Science.gov

Sample records for cryogenic composite detectors

  1. Large Cryogenic Germanium Detector. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mandic, Vuk

    2013-02-13

    The goal of this project was to investigate possible ways of increasing the size of cryogenic Ge detectors. This project identified two possible approaches to increasing the individual cryogenic Ge detector size. The first approach relies on using the existing technology for growing detector-grade (high-purity) germanium crystals of dislocation density 100-7000 cm{sup -2}. The second approach is to consider dislocation-free Ge crystals.

  2. Cryogenic Detectors (Narrow Field Instruments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoevers, H.; Verhoeve, P.

    Two cryogenic imaging spectrometer arrays are currently considered as focal plane instruments for XEUS. The narrow field imager 1 (NFI 1) will cover the energy range from 0.05 to 3 keV with an energy resolution of 2 eV, or better, at 500 eV. A second narrow field imager (NFI 2) covers the energy range from 1 to 15 keV with an energy resolution of 2 eV (at 1 keV) and 5 eV (at 7 keV), creating some overlap with part of the NFI 1 energy window. Both narrow field imagers have a 0.5 arcmin field of view. Their imaging capabilities are matched to the XEUS optics of 2 to 5 arcsec leading to 1 arcsec pixels. The detector arrays will be cooled by a closed cycle system comprising a mechanical cooler with a base temperature of 2.5 K and either a low temperature 3He sorption pump providing the very low temperature stage and/or an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR). The ADR cooler is explicitly needed to cool the NFI 2 array. The narrow field imager 1} Currently a 48 times 48 element array of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) is envisaged. Its operating temperature is in the range between 30 and 350 mK. Small, single Ta STJs (20-50 mum on a side) have shown 3.5 eV (FWHM) resolution at E = 525 eV and small arrays have been successfully demonstrated (6 times 6 pixels), or are currently tested (10 times 12 pixels). Alternatively, a prototype Distributed Read-Out Imaging Device (DROID), consisting of a linear superconducting Ta absorber of 20 times 100 mum2, including a 20 times 20 mum STJ for readout at either end, has shown a measured energy resolution of 2.4 eV (FWHM) at E = 500 eV. Simulations involving the diffusion properties as well as loss and tunnel rates have shown that the performance can be further improved by slight modifications in the geometry, and that the size of the DROIDS can be increased to 0.5-1.0 mm without loss in energy resolution. The relatively large areas and good energy resolution compared to single STJs make DROIDS good candidates for the

  3. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  4. A Rapid Turnaround Cryogenic Detector Characterization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic j.; Dipirro, Michael J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Jackson, Clifton E.; Jackson, Michael L.; Kogut, Al; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shirron, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Upcoming major NASA missions such as the Einstein Inflation Probe and the Single Aperture Far-Infrared Observatory require arrays of detectors with thousands of elements, operating at temperatures near l00 mK and sensitive to wavelengths from approx. 100 microns to approx. 3 mm. Such detectors represent a substantial enabling technology for these missions, and must be demonstrated soon in order for them to proceed. In order to make rapid progress on detector development, the cryogenic testing cycle must be made convenient and quick. We have developed a cryogenic detector characterization system capable of testing superconducting detector arrays in formats up to 8 x 32, read out by SQUID multiplexers. The system relies on the cooling of a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator immersed in a liquid helium bath. This approach permits a detector to be cooled from 300K to 50 mK in about 4 hours, so that a test cycle begun in the morning will be over by the end of the day. Tine system is modular, with two identical immersible units, so that while one unit is cooling, the second can be reconfigured for the next battery of tests. We describe the design, construction, and performance of this cryogenic detector testing facility.

  5. Sensor and Instrumentation Development for Cryogenic Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Nicholas; Febbraro, Micheal; Pain, Steven; Aidala, Christine; Lesser, Ezra; White, Aaron

    2015-10-01

    In the study of nuclear science, there is an ever increasing need for better efficiency and resolution in In nuclear sciences, new detectors with improved detection efficiency and energy resolution are constantly needed to drive experimental discovery and accuracy. Certain cryogenic liquids, particularly liquid noble gases such as Argon and Xenon, are very sensitive to energy deposited by ionizing particles and have many other useful properties for detector development. Developing these cryogenic liquids to operate with known detection methods offers exciting opportunities for experimental setups and has a wide variety of uses with regards to nuclear studies, such as gamma ray, neutron, and neutrino detection. However, operating at such low temperatures presents many complications when trying to effectively control and maintain detectors. In this poster, I will present some of the equipment and systems developed for particular low temperature applications. This will include the use of platinum resistance thermometers, capacitance-based liquid level sensors, and various systems used to regulate fluid flow for cryogenic detector systems.

  6. Termosyphon cryogenic system for RED-100 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnovtsev, V.; Tolstukhin, I.; Shakirov, A.; Shafigullin, R.

    2016-02-01

    A cryogenic system based on a two-phase closed tubular thermosyphon with 12 mm diameter copper tube is developed. It was used for thermal stabilization of the liquid xenon emission detector RED-100. The nitrogen refrigerant cooled down with a free-boiling liquid nitrogen bath has been used. It was shown that the system supports the RED100 operation at temperature 166 K with accuracy ±1K.

  7. Status of the cryogenic payload system for the KAGRA detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Chen, D.; Hagiwara, A.; Kajita, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Suzuki, T.; Sakakibara, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Tomaru, T.

    2016-05-01

    KAGRA is a large scale cryogenic gravitational wave telescope currently under construction in Japan. The detector is located 200 m underground in the Kamioka mine and will employ cryogenic technologies to achieve high sensitivity. The mirrors of the interferometer will be in the form of multiple pendulums and the final stages will employ cryogenic sapphire suspension system operating at 20 Kelvin. In this paper we report the ongoing activities of the cryogenic payload group involved in the design and fabrication of the cryogenic payload system for the KAGRA detector

  8. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic

  9. Cryogenic 3-D Detectors for Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. A.; Martinez-Galarce, D.; Rausch, A.; Shing, L.; Deiker, S.; Boerner, P.; Metcalf, T.; Cabrera, B.; Leman, S. W.; Brink, P.; Irwin, K.; Alexander, D.

    2005-05-01

    Cryogenic microcalorimeters operating in the sub-Kelvin temperature range provide non-dispersive energy resolution at optical through gamma ray energies (e.g, E/Δ E ~ 1500 at 6 keV). Microcalorimeters also have high time resolution (msec or better), and can be made into imaging arrays through SQUID multiplexing of individual pixels or employing position sensitive detector structures. The application of such "3-D" detector technology to solar physics will lead to significant advances in our understanding of magnetic reconnection in the Sun, including X-ray jet phenomena, and active region heating and dynamics. An Explorer-class solar mission within the next 5-10 years, based upon these detectors, is rapidly becoming technically feasible. LMSAL currently has an internally funded laboratory research program to investigate TES (Transition Edge Sensor) microcalorimeters; we recently saw our first X-ray photons using TES detectors supplied by NIST. In addition, we have recently been funded by NASA to begin work with NIST on position-sensitive X-ray strip detectors for solar physics applications. Finally, we are collaborating with with Stanford and NIST on a solar sounding rocket. In this presentation, we will discuss the current status of these programs and their applicability to future Explorer missions and Roadmap missions such as RAM.

  10. Linear cryogenic coolers for HOT infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, A.; Riabzev, S.; Avishay, N.; Oster, D.; Tuitto, A.

    2012-06-01

    In spite of a wide spreading the uncooled night vision technologies, the cooled systems are still known to be superior in terms of working ranges, resolution and ability to recognize/track fast moving objects in dynamic infrared scenes. Recent technological advances allowed development and fielding of high temperature infrared detectors working up to 200K while showing performances typical for their 77K predecessors. The direct benefits of using such detectors are the lowering of the optical, cooling and packaging constraints resulting in smaller and cost effective optics, electronics and mechanical cryocooler. The authors are formulating requirements and general vision of prospective ultra-compact, long life, lightweight, power efficient, acoustically and dynamically quiet linear cryogenic cooler towards forthcoming infrared imagers. In particular, the authors are revealing the outcomes of the feasibility study and discuss downscaling options.

  11. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Choi, S. K.; Coughlin, K. P.; Crowley, K. T.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Duff, S. M.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; van Engelen, A.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Hasselfield, M.; Hills, F.; Hilton, G. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hloẑek, R.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Huffenberger, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Koopman, B. J.; Kosowsky, A. B.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Munson, C.; Nati, F.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Page, L. A.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Simon, S. M.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Thornton, R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies—imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution—will enable precision cosmological constraints and also a wide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the Advanced ACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the Advanced ACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  12. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Choi, S. K.; Coughlin, K. P.; Crowley, K. T.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Duff, S. M.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; van Engelen, A.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Hasselfield, M.; Hills, F.; Hilton, G. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hloẑek, R.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Huffenberger, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Koopman, B. J.; Kosowsky, A. B.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Munson, C.; Nati, F.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Page, L. A.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Simon, S. M.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Thornton, R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies—imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution—will enable precision cosmological constraints and also a wide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the Advanced ACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the Advanced ACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  13. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, S.W.; Battaglia, N.; Wollack, E. J.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies-imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution-will enable precision cosmological constraints and also awide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the AdvancedACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the AdvancedACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  14. SQUID Multiplexers for Cryogenic Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Kent; Beall, James; Deiker, Steve; Doriese, Randy; Duncan, William; Hilton, Gene; Moseley, S. Harvey; Reintsema, Carl; Stahle, Caroline; Ullom, Joel; Vale, Leila

    2004-01-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of cryogenic detectors with a manageable number of readout channels. We are developing time-division SQUID multiplexers based on Nb trilayer SQUIDs to read arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors. Our first-generation, 8-channel SQUID multiplexer was used in FIBRE, a one-dimensional TES array for submillimeter astronomy. Our second-generation 32-pixel multiplexer, based on an improved architecture, has been developed for instruments including Constellation-X, SCUBA-2, and solar x-ray astronomy missions. SCUBA-2, which is being developed for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, will have more than 10,000 pixels. We are now developing a third-generation architecture based on superconducting hot-electron switches. The use of SQUID multiplexers in instruments operating at above 2 K will also be discussed.

  15. Review of Dark Matter Direct Detection Using Cryogenic Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, P.L.; /SLAC

    2012-06-13

    The direct detection of the Universe's Dark Matter is one of the key questions in particle astrophysics. Cryogenic based detectors offer advantages in low radioactive backgrounds, target mass, sensitivity to the small energy depositions and rejection of possible background sources. I will summarize the main experimental approaches, including both cryogenic crystal and liquid targets and the options pursued for their signal readout. Recent advances from around the world and prospects for future proposed experiments will be discussed.

  16. Development of cryogenic installations for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamowski, M.; Bremer, J.; Geynisman, M.; Hentschel, S.; Montanari, D.; Nessi, M.; Norris, B.

    2015-12-01

    A proposal for a very large liquid argon (68,000 kg) based neutrino detector is being studied. To validate the design principles and the detector technology, and to gain experience in the development of the cryostats and the cryogenic systems needed for such large experiments, several smaller scale installations will be developed and implemented, at Fermilab and CERN. The cryogenic systems for these installations will be developed, constructed, installed and commissioned by an international engineering team. These installations shall bring the required cooling power under specific conditions to the experiments for the initial cool-down and the long term operation, and shall also guarantee the correct distribution of the cooling power within the cryostats to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution within the cryostat itself. The cryogenic systems shall also include gaseous and liquid phase argon purification devices to be used to reach and maintain the very stringent purity requirements needed for these installations (parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). This paper gives an overview of the installations involved in these cryogenic projects, describes the functional demands made to these cryogenic systems and presents the initial studies on which these future cryogenic systems will be based.

  17. Scientific Applications and Promise of Cryogenic Detector Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, Samuel Harvey

    2009-12-16

    During the past year, the first results from a new generation of instruments based on kilopixel-scale arrays of cryogenic detectors have been released. I will review the history of low temperature detector arrays which has enabled this development, the science which has driven this rapid progress, describe the instruments now in operation and their initial scientific results, and speculate on the developments we may see in the next decade.

  18. Scientific Applications and Promise of Cryogenic Detector Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, Samuel Harvey

    2009-12-01

    During the past year, the first results from a new generation of instruments based on kilopixel-scale arrays of cryogenic detectors have been released. I will review the history of low temperature detector arrays which has enabled this development, the science which has driven this rapid progress, describe the instruments now in operation and their initial scientific results, and speculate on the developments we may see in the next decade.

  19. Acoustic composition sensor for cryogenic gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Luchik, T. S.; Back, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic sensor useful for the determination of the composition of a gaseous binary mixture in cryogenic liquid spills has been characterized. One version of the instrument traps a known mixture of helium and nitrogen at ambient temperature in a tube which is interrogated by sonic pulses to determine the speed of sound and hence the composition. Experimental data shows that this sensor is quite accurate. The second version uses two unconfined microphones which sense sound pulses. Experimental data acquired during mixing when liquid nitrogen is poured into a vessel of gaseous helium is presented. Data during transient cooling of the tubular sensor containing nitrogen when the sensor is dipped into liquid nitrogen and during transient warm-up when the sensor is withdrawn are also presented. This sensor is being developed for use in the mixing of liquid cryogens with gas evolution in the simulation of liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen explosion hazards.

  20. Reinforcing Liner For Composite Cryogenic Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgeson, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed fiber-reinforced liner for graphite/epoxy fuel tank prevents metal-foil leakage barrier from detaching at low temperatures. Consists of epoxy containing fibers of Spectra 1000. Tank holds inner layers of foil, adhesive, and proposed liner. Liner much thinner than shell, adds little weight, and subtracts little volume. Lined composite tank used to hold liquids from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. Not suitable for oxygen, because organic materials in liner oxidized quickly.

  1. Using Composite Materials in a Cryogenic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batton, William D.; Dillard, James E.; Rottmund, Matthew E.; Tupper, Michael L.; Mallick, Kaushik; Francis, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the design and operation of an extended-shaft cryogenic pump to increase the efficiency of pumping. In general, the efficiency of pumping a cryogenic fluid is limited by thermal losses which is itself caused by pump inefficiency and leakage of heat through the pump structure. A typical cryogenic pump includes a drive shaft and two main concentric static components (an outer pressure containment tube and an intermediate static support tube) made from stainless steel. The modifications made include replacement of the stainless-steel drive shaft and the concentric static stainless-steel components with components made of a glass/epoxy composite. The leakage of heat is thus reduced because the thermal conductivity of the composite is an order of magnitude below that of stainless steel. Taking advantage of the margin afforded by the decrease in thermal conductivity, the drive shaft could be shortened to increase its effective stiffness, thereby increasing the rotordynamic critical speeds, thereby further making it possible to operate the pump at a higher speed to increase pumping efficiency. During the modification effort, an analysis revealed that substitution of the shorter glass/epoxy shaft for the longer stainless-steel shaft was not, by itself, sufficient to satisfy the rotordynamic requirements at the desired increased speed. Hence, it became necessary to increase the stiffness of the composite shaft. This stiffening was accomplished by means of a carbon-fiber-composite overwrap along most of the length of the shaft. Concomitantly with the modifications described thus far, it was necessary to provide for joining the composite-material components with metallic components required by different aspects of the pump design. An adhesive material formulated specially to bond the composite and metal components was chosen as a means to satisfy these requirements.

  2. High-energy resolution alpha spectrometry using cryogenic detectors.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, E; Coron, N; Leblanc, J; de Marcillac, P; Bouchard, J; Plagnard, J

    2006-01-01

    Applications such as environment monitoring implying alpha emitters activity measurement associated with isotope identification, require high-energy resolution detectors. Conventional silicon detectors are inexpensive therefore widely used, although intrinsically limited in energy resolution. Thermal detection principle of cryogenic detectors introduces a breakthrough in alpha particle measurement. For the first time, spectra with 5.5 keV FWHM energy resolution have been obtained for several external alpha emitting sources using a copper-germanium bolometer specially developed for alpha spectrometry. PMID:16618545

  3. SuperCDMS Detector Readout Cryogenic Hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, D. N.; Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D. S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C. N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D. A.; Beaty, J.; Brink, P. L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Clark, K.; Cooley, J.; Cushman, P.; DeJongh, F.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Duong, L.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Filippini, J.; Fritts, M.; Golwala, S. R.; Grant, D. R.; Hall, J.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hertel, S.; Homgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Kamaev, O.; Kiveni, M.; Kos, M.; Leman, S. W.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Moore, D.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Nelson, H.; Novak, L.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, X.; Ramberg, E.; Rau, W.; Reisetter, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Serfass, B.; Sundqvist, K. M.; Tomada, A.; Wang, G.; Wikus, P.; Yellin, S.; Yoo, J.; Young, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    SuperCDMS employs 1-inch thick germanium crystals operated below 50mK in a dilution cryostat. Each detector produces ionization and phonon signals. Ionization signals are amplified by JFETs operating at 150K within an assembly mounted on the 4K cryostat stage. These high impedance signals are carried to the FETs by superconducting "vacuum coaxes" which minimize thermal conductivity, stray capacitance, and microphonics. Transition edge sensors produce low-impedance phonon signals, amplified by SQUID arrays mounted on a 600mK stage. Detectors are mounted in a six-sided wiring configuration called a "tower", which carries signals from 40mK to 4K. A flex circuit 3 meters in length carries amplified signals for each detector from 4K to a vacuum bulkhead. We describe the methods used to support the detectors, wiring and amplifier elements at various thermal stages, minimizing electrical noise and thermal loads.

  4. Investigation of woven composites as potential cryogenic tank materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. S.; Melendez-Soto, E.; Castellanos, A. G.; Prabhakar, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, carbon fiber and Kevlar® fiber woven composites were investigated as potential cryogenic tank materials for storing liquid fuel in spacecraft or rocket. Towards that end, both carbon and Kevlar® fiber composites were manufactured and tested with and without cryogenic exposure. The focus was on the investigation of the influence of initial cryogenic exposure on the degradation of the composite. Tensile, flexural and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) tests were conducted, which indicate that Kevlar® and carbon textile composites are potential candidates for use under cryogenic exposure.

  5. Flexible composite radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Bennett, Bryan L.; Muenchausen, Ross E.; Wrobleski, Debra A.; Orler, Edward B.

    2006-12-05

    A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum response of photomultipliers (about 400 nanometers) or photodiodes (about 600 nanometers), which maximizes the overall detector efficiency.

  6. Intercomparison of cryogenic radiometers using silicon trap detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassila, A.; Hofer, H.; Ikonen, E.; Liedquist, L.; Stock, K. D.; Varpula, T.

    1997-02-01

    An intercomparison of cryogenic radiometers of HUT/VTT (Finland), PTB (Germany) and SP (Sweden) using silicon trap detectors was performed. Also results of monitoring of the responsivities of trap detectors over a 6 year period are presented. It was noticed that several non-idealities can undermine the agreement between results of calibrations. The non-uniformity of the responsivity of trap detectors made the results sensitive to alignment and beam size. The nonlinearity of some trap detectors was found to be large. The average relative differences in the results of the laboratories, when all known corrections are applied, are 0957-0233/8/2/003/img9 for HUT-PTB, 0957-0233/8/2/003/img10 for SP-PTB and 0957-0233/8/2/003/img11 for SP-HUT, with standard uncertainties of 0957-0233/8/2/003/img12 and 0957-0233/8/2/003/img13, respectively.

  7. Unlined Reuseable Filament Wound Composite Cryogenic Tank Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, A. W.; Lake, R. E.; Wilkerson, C.

    1999-01-01

    An unlined reusable filament wound composite cryogenic tank was tested at the Marshall Space Flight Center using LH2 cryogen and pressurization to 320 psig. The tank was fabricated by Phillips Laboratory and Wilson Composite Group, Inc., using an EnTec five-axis filament winder and sand mandrels. The material used was IM7/977-2 (graphite/epoxy).

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  9. Effects Of Ionizing Radiation On Cryogenic Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Lakew, B.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1988-04-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. We report here on ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  11. Carbon fiber composites for cryogenic filament-wound vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. V.; Simon, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced unidirectional and bidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites were evaluated for physical and mechanical properties over a cryogenic to room temperature range for potential application to cryogenic vessels. The results showed that Courtaulds HTS carbon fiber was the superior fiber in terms of cryogenic strength properties in epoxy composites. Of the resin systems tested in ring composites, CTBN/ERLB 4617 exhibited the highest composite strengths at cryogenic temperatures, but very low interlaminar shear strengths at room temperature. Tests of unidirectional and bidirectional composite bars showed that the Epon 828/Empol 1040 resin was better at all test temperatures. Neither fatigue cycling nor thermal shock had a significant effect on composite strengths or moduli. Thermal expansion measurements gave negative values in the fiber direction and positive values in the transverse direction of the composites.

  12. Adhesive Bonding Characterization of Composite Joints for Cryogenic Usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Neil A.; Schieleit, Gregory F.; Biggs, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite cryogenic tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future reusable launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW). This weight reduction is possible due to the large reduction in weight that composite materials can provide over current aluminum technology. In addition to composite technology, adhesively bonded joints potentially have several benefits over mechanically fastened joints, such as weight savings and cryogenic fluid containment. Adhesively bonded joints may be used in several areas of these cryogenic tanks, such as in lobe-to-lobe joints (in a multi-lobe concept), skirt-to-tank joint, strut-to-tank joint, and for attaching stringers and ring frames. The bonds, and the tanks themselves, must be able to withstand liquid cryogenic fuel temperatures that they contain. However, the use of adhesively bonded composite joints at liquid oxygen and hydrogen temperatures is largely unknown and must be characterized. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Michoud Operations performed coupon-level tests to determine effects of material selection, cure process parameters, substrate surface preparation, and other factors on the strength of these composite joints at cryogenic temperatures. This led to the selection of a material and process that would be suitable for a cryogenic tank. KEY WORDS: Composites, Adhesive Bonding, Cryogenics

  13. CALDER: Cryogenic light detectors for background-free searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2015-08-01

    The development of background-free detectors is essential for experiments searching for rare events. Bolometers, that are among the most competitive devices for the study of neutrino-less double beta decay (0νDBD) and Dark Matter interactions, suffer from the absence of techniques that allow to identify the nature of the interacting particles. This limit can be overcome by coupling the bolometer to an independent device for the measurement of the light emitted by interactions, as the combined read-out of the bolometric and light signals allows to identify and reject particles different from those of interest. CUORE, the most advanced bolometric experiment for 0νDBD searches, could disentangle the electrons produced by 0νDBD from the dangerous background due to α particles, by measuring the (tiny) Cherenkov light emitted by electrons and not by α's. LUCIFER, a project based on ZnSe scintillating bolometers for the study of 82Se 0νDBD, would be competitive also in the search of Dark Matter interactions if equipped with light detectors that allow to distinguish and reject the background due to electrons and γ's. These advances require cryogenic detectors characterized by noise lower than 20 eV, large active area, wide temperature range of operation, high radio-purity and ease in fabricating hundreds of channels. The CALDER collaboration aims to develop such detectors by exploiting the superb energy resolution and natural multiplexed read-out provided by Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  14. Improving Thick Germanium Detectors: Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Paulette; Mahapatra, Rupak; CDMS at Texas A&M University Team

    2011-10-01

    Texas A&M University is working on improving the current production rate, quality, and reproducibility of fabricated detectors, specifically for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) to detect particles called WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles). An automated sputtering system is used to deposit amorphous silicon and high quality tungsten and aluminum thin-films on 3 inch by 1 inch germanium substrates to demonstrate repeatable depositions with desired properties, such as, accurate thickness, desirable critical temperature, and good sensitivity at low energy. These techniques can then be used in the future to improve detectors, not only for the search for Dark Matter, but for other areas of research in nuclear and particle physics. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  15. Optimizing Cryogenic Detectors for Low-Mass WIMP Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Q.; Billard, J.; Juillard, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the methodology and results from a study dedicated to the optimization of cryogenic detectors for low-mass WIMP searches. Considering a data-driven background model from the EDELWEISS-III experiment, and two analysis methods, namely profile likelihood and boosted decision tree, we indentify the main experimental constraints and performances that have to be improved. We found that there is a clear difference in how to optimize the detector setup whether focusing on WIMPs with masses below 5 GeV or above. Finally, in the case of a hundred-kg scale experiment, we discuss the requirements to probe most of the parameter space region delimited by the ultimate neutrino bound below 6 GeV.

  16. Monte Carlo of Cryogenic Dark Matter Search large germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leman, Steven; McCarty, Kevin; Cabrera, Blas; Pyle, Matthew; Sundqvist, Kyle; Sadoulet, Bernard

    2010-02-01

    A description of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) detector Monte Carlo (MC) is given along with a comparison to calibration data obtained in 3" diameter, 1" thick [100] germanium crystals. Prompt phonons are generated from electron-recoil interactions along with Luke phonons created by charges as they drift through the crystal via our ionization channels' electric field. The MC phonon transport is described by quasidiffusion, which includes anisotropic propagation, isotope scattering and anharmonic decay, until the phonons are absorbed in either the Transition Edge Sensor based phonon channels or lost in surface interactions. Charge creation is a powerful discriminator for electron-recoil and nuclear-recoil events and also surface interaction rejection. Unlike holes, electrons transports obliquely to the electric field in our detectors due to the germanium [100] crystal orientation and the indirect semiconductor band structure. We are improving the agreement between MC and calibration data in different detector designs, which provides a powerful consistency test of our phonon and charge models. )

  17. CALDER: Cryogenic light detectors for background-free searches

    SciTech Connect

    Cardani, L.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Castellano, M. G.; Colantoni, I.; Di Domizio, S.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-17

    The development of background-free detectors is essential for experiments searching for rare events. Bolometers, that are among the most competitive devices for the study of neutrino-less double beta decay (0νDBD) and Dark Matter interactions, suffer from the absence of techniques that allow to identify the nature of the interacting particles. This limit can be overcome by coupling the bolometer to an independent device for the measurement of the light emitted by interactions, as the combined read-out of the bolometric and light signals allows to identify and reject particles different from those of interest. CUORE, the most advanced bolometric experiment for 0νDBD searches, could disentangle the electrons produced by 0νDBD from the dangerous background due to α particles, by measuring the (tiny) Cherenkov light emitted by electrons and not by α’s. LUCIFER, a project based on ZnSe scintillating bolometers for the study of {sup 82}Se 0νDBD, would be competitive also in the search of Dark Matter interactions if equipped with light detectors that allow to distinguish and reject the background due to electrons and γ’s. These advances require cryogenic detectors characterized by noise lower than 20 eV, large active area, wide temperature range of operation, high radio-purity and ease in fabricating hundreds of channels. The CALDER collaboration aims to develop such detectors by exploiting the superb energy resolution and natural multiplexed read-out provided by Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  18. Ultra-high-mass mass spectrometry with charge discrimination using cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.; Mears, C.A.; Labov, S.E.; Benner, W.H.

    1999-11-30

    An ultra-high-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described which uses a cryogenic particle detector as an ion detector with charge discriminating capabilities. Cryogenic detectors have the potential for significantly improving the performance and sensitivity of time-of-flight mass spectrometers, and compared to ion multipliers they exhibit superior sensitivity for high-mass, slow-moving macromolecular ions and can be used as ``stop'' detectors in time-of-flight applications. In addition, their energy resolving capability can be used to measure the charge state of the ions. Charge discrimination is very valuable in all time-of-flight mass spectrometers. Using a cryogenically-cooled Nb-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Nb superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction (STJ) detector operating at 1.3 K as an ion detector in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for large biomolecules it was found that the STJ detector has charge discrimination capabilities. Since the cryogenic STJ detector responds to ion energy and does not rely on secondary electron production, as in the conventionally used microchannel plate (MCP) detectors, the cryogenic detector therefore detects large molecular ions with a velocity-independent efficiency approaching 100%.

  19. Ultra-high-mass mass spectrometry with charge discrimination using cryogenic detectors

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Matthias; Mears, Carl A.; Labov, Simon E.; Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    An ultra-high-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer using a cryogenic particle detector as an ion detector with charge discriminating capabilities. Cryogenic detectors have the potential for significantly improving the performance and sensitivity of time-of-flight mass spectrometers, and compared to ion multipliers they exhibit superior sensitivity for high-mass, slow-moving macromolecular ions and can be used as "stop" detectors in time-of-flight applications. In addition, their energy resolving capability can be used to measure the charge state of the ions. Charge discrimination is very valuable in all time-of-flight mass spectrometers. Using a cryogenically-cooled Nb-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -Nb superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction (STJ) detector operating at 1.3 K as an ion detector in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for large biomolecules it was found that the STJ detector has charge discrimination capabilities. Since the cryogenic STJ detector responds to ion energy and does not rely on secondary electron production, as in the conventionally used microchannel plate (MCP) detectors, the cryogenic detector therefore detects large molecular ions with a velocity-independent efficiency approaching 100%.

