Virus (AbSV) infected abalone (Halitotis diversicolor), and build a pseudoatomic model of isomeric H. diversicolor hemocyanin 1 (HdH1). Our results show that, compared with native form of HdH1, the architecture of isomeric HdH1 turns into a more relaxed form. The interactions between certain functional units (FUs) present in the native form of Hc either decreased or were totally abolished in the isomeric form of Hc. As a result of that, native state Hc switches to its isomeric form, enabling it to play its role in innate immune responses against invading pathogens. PMID:24887432

  8. Cryo-FIB-nanotomography for quantitative analysis of particle structures in cement suspensions.

    PubMed

    Holzer, L; Gasser, P H; Kaech, A; Wegmann, M; Zingg, A; Wepf, R; Muench, B

    2007-09-01

    Cryo-FIB-nanotomography is a novel high-resolution 3D-microscopy technique, which opens new possibilities for the quantitative microstructural analysis of complex suspensions. In this paper, we describe the microstructural changes associated with dissolution and precipitation processes occurring in a fresh cement paste, which has high alumina and sulphate contents. During the first 6 min, precipitation of ettringite leads to a general decrease of the particle size distribution. In the unhydrated cement paste almost no particles smaller than 500 nm are present, whereas after 6 min this size class already represents 9 vol%. The precipitation of ettringite also leads to a significant increase of the particle number density from 0.294*10(9)/mm(3) at t(0min) to 20.55*10(9)/mm(3) at t(6min). Correspondingly the surface area increases from 0.75 m(2)/g at t(0min) to 2.13 m(2)/g at t(6min). The small ettringite particles tend to form agglomerates, which strongly influence the rheological properties. The particular strength of cryo-FIB-nt is the potential to quantify particle structures in suspension and thereby also to describe higher-order topological features such as the particle-particle interfaces, which is important for the study of agglomeration processes. PMID:17760616

  9. Cryo-electron microscopy study of bacteriophage T4 displaying anthrax toxin proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Bowman, Valorie D.; Battisti, Anthony J. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Li Qin [Department of Biology, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Chipman, Paul R. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Rao, Venigalla B. [Department of Biology, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Rossmann, Michael G. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States)], E-mail: mr@purdue.edu

    2007-10-25

    The bacteriophage T4 capsid contains two accessory surface proteins, the small outer capsid protein (Soc, 870 copies) and the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc, 155 copies). As these are dispensable for capsid formation, they can be used for displaying proteins and macromolecular complexes on the T4 capsid surface. Anthrax toxin components were attached to the T4 capsid as a fusion protein of the N-terminal domain of the anthrax lethal factor (LFn) with Soc. The LFn-Soc fusion protein was complexed in vitro with Hoc{sup -}Soc{sup -}T4 phage. Subsequently, cleaved anthrax protective antigen heptamers (PA63){sub 7} were attached to the exposed LFn domains. A cryo-electron microscopy study of the decorated T4 particles shows the complex of PA63 heptamers with LFn-Soc on the phage surface. Although the cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction is unable to differentiate on its own between different proposed models of the anthrax toxin, the density is consistent with a model that had predicted the orientation and position of three LFn molecules bound to one PA63 heptamer.

  10. Morphology of influenza B/Lee/40 determined by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Katz, Garrett; Benkarroum, Younes; Wei, Hui; Rice, William J; Bucher, Doris; Alimova, Alexandra; Katz, Al; Klukowska, Joanna; Herman, Gabor T; Gottlieb, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy projection image analysis and tomography is used to describe the overall architecture of influenza B/Lee/40. Algebraic reconstruction techniques with utilization of volume elements (blobs) are employed to reconstruct tomograms of this pleomorphic virus and distinguish viral surface spikes. The purpose of this research is to examine the architecture of influenza type B virions by cryo-electron tomography and projection image analysis. The aims are to explore the degree of ribonucleoprotein disorder in irregular shaped virions; and to quantify the number and distribution of glycoprotein surface spikes (hemagglutinin and neuraminidase) on influenza B. Projection image analysis of virion morphology shows that the majority (?83%) of virions are spherical with an average diameter of 134±19 nm. The aspherical virions are larger (average diameter?=?155±47 nm), exhibit disruption of the ribonucleoproteins, and show a partial loss of surface protein spikes. A count of glycoprotein spikes indicates that a typical 130 nm diameter type B virion contains ?460 surface spikes. Configuration of the ribonucleoproteins and surface glycoprotein spikes are visualized in tomogram reconstructions and EM densities visualize extensions of the spikes into the matrix. The importance of the viral matrix in organization of virus structure through interaction with the ribonucleoproteins and the anchoring of the glycoprotein spikes to the matrix is demonstrated. PMID:24516628

  11. Tools for macromolecular model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alan; Long, Fei; Nicholls, Robert A.; Toots, Jaan; Emsley, Paul; Murshudov, Garib

    2015-01-01

    The recent rapid development of single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) now allows structures to be solved by this method at resolutions close to 3?Å. Here, a number of tools to facilitate the interpretation of EM reconstructions with stereochemically reasonable all-atom models are described. The BALBES database has been repurposed as a tool for identifying protein folds from density maps. Modifications to Coot, including new Jiggle Fit and morphing tools and improved handling of nucleic acids, enhance its functionality for interpreting EM maps. REFMAC has been modified for optimal fitting of atomic models into EM maps. As external structural information can enhance the reliability of the derived atomic models, stabilize refinement and reduce overfitting, ProSMART has been extended to generate interatomic distance restraints from nucleic acid reference structures, and a new tool, LIBG, has been developed to generate nucleic acid base-pair and parallel-plane restraints. Furthermore, restraint generation has been integrated with visualization and editing in Coot, and these restraints have been applied to both real-space refinement in Coot and reciprocal-space refinement in REFMAC. PMID:25615868

  12. Visualization of ATP synthase dimers in mitochondria by electron cryo-tomography.

    PubMed

    Davies, Karen M; Daum, Bertram; Gold, Vicki A M; Mühleip, Alexander W; Brandt, Tobias; Blum, Thorsten B; Mills, Deryck J; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Electron cryo-tomography is a powerful tool in structural biology, capable of visualizing the three-dimensional structure of biological samples, such as cells, organelles, membrane vesicles, or viruses at molecular detail. To achieve this, the aqueous sample is rapidly vitrified in liquid ethane, which preserves it in a close-to-native, frozen-hydrated state. In the electron microscope, tilt series are recorded at liquid nitrogen temperature, from which 3D tomograms are reconstructed. The signal-to-noise ratio of the tomographic volume is inherently low. Recognizable, recurring features are enhanced by subtomogram averaging, by which individual subvolumes are cut out, aligned and averaged to reduce noise. In this way, 3D maps with a resolution of 2 nm or better can be obtained. A fit of available high-resolution structures to the 3D volume then produces atomic models of protein complexes in their native environment. Here we show how we use electron cryo-tomography to study the in situ organization of large membrane protein complexes in mitochondria. We find that ATP synthases are organized in rows of dimers along highly curved apices of the inner membrane cristae, whereas complex I is randomly distributed in the membrane regions on either side of the rows. By subtomogram averaging we obtained a structure of the mitochondrial ATP synthase dimer within the cristae membrane. PMID:25285856

  13. A novel cryo-mechanical approach for the removal of blocked nonretrievable implant components.

    PubMed

    Joda, Tim; Wittneben, Julia-Gabriela; Brägger, Urs

    2013-01-01

    The removal of nonretrievable implant components represents a challenge in implant dentistry. The mechanical approach involves the risk of damaging the implant connection or the bone-to-implant interface. This case report describes a cryo-mechanical approach for the safe removal of a nonretrievable implant component. A patient had an implant surgically placed in a private practice. When the patient returned to the restorative dentist to make a definitive impression, the healing abutment could not be loosened. The patient was referred to the Division of Fixed Prosthodontics (University of Bern, Switzerland), where the stripped screw hole was enlarged with a special drill from a service kit of the implant provider. Although an extraction bolt was screwed into the opening and the torque ratchet was activated, the healing abutment would not loosen. A novel approach was attempted whereby the healing abutment was cooled with dry ice (CO2). The cooling effect seemingly caused shrinkage of the healing abutment and a reduction of the connection forces between the implant and the nonretrievable component. The approach of creating an access hole for the application of reverse torque via the extraction bolt in combination with the thermal effect led to the successful removal of the blocked component. Neither the implant connection nor the bone-to-implant interface was damaged. The combined cryo-mechanical procedure allowed the implant to be successfully restored. PMID:23377081

  14. Morphological Characterization of Elastin-Mimetic Block Copolymers Utilizing Cryo- and Cryoetch-HRSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Elizabeth R.; Conticello, Vincent P.; Apkarian, Robert P.

