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Sample records for cryogenic devices

  1. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  2. Cryogenic vacuumm RF feedthrough device

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Genfa (Yorktown, VA); Phillips, Harry Lawrence (Hayes, VA)

    2008-12-30

    A cryogenic vacuum rf feedthrough device comprising: 1) a probe for insertion into a particle beam; 2) a coaxial cable comprising an inner conductor and an outer conductor, a dielectric/insulating layer surrounding the inner conductor, the latter being connected to the probe for the transmission of higher mode rf energy from the probe; and 3) a high thermal conductivity stub attached to the coaxial dielectric about and in thermal contact with the inner conductor which high thermal conductivity stub transmits heat generated in the vicinity of the probe efficiently and radially from the area of the probe and inner conductor all while maintaining useful rf transmission line characteristics between the inner and outer coaxial conductors.

  3. 21 CFR 882.4250 - Cryogenic surgical device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cryogenic surgical device. 882.4250 Section 882.4250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4250 Cryogenic surgical device. (a) Identification. A cryogenic...

  4. 21 CFR 882.4250 - Cryogenic surgical device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cryogenic surgical device. 882.4250 Section 882.4250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4250 Cryogenic surgical device. (a) Identification. A cryogenic...

  5. 21 CFR 882.4250 - Cryogenic surgical device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cryogenic surgical device. 882.4250 Section 882.4250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4250 Cryogenic surgical device. (a) Identification. A cryogenic...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4250 - Cryogenic surgical device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cryogenic surgical device. 882.4250 Section 882.4250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4250 Cryogenic surgical device. (a) Identification. A cryogenic...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4250 - Cryogenic surgical device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cryogenic surgical device. 882.4250 Section 882.4250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4250 Cryogenic surgical device. (a) Identification. A cryogenic...

  8. Cryogenic Propellant Management Device: Conceptual Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollen, Mark; Merino, Fred; Schuster, John; Newton, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Concepts of Propellant Management Devices (PMDs) were designed for lunar descent stage reaction control system (RCS) and lunar ascent stage (main and RCS propulsion) missions using liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid methane (LCH4). Study ground rules set a maximum of 19 days from launch to lunar touchdown, and an additional 210 days on the lunar surface before liftoff. Two PMDs were conceptually designed for each of the descent stage RCS propellant tanks, and two designs for each of the ascent stage main propellant tanks. One of the two PMD types is a traditional partial four-screen channel device. The other type is a novel, expanding volume device which uses a stretched, flexing screen. It was found that several unique design features simplified the PMD designs. These features are (1) high propellant tank operating pressures, (2) aluminum tanks for propellant storage, and (3) stringent insulation requirements. Consequently, it was possible to treat LO2 and LCH4 as if they were equivalent to Earth-storable propellants because they would remain substantially subcooled during the lunar mission. In fact, prelaunch procedures are simplified with cryogens, because any trapped vapor will condense once the propellant tanks are pressurized in space.

  9. Development of cryotribological theories & application to cryogenic devices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2001-03-12

    This is the final report of a research program on low-temperature friction and wear, primarily focused on development of cryotribological theories and application to cryogenic devices, particularly superconducting magnets.

  10. Verilog-A Device Models for Cryogenic Temperature Operation of Bulk Silicon CMOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akturk, Akin; Potbhare, Siddharth; Goldsman, Neil; Holloway, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Verilog-A based cryogenic bulk CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) compact models are built for state-of-the-art silicon CMOS processes. These models accurately predict device operation at cryogenic temperatures down to 4 K. The models are compatible with commercial circuit simulators. The models extend the standard BSIM4 [Berkeley Short-channel IGFET (insulated-gate field-effect transistor ) Model] type compact models by re-parameterizing existing equations, as well as adding new equations that capture the physics of device operation at cryogenic temperatures. These models will allow circuit designers to create optimized, reliable, and robust circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures.

  11. Cryogenic Probe Station for On-Wafer Characterization of Electrical Devices Damon Russell,1, a)

    E-print Network

    Weinreb, Sander

    Cryogenic Probe Station for On-Wafer Characterization of Electrical Devices Damon Russell,1, a mobility transistors (HEMTs) remain the lowest noise temperature devices for use in cryogenic microwave such as silicon, and as a result the yield of low noise InP devices, especially at cryogenic tempera- tures

  12. Method and apparatus of cryogenic cooling for high temperature superconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Xing; Mine, Susumu

    2005-02-15

    A method and apparatus for providing cryogenic cooling to HTS devices, in particular those that are used in high-voltage electric power applications. The method involves pressurizing liquid cryogen to above one atmospheric pressure to improve its dielectric strength, while sub-cooling the liquid cryogen to below its saturation temperature in order to improve the performance of the HTS components of the device. An apparatus utilizing such a cooling method consists of a vessel that contains a pressurized gaseous cryogen region and a sub-cooled liquid cryogen bath, a liquid cryogen heating coupled with a gaseous cryogen venting scheme to maintain the pressure of the cryogen to a value in a range that corresponds to optimum dielectric strength of the liquid cryogen, and a cooling system that maintains the liquid cryogen at a temperature below its boiling point to improve the performance of HTS materials used in the device.

  13. Screen Channel Liquid Acquisition Devices for Cryogenic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Kudlac, Maureen T.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an on-going project to study the application screen channel liquid acquisition devices to cryogenic propellant systems. The literature of screen liquid acquisition devices is reviewed for prior cryogenic experience. Test programs and apparatus are presented to study these devices. Preliminary results are shown demonstrating bubble points for 200 x 1400 wires per inch and 325 x 2300 wires per inch Dutch twill screens. The 200 x 1400 screen has a bubble point of 15.8 inches of water in isopropyl alcohol and 6.6 inches of water in liquid nitrogen. The 325 x 2300 screen has a bubble point of 24.5 inches of water in isopropyl alcohol, 10.7 inches of water in liquid nitrogen, and 1.83 inches of water in liquid hydrogen. These values are found to be in good agreement with the results reported in the literature.

  14. Charge dissipative dielectric for cryogenic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantor, Robin Harold (Inventor); Hall, John Addison (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) is disclosed comprising a pair of resistively shunted Josephson junctions connected in parallel within a superconducting loop and biased by an external direct current (dc) source. The SQUID comprises a semiconductor substrate and at least one superconducting layer. The metal layer(s) are separated by or covered with a semiconductor material layer having the properties of a conductor at room temperature and the properties of an insulator at operating temperatures (generally less than 100 Kelvins). The properties of the semiconductor material layer greatly reduces the risk of electrostatic discharge that can damage the device during normal handling of the device at room temperature, while still providing the insulating properties desired to allow normal functioning of the device at its operating temperature. A method of manufacturing the SQUID device is also disclosed.

  15. Inverted Outflow Ground Testing of Cryogenic Propellant Liquid Acquisition Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Hartwig, Jason W.; Rame, Enrique; McQuillen, John B.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently developing propulsion system concepts for human exploration. These propulsion concepts will require the vapor free acquisition and delivery of the cryogenic propellants stored in the propulsion tanks during periods of microgravity to the exploration vehicles engines. Propellant management devices (PMD's), such as screen channel capillary liquid acquisition devices (LAD's), vanes and sponges have been used for earth storable propellants in the Space Shuttle Orbiter and other spacecraft propulsion systems, but only very limited propellant management capability currently exists for cryogenic propellants. NASA is developing PMD technology as a part of their cryogenic fluid management (CFM) project. System concept studies have looked at the key factors that dictate the size and shape of PMD devices and established screen channel LADs as an important component of PMD design. Modeling validated by normal gravity experiments is examining the behavior of the flow in the LAD channel assemblies (as opposed to only prior testing of screen samples) at the flow rates representative of actual engine service (similar in size to current launch vehicle upper stage engines). Recently testing of rectangular LAD channels has included inverted outflow in liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. This paper will report the results of liquid oxygen testing compare and contrast them with the recently published hydrogen results; and identify the sensitivity of these results to flow rate and tank internal pressure.

  16. Inverted Outflow Ground Testing of Cryogenic Propellant Liquid Acquisition Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Hartwig, Jason W.; Rame, Enrique; McQuillen, John B.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently developing propulsion system concepts for human exploration. These propulsion concepts will require the vapor free acquisition and delivery of the cryogenic propellants stored in the propulsion tanks during periods of microgravity to the exploration vehicles engines. Propellant management devices (PMDs), such as screen channel capillary liquid acquisition devices (LADs), vanes and sponges have been used for earth storable propellants in the Space Shuttle Orbiter and other spacecraft propulsion systems, but only very limited propellant management capability currently exists for cryogenic propellants. NASA is developing PMD technology as a part of their cryogenic fluid management (CFM) project. System concept studies have looked at the key factors that dictate the size and shape of PMD devices and established screen channel LADs as an important component of PMD design. Modeling validated by normal gravity experiments is examining the behavior of the flow in the LAD channel assemblies (as opposed to only prior testing of screen samples) at the flow rates representative of actual engine service (similar in size to current launch vehicle upper stage engines). Recently testing of rectangular LAD channels has included inverted outflow in liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. This paper will report the results of liquid oxygen testing compare and contrast them with the recently published hydrogen results; and identify the sensitivity these results to flow rate and tank internal pressure.

  17. Modular cryogenic interconnects for multi-qubit devices

    SciTech Connect

    Colless, J. I.; Reilly, D. J.

    2014-11-15

    We have developed a modular interconnect platform for the control and readout of multiple solid-state qubits at cryogenic temperatures. The setup provides 74 filtered dc-bias connections, 32 control and readout connections with ?3 dB frequency above 5 GHz, and 4 microwave feed lines that allow low loss (less than 3 dB) transmission 10 GHz. The incorporation of a radio-frequency interposer enables the platform to be separated into two printed circuit boards, decoupling the simple board that is bonded to the qubit chip from the multilayer board that incorporates expensive connectors and components. This modular approach lifts the burden of duplicating complex interconnect circuits for every prototype device. We report the performance of this platform at milli-Kelvin temperatures, including signal transmission and crosstalk measurements.

  18. Modular cryogenic interconnects for multi-qubit devices.

    PubMed

    Colless, J I; Reilly, D J

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a modular interconnect platform for the control and readout of multiple solid-state qubits at cryogenic temperatures. The setup provides 74 filtered dc-bias connections, 32 control and readout connections with -3 dB frequency above 5 GHz, and 4 microwave feed lines that allow low loss (less than 3 dB) transmission 10 GHz. The incorporation of a radio-frequency interposer enables the platform to be separated into two printed circuit boards, decoupling the simple board that is bonded to the qubit chip from the multilayer board that incorporates expensive connectors and components. This modular approach lifts the burden of duplicating complex interconnect circuits for every prototype device. We report the performance of this platform at milli-Kelvin temperatures, including signal transmission and crosstalk measurements. PMID:25430132

  19. On-wafer, cryogenic characterization of ultra-low noise HEMT devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, J. J.; Laskar, J.; Szydlik, P.

    1995-01-01

    Significant advances in the development of high electron-mobility field-effect transistors (HEMT's) have resulted in cryogenic, low-noise amplifiers (LNA's) whose noise temperatures are within an order of magnitude of the quantum noise limit (hf/k). Further advances in HEMT technology at cryogenic temperatures may eventually lead to the replacement of maser and superconducting insulator superconducting front ends in the 1- to 100-GHz frequency band. Key to identification of the best HEMT's and optimization of cryogenic LNA's are accurate and repeatable device measurements at cryogenic temperatures. This article describes the design and operation of a cryogenic coplanar waveguide probe system for the characterization and modeling of advanced semiconductor transistors at cryogenic temperatures. Results on advanced HEMT devices are presented to illustrate the utility of the measurement system.

  20. Improved cryogenic coring device for sampling wetland soils

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C.; Knaus, R.M.

    1996-09-01

    This paper is the third in a series on the design and construction (Knaus 1986) and improvements (Knaus and Cahoon 1990) of a cryogenic soil-coring device (cryocorer). Freezing wetland soils in place during sampling eliminates compaction, dewatering, and loss of flocculent material at the water-sediment interface. The cryocorer is suitable for sampling soils of emergent marsh and mangrove forests as well as shallow water bottoms, although it has been used primarily for the former. A small-diameter frozen soil core minimizes disruption of the surface, can be evaluated immediately for overall quality, and can be used to measure soil profiles and subsample for further analysis. The cryocorer continues to be used in studies of wetland accretion and soil bulk density throughout the US. Concomitant with the increased use of the device, improvements in cryocorer design and application have occurred. Reported here are improvements in design that have been made since 1992 with references to wetland research in which the cryocorer has been used extensively.

  1. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-05-01

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

  2. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens. PMID:21547016

  3. Ultra-Low Noise HEMT Device Models: Application of On-Wafer Cryogenic Noise Analysis and Improved Parameter Extraction Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, J. J.; Hamai, M.; Nishimoto, M.; Laskar, J.; Szydlik, P.; Lai, R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant advances in the development of HEMT technology have resulted in high performance cryogenic low noise amplifiers whose noise temperatures are within an order of magnitude of the quantum noise limit. Key to the identification of optimum HEMT structures at cryogenic temperatures is the development of on-wafer noise and device parameter extraction techniques. Techniques and results are described.

  4. Spin-transfer switching of orthogonal spin-valve devices at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, L. Gopman, D. B.; Rehm, L.; Backes, D.; Wolf, G.; Kent, A. D.; Ohki, T.; Kirichenko, A. F.; Vernik, I. V.; Mukhanov, O. A.

    2014-05-07

    We present the quasi-static and dynamic switching characteristics of orthogonal spin-transfer devices incorporating an out-of-plane magnetized polarizing layer and an in-plane magnetized spin valve device at cryogenic temperatures. Switching at 12?K between parallel and anti-parallel spin-valve states is investigated for slowly varied current as well as for current pulses with durations as short as 200 ps. We demonstrate 100% switching probability with current pulses 0.6?ns in duration. We also present a switching probability diagram that summarizes device switching operation under a variety of pulse durations, amplitudes, and polarities.

  5. Do-It-Yourself Device for Recovery of Cryopreserved Samples Accidentally Dropped into Cryogenic Storage Tanks

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohini; Baranova, Ancha; Birerdinc, Aybike

    2012-01-01

    Liquid nitrogen is colorless, odorless, extremely cold (-196 °C) liquid kept under pressure. It is commonly used as a cryogenic fluid for long term storage of biological materials such as blood, cells and tissues 1,2. The cryogenic nature of liquid nitrogen, while ideal for sample preservation, can cause rapid freezing of live tissues on contact - known as 'cryogenic burn'2, which may lead to severe frostbite in persons closely involved in storage and retrieval of samples from Dewars. Additionally, as liquid nitrogen evaporates it reduces the oxygen concentration in the air and might cause asphyxia, especially in confined spaces2. In laboratories, biological samples are often stored in cryovials or cryoboxes stacked in stainless steel racks within the Dewar tanks1. These storage racks are provided with a long shaft to prevent boxes from slipping out from the racks and into the bottom of Dewars during routine handling. All too often, however, boxes or vials with precious samples slip out and sink to the bottom of liquid nitrogen filled tank. In such cases, samples could be tediously retrieved after transferring the liquid nitrogen into a spare container or discarding it. The boxes and vials can then be relatively safely recovered from emptied Dewar. However, the cryogenic nature of liquid nitrogen and its expansion rate makes sunken sample retrieval hazardous. It is commonly recommended by Safety Offices that sample retrieval be never carried out by a single person. Another alternative is to use commercially available cool grabbers or tongs to pull out the vials3. However, limited visibility within the dark liquid filled Dewars poses a major limitation in their use. In this article, we describe the construction of a Cryotolerant DIY retrieval device, which makes sample retrieval from Dewar containing cryogenic fluids both safe and easy. PMID:22617806

  6. Proton irradiation of a swept charge device at cryogenic temperature and the subsequent annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gow, J. P. D.; Smith, P. H.; Pool, P.; Hall, D. J.; Holland, A. D.; Murray, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that a room temperature proton irradiation may not be sufficient to provide an accurate estimation of the impact of the space radiation environment on detector performance. This is a result of the relationship between defect mobility and temperature, causing the performance to vary subject to the temperature history of the device from the point at which it was irradiated. Results measured using Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) irradiated at room temperature therefore tend to differ from those taken when the device was irradiated at a cryogenic temperature, more appropriate considering the operating conditions in space, impacting the prediction of in-flight performance. This paper describes the cryogenic irradiation, and subsequent annealing of an e2v technologies Swept Charge Device (SCD) CCD236 irradiated at -35.4°C with a 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence of 5.0 × 108 protons · cm-2. The CCD236 is a large area (4.4 cm2) X-ray detector that will be flown on-board the Chandrayaan-2 and Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope spacecraft, in the Chandrayaan-2 Large Area Soft X-ray Spectrometer and the Soft X-ray Detector respectively. The SCD is readout continually in order to benefit from intrinsic dither mode clocking, leading to suppression of the surface component of the dark current and allowing the detector to be operated at warmer temperatures than a conventional CCD. The SCD is therefore an excellent choice to test and demonstrate the variation in the impact of irradiation at cryogenic temperatures in comparison to a more typical room temperature irradiation.

  7. Cryogenic refrigeration requirements for superconducting insertion devices in a light source

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Green, Michael A.; Green, Michael A.

    2003-08-15

    This report discusses cryogenic cooling superconducting insertion devices for modern light sources. The introductory part of the report discusses the difference between wiggler and undulators and how the bore temperature may affect the performance of the magnets. The steps one would take to reduce the gap between the cold magnet pole are discussed. One section of the report is devoted to showing how one would calculate the heat that enters the device. Source of heat include, heat entering through the vacuum chamber, heating due to stray electrons and synchrotron radiation, heating due to image current on the bore, heat flow by conduction and radiation, and heat transfer into the cryostat through the magnet leads. A section of the report is devoted to cooling options such as small cryo-cooler and larger conventional helium refrigerators. This section contains a discussion as to when it is appropriate to use small coolers that do not have J-T circuits. Candidate small cryo-coolers are discussed in this section of the report. Cooling circuits for cooling with a conventional refrigerator are also discussed. A section of the report is devoted to vibration isolation and how this may affect how the cooling is attached to the device. Vibration isolation using straps is compared to vibration isolation using helium heat pipes. The vibration isolation of a conventional refrigeration system is also discussed. Finally, the cool down of an insertion device is discussed. The device can either be cooled down using liquid cryogenic nitrogen and liquid helium or by using the cooler used to keep the devices cold over the long haul.

  8. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  9. Thermal expansion of blood vessels in low cryogenic temperatures Part I: A new experimental device

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Rios, Jorge L.; Rabin, Yoed

    2006-01-01

    As part of the ongoing effort to study the mechanical behavior of biological material during cryopreservation processes, the current study focuses on thermal expansion of blood vessels at low cryogenic temperatures. The current paper (Part I) describes a new experimental device for thermal expansion measurements of blood vessels in typical conditions of vitrification, which are associated with rapid cooling rates. For validation purposes, the thermal strain of frozen arteries in the absence of cryoprotectants was measured, and found to be about 10% larger than that of polycrystalline water; this observation agrees with literature data. The companion paper (Part II) reports on experimental results of cryoprotectants permeated with VS55, DP6 and 7.05M DMSO at high cooling rates applicable to vitrification. PMID:16487503

  10. Design and demonstrate the performance of cryogenic components representative of space vehicles: Start basket liquid acquisition device performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to design, fabricate and test an integrated cryogenic test article incorporating both fluid and thermal propellant management subsystems. A 2.2 m (87 in) diameter aluminum test tank was outfitted with multilayer insulation, helium purge system, low-conductive tank supports, thermodynamic vent system, liquid acquisition device and immersed outflow pump. Tests and analysis performed on the start basket liquid acquisition device and studies of the liquid retention characteristics of fine mesh screens are discussed.

  11. NASA Flexible Screen Propellant Management Device (PMD) Demonstration With Cryogenic Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollen, Mark; Bakke, Victor; Baker, James

    2012-01-01

    While evaluating various options for liquid methane and liquid oxygen propellant management for lunar missions, Innovative Engineering Solutions (IES) conceived the flexible screen device as a potential simple alternative to conventional propellant management devices (PMD). An apparatus was designed and fabricated to test flexible screen devices in liquid nitrogen. After resolution of a number of issues (discussed in detail in the paper), a fine mesh screen (325 by 2300 wires per inch) spring return assembly was successfully tested. No significant degradation in the screen bubble point was observed either due to the screen stretching process or due to cyclic fatigue during testing. An estimated 30 to 50 deflection cycles, and approximately 3 to 5 thermal cycles, were performed on the final screen specimen, prior to and between formally recorded testing. These cycles included some "abusive" pressure cycling, where gas or liquid was driven through the screen at rates that produced differential pressures across the screen of several times the bubble point pressure. No obvious performance degradation or other changes were observed over the duration of testing. In summary, it is felt by the author that these simple tests validated the feasibility of the flexible screen PMD concept for use with cryogenic propellants.

  12. Thermal Integration of a Liquid Acquisition Device into a Cryogenic Feed System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, L. J.; Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Schunk, R. G.; Martin, A. K.; Eskridge, R. H.; Frenkel, A.; Grayson, G.; Pendleton, M. L.

    2011-01-01

    Primary objectives of this effort were to define the following: (1) Approaches for quantification of the accumulation of thermal energy within a capillary screen liquid acquisition device (LAD) for a lunar lander upper stage during periods of up to 210 days on the lunar surface, (2) techniques for mitigating heat entrapment, and (3) perform initial testing, data evaluation. The technical effort was divided into the following categories: (1) Detailed thermal modeling of the LAD/feed system interactions using both COMSOL computational fluid device and standard codes, (2) FLOW-3D modeling of bulk liquid to provide interfacing conditions for the LAD thermal modeling, (3) condensation conditioning of capillary screens to stabilize surface tension retention capability, and (4) subscale testing of an integrated LAD/feed system. Substantial progress was achieved in the following technical areas: (1) Thermal modeling and experimental approaches for evaluating integrated cryogen LAD/feed systems, at both the system and component levels, (2) reduced gravity pressure control analyses, (3) analytical modeling and testing for capillary screen conditioning using condensation and wicking, and (4) development of rapid turnaround testing techniques for evaluating LAD/feed system thermal and fluid integration. A comprehensive effort, participants included a diverse cross section of representatives from academia, contractors, and multiple Marshall Space Flight Center organizations.

  13. A New Device for Mechanical Testing of Blood Vessels at Cryogenic Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Rios, Jorge L.; Rabin, Yoed

    2008-01-01

    As part of an ongoing program to study the thermo-mechanical effects associated with cryopreservation via vitrification (vitreous in Latin means glassy), the current study focuses on the development of a new device for mechanical testing of blood vessels at cryogenic temperatures. This device is demonstrated on a bovine carotid artery model, permeated with the cryoprotectant cocktail VS55 and a reference solution of 7.05M DMSO, below glass transition. Results are also presented for crystallized specimens, in the absence of cryoprotectants. Results indicate that the elastic modulus of a specimen with no cryoprotectant, at about ?140°C (8.6°C and 15.5°C below the glass transition temperature of 7.05M DMSO and VS55, respectively), is 1038.8 ± 25.2 MPa, which is 8% and 3% higher than that of a vitrified specimen permeated with 7.05M DMSO and VS55, respectively. The elastic modulus of a crystallized material at ?50°C is lower by ~20% lower from that at ?140°C. PMID:18958183

  14. Precision control of thermal transport in cryogenic single-crystal silicon devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rostem, K.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F. A.; Crowe, E. J.; Denis, K. L.; Lourie, N. P.; Moseley, S. H.; Stevenson, T. R.; Wollack, E. J.

    2014-03-28

    We report on the diffusive-ballistic thermal conductance of multi-moded single-crystal silicon beams measured below 1?K. It is shown that the phonon mean-free-path ? is a strong function of the surface roughness characteristics of the beams. This effect is enhanced in diffuse beams with lengths much larger than ?, even when the surface is fairly smooth, 5–10?nm rms, and the peak thermal wavelength is 0.6??m. Resonant phonon scattering has been observed in beams with a pitted surface morphology and characteristic pit depth of 30?nm. Hence, if the surface roughness is not adequately controlled, the thermal conductance can vary significantly for diffuse beams fabricated across a wafer. In contrast, when the beam length is of order ?, the conductance is dominated by ballistic transport and is effectively set by the beam cross-sectional area. We have demonstrated a uniformity of ±8% in fractional deviation for ballistic beams, and this deviation is largely set by the thermal conductance of diffuse beams that support the micro-electro-mechanical device and electrical leads. In addition, we have found no evidence for excess specific heat in single-crystal silicon membranes. This allows for the precise control of the device heat capacity with normal metal films. We discuss the results in the context of the design and fabrication of large-format arrays of far-infrared and millimeter wavelength cryogenic detectors.

  15. Precision Control of Thermal Transport in Cryogenic Single-Crystal Silicon Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostem, K.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F. A.; Crowe, E. J.; Denis, K. L.; Lourie, N. P.; Moseley, S. H.; Stevenson, T. R.; Wollack, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the diffusive-ballistic thermal conductance of multi-moded single-crystal silicon beams measured below 1 K. It is shown that the phonon mean-free-path is a strong function of the surface roughness characteristics of the beams. This effect is enhanced in diffuse beams with lengths much larger than, even when the surface is fairly smooth, 510 nm rms, and the peak thermal wavelength is 0.6 microns. Resonant phonon scattering has been observed in beams with a pitted surface morphology and characteristic pit depth of 30 nm. Hence, if the surface roughness is not adequately controlled, the thermal conductance can vary significantly for diffuse beams fabricated across a wafer. In contrast, when the beam length is of order, the conductance is dominated by ballistic transport and is effectively set by the beam cross-sectional area. We have demonstrated a uniformity of +/-8% in fractional deviation for ballistic beams, and this deviation is largely set by the thermal conductance of diffuse beams that support the micro-electro-mechanical device and electrical leads. In addition, we have found no evidence for excess specific heat in single-crystal silicon membranes. This allows for the precise control of the device heat capacity with normal metal films. We discuss the results in the context of the design and fabrication of large-format arrays of far-infrared and millimeter wavelength cryogenic detectors.

  16. Liquid Acquisition Device Hydrogen Outflow Testing on the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Engineering Design Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Greg; Statham, Geoff; Garces, Rachel; Cartagena, Will

    2015-01-01

    As part of the NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Engineering Design Unit (EDU) testing with liquid hydrogen, screen-channel liquid acquisition devices (LADs) were tested during liquid hydrogen outflow from the EDU tank. A stainless steel screen mesh (325x2300 Dutch T will weave) was welded to a rectangular cross-section channel to form the basic LAD channel. Three LAD channels were tested, each having unique variations in the basic design. The LADs fed a common outflow sump at the aft end of the 151 cu. ft. volume aluminum tank, and included a curved section along the aft end and a straight section along the barrel section of the tank. Wet-dry sensors were mounted inside the LAD channels to detect when vapor was ingested into the LADs during outflow. The use of warm helium pressurant during liquid hydrogen outflow, supplied through a diffuser at the top of the tank, always led to early breakdown of the liquid column. When the tank was pressurized through an aft diffuser, resulting in cold helium in the ullage, LAD column hold-times as long as 60 minutes were achieved, which was the longest duration tested. The highest liquid column height at breakdown was 58 cm, which is 23 less than the isothermal bubble-point model value of 75 cm. This paper discusses details of the design, construction, operation and analysis of LAD test data from the CPST EDU liquid hydrogen test.

  17. Cryogenic shutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barney, Richard D. (inventor); Magner, Thomas J. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A magnetically operated shutter mechanism is provided that will function in cryogenic or cryogenic zero gravity environments to selectively block radiation such as light from passing through a window to a target object such as a mirror or detector located inside a cryogenic container such as a dewar. The mechanism includes a shutter paddle blade that is moved by an electromagnetically actuated torquing device between an open position where the target object is exposed to ambient radiation or light and a closed position where the shutter paddle blade shields the ambient radiation or light from the target object. The purpose of the shuttering device is to prevent the mirror or other target object from being directly exposed to radiation passing through the window located on the side wall of the dewar, thereby decreasing or eliminating any temperature gradient that would occur within the target object due to exposure to the radiation. A special nylon bearing system is utilized to prevent the device from binding during operation and the paddle blade is also thermally connected to a reservoir containing cryogen to further reduce the internal temperature.

  18. Cryogenic shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Richard D.; Magner, Thomas J.

    1992-07-01

    A magnetically operated shutter mechanism is provided that will function in cryogenic or cryogenic zero gravity environments to selectively block radiation such as light from passing through a window to a target object such as a mirror or detector located inside a cryogenic container such as a dewar. The mechanism includes a shutter paddle blade that is moved by an electromagnetically actuated torquing device between an open position where the target object is exposed to ambient radiation or light and a closed position where the shutter paddle blade shields the ambient radiation or light from the target object. The purpose of the shuttering device is to prevent the mirror or other target object from being directly exposed to radiation passing through the window located on the side wall of the dewar, thereby decreasing or eliminating any temperature gradient that would occur within the target object due to exposure to the radiation. A special nylon bearing system is utilized to prevent the device from binding during operation and the paddle blade is also thermally connected to a reservoir containing cryogen to further reduce the internal temperature.

  19. Cryogenic on-chip multiplexer for the study of quantum transport in 256 split-gate devices

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Taie, H. Kelly, M. J.; Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE ; Smith, L. W.; Xu, B.; Griffiths, J. P.; Beere, H. E.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Smith, C. G.; See, P.

    2013-06-17

    We present a multiplexing scheme for the measurement of large numbers of mesoscopic devices in cryogenic systems. The multiplexer is used to contact an array of 256 split gates on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, in which each split gate can be measured individually. The low-temperature conductance of split-gate devices is governed by quantum mechanics, leading to the appearance of conductance plateaux at intervals of 2e{sup 2}/h. A fabrication-limited yield of 94% is achieved for the array, and a “quantum yield” is also defined, to account for disorder affecting the quantum behaviour of the devices. The quantum yield rose from 55% to 86% after illuminating the sample, explained by the corresponding increase in carrier density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas. The multiplexer is a scalable architecture, and can be extended to other forms of mesoscopic devices. It overcomes previous limits on the number of devices that can be fabricated on a single chip due to the number of electrical contacts available, without the need to alter existing experimental set ups.

  20. Room Temperature Bubble Point Tests on Porous Screens: Implications for Cryogenic Liquid Acquisition Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason; Mann, J. Adin, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental results for room temperature bubble point tests conducted at the Cedar Creek Road Cryogenic Complex, Cell 7 (CCL-7) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The purpose of these tests was to investigate the performance of three different fine mesh screens in room temperature liquids to provide pretest predictions in cryogenic liquid nitrogen (LN2) and hydrogen (LH2) as part of NASA's microgravity LAD technology development program. Bench type tests based on the maximum bubble point method were conducted for a 325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, and 510 x 3600 mesh sample in pure room temperature liquid methanol, acetone, isopropyl alcohol, water, and mixtures of methanol and water to cover the intermediate to upper surface tension range. A theoretical model for the bubble point pressure is derived from the Young-LaPlace equation for the pressure drop across a curved interface. Governing equations are reduced in complexity through a set of simplifying assumptions to permit direct comparison with the experimental data. Screen pore sizes are estimated from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to make pretest predictions. Pore sizes based on SEM analysis are compared with historical data available in the literature for the 325 x 2300 and 450 x 2750 screens as well with data obtained from bubble point tests conducted in this work. Experimental results show that bubble point pressure is proportional to the surface tension of the liquid. We show that there is excellent agreement between data and model for pure fluids when the data is corrected for non-zero contact angle measured on the screens using a modified Sessile Drop technique. SEM image analysis of the three meshes indicated that bubble point pressure would be a maximum for the finest mesh screen. The pore diameters based on SEM analysis and experimental data obtained here are in excellent agreement for the 325 x 2300 and 450 x 2750 meshes, but not for the finest 510 x 3600 mesh. Therefore the simplified model can be used to interpolate predictions for low surface tension cryogenic liquids only when pore diameters are based on room temperature bubble point tests and not SEM analysis as presently implemented.

  1. Control mechanism for attenuation of thermal energy pulses using cold circulators in the cryogenic distribution system of fusion devices in tokamak configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Sarkar, B.; Vaghela, H.; Shah, N.

    2014-01-01

    Operation and control of superconducting (SC) magnets in the fusion devices having tokamak configuration opens up the domain of varying peak thermal energy environment as a function of time, commensurate with the plasma pulses. The varied thermal energy environment, thus propagated to upstream of the cooling system, is responsible for the system level instability of the overall cryogenic system. The cryogenic distribution system, the regime of first impact point, therefore, has to be tuned so as to stay at the nearly stable zone of operation. The configuration of the cryogenic distribution system, considered in the present study, involves a liquid helium (LHe) bath as a thermal buffer, LHe submerged heat exchangers and cold circulator apart from the valves for implementations of the precise controls. The cold circulator supplies the forced flow supercritical helium, used for the cooling of SC magnets. The transients of the thermal energy pulses can be attenuated in the cryogenic distribution system by various methodologies. One of the adopted methodologies in the present study is with the precise speed control of the cold circulators. The adopted methodology is applied to various configurations of arrangements of internal components in the distribution system for obtaining system responses with superior attenuation of energy pulses. The process simulation approach, assumptions, considered inputs and constraints, process modeling with different configuration as well as results to accomplish the control scheme for the attenuation of the thermal energy pulses are described.

  2. Control mechanism for attenuation of thermal energy pulses using cold circulators in the cryogenic distribution system of fusion devices in tokamak configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, R.; Sarkar, B.; Vaghela, H.; Shah, N.

    2014-01-29

    Operation and control of superconducting (SC) magnets in the fusion devices having tokamak configuration opens up the domain of varying peak thermal energy environment as a function of time, commensurate with the plasma pulses. The varied thermal energy environment, thus propagated to upstream of the cooling system, is responsible for the system level instability of the overall cryogenic system. The cryogenic distribution system, the regime of first impact point, therefore, has to be tuned so as to stay at the nearly stable zone of operation. The configuration of the cryogenic distribution system, considered in the present study, involves a liquid helium (LHe) bath as a thermal buffer, LHe submerged heat exchangers and cold circulator apart from the valves for implementations of the precise controls. The cold circulator supplies the forced flow supercritical helium, used for the cooling of SC magnets. The transients of the thermal energy pulses can be attenuated in the cryogenic distribution system by various methodologies. One of the adopted methodologies in the present study is with the precise speed control of the cold circulators. The adopted methodology is applied to various configurations of arrangements of internal components in the distribution system for obtaining system responses with superior attenuation of energy pulses. The process simulation approach, assumptions, considered inputs and constraints, process modeling with different configuration as well as results to accomplish the control scheme for the attenuation of the thermal energy pulses are described.

  3. A device to investigate the delamination strength in laminates at room and cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingyi; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, You-He

    2014-12-01

    We construct an instrument to study the behavior of delamination strength in laminates which can be defined as the critical transverse stress at which an actual delamination occurs. The device allows the anvil measurements at room temperature or the liquid nitrogen temperature. For the electro-magnetic laminated materials (e.g., a superconducting YaBa2Cu3O(7-x) coated conductor which has a typical laminated structure), the delamination strength was measured while the properties of transport current were also recorded. Moreover, the influences of external magnetic field on the delamination strength were presented. PMID:25554334

  4. An RF Sensor for Gauging Screen-Channel Liquid Acquisition Devices for Cryogenic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Metzger, Scott; Asipauskas, Marius

    2014-01-01

    A key requirement of a low-gravity screen-channel liquid acquisition device (LAD) is the need to retain 100% liquid in the channel in response to propellant outflow and spacecraft maneuvers. The point at which a screen-channel LAD ingests vapor is known as breakdown, and can be measured several different ways such as: visual observation of bubbles in the LAD channel outflow; a sudden change in pressure drop between the propellant tank and LAD sump outlet; or, an indication by wet-dry sensors placed in the LAD channel or outflow stream. Here we describe a new type of sensor for gauging a screen-channel LAD, the Radio Frequency Mass Gauge (RFMG). The RFMG measures the natural electromagnetic modes of the screen-channel LAD, which is very similar to an RF waveguide, to determine the amount of propellant in the channel. By monitoring several of the RF modes, we show that the RFMG acts as a global sensor of the LAD channel propellant fill level, and enables detection of LAD breakdown even in the absence of outflow. This paper presents the theory behind the RFMG-LAD sensor, measurements and simulations of the RF modes of a LAD channel, and RFMG detection of LAD breakdown in a channel using a simulant fluid during inverted outflow and long-term stability tests.

  5. Capillary acquisition devices for high-performance vehicles: Executive summary. [evaluation of cryogenic propellant management techniques using the centaur launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blatt, M. H.; Bradshaw, R. D.; Risberg, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Technology areas critical to the development of cryogenic capillary devices were studied. Passive cooling of capillary devices was investigated with an analytical and experimental study of wicking flow. Capillary device refilling with settled fluid was studied using an analytical and experimental program that resulted in successful correlation of a versatile computer program with test data. The program was used to predict Centaur D-1S LO2 and LH2 start basket refilling. Comparisons were made between the baseline Centaur D-1S propellant feed system and feed system alternatives including systems using capillary devices. The preferred concepts from the Centaur D-1S study were examined for APOTV and POTV vehicles for delivery and round trip transfer of payloads between LEO and GEO. Mission profiles were determined to provide propellant usage timelines and the payload partials were defined.

  6. Cooling of superconducting devices by liquid storage and refrigeration unit

    DOEpatents

    Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Urbahn, John Arthur; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

    2013-08-20

    A system is disclosed for cooling superconducting devices. The system includes a cryogen cooling system configured to be coupled to the superconducting device and to supply cryogen to the device. The system also includes a cryogen storage system configured to supply cryogen to the device. The system further includes flow control valving configured to selectively isolate the cryogen cooling system from the device, thereby directing a flow of cryogen to the device from the cryogen storage system.

  7. Cryogenic ion implantation near amorphization threshold dose for halo/extension junction improvement in sub-30 nm device technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hugh; Todorov, Stan; Colombeau, Benjamin; Rodier, Dennis; Kouzminov, Dimitry; Zou Wei; Guo Baonian; Khasgiwale, Niranjan; Decker-Lucke, Kurt

    2012-11-06

    We report on junction advantages of cryogenic ion implantation with medium current implanters. We propose a methodical approach on maximizing cryogenic effects on junction characteristics near the amorphization threshold doses that are typically used for halo implants for sub-30 nm technologies. BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant at a dose of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13}cm{sup -2} does not amorphize silicon at room temperature. When implanted at -100 Degree-Sign C, it forms a 30 - 35 nm thick amorphous layer. The cryogenic BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant significantly reduces the depth of the boron distribution, both as-implanted and after anneals, which improves short channel rolloff characteristics. It also creates a shallower n{sup +}-p junction by steepening profiles of arsenic that is subsequently implanted in the surface region. We demonstrate effects of implant sequences, germanium preamorphization, indium and carbon co-implants for extension/halo process integration. When applied to sequences such as Ge+As+C+In+BF{sub 2}{sup +}, the cryogenic implants at -100 Degree-Sign C enable removal of Ge preamorphization, and form more active n{sup +}-p junctions and steeper B and In halo profiles than sequences at room temperature.

  8. Optical Detection Of Cryogenic Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, Lynn M.

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system identifies leakage without requiring shutdown for testing. Proposed device detects and indicates leaks of cryogenic liquids automatically. Detector makes it unnecessary to shut equipment down so it can be checked for leakage by soap-bubble or helium-detection methods. Not necessary to mix special gases or other materials with cryogenic liquid flowing through equipment.

  9. Cryogenic characterization of Josephson junctions

    E-print Network

    Brown, Keith Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenic characterization is a crucial part of understanding the behavior of low-temperature quantum electronics. Reliable device testing provides the feedback to fabrication process development, facilitating the rapid ...

  10. Cryogenic exciter

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  11. Cryogenic Pound Circuits for Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Wang, Rabi

    2006-01-01

    Two modern cryogenic variants of the Pound circuit have been devised to increase the frequency stability of microwave oscillators that include cryogenic sapphire-filled cavity resonators. The original Pound circuit is a microwave frequency discriminator that provides feedback to stabilize a voltage-controlled microwave oscillator with respect to an associated cavity resonator. In the present cryogenic Pound circuits, the active microwave devices are implemented by use of state-of-the-art commercially available tunnel diodes that exhibit low flicker noise (required for high frequency stability) and function well at low temperatures and at frequencies up to several tens of gigahertz. While tunnel diodes are inherently operable as amplitude detectors and amplitude modulators, they cannot, by themselves, induce significant phase modulation. Therefore, each of the present cryogenic Pound circuits includes passive circuitry that transforms the AM into the required PM. Each circuit also contains an AM detector that is used to sample the microwave signal at the input terminal of the high-Q resonator for the purpose of verifying the desired AM null at this point. Finally, each circuit contains a Pound signal detector that puts out a signal, at the modulation frequency, having an amplitude proportional to the frequency error in the input signal. High frequency stability is obtained by processing this output signal into feedback to a voltage-controlled oscillator to continuously correct the frequency error in the input signal.

  12. Design and construction of a cryogenic distillation device for removal of krypton for liquid xenon dark matter detectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhou; Bao, Lei; Hao, Xihuan; Ju, Yonglin

    2014-01-01

    Liquid xenon (Xe) is one of the commendable detecting media for the dark matter detections. However, the small content of radioactive krypton-85 ((85)Kr) always exists in the commercial xenon products. An efficient cryogenic distillation system to remove this krypton (Kr) from commercial xenon products has been specifically designed, developed, and constructed in order to meet the requirements of the dark matter experiments with high- sensitivity and low-background. The content of krypton in regular commercial xenon products can be reduced from 10(-9) to 10(-12), with 99% xenon collection efficiency at maximum flow rate of 5 kg/h (15SLPM). The purified xenon gases produced by this distillation system can be used as the detecting media in the project of Panda X, which is the first dark matter detector developed in China. PMID:24517821

  13. Cryogenic Technology Development for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the status and findings of different cryogenic technology research projects in support of the President s Vision for Space Exploration. The exploration systems architecture study is reviewed for cryogenic fluid management needs. It is shown that the exploration architecture is reliant on the cryogenic propellants of liquid hydrogen, liquid oxygen and liquid methane. Needs identified include: the key technologies of liquid acquisition devices, passive thermal and pressure control, low gravity mass gauging, prototype pressure vessel demonstration, active thermal control; as well as feed system testing, and Cryogenic Fluid Management integrated system demonstration. Then five NASA technology projects are reviewed to show how these needs are being addressed by technology research. Projects reviewed include: In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot; Experimentation for the Maturation of Deep Space Cryogenic Refueling Technology; Cryogenic Propellant Operations Demonstrator; Zero Boil-Off Technology Experiment; and Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development. Advances are found in the areas of liquid acquisition of liquid oxygen, mass gauging of liquid oxygen via radio frequency techniques, computational modeling of thermal and pressure control, broad area cooling thermal control strategies, flight experiments for resolving low gravity issues of cryogenic fluid management. Promising results are also seen for Joule-Thomson pressure control devices in liquid oxygen and liquid methane and liquid acquisition of methane, although these findings are still preliminary.

  14. Acquisition and correlation of cryogenic nitrogen mass flow data through a multiple orifice Joule-Thomson device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. Stephen; Saiyed, Naseem H.; Nyland, Ted W.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid nitrogen mass flow rate, pressure drop, and temperature drop data were obtained for a series of multiple orifice Joule-Thomson devices, known as Visco Jets, over a wide range of flow resistance. The test rig used to acquire the data was designed to minimize heat transfer so that fluid expansion through the Visco Jets would be isenthalpic. The data include a range of fluid inlet pressures from 30 to 60 psia, fluid inlet temperatures from 118 to 164 R, outlet pressures from 2.8 to 55.8 psia, outlet temperatures from 117 to 162 R and flow rate from 0.04 to 4.0 lbm/hr of nitrogen. A flow rate equation supplied by the manufacturer was found to accurately predict single-phase (noncavitating) liquid nitrogen flow through the Visco Jets. For cavitating flow, the manufacturer's equation was found to be inaccurate. Greatly improved results were achieved with a modified version of the single-phase equation. The modification consists of a multiplication factor to the manufacturer's equation equal to one minus the downstream quality on an isenthalpic expansion of the fluid across the Visco Jet. For a range of flow resistances represented by Visco Jet Lohm ratings between 17,600 and 80,000, 100 percent of the single-phase data and 85 percent of the two-phase data fall within + or - 10 percent of predicted values.

  15. Cryogenic Flow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justak, John

    2010-01-01

    An acousto-optic cryogenic flow sensor (CFS) determines mass flow of cryogens for spacecraft propellant management. The CFS operates unobtrusively in a high-pressure, high-flowrate cryogenic environment to provide measurements for fluid quality as well as mass flow rate. Experimental hardware uses an optical plane-of-light (POL) to detect the onset of two-phase flow, and the presence of particles in the flow of water. Acousto-optic devices are used in laser equipment for electronic control of the intensity and position of the laser beam. Acousto-optic interaction occurs in all optical media when an acoustic wave and a laser beam are present. When an acoustic wave is launched into the optical medium, it generates a refractive index wave that behaves like a sinusoidal grating. An incident laser beam passing through this grating will diffract the laser beam into several orders. Its angular position is linearly proportional to the acoustic frequency, so that the higher the frequency, the larger the diffracted angle. If the acoustic wave is traveling in a moving fluid, the fluid velocity will affect the frequency of the traveling wave, relative to a stationary sensor. This frequency shift changes the angle of diffraction, hence, fluid velocity can be determined from the diffraction angle. The CFS acoustic Bragg grating data test indicates that it is capable of accurately determining flow from 0 to 10 meters per second. The same sensor can be used in flow velocities exceeding 100 m/s. The POL module has successfully determined the onset of two-phase flow, and can distinguish vapor bubbles from debris.

  16. Cryogenic High-Sensitivity Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Peter; Chui, Talso; Goodstein, David

    2005-01-01

    A proposed magnetometer for use in a cryogenic environment would be sensitive enough to measure a magnetic-flux density as small as a picogauss (10(exp -16) Tesla). In contrast, a typical conventional flux-gate magnetometer cannot measure a magnetic-flux density smaller that about 1 microgauss (10(exp -10) Tesla). One version of this device, for operation near the low end of the cryogenic temperature range, would include a piece of a paramagnetic material on a platform, the temperature of which would be controlled with a periodic variation. The variation in temperature would be measured by use of a conventional germanium resistance thermometer. A superconducting coil would be wound around the paramagnetic material and coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer.

