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Sample records for crystal diamond devices

  1. Diamond Electronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Isberg, J.

    2010-11-01

    For high-power and high-voltage applications, silicon is by far the dominant semiconductor material. However, silicon has many limitations, e.g. a relatively low thermal conductivity, electric breakdown occurs at relatively low fields and the bandgap is 1.1 eV which effectively limits operation to temperatures below 175 deg.n C. Wide-bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond offer the potential to overcome both the temperature and power handling limitations of silicon. Diamond is the most extreme in this class of materials. By the fundamental material properties alone, diamond offers the largest benefits as a semiconductor material for power electronic applications. On the other hand, diamond has a problem with a large carrier activation energy of available dopants which necessitates specialised device concepts to allow room temperature (RT) operation. In addition, the role of common defects on the charge transport properties of diamond is poorly understood. Notwithstanding this, many proof-of-principle two-terminal and three-terminal devices have been made and tested. Two-terminal electronic diamond devices described in the literature include: p-n diodes, p-i-n diodes, various types of radiation detectors, Schottky diodes and photoconductive or electron beam triggered switches. Three terminal devices include e.g. MISFETs and JFETs. However, the development of diamond devices poses great challenges for the future. A particularly interesting way to overcome the doping problem, for which there has been some recent progress, is to make so-called delta doped (or pulse-doped) devices. Such devices utilise very thin ({approx}1 nm) doped layers in order to achieve high RT activation.

  2. Diamond Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isberg, J.

    2010-11-01

    For high-power and high-voltage applications, silicon is by far the dominant semiconductor material. However, silicon has many limitations, e.g. a relatively low thermal conductivity, electric breakdown occurs at relatively low fields and the bandgap is 1.1 eV which effectively limits operation to temperatures below 175° C. Wide-bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond offer the potential to overcome both the temperature and power handling limitations of silicon. Diamond is the most extreme in this class of materials. By the fundamental material properties alone, diamond offers the largest benefits as a semiconductor material for power electronic applications. On the other hand, diamond has a problem with a large carrier activation energy of available dopants which necessitates specialised device concepts to allow room temperature (RT) operation. In addition, the role of common defects on the charge transport properties of diamond is poorly understood. Notwithstanding this, many proof-of-principle two-terminal and three-terminal devices have been made and tested. Two-terminal electronic diamond devices described in the literature include: p-n diodes, p-i-n diodes, various types of radiation detectors, Schottky diodes and photoconductive or electron beam triggered switches. Three terminal devices include e.g. MISFETs and JFETs. However, the development of diamond devices poses great challenges for the future. A particularly interesting way to overcome the doping problem, for which there has been some recent progress, is to make so-called delta doped (or pulse-doped) devices. Such devices utilise very thin (˜1 nm) doped layers in order to achieve high RT activation.

  3. Diamond turning of optical crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T.T.; Syn, C.K.; Fuchs, B.A.; Velsko, S.P.

    1990-03-01

    Diamond turning (DT) has proven to be a cost effective optical fabrication technique for both aspherical and spherical/flat figures when precise geometrical tolerances are important. We are interested in the DT of crystals for several reasons. DT has been very effective to insure requisite accurate geometrical orientation of optical surfaces to crystalline axes for frequency conversion applications. Also, DT can achieve figure up to the edge of the crystal. Another key DT benefit is enhanced laser damage threshold, which we feel in part is due to the freedom of the surface from polishing impurities. Several important issues for diamond turning optical crystals are the tool wear, associated surface finish, and laser damage properties. We have found that careful selection and control of diamond turning parameters can yield production techniques for crystals previously considered incompatible with diamond turning. 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Diamond based photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Tomljenovic-Hanic, S; Steel, M J; de Sterke, C Martijn; Salzman, J

    2006-04-17

    Diamond based technologies offer a material platform for the implementation of qubits for quantum computing. The photonic crystal architecture provides the route for a scalable and controllable implementation of high quality factor (Q) nanocavities, operating in the strong coupling regime for cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we compute the photonic band structures and quality factors of microcavities in photonic crystal slabs in diamond, and compare the results with those of the more commonly-used silicon platform. We find that, in spite of the lower index contrast, diamond based photonic crystal microcavities can exhibit quality factors of Q=3.0x10(4), sufficient for proof of principle demonstrations in the quantum regime. PMID:19516502

  5. A procedure for diamond turning KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R.C.; Thompson, S.L.

    1995-07-07

    A procedure and the equipment necessary for single-point diamond flycutting (loosely referred to as diamond turning) potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are described. It is based on current KDP diamond turning activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), drawing upon knowledge from the Nova crystal finishing development during the 1980`s and incorporating refinements from our efforts during 1995. In addition to describing a step-by-step process for diamond turning KDP, specific discussions are included on the necessary diamond tool geometry and edge sharpness, cutting fluid, and crystal preparation, handling, cleaning, and inspection. The authors presuppose that the reader is already familiar with diamond turning practices.

  6. Ultratough single crystal boron-doped diamond

    DOEpatents

    Hemley, Russell J [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Mao, Ho-Kwang [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Yan, Chih-Shiue [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Liang, Qi [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC

    2015-05-05

    The invention relates to a single crystal boron doped CVD diamond that has a toughness of at least about 22 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a method of manufacturing single crystal boron doped CVD diamond. The growth rate of the diamond can be from about 20-100 .mu.m/h.

  7. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  8. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  9. Dynamic actuation of single-crystal diamond nanobeams

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Young-Ik; Burek, Michael J.; Lončar, Marko; Kara, Vural; Kearns, Ryan

    2015-12-14

    We show the dielectrophoretic actuation of single-crystal diamond nanomechanical devices. Gradient radio-frequency electromagnetic forces are used to achieve actuation of both cantilever and doubly clamped beam structures, with operation frequencies ranging from a few MHz to ∼50 MHz. Frequency tuning and parametric actuation are also studied.

  10. Diamond Quantum Devices in Biology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuzhou; Jelezko, Fedor; Plenio, Martin B; Weil, Tanja

    2016-06-01

    The currently available techniques for molecular imaging capable of reaching atomic resolution are limited to low temperatures, vacuum conditions, or large amounts of sample. Quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond offer great potential to achieve single-molecule detection with atomic resolution under ambient conditions. Diamond nanoparticles could also be prepared with implanted NV centers, thereby generating unique nanosensors that are able to traffic into living biological systems. Therefore, this technique might provide unprecedented access and insight into the structure and function of individual biomolecules under physiological conditions as well as observation of biological processes down to the quantum level with atomic resolution. The theory of diamond quantum sensors and the current developments from their preparation to sensing techniques have been critically discussed in this Minireview. PMID:27120692

  11. Characterization of single-crystal diamond grown from the vapor phase on substrates of natural diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Altukhov, A. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Dukhnovsky, M. P.; Zemlyakov, V. E.; Ziablyuk, K. N.; Mitenkin, A. V.; Muchnikov, A. B. Radishev, D. B.; Ratnikova, A. K.; Fedorov, Yu. Yu.

    2011-03-15

    The results of studies of single-crystal diamond layers with orientation (100) grown on substrates of IIa-type natural diamond by chemical-vapor deposition and of semiconductor diamond obtained subsequently by doping by implantation of boron ions are reported. Optimal conditions of postimplantation annealing of diamond that provide the hole mobility of 1150 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} (the highest mobility obtained so far for semiconductor diamond after ion implantation) are given.

  12. The failure strengths of perfect diamond crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, J.; Ruoff, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Finite elasticity analysis is extended to the 110 direction, where off axis strain symmetry is not present, and the third order elastic data are obtained for diamond. The compressive yield strengths of perfect diamond crystals loaded in the 100, 110, and 111 directions are predicted to be 2.2, 5.6, and 2.8 Mbars, respectively, while the corresponding tensile fracture strengths are 1.0, 0.5, and 0.5 Mbars. From these results and from Hertz theory it is predicted that ring fracture of spherically tipped diamonds pressed against a flat will occur at pressures of 1.8-1.9 Mbars, substantially below the yield pressure (above 3 Mbars). Modification of the tip shape leads to a predicted increase in the pressure at which fracture occurs.

  13. Effect of crystalline quality of diamond film to the propagation loss of surface acoustic wave devices.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Satoshi; Shikata, Shinichi; Uemura, Tomoki; Nakahata, Hideaki; Harima, Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    Diamond films with various crystal qualities were grown by chemical vapor deposition on silicon wafers. Their crystallinity was characterized by Raman scattering and electron backscattering diffraction. By fabricating a device structure for surface acoustic wave (SAW) using these diamond films, the propagation loss was measured at 1.8 GHz and compared with the crystallinity. It was found that the propagation loss was lowered in relatively degraded films having small crystallites, a narrow distribution in the diamond crystallite size, and preferential grain orientation. This experiment clarifies diamond film characteristics required for high-frequency applications in SAW filters. PMID:16382634

  14. Phononic crystal devices

    DOEpatents

    El-Kady, Ihab F.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2012-01-10

    Phononic crystals that have the ability to modify and control the thermal black body phonon distribution and the phonon component of heat transport in a solid. In particular, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity can be modified by altering the phonon density of states in a phononic crystal. The present invention is directed to phononic crystal devices and materials such as radio frequency (RF) tags powered from ambient heat, dielectrics with extremely low thermal conductivity, thermoelectric materials with a higher ratio of electrical-to-thermal conductivity, materials with phononically engineered heat capacity, phononic crystal waveguides that enable accelerated cooling, and a variety of low temperature application devices.

  15. Ultratough CVD single crystal diamond and three dimensional growth thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hemley, Russell J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Yan, Chih-shiue

    2009-09-29

    The invention relates to a single-crystal diamond grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition that has a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention also relates to a method of producing a single-crystal diamond with a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a process for producing a single crystal CVD diamond in three dimensions on a single crystal diamond substrate.

  16. Characterization of interfaces in mosaic CVD diamond crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchnikov, Anatoly B.; Radishev, Dmitry B.; Vikharev, Anatoly L.; Gorbachev, Alexei M.; Mitenkin, Anatoly V.; Drozdov, Mikhail N.; Drozdov, Yuri N.; Yunin, Pavel A.

    2016-05-01

    Detailed description of a way to accrete diamond single crystals in one plate using the CVD method is presented. It was found that each region of the mosaic CVD diamond crystal grown over a certain seed substrate "inherits" the crystallographic orientation of its substrate. No correlation was found between the value of misorientation of the accreted crystals and entrance of hydrogen to the boundary. It is shown that successful accretion of single crystal diamond plates in a single mosaic crystal occurs even in the case of great misorientation of crystals. The mechanical stresses appear during the fabrication of the mosaic CVD diamond crystal. Stresses accumulate during accretion of the regions, which grow over substrates with different orientations, in a common structure.

  17. Registration of 3-D holograms of diamond crystals (Abstract Only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, S. N.; Smirnova, S. N.

    1991-02-01

    Registration of 3D ho1orarns broadens the possibility of using single-crystal tool for imagining and investigating inner inhomogeneities and dynamic stresses in top area of gem diamond, study of which by other techniques,e.g. polarization optics, is difficult or impossible. The difficulty is that the diamond with significant refractive index of 2.42 has comparatively small angle of total internal reflection of 24°50. As a result, with random illumination of the tops of octahedron diamond crystals, both smooth- faceted and with polycentric facets, illuminating light is successively reflected from different farets and absorbed in the crystal or comes out of it in a spot and direction that are difficult to calculate. Optimal schemes of illuminating crystals for recording 3D holograms of smooth faceted octahedron diamonds are given. Analysis of illumination of the crystal with polycentric facets shows that correction of light in the diamond is determined by directivity diagram the width of which depends in inhomogeneity size of the diamond. 3D holograms of diamonds with different reflectivity were produced. For the first time the possibility is shown for registration of holograms for studying stresses in diamond top using single-crystal tool.

  18. Diamond device architectures for UV laser monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatori, S.; Girolami, M.; Oliva, P.; Conte, G.; Bolshakov, A.; Ralchenko, V.; Konov, V.

    2016-08-01

    The paper reviews the status of diamond detectors for UV laser monitoring and imaging. Single pixel detectors, position sensitive architectures, optically activated switches and sensor arrays for beam positioning and imaging are analyzed. The performances of natural diamond and synthetic diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition are compared to evaluate the suitability of such an outstanding material for the described applications.

  19. Thermal diffusion boron doping of single-crystal natural diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung-Hun; Wu, Henry; Mikael, Solomon; Mi, Hongyi; Blanchard, James P.; Venkataramanan, Giri; Zhou, Weidong; Gong, Shaoqin; Morgan, Dane; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-05-01

    With the best overall electronic and thermal properties, single crystal diamond (SCD) is the extreme wide bandgap material that is expected to revolutionize power electronics and radio-frequency electronics in the future. However, turning SCD into useful semiconductors requires overcoming doping challenges, as conventional substitutional doping techniques, such as thermal diffusion and ion implantation, are not easily applicable to SCD. Here we report a simple and easily accessible doping strategy demonstrating that electrically activated, substitutional doping in SCD without inducing graphitization transition or lattice damage can be readily realized with thermal diffusion at relatively low temperatures by using heavily doped Si nanomembranes as a unique dopant carrying medium. Atomistic simulations elucidate a vacancy exchange boron doping mechanism that occurs at the bonded interface between Si and diamond. We further demonstrate selectively doped high voltage diodes and half-wave rectifier circuits using such doped SCD. Our new doping strategy has established a reachable path toward using SCDs for future high voltage power conversion systems and for other novel diamond based electronic devices. The novel doping mechanism may find its critical use in other wide bandgap semiconductors.

  20. Enhancing the mechanical properties of single-crystal CVD diamond.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qi; Yan, Chih-Shiue; Meng, Yufei; Lai, Joseph; Krasnicki, Szczesny; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2009-09-01

    Approaches for enhancing the strength and toughness of single-crystal diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at high growth rates are described. CVD processes used to grow single-crystal diamond in high density plasmas were modified to incorporate boron and nitrogen. Semi-quantitative studies of mechanical properties were carried out using Vickers indentation techniques. The introduction of boron in single-crystal CVD diamond can significantly enhance the fracture toughness of this material without sacrificing its high hardness (∼78 GPa). Growth conditions were varied to investigate its effect on boron incorporation and optical properties by means of photoluminescence, infrared, and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. Boron can be readily incorporated into single-crystal diamond by the methods used, but with nitrogen addition, the incorporation of boron was hindered. The spectroscopic measurements indicate that nitrogen and boron coexist in the diamond structure, which helps explain the origin of the enhanced fracture toughness of this material. Further, low pressure/high temperature annealing can enhance the intrinsic hardness of single-crystal CVD diamond by a factor of two without appreciable loss in fracture toughness. This doping and post-growth treatment of diamond may lead to new technological applications that require enhanced mechanical properties of diamond. PMID:21832321

  1. Effects of initial crystal size of diamond powder on surface residual stress and morphology in polycrystalline diamond (PCD) layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, HongSheng; Jia, XiaoPeng; Xu, Yue; Wan, LianRu; Jie, KaiKai; Ma, HongAn

    2011-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond compacts (PDC) were synthesized using diamond powder of average crystal size 3-20 μm by the Ni70Mn25Co5 alloy infiltration technique at high temperature and high pressure (HPHT). The surface residual stress of polycrystalline diamond (PCD) layer was measured using micro-Raman spectroscopy with hydrostatic stress model and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Measurements of the stress levels of PCDs show that the residual compressive stresses range from 0.12 to 0.22 GPa, which increase with the crystal size of diamond. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the morphology of initial diamond grains and PCD cross-section. The results indicate that PCD has a dense and interlaced microstructure with diamond-diamond (D-D) direct bonding. And the smaller the crystal size of diamond, the better the growth of diamond direct bonding and the smaller the binder metal between diamond boundaries will be.

  2. First result on biased CMOS MAPs-on-diamond devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanxheri, K.; Citroni, M.; Fanetti, S.; Lagomarsino, S.; Morozzi, A.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Sciortino, S.; Servoli, L.

    2015-10-01

    Recently a new type of device, the MAPS-on-diamond, obtained bonding a thinned to 25 μm CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor to a standard 500 μm pCVD diamond substrate, has been proposed and fabricated, allowing a highly segmented readout (10×10 μm pixel size) of the signal produced in the diamond substrate. The bonding between the two materials has been obtained using a new laser technique to deliver the needed energy at the interface. A biasing scheme has been adopted to polarize the diamond substrate to allow the charge transport inside the diamond without disrupting the functionalities of the CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor. The main concept of this class of devices is the capability of the charges generated in the diamond by ionizing radiation to cross the silicon-diamond interface and to be collected by the MAPS photodiodes. In this work we demonstrate that such passage occurs and measure its overall efficiency. This study has been carried out first calibrating the CMOS MAPS with monochromatic X-rays, and then testing the device with charged particles (electrons) either with and without biasing the diamond substrate, to compare the amount of signal collected.

  3. Nanofluidics of Single-Crystal Diamond Nanomechanical Resonators.

    PubMed

    Kara, V; Sohn, Y-I; Atikian, H; Yakhot, V; Lončar, M; Ekinci, K L

    2015-12-01

    Single-crystal diamond nanomechanical resonators are being developed for countless applications. A number of these applications require that the resonator be operated in a fluid, that is, a gas or a liquid. Here, we investigate the fluid dynamics of single-crystal diamond nanomechanical resonators in the form of nanocantilevers. First, we measure the pressure-dependent dissipation of diamond nanocantilevers with different linear dimensions and frequencies in three gases, He, N2, and Ar. We observe that a subtle interplay between the length scale and the frequency governs the scaling of the fluidic dissipation. Second, we obtain a comparison of the surface accommodation of different gases on the diamond surface by analyzing the dissipation in the molecular flow regime. Finally, we measure the thermal fluctuations of the nanocantilevers in water and compare the observed dissipation and frequency shifts with theoretical predictions. These findings set the stage for developing diamond nanomechanical resonators operable in fluids. PMID:26509332

  4. Metal films on the surfaces and within diamond crystals from Arkhangelskaya and Yakutian diamond provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, A. B.; Kriulina, G. Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Representative samples of diamonds from five kimberlite pipes (Lomonosovskaya, Archangel'sk, Snegurochka, XXIII Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU), and Internationalnaya) of the Arkhangelskaya and Yakutian diamond provinces in Russia have been studied. Thirty-three varieties of metal films have been identified as syngenetic associated minerals. The films consist of 15 chemical elements that occur in the form of native metals and their natural alloys. Remnants of metal films were detected within diamond crystals. The metal films coating diamonds are a worldwide phenomenon. To date, these films have been described from Europe, Asia, South America, and Africa. Native metals, their alloys, and intermetallides are actual companion minerals of diamond.