    2003-06-01

    Elastin-mimetic block copolymers were produced by genetic engineering. Genetically driven synthesis permitted control of the final physiochemical characteristics of the block copolymers. We designed BB and BAB block copolymers in which the A-block was hydrophilic and the B-block was hydrophobic. By designing the copolymers in this manner, it was proposed that they would self-assemble into micellar aggregates that, at high concentration, would form thermoreversible hydrogels. To analyze the three-dimensional fine surface morphology of the copolymers, to the resolution level of a few nanometers, we employed cryo-HRSEM. This method provided vast expanses of the specimen in its frozen hydrated state for survey. In our initial cryo-HRSEM studies, we observed the protein filaments and micelles surrounded by lakes of vitreous ice. Upon examination at low and intermediate magnifications, there was an extensive honeycomb-like filamentous network. To delineate the fine morphology of the hydrogel network at high magnification and to greater depths, we cryoetched away unbound water from the sample surface, in high vacuum, prior to chromium deposition. By using this technique, we were able to visualize for characterization purposes the fine fibril networks formed from the micellar aggregates over the surface of the hydrogel.

  15. Estimating loop length from CryoEM images at medium resolutions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background De novo protein modeling approaches utilize 3-dimensional (3D) images derived from electron cryomicroscopy (CryoEM) experiments. The skeleton connecting two secondary structures such as ?-helices represent the loop in the 3D image. The accuracy of the skeleton and of the detected secondary structures are critical in De novo modeling. It is important to measure the length along the skeleton accurately since the length can be used as a constraint in modeling the protein. Results We have developed a novel computational geometric approach to derive a simplified curve in order to estimate the loop length along the skeleton. The method was tested using fifty simulated density images of helix-loop-helix segments of atomic structures and eighteen experimentally derived density data from Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB). The test using simulated density maps shows that it is possible to estimate within 0.5Å of the expected length for 48 of the 50 cases. The experiments, involving eighteen experimentally derived CryoEM images, show that twelve cases have error within 2Å. Conclusions The tests using both simulated and experimentally derived images show that it is possible for our proposed method to estimate the loop length along the skeleton if the secondary structure elements, such as ?-helices, can be detected accurately, and there is a continuous skeleton linking the ?-helices. PMID:24565041

  16. User requirements for the snow and land ice services - CryoLand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malnes, E.; Buanes, A.; Nagler, T.; Bippus, G.; Gustafsson, D.; Schiller, C.; Metsämäki, S.; Pulliainen, J.; Luojus, K.; Larsen, H. E.; Solberg, R.; Diamandi, A.; Wiesmann, A.

    2015-02-01

    CryoLand (2011-2015) is a project carried out within the 7th Framework of the European Commission aimed at developing downstream services for monitoring seasonal snow, glaciers and lake/river ice primarily based on satellite remote sensing. The services target private and public users from a wide variety of application areas, and aim to develop sustainable services after the project is completed. The project has performed a thorough user requirement survey in order to derive targeted requirements for the service and provide recommendation for the design and priorities of the service. In this paper we describe the methods used, the major findings in this user survey, and how we used the results to design and specify the CryoLand snow and land ice service. The user requirement analysis shows that a European operational snow and land ice service is required and that there exists developed cryosphere products that can meet the specific needs. The majority of the users were mainly interested in the snow services, but also the lake/river ice products and the glacier products were desired.

  17. Ice sheet elevation change in West Antarctica from CryoSat interferometric altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, M.; Shepherd, A.; Ridout, A.; Sundal, A.

    2013-12-01

    Two decades of radar altimetry have shown accelerating mass losses from the Amundsen Sea Sector of West Antarctica. The mass imbalance of this region, which dominates that of all Antarctica, manifests as sustained ice thinning focussed upon fast-flowing ice streams and their tributaries. Ongoing observations are required to determine whether rates of mass loss continue to increase and, more widely, to monitor the stability of this sector of the ice sheet. With the retirement of the ERS-2 satellite in 2011 and the loss of Envisat in 2012, CryoSat-2 offers the unique potential to extend the current altimetry record. In coastal regions of Antarctica the satellite operates in a novel Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometric (SARin) mode, which enables improved resolution and echo location. Here, we apply a repeat track algorithm to SARin mode data to derive ice sheet elevation, volume and mass changes during the period 2010-2013, focussing upon the Amundsen Sea Sector of West Antarctica. Binning elevation change measurements at 5 km resolution gives on average 40 observations per grid cell, illustrating the high sampling density offered by CryoSat-2. We find that, since the cessation of ERS and Envisat measurements, thinning continues to be most pronounced along the fast-flowing ice streams and tributaries, with rates of 4-8 m/yr near the grounding lines of the Pine Island, Thwaites and Smith Glaciers. We compare these new observations to previous measurements made by the ERS and Envisat satellites.

  18. Heterogeneity of large macromolecular complexes revealed by 3-D cryo-EM variance analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Kimmel, Marek; Spahn, Christian M.T.; Penczek, Pawel A.

    2008-01-01

    Macromolecular structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (EM) and single particle analysis are based on the assumption that imaged molecules have identical structure. With the increased size of processed datasets it becomes apparent that many complexes coexist in a mixture of conformational states or contain flexible regions. As the cryo-EM data is collected in form of projections of imaged molecules, the information about variability of reconstructed density maps is not directly available. To address this problem, we describe a new implementation of the bootstrap resampling technique that yields estimates of voxel-by-voxel variance of a structure reconstructed from the set of its projections. We introduced a novel highly efficient reconstruction algorithm that is based on direct Fourier inversion and which incorporates correction for the transfer function of the microscope, thus extending the resolution limits of variance estimation. We also describe a validation method to determine the number of resampled volumes required to achieve stable estimate of the variance. The proposed bootstrap method was applied to a dataset of 70S ribosome complexed with tRNA and the elongation factor G. The variance map revealed regions of high variability: the L1 protein, the EF-G and the 30S head and the ratchet-like subunit rearrangement. The proposed method of variance estimation opens new possibilities for single particle analysis, by extending applicability of the technique to heterogeneous datasets of macromolecules, and to complexes with significant conformational variability. PMID:19081053

  19. CryoSat Plus for Oceans - analysis of the state-of-the-art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeije, Marc; Gommenginger, Christine; Moreau, Thomas; Cotton, David; Benveniste, Jerome; Dinardo Dinardo, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    The CryoSat Plus for Oceans (CP4O) project is an ESA initiative carried out by a European wide consortium of altimetry experts. It aims to build a sound scientific basis for new scientific and operational applications of data coming from CryoSat-2 over the open ocean, polar ocean, coastal seas and for seafloor mapping. It also generates and evaluates new methods and products that will enable the full exploitation of the capabilities of the CryoSat-2 SIRAL altimeter, and extend their application beyond the initial mission objectives. It therefore also acts as a preparation for the upcoming Sentinel and Jason SAR enabled altimetry missions. In this paper we address the review of the CryoSat state-of-the-art, relevant current initiatives, algorithms, models and Earth Observation based products and datasets that are relevant in the Cryosat+ ocean theme. Compared to conventional (pulse-limited) altimeter missions, Cryosat-2 is not a dedicated platform for ocean research: typically the microwave radiometer (MWR) for wet tropospheric corrections is lacking, as is the direct measurement of the first order ionospheric effect by means of a dual-frequency altimeter. Also the orbit of Cryosat-2 has a rather long repetition period, unsuited for collinear tracks analyses. These three particular features have been studied already in the HERACLES project on the eve of the first CryoSat launch. We revisit the outcome of this study, update to current understanding and perception, and ultimately develop what was, is and will be proposed in these problem areas. Clearly, we question the standard ionosphere corrections, the wet troposphere corrections and the accuracy of the mean sea surface (MSS) underlying the accuracy of derived sea level anomalies. In addition, Cryosat-2 provides the first innovative altimeter with SAR and SARIn modes. This raises the direct problem of "how to process these data", simply because this has not been done before. Compared to pulse-limited altimetry it is a totally different branch of sport. In our CP4O project we try to answer this. We build on the results that have come out of the SAMOSA study, which was initiated to investigate the improvements that SAR mode altimetry can offer in measurements over ocean, coastal and inland water surfaces, developing practical implementation of new theoretical models for the SAR echo waveform. It is clear that having specific processing for SAR and SARIn raises a number of new issues to be studied, such as RDSAR (reducing SAR to pseudo LRM data), sea state bias (SSB) in SAR mode, and land contamination, to name a few. The outcome of the analysis of the state-of-the-art culminates in the delivery of the Preliminary Analysis Report and the Development and Validation Plan (DVP). We present the summary of these documents.