  17. Cryogenic fluid management experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.; Fester, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The cryogenic fluid management experiment (CFME), designed to characterize subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and expulsion in the low-q space environment, is discussed. The experiment utilizes a fine mesh screen fluid management device to accomplish gas-free liquid expulsion and a thermodynamic vent system to intercept heat leak and control tank pressure. The experiment design evolved from a single flight prototype to provision for a multimission (up to 7) capability. A detailed design of the CFME, a dynamic test article, and dedicated ground support equipment were generated. All materials and parts were identified, and components were selected and specifications prepared. Long lead titanium pressurant spheres and the flight tape recorder and ground reproduce unit were procured. Experiment integration with the shuttle orbiter, Spacelab, and KSC ground operations was coordinated with the appropriate NASA centers, and experiment interfaces were defined. Phase 1 ground and flight safety reviews were conducted. Costs were estimated for fabrication and assembly of the CFME, which will become the storage and supply tank for a cryogenic fluid management facility to investigate fluid management in space.

  18. Refrigeration for Cryogenic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, M. G. (editor)

    1983-01-01

    Research in cryogenically cooled refrigerators is discussed. Low-power Stirling cryocoolers; spacecraft-borne long-life units; heat exchangers; performance tests; split-stirling, linear-resonant, cryogenic refrigerators; and computer models are among the topics discussed.

  19. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  20. Cryogenic System Revised June 1994

    E-print Network

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    Chapter 9. Cryogenic System Revised June 1994 9.1. Introduction 9.2. Heat Loads and Refrigeration Duties -- 175 -- #12; 176 Cryogenic System #12; Cryogenic System 177 9.3. Two Phase Helium Cooling 9.4. The Refrigerator and Control #12; 178 Cryogenic System 9.5. Cryogen Delivery and Control 9.6. Three Cooling

  1. Germanium JFET for Cryogenic Readout Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, N. C.; Monroy, C.; Jhabvala, M.; Shu, P.

    1999-01-01

    The n-channel Germanium junction field effect transistor (Ge-JFET) was designed and fabricated for cryogenic applications. The Ge-JFET exhibits superior noise performance at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). From the device current voltage characteristics of n-channel JFETs, it is seen that transconductance increases monotonically with the lowering of temperature to 4.2 K (liquid helium temperature).

  2. NASA's Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Motil, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) Project's primary objective is to develop storage, transfer, and handling technologies for cryogens that will support the enabling of high performance cryogenic propulsion systems, lunar surface systems and economical ground operations. Such technologies can significantly reduce propellant launch mass and required on-orbit margins, reduce or even eliminate propellant tank fluid boil-off losses for long term missions, and simplify vehicle operations. This paper will present the status of the specific technologies that the CFM Project is developing. The two main areas of concentration are analysis models development and CFM hardware development. The project develops analysis tools and models based on thermodynamics, hydrodynamics, and existing flight/test data. These tools assist in the development of pressure/thermal control devices (such as the Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS), and Multi-layer insulation); with the ultimate goal being to develop a mature set of tools and models that can characterize the performance of the pressure/thermal control devices incorporated in the design of an entire CFM system with minimal cryogen loss. The project does hardware development and testing to verify our understanding of the physical principles involved, and to validate the performance of CFM components, subsystems and systems. This database provides information to anchor our analytical models. This paper describes some of the current activities of the NASA's Cryogenic Fluid Management Project.

  3. Fundamentals of Cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley; Tomsik, Thomas; Moder, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the extreme conditions that are encountered in cryogenic systems requires the most effort out of analysts and engineers. Due to the costs and complexity associated with the extremely cold temperatures involved, testing is sometimes minimized and extra analysis is often relied upon. This short course is designed as an introduction to cryogenic engineering and analysis, and it is intended to introduce the basic concepts related to cryogenic analysis and testing as well as help the analyst understand the impacts of various requests on a test facility. Discussion will revolve around operational functions often found in cryogenic systems, hardware for both tests and facilities, and what design or modelling tools are available for performing the analysis. Emphasis will be placed on what scenarios to use what hardware or the analysis tools to get the desired results. The class will provide a review of first principles, engineering practices, and those relations directly applicable to this subject including such topics as cryogenic fluids, thermodynamics and heat transfer, material properties at low temperature, insulation, cryogenic equipment, instrumentation, refrigeration, testing of cryogenic systems, cryogenics safety and typical thermal and fluid analysis used by the engineer. The class will provide references for further learning on various topics in cryogenics for those who want to dive deeper into the subject or have encountered specific problems.

  4. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Vols. 35A & 35B - Proceedings of the 1989 Cryogenic Engineering Conference, University of California, Los Angeles, July 24-28, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, R. W. (editor)

    1990-01-01

    The book presents a review of literature on superfluid helium, together with papers under the topics on heat and mass transfer in He II; applications of He II for cooling superconducting devices in space; heat transfer to liquid helium and liquid nitrogen; multilayer insulation; applications of superconductivity, including topics on magnets and other devices, magnet stability and coil protection, and cryogenic techniques; and refrigeration for electronics. Other topics discussed include refrigeration of superconducting systems; the expanders, cold compressors, and pumps for liquid helium; dilution refrigerators; magnetic refrigerators; pulse tube refrigerators; cryocoolers for space applications; properties of cryogenic fluids; cryogenic instrumentation; hyperconducting devices (cryogenic magnets); cryogenic applications in space science and technology and in transportation; and miscellaneous cryogenic techniques and applications.

  5. Cryogenic Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, Robert A.; Marquardt, Eric D.; Fusilier, Fred C.; Fesmire, James E.

    2003-01-01

    The Cryogenic Information Center (CIC) is a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to preserving and distributing cryogenic information to government, industry, and academia. The heart of the CIC is a uniform source of cryogenic data including analyses, design, materials and processes, and test information traceable back to the Cryogenic Data Center of the former National Bureau of Standards. The electronic database is a national treasure containing over 146,000 specific bibliographic citations of cryogenic literature and thermophysical property data dating back to 1829. A new technical/bibliographic inquiry service can perform searches and technical analyses. The Cryogenic Material Properties (CMP) Program consists of computer codes using empirical equations to determine thermophysical material properties with emphasis on the 4-300K range. CMP's objective is to develop a user-friendly standard material property database using the best available data so government and industry can conduct more accurate analyses. The CIC serves to benefit researchers, engineers, and technologists in cryogenics and cryogenic engineering, whether they are new or experienced in the field.

  6. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  7. Cryogenics for Pulsed Solenoid Magnet

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    .12.0 ii) BNL ESH, 5.1.0 Non Flammable Cryogenic Liquids, Rev.2 iii) BNL OHSG, Flammable Cryogenic LiquidsE951 Cryogenics for Pulsed Solenoid Magnet Design, Operation, Safety Project Status BNL ESR Safety Committee September 6, 2002 G. T Mulholland ACT World Headquarters Applied Cryogenics Technology PO Box 2158

  8. Cryogenic Quenching Process for Electronic Part Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Douglas J.; Cressler, John

    2011-01-01

    The use of electronic parts at cryogenic temperatures (less than 100 C) for extreme environments is not well controlled or developed from a product quality and reliability point of view. This is in contrast to the very rigorous and well-documented procedures to qualify electronic parts for mission use in the 55 to 125 C temperature range. A similarly rigorous methodology for screening and evaluating electronic parts needs to be developed so that mission planners can expect the same level of high reliability performance for parts operated at cryogenic temperatures. A formal methodology for screening and qualifying electronic parts at cryogenic temperatures has been proposed. The methodology focuses on the base physics of failure of the devices at cryogenic temperatures. All electronic part reliability is based on the bathtub curve, high amounts of initial failures (infant mortals), a long period of normal use (random failures), and then an increasing number of failures (end of life). Unique to this is the development of custom screening procedures to eliminate early failures at cold temperatures. The ability to screen out defects will specifically impact reliability at cold temperatures. Cryogenic reliability is limited by electron trap creation in the oxide and defect sites at conductor interfaces. Non-uniform conduction processes due to process marginalities will be magnified at cryogenic temperatures. Carrier mobilities change by orders of magnitude at cryogenic temperatures, significantly enhancing the effects of electric field. Marginal contacts, impurities in oxides, and defects in conductor/conductor interfaces can all be magnified at low temperatures. The novelty is the use of an ultra-low temperature, short-duration quenching process for defect screening. The quenching process is designed to identify those defects that will precisely (and negatively) affect long-term, cryogenic part operation. This quenching process occurs at a temperature that is at least 25 C colder than the coldest expected operating temperature. This quenching process is the opposite of the standard burn-in procedure. Normal burn-in raises the temperature (and voltage) to activate quickly any possible manufacturing defects remaining in the device that were not already rejected at a functional test step. The proposed inverse burn-in or quenching process is custom-tailored to the electronic device being used. The doping profiles, materials, minimum dimensions, interfaces, and thermal expansion coefficients are all taken into account in determining the ramp rate, dwell time, and temperature.

  9. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hatfield; F. Casagrande; I. Campisi; P. Gurd; M. Howell; D. Stout; H. Strong; D. Arenius; J. Creel; K. Dixon; V. Ganni; and P. Knudsen

    2005-08-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  10. Liquid cryogenic lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, M. W.; Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1970-01-01

    Fluorinated polyethers are suitable lubricants for rolling-element bearings in cryogenic systems. Lubrication effectiveness is comparable to that of super-refined mineral oil lubricants operating at room temperature.

  11. Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, J. E.; Wikstrom, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a comparative study of cryogenic insulation systems performed are presented. The key aspects of thermal insulation relative to cryogenic system design, testing, manufacturing, and maintenance are discussed. An overview of insulation development from an energy conservation perspective is given. Conventional insulation materials for cryogenic applications provide three levels of thermal conductivity. Actual thermal performance of standard multilayer insulation (MLI) is several times less than laboratory performance and often 10 times worse than ideal performance. The cost-effectiveness of the insulation system depends on thermal performance; flexibility and durability; ease of use in handling, installation, and maintenance; and overall cost including operations, maintenance, and life cycle. Results of comprehensive testing of both conventional and novel materials such as aerogel composites using cryostat boil-off methods are given. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems that operate at a soft vacuum level is the primary focus of this paper.

  12. CRYOGENIC FACITLITY DESIGN IN BEPC II SUPERCONDUCTING UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,L.X.; WANG,L.; YANG,G.D.; ET AL.

    2004-05-11

    Three kinds of superconducting device are to be constructed at interaction regions in the upgrade of Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPCII). Two sets of refrigerators with each capacity of 500W at 4.5K are adopted to provide the refrigeration for them. The cryogenic systems to support the operation of the superconducting facilities are under design by Harbin Institute of Technology in China. This paper presents the current design of main cryogenic facilities.

  13. Settled Cryogenic Propellant Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutter, Bernard F.; Zegler, Frank; Sakla, Steve; Wall, John; Hopkins, Josh; Saks, Greg; Duffey, Jack; Chato, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenic propellant transfer can significantly benefit NASA s space exploration initiative. LMSSC parametric studies indicate that "Topping off" the Earth Departure Stage (EDS) in LEO with approx.20 mT of additional propellant using cryogenic propellant transfer increases the lunar delivered payload by 5 mT. Filling the EDS to capacity in LEO with 78 mT of propellants increases the delivered payload by 20 mT. Cryogenic propellant transfer is directly extensible to Mars exploration in that it provides propellant for the Mars Earth Departure stage and in-situ propellant utilization at Mars. To enable the significant performance increase provided by cryogenic propellant transfer, the reliability and robustness of the transfer process must be guaranteed. By utilizing low vehicle acceleration during the cryogenic transfer the operation is significantly simplified and enables the maximum use of existing, reliable, mature upper stage cryogenic-fluid-management (CFM) techniques. Due to settling, large-scale propellant transfer becomes an engineering effort, and not the technology development endeavor required with zero-gravity propellant transfer. The following key CFM technologies are all currently implemented by settling on both the Centaur and Delta IV upper stages: propellant acquisition, hardware chilldown, pressure control, and mass gauging. The key remaining technology, autonomous rendezvous and docking, is already in use by the Russians, and must be perfected for NASA whether the use of propellant transfer is utilized or not.

  14. Cryogenically Cooled Field Effect Transistors for Low-Noise Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent tends in the design, fabrication and use of High-Electron-Mobility-Transistors (HEMT) in low noise amplifiers are reviewed. Systems employing these devices have achieved the lowest system noise for wavelengths greater than three millimeters with relatively modest cryogenic cooling requirements in a variety of ground and space based applications. System requirements which arise in employing such devices in imaging applications are contrasted with other leading coherent detector candidates at microwave wavelengths. Fundamental and practical limitations which arise in the context of microwave application of field effect devices at cryogenic temperatures will be discussed from a component and systems point of view.

  15. Physical sciences: Thermodynamics, cryogenics, and vacuum technology: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Technological developments which have potential application outside the aerospace community are reported. A variety of thermodynamic devices including heat pipes and cooling systems are described along with methods of handling cryogenic fluids. Vacuum devices are also described. Pata et information is included.

  16. Spacecraft cryogenic gas storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, G.

    1971-01-01

    Cryogenic gas storage systems were developed for the liquid storage of oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium. Cryogenic storage is attractive because of the high liquid density and low storage pressure of cryogens. This situation results in smaller container sizes, reduced container-strength levels, and lower tankage weights. The Gemini and Apollo spacecraft used cryogenic gas storage systems as standard spacecraft equipment. In addition to the Gemini and Apollo cryogenic gas storage systems, other systems were developed and tested in the course of advancing the state of the art. All of the cryogenic storage systems used, developed, and tested to date for manned-spacecraft applications are described.

  17. CEBAF cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The CEBAF cryogenic system consists of 3 refrigeration systems: Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF), Central Helium Liquefier (CHL), and End Station Refrigerator (ESR). CHL is the main cryogenic system for CEBAF, consisting of a 4.8 kW, 2.0 K refrigerator and transfer line system to supply 2.0 K and 12 kW of 50 K shield refrigeration for the Linac cavity cryostats and 10 g/s of liquid for the end stations. This paper describes the 9-year effort to commission these systems, concentrating on CHL with the cold compressors. The cold compressors are a cold vacuum pump with an inlet temperature of 3 K which use magnetic bearings, thereby eliminating the possibility of air leaks into the subatmospheric He.

  18. Cryogenic vacuum tight adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anashkin, O. P.; Keilin, V. E.; Patrikeev, V. M.

    1999-12-01

    A synthetic adhesive for vacuum tight joints at cryogenic temperatures has been developed. It consists of three components, the main component being epoxy silicone organic resin. The joints made with the adhesive remain vacuum tight at liquid helium temperature, including superfluid helium. It was found possible to connect different materials with the adhesive (copper and stainless steel with each other, aluminum, aluminum alloys, fiberglass, etc.). The joints withstood thermal shock tests of ten repeated sharps cooling to liquid nitrogen temperature and heating in hot water. Using the adhesive a lot of different vacuum tight low temperature joints have been made. More than fifteen years of wide application of this adhesive in vacuum tight cryogenic joints proved its high reliability. Some designs of vacuum tight cryogenic joints are presented and the technique of their manufacturing is described.

  19. Cryogenic foil bearing turbopumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Alston L.

    1993-11-01

    Cryogenic foil bearing turbopumps offer high reliability and low cost. The fundamental cryogenic foil bearing technology has been validated in both liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. High load capacity, excellent rotor dynamics, and negligible bearing wear after over 100 starts and stops, and over many hours of testing, were observed in both fluids. An experimental liquid hydrogen foil bearing turbopump was also successfully demonstrated. The results indicate excellent stability, high reliability, wide throttle-ability, low bearing cooling flow, and two-phase bearing operability. A liquid oxygen foil bearing turbopump has been built and is being tested at NASA MSFC.

  20. Unique Cryogenic Welded Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushchenko, K. A.; Monko, G. G.

    2004-06-01

    For the last few decades, the E. O. Paton Electric Welding Institute has been active in the field of cryogenic materials science. Integrated research on development of new grades of steels and alloys for cryogenic engineering was carried out in collaboration with the leading institutions of Russia, Ukraine, and Georgia. Commercially applied welding technologies and consumables were developed. They include large, spherical tanks for storage of liquefied gases (from oxygen to helium) under high pressures; space simulators with a capacity of 10 000 m3 and more; and load-carrying elements of superconducting fusion magnetic systems for the TOKAMAK, MGD, and ITER series.

  1. Cryogenic Propellant Densification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewart, R. O.; Dergance, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Ground and vehicle system requirements are evaluated for the use of densified cryogenic propellants in advanced space transportation systems. Propellants studied were slush and triple point liquid hydrogen, triple point liquid oxygen, and slush and triple point liquid methane. Areas of study included propellant production, storage, transfer, vehicle loading and system requirements definition. A savings of approximately 8.2 x 100,000 Kg can be achieved in single stage to orbit gross liftoff weight for a payload of 29,484 Kg by utilizing densified cryogens in place of normal boiling point propellants.

  2. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  3. Vapor cooled current lead for cryogenic electrical equipment

    DOEpatents

    Vansant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method are provided for conducting electric current to cryogenic electrical equipment devices. A combination of inner and outer tubes together form a plurality of hollow composite tubes housed in a sheath. Top and bottom block mounting means are fitted to hold the composite tubes and are affixed to the ends of the sheath. This combination forms a current lead. The current lead is attached to a cryogenic device housing a fluid coolant which moves through the current lead, cooling the current lead as the fluid travels.

  4. High Q tunable LC resonator operating at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaldi, Michele; Falferi, Paolo; Dolesi, Rita; Cerdonio, Massimo; Vitale, Stefano

    1998-10-01

    We present a step-motor based cryogenic tuning device for a high Q electrical resonator. The resonator can be tuned in the 145-175 Hz frequency range. Tuning is achieved by moving a superconducting core inside the 3 H superconducting coil of the resonator. The resonator intrinsic quality factor of 1.8×106 is found to be unaffected by the superconducting core and by the drive system. The noise of the resonator has been measured to be thermal. The device has been developed to improve sensitivity and bandwidth performance of cryogenic resonant gravitational wave detectors equipped with resonant capacitance transducers.

  5. Cryogenics Research and Engineering Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space have a direct impact on NASA, government and commercial programs. Research and development on thermal insulation, propellant servicing, cryogenic components, material properties and sensing technologies provides industry, government and research institutions with the cross-cutting technologies to manage low-temperature applications. Under the direction of the Cryogenic Testing Lab at Kennedy Space Center, the work experience acquired allowed me to perform research, testing, design and analysis of current and future cryogenic technologies to be applied in several projects.

  6. Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids

    E-print Network

    have boiling points below -73°C (-100°F). The most common cryogenic liquids currently on campus conditions of temperature and pressure. But all have two very important properties in common. First, the liquids and their vapors are extremely cold. The risk of destructive freezing of tissues is always present

  7. Cryogenic structural support

    DOEpatents

    Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Mataya, Karl F. (Lemont, IL); Gonczy, John D. (Oak Lawn, IL)

    1982-01-01

    A tensile support member is provided for use in a cryogenic environment. The member is in the form of a link formed of an epoxy glass laminate with at least one ply of the laminate having its fibers aligned circumferentially about the link.

  8. Compact cryogenic inductors

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Carr, W.J. Jr.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Hordubay, T.D.; Chuboy, H.L. . Science and Technology Center)

    1994-07-01

    Power systems requiring power levels as high as a few megawatts to a few gigawatts for periods of several microseconds to several milliseconds with repetitive frequencies of a few hertz to a few kilohertz are being considered for potential space applications. The impulsive nature of the power presents the opportunity to use inductive energy storage techniques for pulse duty to enhance economic and practical considerations. An inductors must be efficient, lightweight, and reliable, and it must have high energy density if it is to be used in space based power systems. Cryogenic inductors are best studied for such an application. Parametric analyses of the two potential types of cryogenic inductors (superconducting and hyperconducting reveal that the hyperconducting (high purity aluminum)) inductor would be significantly lighter and achieve higher energy densities without the added penalty of a helium refrigeration system, thus resulting in improved overall system reliability. The lightweight hyperconducting cryogenic inductor technology is, however, in its infancy. This paper describes the required technology base which would allow the eventual application of the lightweight cryogenic inductor in space power systems, and also conclusively demonstrates the underlying principles.

  9. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  10. Physica B 280 (2000) 532}534 Radiation hard position-sensitive cryogenic silicon detectors

    E-print Network

    Zavrtanik, Marko

    2000-01-01

    Physica B 280 (2000) 532}534 Radiation hard position-sensitive cryogenic silicon detectors-trapping processes severely a!ects the CCE mechanism. When the devices are operated below 130 K, the de-trapping time

  11. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    DOEpatents

    Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  12. Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasser, M. G.; Sherman, A.; Studer, P. A.; Daniels, A.; Goldowsky, M. P.

    1983-06-01

    A long lifetime Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler particularly adapted for space applications is described. It consists of a compressor section centrally aligned end to end with an expansion section, and respectively includes a reciprocating compressor piston and displacer radially suspended in interconnecting cylindrical housings by active magnetic bearings and has adjacent reduced clearance regions so as to be in noncontacting relationship therewith and wherein one or more of these regions operate as clearance seals. The piston and displacer are reciprocated in their housings by linear drive motors to vary the volume of respectively adjacent compression and expansion spaces which contain a gaseous working fluid and a thermal regenerator to effect Stirling cycle cryogenic cooling.

  13. Oxygen chemisorption cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention relates to a chemisorption compressor cryogenic refrigerator which employs oxygen to provide cooling at 60 to 100 K. The invention includes dual vessels containing an oxygen absorbent material, alternately heated and cooled to provide a continuous flow of high pressure oxygen, multiple heat exchangers for precooling the oxygen, a Joule-Thomson expansion valve system for expanding the oxygen to partially liquefy it and a liquid oxygen pressure vessel. The primary novelty is that, while it was believed that once oxygen combined with an element or compound the reaction could not reverse to release gaseous oxygen, in this case oxygen will indeed react in a reversible fashion with certain materials and will do so at temperatures and pressures which make it practical for incorporation into a cryogenic refrigeration system.

  14. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    DOEpatents

    Brindza, Paul Daniel (Yorktown, VA); Wines, Robin Renee (Norfolk, VA); Takacs, James Joseph (Hayes, VA)

    1999-01-01

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament.

  15. Cryogenic support system

    DOEpatents

    Nicol, Thomas H. (Aurora, IL); Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Gonczy, John D. (Oak Lawn, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A support system is disclosed for restraining large masses at very low or cryogenic temperatures. The support system employs a tie bar that is pivotally connected at opposite ends to an anchoring support member and a sliding support member. The tie bar extends substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cold mass assembly, and comprises a rod that lengthens when cooled and a pair of end attachments that contract when cooled. The rod and end attachments are sized so that when the tie bar is cooled to cryogenic temperature, the net change in tie bar length is approximately zero. Longitudinal force directed against the cold mass assembly is distributed by the tie bar between the anchoring support member and the sliding support member.

  16. Cryogenic support system

    DOEpatents

    Nicol, T.H.; Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.

    1988-11-01

    A support system is disclosed for restraining large masses at very low or cryogenic temperatures. The support system employs a tie bar that is pivotally connected at opposite ends to an anchoring support member and a sliding support member. The tie bar extends substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cold mass assembly, and comprises a rod that lengthens when cooled and a pair of end attachments that contract when cooled. The rod and end attachments are sized so that when the tie bar is cooled to cryogenic temperature, the net change in tie bar length is approximately zero. Longitudinal force directed against the cold mass assembly is distributed by the tie bar between the anchoring support member and the sliding support member. 7 figs.

  17. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Brindza, P.D.; Wines, R.R.; Takacs, J.J.

    1999-12-21

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament.

  18. Cryogenic Selective Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Nurge, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Under our NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) project we have theoretically demonstrated a novel selective surface that reflects roughly 100 times more solar radiation than any other known coating. If this prediction holds up under experimental tests it will allow cryogenic temperatures to be reached in deep space even in the presence of the sun. It may allow LOX to be carried to the Moon and Mars. It may allow superconductors to be used in deep space without a refrigeration system.

  19. Cryogenic flow in ejectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancz, B.

    An exaust ejector responsible for the relieving of a closed-circuit cryogenic flow system has been analyzed in order to establish optimum system configuration and geometry. In place of the conventionally used supersonic ejector, a circulation fan has been employed. Numerical computations of the stack flow, which consists of three jets, as well as the flow of the gaseous N2 plume that forms above the stack exit, have been conducted by the GENMIX computer code.

  20. Cryogenic Treatment of Metal Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Chillar, Rahul; Agrawal, S. C.

    2006-03-31

    Cryogenic treatment and its variables have been described. Results of eight engineering tests carried out on cryotreated parts have been presented. Cryogenic treatment of metal parts enhances useful properties which in turn, improves various strengths. Our tests viz. Abrasion, Torsion, Fatigue, Tensile, Shear, Hardness and Impact on Mild steel, Cast Iron, Brass and Copper show that the cryogenic treatment improved useful properties of mild steel parts appreciably but did not show promise with brass and copper parts.

  1. Experiments on Cryogenic Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, O.; Sekine, W.; Kubota, J.; Uotani, N.; Chikasue, M.; Shindo, M.

    2009-11-10

    Experiments on a cryogenic complex plasma have been performed. Preliminary experiments include production of a plasma in a liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by a pulsed discharge. The extended production of a plasma has been realized in a vapor of liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by rf discharge. The charge of dust particles injected in such a plasma has been studied in detail.

  2. Surface Tension Confines Cryogenic Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    New type of Dewar provides passive, constant-temperature cryogenic cooling for scientific instruments under normal-to low-gravity conditions. Known as Surface-Tension-Contained Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), keeps liquid cryogen in known location inside the Dewar by trapping liquid inside spongelike material. Unique sponge material fills most of volume of inner tank. Sponge is all-silica, open-cell material similar to that used for Space Shuttle thermal-protection tiles.

  3. Refrigeration and Cryogenics Specialist. J3ABR54530

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Training Command, Sheppard AFB, TX.

    This document package contains an Air Force course used to train refrigeration and cryogenics specialists. The course is organized in six blocks designed for group instruction. The blocks cover the following topics: electrical principles; fundamentals of tubing and piping; metering devices, motor controls, domestic and commercial refrigeration;…

  4. Cryogenic Microwave Anisotropic Artificial Frank Trang

    E-print Network

    Popovic, Zoya

    Cryogenic Microwave Anisotropic Artificial Materials by Frank Trang B.S., University of California entitled: Cryogenic Microwave Anisotropic Artificial Materials written by Frank Trang has been approved.D., Electrical Engineering) Cryogenic Microwave Anisotropic Artificial Materials Thesis directed by Professor

  5. An FPGA-based Instrumentation Platform for use at Deep Cryogenic Temperatures

    E-print Network

    Lamb, I D Conway; Hornibrook, J M; Pauka, S J; Waddy, S J; Frechtling, M K; Reilly, D J

    2015-01-01

    We describe the operation of a cryogenic instrumentation platform incorporating commercially- available field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The functionality of the FPGAs at temperatures approaching 4 kelvin enables signal routing, multiplexing, and complex digital signal processing in close proximity to cooled devices or detectors within the cryostat. The performance of the FPGAs in a cryogenic environment is evaluated, including clock speed, error rates, and power consumption. Although constructed for the purpose of controlling and reading out quantum computing devices with low latency, the instrument is generic enough to be of broad use in a range of cryogenic applications.

  6. An FPGA-based Instrumentation Platform for use at Deep Cryogenic Temperatures

    E-print Network

    I. D. Conway Lamb; J. I. Colless; J. M. Hornibrook; S. J. Pauka; S. J. Waddy; M. K. Frechtling; D. J. Reilly

    2015-09-29

    We describe a cryogenic instrumentation platform incorporating commercially-available field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) configured to operate well beyond their specified temperature range. The instrument enables signal routing, multiplexing, and complex digital signal processing at temperatures approaching 4 kelvin and in close proximity to cooled devices or detectors within the cryostat. The cryogenic performance of the system is evaluated, including clock speed, error rates, and power consumption. Although constructed for the purpose of controlling and reading out quantum computing devices with low latency, the instrument is generic enough to be of broad use in a range of cryogenic applications.

  7. Precision Cryogenic Dilatometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudik, Matthew; Halverson, Peter; Levine-West, Marie; Marcin, Martin; Peters, Robert D.; Shaklan, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    A dilatometer based on a laser interferometer is being developed to measure mechanical creep and coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) of materials at temperatures ranging from ambient down to 15 K. This cryogenic dilatometer has been designed to minimize systematic errors that limit the best previously available dilatometers. At its prototype stage of development, this cryogenic dilatometer yields a strain measurement error of 35 ppb or 1.7 ppb/K CTE measurement error for a 20-K thermal load, for low-expansion materials in the temperature range from 310 down to 30 K. Planned further design refinements that include a provision for stabilization of the laser and addition of a high-precision sample-holding jig are expected to reduce the measurement error to 5-ppb strain error or 0.3-ppb/K CTE error for a 20-K thermal load. The dilatometer (see figure) includes a common-path, differential, heterodyne interferometer; a dual-frequency, stabilized source bench that serves as the light source for the interferometer; a cryogenic chamber in which one places the material sample to be studied; a cryogenic system for cooling the interior of the chamber to the measurement temperature; an ultra-stable alignment stage for positioning the chamber so that the sample is properly positioned with respect to the interferometer; and a data-acquisition and control system. The cryogenic chamber and the interferometer portion of the dilatometer are housed in a vacuum chamber on top of a vibration isolating optical table in a cleanroom. The sample consists of two pieces a pillar on a base both made of the same material. Using reflections of the interferometer beams from the base and the top of the pillar, what is measured is the change in length of the pillar as the temperature in the chamber is changed. In their fundamental optical and electronic principles of operation, the laser light source and the interferometer are similar to those described in Common-Path Heterodyne Interferometers (NPO-20786), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 7 (July 2001), page 12a, and Interferometer for Measuring Displacement to Within 20 pm (NPO- 21221), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 7 (July 2003), page 8a. However, the present designs incorporate a number of special geometric, optical, and mechanical features to minimize optical and thermal-expansion effects that contribute to measurement errors. These features include the use of low-thermal expansion materials for structural components, kinematic mounting and symmetrical placement of optical components, and several measures taken to minimize spurious reflections of laser beams.

  8. Expandable Purge Chambers Would Protect Cryogenic Fittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Ivan I., III

    2004-01-01

    Expandable ice-prevention and cleanliness-preservation (EIP-CP) chambers have been proposed to prevent the accumulation of ice or airborne particles on quick-disconnect (QD) fittings, or on ducts or tubes that contain cryogenic fluids. In the original application for which the EIP-CP chambers were conceived, there is a requirement to be able to disconnect and reconnect the QD fittings in rapid succession. If ice were to form on the fittings by condensation and freezing of airborne water vapor on the cold fitting surfaces, the ice could interfere with proper mating of the fittings, making it necessary to wait an unacceptably long time for the ice to thaw before attempting reconnection. By keeping water vapor away from the cold fitting surfaces, the EIP-CP chambers would prevent accumulation of ice, preserving the ability to reconnect as soon as required. Basically, the role of an EIP-CP chamber would be to serve as an enclosure for a flow of dry nitrogen gas that would keep ambient air away from QD cryogenic fittings. An EIP-CP chamber would be an inflatable device made of a fabriclike material. The chamber would be attached to an umbilical plate holding a cryogenic QD fitting.

  9. Thermoelectric Generators used as Cryogenic Heat Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. E.; Ordonez, C. A.

    1997-03-01

    A future experiment is being planned at the University of North Texas to design, build, and test a cryogenic heat engine(C. A. Ordonez, Am. J. Phys. 64), 479 (1996). suitable as an electric-vehicle power system. The power system shall then be installed in a demonstration vehicle. This will be a next-generation vehicle following the current project described in the accompanying poster, ``Experimental Car Which Uses Liquid Nitrogen as Its Fuel" by M. E. Parker et al. The cryogenic heat engine electric vehicle power system will incorporate both a thermoelectric generator and an ambient-temperature turbine or pneumatic-motor/generator. The thermoelectric generator shall use liquid nitrogen (under pressure) as its cold reservoir. Energy is produced with the thermoelectric generator by using the liquid/gas phase change to absorb heat. At the present time a study is being carried out to determine the efficiency of thermoelectric devices which are used as cryogenic heat engines. Initial data is being taken using frozen H_2O and CO2 as cold reservoirs. The results of the study shall be presented.

  10. Optomechanics and thermometry of cryogenic silica microresonators

    E-print Network

    A. J. R. MacDonald; B. D. Hauer; X. Rojas; P. H. Kim; G. G. Popowich; J. P. Davis

    2015-09-05

    We present measurements of silica optomechanical resonators, known as bottle resonators, passively cooled in a cryogenic environment. These devices possess a suite of properties that make them advantageous for preparation and measurement in the mechanical ground state, including high mechanical frequency, high optical and mechanical quality factors, and optomechanical sideband resolution. Performing thermometry of the mechanical motion, we find that the optical and mechanical modes demonstrate quantitatively similar laser-induced heating, limiting the lowest average phonon occupation observed to just ~1500. Thermalization to the 9 mK thermal bath would facilitate quantum measurements on these promising nanogram-scale mechanical resonators.

  11. Cryogenic 3D printing for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Adamkiewicz, Michal; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-12-01

    We describe a new cryogenic 3D printing technology for freezing hydrogels, with a potential impact to tissue engineering. We show that complex frozen hydrogel structures can be generated when the 3D object is printed immersed in a liquid coolant (liquid nitrogen), whose upper surface is maintained at the same level as the highest deposited layer of the object. This novel approach ensures that the process of freezing is controlled precisely, and that already printed frozen layers remain at a constant temperature. We describe the device and present results which illustrate the potential of the new technology. PMID:26548335

  12. Compact RF resonator for cryogenic ion traps

    E-print Network

    D. Gandolfi; M. Niedermayr; M. Kumph; M. Brownnutt; R. Blatt

    2012-04-29

    We report on the investigation and implementation of a lumped-component, radio-frequency resonator used in a cryogenic vacuum environment to drive an ion trap. The resonator was required to achieve the voltages necessary to trap (about 100 V), while dissipating as little power as possible (< 250 mW). Ultimately a voltage gain of 100 was measured at 5.7 K. Single calcium ions were confined in a trap driven by this device, providing proof of successful resonator operation at low temperature.

  13. Low-Heat-Leak Electrical Leads For Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Hooker, Matthew W.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical leads offering high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity developed for use in connecting electronic devices inside cryogenic systems to power supplies, signal-processing circuits, and other circuitry located in nearby warmer surroundings. Strip of superconductive leads on ceramic substrate, similar to ribbon cable, connects infrared detectors at temperature of liquid helium with warmer circuitry. Electrical leads bridging thermal gradient at boundary of cryogenic system designed both to minimize conduction of heat from surroundings through leads into system and to minimize resistive heating caused by electrical currents flowing in leads.

  14. Commissioning of the cryogenics of the LHC long straight sections

    SciTech Connect

    Perin, A.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Claudet, S.; Darve, C.; Ferlin, G.; Millet, F.; Parente, C.; Rabehl, R.; Soubiran, M.; van Weelderen, R.; Wagner, U.; /CERN

    2010-01-01

    The LHC is made of eight circular arcs interspaced with eight Long Straight Sections (LSS). Most powering interfaces to the LHC are located in these sections where the particle beams are focused and shaped for collision, cleaning and acceleration. The LSSs are constituted of several unique cryogenic devices and systems like electrical feed-boxes, standalone superconducting magnets, superconducting links, RF cavities and final focusing superconducting magnets. This paper presents the cryogenic commissioning and the main results obtained during the first operation of the LHC Long Straight Sections.

  15. Cryogenic measurements of a digital pixel readout integrated circuit for LWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafique, Atia; Yazici, Melik; Kayahan, Huseyin; Ceylan, Omer; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents and discusses the cryogenic temperature (77K) measurement results of a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) for a 32x32 long wavelength infrared pixel sensor array designed in 90nm CMOS process. The chip achieves a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 58dB with a charge handling capacity of 2.03Ge- at cryogenic temperature with 1.3mW of power dissipation. The performance of the readout is discussed in terms of power dissipation, charge handling capacity and SNR considering the fact that the process library models are not optimized for cryogenic temperature operation of the Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) devices. These results provide an insight to foresee the design confrontations due to non-optimized device models for cryogenic temperatures particularly for short channel devices

  16. Spacelab cryogenic propellant management experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Spacelab cryogen management experiment was performed to demonstrate toe desirability and feasibility of subcritical cryogenic fluid orbital storage and supply. A description of the experimental apparatus, definition of supporting requirements, procedures, data analysis, and a cost estimate are included.

  17. Cryogenic container compound suspension strap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W. (inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A support strap for use in a cryogenic storage vessel for supporting the inner shell from the outer shell with a minimum heat leak is presented. The compound suspension strap is made from a unidirectional fiberglass epoxy composite material with an ultimate tensile strength and fatigue strength which are approximately doubled when the material is cooled to a cryogenic temperature.

  18. Electromechanical Materials for Cryogenic Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidinger, Peter; Pilgrim, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    Electromechanical materials can be used in smart sensor and actuator devices. Yet none performing at low temperatures are available. To meet this need, Pb((MgNi)(1/3)Ta(2/3))03 was synthesized as an electrostrictive ceramic for applications in cryogenic environments. Employing the columbite precursor route, samples with 0% to 100% Ni substitution for Mg were prepared, but only samples with Ni-substitutions less than or equal to 20% yielded primarily the desired perovskite phase. For these compositions the temperature of highest permittivity decreased linearly with increasing Ni content to yield a minimum value of -124 C for 20% Ni-substitution. This composition showed good relaxor dielectric behavior with a maximum relative permittivity of 5890 at 1 kHz. Additionally, in samples with excess MgO, the magnitude of permittivity doubled. In this effort, Pb((MgNi)(1/3)Ta(2/3))03 (PMNiTa) was fabricated to lower its transition temperature by substituting Ni for Mg successively.

  19. The future of cryogenic propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palerm, S.; Bonhomme, C.; Guelou, Y.; Chopinet, J. N.; Danous, P.

    2015-07-01

    As the French Space Agency, CNES is funding an ambitious program to identify, develop and evaluate the technologies and skills that will enable to design cost efficient future launchers. This program deals together with, researches for mastering complex physical phenomena, set ups of robust and efficient numerical tools for design and justification, and identification of innovative manufacturing processes and hardware. It starts from low Technical Readiness Level (TRL 2) up to a maturation of TRL 6 with the use of demonstrators, level that allows to be ready for a development. This paper focuses on cryogenic propulsion activities conducted with SNECMA and French laboratories to prepare next generation engines. The physics in that type of hardware addresses a large range of highly complex phenomena, among them subcritical and supercritical combustion and possible associated High Frequency oscillations in combustion devices, tribology in bearings and seals, cavitation and rotordynamics in turbopump. The research activities conducted to master those physical phenomena are presented. Moreover, the operating conditions of these engines are very challenging, both thermally and mechanically. The innovative manufacturing processes and designs developed to cope with these conditions while filling cost reduction requirements are described. Finally, the associated demonstrators put in place to prepare the implementation of these new technologies on future engines are presented.

  20. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced NEP.

  1. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Laverdure, N.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D.; Barrios, M.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, F.

    2014-01-29

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  2. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Laverdure, Nathaniel A.; Knudsen, Peter N.; Arenius, Dana M.; Barrios, Matthew N.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  3. Cryogenic support member

    DOEpatents

    Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Gonczy, John D. (Oak Lawn, IL); Nicol, Thomas H. (Aurora, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic support member is comprised of a non-metallic rod having a depression in at least one end and a metallic end connection assembled to the rod. The metallic end connection comprises a metallic plug which conforms to the shape and is disposed in the depression and a metallic sleeve is disposed over the rod and plug. The plug and the sleeve are shrink-fitted to the depression in the rod to form a connection good in compression, tension and bending.

  4. Cryogenic insulation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonhard, K. E.

    1972-01-01

    Multilayer insulations for long term cryogenic storage are described. The development effort resulted in an insulation concept using lightweight radiation shields, separated by low conductive Dacron fiber tufts. The insulation is usually referred to as Superfloc. The fiber tufts are arranged in a triangular pattern and stand about .040 in. above the radiation shield base. Thermal and structural evaluation of Superfloc indicated that this material is a strong candidate for the development of high performance thermal protection systems because of its high strength, purge gas evacuation capability during boost, its density control and easy application to a tank.

  5. Cryogenic distribution for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect

    S. Jones, Dana Arenius, Adam Fila, P. Geutschow, Helmut Laumer, Matt Johnson, Cory S. Waltz, J. G. Weisend II

    2012-06-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a new National User Facility for nuclear science funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science and operated by Michigan State University. The FRIB accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) cavities operating at 2 K and SC magnets operating at 4.5 K all cooled by a large scale cryogenic refrigeration system. A major subsystem of the cryogenic system will be the distribution system whose primary components will include a distribution box, the transfer lines and the interconnect valve boxes at each cryogenic device. An overview of the conceptual design of the distribution system including engineering details, capabilities and schedule is described.

  6. Report on the first VLHC photon stop cryogenic design experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Geynisman et al.

    2003-09-15

    As part of Fermilab's study of a Very Large Hadron Collider, a water-cooled photon stop was proposed as a device to intercept the synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy proton beams in the high field superconducting magnets with minimal plug-cooling power. Photon stops are radiation absorbers operating at room temperature that protrude into the beam tube at the end of each bending magnet to scrape the synchrotron light emitted by the beam one magnet up-stream. Among the technological challenges regarding photon stops is their cryo-design. The photon stop is water-cooled and operates in a cryogenic environment. A careful cryo-design is therefore essential to enable operation at minimum heat transfer between the room temperature sections and the cryogenic parts. A photon stop cryo-design was developed and a prototype was built. This paper presents the results of the cryogenic experiments conducted on the first VLHC photon stop prototype.

  7. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive use of a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives data base, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented in 1986. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings relating the status of air liquefaction technology are presented both as a singular technical area, and also as that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; Heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; Para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; Hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; Hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sinks; Liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket type combustion devices; Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES); and Technically related engine concepts.

  8. Cryogenic optical lattice clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushijima, Ichiro; Takamoto, Masao; Das, Manoj; Ohkubo, Takuya; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of atomic clocks relies on the superb reproducibility of atomic spectroscopy, which is accomplished by careful control and the elimination of environmental perturbations on atoms. To date, individual atomic clocks have achieved a 10-18 level of total uncertainties, but a two-clock comparison at the 10-18 level has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate optical lattice clocks with 87Sr atoms interrogated in a cryogenic environment to address the blackbody radiation-induced frequency shift, which remains the primary source of systematic uncertainty and has initiated vigorous theoretical and experimental investigations. The systematic uncertainty for the cryogenic clock is evaluated to be 7.2?×?10-18, which is expedited by operating two such cryo-clocks synchronously. After 11 measurements performed over a month, statistical agreement between the two cryo-clocks reached 2.0?×?10-18. Such clocks' reproducibility is a major step towards developing accurate clocks at the low 10-18 level, and is directly applicable as a means for relativistic geodesy.

  9. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  10. Cryogenic Cooling for Myriad Applications-A STAR Is Born

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenics, the science of generating extremely low temperatures, has wide applicability throughout NASA. The Agency employs cryogenics for rocket propulsion, high-pressure gas supply, breathable air in space, life support equipment, electricity, water, food preservation and packaging, medicine, imaging devices, and electronics. Cryogenic liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen systems are also replacing solid rocket motor propulsion systems in most of the proposed launch systems, a reversion to old-style liquid propellants. In the late 1980s, NASA wanted a compact linear alternator/motor with reduced size and mass, as well as high efficiency, that had unlimited service life for use in a thermally driven power generator for space power applications. Prior development work with free-piston Stirling converters (a Stirling engine integrated with a linear actuator that produces electrical power output) had shown the promise of that technology for high-power space applications. A dual use for terrestrial applications exists for compact Stirling converters for onsite combined heat and power units. The Stirling cycle is also usable in reverse as a refrigeration cycle suitable for cryogenic cooling, so this Stirling converter work promised double benefits as well as dual uses. The uses for cryogenic coolers within NASA abound; commercial applications are similarly wide-ranging, from cooling liquid oxygen and nitrogen, to cryobiology and bio-storage, cryosurgery, instrument and detector cooling, semiconductor manufacturing, and support service for cooled superconducting power systems.

  11. A planar Al-Si Schottky barrier metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor operated at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purches, W. E.; Rossi, A.; Zhao, R.; Kafanov, S.; Duty, T. L.; Dzurak, A. S.; Rogge, S.; Tettamanzi, G. C.

    2015-08-01

    Schottky Barrier-MOSFET technology offers intriguing possibilities for cryogenic nano-scale devices, such as Si quantum devices and superconducting devices. We present experimental results on a device architecture where the gate electrode is self-aligned with the device channel and overlaps the source and drain electrodes. This facilitates a sub-5 nm gap between the source/drain and channel, and no spacers are required. At cryogenic temperatures, such devices function as p-MOS Tunnel FETs, as determined by the Schottky barrier at the Al-Si interface, and as a further advantage, fabrication processes are compatible with both CMOS and superconducting logic technology.

  12. Cryogenic insulation strength and bond tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerer, P. H.; Ehl, J. H.; Prasthofer, W. P. (inventors)

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing the tensile strength and bonding strength of sprayed-on foam insulation attached to metal cryogenic fuel tanks is described. A circular cutter is used to cut the insulation down to the surface of the metal tank to form plugs of the insulation for testing in situ on the tank. The apparatus comprises an electromechanical pulling device powered by a belt battery pack. The pulling device comprises a motor driving a mechanical pulling structure comprising a horizontal shaft connected to two bell cracks which are connected to a central member. When the lower end of member is attached to a fitting, which in turn is bonded to a plug, a pulling force is exerted on the plug sufficient to rupture it. The force necessary to rupture the plug or pull it loose is displayed as a digital read-out.

  13. On a cryogenic noble gas ion catcher

    E-print Network

    P. Dendooven; S. Purushothaman; K. Gloos

    2005-12-20

    In-situ purification of the gas used as stopping medium in a noble gas ion catcher by operating the device at low temperatures of 60 to 150 K was investigated. Alpha-decay recoil ions from a 223Ra source served as energetic probes. The combined ion survival and transport efficiencies for 219Rn ions saturated below about 90 K, reaching 28.7(17) % in helium, 22.1(13) % in neon, and 17.0(10) % in argon. These values may well reflect the charge exchange and stripping cross sections during the slowing down of the ions, and thus represent a fundamental upper limit for the efficiency of noble gas ion catcher devices. We suggest the cryogenic noble gas ion catcher as a technically simpler alternative to the ultra-high purity noble gas ion catcher operating at room temperature.