  5. Free-standing nanomechanical and nanophotonic structures in single-crystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, Michael John

    Realizing complex three-dimensional structures in a range of material systems is critical to a variety of emerging nanotechnologies. This is particularly true of nanomechanical and nanophotonic systems, both relying on free-standing small-scale components. In the case of nanomechanics, necessary mechanical degrees of freedom require physically isolated structures, such as suspended beams, cantilevers, and membranes. For nanophotonics, elements like waveguides and photonic crystal cavities rely on light confinement provided by total internal reflection or distributed Bragg reflection, both of which require refractive index contrast between the device and surrounding medium (often air). Such suspended nanostructures are typically fabricated in a heterolayer structure, comprising of device (top) and sacrificial (middle) layers supported by a substrate (bottom), using standard surface nanomachining techniques. A selective, isotropic etch is then used to remove the sacrificial layer, resulting in free-standing devices. While high-quality, crystalline, thin film heterolayer structures are readily available for silicon (as silicon-on-insulator (SOI)) or III-V semiconductors (i.e. GaAs/AlGaAs), there remains an extensive list of materials with attractive electro-optic, piezoelectric, quantum optical, and other properties for which high quality single-crystal thin film heterolayer structures are not available. These include complex metal oxides like lithium niobate (LiNbO3), silicon-based compounds such as silicon carbide (SiC), III-V nitrides including gallium nitride (GaN), and inert single-crystals such as diamond. Diamond is especially attractive for a variety of nanoscale technologies due to its exceptional physical and chemical properties, including high mechanical hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity. Optically, it is transparent over a wide wavelength range (from 220 nm to the far infrared), has a high refractive index (n ~ 2.4), and is host to a vast

  6. Novel electron devices based on the unique properties of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, M. N.

    An account is given of the unique design principles that apply to such electron devices as metal-insulator-metal photodetectors, cascade and virtual-contact FETs, and high-electron-mobility transistors. It is noted that while diamond is a high-power, high-temperature, or extremely HF amplifier, it cannot accomplish all three functions simultaneously. Attention is given to the significance of diamond's heat-dissipation capabilities.

  7. Evolution of Diamond Crystal Shape with Boron Concentration during CVD Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issaoui, R.; Silva, F.; Tallaire, A.; Mille, V.; Achard, J.; Gicquel, A.

    2010-11-01

    Homoepitaxially grown boron-doped diamond films have been extensively studied for many years, in particular for the development of power-electronic devices. Coplanar structures have already been fabricated and characterized but, in such structures, the current is limited by a high series resistance. A vertical component could allow overcoming this issue but this requires that thick heavily boron-doped diamond crystals with a large usable top surface are grown. In this paper we used a 3D geometrical model in order to study the evolution of the crystal shape of thick diamond crystals as a function of boron doping. The growth parameters used in the model were determined by measuring the growth rate in different crystalline orientations. It was found that the addition of boron to the gas phase promotes the appearance of large {110} and {113} crystalline faces. {110} faces have a detrimental effect on the crystal since they can generate large stress and promote crystal break-up. The results predicted by the model are consistent with that obtained for a thick boron-doped diamond single crystal.

  8. Free-standing nanomechanical and nanophotonic structures in single-crystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, Michael John

    Realizing complex three-dimensional structures in a range of material systems is critical to a variety of emerging nanotechnologies. This is particularly true of nanomechanical and nanophotonic systems, both relying on free-standing small-scale components. In the case of nanomechanics, necessary mechanical degrees of freedom require physically isolated structures, such as suspended beams, cantilevers, and membranes. For nanophotonics, elements like waveguides and photonic crystal cavities rely on light confinement provided by total internal reflection or distributed Bragg reflection, both of which require refractive index contrast between the device and surrounding medium (often air). Such suspended nanostructures are typically fabricated in a heterolayer structure, comprising of device (top) and sacrificial (middle) layers supported by a substrate (bottom), using standard surface nanomachining techniques. A selective, isotropic etch is then used to remove the sacrificial layer, resulting in free-standing devices. While high-quality, crystalline, thin film heterolayer structures are readily available for silicon (as silicon-on-insulator (SOI)) or III-V semiconductors (i.e. GaAs/AlGaAs), there remains an extensive list of materials with attractive electro-optic, piezoelectric, quantum optical, and other properties for which high quality single-crystal thin film heterolayer structures are not available. These include complex metal oxides like lithium niobate (LiNbO3), silicon-based compounds such as silicon carbide (SiC), III-V nitrides including gallium nitride (GaN), and inert single-crystals such as diamond. Diamond is especially attractive for a variety of nanoscale technologies due to its exceptional physical and chemical properties, including high mechanical hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity. Optically, it is transparent over a wide wavelength range (from 220 nm to the far infrared), has a high refractive index (n ~ 2.4), and is host to a vast

  9. Mechanism for diamond nucleation and growth on single crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, T. P.; Xiong, Fulin; Chang, R. P. H.; White, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of diamond crystals on single-crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon ions is studied. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition is used for diamond growth. The single-crystal copper substrates were implanted either at room or elevated temperature with carbon ions prior to diamond nucleation. This procedure leads to the formation of a graphite film on the copper surface which greatly enhances diamond crystallite nucleation. A simple lattice model is constructed for diamond growth on graphite as 111 line (diamond) parallel to 0001 line (graphite) and 110 line (diamond) parallel to 1 1 -2 0 (graphite).

  10. Single crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond for demanding optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, J. M.; Brandon, J. R.; Dhillon, H. K.; Friel, I.; Geoghegan, S. L.; Mollart, T. P.; Santini, P.; Scarsbrook, G. A.; Twitchen, D. J.; Whitehead, A. J.; Wilman, J. J.; de Wit, H.

    2011-06-01

    Diamond's extremely wide transparency, combined with its other exceptional properties including hardness, strength and thermal conductivity make it a desirable material for optical windows. Polycrystalline diamond grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) has become the preferred window material for high power CO2 laser systems since its development in the 1990s. The range and availability of diamond materials is expanding, and in recent years has been extended to include CVD single crystal diamond. This paper reviews the quality of these materials, looking at optical scatter and absorption around 1 and 10 microns, along with their thermal and mechanical properties. We also discuss selection of appropriate grades and how they may best be integrated into demanding optical applications.

  11. Single-crystal diamond nanomechanical resonators with quality factors exceeding one million.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Boss, J M; Moores, B A; Degen, C L

    2014-01-01

    Diamond has gained a reputation as a uniquely versatile material, yet one that is intricate to grow and process. Resonating nanostructures made of single-crystal diamond are expected to possess excellent mechanical properties, including high-quality factors and low dissipation. Here we demonstrate batch fabrication and mechanical measurements of single-crystal diamond cantilevers with thickness down to 85 nm, thickness uniformity better than 20 nm and lateral dimensions up to 240 μm. Quality factors exceeding one million are found at room temperature, surpassing those of state-of-the-art single-crystal silicon cantilevers of similar dimensions by roughly an order of magnitude. The corresponding thermal force noise for the best cantilevers is ~5·10(-19) N Hz(-1/2) at millikelvin temperatures. Single-crystal diamond could thus directly improve existing force and mass sensors by a simple substitution of resonator material. Presented methods are easily adapted for fabrication of nanoelectromechanical systems, optomechanical resonators or nanophotonic devices that may lead to new applications in classical and quantum science. PMID:24710311

  12. Dichroism and birefringence of natural violet diamond crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinova, A. F. Titkov, S. V.; Imangazieva, K. B.; Evdishchenko, E. A.; Sergeev, A. M.; Zudin, N. G.; Orekhova, V. P.

    2006-05-15

    Investigation of the optical properties of natural violet diamonds from the Yakutian kimberlites is performed. A red shift of the absorption edge is revealed in the absorption spectra of these crystals. This shift is indicative of the presence of a high concentration of nitrogen in the diamonds studied. Along with the strong band at 0.550 {mu}m, weaker bands at 0.390, 0.456 and 0.496 {mu}m are revealed. It is shown that violet diamond crystals have birefringence and dichroism of about 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -6}, respectively. When a light beam propagates perpendicularly to colored lamellas, the dichroism is much larger and the birefringence is smaller than in the case where the beam direction is parallel to lamellas.

  13. Radiation-induced diamond crystallization: Origin of carbonados and its implications on meteorite nano-diamonds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ozima, M.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1997-01-01

    Ten carbonados from Central Africa were studied for U-Th-Pb systematics. To extract U, Th, and Pb from the samples, we developed a cold combustion technique wherein diamond was burnt in liquid oxygen. The technique gave low blanks; 25-50 pg for Pb, 3 pg for U, and 5 pg for Th. After very thorough acid treatments of the carbonados with hot HNO3, HF, and HCl over one week, most of U, Th, and Pb were removed from the samples. Lead in the acid-leached diamonds was highly radiogenic (206Pb/204Pb up to 470). However, the amounts of U and Th in the acid-leached diamonds are too low to account for the radiogenic Pb even if we assume 4.5 Ga for the age of the diamonds. Therefore, we conclude that the radiogenic Pb was implanted into the diamonds from surroundings by means of recoil energy of radioactive decays of U and Th. From the radiogenic lead isotopic composition, we estimate a minimum age of 2.6 Ga and a maximum age of 3.8 Ga for the formation of the carbonados. The above findings of the implantation of recoiled radiogenic Pb into carbonados is consistent with the process of radiation-induced crystallization which was proposed for carbonado by Kaminsky (1987). We show from some theoretical considerations that when highly energetic particles, such as those emitted from radioactive decay of U and Th, interact with carbonaceous materials, they give rise to cascades of atomic disturbance (over regions of about a few nanometer), and the disturbed atoms are likely to recrystallize to form micro-diamonds because of increasing surface energy due to small size. The radiation-induced diamond formation mechanism may be relevant to the origin of nano-diamonds in primitive meteorites. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  14. The boron doping of single crystal diamond for high power diode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicley, Shannon Singer

    Diamond has the potential to revolutionize the field of high power and high frequency electronic devices as a superlative electronic material. The realization of diamond electronics depends on the control of the growth process of both lightly and heavily boron doped diamond. This dissertation work is focused on furthering the state of the art of boron doped diamond (BDD) growth toward the realization of high power diamond Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs). The achievements of this work include the fabrication of a new dedicated reactor for lightly boron doped diamond deposition, the optimization of growth processes for both heavily and lightly boron doped single crystal diamond (SCD), and the proposal and realization of the corner architecture SBD. Boron doped SCD is grown in microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPACVD) plasma disc bell-jar reactors, with feedgas mixtures including hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and diborane. Characterization methods for the analysis of BDD are described, including Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and temperature-dependent four point probe conductivity for activation energy. The effect of adding carbon dioxide to the plasma feedgas for lightly boron doped diamond is investigated. The effect of diborane levels and other growth parameters on the incorporated boron levels are reported, and the doping efficiency is calculated over a range of boron concentrations. The presence of defects is shown to affect the doping uniformity. The substrate growth temperature dependence of the plasma gas-phase to solid-phase doping efficiency in heavily boron doped SCD deposition is investigated. The substrate temperature during growth is shown to have a significant effect on the grown sample defect morphology, and a temperature dependence of the doping efficiency is also shown. The effect of the growth rate on the doping efficiency is discussed, and the ratio of the boron

  15. Single crystal diamond for infrared sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Majdi, S. Kovi, K. K.; Isberg, J.; Kolahdouz, M.; Moeen, M.; Radamson, H. H.; Balmer, R. S.

    2014-10-20

    The synthesis of new materials for thermal infrared (IR) detection has been an intensive research area in recent years. Among new semiconductor materials, synthetic diamond has the ability to function even under very high temperature and high radiation conditions. In the present work, diamond Schottky diodes with boron concentrations in the range of 10{sup 14 }< B < 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} are presented as candidates for IR thermal sensors with an excellent temperature coefficient of resistance (−8.42%/K) and very low noise levels around 6.6 × 10{sup −15} V{sup 2}/Hz. This enables huge performance enhancements for a wide variety of systems, e.g., automotive and space applications.

  16. Diamond turning of Si and Ge single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, P.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single-point diamond turning studies have been completed on Si and Ge crystals. A new process model was developed for diamond turning which is based on a critical depth of cut for plastic flow-to-brittle fracture transitions. This concept, when combined with the actual machining geometry for single-point turning, predicts that {open_quotes}ductile{close_quotes} machining is a combined action of plasticity and fracture. Interrupted cutting experiments also provide a meant to directly measure the critical depth parameter for given machining conditions.

  17. ESR and Microwave Absorption in Boron Doped Diamond Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timms, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    Superconductivity has been reportedly found in boron-doped diamond. Most research to date has only studied superconductivity in polycrystalline and thin film boron-diamonds, as opposed to a single crystal. In fact, only one other group has examined a macro scale boron-doped diamond crystal. Our group has successfully grown large single crystals by using the High Temperature High Pressure method (HTHP) and observed a transition to metallic and superconducting states for high B concentrations. For the present, we are studying BDD crystal using Electron Spin Resonance. We conducted our ESR analysis over a range of temperatures (2K to 300K) and found several types of signals, proving the existence of charge carriers with spin 1/2 in BDD. Moreover, we have found that with increasing B concentrations, from n ~ 1018 cm-3 to n of over 1020 cm-3, the ESR signal changes from that of localized spins to the Dysonian shape of free carriers. The low magnetic field microwave absorption has also been studied in BDD samples at various B concentrations and the clear transition to superconducting state has been found below Tc that ranges from 2K to 4 K depending on concentration and quality of crystal. Sergey Polyakov, Victor Denisov, Vladimir Blank, Ray Baughman, Anvar Zakhidov.

  18. Large-area low-temperature ultrananocrystaline diamond (UNCD) films and integration with CMOS devices for monolithically integrated diamond MEMD/NEMS-CMOS systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumant, A.V.; Auciello, O.; Yuan, H.-C; Ma, Z.; Carpick, R. W.; Mancini, D. C.; Univ. of Wisconsin; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-05-01

    Because of exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties, diamond has a great potential to be used as a material for the development of high-performance MEMS and NEMS such as resonators and switches compatible with harsh environments, which involve mechanical motion and intermittent contact. Integration of such MEMS/NEMS devices with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microelectronics will provide a unique platform for CMOS-driven commercial MEMS/NEMS. The main hurdle to achieve diamond-CMOS integration is the relatively high substrate temperatures (600-800 C) required for depositing conventional diamond thin films, which are well above the CMOS operating thermal budget (400 C). Additionally, a materials integration strategy has to be developed to enable diamond-CMOS integration. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), a novel material developed in thin film form at Argonne, is currently the only microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) grown diamond film that can be grown at 400 C, and still retain exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties comparable to that of single crystal diamond. We have developed a process based on MPCVD to synthesize UNCD films on up to 200 mm in diameter CMOS wafers, which will open new avenues for the fabrication of monolithically integrated CMOS-driven MEMS/NEMS based on UNCD. UNCD films were grown successfully on individual Si-based CMOS chips and on 200 mm CMOS wafers at 400 C in a MPCVD system, using Ar-rich/CH4 gas mixture. The CMOS devices on the wafers were characterized before and after UNCD deposition. All devices were performing to specifications with very small degradation after UNCD deposition and processing. A threshold voltage degradation in the range of 0.08-0.44V and transconductance degradation in the range of 1.5-9% were observed.

  19. Analysis of synthetic diamond single crystals by X-ray topography and double-crystal diffractometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorov, I. A.; Ralchenko, V. G.; Bolshakov, A. P.; Polskiy, A. V.; Vlasov, A. V.; Subbotin, I. A.; Podurets, K. M.; Pashaev, E. M.; Sozontov, E. A.

    2013-12-15

    Structural features of diamond single crystals synthesized under high pressure and homoepitaxial films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been analyzed by double-crystal X-ray diffractometry and topography. The conditions of a diffraction analysis of diamond crystals using Ge monochromators have been optimized. The main structural defects (dislocations, stacking faults, growth striations, second-phase inclusions, etc.) formed during crystal growth have been revealed. The nitrogen concentration in high-pressure/high-temperature (HPHT) diamond substrates is estimated based on X-ray diffraction data. The formation of dislocation bundles at the film-substrate interface in the epitaxial structures has been revealed by plane-wave topography; these dislocations are likely due to the relaxation of elastic macroscopic stresses caused by the lattice mismatch between the substrate and film. The critical thicknesses of plastic relaxation onset in CVD diamond films are calculated. The experimental techniques for studying the real diamond structure in optimizing crystal-growth technology are proven to be highly efficient.

  20. Spatial Coherence Preservation By Synthetic Single Diamond Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoszowska, J.; Freund, A. K.; Guigay, J.-P.; Rommeveaux, A.

    2004-05-01

    The degree of spatial coherence after x-ray diffraction by synthetic single diamond crystals was investigated. The coherence preservation was measured by means of the Talbot effect for x-rays at the optics beamline BM5 at the ESRF. The (111)- and (100)- oriented specimens of type Ib and IIa were grown by De Beers. To establish a correlation between the coherence degradation and the surface quality, 3D surface topography was measured with an optical interferometric profiler and an AFM. Likewise, to pinpoint the relationship with crystalline quality, the samples were characterized by means of double crystal x-ray diffractometry with microscopic resolution.

  1. Spatial Coherence Preservation By Synthetic Single Diamond Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoszowska, J.; Freund, A. K.; Guigay, J.-P.; Rommeveaux, A.

    2004-05-12

    The degree of spatial coherence after x-ray diffraction by synthetic single diamond crystals was investigated. The coherence preservation was measured by means of the Talbot effect for x-rays at the optics beamline BM5 at the ESRF. The (111)- and (100)- oriented specimens of type Ib and IIa were grown by De Beers. To establish a correlation between the coherence degradation and the surface quality, 3D surface topography was measured with an optical interferometric profiler and an AFM. Likewise, to pinpoint the relationship with crystalline quality, the samples were characterized by means of double crystal x-ray diffractometry with microscopic resolution.

  2. Modeling liquid crystal polymeric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez Pinto, Vianney Karina

    The main focus of this work is the theoretical and numerical study of materials that combine liquid crystal and polymer. Liquid crystal elastomers are polymeric materials that exhibit both the ordered properties of the liquid crystals and the elastic properties of rubbers. Changing the order of the liquid crystal molecules within the polymer network can induce shape change. These materials are very valuable for applications such as actuators, sensors, artificial muscles, haptic displays, etc. In this work we apply finite element elastodynamics simulations to study the temperature induced shape deformation in nematic elastomers with complex director microstructure. In another topic, we propose a novel numerical method to model the director dynamics and microstructural evolution of three dimensional nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals. Numerical studies presented in this work are in agreement with experimental observations and provide insight into the design of application devices.