  20. Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    According to f =d(mv)/dt=m(dv/dt)+ v(dm/dt), a same gravitational formula had been de-duced from the variance in physical mass of QFT and from the variance in mass of inductive energy-transfer of GR respectively: f QF T = f GR = -G (mM/r2 )((r/r)+(v/c)) when their interaction-constants are all taken the experimental values (H05-0029-08, E15-0039-08). f QF T is the quasi-Casimir pressure. f GR is equivalent to Einstein's equation, then more easy to solve it. The hypothesis of the equivalent principle is not used in f QF T , but required by f GR . The predictions of f QF T and f GR are identical except that f QF T has quantum effects but f GR has not and f GR has Lense-Thirring effect but f QF T has not. The quantum effects of gravitation had been verified by Nesvizhevsky et al with the ultracold neutrons falling in the earth's gravitational field in 2002. Yet Lense-Thirring effect had not been measured by GP-B. It shows that f QF T is essential but f GR is phenomenological. The macro-f QF T is the statistic average pressure collided by net virtual neutrinos ? 0 flux (after self-offset in opposite directions) and in direct proportion to the mass. But micro-f QF T is in direct proportion to the scattering section. The electric mass (in inverse proportion to de Broglie wavelength ?) far less than nucleonic mass and the electric scattering section (in direct proportion to ?2 ) far large than that of nucleon, then the net ? 0 flux pressure exerted to electron far large than that to nucleon and the electric displacement far large than that of nucleon, it causes the gravitational polarization of positive-negative charge center separation. Because the gravity far less than the electromagnetic binding force, in atoms the gravitational polarization only produces a little separation. But the net ? 0 flux can press a part freedom electrons in plasma of ionosphere into the earth's surface, the static electric force of redundant positive ions prevents electrons from further falling and till reach the equilibrium of stable spatial charge distribution, which is just the cause of the geomagnetic field and the geo-electric field (the observational value on the earth surface is about 120 V/m downward equivalent to 500000 Coulomb negative charges in the earth surface). All celestial bodies are gravitation sources and attract the molecules and ions in space to its circumference by the gravitation of own and other celestial bodies, e.g., all planets in the solar system have their own atmospheres. Therefore, the origin mechanism of geo-electric and geomagnetic fields caused by gravitation is very universal, at least it is appli-cable to all the planets in the solar system. For planets, the joint result of the gravitations of the planets and the sun makes the negative charges and dipolar charges distributed in the surfaces of the celestial bodies. The quicker the rotation is, the larger the angular momentum U is, then larger the accompanying current and magnetic moment P, it accord a experiential law found by subsistent observational data of all celestial bodies in solar system: P = -G 1/2 U cos ? / c (1), ? is the angle between the net ? 0 flux direction (mark by CMB) and the rotational axis of celestial body (Chen Shao-Guang, Chinese Science Bulletin, 26,233,1981). Uranian and Neptunian P predicted with Eq.(1) in 1981 are about -3.4•1028 Gs•cm3 and 1.9•1028 Gs•cm3 respectively (use new rotate speed measured by Voyager 2). The P measured by Voyager 2 in 1986 and 1989 are about -1.9 •1028 Gs•cm3 and 1.5•1028 Gs•cm3 respectively (the contribution of quadrupole P is converted into the contribution of dipole P alone). The neutron star pos-sesses much high density and rotational speed because of the conservation of the mass and the angular momentum during the course of the formation, then has strong gravity and largerU. From Eq.(1) there is a larger P and extremely strong surface magnetic field in neutron star. The origin mechanism of basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies will affect directly all fields refer

  1. Separating Mixtures

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Foundation GK-12 and Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Programs,

    Students learn how to classify materials as mixtures, elements or compounds and identify the properties of each type. The concept of separation of mixtures is also introduced since nearly every element or compound is found naturally in an impure state such as a mixture of two or more substances, and it is common that chemical engineers use separation techniques to separate mixtures into their individual components. For example, the separation of crude oil into purified hydrocarbons such as natural gas, gasoline, diesel, jet fuel and/or lubricants.

  2. ATTRACT-EM: A New Method for the Computational Assembly of Large Molecular Machines Using Cryo-EM Maps

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Zacharias, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Many of the most important functions in the cell are carried out by proteins organized in large molecular machines. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is increasingly being used to obtain low resolution density maps of these large assemblies. A new method, ATTRACT-EM, for the computational assembly of molecular assemblies from their components has been developed. Based on concepts from the protein-protein docking field, it utilizes cryo-EM density maps to assemble molecular subunits at near atomic detail, starting from millions of initial subunit configurations. The search efficiency was further enhanced by recombining partial solutions, the inclusion of symmetry information, and refinement using a molecular force field. The approach was tested on the GroES-GroEL system, using an experimental cryo-EM map at 23.5 Å resolution, and on several smaller complexes. Inclusion of experimental information on the symmetry of the systems and the application of a new gradient vector matching algorithm allowed the efficient identification of docked assemblies in close agreement with experiment. Application to the GroES-GroEL complex resulted in a top ranked model with a deviation of 4.6 Å (and a 2.8 Å model within the top 10) from the GroES-GroEL crystal structure, a significant improvement over existing methods. PMID:23251350

  3. A Temperature-Stable Cryo-System for High-Temperature Superconducting MR In-Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, In-Tsang; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2013-01-01

    To perform a rat experiment using a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) surface resonator, a cryostat is essential to maintain the rat's temperature. In this work, a compact temperature-stable HTS cryo-system, keeping animal rectal temperature at 37.4°C for more than 3 hours, was successfully developed. With this HTS cryo-system, a 40-mm-diameter Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (Bi-2223) surface resonator at 77 K was demonstrated in a 3-Tesla MRI system. The proton resonant frequency (PRF) method was employed to monitor the rat's temperature. Moreover, the capacity of MR thermometry in the HTS experiments was evaluated by correlating with data from independent fiber-optic sensor temperature measurements. The PRF thermal coefficient was derived as 0.03 rad/°C and the temperature-monitoring architecture can be implemented to upgrade the quality and safety in HTS experiments. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the HTS surface resonator at 77 K was higher than that of a professionally made copper surface resonator at 300 K, which has the same geometry, by a 3.79-fold SNR gain. Furthermore, the temperature-stable HTS cryo-system we developed can obtain stable SNR gain in every scan. A temperature-stable HTS cryo-system with an external air-blowing circulation system is demonstrated. PMID:23637936

  4. Surface molecular imprinting onto fluorescein-coated magnetic nanoparticles via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization: a facile three-in-one system for recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Dong, Cunku; Chu, Jia; Qi, Jingyao; Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we present a general protocol for the making of surface-imprinted magnetic fluorescence beads via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The resulting composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized beads exhibited homogeneous polymer films (thickness of about 5.7 nm), spherical shape, high fluorescence intensity and magnetic property (Magnetization (Ms)=3.67 emu g(-1)). The hybrids bind the original template 17?-estradiol with an appreciable selectivity over structurally related compounds. In addition, the resulting hybrids performed without obvious deterioration after five repeated cycles. This study therefore demonstrates the potential of molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals. PMID:21063623

  5. Surface molecular imprinting onto fluorescein-coated magnetic nanoparticles via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization: A facile three-in-one system for recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Dong, Cunku; Chu, Jia; Qi, Jingyao; Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we present a general protocol for the making of surface-imprinted magnetic fluorescence beads via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The resulting composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized beads exhibited homogeneous polymer films (thickness of about 5.7 nm), spherical shape, high fluorescence intensity and magnetic property (Magnetization (Ms) = 3.67 emu g-1). The hybrids bind the original template 17?-estradiol with an appreciable selectivity over structurally related compounds. In addition, the resulting hybrids performed without obvious deterioration after five repeated cycles. This study therefore demonstrates the potential of molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals.In this study, we present a general protocol for the making of surface-imprinted magnetic fluorescence beads via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The resulting composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized beads exhibited homogeneous polymer films (thickness of about 5.7 nm), spherical shape, high fluorescence intensity and magnetic property (Magnetization (Ms) = 3.67 emu g-1). The hybrids bind the original template 17?-estradiol with an appreciable selectivity over structurally related compounds. In addition, the resulting hybrids performed without obvious deterioration after five repeated cycles. This study therefore demonstrates the potential of molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supplementary figure S1. The hysteresis loop of Fe3O4 (a), Fe3O4@SiO2 (b), and Fe3O4@SiO2-Dye-SiO2 (c). See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00614a

  6. Hot Views on Cold Crystals: The Application of Thermal Imaging in Cryo-crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M. J.; Deacon, A.