  20. Tensile Properties of Polymeric Matrix Composites Subjected to Cryogenic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Karen S.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2004-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites (PMC s) have seen limited use as structural materials in cryogenic environments. One reason for the limited use of PMC s in cryogenic structures is a design philosophy that typically requires a large, validated database of material properties in order to ensure a reliable and defect free structure. It is the intent of this paper to provide an initial set of mechanical properties developed from experimental data of an advanced PMC (IM7/PETI-5) exposed to cryogenic temperatures and mechanical loading. The application of this data is to assist in the materials down-select and design of cryogenic fuel tanks for future reusable space vehicles. The details of the material system, test program, and experimental methods will be outlined. Tension modulus and strength were measured at room temperature, -196 C, and -269 C on five different laminates. These properties were also tested after aging at -186 C with and without loading applied. Microcracking was observed in one laminate.

  1. Split-Stirling Cryogenic Refrigerators For Detector Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehrfeld, Daniel

    1983-08-01

    Unfortunately, for user and manufacturer both, the closed-cycle cryogenic cooler to date has deserved its reputation as the "weak-link" in IR systems. When the cooler requires service at intervals of a few hundred hours at best, the quality of the system it serves is unfairly diminished. This paper addresses technological advances in the art of Stirling-cycle coolers which will increasingly cause that image of military cryocoolers to change for the better. A family of split-cycle coolers designed for long MTBF and in the final stages of development is the focus of the discussion. Their technological evolution, from multi-year-MTBF satellite system Stirling coolers developed in the U.S., and the UA 7011 cooler (tne first all-linear, military, production cooler) developed in Holland, is explained. Three new machines are discussed. Both 1/4 watt and 1 watt (nominal capacity) at 80°K linear-resonant, free-dispLacer Stirling coolers designed for thousands of hours of service-free operation are examined. The third machine is an advanced 1/4 watt at 80°K Stirling cooler incorporating the same component improvements in its free-displacer while utilizing a crankshaft-driven compressor. All three are designed to be compatible with standard U.S. 60 element and 120/180 element detector/dewars. The technologies of linear-resonant compressor and free-displacer expanders as embodied in these machines is discussed in sufficient detail that the reasons for their superior performance will he clear.

  2. Facesheet Delamination of Composite Sandwich Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Odegard, Gregory M.; Herring, Helen M.

    2003-01-01

    The next generation of space transportation vehicles will require advances in lightweight structural materials and related design concepts to meet the increased demands on performance. One potential source for significant structural weight reduction is the replacement of traditional metallic cryogenic fuel tanks with new designs for polymeric matrix composite tanks. These new tank designs may take the form of thin-walled sandwich constructed with lightweight core and composite facesheets. Life-time durability requirements imply the materials must safely carry pressure loads, external structural loads, resist leakage and operate over an extremely wide temperature range. Aside from catastrophic events like tank wall penetration, one of the most likely scenarios for failure of a tank wall of sandwich construction is the permeation of cryogenic fluid into the sandwich core and the subsequent delamination of the sandwich facesheet due to the build-up of excessive internal pressure. The research presented in this paper was undertaken to help understand this specific problem of core to facesheet delamination in cryogenic environments and relate this data to basic mechanical properties. The experimental results presented herein provide data on the strain energy release rate (toughness) of the interface between the facesheet and the core of a composite sandwich subjected to simulated internal pressure. A unique test apparatus and associated test methods are described and the results are presented to highlight the effects of cryogenic temperature on the measured material properties.

  3. Thermal-Mechanical Cyclic Test of a Composite Cryogenic Tank for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messinger, Ross; Pulley, John

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of thermal-mechanical cyclic tests conducted on a composite cryogenic tank designed for reusable launch vehicles. Topics covered include: a structural analysis of the composite cryogenic tank, a description of Marshall Space Flight Center's Cryogenic Structure Test Facility, cyclic test plans and accomplishments, burst test and analysis and post-testing evaluation.

  4. Applicability Study of Composite Laminates to the Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, T.; Ishikawa, T.

    2002-01-01

    Extensive application of light weight composite materials is one of the major technical challenges for drastic reduction of structural weight of the planned reusable launch vehicles (RLV) and space planes. Cryogenic propellant tanks are the dominating structural components of the vehicle structure and thus the application of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) to these components is one of the most promising but challenging technologies for achieving the aimed goal of weight reduction. Research effort has been made to scrutinize the cryogenic mechanical performance of currently available candidates of CFRP material systems suitable for use under cryogenic conditions. Seven different types of material systems of CFRP are chosen and are experimentally and analytically evaluated to discuss their applicability to the liquid propellant tanks and to provide basic information for material selections. Static tensile tests were conducted with quasi-isotropic laminates to acquire static strengths, both under cryogenic and room temperatures. The development of matrix cracks and free-edge delaminations were also experimentally investigated and were compared with the numerical calculations. Interlaminar fracture toughness at cryogenic temperature was also evaluated to investigate the damage susceptibility of the materials. The decrease in matrix crack onset stresses observed in the laminate performance experiments suggested that the propellant leakage may be a key issue when applying CFRP to the propellant tanks, as well as the durability concern. Thus the propellant leakage under matrix crack accumulation was simulated by the gas helium leakage tests. Leakage model was also developed and successfully applied to the prediction of the propellant leakage. Preliminary results of adhesive joint tests under cryogenic conditions will also be referred to.

  5. Performance evaluation of a lossy transmission lines based diode detector at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, E.; Aja, B.; de la Fuente, L.; Artal, E.

    2016-01-01

    This work is focused on the design, fabrication, and performance analysis of a square-law Schottky diode detector based on lossy transmission lines working under cryogenic temperature (15 K). The design analysis of a microwave detector, based on a planar gallium-arsenide low effective Schottky barrier height diode, is reported, which is aimed for achieving large input return loss as well as flat sensitivity versus frequency. The designed circuit demonstrates good sensitivity, as well as a good return loss in a wide bandwidth at Ka-band, at both room (300 K) and cryogenic (15 K) temperatures. A good sensitivity of 1000 mV/mW and input return loss better than 12 dB have been achieved when it works as a zero-bias Schottky diode detector at room temperature, increasing the sensitivity up to a minimum of 2200 mV/mW, with the need of a DC bias current, at cryogenic temperature.

  6. Performance evaluation of a lossy transmission lines based diode detector at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Villa, E; Aja, B; de la Fuente, L; Artal, E

    2016-01-01

    This work is focused on the design, fabrication, and performance analysis of a square-law Schottky diode detector based on lossy transmission lines working under cryogenic temperature (15 K). The design analysis of a microwave detector, based on a planar gallium-arsenide low effective Schottky barrier height diode, is reported, which is aimed for achieving large input return loss as well as flat sensitivity versus frequency. The designed circuit demonstrates good sensitivity, as well as a good return loss in a wide bandwidth at Ka-band, at both room (300 K) and cryogenic (15 K) temperatures. A good sensitivity of 1000 mV/mW and input return loss better than 12 dB have been achieved when it works as a zero-bias Schottky diode detector at room temperature, increasing the sensitivity up to a minimum of 2200 mV/mW, with the need of a DC bias current, at cryogenic temperature. PMID:26827340

  7. Cryogenic detectors below 100 mK for X-ray measurements in metrology

    PubMed

    Bobin; Leblanc; Bouchard; Coron; Cassette; Leblanc; de Marcillac P; Plagnard

    2000-03-01

    Due to the intrinsic performances of cryogenic detectors such as energy resolution, LPRI has decided to use these devices to improve the quality of the radioactive measurements usually obtained with classical semiconductor detectors. A bolometer with a 10 microg tin absorber has been developed at IAS (Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale) and has been tested in the cryogenic installation of LPRI; an energy resolution (full width half maximum, FWHM) of 39 eV has been obtained on the Kalpha line of Mn. Besides these good spectrometry results, an absolute activity measurement using bolometers is proposed by adapting an absorber geometry for 4 pi counting. PMID:10724382

  8. Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Matthias; Mears, Carl A.; Labov, Simon E.; Hiller, Larry J.; Barfknecht, Andrew T.

    2003-03-04

    A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

  9. Durability Characterization of Advanced Polymeric Composites at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, T. S.

    2001-01-01

    The next generation of reusable launch vehicles will require technology development in several key areas. Of these key areas, the development of polymeric composite cryogenic fuel tanks promises to present one of the most difficult technical challenges. It is envisioned that a polymer matrix composite (PMC) tank would be a large shell structure capable of containing cryogenic fuels and carrying a range of structural loads. The criteria that will be imposed on such a design include reduced weight, conformal geometry, and impermeability. It is this last criterion, impermeability, that will provide the focus of this paper. The essence of the impermeability criterion is that the tank remains leak free throughout its design lifetime. To address this criterion, one of the first steps is to conduct a complete durability assessment of the PMC materials. At Langley Research Center, a durability assessment of promising new polyimide-based PMCs is underway. This durability program has focused on designing a set of critical laboratory experiments that will determine fundamental material properties under combined thermal-mechanical loading at cryogenic temperatures. The test program provides measurements of lamina and laminate properties, including strength, stiffness, and fracture toughness. The performance of the PMC materials is monitored as a function of exposure conditions and aging time. Residual properties after exposure are measured at cryogenic temperatures and provide quantitative values of residual strength and stiffness. Primary degradation mechanisms and the associated damage modes are measured with both destructive and nondestructive techniques. In addition to mechanical properties, a range of physical properties, such as weight, glass transition, and crack density, are measured and correlated with the test conditions. This paper will report on the progress of this research program and present critical results and illustrative examples of current findings.

  10. International and national security applications of cryogenic detectors - mostly nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    As with science, so with security - in both arenas, the extraordinary sensitivity of cryogenic sensors enables high-confidence detection and high-precision measurement even of the faintest signals. Science applications are more mature, but several national and international security applications have been identified where cryogenic detectors have high potential payoff. International safeguards and nuclear forensics are areas needing new technology and methods to boost speed, sensitivity, precision and accuracy. Successfully applied, improved nuclear materials analysis will help constrain nuclear materials diversion pathways and contribute to treaty verification. Cryogenic microcalorimeter detectors for X-ray, gamma ray, neutron, and alpha particle spectrometry are under development with these aims in mind. In each case the unsurpassed energy resolution of microcalorimeters reveals previously invi sible spectral features of nuclear materials. Preliminary results of quantitative analysis indicate substantial improvements are still possible, but significant work will be required to fully understand the ultimate performance limits.

  11. Cryogenic Detectors for Rare Alpha Decay Search: A New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casali, N.; Dubovik, A.; Nagorny, S.; Nisi, S.; Orio, F.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S.; Schäffner, K.; Tupitsyna, I.; Yakubovskaya, A.

    2016-08-01

    The detection of ^{148}Sm alpha decay with a precise measured half-life of ( {6.4_{-1.3}^{+1.2} }) × 10^{15}y and a Q-value of 1987.3 ± 0.5 keV was achieved by a new experimental approach, where a conventional ZnWO4 scintillating crystal doped with enriched ^{148}Sm isotope is operated as a cryogenic scintillating bolometer (phonon and light channel) at mK-temperatures.

  12. Composite polycrystalline semiconductor neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, M.; Zuck, A.; Marom, G.; Khakhan, O.; Roth, M.; Alfassi, Z. B.

    2007-08-01

    Composite polycrystalline semiconductor detectors bound with different binders, both inorganic molten glasses, such as B 2O 3, PbO/B 2O 3, Bi 2O 3/PbO, and organic polymeric binders, such as isotactic polypropylene (iPP), polystyrene or nylon-6, and coated with different metal electrodes were tested at room temperature for α-particles and very weak thermal neutron sources. The detector materials tested were natural occurring hexagonal BN and cubic LiF, where both are not containing enriched isotopes of 10B or 6Li. The radiation sources were 5.5 MeV α's from 241Am, 5.3 MeV from 210Po and also 4.8 MeV from 226Ra. Some of these detectors were also tested with thermal neutrons from very weak 227Ac 9Be, 241Am- 10Be sources and also from a weak 238Pu+ 9Be and somewhat stronger 252Cf sources. The neutrons were thermalized with paraffin. Despite very low signal to noise ratio of only ˜2, the neutrons could be counted by subtracting the noise from the signal.

  13. Evaluation of high temperature superconductive thermal bridges for space borne cryogenic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Elaine P.

    1996-01-01

    Infrared sensor satellites are used to monitor the conditions in the earth's upper atmosphere. In these systems, the electronic links connecting the cryogenically cooled infrared detectors to the significantly warmer amplification electronics act as thermal bridges and, consequently, the mission lifetimes of the satellites are limited due to cryogenic evaporation. High-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials have been proposed by researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley's Research Center (NASA-LaRC) as an alternative to the currently used manganin wires for electrical connection. The potential for using HTS films as thermal bridges has provided the motivation for the design and the analysis of a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the performance of this superconductive technology in the space environment. The initial efforts were focused on the preliminary design of the experimental system which allows for the quantitative comparison of superconductive leads with manganin leads, and on the thermal conduction modeling of the proposed system. Most of the HTS materials were indicated to be potential replacements for the manganin wires. In the continuation of this multi-year research, the objectives of this study were to evaluate the sources of heat transfer on the thermal bridges that have been neglected in the preliminary conductive model and then to develop a methodology for the estimation of the thermal conductivities of the HTS thermal bridges in space. The Joule heating created by the electrical current through the manganin wires was incorporated as a volumetric heat source into the manganin conductive model. The radiative heat source on the HTS thermal bridges was determined by performing a separate radiant interchange analysis within a high-T(sub c) superconductor housing area. Both heat sources indicated no significant contribution on the cryogenic heat load, which validates the results obtained in the preliminary conduction

  14. Cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors with PMT readout for rare event search experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Lin, J.; Mikhailik, V. B.; Kraus, H.

    2016-06-01

    Cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors (CPSD) for rare event search experiments require reliable, efficient and robust photon detectors that can resolve individual photons in a scintillation event. We report on a cryogenic detector containing a scintillating crystal, equipped with an NTD-Ge phonon sensor and a photon detector based on a low-temperature photomultiplier tube (PMT) that is powered by a Cockcroft-Walton generator. Here we present results from the characterisation of two detector modules, one with CaWO4, the other with CaMoO4 as scintillator. The energy resolutions (FWHM) at 122.1 keV for the scintillation/PMT channel are 19.9% and 29.7% respectively for CaWO4 and CaMoO4 while the energy resolutions (FWHM) for the phonon channels are 2.17 keV (1.8%) and 0.97 keV (0.79%). These characteristics compare favourably with other CPSDs currently used in cryogenic rare-event search experiments. The detection module with PMT readout benefits from the implementation of a well-understood, reliable, and commercially available component and improved time resolution, while retaining the major advantages of conventional CPSD, such as high sensitivity, resolving power and discrimination ability.

  15. Conceptual design of a cryogenic test bench system for millimeter wavelength detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, S.; Ferrusca, D.; Ibarra-Medel, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present the design of a cryogenic system for testing different technologies of millimeter wavelength detectors. The proposed design is developed at the Astronomical Instrumentation Laboratory for Millimeter Wavelength at the National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, in México. The cryogenic system is integrated by a closed cycle pulse tube cooler with a 4 Kelvin 12 inches cold plate and a He-4/He-3 fridge and would be able to characterize KIDs (Kinetic Inductor Detectors), TES (Transition Edge Sensors) or semiconductor bolometers using a thermal link to a 250 mK stage. Readout electronics will be installed at the 4 Kelvin cold plate along with connectors and cables for the thermometry. In this paper we present a preliminary 3D model design which its main goal is to use efficiently the limited space in the cryostat with emphasis on the interchangeability for installing each time any of the three different detector technologies in the same cold plate; results for the thermal calculations and finite-element modeling are also shown. The system would allow, with some minor changes, to replace the He-4/He-3 fridge by a dilution fridge in order to reach temperatures about 100 mK to have more flexibility in the detector testing. The importance of the cryogenic test bench relies in the need for an easier and quicker characterization of detectors arrays as part of the research for the development of instruments for millimeter telescopes.

  16. Development of a Navigator and Imaging Techniques for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilen, Chris; /Carleton Coll. /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-06-22

    This project contributes to the detection of flaws in the germanium detectors for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Specifically, after imaging the detector surface with a precise imaging and measuring device, they developed software to stitch the resulting images together, applying any necessary rotations, offsets, and averaging, to produce a smooth image of the whole detector that can be used to detect flaws on the surface of the detector. These images were also tiled appropriately for the Google Maps API to use as a navigation tool, allowing viewers to smoothly zoom and pan across the detector surface. Automated defect identification can now be implemented, increasing the scalability of the germanium detector fabrication.

  17. Composite, Cryogenic, Conformal, Common Bulkhead, Aerogel-Insulated Tank (CBAT) Materials and Processing Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, Michael P.; Roberts, J. Keith; Finckenor, Jeffrey L.; McMahon, William M.; Clinton, R. G., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the current status and future activities of the composite, cryogenic, conformal, common bulkhead, aerogel-insulated tank (CBAT). Each term (composite, cryogenic, conformal, etc.) is explained. The fabrication method for the CBAT is described, including challenges and their solutions. Near term and long term goals are discussed.

  18. Phonon Quasidiffusion in Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Large Germanium Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Leman, S.W.; Cabrera, B.; McCarthy, K.A.; Pyle, M.; Resch, R.; Sadoulet, B.; Sundqvist, K.M.; Brink, P.L.; Cherry, M.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Serfass, B.; Tomada, A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2012-06-04

    We present results on quasidiffusion studies in large, 3 inch diameter, 1 inch thick [100] high purity germanium crystals, cooled to 50 mK in the vacuum of a dilution refrigerator, and exposed with 59.5 keV gamma-rays from an Am-241 calibration source. We compare data obtained in two different detector types, with different phonon sensor area coverage, with results from a Monte Carlo. The Monte Carlo includes phonon quasidiffusion and the generation of phonons created by charge carriers as they are drifted across the detector by ionization readout channels.

  19. Cryogenic SiGe ASICs for readout and multiplexing of superconducting detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisin, F.; Prêle, D.; Bréelle, E.; Piat, M.; Sou, G.; Klisnick, G.; Redon, M.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents an ultra low noise instrumentation based on cryogenic electronic integrated circuits (ASICs : Application Specific Integrated Circuits). We have designed successively two ASICs in standard BiCMOS SiGe 0.35 μm technology that have proved to be operating at cryogenic temperatures. The main functions of these circuits are the readout and the multiplexing of SQUID/TES arrays. We report the cryogenic operation of a first ASIC version dedicated to the readout of a 2×4 pixel demonstrator array. We particularly emphasize on the development and the test phases of an ultra low noise (0.2 nV/√Hz) cryogenic amplifier designed with two multiplexed inputs. The cryogenic SiGe amplifier coupled to a SQUID in a FLL operating at 4.2 K is also presented. We finally report on the development of a second version of this circuit to readout a 3×8 detectors array with improved noise performances and upgraded functionalities.

  20. Cryogenic SiGe ASICs for readout and multiplexing of superconducting detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sou, G.; Klisnick, G.; Redon, M.; Voisin, F.; Prêle, D.; Bréelle, E.; Piat, M.

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents an ultra low noise instrumentation based on cryogenic electronic integrated circuits (ASICs: Application Specific Integrated Circuits). We have designed successively two ASICs in standard BiCMOS SiGe 0.35 μm technology that have proved to be operating at cryogenic temperatures. The main functions of these circuits are the readout and the multiplexing of TES/SQUID arrays. We report the cryogenic operation of a first ASIC version dedicated to the readout of a 2 × 4 pixel demonstrator array. We particularly emphasize on the development and the test phases of an ultra low white noise (0.2 nV/sqrtHz) cryogenic amplifier designed with two multiplexed inputs. The cryogenic SiGe amplifier coupled to a SQUID in a FLL operating at 4.2 K is also presented. We finally report on the development of a second version of this circuit to readout a 3 × 8 detectors array with improved noise performances and upgraded functionalities.

  1. EVALUATION OF SILICON DIODES AS IN-SITU CRYOGENIC FIELD EMISSION DETECTORS FOR SRF CAVITY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ari Palczewski, Rongli Geng

    2012-07-01

    We performed in-situ cryogenic testing of four silicon diodes as possible candidates for field emission (FE) monitors of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities during qualification testing and in accelerator cryo-modules. We evaluated diodes from 2 companies - from Hamamatsu corporation model S1223-01; and from OSI Optoelectronics models OSD35-LR-A, XUV-50C, and FIL-UV20. The measurements were done by placing the diodes in superfluid liquid helium near the top of a field emitting 9-cell cavity during its vertical test. For each diode, we will discuss their viability as a 2K cryogenic detector for FE mapping of SRF cavities and the directionality of S1223-01 in such environments. We will also present calibration curves between the diodes and JLab's standard radiation detector placed above the Dewar's top plate.

  2. Analysis of defect formation in semiconductor cryogenic bolometric detectors created by heavy dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazanu, Ionel; Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia; Lazanu, Sorina

    2013-04-01

    The cryogenic detectors in the form of bolometers are presently used for different applications, in particular for very rare or hypothetical events associated with new forms of matter, specifically related to searches for dark matter. In the detection of particles with a semiconductor as target and detector, usually two signals are measured: ionization and heat. The amplification of the thermal signal is obtained with the prescriptions from the Luke-Neganov effect. The energy deposited in the semiconductor lattice as stable defects in the form of Frenkel pairs at cryogenic temperatures, following the interaction of a dark matter particle, is evaluated and consequences for measured quantities are discussed. This contribution is included in the energy balance of the Luke effect. Applying the present model to germanium and silicon, we found that for the same incident weakly interacting massive particle the energy deposited in defects in germanium is about twice the value for silicon.

  3. An HEMT-Based Cryogenic Charge Amplifier for Sub-kelvin Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, A.; Sadoulet, B.; Juillard, A.; Jin, Y.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design and noise performance of a fully cryogenic (T=4 K) high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT)-based charge amplifier for readout of sub-kelvin semiconductor radiation detectors. The amplifier is being developed for use in direct detection dark matter searches such as the cryogenic dark matter search and will allow these experiments to probe weakly interacting massive particle masses below 10 GeV/c^2 while retaining background discrimination. The amplifier dissipates ≈ 1 mW of power and provides an open loop voltage gain of several hundreds. The measured noise performance is better than that of JFET-based charge amplifiers and is dominated by the noise of the input HEMT. An optimal filter calculation using the measured closed loop noise and typical detector characteristics predicts a charge resolution of σ _q=106 eV (35 electrons) for leakage currents below 4 × 10^{-15} A.

  4. Specification and Design of the SBRC-190: A Cryogenic Multiplexer for Far Infrared Photoconductor Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.; Young, E. T.; Wolf, J.; Asbrock, J. F.; Lum, N.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Arrays of far-infrared photoconductor detectors operate at a few degrees Kelvin and require electronic amplifiers in close proximity. For the electronics, a cryogenic multiplexer is ideal to avoid the large number of wires associated with individual amplifiers for each pixel, and to avoid adverse effects of thermal and radiative heat loads from the circuitry. For low background applications, the 32 channel CRC 696 CMOS device was previously developed for SIRTF, the cryogenic Space Infrared Telescope Facility. For higher background applications, we have developed a similar circuit, featuring several modifications: (a) an AC coupled, capacitive feedback transimpedence unit cell, to minimize input offset effects, thereby enabling low detector biases, (b) selectable feedback capacitors to enable operation over a wide range of backgrounds, and (c) clamp and sample & hold output circuits to improve sampling efficiency, which is a concern at the high readout rates required. We describe the requirements for and design of the new device.

  5. Cryogenic single-chip electron spin resonance detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualco, Gabriele; Anders, Jens; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Alberti, Stefano; Forró, László; Boero, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    We report on the design and characterization of a single-chip electron spin resonance detector, operating at a frequency of about 20 GHz and in a temperature range extending at least from 300 K down to 4 K. The detector consists of an LC oscillator formed by a 200 μm diameter single turn aluminum planar coil, a metal-oxide-metal capacitor, and two metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors used as negative resistance network. At 300 K, the oscillator has a frequency noise of 20 Hz/Hz1/2 at 100 kHz offset from the 20 GHz carrier. At 4 K, the frequency noise is about 1 Hz/Hz1/2 at 10 kHz offset. The spin sensitivity measured with a sample of DPPH is 108 spins/Hz1/2 at 300 K and down to 106 spins/Hz1/2 at 4 K.

  6. Focal-plane optimization for detector noise limited performance in cryogenic Fourier transform spectrometer /FTS/ sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, M.; Logan, L.

    1980-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the optimum focal plane configuration including optics, filters and detector-preamplifier selection. The configuration was optimized particularly with respect to minimizing the noise level, but fabrication considerations for a cryogenic environment were also taken into account. The noise terms from source, background, detector electronics and charged particle radiation were quantitatively evaluated. It appears that noise equivalent spectral radiance less than 10 to the -11th W/sq cm per sr per kayser can be achieved between 2.5 and 20 microns.

  7. Environmental testing of high Tc superconductive thermal isolators for space-borne cryogenic detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Randolf, Henry W.; Verbelyi, Darren; Haertling, Gene H.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Selim, Raouf; Caton, Randall

    1992-01-01

    Thick films of superconductive material on low thermal conductivity substrates (e.g., yttria-stabilized zirconia and fused silica) are considered as a replacement for the existing electrical connections between the detector array and data acquisition and storage electronics in the cryogenic detector systems being developed by NASA. The paper describes some of the design constraints on the superconducting device and presents results of a preliminary analysis of the effects of vibration, gamma irradiation, and long-term exposure to high vacuum and liquid nitrogen encountered in operating such a device in space.

  8. A measurement of the beta spectrum of 63Ni using a new type of cryogenic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaistkell, R. J.; Angrave, L. C.; Booth, N. E.; Hahn, A. D.; Salmon, G. L.; Swift, A. M.

    1996-02-01

    A precision measurement of the beta spectrum of 63Ni has been performed using a new type of cryogenic particle detector. This is the first nuclear physics experiment using this technique, and we discuss the principles of the method, its advantages and its shortcomings. Careful studies of detector stability, calibration, pulse pile-up and systematics have made it possible to collect large numbers of events (∼ 10 8) over long periods (∼ 28 days). The measurement is consistent with no 17 keV/c 2 neutrino admixture, giving a preferred value of (-0.05 ± 0.31)%.

  9. Quantum Efficiency for Electron-Hole Pair Generation by Infrared Irradiation in Germanium Cryogenic Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domange, J.; Broniatowski, A.; Olivieri, E.; Chapellier, M.; Dumoulin, L.

    2009-12-01

    A study is made of the quantum efficiency of a coplanar grid ionization/heat Ge detector operated at cryogenic temperatures for dark matter search. Carrier generation is performed with infra-red LEDs of different wavelengths (1.30, 1.45, and 1.65 μm) near the optical bandgap of germanium. The corresponding quantum efficiency is obtained from an analysis of the Joule (Luke-Neganov) effect. This investigation is part of a program to optimize the reset procedure of the detectors in the Edelweiss-II dark matter search experiment at the Modane Underground Laboratory.

  10. Cryogenic Temperature Effects on Performance of Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, David; Dutta, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the low temperature behavior of polymer composites down to the cryogenic temperature range. This would be accomplished by study of its behavior in several ways. First we would study the microfracture growth by observing the acoustic emission as the temperature is lowered. We would also note any damage growth by ultrasonic velocity testing applying the pulse echo method. Effects of such low temperature would then be studied by examining the shear properties by the short beam shear test, and also the fracture toughness properties over a wide range of strain rate and temperature. At present these studies are continuing. The limited data obtained from these studies are reported in this report.

  11. Design of a Prototype Cryogenic Chamber and Characterization of a High Purity Germanium Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Abu Hena Muhammad Nazir

    Germanium detectors are the best choice for gamma ray spectrometry because of their good energy resolution and high efficiency compared to any other gamma rays spectrometers. Due to their high sensitivity and good energy resolution, these kinds of detector have a range of application. There is a significant number of particles detection experiments going on which used germanium detectors all around the world. These also have applications in non-proliferation and medical diagnosis. Thus, germanium detectors have a wide range of applications both research and industry. The Center for Ultra-Low Background Experiment in the Dakotas (CUBED) at the University of South Dakota is developing the facilities to fabricate germanium detectors. It is requires to characterize the germanium detector properties, especially electrical properties. In this project I design and developed a cryogenic chamber for the CUBED group which is able to rest any type of radiation detectors of different sizes and shapes. The cryostat chamber is able to provide low pressure and low temperature for the testing of the germanium detector sample. Leakage current measurements have been done for several detector samples by using this cryostat chamber. Several kinds of electrical properties such as depletion voltage, breakdown voltage, electronics noise, impurity concentration etc. can be derived from these experiments in the future.