  14. Ultrastable Cryogenic Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Anthony G.

    Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are secondary frequency standards in the microwave domain. The best of these oscillators have demonstrated a short term frequency stability in the range 10-14 to a few times 10-16. The main application for these oscillators is as flywheel oscillators for the next generation of passive atomic frequency standards, and as local oscillators in space telemetry ground stations to clean up the transmitter close in phase noise. Fractional frequency stabilities of passive atomic frequency standards are now approaching 3 x10^-14 /? where ? is the measurement time, limited only by the number of atoms that are being interrogated. This requires an interrogation oscillator whose short-term stability is of the order of 10-14 or better, which cannot be provided by present-day quartz technology. Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are based on resonators which have very high electrical Q-factors. The resolution of the resonator's linewidth is typically limited by electronics noise to about 1ppm and hence Q-factors in excess of 108 are required. As these are only attained in superconducting cavities or sapphire resonators at low temperatures, use of liquid helium cooling is mandatory, which has so far restricted these oscillators to the research or metrology laboratory. Recently, there has been an effort to dispense with the need for liquid helium and make compact flywheel oscillators for the new generation of primary frequency standards. Work is under way to achieve this goal in space-borne and mobile liquid-nitrogen-cooled systems. The best cryogenic oscillators developed to date are the ``whispering gallery'' (WG) mode sapphire resonator-oscillators of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of Western Australia (UWA), as well as Stanford University's superconducting cavity stabilized oscillator (SCSO). All of these oscillators have demonstrated frequency stabilities in the range of a few times 10-15 to a few times 10-16. In this contribution we review only liquid-helium-cooled secondary frequency standards, such as those just mentioned, which have attained frequency stabilities of 10-14 or better.

  15. Cryogenic Fluid Transfer for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses current plans and issues for exploration that involve the use of cryogenic transfer. The benefits of cryogenic transfer to exploration missions are examined. The current state of the art of transfer technology is reviewed. Mission concepts of operation for exploration are presented, and used to qualitatively discuss the performance benefits of transfer. The paper looks at the challenges faced to implement a cryogenic transfer system and suggest approaches to address them with advanced development research. Transfer rates required for exploration are shown to have already been achieved in ground test. Cost effective approaches to the required on-orbit demonstration are suggested.

  16. Cryogenic Fluid Transfer for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses current plans and issues for exploration that involve the use of cryogenic transfer. The benefits of cryogenic transfer to exploration missions are examined. The current state of the art of transfer technology is reviewed. Mission concepts of operation for exploration are presented, and used to qualitatively discuss the performance benefits of transfer. The paper looks at the challenges faced to implement a cryogenic transfer system and suggest approaches to address them with advanced development research. Transfer rates required for exploration are shown to have already been achieved in ground test. Cost-effective approaches to the required on-orbit demonstration are suggested.

  17. Cryogenic cooler apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C. (Del Mar, CA); Paulson, Douglas N. (Del Mar, CA); Allen, Paul C. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A Malone-type final stage for utilization in a Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler apparatus includes a displacer slidable within a vessel. .sup.4 He, .sup.3 He, or a mixture thereof is made to flow in a pulsating unidirectional manner through a regenerator in the displacer by utilization of check valves in separate fluid channels. Stacked copper screen members extend through the channels and through a second static thermodynamic medium within the displacer to provide efficient lateral heat exchange and enable cooling to temperatures in the range of 3-4 K. Another embodiment utilizes sintered copper particles in the regenerator. Also described is a final stage that has a non-thermally conducting displacer having passages with check valves for directing fluid past a regenerator formed in the surrounding vessel.

  18. Cryogenic quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeown, D.; Sonnenschein, G.; Fox, M. G.

    1975-01-01

    A radiatively cooled Cryogenic Quartz Crystal Microbalance designed to monitor highly volatile contaminants on the shuttle is described. Measurements are made with two 15-MHz microbalances having removable, optically polished sensors mounted in a radiant cooler. One sensor operates below the freezing point of water and monitors contamination including that of water vapor. The second sensor is heated and monitors the contamination background. It provides a reference from which the density of the water vapor cloud enveloping the shuttle is determined. The design incorporates a low-power dissipation oscillator, heaters for ice removal, and a method for attaching second-surface mirrors to the radiator employing an indium type solder instead of a room temperature vulcanizer.

  19. Nanodielectrics for Cryogenic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Pace, Marshall O; More, Karren; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; Woodward, Jonathan; Rondinone, Adam Justin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report the recent advances in nanodielectrics that were developed and tested for cryogenic dielectric applications. The systems studied are composed of nanometer size particles. Particles were produced using either an ex-situ or in-situ technique. It is observed that there are clear differences in the structural properties of materials produced using these two approaches. Either no significant degradation or improvement in the electrical insulation properties were observed for ex-situ nano-particle samples processed with an ultrasonic processor and in-situ nano-particle samples. Nanodielectrics have the potential to be tailored with better thermal and mechanical properties without losing their electrical insulation characteristics.

  20. Cryogenic nuclear gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gallop, J.C.; Potts, S.P.

    1980-09-30

    A cryogenic nuclear gyroscope is described that is comprised of a cylinder of niobium cooled within a helium cryostat so as to be superconducting and to provide a trapped, substantially homogeneous magnetic field, a helium-3 sample contained within a spherical pyrex cell having nuclei possessing a net magnetic moment, coils provided to polarize the sample to provide that net magnetic moment, and a SQUID magnetometer coupled to the sample by a pick-up coil of a transformer and frequency sensitive means coupled to the SQUID to detect changes in the precession of the nuclear moments of the sample caused by rotation of the gyroscope about an axis parallel to the direction of the homogeneous magnetic field. A superconducting lead shield isolates the helium-3 sample from external magnetic fields.

  1. Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, David

    2011-01-01

    The CPS is an in-space cryogenic propulsive stage based largely on state of the practice design for launch vehicle upper stages. However, unlike conventional propulsive stages, it also contains power generation and thermal control systems to limit the loss of liquid hydrogen and oxygen due to boil-off during extended in-space storage. The CPS provides the necessary (Delta)V for rapid transfer of in-space elements to their destinations or staging points (i.e., E-M L1). The CPS is designed around a block upgrade strategy to provide maximum mission/architecture flexibility. Block 1 CPS: Short duration flight times (hours), passive cryo fluid management. Block 2 CPS: Long duration flight times (days/weeks/months), active and passive cryo fluid management.

  2. Cryogenic cooler apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Paulson, D.N.; Allen, P.C.

    1983-01-04

    A Malone-type final stage for utilization in a Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler apparatus includes a displacer slidable within a vessel. [sup 4]He, [sup 3]He, or a mixture thereof is made to flow in a pulsating unidirectional manner through a regenerator in the displacer by utilization of check valves in separate fluid channels. Stacked copper screen members extend through the channels and through a second static thermodynamic medium within the displacer to provide efficient lateral heat exchange and enable cooling to temperatures in the range of 3--4 K. Another embodiment utilizes sintered copper particles in the regenerator. Also described is a final stage that has a non-thermally conducting displacer having passages with check valves for directing fluid past a regenerator formed in the surrounding vessel. 10 figs.

  3. Cryogenic Two-Phase Flight Experiment: Results overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, T.; Buchko, M.; Brennan, P.; Bello, M.; Stoyanof, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper focuses on the flight results of the Cryogenic Two-Phase Flight Experiment (CRYOTP), which was a Hitchhiker based experiment that flew on the space shuttle Columbia in March of 1994 (STS-62). CRYOTP tested two new technologies for advanced cryogenic thermal control; the Space Heat Pipe (SHP), which was a constant conductance cryogenic heat pipe, and the Brilliant Eyes Thermal Storage Unit (BETSU), which was a cryogenic phase-change thermal storage device. These two devices were tested independently during the mission. Analysis of the flight data indicated that the SHP was unable to start in either of two attempts, for reasons related to the fluid charge, parasitic heat leaks, and cryocooler capacity. The BETSU test article was successfully operated with more than 250 hours of on-orbit testing including several cooldown cycles and 56 freeze/thaw cycles. Some degradation was observed with the five tactical cryocoolers used as thermal sinks, and one of the cryocoolers failed completely after 331 hours of operation. Post-flight analysis indicated that this problem was most likely due to failure of an electrical controller internal to the unit.

  4. Cryogenic dielectric resonators for future microwave communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, N.; Winter, M.; Yi, H. R.

    2000-05-01

    Recent progress in manufacturing dielectric ceramics and single crystals with high dielectric constant and low microwave losses has turned out to be a challenge for the development of novel devices for satellite communication. From this development device performance is expected to benefit for possible device operation temperatures ranging from cryogenic temperatures around 50-150 K (achievable with one-stage closed cycle refrigerators) over temperatures from 150 to 200 K (in principal achievable with radiation cooling) towards room temperature, if novel dielectric resonator structures with lower loss contribution of the metallic housing became available.

  5. Cryogenic liquid level measuring probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinkel, J. A.; Wegner, C. R.

    1968-01-01

    Universal probe, which contains a unique frequency discriminator, measures the static and dynamic levels of cryogenic liquids in a hydrogen bubble chamber. The probe allows boiling conditions or other turbulence to be observed throughout all the transition stages.

  6. Introduction to cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The background to the evolution of the cryogenic wind tunnel is outlined, with particular reference to the late 60's/early 70's when efforts were begun to re-equip with larger wind tunnels. The problems of providing full scale Reynolds numbers in transonic testing were proving particularly intractible, when the notion of satisfying the needs with the cryogenic tunnel was proposed, and then adopted. The principles and advantages of the cryogenic tunnel are outlined, along with guidance on the coolant needs when this is liquid nitrogen, and with a note on energy recovery. Operational features of the tunnels are introduced with reference to a small low speed tunnel. Finally the outstanding contributions are highlighted of the 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) at NASA Langley Research Center, and its personnel, to the furtherance of knowledge and confidence in the concept.

  7. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  8. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  9. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  10. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  11. Superconducting thermometer for cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Digital electronic device uses superconducting filaments as sensors. Simple solid-state circuitry combined with filaments comprise highly-reliable temperature monitor. Device has ability to track very fast thermal transients and "on/off" output is adaptable to remote sensing and telemetry.

  12. The integration of liquid cryogen cooling and cryocoolers withsuperconducting electronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-07-09

    The need for cryogenic cooling has been a critical issuethat has kept superconducting electronic devices from reaching the marketplace. Even though the performance of many of the superconductingcircuits is superior to silicon electronics, the requirement forcryogenic cooling has put the superconducting devices at a seriousdisadvantage. This report discusses the process of refrigeratingsuperconducting devices with cryogenic liquids and small cryocoolers.Three types of cryocoolers are compared for vibration, efficiency, andreliability. The connection of a cryocooler to the load is discussed. Acomparison of using flexible copper straps to carry the heat load andusing heat pipe is shown. The type of instrumentation needed formonitoring and controlling the cooling is discussed.

  13. R&D ERL: Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect

    Than, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL cryogenic system will supply cooling to a super-conducting RF (SCRF) gun and the 5-cell super-conducting RF cavity system that need to be held cold at 2K. The engineering of the cavity cryomodules were carried out by AES in collaboration with BNL. The 2K superfluid bath is produced by pumping on the bath using a sub-atmospheric warm compression system. The cryogenic system makes use of mainly existing equipment relocated from other facilities: a 300W 4.5K coldbox, an 45 g/s screw compressor, a 3800 liter liquid helium storage dewar, a 170 m{sup 3} warm gas storage tank, and a 40,000 liter vertical low pressure liquid nitrogen storage dewar. An existing wet expander obtained from another facility has been added to increase the plant capacity. In order to deliver the required 3 to 4 bar helium to the cryomodules while using up stored liquid capacity at low pressure, a new subcooler will be installed to function as the capacity transfer device. A 2K to 4K recovery heat exchanger is also implemented for each cryomodule to recover refrigeration below 4K, thus maximizing 2K cooling capacity with the given sub-atmospheric pump. No 4K-300K refrigeration recovery is implemented at this time of the returning sub-atmospheric cold vapor, hence the 2K load appears as a liquefaction1 load on the cryogenic plant. A separate LN2 cooling loop supplies liquid nitrogen to the superconducting gun's cathode tip.

  14. Polyamide 66 as a Cryogenic Dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Messman, Jamie M; Aytug, Tolga

    2009-01-01

    Improvements in superconductor and cryogenic technologies enable novel power apparatus, \\eg, cables, transformers, fault current limiters, generators, \\etc, with better device characteristics than their conventional counterparts. In these applications electrical insulation materials play an important role in system weight, footprint (size), and voltage level. The trend in the electrical insulation material selection has been to adapt or to employ conventional insulation materials to these new systems. However, at low temperatures, thermal contraction and loss of mechanical strength in many materials make them unsuitable for superconducting power applications. In this paper, a widely used commercial material was characterized as a potential cryogenic dielectric. The material is used in ``oven bag'' a heat-resistant polyamide (nylon) used in cooking (produced by Reynolds\\textregistered, Richmond, VA, USA). It is first characterized by Fourier transform infrared and x-ray diffraction techniques and determined to be composed of polyamide 66 (PA66) polymer. Secondly the complex dielectric permittivity and dielectric breakdown strength of the PA66 films are investigated. The dielectric data are then compared with data reported in the literature. A comparison of dielectric strength with a widely used high-temperature superconductor electrical insulation material, polypropylene-laminated paper (PPLP\\texttrademark\\ a product of Sumitomo Electric Industries, Japan), is provided. It is observed that the statistical analysis of the PA66 films yields 1\\% failure probability at $127\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$; this value is approximately $46\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$ higher than PPLP\\texttrademark. It is concluded that PA66 may be a good candidate for cryogenic applications. Finally, a summary of dielectric properties of some of the commercial tape insulation materials and various polymers is also provided.

  15. Cryogenic refrigeration. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development and applications of cryogenic refrigeration technology. Citations discuss performance evaluations of specific systems, equipment descriptions, the cooling of instrumentation, superconducting devices, reactor devices, and applications in satellites and spaceborne vehicles. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Cryogenic refrigeration. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development and applications of cryogenic refrigeration technology. Citations discuss performance evaluations of specific systems, equipment descriptions, the cooling of instrumentation, superconducting devices, reactor devices, and applications in satellites and spaceborne vehicles. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Cryogenic refrigeration. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development and applications of cryogenic refrigeration technology. Citations discuss performance evaluations of specific systems, equipment descriptions, the cooling of instrumentation, superconducting devices, reactor devices, and applications in satellites and spaceborne vehicles. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Experimental Observations on Material Damping at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Chia-Yen; Levine, Marie; Shido, Lillian; Leland, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a unique experimental facility designed to measure damping of materials at cryogenic temperatures for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The test facility removes other sources of damping in the measurement by avoiding frictional interfaces, decoupling the test specimen from the support system, and by using a non-contacting measurement device. Damping data reported herein are obtained for materials (Aluminum, Aluminum/Terbium/Dysprosium, Titanium, Composites) vibrating in free-free bending modes with low strain levels (< 10(exp -6) ppm). The fundamental frequencies of material samples are ranged from 14 to 202 Hz. To provide the most beneficial data relevant to TPF-like precision optical space missions, the damping data are collected from room temperatures (around 293 K) to cryogenic temperatures (below 40 K) at unevenly-spaced intervals. More data points are collected over any region of interest. The test data shows a significant decrease in viscous damping at cryogenic temperatures. The cryogenic damping can be as low as 10(exp -4) %, but the amount of the damping decrease is a function of frequency and material. However, Titanium 15-3-3-3 shows a remarkable increase in damping at cryogenic temperatures. It demonstrates over one order of magnitude increase in damping in comparison to Aluminum 6061-T6. Given its other properties (e.g., good stiffness and low conductivity) this may prove itself to be a good candidate for the application on TPF. At room temperatures, the test data are correlated well with the damping predicted by the Zener theory. However, large discrepancies at cryogenic temperatures between the Zener theory and the test data are observed.

  19. Ultralow noise current amplifier based on a cryogenic current comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, F.; Piquemal, F.; Genevès, G.

    2000-12-01

    This article describes the development of a current amplifier operating at 4.2 K designed for very low current measurements. A cryogenic current comparator with a winding ratio of 10 000/1, a low noise dc superconducting quantum interference device, and a very efficient magnetic shield are combined to reach an equivalent input noise of 4 fA/?Hz in the signal bandwidth and a flicker noise corner around 0.5 Hz.

  20. Cryogenic Neutron Spectrometer Development

    SciTech Connect

    Niedermayr, T; Hau, I D; Friedrich, S; Burger, A; Roy, U N; Bell, Z W

    2006-03-08

    Cryogenic microcalorimeter detectors operating at temperatures around {approx}0.1 K have been developed for the last two decades, driven mostly by the need for ultra-high energy resolution (<0.1%) in X-ray astrophysics and dark matter searches [1]. The Advanced Detector Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed different cryogenic detector technologies for applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to nuclear science and non-proliferation. In particular, we have adapted cryogenic detector technologies for ultra-high energy resolution gamma-spectroscopy [2] and, more recently, fast-neutron spectroscopy [3]. Microcalorimeters are essentially ultra-sensitive thermometers that measure the energy of the radiation from the increase in temperature upon absorption. They consist of a sensitive superconducting thermometer operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state, where its resistance changes very rapidly with temperature such that even the minute energies deposited by single radiation quanta are sufficient to be detectable with high precision. The energy resolution of microcalorimeters is fundamentally limited by thermal fluctuations to {Delta}E{sub FWHM} {approx} 2.355 (k{sub B}T{sup 2}C{sub abs}){sup 1/2}, and thus allows an energy below 1 keV for neutron spectrometers for an operating temperature of T {approx} 0.1 K . The {Delta}E{sub FWHM} does not depend on the energy of the incident photon or particle. This expression is equivalent to the familiar (F{var_epsilon}E{sub {gamma}}){sup 1/2} considering that an absorber at temperature T contains a total energy C{sub abs}T, and the associated fluctuation are due to variations in uncorrelated (F=1) phonons ({var_epsilon} = k{sub B}T) dominated by the background energy C{sub abs}T >> E{gamma}. The rationale behind developing a cryogenic neutron spectrometer is the very high energy resolution combined with the high efficiency. Additionally, the response function is simple and the instrument is transportable. We are currently developing a fast neutron spectrometer with 0.1% energy resolution at 1 MeV neutron energy with an efficiency of > 1%. Our fast-neutron spectrometers use boron-based and {sup 6}LiF absorber crystals with Mo/Cu thermistors readout. They have achieved an energy resolution of 5.5 keV FWHM for 2.79 MeV deposited in {sup 10}B by thermal neutron capture (fig. 1), and 46 keV FWHM for fast (MeV) neutrons absorbed in {sup 6}LiF (fig. 2). Since the energy resolution does not depend on the neutron energy, we expect a similar energy resolution for MeV neutron energies. The response function is given simply by the cross section of the capture reaction, offset from zero by the Q-value of the capture reaction. This allows straightforward discrimination against gamma-events, most of which deposit less that Q{sub 6Li} = 4.79 MeV in the {sup 6}LiF absorber, and easy deconvolution of the neutron spectrum, since there is only a single capture reaction in {sup 6}Li and the spectrum is not affected by edge effects or geometric broadening. The current challenge for microcalorimeters is their necessarily small effective pixel area, {approx}1cm{sup 3} for neutron spectrometer pixels, and their slow decay time, {approx}10ms for neutron spectrometers. The pixel size is limited by the requirement for low Cabs for high energy resolution; the decay time is set by the intrinsically weak thermal coupling between materials at low temperatures. Both issues can be addressed by fabricating large detector arrays. This will enable high-precision neutron spectrometry with high statistics, such as simulated for Pu analysis in fig 3.

  1. Collapsible Cryogenic Storage Vessel Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Collapsible cryogenic storage vessels may be useful for future space exploration missions by providing long-term storage capability using a lightweight system that can be compactly packaged for launch. Previous development efforts have identified an 'inflatable' concept as most promising. In the inflatable tank concept, the cryogen is contained within a flexible pressure wall comprised of a flexible bladder to contain the cryogen and a fabric reinforcement layer for structural strength. A flexible, high-performance insulation jacket surrounds the vessel. The weight of the tank and the cryogen is supported by rigid support structures. This design concept is developed through physical testing of a scaled pressure wall, and through development of tests for a flexible Layered Composite Insulation (LCI) insulation jacket. A demonstration pressure wall is fabricated using Spectra fabric for reinforcement, and burst tested under noncryogenic conditions. An insulation test specimens is prepared to demonstrate the effectiveness of the insulation when subject to folding effects, and to examine the effect of compression of the insulation under compressive loading to simulate the pressure effect in a nonrigid insulation blanket under the action atmospheric pressure, such as would be seen in application on the surface of Mars. Although pressure testing did not meet the design goals, the concept shows promise for the design. The testing program provides direction for future development of the collapsible cryogenic vessel concept.

  2. Cryogenic magnetic force microscope M. Rosemana)

    E-print Network

    Grütter, Peter

    Cryogenic magnetic force microscope M. Rosemana) and P. Gru¨tter Centre for the Physics for publication 27 June 2000 We describe our cryogenic magnetic force microscope, operating between 4.2 and 300 K

  3. Cryogenic 3D printing for tissue engineering.

    E-print Network

    Adamkiewicz, M; Rubinsky, B

    2015-01-01

    was cooled by liquid nitrogen. B) A cryogenic 3D printedcryogenic 3D printing has failed because the object was not immersed during printing in liquidliquid is dispensed through a syringe. B) A photograph of the assembled cryogenic

  4. Analysis of the cryogenic system behavior for pulsed heat load in EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, L. B.; Zhuang, M.; Zhou, Z. W.; Xia, G. H.

    2014-01-29

    EAST is the first full superconducting fusion device. The plasma is confined by the magnetic fields generated from a large set of superconducting magnets which are made of cable in-conduit conductor (CICC). In operation, these magnets suffer heat loads from thermal and nuclear radiation from the surrounding components and plasma as well as the eddy currents and the AC losses generated within the magnets, together with the heat conduction through supports and the resistive heat generated at the current lead transiting to room temperature. The cryogenic system of our EAST consists of a 2kW/4K helium refrigerator and a distribution system for the cooling of poloidal field (PF) and toroidal field (TF) coils, structures, thermal shields, buslines and current leads. Pulsed heat load is the main difference between the cryogenic system of a full superconducting Tokamak system and other large scale cryogenic systems. The cryogenic system operates in a pulsed heat loads mode requiring the helium refrigerator to remove periodically large heat loads in time. At the same time, the cryogenic system parameters such as helium cooling superconducting magnets, helium refrigerator and helium distribution system are changing. In this paper, the variation range of the parameters of superconducting magnets and refrigerator has been analyzed in the typical plasma discharge mode. The control scheme for the pulsed loads characteristics of the cryogenic system has been proposed, the implementation of which helps to smooth the pulse loads and to improve the stability of the operation of the cryogenic system.

  5. Advances in Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors

    E-print Network

    A. Buzulutskov

    2015-03-29

    Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors (CRADs) are referred to as a new class of noble-gas detectors operated at cryogenic temperatures with electron avalanching performed directly in the detection medium, the latter being in gaseous, liquid or two-phase (liquid-gas) state. Electron avalanching is provided by Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) multipliers, in particular GEMs and THGEMs, operated at cryogenic temperatures in dense noble gases. The final goal for this kind of detectors is the development of large-volume detectors of ultimate sensitivity for rare-event experiments and medical applications, such as coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, direct dark matter search, astrophysical (solar and supernova) neutrino detection experiments and Positron Emission Tomography technique. This review is the first attempt to summarize the results on CRAD performances obtained by different groups. A brief overview of the available CRAD concepts is also given and the most remarkable CRAD physics effects are discussed.

  6. Magnet cryogenic system update Yury Ivanyushenkov

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    CERN P186 Magnet cryogenic system update Yury Ivanyushenkov RAL December 7, 2004 #12;Liquid drop of 1.34 bar for 500 g/s #12;Cryogenic system cost estimate (Preliminary and not official !) 86 Installation manpower 25 25 Deinstallation 10 10 Operation 1) cryogenics team -surface tests 250 shots 20 20

  7. Cryogenic low energy electron point source microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2006-04-15

    The design and performance of a cryogenic low energy electron point source microscope are described. The microscope can be immersed in liquid helium, thus allowing for investigations at cryogenic temperatures. The cryogenic environment is associated with a low fluctuation in the field emission electron beam current and, combined with a compact and rigid mechanical design, low mechanical drift characteristics.

  8. Developments and Cryogenic Measurements of an Optical

    E-print Network

    Developments and Cryogenic Measurements of an Optical Transducer for the Gravitational Wave. Photograph by European Southern Observatory, 17 November 1999. #12;Developments and Cryogenic Measurements....................................... 4.7 Measurements of the resonator mechanical Q........................ 4.7.1 Cryogenic Run 1

  9. Gauging Systems Monitor Cryogenic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Rocket fuel needs to stay cool - super cool, in fact. The ability to store gas propellants like liquid hydrogen and oxygen at cryogenic temperatures (below -243 F) is crucial for space missions in order to reduce their volumes and allow their storage in smaller (and therefore, less costly) tanks. The Agency has used these cryogenic fluids for vehicle propellants, reactants, and life support systems since 1962 with the Centaur upper stage rocket, which was powered with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. During proposed long-duration missions, super-cooled fluids will also be used in space power systems, spaceports, and lunar habitation systems. In the next generation of launch vehicles, gaseous propellants will be cooled to and stored for extended periods at even colder temperatures than currently employed via a process called densification. Densification sub-cools liquids to temperatures even closer to absolute zero (-459 F), increasing the fluid s density and shrinking its volume beyond common cryogenics. Sub-cooling cryogenic liquid hydrogen, for instance, from 20 K (-423 F) to 15 K (-432.4 F) reduces its mass by 10 percent. These densified liquid gases can provide more cost savings from reduced payload volume. In order to benefit from this cost savings, the Agency is working with private industry to prevent evaporation, leakage, and other inadvertent loss of liquids and gases in payloads - requiring new cryogenic systems to prevent 98 percent (or more) of boil-off loss. Boil-off occurs when cryogenic or densified liquids evaporate, and is a concern during launch pad holds. Accurate sensing of propellants aboard space vehicles is also critical for proper engine shutdown and re-ignition after launch, and zero boil-off fuel systems are also in development for the Altair lunar lander.

  10. A piezoelectric cryogenic heat switch.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Amir E; Sullivan, Dan F

    2014-06-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios of about 100-200 at lowest and highest measures temperature were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N, respectively. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an ideal PZHS. PMID:24985863

  11. Cryogenic thermal diode heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.

    1979-01-01

    The development of spiral artery cryogenic thermal diode heat pipes was continued. Ethane was the working fluid and stainless steel the heat pipe material in all cases. The major tasks included: (1) building a liquid blockage (blocking orifice) thermal diode suitable for the HEPP space flight experiment; (2) building a liquid trap thermal diode engineering model; (3) retesting the original liquid blockage engineering model, and (4) investigating the startup dynamics of artery cryogenic thermal diodes. An experimental investigation was also conducted into the wetting characteristics of ethane/stainless steel systems using a specially constructed chamber that permitted in situ observations.

  12. Programmable 2-D Addressable Cryogenic Aperture Masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutyrev, A. S.; Moseley, S. H.; Jhabvala, M.; Li, M.; Schwinger, D. S.; Silverberg, R. F.; Wesenberg, R. P.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing a two-dimensional array of square microshutters (programmable aperture mask) for a multi-object spectrometer for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This device will provide random access selection of the areas in the field to be studied. The device is in essence a close packed array of square slits, each of which can be opened independently to select areas of the sky for detailed study.The device is produced using a 100-micron thick silicon wafer as a substrate with 0.5-micron thick silicon nitride shutters on top of it. Silicon nitride has been selected as the blade and flexure material because its stiffness allows thinner and lighter structures than single crystal Si, the chief alternative, and because of its ease of manufacture. The 100 micron silicon wafer is backetched in a high aspect ratio Deep Reactive Ion Etching (Deep RIE) to leave only a support grid for the shutters and the address electronics. The shutter actuation is done magnetically whereas addressing is electrostatic. 128x128 format microshutter arrays have been produced. Their operation has been demostarted on 32x32 subarrays. Good reliability of the fabrication process and good quality of the microshutters has been achieved. The mechanical behavior and optical performance of the fabricated arrays at cryogenic temperature are being studied.

  13. Thermal lensing in cryogenic sapphire substrates

    E-print Network

    Takayuki Tomaru; Toshikazu Suzuki; Shinji Miyoki; Takashi Uchiyama; C. T. Taylor; Akira Yamamoto; Takakazu Shintomi; Masatake Ohashi; Kazuaki Kuroda

    2002-02-12

    We report the reduction of the thermal lensing in cryogenic sapphire mirrors, which is planed to be used in the Large scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope (LCGT) project. We measured three key parameters of sapphire substrate for thermal lensing at cryogenic temperature. They are optical absorption coefficient, thermal conductivity and temperature coefficient of refractive index at cryogenic temperature. On basis of these measurements, we estimated the shot noise sensitivity of the interferometer with thermal lensing by using a wave-front tracing simulation. We found that thermal lensing in cryogenic sapphire mirrors is negligible.

  14. Sources of Cryogenic Data and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohling, R. A.; Hufferd, W. L.; Marquardt, E. D.

    It is commonly known that cryogenic data, technology, and information are applied across many military, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and civilian product lines. Before 1950, however, there was no centralized US source of cryogenic technology data. The Cryogenic Data Center of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) maintained a database of cryogenic technical documents that served the national need well from the mid 1950s to the early 1980s. The database, maintained on a mainframe computer, was a highly specific bibliography of cryogenic literature and thermophysical properties that covered over 100 years of data. In 1983, however, the Cryogenic Data Center was discontinued when NBS's mission and scope were redefined. In 1998, NASA contracted with the Chemical Propulsion Information Agency (CPIA) and Technology Applications, Inc. (TAI) to reconstitute and update Cryogenic Data Center information and establish a self-sufficient entity to provide technical services for the cryogenic community. The Cryogenic Information Center (CIC) provided this service until 2004, when it was discontinued due to a lack of market interest. The CIC technical assets were distributed to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Plans are under way in 2006 for CPIA to launch an e-commerce cryogenic website to offer bibliography data with capability to download cryogenic documents.

  15. Foam shell cryogenic ICF target

    DOEpatents

    Darling, Dale H. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A uniform cryogenic layer of DT fuel is maintained in a fusion target having a low density, small pore size, low Z rigid foam shell saturated with liquid DT fuel. Capillary action prevents gravitational slumping of the fuel layer. The saturated shell may be cooled to produce a solid fuel layer.

  16. Gravity Probe B cryogenic payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, C. W. F.; Parmley, R.; Taber, M.; Bencze, W.; Burns, K.; Frank, D.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Mester, J.; Muhlfelder, B.; Murray, D.; Reynolds, G.; Till, W.; Vassar, R.

    2015-11-01

    This paper gives a detailed account of the Gravity Probe B cryogenic payload comprised of a unique Dewar and Probe. The design, fabrication, assembly, and ground and on-orbit performance will be discussed, culminating in a 17 month 9 day on-orbit liquid helium lifetime.

  17. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  18. Status Of Sorption Cryogenic Refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews sorption refrigeration. Developed for cooling infrared detectors, cryogenic research, and other advanced applications, sorption refrigerators have few moving parts, little vibration, and lifetimes of 10 years or more. Describes types of sorption stages, multistage and hybrid refrigeration systems, power requirements, cooling capacities, and advantages and disadvantages of various stages and systems.

  19. Dust Charge in Cryogenic Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, J.; Kojima, C.; Sekine, W.; Ishihara, O.

    2008-09-07

    Dust charges in a complex helium gas plasma, surrounded by cryogenic liquid, are studied experimentally. The charge is determined by frequency and equilibrium position of damped dust oscillation proposed by Tomme et al.(2000) and is found to decrease with ion temperature of the complex plasma.

  20. Cryogenic MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinreb, S.; Gaier, T.; Fernandez, J.; Erickson, N.; Wielgus, J.

    2000-01-01

    Monolithic (MMIC) and discrete transistor (MIC) low noise amplifiers are compared on the basis of performance, cost, and reliability. The need for cryogenic LNA's for future large microwave arrays for radio astronomy is briefly discussed and data is presented on a prototype LNA for the 1 to 10 GZH range along with a very wideband LNA for the 1 to 60 GHz range.

  1. ILC cryogenic systems reference design

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.J.; Geynisman, M.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Parma, V.; Tavian, L.; /CERN

    2008-01-01

    A Global Design Effort (GDE) began in 2005 to study a TeV scale electron-positron linear accelerator based on superconducting radio-frequency (RF) technology, called the International Linear Collider (ILC). In early 2007, the design effort culminated in a reference design for the ILC, closely based on the earlier TESLA design. The ILC will consist of two 250 GeV linacs, which provide positron-electron collisions for high energy physics research. The particle beams will be accelerated to their final energy in superconducting niobium RF cavities operating at 2 kelvin. At a length of about 12 km each, the main linacs will be the largest cryogenic systems in the ILC. Positron and electron sources, damping rings, and beam delivery systems will also have a large number and variety of other superconducting RF cavities and magnets, which require cooling at liquid helium temperatures. Ten large cryogenic plants with 2 kelvin refrigeration are envisioned to cool the main linacs and the electron and positron sources. Three smaller cryogenic plants will cool the damping rings and beam delivery system components predominately at 4.5 K. This paper describes the cryogenic systems concepts for the ILC.

  2. 49 CFR 178.338-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... tube gauging devices and pressure gauges in flammable cryogenic liquid service must be restricted at or... Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid level gauging devices... gauging devices, which accurately indicate the maximum permitted liquid level at the loading pressure,...

  3. 49 CFR 178.338-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... tube gauging devices and pressure gauges in flammable cryogenic liquid service must be restricted at or... Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid level gauging devices... gauging devices, which accurately indicate the maximum permitted liquid level at the loading pressure,...

  4. 49 CFR 178.338-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... tube gauging devices and pressure gauges in flammable cryogenic liquid service must be restricted at or... Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid level gauging devices... gauging devices, which accurately indicate the maximum permitted liquid level at the loading pressure,...

  5. 49 CFR 178.338-14 - Gauging devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... tube gauging devices and pressure gauges in flammable cryogenic liquid service must be restricted at or... Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-14 Gauging devices. (a) Liquid level gauging devices... gauging devices, which accurately indicate the maximum permitted liquid level at the loading pressure,...

  6. Microwave properties of Yttrium Vanadate at cryogenic temperatures

    E-print Network

    Jacob, Mohan V; Krupka, Jerzy; Ledenyov, Dimitri O; Takeuchi, Seiichi

    2012-01-01

    Yttrium Vanadate (YVO4) is a birefringent crystal material used in optical isolators and circulators with potentials for application in cryogenic microwave devices. As microwave properties of the YVO4 are not known, we measured the complex permittivity at the frequency of 25 GHz, using the Hakki-Coleman dielectric resonator technique in the temperature range from 13 K to 80 K. The real part of relative permittivity of YVO4 turned out to be similar to that of Sapphire - one of popular dielectric materials, used at microwave frequencies. The measured loss tangent tang {\\delta} of the YVO4 was of the order of 10^(-6) at cryogenic temperatures. As Yttrium Vanadate (YVO4) is easy to synthesis and machine, it may replace the expensive Sapphire in some microwave applications.

  7. Reliability of Electronics for Cryogenic Space Applications Being Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    Many future NASA missions will require electronic parts and circuits that can operate reliably and efficiently in extreme temperature environments below typical device specification temperatures. These missions include the Mars Exploration Laboratory, the James Webb Space Telescope, the Europa Orbiter, surface rovers, and deep-space probes. In addition to NASA, the aerospace and commercial sectors require cryogenic electronics in applications that include advanced satellites, military hardware, medical instrumentation, magnetic levitation, superconducting energy management and distribution, particle confinement and acceleration, and arctic missions. Besides surviving hostile space environments, electronics capable of low-temperature operation would enhance circuit performance, improve system reliability, extend lifetime, and reduce development and launch costs. In addition, cryogenic electronics are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature.

  8. Cryogenic Electronics Being Developed for Space Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott S.

    2002-01-01

    Planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electrical power management and control systems that can operate efficiently and reliably in very low temperature environments. Presently, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units to maintain the surrounding temperature of the onboard electronics at approximately 20 C. Electronics capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures would not only tolerate the hostile environment of deep space but also reduce system size and weight by eliminating or reducing the radioisotope heating units and their associate structures. Thereby, such electronics would reduce system development as well as launch costs. In addition, power electronic circuits designed for operation at low temperatures are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature. This improvement results because semiconductor and dielectric materials have better behavior and tolerance in their electrical and thermal properties at low temperatures. The Low Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center is focusing on the research and development of electrical components, circuits, and systems suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and in deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices and systems for reliable use down to cryogenic temperatures. Some of the commercial off-the-shelf as well as developed components that are being characterized include semiconductor switching devices, resistors, magnetics, and capacitors. Semiconductor devices and integrated circuits including digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters, dc-dc converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators are also being investigated for potential use in low-temperature applications. For example, the output response of an advanced oscillator at room temperature and at -190 C is shown. Most oscillators can operate at temperatures down to only -55 C. It can be seen that, for this oscillator, the low temperature of -196 C changed the leading and trailing edges of the oscillator pulses by producing overshoot. The research and development efforts performed under the Low Temperature Electronics Program at Glenn are being carried out through collaboration with other Government agencies, industrial and aerospace companies, and academia. The program supports missions as well as technology development efforts at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and Langley Research Center, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  9. Feasibility study for a Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot-Storage, Acquisition and Transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybak, S. C.; Willen, G. S.; Follett, W. H.; Hanna, G. J.; Cady, E. C.; Distefano, E.; Meserole, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    This feasibility study presents the conceptual design of a spacecraft for performing a series of cryogenic fluid management flight experiments. This spacecraft, the Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot-Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite, will use liquid hydrogen as the test fluid, be launched on a Delta expendable launch vehicle, and conduct a series of experiments over a two to three month period. These experiments will investigate the physics of subcritical cryogens in the low gravity space environment to characterize their behavior and to correlate the data with analytical and numerical models of in-space cryogenic fluid management systems. Primary technologies addressed by COLD-SAT are: (1) pressure control; (2) chilldown; (3) no-vent fill; (4) liquid acquisition device fill; (5) pressurization; (6) low-g fill and drain; (7) liquid acquisition device expulsion; (8) line chilldown; (9) thermodynamic state control; and (10) fluid dumping.

  10. Cryogenics and the Human Exploration of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current plans within NASA involve extending the human exploration of space from low earth orbit into the solar system, with the first human exploration of Mars presently planned in 2011. Integral to all hum Mars mission phases is cryogenic fluid management. Cryogenic fluids will be required both as propellant and for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Without safe and efficient cryogen storage human Mars missions will not be possible. Effective control and handling of cryogenic fluids is the key to affordable Mars missions, and advancing active thermal control technology is synergistic with all of NASA's exploration initiatives and with existing and future instrument cooling programs, including MTPE and Origins. Present mission scenarios for human exploration require cryogenic propellant storage for up to 1700 days and for up to 60 metric tons. These requirements represent increases of an order of magnitude over previous storage masses and lifetimes. The key cryogenic terminology areas to be addressed in human Mars missions are long-term propellant storage, cryogenic refrigeration, cryogenic liquefaction, and zero gravity fluid management. Long-term storage for the thermal control of cryogenic propellants is best accomplished with a mix of passive and active technologies. Passive technologies such as advanced multilayer insulation (MLI) concepts will be combined with the development of active coolers (cryogenic refrigerators). Candidates for long-life active cooling applications include Reverse Turbo-Brayton, Stirling, and Pulse-Tube coolers. The integration of passive and active technologies will form a hybrid system optimized to minimize the launch mass while preserving the cryogenic propellants. Since cryogenic propellants are the largest mass that Mars missions must launch from earth, even a modest reduction in the percentage of propellant carried results in a significant weight saving. This paper will present a brief overview of cryogenic fluid management technology as it applies to the current human Mars mission scenarios.

  11. Relaxation phenomena in cryogenic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikin, V.; Chikina, I.; Nazin, S.

    2013-06-01

    Proposed is a scenario for the development of observed relaxation phenomena in a cryogenic electrolyte with the structure of "liquid hydrogen + injected ions." Ions of one sign are generated in the bulk of liquid hydrogen in the presence of external field E? by a stationary radioactive source of ± ions at the bottom of a vessel. After accumulation near the free surface of the liquid with a finite density ns the ions can break its stability producing a pulse of ion current to the collector located above the liquid surface. The outlined process is periodically repeated. Its period contains information on the ion mobility and, which is most interesting, on dissociation (association) processes occurring in a system of charged particles placed in an external field. The cryogenic problem is a good model for dissociation in the presence of external field occurring in normal electrolytes without any external ion sources.

  12. Advanced cryogenic tank development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, G. F.; Tack, W. T.; Scholz, E. F.

    1993-06-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of materials, structures, and manufacturing technologies for the next generation of cryogenic propellant tanks under the auspices of a joint U.S. Air Force/NASA sponsored advanced development program. This paper summarizes the achievements of this three-year program, particularly in the evolution and properties of Weldalite 049, net shape component technology, Al-Li welding technology, and efficient manufacturing concepts. Results of a recent mechanical property characterization of a full-scale integrally stiffened barrel panel extrusion are presented, as well as plans for an additional weld process optimization program using response surface design of experiment techniques. A further discussion is given to the status of hardware completed for the Advanced Manufacturing Development Center and Martin Marietta's commitment to the integration of these technologies into the production of low-cost, light-weight cryogenic propellant tanks.

  13. USAF space sensing cryogenic considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettyjohn, Erin N.

    2011-03-01

    Infrared (IR) space sensing missions of the future depend on low mass, highly capable imaging technologies. Limitations in visible imaging due to the earth's shadow drive the use of IR surveillance methods for a wide variety of applications. Utilization of IR sensors greatly improves mission capabilities including target behavioral discrimination. Background IR emissions and electronic noise that is inherently present in Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) and surveillance optics bench designs obviates their use unless they are cooled to cryogenic temperatures. The interaction between cryogenic refrigeration component performance and the IR sensor optics and FPA can be seen as not only mission enabling but also as mission performance enhancing when the refrigeration system is considered as part of an overall optimization problem.

  14. Cryogenic Power Converter Module Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, M. J.; Mueller, E. K.; Mueller, O.; Park, J. N.; Neal, R. R.

    2006-03-01

    Several cryogenic power converter modules were built and tested, including a low-voltage, high-power series based on Cryo-MOSFETs and a high-voltage, high-power series based on Cryo-IGBTs. Half-bridge modules were manufactured and demonstrated in liquid nitrogen. The hardware is such that several half-bridge modules can be interconnected to form a multiphase full bridge. Conduction losses in the MOSFET modules were reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Switching powers up to 340 kW were achieved in the MOSFET modules, and 720 kW was demonstrated in the IGBT series. These modules can be utilized in fully integrated, megawatt-level cryogenic power systems.

  15. Cryogenic moderator simulations : confronting reality.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-06

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities.

  16. Shuttle cryogenic supply system optimization study. Volume 4: Cryogenic cooling in environmental control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of cryogenic fluid cooling in the environmental control system of the space shuttle was conducted. The technique for treating the cryogenic fluid storage and supply tanks and subsystems as integrated systems was developed. It was concluded that a basic incompatibility exists between the heat generated and the cryogen usage rate and cryogens cannot be used to absorb the generated heat. The use of radiators and accumulators to provide additional cooling capability is recommended.

  17. Usaf Space Sensing Cryogenic Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, F.

    2010-04-01

    Infrared (IR) space sensing missions of the future depend upon low mass components and highly capable imaging technologies. Limitations in visible imaging due to the earth's shadow drive the use of IR surveillance methods for a wide variety of applications for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR), Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) applications, and almost certainly in Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) missions. Utilization of IR sensors greatly expands and improves mission capabilities including target and target behavioral discrimination. Background IR emissions and electronic noise that is inherently present in Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) and surveillance optics bench designs prevents their use unless they are cooled to cryogenic temperatures. This paper describes the role of cryogenic coolers as an enabling technology for generic ISR and BMD missions and provides ISR and BMD mission and requirement planners with a brief glimpse of this critical technology implementation potential. The interaction between cryogenic refrigeration component performance and the IR sensor optics and FPA can be seen as not only mission enabling but also as mission performance enhancing when the refrigeration system is considered as part of an overall optimization problem.

  18. Cryogenic fluid management in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1988-01-01

    Many future space based vehicles and satellites will require on orbit refuelling procedures. Cryogenic fluid management technology is being developed to assess the requirements of such procedures as well as to aid in the design and development of these vehicles. Cryogenic fluid management technology for this application could be divided into two areas of study, one is concerned with fluid transfer process and the other with cryogenic liquid storage. This division is based upon the needed technology for the development of each area. In the first, the interaction of fluid dynamics with thermodynamics is essential, while in the second only thermodynamic analyses are sufficient to define the problem. The following specific process related to the liquid transfer area are discussed: tank chilldown and fill; tank pressurization; liquid positioning; and slosh dynamics and control. These specific issues are discussed in relation with the required technology for their development in the low gravity application area. In each process the relevant physics controlling the technology is identified and methods for resolving some of the basic questions are discussed.

  19. Cryogenic actuator for subnanometer positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bree, B. v.; Janssen, H.; Paalvast, S.; Albers, R.

    2012-09-01

    This paper discusses the development, realization, and qualification of a positioning actuator concept specifically for cryogenic environments. Originally developed for quantum physics research, the actuator also has many applications in astronomic cryogenic instruments to position optical elements with nanometer level accuracy and stability. Typical applications include the correction of thermally induced position errors of optical components after cooling down from ambient to cryogenic temperatures or sample positioning in microscopes. The actuator is nicknamed the ‘PiezoKnob’ because it is piezo based and it is compatible with the typical manipulator knob often found in standard systems for optical benches, such as linear stages or tip/tilt lens holders. Actuation with high stiffness piezo elements enables the Piezoknob to deliver forces up to 50 Newton which allows relatively stiff guiding mechanisms or large pre-loads. The PiezoKnob has been qualified at 77 Kelvin and was shown to work down to 2 Kelvin. As part of the qualification program, the custom developed driving electronics and set point profile have been fine-tuned, by combing measurements with predictions from a dynamic model, thus maximizing efficiency and minimizing power dissipation. Furthermore, the actuator holds its position without power and thanks to its mechanical layout it is absolutely insensitive to drift of the piezo elements or the driving electronics.