  3. The evaluation of chemical wear on single crystal diamond tools while diamond turning a binary Cu-Ni alloy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browy, Eric Calmer

    The current work describes the evaluation of chemical wear on diamond tools while diamond turning copper nickel alloys of varying composition. The primary goal of my project is to quantify the chemical wear of single crystal diamond tools while diamond turning Cu-Ni alloys of different compositions. Pure copper is commonly understood to give negligible tool wear, while pure nickel is reported to give rapid wear. The Cu-Ni equilibrium phase diagram shows a single phase at all compositions. The development and testing of a method to evaluate and quantify diamond tool wear is also described within the current work. The method chosen for development is the metrology of the progressive edge recession of the diamond. A procedure of progressive plunge cuts into an ultra-bright acid copper before and after diamond turning of the workpiece takes a snapshot of the edge of the diamond tool as the cutting distance increases. An algorithm executed in MatLabRTM displays the residual tool wear after removal of the initial diamond tool geometry. A theoretical model has been developed to predict the chemical diamond tool wear and the results will be shown within the body of work.

  4. Scalable fabrication of high-quality, ultra-thin single crystal diamond membrane windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piracha, Afaq Habib; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond W. M.; Stacey, Alastair; McGuinness, Liam P.; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; Prawer, Steven

    2016-03-01

    High quality, ultra-thin single crystal diamond (SCD) membranes that have a thickness in the sub-micron range are of extreme importance as a materials platform for photonics, quantum sensing, nano/micro electro-mechanical systems (N/MEMS) and other diverse applications. However, the scalable fabrication of such thin SCD membranes is a challenging process. In this paper, we demonstrate a new method which enables high quality, large size (~4 × 4 mm) and low surface roughness, low strain, ultra-thin SCD membranes which can be fabricated without deformations such as breakage, bowing or bending. These membranes are easy to handle making them particularly suitable for fabrication of optical and mechanical devices. We demonstrate arrays of single crystal diamond membrane windows (SCDMW), each up to 1 × 1 mm in dimension and as thin as ~300 nm, supported by a diamond frame as thick as ~150 μm. The fabrication method is robust, reproducible, scalable and cost effective. Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition is used for in situ creation of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers into the thin SCDMW. We have also developed SCD drum head mechanical resonator composed of our fully clamped and freely suspended membranes.High quality, ultra-thin single crystal diamond (SCD) membranes that have a thickness in the sub-micron range are of extreme importance as a materials platform for photonics, quantum sensing, nano/micro electro-mechanical systems (N/MEMS) and other diverse applications. However, the scalable fabrication of such thin SCD membranes is a challenging process. In this paper, we demonstrate a new method which enables high quality, large size (~4 × 4 mm) and low surface roughness, low strain, ultra-thin SCD membranes which can be fabricated without deformations such as breakage, bowing or bending. These membranes are easy to handle making them particularly suitable for fabrication of optical and mechanical devices. We demonstrate arrays of single crystal diamond

  5. Very High Efficiency, Miniaturized, Long-Lived Alpha Particle Power Source Using Diamond Devices for Extreme Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, Elizabeth A. (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai U. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source that converts a-particle energy into electricity by coulomb collision in doped diamond films is described. Alpha particle decay from curium-244 creates electron-hole pairs by free- ing electrons and holes inside the crystal lattice in N- and P-doped diamond films. Ohmic contacts provide electrical connection to an electronic device. Due to the built-in electric field at the rectifying junction across the hT- and P-doped diamond films, the free electrons are constrained to traveling in generally one direction. This one direction then supplies electrons in a manner similar to that of a battery. The radioactive curium layer may be disposed on diamond films for even distribution of a-particle radiation. The resulting power source may be mounted on a diamond substrate that serves to insulate structures below the diamond substrate from a-particle emission. Additional insulation or isolation may be provided in order to prevent damage from a-particle collision. N-doped silicon may be used instead of N-doped diamond.

  6. A neutron sensor based on synthetic single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, G J; Koch, J A; Lerche, R A; Moran, M J

    2003-10-17

    We report the first neutron data for a single crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond sensor. Results are presented for 2.5, 14.1, and 14.9 MeV incident neutrons. We show that the energy resolution for 14.1 MeV neutrons is at least 2.9% (as limited by the energy spread of the incident neutrons), and perhaps as good as 0.4% (as extrapolated from high resolution {alpha} particle data). This result could be relevant to fusion neutron spectroscopy at machines like the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). We also show that our sensor has a high neutron linear attenuation coefficient, due to the high atomic density of diamond, and this could lead to applications in fission neutron detection.

  7. Super-thin single crystal diamond membrane radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pomorski, Michal; Caylar, Benoit; Bergonzo, Philippe

    2013-09-09

    We propose to use the non-electronic grade (nitrogen content 5 ppb < [N] < 5 ppm) single crystal (sc) chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond as a thin-membrane radiation detector. Using deep Ar/O{sub 2} plasma etching it is possible to produce self-supported few micrometres thick scCVD membranes of a size approaching 7 mm × 7 mm, with a very good surface quality. After metallization and contacting, electrical properties of diamond membrane detectors were probed with 5.486 MeV α-particles as an ionization source. Despite nitrogen impurity, scCVD membrane detectors exhibit stable operation, charge collection efficiency close to 100%, with homogenous response, and extraordinary dielectric strength up to 30 V/μm.

  8. Brilliant camouflage: photonic crystals in the diamond weevil, Entimus imperialis

    PubMed Central

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Michielsen, Kristel; Kuipers, Jeroen; De Raedt, Hans; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2012-01-01

    The neotropical diamond weevil, Entimus imperialis, is marked by rows of brilliant spots on the overall black elytra. The spots are concave pits with intricate patterns of structural-coloured scales, consisting of large domains of three-dimensional photonic crystals that have a diamond-type structure. Reflectance spectra measured from individual scale domains perfectly match model spectra, calculated with anatomical data and finite-difference time-domain methods. The reflections of single domains are extremely directional (observed with a point source less than 5°), but the special arrangement of the scales in the concave pits significantly broadens the angular distribution of the reflections. The resulting virtually angle-independent green coloration of the weevil closely approximates the colour of a foliaceous background. While the close-distance colourful shininess of E. imperialis may facilitate intersexual recognition, the diffuse green reflectance of the elytra when seen at long-distance provides cryptic camouflage. PMID:22378806

  9. Single crystal diamond detectors grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuvè, C.; Angelone, M.; Bellini, V.; Balducci, A.; Donato, M. G.; Faggio, G.; Marinelli, M.; Messina, G.; Milani, E.; Morgada, M. E.; Pillon, M.; Potenza, R.; Pucella, G.; Russo, G.; Santangelo, S.; Scoccia, M.; Sutera, C.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2007-01-01

    The detection properties of heteropitaxial (polycrystalline, pCVD) and homoepitaxial (single crystal, scCVD) diamond films grown by microwave chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the Laboratories of Roma "Tor Vergata" University are reported. The pCVD diamond detectors were tested with α-particles from different sources and 12C ions produced by 15 MV Tandem accelerator at Southern National Laboratories (LNS) in Catania (Italy). pCVDs were also used to monitor 14 MeV neutrons produced by the D-T plasma at Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, U.K. The limit of pCVDs is the poor energy resolution. To overcome this problem, we developed scCVD diamonds using the same reactor parameters that optimized pCVD diamonds. scCVD were grown on a low cost (1 0 0) HPHT single crystal substrate. A detector 110 μm thick was tested under α-particles and under 14 MeV neutron irradiation. The charge collection efficiency spectrum measured under irradiation with a triple α-particle source shows three clearly resolved peaks, with an energy resolution of about 1.1%. The measured spectra under neutron irradiation show a well separated C(n,α0)9Be12 reaction peak with an energy spread of 0.5 MeV for 14.8 MeV neutrons and 0.3 MeV for 14.1 MeV neutrons, which are fully compatible with the energy spread of the incident neutron beams.

  10. Fast response liquid crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yung-Hsun

    Liquid crystal (LC) has been widely used for displays, spatial light modulators, variable optical attenuators (VOAs) and other tunable photonic devices. The response time of these devices is mainly determined by the employed liquid crystal material. The response time of a LC device depends on the visco-elastic coefficient (gamma1/K11), LC cell gap (d), and applied voltage. Hence, low visco-elastic coefficient LC materials and thinner cell gap are favorable for reducing the response time. However, low visco-elastic coefficient LCs are usually associated with a low birefringence because of shorter molecular conjugation. For display applications, such as LCD TVs, low birefringence (Deltan<0.1) LCs are commonly used. However, for optical communications at 1550 nm, low birefringence requires to a thick cell gap which, in turn, increases the response time. How to obtain fast response for the LC devices is a fundamentally important and technically challenging task. In this dissertation, we investigate several methods to improve liquid crystal response time, for examples, using dual-frequency liquid crystals, polymer stabilized liquid crystals, and sheared polymer network liquid crystals. We discover a new class of material, denoted as sheared polymer network liquid crystal (SPNLC) which exhibits a submillisecond response time. Moreover, this response time is insensitive to the LC cell gap. This is the first LC device exhibiting such an interesting property. Chapters 1 and 2 describe the motivation and background of this dissertation. From chapter 3 to chapter 6, dual-frequency liquid crystals and polymer network methods are demonstrated as examples for the variable optical attenuators. Variable optical attenuator (VOA) is a key component in optical communications. Especially, the sheared PNLC VOA shows the best result; its dynamic range reaches 43 dB while the response time is in the submillisecond range at 1550 nm wavelength, which is 50 times faster than the commercial

  11. Dedicated multichannel readout ASIC coupled with single crystal diamond for dosimeter application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, A.; Falco, M. D.; De Notaristefani, F.; Galasso, M.; Marinelli, M.; Orsolini Cencelli, V.; Tortora, L.; Verona, C.; Verona Rinati, G.

    2013-02-01

    This paper reports on the tests of a low-noise, multi-channel readout integrated circuit used as a readout electronic front-end for a diamond multi-pixel dosimeter. The system is developed for dose distribution measurement in radiotherapy applications. The first 10-channel prototype chip was designed and fabricated in a 0.18 um CMOS process. Every channel includes a charge integrator with a 10 pF capacitor and a double slope A/D converter. The diamond multi-pixel detector, based on CVD synthetic single crystal diamond Schottky diodes, is made by a 3 × 3 sensor matrix. The overall device has been tested under irradiation with 6 MeV radio therapeutic photon beams at the Policlinico ``Tor Vergata'' (PTV) hospital. Measurements show a 20 fA RMS leakage current from the front-end input stage and a negligible dark current from the diamond detector, a stable temporal response and a good linear behaviour as a function of both dose and dose rate. These characteristics were common to each tested channel.

  12. Fabrication and electrical characterization of three-dimensional graphitic microchannels in single crystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picollo, F.; Gatto Monticone, D.; Olivero, P.; Fairchild, B. A.; Rubanov, S.; Prawer, S.; Vittone, E.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the systematic characterization of conductive micro-channels fabricated in single-crystal diamond with direct ion microbeam writing. Focused high-energy (˜MeV) helium ions are employed to selectively convert diamond with micrometric spatial accuracy to a stable graphitic phase upon thermal annealing, due to the induced structural damage occurring at the end-of-range. A variable-thickness mask allows the accurate modulation of the depth at which the microchannels are formed, from several μm deep up to the very surface of the sample. By means of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we demonstrate that the technique allows the direct writing of amorphous (and graphitic, upon suitable thermal annealing) microstructures extending within the insulating diamond matrix in the three spatial directions, and in particular, that buried channels embedded in a highly insulating matrix emerge and electrically connect to the sample surface at specific locations. Moreover, by means of electrical characterization at both room temperature and variable temperature, we investigate the conductivity and the charge-transport mechanisms of microchannels obtained by implantation at different ion fluences and after subsequent thermal processes, demonstrating that upon high-temperature annealing, the channels implanted above a critical damage density convert into a stable graphitic phase. These structures have significant impact for different applications, such as compact ionizing radiation detectors, dosimeters, bio-sensors and more generally diamond-based devices with buried three-dimensional all-carbon electrodes.

  13. Analysis of laser-generated plasma ionizing radiation by synthetic single crystal diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Krousky, E.

    2013-05-01

    Diamond based detectors have been used in order to analyze the ionizing radiation emitted from the laser-generated plasma. High energy proton/ion beams were generated at Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) Centre by the sub-nanosecond kJ-class laser at intensities above 1016 W/cm2. The tested detectors consisted of a photoconductive device based on high quality chemical vapor deposition (CVD) single crystal diamond, produced at Rome "Tor Vergata" University. They have been operated in planar configuration, having inter-digitized electrodes. The proposed diamond detectors were able to measure UV, X-rays, electrons and ions. They have been employed in time-of-flight (TOF) configuration and their reliability was checked by comparison with standard ion collectors (mostly used at PALS). Both the forward and backward expanding plasma was characterized in the experiment. The results indicate that diamond detectors are very promising for the characterization of fast proton and ion beams produced by high power laser systems.

  14. Integration of high-dielectric constant Ta2O5 oxides on diamond for power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shaoheng; Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Liu, Jiangwei; Imura, Masataka; Li, Hongdong; Koide, Yasuo

    2012-12-01

    The authors report on the direct integration of high-dielectric constant (high-k) Ta2O5 films on p-type single crystal diamond for high-power electronic devices. Crystallized hexagonal phase δ-Ta2O5 film is achieved on diamond by annealing the amorphous Ta2O5 film deposited by a sputter-deposition technique. The electrical properties of the Ta2O5 thin films are investigated by fabricating metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) diodes. The leakage current of the MIS diode is as low as 10-8 A/cm2 for the as-deposited amorphous Ta2O5 film and 10-2 A/cm2 for the crystallized film, which is 108 and 102 times lower than that of the Schottky diode at a forward bias of -3 V, respectively. The dielectric constant of the amorphous Ta2O5 films is measured to be 16 and increases to 29 after annealing at 800 °C. Different current leakage mechanisms and charge trapping behaviors are proposed for the amorphous and crystallized Ta2O5 thin films.

  15. Scalable fabrication of high-quality, ultra-thin single crystal diamond membrane windows.

    PubMed

    Piracha, Afaq Habib; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond W M; Stacey, Alastair; McGuinness, Liam P; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; Prawer, Steven

    2016-03-28

    High quality, ultra-thin single crystal diamond (SCD) membranes that have a thickness in the sub-micron range are of extreme importance as a materials platform for photonics, quantum sensing, nano/micro electro-mechanical systems (N/MEMS) and other diverse applications. However, the scalable fabrication of such thin SCD membranes is a challenging process. In this paper, we demonstrate a new method which enables high quality, large size (∼4 × 4 mm) and low surface roughness, low strain, ultra-thin SCD membranes which can be fabricated without deformations such as breakage, bowing or bending. These membranes are easy to handle making them particularly suitable for fabrication of optical and mechanical devices. We demonstrate arrays of single crystal diamond membrane windows (SCDMW), each up to 1 × 1 mm in dimension and as thin as ∼300 nm, supported by a diamond frame as thick as ∼150 μm. The fabrication method is robust, reproducible, scalable and cost effective. Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition is used for in situ creation of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers into the thin SCDMW. We have also developed SCD drum head mechanical resonator composed of our fully clamped and freely suspended membranes. PMID:26956525

  16. Synthetic diamond devices for radio-oncology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, C.; Tromson, D.; Mer, C.; Nesládek, M.; Bergonzo, P.; Benabdesselam, M.

    2006-09-01

    Diamond exhibits a range of outstanding properties that make it a material of interest for radiation detection and particularly in the field of dosimetry applications. In fact, its crystallographic structure makes it chemically inert and radiation hard. Moreover, its atomic number (carbon Z = 6) close to the equivalent effective atomic number of human soft tissues (Z = 7.4) and of water (reference material in radiotherapy) enables a direct evaluation of the deposited dose without requiring corrections for material nature or energy. Finally, as a bio-compatible material, it can be sterilised, and it is non-toxic thus giving strong advantages for medical uses. Natural diamonds are expensive, rare and their use implies a severe gem selection to fabricate reproducible and reliable devices. The emergence of synthetic samples from the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique offers new possibilities in the fabrication of ionisation chamber for the particular field of radiotherapy. Previous studies have shown that defect levels present in material clearly influence the device response under irradiation. Therefore, in order to optimise dosimetric characteristics needed in radiotherapy applications, various low and precisely nitrogen concentrations were incorporated in the material during growth. Influence of these incorporations on ionisation chamber response under medical cobalt irradiator is presented in this paper.