  12. Layered composite thermal insulation system for nonvacuum cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    A problem common to both space launch applications and cryogenic propulsion test facilities is providing suitable thermal insulation for complex cryogenic piping, tanks, and components that cannot be vacuum-jacketed or otherwise be broad-area-covered. To meet such requirements and provide a practical solution to the problem, a layered composite insulation system has been developed for nonvacuum applications and extreme environmental exposure conditions. Layered composite insulation system for extreme conditions (or LCX) is particularly suited for complex piping or tank systems that are difficult or practically impossible to insulate by conventional means. Consisting of several functional layers, the aerogel blanket-based system can be tailored to specific thermal and mechanical performance requirements. The operational principle of the system is layer-pairs working in combination. Each layer pair is comprised of a primary insulation layer and a compressible radiant barrier layer. Vacuum-jacketed piping systems, whether part of the ground equipment or the flight vehicle, typically include numerous terminations, disconnects, umbilical connections, or branches that must be insulated by nonvacuum means. Broad-area insulation systems, such as spray foam or rigid foam panels, are often the lightweight materials of choice for vehicle tanks, but the plumbing elements, feedthroughs, appurtenances, and structural supports all create "hot spot" areas that are not readily insulated by similar means. Finally, the design layouts of valve control skids used for launch pads and test stands can be nearly impossible to insulate because of their complexity and high density of components and instrumentation. Primary requirements for such nonvacuum thermal insulation systems include the combination of harsh conditions, including full weather exposure, vibration, and structural loads. Further requirements include reliability and the right level of system breathability for thermal

  13. Development of a scintillation light detector for a cryogenic rare-event-search experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; So, J. H.; Kang, C. S.; Kim, G. B.; Kim, S. R.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, M. K.; Yoon, W. S.; Kim, Y. H.

    2015-06-01

    We developed a light detector to measure scintillation light from a crystal utilized in heat and light measurements at low temperatures for a rare-event-search experiment. A 2-in. Ge wafer was used as the light absorber, while a metallic magnetic calorimeter was employed to read out the temperature increase of the absorber. The light detector was tested at 25-100 mK using a cryogen-free adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The performance in terms of energy resolution, rise time and signal amplitude was measured using radioactive sources with a consideration of the absorption position on the wafer. The light detector was used to measure the scintillation light of a CaMoO4 crystal at mK temperatures. We also discuss for the potential application of this detector in a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment.

  14. Sensitivity of sodium iodide cryogenic scintillation-phonon detectors to WIMP signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M.; Nadeau, P.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Roth, S.; von Sivers, M.; Yavin, I.

    2016-05-01

    There is great interest in performing dark matter direct detection experiments using alkali halides such as NaI to test the DAMA/LIBRA claim. Cryogenic scintillation-phonon detectors measure both scintillation light and phonons to provide event-by-event discrimination between particles interacting with nuclei and particles interacting with electrons. An alkali halide scintillation-phonon detector could test the DAMA/LIBRA claim in a model-independent way using a similar material with added background discrimination. We present simulations of such detectors to determine their possible sensitivity to both annual modulation and particle interaction signals. We find that a 5 kg detector array could test the modulation reported by DAMA/LIBRA within 2 years using a likelihood-ratio test.

  15. Autonomous Cryogenic Leak Detector for Improving Launch Site Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, Kisholoy

    2013-01-01

    NASA, military, and commercial satellite users need launch services that are highly reliable, less complex, easier to test, and cost effective. This project has developed a tapered optical fiber sensor for detecting hydrogen. The invention involves incorporating chemical indicators on the tapered end of an optical fiber using organically modified silicate nanomaterials. The Hazardous Gas Detection Lab (HGDL) at Kennedy Space Center is involved in the design and development of instrumentation that can detect and qualify various mission-critical chemicals. Historically, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon are the first five gases of HGDL focus. The use of these cryogenic fluids in the area of propulsion offers challenges. Due to their extreme low temperatures, these fluids induce contraction of the materials they contact, a potential cause of leakage. Among them, hydrogen is of particular concern. Small sensors are needed in multiple locations without adding to the structural weight. The most vulnerable parts of the engine are the connection flanges on the transfer lines, which have to support cycles of large thermal amplitude. The thermal protection of the engine provides a closed area, increasing the likelihood of an explosive atmosphere. Thus, even a small leak represents an unacceptable hazardous condition during loading operations, in flight, or after an aborted launch. Tapered fibers were first fabricated from 1/1.3-mm core/cladding (silica/ plastic) optical fibers. Typically a 1-ft (approx. 30- cm) section of the 1-mm fiber is cut from the bundle and marked with a pen into five 2-.-in. (.5.7-cm) sections. A propane torch is applied at every alternate mark to burn the jacket and soften the glass core. While the core is softening, the two ends of the fiber are pulled apart slowly to create fine tapers of .- to .-in. (.6- to 12-mm) long on the 1-mm optical fiber. Following this, the non-tapered ends of the fibers are polished to a 0.3-micron finish

  16. Feasibility of Carbon Fiber/PEEK Composites for Cryogenic Fuel Tank Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, K.; Doyle, A.; O Bradaigh, C. M.; Jaredson, D.

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of CF/PEEK composites for manufacture of cryogenic fuel tanks for Next Generation Space Launchers. The material considered is CF/PEEK tape from Suprem SA and the proposed manufacturing process for the fuel tank is Automated Tape Placement. Material characterization was carried out on test laminates manufactured in an autoclave and also by Automated Tape Placement with in-situ consolidation. The results of the two processes were compared to establish if there is any knock down in properties for the automated tape placement process. A permeability test rig was setup with a helium leak detector and the effect of thermal cycling on the permeability properties of CF/PEEK was measured. A 1/10th scale demonstrator was designed and manufactured consisting of a cylinder manufactured by automated tape placement and an upper dome manufactured by autoclave processing. The assembly was achieved by Amorphous Interlayer Bonding with PEI.

  17. Stress Analysis and Permeability Testing of Cryogenic Composite Feed Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip

    1999-01-01

    For the next generation Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), the use of advanced composite materials is highly desirable and critical to the success of the mission. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been working with the aerospace industry for many years to develop and demonstrate the cryogenic composite propellant tanks and feed lines technologies. A 50.8-mm diameter composite feed line for the Clipper Graham (DCY.A) was developed and tested. The purpose of the program is to demonstrate the LH2 permeability, composite to composite and metal joints, as well as composite flange interface of the composite feed line. Stress analysis and permeability testing have been performed on this article. Recently, a larger composite feed line design is being investigated and developed at MSFC for potential use in future RLV. The diameter of the feed line is 203 mm and the overall length is approximately 2.2 meters. This one piece unlined feed line consists of three straight tubular sections joined by two 90 degree elbows. The material chosen is IM7/977-3 prepreg fabric. The lay-up pattern is [0/90, plus or minus 45]s and is built up to 18 plies to the flanges at both ends. A preliminary stress analysis has been conducted to identify potential critical stresses and to develop the finite element analysis (FEA) capability of composite feed lines. As expected, the critical stresses occurred at the rims of some flange holes and the onset of the tapered tubular sections. Further analysis is required to determine the loads, flange deflection, vibration, and combined maximum loads. Two permeability-testing apparatuses were also designed for both flat panel specimens and curved feed line sections after impact damage. A larger permeant gas exposed area is required to accurately determine the effect of impact damage on the permeability of the feed line materials. The flat panel tester was fabricated and assembled. Three test coupons were made of graphite

  18. Study of a Vuilleumier cycle cryogenic refrigerator for detector cooling on the limb scanning infrared radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    A program to detect and monitor the presence of trace constituents in the earth's atmosphere by using the Limb Scanning Infrared Radiometer (LSIR) is reported. The LSIR, which makes radiometric measurements of the earth's limb radiance profile from a space platform, contains a detector assembly that must be cooled to a temperature of 65 + or - 2 K. The feasibility of cooling the NASA-type detector package with Vuilleumier (VM) cryogenic refrigerator was investigated to develop a preliminary conceptual design of a VM refrigerator that is compatible with a flight-type LSIR instrument. The scope of the LSIR program consists of analytical and design work to establish the size, weight, power consumption, interface requirements, and other important characteristics of a cryogenic cooler that would meet the requirements of the LSIR. The cryogenic cooling requirements under the conditions that NASA specified were defined. Following this, a parametric performance analysis was performed to define the interrelationships between refrigeration characteristics and mission requirements. This effort led to the selection of an optimum refrigerator design for the LSIR mission.

  19. Modeling Icy Saturnian Satellite Compositions Using Cryogenic Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, James B.

    2006-09-01

    Surface compositions among the icy Saturnian satellites range from nearly pure water ice at Mimas and Tethys to dark, nitrile-laced compounds at Phoebe and Dione. New measurements from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) coupled with laboratory measurements of relevant compounds at cryogenic temperatures, are beginning to reveal some of the subtle variations in compounds on these worlds. By comparing spectral observations for each of these moons to the others, inferences may be drawn which help to reveal their varying formation histories. Spectral modeling of Tethys observations, for example, indicates a surface dominated by water ice with only small contributions by other materials such as carbon dioxide or amorphous carbon; yet, requires an unusual mixture of grain sizes ranging from less than ten microns to as much as 2.5 millimeters in diameter. At the other extreme, Phoebe has been shown to exhibit much clearer evidence (cf. Clark et al., 2005) for a host of compounds, including iron-bearing materials, carbon dioxide, nitriles, and organics. Comparison of Cassini VIMS spectra of Phoebe, Dione, and Hyperion indicate many of the same spectral features. Mapping of these spectral features using automated feature extraction algorithms, cryogenic laboratory reflectance measurements, and standard Hapke reflectance models allows insights into the nature and distribution of these materials on the icy Saturnian satellites. In addition, this exercise allows examination of the methods and suggests ways in which the models might be improved. These include improved formulations of phase and scattering functions, as well as laboratory investigations of both pure compounds and mixtures.

  20. Characteristics of CMOS Light Detectors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, James; Johnson, Erik; Stapels, Christopher; Linsay, Paul; Miskimen, Rory; Crabb, Donald; Augustine, Frank

    2008-10-01

    Advancing nuclear and high-energy physics often requires experiments conducted in harsh environments, such as a liquid helium bath and a superconducting magnet at several Tesla. These experiments need improved sensors that operate in these conditions. Improvements in detector technology used in extreme environments can improve the data quality and allow new designs for experiments that operate under these conditions. Solid-State Photomultipliers (SSPM), a device built from a monolithic array of photodiodes, can be used in these environments where traditional PMTs may not operate. Measurements of the diode properties at low temperatures down to 5 K are used to determine the potential of CMOS SSPMs in these environments. At temperatures below 60 K, extensive after pulsing is observed, which renders the Geiger photodiodes in the SSPM nonfunctional for biases above breakdown. In proportional mode operation, below the reverse bias breakdown, the photodiodes show a linear response to incident light with a relatively large gain and can be used at temperatures near 5 K.

  1. Characterization of the room temperature payload prototype for the cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detector KAGRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Arellano, Fabián Erasmo; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Fujii, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Barton, Mark; Hirata, Naoatsu; Shoda, Ayaka; van Heijningen, Joris; Flaminio, Raffaele; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Okutumi, Koki; Akutsu, Tomotada; Aso, Yoichi; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Ohishi, Naoko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Takamori, Akiteru; Majorana, Ettore; Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Hennes, Eric; van den Brand, Jo; Bertolini, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    KAGRA is a cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detector currently under construction in the Kamioka mine in Japan. Besides the cryogenic test masses, KAGRA will also rely on room temperature optics which will hang at the bottom of vibration isolation chains. The payload of each chain comprises an optic, a system to align it, and an active feedback system to damp the resonant motion of the suspension itself. This article describes the performance of a payload prototype that was assembled and tested in vacuum at the TAMA300 site at the NAOJ in Mitaka, Tokyo. We describe the mechanical components of the payload prototype and their functionality. A description of the active components of the feedback system and their capabilities is also given. The performance of the active system is illustrated by measuring the quality factors of some of the resonances of the suspension. Finally, the alignment capabilities offered by the payload are reported.

  2. Characterization of the room temperature payload prototype for the cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detector KAGRA.

    PubMed

    Peña Arellano, Fabián Erasmo; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Fujii, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Barton, Mark; Hirata, Naoatsu; Shoda, Ayaka; van Heijningen, Joris; Flaminio, Raffaele; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Okutumi, Koki; Akutsu, Tomotada; Aso, Yoichi; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Ohishi, Naoko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Takamori, Akiteru; Majorana, Ettore; Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Hennes, Eric; van den Brand, Jo; Bertolini, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    KAGRA is a cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detector currently under construction in the Kamioka mine in Japan. Besides the cryogenic test masses, KAGRA will also rely on room temperature optics which will hang at the bottom of vibration isolation chains. The payload of each chain comprises an optic, a system to align it, and an active feedback system to damp the resonant motion of the suspension itself. This article describes the performance of a payload prototype that was assembled and tested in vacuum at the TAMA300 site at the NAOJ in Mitaka, Tokyo. We describe the mechanical components of the payload prototype and their functionality. A description of the active components of the feedback system and their capabilities is also given. The performance of the active system is illustrated by measuring the quality factors of some of the resonances of the suspension. Finally, the alignment capabilities offered by the payload are reported. PMID:27036793

  3. Stability of the spectral responsivity of cryogenically cooled InSb infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharous, Evangelos

    2005-10-10

    The spectral responsivity of two cryogenically cooled InSb detectors was observed to drift slowly with time. The origin of these drifts was investigated and was shown to occur due to a water-ice thin film that was deposited onto the active areas of the cold detectors. The presence of the ice film (which is itself a dielectric film) modifies the transmission characteristics of the antireflection coatings deposited on the active areas of the detectors, thus giving rise to the observed drifts. The magnitude of the drifts was drastically reduced by evacuating the detector dewars while baking them at 50 deg. C for approximately 48 h. All InSb detectors have antireflection coatings to reduce the Fresnel reflections and therefore enhance their spectral responsivity. This work demonstrates that InSb infrared detectors should be evacuated and baked at least annually and in some cases (depending on the quality of the dewar and the measurement uncertainty required) more frequently. These observations are particularly relevant to InSb detectors mounted in dewars that use rubber O rings since the ingress of moisture was found to be particularly serious in this type of dewar.

  4. Cryogenic Loop Heat Pipes for the Cooling of Small Particle Detectors at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, H.; Haug, F.; Silva, P.; Wu, J.; Koettig, T.

    2010-04-01

    The loop heat pipe (LHP) is among the most effective heat transfer elements. Its principle is based on a continuous evaporation/condensation process and its passive nature does not require any mechanical devices such as pumps to circulate the cooling agent. Instead a porous wick structure in the evaporator provides the capillary pumping forces to drive the fluid [1]. Cryogenic LHP are investigated as potential candidates for the cooling of future small-scale particle detectors and upgrades of existing ones. A large spectrum of cryogenic temperatures can be covered by choosing appropriate working fluids. For high luminosity upgrades of existing experiments installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) (TOTEM) and planned ones (FP420) [2-3] being in the design phase, radiation-hard solutions are studied with noble gases as working fluids to limit the radiolysis effect on molecules detrimental to the functioning of the LHP. The installation compactness requirement of experiments such as the CAST frame-store CCD detector cooling system impels also the design of a compact shaped LHP [4]. This paper reports on the design and experimental results of a general purpose LHP for temperatures as low as 110 K, for which the performances were measured using a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cooler as the cold source, combination envisaged for the cooling of future particle detectors.

  5. Development of Cryogenic Readout Electronics for Sensitive Far-Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watabe, Toyoki; Shibai, Hiroshi; Hirao, Takanori; Nagata, Hirohisa; Hibi, Yasunori; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Nakagawa, Takao; Noda, Manabu

    We have successfully developed low-noise, low-power cryogenic readout electronics (CRE) for sensitive far-infrared detectors operated at low temperatures. The CRE must be mounted besides of the detector, and thus, it must be operated at cryogenic temperatures. The reasons of that are to avoid electrical interferences to the high-impedance portion between the detector itself and the CRE, and to minimize the stray capacitance that may decrease the read-out gain. The goals of the CRE performance are the operation temperature can be down to 2K, the noise level is 2µV/√Hz at 1Hz, the power consumption is 10µW/channel, and the open-loop gain of differential amplifier is over 1000. We have so far manufactured the CRE four times, and evaluated the performances at 4.2K. The present performance achieved is nearly acceptable for the far-infrared sensor of the next Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, ASTRO-F.

  6. Detector Simulation and WIMP Search Analysis for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    Astrophysical and cosmological measurements on the scales of galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the universe indicate that 85% of the matter in the universe is composed of dark matter, made up of non-baryonic particles that interact with cross-sections on the weak scale or lower. Hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, represent a potential solution to the dark matter problem, and naturally arise in certain Standard Model extensions. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) collaboration aims to detect the scattering of WIMP particles from nuclei in terrestrial detectors. Germanium and silicon particle detectors are deployed in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These detectors are instrumented with phonon and ionization sensors, which allows for discrimination against electromagnetic backgrounds, which strike the detector at rates orders of magnitude higher than the expected WIMP signal. This dissertation presents the development of numerical models of the physics of the CDMS detectors, implemented in a computational package collectively known as the CDMS Detector Monte Carlo (DMC). After substantial validation of the models against data, the DMC is used to investigate potential backgrounds to the next iteration of the CDMS experiment, known as SuperCDMS. Finally, an investigation of using the DMC in a reverse Monte Carlo analysis of WIMP search data is presented.

  7. Cryogenic SiGe integrated circuits for superconducting nanowire single photon detector readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardin, Joseph C.; Ravindran, Prasana; Chang, Su-Wei; Mohamed, Charif; Kumar, Raghavan; Stern, Jeffrey A.; Shaw, Matthew D.; Russell, Damon; Marsili, Francesco; Resta, Giovanni; Farr, William H.

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing interest in developing systems employing large arrays of SNSPDs. To make such instruments practical, it is desirable to perform signal processing before transporting the detector outputs to room temperature. We present a cryogenic eight-channel pixel combiner circuit designed to amplify, digitize, edge detect, and combine the output signals of an array of eight SNSPDs. The circuit has been fabricated and measurement results agree well with expectation. The paper will conclude with a summary of ongoing work and future directions.

  8. Thermostabilization System Based on Two-phase Closed Cryogenic Thermosyphon for RED100 Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolozdynya, A. I.; Efremenko, Yu. V.; Khromov, V. A.; Shafigullin, R. R.; Shakirov, A. V.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Tolstukhin, I. A.

    The RED 100 emission detector requires thermostabilization at about 100K. The heat transfer characteristics of a two-phase closed cryogenic thermosyphon made of copper pipe and bellow flex hoses with nitrogen fluid have been investigated. The thermosyphon consists of sealed pipe enclosed in a vacuum jacket and uses a free-boiling liquid nitrogen pool as a cooling machine. The system is very flexible and can provide heat transfer rate up to 100 W in the temperature range of 80-100 K.

  9. Composite propulsion feedlines for cryogenic space vehicles, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, C. A.; Laintz, D. J.; Phillips, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Thin metallic liners that provide leak-free service in cryogenic propulsion systems are overwrapped with a glass-fiber composite that provides strength and protection from handling damage. The resultant tube is lightweight, strong and has a very low thermal flux. Several styles of tubing ranging from 5 to 38 cm in diameter and up to 305 cm long were fabricated and tested at operating temperatures from 294 to 21 K and operating pressures up to 259 N/sq cm. The primary objective for the smaller sizes was thermal performance optimization of the propulsion system while the primary objective of the larger sizes was weight optimization and to prove fabricability. All major program objectives were met resulting in a design concept that is adaptable to a wide range of aerospace vehicle requirements. Major items of development included: bonding large diameter aluminum end fittings to the thin Inconel liner; fabrication of a 38 cm diameter tube from 0.008 cm thick Inconel; and evaluation of tubing which provides essentially zero quality propellant in a very short period of time resulting in a lower mass of propellant expended in chilldown.

  10. MPPC versus MRS APD in two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Shemyakina, E.; Sokolov, A.; Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Shemyakina, E.; Sokolov, A.

    2015-04-01

    Two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors (CRADs) with combined THGEM/GAPD multiplier have become an emerging potential technique for dark matter search and coherent neu\\-tri\\-no-nucleus scattering experiments. In such a multiplier the THGEM hole avalanches are optically recorded in the Near Infrared (NIR) using a matrix of Geiger-mode APDs (GAPDs). To select the proper sensor, the performances of six GAPD types manufactured by different companies, namely by Hamamatsu (MPPCs), CPTA (MRS APDs) and SensL (SiPMs), have been comparatively studied at cryogenic temperatures when operated in two-phase CRADs in Ar at 87 K. While the GAPDs with ceramic packages failed to operate properly at cryogenic temperatures, those with plastic packages, namely MPPC S10931-100P and MRS APD 149-35, showed satisfactory performances at 87 K. In addition, MPPC S10931-100P turned out to be superior in terms of the higher detection efficiency, lower noise rate, lower pixel quenching resistor and better characteristics reproducibility.

  11. Invited review article: physics and Monte Carlo techniques as relevant to cryogenic, phonon, and ionization readout of Cryogenic Dark Matter Search radiation detectors.

    PubMed

    Leman, Steven W

    2012-09-01

    This review discusses detector physics and Monte Carlo techniques for cryogenic, radiation detectors that utilize combined phonon and ionization readout. A general review of cryogenic phonon and charge transport is provided along with specific details of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search detector instrumentation. In particular, this review covers quasidiffusive phonon transport, which includes phonon focusing, anharmonic decay, and isotope scattering. The interaction of phonons in the detector surface is discussed along with the downconversion of phonons in superconducting films. The charge transport physics include a mass tensor which results from the crystal band structure and is modeled with a Herring-Vogt transformation. Charge scattering processes involve the creation of Neganov-Luke phonons. Transition-edge-sensor (TES) simulations include a full electric circuit description and all thermal processes including Joule heating, cooling to the substrate, and thermal diffusion within the TES, the latter of which is necessary to model normal-superconducting phase separation. Relevant numerical constants are provided for these physical processes in germanium, silicon, aluminum, and tungsten. Random number sampling methods including inverse cumulative distribution function (CDF) and rejection techniques are reviewed. To improve the efficiency of charge transport modeling, an additional second order inverse CDF method is developed here along with an efficient barycentric coordinate sampling method of electric fields. Results are provided in a manner that is convenient for use in Monte Carlo and references are provided for validation of these models. PMID:23020355

  12. Invited Review Article: Physics and Monte Carlo techniques as relevant to cryogenic, phonon, and ionization readout of Cryogenic Dark Matter Search radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leman, Steven W.

    2012-09-01

    This review discusses detector physics and Monte Carlo techniques for cryogenic, radiation detectors that utilize combined phonon and ionization readout. A general review of cryogenic phonon and charge transport is provided along with specific details of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search detector instrumentation. In particular, this review covers quasidiffusive phonon transport, which includes phonon focusing, anharmonic decay, and isotope scattering. The interaction of phonons in the detector surface is discussed along with the downconversion of phonons in superconducting films. The charge transport physics include a mass tensor which results from the crystal band structure and is modeled with a Herring-Vogt transformation. Charge scattering processes involve the creation of Neganov-Luke phonons. Transition-edge-sensor (TES) simulations include a full electric circuit description and all thermal processes including Joule heating, cooling to the substrate, and thermal diffusion within the TES, the latter of which is necessary to model normal-superconducting phase separation. Relevant numerical constants are provided for these physical processes in germanium, silicon, aluminum, and tungsten. Random number sampling methods including inverse cumulative distribution function (CDF) and rejection techniques are reviewed. To improve the efficiency of charge transport modeling, an additional second order inverse CDF method is developed here along with an efficient barycentric coordinate sampling method of electric fields. Results are provided in a manner that is convenient for use in Monte Carlo and references are provided for validation of these models.

  13. Invited Review Article: Physics and Monte Carlo techniques as relevant to cryogenic, phonon, and ionization readout of Cryogenic Dark Matter Search radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Leman, Steven W.

    2012-09-15

    This review discusses detector physics and Monte Carlo techniques for cryogenic, radiation detectors that utilize combined phonon and ionization readout. A general review of cryogenic phonon and charge transport is provided along with specific details of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search detector instrumentation. In particular, this review covers quasidiffusive phonon transport, which includes phonon focusing, anharmonic decay, and isotope scattering. The interaction of phonons in the detector surface is discussed along with the downconversion of phonons in superconducting films. The charge transport physics include a mass tensor which results from the crystal band structure and is modeled with a Herring-Vogt transformation. Charge scattering processes involve the creation of Neganov-Luke phonons. Transition-edge-sensor (TES) simulations include a full electric circuit description and all thermal processes including Joule heating, cooling to the substrate, and thermal diffusion within the TES, the latter of which is necessary to model normal-superconducting phase separation. Relevant numerical constants are provided for these physical processes in germanium, silicon, aluminum, and tungsten. Random number sampling methods including inverse cumulative distribution function (CDF) and rejection techniques are reviewed. To improve the efficiency of charge transport modeling, an additional second order inverse CDF method is developed here along with an efficient barycentric coordinate sampling method of electric fields. Results are provided in a manner that is convenient for use in Monte Carlo and references are provided for validation of these models.

  14. Characterization of photo-multiplier tubes for the Cryogenic Avalanche Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Nosov, V.; Shekhtman, L.; Sokolov, A.

    2015-10-01

    New Cryogenic Avalanche Detector (CRAD) with ultimate sensitivity, that will be able to detect one primary electron released in the cryogenic liquid, is under development in the Laboratory of Cosmology and Particle Physics of the Novosibirsk State University jointly with the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The CRAD will use two sets of cryogenic PMTs in order to get trigger signal either from primary scintillations in liquid Ar or from secondary scintillations in high field gap above the liquid. Two types of cryogenic PMTs produced by Hamamatsu Photonics were tested and the results are presented in this paper. Low background 3 inch PMT R11065-10 demonstrated excellent performance according to its specifications provided by the producer. The gain measured with single electron response (SER) in liquid Ar reached 107, dark count rate rate did not exceed 300 Hz and pulse height resolution of single electron signals was close to 50%(FWHM). However, two R11065-10 PMTs out of 7 tested stopped functioning after several tens minutes of operation immersed completely into liquid Ar. The remaining 5 devices and one R11065-MOD were operated successfully for several hours each with all the parameters according to the producer specifications. Compact 2 inch PMT R6041-506-MOD with metal-channel dynode structure is a candidate for side wall PMT system that will look at electroluminescence in high field region above liquid. Four of these PMTs were tested in liquid Ar and demonstrated gain up to 2× 107, dark count rate rate below 100 Hz and pulse height resolution of single electron signals of about 110% (FWHM).

  15. An efficient, movable single-particle detector for use in cryogenic ultra-high vacuum environments

    SciTech Connect

    Spruck, Kaija; Becker, Arno; Fellenberger, Florian; Grieser, Manfred; Hahn, Robert von; Klinkhamer, Vincent; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas; Krantz, Claude; Novotný, Oldřich; Schippers, Stefan

    2015-02-15

    A compact, highly efficient single-particle counting detector for ions of keV/u kinetic energy, movable by a long-stroke mechanical translation stage, has been developed at the Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik (Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, MPIK). Both, detector and translation mechanics, can operate at ambient temperatures down to ∼10 K and consist fully of ultra-high vacuum compatible, high-temperature bakeable, and non-magnetic materials. The set-up is designed to meet the technical demands of MPIK’s Cryogenic Storage Ring. We present a series of functional tests that demonstrate full suitability for this application and characterise the set-up with regard to its particle detection efficiency.

  16. Pulse-Shape Analysis of Ionization Signals in Cryogenic Ge Detectors for Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, N.; Broniatowski, A.; Eitel, K.; Marnieros, S.; Paul, B.; Piro, M.-C.; Siebenborn, B.