  20. ZERODUR TAILORED for cryogenic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, R.; Westerhoff, T.

    2014-07-01

    ZERODUR® glass ceramic from SCHOTT is known for its very low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) at room temperature and its excellent CTE homogeneity. It is widely used for ground-based astronomical mirrors but also for satellite applications. Many reference application demonstrate the excellent and long lasting performance of ZERODUR® components in orbit. For space application a low CTE of the mirror material is required at cryogenic temperatures together with a good match of the thermal expansion to the supporting structure material. It is possible to optimize the coefficient of thermal expansion of ZERODUR® for cryogenic applications. This paper reports on measurements of thermal expansion of ZERODUR® down to cryogenic temperatures of 10 K performed by the PTB (Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstallt, Braunschweig, Germany, the national metrology laboratory). The ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO presented in this paper has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion down to 70 K. The maximum absolute integrated thermal expansion down to 10 K is only about 20 ppm. Mirror blanks made from ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO can be light weighted to almost 90% with our modern processing technologies. With ZERODUR® TAILORED CRYO, SCHOTT offers the mirror blank material for the next generation of space telescope applications.

  1. The evolution of cryogenic safety at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Stanek, R.; Kilmer, J.

    1992-12-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, Fermilab has been involved in cryogenic technology as it relates to pursuing experimentation in high energy physics. The Laboratory has instituted a strong cryogenic safety program and has maintained a very positive safety record. The solid commitment of management and the cryogenic community to incorporating safety into the system life cycle has led to policies that set requirements and help establish consistency for the purchase and installation of equipment and the safety analysis and documentation.

  2. Investigation of cryogenic rupture disc design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rupture disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure ruptured) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of rupture discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.

  3. 49 CFR 179.400-20 - Pressure relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.400... both the liquid and vapor phases. (c) Inner tank. Pressure relief devices for the inner tank must...

  4. Cryogenic Particle Detectors in Search for Dark Matter

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Cryogenic Particle Detectors in Search for Dark Matter Panofsky Prize presentation American;Panofsky Prize Talk - Cryogenic Dark Matter Detectors Page Blas Cabrera - Stanford University Original Motivation for broad international program on cryogenic particle detectors was neutrino physics and dark

  5. 49 CFR 173.319 - Cryogenic liquids in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. 173.319 Section 173.319 Transportation...Packaging § 173.319 Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. (a) General requirements. (1) A tank car containing a flammable cryogenic liquid...

  6. 49 CFR 173.319 - Cryogenic liquids in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. 173.319 Section 173.319 Transportation...Packaging § 173.319 Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. (a) General requirements. (1) A tank car containing a flammable cryogenic liquid...

  7. 49 CFR 173.319 - Cryogenic liquids in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. 173.319 Section 173.319 Transportation...Packaging § 173.319 Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. (a) General requirements. (1) A tank car containing a flammable cryogenic liquid...

  8. 49 CFR 173.319 - Cryogenic liquids in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. 173.319 Section 173.319 Transportation...Packaging § 173.319 Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. (a) General requirements. (1) A tank car containing a flammable cryogenic liquid...

  9. 49 CFR 173.319 - Cryogenic liquids in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. 173.319 Section 173.319 Transportation...Packaging § 173.319 Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. (a) General requirements. (1) A tank car containing a flammable cryogenic liquid...

  10. Cryogenics at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisend, J. G., II; Arnold, P.; Hees, J. Fydrych. W.; Jurns, J. M.; Wang, X. L.

    Cryogenics plays an important role at the European Spallation Source, a world class neutron science center, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. Three principal applications of cryogenics are found at ESS. The SRF cryomodules of the ESS proton linac require cooling at 2 K, 4.5 K and 40 K; the hydrogenmoderator surrounding the target that produces neutrons, requires cooling via 16.5 K helium and LHe is required for many of the scientific instruments. These needs will be met by a set of three cryogenic refrigeration/liquefaction plants and an extensive cryogenic distribution system. Significant progress has been made on the ESS cryogenic system in preparation for the expected first beam on target in 2019. This work includes: funding of industry studies for the accelerator cryoplant, preliminary design of the cryogenic distribution system, investigation of possible in kind contributors and release of the invitation to tender for the accelerator cryoplant.This paper describes the requirements, design solutions and current status of the ESS cryogenic system. The planned recovery of waste heat from the cryogenic plants, a unique aspect of ESS, is described. The procurement of the cryogenic system, expected to be done via a combination of purchase via competitive bids and in kind contributions is also discussed.

  11. Working with non-cryogenic Hall sensors at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Jorge, H.; Quelle, I.; Carballo, E.; Domarco, G.

    2006-10-01

    In this work we show the possibility of using non-cryogenic Hall sensors at cryogenic temperatures. To avoid the instabilities at cryogenic temperatures, 9 non-cryogenic Hall sensors are connected to the different channels of a multimeter and the average measurement is obtained as the truthful value. It is demonstrated that the average value is very close to the value obtained for a cryogenic sensor and opens the possibility of using these set of sensors instead of a cryogenic single one.

  12. Effects of electrostatic discharge on three cryogenic temperature sensor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. Scott; Mott, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensors are not usually thought of as electrostatic discharge (ESD) sensitive devices. However, the most common cryogenic thermometers in use today are thermally sensitive diodes or resistors - both electronic devices in their base form. As such, they are sensitive to ESD at some level above which either catastrophic or latent damage can occur. Instituting an ESD program for safe handling and installation of the sensor is costly and it is desirable to balance the risk of ESD damage against this cost. However, this risk cannot be evaluated without specific knowledge of the ESD vulnerability of the devices in question. This work examines three types of cryogenic temperature sensors for ESD sensitivity - silicon diodes, Cernox{trade mark, serif} resistors, and wire wound platinum resistors, all manufactured by Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. Testing was performed per TIA/EIA FOTP129 (Human Body Model). Damage was found to occur in the silicon diode sensors at discharge levels of 1,500 V. For Cernox{trade mark, serif} temperature sensors, damage was observed at 3,500 V. The platinum temperature sensors were not damaged by ESD exposure levels of 9,900 V. At the lower damage limit, both the silicon diode and the Cernox{trade mark, serif} temperature sensors showed relatively small calibration shifts of 1 to 3 K at room temperature. The diode sensors were stable with time and thermal cycling, but the long term stability of the Cernox{trade mark, serif} sensors was degraded. Catastrophic failure occurred at higher levels of ESD exposure.

  13. Effects of electrostatic discharge on three cryogenic temperature sensor models

    SciTech Connect

    Courts, S. Scott; Mott, Thomas B.

    2014-01-29

    Cryogenic temperature sensors are not usually thought of as electrostatic discharge (ESD) sensitive devices. However, the most common cryogenic thermometers in use today are thermally sensitive diodes or resistors - both electronic devices in their base form. As such, they are sensitive to ESD at some level above which either catastrophic or latent damage can occur. Instituting an ESD program for safe handling and installation of the sensor is costly and it is desirable to balance the risk of ESD damage against this cost. However, this risk cannot be evaluated without specific knowledge of the ESD vulnerability of the devices in question. This work examines three types of cryogenic temperature sensors for ESD sensitivity - silicon diodes, Cernox(trade mark, serif) resistors, and wire wound platinum resistors, all manufactured by Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. Testing was performed per TIA/EIA FOTP129 (Human Body Model). Damage was found to occur in the silicon diode sensors at discharge levels of 1,500 V. For Cernox(trade mark, serif) temperature sensors, damage was observed at 3,500 V. The platinum temperature sensors were not damaged by ESD exposure levels of 9,900 V. At the lower damage limit, both the silicon diode and the Cernox(trade mark, serif) temperature sensors showed relatively small calibration shifts of 1 to 3 K at room temperature. The diode sensors were stable with time and thermal cycling, but the long term stability of the Cernox(trade mark, serif) sensors was degraded. Catastrophic failure occurred at higher levels of ESD exposure.

  14. Cryogenic method for measuring nuclides and fission gases

    DOEpatents

    Perdue, P.T.; Haywood, F.F.

    1980-05-02

    A cryogenic method is provided for determining airborne gases and particulates from which gamma rays are emitted. A special dewar counting vessel is filled with the contents of the sampling flask which is immersed in liquid nitrogen. A vertically placed sodium-iodide or germanium-lithium gamma-ray detector is used. The device and method are of particular use in measuring and identifying the radioactive noble gases including emissions from coal-fired power plants, as well as fission gases released or escaping from nuclear power plants.

  15. Cryogenic metal mesh bandpass filters for submillimeter astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovan, M.

    1984-01-01

    The design and performance of a tunable double-half-wave bandpass filter centered at 286 microns (Delta lambda/lambda = 0.16) and operating at cryogenic temperatures (for astronomy applications) are presented. The operating principle is explained, and the fabrication of the device, which comprises two identical mutually coupled Fabry-Perot filters with electroformed Ni-mesh reflectors and is tuned by means of variable spacers, is described. A drawing of the design and graphs of computed and measured performance are provided. Significantly improved bandpass characteristics are obtained relative to the single Fabry-Perot filter.

  16. Charged Probes, Bourdon Tubes Maintain Cryogenic Liquid Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, Mylo J.

    1966-01-01

    The problem: To design a system that automatically maintains the fluid level in a liquid nitrogen cold trap. It is frequently necessary to operate a vacuum system using one or more cold traps for a prolonged period with the cold trap liquid level maintained between set limits. Electronic devices have been subject to failure due to the effect on components of cryogenic temperatures. The solution: An automatic liquid nitrogen dispensing system that uses gas filled probes, driving Bourdon tube gauges equipped with microswitches that, through a relay, control a solenoid valve in the liquid nitrogen storage line.

  17. Multi-Channel Electronically Scanned Cryogenic Pressure Sensor And Method For Making Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Hopson, Purnell, Jr. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A miniature, multi-channel, electronically scanned pressure measuring device uses electrostatically bonded silicon dies in a multi-element array. These dies are bonded at specific sites on a glass, pre-patterned substrate. Thermal data is multiplexed and recorded on each individual pressure measuring diaphragm. The device functions in a cryogenic environment without the need of heaters to keep the sensor at constant temperatures.

  18. Experiments in thermosensitive cavitation of a cryogenic rocket propellant surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Sean Benjamin

    Cavitation is a phase-change phenomenon that may appear in practical devices, often leading to loss of performance and possible physical damage. Of particular interest is the presence of cavitation in rocket engine pumps as the cryogenic fluids cavitate in impellers and inducers. Unlike water, which has been studied exhaustively, cryogenic fluids undergo cavitation with significant thermal effect. Past attempts at analyzing this behavior in water have led to poor predictive capability due to the lack of data in the regime defined as thermosensitive cavitation. Fluids flowing near their thermodynamic critical point have a liquid-vapor density ratio that is orders of magnitude less than typical experimental fluids, so that the traditional equation-of-state and cavitation models do not apply. Thermal effects in cavitation have not been fully investigated due to experimental difficulties handling cryogenics. This work investigates the physical effects of thermosensitive cavitation in a model representative of a turbopump inducer in a modern rocket engine. This is achieved by utilizing a room-temperature testing fluid that exhibits a thermal effect equivalent to that experienced by cryogenic propellants. Unsteady surface pressures and high speed imaging collected over the span of thermophysical regimes ranging from thermosensitive to isothermal cavitation offer both quantitative and qualitative insight into the physical process of thermal cavitation. Physical and thermodynamic effects are isolated to identify the source of cavity conditions, oscillations and growth/collapse behavior. Planar laser imaging offers an instantaneous look inside the vapor cavity and at the behavior of the boundary between the two-phase region and freestream liquid. Nondimensional parameters are explored, with cavitation numbers, Reynolds Numbers, coefficient of pressure and nondimensional temperature in a broad range. Results in the form of cavitation regime maps, Strouhal Number of cavity collapse, and cavity length offer a mechanistic analysis of the phenomenon. Linear stability analysis of the boundary is performed, as well as analysis of the thermal effects in the cavity and the oscillatory behavior of the cavity and reentrant jet.

  19. Cryogenic filter wheel design for an infrared instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcue, Joaquín.; Villanueva, Carlos; Sánchez, Antonio; Polo, Cristina; Reina, Manuel; Carretero, Angel; Torres, Josefina; Ramos, Gonzalo; Gonzalez, Luis M.; Sabau, Maria D.; Najarro, Francisco; Pintado, Jesús M.

    2014-09-01

    In the last two decades, Spain has built up a strong IR community which has successfully contributed to space instruments, reaching Co-PI level in the SPICA mission (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics). Under the SPICA mission, INTA, focused on the SAFARI instrument requirements but highly adaptable to other missions has designed a cryogenic low dissipation filter wheel with six positions, taking as starting point the past experience of the team with the OSIRIS instrument (ROSETTA mission) filter wheels and adapting the design to work at cryogenic temperatures. One of the main goals of the mechanism is to use as much as possible commercial components and test them at cryogenic temperature. This paper is focused on the design of the filter wheel, including the material selection for each of the main components of the mechanism, the design of elastic mount for the filter assembly, a positioner device designed to provide positional accuracy and repeatability to the filter, allowing the locking of the position without dissipation. In order to know the position of the wheel on every moment a position sensor based on a Hall sensor was developed. A series of cryogenic tests have been performed in order to validate the material configuration selected, the ball bearing lubrication and the selection of the motor. A stepper motor characterization campaign was performed including heat dissipation measurements. The result is a six position filter wheel highly adaptable to different configurations and motors using commercial components. The mechanism was successfully tested at INTA facilities at 20K at breadboard level.

  20. Issues of Long-Term Cryogenic Propellant Storage in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muratov, C. B.; Osipov, Viatcheslav V.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Modern multi-layer insulation (MLI) allows to sharply reduce the heat leak into cryogenic propellant storage tanks through the tank surface and, as a consequence, significantly extend the storage duration. In this situation the MLI penetrations, such as support struts, feed lines, etc., become one of the most significant challenges of the tanks heat management. This problem is especially acute for liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage, since currently no efficient cryocoolers exist that operate at very low LH2 temperatures (20K). Even small heat leaks under microgravity conditions and over the period of many months give rise to a complex slowly-developing, large-scale spatiotemporal physical phenomena in a multi-phase liquid-vapor mixture. These phenomena are not well-understood nor can be easily controlled. They can be of a potentially hazardous nature for long-term on-orbital cryogenic torage, propellant loading, tank chilldown, engine restart, and other in-space cryogenic fluid management operations. To support the engineering design solutions that would mitigate these effects a detailed physics-based analysis of heat transfer, vapor bubble formation, growth, motion, coalescence and collapse is required in the presence of stirring jets of different configurations and passive cooling devices such as MLI, thermodynamic vent system, and vapor-cooled shield. To develop physics-based models and correlations reliable for microgravity conditions and long-time scales there is a need for new fundamental data to be collected from on-orbit cryogenic storage experiments. Our report discusses some of these physical phenomena and the design requirements and future studies necessary for their mitigation. Special attention is payed to the phenomena occurring near MLI penetrations.

  1. Study and design of cryogenic propellant acquisition systems. Volume 1: Design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burge, G. W.; Blackmon, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    An in-depth study and selection of practical propellant surface tension acquisition system designs for two specific future cryogenic space vehicles, an advanced cryogenic space shuttle auxiliary propulsion system and an advanced space propulsion module is reported. A supporting laboratory scale experimental program was also conducted to provide design information critical to concept finalization and selection. Designs using localized pressure isolated surface tension screen devices were selected for each application and preliminary designs were generated. Based on these designs, large scale acquisition prototype hardware was designed and fabricated to be compatible with available NASA-MSFC feed system hardware.

  2. Continuous-Reading Cryogen Level Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barone, F. E.; Fox, E.; Macumber, S.

    1984-01-01

    Two pressure transducers used in system for measuring amount of cryogenic liquid in tank. System provides continuous measurements accurate within 0.03 percent. Sensors determine pressure in liquid and vapor in tank. Microprocessor uses pressure difference to compute mass of cryogenic liquid in tank. New system allows continuous sensing; unaffected by localized variations in composition and density as are capacitance-sensing schemes.

  3. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    The Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System was tested with LH2 and LOX in a vacuum chamber to simulate space vacuum and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. Testing was successful and results validated the scaling study model that predicts active cooling reduces upper stage cryogenic propulsion mass for loiter periods greater than 2 weeks.

  4. Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, Jonathan D

    2011-07-05

    Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

  5. Concept for cryogenic liquid reclamation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daderian, S. M.

    1967-01-01

    Cryogenic liquid reclamation system is used as an add-on unit to the nitrogen system of environmental test laboratories to salvage liquid nitrogen presently being treated as waste. The system may be installed indoors or outdoors provided the gas boiled off from the cryogenic liquid is vented to the outside.

  6. Connectors and Wiring for Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    Tests performed at Langley Research Center to find connectors, cables, and other electrical components suitable for use in cryogenic environment described. In addition, several electrical cables have to flex under cryogenic conditions. Tests necessary to qualify materials for use in National Transonic Facility (NTF), which operates at temperature range from 175 degrees to - 300 degrees F (353 to 89 K).

  7. Cryogenic Cermic Multilayer Capacitors for Power Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberta, E. F.; Hackenberger, W. S.

    2006-03-01

    Recent advances in the areas of high temperature superconductors and low temperature MOSFET devices have opened the door to the possibility of developing highly efficient low-temperature power electronics. The most commonly used high-efficiency capacitors are based on high dielectric constant (K ˜ 1000-4000) barium titanate doped to yield and X7R temperature dependence (±15% change in capacitance from -55°C to 125°C); however, below their minimum use temperature the capacitance drops-off quickly leading to a low volumetric efficiency and high temperature coefficient of capacitance (TCC) at cryogenic temperatures. A series of low temperature materials with moderate to high dielectric constants have been specifically developed for low temperature operation (below 80K). The capacitors fall into three main categories: low TCC, high volumetric efficiency, and energy storage. In the low TCC category, co-fired multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) were fabricated with capacitance values up to 62nF at 30K, TCCs from 0.9 to 2% below 80K, and losses on the order of 0.0001. In the high volumetric efficiency category, dielectrics with permittivities ranging from 1,000 to 30,000 were demonstrated.

  8. Cryogenic, high speed, turbopump bearing cooling requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Fred J.; Gibson, Howard G.; Cannon, James L.; Cody, Joe C.

    1988-01-01

    Although the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has repeatedly demonstrated the capability to perform during launch, the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) main shaft bearings have not met their 7.5 hour life requirement. A tester is being employed to provide the capability of subjecting full scale bearings and seals to speeds, loads, propellants, temperatures, and pressures which simulate engine operating conditions. The tester design permits much more elaborate instrumentation and diagnostics than could be accommodated in an SSME turbopump. Tests were made to demonstrate the facilities; and the devices' capabilities, to verify the instruments in its operating environment and to establish a performance baseline for the flight type SSME HPOTP Turbine Bearing design. Bearing performance data from tests are being utilized to generate: (1) a high speed, cryogenic turbopump bearing computer mechanical model, and (2) a much improved, very detailed thermal model to better understand bearing internal operating conditions. Parametric tests were also made to determine the effects of speed, axial loads, coolant flow rate, and surface finish degradation on bearing performance.

  9. RRM3 Fluid Management Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barfknecht, P.; Benson, D.; Boyle, R.; DeLee, C.; DiPirro, M.; Francis, J.; Li, X.; McGuire, J.; Mustafi, S.; Tuttle, J.; Whitehouse, P.

    2015-01-01

    The current development progress of the fluid management device (FMD) for the Robotic Resupply Mission 3 (RRM3) cryogen source Dewar is described. RRM3 is an on-orbit cryogenic transfer experiment payload for the International Space Station. The fluid management device is a key component of the source Dewar to ensure the ullage bubble is located away from the outlet during transfer. The FMD also facilitates demonstration of radio frequency mass gauging within the source Dewar. The preliminary design of the RRM3 FMD is a number of concentric cones of Mylar which maximizes the volume of liquid in contact with the FMD in the source Dewar. This paper describes the design of the fluid management device and progress of hardware development

  10. Fiberglass supports for cryogenic tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Analysis, design, fabrication, and test activities were conducted to develop additional technology needed for application of filament-wound fiberglass struts to cryogenic flight tankage. It was conclusively verified that monocoque cylinder or ogive struts are optimum or near-optimum for the range of lengths and loads studied, that a higher strength-to-weight ratio can be achieved for fiberglass struts than for any metallic struts, and that integrally-wrapped metallic end fittings can be used to achieve axial load transfer without reliance on bond strength or mechanical fasteners.

  11. Nanoinclusions in cryogenically quenched nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Fryd, Michael M; Mason, Thomas G

    2012-08-21

    Nanodroplets containing mixtures of silicone oil and squalene are dispersed in a simple aqueous surfactant solution, quenched in liquid ethane, and examined using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). Depending on the phase of ice that forms around the nanodroplets and on the composition of the oil mixture, nanoinclusions can be observed inside oil nanodroplets, independent of surfactant type. Our observations suggest that these nanoinclusions arise from nucleation of vapor cavities as the water freezes and expands while the oil remains liquid during the quench. PMID:22881456

  12. Self-Sealing Cryogenic Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Lin Xiang; Chow, Wen Lung; Moslemian, Davood; Lin, Gary; Melton, Greg

    1994-01-01

    Self-sealing fitting for cryogenic tubes remains free of leakage from room temperature to liquid-helium temperature even at internal pressure as high as 2.7 MPa. Fitting comprises parts made of materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion to prevent leakage gaps from forming as temperature decreases. Consists of coupling nut, two flared tube ends, and flared O-ring spacer. Spacer contracts more than tube ends do as temperature decreases. This greater contraction seals tube ends more tightly, preventing leakage.

  13. Techniques for on-orbit cryogenic servicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLee, C. H.; Barfknecht, P.; Breon, S.; Boyle, R.; DiPirro, M.; Francis, J.; Huynh, J.; Li, X.; McGuire, J.; Mustafi, S.; Tuttle, J.; Wegel, D.

    2014-11-01

    NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) has a renewed interest in on-orbit cryogen storage and transfer to support its mission to explore near-earth objects such as asteroids and comets. The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission (CPST-TDM), managed by the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and scheduled for launch in 2018, will demonstrate numerous key technologies applicable to a cryopropellant fuel depot. As an adjunct to the CPST-TDM work, experiments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) will support the development of techniques to manage and transfer cryogens on-orbit and expand these techniques as they may be applicable to servicing science missions using solid cryogens such as the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The results of several ground experiments are described, including autogenous pressurization used for transfer of liquid nitrogen and argon, characterization of the transfer and solidification of argon, and development of robotic tools for cryogen transfer.

  14. Ultrathin fiber-taper coupling with nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamonds at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masazumi; Zhao, Hong-Quan; Noda, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2015-12-15

    We demonstrate cooling of ultrathin fiber tapers coupled with nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in nanodiamonds to cryogenic temperatures. Nanodiamonds containing multiple NV centers are deposited on the subwavelength 480-nm-diameter nanofiber region of fiber tapers. The fiber tapers are successfully cooled to 9 K using our home-built mounting holder and an optimized cooling speed. The fluorescence from the nanodiamond NV centers is efficiently channeled into a single guided mode and shows characteristic sharp zero-phonon lines (ZPLs) of both neutral and negatively charged NV centers. The present nanofiber/nanodiamond hybrid systems at cryogenic temperatures can be used as NV-based quantum information devices and for highly sensitive nanoscale magnetometry in a cryogenic environment. PMID:26670490

  15. Computer-controlled cryogenic-temperature controller. Final report, September 1982-January 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, R.E.

    1990-01-10

    In laboratories which do materials characterization it is necessary to have a temperature controller which can be computer controlled, is accurate to within .1-.2K, can control temperature from 15-350K with a drift of no more than .1, and is relatively unaffected by the presence of a magnetic field on the sample container. The subject controller uses two thermometers to meet these requirements. One is a commercially available calibrated silicon diode manufactured expressly for this type of application. The second thermometer is used for control. Once the sample has reached the setpoint according to the calibrated thermometer the control thermometer's value is sampled and used as the new setpoint. Since the control thermometer should be insensitive to a mag field the sample will remain at the desired temperature when the magnetic field is applied. Cryogenic, Computer control, Magnetic field, Cryogenics, Cryogenic storage devices.

  16. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies for combined-cycle propulsion applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a technical assessment of the realization of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction technologies in a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process setting. The technical findings related to the status of air liquefaction technologies are reviewed. Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers, heat exchanger atmospheric constituent fouling alleviation measures, para/ortho-hydrogen shift-conversion catalysts, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps, hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as a heat sink, liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices, and technically related engine concepts are discussed. Much of the LACE work is related to aerospaceplane propulsion concepts that were developed in the 1960's. Emphasis is placed on the Liquid Air Cycle Engine (LACE).

  17. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  18. Models for cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, Pierce L.

    1989-01-01

    Model requirements, types of model construction methods, and research in new ways to build models are discussed. The 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel was in operation for 16 years and many 2-D airfoil pressure models were tested. In addition there were airfoil models dedicated to transition detection techniques and other specialized research. There were also a number of small 3-D models tested. A chronological development in model building technique is described which led to the construction of many successful models. The difficulties of construction are illustrated by discussing several unsuccessful model fabrication attempts. The National Transonic Facility, a newer and much larger tunnel, was used to test a variety of models including a submarine, transport and fighter configurations, and the Shuttle Orbiter. A new method of building pressure models was developed and is described. The method is centered on the concept of bonding together plates with pressure channels etched into the bond planes, which provides high density pressure instrumentation with minimum demand on parent model material. With care in the choice of materials and technique, vacuum brazing can be used to produce strong bonds without blocking pressure channels and with no bonding voids between channels. Using multiple plates, a 5 percent wing with 96 orifices was constructed and tested in a transonic cryogenic wind tunnel. Samples of test data are presented and future applications of the technology are suggested.

  19. Nanotomography of labeled cryogenic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gerd; Knoechel, Christian; Vogt, Stefan; Weiss, Daniel; Anderson, Erik H.

    2002-01-01

    By employing the natural absorption contrast of organic matter in water at 0.5 keV photon energy, X-ray microcopy has resolved 30 nm structures in animal cells. To protect the cells from radiation damage caused by x-rays, imaging of the samples was performed at cryogenic temperatures, which makes it possible to take multiple images of a single cell. Due to the small numerical aperture of zone plates, X-ray objectives have a depth of focus on the order of several microns. By treating the X-ray microscopic images as projections of the sample absorption, computed tomography (CT) can be performed. Since cryogenic biological samples are resistant to radiation damage, it is possible to reconstruct frozen-hydrated cells imaged with a full-field X-ray microscope. This approach is used to obtain three- dimensional information about the location of specific proteins in cells. To localize proteins in cells, immunolabelling with strongly X-ray absorbing nanoparticles was performed. With the new tomography apparatus developed for the X-ray microscope XM-1 installed at the ALS, we have performed tomography of immunolabelled frozen-hydrated cells to detect protein distributions in all three dimensions inside of cells. As a first example, the distribution of the nuclear protein, male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1) in the Drosophila melanogaster cell was studied.

  20. CRYOTE (Cryogenic Orbital Testbed) Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravlee, Mari; Kutter, Bernard; Wollen, Mark; Rhys, Noah; Walls, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    Demonstrating cryo-fluid management (CFM) technologies in space is critical for advances in long duration space missions. Current space-based cryogenic propulsion is viable for hours, not the weeks to years needed by space exploration and space science. CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed (CRYOTE) provides an affordable low-risk environment to demonstrate a broad array of critical CFM technologies that cannot be tested in Earth's gravity. These technologies include system chilldown, transfer, handling, health management, mixing, pressure control, active cooling, and long-term storage. United Launch Alliance is partnering with Innovative Engineering Solutions, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and others to develop CRYOTE to fly as an auxiliary payload between the primary payload and the Centaur upper stage on an Atlas V rocket. Because satellites are expensive, the space industry is largely risk averse to incorporating unproven systems or conducting experiments using flight hardware that is supporting a primary mission. To minimize launch risk, the CRYOTE system will only activate after the primary payload is separated from the rocket. Flying the testbed as an auxiliary payload utilizes Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle performance excess to cost-effectively demonstrate enhanced CFM.

  1. CRYOGENIC RESONANT DETECTORS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES: CURRENT OPERATION AND PROSPECTS

    E-print Network

    CRYOGENIC RESONANT DETECTORS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES: CURRENT OPERATION AND PROSPECTS M. CERDONIO, L ever at- #12; 2 M. CERDONIO ET AL. tempted. In fact, many cryogenic resonant detectors are already[5] and the cryogenic EX- PLORER[6], one N.S.F. cryogenic detector, ALLEGRO[7], and one A

  2. Cryogenic refrigeration. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning cryogenic refrigeration or cryocooling. Design, development, testing, and evaluation of cryogenic cooling systems are discussed. Design applications in spacecraft, magnet cooling, superconductors, liquid fuel storage, radioastronomy, and medicine are presented. Material properties at cryogenic temperatures and cryogenic rocket propellants are considered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Experimental measurements and noise analysis of a cryogenic radiometer.

    PubMed

    Carr, S M; Woods, S I; Jung, T M; Carter, A C; Datla, R U

    2014-07-01

    A cryogenic radiometer device, intended for use as part of an electrical-substitution radiometer, was measured at low temperature. The device consists of a receiver cavity mechanically and thermally connected to a temperature-controlled stage through a thin-walled polyimide tube which serves as a weak thermal link. With the temperature difference between the receiver and the stage measured in millikelvin and the electrical power measured in picowatts, the measured responsivity was 4700 K/mW and the measured thermal time constant was 14 s at a stage temperature of 1.885 K. Noise analysis in terms of Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) was used to quantify the various fundamental and technical noise contributions, including phonon noise and Johnson-Nyquist noise. The noise analysis clarifies the path toward a cryogenic radiometer with a noise floor limited by fundamental phonon noise, where the magnitude of the phonon NEP is 6.5 fW/?Hz for the measured experimental parameters. PMID:25085171

  4. Experimental measurements and noise analysis of a cryogenic radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, S. M.; Woods, S. I.; Jung, T. M.; Carter, A. C.; Datla, R. U.

    2014-07-15

    A cryogenic radiometer device, intended for use as part of an electrical-substitution radiometer, was measured at low temperature. The device consists of a receiver cavity mechanically and thermally connected to a temperature-controlled stage through a thin-walled polyimide tube which serves as a weak thermal link. With the temperature difference between the receiver and the stage measured in millikelvin and the electrical power measured in picowatts, the measured responsivity was 4700 K/mW and the measured thermal time constant was 14 s at a stage temperature of 1.885 K. Noise analysis in terms of Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) was used to quantify the various fundamental and technical noise contributions, including phonon noise and Johnson-Nyquist noise. The noise analysis clarifies the path toward a cryogenic radiometer with a noise floor limited by fundamental phonon noise, where the magnitude of the phonon NEP is 6.5 fW/?(Hz) for the measured experimental parameters.

  5. Power Electronics Being Developed for Deep Space Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2003-01-01

    Electronic circuits and systems designed for deep space missions need to operate reliably and efficiently in harsh environments that include very low temperatures. Spacecraft that operate in such cold environments carry a large number of heaters so that the ambient temperature for the onboard electronics remains near 20 C. Electronics that can operate at cryogenic temperatures will simplify system design and reduce system size and weight by eliminating the heaters and their associated structures. As a result, system development and launch cost will be reduced. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, an ongoing program is focusing on the development of power electronics geared for deep space low-temperature environments. The research and development efforts include electrical components design, circuit design and construction, and system integration and demonstration at cryogenic temperatures. Investigations are being carried out on circuits and systems that are targeted for use in NASA missions where low temperatures will be encountered: devices such as ceramic and tantalum capacitors, metal film resistors, semiconductor switches, magnetics, and integrated circuits including dc/dc converters, operational amplifiers, voltage references, and motor controllers. Test activities cover a wide range of device and circuit performance under simple as well as complex test conditions, such as multistress and thermal cycling. The effect of low-temperature conditions on the switching characteristics of an advanced silicon-on-insulator field effect transistor is shown. For gate voltages (VGS) below 2.6 V, drain currents at -190 C are lower than drain currents at room temperature (20 C).

  6. Cryogenic Control Architecture for Large-Scale Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornibrook, J. M.; Colless, J. I.; Conway Lamb, I. D.; Pauka, S. J.; Lu, H.; Gossard, A. C.; Watson, J. D.; Gardner, G. C.; Fallahi, S.; Manfra, M. J.; Reilly, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    Solid-state qubits have recently advanced to the level that enables them, in principle, to be scaled up into fault-tolerant quantum computers. As these physical qubits continue to advance, meeting the challenge of realizing a quantum machine will also require the development of new supporting devices and control architectures with complexity far beyond the systems used in today's few-qubit experiments. Here, we report a microarchitecture for controlling and reading out qubits during the execution of a quantum algorithm such as an error-correcting code. We demonstrate the basic principles of this architecture using a cryogenic switch matrix implemented via high-electron-mobility transistors and a new kind of semiconductor device based on gate-switchable capacitance. The switch matrix is used to route microwave waveforms to qubits under the control of a field-programmable gate array, also operating at cryogenic temperatures. Taken together, these results suggest a viable approach for controlling large-scale quantum systems using semiconductor technology.

  7. Methane cryogenic heat pipe for space use with a liquid trap for on-off switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda-Rizo, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Israel; Bugby, David

    2012-06-01

    A methane cryogenic heat pipe with a liquid trap for on-off actuation was developed by ATK for use on Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Space Interferometer Mission Lite (SIM Lite) pre-Phase A hardware technology demonstration tests. The cryogenic heat pipe coupled to a cold radiator at 160K provides cooling to the Charged Coupled Device camera focal planes. The heat pipe was designed for a transport capacity of 15 W across a 1.5 m span through a near room-temperature spacecraft environment. A key and driving requirement for the heat pipe was the need for switching the heat pipe on and off needed to support low power decontamination cycles to near room temperature of the cryogenic focal planes. The cryogenic heat pipe is turned off by removing the methane working fluid from the heat pipe and storing in the liquid trap. The heat pipe is turned-on by simply reintroducing the working fluid from the liquid trap. This on-off switching capability is a key requirement for cryogenic heat pipes used with passive or active cryocoolers for cooling focal planes or optics. This switching capability provides a means to decouple a cold focal plane or optics from a redundant stand-by cryocooler or a passive cooler when in need for a decontamination cycle.

  8. Vent System Analysis for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage Transfer Ground Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A

    2013-01-01

    To test and validate key capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements such as large cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots, NASA is leading the efforts to develop and design the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) payload. The primary objectives of CPST payload are to demonstrate: 1) in-space storage of cryogenic propellants for long duration applications; and 2) in-space transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Ground Test Article (GTA) is a technology development version of the CPST payload. The GTA consists of flight-sized and flight-like storage and transfer tanks, liquid acquisition devices, transfer, and pressurization systems with all of the CPST functionality. The GTA is designed to perform integrated passive and active thermal storage and transfer performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a vacuum environment. The GTA storage tank is designed to store liquid hydrogen and the transfer tank is designed to be 5% of the storage tank volume. The LH2 transfer subsystem is designed to transfer propellant from one tank to the other utilizing pressure or a pump. The LH2 vent subsystem is designed to prevent over-pressurization of the storage and transfer tanks. An in-house general-purpose computer program was utilized to model and simulate the vent subsystem operation. The modeling, analysis, and the results will be presented in the final paper.

  9. Thermal Design and Analysis for the Cryogenic MIDAS Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth McElroy

    1997-01-01

    The Materials In Devices As Superconductors (MIDAS) spaceflight experiment is a NASA payload which launched in September 1996 on the Shuttle, and was transferred to the Mir Space Station for several months of operation. MIDAS was developed and built at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The primary objective of the experiment was to determine the effects of microgravity and spaceflight on the electrical properties of high-temperature superconductive (HTS) materials. The thermal challenge on MIDAS was to maintain the superconductive specimens at or below 80 K for the entire operation of the experiment, including all ground testing and 90 days of spaceflight operation. Cooling was provided by a small tactical cryocooler. The superconductive specimens and the coldfinger of the cryocooler were mounted in a vacuum chamber, with vacuum levels maintained by an ion pump. The entire experiment was mounted for operation in a stowage locker inside Mir, with the only heat dissipation capability provided by a cooling fan exhausting to the habitable compartment. The thermal environment on Mir can potentially vary over the range 5 to 40 C; this was the range used in testing, and this wide range adds to the difficulty in managing the power dissipated from the experiment's active components. Many issues in the thermal design are discussed, including: thermal isolation methods for the cryogenic samples; design for cooling to cryogenic temperatures; cryogenic epoxy bonds; management of ambient temperature components self-heating; and fan cooling of the enclosed locker. Results of the design are also considered, including the thermal gradients across the HTS samples and cryogenic thermal strap, electronics and thermal sensor cryogenic performance, and differences between ground and flight performance. Modeling was performed in both SINDA-85 and MSC/PATRAN (with direct geometry import from the CAD design tool Pro/Engineer). Advantages of both types of models are discussed. Correlation of several models to ground testing and flight data (where available) is presented. Both SINDA and PATRAN models predicted the actual thermal performance of the experiment well, even without post-flight correlation adjustments of the models.

  10. Apparatus and method for evacuating an insulated cryogenic hose

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, W.D.; Zwick, E.B.

    1990-05-15

    This patent describes a cryogenic hose for use in ambient environments. It comprises: a cryogenic tube for conducting the flow of a cryogenic fluid at a cryogenic temperature; an insulating chamber thermally coupled with the cryogenic tube for insulating the cryogenic tube; and a predetermined fluid disposed in the chamber, the predetermined fluid being gaseous at ambient temperatures and liquefying or solidifying at the cryogenic temperature, heat conducted from the predetermined fluid disposed in the chamber into the cryogenic tube causing the predetermined fluid to liquefy or solidify, thereby substantially evacuating the chamber, the evacuated chamber thermally insulating the cryogenic tube from the ambient environments, whereby the hose provides for delivery of the cryogenic fluid without the need for repeated evacuation of the chamber by external pumping.

  11. Design, production, and testing of field effect transistors. [cryogenic MOSFETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sclar, N.

    1982-01-01

    Cryogenic MOSFETS (CRYOFETS), specifically designed for low temperature preamplifier application with infrared extrinsic detectors were produced and comparatively tested with p-channel MOSFETs under matched conditions. The CRYOFETs exhibit lower voltage thresholds, high source-follower gains at lower bias voltage, and lower dc offset source voltage. The noise of the CRYOFET is found to be 2 to 4 times greater than the MOSFET with a correspondingly lower figure of merit (which is established for source-follower amplifiers). The device power dissipation at a gain of 0.98 is some two orders of magnitude lower than for the MOSFET. Further, CRYOFETs are free of low temperature I vs V character hysteresis and balky conduction turn-on effects and operate effectively in the 2.4 to 20 K range. These devices have promise for use on long term duration sensor missions and for on-focal-plane signal processing at low temperatures.

  12. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic temperatures, and will not crack or produce leaks. The outer layer serves as more of a high-performance structural unit for the inner layer, and can handle external environments.

  13. Nanosecond cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser

    SciTech Connect

    Perevezentsev, E A; Mukhin, I B; Kuznetsov, I I; Vadimova, O L; Palashov, O V

    2014-05-30

    A cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser is modernised to increase its average and peak power. The master oscillator unit of the laser is considerably modified so that the pulse duration decreases to several nanoseconds with the same pulse energy. A cryogenic disk laser head with a flow-through cooling system is developed. Based on two such laser heads, a new main amplifier is assembled according to an active multipass cell scheme. The total small-signal gain of cryogenic cascades is ?10{sup 8}. (lasers)

  14. Cryogenic thermal control technology summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, J. A.; Leonhard, K. E.; Bennett, F. O., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A summarization and categorization is presented of the pertinent literature associated with cryogenic thermal control technology having potential application to in-orbit fluid transfer systems and/or associated space storage. Initially, a literature search was conducted to obtain pertinent documents for review. Reports determined to be of primary significance were summarized in detail. Each summary, where applicable, consists of; (1) report identification, (2) objective(s) of the work, (3) description of pertinent work performed, (4)major results, and (5) comments of the reviewer (GD/C). Specific areas covered are; (1) multilayer insulation of storage tanks with and without vacuum jacketing, (2) other insulation such as foams, shadow shields, microspheres, honeycomb, vent cooling and composites, (3) vacuum jacketed and composite fluid lines, and (4) low conductive tank supports and insulation penetrations. Reports which were reviewed and not summarized, along with reasons for not summarizing, are also listed.

  15. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E., Jr.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R < or = 0.003, from 800 to 4800/cm (12 - 2 microns ). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to 400-10,000/ cm-1 (25 - 1 microns) the observed performance gracefully degrades to R < or = 0.02 at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to approx.4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials-Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder-are characterized and presented

  16. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progres made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP).

  17. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Nuclear propulsion can be affordable and viable compared to other propulsion systems and must overcome a biased public fear due to hyper-environmentalism and a false perception of radiation and explosion risk.

  18. Brush seals for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    1994-07-01

    This viewgraph presentation presents test results of brush seals for cryogenic applications. Leakage for a single brush seal was two to three times less than for a 12-tooth labyrinth seal. The maximum temperature rise for a single brush seal was less than 50 R and occurred at 25 psid across the seal and 35,000 rpm. A static blowout test demonstrated sealing capability up to 550 psid. The seal limit was not obtained. The power loss for a single brush at 35,000 rpm and 175 psid was 2.45 hp. Two brushes far apart leak less than two brushes tight packed. Rotor wear was approximately 0.00075 mils and bristle wear was 1-3 mils after 4-1/2 hours.

  19. Brush seals for cryogenic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    1994-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation presents test results of brush seals for cryogenic applications. Leakage for a single brush seal was two to three times less than for a 12-tooth labyrinth seal. The maximum temperature rise for a single brush seal was less than 50 R and occurred at 25 psid across the seal and 35,000 rpm. A static blowout test demonstrated sealing capability up to 550 psid. The seal limit was not obtained. The power loss for a single brush at 35,000 rpm and 175 psid was 2.45 hp. Two brushes far apart leak less than two brushes tight packed. Rotor wear was approximately 0.00075 mils and bristle wear was 1-3 mils after 4-1/2 hours.

  20. A cryogenic infrared calibration target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-04-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R ? 0.003, from 800 to 4800 cm-1 (12 - 2 ?m). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to 400-10 000 cm-1 (25 - 1 ?m) the observed performance gracefully degrades to R ? 0.02 at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to ˜4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials—Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder—are characterized and presented.

  1. A cryogenic infrared calibration target.

    PubMed

    Wollack, E J; Kinzer, R E; Rinehart, S A

    2014-04-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R ? 0.003, from 800?to?4800?cm(-1) (12 - 2??m). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to 400-10,000?cm(-1) (25 - 1??m) the observed performance gracefully degrades to R ? 0.02 at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to ?4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials-Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder-are characterized and presented. PMID:24784638

  2. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-08-30

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions.

  3. TIMO-2-A cryogenic test bed for the ITER cryosorption pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Horst; Day, Christian; Herzog, Friedhelm

    2012-06-01

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has been carrying out research and development in the field of vacuum cryopumps for nuclear fusion devices over the last decade. Together with the development activities also experience in the operation of the needed cryogenic systems necessary for such type of large scale cryopumps was collected. Due to the specific requirements of a large fusion device, such as ITER, the cryogenic distribution is based on gaseous helium at the needed temperature levels rather than liquid nitrogen or liquid helium. KIT has set up a large scale research facility, called TIMO-2, fully equipped with supercritical helium supply at large flow rates to be able to perform cryogenic tests of components under ITER-relevant conditions. During first test campaigns at TIMO-2 with a large scale model cryopump the ITER cryosorption vacuum pumping concept was successfully validated. After major refurbishments and upgrades, the TIMO-2 facility is now ready for the acceptance tests of the ITER torus cryopump. This paper describes the modified test facility TIMO-2 with particular attention to the available cryogenic supply at different temperature levels. The new 100 K helium supply facility will be described in detail.

  4. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Volume 33 - Proceedings of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Saint Charles, IL, June 14-18, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, R. W. (editor)

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on superconductivity applications including magnets, electronics, rectifiers, magnet stability, coil protection, and cryogenic techniques. Also considered are insulation, heat transfer to liquid helium and nitrogen, heat and mass transfer in He II, superfluid pumps, and refrigeration for superconducting systems. Other topics include cold compressors, refrigeration and liquefaction, magnetic refrigeration, and refrigeration for space applications. Papers are also presented on cryogenic applications, commercial cryogenic plants, the properties of cryogenic fluids, and cryogenic instrumentation and data acquisition.

  5. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-02-26

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets are disclosed. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member. 4 figs.

  6. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-26

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

  7. Aerogel Blanket Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffman, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; White, S.; Gould, G.; Augustynowicz, S.

    2010-04-01

    Aerogel blanket materials for use in thermal insulation systems are now commercially available and implemented by industry. Prototype aerogel blanket materials were presented at the Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1997 and by 2004 had progressed to full commercial production by Aspen Aerogels. Today, this new technology material is providing superior energy efficiencies and enabling new design approaches for more cost-effective cryogenic systems. Aerogel processing technology and methods are continuing to improve, offering a tailorable array of product formulations for many different thermal and environmental requirements. Many different varieties and combinations of aerogel blankets have been characterized using insulation test cryostats at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Detailed thermal conductivity data for a select group of materials are presented for engineering use. Heat transfer evaluations for the entire vacuum pressure range, including ambient conditions, are given. Examples of current cryogenic applications of aerogel blanket insulation are also given.

  8. Cryogenic xenon droplets for advanced lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Fisher, P.W.

    1996-04-01

    A cryogenic xenon droplet production system for use in anadvanced laser plasma source for x-ray lithography has been designed, fabricated, and tested at ORNL. The droplet generator is based on proven (ink jet printer) drop-on-demand.

  9. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. (Livermore, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

  10. Cryogenic liquid transfer system reduces residual boiloff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegland, D. E.

    1966-01-01

    System for transferring cryogenic liquids to a dewar prevents boiloff of residual liquid by venting the boiloff to the atmosphere during the transfer tube cooling period. The system is most useful with liquids having very small heat of vaporization.

  11. Modeling of cryogen leakage through composite laminates 

    E-print Network

    Peddiraju, Naga Venkata Satya Pravin Kumar

    2005-02-17

    Cryogenic composites ?nd critical application in the manufacture of fuel tanks for reusable launch vehicles due to signi?cant reduction in overall structural weight of the tank. These fuel tanks contain ...

  12. Large Cryogenic Germanium Detector. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mandic, Vuk

    2013-02-13

    The goal of this project was to investigate possible ways of increasing the size of cryogenic Ge detectors. This project identified two possible approaches to increasing the individual cryogenic Ge detector size. The first approach relies on using the existing technology for growing detector-grade (high-purity) germanium crystals of dislocation density 100-7000 cm{sup -2}. The second approach is to consider dislocation-free Ge crystals.