  17. Hemispherical Brillouin zone imaging of a diamond-type biological photonic crystal

    PubMed Central

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Michielsen, Kristel; De Raedt, Hans; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2012-01-01

    The brilliant structural body colours of many animals are created by three-dimensional biological photonic crystals that act as wavelength-specific reflectors. Here, we report a study on the vividly coloured scales of the diamond weevil, Entimus imperialis. Electron microscopy identified the chitin and air assemblies inside the scales as domains of a single-network diamond (Fd3m) photonic crystal. We visualized the topology of the first Brillouin zone (FBZ) by imaging scatterometry, and we reconstructed the complete photonic band structure diagram (PBSD) of the chitinous photonic crystal from reflectance spectra. Comparison with calculated PBSDs indeed showed a perfect overlap. The unique method of non-invasive hemispherical imaging of the FBZ provides key insights for the investigation of photonic crystals in the visible wavelength range. The characterized extremely large biophotonic nanostructures of E. imperialis are structurally optimized for high reflectance and may thus be well suited for use as a template for producing novel photonic devices, e.g. through biomimicry or direct infiltration from dielectric material. PMID:22188768

  18. Photonic crystals: Theory and device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanhui

    In this thesis, first-principle frequency-domain and time-domain methods are developed and applied to investigate various properties and device applications of photonic crystals. In Chapter 2, I discuss the two numerical methods used to investigate the properties of photonic crystals. The first solves Maxwell's equations in the frequency domain, while the second solves the equations in the time domain. The frequency-domain method yields the frequency, polarization, symmetry, and field distribution of every eigenmode of the system; the time-domain method allows one to determine the temporal behavior of the modes. In Chapter 3, a new class of three-dimensional photonic crystal structures is introduced that is amenable for fabrication at submicron-length scales. The structures give rise to a 3D photonic bandgap. They consist of a layered structure in which a series of cylindrical air holes are etched at normal incidence. The calculation demonstrates the existence of a gap as large as 14% of the mid-gap frequency using Si, SiO2, and air; and 23% using Si and air. In Chapter 4, the bandstructure and transmission properties of three-dimensional metallodielectric photonic crystals are presented. The metallodielectric crystals are modeled as perfect electrical conducting objects embedded in dielectric media. We investigate the face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattice, and the diamond lattice. Partial gaps are predicted in the fcc lattice, in excellent agreement with recent experiments. Complete gaps are found in a diamond lattice of isolated metal spheres. The gaps appear between the second and third bands, and their sizes can be larger than 60% when the radius of the spheres exceeds 21% of the cubic unit cell size. In Chapter 5, I investigate the properties of resonant modes which arise from the introduction of local defects in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D photonic crystals. The properties of these modes can be controlled by changing the nature and the size of the defects. The

  19. Tunable liquid crystal photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yun-Hsing

    2005-07-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based adaptive optics are important for information processing, optical interconnections, photonics, integrated optics, and optical communications due to their tunable optical properties. In this dissertation, we describe novel liquid crystal photonic devices. In Chap. 3, we demonstrate a novel electrically tunable-efficiency Fresnel lens which is devised for the first time using nanoscale PDLC. The tunable Fresnel lens is very desirable to eliminate the need of external spatial light modulator. The nanoscale LC devices are polarization independent and exhibit a fast response time. Because of the small droplet sizes, the operating voltage is higher than 100 Vrms. To lower the driving voltage, in Chap. 2 and Chap. 3, we have investigated tunable Fresnel lens using polymer-network liquid crystal (PNLC) and phase-separated composite film (PSCOF). The operating voltage is below 12 Vrms. The PNLC and PSCOF devices are polarization dependent. To overcome this shortcoming, stacking two cells with orthogonal alignment directions is a possibility. Using PNLC, we also demonstrated LC blazed grating. The diffraction efficiency of these devices is continuously controlled by the electric field. We also develop a system with continuously tunable focal length. A conventional mechanical zooming system is bulky and power hungry. In Chap. 4, we developed an electrically tunable-focus flat LC spherical lens and microlens array. A huge tunable range from 0.6 m to infinity is achieved by the applied voltage. In Chap. 5, we describe a LC microlens array whose focal length can be switched from positive to negative by the applied voltage. The fast response time feature of our LC microlens array will be very helpful in developing 3-D animated images. In Chap. 6, we demonstrate polymer network liquid crystals for switchable polarizers and optical shutters. The use of dual-frequency liquid crystal and special driving scheme leads to a sub-millisecond response time. In

  20. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  1. Rarefaction shock waves in shock-compressed diamond <110> crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perriot, Romain; Lin, You; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; White, Carter; Oleynik, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    Piston-driven shock compression of diamond <110> crystal was simulated by molecular dynamics using the REBO potential. At piston velocities between 2 and 5 km/s and corresponding pressures 117 GPA < P < 278 GPa, diamond sample undergoes a polymorphic phase transition, characterized by the coexistence of two elastically compressed phases, low-pressure phase A and high-pressure phase B. This phase transition results in the splitting of the shock wave into two elastic shock waves, composed of pure phase A and a mixture of phases A and B. Upon removal of the piston, a release wave is observed at the rear of the sample, turning into a rarefaction shock wave where the material undergoes the reverse phase transition from coexisting phases to the original low-pressure phase. For strong plastic waves induced by larger piston velocities the release wave propagates as a rarefaction wave without any phase transition corresponding to the adiabatic expansion along the plastic branch of the Hugoniot.

  2. Nanometric inclusions of carbonates in Kokchetav diamonds from Kazakhstan: A new constraint for the depth of metamorphic diamond crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzhinetskaya, Larissa F.; Wirth, Richard; Green, Harry W.

    2006-03-01

    Previous studies have revealed that microdiamonds from the Kokchetav ultra-high pressure metamorphic terrane of Kazakhstan contain nanometric scale inclusions of Si-, Fe-, Ti-, and Cr-oxides. Because the structure of SiO 2 inclusions was not confirmed to be coesite or stishovite due to their very small size, such diamonds formerly served only as an indicator of a minimum pressure, ca. 4 GPa. Geothermobarometry applied to Kokchetav diamond-bearing rocks yielded a wide range of conditions: T = 700 °C-1250 °C, and P = 4-9 GPa. Our paper presents transmission electron microscopy studies with focused ion beam assistance that indicate that diamonds from marbles contain inclusions of aragonite (CaCO 3) and magnesite (MgCO 3), and that aragonite and nitrogen-bearing nanometric particles are associated with dislocations reflecting diamond growth at relatively high-temperature conditions. We determined the boundary of dolomite stability using the reaction CaMg(CO 3) 2 (dolomite) = CaCO 3 (aragonite) + MgCO 3. This allowed us to utilize available experimental data to evaluate the pressure at which diamond was crystallized. Taking into consideration uncertainties existing between experimental data produced in different laboratories, we propose the pressure for Kokchetav diamond crystallization to be ˜ 6 to 9 GPa. This evaluation is based on the assumption that temperature was determined correctly as 980 °C (minimum) and 1250 °C (maximum) for diamond-grade dolomitic marbles. Our data provide strong evidence that the metasedimentary rocks of the Kokchetav massif containing diamonds were subducted to the depth of ˜ 190-280 km.

  3. Diamond bio electronics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions. PMID:19745488

  4. Cooling device featuring thermoelectric and diamond materials for temperature control of heat-dissipating devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Ian W. (Inventor); Ewell, Richard (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Lyon, Hylan B. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A cooling device for lowering the temperature of a heat-dissipating device. The cooling device includes a heat-conducting substrate (composed, e.g., of diamond or another high thermal conductivity material) disposed in thermal contact with the heat-dissipating device. During operation, heat flows from the heat-dissipating device into the heat-conducting substrate, where it is spread out over a relatively large area. A thermoelectric cooling material (e.g., a Bi.sub.2 Te.sub.3 -based film or other thermoelectric material) is placed in thermal contact with the heat-conducting substrate. Application of electrical power to the thermoelectric material drives the thermoelectric material to pump heat into a second heat-conducting substrate which, in turn, is attached to a heat sink.

  5. Wear inspection of a single-crystal diamond tool used in electroless nickel turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Kwon Su; Takahashi, Hideaki; Namba, Yoshiharu

    2014-03-01

    Single-point diamond turning is a useful optical fabrication method for simultaneously obtaining a smooth surface and generating an accurate shape. Generally, a single-crystal diamond tool has been used in the single-point diamond turning method and a degree of the wear on the diamond tool is unavoidable. Tool wear causes the degradation of the surface quality, surface roughness, and shape accuracy of the workpiece. Inspection of tool wear is important in improving the surface quality. A single-crystal diamond tool used in electroless nickel turning was inspected by a laser scanning microscope and a scanning probe microscope. Regular grooves were observed on the flank face of the diamond tool, and the pitch interval was the same as the feed rate. The worn distance was obtained by measuring the clearance angle and the groove length on the flank face of the worn diamond tool. The worn distance of the diamond tool was 1.7 μm after machining electroless nickel for a 3.18 km cutting distance. The worn distance could also be obtained using the worn width on the flank face and the nose radius and was 2.05 μm, which was very close to 1.7 μm. Two methods based on the wear measurement of the flank face will be new methods to measure the worn distance of the single-crystal diamond tool.

  6. Recent Advances in High-Growth Rate Single-Crystal CVD Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Q.; Yan, C; Meng, Y; Lai, J; Krasnicki, S; Mao, H; Hemley, R

    2009-01-01

    There have been important advances in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) of large single-crystal CVD diamond at high growth rates and applications of this diamond. The types of gas chemistry and growth conditions, including microwave power, pressure, and substrate surface temperatures, have been varied to optimize diamond quality and growth rates. The diamond has been characterized by a variety of spectroscopic and diffraction techniques. We have grown single-crystal CVD diamond over ten carats and above 1 cm in thickness at growth rates of 50-100 {micro}m/h. Colorless and near colorless single crystals up to two carats have been produced by further optimizing the process. The nominal Vickers fracture toughness of this high-growth rate diamond can be tuned to exceed 20 MPa m{sup 1/2} in comparison to 5-10 MPa m{sup 1/2} for conventional natural and CVD diamond. Post-growth high-pressure/high-temperature (HPHT) and low-pressure/high-temperature (LPHT) annealing have been carried out to alter the optical, mechanical, and electronic properties. Most recently, single-crystal CVD diamond has been successfully annealed by LPHT methods without graphitization up to 2200 C and < 300 Torr for periods of time ranging from a fraction of minute to a few hours. Significant changes observed in UV, visible, infrared, and photoluminescence spectra are attributed to changes in various vacancy centers and extended defects.

  7. Method to fabricate micro and nano diamond devices

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M; Anderson, Richard J; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Skinner, Jack L; Rye, Michael J

    2014-10-07

    A method including forming a diamond material on the surface of a substrate; forming a first contact and a separate second contact; and patterning the diamond material to form a nanowire between the first contact and the second contact. An apparatus including a first contact and a separate second contact on a substrate; and a nanowire including a single crystalline or polycrystalline diamond material on the substrate and connected to each of the first contact and the second contact.

  8. Fluid inclusions in carbonado diamond_Implication to the crystal growth environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagi, H.; Ishibashi, H.; Sakurai, H.; Ohfuji, H.

    2010-12-01

    Diamond is a unique geological material carrying inside fluid and solid inclusions which are pristine witnesses of diamond crystallization media. Carbonado is natural polycrystalline diamond whose origin is still under hot depate. Our previous study on Central African carbonado reported the presence of fluid inclusions and high residual pressure in the diamond [1]. These results suggested that C-O-H mantle fluid was trapped in the carbonado sample and carbonado had grown in the volatile-rich environment in the mantle. However, it was unclear that the fluid inclusions in carbonado existed inside of diamond grains or in the grain boundaries. In this study, we precisely investigated the location of fluid inclusions from spectroscopic measurements and TEM observations. A carbonado grain with hundreds of micrometer in diameter was heated incrementally at temperatures from 700 to 1100°C under vacuum. After heating at each temperature condition, infrared absorption spectra were measured. Dehydration of hydrous minerals were observed with increasing temperature. In contrast, absorption bands assignable to liquid water were observed up to 950°C right before graphitization occurred. This observation strongly suggests that the fluid was trapped inside of diamond grains. For obtaining direct evidence of fluid inclusion existing inside of a diamond grain, we conducted TEM observations on an FIB-fabricated thin foil of carbonado. We found a void in the carbonado sample. The void was surrounded by (111) equivalent crystal faces. The octahedral void controlled by crystal habit of host diamond strongly suggests that the void is the negative crystal of diamond. The existence of negative crystal of diamond indicates that the fluid equilibrated with surrounding diamond crystals. Moreover, it was found that the grain boundary of the polished carbonado sample was in zig-zag texture. The detailed EBSD analyses on the grain boundary indicated that the grain boundary corresponded to the

  9. Crystallization of diamond from a silicate melt of kimberlite composition in high-pressure and high-temperature experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Arima, Makoto; Nakayama, Kazuhiro ); Akaishi, Minoru; Yamaoka, Shinobu; Kanda, Hisao )

    1993-11-01

    In high-pressure and high-temperature experiments (1800-2200[degrees]C and 7.0-7.7 GPa), diamond crystallized and grew in a volatile-rich silicate melt of kimberlite composition. This diamond has well-developed [111] faces, and its morphologic characteristics resemble those of natural diamond but differ from those of synthetic diamond grown from metallic solvent-catalysts. The kimberlite melt has a strong solvent-catalytic effect on diamond formation, supporting the view that some natural diamonds crystallized from volatile-rich melts in the upper mantle. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Adhesion and friction of single-crystal diamond in contact with transition metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and friction of single-crystal diamond in contact with various transition metals and the nature of metal transfer to diamond. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with diamond in sliding contact with the metals yttrium, titanium, zirconium, vanadium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium and rhodium. All experiments were conducted with loads of 0.05 to 0.3 N, at a sliding velocity of 0.003 m per minute, in a vacuum of 10 to the -8th Pa, at room temperature, and on the (111) plane of diamond with sliding in the 110 line type direction. The results of the investigation indicate that the coefficient of friction for diamond in contact with various metals is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals in high vacuum. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of diamond in sliding.

  11. Single-crystal diamond pyramids: synthesis and application for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuyakova, Feruza T.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Ismagilov, Rinat R.

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the results of investigations aimed at the development and testing of robust, chemically inert single-crystal diamond probes for atomic force microscopy (AFM). The probes were prepared by assembling common silicon probes with micrometer-sized pyramid-shaped single-crystal diamonds (SCD). The SCD were obtained by the selective thermal oxidation of the polycrystalline films grown by chemical vapor deposition. Electrostatic spray of adhesive coating onto silicon probes was used to attach individual SCD. Geometrical parameters of produced AFM SCD probes were revealed with transmission electron microscopy: the apex angle of the pyramidal diamond crystallite was ˜10 deg, and the curvature radius at the apex was ˜2 to 10 nm. The diamond AFM probes were used for surface imaging of deoxyribonucleic acid deposited on graphite substrate. Obtained results demonstrate high efficiency of the diamond AFM probes, allowing improvement of the image quality compared to standard silicon probes.

  12. Kinetic peculiarities of diamond crystallization in K-Na-Mg-Ca-Carbonate-Carbon melt-solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solopova, N. A.; Spivak, A. V.; Litvin, Yu. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Tsel'movich, V. A.; Nekrasov, A. N.

    2013-02-01

    The kinetic peculiarities of diamond crystallization in multicomponent K-Na-Mg-Ca-carbonate-carbon system have been studied in conditions of diamond stability at 1500-1800°C and 7.5-8.5 GPa. It has been established that the diamond phase nucleation density at a fixed temperature of 1600°C decreases from 1.3 × 105 nuclei/mm3 at 8.5 GPa to 3.7 × 103 nuclei/mm3 at 7.5 GPa. The fluorescence spectra of obtained diamond crystals contain peaks at 504 nm ( H3-defect), 575 nm (NV-center), and 638 nm (NV-defect), caused by the presence of nitrogen impurity. In the cathodoluminescence spectra, an A-band with the maximum at 470 nm is present. The obtained data make it possible to assign the synthesized diamonds in the carbonate-carbon system to the mixed Ia + Ib type.

  13. GaN-on-diamond electronic device reliability: Mechanical and thermo-mechanical integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dong; Sun, Huarui; Pomeroy, James W.; Kuball, Martin; Francis, Daniel; Faili, Firooz; Twitchen, Daniel J.

    2015-12-21

    The mechanical and thermo-mechanical integrity of GaN-on-diamond wafers used for ultra-high power microwave electronic devices was studied using a micro-pillar based in situ mechanical testing approach combined with an optical investigation of the stress and heat transfer across interfaces. We find the GaN/diamond interface to be thermo-mechanically stable, illustrating the potential for this material for reliable GaN electronic devices.

  14. GaN-on-diamond electronic device reliability: Mechanical and thermo-mechanical integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Sun, Huarui; Pomeroy, James W.; Francis, Daniel; Faili, Firooz; Twitchen, Daniel J.; Kuball, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical and thermo-mechanical integrity of GaN-on-diamond wafers used for ultra-high power microwave electronic devices was studied using a micro-pillar based in situ mechanical testing approach combined with an optical investigation of the stress and heat transfer across interfaces. We find the GaN/diamond interface to be thermo-mechanically stable, illustrating the potential for this material for reliable GaN electronic devices.

  15. Liquid crystal device and method thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Shiyanovskii, Sergij V; Gu, Mingxia; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2012-10-23

    The invention provides a liquid crystal device and method thereof. Subsequent to applying a first electrical voltage on a liquid crystal to induce a reorientation of the liquid crystal, a second electrical voltage with proper polarity is applied on the liquid crystal to assist the relaxation of the reorientation that was induced by the first electrical voltage. The "switch-off" phase of the liquid crystal can therefore be accelerated or temporally shortened, and the device can exhibit better performance such as fast response to on/off signals. The invention can be widely used LCD, LC shutter, LC lens, spatial light modulator, telecommunication device, tunable filter, beam steering device, and electrically driven LC device, among others.

  16. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  17. Pixelated Single-crystal Diamond Detector for fast neutron measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebai, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Croci, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Trucchi, D. M.; Grosso, G.; Gorini, G.

    2015-03-01

    Single-crystal Diamond Detectors (SDDs), due to their high radiation hardness, fast response time and small size, are good candidates as fast neutron detectors in those environments where the high neutron flux is an issue, such as spallation neutron sources and the next generation thermonuclear fusion plasmas, i.e. the ITER experiment. Neutron detection in SDDs is based on the collection of electron-hole pairs produced by charged particles generated by neutron interactions with 12C. Recent measurements have demonstrated the SDD capability of measuring the neutron flux with a good energy resolution and at high rates. In this work a novel detector based on a 12-pixels SDD matrix will be presented. Each pixel is equipped with an independent electronic chain: the fast shaping preamplifier coupled to a digitizer is able to combine the high rate capability and the good energy resolution. Two CAEN digitizers are compared and the possibility of performing good energy resolution measurements (<2%) and at high rates (>1 MHz per channel) is described. Each pixel was characterized and calibrated using an 241Am source: the energy resolution was evaluated and gives a mean value of 1.73% at 5.5 MeV. The good energy resolution achieved and its uniformity between pixels are the demonstration of the capability of this novel detector as a spectrometer. This system will be installed during the next Deuterium-Tritium campaign on a collimated vertical line of sight at JET for 14 MeV neutron measurements.

  18. EBS/C proton spectra from a virgin diamond crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erich, M.; Kokkoris, M.; Fazinić, S.; Petrović, S.

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, elastic backscattering channeling spectra, EBS/C, of protons in a <1 0 0> diamond crystal were experimentally and theoretically studied via a new computer simulation code. Proton incident energies for EBS/C spectra were in the energy range from 1.0 MeV to 1.9 MeV. The energy range was chosen in order to explore a distinct strong resonance of the 12C(p,p0)12C elastic scattering at 1737 keV. The computer simulation code applied for the fitting of the experimental spectra in the random mode was compared with the corresponding SIMNRA results. In the channeling mode, it assumes a Gompertz type sigmoidal dechanneling function, which has two fitting parameters, xc and k, the dechanneling range and rate, respectively. It also uses α, ratio of the channeling to random energy losses, as a fitting parameter. It was observed that xc increases, k decreases and α stays relatively constant with the proton incident energy. These observations confirm the physical interpretation of the fitting parameters. Also, they constitute the basics for the further development of the code for the quantification of induced amorphization and depth profiling of implanted ions.