    2016-02-01

    The detectors of the direct dark matter search experiment EDELWEISS consist of high-purity germanium crystals operated at cryogenic temperatures ({{<}20 mK} ) and low electric fields ({{<}1 V/cm} ). The surface discrimination is based on the simultaneous measurement of the charge amplitudes on different sets of electrodes. As the rise time of a charge signal strongly depends on the location of an interaction in the crystal, a time-resolved measurement can also be used to identify surface interactions. This contribution presents the results of a study of the discrimination power of the rise time parameter from a hot carrier transport simulation in combination with time-resolved measurements using an EDELWEISS-type detector in a test cryostat at ground level. We show the setup for the time-resolved ionization signal read-out in the EDELWEISS-III experiment and first results from data taking in the underground laboratory of Modane.

  17. Pulse-Shape Analysis of Ionization Signals in Cryogenic Ge Detectors for Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, N.; Broniatowski, A.; Eitel, K.; Marnieros, S.; Paul, B.; Piro, M.-C.; Siebenborn, B.

    2016-08-01

    The detectors of the direct dark matter search experiment EDELWEISS consist of high-purity germanium crystals operated at cryogenic temperatures (mathrm {{<}20 mK}) and low electric fields (mathrm {{<}1 V/cm}). The surface discrimination is based on the simultaneous measurement of the charge amplitudes on different sets of electrodes. As the rise time of a charge signal strongly depends on the location of an interaction in the crystal, a time-resolved measurement can also be used to identify surface interactions. This contribution presents the results of a study of the discrimination power of the rise time parameter from a hot carrier transport simulation in combination with time-resolved measurements using an EDELWEISS-type detector in a test cryostat at ground level. We show the setup for the time-resolved ionization signal read-out in the EDELWEISS-III experiment and first results from data taking in the underground laboratory of Modane.

  18. Reliable cool-down of GridPix detectors for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, R.; Schmitz, J.; Smits, S.; Bilevych, Y.; van Bakel, N.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present thermal cycling experiments of GridPix radiation imaging detectors, in view of a potential application in a cryogenic experiment. The robustness of the GridPix detector is studied for various grid designs, as well as various mechanical and thermal surroundings. The grid design variations had insignificant effect on the grid strength. A low cool-down rate as well as good thermal contact are crucial for the durability of the grid. Further, additional strengthening at the grid edges proved necessary to maintain the integrity of the structure during thermal cycling, which was done using globtop adhesive. The combination of these measures led to 100% survival rate after thermal cycling down to -130 °C.

  19. Towards Background-Limited Kinetic Inductance Detectors for a Cryogenic Far-Infrared Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyhrie, A.; Glenn, J.; Wheeler, J.; Day, P.; Eom, B. H.; Leduc, H.; Skrutskie, M.

    2016-02-01

    Arrays of tens of thousands of sensitive far-infrared detectors coupled to a cryogenic 4-6 m class orbital telescope are needed to trace the assembly of galaxies over cosmic time. The sensitivity of a 4 Kelvin telescope observing in the far-infrared (30-300 \\upmu m) would be limited by zodiacal light and Galactic interstellar dust emission, and require broadband detector noise equivalent powers (NEPs) in the range of 3× 10^{-19} W/√{Hz} . We are fabricating and testing 96 element arrays of lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) designed to reach NEPs near this level in a low-background laboratory environment. The LEKIDs are fabricated with aluminum: the low normal-state resistivity of Al permits the use of very thin wire-grid absorber lines (150 nm) for efficient absorption of radiation, while the small volumes enable high sensitivities because quasiparticle densities are high. Such narrow absorption lines present a fabrication challenge, but we deposit TiN atop the Al to increase the robustness of the detectors and achieve a 95 % yield. We present the design of these Al/TiN bilayer LEKIDs and preliminary sensitivity measurements at 350 \\upmu m optically loaded by cold blackbody radiation.

  20. The Cryogenic AntiCoincidence Detector Project for ATHENA+: An Overview Up to the Present Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macculi, C.; Piro, L.; Colasanti, L.; Lotti, S.; Natalucci, L.; Bagliani, D.; Biasotti, M.; Gatti, F.; Torrioli, G.; Barbera, M.; Mineo, T.; Perinati, E.

    2014-09-01

    ATHENA+ is a space mission proposal for the next ESA L2-L3 slot. One of the focal plane instruments is the X-ray integral field unit (X-IFU) working in the energy range 0.3-10 keV. It is a multi-array based on TES detectors aimed at characterizing faint or diffuse sources (e.g. WHIM or galaxy outskirt). The X-IFU will be able to achieve the required sensitivity if a low background is guaranteed. The studies performed by GEANT4 simulations depict a scenario where the use of an active anticoincidence (AC) is mandatory to reduce the background expected in L2 orbit down to the goal level of 0.005 cts cm s keV. This is possible using a cryogenic anticoincidence (CryoAC) detector placed within a proper optimized environment surrounding the X-IFU. We propose a 2 2 array of microcalorimeter detectors made by silicon absorber (each of about 1 cm and 300 m thick) and sensed by an Ir TES. In order to better understand the involved physics and optimize the performance, we have produced several samples featured by different absorber areas, TES size, and QPs Al collectors. Here we will discuss, as a review, the obtained results and the related impact to the final detector design.

  1. Towards Background-Limited Kinetic Inductance Detectors for a Cryogenic Far-Infrared Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyhrie, A.; Glenn, J.; Wheeler, J.; Day, P.; Eom, B. H.; Leduc, H.; Skrutskie, M.

    2016-08-01

    Arrays of tens of thousands of sensitive far-infrared detectors coupled to a cryogenic 4-6 m class orbital telescope are needed to trace the assembly of galaxies over cosmic time. The sensitivity of a 4 Kelvin telescope observing in the far-infrared (30-300 \\upmu m) would be limited by zodiacal light and Galactic interstellar dust emission, and require broadband detector noise equivalent powers (NEPs) in the range of 3× 10^{-19} W/√{Hz}. We are fabricating and testing 96 element arrays of lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) designed to reach NEPs near this level in a low-background laboratory environment. The LEKIDs are fabricated with aluminum: the low normal-state resistivity of Al permits the use of very thin wire-grid absorber lines (150 nm) for efficient absorption of radiation, while the small volumes enable high sensitivities because quasiparticle densities are high. Such narrow absorption lines present a fabrication challenge, but we deposit TiN atop the Al to increase the robustness of the detectors and achieve a 95 % yield. We present the design of these Al/TiN bilayer LEKIDs and preliminary sensitivity measurements at 350 \\upmu m optically loaded by cold blackbody radiation.

  2. Development of a cryogenic radiation detector for mapping radio frequency superconducting cavity field emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Danny Dotson; John Mammosser

    2005-05-01

    Field emissions in a super conducting helium cooled RF cavity and the production of radiation (mostly X-Rays) have been measured externally on cryomodules at Jefferson Lab since 1991. External measurements are limited to radiation energies above 100 keV due to shielding of the stainless steel cryogenic body. To measure the onset of and to map field emissions from a superconducting cavity requires the detecting instrument be inside the shield and within the liquid Helium. Two possible measurement systems are undergoing testing at JLab. A CsI detector array set on photodiodes and an X-Ray film camera with a fixed aperture. Several devices were tested in the cell with liquid Helium without success. The lone survivor, a CsI array, worked but saturated at high power levels due to backscatter. The array was encased in a lead shield with a slit opening set to measure the radiation emitted directly from the cell eliminating a large portion of the backscatter. This is a work in progress and te sting should be complete before the PAC 05. The second system being tested is passive. It is a shielded box with an aperture to expose radiation diagnostic film located inside to direct radiation from the cell. Developing a technique for mapping field emissions in cryogenic cells will assist scientists and engineers in pinpointing any surface imperfections for examination.

  3. Split-Stirling, linear-resonant, cryogenic refrigerators for detector cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehrfeld, D.

    1983-12-01

    For the past decade, military IR systems have preferred to see cryogenic coolers provided as split units; separating the functions of compressor and cold-end for system packaging and vibration isolation reasons. A family of split-cycle coolers designed for long MTBF and in the final stages of development is the focus of the discussion. Their technological evolution, from multi-year-MTBF satellite system Stirling coolers developed in the U.S., and the UA 7011 cooler (the first all-linear, military, production cooler) developed in Holland, is explained. Two new split-cycle machines are discussed. They provided 1/4 watt and 1 watt (nominal capacity) at 80 K and 85 K respectively. These linear-resonant, free-displacer Stirling coolers are designed for thousands of hours of service-free operation. They are designed to be compatible with standard U.S. 60 element and 120/180 element detector/dewars, respectively.

  4. Split-Stirling, linear-resonant, cryogenic refrigerators for detector cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehrfeld, D.

    1983-01-01

    For the past decade, military IR systems have preferred to see cryogenic coolers provided as split units; separating the functions of compressor and cold-end for system packaging and vibration isolation reasons. A family of split-cycle coolers designed for long MTBF and in the final stages of development is the focus of the discussion. Their technological evolution, from multi-year-MTBF satellite system Stirling coolers developed in the U.S., and the UA 7011 cooler (the first all-linear, military, production cooler) developed in Holland, is explained. Two new split-cycle machines are discussed. They provided 1/4 watt and 1 watt (nominal capacity) at 80 K and 85 K respectively. These linear-resonant, free-displacer Stirling coolers are designed for thousands of hours of service-free operation. They are designed to be compatible with standard U.S. 60 element and 120/180 element detector/dewars, respectively.

  5. Large scale xenon purification using cryogenic distillation for dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Bao, L.; Hao, X. H.; Ju, Y. L.; Pushkin, K.; He, M.

    2014-11-01

    A high efficiency cryogenic distillation system for removal of radioactive krypton-85 (85Kr) from commercially available xenon (Xe) has been designed, developed and assessed to meet the requirements of high sensitivity, low background dark matter detection experiments. The concentration of krypton (Kr) in a commercial xenon product can be decreased from 10-9 to 10-12 mol/mol based on the theoretical design and simulation. The experimental measurements showed that the concentration of krypton was decreased to 10-11 mol/mol with 99% xenon collection efficiency at maximum flow rate of 5 kg/h. Over 500 kg of xenon has been purified using this system, which has been used as the detection medium in project Panda X, the first dark matter detector developed in China.

  6. Foam/Aerogel Composite Materials for Thermal and Acoustic Insulation and Cryogen Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Sass, Jared P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The invention involves composite materials containing a polymer foam and an aerogel. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability, good acoustic insulation, and excellent physical mechanical properties. The composite materials can be used, for instance, for heat and acoustic insulation on aircraft, spacecraft, and maritime ships in place of currently used foam panels and other foam products. The materials of the invention can also be used in building construction with their combination of light weight, strength, elasticity, ability to be formed into desired shapes, and superior thermal and acoustic insulation power. The materials have also been found to have utility for storage of cryogens. A cryogenic liquid or gas, such as N.sub.2 or H.sub.2, adsorbs to the surfaces in aerogel particles. Thus, another embodiment of the invention provides a storage vessel for a cryogen.

  7. Foam/aerogel composite materials for thermal and acoustic insulation and cryogen storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Sass, Jared P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention involves composite materials containing a polymer foam and an aerogel. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability, good acoustic insulation, and excellent physical mechanical properties. The composite materials can be used, for instance, for heat and acoustic insulation on aircraft, spacecraft, and maritime ships in place of currently used foam panels and other foam products. The materials of the invention can also be used in building construction with their combination of light weight, strength, elasticity, ability to be formed into desired shapes, and superior thermal and acoustic insulation power. The materials have also been found to have utility for storage of cryogens. A cryogenic liquid or gas, such as N.sub.2 or H.sub.2, adsorbs to the surfaces in aerogel particles. Thus, another embodiment of the invention provides a storage vessel for a cryogen.

  8. Micromechanics, fracture mechanics and gas permeability of composite laminates for cryogenic storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sukjoo

    A micromechanics method is developed to investigate microcrack propagation in a liquid hydrogen composite tank at cryogenic temperature. The unit cell is modeled using square and hexagonal shapes depends on fiber and matrix layout from microscopic images of composite laminates. Periodic boundary conditions are applied to the unit cell. The temperature dependent properties are taken into account in the analysis. The laminate properties estimated by the micromechanics method are compared with empirical solutions using constituent properties. The micro stresses in the fiber and matrix phases based on boundary conditions in laminate level are calculated to predict the formation of microcracks in the matrix. The method is applied to an actual liquid hydrogen storage system. The analysis predicts micro stresses in the matrix phase are large enough to cause microcracks in the composite. Stress singularity of a transverse crack normal to a ply-interface is investigated to predict the fracture behavior at cryogenic conditions using analytical and finite element analysis. When a transverse crack touches a ply-interface of a composite layer with same fiber orientation, the stress singularity is equal to ½. When the transverse crack propagates to a stiffer layer normal to a ply-direction, the singularity becomes less than ½ and vice versa. Finite element analysis is performed to evaluate fracture toughness of a laminated beam subjected to the fracture load measured by the fracture experiment at room and cryogenic temperatures. As results, the fracture load at cryogenic temperature is significantly lower than that at room temperature. However, when thermal stresses are taken into consideration, for both cases of room and cryogenic temperatures, the variation of fracture toughness becomes insignificant. The result indicates fracture toughness is a characteristic property which is independent to temperature changes. The experimental analysis is performed to investigate the

  9. Micromechanics, Fracture Mechanics and Gas Permeability of Composite Laminates for Cryogenic Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sukjoo; Sankar, Bhavani; Ebaugh, Newton C.

    2005-01-01

    A micromechanics method is developed to investigate microcrack propagation in a liquid hydrogen composite tank at cryogenic temperature. The unit cell is modeled using square and hexagonal shapes depends on fiber and matrix layout from microscopic images of composite laminates. Periodic boundary conditions are applied to the unit cell. The temperature dependent properties are taken into account in the analysis. The laminate properties estimated by the micromechanics method are compared with empirical solutions using constituent properties. The micro stresses in the fiber and matrix phases based on boundary conditions in laminate level are calculated to predict the formation of microcracks in the matrix. The method is applied to an actual liquid hydrogen storage system. The analysis predicts micro stresses in the matrix phase are large enough to cause microcracks in the composite. Stress singularity of a transverse crack normal to a ply-interface is investigated to predict the fracture behavior at cryogenic conditions using analytical and finite element analysis. When a transverse crack touches a ply-interface of a composite layer with same fiber orientation, the stress singularity is equal to 1/2. When the transverse crack propagates to a stiffer layer normal to the ply-direction, the singularity becomes less than 1/2 and vice versa. Finite element analysis is performed to predict the fracture toughness of a laminated beam subjected to fracture loads measured by four-point bending tests at room and cryogenic temperatures. As results, the fracture load at cryogenic temperature is significantly lower than that at room temperature. However, when thermal stresses are taken into consideration, for both cases of room and cryogenic temperatures, the difference of the fracture toughness becomes insignificant. The result indicates fracture toughness is a characteristic property, which is independent to temperature changes. The experimental analysis is performed to

  10. GaAs cryogenic readout electronics for high impedance detector arrays for far-infrared and submillimeter wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, H.; Matsuo, H.; Hibi, Y.; Kobayashi, J.; Nakahashi, M.; Ikeda, H.; Fujiwara, M.

    2009-11-01

    We have been developing cryogenic readout integrate circuits (ROICs) for high impedance submillimeter and far-infrared detectors: Our ROICs are constructed from SONY GaAs-JFETs, which have excellent performance even at less than 1 K. We designed ROICs consisting of analog readouts and digital circuits for 32-element SIS photon detectors fabricated in RIKEN. The analog readout is ac-coupled capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA), which is composed of the two-stage amplifier. Some initial test results of the ac-coupled CTIA gave us the following performance; open loop gain of >740, power consumption ≈1.4 μW. The input referred noise is ≈4 μV/ √{Hz} at 1 Hz. These results suggest that low power and high sensitive cryogenic readout electronics are successfully developed for high impedance detectors.

  11. Thermal/Mechanical Response and Damage Growth in Polymeric Composites at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Karen S.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2002-01-01

    In order to increase the reliability of the next generation of space transportation systems, the mechanical behavior of polymeric matrix composite (PMC) materials at cryogenic temperatures must be investigated. This paper presents experimental data on the residual mechanical properties of a carbon fiber polymeric composite, IM7/PETI-5 both before and after aging at cryogenic temperatures. Tension modulus and strength were measured at room temperature, -196 C, and -269 C on five different specimen ply lay-ups, [0](sub 12), [90](sub 12), [+/-45](sub 3S), [+/-25](sub 3s) and [45,90(sub 3),-45,0(sub 3),-45,90(sub 3),45]. Specimens were preconditioned with one set of coupons being isothermally aged for 555 hours at -184 C in an unloaded state. Another set of corresponding coupons were mounted in constant displacement fixtures such that a constant uniaxial strain was applied to the specimens for 555 hours at -184 C. The measured lamina level properties indicated that cryogenic temperatures have an appreciable influence on behavior, and residual stress calculations based on lamination theory showed that the transverse tensile ply stresses could be quite high for cryogenic test temperatures. Microscopic examination of the surface morphology showed evidence of degradation along the exposed edges of the material due to aging at cryogenic temperatures.

  12. Design and performance of a modular low-radioactivity readout system for cryogenic detectors in the CDMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerib, D. S.; Barnes, P. D., Jr.; Brink, P. L.; Cabrera, B.; Clarke, R. M.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Golwala, S. R.; Huber, M. E.; Kurylowicz, M.; Mandic, V.; Martinis, J. M.; Meunier, P.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Nam, S. W.; Perillo-Isaac, M.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Schnee, R. W.; Seitz, D. N.; Shutt, T.; Smith, G. W.; Stockwell, W. K.; Sundqvist, K. M.; White, S.

    2008-07-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment employs ultra-cold solid-state detectors to search for rare events resulting from WIMP-nucleus scattering. An innovative detector packaging and readout system has been developed to meet the unusual combination of requirements for: low temperature, low radioactivity, low energy threshold, and large channel count. Features include use of materials with low radioactivity such as multi-layer KAPTON laminates for circuit boards; immunity to microphonic noise via a vacuum coaxial wiring design, manufacturability, and modularity. The detector readout design had to accommodate various electronic components which have to be operated in close proximity to the detector as well maintaining separate individual temperatures (ranging from 600 mK to 150 K) in order to achieve optimal noise performance. The paper will describe the general electrical, thermal, and mechanical designs of the CDMS readout system, as well as presenting the theoretical and measured performance of the detector readout channels.

  13. The Cryogenic AntiCoincidence detector for ATHENA: the progress towards the final pixel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macculi, Claudio; Piro, Luigi; Cea, Donatella; Colasanti, Luca; Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Gatti, Flavio; Bagliani, Daniela; Biasotti, Michele; Corsini, Dario; Pizzigoni, Giulio; Torrioli, Guido; Barbera, Marco; Mineo, Teresa; Perinati, Emanuele

    2014-07-01

    "The Hot and Energetic Universe" is the scientific theme approved by the ESA SPC for a Large mission to be flown in the next ESA slot (2028th) timeframe. ATHENA is a space mission proposal tailored on this scientific theme. It will be the first X-ray mission able to perform the so-called "Integral field spectroscopy", by coupling a high-resolution spectrometer, the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU), to a high performance optics so providing detailed images of its field of view (5' in diameter) with an angular resolution of 5" and fine energy-spectra (2.5eV@E<7keV). The X-IFU is a kilo-pixel array based on TES (Transition Edge Sensor) microcalorimeters providing high resolution spectroscopy in the 0.2-12 keV range. Some goals is the detection of faint and diffuse sources as Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) or galaxies outskirts. To reach its challenging scientific aims, it is necessary to shield efficiently the X-IFU instrument against background induced by external particles: the goal is 0.005 cts/cm^2/s/keV. This scientific requirement can be met by using an active Cryogenic AntiCoincidence (CryoAC) detector placed very close to X-IFU (~ 1 mm below). This is shown by our GEANT4 simulation of the expected background at L2 orbit. The CryoAC is a TES based detector as the X-IFU sharing with it thermal and mechanical interfaces, so increasing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the payload. It is a 2x2 array of microcalorimeter detectors made by Silicon absorber (each of about 80 mm^2 and 300 μm thick) and sensed by an Ir TES. This choice shows that it is possible to operate such a detector in the so-called athermal regime which gives a response faster than the X-IFU (< 30 μs), and low energy threshold (above few keV). Our consortium has developed and tested several samples, some of these also featured by the presence of Al-fins to efficiently collect the athermal phonons, and increased x-ray absorber area (up to 1 cm^2). Here the results of deep test

  14. Evaluation of Microcracking in Two Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Matrix Composite Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, A. J.

    2001-01-01

    Two graphite/epoxy cryogenic pressure vessels were evaluated for microcracking. The X-33 LH2 tank lobe skins were extensively examined for microcracks. Specimens were removed from the inner skin of the X-33 tank for tensile testing. The data obtained from these tests were used to model expected microcrack density as a function of stress. Additionally, the laminate used in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Composite Conformal, Cryogenic, Common Bulkhead, Aerogel-Insulated Tank (CBAT) was evaluated. Testing was performed in an attempt to predict potential microcracking during testing of the CBAT.

  15. The cryogenic bonding evaluation at the metallic-composite interface of a composite overwrapped pressure vessel with additional impact investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Eric A.

    A bonding evaluation that investigated the cryogenic tensile strength of several different adhesives/resins was performed. The test materials consisted of 606 aluminum test pieces adhered to a wet-wound graphite laminate in order to simulate the bond created at the liner-composite interface of an aluminum-lined composite overwrapped pressure vessel. It was found that for cryogenic applications, a flexible, low modulus resin system must be used. Additionally, the samples prepared with a thin layer of cured resin -- or prebond -- performed significantly better than those without. It was found that it is critical that the prebond surface must have sufficient surface roughness prior to the bonding application. Also, the aluminum test pieces that were prepared using a surface etchant slightly outperformed those that were prepared with a grit blast surface finish and performed significantly better than those that had been scored using sand paper to achieve the desired surface finish. An additional impact investigation studied the post impact tensile strength of composite rings in a cryogenic environment. The composite rings were filament wound with several combinations of graphite and aramid fibers and were prepared with different resin systems. The rings were subjected to varying levels of Charpy impact damage and then pulled to failure in tension. It was found that the addition of elastic aramid fibers with the carbon fibers mitigates the overall impact damage and drastically improves the post-impact strength of the structure in a cryogenic environment.

  16. A vertical accelerometer for cryogenics implementation in third-generation gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasconi, F.; Majorana, E.; Naticchioni, L.; Paoletti, F.; Perciballi, M.

    2014-01-01

    The design of third-generation gravitational-wave detectors requires dedicated sensors to perform very accurate measurements of the residual motion of mechanical components cooled down at cryogenic temperatures and accommodated close to the test masses. For this reason, we developed a vertical accelerometer prototype derived by the classical scheme widely used in Virgo seismic suspension control. Thermal contractions are the main concern when cooling down such a device and the calibration check at low temperature, in the absence of commercial sensors working in parallel, plays a crucial role. The accelerometer was conceived to be used at low frequencies (0.3-3 Hz) in a quite specific environment, where the noise produced by cryocoolers has to be suppressed. However, it can be easily operated over a wider frequency band, up to ˜100 Hz. The achieved sensitivity is ˜10-8 m s-2 below 3 Hz. During 2013, the device was successfully installed in the KAGRA cryostat, where it was tested at low temperatures down to 8 K and provided the measurement of vertical vibrational modes of the inner thermal shield.

  17. Characterization of zero-bias microwave diode power detectors at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Vincent; Fluhr, Christophe; Dubois, Benoît; Rubiola, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    We present the characterization of commercial tunnel diode low-level microwave power detectors at room and cryogenic temperatures. The sensitivity as well as the output voltage noise of the tunnel diodes is measured as functions of the applied microwave power. We highlight strong variations of the diode characteristics when the applied microwave power is higher than a few microwatts. For a diode operating at 4 K, the differential gain increases from 1000 V/W to about 4500 V/W when the power passes from -30 dBm to -20 dBm. The diode white noise floor is equivalent to a Noise Equivalent Power of 0.8 pW/Hz and 8 pW/Hz at 4 K and 300 K, respectively. Its flicker noise is equivalent to a relative amplitude noise power spectral density Sα(1 Hz) = - 120 dB/Hz at 4 K. Flicker noise is 10 dB higher at room temperature. PMID:27587142

  18. High-accuracy X-ray detector calibration based on cryogenic radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Müller, P.

    2010-06-01

    Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs) are absolute thermal detectors, based on the equivalence of electrical power and radiant power. Their core piece is a cavity absorber, which is typically made of copper to achieve a short response time. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESRs due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard X-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4 was applied to optimize its absorptance for photon energies of up to 60 keV. The measurement of the radiant power of monochromatized synchrotron radiation was achieved with relative standard uncertainties of less than 0.2 %, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative standard uncertainties below 0.3 %. For some silicon photodiodes, the photocurrent is not linear with the incident radiant power.

  19. Numerical Modeling, Thermomechanical Testing, and NDE Procedures for Prediction of Microcracking Induced Permeability of Cryogenic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noh, Jae; Whitcomb, John; Oh, Bongtaek; Lagoudas, Dimitris; Maslov, Konstatin; Ganpatyre, Atul; Kinra, Vikram

    2003-01-01

    Reusable Space Vehicles will include light cryogenic composite fuel tanks that must not leak excessively even after multiple launches. Damage in cryogenic composite fuel tanks induced during manufacturing and advanced by thermomechanical cycling can accelerate leakage of the propellant. Whether the leakage exceeds tolerable levels depends on many factors, including pressure gradients, microcrack density, other damage such as delamination, connectivity of the cracks, residual stresses from manufacture, service-induced stresses from thermal and mechanical loads, and composite lay-up. Although it is critical to experimentally characterize permeability during various thermal and mechanical load histories, optimal design depends on having analytical models that can predict the effect of various parameters on performance. Our broad goal is to develop such models that are experimentally validated by destructive and non-destructive evaluation means.

  20. Evaluation of neutron background in cryogenic Germanium target for WIMP direct detection when using reactor neutrino detector as neutron veto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ye; Lan, Jieqin; Bai, Ying; Gao, Weiwei

    2016-09-01

    A direct WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle) detector with a neutron veto system is designed to better reject neutrons. An experimental configuration is studied in the present paper: 984 Ge modules are placed inside a reactor neutrino detector. In order to discriminate between nuclear and electron recoil, both ionization and heat signatures are measured using cryogenic germanium detectors in this detection. The neutrino detector is used as a neutron veto device. The neutron background for the experimental design has been estimated using the Geant4 simulation. The results show that the neutron background can decrease to O(0.01) events per year per tonne of high purity Germanium. We calculate the sensitivity to spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering. An exposure of one tonne × year could reach a cross-section of about 2×10-11 pb.

  1. Carrier Transport and Related Effects in Detectors of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Sundqvist, Kyle Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is searching for weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPS), which could explain the dark matter problem in cosmology and particle physics. By simultaneously measuring signals from deposited charge and the energy in nonequilibrium phonons created by particle interactions in intrinsic germanium crystals at a temperature of 40 mK, a signature response for each event is produced. This response, combined with phonon pulse-shape information, allows CDMS to actively discriminate candidate WIMP interactions with nuclei from electromagnetic radioactive background which interacts with electrons. The challenges associated with these techniques are unique. Carrier scattering is dominated by the spontaneous emission of Luke-Neganov phonons due to zeropoint fluctuations of the lattice ions. Drift fields are maintained at only a few V/cm, else these emitted phonons would dominate the phonons of the original interaction. The dominant systematic issues with CDMS detectors are due to the effects of space charge accumulation. It has been an open question how space charge accrues, and by which of several potential recombination and ionization processes. In this work, we have simulated the transport of electrons and holes in germanium under CDMS conditions. We have implemented both a traditional Monte Carlo technique based on carrier energy, followed later by a novel Monte Carlo algorithm with scattering rates defined and sampled by vector momentum. This vector-based method provides for a full anisotropic simulation of carrier transport including free-fight acceleration with an anisotropic mass, and anisotropic scattering rates. With knowledge of steady state carrier dynamics as a function of applied field, the results of our Monte Carlo simulations allow us to make a wide variety of predictions for energy dependent processes for both electrons and holes. Such processes include carrier capture by charged impurities, neutral impurities, static

  2. Carrier Transport and Related Effects in Detectors of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundqvist, Kyle Michael

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is searching for weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPS), which could explain the dark matter problem in cosmology and particle physics. By simultaneously measuring signals from deposited charge and the energy in non-equilibrium phonons created by particle interactions in intrinsic germanium crystals at a temperature of 40 mK, a signature response for each event is produced. This response, combined with phonon pulse-shape information, allows CDMS to actively discriminate candidate WIMP interactions with nuclei from electromagnetic radioactive background which interacts with electrons. The challenges associated with these techniques are unique. Carrier scattering is dominated by the spontaneous emission of Luke-Neganov phonons due to zero-point fluctuations of the lattice ions. Drift fields are maintained at only a few V/cm, else these emitted phonons would dominate the phonons of the original interaction. The dominant systematic issues with CDMS detectors are due to the effects of space charge accumulation. It has been an open question how space charge accrues, and by which of several potential recombination and ionization processes. In this work, we have simulated the transport of electrons and holes in germanium under CDMS conditions. We have implemented both a traditional Monte Carlo technique based on carrier energy, followed later by a novel Monte Carlo algorithm with scattering rates defined and sampled by vector momentum. This vector-based method provides for a full anisotropic simulation of carrier transport including free-flight acceleration with an anisotropic mass, and anisotropic scattering rates. With knowledge of steady state carrier dynamics as a function of applied field, the results of our Monte Carlo simulations allow us to make a wide variety of predictions for energy dependent processes for both electrons and holes. Such processes include carrier capture by charged

  3. Particle tracking at cryogenic temperatures: the Fast Annihilation Cryogenic Tracking (FACT) detector for the AEgIS antimatter gravity experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, J.; Aghion, S.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Belov, A.; Bonomi, G.; Braunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Derking, H.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Ferragut, R.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Gninenko, S.; Haider, S.; Hogan, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E. J.; Kawada, J.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Krasnicky, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lehner, S.; Magnani, A.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Riccardi, C.; Røhne, O. M.; Rosenberger, S.; Rotondi, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Simon, M.; Spacek, M.; Strojek, I. M.; Subieta, M.; Testera, G.; Vaccarone, R.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.