  13. Surface tension confined liquid cryogen cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H. (inventor); Schein, Michael E. (inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A cryogenic cooler is provided for use in craft such as launch, orbital, and space vehicles subject to substantial vibration, changes in orientation, and weightlessness. The cooler contains a small pore, large free volume, low density material to restrain a cryogen through surface tension effects during launch and zero-g operations and maintains instrumentation within the temperature range of 10 to 140 K. The cooler operation is completely passive, with no inherent vibration or power requirements.

  14. Filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. S.; Timberlake, T. E.

    1971-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of filament-wound, fiberglass cryogenic tank supports for a LH2 tank, a LF2/FLOX tank and a CH4 tank. These supports consist of filament-wound fiberglass tubes with titanium end fittings. These units were satisfactorily tested at cryogenic temperatures, thereby offering a design that can be reliably and economically produced in large or small quantities. The basic design concept is applicable to any situation where strong, lightweight axial load members are desired.

  15. The Fast Alternative Cryogenic Experiment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Alfred; Holmes, Warren

    2000-01-01

    One of the challenges in the area of cryogenics for space exploration in the next millennium is providing the capability for inexpensive, frequent, access to space. Faced with this challenge during the International Space Station (ISS) build era, when other Space Shuttle manifesting opportunities are unavailable, a "proof of concept" cryostat has been developed to demonstrate the ability to accommodate low temperature science investigations within the constraints of the Hitchhiker siderail carrier. The Hitchhiker siderail carrier is available on a "mass available" basis during the ISS build era. In fact, several hitchhiker payloads flew with the deployment of the Unity module. Hitchhiker siderail carrier payloads have historically flown an average of about four times a year. A hybrid Solid Neon - Superfluid Helium cryostat has been developed with Janis Research Company to accommodate instruments of 16.5 cm diameter and 30 cm. length. This hybrid approach was taken in part to provide adequate on-orbit lifetime for instruments with high (conducted) heat loads from the instrumentation wiring. Mass, volume, lifetime and the launch hold scenario were all design drivers. In addition, with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation, a multichannel VME architecture Germanium Resistance Thermometer (GRT) readout and heater control servo system has been developed. In a flight system, the cryostat and electronics payloads would be umbilically attached in a paired Hitchhiker siderail mount, and permit on-orbit command and telemetry capability. The results of performance tests of both the cryostat, and a helium sample instrument will be presented. The instrument features a self contained, miniaturized, nano-Kelvin resolution High Resolution Thermometer (HRT). This high level of thermal resolution is achieved through the utilization of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). Although developed for the Low Temperature Microgravity Fundamental Physics investigator community, many design features are applicable in fields such as infrared and x-ray astronomy.

  16. Flight Performance of the AKARI Cryogenic System

    E-print Network

    Takao Nakagawa; Keigo Enya; Masayuki Hirabayashi; Hidehiro Kaneda; Tsuneo Kii; Yoshiyuki Kimura; Toshio Matsumoto; Hiroshi Murakami; Masahide Murakami; Katsuhiro Narasaki; Masanao Narita; Akira Ohnishi; Shoji Tsunematsu; Seiji Yoshida

    2007-08-14

    We describe the flight performance of the cryogenic system of the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI, which was successfully launched on 2006 February 21 (UT). AKARI carries a 68.5 cm telescope together with two focal plane instruments, Infrared Cameras (IRC) and Far Infrared Surveyor (FIS), all of which are cooled down to cryogenic temperature to achieve superior sensitivity. The AKARI cryogenic system is a unique hybrid system, which consists of cryogen (liquid helium) and mechanical coolers (2-stage Stirling coolers). With the help of the mechanical coolers, 179 L (26.0 kg) of super-fluid liquid helium can keep the instruments cryogenically cooled for more than 500 days. The on-orbit performance of the AKARI cryogenics is consistent with the design and pre-flight test, and the boil-off gas flow rate is as small as 0.32 mg/s. We observed the increase of the major axis of the AKARI orbit, which can be explained by the thrust due to thermal pressure of vented helium gas.

  17. D0 Cryogenic System Operator Training

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1991-11-30

    D0 is a collider detector. It will be operating and doing physics at the same time as CDP, therefore it has been decided to train CDP operators to operate and respond to the D0 cryogenic control system. A cryogenic operator will be required to be in residence at D0, during the cooldown and liquid Argon fill of any of the calorimeters. The cryogenic system at D0 is designed to be unmanned during steady state operation. CDP operations has 2 man cryogenic shifts 24 hours a day. It is intended that CDP operators monitor the D0 cryogenic systems, evaluate and respond to alarms, and notify a D0 cryo expert in the event of an unusual problem. A D0 cryogenic system view node has been installed at CDP to help facilitate these goals. It should be noted that even though the CDP view node is a fully operational node it is intended that it be more of an information node and is therefore password protected. The D0 cryo experts may reassess the use of the CDP node at a later date based on experience and operating needs. This engineering note outlines the format of the training and testing given to the CDP operators to make them qualified D0 operators.

  18. Cryogenic ion chemistry and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolk, Arron B; Leavitt, Christopher M; Garand, Etienne; Johnson, Mark A

    2014-01-21

    The use of mass spectrometry in macromolecular analysis is an incredibly important technique and has allowed efficient identification of secondary and tertiary protein structures. Over 20 years ago, Chemistry Nobelist John Fenn and co-workers revolutionized mass spectrometry by developing ways to non-destructively extract large molecules directly from solution into the gas phase. This advance, in turn, enabled rapid sequencing of biopolymers through tandem mass spectrometry at the heart of the burgeoning field of proteomics. In this Account, we discuss how cryogenic cooling, mass selection, and reactive processing together provide a powerful way to characterize ion structures as well as rationally synthesize labile reaction intermediates. This is accomplished by first cooling the ions close to 10 K and condensing onto them weakly bound, chemically inert small molecules or rare gas atoms. This assembly can then be used as a medium in which to quench reactive encounters by rapid evaporation of the adducts, as well as provide a universal means for acquiring highly resolved vibrational action spectra of the embedded species by photoinduced mass loss. Moreover, the spectroscopic measurements can be obtained with readily available, broadly tunable pulsed infrared lasers because absorption of a single photon is sufficient to induce evaporation. We discuss the implementation of these methods with a new type of hybrid photofragmentation mass spectrometer involving two stages of mass selection with two laser excitation regions interfaced to the cryogenic ion source. We illustrate several capabilities of the cryogenic ion spectrometer by presenting recent applications to peptides, a biomimetic catalyst, a large antibiotic molecule (vancomycin), and reaction intermediates pertinent to the chemistry of the ionosphere. First, we demonstrate how site-specific isotopic substitution can be used to identify bands due to local functional groups in a protonated tripeptide designed to stereoselectively catalyze bromination of biaryl substrates. This procedure directly reveals the particular H-bond donor and acceptor groups that enforce the folded structure of the bare ion as well as provide contact points for noncovalent interaction with substrates. We then show how photochemical hole-burning involving only vibrational excitations can be used in a double-resonance mode to systematically disentangle overlapping spectra that arise when several conformers of a dipeptide are prepared in the ion source. Finally, we highlight our ability to systematically capture reaction intermediates and spectroscopically characterize their structures. Through this method, we can identify the pathway for water-network-mediated, proton-coupled transformation of nitrosonium, NO(+) to HONO, a key reaction controlling the cations present in the ionosphere. Through this work, we reveal the critical role played by water molecules occupying the second solvation shell around the ion, where they stabilize the emergent product ion in a fashion reminiscent of the solvent coordinate responsible for the barrier to charge transfer in solution. Looking to the future, we predict that the capture and characterization of fleeting intermediate complexes in the homogeneous catalytic activation of small molecules like water, alkanes, and CO2 is a likely avenue rich with opportunity. PMID:23972279

  19. Science and Technology Facilities Council -Cryogenics Impact Review 1 Cryogenics Impact

    E-print Network

    to global businesses. We estimate this cluster to contribute £97 million to the UK economy annually (based to the UK economy. Cryogenics is also supporting future potential scientific advancements and economic estimate that sectors broadly associated with cryogenics represent 17% of the UK economy. The total (direct

  20. Design and Analysis on a Cryogenic Current Amplifier with a Superconducting Microwave Resonator

    E-print Network

    Okazaki, Yuma

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new type of cryogenic current amplifiers, in which low-frequency power spectrum of current can be measured through a measurement of microwave response of a superconducting resonant circuit shunted by a series array of Josephson junctions. From numerical analysis on the equivalent circuit, the numerical value of the input-referred current noise of the proposed amplifier is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than the noise floor measured with the conventional cryogenic current amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors or superconducting quantum interference devices. Our proposal can open new avenues for investigating low-temperature solid-state devices that require lower noise and wider bandwidth power spectrum measurements of current.

  1. Cryogenic pellet production developments for long-pulse plasma operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitner, S. J.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Fehling, D. T.; McGill, J. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; McGinnis, W. D.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Long pulse plasma operation on large magnetic fusion devices require multiple forms of cryogenically formed pellets for plasma fueling, on-demand edge localized mode (ELM) triggering, radiative cooling of the divertor, and impurity transport studies. The solid deuterium fueling and ELM triggering pellets can be formed by extrusions created by helium cooled, twin-screw extruder based injection system that freezes deuterium in the screw section. A solenoid actuated cutter mechanism is activated to cut the pellets from the extrusion, inserting them into the barrel, and then fired by the pneumatic valve pulse of high pressure gas. Fuel pellets are injected at a rate up to 10 Hz, and ELM triggering pellets are injected at rates up to 20 Hz. The radiative cooling and impurity transport study pellets are produced by introducing impurity gas into a helium cooled section of a pipe gun where it deposits in-situ. A pneumatic valve is opened and propellant gas is released downstream where it encounters a passive punch which initially accelerates the pellet before the gas flow around the finishes the pellet acceleration. This paper discusses the various cryogenic pellet production techniques based on the twin-screw extruder, pipe gun, and pellet punch designs.

  2. Cryogenic pellet production developments for long-pulse plasma operation

    SciTech Connect

    Meitner, S. J.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Fehling, D. T.; McGill, J. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; McGinnis, W. D.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-01-29

    Long pulse plasma operation on large magnetic fusion devices require multiple forms of cryogenically formed pellets for plasma fueling, on-demand edge localized mode (ELM) triggering, radiative cooling of the divertor, and impurity transport studies. The solid deuterium fueling and ELM triggering pellets can be formed by extrusions created by helium cooled, twin-screw extruder based injection system that freezes deuterium in the screw section. A solenoid actuated cutter mechanism is activated to cut the pellets from the extrusion, inserting them into the barrel, and then fired by the pneumatic valve pulse of high pressure gas. Fuel pellets are injected at a rate up to 10 Hz, and ELM triggering pellets are injected at rates up to 20 Hz. The radiative cooling and impurity transport study pellets are produced by introducing impurity gas into a helium cooled section of a pipe gun where it deposits in-situ. A pneumatic valve is opened and propellant gas is released downstream where it encounters a passive punch which initially accelerates the pellet before the gas flow around the finishes the pellet acceleration. This paper discusses the various cryogenic pellet production techniques based on the twin-screw extruder, pipe gun, and pellet punch designs.

  3. Electronic Components and Systems for Cryogenic Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. L.; Hammoud, A.; Dickman, J. E.; Gerber, S.; Elbuluk, M. E.; Overton, E.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic components and systems capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures are anticipated in many future NASA space missions such as deep space probes and planetary surface exploration. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would reach an average temperature near Saturn of about - 183 C. In addition to surviving the deep space harsh environment, electronics capable of low temperature operation would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing payload development and launch costs. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. An on-going research and development program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on the development of reliable electronic devices and efficient power systems capable of surviving in low temperature environments. An overview of the program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with selected data obtained from in-house component testing will also be discussed. Ongoing research activities that are being performed in collaboration with various organizations will also be presented.

  4. Engineering and fabrication cost considerations for cryogenic wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, R. M., Jr.; Davenport, J. B., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Design and fabrication cost drivers for cryogenic transonic wind tunnel models are defined. The major cost factors for wind tunnel models are model complexity, tolerances, surface finishes, materials, material validation, and model inspection. The cryogenic temperatures require the use of materials with relatively high fracture toughness but at the same time high strength. Some of these materials are very difficult to machine, requiring extensive machine hours which can add significantly to the manufacturing costs. Some additional engineering costs are incurred to certify the materials through mechanical tests and nondestructive evaluation techniques, which are not normally required with conventional models. When instrumentation such as accelerometers and electronically scanned pressure modules is required, temperature control of these devices needs to be incorporated into the design, which requires added effort. Additional thermal analyses and subsystem tests may be necessary, which also adds to the design costs. The largest driver to the design costs is potentially the additional static and dynamic analyses required to insure structural integrity of the model and support system.

  5. Thin semi-rigid coaxial cables for cryogenics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushino, Akihiro; Kasai, Soichi

    2013-03-01

    We have developed cryogenic coaxial cables for low temperature signal readout from sensitive devices, such as transition edge sensors, superconducting tunnel junctions, and kinetic inductance detectors. In order to reduce heat penetration into cryogenic stages, low thermal conductivity metals were chosen for both center and outer electrical conductors. Various types of coaxial cables, employing stainless-steel, cupro-nickel, brass, beryllium-copper, phosphor-bronze, niobium, and niobium-titanium, were manufactured using drawing dies. Thermal and electrical properties were investigated between 1 and 8 K. Coaxial cables made of copper alloys showed thermal conductance roughly consistent with literature, meanwhile Nb coaxial cable must be affected by the drawing process and thermal conductance was lowered. Attenuation of superconducting Nb and NbTi coaxial cables were observed to be adequately small up to above 10 GHz compared to those of normal conducting coaxial cables, which are subject to the Wiedemann-Franz law. We also measured normal conducting coaxial cables with silver-plated center conductors to improve high frequency performance.

  6. Ceramic Fiber Structures for Cryogenic Load-Bearing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Eckel, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This invention is intended for use as a load-bearing device under cryogenic temperatures and/or abrasive conditions (i.e., during missions to the Moon). The innovation consists of small-diameter, ceramic fibers that are woven or braided into devices like ropes, belts, tracks, or cables. The fibers can be formed from a variety of ceramic materials like silicon carbide, carbon, aluminosilicate, or aluminum oxide. The fiber architecture of the weave or braid is determined by both the fiber properties and the mechanical requirements of the application. A variety of weave or braid architectures is possible for this application. Thickness of load-bearing devices can be achieved by using either a 3D woven structure, or a layered, 2D structure. For the prototype device, a belt approximately 0.10 in. (0.25 cm) thick, and 3.0 in. (7.6 cm) wide was formed by layering and stitching a 2D aluminosilicate fiber weave.

  7. The SHOOT cryogenic components - Testing and applicability to other flight programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipirro, Michael J.; Schein, Michael E.; Boyle, Robert F.; Figueroa, Orlando; Lindauer, David A.; Mchugh, Daniel C.; Shirron, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    Cryogenic components and techniques for the superfluid helium on-orbit transfer (SHOOT) flight demonstration are described. Instrumentation for measuring liquid quantity, position, flow rate, temperature, and pressure has been developed using the data obtained from the IRAS, Cosmic Background Explorer, and Spacelab 2 helium dewars. Topics discussed include valves and burst disks, fluid management devices, structural/thermal components, instrumentation, and ground support equipment and performance test apparatus.

  8. Dark current measurements on a superconducting cavity using a cryogenic current comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geithner, R.; Neubert, R.; Vodel, W.; Seidel, P.; Knaack, K.; Vilcins, S.; Wittenburg, K.; Kugeler, O.; Knobloch, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents nondestructive dark current measurements of tera electron volt energy superconducting linear accelerator cavities. The measurements were carried out in an extremely noisy accelerator environment using a low temperature dc superconducting quantum interference device based cryogenic current comparator. The overall current sensitivity under these rough conditions was measured to be 0.2 nA/Hz^{1/2}, which enables the detection of dark currents of 5 nA.

  9. Dark current measurements on a superconducting cavity using a cryogenic current comparator.

    PubMed

    Geithner, R; Neubert, R; Vodel, W; Seidel, P; Knaack, K; Vilcins, S; Wittenburg, K; Kugeler, O; Knobloch, J

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents nondestructive dark current measurements of tera electron volt energy superconducting linear accelerator cavities. The measurements were carried out in an extremely noisy accelerator environment using a low temperature dc superconducting quantum interference device based cryogenic current comparator. The overall current sensitivity under these rough conditions was measured to be 0.2 nA/Hz(1/2), which enables the detection of dark currents of 5 nA. PMID:21280820

  10. Active Costorage of Cryogenic Propellants for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavan, Edgar R.; Boyle, Rob; Mustafi, Shuvo

    2008-01-01

    Long-term storage of cryogenic propellants is a critical requirement for NASA's effort to return to the moon. Liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen provide the highest specific impulse of any practical chemical propulsion system, and thus provides the greatest payload mass per unit of launch mass. Future manned missions will require vehicles with the flexibility to remain in orbit for months, necessitating long-term storage of these cryogenic liquids. For decades cryogenic scientific satellites have used cryogens to cool instruments. In many cases, the lifetime of the primary cryogen tank has been extended by intercepting much of the heat incident on the tank at an intermediate-temperature shield cooled either by a second cryogen tank or a mechanical cryocooler. For an LH2/LO2 propellant system, a combination of these ideas can be used, in which the shield around the LO2 tank is attached to, and at the same temperature as, the LO2 tank, but is actively cooled so as to remove all heat impinging on the tank and shield. This configuration eliminates liquid oxygen boil-off and cuts the liquid hydrogen boil-off to a small fraction of the unshielded rate. This paper studies the concept of active costorage as a means of long-term cryogenic propellant storage. The paper describes the design impact of an active costorage system for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). This paper also compares the spacecraft level impact of the active costorage concept with a passive storage option in relation to two different scales of spacecraft that will be used for the lunar exploration effort, the CEV and the Earth Departure Stage (EDS). Spacecraft level studies are performed to investigate the impact of scaling of the costorage technologies for the different components of the Lunar Architecture and for different mission durations.

  11. Cryogenic silicon surface ion trap

    E-print Network

    Michael Niedermayr; Kirill Lakhmanskiy; Muir Kumph; Stefan Partel; Johannes Edlinger; Michael Brownnutt; Rainer Blatt

    2015-05-01

    Trapped ions are pre-eminent candidates for building quantum information processors and quantum simulators. They have been used to demonstrate quantum gates and algorithms, quantum error correction, and basic quantum simulations. However, to realise the full potential of such systems and make scalable trapped-ion quantum computing a reality, there exist a number of practical problems which must be solved. These include tackling the observed high ion-heating rates and creating scalable trap structures which can be simply and reliably produced. Here, we report on cryogenically operated silicon ion traps which can be rapidly and easily fabricated using standard semiconductor technologies. Single $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions have been trapped and used to characterize the trap operation. Long ion lifetimes were observed with the traps exhibiting heating rates as low as $\\dot{\\bar{n}}=$ 0.33 phonons/s at an ion-electrode distance of 230 $\\mu$m. These results open many new avenues to arrays of micro-fabricated ion traps.

  12. Mass Driver Two - Cryogenic module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fine, K.; Williams, F.; Mongeau, P.; Kolm, H.

    1979-01-01

    The cryogenic module of Mass Driver Two comprises a 3.25 inch (82.55 mm) OD bucket with two 44 kilo-ampere-turn coils made with .028 inch (.71 mm) diam niobium-titanium multi-filamentary cable in a copper matrix, impregnated with lead alloy for thermal inertia, as well as the service station to refrigerate, energize and eject the bucket. The station is housed in a six inch flanged pyrex cross which connects to the four inch pyrex tube of the mass driver itself. The bucket is refrigerated by being forced against a copper braid cradle attached to the bottom of a liquid helium reservoir which protrudes into the cross from above. The bucket is energized inductively by turning off two superconducting coils which are also attached to the helium reservoir, and which have maintained the correct flux linkage through the bucket coils during their cool-down through the critical temperature. Once charging is completed, the clamping pressure is released and the bucket is injected into the mass driver by means of two normal-conductor pulse coils surrounding the horizontal branches of the cross.

  13. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    E-print Network

    Wollack, Edward J; Rinehart, Stephan A

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, $R \\le 0.003$, from $800-4,800\\,{\\rm cm}^{-1}$ $(12-2\\,\\mu$m). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to $400-10,000\\,{\\rm cm}^{-1}$ $(25-1\\,\\mu$m) the observed performance gracefully degrades to $R \\le 0.02$ at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to $\\sim4\\,$K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials -- Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder -- are character...

  14. Thermodynamic Vent System for an On-Orbit Cryogenic Reaction Control Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; Romig, Kris A.; Jimenez, Rafael; Flores, Sam

    2012-01-01

    A report discusses a cryogenic reaction control system (RCS) that integrates a Joule-Thompson (JT) device (expansion valve) and thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with a cryogenic distribution system to allow fine control of the propellant quality (subcooled liquid) during operation of the device. It enables zero-venting when coupled with an RCS engine. The proper attachment locations and sizing of the orifice are required with the propellant distribution line to facilitate line conditioning. During operations, system instrumentation was strategically installed along the distribution/TVS line assembly, and temperature control bands were identified. A sub-scale run tank, full-scale distribution line, open-loop TVS, and a combination of procured and custom-fabricated cryogenic components were used in the cryogenic RCS build-up. Simulated on-orbit activation and thruster firing profiles were performed to quantify system heat gain and evaluate the TVS s capability to maintain the required propellant conditions at the inlet to the engine valves. Test data determined that a small control valve, such as a piezoelectric, is optimal to provide continuously the required thermal control. The data obtained from testing has also assisted with the development of fluid and thermal models of an RCS to refine integrated cryogenic propulsion system designs. This system allows a liquid oxygenbased main propulsion and reaction control system for a spacecraft, which improves performance, safety, and cost over conventional hypergolic systems due to higher performance, use of nontoxic propellants, potential for integration with life support and power subsystems, and compatibility with in-situ produced propellants.

  15. The Future with Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scurlock, R. G.

    The applications of cryogenic systems have expanded over the past 50 years into many areas of our lives. During this time, the impact of the common features of Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics, CryoFD, on the economic design of these cryogenic systems, has grown out of a long series of experimental studies carried out by teams of postgraduate students at Southampton University.These studies have sought to understand the heat transfer and convective behavior of cryogenic liquids and vapors, but they have only skimmed over the many findings made, on the strong convective motions of fluids at low temperatures. The convection takes place in temperature gradients up to 10,000 K per meter, and density gradients of 1000% per meter and more, with rapid temperature and spatially dependent changes in physical properties like viscosity and surface tension, making software development and empirical correlations almost impossible to achieve. These temperature and density gradients are far larger than those met in other convecting systems at ambient temperatures, and there is little similarity. The paper will discuss the likely impact of CryoFD on future cryogenic systems, and hopefully inspire further research to support and expand the use of existing findings, and to improve the economy of present-day systems even more effectively. Particular examples to be mentioned include the following. Doubling the cooling power of cryo-coolers by a simple use of CryoFD. Reducing the boil-off rate of liquid helium stored at the South Pole, such that liquid helium availability is now all-the-year-round. Helping to develop the 15 kA current leads for the LHC superconducting magnets at CERN, with much reduced refrigeration loads. Improving the heat transfer capability of boiling heat transfer surfaces by 10 to 100 fold. This paper is an edited text of an invited plenary presentation at ICEC25/ICMC2014 by Professor Scurlock on the occasion of his being presented with the ICEC Mendelssohn Award for his many contributions to Cryogenics. As long ago as 1992, he first proposed in his "History and Origins of Cryogenics" that the temperature range for Cryogenics should be extended up to the ice-point at 273K. This paper expands on this proposal with the implicit assumption that Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics can provide a universal basis for modelling heat transfer and convective fluid behaviour of all fluids, at all temperatures, below the ice-point at 273K; or below 250K if you wish to exclude refrigeration engineering."

  16. Cryogenic applications of commercial electronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Ernest D.; Benford, Dominic J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Harvey Moseley, S.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a range of techniques useful for constructing analog and digital circuits for operation in a liquid Helium environment (4.2 K), using commercially available low power components. The challenges encountered in designing cryogenic electronics include finding components that can function usefully in the cold and possess low enough power dissipation so as not to heat the systems they are designed to measure. From design, test, and integration perspectives it is useful for components to operate similarly at room and cryogenic temperatures; however this is not a necessity. Some of the circuits presented here have been used successfully in the MUSTANG [1] and in the GISMO [2] camera to build a complete digital to analog multiplexer (which will be referred to as the Cryogenic Address Driver board). Many of the circuit elements described are of a more general nature rather than specific to the Cryogenic Address Driver board, and were studied as a part of a more comprehensive approach to addressing a larger set of cryogenic electronic needs.

  17. Cryogenic Applications of Commercial Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Ernest D.; Benford, Dominic J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a range of techniques useful for constructing analog and digital circuits for operation in a liquid Helium environment (4.2K), using commercially available low power components. The challenges encountered in designing cryogenic electronics include finding components that can function usefully in the cold and possess low enough power dissipation so as not to heat the systems they are designed to measure. From design, test, and integration perspectives it is useful for components to operate similarly at room and cryogenic temperatures; however this is not a necessity. Some of the circuits presented here have been used successfully in the MUSTANG and in the GISMO camera to build a complete digital to analog multiplexer (which will be referred to as the Cryogenic Address Driver board). Many of the circuit elements described are of a more general nature rather than specific to the Cryogenic Address Driver board, and were studied as a part of a more comprehensive approach to addressing a larger set of cryogenic electronic needs.

  18. Advanced cryogenics for cutting tools. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine if cryogenic treatment improved the life and cost effectiveness of perishable cutting tools over other treatments or coatings. Test results showed that in five of seven of the perishable cutting tools tested there was no improvement in tool life. The other two tools showed a small gain in tool life, but not as much as when switching manufacturers of the cutting tool. The following conclusions were drawn from this study: (1) titanium nitride coatings are more effective than cryogenic treatment in increasing the life of perishable cutting tools made from all cutting tool materials, (2) cryogenic treatment may increase tool life if the cutting tool is improperly heat treated during its origination, and (3) cryogenic treatment was only effective on those tools made from less sophisticated high speed tool steels. As a part of a recent detailed investigation, four cutting tool manufacturers and two cutting tool laboratories were queried and none could supply any data to substantiate cryogenic treatment of perishable cutting tools.

  19. Aerogel Blanket Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffman, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; White, S.; Gould, G.; Augustynowicz, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aerogel blanket materials for use in thermal insulation systems are now commercially available and implemented by industry. Prototype aerogel blanket materials were presented at the Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1997 and by 2004 had progressed to full commercial production by Aspen Aerogels. Today, this new technology material is providing superior energy efficiencies and enabling new design approaches for more cost effective cryogenic systems. Aerogel processing technology and methods are continuing to improve, offering a tailor-able array of product formulations for many different thermal and environmental requirements. Many different varieties and combinations of aerogel blankets have been characterized using insulation test cryostats at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Detailed thermal conductivity data for a select group of materials are presented for engineering use. Heat transfer evaluations for the entire vacuum pressure range, including ambient conditions, are given. Examples of current cryogenic applications of aerogel blanket insulation are also given. KEYWORDS: Cryogenic tanks, thermal insulation, composite materials, aerogel, thermal conductivity, liquid nitrogen boil-off

  20. Status of the ESS cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Weisend II, J. G.; Darve, C.; Gallimore, S.; Hees, W.; Jurns, J.; Köttig, T.; Ladd, P.; Molloy, S.; Parker, T.; Wang, X. L.

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a neutron science facility funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries currently under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. The centerpiece of ESS is a 2.5 GeV proton linac utilizing superconducting RF cavities operating at 2 K. In addition to cooling the SRF cavities, cryogenics is also used at ESS in the liquid hydrogen moderators surrounding the target. ESS also uses both liquid helium and liquid nitrogen in a number of the planned neutron instruments. There is also a significant cryogenic installation associated with the site acceptance testing of the ESS cryomodules. The ESS cryogenic system consists of 3 separate helium refrigeration/liquefaction plants supplying the accelerator, target moderators and instruments. An extensive cryogenic distribution system connects the accelerator cryoplant with the cryomodules. This paper describes the preliminary design of the ESS cryogenic system including the expected heat loads. Challenges associated with the required high reliability and turn-down capability will also be discussed. A unique feature of ESS is its commitment to sustainability and energy recovery. A conceptual design for recovering waste heat from the helium compressors for use in the Lund district heating system will also be described.

  1. Notes on Single-Particle Reconstruction in Cryogenic

    E-print Network

    Duncan, James S.

    Notes on Single-Particle Reconstruction in Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Hemant D. Tagare-dimensional structure of macromolecules. A more modern method is cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-em), which

  2. 49 CFR 173.320 - Cryogenic liquids; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Cryogenic liquids; exceptions. (a) Atmospheric gases and helium, cryogenic liquids, in Dewar flasks, insulated cylinders...requirements of this subchapter do not apply to atmospheric gases and helium: (1) During loading and unloading operations...

  3. 49 CFR 173.320 - Cryogenic liquids; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Cryogenic liquids; exceptions. (a) Atmospheric gases and helium, cryogenic liquids, in Dewar flasks, insulated cylinders...requirements of this subchapter do not apply to atmospheric gases and helium: (1) During loading and unloading operations...

  4. 49 CFR 173.320 - Cryogenic liquids; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Cryogenic liquids; exceptions. (a) Atmospheric gases and helium, cryogenic liquids, in Dewar flasks, insulated cylinders...requirements of this subchapter do not apply to atmospheric gases and helium: (1) During loading and unloading operations...

  5. 49 CFR 173.320 - Cryogenic liquids; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Cryogenic liquids; exceptions. (a) Atmospheric gases and helium, cryogenic liquids, in Dewar flasks, insulated cylinders...requirements of this subchapter do not apply to atmospheric gases and helium: (1) During loading and unloading operations...

  6. 49 CFR 173.320 - Cryogenic liquids; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Cryogenic liquids; exceptions. (a) Atmospheric gases and helium, cryogenic liquids, in Dewar flasks, insulated cylinders...requirements of this subchapter do not apply to atmospheric gases and helium: (1) During loading and unloading operations...

  7. Supplemental Material to Cryogenic Roadmap Current Commercial Technology

    E-print Network

    Supplemental Material to Cryogenic Roadmap Current Commercial Technology Refrigeration Approximate $400,000 $333.33 105 87.5 4.13% Stirling Cycle Stirling Cryogenics LPC04 80 He 4200 Watts 4200 Stirling

  8. Simulated Extragalactic Observations with a Cryogenic Imaging Spectrophotometer

    E-print Network

    Mazin, B A; Mazin, Ben A.; Brunner, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we explore the application of cryogenic imaging spectrophotometers. Prototypes of this new class of detector, such as superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) and transition edge sensors (TESs), currently deliver low resolution imaging spectrophotometry with high quantum efficiency (70-100%) and no read noise over a wide bandpass in the visible to near-infrared. In order to demonstrate their utility and the differences in observing strategy needed to maximize their scientific return, we present simulated observations of a deep extragalactic field. Using a simple analytic technique, we can estimate both the galaxy redshift and spectral type more accurately than is possible with current broadband techniques. From our simulated observations and a subsequent discussion of the expected migration path for this new technology, we illustrate the power and promise of these devices.

  9. Simulated Extragalactic Observations with a Cryogenic Imaging Spectrophotometer

    E-print Network

    Ben A. Mazin; Robert J. Brunner

    2000-07-27

    In this paper we explore the application of cryogenic imaging spectrophotometers. Prototypes of this new class of detector, such as superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) and transition edge sensors (TESs), currently deliver low resolution imaging spectrophotometry with high quantum efficiency (70-100%) and no read noise over a wide bandpass in the visible to near-infrared. In order to demonstrate their utility and the differences in observing strategy needed to maximize their scientific return, we present simulated observations of a deep extragalactic field. Using a simple analytic technique, we can estimate both the galaxy redshift and spectral type more accurately than is possible with current broadband techniques. From our simulated observations and a subsequent discussion of the expected migration path for this new technology, we illustrate the power and promise of these devices.

  10. Cryogenic measurements of aerojet GaAs n-JFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, John H.; Weber, Theodore T.

    1993-01-01

    The spectral noise characteristics of Aerojet gallium arsenide (GaAs) junction field effect transistors (JFET's) have been investigated down to liquid-helium temperatures. Noise characterization was performed with the field effect transistor (FET) in the floating-gate mode, in the grounded-gate mode to determine the lowest noise readings possible, and with an extrinsic silicon photodetector at various detector bias voltages to determine optimum operating conditions. The measurements indicate that the Aerojet GaAs JFET is a quiet and stable device at liquid helium temperatures. Hence, it can be considered a readout line driver or infrared detector preamplifier as well as a host of other cryogenic applications. Its noise performance is superior to silicon (Si) metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET's) operating at liquid helium temperatures, and is equal to the best Si n channel junction field effect transistor (n-JFET's) operating at 300 K.

  11. A Micro Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based Cryogenic Deformable Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; Kataza, H.; Bierden, P.

    2009-03-01

    We present our first results on the development and evaluation of a cryogenic deformable mirror (DM) based on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. A MEMS silicon-based DM chip with 32 channels, in which each channel is N, zooming optics, electric drivers. The surface of the mirror at 95 K deformed in response to the application of a voltage, and no significant difference was found between the deformation at 95 K and that at room temperature. The power dissipation by the cryogenic DM was also measured, and we suggest that this is small enough for it to be used in a space cryogenic telescope. The properties of the DM remained unchanged after five cycles of vacuum pumping, cooling, warming, and venting. We conclude that fabricating cryogenic DMs employing MEMS technology is a promising approach. Therefore, we intend to develop a more sophisticated device for actual use, and to look for potential applications including the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology & Astrophysics (SPICA), and other missions.

  12. Cryogenic neutron moderator on mesitylene pellets for IBR-2 reactor

    E-print Network

    Titov, Anatoly

    Cryogenic neutron moderator on mesitylene pellets for IBR-2 reactor Anan'ev V., Belyakov A mesitylene receiver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 8 HeHe #12;Cryogenic transport pipeline for moderators of 2-3 and 7- 10 of the IBR-2M cryogenic moderator 1 2 3 5 4 1 ­ camera-imitator of cryogenic moderator, 2 ­thermal exchanger

  13. Fractional watt Vuillemier cryogenic refrigerator program engineering notebook. Volume 1: Thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. S.

    1974-01-01

    The cryogenic refrigerator thermal design calculations establish design approach and basic sizing of the machine's elements. After the basic design is defined, effort concentrates on matching the thermodynamic design with that of the heat transfer devices (heat exchangers and regenerators). Typically, the heat transfer device configurations and volumes are adjusted to improve their heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics. These adjustments imply that changes be made to the active displaced volumes, compensating for the influence of the heat transfer devices on the thermodynamic processes of the working fluid. Then, once the active volumes are changed, the heat transfer devices require adjustment to account for the variations in flows, pressure levels, and heat loads. This iterative process is continued until the thermodynamic cycle parameters match the design of the heat transfer devices. By examing several matched designs, a near-optimum refrigerator is selected.

  14. Performance of Power Converters at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    Power converters capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures are anticipated to play an important role in the power system architecture of future NASA deep space missions. Design of such converters to survive cryogenic temperatures will improve the power system performance and reduce development and launch costs. Aerospace power systems are mainly a DC distribution network. Therefore, DC/DC and DC/AC converters provide the outputs needed to different loads at various power levels. Recently, research efforts have been performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to design and evaluate DC/DC converters that are capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures. This paper presents a summary of the research performed to evaluate the low temperature performance of five DC/DC converters. Various parameters were investigated as a function of temperature in the range of 20 to -196 C. Data pertaining to the output voltage regulation and efficiency of the converters is presented and discussed.

  15. Long-term cryogenic space storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. A.; Chronic, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the design, fabrication and testing of a 225-cu ft spherical cryogenic storage system for long-term subcritical applications under zero-g conditions in storing subcritical cryogens for space vehicle propulsion systems. The insulation system design, the analytical methods used, and the correlation between the performance test results and analytical predictions are described. The best available multilayer insulation materials and state-of-the-art thermal protection concepts were applied in the design, providing a boiloff rate of 0.152 lb/hr, or 0.032% per day, and an overall heat flux of 0.066 Btu/sq ft hr based on a 200 sq ft surface area. A six to eighteen month cryogenic storage is provided by this system for space applications.

  16. Long term storage of cryogens in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fester, D. A.; Eberhardt, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental design procedures leading to the configuration of a space-based cryogenic fluids test system are reported. Large quantities of cryogenic fluids are expected to be required in space for cooling systems, chemical and electrical OTVs, and resupply tankers. The design was guided by the necessity for representative storage and supply systems to be compatible with the Shuttle. Consideration was given to liquid hydrogen, oxygen, methane, and argon containers and concommitant fluid dynamics, thermal, and structural analyses. A 5% initial ullage was included for the liquids, except for methane, which was calculated at 8.9%. The Ar, CH4, and O2 tanks were set at 12.5 cu m, while the H2 tank was 37.4 cu m. The orbital experiment is required to provide actual thermal stabilization lags in a zero-g environment. Details of the Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility test module for flight on board the Shuttle are presented.

  17. Conceptual design of the FRIB cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Weisend II, J G; Bull, Brad; Burns, Chris; Fila, Adam; Kelley, Patrick; Laumer, Helmut; Mann, Thomas; McCartney, Allyn; Jones, S

    2012-06-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a new nuclear science facility funded by the DOE Office of Science and Michigan State University (MSU). FRIB is currently under design and will be located on the MSU campus. The centerpiece of FRIB is a heavy ion linac utilizing superconducting RF cavities and magnets which in turn requires a large cryogenic system. The cryogenic system consists of a commercially produced helium refrigeration plant and an extensive distribution system. Superconducting components will operate at both 4.5 K and 2 K. This paper describes the conceptual design of the system including the expected heat loads and operating modes. The strategy for procuring a custom turnkey helium refrigeration plant from industry, an overview of the distribution system, the interface of the cryogenic system to the conventional facilities and the project schedule are also described.

  18. The high Reynolds number cryogenic wind tunnel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.; Kilgore, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical considerations indicate that cooling the wind-tunnel test gas to cryogenic temperatures will provide a large increase in test Reynolds number with no increase in dynamic pressure while reducing the tunnel drive-power requirements. Studies have been made to determine the expected variations of Reynolds number and other parameters over wide ranges of Mach number, pressure, and temperature with due regard to avoiding liquefaction and adverse real-gas effects. Practical operational procedures have been developed in a low-speed prototype cryogenic wind tunnel. Aerodynamic experiments in the facility have demonstrated the theoretically predicted variations in Reynolds number and drive power. Force and moment measurements on a wing model mounted on a water-jacketed strain-gage sting balance have demonstrated the feasibility of operation of such balances in a cryogenic environment.

  19. Cryogenic transfer module for geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oiknine, Claude

    1992-02-01

    Israel Aircraft Industries (IAI) is developing a Cryogenic Transfer Module (CTM) which will be able to raise a 2,100-kg satellite from low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit. The CTM is fully independent of the satellite payload during the entire transfer mission, which can last about 10 days. It is powered by a cryogenic propulsion unit of 10,000-N thrust, using liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. Total burn time is 2,100 seconds, typically divided into five discrete burns at perigee and apogee. The stage mass fraction is 0.87, with a maximum cryogenic propellant mass of 4,800 kg. Ground tests of the propulsion unit have been started.

  20. Cryogenic Amplifier Based Receivers at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Reck, Theodore and; Schlecht, Erich; Lin, Robert; Deal, William

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based amplifiers has moved well in the submillimeter-wave frequencies over the last couple of years. Working amplifiers with usable gain in waveguide packages has been reported beyond 700 GHz. When cooled cryogenically, they have shown substantial improvement in their noise temperature. This has opened up the real possibility of cryogenic amplifier based heterodyne receivers at submillimeter wavelengths for ground-based, air-borne, and space-based instruments for astrophysics, planetary, and Earth science applications. This paper provides an overview of the science applications at submillimeter wavelengths that will benefit from this technology. It also describes the current state of the InP HEMT based cryogenic amplifier receivers at submillimeter wavelengths.

  1. Advanced long term cryogenic storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Norman S.

    1987-01-01

    Long term, cryogenic fluid storage facilities will be required to support future space programs such as the space-based Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), Telescopes, and Laser Systems. An orbital liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen storage system with an initial capacity of approximately 200,000 lb will be required. The storage facility tank design must have the capability of fluid acquisition in microgravity and limit cryogen boiloff due to environmental heating. Cryogenic boiloff management features, minimizing Earth-to-orbit transportation costs, will include advanced thick multilayer insulation/integrated vapor cooled shield concepts, low conductance support structures, and refrigeration/reliquefaction systems. Contracted study efforts are under way to develop storage system designs, technology plans, test article hardware designs, and develop plans for ground/flight testing.

  2. Cyra Cryogenic Infrared Spectrograph The BBSO facility infrared spectrometer, Cyra, will consist of a fully cryogenic folded Czerny-

    E-print Network

    Cyra ­ Cryogenic Infrared Spectrograph The BBSO facility infrared spectrometer, Cyra, will consist of a fully cryogenic folded Czerny- Turner spectrograph utilizing a 2048x2048 HgCdTe array sensitive through

  3. University of Toronto Control Program for Liquid Cryogenic Transfer Facilities

    E-print Network

    Chan, Hue Sun

    | 1 CONTROL PROGRAM for LIQUID CRYOGENIC TRANSFER FACILITIES / OTHER LOW OXYGEN HAZARDOUS ROOMS 1 Control Program for Liquid Cryogenic Transfer Facilities February 2014 Page | 3 3.1 Oxygen DeficiencyUniversity of Toronto Control Program for Liquid Cryogenic Transfer Facilities February 2014 Page

  4. Cryogenic Roadmap U.S. Department of Energy

    E-print Network

    i Cryogenic Roadmap U.S. Department of Energy Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems Executive Summary Cryogenic systems providing 100-1000 watts of cooling power at 65-80 K are required) and operate more efficiently (30+% of Carnot) and reliably than present day off the shelf cryogenic systems

  5. Cryogenic optomechanics with a Si membrane and classical laser noise

    E-print Network

    Harris, Jack

    Cryogenic optomechanics with a Si 3 N 4 membrane and classical laser noise This article has been Contact us My IOPscience #12;Cryogenic optomechanics with a Si3N4 membrane and classical laser noise A M demonstrate a cryogenic optomechanical system comprising a flexible Si3N4 membrane placed at the center

  6. Dissipative cryogenic filters with zero dc resistance Hendrik Bluhma

    E-print Network

    Moler, Kathryn A.

    Dissipative cryogenic filters with zero dc resistance Hendrik Bluhma and Kathryn A. Moler, implemented, and tested cryogenic rf filters with zero dc resistance, based on wires with a superconducting American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2835716 I. INTRODUCTION Many cryogenic experiments involve

  7. Cryogenic Roadmap U.S. Department of Energy

    E-print Network

    06/18/01 1 Cryogenic Roadmap U.S. Department of Energy Superconductivity Program for Electric pertaining to cryogenics. Appendix A is a tabulation of the steering committee members who participated by the steering committee and the 1997 and 1998 cryogenic workshop findings. However, there are added

  8. An all-cryogenic THz transmission spectrometer P. J. Burkea)

    E-print Network

    Eisenstein, Jim

    An all-cryogenic THz transmission spectrometer P. J. Burkea) and J. P. Eisenstein Condensed Matter contained in a cryogenic environment. Cyclotron emission from a two-dimensional electron gas 2DEG heated microwave to optical frequencies.2 In this article an all-cryogenic spectrometer is presented that bypasses

  9. Cryogenic optical refrigeration Denis V. Seletskiy1,3

    E-print Network

    Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    Cryogenic optical refrigeration Denis V. Seletskiy1,3 , Markus P. Hehlen2 , Richard I. Epstein1, focusing our attention on the recent advances in cryogenic cooling of an ytterbium-doped fluoride crystal improvements position optical refrigeration as the only viable all-solid-state cooling approach for cryogenic

  10. Recirculating Liquid Nitrogen System for Operation of Cryogenic Pumps

    E-print Network

    Walker, Mitchell

    1 Recirculating Liquid Nitrogen System for Operation of Cryogenic Pumps IEPC-2011-217 Presented Abstract: Cryogenic pumps are attractive for electric propulsion test facilities due to their pumping speed. Introduction Cryogenically-pumped electric propulsion (EP) facilities achieve very high pumping speeds through

  11. Dynamic Cryogenic Seals to Support Fueling of Fusion Tokomaks

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Dynamic Cryogenic Seals to Support Fueling of Fusion Tokomaks U. Naranjo and J. W. Leachman School in damaged products every year. Sealing at cryogenic temperatures is a substantially more difficult task than extruder in development at the WSU HYPER laboratory. The purpose of a cryogenic dynamic polymer seal

  12. On Surface Cryogenic System Comissioning Preliminary Test Results

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    MERIT On Surface Cryogenic System Comissioning Preliminary Test Results (Draft) Friedrich Haug Phillip Santos Silva Hugo Pereira Accelerator Technology Department Genève, Suisse Cryogenics for Experiments April 2007 #12;The Cryogenic System allows us to fully control the filling and emptying procedure

  13. TT2A Mercury Jet Experiment The Cryogenic

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    TT2A Mercury Jet Experiment The Cryogenic System Roger Bennett and Yury Ivanyushenkov CCLRC "SPECIFICATION" of the cryogenic cycle is: 1. Initial fill of the magnet cryostat slowly over many hours -12 at CERN, December 2004, drawn by Peter Titus #12;Design and Costing of the Cryogenic System 1. The input

  14. Development of dual solid cryogens for high reliability refrigeration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caren, R. P.; Coston, R. M.

    1967-01-01

    High reliability solid cryogen refrigeration system consists of a container initially filled with a solid cryogen which is coupled thermally to an infrared detector by means of a link of high thermal conductivity extending from a heat exchanger within the cryogen container.

  15. Optical links for cryogenic focal plane array Alan R. Johnston

    E-print Network

    Fossum, Eric R.

    Optical links for cryogenic focal plane array readout Alan R. Johnston Duncan T. H. Liu, MEMBER@jplopto.jpl.nasa.gov 1 Introduction Optical instruments employing cryogenic focal plane arrays must minimize power dissipation on the focal plane. Because cooler power efficiency is low at cryogenic temperatures, reduction

  16. The new cryogenic facility at LMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degallaix, Jérôme; Flaminio, Raffaele; Forest, Danièle; Franc, Janyce; Gautier, Kevin; Granata, Massimo; Lagrange, Bernard; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent; Saracco, Emeline; Benoit, Quentin

    2012-06-01

    To support the research effort for the third generation of gravitational wave interferometers, the Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés (LMA) at Lyon, France has developed a new cryogenic facility to characterize optics at low temperature. The new cryostat is installed in a clean room and allows samples to be cooled down to 10 Kelvin in around 12 hours. Currently, two independent experiments have been installed in the cryostat: the measure of the optical absorption of silicon and the measurement of the coating mechanical loss. After a short presentation of the cryogenic and optical setup, preliminary results from the optical absorption experiment will be presented.