    2003-01-01

    In the past we have used thermal imaging techniques to visualize the cryocooling processes of macromolecular crystals. From these images it was clear that a cold wave progresses through a crystal starting at the face closest to the origin of the cold stream and ending at the point furthest away. During these studies we used large volume crystals, which were clearly distinguished from the loop holding them. These large crystals, originally grown for neutron diffraction studies, were chosen deliberately to enhance the imaging. As an extension to this work, we present used thermal imaging to study small crystals, held in a cryo-loop, in the presence of vitrified mother liquor. The different infrared transmission and reflectance properties of the crystal in comparison to the mother liquor surrounding it are thought to be the parameter that produces the contrast that makes the crystal visible. An application of this technology may be the determination of the exact location of small crystals in a cryo-loop. Data from initial tests in support of application development was recorded for lysozyme crystals and for bFGF/dna complex crystals, which were cryo-cooled and imaged in large loops, both with visible light and with infrared radiation. The crystals were clearly distinguished from the vitrified solution in the infrared spectrum, while in the case of the bFGF/dna complex the illumination had to be carefully manipulated to make the crystal visible in the visible spectrum. These results suggest that the thermal imaging may be more sensitive than visual imaging for automated location of small crystals. However, further work on small crystals robotically mounted at SSRL did not clearly visualize those crystals. The depth of field of the camera proved to be limiting and a different cooling geometry was used, compared to the previous, successful experiments. Analysis to exploit multiple images to improve depth of field and experimental work to understand cooling geometry effects is ongoing. These results will be presented along with advantages and disadvantages of the technique and a discussion of how it might be applied.

  7. Validation of CryoSat-2 Classical Altimetry Data over Ocean using a GOCE Geoid to derive Absolute Dynamic Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, A.; Dinardo, S.; Pail, R.; Gruber, T.; Benveniste, J.

    2011-12-01

    The ESA Earth Explorer mission CryoSat-2 provides a unique opportunity for exploring a broad variety of scientific applications in the fields of Geodesy and Oceanography. The quality assessment of CryoSat-2 data and in particular Low Rate Mode Level 2 (LRM L2) data is an essential step for a successful integration of the data products into operational usage and processing. The investigations presented in this paper are divided into two parts; on the one side the data quality analysis and on the other side the computation and use of an enhanced data product in an oceanographic application. After one year of data acquisition, the evolution of data quality is clearly visible. In this context, a comprehensive data quality analysis has been carried out, focussing mainly on cross-over difference analysis and the estimation of a present time tag bias in detail as well as other parameters, such as consistency and availability of the product. Different types of measures will be shown: Firstly, a CryoSat-2 mission internal analysis of the cross-over differences and secondly, a validation of CryoSat-2 with respect to Jason-2 as reference. As a consequence of the present deficiencies in the delivered products, a correction, to be applied to the product's data, was computed in order to gain enhanced data. To prove the feasibility of this enhancement, a case study will demonstrate the improvement of Absolute Dynamic Topography (ADT) results in an oceanic region, such as the Gulf Stream. For the ADT computation in an along track approach, geoid heights derived from the GOCE time-wise geoid model are used. The spatial resolution of the ADT is at 100km. A validation of the CryoSat-2/GOCE ADT results with other independently derived ADT estimates will be shown. A comprehensive description of the data, the techniques, the references and the models used will be included.

  8. An improved CryoSat-2 sea ice freeboard and thickness retrieval algorithm through the use of waveform fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, N. T.; Galin, N.; Studinger, M.

    2014-01-01

    We develop an empirical model capable of simulating the mean echo power cross product of CryoSat-2 SAR and SARIn mode waveforms over sea ice covered regions. The model simulations are used to show the importance of variations in the radar backscatter coefficient with incidence angle and surface roughness for the retrieval of surface elevation of both sea ice floes and leads. The numerical model is used to fit CryoSat-2 waveforms to enable retrieval of surface elevation through the use of look-up tables and a bounded trust region Newton least squares fitting approach. The use of a model to fit returns from sea ice regions offers advantages over currently used threshold retracking methods which are here shown to be sensitive to the combined effect of bandwidth limited range resolution and surface roughness variations. Laxon et al. (2013) have compared ice thickness results from CryoSat-2 and IceBridge, and found good agreement, however consistent assumptions about the snow depth and density of sea ice were not used in the comparisons. To address this issue, we directly compare ice freeboard and thickness retrievals from the waveform fitting and threshold tracker methods of CryoSat-2 to Operation IceBridge data using a consistent set of parameterizations. For three IceBridge campaign periods from March 2011-2013, mean differences (CryoSat-2 - IceBridge) of 0.144 m and 1.351 m are respectively found between the freeboard and thickness retrievals using a 50% sea ice floe threshold retracker, while mean differences of 0.019 m and 0.182 m are found when using the waveform fitting method. This suggests the waveform fitting technique is capable of better reconciling the sea ice thickness data record from laser and radar altimetry data sets through the usage of consistent physical assumptions.

  9. Semi-automated selection of cryo-EM particles in RELION-1.3

    PubMed Central

    Scheres, Sjors H.W.

    2015-01-01

    The selection of particles suitable for high-resolution cryo-EM structure determination from noisy micrographs may represent a tedious and time-consuming step. Here, a semi-automated particle selection procedure is presented that has been implemented within the open-source software RELION. At the heart of the procedure lies a fully CTF-corrected template-based picking algorithm, which is supplemented by a fast sorting algorithm and reference-free 2D class averaging to remove false positives. With only limited user-interaction, the proposed procedure yields results that are comparable to manual particle selection. Together with an improved graphical user interface, these developments further contribute to turning RELION from a stand-alone refinement program into a convenient image processing pipeline for the entire single-particle approach. PMID:25486611

  10. Prefusion structure of trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein determined by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Merk, Alan; Borgnia, Mario J; Milne, Jacqueline L S; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2013-12-01

    The activation of trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) by its binding to the cell-surface receptor CD4 and co-receptors (CCR5 or CXCR4) represents the first of a series of events that lead to fusion between viral and target-cell membranes. Here, we present the cryo-EM structure, at subnanometer resolution (~6 Å at 0.143 FSC), of the 'closed', prefusion state of trimeric HIV-1 Env complexed to the broadly neutralizing antibody VRC03. We show that three gp41 helices at the core of the trimer serve as an anchor around which the rest of Env is reorganized upon activation to the 'open' quaternary conformation. The architecture of trimeric HIV-1 Env in the prefusion state and in the activated intermediate state resembles the corresponding states of influenza hemagglutinin trimers, thus providing direct evidence for the similarity in entry mechanisms used by HIV-1, influenza and related enveloped viruses. PMID:24154805

  11. Heparin binding sites on Ross River virus revealed by electron cryo-microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Wei [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Heil, Marintha [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Kuhn, Richard J. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States); Baker, Timothy S. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054 (United States)]. E-mail: tsb@chem.ucsd.edu

    2005-02-20

    Cell surface glycosaminoglycans play important roles in cell adhesion and viral entry. Laboratory strains of two alphaviruses, Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus, have been shown to utilize heparan sulfate as an attachment receptor, whereas Ross River virus (RRV) does not significantly interact with it. However, a single amino acid substitution at residue 218 in the RRV E2 glycoprotein adapts the virus to heparan sulfate binding and expands the host range of the virus into chicken embryo fibroblasts. Structures of the RRV mutant, E2 N218R, and its complex with heparin were determined through the use of electron cryo-microscopy and image reconstruction methods. Heparin was found to bind at the distal end of the RRV spikes, in a region of the E2 glycoprotein that has been previously implicated in cell-receptor recognition and antibody binding.