    2015-02-01

    The AEgIS experiment is an interdisciplinary collaboration between atomic, plasma and particle physicists, with the scientific goal of performing the first precision measurement of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antimatter. The principle of the experiment is as follows: cold antihydrogen atoms are synthesized in a Penning-Malmberg trap and are Stark accelerated towards a moiré deflectometer, the classical counterpart of an atom interferometer, and annihilate on a position sensitive detector. Crucial to the success of the experiment is an antihydrogen detector that will be used to demonstrate the production of antihydrogen and also to measure the temperature of the anti-atoms and the creation of a beam. The operating requirements for the detector are very challenging: it must operate at close to 4 K inside a 1 T solenoid magnetic field and identify the annihilation of the antihydrogen atoms that are produced during the 1 μs period of antihydrogen production. Our solution—called the FACT detector—is based on a novel multi-layer scintillating fiber tracker with SiPM readout and off the shelf FPGA based readout system. This talk will present the design of the FACT detector and detail the operation of the detector in the context of the AEgIS experiment.

  4. Permeability and flammability study of composite sandwich structures for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubacz, Monika

    Fiber reinforced plastics offer advantageous specific strength and stiffness compared to metals and has been identified as candidates for the reusable space transportation systems primary structures including cryogenic tanks. A number of carbon and aramid fiber reinforced plastics have been considered for the liquid hydrogen tanks. Materials selection is based upon mechanical properties and containment performance (long and short term) and upon manufacturing considerations. The liquid hydrogen tank carries shear, torque, end load, and bending moment due to gusts, maneuver, take-off, landing, lift, drag, and fuel sloshing. The tank is pressurized to about 1.5 atmosphere (14.6psi or 0.1 MPa) differential pressure and on ascent maintains the liquid hydrogen at a temperature of 20K. The objective of the research effort into lay the foundation for developing the technology required for reliable prediction of the effects of various design, manufacturing, and service parameters on the susceptibility of composite tanks to develop excessive permeability to cryogenic fuels. Efforts will be expended on developing the materials and structural concepts for the cryogenic tanks that can meet the functional requirements. This will include consideration for double wall composite sandwich structures, with inner wall to meet the cryogenic requirements. The structure will incorporate nanoparticles for properties modifications and developing barriers. The main effort will be extended to tank wall's internal skin design. The main requirements for internal composite stack are: (1) introduction of barrier film (e.g. honeycomb material paper sheet) to reduce the wall permeability to hydrogen, (2) introduction of nanoparticles into laminate resin to prevent micro-cracking or crack propagation. There is a need to characterize and analyze composite sandwich structural damage due to burning and explosion. Better understanding of the flammability and blast resistance of the composite structures

  5. Mechanical properties of heterophase polymer blends of cryogenically fractured soy flour composite filler and poly(styrene-butadiene)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reinforcement effect of cryogenically fractured soy Flour composite filler in soft polymer was investigated in this study. Polymer composites were prepared by melt-mixing polymer and soy flour composite fillers in an internal mixer. Soy flour composite fillers were prepared by blending aqueous dis...

  6. Cryogenic deformation of high temperature superconductive composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Peter R.; Michels, William; Bingert, John F.

    2001-01-01

    An improvement in a process of preparing a composite high temperature oxide superconductive wire is provided and involves conducting at least one cross-sectional reduction step in the processing preparation of the wire at sub-ambient temperatures.

  7. Cryogenic optical measurements of 12-segment-bonded carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite mirror with support mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nakagawa, Takao; Onaka, Takashi; Enya, Keigo; Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Takaki, Junji; Haruna, Masaki; Kume, Masami; Ozaki, Tsuyoshi

    2008-03-10

    A 720 mm diameter 12-segment-bonded carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite mirror has been fabricated and tested at cryogenic temperatures. Interferometric measurements show significant cryogenic deformation of the C/SiC composite mirror, which is well reproduced by a model analysis with measured properties of the bonded segments. It is concluded that the deformation is due mostly to variation in coefficients of thermal expansion among segments. In parallel, a 4-degree-of-freedom ball-bearing support mechanism has been developed for cryogenic applications. The C/SiC composite mirror was mounted on an aluminum base plate with the support mechanism and tested again. Cryogenic deformation of the mirror attributed to thermal contraction of the aluminum base plate via the support mechanism is highly reduced by the support, confirming that the newly developed support mechanism is promising for its future application to large-aperture cooled space telescopes. PMID:18327285

  8. Hydrogen Permeability of Polymer Matrix Composites at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenoble, Ray W.; Gates, Thomas S

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents experimental methods and results of an ongoing study of the correlation between damage state and hydrogen gas permeability of laminated composite materials under mechanical strains and thermal loads. A specimen made from IM-7/977-2 composite material has been mechanically cycled at room temperature to induce microcrack damage. Crack density and tensile modulus were observed as functions of number of cycles. Damage development was found to occur most quickly in the off-axis plies near the outside of the laminate. Permeability measurements were made after 170,000 cycles and 430,000 cycles. Leak rate was found to depend on applied mechanical strain, crack density, and test temperature.

  9. Polymeric compositions and their method of manufacture. [forming filled polymer systems using cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, B. G.; Landel, R. F. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    Filled polymer compositions are made by dissolving the polymer binder in a suitable sublimable solvent, mixing the filler material with the polymer and its solvent, freezing the resultant mixture, and subliming the frozen solvent from the mixture from which it is then removed. The remaining composition is suitable for conventional processing such as compression molding or extruding. A particular feature of the method of manufacture is pouring the mixed solution slowly in a continuous stream into a cryogenic bath wherein frozen particles of the mixture result. The frozen individual particles are then subjected to the sublimation.

  10. Thermal/Mechanical Durability of Polymer-Matrix Composites in Cryogenic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Whitley, Karen S.; Grenoble, Ray W.; Bandorawalla, Tozer

    2003-01-01

    In order to increase the reliability of the next generation of space transportation systems, the mechanical behavior of polymeric-matrix composite (PMC) materials at cryogenic temperatures must be investigated. This paper presents experimental data on the residual mechanical properties of a carbon fiber polymeric composite, IM7/PETI-5 as a function of temperature and aging. Tension modulus and strength were measured at room temperature, -196 C, and -269 C on five different specimens ply lay-ups. Specimens were preconditioned with one set of coupons being isothermally aged for 576 hours at -184 C, in an unloaded state. Another set of corresponding coupons were mounted in constant strain fixtures such that a constant uniaxial strain was applied to the specimens for 576 hours at -184 C. A third set was mechanically cycled in tension at -184 C. The measured properties indicated that temperature, aging, and loading mode can all have significant influence on performance. Moreover, this influence is a strong function of laminate stacking sequence. Thermal-stress calculations based on lamination theory predicted that the transverse tensile ply stresses could be quite high for cryogenic test temperatures. Microscopic examination of the surface morphology showed evidence of degradation along the exposed edges of the material because of aging at cryogenic temperatures. ________________

  11. Lightweight thermally efficient composite feedlines for the space tug cryogenic propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spond, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    Six liquid hydrogen feedline design concepts were developed for the cryogenic space tug. The feedlines include composite and all-metal vacuum jacketed and nonvacuum jacketed concepts, and incorporate the latest technological developments in the areas of thermally efficient vacuum jacket end closures and standoffs, radiation shields in the vacuum annulus, thermal coatings, and lightweight dissimilar metal flanged joints. The feedline design concepts are evaluated on the basis of thermal performance, weight, cost, reliability, and reusability. Design concepts were proved in a subscale test program. Detail design was completed on the most promising composite feedline concept and an all-metal feedline. Three full scale curved composite feedlines and one all-metal feedline assembly were fabricated and subjected to a test program representative of flight hardware qualification. The test results show that composite feedline technology is fully developed. Composite feedlines are ready for space vehicle application and offer significant reduction in weights over the conventional all-metal feedlines presently used.

  12. A study of cooling time reduction of interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors using a high-emissivity coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sakakibara, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Chen, D.; Tokoku, C.; Uchiyama, T.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K.; Kimura, N.; Suzuki, T.; Koike, S.

    2014-01-29

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  13. Cryogenic Silicon Detectors with Implanted Contacts for the Detection of Visible Photons Using the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defay, X.; Mondragon, E.; Willers, M.; Langenkämper, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Münster, A.; Zöller, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Steiger, H.; Hitzler, F.; Bruhn, C.; Schönert, S.; Potzel, W.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-07-01

    There is a common need in astroparticle experiments such as direct dark matter detection, double-beta decay without emission of neutrinos [0 ν β β ] and coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments for light detectors with a very low energy threshold. By employing the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect, the thermal signal of particle interactions in a semiconductor absorber operated at cryogenic temperatures can be amplified by drifting the photogenerated electrons and holes in an electric field. This technology is not used in current experiments, in particular because of a reduction of the signal amplitude with time which is due to trapping of the charges within the absorber. We present here the first results of a novel type of Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect light detector with an electric field configuration designed to improve the charge collection within the semiconductor.

  14. Development of a cryogenic GaAs AC-coupled CTIA readout for far-infrared and submillimeter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Jun; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Hibi, Yasunori; Nakahashi, Misato; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Fujiwara, Mikio

    2008-07-01

    We have been developing cryogenic readout integrated circuits (ROICs) for sensitive detectors at far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths: The ROICs are constructed from SONY GaAs-JFETs, which have excellent performance even at less than 1 K. In addition, it is suitable device for ultra low background applications because of the extremely low gate leakage current. In the spring of 2008, we have designed and fabricated 4-ch AC-coupled capacitive transimpedance amplifiers and several basic digital circuits giving multiplex function for 32-element SIS photon detector array. The expected performance of the amplifier is as follows; open loop gain of >2000, power consumption <1.5 μW, and input referred noise ~ 1 μV/√Hz@1Hz. A summary of this 2008's experimental production and initial test results are presented in this paper.

  15. Cryogenic Silicon Detectors with Implanted Contacts for the Detection of Visible Photons Using the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defay, X.; Mondragon, E.; Willers, M.; Langenkämper, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Münster, A.; Zöller, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Steiger, H.; Hitzler, F.; Bruhn, C.; Schönert, S.; Potzel, W.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-02-01

    There is a common need in astroparticle experiments such as direct dark matter detection, double-beta decay without emission of neutrinos [0 ν β β ] and coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments for light detectors with a very low energy threshold. By employing the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect, the thermal signal of particle interactions in a semiconductor absorber operated at cryogenic temperatures can be amplified by drifting the photogenerated electrons and holes in an electric field. This technology is not used in current experiments, in particular because of a reduction of the signal amplitude with time which is due to trapping of the charges within the absorber. We present here the first results of a novel type of Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect light detector with an electric field configuration designed to improve the charge collection within the semiconductor.

  16. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Plates Under Ambient and Cryogenic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engberg, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Methods for structural health monitoring are now being assessed, especially in high-performance, extreme environment, safety-critical applications. One such application is for composite cryogenic fuel tanks. The work presented here attempts to characterize and investigate the feasibility of using imbedded piezoelectric sensors to detect cracks and delaminations under cryogenic and ambient conditions. Different types of excitation and response signals and different sensors are employed in composite plate samples to aid in determining an optimal algorithm, sensor placement strategy, and type of imbedded sensor to use. Variations of frequency and high frequency chirps of the sensors are employed and compared. Statistical and analytic techniques are then used to determine which method is most desirable for a specific type of damage and operating environment. These results are furthermore compared with previous work using externally mounted sensors. More work is needed to accurately account for changes in temperature seen in these environments and be statistically significant. Sensor development and placement strategy are other areas of further work to make structural health monitoring more robust. Results from this and other work might then be incorporated into a larger composite structure to validate and assess its structural health. This could prove to be important in the development and qualification of any 2nd generation reusable launch vehicle using composites as a structural element.

  17. Methods and Piezoelectric Imbedded Sensors for Damage Detection in Composite Plates Under Ambient and Cryogenic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engberg, Robert; Ooi, Teng K.

    2004-01-01

    New methods for structural health monitoring are being assessed, especially in high-performance, extreme environment, safety-critical applications. One such application is for composite cryogenic fuel tanks. The work presented here attempts to characterize and investigate the feasibility of using imbedded piezoelectric sensors to detect cracks and delaminations under cryogenic and ambient conditions. A variety of damage detection methods and different Sensors are employed in the different composite plate samples to aid in determining an optimal algorithm, sensor placement strategy, and type of imbedded sensor to use. Variations of frequency, impedance measurements, and pulse echoing techniques of the sensors are employed and compared. Statistical and analytic techniques are then used to determine which method is most desirable for a specific type of damage. These results are furthermore compared with previous work using externally mounted sensors. Results and optimized methods from this work can then be incorporated into a larger composite structure to validate and assess its structural health. This could prove to be important in the development and qualification of any 2" generation reusable launch vehicle using composites as a structural element.

  18. Inductively coupled plasma etching of HgCdTe IRFPAs detectors at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.; Sun, C. H.; Zhang, S.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; He, L.

    2016-05-01

    To fabricate various advanced structures with HgCdTe material, the Inductively Coupled Plasma enhanced Reactive Ion Etching system is indispensable. However, due to low damage threshold and complicated behaviors of mercury in HgCdTe, the lattice damage and induced electrical conversion is very common. According to the diffusion model during etching period, the mercury interstitials, however, may not diffuse deep into the material at cryogenic temperature. In this report, ICP etching of HgCdTe at cryogenic temperature was implemented. The etching system with cryogenic assembly is provided by Oxford Instrument. The sample table was cooled down to 123K with liquid nitrogen. The mask of SiO2 with a contact layer of ZnS functioned well at this temperature. The selectivity and etching velocity maintained the same as reported in the etching of room temperature. Smooth and clean surfaces and profiles were achieved with an optimized recipe.

  19. Thermoelectric infrared detectors with improved mechanical stability for the composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) far-infrared focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fettig, Rainer; Lakew, Brook; Brasunas, John C.; Crooke, Julie A.; Hakun, Claef F.; Orloff, Jon

    1998-09-01

    The Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument aboard the Cassini spacecraft en route to Saturn is a cryogenic spectrometer with far-infrared (FIR) and mid-infrared channels. The CIRS FIR focal plane, which covers the spectral range of 10 - 600 cm-1, consists of focusing optics and an output polarizer/analyzer that splits the output radiation according to polarization. The reflected and transmitted components are focused by concentrating cones onto thermoelectric detectors. These thermoelectric detectors consist of a gold black absorber on top of a gold foil that is welded to a thermoelement consisting of two semiconductor pyramids. After the detectors were integrated into the focal plane assembly and the CIRS instrument, the detectors proved to be extremely susceptible to two environmental survivability conditions: acoustics and airflow. Several changes were investigated to improve the integrity of the detectors including detector airflow geometry, structural changes to the detectors, and more intensive screening methods. The geometry of the air paths near the sensing elements was modified. Two structural modifications were implemented to improve the stability of the sensing elements. These were changes in the geometry of the thermoelectric pyramids by ion milling, and a change in the gold foil thickness. New screening methods, centrifuge and modulated force testing, were developed to select the most rugged detectors. Although several methods gave significant improvements to the detector's stability, the modification that allowed the detectors to meet the environmental survivability requirements was the change in the geometry of the air paths near the sensing elements.

  20. Zig-zag active-mirror laser with cryogenic Yb3+:YAG/YAG composite ceramics.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Hiroaki; Kawanaka, Junji; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Saiki, Taku; Imasaki, Kazuo; Fujita, Masayuki; Takeshita, Kenji; Ishii, Shinya; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2011-01-31

    We report on a novel amplifier configuration concept for a 10 kW laser system using a zig-zag optical path based on a cryogenic Yb:YAG Total-Reflection Active-Mirror (TRAM) laser. The laser material is a compact composite ceramic, in which three Yb:YAG TRAMs are combined in series to increase the output power. Output powers of up to 214 W with a slope efficiency of 63% have been demonstrated for CW operation, even at a quite low pump intensity of less than 170 W/cm2. Further scaling could achieve output powers of more than 10 kW. PMID:21369064

  1. Cryogenic Yb:YAG composite-thin-disk for high energy and average power amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Luis E; Lin, Hua; Calendron, Anne-Laure; Cankaya, Huseyin; Hemmer, Michael; Reichert, Fabian; Huang, W Ronny; Granados, Eduardo; Hong, Kyung-Han; Kärtner, Franz X

    2015-06-01

    A cryogenic composite-thin-disk amplifier with amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) rejection is implemented that overcomes traditional laser system problems in high-energy pulsed laser drivers of high average power. A small signal gain of 8 dB was compared to a 1.5 dB gain for an uncapped thin-disk without ASE mitigation under identical pumping conditions. A strict image relayed 12-pass architecture using an off-axis vacuum telescope and polarization switching extracted 100 mJ at 250 Hz in high beam quality stretched 700 ps pulses of 0.6-nm bandwidth. PMID:26030570

  2. Experimental results on the thermal contact resistance of G-10CR composites at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.E.; Mei, S.

    1999-07-01

    The composite material G-10CR, an epoxy resin laminate reinforced with glass filaments, is widely used in cryogenic structures, especially where thermal insulation is required. The thermal contact resistance, or its inverse, the thermal contact conductance, at a G-10CR/G-10CR interface has not previously been investigated at cryogenic temperatures. Consequently, an experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to permit measurements of the thermal contact conductance over a temperature range from 10 to 300 K, while enabling a controlled contact pressure to be applied. Such measurements for these composite materials indicated that the fiber orientation, plays a crucial role in determining the thermal contact conductance, which is greatest in the warp direction, where the glass fibers offer a high-thermal-conductance path for heat flow in parallel to the epoxy matrix. Typical results demonstrating the effect of fiber orientation on thermal contact conductance are displayed. The dimensionless contact conductance was shown to vary with dimensionless contact pressure with a power-law exponent near 0.28, in broad agreement with other data reported for graphite fiber composites.

  3. Ion detection with a cryogenic detector compared to a microchannel plate detector in MALDI TOF-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, W H; Frank, M; Labov, S; Westmacott, G; Zhong, F

    1999-06-29

    Detection of molecular ions in mass spectrometry is typically accomplished by an ion colliding with a surface and then amplifying the emitted secondary electrons. It is well established that the secondary electron yield decreases as the mass of the primary ion increases [1-3], thus limiting the detection efficiency of large molecular ions. One way around this limitation is to use secondary ion detectors because the emission efficiency of secondary ions does not seem to decrease for increasing primary ion mass [1]. However this technique has limitations in timing resolution because of the mass spread of the emitted secondary ions. To find other ways around high mass detection limitations it is important to understand existing mechanisms of detection and to explore alternative detector types. To this end, a superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector was used in measuring the secondary electron emission efficiency, se, for a MCP detector. STJ detectors are energy sensitive and do not rely on secondary emission to produce a signal. Using a linear MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer, a STJ detector is mounted directly behind the hole in an annular MCP detector. This mounting arrangement allows ions to be detected simultaneously by each detector. The STJ detector sits in a liquid helium cryostat and is operated at 1.3 K to minimize thermal noise (see [4,5] for more details). Primary ions passing through the center hole of the MCP detector collide with the 0.04 mm{sup 2} STJ surface and generate a detector-pulse that is approximately proportional to the ion's total energy. A mask with a small hole in it was placed in front of the MCP detector so that the MCP and STJ detectors have approximately the same effective active areas. The ion beam diameter near the MCP is over 2.5 cm (measured with a MCP-phosphorus screen detector) and the axial separation of the two detectors is about 4 mm. Both detectors were operated in pulse-counting mode and set to have the same effective

  4. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Bai, J; Li, J S; Qiao, J W; Wang, J; Feng, R; Kou, H C; Liaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites. PMID:27576728

  5. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bai, J.; Li, J. S.; Qiao, J. W.; Wang, J.; Feng, R.; Kou, H. C.; Liaw, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites. PMID:27576728

  6. Impedance-Based Structural Health Monitoring for Composite Laminates at Cryogenic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    One of the important ways of increasing the payload in a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) is to replace heavy metallic materials by lightweight composite laminates. Among various parts and systems of the RLV, this project focuses on tanks containing cryogenic fuel. Historically, aluminum alloys have been used as the materials to construct fuel tanks for launch vehicles. To replace aluminum alloys with composite laminates or honeycomb materials, engineers have to make sure that the composites are free of defects before, during, and after launch. In addition to robust design and manufacturing procedures, the performance of the composite structures needs to be monitored constantly.In recent years, the impedance-based health monitoring technique has shown its promise in many applications. This technique makes use of the special properties of smart piezoelectric materials to identify the change of material properties due to the nucleation and progression of damage. The piezoceramic patch serves as a sensor and an actuator simultaneously. The piezoelectric patch is bonded onto an existing structure or embedded into a new structure and electrically excited at high frequencies. The signature (impedance or admittance) is extracted as a function of the exciting frequency and is compared with the baseline signature of the healthy state. The damage is quantified using root mean square deviation (RMSD) in the impedance signatures with respect to the baseline signature. A major advantage of this technique is that the procedure is nondestructive in nature and does not perturb the properties and performance of the materials and structures. This project aims at applying the impedance-based nondestructive testing technique to the damage identification of composite laminates at cryogenic temperature.

  7. Thermal/Mechanical Response of a Polymer Matrix Composite at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Karen S.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2003-01-01

    In order for polymeric-matrix composites to be considered for use as structural materials in the next generation of space transportation systems, the mechanical behavior of these materials at cryogenic temperatures must be investigated. This paper presents experimental data on the residual mechanical properties of a carbon-fiber polymeric composite, IM7/PETI-5, both before and after aging. Both tension and compression modulus and strength were measured at room temperature, -196C, and -269 C on five different laminate configurations. One set of specimens was aged isothermally for 576 hours at -184 C in an unconstrained state. Another set of corresponding specimens was aged under constant uniaxial strain for 576 hours at -184 C. Based on the experimental data presented, it is shown that trends in stiffness and strength that result from changes in temperature are not always smooth and consistent. Moreover, it is shown that loading mode and direction are significant for both stiffness and strength, and aging at cryogenic temperature while under load can alter the mechanical properties of pristine, un-aged laminates made of IM7/PETI-5 material.

  8. Composite,Cryogenic, Conformal, Common Bulkhead, Aerogel-Insulated Tank (CBAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. K.; Kovach, M. P.; McMahon, W. M.; Finckenor, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the Composite, Cryogenic, Conformal, Common Bulkhead, Aerogel-insulated Tank (CBAT) Program is to evaluate the potential for using various new technologies in next generation Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs) through design, fabrication, and testing of a subscale system. The new technologies include polymer matrix composites (PMCs), conformal propellant storage, common bulkhead packaging, and aerogel insulation. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Thiokol Propulsion from Cordant Technologies are working together to develop a design and the processing methodologies which will allow integration of these technologies into a single structural component assembly. Such integration will significantly decrease subsystem weight and reduce shape, volume, and placement restrictions, thereby enhancing overall launch system performance. This paper/presentation focuses on the challenges related to materials and processes that were encountered and overcome during this program to date.

  9. Minimizing Superficial Thermal Injury Using Bilateral Cryogen Spray Cooling During Laser Reshaping of Composite Cartilage Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Jen; Cheng, Sally M.H.; Chiu, Lynn L.; Wong, Brian J.F.; Ting, Keen

    2014-01-01

    Composite cartilage grafts were excised from New Zealand rabbit ears. Flat composite grafts (of cartilage and overlying skin graft on both surfaces) were obtained from each ear and cut into a rectangle measuring 50 mm by 25 mm (x by y) with an average thickness of approximately 1.3 mm (z), skin included. Specimens were manually deformed with a jig and maintained in this new position during laser illumination. The composite cartilage grafts were illuminated on the concave surface with an Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm, 3 mm spot) at 10 W, 20 W, 30 W, 40 W, 50 W. Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) was applied to both exterior (convex) and interior (concave) surfaces of the tissue to reduce thermal injury to the grafts. CSC was delivered: (1) in controlled applications (cryogen released when surface reached 40°C, and (2) receiving only laser at above wattage, no CSC [representing the control group]. The specimens were maintained in a deformation for 15 minutes after illumination and serially examined for 14 days. The control group with no CSC caused injury to all specimens, ranging from minor to full thickness epidermal thermal injury. Although most levels of laser and CSC yielded a high degree of reshaping over an acute time period, after 14 days specimens exposed to 30 W, 40 W, 50 W retained shape better than those treated at 10 W and 20 W. The specimens exposed to 50 W with controlled CSC retained its new shape to the highest degree over all others, and thermal injury was minimal. In conclusion, combinations of laser and CSC parameters were effective and practical for the reshaping of composite cartilage grafts. Lasers Surg. PMID:18727025

  10. Cryogenic thermoelectric (QVD) detectors: Emerging technique for fast single-photon counting and non-dispersive energy characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulian, A.; Wood, K.; van Vechten, D.; Fritz, G.

    2004-09-01

    ''QVD'' detectors are based on thermoelectric heat-to-voltage (Q → V) conversion and digital (V → D) readout. We have devised and analyzed the performance of QVD detectors with several different sensor designs that enable use of high thermoelectric figure of merit samples, be they of thin film, bulk crystal, or whisker form. Our first QVD devices had the well-studied material Au-Fe as thin film sensors. More recently, we have confirmed the literature reports of substantially higher Seebeck coefficient at cryogenic temperatures in lanthanum (cerium) hexaborides. We have also investigated the kinetic properties of La(Ce)B6 crystals with different La-Ce ratios. Currently we are exploring prototype devices based on bulk single-crystalline sensors. These include a successfully tested candidate with a sharp-end hexaboride sensor and small-size bismuth absorber - a whisker prototype. In theory, QVD sensors are competitive with superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) and transition edge sensor (TES) devices in energy resolution ability. However, QVD sensors ought to be able to respond at very much faster rates than these competitors; the lanthanum-cerium hexaboride sensors are expected to reach rates of 100 MHz counting rates for UV/optical photons. In addition to traditional astrophysical applications, these detectors can be applied to the tasks of quantum computing and communication.

  11. An experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces for thermal radiation in cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2015-07-01

    In cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors, one of the most important issues is the fast cooling of their mirrors and keeping them cool during operation to reduce thermal noise. For this purpose, the correct estimation of thermal-radiation heat transfer through the pipe-shaped radiation shield is vital to reduce the heat load on the mirrors. However, the amount of radiation heat transfer strongly depends on whether the surfaces reflect radiation rays diffusely or specularly. Here, we propose an original experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces. This experiment has clearly shown that the examined diamond-like carbon-coated surface is specular. This result emphasizes the importance of suppressing the specular reflection of radiation in the pipe-shaped shield.