  17. Cryogenic electron beam induced chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Martin, Aiden A; Toth, Milos

    2014-11-12

    Cryogenic cooling is used to enable efficient, gas-mediated electron beam induced etching (EBIE) in cases where the etch rate is negligible at room and elevated substrate temperatures. The process is demonstrated using nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) as the etch precursor, and Si, SiO2, SiC, and Si3N4 as the materials volatilized by an electron beam. Cryogenic cooling broadens the range of precursors that can be used for EBIE, and enables high-resolution, deterministic etching of materials that are volatilized spontaneously by conventional etch precursors as demonstrated here by NF3 and XeF2 EBIE of silicon. PMID:25333843

  18. Adjustable expandable cryogenic piston and ring

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Peter O. (Aurora, IL); Pallaver, Carl B. (Woodridge, IL)

    1980-01-01

    The operation of a reciprocating expansion engine for cryogenic refrigeration is improved by changing the pistons and rings so that the piston can be operated from outside the engine to vary the groove in which the piston ring is located. This causes the ring, which is of a flexible material, to be squeezed so that its contact with the wall is subject to external control. This control may be made manually or it may be made automatically in response to instruments that sense the amount of blow-by of the cryogenic fluid and adjust for an optimum blow-by.

  19. Resolving ultrafast heating of dense cryogenic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zastrau, U; Sperling, P; Harmand, M; Becker, A; Bornath, T; Bredow, R; Dziarzhytski, S; Fennel, T; Fletcher, L B; Förster, E; Göde, S; Gregori, G; Hilbert, V; Hochhaus, D; Holst, B; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Ma, T; Mithen, J P; Mitzner, R; Murphy, C D; Nakatsutsumi, M; Neumayer, P; Przystawik, A; Roling, S; Schulz, M; Siemer, B; Skruszewicz, S; Tiggesbäumker, J; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; White, T; Wöstmann, M; Zacharias, H; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S H; Redmer, R

    2014-03-14

    We report on the dynamics of ultrafast heating in cryogenic hydrogen initiated by a ?300??fs, 92 eV free electron laser x-ray burst. The rise of the x-ray scattering amplitude from a second x-ray pulse probes the transition from dense cryogenic molecular hydrogen to a nearly uncorrelated plasmalike structure, indicating an electron-ion equilibration time of ?0.9??ps. The rise time agrees with radiation hydrodynamics simulations based on a conductivity model for partially ionized plasma that is validated by two-temperature density-functional theory. PMID:24679300

  20. Sorption cryogenic refrigeration - Status and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1988-01-01

    The operation principles of sorption cryogenic refrigeration are discussed. Sorption refrigerators have virtually no wear-related moving parts, have negligible vibration, and offer extremely long life (at least ten years), making it possible to obtain efficient, long life and low vibration cooling to as low as 7 K for cryogenic sensors. The physisorption and chemisorption systems recommended for various cooling ranges down to 7 K are described in detail. For long-life cooling at 4-5 K temperatures, a hybrid chemisorption-mechanical refrigeration system is recommended.

  1. Two-Phase Cryogenic Heat Exchanger for the Thermodynamic Vent System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A two-phase cryogenic heat exchanger for a thermodynamic vent system was designed and analyzed, and the predicted performance was compared with test results. A method for determining the required size of the Joule-Thomson device was also developed. Numerous sensitivity studies were performed to show that the design was robust and possessed a comfortable capacity margin. The comparison with the test results showed very similar heat extraction performance for similar inlet conditions. It was also shown that estimates for Joule- Thomson device flow rates and exit quality can vary significantly and these need to be accommodated for with a robust system design.

  2. Environmental testing of high Tc superconductive thermal isolators for space-borne cryogenic detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Randolf, Henry W.; Verbelyi, Darren; Haertling, Gene H.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Selim, Raouf; Caton, Randall

    1992-01-01

    Thick films of superconductive material on low thermal conductivity substrates (e.g., yttria-stabilized zirconia and fused silica) are considered as a replacement for the existing electrical connections between the detector array and data acquisition and storage electronics in the cryogenic detector systems being developed by NASA. The paper describes some of the design constraints on the superconducting device and presents results of a preliminary analysis of the effects of vibration, gamma irradiation, and long-term exposure to high vacuum and liquid nitrogen encountered in operating such a device in space.

  3. Characterization of large area PMTs at cryogenic temperature for rare event physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnes, P.; Raselli, G. L.; Rossella, M.

    2014-03-01

    We carried out a careful evaluation of the behaviour of the large cathode area Hamamatsu R5912-MOD and R5912-2-MOD photomultiplier tubes operating at cryogenic temperature. The measurements were focused on evaluating the parameters which mainly characterize the operating performances of the devices down to 77K. The results that we obtained demonstrate that both photomultipliers models are suited, with some distinguishing characteristics, for light detection in such unconventional operating conditions, certifying the devices for the direct measurement of scintillation light coming from noble-gas liquids in detectors dedicated to neutrino physics and Dark Matter research.

  4. Conceptual design of pressure relief systems for cryogenic application

    SciTech Connect

    Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-29

    The conceptual design of pressure relief systems is an important aspect in the early phase of any cryogenic system design, because a prudent and responsible evaluation of relief systems involves much more than just relief devices. The conceptual design consists of various steps: At first, hazard scenarios must be considered and the worst-case scenario identified. Next, a staged interaction against pressure increase is to be defined. This is followed by the selection of the general type of pressure relief device for each stage, such as safety valve and rupture disc, respectively. Then, a decision concerning their locations, their capacities and specific features must be taken. Furthermore, it is mandatory to consider the inlet pressure drop and the back pressure in the exhaust line for sizing the safety devices. And last but not least, economic and environmental considerations must be made in case of releasing the medium to the atmosphere. The development of the system's safety concept calls for a risk management strategy based on identification and analysis of hazards, and consequent risk mitigation using a system-based approach in compliance with the standards.

  5. Method of measuring heat influx of a cryogenic transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Zelipsky, Steven A. (Tinley Park, IL); Rezmer, Ronald R. (Lisle, IL); Smelser, Peter (Bruner, MO)

    1981-01-01

    A method is provided for measuring the heat influx of a cryogenic transfer system. A gaseous phase of the cryogen used during normal operation of the system is passed through the system. The gaseous cryogen at the inlet to the system is tempered to duplicate the normal operating temperature of the system inlet. The temperature and mass flow rate of the gaseous cryogen is measured at the outlet of the system, and the heat capacity of the cryogen is determined. The heat influx of the system is then determined from known thermodynamic relationships.

  6. Cryogenic Technology, part 1. [conference proceedings; cryogenic wind tunnel design and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Different engineering problems associated with the design of mechanisms and systems to operate in a cryogenic environment are discussed. The focal point for the entire engineering effort was the design of the National Transonic Facility, which is a closed-circuit cryogenic wind tunnel. The papers covered a variety of mechanical, structural, and systems design subjects including thermal structures insulation systems, noise, seals, and materials.

  7. Improved Ultrasonic Transducer For Measuring Cryogenic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis

    1991-01-01

    Improved ultrasonic transducer used to measure flow of cryogenic fluid. Includes wedge made nonintrusive by machining it out of bulk material of duct carrying fluid. Skewed surfaces of wedge suppress standing waves, thus reducing ringing and increasing signal-to-noise ratio. Increases accuracy of measurements of times of arrival of ultrasonic pulses, from which times flow inferred.

  8. Preliminary Thermal Design of Cryogenic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Mustafi, Shuvo; Boutte, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic Hydrogen Radiation Shielding (CHRS) is the most mass efficient material radiation shielding strategy for human spaceflight beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Future human space flight, mission beyond LEO could exceed one year in duration. Previous radiation studies showed that in order to protect the astronauts from space radiation with an annual allowable radiation dose less than 500 mSv, 140 kgm2 of polyethylene is necessary. For a typical crew module that is 4 meter in diameter and 8 meter in length. The mass of polyethylene radiation shielding required would be more than 17,500 kg. The same radiation study found that the required hydrogen shielding for the same allowable radiation dose is 40 kgm2, and the mass of hydrogen required would be 5, 000 kg. Cryogenic hydrogen has higher densities and can be stored in relatively small containment vessels. However, the CHRS system needs a sophisticated thermal system which prevents the cryogenic hydrogen from evaporating during the mission. This study designed a cryogenic thermal system that protects the CHRS from hydrogen evaporation for one to up to three year mission. The design also includes a ground based cooling system that can subcool and freeze liquid hydrogen. The final results show that the CHRS with its required thermal protection system is nearly half of the mass of polyethylene radiation shielding.

  9. Cryogenics Testbed Laboratory Flange Baseline Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, Marie Lei Ysabel D.

    2013-01-01

    As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), I was involved in research for the Fluids and Propulsion Division of the NASA Engineering (NE) Directorate. I was immersed in the Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project for the majority of my time at KSC, primarily with the Ground Operations Demonstration Unit Liquid Oxygen (GODU L02) branch of IGODU. This project was established to develop advancements in cryogenic systems as a part of KSC's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. The vision of AES is to develop new approaches for human exploration, and operations in and beyond low Earth orbit. Advanced cryogenic systems are crucial to minimize the consumable losses of cryogenic propellants, develop higher performance launch vehicles, and decrease operations cost for future launch programs. During my internship, I conducted a flange torque tracking study that established a baseline configuration for the flanges in the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) at the KSC Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) - the testing environment for GODU L02.

  10. Cryogenic Laser Calorimetry for Impurity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swimm, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a one-year effort to determine the applicability of laser-calorimetric spectroscopy to the study of deep-level impurities in silicon are presented. Critical considerations for impurity analysis by laser-calorimetric spectroscopy are discussed, the design and performance of a cryogenic laser calorimeter is described, and measurements of background absorption in high-purity silicon are presented.

  11. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  12. The Cryogenic Test Bed experiments: Cryogenic heat pipe flight experiment CRYOHP (STS-53). Cryogenic two phase flight experiment CRYOTP (STS-62). Cryogenic flexible diode flight experiment CRYOFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, Lee; Stouffer, Chuck

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cryogenic Test Bed (CTB) experiments including experiment results, integration techniques used, and lessons learned during integration, test and flight phases of the Cryogenic Heat Pipe Flight Experiment (STS-53) and the Cryogenic Two Phase Flight Experiment (OAST-2, STS-62). We will also discuss the Cryogenic Flexible Diode Heat Pipe (CRYOFD) experiment which will fly in the 1996/97 time frame and the fourth flight of the CTB which will fly in the 1997/98 time frame. The two missions tested two oxygen axially grooved heat pipes, a nitrogen fibrous wick heat pipe and a 2-methylpentane phase change material thermal storage unit. Techniques were found for solving problems with vibration from the cryo-collers transmitted through the compressors and the cold heads, and mounting the heat pipe without introducing parasitic heat leaks. A thermally conductive interface material was selected that would meet the requirements and perform over the temperature range of 55 to 300 K. Problems are discussed with the bi-metallic thermostats used for heater circuit protection and the S-Glass suspension straps originally used to secure the BETSU PCM in the CRYOTP mission. Flight results will be compared to 1-g test results and differences will be discussed.

  13. Robust Multilayer Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Scholtens, B. F.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    New requirements for thermal insulation include robust Multilayer insulation (MU) systems that work for a range of environments from high vacuum to no vacuum. Improved MLI systems must be simple to install and maintain while meeting the life-cycle cost and thermal performance objectives. Performance of actual MLI systems has been previously shown to be much worse than ideal MLI. Spacecraft that must contain cryogens for both lunar service (high vacuum) and ground launch operations (no vacuum) are planned. Future cryogenic spacecraft for the soft vacuum environment of Mars are also envisioned. Industry products using robust MLI can benefit from improved cost-efficiency and system safety. Novel materials have been developed to operate as excellent thermal insulators at vacuum levels that are much less stringent than the absolute high vacuum requirement of current MLI systems. One such robust system, Layered Composite Insulation (LCI), has been developed by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at NASA Kennedy Space Center. The experimental testing and development of LCI is the focus of this paper. LCI thermal performance under cryogenic conditions is shown to be six times better than MLI at soft vacuum and similar to MLI at high vacuum. The experimental apparent thermal conductivity (k-value) and heat flux data for LCI systems are compared with other MLI systems.

  14. Piston sealing arrangement for a cryogenic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Green, G.F.; Humphrey, J.C.

    1984-02-21

    A sealing arrangement for a rectilinear reciprocable piston within a cryogenic refrigerator comprising a buffer defined by dual O-rings disposed around the circumference of the piston and containing pressurized gas of the same type as the refrigeration gas. The buffer limits or prevents both the entrance of contaminants and also the escape of the refrigeration gas.

  15. Cryogenic seal remains leaktight during thermal displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, T. H.; Martin, K. B.; Pewitt, E. G.

    1967-01-01

    Cryogenic seals protect the surfaces of a plastic member in a low-pressure system subjected to extreme temperature changes. The outer seal is an aluminum expansion ring bonded to the lens outer surface and the inner seal consists of a resin-filled aluminum U-ring bonded to the inner surface.

  16. Energy Efficient Storage and Transfer of Cryogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Cryogenics is globally linked to energy generation, storage, and usage. Thermal insulation systems research and development is an enabling part of NASA's technology goals for Space Launch and Exploration. New thermal testing methodologies and materials are being transferred to industry for a wide range of commercial applications.

  17. Cryogenic thermoelectric thermometer using a heat tube

    SciTech Connect

    Skripnik, Yu.A.; Khimicheva, A.I.

    1995-09-01

    An original application of heat tubes is proposed for increasing the accuracy of cryogenic temperature measurement. This is achieved by supplementary action on the working end of the thermocouple, based on the tube`s heat energy transmission, controlled by a magnetic field.

  18. Jacketed cryogenic piping is stress relieved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, W. M.

    1967-01-01

    Jacketed design of piping used to transfer cryogenic fluids, relieves severe stresses associated with the temperature gradients that occur during transfer cycles and ambient periods. The inner /transfer/ pipe is preloaded in such a way that stress relief takes place automatically as cycling occurs.

  19. Elastic vacuum seal for cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kolenko, E.A.

    1988-06-01

    Cold-hardened silicone rubber is proposed as a vacuum seal in units that contain materials with vastly different expansion coefficients and which operate at cryogenic temperatures. The cold vulcanization process and the polymerization catalyst used to accelerate and stabilize the process are described. Test results obtained for vacuum tightness in liquid nitrogen are assessed.

  20. Cost-Efficient Storage of Cryogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Sass, J. P.; Nagy, Z.; Sojoumer, S. J.; Morris, D. L.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's cryogenic infrastructure that supports launch vehicle operations and propulsion testing is reaching an age where major refurbishment will soon be required. Key elements of this infrastructure are the large double-walled cryogenic storage tanks used for both space vehicle launch operations and rocket propulsion testing at the various NASA field centers. Perlite powder has historically been the insulation material of choice for these large storage tank applications. New bulk-fill insulation materials, including glass bubbles and aerogel beads, have been shown to provide improved thermal and mechanical performance. A research testing program was conducted to investigate the thermal performance benefits as well as to identify operational considerations and associated risks associated with the application of these new materials in large cryogenic storage tanks. The program was divided into three main areas: material testing (thermal conductivity and physical characterization), tank demonstration testing (liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen), and system studies (thermal modeling, economic analysis, and insulation changeout). The results of this research work show that more energy-efficient insulation solutions are possible for large-scale cryogenic storage tanks worldwide and summarize the operational requirements that should be considered for these applications.

  1. Jet impingement modeling of cryogen spray cooling: analysis of 2D cryogen temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bernard; Welch, Ashley J.

    2001-05-01

    The main goal of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using backside infrared imaging to estimate the spatial cryogen temperature distribution during a cryogen spurt. Calculations from numerical models showed that the frontside temperature distribution could be identified at the back side of a thin aluminum sheet. Infrared images were obtained at various timepoints during a cryogen spurt from the back side of an 800-micrometers aluminum sheet and the temperature distribution estimated. The temperature distribution was approximately gaussian in shape. A secondary goal was to calculate the temperature distribution in skin for two cases: 1) uniform cryogen temperature distribution, essentially representative of a 1D geometry assumption; and 2) nonuniform distribution. At the end of a 100-ms spurt, calculations showed that, for the two cases, large discrepancies in temperatures at the surface and at a 60-micrometers depth were found at radii greater than 2.5 mm. These results suggest that it is necessary to consider spatial cryogen temperature gradients during cryogen spray cooling of tissue.

  2. Subcooling for Long Duration In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustafi, Shuvo; Johnson, Wesley; Kashani, Ali; Jurns, John; Kutter, Bernard; Kirk, Daniel; Shull, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as hydrogen and oxygen are crucial for exploration of the solar system because of their superior specific impulse capability. Future missions may require vehicles to remain in space for months, necessitating long-term storage of these cryogens. A Thermodynamic Cryogen Subcooler (TCS) can ease the challenge of cryogenic fluid storage by removing energy from the cryogenic propellant through isobaric subcooling of the cryogen below its normal boiling point prior to launch. The isobaric subcooling of the cryogenic propellant will be performed by using a cold pressurant to maintain the tank pressure while the cryogen's temperature is simultaneously reduced using the TCS. The TCS hardware will be integrated into the launch infrastructure and there will be no significant addition to the launched dry mass. Heat leaks into all cryogenic propellant tanks, despite the use of the best insulation systems. However, the large heat capacity available in the subcooled cryogenic propellants allows the energy that leaks into the tank to be absorbed until the cryogen reaches its operational thermodynamic condition. During this period of heating of the subcooled cryogen there will be minimal loss of the propellant due to venting for pressure control. This simple technique can extend the operational life of a spacecraft or an orbital cryogenic depot for months with minimal mass penalty. In fact isobaric subcooling can more than double the in-space hold time of liquid hydrogen compared to normal boiling point hydrogen. A TCS for cryogenic propellants would thus provide an enhanced level of mission flexibility. Advances in the important components of the TCS will be discussed in this paper.

  3. The cryogenic cooling program in high-heat-load optics at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.S.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes some of the aspects of the cryogenic optics program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). A liquid-nitrogen-cooled, high-vacuum, double crystal monochromator is being fabricated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A pumping system capable of delivering a variable flow rate of up to 10 gallons per minute of pressurized liquid nitrogen and removing 5 kilowatts of x-ray power is also being constructed. This specialized pumping system and monochromator will be used to test the viability of cryogenically cooled, high-heat-load synchrotron optics. It has been determined that heat transfer enhancement will be required for optics used with APS insertion devices. An analysis of a porous-matrix-enhanced monochromator crystal is presented. For the particular case investigated, a heat transfer enhancement factor of 5 to 6 was calculated.

  4. Cryogenic aspects of the operation of a superconducting cyclotron-based neutron therapy facility.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R L; Blosser, H G; Blosser, E B; McEnhill, K

    1996-01-01

    The Harper Hospital superconducting cyclotron, which is used for neutron radiation therapy, is a unique device. It is the first superconducting cyclotron to be installed in a hospital. The novel magnet cryostat can be rotated through 360 degrees without spilling liquid and whilst remaining vented to a low pressure return line for collection of the boil-off gas. The mode of operation of the cryogenic magnet is described in detail. Some of the problems associated with the cryogenic nature of the cyclotron including those problems encountered in operating a helium liquefaction system in a hospital are discussed. At the present time the magnet is kept cold by filling the cryostat with approximately 75 L of liquid helium each day before patient treatments begin. This is a time-consuming process. The possibility of modifying the helium gas recovery and liquefaction system so that a continuous liquid helium supply could be delivered to the magnet cryostat is discussed. PMID:8949768

  5. Energy Efficiency of large Cryogenic Systems: the LHC Case and Beyond

    E-print Network

    Claudet, S; Ferlin, G; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2013-01-01

    Research infrastructures for high-energy and nuclear physics, nuclear fusion and production of high magnetic fields are increasingly based on applied superconductivity and associated cryogenics in their quest for scientific breakthroughs at affordable capital and operation costs, a condition for their acceptance and sustained funding by society. The thermodynamic penalty for operating at low temperature makes energy efficiency a key requirement for their large cryogenic systems, from conceptual design to procurement, construction and operation. Meeting this requirement takes a combined approach on several fronts in parallel: management of heat loads and sizing of cooling duties, distribution of cooling power matching the needs of the superconducting devices, efficient production of refrigeration, optimal control resting on precise instrumentation and diagnostics, as well as a targeted industrial procurement policy. The case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is presented. Potential improvements for fu...

  6. Flow Visualization of Density in a Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Using Planar Rayleigh and Raman Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.; Shirinzadeh, Behrooz

    2002-01-01

    Using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) and a gated, intensified charge-coupled device, planar Rayleigh and Raman scattering techniques have been used to visualize the unseeded Mach 0.2 flow density in a 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic wind tunnel. Detection limits are determined for density measurements by using both unseeded Rayleigh and Raman (N2 vibrational) methods. Seeding with CO2 improved the Rayleigh flow visualization at temperatures below 150 K. The seeded Rayleigh version was used to demonstrate the observation of transient flow features in a separated boundary layer region, which was excited with an oscillatory jet. Finally, a significant degradation of the laser light sheet, in this cryogenic facility, is discussed.

  7. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Belvin, Anthony D.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) development efforts in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability and performance potential of NTP systems. For example, Project Rover (1955 - 1973) completed 22 high power rocket reactor tests. Peak performances included operating at an average hydrogen exhaust temperature of 2550 K and a peak fuel power density of 5200 MW/m3 (Pewee test), operating at a thrust of 930 kN (Phoebus-2A test), and operating for 62.7 minutes in a single burn (NRX-A6 test). Results from Project Rover indicated that an NTP system with a high thrust-to-weight ratio and a specific impulse greater than 900 s would be feasible. Excellent results were also obtained by the former Soviet Union. Although historical programs had promising results, many factors would affect the development of a 21st century nuclear thermal rocket (NTR). Test facilities built in the US during Project Rover no longer exist. However, advances in analytical techniques, the ability to utilize or adapt existing facilities and infrastructure, and the ability to develop a limited number of new test facilities may enable affordable development, qualification, and utilization of a Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS). Bead-loaded graphite fuel was utilized throughout the Rover/NERVA program, and coated graphite composite fuel (tested in the Nuclear Furnace) and cermet fuel both show potential for even higher performance than that demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA engine tests.. NASA's NCPS project was initiated in October, 2011, with the goal of assessing the affordability and viability of an NCPS. FY 2014 activities are focused on fabrication and test (non-nuclear) of both coated graphite composite fuel elements and cermet fuel elements. Additional activities include developing a pre-conceptual design of the NCPS stage and evaluating affordable strategies for NCPS development, qualification, and utilization. NCPS stage designs are focused on supporting human Mars missions. The NCPS is being designed to readily integrate with the Space Launch System (SLS). A wide range of strategies for enabling affordable NCPS development, qualification, and utilization should be considered. These include multiple test and demonstration strategies (both ground and in-space), multiple potential test sites, and multiple engine designs. Two potential NCPS fuels are currently under consideration - coated graphite composite fuel and tungsten cermet fuel. During 2014 a representative, partial length (approximately 16") coated graphite composite fuel element with prototypic depleted uranium loading is being fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In addition, a representative, partial length (approximately 16") cermet fuel element with prototypic depleted uranium loading is being fabricated at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). During the development process small samples (approximately 3" length) will be tested in the Compact Fuel Element Environmental Tester (CFEET) at high temperature (approximately 2800 K) in a hydrogen environment to help ensure that basic fuel design and manufacturing process are adequate and have been performed correctly. Once designs and processes have been developed, longer fuel element segments will be fabricated and tested in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREE) at high temperature (approximately 2800 K) and in flowing hydrogen.

  8. Ground-Based Investigations with the Cryogenic Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.; Mattison, Edward; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    2003-01-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen maser (CHM) developed at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) was designed to be functionally similar to SAO room temperature hydrogen masers with appropriate modifications made for operation at cryogenic temperatures. A schematic of the SAO CHM is shown in Figure 1, and a description of this device and its operation follows. A beam of molecular hydrogen is dissociated into atoms at room temperature. The resultant beam of atomic hydrogen is then cooled, magnetically state selected, and focused into a quartz storage bulb centered inside of a microwave cavity resonant with the hydrogen hyperfine transition at 1420 MHz. The quartz storage bulb is coated with a superfluid He-4 film, and both the bulb and cavity are maintained near 0.5 K. The maser signal is coupled out inductively and carried to room temperature via semi-rigid coaxial cable. After passing through a room temperature isolator and preamp, the maser signal is detected with a low-noise heterodyne receiver as used in the room temperature SAO hydrogen masers. The maser temperature is lowered to 0.5 K using a recirculating He-3 refrigerator. This refrigerator consists of several cooling stages: a liquid nitrogen stage at 77 K, a liquid 4He bath at 4.2 K, a pumped He-4 pot at approximately 1.7 K, and the pumped, recirculating He-3 stage at 0.5 K. The atomic hydrogen beam, state selector, storage bulb and cavity are all connected inside a single, maser vacuum chamber (MVC). This space is pumped out from below by a turbo pump. Above the MVC, an inlet to the space allows for the input of flowing superfluid 4He film. External to the MVC is a second, outer vacuum chamber (OVC), maintained for operation of the cryostat and also pumped by a turbo pump. Inside the OVC, there is radiation shielding at 77 K and 1.7 K.

  9. CALDER: Cryogenic light detectors for background-free searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2015-08-01

    The development of background-free detectors is essential for experiments searching for rare events. Bolometers, that are among the most competitive devices for the study of neutrino-less double beta decay (0?DBD) and Dark Matter interactions, suffer from the absence of techniques that allow to identify the nature of the interacting particles. This limit can be overcome by coupling the bolometer to an independent device for the measurement of the light emitted by interactions, as the combined read-out of the bolometric and light signals allows to identify and reject particles different from those of interest. CUORE, the most advanced bolometric experiment for 0?DBD searches, could disentangle the electrons produced by 0?DBD from the dangerous background due to ? particles, by measuring the (tiny) Cherenkov light emitted by electrons and not by ?'s. LUCIFER, a project based on ZnSe scintillating bolometers for the study of 82Se 0?DBD, would be competitive also in the search of Dark Matter interactions if equipped with light detectors that allow to distinguish and reject the background due to electrons and ?'s. These advances require cryogenic detectors characterized by noise lower than 20 eV, large active area, wide temperature range of operation, high radio-purity and ease in fabricating hundreds of channels. The CALDER collaboration aims to develop such detectors by exploiting the superb energy resolution and natural multiplexed read-out provided by Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  10. Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klem, Mark D.; Smith, Timothy D.; Wadel, Mary F.; Meyer, Michael L.; Free, James M.; Cikanek, Harry A., III

    2011-01-01

    Exploration Systems Architecture Study conducted by NASA in 2005 identified the liquid oxygen (LOx)/liquid methane (LCH4) propellant combination as a prime candidate for the Crew Exploration Vehicle Service Module propulsion and for later use for ascent stage propulsion of the lunar lander. Both the Crew Exploration Vehicle and Lunar Lander were part the Constellation architecture, which had the objective to provide global sustained lunar human exploration capability. From late 2005 through the end of 2010, NASA and industry matured advanced development designs for many components that could be employed in relatively high thrust, high delta velocity, pressure fed propulsion systems for these two applications. The major investments were in main engines, reaction control engines, and the devices needed for cryogenic fluid management such as screens, propellant management devices, thermodynamic vents, and mass gauges. Engine and thruster developments also included advanced high reliability low mass igniters. Extensive tests were successfully conducted for all of these elements. For the thrusters and engines, testing included sea level and altitude conditions. This advanced development provides a mature technology base for future liquid oxygen/liquid methane pressure fed space propulsion systems. This paper documents the design and test efforts along with resulting hardware and test results.

  11. Cryogenic Optical Systems and Instrumentation IX (AM 116) Newly Modified Cryogenic Optical Test Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ronnie; Kegley, Jeff; Keidel, John

    2000-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has maintained and operated a world-class x-ray optics and detector testing facility known as the X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) since the mid 1970's. The ground test and calibration of the Chandra X-ray Observatory optics and detectors were successfully completed at the XRCF in 1997. The beginning of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) development programs (NMSD, SBMD, AMSD, etc.) and the establishment of the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center at MSFC have led to an XRCF modification. In 1999 the facility was upgraded to perform cryogenic testing of lightweight visible optics (without compromising the existing x-ray testing capability). A thermal enclosure capable of 20 degrees Kelvin and vibration isolated instrumentation mount were added. A vacuum-compatible five-axis motion table was modified to operate under cryogenic conditions. Optics up to two meters in diameter with radii of curvature of up to twenty meters can be accommodated. Facility characterization tests and one NGST program mirror test have been completed to date. By July 2000, two other mirrors will be tested. Optical wavefront measurements were made at < 35 degrees Kelvin with several instruments located at the test mirror's radius of curvature. The current wavefront measuring instruments include a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor, a point diffraction interferometer, a point spread function-measuring device, and a radius of curvature measuring instrument. A vibration insensitive phase shifting interferometer is planned for future optical testing. This paper will present a brief history of the facility, a discussion of its current x-ray optic testing capabilities, and a complete description of the new capabilities in the visible optical testing regime.

  12. Acoustic composition sensor for cryogenic gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Luchik, T. S.; Back, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic sensor useful for the determination of the composition of a gaseous binary mixture in cryogenic liquid spills has been characterized. One version of the instrument traps a known mixture of helium and nitrogen at ambient temperature in a tube which is interrogated by sonic pulses to determine the speed of sound and hence the composition. Experimental data shows that this sensor is quite accurate. The second version uses two unconfined microphones which sense sound pulses. Experimental data acquired during mixing when liquid nitrogen is poured into a vessel of gaseous helium is presented. Data during transient cooling of the tubular sensor containing nitrogen when the sensor is dipped into liquid nitrogen and during transient warm-up when the sensor is withdrawn are also presented. This sensor is being developed for use in the mixing of liquid cryogens with gas evolution in the simulation of liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen explosion hazards.

  13. Large scale cryogenic fluid systems testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Cryogenic Fluid Systems Branch (CFSB) within the Space Propulsion Technology Division (SPTD) has the ultimate goal of enabling the long term storage and in-space fueling/resupply operations for spacecraft and reusable vehicles in support of space exploration. Using analytical modeling, ground based testing, and on-orbit experimentation, the CFSB is studying three primary categories of fluid technology: storage, supply, and transfer. The CFSB is also investigating fluid handling, advanced instrumentation, and tank structures and materials. Ground based testing of large-scale systems is done using liquid hydrogen as a test fluid at the Cryogenic Propellant Tank Facility (K-site) at Lewis' Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. A general overview of tests involving liquid transfer, thermal control, pressure control, and pressurization is given.

  14. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  15. Long term cryogenic storage facility systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, John R.

    1987-01-01

    The Long Term Cryogenic Storage Facility Systems Study (LTCSFSS) is a Phase A study of a large capacity propellant depot for the space based, cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle. The study is being performed for Marshall Space Flight Center by General Dynamics Space Systems Division and has five principal objectives: (1) Definition of preliminary concept designs for four storage facility concepts; (2) Selection of preferred concepts through the application of trade studies to candidate propellant management system components; (3) Preparation of a conceptual design for an orbital storage facility; (4) Development of supporting research and technology requirements; and (5) Development of a test program to demonstrate facility performance. The initial study has been completed, and continuation activities are just getting under way to provide greater detail in key areas and accommodate changes in study guidelines and assumptions.

  16. Test of a cryogenic helium pump

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, J.W.; Miller, J.R.; Walstrom, P.L.; Herz, W.

    1981-01-01

    The design of a cryogenic helium pump for circulating liquid helium in a magnet and the design of a test loop for measuring the pump performance in terms of mass flow vs pump head at various pump speeds are described. A commercial cryogenic helium pump was tested successfully. Despite flaws in the demountable connections, the piston pump itself has performed satisfactorily. A helium pump of this type is suitable for the use of flowing supercritical helium through Internally Cooled Superconductor (ICS) magnets. It has pumped supercritical helium up to 7.5 atm with a pump head up to 2.8 atm. The maximum mass flow rate obtained was about 16 g/s. Performance of the pump was degraded at lower pumping speeds. (LCL)

  17. Cryogenic fluid management (base R/T): Cryogenic fluid systems, Cryogenic Orbital Nitrogen Experiment (CONE), Cryogenic Orbital Hydrogen Experiment (COHE). (Transportation focused technology)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, Pat

    1991-01-01

    The topics presented are covered in viewgraph form. The concluded remarks are: (1) advanced cryogenic fluid systems technology is enhancing or enabling to all known transportation scenarios for space exploration; (2) an integrated/coordinated program involving LeRC/MSFC has been formulated to address all known CFM needs - new needs should they develop, can be accommodated within available skills/facilities; (3) all required/experienced personnel and facilities are finally in place - data from initial ground-based experiments is being collected and analyzed - small scale STS experiments are nearing flight - program is beginning to yield significant results; (4) future proposed funding to primarily come from two sources; and (5) cryogenic fluid experimentation is essential to provide required technology and assure implementation in future NASA missions.

  18. Cryogenic hydrogen circulation system of neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Y. N.; Hu, Z. J.; Wu, J. H.; Li, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, P.; Wang, G. P.

    2014-01-29

    Cold neutron sources of reactors and spallation neutron sources are classic high flux neutron sources in operation all over the world. Cryogenic fluids such as supercritical or supercooled hydrogen are commonly selected as a moderator to absorb the nuclear heating from proton beams. By comparing supercritical hydrogen circulation systems and supercooled hydrogen circulation systems, the merits and drawbacks in both systems are summarized. When supercritical hydrogen circulates as the moderator, severe pressure fluctuations caused by temperature changes will occur. The pressure control system used to balance the system pressure, which consists of a heater as an active controller for thermal compensation and an accumulator as a passive volume controller, is preliminarily studied. The results may provide guidelines for design and operation of other cryogenic hydrogen system for neutron sources under construction.

  19. Optimized Heat Interception for Cryogen Tank Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavan, Edgar R.; Miller, F. K.

    2007-01-01

    We consider means for using the cooling available in boil-off gas to intercept heat conducted through the support structure of a cryogen tank. A one-dimensional model of the structure coupled to a gas stream gives an analytical expression for heat leak in terms of flow rate for temperature independent-properties and laminar flow. A numerical model has been developed for heat transfer on a thin cylindrical tube with an attached vent line. The model is used to determine the vent path layout that will minimize heat flow into the cryogen tank. The results are useful for a number of applications, but the one of interest in this study is the minimization of the boil-off in large cryopropellant tanks in low Earth and low lunar orbit.

  20. Bonding and Sealing Evaluations for Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    1997-01-01

    Several different cryogenic tank concepts are being considered for reusable launch vehicles (RLV'S) . Though different tank concepts are being considered, many will require that the cryogenic insulation be evacuated and be bonded to a structure. In this work, an attempt was made to evaluate the effectiveness of maintaining a vacuum on a specimen where foam or honeycomb core was encased within Gr/Ep. In addition to these tests, flatwise adhesion pull off tests were performed at room temperature with PR 1664, EA 9394, FM-300, Crest 3170, and HT 435 adhesives. The materials bonded included Gr/Ep, Gr/BMI, Al, and stainless steel facesheets, and Ti honeycomb, Hexcel honeycomb, and Rohacell foam core materials.

  1. The XENON1T Cryogenic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Xenon Collaboration Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The XENON1T experiment, currently under construction at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy, aims at detecting dark matter weakly interacting massive particles using a dual-phase (liquid/gas) xenon time projection chamber filled with 3300kg of liquid xenon. The cryogenic system of the experiment maintains the liquid xenon target at a stable temperature and allows high speed continuous xenon purification through the use of efficient heat exchangers. The reliability of the system is achieved with two redundant pulse tube refrigerators and an additional backup liquid nitrogen cooling system. In this talk we will describe the XENON1T cryogenic system and present results from commissioning performance tests. We gratefully acknowledge continued support for the XENON Dark Matter program from the National Science Foundation.

  2. Cryogenic Magnetic Bearing Test Facility (CMBTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Cryogenic Magnetic Bearing Test Facility (CMBTF) was designed and built to evaluate compact, lightweight magnetic bearings for use in the SSME's (space shuttle main engine) liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen turbopumps. State of the art and tradeoff studies were conducted which indicated that a hybrid permanent magnet bias homopolar magnetic bearing design would be smaller, lighter, and much more efficient than conventional industrial bearings. A test bearing of this type was designed for the test rig for use at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (-320 F). The bearing was fabricated from state-of-the-art materials and incorporated into the CMBTF. Testing at room temperature was accomplished at Avcon's facility. These preliminary tests indicated that this magnetic bearing is a feasible alternative to older bearing technologies. Analyses showed that the hybrid magnetic bearing is one-third the weight, considerably smaller, and uses less power than previous generations of magnetic bearings.

  3. Cryogen free sample environment for neutron scattering experiments at ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Down, R. B. E.; Keeping, J.; Evans, B.; Bowden, Z. A.

    2012-02-01

    Most neutron facilities have a fleet of cryostats providing low temperature and high magnetic fields for sample environment. This large scale usage of cryogenic equipment requires significant resources and can create a number of problems including health and safety issues and the considerable cost of the required cryogens. The last problem has become more significant due to the increasing costs of liquid helium caused by global helium supply problems. The ISIS facility has an internal development programme intended to gradually substitute all conventional cryogenic systems with cryogen free systems preferably based on the pulse tube refrigerator. The programme includes a number of development projects which are aiming to deliver a range of cryogen free equipment including a top-loading 1.5 K cryostat, superconducting magnets in re-condensing cryostats and cryogen free dilution refrigerators. Here we are going to describe the design of these systems and discuss the results of prototype testing.

  4. Feasibility study for the Cryogenic Orbital Nitrogen Experiment (CONE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R. S.; Crouch, M. A.; Hanna, G. J.; Cady, E. C.; Meserole, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    An improved understanding of low gravity subcritical cryogenic fluid behavior is critical for the continued development of space based systems. Although early experimental programs provided some fundamental understanding of zero gravity cryogenic fluid behavior, more extensive flight data are required to design space based cryogenic liquid storage and transfer systems with confidence. As NASA's mission concepts evolve, the demand for optimized in-space cryogenic systems is increasing. Cryogenic Orbital Nitrogen Experiment (CONE) is an attached shuttle payload experiment designed to address major technological issues associated with on-orbit storage and supply of cryogenic liquids. During its 7 day mission, CONE will conduct experiments and technology demonstrations in active and passive pressure control, stratification and mixing, liquid delivery and expulsion efficiency, and pressurant bottle recharge. These experiments, conducted with liquid nitrogen as the test fluid, will substantially extend the existing low gravity fluid data base and will provide future system designers with vital performance data from an orbital environment.

  5. Terrestrial Planet Finder cryogenic delay line development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, Robert F.; Swain, Mark R.; Alvarez-Salazar, Oscar; Moore, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Delay lines provide the path-length compensation that makes the measurement of interference fringes possible. When used for nulling interferometry, the delay line must control path-lengths so that the null is stable and controlled throughout the measurement. We report on a low noise, low disturbance, and high bandwidth optical delay line capable of meeting the TPF interferometer optical path length control requirements at cryogenic temperatures.

  6. Method and apparatus for producing cryogenic targets

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, James T. (Los Alamos, NM); Miller, John R. (Penfield, NY)

    1984-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus are given for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets in the fast isothermal freezing (FIF) method. Improved coupling efficiency and greater availability of volume near the target for diagnostic purposes and for fusion driver beam propagation result. Other embodiments include a new electrical switch and a new explosive detonator, all embodiments making use of a purposeful heating by means of optical fibers.

  7. Method and apparatus for producing cryogenic targets

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, J.T.; Miller, J.R.

    1984-08-07

    An improved method and apparatus are given for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets in the fast isothermal freezing (FIF) method. Improved coupling efficiency and greater availability of volume near the target for diagnostic purposes and for fusion driver beam propagation result. Other embodiments include a new electrical switch and a new explosive detonator, all embodiments making use of a purposeful heating by means of optical fibers. 6 figs.

  8. Cryogenic properties of optomechanical silica microcavities

    E-print Network

    Olivier Arcizet; Rémi Rivière; Albert Schliesser; Tobias J. Kippenberg

    2009-01-09

    We present the optical and mechanical properties of high-Q fused silica microtoroidal resonators at cryogenic temperatures (down to 1.6 K). A thermally induced optical multistability is observed and theoretically described; it serves to characterize quantitatively the static heating induced by light absorption. Moreover the influence of structural defect states in glass on the toroid mechanical properties is observed and the resulting implications of cavity optomechanical systems on the study of mechanical dissipation discussed.

  9. Cryogenic adhesives and sealants: Abstracted publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. R.; Olien, N. A.

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of primary documents containing original experimental data on the properties of adhesives and sealants at cryogenic temperatures are presented. The most important references mentioned in each document are cited. In addition, a brief annotation is given for documents considered secondary in nature, such as republications or variations of original reports, progress reports leading to final reports included as primary documents, and experimental data on adhesive properties at temperatures between about 130 K and room temperature.

  10. Cryogenic regenerator including sarancarbon heat conduction matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Petrick, S. Walter (Inventor); Britcliffe, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A saran carbon matrix is employed to conduct heat through the heat storing volume of a cryogenic regenerator. When helium is adsorbed into the saran carbon matrix, the combination exhibits a volumetric specific heat much higher than previously used lead balls. A helium adsorbed saran regenerator should allow much lower refrigerator temperatures than those practically obtainable with lead based regenerators for regenerator type refrigeration systems.

  11. Cryogenic Cooling by Noncondensible-Gas Injection.

    PubMed

    Lytle, F W; Stoner, J T

    1965-06-25

    Temperature control of various cryogenic liquids in the range from their boiling points to near or below their freezing points has been achieved by injecting a noncondensing gas, helium. The process is more easily accomplished than the usual vapor-pumping technique and is applicable in the range from 15 degrees to 300 degrees K. Interesting ice formations were observed in liquid argon. PMID:17819423

  12. PRESSURE OSCILLATION IN RHIC CRYOGENIC SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,L.MONTAG,C.TALLERICO,T.HIRZEL,W.NICOLETTI,A.

    2003-09-22

    HORIZONTAL BEAM VIBRATION AROUND 10HZ IN THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC) HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED AND THE POSSIBLE SOURCES TO CAUSE THIS VIBRATION HAVE BEEN INVESTIGATED. TO DETERMINE THE HETIUM PRESSURE OSCILLATIONS AS A POSSIBLE PRIMARY VIBRATION SOURCE, HELIUM PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS WERE CARRIED OUT IN THE FIVE CRYOGENIC TRANSFER LINES AT 2 VALVE BOXES AND 6 LEAD PORTS AT 2 TRIPLET CRYOSTAT FOR BOTH MAGNET RINGS. ADDITIONALLY, COLD MA...

  13. Value for controlling flow of cryogenic fluid

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Philip A. (Moore, ID)

    1996-01-01

    A valve is provided for accurately controlling the flow of cryogenic fluids such as liquid nitrogen. The valve comprises a combination of disc and needle valves affixed to a valve stem in such a manner that the disc and needle are free to rotate about the stem, but are constrained in lateral and vertical movements. This arrangement provides accurate and precise fluid flow control and positive fluid isolation.

  14. Active Control of Cryogenic Propellants in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, William

    2011-01-01

    A new era of space exploration is being planned. Exploration architectures under consideration require the long term storage of cryogenic propellants in space. This requires development of active control systems to mitigate the effect of heat leak. This work summarizes current state of the art, proposes operational design strategies and presents options for future architectures. Scaling and integration of active systems will be estimated. Ideal long range spacecraft systems will be proposed with Exploration architecture benefits considered.

  15. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, David W.; Guzik, Monica C.

    2014-03-01

    A computational model of the cryogenic boil-off reduction system being developed by NASA as part of the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer technology maturation project has been applied to a range of propellant storage tanks sizes for high-performing in-space cryogenic propulsion applications. This effort focuses on the scaling of multi-layer insulation (MLI), cryocoolers, broad area cooling shields, radiators, solar arrays, and tanks for liquid hydrogen propellant storage tanks ranging from 2 to 10 m in diameter. Component scaling equations were incorporated into the Cryogenic Analysis Tool, a spreadsheet-based tool used to perform system-level parametric studies. The primary addition to the evolution of this updated tool is the integration of a scaling method for reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocoolers, as well as the development and inclusion of Self-Supporting Multi-Layer Insulation. Mass, power, and sizing relationships are traded parametrically to establish the appropriate loiter period beyond which this boil-off reduction system application reduces mass. The projected benefit compares passive thermal control to active thermal control, where active thermal control is evaluated for reduced boil-off with a 90 K shield, zero boil-off with a single heat interception stage at the tank wall, and zero boil-off with a second interception stage at a 90 K shield. Parametric studies show a benefit over passive storage at loiter durations under one month, in addition to showing a benefit for two-stage zero boil-off in terms of reducing power and mass as compared to single stage zero boil-off. Furthermore, active cooling reduces the effect of varied multi-layer insulation performance, which, historically, has been shown to be significant.

  16. Thermal Performance Testing Of Cryogenic Piping Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Nagy, Z. F.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal performance measurement of piping systems under actual field conditions is important for space launch development and commercial industry. Knowledge of the true insulating effectiveness is needed in system design, development, and research activities. A new 18-meter-long test apparatus for cryogenic pipelines has been developed. Three different pipelines, rigid or flexible, can be tested simultaneously. Critical factors in heat leak measurements include eliminating heat transfer at end connections and obtaining proper liquid saturation condition. Effects due to variations in the external ambient conditions like wind, humidity, and solar radiation must be minimized. The static method of liquid nitrogen evaporation has been demonstrated, but the apparatus can be adapted for dynamic testing with cryogens, chilled water, or other working fluids. This technology is suited for the development of an industry standard test apparatus and method. Examples of the heat transfer data from testing commercially available pipelines are given. Prototype pipelines are currently being tested and evaluated at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center.