  19. The mechanical properties of various chemical vapor deposition diamond structures compared to the ideal single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The structural and electronic properties of the diamond lattice, leading to its outstanding mechanical properties, are discussed. These include the highest elastic moduli and fracture strength of any known material. Its extreme hardness is strongly connected with the extreme shear modulus, which even exceeds the large bulk modulus, revealing that diamond is more resistant to shear deformation than to volume changes. These unique features protect the ideal diamond lattice also against mechanical failure and fracture. Besides fast heat conduction, the fast vibrational movement of carbon atoms results in an extreme speed of sound and propagation of crack tips with comparable velocity. The ideal mechanical properties are compared with those of real diamond films, plates, and crystals, such as ultrananocrystalline (UNC), nanocrystalline, microcrystalline, and homo- and heteroepitaxial single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, produced by metastable synthesis using CVD. Ultrasonic methods have played and continue to play a dominant role in the determination of the linear elastic properties, such as elastic moduli of crystals or the Young's modulus of thin films with substantially varying impurity levels and morphologies. A surprising result of these extensive measurements is that even UNC diamond may approach the extreme Young's modulus of single-crystal diamond under optimized deposition conditions. The physical reasons for why the stiffness often deviates by no more than a factor of two from the ideal value are discussed, keeping in mind the large variety of diamond materials grown by various deposition conditions. Diamond is also known for its extreme hardness and fracture strength, despite its brittle nature. However, even for the best natural and synthetic diamond crystals, the measured critical fracture stress is one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the ideal value obtained by ab initio calculations for the ideal cubic lattice. Currently

  20. Kelvin probe characterization of buried graphitic microchannels in single-crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, E. Battiato, A.; Olivero, P.; Vittone, E.; Picollo, F.

    2015-01-14

    In this work, we present an investigation by Kelvin Probe Microscopy (KPM) of buried graphitic microchannels fabricated in single-crystal diamond by direct MeV ion microbeam writing. Metal deposition of variable-thickness masks was adopted to implant channels with emerging endpoints and high temperature annealing was performed in order to induce the graphitization of the highly-damaged buried region. When an electrical current was flowing through the biased buried channel, the structure was clearly evidenced by KPM maps of the electrical potential of the surface region overlying the channel at increasing distances from the grounded electrode. The KPM profiling shows regions of opposite contrast located at different distances from the endpoints of the channel. This effect is attributed to the different electrical conduction properties of the surface and of the buried graphitic layer. The model adopted to interpret these KPM maps and profiles proved to be suitable for the electronic characterization of buried conductive channels, providing a non-invasive method to measure the local resistivity with a micrometer resolution. The results demonstrate the potential of the technique as a powerful diagnostic tool to monitor the functionality of all-carbon graphite/diamond devices to be fabricated by MeV ion beam lithography.

  1. Kelvin probe characterization of buried graphitic microchannels in single-crystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, E.; Battiato, A.; Olivero, P.; Picollo, F.; Vittone, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present an investigation by Kelvin Probe Microscopy (KPM) of buried graphitic microchannels fabricated in single-crystal diamond by direct MeV ion microbeam writing. Metal deposition of variable-thickness masks was adopted to implant channels with emerging endpoints and high temperature annealing was performed in order to induce the graphitization of the highly-damaged buried region. When an electrical current was flowing through the biased buried channel, the structure was clearly evidenced by KPM maps of the electrical potential of the surface region overlying the channel at increasing distances from the grounded electrode. The KPM profiling shows regions of opposite contrast located at different distances from the endpoints of the channel. This effect is attributed to the different electrical conduction properties of the surface and of the buried graphitic layer. The model adopted to interpret these KPM maps and profiles proved to be suitable for the electronic characterization of buried conductive channels, providing a non-invasive method to measure the local resistivity with a micrometer resolution. The results demonstrate the potential of the technique as a powerful diagnostic tool to monitor the functionality of all-carbon graphite/diamond devices to be fabricated by MeV ion beam lithography.

  2. Metallo-dielectric diamond and zinc-blende photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Alexander

    2002-09-01

    Diamond and zinc-blende photonic crystals are studied both in the purely dielectric case and in the presence of small inclusions of a low absorbing metal. It is shown that small metal inclusions can have a dramatic effect on the photonic band structure. Several complete photonic band gaps (CPBG's) can open in the spectrum, between the second and third, fifth and sixth, and eighth and ninth bands. Unlike in the purely dielectric case, in the presence of small inclusions of a low absorbing metal the largest CPBG for a moderate dielectric constant (ɛ<=10) turns out to be the second to third CPBG. The second to third CPBG is the most important CPBG, because it is the most stable against disorder. For a diamond and zinc-blende structure of nonoverlapping dielectric and metallo-dielectric spheres, a CPBG begins to decrease with an increasing dielectric contrast roughly at the point where another CPBG starts to open-a kind of gap competition. A CPBG can even shrink to zero when the dielectric contrast increases further. Metal inclusions have the biggest effect for the dielectric constant ɛ∈[2,12], which is a typical dielectric constant at near infrared and in the visible for many materials, including semiconductors and polymers. It is shown that one can create a sizeable and robust second to third CPBG at near-infrared and visible wavelengths even for a photonic crystal which is composed of more than 97% low refractive index materials (n<=1.45, i.e., that of silica glass or a polymer). In the case of silica spheres with a silver core, the second to third CPBG opens for a metal volume fraction fm~1.1% and has a gap width to midgap frequency ratio of 5% for fm~2.5%. Within the second to third CPBG of 5%, absorption remains very small (<=2.6% once the CPBG is centered at a wavelength λ>=750 nm), which should be tolerable in most practical applications. The metallo-dielectric structures display a scalinglike behavior, which makes it possible to scale the CPBG from

  3. Radial mosaic internal structure of rounded diamond crystals from alluvial placers of Siberian platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragozin, A. L.; Zedgenizov, D. A.; Kuper, K. E.; Shatsky, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    The specific gray to almost black diamonds of rounded morphology are especially typical in alluvial placers of the northeastern part of the Siberian platform. The results of study of internal structure of these diamonds are presented. X-ray topography and birefringence patterns of polished plates of studied diamonds show their radial mosaic structure. Diamonds consists of slightly misorientated (up to 20') subindividuals which are combined to mosaic wedge-shaped sectors. Electron back-scatter diffraction technique has demonstrated that subindividuals are often combined in the single large blocks (subgrains). The whole crystals commonly consist of several large subgrains misoriented up to 5° to one another. The total nitrogen content of these diamonds vary in the range 900-3300 ppm and nitrogen aggregation state (NB/(NB + NA)*100) from 25 to 64 %. Rounded diamond crystals of variety V are suggested to have been formed at the high growth rate caused by the high oversaturation of carbon in the crystallization medium. It may result in the splitting of growing crystal and their radial mosaic structure as a sequence. High content of structural nitrogen defects and the great number of mechanical impurities - various mineral and fluid inclusions may also favor to generation of this structure.

  4. Invited Article: Precision nanoimplantation of nitrogen vacancy centers into diamond photonic crystal cavities and waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schukraft, M.; Zheng, J.; Schröder, T.; Mouradian, S. L.; Walsh, M.; Trusheim, M. E.; Bakhru, H.; Englund, D. R.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a self-aligned lithographic technique for precision generation of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers within photonic nanostructures on bulk diamond substrates. The process relies on a lithographic mask with nanoscale implantation apertures for NV creation, together with larger features for producing waveguides and photonic nanocavities. This mask allows targeted nitrogen ion implantation, and precision dry etching of nanostructures on bulk diamond. We demonstrate high-yield generation of single NVs at pre-determined nanoscale target regions on suspended diamond waveguides. We report implantation into the mode maximum of diamond photonic crystal nanocavities with a single-NV per cavity yield of ˜26% and Purcell induced intensity enhancement of the zero-phonon line. The generation of NV centers aligned with diamond photonic structures marks an important tool for scalable production of optically coupled spin memories.

  5. Formation of metastable graphite inclusions during diamond crystallization in model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechaev, D. V.; Khokhryakov, A. F.

    2014-03-01

    Metastable graphite inclusions have been studied in diamond, forsterite, and orthopyroxene synthesized in silicate-carbonate-fluid and aqueous chloride systems at 6.3-7.5 GPa and 1400-1600°C. The graphite inclusions were studied using optic microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It has been established that graphite in diamond and liquidus silicate minerals is represented by a highly ordered variety. Depending on parameters of runs, the graphite inclusions are hexagonal, irregular polygonal, or rounded in shape. The morphology of graphite inclusions involving metastable graphite in run products is compared with previously established crystallization sequence of carbon phases. It has been revealed that the protogenetic graphite inclusions in diamond are rounded, and this shape was caused by dissolution of the newly formed graphite. Polygonal graphite inclusions are syngenetic and represented by metastable graphite that crystallized contemporaneously with diamond.

  6. Multiple substrate microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition single crystal diamond synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Asmussen, J.; Grotjohn, T. A.; Reinhard, D. K.; Schuelke, T.; Becker, M. F.; Yaran, M. K.; King, D. J.; Wicklein, S.

    2008-07-21

    A multiple substrate, microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis process for single crystal diamond (SCD) is demonstrated using a 915 MHz reactor. Diamond synthesis was performed using input chemistries of 6-8% of CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, microwave input powers of 10-11.5 kW, substrate temperatures of 1100-1200 deg. C, and pressures of 110-135 Torr. The simultaneous synthesis of SCD over 70 diamond seeds yielded good quality SCD with deposition rates of 14-21 {mu}m/h. Multiple deposition runs totaling 145 h of deposition time added 1.8-2.5 mm of diamond material to each of the 70 seed crystals.

  7. Patterning of nanocrystalline diamond films for diamond microstructures useful in MEMS and other devices

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Busmann, Hans-Gerd; Meyer, Eva-Maria; Auciello, Orlando; Krauss, Alan R.; Krauss, Julie R.

    2004-11-02

    MEMS structure and a method of fabricating them from ultrananocrystalline diamond films having average grain sizes of less than about 10 nm and feature resolution of less than about one micron . The MEMS structures are made by contacting carbon dimer species with an oxide substrate forming a carbide layer on the surface onto which ultrananocrystalline diamond having average grain sizes of less than about 10 nm is deposited. Thereafter, microfabrication process are used to form a structure of predetermined shape having a feature resolution of less than about one micron.

  8. Stress engineering of high-quality single crystal diamond by heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.-H.; Golding, B.

    2016-02-01

    A method for lateral overgrowth of low-stress single crystal diamond by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is described. The process is initiated by deposition of a thin (550 nm) (001) diamond layer on Ir-buffered a-plane sapphire. The diamond is partially masked by periodic thermally evaporated Au stripes using photolithography. Lateral overgrowth of the Au occurs with extremely effective filtering of threading dislocations. Thermal stress resulting from mismatch of the low thermal expansion diamond and the sapphire substrate is largely accommodated by the ductile Au layer. The stress state of the diamond is investigated by Raman spectroscopy for two thicknesses: at 10 μm where the film has just overgrown the Au mask and at 180 μm where the film thickness greatly exceeds the scale of the masking. For the 10-μm film, the Raman linewidth shows spatial oscillations with the period of the Au stripes with a factor of 2 to 3 reduction relative to the unmasked region. In a 180-μm thick diamond film, the overall surface stress was extremely low, 0.00 ± 0.16 GPa, obtained from the Raman shift averaged over the 7.5 mm diameter of the crystal at its surface. We conclude that the metal mask protects the overgrown diamond layer from substrate-induced thermal stress and cracking. It is also responsible for low internal stress by reducing dislocation density by several orders of magnitude.

  9. Single crystal chemical vapor deposit diamond detector for energetic plasma measurement in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, K.; Broiles, T. W.; Coulter, K. E.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Livi, S. A.; McComas, D. J.; Walther, B. C.

    2015-03-01

    This study reports the performance of single crystal chemical vapor deposit diamond detectors for measuring space plasma and energetic particles: ~7 keV energy resolution for protons with a 14 keV threshold level, and good response linearity for ions and electrons as expected from Monte-Carlo calculations of primary particle energy loss. We investigated that these diamond detectors are able to operate at high temperature (> 70 ° C) and have fast response times (< 1 ns rise time). While silicon detectors have proven capability over this energy range for space plasma measurements, diamond detectors offer a faster response, higher temperature operation, greater radiation tolerance, and immunity to light.

  10. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy method and studies of implant damage in single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, D.P.; Kuryliw, E.; Siebein, K.; Jones, K.S.; Chodelka, R.; Elliman, R.

    2006-07-15

    Few transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of single crystal diamond have been reported, most likely due to the time and difficulty involved in sample preparation. A method is described for creating a TEM cross section of single crystal diamond using a focused ion beam and in situ lift-out. The method results in samples approximately 10 {mu}m long by 3 {mu}m deep with an average thickness of 100-300 nm. The total time to prepare a cross-sectional TEM sample of diamond is less than 5 h. The method also allows for additional thinning to facilitate high resolution TEM imaging, and can be applied to oddly shaped diamond samples. This sample preparation technique has been applied to the study of ion implantation damage in single crystal diamond and its evolution upon annealing. High-pressure-high-temperature diamonds were implanted with Si{sup +} at an energy of 1 MeV and a temperature of 30 deg. C. One sample, with a (110) surface, was implanted with a dose of 1x10{sup 14} Si cm{sup -2} and annealed at 950 deg. C for 10 and 40 min. No significant defect formation or evolution was discernible by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Another sample, with a (100) orientation, was implanted with 1 MeV at 1x10{sup 15} Si cm{sup -2} and annealed at 1050 deg. C for 10 min. Prior to annealing, a heavily damaged but still crystalline region was observed. Upon annealing, the sample showed no signs of conversion either to an amorphous form of carbon or to graphite. This is unexpected as the energy and dose are above the previously reported graphitization threshold for diamond. Higher annealing temperatures and possibly a high vacuum will be required for future study of defect formation, evolution, and phase transformations in ion-implanted single crystal diamond.

  11. Science and technology of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films for multifunctional devices

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Jayatissa, A.; Sumant, A.; Tucek, J.; Mancini, D.; Molodvan, N.; Erdemir, A.; Ersoy, D.; Gardos, M. N.; Busman, H. G.; Meyer, E. M.

    2000-08-24

    MEMS devices are currently fabricated primarily in silicon because of the available surface machining technology. However, Si has poor mechanical and tribological properties, and practical MEMS devices are currently limited primarily to applications involving only bending and flexural motion, such as cantilever accelerometers and vibration sensors. However, because of the poor flexural strength and fracture toughness of Si, and the tendency of Si to adhere to hydrophyllic surfaces, even these simple devices have limited dynamic range. Future MEMS applications that involve significant rolling or sliding contact will require the use of new materials with significantly improved mechanical and tribological properties, and the ability to perform well in harsh environments. Diamond is a superhard material of high mechanical strength, exceptional chemical inertness, and outstanding thermal stability. The brittle fracture strength is 23 times that of Si, and the projected wear life of diamond MEMS moving mechanical assemblies (MEMS-MMAs) is 10,000 times greater than that of Si MMAs. However, as the hardest known material, diamond is notoriously difficult to fabricate. Conventional CVD thin film deposition methods offer an approach to the fabrication of ultra-small diamond structures, but the films have large grain size, high internal stress, poor intergranular adhesion, and very rough surfaces, and are consequently ill-suited for MEMS-MMA applications. A thin film deposition process has been developed that produces phase-pure nanocrystalline diamond with morphological and mechanical properties that are ideally suited for MEMS applications in general, and MMA use in particular. The authors have developed lithographic techniques for the fabrication of diamond microstructure including cantilevers and multi-level devices, acting as precursors to micro-bearings and gears, making nanocrystalline diamond a promising material for the development of high performance MEMS devices.

  12. Test results of a diamond double-crystal monochromator at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, P.B.; Graber, T.; Krasnicki, S.; Lee, W.; Mills, D.M.; Rogers, C.S.; Assoufid, L.

    1997-07-01

    We have tested the first diamond double-crystal monochromator at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The monochromator consisted of two synthetic type 1b (111) diamond plates in symmetric Bragg geometry. We tested two pairs of single-crystal plates: the first pair was 6 mm by 5 mm by 0.25 mm and 6 mm by 5 mm by 0.37 mm; the second set was 7 mm by 5.5 mm by 0.44 mm. The monochromator first crystal was indirectly cooled by edge contact with a water-cooled copper holder. We studied the performance of the monochromator under the high-power x-ray beam delivered by the APS undulator A. We found no indication of thermal distortions or strains even at the highest incident power (280 watts) and power density (123W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence). The calculated maximum power and power density absorbed by the first crystal were 37 watts and 4.3W/mm{sup 2}, respectively. We also compared the maximum intensity delivered by the diamond monochromator and by a silicon (111) cryogenically cooled monochromator. For energies in the range of 6 to 10 keV, the flux through the diamond monochromator was about a factor of two less than through the silicon monochromator, in good agreement with calculations. We conclude that water-cooled diamond monochromators can handle the high-power beams from the undulator beamlines at the APS. As single-crystal diamond plates of larger size and better quality become available, the use of diamond monochromators will become a very attractive option. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Test results of a diamond double-crystal monochromator at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, P. B.; Graber, T.; Krasnicki, S.; Lee, W.-K.; Mills, D. M.; Rogers, C. S.; Assoufid, L.

    1997-07-01

    We have tested the first diamond double-crystal monochromator at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The monochromator consisted of two synthetic type 1b (111) diamond plates in symmetric Bragg geometry. We tested two pairs of single-crystal plates: the first pair was 6 mm by 5 mm by 0.25 mm and 6 mm by 5 mm by 0.37 mm; the second set was 7 mm by 5.5 mm by 0.44 mm. The monochromator first crystal was indirectly cooled by edge contact with a water-cooled copper holder. We studied the performance of the monochromator under the high-power x-ray beam delivered by the APS undulator A. We found no indication of thermal distortions or strains even at the highest incident power (280 watts) and power density (123 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence). The calculated maximum power and power density absorbed by the first crystal were 37 watts and 4.3 W/mm{sup 2}, respectively. We also compared the maximum intensity delivered by the diamond monochromator and by a silicon (111) cryogenically cooled monochromator. For energies in the range of 6 to 10 keV, the flux through the diamond monochromator was about a factor of two less than through the silicon monochromator, in good agreement with calculations. We conclude that water-cooled diamond monochromators can handle the high-power beams from the undulator beamlines at the APS. As single-crystal diamond plates of larger size and better quality become available, the use of diamond monochromators will become a very attractive option.