  12. Design and construction of a cryogenic distillation device for removal of krypton for liquid xenon dark matter detectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhou; Bao, Lei; Hao, Xihuan; Ju, Yonglin

    2014-01-01

    Liquid xenon (Xe) is one of the commendable detecting media for the dark matter detections. However, the small content of radioactive krypton-85 ((85)Kr) always exists in the commercial xenon products. An efficient cryogenic distillation system to remove this krypton (Kr) from commercial xenon products has been specifically designed, developed, and constructed in order to meet the requirements of the dark matter experiments with high- sensitivity and low-background. The content of krypton in regular commercial xenon products can be reduced from 10(-9) to 10(-12), with 99% xenon collection efficiency at maximum flow rate of 5 kg/h (15SLPM). The purified xenon gases produced by this distillation system can be used as the detecting media in the project of Panda X, which is the first dark matter detector developed in China. PMID:24517821

  13. Digital Signal Processors for Cryogenic High-Resolution X-Ray Detector Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Bechstein, S; Henning, W; Momayezi, M

    2003-01-01

    The authors are developing fast digital signal processors (DSPs) to read out superconducting high-resolution X-ray detectors with on-line pulse processing. For superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector read-out, the DSPs offer on-line filtering, rise time discrimination and pile-up rejection. Compared to analog pulse processing, DSP readout somewhat degrades the detector resolution, but improves the spectral purity of the detector response. They discuss DSP performance with the 9-channel STJ array for synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy.

  14. Cryogenic Property Measurements on Icy Compositions with Application to Solar System Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, C.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Barmatz, M.; Mitchell, K.

    2007-08-01

    grains). Post-synthesis microstructural characterization will be performed using Cryogenic Optical Microscopy integrating a cross-polarizer to analyze thin sections, and a Cryogenic Scanning Electron Microscope. Mechanical property measurements on solid specimens will be performed between 80 and 270 K with a cryogenically cooled Instron measurement system. Compression measurements will be conducted as a function of temperature, strain-rate, microstructural length scale and orientation. The time dependent viscous response will be measured by performing creep measurements over the same range of temperatures. Using low-frequency cyclic loading, the dissipation factor will be measured at frequencies approaching satellite orbital frequencies. We will report preliminary mechanical property measurements of Antarctic glacial specimens at cryogenic temperatures. Fluids. In order to improve our understanding of effusive cryovolcanism, the rheological properties of liquid and mixed (slurry) materials will be measured between 80 and 300 K using a cryogenically cooled Brookfield rotational rheometer. We will report preliminary measurements of the temperature dependence of the viscous response for several compositions in the Methanol-Water System. Also, we will describe an experiment designed to measure methane wetting on water ice. These experiments will be carried out in order to explore the effects of the presence of methane lakes on Titan's surface. We are developing the capability to investigate more complex materials relevant to surface processes on Titan, including methane-ethane phase studies, hydrocarbons such as acetylene and benzene, as well as tholins and clathrates, which should exhibit a range of rheological and mechanical properties from fast-moving fluids to glacial creep. Acknowledgements: Most of the research described in this presentation was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National

  15. The ITER pre-compression rings – A first in cryogenic composite technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rajainmaki, Hannu; Fanthome, John; Losasso, Marcello; Rodriguez, Jesus; Evans, David; Diaz, Victor

    2014-01-27

    The ITER Pre-Compression Rings represent one of the heaviest composite structures ever manufactured as a single piece and the largest - the outer diameter will be above 5.5 meters - intended for use in a cryogenic environment. With a cross section of 337 mm × 288 mm, each item will weigh more than 3,000 kg. A development program, based on filament wound and dry wound S2 glass unidirectional fibers, the latter processed by VARTM, was completed on one fifth scale rings, and these materials and techniques were shown to be satisfactory. The paper describes how a technology applied to build up primary structures of European launchers is being accommodated to produce the ITER Pre-Compression Rings, fulfilling its extremely challenging requirements. In addition, we will describe how the structural analysis is correlated with the test results of scaled down rings, as well as how the pre-compression rings’ manufacturing process will be qualified.

  16. Development of Low-Noise High Value Chromium Silicide Resistors for Cryogenic Detector Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Babu, Sachi; Monroy, Carlos; Darren, C.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extremely high sensitivity detectors, such as silicon bolometers are required in many NASA missions for detection of photons from the x-ray to the far infrared regions. Typically, these detectors are cooled to well below the liquid helium (LHe) temperature (4.2 K) to achieve the maximum detection performance. As photoconductors, they are generally operated with a load resistor and a pre-set bias voltage, which is then coupled to the input gate of a source-follower Field Effect Transistor (FET) circuit. It is imperative that the detector system signal to noise performance be limited by the noise of the detector and not by the noise of the external components. The load resistor value is selected to optimize the detector performance. These two criteria tend to be contradictory in that these detectors require load resistors in the hundreds of megaohms, which leads to a higher Johnson noise. Additionally, the physical size of the resistor must be small for device integration as required by such missions as the NASA High Resolution Airborne Wide-Band Camera (HAWC) instrument and the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera (SHARC) for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). We have designed, fabricated and characterized thin film resistors using a CrSi/TiW/Al metal system on optical quality quartz substrates. The resistor values range from 100 megaohms to over 650 megaohms and are Johnson noise limited at LHe temperatures. The resistor film is sputtered with a sheet resistance ranging from 300 ohms to 1600 ohms and the processing sequence developed for these devices allows for chemically fine tuning the sheet resistance in-situ. The wafer fabrication process was of sufficiently high yield (>80%) providing clusters of good resistors for integrated multiple detector channels, a very important feature in the assembly of these two instruments.

  17. Cryogenic-Compatible Winchester Connector Mount and Retaining System for Composite Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pontius, James; McGuffey, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    A connector retainer and mounting system has been designed to replace screw-mounting of Winchester connectors. Countersunk screws are normally used to secure connectors to structures, and to keep them from coming apart. These screws are normally put into threaded or through-holes in metallic structures. This unique retainer is designed such that integral posts keep the connector halves retained, and a groove permits a cable tie to be fastened around the retainer and composite tube, thus securing the connector to the structure. The system is compatible for use on cryogenic (and conventional) bonded composite tube assemblies. Screws and tapped/through-holes needed to retain and mount Winchester connectors cannot be used on blind-access composite tubes. This system allows for rapid installation, removal, low-molecular-outgassing materials, and particulate-free installation and removal. Installation and/or changes late in the integration, and test flow with limited access in a cleanroom environment are possible. No sanding or bonding is needed.

  18. Cryogenic detector development at LLNL: ultraviolet x-ray, gamma-ray and biomolecule spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Labov, S.E.; Frank, M.; le Grand, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    We are developing low-temperature detectors for optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and for biomolecular mass spectrometry. We present development work on these detectors and materials analysis and biomolecular mass spectrometry. We have measured thin-film Nb/Al/Al2O3/AlNb superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) X-ray detectors in the 0.2 to 1 keV band with a range of different junction sizes and aluminum film thicknesses. In one case, we have achieved the statistical limit to the energy resolution of 13 eV FWHM at 227 eV with an output count rate of 20,600 cts/s.

  19. Cryogenic Wide-Area Light Detectors for Neutrino and Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Domizio, S.; Bagni, R.; Battistelli, E. S.; Bellini, F.; Bucci, C.; Calvo, M.; Cardani, L.; Castellano, M. G.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; D'Addabbo, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Pinci, D.; Vignati, M.

    2014-09-01

    Large-mass arrays of bolometers proved to be good detectors for neutrinoless double beta decay (0DBD) and dark matter searches. CUORE and LUCIFER are bolometric 0DBD experiments that will start to take data in 2015 at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. The sensitivity of CUORE could be increased by removing the background due to particles, by detecting the small amount of Čerenkov light (100 eV) emitted by the s' signal and not by s. LUCIFER could be extended to detect also dark matter, provided that the background from / particles (100 eV of scintillation light) is discriminated from nuclear recoils of about 10 keV energy (no light). We have recently started to develop light detectors for CUORE, LUCIFER and similar bolometric experiments. The aim is to obtain detectors with an active area of (the face of bolometric crystals), operating at 10 mK, and with an energy resolution at the baseline below 20 eV RMS. We have chosen to develop phonon-mediated detectors with KID sensors. We are currently testing the first prototypes.

  20. Microscopic surface structure of C/SiC composite mirrors for space cryogenic telescopes.

    PubMed

    Enya, Keigo; Nakagawa, Takao; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Onaka, Takashi; Ozaki, Tuyoshi; Kume, Masami

    2007-04-10

    We report on the microscopic surface structure of carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite mirrors that have been improved for the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) and other cooled telescopes. The C/SiC composite consists of carbon fiber, silicon carbide, and residual silicon. Specific microscopic structures are found on the surface of the bare C/SiC mirrors after polishing. These structures are considered to be caused by the different hardness of those materials. The roughness obtained for the bare mirrors is 20 nm rms for flat surfaces and 100 nm rms for curved surfaces. It was confirmed that a SiSiC slurry coating is effective in reducing the roughness to 2 nm rms. The scattering properties of the mirrors were measured at room temperature and also at 95 K. No significant change was found in the scattering properties through cooling, which suggests that the microscopic surface structure is stable with changes in temperature down to cryogenic values. The C/SiC mirror with the SiSiC slurry coating is a promising candidate for the SPICA telescope. PMID:17384720

  1. An investigation into the impact of cryogenic environment on mechanical stresses in FRP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifo, O.; Basu, B.

    2015-07-01

    Fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are fast becoming a highly utilised engineering material for high performance applications due to their light weight and high strength. Carbon fibre and other high strength fibres are commonly used in design of aerospace structures, wind turbine blades, etc. and potentially for propellant tanks of launch vehicles. For the aforementioned fields of application, stability of the material is essential over a wide range of temperature particularly for structures in hostile environments. Many studies have been conducted, experimentally, over the last decade to investigate the mechanical behaviour of FRP materials at varying subzero temperature. Likewise, tests on aging and cycling effect (room to low temperature) on the mechanical response of FRP have been reported. However, a relatively lesser focused area has been the mechanical behaviour of FRP composites under cryogenic environment. This article reports a finite element method of investigating the changes in the mechanical characteristics of an FRP material when temperature based analysis falls below zero. The simulated tests are carried out using a finite element package with close material properties used in the cited literatures. Tensile test was conducted and the results indicate that the mechanical responses agree with those reported in the literature sited.

  2. Canister cryogenic system for cooling germanium semiconductor detectors in borehole and marine probes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boynton, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    High resolution intrinsic and lithium-drifted germanium gamma-ray detectors operate at about 77-90 K. A cryostat for borehole and marine applications has been designed that makes use of prefrozen propane canisters. Uses of such canisters simplifies cryostat construction, and the rapid exchange of canisters greatly reduces the time required to restore the detector to full holding-time capability and enhances the safety of a field operation where high-intensity 252Cf or other isotopic sources are used. A holding time of 6 h at 86 K was achieved in the laboratory in a simulated borehole probe in which a canister 3.7 cm diameter by 57 cm long was used. Longer holding times can be achieved by larger volume canisters in marine probes. ?? 1975.

  3. Design/Analysis of Metal/Composite Bonded Joints for Survivability at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoszyk, Andrew E.

    2004-01-01

    A major design and analysis challenge for the JWST ISM structure is the metal/composite bonded joints that will be required to survive down to an operational ultra-low temperature of 30K (-405 F). The initial and current baseline design for the plug-type joint consists of a titanium thin walled fitting (1-3mm thick) bonded to the interior surface of an M555/954-6 composite truss square tube with an axially stiff biased lay-up. Metallic fittings are required at various nodes of the truss structure to accommodate instrument and lift-point bolted interfaces. Analytical experience and design work done on metal/composite bonded joints at temperatures below liquid nitrogen are limited and important analysis tools, material properties, and failure criteria for composites at cryogenic temperatures are virtually nonexistent. Increasing the challenge is the difficulty in testing for these required tools and parameters at 30K. A preliminary finite element analysis shows that failure due to CTE mismatch between the biased composite and titanium or aluminum is likely. Failure is less likely with Invar, however an initial mass estimate of Invar fittings demonstrates that Invar is not an automatic alternative. In order to gain confidence in analyzing and designing the ISM joints, a comprehensive joint development testing program has been planned and is currently running. The test program is designed for the correlation of the analysis methodology, including tuning finite element model parameters, and developing a composite failure criterion for the effect of multi-axial composite stresses on the strength of a bonded joint at 30K. The testing program will also consider stress mitigation using compliant composite layers and potential strength degradation due to multiple thermal cycles. Not only will the finite element analysis be correlated to the test data, but the FEA will be used to guide the design of the test. The first phase of the test program has been completed and the

  4. Optimizing the design and analysis of cryogenic semiconductor dark matter detectors for maximum sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Pyle, Matt Christopher

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, we illustrate how the complex E- field geometry produced by interdigitated electrodes at alternating voltage biases naturally encodes 3D fiducial volume information into the charge and phonon signals and thus is a natural geometry for our next generation dark matter detectors. Secondly, we will study in depth the physics of import to our devices including transition edge sensor dynamics, quasi- particle dynamics in our Al collection fins, and phonon physics in the crystal itself so that we can both understand the performance of our previous CDMS II device as well as optimize the design of our future devices. Of interest to the broader physics community is the derivation of the ideal athermal phonon detector resolution and it's T3 c scaling behavior which suggests that the athermal phonon detector technology developed by CDMS could also be used to discover coherent neutrino scattering and search for non-standard neutrino interaction and sterile neutrinos. These proposed resolution optimized devices can also be used in searches for exotic MeV-GeV dark matter as well as novel background free searches for 8GeV light WIMPs.

  5. Damping characteristics of composite petal structure for an 8-m diameter telescope at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Alain C.; Romney, Bruce; Mihara, Roger

    2004-10-01

    Concerns have been raised in the engineering community about the potentially extremely low levels of structural damping in structures at cryogenic temperatures. Experiments conducted on material coupons have shown that material damping at those temperatures can be orders of magnitude lower than that at room temperature. Whether structural damping in built-up structures at those temperatures can be that low is unknown, but if it was, the telescope resonances could exacerbate microdynamics originating from the structure itself and residual vibrations propagating from the instrument module to the telescope. Since the effect of those vibrations might not be compensated for optically, the observatory might not meet its wavefront and jitter error budgets. The structural damping characteristics of built-up structures in the micrometer to nanometer regime and at cryogenic temperatures are to a large extent unknown. Characterization on structures traceable to future flight designs is therefore necessary to develop an understanding of these characteristics, as well as devise means to mitigate those effects. To address those concerns and to reduce the technical risks in these areas, Lockheed Martin tested the dynamics characteristics of its Single Petal Testbed (SPT) flight-like petal structure at full-scale, from room temperature down to -175C (98K). The SPT was designed by the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center and fabricated by Programmed Composites Inc. Significant changes in dynamics characteristics with temperature were observed, but primarily in mode shapes as opposed to modal frequencies and modal dampings. The modal damping remained fairly constant throughout the temperature range and, to the extent changes could be detected, the trends were more towards an increase than a decrease in damping at 98K, which was highly unexpected. A detailed analysis of these results extracted from dynamics tests conducted during the cool down portion of the last thermal cycle

  6. A cryogenic monitor system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter in the SLD detector

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.J.; Fox, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    This paper describes the monitoring electronics system design for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) portion of the SLD detector. This system measures temperatures and liquid levels inside the LAC cryostat and transfers the results over a fiber-optic serial link to an external monitoring computer. System requirements, unique design constraints, and detailed analog, digital and software designs are presented. Fault tolerance and the requirement for a single design to work in several different operating environments are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. High-precision CTE measurement of hybrid C/SiC composite for cryogenic space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; Yamada, N.; Imai, T.; Tange, Y.; Kaneda, H.; Katayama, H.; Kotani, M.; Maruyama, K.; Naitoh, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Onaka, T.; Suganuma, M.; Ozaki, T.; Kume, M.; Krödel, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents highly precise measurements of thermal expansion of a "hybrid" carbon-fiber reinforced silicon carbide composite, HB-Cesic® - a trademark of ECM, in the temperature region of ˜310-10 K. Whilst C/SiC composites have been considered to be promising for the mirrors and other structures of space-borne cryogenic telescopes, the anisotropic thermal expansion has been a potential disadvantage of this material. HB-Cesic® is a newly developed composite using a mixture of different types of chopped, short carbon-fiber, in which one of the important aims of the development was to reduce the anisotropy. The measurements indicate that the anisotropy was much reduced down to 4% as a result of hybridization. The thermal expansion data obtained are presented as functions of temperature using eighth-order polynomials separately for the horizontal (XY-) and vertical (Z-) directions of the fabrication process. The average CTEs and their dispersion (1σ) in the range 293-10 K derived from the data for the XY- and Z-directions were 0.805 ± 0.003 × 10-6 K-1 and 0.837 ± 0.001 × 10-6 K-1, respectively. The absolute accuracy and the reproducibility of the present measurements are suggested to be better than 0.01 × 10-6 K-1 and 0.001 × 10-6 K-1, respectively. The residual anisotropy of the thermal expansion was consistent with our previous speculation regarding carbon-fiber, in which the residual anisotropy tended to lie mainly in the horizontal plane.

  8. Cryogenic shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Richard D.; Magner, Thomas J.

    1992-07-01

    A magnetically operated shutter mechanism is provided that will function in cryogenic or cryogenic zero gravity environments to selectively block radiation such as light from passing through a window to a target object such as a mirror or detector located inside a cryogenic container such as a dewar. The mechanism includes a shutter paddle blade that is moved by an electromagnetically actuated torquing device between an open position where the target object is exposed to ambient radiation or light and a closed position where the shutter paddle blade shields the ambient radiation or light from the target object. The purpose of the shuttering device is to prevent the mirror or other target object from being directly exposed to radiation passing through the window located on the side wall of the dewar, thereby decreasing or eliminating any temperature gradient that would occur within the target object due to exposure to the radiation. A special nylon bearing system is utilized to prevent the device from binding during operation and the paddle blade is also thermally connected to a reservoir containing cryogen to further reduce the internal temperature.

  9. Mechanical performance of graphite and aramid-reinforced composites at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    The low thermal conductivity of graphite-reinforced epoxy laminates in the 77-4 K range combined with high strength and modulus suggests that it is possible to fabricate thermal isolation supports more efficient than those which use metals. This study details the effect of cryogenic temperatures on two types of graphite-reinforced epoxy-matrix laminates. One is fabricated with fibers of intermediate strength and intermediate modulus; the other is fabricated with a fiber of lower strength but high modulus. Results of tests on a composite laminate reinforced with an aramid fiber are also presented. The study evaluates the uniaxial longitudinal strength and moduli (6 ply), the uniaxial transverse strength and moduli (15 ply), uniaxial longitudinal and transeverse compressive strength (30 ply), and in-plane shear strength and moduli (45 degrees, 10 ply). Tables and graphs are included. The study confirms that off-the-shelf laminates developed for room-temperature service are viable engineering materials for use at 4 K.

  10. Cryogenic EBSD reveals structure of directionally solidified ice–polymer composite

    SciTech Connect

    Donius, Amalie E.; Obbard, Rachel W.; Burger, Joan N.; Hunger, Philipp M.; Baker, Ian; Doherty, Roger D.; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.

    2014-07-01

    Despite considerable research efforts on directionally solidified or freeze-cast materials in recent years, little fundamental knowledge has been gained that links model with experiment. In this contribution, the cryogenic characterization of directionally solidified polymer solutions illustrates, how powerful cryo-scanning electron microscopy combined with electron backscatter diffraction is for the structural characterization of ice–polymer composite materials. Under controlled sublimation, the freeze-cast polymer scaffold structure is revealed and imaged with secondary electrons. Electron backscatter diffraction fabric analysis shows that the ice crystals, which template the polymer scaffold and create the lamellar structure, have a-axes oriented parallel to the direction of solidification and the c-axes perpendicular to it. These results indicate the great potential of both cryo-scanning electron microscopy and cryo-electron backscatter diffraction in gaining fundamental knowledge of structure–property–processing correlations. - Highlights: • Cryo-SEM of freeze-cast polymer solution reveals an ice-templated structure. • Cryo-EBSD reveals the ice crystal a-axis to parallel the solidification direction. • The honeycomb-like polymer phase favors columnar ridges only on one side. • Combining cryo-SEM with EBSD links solidification theory with experiment.

  11. Sea Spray Aerosol Structure and Composition Using Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The composition and surface properties of atmospheric aerosol particles largely control their impact on climate by affecting their ability to uptake water, react heterogeneously, and nucleate ice in clouds. However, in the vacuum of a conventional electron microscope, the native surface and internal structure often undergo physicochemical rearrangement resulting in surfaces that are quite different from their atmospheric configurations. Herein, we report the development of cryogenic transmission electron microscopy where laboratory generated sea spray aerosol particles are flash frozen in their native state with iterative and controlled thermal and/or pressure exposures and then probed by electron microscopy. This unique approach allows for the detection of not only mixed salts, but also soft materials including whole hydrated bacteria, diatoms, virus particles, marine vesicles, as well as gel networks within hydrated salt droplets—all of which will have distinct biological, chemical, and physical processes. We anticipate this method will open up a new avenue of analysis for aerosol particles, not only for ocean-derived aerosols, but for those produced from other sources where there is interest in the transfer of organic or biological species from the biosphere to the atmosphere. PMID:26878061

  12. A Search for Low-Mass Dark Matter with the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search and the Development of Highly Multiplexed Phonon-Mediated Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, David Craig

    2012-06-01

    A wide variety of astrophysical observations indicate that approximately 85% of the matter in the universe is nonbaryonic and nonluminous. Understanding the nature of this "dark matter" is one of the most important outstanding questions in cosmology. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are a leading candidate for dark matter since they would be thermally produced in the early universe in the correct abundance to account for the observed relic density of dark matter. If WIMPs account for the dark matter, then rare interactions from relic WIMPs should be observable in terrestrial detectors. Recently, unexplained excess events in the DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT, and CRESST-II experiments have been interpreted as evidence of scattering from WIMPs with masses ˜10 GeV and spin-independent scattering cross sections of 10--41--10 --40 cm2. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) attempts to identify WIMP interactions using an array of cryogenic germanium and silicon particle detectors located at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. In this dissertation, data taken by CDMS II are reanalyzed using a 2 keV recoil energy threshold to increase the sensitivity to WIMPs with masses ˜10 GeV. These data disfavor an explanation for the DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT, and CRESST-II results in terms of spin-independent elastic scattering of WIMPs with masses ≲ 12 GeV, under standard assumptions. At the time of publication, they provided the strongest constraints on spin-independent elastic scattering from 5--9 GeV, ruling out previously unexplored parameter space. To detect WIMPs or exclude the remaining parameter space favored by the most popular models will ultimately require detectors with target masses ≳ 1 ton, requiring an increase in mass by more than two orders of magnitude over CDMS II. For cryogenic detectors such as CDMS, scaling to such large target masses will require individual detector elements to be fabricated more quickly and cheaply, while maintaining

  13. A search for low-mass dark matter with the cryogenic dark matter search and the development of highly multiplexed phonon-mediated particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Craig

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of astrophysical observations indicate that approximately 85% of the matter in the universe is nonbaryonic and nonluminous. Understanding the nature of this "dark matter" is one of the most important outstanding questions in cosmology. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are a leading candidate for dark matter since they would be thermally produced in the early universe in the correct abundance to account for the observed relic density of dark matter. If WIMPs account for the dark matter, then rare interactions from relic WIMPs should be observable in terrestrial detectors. Recently, unexplained excess events in the DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT, and CRESST-II experiments have been interpreted as evidence of scattering from WIMPs with masses ~10 GeV and spin-independent scattering cross sections of 10-41-10-40 cm2. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) attempts to identify WIMP interactions using an array of cryogenic germanium and silicon particle detectors located at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. In this dissertation, data taken by CDMS II are reanalyzed using a 2 keV recoil energy threshold to increase the sensitivity to WIMPs with masses ~10 GeV. These data disfavor an explanation for the DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT, and CRESST-II results in terms of spin-independent elastic scattering of WIMPs with masses ≲12 GeV, under standard assumptions. At the time of publication, they provided the strongest constraints on spin-independent elastic scattering from 5-9 GeV, ruling out previously unexplored parameter space. To detect WIMPs or exclude the remaining parameter space favored by the most popular models will ultimately require detectors with target masses ≳1 ton, requiring an increase in mass by more than two orders of magnitude over CDMS II. For cryogenic detectors such as CDMS, scaling to such large target masses will require individual detector elements to be fabricated more quickly and cheaply, while

  14. Neganov-Luke amplified cryogenic light detectors for the background discrimination in neutrinoless double beta decay search with TeO2 bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willers, M.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Gütlein, A.; Münster, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Roth, S.; Schönert, S.; Sivers, M. v.; Wawoczny, S.; Zöller, A.; Giuliani, A.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that Neganov-Luke amplified cryogenic light detectors with Transition Edge Sensor read-out can be applied for the background suppression in cryogenic experiments searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 130Te with TeO2 based bolometers. Electron and gamma induced events can be discriminated from α events by detecting the Cherenkov light produced by the β particles emitted in the decay. We use the Cherenkov light produced by events in the full energy peak of 208Tl and by events from a 147Sm source to show that at the Q-value of the neutrinoless double beta decay of 130Te (Qβ β = 2.53 MeV), a separation of e-/γ events from α events can be achieved on an event-by-event basis with practically no reduction in signal acceptance.

  15. Cryogenic Interlaminar Fracture Properties of Woven Glass/Epoxy Composite Laminates Under Mixed-Mode I/III Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masaya; Shindo, Yasuhide; Takeda, Tomo; Narita, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    We characterize the combined Mode I and Mode III delamination fracture behavior of woven glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite laminates at cryogenic temperatures. The eight-point bending plate (8PBP) tests were conducted at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) and liquid helium temperature (4 K) using a new test fixture. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was also performed to calculate the energy release rate distribution along the delamination front, and the delamination fracture toughnesses were evaluated for various mixed-mode I/III ratios. Furthermore, the microscopic examinations of the fracture surfaces were carried out with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the mixed-mode I/III delamination fracture mechanisms in the woven GFRP laminates at cryogenic temperatures were assessed. The fracture properties were then correlated with the observed characteristics.

  16. Cryogenic Infrared Reflectance Spectra of Organic Ices and Their Relevance to the Surface Composition of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curchin, John; Clark, R. N.; Hoefen, T. M.

    2006-09-01

    In order to properly interpret reflectance spectra of Titan's surface, laboratory spectra of candidate materials for comparative analysis is needed. Although the common cosmochemical species (H2O, CO2, CO, NH3, and CH4) are well represented in the spectroscopic literature, comparatively little reflectance work has been done on organics at cryotemperatures at visible to near infrared wavelengths. Measurement of reflectance is required for characterizing weak features not seen in transmittance. Such features may be important in remote sensing of planetary surfaces. The USGS Spectroscopy Laboratory uses Nicolet FT-IR and ASD field spectrometers in combination with cryogenic chambers to acquire reflectance spectra of organic ices at approximately 80-90 ºK in a wavelength range of 0.35 to 15.5 microns. This region encompasses the fundamental absorptions and many overtones and combinations of major organic molecules including those with hydrogen-carbon, carbon-carbon (single, double and triple bonds), carbon-oxygen, oxygen-hydrogen, carbon-nitrogen, and nitrogen-hydrogen bonds. Because most organic compounds belong to families with similar structure and composition, individual species identification within a narrow wavelength range may be ambiguous. Only by measuring spectral reflectance of the pure laboratory ices from the visible through the near and mid-infrared can absorption bands unique to each be observed, cataloged and compared to planetary reflectance data. We present here spectra of organic ices belonging to eight families, the alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, nitriles, amines, and cyanides. Many of these compounds are predicted to coat the surface of Titan and indeed, a number of atmospheric windows, particularly at 5 microns, have allowed their identification with VIMS (Clark et al., DPS 2006, this volume). The spectral properties of these materials have applications to other solar system surfaces and remote sensing of terrestrial

  17. Thermal-Mechanical Response of Cracked Satin Weave CFRP Composites at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Shindo, Y.; Narita, F.; Takeda, T.

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines the thermal-mechanical response of satin weave carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with internal and/or edge cracks subjected to uniaxial tension load at cryogenic temperatures. Cracks are considered to occur in the transverse fiber bundles and extend through the entire thickness of the fiber bundles. Two-dimentional generalized plane strain finite element models are developed to study the effects of residual thermal stresses and cracks on the mechanical behavior of CFRP woven laminates. A detailed examination of the Young's modulus and stress distributions near the crack tip is carried out which provides insight into material behavior at cryogenic temperatures.

  18. THERMAL-MECHANICAL RESPONSE OF CRACKED SATIN WEAVE CFRP COMPOSITES AT CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, S.; Shindo, Y.; Narita, F.; Takeda, T.