  17. A Rapid Turnaround Cryogenic Detector Characterization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic j.; Dipirro, Michael J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Jackson, Clifton E.; Jackson, Michael L.; Kogut, Al; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shirron, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Upcoming major NASA missions such as the Einstein Inflation Probe and the Single Aperture Far-Infrared Observatory require arrays of detectors with thousands of elements, operating at temperatures near l00 mK and sensitive to wavelengths from approx. 100 microns to approx. 3 mm. Such detectors represent a substantial enabling technology for these missions, and must be demonstrated soon in order for them to proceed. In order to make rapid progress on detector development, the cryogenic testing cycle must be made convenient and quick. We have developed a cryogenic detector characterization system capable of testing superconducting detector arrays in formats up to 8 x 32, read out by SQUID multiplexers. The system relies on the cooling of a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator immersed in a liquid helium bath. This approach permits a detector to be cooled from 300K to 50 mK in about 4 hours, so that a test cycle begun in the morning will be over by the end of the day. Tine system is modular, with two identical immersible units, so that while one unit is cooling, the second can be reconfigured for the next battery of tests. We describe the design, construction, and performance of this cryogenic detector testing facility.

  18. Aerodynamics of a Cryogenic Semi-Tanker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Salari, Kambiz

    2009-11-01

    The design of a modern cryogenic semi-tanker is based primarily upon functionality with little consideration given to aerodynamic drag. As a result, these tankers have maintained the appearance of a wheeled cylinder for several decades. To reduce the fuel usage of these vehicles, this study investigates their aerodynamics. A detailed understanding of the flow field about the vehicle and its influence on aerodynamic drag is obtained by performing Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of a full-scale tractor and cryogenic tanker-trailer operating at highway speed within a crosswind. The tanker-trailer has a length to diameter ratio of 6.3. The Reynolds number, based upon the tanker diameter, is 4.0x10^6, while the effective vehicle yaw angle is 6.1 . The flow field about the vehicle is characterized by large flow separation regions at the tanker underbody and base. In addition, the relatively large gap between the tractor and the tanker-trailer allows the free-stream flow to be entrained into the tractor-tanker gap. By mitigating these drag-producing phenomena through the use of simple geometry modifications, it may be possible to reduce the aerodynamic drag of cryogenic semi-tankers and, thereby, improve their fuel economy. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. High-aperture cryogenic light microscopy

    PubMed Central

    LE GROS, M.A.; McDERMOTT, G.; UCHIDA, M.; KNOECHEL, C.G.; LARABELL, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We report here the development of instruments and protocols for carrying out high numerical aperture immersion light microscopy on cryogenic specimens. Imaging by this modality greatly increases the lifetimes of fluorescence probes, including those commonly used for protein localization studies, while retaining the ability to image the specimen with high fidelity and spatial resolution. The novel use of a cryogenic immersion fluid also minimizes the refractive index mismatch between the sample and lens, leading to a more efficient coupling of the light from the sample to the image forming system. This enhancement is applicable to both fluorescence and transmitted light microscopy techniques. The design concepts used for the cryogenic microscope can be applied to virtually any existing light-based microscopy technique. This prospect is particularly exciting in the context of ‘super-resolution’ techniques, where enhanced fluorescence lifetime probes are especially useful. Thus, using this new modality it is now possible to observe dynamic events in a live cell, and then rapidly vitrify the specimen at a specific time point prior to carrying out high-resolution imaging. The techniques described can be used in conjunction with other imaging modalities in correlated studies. We have also developed instrumentation to perform cryo-light imaging together with soft X-ray tomography on the same cryo-fixed specimen as a means of carrying out high content, quantifiable correlated imaging analyses. These methods are equally applicable to correlated light and electron microscopy of frozen biological objects. PMID:19566622

  20. Miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump

    DOEpatents

    Keville, R.F.

    1997-11-18

    A miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump is described for removing residual water molecules from an inlet sample prior to sample analysis in a mass spectroscopy system, such as ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectroscopy. The cryogenic pump is a battery operated, low power (<1.6 watts) pump with a {Delta}T=100 C characteristic. The pump operates under vacuum pressures of 5{times}10{sup {minus}4} Torr to ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions in the range of 1{times}10{sup {minus}7} to 3{times}10{sup {minus}9} Torr and will typically remove partial pressure, 2{times}10{sup {minus}7} Torr, residual water vapor. The cryogenic pump basically consists of an inlet flange piece, a copper heat sink with a square internal bore, four two tier Peltier (TEC) chips, a copper low temperature square cross sectional tubulation, an electronic receptacle, and an exit flange piece, with the low temperature tubulation being retained in the heat sink at a bias angle of 5{degree}, and with the TECs being positioned in parallel to each other with a positive potential being applied to the top tier thereof. 2 figs.

  1. Miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump

    DOEpatents

    Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump for removing residual water molecules from an inlet sample prior to sample analysis in a mass spectroscopy system, such as ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectroscopy. The cryogenic pump is a battery operated, low power (<1.6 watts) pump with a .DELTA.T=100.degree. C. characteristic. The pump operates under vacuum pressures of 5.times.10.sup.-4 Torr to ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions in the range of 1.times.10.sup.-7 to 3.times.10.sup.-9 Torr and will typically remove partial pressure, 2.times.10.sup.-7 Torr, residual water vapor. The cryogenic pump basically consists of an inlet flange piece, a copper heat sink with a square internal bore, four two tier Peltier (TEC) chips, a copper low temperature square cross sectional tubulation, an electronic receptacle, and an exit flange piece, with the low temperature tubulation being retained in the heat sink at a bias angle of 5.degree., and with the TECs being positioned in parallel to each other with a positive potential being applied to the top tier thereof.

  2. Developing NDE Techniques for Large Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Don; Starr, Stan; Arens, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The Shuttle Program requires very large cryogenic ground storage tanks in which to store liquid oxygen and hydrogen. The existing Pads A and B Launch Complex-39 tanks, which will be passed onto future launch programs, are 45 years old and have received minimal refurbishment and only external inspections over the years. The majority of the structure is inaccessible without a full system drain of cryogenic liquid and granular insulation in the annular region. It was previously thought that there was a limit to the number of temperature cycles that the tanks could handle due to possible insulation compaction before undergoing a costly and time consuming complete overhaul; therefore the tanks were not drained and performance issues with these tanks, specifically the Pad B liquid hydrogen tank, were accepted. There is a needind an opportunity, as the Shuttle program ends and work to upgrade the launch pads progresses, to develop innovative non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to analyze the current tanks. Techniques are desired that can aid in determining the extent of refurbishment required to keep the tanks in service for another 20+ years. A nondestructive technique would also be a significant aid in acceptance testing of new and refurbished tanks, saving significant time and money, if corrective actions can be taken before cryogen is introduced to the systems.

  3. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew John; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Boschee, Jacob; Foygel, Michael Gregory

    2013-01-01

    A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It accounts for cryogenic propellant loading, storage, and unloading in the conditions of normal, increased, and micro- gravity. The model involves multiple horizontal control volumes in both liquid and ullage spaces. Temperature and velocity boundary layers at the tank walls are taken into account by using correlation relations. Heat exchange involving the tank wall is considered by means of the lumped-parameter method. By employing basic conservation laws, the model takes into consideration the major multi-phase mass and energy exchange processes involved, such as condensation-evaporation of the hydrogen, as well as flows of hydrogen liquid and vapor in the presence of pressurizing helium gas. The model involves a liquid hydrogen feed line and a tank ullage vent valve for pressure control. The temperature stratification effects are investigated, including in the presence of vent valve oscillations. A simulation of temperature stratification effects in a generic cryogenic tank has been implemented in Matlab and results are presented for various tank conditions.

  4. Some General Principles in Cryogenic Design, Implementation, and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipirro, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    Brief Course Description: In 2 hours only the most basic principles of cryogenics can be presented. I will concentrate on the differences between a room temperature thermal analysis and cryogenic thermal analysis, namely temperature dependent properties. I will talk about practical materials for thermal contact and isolation. I will finish by describing the verification process and instrumentation used that is unique to cryogenic (in general less than 100K) systems.

  5. Rapid-Chill Cryogenic Coaxial Direct-Acting Solenoid Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James; Castor, Jim; Sheller, Richard

    2006-01-01

    A commercially available cryogenic direct- acting solenoid valve has been modified to incorporate a rapid-chill feature. The net effect of the modifications is to divert some of the cryogenic liquid to the task of cooling the remainder of the cryogenic liquid that flows to the outlet. Among the modifications are the addition of several holes and a gallery into a valve-seat retainer and the addition of a narrow vent passage from the gallery to the atmosphere.

  6. Texture comparison between cold rolled and cryogenically rolled pure copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapeire, L.; Sidor, J.; Martinez Lombardia, E.; Verbeken, K.; De Graeve, I.; Terryn, H.; Kestens, L. A. I.

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, there is a considerable scientific interest in bulk ultrafine grained materials, due to their potential for superior mechanical properties. One of the possible formation methods of nano-grained materials is cryogenic rolling. The influence of rolling at cryogenic temperatures has been investigated. Significant differences in the textures and the microstructures can be observed between the cryogenically rolled copper and conventionally cold rolled copper, reduced to the same thickness.

  7. A simplified generic cryostat thermal model for predicting cryogen mass and lifetime. [of cryogenic space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, G. C.; Tsuyuki, G. T.

    1992-01-01

    This study presents a simple generic cryostat thermal model developed for predicting cryogen mass and the lifetime of cryogenic space telescopes. The model is based on a lumped parameter representation of eight nodes and over 35 conductors. The major telescope Dewar components represented as nodes are the main cryogen tank, the three vapor-cooled shields, the outer shell, barrel baffle, and the barrel baffle heat exchanger. The input to the model consists of the vapor-cooled shield, support straps and instrument cable geometry, and the cryostat heat loads from the instrument and through the aperture. The predictions from the model were compared with those from the more detailed models of IRAS, COBE, and SIRTF. Correlation of the helium flow rates of the IRAS and COBE Dewars was 12 percent above the actual flight or ground test data and for SIRTF it was less than 2 percent of the prediction from the detailed model.

  8. A portable cryo-plunger for on-site intact cryogenic microscopy sample preparation in natural environments

    PubMed Central

    Comolli, Luis R.; Duarte, Robert; Baum, Dennis; Luef, Birgit; Downing, Kenneth H.; Larson, David M.; Csencsits, Roseann; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2014-01-01

    We present a modern, light portable device specifically designed for environmental samples for cryo-electron microscopy by on-site cryo-plunging. The power of cryogenic EM comes from preparation of artifact-free samples. However, in many studies the samples must be collected at remote field locations, and the time involved in transporting samples back to the laboratory for cryogenic preservation can lead to severe degradation artifacts. Thus, going back to the basics, we developed a simple mechanical device that is light and easy to transport on foot yet effective. With the system design presented here we are able to obtain cryo-samples of microbes and microbial communities not possible to culture, in their near-intact environmental conditions as well as in routine laboratory work, and in real time. This methodology thus enables us to bring the power of cryo-TEM to microbial ecology. PMID:22213355

  9. THE CRYOGENIC DARK MATTER SEARCH: FIRST 5-TOWER DATA AND IMPROVED

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    THE CRYOGENIC DARK MATTER SEARCH: FIRST 5-TOWER DATA AND IMPROVED UNDERSTANDING OF IONIZATION Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.4.1 Cryogenic Solid State Detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 2 The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search 29 2.1 Introduction

  10. Standard for Inert Cryogenic Liquid Usage in the Laboratory Page 1 of 4 Standard for Inert Cryogenic Liquid Usage in the Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Chan, Hue Sun

    Cryogenic Liquid Usage in the Laboratory Page 1 of 4 March 2009 Standard for Inert Cryogenic Liquid Usage in the Laboratory In University workplaces, the storage, handling and dispensing of cryogenic liquids (e.g. liquid-up. Appropriate controls must be implemented wherever cryogenics are in use. This standard outlines some general

  11. Commissioning the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, F.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Perin, A.; Riddone, G.; Serio, L.; Soubiran, M.; Tavian, L.; Ronayette, L.; Rabehl, R.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The LHC machine, composed of eight sectors with superconducting magnets and accelerating cavities, requires a complex cryogenic system providing high cooling capacities (18 kW equivalent at 4.5 K and 2.4 W at 1.8 K per sector produced in large cold boxes and distributed via 3.3-km cryogenic transfer lines). After individual reception tests of the cryogenic subsystems (cryogen storages, refrigerators, cryogenic transfer lines and distribution boxes) performed since 2000, the commissioning of the cryogenic system of the first LHC sector has been under way since November 2006. After a brief introduction to the LHC cryogenic system and its specificities, the commissioning is reported detailing the preparation phase (pressure and leak tests, circuit conditioning and flushing), the cool-down sequences including the handling of cryogenic fluids, the magnet powering phase and finally the warm-up. Preliminary conclusions on the commissioning of the first LHC sector will be drawn with the review of the critical points already solved or still pending. The last part of the paper reports on the first operational experience of the LHC cryogenic system in the perspective of the commissioning of the remaining LHC sectors and the beam injection test.

  12. Investigation of woven composites as potential cryogenic tank materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. S.; Melendez-Soto, E.; Castellanos, A. G.; Prabhakar, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, carbon fiber and Kevlar® fiber woven composites were investigated as potential cryogenic tank materials for storing liquid fuel in spacecraft or rocket. Towards that end, both carbon and Kevlar® fiber composites were manufactured and tested with and without cryogenic exposure. The focus was on the investigation of the influence of initial cryogenic exposure on the degradation of the composite. Tensile, flexural and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) tests were conducted, which indicate that Kevlar® and carbon textile composites are potential candidates for use under cryogenic exposure.

  13. Cryogenic optical tests of a lightweight HIP beryllium mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melugin, Ramsey K.; Miller, Jacob H.; Young, J. A.; Howard, Steven D.; Pryor, G. Mark

    1989-01-01

    Five interferometric tests were conducted at cryogenic temperatures on a lightweight, 50 cm diameter, hot isostatic pressed (HIP) beryllium mirror in the Ames Research Center (ARC) Cryogenic Optics Test Facility. The purpose of the tests was to determine the stability of the mirror's figure when cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Test temperatures ranged from room ambient to 8 K. One cycle to 8 K and five cycles to 80 K were performed. Optical and thermal test methods are described. Data is presented to show the amount of cryogenic distortion and hysteresis present in the mirror when measured with an earlier, Shack interferometer, and with a newly-acquired, phase-measuring interferometer.

  14. KOTOBUKI-1 apparatus for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nakasako, Masayoshi; Takayama, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 ; Shirahama, Keiya; Yamamoto, Masaki; Hikima, Takaaki; Yonekura, Koji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Takahashi, Yukio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 ; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Inui, Yayoi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa; Hoshi, Takahiko

    2013-09-15

    We have developed an experimental apparatus named KOTOBUKI-1 for use in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiments of frozen-hydrated non-crystalline particles at cryogenic temperature. For cryogenic specimen stage with small positional fluctuation for a long exposure time of more than several minutes, we here use a cryogenic pot cooled by the evaporation cooling effect for liquid nitrogen. In addition, a loading device is developed to bring specimens stored in liquid nitrogen to the specimen stage in vacuum. The apparatus allows diffraction data collection for frozen-hydrated specimens at 66 K with a positional fluctuation of less than 0.4 ?m and provides an experimental environment to easily exchange specimens from liquid nitrogen storage to the specimen stage. The apparatus was developed and utilized in diffraction data collection of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of ?m from material and biological sciences, such as metal colloid particles and chloroplast, at BL29XU of SPring-8. Recently, it has been applied for single-shot diffraction data collection of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of sub-?m using X-ray free electron laser at BL3 of SACLA.

  15. Cryogenic Test of a Coaxial Coupling Scheme for Fundamental and Higher Order Modes in Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Sekutowicz, P. Kneisel

    2009-05-01

    A coaxial coupling device located in the beam pipe of the TESLA type superconducting cavities provides for better propagation of Higher Order Modes (HOMs) and their strong damping in appropriate HOM couplers. Additionally, it also provides efficient coupling for fundamental mode RF power into the superconducting cavity. The whole coupling device can be designed as a detachable system. If appropriately dimensioned, the magnetic field can be minimized to a negligible level at the flange position. This scheme, presented previously*, provides for several advantages: strong HOM damping, flangeable solution, exchangeability of the HOM damping device on a cavity, less complexity of the superconducting cavity, possible cost advantages. This contribution will describe the results of the first cryogenic test.

  16. Demonstration of an ultracold micro-optomechanical oscillator in a cryogenic cavity

    E-print Network

    Simon Groeblacher; Jared B. Hertzberg; Michael R. Vanner; Garrett D. Cole; Sylvain Gigan; K. C. Schwab; Markus Aspelmeyer

    2013-10-21

    Preparing and manipulating quantum states of mechanical resonators is a highly interdisciplinary undertaking that now receives enormous interest for its far-reaching potential in fundamental and applied science. Up to now, only nanoscale mechanical devices achieved operation close to the quantum regime. We report a new micro-optomechanical resonator that is laser cooled to a level of 30 thermal quanta. This is equivalent to the best nanomechanical devices, however, with a mass more than four orders of magnitude larger (43 ng versus 1 pg) and at more than two orders of magnitude higher environment temperature (5 K versus 30 mK). Despite the large laser-added cooling factor of 4,000 and the cryogenic environment, our cooling performance is not limited by residual absorption effects. These results pave the way for the preparation of 100-um scale objects in the quantum regime. Possible applications range from quantum-limited optomechanical sensing devices to macroscopic tests of quantum physics.

  17. The formation of natural cryogenic brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starinsky, Abraham; Katz, Amitai

    2003-04-01

    The source of salts in the Ca-chloridic, hypersaline brines (up to 190 g Cl L -1) occurring in crystalline basement rocks in the Canadian, Fennoscandian and Bohemian Shields and their evolution have been investigated and reported. The Cl-Br-Na relationship indicates that these waters have been concentrated from seawater, by freezing during glacial times. The Na/Cl ratio (0.25 to 0.35) in the more saline fluids is compatible with cooling down to -30°C, where the most saline waters have been concentrated by a factor of 25 to 30 relative to the parent seawater. The brines formed from seawater within cryogenic troughs, along the subarctic continental margins, around ice sheets. The depressions within which the brines formed are the cryogenic analogues of the classic, evaporitic lagoon. One million years suffice to saturate with brine a 2000km-radius by 1km-depth rock volume at an H 2O removal rate of only 2.8 mm/yr. Density-induced brine migration on a continental scale takes place via fissures below the ice. Our calculations, that were performed on a hypothetical ice sheet with dimensions compatible with the Laurentide ice sheet, demonstrate that during 1m.y., a 60m thick cryogenic sediment section could have formed. However, the precipitated minerals (mirabilite and hydrohalite) are repeatedly dispersed by the advance and retreat of the ice sheet, dissolved by melt water-seawater mixtures, and eroded during postglacial uplift, leaving almost no trace in the geological record. The cryogenic brines formed intermittently during and between glacial periods. The repeating advance and retreat of the ice sheets exerted a major control on the direction and intensity of brine flow. The cryogenic concentration of seawater and the migration of brine towards the center of the glaciostatic depression occurred mainly during the build up of the ice sheet, while reversal of the water flow from the center of the cryogenic basin outwards happened upon deglaciation. The flow of the waters in the subsurface was, inevitably, accompanied by significant dilution with melt water from the ice sheets. Using a "granitic" U concentration of 4 ppm and a (Ca-Mg mass balance based) rock/water ratio anywhere between 3.4 and 6.8 kg L -1, a few hundred thousand years of brine-rock interaction are sufficient for the growth of 129I in the most saline Canadian Shield brine to its present concentration (3.4×10 8 atoms 129I L -1). Hence, both the formation of the saline fluids and their emplacement in their present sites occurred most likely within the Pleistocene. The young age calculated for cryogenic brines in crystalline shields and the dynamic water flow therein should raise concern about the planning and construction of high-grade nuclear waste repositories in such rocks, which are already under way.

  18. Cryogenic probe station for use in automated microwave and noise figure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taub, Susan R.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Young, Paul G.; Ebihara, Ben T.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1994-01-01

    A cryogenic measurement system capable of performing on-wafer RF testing of semiconductor devices and circuits has been developed. This 'CryoProbe Station' can wafer-probe devices and circuits at cryogenic temperatures, thus eliminating the need for wire bonds. The system operates under vacuum created by a sorption pump. It uses an open cycle cooling system that can be cooled with either liquid nitrogen or liquid helium. Presently, it can reach temperatures, as low as 80 K and 37 K for each of the coolants, respectively. The temperature can be raised using a heater and it is stabilized to within 0.2 K by use of a temperature controller. The CryoProbe Station features a 1 by 2 inch stage that can hold large circuits and calibration standards simultaneously. The system is used with a Hewlett Packard 8510C Automatic Network Analyzer (ANA) to obtain S-parameter data over the frequency range 0.045-26.5 GHz. S-parameter data on HEMT (high electron mobility transistors) devices has been obtained with this station. With the use of DEEMBED software from NIST, detailed transmission line studies have been performed. Although the CryoProbe Station is designed for frequencies up to 26.5 GHz, useful transmission line data has been obtained for frequencies as high as 40 GHz. The CryoProbe station has also been used with the ATN noise figure measurement system to perform automatic, temperature dependent noise figure measurements.

  19. Cryogenic High-Frequency Readout and Control Platform for Spin Qubits

    E-print Network

    J. I. Colless; D. J. Reilly

    2011-11-29

    We have developed a cryogenic platform for the control and readout of spin qubits that comprises a high density of dc and radio frequency sample interconnects based on a set of coupled printed circuit boards. The modular setup incorporates 24 filtered dc lines, 14 control and readout lines with bandwidth from dc to above 6 GHz, and 2 microwave connections for excitation to 40 GHz. We report the performance of this platform, including signal integrity and crosstalk measurements and discuss design criteria for constructing sample interconnect technology needed for multi-qubit devices.

  20. Design and Cryogenic Operation of a Hybrid Quantum-CMOS Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapera, P.; Ray, S.; Jehl, X.; Sanquer, M.; Valentian, A.; Barraud, S.

    2015-10-01

    Silicon-on-insulator nanowire transistors of very small dimensions exhibit electrostatic or quantum effects like Coulomb blockade or single-dopant transport at low temperature. The same process also yields excellent field-effect transistors (FETs) for larger dimensions, allowing us to design integrated circuits. Using the same process, we cointegrate a FET-based ring oscillator circuit operating at cryogenic temperature which generates a radio-frequency (rf) signal on the gate of a nanoscale device showing Coulomb oscillations. We observe rectification of the rf signal, in good agreement with modeling.

  1. Apparatus for measuring tensile and compressive properties of solid materials at cryogenic temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Gonczy, John D. (Oaklawn, IL); Markley, Finley W. (St. Charles, IL); McCaw, William R. (Burr Ridge, IL); Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for evaluating the tensile and compressive properties of material samples at very low or cryogenic temperatures employs a stationary frame and a dewar mounted below the frame. A pair of coaxial cylindrical tubes extend downward towards the bottom of the dewar. A compressive or tensile load is generated hydraulically and is transmitted by the inner tube to the material sample. The material sample is located near the bottom of the dewar in a liquid refrigerant bath. The apparatus employs a displacement measuring device, such as a linear variable differential transformer, to measure the deformation of the material sample relative to the amount of compressive or tensile force applied to the sample.

  2. Cavity optomechanics with Si3N4 membranes at cryogenic temperatures

    E-print Network

    T. P. Purdy; R. W. Peterson; P. -L. Yu; C. A. Regal

    2012-08-31

    We describe a cryogenic cavity-optomechanical system that combines Si3N4 membranes with a mechanically-rigid Fabry-Perot cavity. The extremely high quality-factor frequency products of the membranes allow us to cool a MHz mechanical mode to a phonon occupation of less than 10, starting at a bath temperature of 5 kelvin. We show that even at cold temperatures thermally-occupied mechanical modes of the cavity elements can be a limitation, and we discuss methods to reduce these effects sufficiently to achieve ground state cooling. This promising new platform should have versatile uses for hybrid devices and searches for radiation pressure shot noise.

  3. An Overview of NASA's In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Management Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Stephen; Hastings, Leon; Haynes, Davy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Future mission planning within NASA continues to include cryogenic propellants for in space transportation, with mission durations ranging from days to years. Between 1995 and the present, NASA has pursued a diversified program of ground-based testing to prepare the various technologies associated with in-space cryogenic fluid management (CFM) for implementation. CFM technology areas being addressed include passive insulation, zero gravity pressure control, zero gravity mass gauging, capillary liquid acquisition devices, and zero boiloff storage. NASA CFM technologies are planned, coordinated, and implemented through the Cryogenic Technology Working Group which is comprised of representatives from the various NASA Centers as well as the National Institute of Standards and Technologies (NIST) and, on selected occasions, the Air Force. An overview of the NASA program and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) roles, accomplishments, and near-term activities are presented herein. Basic CFM technology areas being addressed include passive insulation, zero gravity pressure control, zero gravity mass gauging, capillary liquid acquisition devices, and zero boiloff storage. Recent MSFC accomplishments include: the large scale demonstration of a high performance variable density multilayer insulation (MLI) that reduced the boiloff by about half that of standard MLI; utilization of a foam substrate under MLI to eliminate the need for a helium purge bag system; demonstrations of both spray-bar and axial-jet mixer concepts for zero gravity pressure control; and sub-scale testing that verified an optical sensor concept for measuring liquid hydrogen mass in zero gravity. In response to missions requiring cryogenic propellant storage durations on the order of years, a cooperative effort by NASA's Ames Research Center, Glenn Research Center, and MSFC has been implemented to develop and demonstrate zero boiloff concepts for in-space storage of cryogenic propellants. An MSFC contribution to this cooperative effort is a large-scale demonstration of the integrated operation of passive insulation, destratification/pressure control, and cryocooler (commercial unit) subsystems to achieve zero boiloff storage of liquid hydrogen. Testing is expected during the Summer of 2001.

  4. Characterization of photo-multiplier tubes for the Cryogenic Avalanche Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Nosov, V.; Shekhtman, L.; Sokolov, A.

    2015-10-01

    New Cryogenic Avalanche Detector (CRAD) with ultimate sensitivity, that will be able to detect one primary electron released in the cryogenic liquid, is under development in the Laboratory of Cosmology and Particle Physics of the Novosibirsk State University jointly with the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The CRAD will use two sets of cryogenic PMTs in order to get trigger signal either from primary scintillations in liquid Ar or from secondary scintillations in high field gap above the liquid. Two types of cryogenic PMTs produced by Hamamatsu Photonics were tested and the results are presented in this paper. Low background 3 inch PMT R11065-10 demonstrated excellent performance according to its specifications provided by the producer. The gain measured with single electron response (SER) in liquid Ar reached 107, dark count rate rate did not exceed 300 Hz and pulse height resolution of single electron signals was close to 50%(FWHM). However, two R11065-10 PMTs out of 7 tested stopped functioning after several tens minutes of operation immersed completely into liquid Ar. The remaining 5 devices and one R11065-MOD were operated successfully for several hours each with all the parameters according to the producer specifications. Compact 2 inch PMT R6041-506-MOD with metal-channel dynode structure is a candidate for side wall PMT system that will look at electroluminescence in high field region above liquid. Four of these PMTs were tested in liquid Ar and demonstrated gain up to 2× 107, dark count rate rate below 100 Hz and pulse height resolution of single electron signals of about 110% (FWHM).

  5. Automatic PID Control Loops Design for Performance Improvement of Cryogenic Turboexpander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, D. M.; Patel, H. K.; Shah, D. K.

    2015-04-01

    Cryogenics field involves temperature below 123 K which is much less than ambient temperature. In addition, many industrially important physical processes—from fulfilling the needs of National Thermonuclear Fusion programs, superconducting magnets to treatment of cutting tools and preservation of blood cells, require extreme low temperature. The low temperature required for liquefaction of common gases can be obtained by several processes. Liquefaction is the process of cooling or refrigerating a gas to a temperature below its critical temperature so that liquid can be formed at some suitable pressure which is below the critical pressure. Helium liquefier is used for the liquefaction process of helium gas. In general, the Helium Refrigerator/Liquefier (HRL) needs turboexpander as expansion machine to produce cooling effect which is further used for the production of liquid helium. Turboexpanders, a high speed device that is supported on gas bearings, are the most critical component in many helium refrigeration systems. A very minor fault in the operation and manufacturing or impurities in the helium gas can destroy the turboexpander. However, since the performance of expanders is dependent on a number of operating parameters and the relations between them are quite complex, the instrumentation and control system design for turboexpander needs special attention. The inefficiency of manual control leads to the need of designing automatic control loops for turboexpander. Proper design and implementation of the control loops plays an important role in the successful operation of the cryogenic turboexpander. The PID control loops has to be implemented with accurate interlocks and logic to enhance the performance of the cryogenic turboexpander. For different normal and off-normal operations, speeds will be different and hence a proper control method for critical rotational speed avoidance is must. This paper presents the design of PID control loops needed for the efficient performance of cryogenic turboexpander (Radial Inflow type) to ensure that the control systems meet the technical conditions and constraints more accurately and ensure the equipment safety.

  6. Thermography to Inspect Insulation of Large Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen; Youngquist, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Thermography has been used in the past to monitor active, large, cryogenic storage tanks. This approach proposes to use thermography to monitor new or refurbished tanks, prior to filling with cryogenic liquid, to look for insulation voids. Thermography may provide significant cost and schedule savings if voids can be detected early before a tank is returned to service.

  7. AF cryogenic and fluid management spacecraft technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Roy

    1987-01-01

    Viewgraphs are given that outline the program objectives of long term cryogenic storage programs. Diagrams of the orbit transfer vehicle, thermal insulation blankets, cryogenic storage tanks, the advanced liquid feed experiment, and the acoustic measurement on satellite experiment are presented. The objectives, goals, and payoffs of the fluid management space experiment and the liquid droplet radiator are outlined.

  8. Cryogenic fluid management technology requirements for the Space Transfer Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, John M.; Brown, Norman S.

    1989-01-01

    An in-house study was performed to design a cryogenic Space Transfer Vehicle (STV) for the late 1990s that can evolve with the demanding mission requirements of the manned exploration initiatives. An assessment of cryogenic fluid management technology issues associated with the STV was performed to identify technology gaps and propose advanced development activities.

  9. Metals for cryogenic applications. (Latest citations from Metadex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning technology and development of metals for cryogenic applications. The processing, mechanical properties, and compositions of specific alloys are detailed. Applications include aircraft, rockets, spacecraft, and equipment used to store and transport cryogenic fluids. (Contains a minimum of 172 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Metals for cryogenic applications. (Latest citations from METADEX). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning technology and development of metals for cryogenic applications. The processing, mechanical properties, and compositions of specific alloys are detailed. Applications include aircraft, rockets, spacecraft, and equipment used to store and transport cryogenic fluids. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF PHONON-MEDIATED CRYOGENIC PARTICLE DETECTORS WITH

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    DEVELOPMENT OF PHONON-MEDIATED CRYOGENIC PARTICLE DETECTORS WITH ELECTRON AND NUCLEAR RECOIL massive particls (WIMPs). This thesis describes the development of silicon based cryogenic particle detectors designed to directly detect interactions with these WIMPs. These detectors are part of a new class

  12. Submerged gas injector expels cryogenic liquids from tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, E. W.; Johnson, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Vaporizing small portion of cryogenic liquid into pressurizing gas reduces amount of pressurizing gas required to expel cryogenic liquid from tank. Specific example of injecting helium gas, stored at same temperature of liquid hydrogen, through submerged porous plate directly into liquid hydrogen is described.

  13. Cryogenic line insulation made from prefabricated polyurethane shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerma, G.

    1975-01-01

    Prefabricated polyurethane foam insulation is inexpensive and easily installed on cryogenic lines. Insulation sections are semicircular half shells. Pair of half shells is placed to surround cryogenic line. Cylindrically-shaped knit sock is pulled over insulation then covered with polyurethane resin to seal system.

  14. Unlined Reuseable Filament Wound Composite Cryogenic Tank Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, A. W.; Lake, R. E.; Wilkerson, C.

    1999-01-01

    An unlined reusable filament wound composite cryogenic tank was tested at the Marshall Space Flight Center using LH2 cryogen and pressurization to 320 psig. The tank was fabricated by Phillips Laboratory and Wilson Composite Group, Inc., using an EnTec five-axis filament winder and sand mandrels. The material used was IM7/977-2 (graphite/epoxy).

  15. Contracting/expanding self-sealing cryogenic tube seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Lin X. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Contracting/expanding self-sealing cryogenic tube seals are disclosed which use the different properties of thermal contraction and expansion of selected dissimilar materials in accord with certain design criteria to yield self-tightening seals via sloped-surface sealing. The seals of the subject invention are reusable, simple to assemble, adaptable to a wide variety of cryogenic applications.

  16. Contracting/expanding self-sealing cryogenic tube seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Lin X. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Contracting/expanding self-sealing cryogenic tube seals are disclosed which use the different properties of thermal contraction and expansion of selected dissimilar materials in accord with certain design criteria to yield self-tightening seals via sloped-surface sealing. The seals of the subject invention are reusable, simple to assemble, and adaptable to a wide variety of cryogenic applications.

  17. Measurement techniques for cryogenic Ka-band microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, M. A.; Bhasin, K. B.; Gilbert, C.; Metzler, S.; Claspy, P. C.

    1991-01-01

    The measurement of cryogenic antennas poses unique logistical problems since the antenna under test must be embedded in a cooling chamber. A method of measuring the performance of cryogenic microstrip antennas using a closed cycle gas cooled refrigerator in a far field range is described. Antenna patterns showing the performance of gold and superconducting Ka-band microstrip antennas at various temperatures are presented.

  18. Anomalous Phase Inversion in Polymer Blends Prepared by Cryogenic Mechanical

    E-print Network

    Anomalous Phase Inversion in Polymer Blends Prepared by Cryogenic Mechanical Alloying Archie P of Materials Science and Engineering, Physics, and Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University, such as cryogenic mechanical al- loying (CMA)1 and solid-state shear pulverization (S3P),2 offer alternative

  19. Long-Term Cryogenic Propellant Storage for the TOPS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustafi, Shuvo; Francis, John; Li, Xiaoyi; Purves, Lloyd; DeLee, Hudson; Riall, Sara; McGuinness, Dan; Willis, Dewey; Nixon, Conor; Devine Matt; Hedayat, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) can dramatically enhance NASAs ability to explore the solar system because of their superior specific impulse (Isp) capability. Although these cryogenic propellants can be challenging to manage and store, they allow significant mass advantages over traditional hypergolic propulsion systems and are therefore technically enabling for many planetary science missions. New cryogenic storage techniques such as subcooling and the use of advanced insulation and low thermal conductivity support structures will allow for the long term storage and use of cryogenic propellants for solar system exploration and hence allow NASA to deliver more payloads to targets of interest, launch on smaller and less expensive launch vehicles, or both. Employing cryogenic propellants will allow NASA to perform missions to planetary destinations that would not be possible with the use of traditional hypergolic propellants. These new cryogenic storage technologies were implemented in a design study for the Titan Orbiter Polar Surveyor (TOPS) mission, with LH2 and LOX as propellants, and the resulting spacecraft design was able to achieve a 43 launch mass reduction over a TOPS mission, that utilized a conventional hypergolic propulsion system with mono-methyl hydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants. This paper describes the cryogenic propellant storage design for the TOPS mission and demonstrates how these cryogenic propellants are stored passively for a decade-long Titan mission.

  20. Evolvable Cryogenics (ECRYO) Pressure Transducer Calibration Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Carlos E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the findings of recent activities conducted by Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) In-Space Propulsion Branch and MSFC's Metrology and Calibration Lab to assess the performance of current "state of the art" pressure transducers for use in long duration storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. A brief historical narrative in this paper describes the Evolvable Cryogenics program and the relevance of these activities to the program. This paper also provides a review of three separate test activities performed throughout this effort, including: (1) the calibration of several pressure transducer designs in a liquid nitrogen cryogenic environmental chamber, (2) the calibration of a pressure transducer in a liquid helium Dewar, and (3) the calibration of several pressure transducers at temperatures ranging from 20 to 70 degrees Kelvin (K) using a "cryostat" environmental chamber. These three separate test activities allowed for study of the sensors along a temperature range from 4 to 300 K. The combined data shows that both the slope and intercept of the sensor's calibration curve vary as a function of temperature. This homogeneous function is contrary to the linearly decreasing relationship assumed at the start of this investigation. Consequently, the data demonstrates the need for lookup tables to change the slope and intercept used by any data acquisition system. This ultimately would allow for more accurate pressure measurements at the desired temperature range. This paper concludes with a review of a request for information (RFI) survey conducted amongst different suppliers to determine the availability of current "state of the art" flight-qualified pressure transducers. The survey identifies requirements that are most difficult for the suppliers to meet, most notably the capability to validate the sensor's performance at temperatures below 70 K.

  1. Cryogenic Scan Mechanism for Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, John C.; Francis, John L.

    2011-01-01

    A compact and lightweight mechanism has been developed to accurately move a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) scan mirror (a cube corner) in a near-linear fashion with near constant speed at cryogenic temperatures. This innovation includes a slide mechanism to restrict motion to one dimension, an actuator to drive the motion, and a linear velocity transducer (LVT) to measure the speed. The cube corner mirror is double-passed in one arm of the FTS; double-passing is required to compensate for optical beam shear resulting from tilting of the moving cube corner. The slide, actuator, and LVT are off-the-shelf components that are capable of cryogenic vacuum operation. The actuator drives the slide for the required travel of 2.5 cm. The LVT measures translation speed. A proportional feedback loop compares the LVT voltage with the set voltage (speed) to derive an error signal to drive the actuator and achieve near constant speed. When the end of the scan is reached, a personal computer reverses the set voltage. The actuator and LVT have no moving parts in contact, and have magnetic properties consistent with cryogenic operation. The unlubricated slide restricts motion to linear travel, using crossed roller bearings consistent with 100-million- stroke operation. The mechanism tilts several arc seconds during transport of the FTS mirror, which would compromise optical fringe efficiency when using a flat mirror. Consequently, a cube corner mirror is used, which converts a tilt into a shear. The sheared beam strikes (at normal incidence) a flat mirror at the end of the FTS arm with the moving mechanism, thereby returning upon itself and compensating for the shear

  2. Using Composite Materials in a Cryogenic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batton, William D.; Dillard, James E.; Rottmund, Matthew E.; Tupper, Michael L.; Mallick, Kaushik; Francis, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the design and operation of an extended-shaft cryogenic pump to increase the efficiency of pumping. In general, the efficiency of pumping a cryogenic fluid is limited by thermal losses which is itself caused by pump inefficiency and leakage of heat through the pump structure. A typical cryogenic pump includes a drive shaft and two main concentric static components (an outer pressure containment tube and an intermediate static support tube) made from stainless steel. The modifications made include replacement of the stainless-steel drive shaft and the concentric static stainless-steel components with components made of a glass/epoxy composite. The leakage of heat is thus reduced because the thermal conductivity of the composite is an order of magnitude below that of stainless steel. Taking advantage of the margin afforded by the decrease in thermal conductivity, the drive shaft could be shortened to increase its effective stiffness, thereby increasing the rotordynamic critical speeds, thereby further making it possible to operate the pump at a higher speed to increase pumping efficiency. During the modification effort, an analysis revealed that substitution of the shorter glass/epoxy shaft for the longer stainless-steel shaft was not, by itself, sufficient to satisfy the rotordynamic requirements at the desired increased speed. Hence, it became necessary to increase the stiffness of the composite shaft. This stiffening was accomplished by means of a carbon-fiber-composite overwrap along most of the length of the shaft. Concomitantly with the modifications described thus far, it was necessary to provide for joining the composite-material components with metallic components required by different aspects of the pump design. An adhesive material formulated specially to bond the composite and metal components was chosen as a means to satisfy these requirements.

  3. The development of a cryogenic over-pressure pump

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, M.; Cease, H.; Flaugher, B.; Flores, R.; Lathrop, A.; Garcia, J.; Ruiz, F.

    2014-01-29

    A cryogenic over-pressure pump (OPP) was tested in the prototype telescope liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling system for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Project. This OPP consists of a process cylinder (PC), gas generator, and solenoid operated valves (SOVs). It is a positive displacement pump that provided intermittent liquid nitrogen (LN2) flow to an array of charge couple devices (CCDs) for the prototype Dark Energy Camera (DECam). In theory, a heater submerged in liquid would generate the drive gas in a closed loop cooling system. The drive gas would be injected into the PC to displace that liquid volume. However, due to limitations of the prototype closed loop nitrogen system (CCD cooling system) for DECam, a quasiclosed-loop nitrogen system was created. During the test of the OPP, the CCD array was cooled to its designed set point temperature of 173K. It was maintained at that temperature via electrical heaters. The performance of the OPP was captured in pressure, temperature, and flow rate in the CCD LN2 cooling system at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL)

  4. The cryogenic system for ITER CC superconducting conductor test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jinqing; Wu, Yu; Liu, Huajun; Shi, Yi; Chen, Jinglin; Ren, Zhibin

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic system of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Correction Coils (CC) test facility, which consists of a 500 W/4.5 K helium refrigerator, a 50 kA superconducting transformer cryostat (STC) and a background field magnet cryostat (BFMC). The 500 W/4.5 K helium refrigerator synchronously produces both the liquid helium (LHe) and supercritical helium (SHe). The background field magnet and the primary coil of the superconducting transformer (PCST) are cooled down by immersing into 4.2 K LHe. The secondary Cable-In-Conduit Conductor (CICC) coil of the superconducting transformer (SCST), superconducting joints and the testing sample of ITER CC are cooled down by forced-flow supercritical helium. During the commissioning experiment, all the superconducting coils were successfully translated into superconducting state. The background field magnet was fully cooled by immersing it into 4.2 K LHe and generated a maximal background magnetic field of 6.96 T; the temperature of transformer coils and current leads was reduced to 4.3 K; the inlet temperature of SHe loop was 5.6 K, which can meet the cooling requirements of CIC-Conductor and joint boxes. It is noted that a novel heat cut-off device for High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) binary current leads was introduced to reduce the heat losses of transformer cryostat.

  5. Cryogenic molecular separation system for radioactive (11)C ion acceleration.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, K; Noda, A; Suzuki, K; Nagatsu, K; Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, D E; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Nakao, M; Hojo, S; Wakui, T; Noda, K

    2015-12-01

    A (11)C molecular production/separation system (CMPS) has been developed as part of an isotope separation on line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive (11)C ion beams. In the ISOL system, (11)CH4 molecules will be produced by proton irradiation and separated from residual air impurities and impurities produced during the irradiation. The CMPS includes two cryogenic traps to separate specific molecules selectively from impurities by using vapor pressure differences among the molecular species. To investigate the fundamental performance of the CMPS, we performed separation experiments with non-radioactive (12)CH4 gases, which can simulate the chemical characteristics of (11)CH4 gases. We investigated the separation of CH4 molecules from impurities, which will be present as residual gases and are expected to be difficult to separate because the vapor pressure of air molecules is close to that of CH4. We determined the collection/separation efficiencies of the CMPS for various amounts of air impurities and found desirable operating conditions for the CMPS to be used as a molecular separation device in our ISOL system. PMID:26724018

  6. Ground-Based Investigations with the Cryogenic Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.; Mattison, Edward; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    2001-01-01

    The room temperature hydrogen maser is an active atomic oscillator used as a high-frequency-stability local oscillator for radio astronomy, metrology, and spacecraft navigation, and in tests of fundamental physics. The cryogenic hydrogen maser (CHM) operates at 0.5 K, employing superfluid helium-coated walls to store the masing hydrogen atoms. We are investigating whether the CHM may provide better frequency stability than the room temperature hydrogen maser: one to three orders of magnitude improvement may be possible because of greatly reduced thermal noise and larger signal power. Exceptional frequency stability will be required for spacecraft tracking in future deep-space missions, for space-based tests of relativity and gravitation, and for local (i.e., flywheel) oscillators used with absolute frequency standards such as laser-cooled atomic fountains and linear ion traps. These new devices are passive high-resolution frequency discriminators. Alone, they cannot function as superior atomic clocks; their effective operation depends on being integrated with an active local oscillator with excellent short term stability - such as that possible with the CHM.

  7. Use of Capillaries for Macromolecular Crystallization in a Cryogenic Dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Hammons, Aaron S.; Hong, Young Soo

    2002-01-01

    The enhanced gaseous nitrogen (EGN) dewar is a cryogenic dry shipper with a sealed cylinder inserted inside along with a temperature monitoring device, and is intended for macromolecular crystallization experiments on the International Space Station. Within the dewar, each crystallization experiment is contained as a solution within a plastic capillary tube. The standard procedure for loading samples in these tubes has involved rapid freezing of the precipitant and biomolecular solution, e.g., protein, directly in liquid nitrogen; this method, however, often resulted in uncontrolled formation of air voids, These air pockets, or bubbles, can lead to irreproducible crystallization results. A novel protocol has been developed to prevent formation of bubbles, and this has been tested in the laboratory as well as aboard the International Space Station during a 42-day long mission of July/August 2001. The gain or loss of mass from solutions within the plastic capillaries revealed that mass transport occurred among separated tubes, and that this mass transport was dependent upon the hygroscopic character of the solution contained in any given tube. The surface area of the plastic capillary tube also related to the observed mass transport. Furthermore, the decreased mass of solutions of-protein correlated to observed formation of protein crystals.

  8. Increasing the Cryogenic Toughness of Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.

    1986-01-01

    Grain-refining heat treatments increase toughness without substantial strength loss. Five alloys selected for study, all at or near technological limit. Results showed clearly grain sizes of these alloys refined by such heat treatments and grain refinement results in large improvement in toughness without substantial loss in strength. Best improvements seen in HP-9-4-20 Steel, at low-strength end of technological limit, and in Maraging 200, at high-strength end. These alloys, in grain refined condition, considered for model applications in high-Reynolds-number cryogenic wind tunnels.

  9. Pressure transducer and system for cryogenic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A silicon pressure die is bonded to a borosilicate substrate above the pneumatic port. A Wheatstone bridge circuit is formed on the silicon pressure die and has bridge elements of silicon doped with boron to a deposit density level of approximately 1 x 10(exp 19)-10(exp 21) boron/cc. A current source is provided to excite the Wheatstone bridge circuit. In addition, a temperature sensor is provided to provide temperature readings. An array may be formed of the resulting pressure transducers. This unique solution of materials permits operation of a pressure transducer in cryogenic environments.

  10. SPICA sub-Kelvin cryogenic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duband, L.; Duval, J. M.; Luchier, N.; Prouve, T.