  12. Three-dimensional structure of basal body triplet revealed by electron cryo-tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sam; Fernandez, Jose-Jesus; Marshall, Wallace F; Agard, David A

    2012-01-01

    Basal bodies and centrioles play central roles in microtubule (MT)-organizing centres within many eukaryotes. They share a barrel-shaped cylindrical structure composed of nine MT triplet blades. Here, we report the structure of the basal body triplet at 33 Å resolution obtained by electron cryo-tomography and 3D subtomogram averaging. By fitting the atomic structure of tubulin into the EM density, we built a pseudo-atomic model of the tubulin protofilaments at the core of the triplet. The 3D density map reveals additional densities that represent non-tubulin proteins attached to the triplet, including a large inner circular structure in the basal body lumen, which functions as a scaffold to stabilize the entire basal body barrel. We found clear longitudinal structural variations along the basal body, suggesting a sequential and coordinated assembly mechanism. We propose a model in which ?-tubulin and other components participate in the assembly of the basal body. PMID:22157822

  13. Visualization of bacteriophage P1 infection by cryo-electron tomography of tiny Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jun, E-mail: Jun.Liu.1@uth.tmc.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Chen Chengyen [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Shiomi, Daisuke; Niki, Hironori [Microbial Genetics Laboratory, Genetic Strain Research Center, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540 (Japan); Margolin, William, E-mail: William.Margolin@uth.tmc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Bacteriophage P1 has a contractile tail that targets the conserved lipopolysaccharide on the outer membrane surface of the host for initial adsorption. The mechanism by which P1 DNA enters the host cell is not well understood, mainly because the transient molecular interactions between bacteriophage and bacteria have been difficult to study by conventional approaches. Here, we engineered tiny E. coli host cells so that the initial stages of P1-host interactions could be captured in unprecedented detail by cryo-electron tomography. Analysis of three-dimensional reconstructions of frozen-hydrated specimens revealed three predominant configurations: an extended tail stage with DNA present in the phage head, a contracted tail stage with DNA, and a contracted tail stage without DNA. Comparative analysis of various conformations indicated that there is uniform penetration of the inner tail tube into the E. coli periplasm and a significant movement of the baseplate away from the outer membrane during tail contraction.

  14. Identifying conformational states of macromolecules by eigen-analysis of resampled cryo-EM images

    PubMed Central

    Penczek, Pawel A.; Kimmel, Marek; Spahn, Christian M.T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We present the codimensional PCA, a novel and straightforward method for resolving sample heterogeneity within a set of cryo-EM 2D projection images of macromolecular assemblies. The method employs Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of resmapled 3D structures computed using subsets of 2D data obtained with a novel hypergeometric sampling scheme. PCA provides us with a small subset of dominating “eingevolumes” of the system, whose reprojections are compared with experimental projection data to yield their factorial coordinates constructed in a common framework of the 3D space of the macromolecule. Codimensional PCA is unique in the dramatic reduction of dimensionality of the problem, which facilitates rapid determination of both the plausible number of conformers in the sample and their 3D structures. We applied the codimensional PCA to a complex data set of T. thermophilus 70S ribosome, and we identified four major conformational states and visualized high mobility of the stalk base region. PMID:22078558

  15. Extraction of macro-molecule images in cryo-EM micrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Adiga, Umesha P.S.; Malladi, Ravi; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2003-03-20

    Advances in Electron Microscopy and single-particle reconstruction have led to results at increasingly high resolutions. This has opened up the possibility of complete automation of single particle reconstruction. Main bottleneck in automation of single particle reconstruction is manual selection of particles in the micrograph. This paper describes a simple but efficient approach for segmentation of particle projections in the micrographs obtained using cryo-electron microscope. Changing the shape of objects to facilitate segmentation from the cluster and reconstructing its actual shape after isolation is successfully attempted. Both low-level and high-level processing techniques are used and the whole process is made automatic. Over 90 percent success in automatic particle picking is achieved. Several areas for improvement and future research directions are discussed.

  16. Cryo-Vacuum Testing of the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Antonille, Scott R.; Comber, Brian J.; Fatig, Curtis C.; Ferruit, Pierre; Glasse, Alistair; Glazer, Stuart D.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Lundquist, Ray; Mann, Steven D.; Martel, Andre; Novo-Gradac, Kevin J.; Ohl, Raymond George; Penanen, Konstantin; Shade, Edward L.; Sullivan, Joseph; Vila, Maria B.; Van Campen, Julie; Zak, Dean; Zhou, Julia

    2015-01-01

    In October of 2014, a major milestone in the JWST program was reached: completion of the first (of two planned) cryo-vacuum tests of the fully-assembled Integrated Science Instrument Module. This test, executed in the largest thermal-vacuum chamber of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, was a massive undertaking, with round-the-clock testing covering a period of 117 days from door-close to door-open. Over this period, the full complement of ISIM flight instruments, structure, harness radiator, and electronics were put through a comprehensive program of thermal, optical, electrical, and operational tests. In this paper, we briefly summarize the goals, setup, execution, and preliminary results of this important and very successful test.

  17. Cryo-EM structure of a fully glycosylated soluble cleaved HIV-1 Env trimer

    PubMed Central

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Julien, Jean-Philippe; de Val, Natalia; Cupo, Albert; Potter, Clinton S.; Klasse, Per Johan; Burton, Dennis R.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Carragher, Bridget; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer contains the receptor binding sites and membrane fusion machinery that introduce the viral genome into the host cell. As the only target for broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs), Env is a focus for rational vaccine design. We present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction and structural model of a cleaved, soluble SOSIP gp140 trimer in complex with a CD4 binding site (CD4bs) bnAb, PGV04, at 5.8 Å resolution. The structure reveals the spatial arrangement of Env components, including the V1/V2, V3, HR1 and HR2 domains, and shielding glycans. The structure also provides insights into trimer assembly, gp120-gp41 interactions, and the CD4bs epitope cluster for bnAbs, which covers a more extensive area and defines a more complex site of vulnerability than previously described. PMID:24179160

  18. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of Rift Valley fever virus

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Michael B. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Freiberg, Alexander N. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Holbrook, Michael R. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Watowich, Stanley J., E-mail: watowich@xray.utmb.ed [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

    2009-04-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae; Phlebovirus) is an emerging human and veterinary pathogen causing acute hepatitis in ruminants and has the potential to cause hemorrhagic fever in humans. We report a three-dimensional reconstruction of RVFV vaccine strain MP-12 (RVFV MP-12) by cryo-electron microcopy using icosahedral symmetry of individual virions. Although the genomic core of RVFV MP-12 is apparently poorly ordered, the glycoproteins on the virus surface are highly symmetric and arranged on a T = 12 icosahedral lattice. Our RVFV MP-12 structure allowed clear identification of inter-capsomer contacts and definition of possible glycoprotein arrangements within capsomers. This structure provides a detailed model for phleboviruses, opens new avenues for high-resolution structural studies of the bunyavirus family, and aids the design of antiviral diagnostics and effective subunit vaccines.

  19. Cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstructions of hepatitis C virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xuekui [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Qiao Ming [Liver Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Atanasov, Ivo [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Hu Zongyi; Kato, Takanobu [Liver Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Liang, T. Jake [Liver Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)], E-mail: jliang@nih.gov; Zhou, Z. Hong [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2007-10-10

    The structural details of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been elusive because of the lack of a robust tissue culture system for producing an adequate amount of virions from infectious sources for in-depth three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis. Using both negative-stain and cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM), we show that HCV virions isolated from cell culture have a rather uniform size of 500 A in diameter and that recombinantly expressed HCV-like particles (HCV-LPs) have similar morphologic, biophysical and antigenic features in spite of the varying sizes of the particles. 3D reconstructions were obtained from HCV-LPs with the same size as the HCV virions in the presence and absence of monoclonal antibodies bound to the E1 glycoprotein. The 3D reconstruction of HCV-LP reveals a multilayered architecture, with smooth outer-layer densities arranged in a 'fishbone' configuration. Reconstruction of the particles in complex with anti-E1 antibodies shows that sites of the E1 epitope are exposed and surround the 5-, 3- and 2-fold axes. The binding pattern of the anti-E1 antibody and the fitting of the structure of the dengue virus E glycoprotein into our 3D reconstructions further suggest that the HCV-LP E1 and E2 proteins form a tetramer (or dimer of heterodimers) that corresponds morphologically and functionally to the flavivirus E homodimer. This first 3D structural analysis of HCV particles offers important insights into the elusive mechanisms of HCV assembly and maturation.