    2008-03-03

    This paper examines the thermal-mechanical response of satin weave carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with internal and/or edge cracks subjected to uniaxial tension load at cryogenic temperatures. Cracks are considered to occur in the transverse fiber bundles and extend through the entire thickness of the fiber bundles. Two-dimentional generalized plane strain finite element models are developed to study the effects of residual thermal stresses and cracks on the mechanical behavior of CFRP woven laminates. A detailed examination of the Young's modulus and stress distributions near the crack tip is carried out which provides insight into material behavior at cryogenic temperatures.

  19. Distributed sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel using Fiber-Bragg Gratings at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in laminate structure. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 2800 psi. This is done at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures using water and liquid nitrogen. The recorded response is compared with the response from conventional strain gauge also present on the vessel. Additionally, several vessels were tested that had been damaged to simulate different type of events, such as cut tow, delimitation and impact damage.

  20. Distributed Sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in laminate structure. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 2800 psi. This is done at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures using water and liquid nitrogen. The recorded response is compared with the response from conventional strain gauge also present on the vessel. Additionally, several vessels were tested that had been damaged to simulate different type of events, such as cut tow, delimitation and impact damage.

  1. Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Detection of Gamma Interactions in a Prototype Cryogenic Ge Detector of the EDELWEISS Collaboration for Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broniatowski, A.; Piro, M.-C.; Marnieros, S.; Bergé, L.; Dumoulin, L.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-07-01

    As a part of an R&D program to improve the sensitivity of its detectors to low-mass (<10 GeV) weakly interacting massive particles, the Edelweiss dark matter collaboration is developing cryogenic ionization-and-heat coplanar grid germanium detectors, operated in a high-bias mode where advantage is taken of the voltage-assisted amplification of the ionization signals for enhanced sensitivity to low-energy (detector, capable of sustaining collection voltages up to 180 V with a corresponding gain of 60 in the heat measurement channel for electron recoil interactions. Event populations are analyzed based on ionization and heat data and on computer modeling of the detector signals, and a tentative interpretation of the results for the heat resolution is presented, involving athermal ballistic phonon losses in the device with consequent fluctuations in the thermometer response to the energy deposit of a particle.

  2. Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Detection of Gamma Interactions in a Prototype Cryogenic Ge Detector of the EDELWEISS Collaboration for Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broniatowski, A.; Piro, M.-C.; Marnieros, S.; Bergé, L.; Dumoulin, L.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-07-01

    As a part of an R&D program to improve the sensitivity of its detectors to low-mass (<10 GeV) weakly interacting massive particles, the Edelweiss dark matter collaboration is developing cryogenic ionization-and-heat coplanar grid germanium detectors, operated in a high-bias mode where advantage is taken of the voltage-assisted amplification of the ionization signals for enhanced sensitivity to low-energy (detector, capable of sustaining collection voltages up to 180 V with a corresponding gain of 60 in the heat measurement channel for electron recoil interactions. Event populations are analyzed based on ionization and heat data and on computer modeling of the detector signals, and a tentative interpretation of the results for the heat resolution is presented, involving athermal ballistic phonon losses in the device with consequent fluctuations in the thermometer response to the energy deposit of a particle.

  3. Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Detection of Gamma Interactions in a Prototype Cryogenic Ge Detector of the EDELWEISS Collaboration for Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broniatowski, A.; Piro, M.-C.; Marnieros, S.; Bergé, L.; Dumoulin, L.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-02-01

    As a part of an R&D program to improve the sensitivity of its detectors to low-mass (< 10 GeV) weakly interacting massive particles, the Edelweiss dark matter collaboration is developing cryogenic ionization-and-heat coplanar grid germanium detectors, operated in a high-bias mode where advantage is taken of the voltage-assisted amplification of the ionization signals for enhanced sensitivity to low-energy (< a few keV) interactions. First results of \\upgamma calibration experiments are presented for a 200 g prototype detector, capable of sustaining collection voltages up to 180 V with a corresponding gain of 60 in the heat measurement channel for electron recoil interactions. Event populations are analyzed based on ionization and heat data and on computer modeling of the detector signals, and a tentative interpretation of the results for the heat resolution is presented, involving athermal ballistic phonon losses in the device with consequent fluctuations in the thermometer response to the energy deposit of a particle.

  4. Composition of a Cryogenic Sea Studied by the Titan Mare Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Stofan, E.; Trainer, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    The Titan Mare Explorer (TiME) mission that proposes to operate from the surface of Ligeia Mare (Fig. 1) is one of the finalists in the latest Discovery small mission competition. One of the TiME instruments is a Neutral Mass Spectrometer that would sample gas from a volatilized sample of this cryogenic sea. Although this Titan sea may be principally ethane (Cordier et al., 2009), the mixing ratios of methane, ethane, propane, and more complex hydrocarbons and nitriles in Ligeia Mare is unknown and their measurement is one of the motivations for this mission. We will describe the approach to securing these measurements including methods developed and tested to robustly sample the cryogenic fluid. Figure 1. Ligeia Mare (credit NASA/JPL). References: Cordier, D., Mousis, O., Lunine, J.I., Lavvas, P., and Vuiton, V. The Astrophysical Journal 707 (2009) L128.

  5. High Pressure Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Development Tests at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, David M.; Greene, Nathanael J.; Revilock, Duane; Sneddon, Kirk; Anselmo, Estelle

    2008-01-01

    Development tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of 2 COPV designs at cryogenic temperatures. This allows for risk reductions for critical components for a Gaseous Helium (GHe) Pressurization Subsystem for an Advanced Propulsion System (APS) which is being proposed for NASA s Constellation project and future exploration missions. It is considered an advanced system since it uses Liquid Methane (LCH4) as the fuel and Liquid Oxygen (LO2) as the oxidizer for the propellant combination mixture. To avoid heating of the propellants to prevent boil-off, the GHe will be stored at subcooled temperatures equivalent to the LO2 temperature. Another advantage of storing GHe at cryogenic temperatures is that more mass of the pressurized GHe can be charged in to a vessel with a smaller volume, hence a smaller COPV, and this creates a significant weight savings versus gases at ambient temperatures. The major challenge of this test plan is to verify that a COPV can safely be used for spacecraft applications to store GHe at a Maximum Operating Pressure (MOP) of 4,500 psig at 140R to 160R (-320 F to -300 F). The COPVs for these tests were provided by ARDE , Inc. who developed a resin system to use at cryogenic conditions and has the capabilities to perform high pressure testing with LN2.

  6. Measuring symmetry of implosions in cryogenic Hohlraums at the NIF using gated x-ray detectors (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Dixit, S.; Glenzer, S.; Kalantar, D.; Bradley, D.; Izumi, N.; Meezan, N.; Landen, O. L.; Callahan, D.; Weber, S. V.; Holder, J. P.; Glenn, S.; Edwards, M. J.; Bell, P.; Kimbrough, J.; Koch, J.; Prasad, R.; Suter, L.; Kilkenny, J.

    2010-10-15

    Ignition of imploding inertial confinement capsules requires, among other things, controlling the symmetry with high accuracy and fidelity. We have used gated x-ray imaging, with 10 {mu}m and 70 ps resolution, to detect the x-ray emission from the imploded core of symmetry capsules at the National Ignition Facility. The measurements are used to characterize the time dependent symmetry and the x-ray bang time of the implosion from two orthogonal directions. These measurements were one of the primary diagnostics used to tune the parameters of the laser and Hohlraum to vary the symmetry and x-ray bang time of the implosion of cryogenically cooled ignition scale deuterium/helium filled plastic capsules. Here, we will report on the successful measurements performed with up to 1.2 MJ of laser energy in a fully integrated cryogenics gas-filled ignition-scale Hohlraum and capsule illuminated with 192 smoothed laser beams. We will describe the technique, the accuracy of the technique, and the results of the variation in symmetry with tuning parameters, and explain how that set was used to predictably tune the implosion symmetry as the laser energy, the laser cone wavelength separation, and the Hohlraum size were increased to ignition scales. We will also describe how to apply that technique to cryogenically layered tritium-hydrogen-deuterium capsules.

  7. Measuring symmetry of implosions in cryogenic Hohlraums at the NIF using gated x-ray detectors (invited).

    PubMed

    Kyrala, G A; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D; Bradley, D; Izumi, N; Meezan, N; Landen, O L; Callahan, D; Weber, S V; Holder, J P; Glenn, S; Edwards, M J; Bell, P; Kimbrough, J; Koch, J; Prasad, R; Suter, L; Kline, J L; Kilkenny, J

    2010-10-01

    Ignition of imploding inertial confinement capsules requires, among other things, controlling the symmetry with high accuracy and fidelity. We have used gated x-ray imaging, with 10 μm and 70 ps resolution, to detect the x-ray emission from the imploded core of symmetry capsules at the National Ignition Facility. The measurements are used to characterize the time dependent symmetry and the x-ray bang time of the implosion from two orthogonal directions. These measurements were one of the primary diagnostics used to tune the parameters of the laser and Hohlraum to vary the symmetry and x-ray bang time of the implosion of cryogenically cooled ignition scale deuterium/helium filled plastic capsules. Here, we will report on the successful measurements performed with up to 1.2 MJ of laser energy in a fully integrated cryogenics gas-filled ignition-scale Hohlraum and capsule illuminated with 192 smoothed laser beams. We will describe the technique, the accuracy of the technique, and the results of the variation in symmetry with tuning parameters, and explain how that set was used to predictably tune the implosion symmetry as the laser energy, the laser cone wavelength separation, and the Hohlraum size were increased to ignition scales. We will also describe how to apply that technique to cryogenically layered tritium-hydrogen-deuterium capsules. PMID:21034014

  8. Cryogenic Pound Circuits for Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Wang, Rabi

    2006-01-01

    Two modern cryogenic variants of the Pound circuit have been devised to increase the frequency stability of microwave oscillators that include cryogenic sapphire-filled cavity resonators. The original Pound circuit is a microwave frequency discriminator that provides feedback to stabilize a voltage-controlled microwave oscillator with respect to an associated cavity resonator. In the present cryogenic Pound circuits, the active microwave devices are implemented by use of state-of-the-art commercially available tunnel diodes that exhibit low flicker noise (required for high frequency stability) and function well at low temperatures and at frequencies up to several tens of gigahertz. While tunnel diodes are inherently operable as amplitude detectors and amplitude modulators, they cannot, by themselves, induce significant phase modulation. Therefore, each of the present cryogenic Pound circuits includes passive circuitry that transforms the AM into the required PM. Each circuit also contains an AM detector that is used to sample the microwave signal at the input terminal of the high-Q resonator for the purpose of verifying the desired AM null at this point. Finally, each circuit contains a Pound signal detector that puts out a signal, at the modulation frequency, having an amplitude proportional to the frequency error in the input signal. High frequency stability is obtained by processing this output signal into feedback to a voltage-controlled oscillator to continuously correct the frequency error in the input signal.

  9. Optical Detection Of Cryogenic Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, Lynn M.

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system identifies leakage without requiring shutdown for testing. Proposed device detects and indicates leaks of cryogenic liquids automatically. Detector makes it unnecessary to shut equipment down so it can be checked for leakage by soap-bubble or helium-detection methods. Not necessary to mix special gases or other materials with cryogenic liquid flowing through equipment.

  10. Cryogenic Optical Performance of the Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) Flight Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losch, Patricia; Lyons, James J., III; Hagopian, John

    1998-01-01

    The CIRS half-meter diameter beryllium flight telescope's optical performance was tested at the instrument operating temperature of 170 Kelvin. The telescope components were designed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) but fabricated out of house and then assembled, aligned and tested upon receipt at GSFC. A 24 inch aperture cryogenic test facility utilizing a 1024 x 1024 CCD array was developed at GSFC specifically for this test. The telescope,s image quality (measured as encircled energy), boresight stability and focus stability were measured. The gold coated beryllium design exceeded the cold image performance requirement of 80% encircled energy within a 460 micron diameter circle.

  11. Cryogenic Optical Performance of the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) Flight Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losch, Patricia; Lyons, James J., III; Hagopian, John

    1998-01-01

    The CIRS half-meter diameter beryllium flight telescope's optical performance was tested at the instrument operating temperature of 170 Kelvin. The telescope components were designed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) but fabricated out of house and then assembled, aligned and tested upon receipt at GSFC. A 24 inch aperture cryogenic test facility utilizing a 1024 x 1024 CCD array was developed at GSFC specifically for this test. The telescope's image quality (measured as encircled energy), boresight stability and focus stability were measured. The gold coated beryllium design exceeded the image performance requirement of 80% encircled energy within a 432 microns diameter circle.

  12. Cryogenic (70K) measurement of an all-composite 2-meter diameter mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catanzaro, B.; Connell, S.; Mimovich, M.; Backovsky, S.; Williams, G.; Thomas, James A.; Barber, D.; Johnston, R.; Hylton, J.; Dodson, K.; Cohen, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Herschel Space observatory (formerly known as FIRST) consists of a 3.5 m space telescope. In order to develop lightweight telescope technology suitable for this mission, COI designed and fabricated aspherical, f/1 2 m aperture prototype primary mirror using solely carbon fiber reinforced polypmer (CFR) materials. To assess the performance of this technology, optical metrology of the mirror surface was performed from ambient to an intended operational temperature for IR-telescopes of 70K. Testing was performed horizontally in a cryogenic vacuum chamber at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC), Tennessee.

  13. FaceSheet Push-off Tests to Determine Composite Sandwich Toughness at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Herring, Helen M.

    2001-01-01

    A new novel test method, associated analysis, and experimental procedures are developed to investigate the toughness of the facesheet-to-core interface of a sandwich material at cryogenic temperatures. The test method is designed to simulate the failure mode associated with facesheet debonding from high levels of gas pressure in the sandwich core. The effects of specimen orientation are considered, and the results of toughness measurements are presented. Comparisons are made between room and liquid nitrogen (-196 C) test temperatures. It was determined that the test method is insensitive to specimen facesheet orientation and strain energy release rate increases with a decrease in the test temperature.

  14. Metallic Permeation Barrier for Cryogenic Composite Propellant Storage and Transfer Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, O.; Njuhovic, E.; Glode, S.; Persson, J.; Altstadt, V.

    2012-07-01

    Mass savings for cryogenic transfer and storage applications using fibre-reinforced polymers (FRP) is a key approach at MAGNA STEYR’s Aerospace division. The permeable nature of FRP materials requires an impermeable metallic barrier; its development forms the herein presented project. The described results are the outcome of a comprehensive two-dimensional (2-D) sample test programme defining the essential sub-processes of the metallisation before entering the three-dimensional (3- D) component test and furthermore the demonstrator verification phase.

  15. The Cryogenic AntiCoincidence Detector for the ATHENA X-IFU: Design Aspects by Geant4 Simulation and Preliminary Characterization of the New Single Pixel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macculi, C.; Argan, A.; D'Andrea, M.; Lotti, S.; Piro, L.; Biasotti, M.; Corsini, D.; Gatti, F.; Orlando, A.; Torrioli, G.

    2016-01-01

    The ATHENA observatory is the second large-class ESA mission, in the context of the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025, scheduled to be launched on 2028 at L2 orbit. One of the two planned focal plane instruments is the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU), which will be able to perform simultaneous high-grade energy spectroscopy and imaging over the 5 arcmin FoV by means of a kilo-pixel array of transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters, coupled to a high-quality X-ray optics. The X-IFU sensitivity is degraded by the particle background, induced by primary protons of both solar and cosmic rays' origin and secondary electrons. A Cryogenic AntiCoincidence (CryoAC) TES-based detector, located < 1 mm below the TES array, will allow the mission to reach the background level that enables its scientific goals. The CryoAC is a 4-pixel detector made of Silicon absorbers sensed by Iridium TESs. We currently achieve a TRL = 3-4 at the single-pixel level. We have designed and developed two further prototypes in order to reach TRL = 4. The design of the CryoAC has been also optimized using the Geant4 simulation tool. Here we will describe some results from the Geant4 simulations performed to optimize the design and preliminary test results from the first of the two detectors, 1 cm2 area, made of 65 Ir TESs.

  16. The Cryogenic AntiCoincidence Detector for the ATHENA X-IFU: Design Aspects by Geant4 Simulation and Preliminary Characterization of the New Single Pixel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macculi, C.; Argan, A.; D'Andrea, M.; Lotti, S.; Piro, L.; Biasotti, M.; Corsini, D.; Gatti, F.; Orlando, A.; Torrioli, G.

    2016-08-01

    The ATHENA observatory is the second large-class ESA mission, in the context of the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025, scheduled to be launched on 2028 at L2 orbit. One of the two planned focal plane instruments is the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU), which will be able to perform simultaneous high-grade energy spectroscopy and imaging over the 5 arcmin FoV by means of a kilo-pixel array of transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters, coupled to a high-quality X-ray optics. The X-IFU sensitivity is degraded by the particle background, induced by primary protons of both solar and cosmic rays' origin and secondary electrons. A Cryogenic AntiCoincidence (CryoAC) TES-based detector, located <1 mm below the TES array, will allow the mission to reach the background level that enables its scientific goals. The CryoAC is a 4-pixel detector made of Silicon absorbers sensed by Iridium TESs. We currently achieve a TRL = 3-4 at the single-pixel level. We have designed and developed two further prototypes in order to reach TRL = 4. The design of the CryoAC has been also optimized using the Geant4 simulation tool. Here we will describe some results from the Geant4 simulations performed to optimize the design and preliminary test results from the first of the two detectors, 1 cm2 area, made of 65 Ir TESs.

  17. CRYOGENICS IN BEPCII UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,L.; WANG,L.; LI,S.

    2002-07-22

    THIS PAPER PRESENTS A CRYOGENIC DESIGN FOR UPGRADING THE BEIJING ELECTRON POSITRON COLLIDER AT THE INSTITUTE OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS IN BEIJING. THE UPGRADE INVOLVES 3 NEW SUPERCONDUCTING FACILITIES, THE INTERACTION REGION QUADRUPOLE MAGNETS, THE DETECTOR SOLENOID MAGNETS AND THE SRF CAVITIES. FOR COOLING OF THESE DEVICES, A NEW CRYPLANT WITH A TOTAL CAPACITY OF 1.0KW AT 4.5K IS TO BE BUILT AT IHEP. AN INTEGRATED CRYOGENIC DESIGN TO FIT THE BEPCII CRYOGENIC LOADS WITH HIGH EFFICIENCY IS CARRIEDOUT USING COMPUTATIONAL PROCESS ANALYSIS SOFTWARE WITH THE EMPHASES ON ECONOMICS AND SAFETY IN BOTH CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF THE PLANT. THIS PAPER DESCRIBES THE CRYOGENIC CHARACTERISTICS OF EACH SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICE, THEIR COOLING SCHEMES AND THE OVERALL CRYOPLANT.

  18. Development and Performance of Detectors for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment with an Increased Sensitivity Based on a Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Beta Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, Donald D.; /Case Western Reserve U.

    2004-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) uses cryogenically-cooled detectors made of germanium and silicon in an attempt to detect dark matter in the form of Weakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The expected interaction rate of these particles is on the order of 1/kg/day, far below the 200/kg/day expected rate of background interactions after passive shielding and an active cosmic ray muon veto. Our detectors are instrumented to make a simultaneous measurement of both the ionization energy and thermal energy deposited by the interaction of a particle with the crystal substrate. A comparison of these two quantities allows for the rejection of a background of electromagnetically-interacting particles at a level of better than 99.9%. The dominant remaining background at a depth of {approx} 11 m below the surface comes from fast neutrons produced by cosmic ray muons interacting in the rock surrounding the experiment. Contamination of our detectors by a beta emitter can add an unknown source of unrejected background. In the energy range of interest for a WIMP study, electrons will have a short penetration depth and preferentially interact near the surface. Some of the ionization signal can be lost to the charge contacts there and a decreased ionization signal relative to the thermal signal will cause a background event which interacts at the surface to be misidentified as a signal event. We can use information about the shape of the thermal signal pulse to discriminate against these surface events. Using a subset of our calibration set which contains a large fraction of electron events, we can characterize the expected behavior of surface events and construct a cut to remove them from our candidate signal events. This thesis describes the development of the 6 detectors (4 x 250 g Ge and 2 x 100 g Si) used in the 2001-2002 CDMS data run at the Stanford Underground Facility with a total of 119 livedays of data. The preliminary results presented are based on the

  19. CERN-RD39 collaboration activities aimed at cryogenic silicon detector application in high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Eremin, Vladimir; Verbitskaya, Elena; Dehning, Bernd; Sapinski, Mariusz; Bartosik, Marcin R.; Alexopoulos, Andreas; Kurfürst, Christoph; Härkönen, Jaakko

    2016-07-01

    Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) made of silicon are new devices for monitoring of radiation environment in the vicinity of superconductive magnets of the Large Hadron Collider. The challenge of BLMs is extreme radiation hardness, up to 1016 protons/cm2 while placed in superfluid helium (temperature of 1.9 K). CERN BE-BI-BL group, together with CERN-RD39 collaboration, has developed prototypes of BLMs and investigated their device physics. An overview of this development-results of the in situ radiation tests of planar silicon detectors at 1.9 K, performed in 2012 and 2014-is presented. Our main finding is that silicon detectors survive under irradiation to 1×1016 p/cm2 at 1.9 K. In order to improve charge collection, current injection into the detector sensitive region (Current Injection Detector (CID)) was tested. The results indicate that the detector signal increases while operated in CID mode.

  20. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    SciTech Connect

    Reuben Walter Ogburn, IV

    2008-06-01

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single

  1. The Effect of the Variability in the Isotopic Composition of Gases on Top-Accuracy Cryogenic Temperature Standards and Remedies

    SciTech Connect

    Pavese, F.

    2006-04-27

    In the cryogenic range, temperature standards are based on the measurement of phase transitions of substances that are gaseous at room temperature. For total uncertainty budgets today approaching, for the most accurate realizations, 50 {mu}K, the effect of different isotopic compositions in the samples measured can become so large as to be the leading component of the total uncertainty budget.The variability of the isotopic composition is a well-known issue and is regularly monitored and reviewed by bodies such as the IUPAC. However, these data cover the whole spectrum of the variability observed on the earth. The actual variability that can be observed when buying commercial substances could be smaller to such an extent to alleviate or eliminate the practical problem, or could instead remain relevant. Only recently attention has been paid to the latter problem and the results were partially unexpected. This paper briefly reviews the modern analytical and thermal techniques, the resulting present knowledge and problems, and some recent solutions.

  2. Evaluation of cryogenic insulation materials and composites for use in nuclear radiation environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The following subjects are studied: (1) composite materials tests; (2) test of liquid level sensors and fission couples; (3) test of valve-seal materials; (4) boron epoxy composites; (5) radiation analysis of explosive materials and bifuels for RNS applications; and (6) test of thermal insulation.

  3. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two-tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogburn, Reuben Walter, IV

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identity of the dark matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a "halo" because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ("ZIP") detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, we must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detectors, and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the first two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as "Run 118," with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and "Run 119," with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). We have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single

  4. Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, J. E.; Wikstrom, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a comparative study of cryogenic insulation systems performed are presented. The key aspects of thermal insulation relative to cryogenic system design, testing, manufacturing, and maintenance are discussed. An overview of insulation development from an energy conservation perspective is given. Conventional insulation materials for cryogenic applications provide three levels of thermal conductivity. Actual thermal performance of standard multilayer insulation (MLI) is several times less than laboratory performance and often 10 times worse than ideal performance. The cost-effectiveness of the insulation system depends on thermal performance; flexibility and durability; ease of use in handling, installation, and maintenance; and overall cost including operations, maintenance, and life cycle. Results of comprehensive testing of both conventional and novel materials such as aerogel composites using cryostat boil-off methods are given. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems that operate at a soft vacuum level is the primary focus of this paper.

  5. Faraday rotation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticle polymer composite films at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Demir, Veysi; Gangopadhyay, Palash; Norwood, Robert A; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates the behavior of the Verdet constant for cobalt ferrite (CoFe₂O₄) nanoparticles polymer composite films at low temperatures using a 532 nm laser source. An experimental setup for Faraday rotation (FR) at low temperatures is introduced and FRs were measured at various temperatures. Verdet constants were deduced from the paramagnetic model for terbium gallium garnet glass where ~4× improvement was observed at 40° K for CoFe₂O₄ composite film. PMID:24787165

  6. Neutron detector using lithiated glass-scintillating particle composite

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Steven; Stephan, Andrew C.; Dai, Sheng; Im, Hee-Jung

    2009-09-01

    A neutron detector composed of a matrix of scintillating particles imbedded in a lithiated glass is disclosed. The neutron detector detects the neutrons by absorbing the neutron in the lithium-6 isotope which has been enriched from the natural isotopic ratio to a commercial ninety five percent. The utility of the detector is optimized by suitably selecting scintillating particle sizes in the range of the alpha and the triton. Nominal particle sizes are in the range of five to twenty five microns depending upon the specific scintillating particle selected.

  7. NASA Prototype All Composite Tank Cryogenic Pressure Tests to Failure with Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudolph J.; Pena, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This Paper will describe the results of pressurization to failure of 100 gallon composite tanks using liquid nitrogen. Advanced methods of health monitoring will be compared as will the experimental data to a finite element model. The testing is wholly under NASA including unique PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) based active vibration technology. Other technologies include fiber optics strain based systems including NASA AFRC technology, Acoustic Emission, Acellent smart sensor, this work is expected to lead to a practical in-Sutu system for composite tanks.

  8. Mechanical loss of a multilayer tantala/silica coating on a sapphire disk at cryogenic temperatures: Toward the KAGRA gravitational wave detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Eiichi; Craig, Kieran; Ishitsuka, Hideki; Martin, Iain W.; Mio, Norikatsu; Moriwaki, Shigenori; Murray, Peter G.; Ohashi, Masatake; Rowan, Sheila; Sakakibara, Yusuke; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Waseda, Kouichi; Watanabe, Kyohei; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2014-11-01

    We report the results of a new experimental setup to measure the mechanical loss of coating layers on a thin sapphire disk at cryogenic temperatures. Some of the authors previously reported that there was no temperature dependence of the mechanical loss from a multilayer tantala/silica coating on a sapphire disk, both before and after heat treatment, although some reports indicate that Ta2O5 and SiO2 layers annealed at 600 °C have loss peaks near 20 K. Since KAGRA—the Japanese gravitational-wave detector, currently under construction—will be operated at 20 K and have coated sapphire mirrors, it is very important to clarify the mechanical loss behavior of tantala/silica coatings around this temperature. We carefully investigate a tantala/silica-coated sapphire disk with the new setup, anneal the disk, and then investigate the annealed disk. We find that there is no distinct loss peak both before and after annealing under particular conditions. The mechanical loss for the unannealed disk at 20 K is about 5 ×10-4 , as previously reported, while that for the annealed disk is approximately 6.4 ×10-4 .

  9. Cryogenic exciter

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  10. Task I: Dark Matter Search Experiments with Cryogenic Detectors: CDMS-I and CDMS-II Task II: Experimental Study of Neutrino Properties: EXO and KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Blas; Gratta, Giorgio

    2013-08-30

    Dark Matter Search - During the period of performance, our group continued the search for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles or WIMPs. As a key member of the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) collaboration, we completed the CDMS II experiment which led the field in sensitivity for more than five years. We fabricated all detectors, and participated in detector testing and verification. In addition, we participated in the construction and operation of the facility at the Soudan Underground Laboratory and played key roles in the data acquisition and analysis. Towards the end of the performance period, we began operating the SuperCDMS Soudan experiment, which consists of 15 advanced Ge (9 kg) detectors. The advanced detector design called iZIP grew out of our earlier DOE Particle Detector R&D program which demonstrated the rejection of surface electrons to levels where they are no longer the dominant source of background. Our group invented this advanced design and these larger detectors were fabricated on the Stanford campus in collaboration with the SLAC CDMS group and the Santa Clara University group. The sensitivity reach is expected to be up to 5 times better than CDMS II after two years of operation. We will check the new limits on WIMPs set by XENON100, and we expect improved sensitivity for light mass WIMPs beyond that of any other existing experiment. Our group includes the Spokesperson for SuperCDMS and continues to make important contributions to improvements in the detector technology which are enabling the very low trigger thresholds used to explore the low mass WIMP region. We are making detailed measurements of the charge transport and trapping within Ge crystals, measuring the diffusive trapping distance of the quasiparticle excitations within the Al phonon collector fins on the detector surface, and we are contributing to the development of much improved detector Monte Carlos which are essential to guide the detector

  11. Monte Carlo Comparisons to a Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Detector with Low Transition-Edge-Sensor Transition Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Leman, S.W.; McCarthy, K.A.; Brink, P.L.; Cabrera, B.; Cherry, M.; Silva, E.Do Couto E; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Kim, P.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Pyle, M.; Resch, R.; Sadoulet, B.; Serfass, B.; Sundqvist, K.M.; Tomada, A.; Young, B.A.; /Santa Clara U.