    2012-04-01

    SPICA, a Japanese led mission, is part of the JAXA future science program and is planned for launch in 2018. SPICA will perform imaging and spectroscopic observations in the mid- and far-IR waveband, and is developing instrumentation spanning the 5-400 ?m range. The SPICA payload features several candidate instruments, some of them requiring temperature down to 50 mK. This is currently the case for SAFARI, a core instrument developed by a European-based consortium, and BLISS proposed by CALTECH/JPL in the US. SPICA's distinctive feature is to actively cool its telescope to below 6 K. In addition, SPICA is a liquid cryogen free satellite and all the cooling will be provided by radiative cooling (L2 orbit) down to 30 K and by mechanical coolers for lower temperatures. The satellite will launch warm and slowly equilibrate to its operating temperatures once in orbit. This warm launch approach makes it possible to eliminate a large liquid cryogen tank and to use the mass saved to launch a large diameter telescope (3.2 m). This 4 K cooled telescope significantly reduces its own thermal radiation, offering superior sensitivity in the infrared region. The cryogenic system that enables this warm launch/cooled telescope concept is a key issue of the mission. This cryogenic chain features a number of cooling stages comprising passive radiators, Stirling coolers and several Joule Thomson loops, offering cooling powers at typically 20, 4.5, 2.5 and 1.7 K. The SAFARI and BLISS detectors require cooling to temperatures as low as 50 mK. The instrument coolers will be operated from these heat sinks. They are composed of a small demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) pre cooled by either a single or a double sorption cooler, respectively for SAFARI and BLISS. The BLISS cooler maintains continuous cooling at 300 mK and thus suppresses the thermal equilibrium time constant of the large focal plane. These hybrid architectures allow designing low weight coolers able to reach 50 mK. Because the sorption cooler has extremely low mass for a sub-Kelvin cooler, it allows the stringent mass budget to be met. These concepts are discussed in this paper.

  11. Cryogenic Vacuum Insulation for Vessels and Piping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, A.; Fesmire, J.; Johnson, W.; Minnick, J.

    2010-01-01

    Cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, with proper materials selection and execution, can offer the highest levels of thermal performance. Three areas of consideration are vital to achieve the optimum result: materials, representative test conditions, and engineering approach for the particular application. Deficiency in one of these three areas can prevent optimum performance and lead to severe inefficiency. Materials of interest include micro-fiberglass, multilayer insulation, and composite arrangements. Cylindrical liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimetry methods were used. The need for standard thermal conductivity data is addressed through baseline testing. Engineering analysis and design factors such as layer thickness, density, and practicality are also considered.

  12. Deep Space Network, Cryogenic HEMT LNAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, J. Javier

    2006-01-01

    Exploration of the Solar System with automated spacecraft that are more than ten astronomical units (1 AU = 149,597,870.691 km) from earth requires very large antennae employing extremely sensitive receivers. A key figure of merit in the specification of the spacecraft-to-earth telecommunications link is the ratio of the antenna gain to operatio nal noise temperature (G/Top) of the system. The Deep Space Network (DSN) receivers are cryogenic, low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) which addres s the need to maintain Top as low as technology permits. Historicall y, the extra-ordinarily sensitive receive systems operated by the DSN have required ctyogenically cooled, ruby masers, operating at a physi cal temperature near the boiling point of helium, as the LNA. Althoug h masers continue to be used today, they are hand crafted at JPL and expensive to manufacture and maintain. Recent advances in the developm ent of indium phosphide (InP) based high electron mobility transistor s (HEMTs) combined with cryogenic cooling near the boiling point of h ydrogen have made this alternate technology comparable with and a fraction of the cost of maser technology. InP HEMT LNA modules are demons trating noise temperatures less than ten times the quantum noise limi t (10hf/k) from 1 to 100 GHz. To date, the lowest noise LNA modules developed for the DSN have demonstrated noise temperatures of 3.5 K and 8.5 K at 8.5 K at 32 GHz, respectively. Front-end receiver packages employing these modules have demonstrated operating system noise temperatures of 17 K at 8.4 GHz (on a 70m antenna at zenith) and 39 K at 3 2 GHz (on a 34m antenna at zenith). The development and demonstration of cryogenic, InP HEMT based front-end amplifiers for the DSN requir es accurate component and module characterization, and modeling from 1 to 100 GHz at physical temperatures down to 12 K. The characterizati on and modeling begins with the HEMT chip, proceeds to the multi-stag e HEMT LNA module, and culminates with the complete front-end cryogenic receiver package for the antenna. This presentation will provide a n overview of this development process. Examples will be shown for de vices, LNA modules, front-end receiver packages, antennae employing these packages and the improvements to the down-link capacity.

  13. Canceling Torque Caused By Boiloff Of Cryogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep

    1993-01-01

    Proposed technique for cancellation of small torques caused by venting of cryogens from tanks in spacecraft adaptable to use in making small corrections in orientations of terrestrial scientific instruments. Torque eliminated by directing exhaust gas through "T" vent. To cancel remaining small torque, that side of "T" from which exhaust produces smaller thrust heated just enough to equalize opposing thrusts. Concept useful in situations in which conventional electromagnetic actuators not suitable because of constraints related to temperature, radiation, or vibration and equipment required to be robust, simple, reliable, light in weight, and without moving parts.

  14. Ferromagnetic Josephson Junctions for Cryogenic Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, Bethany M.; Gingrich, Eric C.; Khasawneh, Mazin A.; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, William P., Jr.; Birge, Norman O.

    2015-03-01

    Josephson junctions containing ferromagnetic materials are of interest for both scientific and technological purposes. In principle, either the amplitude of the critical current or superconducting phase shift across the junction can be controlled by the relative magnetization directions of the ferromagnetic layers in the junction. Our approach concentrates on phase control utilizing two junctions in a SQUID geometry. We will report on efforts to control the phase of junctions carrying either spin-singlet or spin-triplet supercurrent for cryogenic memory applications. Supported by Northorp Grumman Corporation and by IARPA under SPAWAR Contract N66001-12-C-2017.

  15. Evacuation time of cryogenic pipes for superconducting power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sun, Jian; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Hamabe, Makoto; Kawahara, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Satarou

    2013-11-01

    The vacuum insulation has been used for the thermal insulation of cryogenic pipes for the superconducting power transmission to reduce the heat leak from the environment at the room temperature to the low temperature parts. Since the cryogenic pipes, in particular, those for long distance power transmission, are considered to be thin long pipes, it might take a long time for evacuation. To estimate the evacuation time of the long cryogenic pipes, model calculations have been performed. According to the calculations, it is found that there is an optimum condition between the pumping speed, the diameter of the outer pipe and the length of the cryogenic pipe for efficient evacuation. It is also found that, if the outgassing is suppressed enough, the evacuation can be possible within 1 week even for the long cryogenic pipe with the length of 10 km. The reduction of outgassing is particularly important for the efficient evacuation.

  16. Physical understanding of cryogenic implant benefits for electrical junction stability

    SciTech Connect

    Adeni Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd

    2012-03-12

    We investigate the effect of cryogenic temperature implants on electrical junction stability for ultra shallow junction applications for sub-32 nm technology nodes and beyond. A comprehensive study was conducted to gain physical understanding of the impact of cryogenic temperature implants on dopant-defect interactions. Carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) molecule, a potential alternative to monomer boron was implanted in carbon preamorphized silicon substrates at cryogenic implant temperatures. Results indicate implants at cryogenic temperatures increase dopant activation with reduced diffusion, resulting in lower sheet resistance for a lower junction depth. Further, this study emphasizes the benefits of co-implants performed at cryogenic temperatures as alternative to traditional preamorphizing implants.

  17. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology for Moon and Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Gaby, Joseph D.; Salerno, Louis J.; Sutherlin, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Space Exploration Policy, focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are underway within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are being conducted by the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project. Cryogenic Fluid Management Project objectives are to develop storage, transfer, and handling technologies for cryogens to support high performance demands of lunar, and ultimately, Mars missions in the application areas of propulsion, surface systems, and Earth-based ground operations. The targeted use of cryogens and cryogenic technologies for these application areas is anticipated to significantly reduce propellant launch mass and required on-orbit margins, to reduce and even eliminate storage tank boil-off losses for long term missions, to economize ground pad storage and transfer operations, and to expand operational and architectural operations at destination. This paper organizes Cryogenic Fluid Management Project technology efforts according to Exploration Architecture target areas, and discusses the scope of trade studies, analytical modeling, and test efforts presently underway, as well as future plans, to address those target areas. The target areas are: liquid methane/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Ascent Stage, liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Descent Stage and Ares V Earth Departure Stage, liquefaction, zero boil-off, and propellant scavenging for Lunar Surface Systems, cold helium and zero boil-off technologies for Earth-Based Ground Operations, and architecture definition studies for long term storage and on-orbit transfer and pressurization of LH2, cryogenic Mars landing and ascent vehicles, and cryogenic production via in situ resource utilization on Mars.

  18. Cryogenic engineering and superconductor technology; Proceedings of the 14th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference and International Cryogenic Materials Conference, Kiev, Ukraine, June 8-12, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarek, P.; Rizzuto, C.

    Consideration is given to application concepts of small regenerative cryocoolers in superconducting magnet systems, thermoelectric materials for Peltier cryogenic coolers, closed-cycle liquid helium refrigerators, built-in cryogenic control fixtures with electric drive, large cryogenic helium systems for superconducting magnets, low temperature adsorptive hydrogen isotope separation, cryogenic thermometry for space testing systems, performance of parallel flow He-II heat exchangers, and transient heat transfer to liquid helium at a 100 Hz pulsed heat load. Also discussed are He II cooling of a large superconducting magnet system, a computer code for simulation of thermal processes during quench in superconducting magnet windings, quench energies of multistable composite superconductors, a superconducting hydrogen-cooled switch on Nb-Sn tape, a gravity radiometer with coupled superconducting suspensions, new design of RSFQ logic family, and high-temperature Josephson junctions and their applications.

  19. A transition detection study using a cryogenic hot film system in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Carraway, D. L.; Stainback, P. C.; Fancher, M. F.

    1987-01-01

    A transition detection study was conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT) using a specialized hot film system designed specifically for use in cryogenic wind tunnels. The quantitative transition location data obtained at near cryogenic conditions, 360 deg R (200K) represents the first definitive transition Reynolds numbers obtained in a cryogenic wind tunnel. The model was tested at both adiabatic and nonadiabatic wall conditions with a wall-to-total temperature ratio as low as 0.47. The test results indicated an improved technique for hot-film installation and a modified data acquisition system would allow the on-line determination of the location of boundary layer transition in cryogenic wind tunnels, such as the U.S. National Transonic Facility.

  20. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Volume 27 - Proceedings of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference, San Diego, CA, August 11-14, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, R. W. (editor)

    1982-01-01

    Applications of superconductivity are considered, taking into account MHD and fusion, generators, transformers, transmission lines, magnets for physics, cryogenic techniques, electrtronics, and aspects of magnet stability. Advances related to heat transfer in He I are discussed along with subjects related to theat transfer in He II, refrigeration of superconducting systems, refrigeration and liquefaction, dilution and magnetic refrigerators, refrigerators for space applications, mass transfer and flow phenomena, and the properties of fluids. Developments related to cryogenic applications are also explored, giving attention to bulk storage and transfer of cryogenic fluids, liquefied natural gas operations, space science and technology, and cryopumping. Topics related to cryogenic instrumentation and controls include the production and use of high grade silicon diode temperature sensors, the choice of strain gages for use in a large superconducting alternator, microprocessor control of cryogenic pressure, and instrumentation, data acquisition and reduction for a large spaceborne helium dewar.

  1. Cryogenic Propellant Depot Experiments, Demonstrations and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Joe T.; Fikes, John C.; Henley, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic Propellant Depots have been assessed over many years in terms of architectures, system configuration trades, related technologies, economic assessments, etc., to enable more ambitious and affordable human and robotic exploration of the Earth Neighborhood and beyond. These activities have identified architectures and concepts that produce, preposition and store propellants in space for exploration and commercial space activities. Commonalities across mission scenarios for these architecture definitions, depot concepts, technologies, and operations were identified that also best satisfy the Vision of Space Exploration. The Boeing Company supported the NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) by conducting Architecture Definitions and Systems Studies. The primary objectives were: (1) determine high leverage propellant depot concepts and related technologies; (2) identify commonalities across mission scenarios of depot concepts, technologies, and operations; (3) determine the best depot concepts and key technology requirements and (4) identify technology development needs including definition of ground and space demonstration requirements. This presentation briefly summarizes potential ground and flight experiments and demonstrations as well as discusses various commercial and exploration applications of Cryogenic Propellant Depots.

  2. Surrogate Cryogenic Target Experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Yaakobi, B.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Town, R. P. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V.; Bradley, D. K.; Knauer, J. P.; Cable, M. D.; Ognibene, T. J.

    1998-11-01

    We will describe the latest set of surrogate cryogenic capsule implosion experiments performed with the OMEGA 60-beam UV laser system. These experiments are investigating the final compression performance of capsules consisting of gas-filled or evacuated CH or CD shells as ``surrogates'' of cryogenically prepared targets soon to be available on OMEGA. The final compression performance of the capsules is diagnosed by a combination of measurements of primary neutron yield from deuterium, secondary neutron spectroscopy (from the DT neutron spectrum), and shell areal density and core electron temperature from x-ray spectroscopy. The time-resolved neutron yield and monochromatic imaging of shell dopants (such as Ti) are also available for selected target shots. We will present comparisons of experiments performed with and without distributed phase plates (DPP's) and show the beneficial effect of using beam smoothing (SSD) on the implosions. Implosions by optimized pulse shapes have been used to lower the target adiabat during acceleration. These results will also be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  3. Aerogel Beads as Cryogenic Thermal Insulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Rouanet, S.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of the use of aerogel beads as thermal insulation for cryogenic applications was conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Steady-state liquid nitrogen boiloff methods were used to characterize the thermal performance of aerogel beads in comparison with conventional insulation products such as perlite powder and multilayer insulation (MLI). Aerogel beads produced by Cabot Corporation have a bulk density below 100 kilograms per cubic meter (kg/cubic m) and a mean particle diameter of 1 millimeter (mm). The apparent thermal conductivity values of the bulk material have been determined under steady-state conditions at boundary temperatures of approximately 293 and 77 kelvin (K) and at various cold vacuum pressures (CVP). Vacuum levels ranged from 10(exp -5) torr to 760 torr. All test articles were made in a cylindrical configuration with a typical insulation thickness of 25 mm. Temperature profiles through the thickness of the test specimens were also measured. The results showed the performance of the aerogel beads was significantly better than the conventional materials in both soft-vacuum (1 to 10 torr) and no-vacuum (760 torr) ranges. Opacified aerogel beads performed better than perlite powder under high-vacuum conditions. Further studies for material optimization and system application are in progress.

  4. D0 Cryogenic Auto Dialing Alarm System

    SciTech Connect

    Markely, D.; /Fermilab

    1992-08-03

    The Automatic Dialing system purchased by D0 is intended to help make the D0 cryogenic system operate unattended by cryogenic operating personnel. The auto dialer is completely programmable and is voice synthesized. The auto dialer was purchased with 32 bistable inputs, but is expandable to 64 bistable inputs with the purchase of more electronic cards at an approximate cost of $260 per card (8 bistable inputs). The auto dialer also has the capability for analog inputs, analog outputs, and bistable outputs none of which D0 uses or intends to use. The auto dialer can be called on its operating phone line to describe current alarms with the proper password. The Auto Dialer can dial lab extensions, lab pagers, and any number outside the lab. It cannot dial a long distance pager. The auto dialer monitors alarms and alarm conditions via the T1565 PLC, upon an alarm condition it initiates a phone calling sequence of preprogrammed lists with assigned priorities. When someone is reached, the auto dialer describes the individual alarm it is calling for, by a preprogrammed set of words for that individual alarm, spoken by a female voice. The called person then has a chance to acknowledge the alarm over the telephone, if the alarm is not acknowledged the auto dialer will disconnect and call the next person on the list. The auto dialer will continue to cycle through the list until it is acknowledged, reset, or the alarm condition no longer exists.

  5. VISCOUS ENERGY DISSIPATION IN FROZEN CRYOGENS

    SciTech Connect

    Meitner, S. J.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.; Andraschko, M. R.

    2008-03-16

    ITER is an international research and development project with the goal of demonstrating the feasibility of fusion power. The fuel for the ITER plasma is injected in the form of frozen deuterium pellets; the current injector design includes a batch extruder, cooled by liquid helium. A more advanced fuel system will produce deuterium pellets continuously using a twin-screw extruder, cooled by a cryocooler. One of the critical design parameters for the advanced system is the friction associated with the shearing planes of the frozen deuterium in the extruder; the friction determines the required screw torque as well as the cryocooler heat load.An experiment has been designed to measure the energy dissipation associated with shearing frozen deuterium. Deuterium gas is cooled to its freezing point in the gap between a stationary outer canister and a rotating inner cylinder. The dissipation is measured mechanically and through calorimetric means. The experiment has also been used to measure dissipation in other cryogens, such as neon, as a function of rotational velocity and temperature. This paper describes the design and construction of the experiment and presents measurements over a range of cryogens and test conditions.

  6. Narrow bandpass cryogenic filter for microwave measurements.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, B I; Klimenko, D N; Sultanov, A N; Il'ichev, E; Meyer, H-G

    2013-05-01

    An ultra-wide stopband hairpin bandpass filter with integrated nonuniform transmission lines was designed and fabricated for highly sensitive measurements at cryogenic temperatures down to millikelvin and a frequency range of 10 Hz-10 GHz. The scattering matrices of the filter were characterized at T = 4.2 K. The filter provides a stopband from 10 Hz to 2.2 GHz and from 2.3 GHz to 10 GHz with more than 50 dB and 40 dB of amplitude suppression, respectively. The center frequency of the passband is f0 = 2.25 GHz with a bandwidth ?f = 80 MHz. The maximum insertion loss in the passband is 4 dB. The filter has a 50 ? input and output impedance, SubMiniature version A connector termination, and significantly reduced form factor. The wide stopband frequency range and narrow passband in conjunction with small dimensions make the filter suitable to use it as a part of a high sensitive readout for superconducting quantum circuits, such as superconducting quantum bits and cryogenic parametric amplifiers. PMID:23742575

  7. Experimental investigation of cryogenic oscillating heat pipes

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, A.J.; Ma, H.B.; Critser, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    A novel cryogenic heat pipe, oscillating heat pipe (OHP), which consists of an 4 × 18.5 cm evaporator, a 6 × 18.5 cm condenser, and 10 cm length of adiabatic section, has been developed and experimental characterization conducted. Experimental results show that the maximum heat transport capability of the OHP reached 380W with average temperature difference of 49 °C between the evaporator and condenser when the cryogenic OHP was charged with liquid nitrogen at 48% (v/v) and operated in a horizontal direction. The thermal resistance decreased from 0.256 to 0.112 while the heat load increased from 22.5 to 321.8 W. When the OHP was operated at a steady state and an incremental heat load was added to it, the OHP operation changed from a steady state to an unsteady state until a new steady state was reached. This process can be divided into three regions: (I) unsteady state; (II) transient state; and (III) new steady state. In the steady state, the amplitude of temperature change in the evaporator is smaller than that of the condenser while the temperature response keeps the same frequency both in the evaporator and the condenser. The experimental results also showed that the amplitude of temperature difference between the evaporator and the condenser decreased when the heat load increased. PMID:20585410

  8. High efficiency, variable geometry, centrifugal cryogenic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Forsha, M.D.; Nichols, K.E.; Beale, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    A centrifugal cryogenic pump has been developed which has a basic design that is rugged and reliable with variable speed and variable geometry features that achieve high pump efficiency over a wide range of head-flow conditions. The pump uses a sealless design and rolling element bearings to achieve high reliability and the ruggedness to withstand liquid-vapor slugging. The pump can meet a wide range of variable head, off-design flow requirements and maintain design point efficiency by adjusting the pump speed. The pump also has features that allow the impeller and diffuser blade heights to be adjusted. The adjustable height blades were intended to enhance the pump efficiency when it is operating at constant head, off-design flow rates. For small pumps, the adjustable height blades are not recommended. For larger pumps, they could provide off-design efficiency improvements. This pump was developed for supercritical helium service, but the design is well suited to any cryogenic application where high efficiency is required over a wide range of head-flow conditions.

  9. Cryogenic Design of the Katrin Source Cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohmann, S.; Bonn, J.; Bornschein, B.; Gehring, R.; Gil, W.; Kazachenko, O.; Neumann, H.; Noe, M.; Weiss, C.

    2008-03-01

    The KATRIN experiment will measure the mass of electron antineutrinos with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2 by the precise measurement of the tritium ? spectrum. A key component is the Windowless Gaseous Tritium Source (WGTS), which will deliver 1011 ? decay electrons per second. The WGTS consists in its centre of a 10 m long beam tube operated at 30 K, which is surrounded by a series of superconducting solenoids. Molecular tritium is injected through a central injection chamber and pumped at either beam tube end. The tritium density profile must have a stability of 10-3 to limit systematic errors, yielding stringent requirements on the beam tube temperature homogeneity (±30 mK) and stability (±30 mK/h). This shall be achieved with a design, where the thermal radiation heat from the vacuum pumps is almost entirely absorbed by LN2 and He coolers on the pump ports, while the beam tube temperature is stabilized with saturated Ne in a thermosiphon. Starting from a functional description, we explain the cryogenic design of the magnet cryostat featuring 13 separate fluid circuits with 6 cryogenic fluids. Besides magnet cooling, we focus on the beam tube cooling and present the preparations for a full-scale demonstrator test.

  10. Power control electronics for cryogenic instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Biswajit; Gerber, Scott S.; Patterson, Richard L.; Myers, Ira T.

    1995-01-01

    In order to achieve a high-efficiency high-density cryogenic instrumentation system, the power processing electronics should be placed in the cold environment along with the sensors and signal-processing electronics. The typical instrumentation system requires low voltage dc usually obtained from processing line frequency ac power. Switch-mode power conversion topologies such as forward, flyback, push-pull, and half-bridge are used for high-efficiency power processing using pulse-width modulation (PWM) or resonant control. This paper presents several PWM and multiresonant power control circuits, implemented using commercially available CMOS and BiCMOS integrated circuits, and their performance at liquid-nitrogen temperature (77 K) as compared to their room temperature (300 K) performance. The operation of integrated circuits at cryogenic temperatures results in an improved performance in terms of increased speed, reduced latch-up susceptibility, reduced leakage current, and reduced thermal noise. However, the switching noise increased at 77 K compared to 300 K. The power control circuits tested in the laboratory did successfully restart at 77 K.

  11. Cryogenic Insulation System for Soft Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a cryogenic insulation system for operation under soft vacuum is presented in this paper. Conventional insulation materials for cryogenic applications can be divided into three levels of thermal performance, in terms of apparent thermal conductivity [k-value in milliwatt per meter-kelvin (mW/m-K)]. System k-values below 0.1 can be achieved for multilayer insulation operating at a vacuum level below 1 x 10(exp -4) torr. For fiberglass or powder operating below 1 x 10(exp -3) torr, k-values of about 2 are obtained. For foam and other materials at ambient pressure, k-values around 30 are typical. New industry and aerospace applications require a versatile, robust, low-cost thermal insulation with performance in the intermediate range. The target for the new composite insulation system is a k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K (R-30) at a soft vacuum level (from 1 to 10 torr) and boundary temperatures of approximately 77 and 293 kelvin (K). Many combinations of radiation shields, spacers, and composite materials were tested from high vacuum to ambient pressure using cryostat boiloff methods. Significant improvement over conventional systems in the soft vacuum range was demonstrated. The new layered composite insulation system was also shown to provide key benefits for high vacuum applications as well.

  12. Cryogenic Heat Engines Made Using Electrocaloric Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Justin; Ordonez, Carlos A.

    2001-10-01

    It is possible to operate a heat engine using a cold substance, such as liquid nitrogen, as a heat sink and the atmosphere as a heat source.(C. A. Ordonez, American Journal of Physics 64), (1996) 479-481. With sufficient work produced per unit mass of liquid nitrogen, such a cryogenic heat engine may be suitable for powering short range, non-polluting automobiles.(C. A. Ordonez, Energy Conversion and Management 41) (2000) 331-341. Using existing liquid nitrogen plants to produce liquid nitrogen at about 50% of Carnot efficiency, and using renewable energy to power the liquid nitrogen plants, the cost to use liquid nitrogen to power an automobile per mile driven would be a few times the cost of using gasoline in the U.S. The increased ``fuel" cost may be acceptable for short range vehicles provided such vehicles have an acceptable price. We report on thermal-to-electrical energy conversion systems being studied for use as cryogenic heat engines. Specifically, capacitors made using paraelectric materials can provide energy conversion based on the electrocaloric effect. The electrocaloric effect is a change in electric field across a material that results from a change in temperature of the material.

  13. Cryogen free cryostat for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Down, R. B. E.; Manuel, P.; Keeping, J.; Bowden, Z. A.

    2014-12-01

    Most very low temperature (below 1K) experiments at advanced neutron facilities are based on dilution and 3He refrigerator inserts used with Orange cryostats, or similar systems. However recent increases in the cost of liquid helium caused by global helium supply problems, has raised significant concern about the affordability of such cryostats. Here we present the design and test results of a cryogen free top-loading cryostat with a standard KelvinoxVT® dilution refrigerator insert which provides sample environment for neutron scattering experiments in the temperature range 35 mK - 300 K. The dilution refrigerator insert operates in a continuous regime. The cooling time of the insert is similar to one operated in the Orange cryostat. The main performance criteria such as base temperature, cooling power, and circulation rate are compatible with the technical specification of a standard dilution refrigerator. In fact the system offers operating parameters very similar to those of an Orange cryostat, but without the complication of cryogens. The first scientific results obtained in ultra-low temperature neutron scattering experiment with this system are also going to be discussed.

  14. Experimental investigation of cryogenic oscillating heat pipes.

    PubMed

    Jiao, A J; Ma, H B; Critser, J K

    2009-07-01

    A novel cryogenic heat pipe, oscillating heat pipe (OHP), which consists of an 4 × 18.5 cm evaporator, a 6 × 18.5 cm condenser, and 10 cm length of adiabatic section, has been developed and experimental characterization conducted. Experimental results show that the maximum heat transport capability of the OHP reached 380W with average temperature difference of 49 °C between the evaporator and condenser when the cryogenic OHP was charged with liquid nitrogen at 48% (v/v) and operated in a horizontal direction. The thermal resistance decreased from 0.256 to 0.112 while the heat load increased from 22.5 to 321.8 W. When the OHP was operated at a steady state and an incremental heat load was added to it, the OHP operation changed from a steady state to an unsteady state until a new steady state was reached. This process can be divided into three regions: (I) unsteady state; (II) transient state; and (III) new steady state. In the steady state, the amplitude of temperature change in the evaporator is smaller than that of the condenser while the temperature response keeps the same frequency both in the evaporator and the condenser. The experimental results also showed that the amplitude of temperature difference between the evaporator and the condenser decreased when the heat load increased. PMID:20585410

  15. Thermal Design of a Collapsible Cryogenic Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegab, Hisham E.

    2001-01-01

    Strategic planning for human exploration missions to Mars has conclusively identified in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) as an enabling technology. Most mission scenarios include an ISRU plant to produce propellants for ascent from Mars as well as the production of backup reserves of water, oxygen, and process gases. Current mission scenarios call for an ISRU plant to be deployed and then produce and store the required propellants and life support reserves before the arrival of the first human mission. Reliable cryogenic propellant liquefaction and storage technologies for extended period missions are especially critical. This report examines the cryogenic storage problem for liquid oxygen produced by an ISRU plant for a human mission scenario. The analysis examines various hardware configurations including insulation types, packaging techniques, and required cryocoolers to minimize the initial launch mass to low Earth orbit. Results of the analyses indicate that high vacuum insulation systems requiring vacuum pressures below one millitorr will be required to minimize the 'initial launch mass into low Earth orbit even though the temperature on the surface of Mars is much lower than Earth.

  16. Performance of scintillation materials at cryogenic temperatures

    E-print Network

    V. B. Mikhailik; H. Kraus

    2010-01-29

    An increasing number of applications of scintillators at low temperatures, particularly in cryogenic experiments searching for rare events, has motivated the investigation of scintillation properties of materials over a wide temperature range. This paper provides an overview of the latest results on the study of luminescence, absorption and scintillation properties of materials selected for rare event searches so far. These include CaWO4, ZnWO4, CdWO4, MgWO4, CaMoO4, CdMoO4, Bi4Ge3O12, CaF2, MgF2, ZnSe and AL2O3-Ti. We discuss the progress achieved in research and development of these scintillators, both in material preparation and in the understanding of scintillation mechanisms, as well as the underlying physics. To understand the origin of the performance limitation of self-activated scintillators we employed a semi-empirical model of conversion of high energy radiation into light and made appropriate provision for effects of temperature and energy transfer. We conclude that the low-temperature value of the light yield of some modern scintillators, namely CaWO4, CdWO4 and Bi4Ge3O12, is close to the theoretical limit. Finally, we discuss the advantages and limitations of different materials with emphasis on their application as cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors (CPSD) in rare event search experiments.

  17. Test techniques for cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, Pierce L.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the testing techniques developed for transonic cryogenic tunnels are presented. Techniques are emphasized which required special development or were unique because of the opportunities offered by cryogenic operation. Measuring the static aerodynamic coefficients normally used to determine component efficiency is discussed. The first topic is testing of two dimensional airfoils at transonic Mach numbers and flight values of Reynolds number. Three dimensional tests of complete configurations and sidewall mounted wings are also described. Since flight Reynolds numbers are of interest, free transition must be allowed. A discussion is given of wind tunnel and model construction effects on transition location. Time dependent phenomena, fluid mechanics, and measurement techniques are examined. The time dependent, or unsteady, aerodynamic test techniques described include testing for flutter, buffet, and oscillating airfoil characteristics. In describing non-intrusive laser techniques, discussions are given regarding optical access, seeding, forward scatter lasers, two-spot lasers, and laser holography. Methods of detecting transition and separation are reported and a new type of skin friction balance is described.

  18. Cryogenic coolers and refrigerators. (Latest citations from the Patent Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning cryogenic cooling equipment and cryogenic refrigerators. Associated components such as drive motors, insulation, temperature controls, vibration damping, actuators, pumps, and heat exchangers are discussed. Applications of cryogenic refrigeration and materials properties at cryogenic temperatures are considered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Cryogenic coolers and refrigerators. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning cryogenic cooling equipment and cryogenic refrigerators. Associated components such as drive motors, insulation, temperature controls, vibration damping, actuators, pumps, and heat exchangers are discussed. Applications of cryogenic refrigeration and materials properties at cryogenic temperatures are considered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Vols. 37A & 37B - Proceedings of the 1991 Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, June 11-14, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Ronald W. (editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advances in cryogenic engineering discusses heat and mass transfer in helium, heat transfer in cryogenic fluids, thermoacoustic oscillations, and insulation. Attention is given to applications of superconductivity with reference to magnetic stability and coil protection, cryogenic techniques, and refrigeration for electronics and superconducting systems. Topics addressed include compressors, expanders, and pumps for liquid helium, magnetic refrigerators, pulse tube refrigerators, and cryocoolers. Also examined are properties of cryogenic fluids, cryogenic applications in transportion and space science and technology, and cryogenic instrumentation.

  1. Cryogenic Characterization and Testing of Magnetically-Actuated Microshutter Arrays for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, T. T.; Kletetschka, G.; Jah, M. A.; Li, M. J.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Wang, L. L.; Beamesderfer, M. A.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Silverberg, R. F.; Rapchun, D.; Schwinger, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Two-dimensional MEMS microshutter arrays (MSA) have been fabricated at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to enable cryogenic (approximately 35 K) spectrographic astronomy measurements in the near-infrared region. Functioning as a focal plane object selection device, the MSA is a 2-D programmable aperture mask with fine resolution, high efficiency and high contrast. The MSA are close- packed silicon nitride shutters (cell size of 100 x 200 microns) patterned with a torsion flexure to allow opening to 90 degrees. A layer of magnetic material is deposited onto each shutter to permit magnetic actuation. Two electrodes are deposited, one onto each shutter and another onto the support structure side-wall, permitting electrostatic latching and 2-D addressing. New techniques were developed to test MSA under mission-similar conditions (8 K less than or equal to T less than 300K). The magnetic rotisserie has proven to be an excellent tool for rapid characterization of MSA. Tests conducted with the magnetic rotisserie method include accelerated cryogenic lifetesting of unpackaged 128 x 64 MSA and parallel measurement of the magneto-mechanical stiffness of shutters in pathfinder test samples containing multiple MSA designs. Lifetest results indicate a logarithmic failure rate out to approximately 10(exp 6) shutter actuations. These results have increased our understanding of failure mechanisms and provide a means to predict the overall reliability of MSA devices.

  2. Study and design of cryogenic propellant acquisition systems. Volume 2: Supporting experimental program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burge, G. W.; Blackmon, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    Areas of cryogenic fuel systems were identified where critical experimental information was needed either to define a design criteria or to establish the feasibility of a design concept or a critical aspect of a particular design. Such data requirements fell into three broad categories: (1) basic surface tension screen characteristics; (2) screen acquisition device fabrication problems; and (3) screen surface tension device operational failure modes. To explore these problems and to establish design criteria where possible, extensive laboratory or bench test scale experiments were conducted. In general, these proved to be quite successful and, in many instances, the test results were directly used in the system design analyses and development. In some cases, particularly those relating to operational-type problems, areas requiring future research were identified, especially screen heat transfer and vibrational effects.

  3. Improved Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeffrey; Haight, Harlan; Hogue, William; Carpenter, Jay; Siler, Richard; Wright, Ernie; Eng, Ron; Baker, Mark; McCracken, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray & Cryogenic Test Facility (XRCF) has been performing optical wavefront testing and thermal structural deformation testing at subliquid nitrogen cryogenic temperatures since 1999. Recent modifications have been made to the facility in support of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program. The test article envelope and the chamber's refrigeration capacity have both been increased. A new larger helium-cooled enclosure has been added to the existing enclosure increasing both the cross-sectional area and the length. This new enclosure is capable of supporting six JWST Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies. A second helium refrigeration system has been installed essentially doubling the cooling capacity available at the facility. Modifications have also been made to the optical instrumentation area. Improved access is now available for both the installation and operation of optical instrumentation outside the vacuum chamber. Chamber configuration, specifications, and performance data will be presented.

  4. Evacuation apparatus with cryogenic pump and trap assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Mahl, G.

    1980-07-29

    An evacuation apparatus comprising a vessel defining a vacuum chamber therein, vacuumizing means communicating with an opening to said vacuum chamber for selectively drawing a vacuum therein comprising cryogenic pump means disposed closely adjacent to said opening and defined by substantial cryogenically cooled trap surfaces for freezing-out water vapor from air evacuated from said vacuum chamber, said opening being common to said vacuum chamber and to said cryogenic pump means, valve means for selectively opening or closing the opening to said vacuum chamber and movable from a first position within said cryogenic pump means closing said opening to a second position within said cryogenic pump means directly exposing said vacuum chamber to said cryogenic pump means, through said opening, baffle means disposed closely adjacent to the opening to said vacuum chamber for providing substantial open communication to said vacuum chamber and for substantially preventing ingress of contaminants into said vacuum chamber, said baffle means being positioned to provide an optically dense view of said opening when viewed from a downstream side of said baffle means, and a plurality of longitudinally spaced and cryogenically cooled fins mounted in nested relationship within said baffle means and disposed in out-of-contact relationship therewith, said fins being positioned to provide an optically dense view of the downstream side of said baffle means when viewed from said openings. The cryogenic pump is adapted for use in an evacuation apparatus comprising a housing defining an opening to a vacuum chamber, a plurality of metallic plates defining a first chamber therein communicating with said vacuum chamber through said opening and further defining a second chamber at least partially surrounding said first chamber and adapted to be at least partially filled with a cryogenic liqui.d

  5. Cryogenically cooled sensor technology; Proceedings of the Seminar, San Diego, CA, July 29, 30, 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppi, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Topics discussed include spectrometric and radiometric instruments and measurements; detector optimization and optical, mechanical, and electrical techniques; the methodology and applications of closed cycle cryogenic coolers; and the advantages, limitations, thermal considerations, and testing of cryogenic instrumentation. Particular attention is given to aspects of dynamically aligned Fourier transform spectrometer operation at cryogenic temperatures, to the development of a cryogenic infrared acousto-optic tunable spectral filter, and to cryogenic cooling options for forward looking infrared.

  6. Development of an optical sensor for the measurement of density in a multiphase cryogenic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, Valentin

    This research describes the theoretical mode, development and testing of an all optical flow meter capable of making a direct density measurement in a single- and multiphase cryogenic fluid. The sensing method is based on the interaction of light with the physical state of the fluid. The optical sensor only minimally interacts with the fluid, thereby not perturbing the state condition of the flow and avoiding complications of existing volumetric and mass flow devices. The theoretical basis of the device is a Bruggeman model of effective medium theory. This provides a direct density measurement of any number of fluid phase constituents and provides an effective measurement scheme to perform the necessary calculations without undue computation. Materials for the optical sensor were qualified and tested in a relevant liquid nitrogen cryogenic environment. The theorized device was developed through a series of prototype iterations. Various prototype devices were tested and evaluated in full-scale water and full-scale liquid nitrogen flow facilities. Results verified the response predicted by the theoretical model with an approximate 0.8% error in density measurement. Data obtained by the sensor was also used to determine a secondary density measurement, fluid velocity, and bubble sizing and distribution statistics. The sensor functioned successfully in liquid nitrogen submersion and the design has been hydrostatically tested to 204 atmospheres or 3000 pounds per square inch. Propulsion research and development has direct roots in the sensing technology available. For liquid propulsion rocket engines the ability to measure mass flow is currently limited by the environmental constraints and approximations inherent to the existing measurement technology. The optical flow sensor can provide an enabling method for supporting test and evaluation operations as part of a ground based propulsion testing in addition to supporting safe and efficient operation of space flight and launch systems.

  7. Threaded insert for compact cryogenic-capable pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Ross, Timothy O.; Switzer, Vernon A.; Aceves, Salvador M.; Killingsworth, Nicholas J.; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias

    2015-06-16

    An insert for a cryogenic capable pressure vessel for storage of hydrogen or other cryogenic gases at high pressure. The insert provides the interface between a tank and internal and external components of the tank system. The insert can be used with tanks with any or all combinations of cryogenic, high pressure, and highly diffusive fluids. The insert can be threaded into the neck of a tank with an inner liner. The threads withstand the majority of the stress when the fluid inside the tank that is under pressure.

  8. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, B. D.; Caffrey, J.; Hedayat, A.; Stephens, J.; Polsgrove, R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic fluid management technology is critical to the success of future nuclear thermal propulsion powered vehicles and long duration missions. This paper discusses current capabilities in key technologies and their development path. The thermal environment, complicated from the radiation escaping a reactor of a nuclear thermal propulsion system, is examined and analysis presented. The technology development path required for maintaining cryogenic propellants in this environment is reviewed. This paper is intended to encourage and bring attention to the cryogenic fluid management technologies needed to enable nuclear thermal propulsion powered deep space missions.

  9. Cryogenic grinding: an efficient method for recycling scrap rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Cryogenic grinding represents an opportunity for expanding recycling capabilities to a broad range of compounds. Many materials that can be reduced to a powder by conventional coarse grinding can be reduced more efficiently by using a super-cold agent such as liquid nitrogen at -320/sup 0/F to embrittle plastic or rubber polymers before grinding. In addition, cryogenic grinding makes possible the size reduction of many materials that cannot be ground by conventional ambient grinding methods. Some experiences of cryogenic grinding in practice at United Tire and Rubber company, Limited, headquartered in Rexdale, Ontario, are noted. A schematic of such a system is shown.

  10. Lightweight cryogenic-compatible pressure vessels for vehicular fuel storage

    DOEpatents

    Aceves, Salvador; Berry, Gene; Weisberg, Andrew H.

    2004-03-23

    A lightweight, cryogenic-compatible pressure vessel for flexibly storing cryogenic liquid fuels or compressed gas fuels at cryogenic or ambient temperatures. The pressure vessel has an inner pressure container enclosing a fuel storage volume, an outer container surrounding the inner pressure container to form an evacuated space therebetween, and a thermal insulator surrounding the inner pressure container in the evacuated space to inhibit heat transfer. Additionally, vacuum loss from fuel permeation is substantially inhibited in the evacuated space by, for example, lining the container liner with a layer of fuel-impermeable material, capturing the permeated fuel in the evacuated space, or purging the permeated fuel from the evacuated space.

  11. Cost effective use of liquid nitrogen in cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, Glen E.; Lombard, David S.; Martindale, David L.; Dunn, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    A method of reliquefying from 12 to 19% of the nitrogen exhaust gas from a cryogenic wind tunnel has been developed. Technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of the system depends on performance of an innovative positive displacement expander which requires scale model testing to confirm design studies. The existing cryogenic system at the 0.3-m transonic cryogenic tunnel has been surveyed and extensive upgrades proposed. Upgrades are generally cost effective and may be implemented immediately since they are based on established technology.

  12. Status of the Cryogenic System Commissioning at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    F. Casagrande; I.E. Campisi; P.A. Gurd; D.R. Hatfield; M.P. Howell; D. Stout; W.H. Strong; D. Arenius; J.C. Creel; K. Dixon; V. Ganni; P.K. Knudsen

    2005-05-16

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 Watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning strategy and status will be presented.

  13. Spacecraft-borne long life cryogenic refrigeration: Status and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    The status of cryogenic refrigerator development intended for, or possibly applicable to, long life spacecraft-borne application is reviewed. Based on these efforts, the general development trends are identified. Using currently projected technology needs, the various trends are compared and evaluated. The linear drive, non-contacting bearing Stirling cycle refrigerator concept appears to be the best current approach that will meet the technology projection requirements for spacecraft-borne cryogenic refrigerators. However, a multiply redundant set of lightweight, moderate life, moderate reliability Stirling cycle cryogenic refrigerators using high-speed linear drive and sliding contact bearings may possibly suffice.

  14. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  15. Cryogenic system operating experience review for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a review of cryogenic system operating experiences, from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, space research, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of cryogenic component failure rates and accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with cryogenic systems are discussed, including ozone formation, effects of spills, and modeling spill behavior. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design.

  16. Comparison of cryogenic W band low noise amplifier based on different III-V HEMT foundry process and technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenziano, L.; Zannoni, M.; Mariotti, S.; Cremonini, A.; De Rosa, A.; Banfi, S.; Baó, A.; Gervasi, M.; Limiti, E.; Passerini, A.; Schiavone, F.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a development activity for cryogenic Low Noise Amplifiers based on HEMT technology for ground based and space-borne application. We have developed and realized two LNA design in W band, based on m-HEMT technology. MMIC chips have been manufactured by European laboratories and companies and assembled in test modules by our team. We compare performances with other technologies and manufacturers. LNA RF properties (noise figures, S-parameters) have been measured at room and cryogenic temperature and test results are reported in this paper. Performance are compared with those of state-of-the-art devices, as available in the literature. Strengths and improvements of this project are also discussed.

  17. Daydreaming Devices

    E-print Network

    Da Ponte, Ana Sofia Lopes

    2008-01-01

    Daydreaming Devices is a project on aspects of daydream and the design of convertible furniture within the context of art. This thesis addresses the concepts and the design of two daydreaming devices developed during my ...

  18. Quantum information experiments with a micro-fabricated, cryogenic, surface-electrode ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. C.; Brown, K. R.; Ospelkaus, C.; Colombe, Y.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    Although the basic components of a quantum information processor using trapped ions have been demonstrated, scaling to large numbers of qubits and operations so that algorithms and simulations of practical importance can be implemented remains a major challenge. This is technically challenging because it requires significant improvements in the precision with which quantum states of ions are prepared, manipulated and measured. Solutions are multi-disciplinary - involving micro-fabrication, cryogenics, integrated photonic devices, as wells as materials and surface science. Here we report progress from experiments that address a range of these issues. We use a micro-fabricated, cryogenic, surface-electrode ion trap, with two closely-spaced independently controlled potential wells. In the first experiment with this new apparatus, we implement a scheme for coupling two ions trapped in separate wells, and demonstrate tunable energy exchange at approximately the single quantum level. A second experiment investigates errors in single qubit gates (rotations) with the use of randomized bench-marking. Although the basic components of a quantum information processor using trapped ions have been demonstrated, scaling to large numbers of qubits and operations so that algorithms and simulations of practical importance can be implemented remains a major challenge. This is technically challenging because it requires significant improvements in the precision with which quantum states of ions are prepared, manipulated and measured. Solutions are multi-disciplinary - involving micro-fabrication, cryogenics, integrated photonic devices, as wells as materials and surface science. Here we report progress from experiments that address a range of these issues. We use a micro-fabricated, cryogenic, surface-electrode ion trap, with two closely-spaced independently controlled potential wells. In the first experiment with this new apparatus, we implement a scheme for coupling two ions trapped in separate wells, and demonstrate tunable energy exchange at approximately the single quantum level. A second experiment investigates errors in single qubit gates (rotations) with the use of randomized bench-marking. Supported by IARPA, DARPA, NSA, ONR and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  19. Silicon single-crystal cryogenic optical resonator.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Eugen; Chen, Qun-Feng; Ernsting, Ingo; Luckmann, Heiko; Rosowski, Ulrich; Nevsky, Alexander; Schiller, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    We report on the demonstration and characterization of a silicon optical resonator for laser frequency stabilization, operating in the deep cryogenic regime at temperatures as low as 1.5 K. Robust operation was achieved, with absolute frequency drift less than 20 Hz over 1 h. This stability allowed sensitive measurements of the resonator thermal expansion coefficient (?). We found that ?=4.6×10(-13)??K(-1) at 1.6 K. At 16.8 K ? vanishes, with a derivative equal to -6×10(-10)??K(-2). The temperature of the resonator was stabilized to a level below 10 ?K for averaging times longer than 20 s. The sensitivity of the resonator frequency to a variation of the laser power was also studied. The corresponding sensitivities and the expected Brownian noise indicate that this system should enable frequency stabilization of lasers at the low-10(-17) level. PMID:24876023

  20. Pressure Oscillation in RHIC Cryogenic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, L. X.; Montag, C.; Tallerico, T.; Hirzel, W.; Nicoletti, A.

    2004-06-01

    Horizontal beam vibration around 10 Hz in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have been identified and the possible sources to cause this vibration have been investigated. To determine the helium pressure oscillations as a possible primary vibration source, helium pressure measurements were carried out in the five cryogenic transfer lines at two valve boxes and six lead ports at one triplet cryostat for both magnet rings. Additionally, cold masses inside one triplet cryostat have also been equipped with accelerometers to further investigate the phenomenon. This paper reports the helium pressure oscillations, including one at 10 Hz with peak-to-peak pressure of 7 kPa, which is close to the frequency of beam vibration.