  14. Test results of a diamond double-crystal monochromator at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, P.B.; Graber, T.; Krasnicki, S.; Lee, W.K.

    1997-06-01

    We have tested the first diamond double-crystal monochromator at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The monochromator consisted of two synthetic type lb (111) diamond plates in symmetric Bragg geometry. We tested two pairs of single-crystal plates: the first pair was 6 mm by 5 mm by 0.25 mm and 6 mm by 5 mm by 0.37 mm; the second set was 7 mm by 5.5 mm by 0.44 mm. The monochromator first crystal was indirectly cooled by edge contact with a water-cooled copper holder. We studied the performance of the monochromator under the high-power x-ray beam delivered by the APS undulator A. We found no indication of thermal distortions or strains even at the highest incident power (280 watts) and power density (123 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence). The calculated maximum power and power density absorbed by the first crystal were 37 watts and 16 W/mm{sup 2} respectively. We also compared the maximum intensity delivered by the diamond monochromator and by a silicon (111) cryogenically cooled monochromator. For energies in the range of 6 to 10 keV, the flux through the diamond monochromator was about a factor of two less than through the silicon monochromator, in good agreement with calculations. We conclude that water-cooled diamond monochromators can handle the high-power beams from the undulator beams from the undulator beamlines at the APS. As single-crystal diamond plates of larger size and better quality become available, the use of diamond monochromators will become a very attractive option.

  15. Diamond crystallization in a CO2-rich alkaline carbonate melt with a nitrogen additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhryakov, Alexander F.; Palyanov, Yuri N.; Kupriyanov, Igor N.; Nechaev, Denis V.

    2016-09-01

    Diamond crystallization was experimentally studied in a CO2-bearing alkaline carbonate melt with an increased content of nitrogen at pressure of 6.3 GPa and temperature of 1500 °C. The growth rate, morphology, internal structure of overgrown layers, and defect-impurity composition of newly formed diamond were investigated. The type of growth patterns on faces, internal structure, and nitrogen content were found to be controlled by both the crystallographic orientation of the growth surfaces and the structure of the original faces of diamond seed crystals. An overgrown layer has a uniform structure on the {100} plane faces of synthetic diamond and a fibrillar (fibrous) structure on the faceted surfaces of a natural diamond cube. The {111} faces have a polycentric vicinal relief with numerous twin intergrowths and micro twin lamellae. The stable form of diamond growth under experimental conditions is a curved-face hexoctahedron with small cube faces. The nitrogen impurity concentration in overgrown layers varies depending on the growth direction and surface type, from 100 to 1100 ppm.

  16. Performance of a beam-multiplexing diamond crystal monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Diling Feng, Yiping; Lemke, Henrik T.; Fritz, David M.; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, J. M.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Robert, Aymeric; Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.; Terentyev, Sergey A.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Driel, Tim B. van

    2014-06-15

    A double-crystal diamond monochromator was recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source. It enables splitting pulses generated by the free electron laser in the hard x-ray regime and thus allows the simultaneous operations of two instruments. Both monochromator crystals are High-Pressure High-Temperature grown type-IIa diamond crystal plates with the (111) orientation. The first crystal has a thickness of ∼100 μm to allow high reflectivity within the Bragg bandwidth and good transmission for the other wavelengths for downstream use. The second crystal is about 300 μm thick and makes the exit beam of the monochromator parallel to the incoming beam with an offset of 600 mm. Here we present details on the monochromator design and its performance.

  17. A photoemission study of the diamond and the single crystal C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jin

    1994-03-01

    This report studied the elctronic structure of diamond (100) and diamond/metal interface and C{sub 60}, using angle-resolved and core level photoemission. The C(100)-(2X1) surface electronic structure was studied using both core level and angle resolved valence band photoemission spectroscopy. The surface component of the C 1s core level spectrum agrees with theoretical existence of only symmetrical dimers. In the case of metal/diamond interfaces, core level and valence photoelectron spectroscopy and LEED studies WERE MADE OF B and Sb on diamond (100) and (111) surfaces. In the case of single-crystal C{sub 60}, photoemission spectra show sharp molecular features, indicating that the molecular orbitals are relatively undisturbed in solid C{sub 60}.

  18. Pulse height decrease in a single-crystal CVD diamond detector under gold ion beam bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuki; Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    A charged-particle detector was fabricated using a single-crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition to examine its radiation hardness under heavy-ion bombardment. The irradiation dose dependence of the output pulse height from the diamond detector during gold ion beam bombardment at an energy of 7 MeV was investigated. The pulse height of output signals decreased with increasing amount of gold ion irradiation, and the pulse height was not recovered after applying a reverse-bias voltage. In addition, although only small amounts of vacancy and charge density generation inside the diamond detector were estimated and were found to be less than those in the Si detector by the Monte Carlo simulation of the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter, the diamond detector did not show superior radiation hardness to the Si charged-particle detector.

  19. Science and technology of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films for multifunctional devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Gruen, D. M.; Krauss, A. R.; Jayatissa, A.; Sumant, A.; Tucek, J.; Mancini, D.; Moldovan, N.; Erdemir, A.; Ersoy, D.; Gardos, M. N.; Busmann, H. G.; Meyer, E. M.

    2000-11-15

    MEMS devices are currently fabricated primarily in silicon because of the available surface machining technology. However, Si has poor mechanical and tribological properties, and practical MEMS devices are currently limited primarily to applications involving only bending and flexural motion, such as cantilever accelerometers and vibration sensors, However, because of the poor flexural strength and fracture toughness of Si, and the tendency of Si to adhere to hydrophyllic surfaces, even these simple devices have limited dynamic range. Future MEMS applications that involve significant rolling or sliding contact will require the use of new materials with significantly improved mechanical and tribological properties, and the ability to perform well in harsh environments. Diamond is a superhard material of high mechanical strength, exceptional chemical inertness, and outstanding thermal stability. The brittle fracture strength is 23 times that of Si, and the projected wear life of diamond MEMS moving mechanical assemblies (MEMS-MMAS) is 10,000 times greater than that of Si MMAs. However, as the hardest known material, diamond is notoriously difficult to fabricate. Conventional CVD thin film deposition methods offer an approach to the fabrication of ultra-small diamond structures, but the films have large grain size, high internal stress, poor intergranular adhesion, and very rough surfaces, and are consequently ill-suited for MEMS-MMA applications. A thin film deposition process has been developed that produces phase-pure ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) with morphological and mechanical properties that are ideally suited for MEMS applications in general, and MMA use in particular. We have developed lithographic techniques for the fabrication of diamond microstructure including cantilevers and multi-level devices, acting as precursors to micro-bearings and gears, making UNCD a promising material for the development of high performance MEMS devices.

  20. TH-C-19A-06: Measurements with a New Commercial Synthetic Single Crystal Diamond Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Laub, W; Crilly, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A commercial version of a synthetic single crystal diamond detector in a Scottky diode configuration was recently released as the new type 60019 microDiamond detector (PTW-Freiburg). In this study we investigate the dosimetric properties of this detector and explore if the use of the microDiamond detector can be expanded to high energy photon beams of up to 15MV and to large field measurements. Methods: Energy dependency was investigated. Photon and electron depth-dose curves were measured. Photon PDDs were measured with the Semiflex type 31010, microLion type 31018, P-Diode type 60016, SRS Diode type 60018, and the microDiamond type 60019 detector. Electron depth-dose curves were measured with a Markus chamber type 23343, an E Diode type 60017 and the microDiamond type 60019 detector (all PTW-Freiburg). Profiles were measured with the E-Diode and microDiamond at dose maximum depths. Results: The microDiamond detector shows no energy dependence in high energy photon or electron dosimetry. Electron PDD measurements with the E-Diode and microDiamond are in good agreement except for the bremsstrahlungs region, where values are about 0.5 % lower with the microDiamond detector. Markus detector measurements agree with E-Diode measurements in this region. For depths larger than dmax, depth-dose curves of photon beams measured with the microDiamond detector are in close agreement to those measured with the microLion detector for small fields and with those measured with a Semiflex 0.125cc ionization chamber for large fields. For profile measurements, microDiamond detector measurements agree well with microLion and P-Diode measurements in the high-dose region and the penumbra region. For areas outside the open field, P-Diode measurements are about 0.5–1.0% higher than microDiamond and microLion measurements. Conclusion: The investigated diamond detector is suitable for a wide range of applications in high energy photon and electron dosimetry and is interesting

  1. Single-Crystal Diamond Nanowire Tips for Ultrasensitive Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Degen, C L

    2015-12-01

    We report the fabrication, integration, and assessment of sharp diamond tips for ultrasensitive force microscopy experiments. Two types of tips, corresponding to the upper and lower halves of a diamond nanowire, were fabricated by top-down plasma etching from a single-crystalline substrate. The lower, surface-attached halves can be directly integrated into lithographically defined nanostructures, like cantilevers. The upper, detachable halves result in diamond nanowires with a tunable diameter (50-500 nm) and lengths of a few microns. Tip radii were around 10 nm and tip apex angles around 15°. We demonstrate the integration of diamond nanowires for use as scanning tips onto ultrasensitive pendulum-style silicon cantilevers. We find the noncontact friction and frequency jitter to be exceptionally low, with no degradation in the intrinsic mechanical quality factor (Q ≈ 130,000) down to tip-to-surface distances of about 10 nm. Our results are an encouraging step toward further improvement of the sensitivity and resolution of force-detected magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26517172

  2. Optical excitation and quenching of photocurrent in single-crystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jeson; Lourette, Sean; Rezai, Kristine; Kehayias, Pauli; Lake, Michael; Jarmola, Andrey; Nesladek, Milos; Bouchard, Louis; Hemmer, Philip; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    Diamond has found important applications in optoelectronics including electron emitters, windows for high power devices, and x-ray photon detectors, thanks to its unique properties, such as a wide bandgap, high thermal conductance and broadband optical transmittance. It is thus of paramount importance to investigate the photoelectric properties of diamond in greater details. Here we report the observation of optical quenching of photocurrent in diamond using simultaneous illumination of pulsed and continuous wave lasers at the same wavelength and different wavelengths. The quenched photocurrent shows a recovery related to the external bias voltage, pulsed optical power and wavelength. The recovery of the quenched photocurrent provides information on the nature of the electron trap states in diamond. Current: Academia Sinica, Taiwan.

  3. Photonic crystal and photonic wire device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rue, Richard; Sorel, Marc; Johnson, Nigel; Rahman, Faiz; Ironside, Charles; Cronin, Lee; Watson, Ian; Martin, Robert; Jin, Chongjun; Pottier, Pierre; Chong, Harold; Gnan, Marco; Jugessur, Aju; Camargo, Edilson; Erwin, Grant; Md Zain, Ahmad; Ntakis, Iraklis; Hobbs, Lois; Zhang, Hua; Armenise, Mario; Ciminelli, Caterina; Coquillat, Dominique

    2005-09-01

    Photonic devices that exploit photonic crystal (PhC) principles in a planar environment continue to provide a fertile field of research. 2D PhC based channel waveguides can provide both strong confinement and controlled dispersion behaviour. In conjunction with, for instance, various electro-optic, thermo-optic and other effects, a range of device functionality is accessible in very compact PhC channel-guide devices that offer the potential for high-density integration. Low enough propagation losses are now being obtained with photonic crystal channel-guide structures that their use in real applications has become plausible. Photonic wires (PhWs) can also provide strong confinement and low propagation losses. Bragg-gratings imposed on photonic wires can provide dispersion and frequency selection in device structures that are intrinsically simpler than 2D PhC channel guides--and can compete with them under realistic conditions.

  4. Electrocatalytic processes promoted by diamond nanoparticles in enzymatic biosensing devices.

    PubMed

    Briones, M; Petit-Domínguez, M D; Parra-Alfambra, A M; Vázquez, L; Pariente, F; Lorenzo, E; Casero, E

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a biosensing platform for lactate determination based on gold electrodes modified with diamond nanoparticles of 4nm of nominal diameter, employing the enzyme lactate oxidase and (hydroxymethyl)ferrocene (HMF) as redox mediator in solution. This system displays a response towards lactate that is completely different to those typically observed for lactate biosensors based on other nanomaterials, such as graphene, carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles or even diamond nanoparticles of greater size. We have observed by cyclic voltammetry that, under certain experimental conditions, an irreversible wave (E(0)=+0.15V) appears concomitantly with the typical Fe(II)/Fe(III) peaks (E(0)=+0.30V) of HMF. In this case, the biosensor response to lactate shows simultaneous electrocatalytic peaks at +0.15V and +0.30V, indicating the concurrence of different feedback mechanisms. The achievement of a biosensor response to lactate at +0.15V is very convenient in order to avoid potential interferences. The developed biosensor presents a linear concentration range from 0.02mM to 1.2mM, a sensitivity of 6.1μAmM(-1), a detection limit of 5.3μM and excellent stability. These analytical properties compare well with those obtained for other lactate-based biosensors that also include nanomaterials and employ HMF as redox mediator. PMID:27261566

  5. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Harris; Kass, Richard; Gan, K. K.

    2014-01-23

    With the LHC upgrades in 2013, and further LHC upgrades scheduled in 2018, most LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require more radiation hard technologies than presently available. At present all LHC experiments now have some form of diamond detector. As a result Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. Moreover CVD diamond is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the HL-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications. Our accomplishments include: • Developed a two U.S.companies to produce electronic grade diamond, • Worked with companies and acquired large area diamond pieces, • Performed radiation hardness tests using various proton energies: 70 MeV (Cyric, Japan), 800 MeV (Los Alamos), and 24 GeV (CERN).

  6. Scalable Fabrication of Integrated Nanophotonic Circuits on Arrays of Thin Single Crystal Diamond Membrane Windows.

    PubMed

    Piracha, Afaq H; Rath, Patrik; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Kühn, Stefan; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Prawer, Steven

    2016-05-11

    Diamond has emerged as a promising platform for nanophotonic, optical, and quantum technologies. High-quality, single crystalline substrates of acceptable size are a prerequisite to meet the demanding requirements on low-level impurities and low absorption loss when targeting large photonic circuits. Here, we describe a scalable fabrication method for single crystal diamond membrane windows that achieves three major goals with one fabrication method: providing high quality diamond, as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy; achieving homogeneously thin membranes, enabled by ion implantation; and providing compatibility with established planar fabrication via lithography and vertical etching. On such suspended diamond membranes we demonstrate a suite of photonic components as building blocks for nanophotonic circuits. Monolithic grating couplers are used to efficiently couple light between photonic circuits and optical fibers. In waveguide coupled optical ring resonators, we find loaded quality factors up to 66 000 at a wavelength of 1560 nm, corresponding to propagation loss below 7.2 dB/cm. Our approach holds promise for the scalable implementation of future diamond quantum photonic technologies and all-diamond photonic metrology tools. PMID:27111636

  7. Effects of catalyst height on diamond crystal morphology under high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya-Dong, Li; Xiao-Peng, Jia; Bing-Min, Yan; Ning, Chen; Chao, Fang; Yong, Li; Hong-An, Ma

    2016-04-01

    The effect of the catalyst height on the morphology of diamond crystal is investigated by means of temperature gradient growth (TGG) under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions with using a Ni-based catalyst in this article. The experimental results show that the morphology of diamond changes from an octahedral shape to a cub-octahedral shape as the catalyst height rises. Moreover, the finite element method (FEM) is used to simulate the temperature field of the melted catalyst/solvent. The results show that the temperature at the location of the seed diamond continues to decrease with the increase of catalyst height, which is conducive to changing the morphology of diamond. This work provides a new way to change the diamond crystal morphology. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51172089), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, the Natural Science Foundation of Guizhou Provincial Education Department (Grant No. KY[2013]183), and the Collaborative Fund of Science and Technology Office of Guizhou Province, China (Grant No. LH[2015]7232).

  8. Characterization of a synthetic single crystal diamond Schottky diode for radiotherapy electron beam dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Di Venanzio, C.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Falco, M. D.; Bagala, P.; Santoni, R.; Pimpinella, M.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric properties of synthetic single crystal diamond based Schottky diodes under irradiation with therapeutic electron beams from linear accelerators. Methods: A single crystal diamond detector was fabricated and tested under 6, 8, 10, 12, and 15 MeV electron beams. The detector performances were evaluated using three types of commercial detectors as reference dosimeters: an Advanced Markus plane parallel ionization chamber, a Semiflex cylindrical ionization chamber, and a p-type silicon detector. Preirradiation, linearity with dose, dose rate dependence, output factors, lateral field profiles, and percentage depth dose profiles were investigated and discussed. Results: During preirradiation the diamond detector signal shows a weak decrease within 0.7% with respect to the plateau value and a final signal stability of 0.1% (1{sigma}) is observed after about 5 Gy. A good linear behavior of the detector response as a function of the delivered dose is observed with deviations below {+-}0.3% in the dose range from 0.02 to 10 Gy. In addition, the detector response is dose rate independent, with deviations below 0.3% in the investigated dose rate range from 0.17 to 5.45 Gy/min. Percentage depth dose curves obtained from the diamond detector are in good agreement with the ones from the reference dosimeters. Lateral beam profile measurements show an overall good agreement among detectors, taking into account their respective geometrical features. The spatial resolution of solid state detectors is confirmed to be better than that of ionization chambers, being the one from the diamond detector comparable to that of the silicon diode. A good agreement within experimental uncertainties was also found in terms of output factor measurements between the diamond detector and reference dosimeters. Conclusions: The observed dosimetric properties indicate that the tested diamond detector is a suitable candidate for clinical electron beam dosimetry.

  9. White electroluminescence of n-ZnO:Al/p-diamond heterostructure devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Can; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Li-Jun; Pan, Xiu-Fang; Li, Song-Kun; Jing, Long-Wei

    2013-08-01

    An n-ZnO:Al/p-boron-doped diamond heterostructure electroluminescent device is produced, and a rectifying behavior can be observed. The electroluminescence spectrum at room temperature exhibits two visible bands centred at 450 nm-485 nm (blue emission) and 570 nm-640 nm (yellow emission). Light emission with a luminance of 15 cd/m2 is observed from the electroluminescent device at a forward applied voltage of 85 V, which is distinguished from white light by the naked eye.