    2012-06-05

    We present results on phonon quasidiffusion and Transition Edge Sensor (TES) studies in a large, 3-inch diameter, 1-inch thick [100] high purity germanium crystal, cooled to 50 mK in the vacuum of a dilution refrigerator, and exposed with 59.5 keV gamma-rays from an Am-241 calibration source. We compare calibration data with results from a Monte Carlo which includes phonon quasidiffusion and the generation of phonons created by charge carriers as they are drifted across the detector by ionization readout channels. The phonon energy is then parsed into TES based phonon readout channels and input into a TES simulator.

  12. Development of Lightweight Material Composites to Insulate Cryogenic Tanks for 30-Day Storage in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    A conceptual design was developed for an MLI system which will meet the design constraints of an ILRV used for 7- to 30-day missions. The ten tasks are briefly described: (1) material survey and procurement, material property tests, and selection of composites to be considered; (2) definition of environmental parameters and tooling requirements, and thermal and structural design verification test definition; (3) definition of tanks and associated hardware to be used, and definition of MLI concepts to be considered; (4) thermal analyses, including purge, evacuation, and reentry repressurization analyses; (5) structural analyses (6) thermal degradation tests of composite and structural tests of fastener; (7) selection of MLI materials and system; (8) definition of a conceptual MLI system design; (9) evaluation of nondestructive inspection techniques and definition of procedures for repair of damaged areas; and (10) preparation of preliminary specifications.

  13. Bolometric detector on the basis of single-wall carbon nanotube/polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Ali E.

    2008-10-01

    Infrared imaging sensors that operate without cryogenic cooling have the potential to provide the military or civilian users with infrared vision capabilities packaged in a camera of extremely small size, weight and power consumption. We present here the uncooled bolometric sensor on the basis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) polymer composite with enhanced sensitivity. The voltage responsivity of device working at room temperatures exceeds 150 V/W. The absorption coefficient of single-wall carbon nanotubes was increased by involving Forster type energy transfer from polymer film to dispersed SWNT. The temperature gradient of resistivity was substantially improved by chemical functionalization of SWNT.

  14. Vacuum jacketed composite propulsion feedlines for cryogenic launch and space vehicles, volume 1. [development of glass fiber composite for strength and protection from handling damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spond, D. E.; Laintz, D. J.; Hall, C. A.; Dulaigh, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Thin metallic liners that provide leak-free service in cryogenic propulsion systems are overwrapped with a glass-fiber composite that provides strength and protection from handling damage. The resultant tube is lightweight, strong, and has a low thermal flux. The inside commodity flow line and the outside vacuum jacket were fabricated using this method. Several types of vacuum jackets were fabricated and tested at operating temperatures from 294 to 21 K (+70 to minus 423 F) and operating pressure up to 69 N/cm2 (100 psi). The primary objective of the program was to develop vacuum jacket concepts, using previously developed concepts for the inner line. All major program objectives were met resulting in a design concept that is adaptable to a wide range of aerospace vehicle requirements. Major items of development included convolution of thin metallic sections up to 46 cm (18 in.) in diameter, design and fabrication of an extremely lightweight tension membrane concept for the vacuum jacket, and analytical tools that predict the failure mode and levels.

  15. ZnO/Ag nanowires composite film ultraviolet photoconductive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guodong, Yan; Minqiang, Wang; Zhi, Yang

    2015-08-01

    ZnO/Ag nanowires (NWs) film ultraviolet (UV) detector was fabricated by a simple and low-cost solution-processed method. In order to prepare this device, Ag NWs network was first spin-coated on glass substrate as a transparent conducting electrode, then ZnO NWs arrays were grown vertically on the Ag NWs network based on the hydrothermal method. This UV detector exhibited an excellent detection performance with large on/off ratio and short response time. Several process and working parameters were particularly investigated to analyze the relationship between structure and performance, which include growth time of ZnO NWs array, spin speed of Ag NWs network and working temperature. This UV photoconductive detector is based on two kinds of one-dimension nanomaterials, and it was regarded as a compromise between high performance with large area, low voltage and low cost. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61176056, 91323303, 91123019), the 111 Program (No. B14040), and the Open Projects from the Institute of Photonics and Photo-Technology, Provincial Key Laboratory of Photoelectronic Technology, Northwest University, China.

  16. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  17. Inspection of composite materials with an advanced ultrasonic flaw detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, W.

    The structures and shapes of the composite material products are described. Methods of ultrasonic wave detection are described. New damage detection equipment for laminate and honeycomb structures is addressed.

  18. MCP-based photodetectors for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmapalan, R.; Mane, A.; Byrum, K.; Demarteau, M.; Elam, J.; May, E.; Wagner, R.; Walters, D.; Xia, L.; Xie, J.; Zhao, H.

    2016-02-01

    The Argonne MCP-based photo detector is an offshoot of the Large Area Pico-second Photo Detector (LAPPD) project, wherein 6 cm × 6 cm sized detectors are made at Argonne National Laboratory. We have successfully built and tested our first detectors for pico-second timing and few mm spatial resolution. We discuss our efforts to customize these detectors to operate in a cryogenic environment. Initial plans aim to operate in liquid argon. We are also exploring ways to mitigate wave length shifting requirements and also developing bare-MCP photodetectors to operate in a gaseous cryogenic environment.

  19. Mass composition sensitivity of combined arrays of water cherenkov and scintillation detectors in the EeV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Javier G.; Engel, Ralph; Roth, Markus

    2016-02-01

    We consider an array of scintillation detectors combined with an array of water Cherenkov detectors designed to simultaneously measure the cosmic-ray primary mass composition and energy spectrum at energies around 1EeV. In this work we investigate the sensitivity to primary mass composition of such combined arrays. The water Cherenkov detectors are arranged in a triangular grid with fixed 750m spacing and the configuration of the scintillation detectors is changed to study the impact of different configurations on the sensitivity to mass composition. We show that the performance for composition determination can be compared favorably to that of fluorescence measurements after the difference in duty cycles is considered.

  20. Fatigue delamination growth in woven glass/epoxy composite laminates under mixed-mode II/III loading conditions at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tomo; Miura, Masaya; Shindo, Yasuhide; Narita, Fumio

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the cryogenic delamination growth behavior in woven glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite laminates under mixed-mode II/III fatigue loading. Fatigue delamination tests were conducted with six-point bending plate (6PBP) specimens at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) and liquid helium temperature (4 K), and the delamination growth rate data for various mixed-mode ratios of Modes II and III were obtained. The energy release rate was evaluated using the three-dimensional finite element method. In addition, the fatigue delamination growth mechanisms were characterized by scanning electron microscopic observations of the specimen fracture surfaces.

  1. Cryogenic optical testing of SiC mirrors for ASTRO-F and C/SiC composite mirrors for SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nakagawa, Takao; Enya, Keigo; Onaka, Takashi

    2004-06-01

    Light-weight mirrors are developed for two Japanese infrared astronomical missions, ASTRO-F and SPICA. ASTRO-F is scheduled for launch in 2005, while the target year for launch of SPICA is 2010. The mirrors of the ASTRO-F telescope are made of a sandwich-type silicon carbide (SiC) material, comprising porous core and CVD coat of SiC on the surface. Cryogenic measurements of the ASTRO-F primary mirror and telescope assembly were performed extensively. As for the SPICA telescope, which has an aperture of 3.5-m diameter, carbon-fiber-reinforced SiC (C/SiC composite), as well as SiC, is one of the promising candidates for mirror material. C/SiC composite spherical test mirrors of 160-mm diameter has recently been manufactured and tested. This paper presents the experimental results of the cryogenic performance obtained for the sandwich-type SiC mirrors and the C/SiC composite mirrors.

  2. Development of dual solid cryogens for high reliability refrigeration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caren, R. P.; Coston, R. M.

    1967-01-01

    High reliability solid cryogen refrigeration system consists of a container initially filled with a solid cryogen which is coupled thermally to an infrared detector by means of a link of high thermal conductivity extending from a heat exchanger within the cryogen container.

  3. Polymer-Ceramic Composite Materials for Pyroelectric Infrared Detectors: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D; Currie, J. R.; Penn, B. G.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.

    2007-01-01

    Ferroelectrics:Polymer composites can be considered an established substitute for conventional electroceramics and ferroelectric polymers. The composites have a unique blend of polymeric properties such as mechanical flexibility, high strength, formability, and low cost, with the high electro-active properties of ceramic materials. They have attracted considerable interest because of their potential use in pyroelectric infrared detecting devices and piezoelectric transducers. These flexible sensors and transducers may eventually be useful for their health monitoring applications for NASA crew launch vehicles and crew exploration vehicles being developed. In the light of many technologically important applications in this field, it is worthwhile to present an overview of the pyroelectric infrared detector theory, models to predict dielectric behavior and pyroelectric coefficient, and the concept of connectivity and fabrication techniques of biphasic composites. An elaborate review of Pyroelectric-Polymer composite materials investigated to date for their potential use in pyroelectric infrared detectors is presented.

  4. Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoyama, Kenji

    2002-02-01

    In this lecture we discuss the principle of method of cooling to a very low temperature, i.e. cryogenic. The "gas molecular model" will be introduced to explain the mechanism cooling by the expansion engine and the Joule-Thomson expansion valve. These two expansion processes are normally used in helium refrigeration systems to cool the process gas to cryogenic temperature. The reverse Carnot cycle will be discussed in detail as an ideal refrigeration cycle. First the fundamental process of liquefaction and refrigeration cycles will be discussed, and then the practical helium refrigeration system. The process flow of the system and the key components; -compressor, expander, and heat exchanger- will be discussed. As an example of an actual refrigeration system, we will use the cryogenic system for the KEKB superconducting RF cavity. We will also discuss the liquid helium distribution system, which is very important, especially for the cryogenic systems used in accelerator applications. 1 Principles of Cooling and Fundamental Cooling Cycle 2 Expansion engine, Joule-Thomson expansion, kinetic molecular theory, and enthalpy 3 Liquefaction Systems 4 Refrigeration Systems 5 Practical helium liquefier/refrigeration system 6 Cryogenic System for TRISTAN Superconducting RF Cavity

  5. Status Of Sorption Cryogenic Refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews sorption refrigeration. Developed for cooling infrared detectors, cryogenic research, and other advanced applications, sorption refrigerators have few moving parts, little vibration, and lifetimes of 10 years or more. Describes types of sorption stages, multistage and hybrid refrigeration systems, power requirements, cooling capacities, and advantages and disadvantages of various stages and systems.

  6. RHIC cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iarocci, M. A.; Brown, D.; Sondericker, J.; Wu, K. C.; Benson, J.; Farah, Y.; Lac, C.; Morgillo, A.; Nicoletti, A.; Quimby, E.; Rank, J.; Rehak, M.; Werner, A.

    2003-03-01

    An integrated helium cryogenic system was designed with the specific performance goal of cooling and refrigerating the cryogenic magnets to below their nominal operating temperature. These magnets make up the steering and focusing elements for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In addition to meeting the accelerator demands, reliability, flexibility, safety, and ease of operation were key considerations during the design phase of the project. The refrigerator, with a capacity of 25 kW at about 4 K, was originally designed to match the load for the Colliding Beam Accelerator Project. The existing refrigerator, along with its complimentary warm compressor system was reconfigured slightly to meet the cooling process cycle design for RHIC. The original VAX based process control system was also adapted for RHIC, and later expanded upon to integrate a new programmable logic controller based ring resident control system, hence forming a common system to monitor and control all cryogenic components.

  7. Cryogenics for the superconducting module test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Klebaner, A.L.; Theilacker, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    A group of laboratories and universities, with Fermilab taking the lead, are constructing a superconducting cryomodule test facility (SMTF) in the Meson Detector Building (MDB) area at Fermilab. The facility will be used for testing and validating designs for both pulsed and CW systems. A multi phase approach is taken to construct the facility. For the initial phase of the project, cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule will be supplied from the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. A cryogenic distribution system to supply cryogens from CTF to MDB is under construction. This paper describes plans, status and challenges of the initial phase of the SMTF cryogenic system.

  8. Cryogenically cooled detector pin mount

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Jr., William E; Chrisp, Michael P

    2014-06-03

    A focal plane assembly facilitates a molybdenum base plate being mounted to another plate made from aluminum. The molybdenum pin is an interference fit (press fit) in the aluminum base plate. An annular cut out area in the base plate forms two annular flexures.

  9. Development and characterization of a neutron detector based on a lithium glass-polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Kukharev, V.; Foster, A.; Meddeb, A.; Trivelpiece, C.; Ounaies, Z.; Jovanovic, I.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a neutron scintillation detector based on a Li-glass-polymer composite that utilizes a combination of pulse height and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) to achieve high gamma rejection. In contrast to fast neutron detection in a PSD medium, we combine two scintillating materials that do not possess inherent neutron/gamma PSD properties to achieve effective PSD/pulse height discrimination in a composite material. Unlike recoil-based fast neutron detection, neutron/gamma discrimination can be robust even at low neutron energies due to the high Q-value neutron capture on 6Li. A cylindrical detector with a 5.05 cm diameter and 5.08 cm height was fabricated from scintillating 1 mm diameter Li-glass rods and scintillating polyvinyltoluene. The intrinsic efficiency for incident fission neutrons from 252Cf and gamma rejection of the detector were measured to be 0.33% and less than 10-8, respectively. These results demonstrate the high selectivity of the detector for neutrons and provide motivation for prototyping larger detectors optimized for specific applications, such as detection and event-by-event spectrometry of neutrons produced by fission.

  10. Geometric optimization of a neutron detector based on a lithium glass-polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Trivelpiece, C.; Jovanovic, I.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the simulation and optimization of a neutron detector based on a glass-polymer composite that achieves high gamma rejection. Lithium glass is embedded in polyvinyltoluene in three geometric forms: disks, rods, and spheres. Optimal shape, geometric configuration, and size of the lithium glass fragments are determined using Geant4 simulations. All geometrical configurations maintain an approximate 7% glass to polymer mass ratio. Results indicate a 125-mm diameter as the optimal detector size for initial prototype design achieving a 10% efficiency for the thermalization of incident fission neutrons from 252Cf. The geometrical features of a composite detector are shown to have little effect on the intrinsic neutron efficiency, but a significant effect on the gamma rejection is observed. The sphere geometry showed the best overall performance with an intrinsic neutron efficiency of approximately 6% with a gamma rejection better than 10-7 for 280-μm diameter spheres. These promising results provide a motivation for prototype composite detector development based on the simulated designs.

  11. Spectroscopic micro-tomography of metallic-organic composites by means of photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichotka, M.; Jakubek, J.; Vavrik, D.

    2015-12-01

    The presumed capabilities of photon counting detectors have aroused major expectations in several fields of research. In the field of nuclear imaging ample benefits over standard detectors are to be expected from photon counting devices. First of all a very high contrast, as has by now been verified in numerous experiments. The spectroscopic capabilities of photon counting detectors further allow material decomposition in computed tomography and therefore inherently adequate beam hardening correction. For these reasons measurement setups featuring standard X-ray tubes combined with photon counting detectors constitute a possible replacement of the much more cost intensive tomographic setups at synchrotron light-sources. The actual application of photon counting detectors in radiographic setups in recent years has been impeded by a number of practical issues, above all by restrictions in the detectors size. Currently two tomographic setups in Czech Republic feature photon counting large-area detectors (LAD) fabricated in Prague. The employed large area hybrid pixel-detector assemblies [1] consisting of 10×10/10×5 Timepix devices have a surface area of 143×143 mm2 / 143×71,5 mm2 respectively, suitable for micro-tomographic applications. In the near future LAD devices featuring the Medipix3 readout chip as well as heavy sensors (CdTe, GaAs) will become available. Data analysis is obtained by a number of in house software tools including iterative multi-energy volume reconstruction.In this paper tomographic analysis of of metallic-organic composites is employed to illustrate the capabilities of our technology. Other than successful material decomposition by spectroscopic tomography we present a method to suppress metal artefacts under certain conditions.

  12. Composite Cryotank Technologies and Demonstration Project

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Composite Cryogenic Propellant Tank project will develop and ground demonstrate large-scale composite cryogenic propellant tanks applicable to heavy-lift launch vehicles, propellant depots, and...

  13. X-ray inspection of composite materials for aircraft structures using detectors of Medipix type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandejsek, I.; Jakubek, J.; Jakubek, M.; Prucha, P.; Krejci, F.; Soukup, P.; Turecek, D.; Vavrik, D.; Zemlicka, J.

    2014-05-01

    This work presents an overview of promising X-ray imaging techniques employed for non-destructive defectoscopy inspections of composite materials intended for the Aircraft industry. The major emphasis is placed on non-tomographic imaging techniques which do not require demanding spatial and time measurement conditions. Imaging methods for defects visualisation, delamination detection and porosity measurement of various composite materials such as carbon fibre reinforced polymers and honeycomb sendwiches are proposed. We make use of the new large area WidePix X-ray imaging camera assembled from up to 100 edgeless Medipix type detectors which is highly suitable for this type of measurements.

  14. CRYOGENIC MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-05-21

    A cryogenic magnet coil is described for generating magnetic fields of the order of 100,000 gauss with a minimum expenditure of energy lost in resistive heating of the coil inductors and energy lost irreversibly in running the coil refrigeration plant. The cryogenic coil comprises a coil conductor for generating a magnetic field upon energization with electrical current, and refrigeration means disposed in heat conductive relation to the coil conductor for cooling to a low temperature. A substantial reduction in the power requirements for generating these magnetic fields is attained by scaling the field generating coil to large size and particular dimensions for a particular conductor, and operating the coil at a particular optimum temperature commensurate with minimum overall power requirements. (AEC)

  15. LUX Cryogenics and Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Adam

    2012-10-01

    LUX is a new dark matter direct detection experiment being carried out at the Sanford Underground Research Facility, at the renewed Homestake mine in Lead, SD. The detector's large size supports effective internal shielding from natural radioactivity of the surrounding materials and environment. The LUX detector consists of a cylindrical vessel containing 350 kg of liquid xenon (LXe) cooled down and maintained at 175-K operating temperature using a novel cryogenic system. We report the efficiency of our thermosyphon-based cooling system, as well as the efficiency of a unique internal heat exchanger with standard gas phase purification using a heated getter, which allows for very high flow purification without requiring large cooling power. Such systems are required for multi-ton scale up.

  16. Comparison of Two Cryogenic Radiometers at NIST

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Jeanne M.; Livigni, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Two cryogenic radiometers from NIST, one from the Optical Technology Division and the other from the Optoelectronics Division, were compared at three visible laser wavelengths. For this comparison, each radiometer calibrated two photodiode trap detectors for spectral responsivity. The calibration values for the two trap detectors agreed within the expanded (k = 2) uncertainties. This paper describes the measurement and results of this comparison.

  17. Continuous-Reading Cryogen Level Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barone, F. E.; Fox, E.; Macumber, S.

    1984-01-01

    Two pressure transducers used in system for measuring amount of cryogenic liquid in tank. System provides continuous measurements accurate within 0.03 percent. Sensors determine pressure in liquid and vapor in tank. Microprocessor uses pressure difference to compute mass of cryogenic liquid in tank. New system allows continuous sensing; unaffected by localized variations in composition and density as are capacitance-sensing schemes.

  18. AMoRE: Collaboration for searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the isotope of {sup 100}Mo with the aid of {sup 40}Ca{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} as a cryogenic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Khanbekov, N. D.

    2013-09-15

    The AMoRE (Advanced Mo based Rare process Experiment) Collaboration is planning to employ {sup 40}Ca{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} single crystals as a cryogenic Scintillation detector for studying the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the isotope {sup 100}Mo. A simultaneous readout of phonon and scintillation signals is performed in order to suppress the intrinsic background. The planned sensitivity of the experiment that would employ 100 kg of {sup 40}Ca{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} over five years of data accumulation would be T{sub 1/2}{sup 0{nu}} = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 26} yr, which corresponds to values of the effective Majorana neutrino mass in the range of Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket m{sub {nu}} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket {approx} 0.02-0.06 eV.

  19. The cryogenic challenge: status of the KAGRA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaminio, Raffaele; KAGRA Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The KAGRA project is building a gravitational wave detector inside the Kamioka mine (Japan). The detector is based on a laser interferometer with arms 3 km in length. In addition to its underground location the detector will be characterized by its mirrors made of sapphire and operated at cryogenic temperature. This paper describes the status of the construction at the site and gives an overview of the developments ongoing to prepare the cryogenic operation.

  20. Constraints on Vesta's elemental composition: Fast neutron measurements by Dawn's gamma ray and neutron detector

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, David J; Peplowski, Patrick N; Prettyman, Thomas H; Feldman, William C; Bazell, David; Mittlefehldt, David W; Reedy, Robert C; Yamashita, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Surface composition information from Vesta is reported using fast neutron data collected by the gamma ray and neutron detector on the Dawn spacecraft. After correcting for variations due to hydrogen, fast neutrons show a compositional dynamic range and spatial variability that is consistent with variations in average atomic mass from howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites. These data provide additional compositional evidence that Vesta is the parent body to HED meteorites. A subset of fast neutron data having lower statistical precision show spatial variations that are consistent with a 400 ppm variability in hydrogen concentrations across Vesta and supports the idea that Vesta's hydrogen is due to long-term delivery of carbonaceous chondrite material. PMID:26074718

  1. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Joel

    2004-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is an experiment to search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The experiment initially was deployed at a shallow underground site, and is currently deployed at a deep underground site at the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. The detectors operate at cryogenic temperature, and are capable of distinguishing nuclear recoils from WIMP interactions from various backgrounds. The detectors are shielded from background by both active and passive elements. We will describe the components of the overall experiment, and focus on the novel data acquisition system that has been develop to control and monitor the experiment via the World Wide Web. Preliminary signals from the operation at Soudan will be discussed.

  2. Cryogenic materials selection, availability, and cost considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.

    1983-01-01

    The selection of structural alloys, composite materials, solder alloys, and filler materials for use in cryogenic models is discussed. In particular, materials testing programs conducted at Langley are described.

  3. Adapting British gas LNG facilities to varying gas compositions: The SELEXOL {reg_sign} process and cryogenic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Dewing, R.A.; Waring, S.; Burns, D.

    1996-12-31

    The original design of the UK National Transmission System (NTS) included five peak shave LNG storage sites strategically located around the country. They now form part of the Storage business that offers gas services to gas transportation companies-these include non British Gas companies as well as other parts of British Gas itself. At these sites, natural gas can be taken from the NTS at the request of the gas transportation companies, treated to cryogenic specifications, and liquefied for storage. LNG can then be re-vaporized and re-injected into the NTS or local mains as required. In this way the whole NTS does not have to be sized for peak rates and increases in demand can be met very quickly. Each peak-shave site was originally designed to handle natural gas with CO{sub 2} levels of up to 1 mol% and with ethane and higher hydrocarbon (C{sub 2}+) levels that needed only limited reduction. However, as different natural gas reservoirs came on stream in the early 1990`s the level of CO{sub 2} and C{sub 2}+ in the NTS network began to rise, and significant modifications were required at four of the five LNG sites. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. An anti-neutrino detector to monitor nuclear reactor's power and fuel composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglieri, M.; DeVita, R.; Firpo, G.; Neuhold, P.; Osipenko, M.; Piombo, D.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Taiuti, M.

    2010-05-01

    In this contribution, we present the expected performance of a new detector to measure the absolute energy-integrated flux and the energy spectrum of anti-neutrinos emitted by a nuclear power plant. The number of detected anti-neutrino is a direct measure of the power while from the energy spectrum is possible to infer the evolution in time of the core isotopic composition. The proposed method should be sensitive to a sudden change in the core burn-up as caused, for instance, by a fraudulent subtraction of plutonium. The detector, a 130×100×100 cm3 cube with 1 m3 active volume, made by plastic scintillator wrapped in thin Gd foils, is segmented in 50 independent optical channels read, side by side, by a pair of 3 in. photomultipliers. Anti-neutrino interacts with hydrogen contained in the plastic scintillator via the neutron inverse β- decay ( ν¯p→e+n). The high segmentation of the detector allows to reduce the background from other reactions by detecting independent hits for the positron, the two photons emitted in the e+e- annihilation and the neutron.

  5. CRYOGENIC DEWAR

    DOEpatents

    Chamberlain, W.H.; Maseck, H.E.

    1964-01-28

    This patent relates to a dewar for storing cryogenic gase and is of the type having aii inner flask surrounded by a vacuum jacket and having a vent spout through which evaporating gas escapes. Heretofore substantial gas loss has resulted from the radiation of heat towards the flask from the warmer outer elements of the dewar. In this invention, the mask is surrounded by a thermally conducting shield which is disposed in the vacuum space between the flask and the outer elements of the dewar. The shield contacts only the vent spout, which is cooled by the evaporating gas, and thus is maintained at a temperature very close to that of the flask itself. Accordingly, heat radiated toward the flask is intercepted and conducted to the evaporating gas rather than being re-radiated towards the hask. In a liquid helium dewar of typical configniration the mention reduces the boil-off rate by approximately one-half.(AEC)

  6. Advanced composite materials and processes for the manufacture of SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) superconducting magnets used at cryogenic temperatures in a high radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Presently, BNL work on superconducting magnets centers mainly on the development of 17 meter length dipoles for the Superconducting Super Collider Project, approved for construction at Waxahatchie, Texas and 9.7 meter dipoles and quadrupoles for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, a BNL project to start construction next year. This paper will discuss the role of composites in the manufacture of magnets, their operational requirements in cryogenic and radiation environments, and the benefits derived from their use. 13 figs.

  7. Collapsible Cryogenic Storage Vessel Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Collapsible cryogenic storage vessels may be useful for future space exploration missions by providing long-term storage capability using a lightweight system that can be compactly packaged for launch. Previous development efforts have identified an 'inflatable' concept as most promising. In the inflatable tank concept, the cryogen is contained within a flexible pressure wall comprised of a flexible bladder to contain the cryogen and a fabric reinforcement layer for structural strength. A flexible, high-performance insulation jacket surrounds the vessel. The weight of the tank and the cryogen is supported by rigid support structures. This design concept is developed through physical testing of a scaled pressure wall, and through development of tests for a flexible Layered Composite Insulation (LCI) insulation jacket. A demonstration pressure wall is fabricated using Spectra fabric for reinforcement, and burst tested under noncryogenic conditions. An insulation test specimens is prepared to demonstrate the effectiveness of the insulation when subject to folding effects, and to examine the effect of compression of the insulation under compressive loading to simulate the pressure effect in a nonrigid insulation blanket under the action atmospheric pressure, such as would be seen in application on the surface of Mars. Although pressure testing did not meet the design goals, the concept shows promise for the design. The testing program provides direction for future development of the collapsible cryogenic vessel concept.

  8. Cryogenic skirt support post

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, R. C.; Buckles, W. E.

    The cold masses of cryostats having vertical axes, like vertical pressure vessels, can be effectively supported by means of a cylindrical skirt that wraps concentrically around the cold mass. The skirt is a cryogenic support post connected at its upper end to the cold mass and at its lower end to the cryostat vacuum vessel. A heat intercept connection to an intermediate temperature refrigeration source can be employed to control heat leak. The support post consists of a composite; e.g. epoxy fibreglass, or cylinder with bolted or thermal interference fit end connections. The support post, being a single element support, simplifies cryostat assembly and alignment. The composite cylinder, with a relatively large diameter, lends itself to structural soundness and stability under both static and dynamic loading conditions. Its relatively long length and intermediate temperature heat intercept allows low heat leak to the cold mass. The details of the design of a cryogenic skirt support post as applied to a superconducting magnetic energy storage cryostat are presented. Included are support post fabrication, cryostat assembly, and predicted structural and thermal performance. Fabrication of and operational experiences with a prototype support post assembly are discussed.

  9. Effect of Matrix Modification on Interlaminar Shear Strength of Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Composites at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhixiong; Li, Jingwen; Huang, Chuanjun; Li, Laifeng

    In order to investigate the effect of the matrix variability on the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass fiber reinforced composites at 77K, three kinds of modifiers were employed to diethyl toluene diamine (DETD) cured diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) epoxy resin system. The woven glass fiber reinforced composites were fabricated by vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI). The ILSS at 77 K was studied and the results indicated that introduction of modifiers used in this study can enhance the ILSS of composite at 77 K. A maximum of 14.87% increase was obtained by addition of 10 wt% IPBE into the epoxy matrix. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the fracture mechanism and strengthening effect.

  10. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.