  20. High precision alignment of cryo-electron subtomograms through gradient-based parallel optimization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cryo-electron tomography emerges as an important component for structural system biology. It not only allows the structural characterization of macromolecular complexes, but also the detection of their cellular localizations in near living conditions. However, the method is hampered by low resolution, missing data and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To overcome some of these difficulties and enhance the nominal resolution one can align and average a large set of subtomograms. Existing methods for obtaining the optimal alignments are mostly based on an exhaustive scanning of all but discrete relative rigid transformations (i.e. rotations and translations) of one subtomogram with respect to the other. Results In this paper, we propose gradient-guided alignment methods based on two popular subtomogram similarity measures, a real space as well as a Fourier-space constrained score. We also propose a stochastic parallel refinement method that increases significantly the efficiency for the simultaneous refinement of a set of alignment candidates. We estimate that our stochastic parallel refinement is on average about 20 to 40 fold faster in comparison to the standard independent refinement approach. Results on simulated data of model complexes and experimental structures of protein complexes show that even for highly distorted subtomograms and with only a small number of very sparsely distributed initial alignment seeds, our combined methods can accurately recover true transformations with a substantially higher precision than the scanning based alignment methods. Conclusions Our methods increase significantly the efficiency and accuracy for subtomogram alignments, which is a key factor for the systematic classification of macromolecular complexes in cryo-electron tomograms of whole cells. PMID:23046491

  1. New controlled environment vitrification system for preparing wet samples for cryo-SEM.

    PubMed

    Ge, H; Suszynski, W J; Davis, H T; Scriven, L E

    2008-01-01

    A new controlled environment vitrification system (CEVS) has been designed and constructed to facilitate examination by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) of initial suspension state and of microstructure development in latex, latex-composite and other coatings while they still contain solvent. The new system has a main chamber with provisions for coating as well as drying, and for well-controlled plunging into cryogen. An added subsidiary chamber holds samples for drying or annealing over minutes to days before they are returned to the main chamber and plunged from it. In the main chamber, samples are blade-coated on 5 x 7 mm pieces of silicon wafer and held at selected temperature and humidity for successively longer times, either there or after transfer along a rail into the subsidiary chamber. They are then placed in the sample holder mounted on the plunge rod, so as to permit adjustment of the sample's attitude when it plunges, at controlled speed, into liquid ethane at its freezing point, to a chosen depth, in order to solidify the sample without significant shear or freezing artifacts. The entries of plunging samples and related sample holders into liquid ethane were recorded with a high-speed, high-resolution Photron digital camera. The data were interpreted with a new hypothesis about the width of the band of extremely rapid cooling by deeply subcooled nucleate boiling below the line of entry. Complementary cryo-SEM images revealed that the freezing rate and surface shearing of a sample need to be balanced by adjusting the plunging attitude. PMID:18173650

  2. Cryo-Electron Tomography of Marburg Virus Particles and Their Morphogenesis within Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kolesnikova, Larissa; Welsch, Sonja; Krähling, Verena; Davey, Norman; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Becker, Stephan; Briggs, John A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Several major human pathogens, including the filoviruses, paramyxoviruses, and rhabdoviruses, package their single-stranded RNA genomes within helical nucleocapsids, which bud through the plasma membrane of the infected cell to release enveloped virions. The virions are often heterogeneous in shape, which makes it difficult to study their structure and assembly mechanisms. We have applied cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging methods to derive structures of Marburg virus, a highly pathogenic filovirus, both after release and during assembly within infected cells. The data demonstrate the potential of cryo-electron tomography methods to derive detailed structural information for intermediate steps in biological pathways within intact cells. We describe the location and arrangement of the viral proteins within the virion. We show that the N-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein contains the minimal assembly determinants for a helical nucleocapsid with variable number of proteins per turn. Lobes protruding from alternate interfaces between each nucleoprotein are formed by the C-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein, together with viral proteins VP24 and VP35. Each nucleoprotein packages six RNA bases. The nucleocapsid interacts in an unusual, flexible “Velcro-like” manner with the viral matrix protein VP40. Determination of the structures of assembly intermediates showed that the nucleocapsid has a defined orientation during transport and budding. Together the data show striking architectural homology between the nucleocapsid helix of rhabdoviruses and filoviruses, but unexpected, fundamental differences in the mechanisms by which the nucleocapsids are then assembled together with matrix proteins and initiate membrane envelopment to release infectious virions, suggesting that the viruses have evolved different solutions to these conserved assembly steps. PMID:22110401

  3. Electron cryo-microscopy of biological specimens on conductive titanium-silicon metal glass films.

    PubMed

    Rhinow, Daniel; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2008-06-01

    Thin films of the metal glass Ti88Si12 were produced by evaporation and characterized by AFM and conductivity measurements. Thin Ti88Si12 support films for electron microscopy were prepared by coating standard EM grids with evaporated films floated off mica, and characterized by electron imaging and electron diffraction. At room temperature, the specific resistance of a thin TiSi film was 10(6) times lower than that of an amorphous carbon film. At 77K, the specific resistance of TiSi films decreased, whereas that of carbon became immeasurably high. The effective scattering cross-section of TiSi and amorphous carbon for 120 kV electrons is roughly equal, but TiSi films for routine use can be approximately 10 times thinner due to their high mechanical strength, so that they would contribute less background noise to the image. Electron diffraction of purple membrane on a TiSi substrate confirmed that the support film was amorphous, and indicated that the high-resolution order of the biological sample was preserved. Electron micrographs of TiSi films tilted by 45 degrees relative to the electron beam recorded at approximately 4 K indicated that the incidence of beam-induced movements was reduced by 50% compared to amorphous carbon film under the same conditions. The success rate of recording high-resolution images of purple membranes on TiSi films was close to 100%. We conclude that TiSi support films are ideal for high-resolution electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) of biological specimens, as they reduce beam-induced movement significantly, due to their high electrical conductivity at low temperature and their favorable mechanical properties. PMID:18164549

  4. Fault Separation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carol Ormand

    Students use gestures to explore the relationship between fault slip direction and fault separation by varying the geometry of faulted layers, slip direction, and the perspective from which these are viewed.

  5. Stereoisomers Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, Piotr

    The use of capillary electrophoresis for enantiomer separation and optical purity determination is presented. The contents start with basic information about the nature of stereoizomers and the mechanism of enantioseparation using capillary electrophoresis techniques. The molecules to be separated show identical chemical structure and electrochemical behavior. Therefore, the chiral recognition of enantiomers is possible only by bonding to chiral selector and the separation based on very small differences in complexation energies of diastereomer complexes formed. This method is useful for this purpose due to the fact that different compounds can be used as chiral selectors. The mostly used chiral selectors like cyclodextrins, crown ethers, chiral surfactants, macrocyclic antibiotics, transition metal complexes, natural, and synthetic polymers and their application for this purpose is also discussed. Finally, examples of practical applications of electromigration techniques for enantiomers separation and determination are presented.

  6. Characterization of volatile nylon 6.6 thermal-oxidative degradation products by selective isotopic labeling and cryo-GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonell N; White, Gregory V; White, Michael I; Bernstein, Robert; Hochrein, James M

    2012-09-01

    Aged materials, such as polymers, can exhibit modifications to their chemical structure and physical properties, which may render the material ineffective for its intended purpose. Isotopic labeling was used to characterize low-molecular weight volatile thermal-oxidative degradation products of nylon 6.6 in an effort to better understand and predict changes in the aged polymer. Headspace gas from aged (up to 243 d at 138 °C) nylon 6.6 monomers (adipic acid and 1,6-hexanediamine) and polymer were preconcentrated, separated, and detected using cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS). Observations regarding the relative concentrations observed in each chromatographic peak with respect to aging time were used in conjunction with mass spectra for samples aged under ambient air to determine the presence and identity of 18 degradation products. A comparison of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) library, unlabeled, and isotopically labeled mass spectra (C-13 or N-15) and expected fragmentation pathways of each degradation product were used to identify the location of isotopically labeled atoms within the product's chemical structure, which can later be used to determine the exact origin of the species. In addition, observations for unlabeled nylon 6.6 aged in an O-18 enriched atmosphere were used to determine if the source of oxygen in the applicable degradation products was from the gaseous environment or the polymer. Approximations for relative isotopic ratios of unlabeled to labeled products are reported, where appropriate. PMID:22711515

  7. Identification of volatile butyl rubber thermal-oxidative degradation products by cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS).