  10. Ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films for MEMS and moving mechanical assembly devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Jayatissa, A.; Sumant, A.; Tucek, J.; Auciello, O.; Mancini, D.; Moldovan, N.; Erdemir, A.; Ersoy, D.; Gardos, M. N.; Busmann, H. G.; Meyer, E. M.; Ding, M. Q.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Raytheon Electronic Systems Comp.; Fraunhofer Inst. for Applied Materials Science; Univ. of Bremen; Beijing Inst. of Electronics

    2001-11-01

    MEMS devices are currently fabricated primarily in silicon because of the available surface machining technology. A major problem with the Si-based MEMS technology is that Si has poor mechanical and tribological properties [J.J. Sniegowski, in: B. Bushan (Ed.), Tribology Issues and Opportunities in MEMS, Kluwer Academic Publisher, The Netherlands, 1998, p. 325; A.P. Lee, A.P. Pisano, M.G. Lim, Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 276 (1992) 67.], and practical MEMS devices are currently limited primarily to applications involving only bending and flexural motion, such as cantilever accelerometers and vibration sensors. However, because of the poor flexural strength and fracture toughness of Si, and the tendency of Si to adhere to hydrophilic surfaces, even these simple devices have limited dynamic range. Future MEMS applications that involve significant rolling or sliding contact will require the use of new materials with significantly improved mechanical and tribological properties, and the ability to perform well in harsh environments, Diamond is a superhard material of high mechanical strength, exceptional chemical inertness, and outstanding thermal stability. The brittle fracture strength is 23 times that of Si, and the projected wear life of diamond MEMS moving mechanical assemblies (MEMS MMAs) is 10 000 times greater than that of Si MMAs. However, as the hardest known material, diamond is notoriously difficult to fabricate. Conventional CVD thin film deposition methods offer an approach to the fabrication of ultra-small diamond structures, but the films have large grain size, high internal stress, poor intergranular adhesion, and very rough surfaces, and are consequently ill-suited for MEMS MMA applications. Diamond-like films are also being investigated for application to MEMS devices. However, they involve mainly physical vapor deposition methods that are not suitable for good conformal deposition on high aspect ratio features, and generally they do not exhibit the

  11. Impact of three-dimensional stacking silicon on diamond substrate for the electrostatic discharge protection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yuho; Nakagawa, Kentaro; Yoshida, Wataru; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the electrostatic-discharge (ESD) protection capabilities of the protection devices fabricated on a silicon-on-diamond (SOD) structure and a conventional Si substrate are compared. The results showed that the ESD protection capability of the SOD substrate is higher than that of the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. We also evaluate the ESD protection device suitable for the SOD structure. In addition, we propose the three-dimensional (3D) stacking structure suitable for a power supply on a chip (power-SoC) and the best location for the implementation of the ESD protection device based on the results of device simulations.

  12. Diamond single micro-crystals and graphitic micro-balls’ formation in plasmoids under atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Kartaschew, Konstantin; Bibinov, Nikita; Havenith, Martina; Awakowicz, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Plasmoids are produced in the argon filamentary discharge. By going through hydrocarbon gas, the plasmoids collect carbon material. These plasmoids produce diamond single micro-crystals upon contact on the inner surface of cavity in air atmosphere. When the plasmoid’s contact point on the substrate is in inert atmosphere, they deposit their material as micro-balls with a graphite core. The dimension and nature of the micro-materials deposited by the plasmoids are analysed using scanning electron microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy. The compressive residual stress in the deposited micro-diamonds varies in the range -7 to -21 GPa.

  13. Quasi-two-dimensional diamond crystals: Deposition from a gaseous phase and structural-morphological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, A. M.; Ismagilov, R. R.; Ashkinazi, E. E.; Orekhov, A. S.; Malykhin, S. A.; Obraztsov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    Diamond films predominantly consisting of plane micrometer-size crystallites with a thickness of several dozen nanometers have been deposited from a methane-hydrogen gas mixture activated by a dc gas discharge. The crystallite structure has been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and diffraction. A possible mechanism of formation of plane crystallites during deposition of diamond from the gas phase has been discussed. It has been shown that the results agree with the theoretical concepts of formation of crystals with a face-centered cubic lattice.

  14. Liquid crystal devices for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2007-11-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) devices for Photonics applications is a hot topic of research. Such elements begin to appear in Photonics market. Passive elements for fiber optical communication systems (DWDM components) based on LC cells can successfully compete with the other elements used for the purpose, such as micro electromechanical (MEM), thermo-optical, opto-mechanical or acousto-optical devices. Application of nematic and ferroelectric LC for high speed communication systems, producing elements that are extremely fast, stable, durable, of low loss, operable over a wide temperature range, and that require small operating voltages and extremely low power consumption. The known LC applications in fiber optics enable to produce switches, filters, attenuators, equalizers, polarization controllers, phase emulators and other fiber optical components. Good robustness due to the absence of moving parts and compatibility with VLSI technology, excellent parameters in a large photonic wavelength range, whereas the complexity of the design and the cost of the device are equivalent to regular passive matrix LC displays makes LC fiber optical devices very attractive for mass production. We have already successfully fabricated certain prototypes of the optical switches based on ferroelectric and nematic LC materials. The electrooptical modes used for the purpose included the light polarization rotation, voltage controllable diffraction and fast switching of the LC refractive index. We used the powerful software to optimize the LC modulation characteristics. Use of photo-alignment technique pioneered by us makes it possible to develop new LC fiber components. Almost all the criteria of perfect LC alignment are met in case of azo-dye layers. We have already used azo-dye materials to align LC in superthin photonic holes, curved and 3D surfaces and as cladding layers in microring silicon based resonators. The prototypes of new LC efficient Photonics devices are envisaged. Controllable

  15. An Isothermal Device Configuration for Diamond Based Photon-Enhanced Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tianyin; Koeck, Franz; Nemanich, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Diamond can obtain a negative electron affinity (NEA) after hydrogen termination. With NEA and n-type doping, a low effective work function and efficient thermionic emission has been observed from these diamond films. Photo-induced electron emission from nitrogen doped diamond with visible light illumination has also been established by our group. Recently several reports have described efficient energy conversion based on the photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) mechanism. This study proposes a multi-layer emitter and collector structure for an isothermal PETE converter. The emitter structure is based on an n-type NEA diamond film deposited on a p-type Si substrate to enable electron emission across a vacuum gap. In this structure the above-bandgap light is absorbed in the Si and establishs an enhanced electron population for emission through the low work function surface, while sub-bandgap light is absorbed in the collector for transfer to a heat engine. Spectroscopy measurements of the n-type diamond on Si indicate strong electron emissivity with photon illumination, and the emission intensity is significantly increased at elevated temperatures. A simplified model describing the efficiency and performance of an isothermal PETE device is presented. This research is supported through ONR under grant number # N00014-10-1-0540.

  16. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harris Kagan; K.K. Gan; Richard Kass

    2009-03-31

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2013, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  17. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer Wallny

    2012-10-15

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2010, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2015, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed and operational in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  18. Science and technology of piezoelectric/diamond heterostructures for monolithically integrated high performance MEMS/NEMS/CMOS devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Sumant, A. V.; Hiller, J.; Kabius, B.; Ma, Z.; Srinivasan, S.

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes the fundamental and applied science performed to integrate piezoelectric PbZr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} and AlN films with a novel mechanically robust ultrananocrystalline diamond layer to enable a new generation of low voltage/high-performance piezoactuated hybrid piezoelectric/diamond MEMS/NEMS devices.

  19. Topology and bistability in liquid crystal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, A.; Newton, C. J. P.; Robbins, J. M.; Zyskin, M.

    2007-05-15

    We study nematic liquid crystal configurations in a prototype bistable device--the post aligned bistable nematic (PABN) cell. Working within the Oseen-Frank continuum model, we describe the liquid crystal configuration by a unit-vector field n, in a model version of the PABN cell. First, we identify four distinct topologies in this geometry. We explicitly construct trial configurations with these topologies which are used as initial conditions for a numerical solver, based on the finite-element method. The morphologies and energetics of the corresponding numerical solutions qualitatively agree with experimental observations and suggest a topological mechanism for bistability in the PABN cell geometry.

  20. Clinical radiation therapy measurements with a new commercial synthetic single crystal diamond detector.

    PubMed

    Laub, Wolfram U; Crilly, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A commercial version of a synthetic single crystal diamond detector (SCDD) in a Schottky diode configuration was recently released as the new type 60019 microDiamond detector (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). In this study we investigate the dosimetric properties of this detector to independently confirm that findings from the developing group of the SCDDs still hold true for the commercial version of the SCDDs. We further explore if the use of the microDiamond detector can be expanded to high-energy photon beams of up to 15 MV and to large field measure- ments. Measurements were performed with an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator delivering 6, 10, and 15 MV X-rays, as well as 6, 9, 12, 15, and 20 MeV electron beams. The dependence of the microdiamond detector response on absorbed dose after connecting the detector was investigated. Furthermore, the dark current of the diamond detector was observed after irradiation. Results are compared to similar results from measurements with a diamond detector type 60003. Energy dependency was investigated, as well. Photon depth-dose curves were measured for field sizes 3 × 3, 10 × 10, and 30 × 30 cm2. PDDs were measured with the Semiflex type 31010 detector, microLion type 31018 detector, P Diode type 60016, SRS Diode type 60018, and the microDiamond type 60019 detector (all PTW-Freiburg). Photon profiles were measured at a depth of 10 cm. Electron depth-dose curves normalized to the dose maximum were measured with the 14 × 14 cm2 electron cone. PDDs were measured with a Markus chamber type 23343, an E Diode type 60017 and the microDiamond type 60019 detector (all PTW-Freiburg). Profiles were measured with the E Diode and microDiamond at half of D90, D90, D70, and D50 depths and for electron cone sizes of 6 × 6 cm2, 14 × 14 cm2, and 20 × 20 cm2. Within a tol- erance of 0.5% detector response of the investigated detector was stable without any preirradiation. After preirradition with approximately 250 cGy the detector response

  1. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  2. Numerical modeling of thermal loading of diamond crystal in X-ray FEL oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-Qi; Zhang, Qing-Min; Guo, Yu-Hang; Li, Kai; Deng, Hai-Xiao

    2016-04-01

    Due to high reflectivity and high resolution of X-ray pulses, diamond is one of the most popular Bragg crystals serving as the reflecting mirror and mono–chromator in the next generation of free electron lasers (FELs). The energy deposition of X-rays will result in thermal heating, and thus lattice expansion of the diamond crystal, which may degrade the performance of X-ray FELs. In this paper, the thermal loading effect of diamond crystal for X-ray FEL oscillators has been systematically studied by combined simulation with Geant4 and ANSYS, and its dependence on the environmental temperature, crystal size, X-ray pulse repetition rate and pulse energy are presented. Our results show that taking the thermal loading effects into account, X-ray FEL oscillators are still robust and promising with an optimized design. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175240, 11205234, 11322550) and Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University (IRT1280)

  3. Investigation of focused ion beam induced damage in single crystal diamond tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Zhen; Luo, Xichun

    2015-08-01

    In this work, transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to characterise the focused ion beam (FIB) induced damage layer in a single crystal diamond tool under different FIB processing voltages. The results obtained from the experiments and the simulations are in good agreement. The results indicate that during FIB processing cutting tools made of natural single crystal diamond, the energetic Ga+ collision will create an impulse-dependent damage layer at the irradiated surface. For the tested beam voltages in a typical FIB system (from 8 kV to 30 kV), the thicknesses of the damaged layers formed on a diamond tool surface increased from 11.5 nm to 27.6 nm. The dynamic damage process of FIB irradiation and ion-solid interactions physics leading to processing defects in FIB milling were emulated by MD simulations. The research findings from this study provide the in-depth understanding of the wear of nanoscale multi-tip diamond tools considering the FIB irradiation induced doping and defects during the tool fabrication process.

  4. Optical emission diagnostics of plasmas in chemical vapor deposition of single-crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hemawan, Kadek W. Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-15

    A key aspect of single crystal diamond growth via microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition is in-process control of the local plasma–substrate environment, that is, plasma gas phase concentrations of activated species at the plasma boundary layer near the substrate surface. Emission spectra of the plasma relative to the diamond substrate inside the microwave plasma reactor chamber have been analyzed via optical emission spectroscopy. The spectra of radical species such as CH, C{sub 2}, and H (Balmer series) important for diamond growth were identified and analyzed. The emission intensities of these electronically excited species were found to be more dependent on operating pressure than on microwave power. Plasma gas temperatures were calculated from measurements of the C{sub 2} Swan band (d{sup 3}Π → a{sup 3}Π transition) system. The plasma gas temperature ranges from 2800 to 3400 K depending on the spatial location of the plasma ball, microwave power and operating pressure. Addition of Ar into CH{sub 4}+H{sub 2} plasma input gas mixture has little influence on the Hα, Hβ, and Hγ intensities and single-crystal diamond growth rates.

  5. Figure of merit of diamond power devices based on accurately estimated impact ionization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    Although a high breakdown voltage or field is considered as a major advantage of diamond, there has been a large difference in breakdown voltages or fields of diamond devices in literature. Most of these apparently contradictory results did not correctly reflect material properties because of specific device designs, such as punch-through structure and insufficient edge termination. Once these data were removed, the remaining few results, including a record-high breakdown field of 20 MV/cm, were theoretically reproduced, exactly calculating ionization integrals based on the ionization coefficients that were obtained after compensating for possible errors involved in reported theoretical values. In this compensation, we newly developed a method for extracting an ionization coefficient from an arbitrary relationship between breakdown voltage and doping density in the Chynoweth's framework. The breakdown field of diamond was estimated to depend on the doping density more than other materials, and accordingly required to be compared at the same doping density. The figure of merit (FOM) of diamond devices, obtained using these breakdown data, was comparable to the FOMs of 4H-SiC and Wurtzite-GaN devices at room temperature, but was projected to be larger than the latter by more than one order of magnitude at higher temperatures about 300 °C. Considering the relatively undeveloped state of diamond technology, there is room for further enhancement of the diamond FOM, improving breakdown voltage and mobility. Through these investigations, junction breakdown was found to be initiated by electrons or holes in a p--type or n--type drift layer, respectively. The breakdown voltages in the two types of drift layers differed from each other in a strict sense but were practically the same. Hence, we do not need to care about the conduction type of drift layers, but should rather exactly calculate the ionization integral without approximating ionization coefficients by a power

  6. Design and fabrication of nano-scale single crystal diamond cutting tool by focused ion beam (FIB) milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seung-Yub

    2015-07-01

    Micro/nanoscale diamond cutting tools used in ultra-precision machining can be fabricated by precision grinding, but it is hard to fabricate a tool with a nanometric cutting edge and complex configurations. High-precision geometry accuracy and special shapes for microcutting tools with sharp edges can be achieved by FIB milling. Because the FIB milling method induces much smaller machining stress compared with conventional precision grinding methods. In this study, the FIB milling characteristics of single-crystal diamond were investigated, along with methods for decreasing the FIB-induced damage on diamond tools. Lift-off process method and Pt(Platinum) coating process method with FIB milling were investigated to reduce the damage layer on diamond substrate and quadrilateral-shaped single-crystal diamond cutting tool with cutting edge width under 500 nm were obtained.

  7. Cryptic iridescence in a fossil weevil generated by single diamond photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Maria E.; Saranathan, Vinod; Locatelli, Emma R.; Noh, Heeso; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Orr, Patrick J.; Cao, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Nature's most spectacular colours originate in integumentary tissue architectures that scatter light via nanoscale modulations of the refractive index. The most intricate biophotonic nanostructures are three-dimensional crystals with opal, single diamond or single gyroid lattices. Despite intense interest in their optical and structural properties, the evolution of such nanostructures is poorly understood, due in part to a lack of data from the fossil record. Here, we report preservation of single diamond (Fd-3m) three-dimensional photonic crystals in scales of a 735 000 year old specimen of the brown Nearctic weevil Hypera diversipunctata from Gold Run, Canada, and in extant conspecifics. The preserved red to green structural colours exhibit near-field brilliancy yet are inconspicuous from afar; they most likely had cryptic functions in substrate matching. The discovery of pristine fossil examples indicates that the fossil record is likely to yield further data on the evolution of three-dimensional photonic nanostructures and their biological functions. PMID:25185581

  8. Cholesteric liquid crystal devices with nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Shie-Chang; Hwang, Shug-June; Hung, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Sheng-Chieh

    2010-10-11

    A broadband cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) device with a multi-domain structure is demonstrated by using an aggregation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles in the CLC layer. The aggregation pattern of the self-assembled POSS nanoparticles depends on the concentration of POSS doped in the mixture of POSS/CLC and the cooling rate of the mixture from a temperature higher than the clear point. POSS-induced changes in the bulk and surface properties of the cholesteric cells, such as a promotion of homeotropic alignment, help to form a cholesteric structure with a broadband reflection of light; the latter can be used for improvement of bistable CLC devices. A higher POSS concentration and a higher cooling rate both improve the appearance of the black-white CLC device. PMID:20941154

  9. Nanoimplantation and Purcell enhancement of single nitrogen-vacancy centers in photonic crystal cavities in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Riedrich-Möller, Janine; Becher, Christoph; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Meijer, Jan; Pauly, Christoph; Mücklich, Frank; Markham, Matthew; Edmonds, Andrew M.

    2015-06-01

    We present the controlled creation of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers via ion implantation at the center of a photonic crystal cavity which is fabricated in an ultrapure, single crystal diamond membrane. High-resolution placement of NV centers is achieved using collimation of a 5 keV-nitrogen ion beam through a pierced tip of an atomic force microscope. We demonstrate coupling of the implanted NV centers' broad band fluorescence to a cavity mode and observe Purcell enhancement of the spontaneous emission. The results are in good agreement with a master equation model for the cavity coupling.

  10. Hybrid Quantum Device with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond Coupled to Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Bo; Xiang, Ze-Liang; Rabl, Peter; Nori, Franco

    2016-07-01

    We show that nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond interfaced with a suspended carbon nanotube carrying a dc current can facilitate a spin-nanomechanical hybrid device. We demonstrate that strong magnetomechanical interactions between a single NV spin and the vibrational mode of the suspended nanotube can be engineered and dynamically tuned by external control over the system parameters. This spin-nanomechanical setup with strong, intrinsic, and tunable magnetomechanical couplings allows for the construction of hybrid quantum devices with NV centers and carbon-based nanostructures, as well as phonon-mediated quantum information processing with spin qubits. PMID:27419577

  11. Hybrid Quantum Device with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond Coupled to Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng-Bo; Xiang, Ze-Liang; Rabl, Peter; Nori, Franco

    2016-07-01

    We show that nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond interfaced with a suspended carbon nanotube carrying a dc current can facilitate a spin-nanomechanical hybrid device. We demonstrate that strong magnetomechanical interactions between a single NV spin and the vibrational mode of the suspended nanotube can be engineered and dynamically tuned by external control over the system parameters. This spin-nanomechanical setup with strong, intrinsic, and tunable magnetomechanical couplings allows for the construction of hybrid quantum devices with NV centers and carbon-based nanostructures, as well as phonon-mediated quantum information processing with spin qubits.