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jonell Nicole; White, Michael Irvin; Bernstein, Robert; Hochrein, James Michael

    2013-02-01

    Chemical structure and physical properties of materials, such as polymers, can be altered as aging progresses, which may result in a material that is ineffective for its envisioned intent. Butyl rubber formulations, starting material, and additives were aged under thermal-oxidative conditions for up to 413 total days at up to 124 %C2%B0C. Samples included: two formulations developed at Kansas City Plant (KCP) (%236 and %2310), one commercially available formulation (%2321), Laxness bromobutyl 2030 starting material, and two additives (polyethylene AC-617 and Vanax MBM). The low-molecular weight volatile thermal-oxidative degradation products that collected in the headspace over the samples were preconcentrated, separated, and detected using cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS). The majority of identified degradation species were alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes. Observations for Butyl %2310 aged in an oxygen-18 enriched atmosphere (18O2) were used to verify when the source of oxygen in the applicable degradation products was from the gaseous environment rather than the polymeric mixture. For comparison purposes, Butyl %2310 was also aged under non-oxidative thermal conditions using an argon atmosphere.

  8. Characterization of Volatile Nylon 6.6 Thermal-Oxidative Degradation Products by Selective Isotopic Labeling and Cryo-GC/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jonell N.; V. White, Gregory; White, Michael I.; Bernstein, Robert; Hochrein, James M.

    2012-09-01

    Aged materials, such as polymers, can exhibit modifications to their chemical structure and physical properties, which may render the material ineffective for its intended purpose. Isotopic labeling was used to characterize low-molecular weight volatile thermal-oxidative degradation products of nylon 6.6 in an effort to better understand and predict changes in the aged polymer. Headspace gas from aged (up to 243 d at 138 °C) nylon 6.6 monomers (adipic acid and 1,6-hexanediamine) and polymer were preconcentrated, separated, and detected using cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS). Observations regarding the relative concentrations observed in each chromatographic peak with respect to aging time were used in conjunction with mass spectra for samples aged under ambient air to determine the presence and identity of 18 degradation products. A comparison of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) library, unlabeled, and isotopically labeled mass spectra (C-13 or N-15) and expected fragmentation pathways of each degradation product were used to identify the location of isotopically labeled atoms within the product's chemical structure, which can later be used to determine the exact origin of the species. In addition, observations for unlabeled nylon 6.6 aged in an O-18 enriched atmosphere were used to determine if the source of oxygen in the applicable degradation products was from the gaseous environment or the polymer. Approximations for relative isotopic ratios of unlabeled to labeled products are reported, where appropriate.

  9. Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy reveals 100 kDa component in a protein complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Min; Wang, Chun-Hsiung; Chang, Jen-wei; Chen, Yi-yun; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Chang, Wei-Hau

    2013-12-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has become a powerful technique for obtaining near atomic structures for large protein assemblies or large virus particles, but the application to protein particles smaller than 200-300 kDa has been hampered by the feeble phase contrast obtained for such small samples and the limited number of electrons tolerated by them without incurring excessive radiation damage. By implementing a thin-film quarter-wave phase plate to a cryo-EM, Nagayama, one of the present authors, has recently restored the long-lost very low spatial frequencies, generating in-focus phase contrast superior to that of conventional defocusing phase contrast, and successfully applied the so-called Zernike phase-plate cryo-EM to target various biological samples in native state. Nevertheless, the sought-after goal of using enhanced phase contrast to reveal a native protein as small as 100 kDa waits to be realized. Here, we report a study in which 200 kV Zernike phase-plate cryo-EM with a plate cut-on periodicity of 36 nm was applied to visualize 100 kDa components of various protein complexes, including the small domains on the surface of an icosahedral particle of ˜38 nm derived from the dragon grouper nervous necrosis virus (DGNNV) and the labile sub-complex dissociated from yeast RNA polymerase III of 17 nm. In the former case, we observed a phase contrast reversal phenomenon at the centre of the icosahedral particle and traced its root cause to the near matching of the cut-on size and the particle size. In summary, our work has demonstrated that Zernike phase-plate implementation can indeed expand the size range of proteins that can be successfully investigated by cryo-EM, opening the door for countless proteins. Finally, we briefly discuss the possibility of using a transfer lens system to enlarge the cut-on periodicity without further miniaturizing the plate pinhole.

  10. Isotope separation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Arnush, Donald (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA); MacKenzie, Kenneth R. (Pacific Palisades, CA); Wuerker, Ralph F. (Palos Verdes Estates, CA)

    1980-01-01

    Isotope separation apparatus consisting of a plurality of cells disposed adjacent to each other in an evacuated container. A common magnetic field is established extending through all of the cells. A source of energetic electrons at one end of the container generates electrons which pass through the cells along the magnetic field lines. Each cell includes an array of collector plates arranged in parallel or in tandem within a common magnetic field. Sets of collector plates are disposed adjacent to each other in each cell. Means are provided for differentially energizing ions of a desired isotope by applying energy at the cyclotron resonant frequency of the desired isotope. As a result, the energized desired ions are preferentially collected by the collector plates.

  11. Chemical Separations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site contains complete notes in a PowerPoint-like presentation for a chemical separations course. It covers a wide variety of topics, including distillation, extraction, gas chromatography, liquid chromatograpy, chromatography theory, instrumentation, electrophoresis, field flow fractionation, and affinity chromatography. It covers these topics thoroughly using a clear, consistent, and simple presentation style. Links to major topics like GC, LC, and electrophoresis provide specific information about the theory, instrumentation, and practice related to these techniques. The site also contains many annimations illustrating important separation processes.

  12. Nano-CuFe2O4 as a magnetically separable and reusable catalyst for the synthesis of diaryl/aryl alkyl sulfides via cross-coupling process under ligand-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Swapna, Kokkirala; Murthy, Sabbavarapu Narayana; Jyothi, Mocharla Tarani; Nageswar, Yadavalli Venkata Durga

    2011-09-01

    An efficient protocol was developed for the CuFe(2)O(4) nanopowder-catalyzed aryl-sulfur bond formation between aryl halide and thiol/disulfide. A variety of aryl sulfides were synthesized in impressive yields with good chemoselectivity and functional group tolerance in the presence of a catalytic amount of CuFe(2)O(4), Cs(2)CO(3) as base, in nitrogen atmosphere, under ligand-free conditions, in DMSO as solvent at 100 °C. The catalyst is air-stable, inexpensive, magnetically separable and recyclable up to four cycles. PMID:21769376

  13. Chemical separations

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.C.; Navratil, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    This volume collects papers presented at a conference on chemical separation. Topics include: field-flow fractionation, chromatography, electrophoresis, solvent extraction in metals recovery, extraction of uranium and plutonium from nitric acid, modeling of flow fields in oscillating droplets, inclusion, and membrane processes.

  14. Chromatographic Separations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This interactive applet provides a simulation of the separation of a mixture of 5 substances across a chromatographic column. The effect of changing various chromatographic factors can simultaneously be seen in the time-dependent dedistribution of analytes along the column along with the development of the chromatogram.

  15. Electron counting and beam-induced motion correction enable near atomic resolution single particle cryoEM

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueming; Mooney, Paul; Zheng, Shawn; Booth, Chris; Braunfeld, Michael B.; Gubbens, Sander; Agard, David A.; Cheng, Yifan

    2013-01-01

    In recent work with large high symmetry viruses, single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) has reached the milestone of determining near atomic resolution structures by allowing direct fitting of atomic models into experimental density maps. However, achieving this goal with smaller particles of lower symmetry remains extraordinarily challenging. Using a newly developed single electron counting detector, we confirm that electron beam induced motion significantly degrades resolution and, importantly, show how the combination of rapid readout and nearly noiseless electron counting allow image blurring to be corrected to subpixel accuracy. Thus, intrinsic image information can be restored to high resolution (Thon rings visible to ~3 Å). Using this approach we determined a 3.3 Å resolution structure of a ~700 kDa protein with D7 symmetry showing clear side chain density. Our method greatly enhances image quality and data acquisition efficiency - key bottlenecks in applying near atomic resolution cryoEM to a broad range of protein samples. PMID:23644547

  16. The influence of cryo-hydrologic warming on the ice temperature in the ablation zone - insights from a computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, H.; Phillips, T. P.; Steffen, K.

    2010-12-01

    Each summer, a large amount of melt water is produced in the ablation zones of glaciers and ice sheets. This melt water does not travel over long distances on the ice, but a significant fraction enters the glacier and flows through en-glacial and sub-glacial hydrologic channels. Correspondingly, the en-glacial and sub-glacial hydrologic channel wall-temperatures are raised to the pressure melting point of ice. The thermal influence of these hydrologic processes is seldom incorporated in heat transfer models for glaciers and ice sheets. In a warming climate with increased melt water production, en-glacial and sub-glacial hydrologic processes can potentially influence the thermodynamics of ice sheets. Although the role of refreezing melt water in the firn of the accumulation zone is often accounted for to explain warmer near-surface temperatures, the role of melt water flow within a glacier is not considered in large ice sheet models. We propose a simple dual-column flow-line model to simulate the importance of cryo-hydrologic warming. Our approach considers two interacting vertical columns representing ice and the cryo-hydrologic system, with exchange of energy between the two columns. Each ice column is connected to next ice column upstream by means of horizontal advection. However, there is no coupling between adjacent cryo-hydrologic columns. The cryo-hydrologic heat exchange coefficient ? is defined as k/R2, where R is the characteristic spacing between en-glacial passages and k is the thermal conductivity of ice. Correspondingly, the characteristic time scale for cryo-hydrologic heat exchange is ?/R2, where ? is the thermal diffusivity of ice, and depends strongly on R. Our results suggest that for a characteristic spacing between en-glacial passages or R in the range of a few 10’s of meters, cryo-hydrologic warming has the potential to accelerate the warming of ice sheets, and thus increase ice flow velocities as the effective viscosity of ice decreases significantly with increasing temperature. The temperature profile of a flow-line in the Sermeq Avannarleq Glacier in Western Greenland is derived using a steady-state flow-line model incorporating cryo-hydrologic heat exchange. Our results show that for a rising equilibrium line over the last 25 years, the ice temperature rises by 9K to a new steady state temperature within a decade. Correspondingly, the ice velocity at the ice margin can increase by 60% even without invoking the influence of lubrication at the bed. The surface topography of the Sermeq Avannarleq Glacier shows a kink in the vicinity of the equilibrium line that may potentially be explained by cryo-hydrologic warming. The increased ice temperatures downstream of the equilibrium line will decrease the ice viscosity in this region, leading to an increase in ice velocity. Because the region just upstream of the equilibrium line remains cold, a sharp spatial velocity variation will occur, leading to a kink.

  17. Cryo-analytical electron microscopy: new insight into the understanding of crystalline and electronic structure of silver halide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleshko, V. P.; Gijbels, R. H.; Jacob, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    Recent results of structural and analytical characterization of AgX (X equals Br, I) microcrystals of photographic emulsions by a number of cryo-analytical electron microscopy (AEM) and image analysis techniques are presented. Monte Carlo simulations of electron beam-AgX interactions have been made for a better understanding of relationships between various signals which can be analyzed in the corresponding AEM modes. Combined cryo-ESI/EDX multielement mapping was performed on AgX grain thin sections and on tabular AgX microcrystals. The contrast imaging under filtering with selected energy windows has been applied to image the morphology, crystal and defect structures of composite tabular AgX microcrystals. Extra reflections at commensurate positions in between the main Bragg reflections and weak diffuse intensity honeycomb contours caused by twins and/or {111} stacking faults in the shell region parallel to {112} grain edges and polyhedral clusters of Ag+ interstitials, respectively, were found in selected-area electron spectroscopic diffraction patterns. Low-loss collective excitations due to plasmons and excitons possibly superimposed with interband transitions and many- electron effects were revealed by cryo-EFTEM/EELS. The real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity were determined by means of a Kramers-Kronig analysis. Elemental inner shell edges of Ag and halides above 50 eV energy loss have been detected by EELS in accordance with cryo-STEM/EDX- analyses. The local crystal thickness was determined by a modified EELS log-ratio technique in agreement with measurements on grain replicas.

  18. Three-dimensional Structure of Ryanodine Receptor Isoform Three in Two Conformational States as Visualized by Cryo-electron Microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manjuli R. Sharma; Loice H. Jeyakumari; Sidney Fleischer; Terence Wagenknecht

    2000-01-01

    Using cryo-electron microscopy and single particle image processing techniques, we present the first three- dimensional reconstructions of isoform 3 of the ryano- dine receptor\\/calcium release channel (RyR3). Recon- structions were carried out on images obtained from a purified, detergent-solubilized receptor for two differ- ent buffer conditions, which were expected to favor open and closed functional states of the channel. As

  19. Structure of influenza haemagglutinin at neutral and at fusogenic pH by electron cryo-microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christoph Böttcher; Kai Ludwig; Andreas Herrmann; Marin van Heel; Holger Stark

    1999-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of the complete haemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus A\\/Japan\\/305\\/57 (H2N2) in its native (neutral pH) and membrane fusion-competent (low pH) form by electron cryo-microscopy at a resolution of 10 Å and 14 Å, respectively, have been determined. In the fusion-competent form the subunits remain closely associated preserving typical overall features of the trimeric ectodomain at neutral pH.

  20. The Formation Mechanism of Mesoporous Materials studied by EPR Spectroscopy and Cryo-TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthstein, Sharon

    Ordered mesoporous materials raised a wide interest in the scientific community due to their unique structural properties which encompasses nanosize ordered channels. These materials have potential applications in diverse technological fields such as catalysis, membranes, microelectronics and sensors. The formation of these materials is initiated by the interaction of micelle of surfactant molecules with precursors of an inorganic oxide, usually silica, which further polymerizes to form solids with a well defined pore structure and amorphous walls. The aim of this study is to explore the details of this intriguing reaction mechanism on two types of materials, hexagonal and cubic, prepared with Pluronic block-copolymers as surfactants. The Pluronic micelles are characterized by a hydrophobic polypropylene oxide core and a hydrophilic polyethylene oxide corona. Examples of questions we address are: How does a homogeneous micellar solution transforms into an ordered phase? What kinds of interactions are responsible to this transformation? Our work focused on processes that take place on two levels, the molecular one and the mesoscale, which were investigated by combining electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) techniques. The molecular level studies combine in-situ and freeze quench EPR spectroscopic techniques applied to nitroxide spin-probes introduced (at minute quantities) into the reaction mixtures. The nitroxide radicals serve as paramagnetic probes in the reaction mixture. They do not react or affect the reaction product but they sense in-situ the changes that occur in their environment during the reaction. The EPR spectrum provides information regarding the dynamic of the probe, which is affected by its surrounding, and the polarity of its environment. Fine structural details, such as the distribution of water and additives within the micelle, can be obtained from Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) techniques that measure weak superhyperfine interactions of an electron spin with nearby nuclear spins. Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER), which measure the interaction between electron spins in the range of 1.5--7 nm, can track changes in micelle size and aggregation numbers. The evolution of the microstructures during the reaction was studied by cryo-TEM, through collaboration with Prof. Ishii Talmon from the Technion, Haifa, Israel. Using these methods the formation mechanisms of hexagonal SBA-15 material and the cubic KIT-6 material were explored. These showed that the formation of these mesoporous materials starts with the penetration of silicate ions into the corona of the micelles. This is driven either by charge matching or hydrogen bonding, mediated by the anions present in solution. The hydrolysis and condensation of the silicate ions in the corona region removes water from the corona and causes change in the micellar curvature. This leads to rearrangement of the original micellar morphology, mainly lengthening the micelles, followed by condensation of the silicate-covered micelles into ordered phase. This then transforms into an ordered hexagonal phase in the case of SBA-15, whereas in the case of the cubic KIT-6, the hexagonal phase transforms into the cubic phase. The transformation occurs within the presence of butanol added either at the beginning or after the formation of the hexagonal phase. We showed that DEER can be used to study the properties of various nanostructures in solution, specifically their volume. The feasibility of the method was initially tested on micelles of Pluronic block copolymers. After establishing the methodology we have applied DEER as a tool to follow the evolution of the solution nanostructures during the formation of KIT-6, a new stage in the reaction mechanism was detected which involves an increase in the hydrophobic core and a decrease in the aggregation number in the first ten minutes of the reaction. This was not observed from the Cryo-TEM and other EPR methods. In addition to the above, within the