  12. Observations on the crystallization of spodumene from aqueous solutions in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Jianking; Chou, I-Ming; Yuan, Shunda; Burruss, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Crystallization experiments were conducted in a new type of hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC; type V) using LiAlSi2O6 (S) gel and H2O (W) as starting materials. A total of 21 experiments were performed at temperatures up to 950°C and pressures up to 788 MPa. In the samples with relatively low W/S ratios, many small crystals formed in the melt phase during cooling. In those with high W/S ratios, only a few crystals with smooth surfaces crystallized from the aqueous fluid in the presence of melt droplets, which were gradually consumed during crystal growth, indicating rapid transfer of material from the melt to the crystals through the aqueous fluid. The nucleation of crystals started at 710 (±70)°C and 520 (±80) MPa, and crystal growth ended at 570 (±40)°C and 320 (±90) MPa, with the cooling P-T path within the stability field of spodumene + quartz in the S-W system. The observed linear crystal growth rates in the aqueous phase, calculated by dividing the maximum length of a single crystal by the duration of the entire growth step, were 4.7 × 10−6 and 5.7 × 10−6 cm s−1 for the cooling rates of 0.5 and 1°C min−1, respectively. However, a rapid crystal growth rate of 3.6 × 10−5 cm s−1 in the aqueous fluid was observed when the components were supplied by nearby melt droplets. Our results show that when crystals nucleate in the aqueous fluid instead of the melt phase, there are fewer nuclei formed, and they grow much faster due to the low viscosity of the aqueous fluid, which accelerates diffusion of components for the growth of crystals. Therefore, the large crystals in granitic pegmatite can crystallize directly from aqueous fluids rather than hydrosilicate melt.

  13. Evaluation of freestanding boron-doped diamond grown by chemical vapour deposition as substrates for vertical power electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issaoui, R.; Achard, J.; Tallaire, A.; Silva, F.; Gicquel, A.; Bisaro, R.; Servet, B.; Garry, G.; Barjon, J.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, 4 × 4 mm2 freestanding boron-doped diamond single crystals with thickness up to 260 μm have been fabricated by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition. The boron concentrations measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy were 1018 to 1020 cm-3 which is in a good agreement with the values calculated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, thus indicating that almost all incorporated boron is electrically active. The dependence of lattice parameters and crystal mosaicity on boron concentrations have also been extracted from high resolution x-ray diffraction experiments on (004) planes. The widths of x-ray rocking curves have globally shown the high quality of the material despite a substantial broadening of the peak, indicating a decrease of structural quality with increasing boron doping levels. Finally, the suitability of these crystals for the development of vertical power electronic devices has been confirmed by four-point probe measurements from which electrical resistivities as low as 0.26 Ω cm have been obtained.

  14. Fabrication of triangular nanobeam waveguide networks in bulk diamond using single-crystal silicon hard masks

    SciTech Connect

    Bayn, I.; Mouradian, S.; Li, L.; Goldstein, J. A.; Schröder, T.; Zheng, J.; Chen, E. H.; Gaathon, O.; Englund, Dirk; Lu, M.; Stein, A.; Ruggiero, C. A.; Salzman, J.; Kalish, R.

    2014-11-24

    A scalable approach for integrated photonic networks in single-crystal diamond using triangular etching of bulk samples is presented. We describe designs of high quality factor (Q = 2.51 × 10{sup 6}) photonic crystal cavities with low mode volume (V{sub m} = 1.062 × (λ/n){sup 3}), which are connected via waveguides supported by suspension structures with predicted transmission loss of only 0.05 dB. We demonstrate the fabrication of these structures using transferred single-crystal silicon hard masks and angular dry etching, yielding photonic crystal cavities in the visible spectrum with measured quality factors in excess of Q = 3 × 10{sup 3}.

  15. FEA analysis of diamond as IMCA{close_quote}s monochromator crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chrzas, J.; Cimpoes, S.; Ivanov, I.N.

    1996-09-01

    A great deal of effort has been make in recent years in the field of undulator high heat load optics, and currently there are several tractable options [Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 69}, 2792 (1994); Nucl. Instrum. Methods A {bold 266}, 517 (1988); Nucl. Instrum. Methods A {bold 239}, 555 (1993)]. Diamond crystals offer some attractive options{endash}water as the coolant, the use of established monochromator mechanisms, simpler monochromator design as compared to the use of liquid nitrogen or gallium. The use of diamond crystals as the optical elements in a double-crystal monochromator for the IMCA-CAT and MR-CAT ID beamlines has been studied. A first crystal mounting scheme using an indium-gallium eutectic as the heat transfer medium developed in collaboration with DND-CAT and M. Hart will be presented. A FEA analysis of the IMCA-CAT ID beamline arrangement using the APS undulator A as the radiaiton source will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Response function stability of single crystal diamond detectors to 14 MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zbořil, Miroslav Zimbal, Andreas

    2014-11-15

    Detectors based on single crystal synthetic diamond show promise as neutron spectrometers for the ITER project. In this work, the stability of the response function of two diamond detectors was tested at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) accelerator using a 14 MeV neutron field and a method of time-resolved fluence monitoring. In addition, measurements at the PTB ion-microbeam were made to investigate the charge collection properties of the detectors in more detail. The {sup 12}C(n,α){sup 9}Be peak response of one of the detectors was found to be stable within 1% after irradiation with a neutron fluence of 8 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. The absolute value of the peak response of this detector was determined as 8.65(26) × 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}.

  17. Response function stability of single crystal diamond detectors to 14 MeV neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zbořil, Miroslav; Zimbal, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Detectors based on single crystal synthetic diamond show promise as neutron spectrometers for the ITER project. In this work, the stability of the response function of two diamond detectors was tested at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) accelerator using a 14 MeV neutron field and a method of time-resolved fluence monitoring. In addition, measurements at the PTB ion-microbeam were made to investigate the charge collection properties of the detectors in more detail. The (12)C(n,α)(9)Be peak response of one of the detectors was found to be stable within 1% after irradiation with a neutron fluence of 8 × 10(9) cm(-2). The absolute value of the peak response of this detector was determined as 8.65(26) × 10(-5) cm(2). PMID:25430252

  18. Effect of nitrogen on the growth of boron doped single crystal diamond

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Karna, Sunil; Vohra, Yogesh

    2013-11-18

    Boron-doped single crystal diamond films were grown homoepitaxially on synthetic (100) Type Ib diamond substrates using microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition. A modification in surface morphology of the film with increasing boron concentration in the plasma has been observed using atomic force microscopy. Use of nitrogen during boron doping has been found to improve the surface morphology and the growth rate of films but it lowers the electrical conductivity of the film. The Raman spectra indicated a zone center optical phonon mode along with a few additional bands at the lower wavenumber regions. The change in the peak profilemore » of the zone center optical phonon mode and its downshift were observed with the increasing boron content in the film. Furthermore, sharpening and upshift of Raman line was observed in the film that was grown in presence of nitrogen along with diborane in process gas.« less

  19. Diamond turning of L-arginine phosphate, a new organic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, B.A.; Syn, K.; Velsko, S.P. )

    1989-10-15

    We have demonstrated that single point diamond turning can be used to generate high optical quality finished surfaces on a new organic nonlinear crystal, L-arginine phosphate (LAP). The proper choice of cutting conditions can produce surfaces with {lt}5-A rms local roughness. Local softening or melting near the cutting tool tip may play a key role in the machining process by ensuring that material is removed by ductile cutting rather than brittle fracture. At the same time, the low melting temperature of LAP makes lubrication and cooling especially important to prevent extensive melting and tool fouling. In spite of the presence of a weak cleavage plane in LAP, the surface quality is relatively insensitive to crystallographic orientation. Tool wear is apparently negligible, so that surface flatness is governed by the stability of the diamond turning machine. These results suggest that it may be possible to fabricate large aperture LAP harmonic converters for use in inertial confinement fusion lasers.

  20. Effect of nitrogen on the growth of boron doped single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Karna, Sunil; Vohra, Yogesh

    2013-11-18

    Boron-doped single crystal diamond films were grown homoepitaxially on synthetic (100) Type Ib diamond substrates using microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition. A modification in surface morphology of the film with increasing boron concentration in the plasma has been observed using atomic force microscopy. Use of nitrogen during boron doping has been found to improve the surface morphology and the growth rate of films but it lowers the electrical conductivity of the film. The Raman spectra indicated a zone center optical phonon mode along with a few additional bands at the lower wavenumber regions. The change in the peak profile of the zone center optical phonon mode and its downshift were observed with the increasing boron content in the film. Furthermore, sharpening and upshift of Raman line was observed in the film that was grown in presence of nitrogen along with diborane in process gas.

  1. Parabolic single-crystal diamond lenses for coherent x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentyev, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir; Polyakov, Sergey; Zholudev, Sergey; Snigirev, Anatoly; Polikarpov, Maxim; Kolodziej, Tomasz; Qian, Jun; Zhou, Hua; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate parabolic single-crystal diamond compound refractive lenses designed for coherent x-ray imaging resilient to extreme thermal and radiation loading expected from next generation light sources. To ensure the preservation of coherence and resilience, the lenses are manufactured from the highest-quality single-crystalline synthetic diamond material grown by a high-pressure high-temperature technique. Picosecond laser milling is applied to machine lenses to parabolic shapes with a ≃ 1 μ m precision and surface roughness. A compound refractive lens comprised of six lenses with a radius of curvature R = 200 μ m at the vertex of the parabola and a geometrical aperture A = 900 μ m focuses 10 keV x-ray photons from an undulator source at the Advanced Photon Source facility to a focal spot size of ≃ 20 × 90 μ m 2 with a gain factor of ≃ 50 - 100 .

  2. GaN grown on (1 1 1) single crystal diamond substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussaigne, A.; Malinverni, M.; Martin, D.; Castiglia, A.; Grandjean, N.

    2009-10-01

    GaN epilayers are grown on (1 1 1) oriented single crystal diamond substrate by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy. Each step of the growth is monitored in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction. It is found that a two-dimensional epitaxial wurtzite GaN film is obtained. The surface morphology is smooth: the rms roughness is as low as 1.3 nm for 2×2 μm 2 scan. Photoluminescence measurements reveal pretty good optical properties. The GaN band edge is centred at 3.469 eV with a linewidth of 5 meV. These results demonstrate that GaN heteroepitaxially grown on diamond opens new rooms for high power electronic applications.

  3. Single-crystal diamond refractive lens for focusing X-rays in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Baryshev, Sergey; Butler, J. E.; Antipova, O.; Liu, Zunping; Stoupin, S.

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication and performance evaluation of single-crystal diamond refractive X-ray lenses of which the surfaces are paraboloids of revolution for focusing X-rays in two dimensions simultaneously are reported. The lenses were manufactured using a femtosecond laser micromachining process and tested using X-ray synchrotron radiation. Such lenses were stacked together to form a standard compound refractive lens (CRL). Owing to the superior physical properties of the material, diamond CRLs could become indispensable wavefront-preserving primary focusing optics for X-ray free-electron lasers and the next-generation synchrotron storage rings. They can be used for highly efficient refocusing of the extremely bright X-ray sources for secondary optical schemes with limited aperture such as nanofocusing Fresnel zone plates and multilayer Laue lenses.

  4. Thermal property characterization of single crystal diamond with varying isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, L.

    1993-01-01

    The mirage-effect/thermal wave technique as a modern technique for thermal property characterization is described. The thermal diffusivity of a material is determined by measuring the time and space varying temperature distribution (thermal wave) in the material generated by an intensity modulated heating laser beam. These thermal waves are detected through the deflection of a probe laser beam due to modulation of gradient of the index of refraction (mirage effect) either in the air above the specimens (the in-air technique) or in the specimen itself (the in-solid technique). Three-dimensional theories, for both in-air and in-solid mirage techniques, are represented. In order to extract the material parameters by comparing the theory with experimental data, an extensive data analysis procedure based on multiparameter-least-squares has been developed. The experimental and data analysis details are discussed. Topics concerns with the quality and reliability of the measurements are addressed. This technique has been successfully applied to the thermal property characterization of single crystal diamond with varying isotope contents. The results showed a 50% enhancement in the thermal conductivity by removal of C[sup 13] content from 1.1% to 0.1% in diamond at room temperature. The technique has also been adapted to function in cryogenic temperatures. The temperature dependence of thermal conductivity in the temperature range 80-378K for natural IIA specimen and 187-375K for isotopically enriched specimen are obtained, the former results agree with previous works and the latter results demonstrate the isotope effect on the thermal conductivity of single crystal diamond consistently in a large temperature range. The physical source of this enhancement in diffusivity due to the isotope effect in diamond is discussed. The discussion is based on the full Callaway's theory with emphasizing the role of N-processes in the phonon scattering mechanism.

  5. Development and high temperature testing by 14 MeV neutron irradiation of single crystal diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilotti, R.; Angelone, M.; Pagano, G.; Loreti, S.; Pillon, M.; Sarto, F.; Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, the performances of single crystal diamond detectors "ad hoc" designed to operate at high temperature are reported. The detectors were realized using commercial CVD single crystal diamond films, 500 micron thick with metal contacts deposited by sputtering method on each side. The new detector layout is based upon mechanical contacts between the diamond film and the electric ground. The detector was first characterized by measuring the leakage current as function of temperature and applied biasing voltage (I-V characteristics). The results obtained using two different metal contacts, Pt and Ag respectively, while irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons at the Frascati neutron generator (FNG) are reported and compared. It is shown that diamond detectors with Ag metal contacts can be properly operated in spectrometric mode up to 240oC with energy resolution (FWHM) of about 3.5%.

  6. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus.

    PubMed

    Nocente, M; Cazzaniga, C; Tardocchi, M; Binda, F; Eriksson, J; Giacomelli, L; Muraro, A; Rebai, M; Sharapov, S; Gorini, G

    2015-10-01

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices. PMID:26520949

  7. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Muraro, A.; Binda, F.; Eriksson, J.; Sharapov, S.; Collaboration:

    2015-10-15

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices.

  8. Enhancing the stability of microplasma device utilizing diamond coated carbon nanotubes as cathode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tinghsun; Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Tai, Nyanhwa E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw; Kunuku, Srinivasu; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I-Nan E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw

    2014-06-02

    This paper reports the enhanced stability of a microplasma device by using hybrid-granular-structured diamond (HiD) film coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as cathode, which overcomes the drawback of short life time in the CNTs-based one. The microplasma device can be operated more than 210 min without showing any sign of degradation, whereas the CNTs-based one can last only 50 min. Besides the high robustness against the Ar-ion bombardment, the HiD/CNTs material also possesses superior electron field emission properties with low turn-on field of 3.2 V/μm, which is considered as the prime factor for the improved plasma illumination performance of the devices.

  9. Effects of FeNi-phosphorus-carbon system on crystal growth of diamond under high pressure and high temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mei-Hua; Bi, Ning; Li, Shang-Sheng; Su, Tai-Chao; Zhou, Ai-Guo; Hu, Qiang; Jia, Xiao-Peng; Ma, Hong-An

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports the crystal growth of diamond from the FeNi-Carbon system with additive phosphorus at high pressures and high temperatures of 5.4-5.8 GPa and 1280-1360 °C. Attributed to the presence of additive phosphorus, the pressure and temperature condition, morphology, and color of diamond crystals change obviously. The pressure and temperature condition of diamond growth increases evidently with the increase of additive phosphorus content and results in the moving up of the V-shape region. The surfaces of the diamonds also become coarse as the additive phosphorus added in the growth system. Raman spectra indicate that diamonds grown from the FeNi-phosphorus-carbon system have more crystal defects and impurities. This work provides a new way to enrich the doping of diamond and improve the experimental exploration for future material applications. Project supported by the Doctoral Fund of Henan Polytechnic University, China (Grant Nos. B2013-013 and B2013-044) and the Research Projects of Science and Technology of the Education Department of Henan Province, China (Grant Nos. 14B430026 and 12A430010).

  10. High carrier mobilities in black diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Oliver A.; Jackman, Richard B.; Nebel, Christoph; Foord, John S.

    2003-03-01

    Hydrogen plasma treatment of diamond renders the surface p-type, with the carriers emerging with little thermal activation, in sharp contrast to the use of boron for the formation of p-type material. To date, it has been thought that only the highest quality 'white' polycrystalline material is useful for electronic device applications, with many regarding single-crystal diamond as ultimately the substrate material of choice. In this paper it is shown that when p-type material is produced through hydrogenation, this is not the case. 'Black' polycrystalline diamond, which can be grown much more rapidly than white, shows carrier concentrations and mobility values similar to both white polycrystalline diamond and single-crystal material. This result has important implications for the provision of low-cost black-diamond substrates for device applications.

  11. The local crystallization in nanoscale diamond-like carbon films during annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Kolpakov, A. Ya. Poplavsky, A. I.; Galkina, M. E.; Gerus, J. V.; Manokhin, S. S.

    2014-12-08

    The local crystallization during annealing at 600 °C in nanoscale diamond-like carbon coatings films grown by pulsed vacuum-arc deposition method was observed using modern techniques of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The crystallites formed by annealing have a face-centred cubic crystal structure and grow in the direction [01{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}] as a normal to the film surface. The number and size of the crystallites depend on the initial values of the intrinsic stresses before annealing, which in turn depend on the conditions of film growth. The sizes of crystallites are 10 nm for films with initial compressive stresses of 3 GPa and 17 nm for films with initial compressive stresses of 12 GPa. Areas of local crystallization arising during annealing have a structure different from the graphite. Additionally, the investigation results of the structure of nanoscale diamond-like carbon coatings films using Raman spectroscopy method are presented, which are consistent with the transmission electron microscopy research results.

  12. The characterization of strain, impurity content, and crush strength of synthetic diamond crystals

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, T.L.; Jackson, W.E.; Nemanich, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    This study addresses the correlation of the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of synthetic diamond crystals produced by high pressure, high temperature conditions. Microscopic properties were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, birefringence, and photoluminescence (PL). Macroscopic properties characterized included inclusion content and crush force. Raman measurements detected measurable stress shifts in only two samples. The PL measurements indicated an increased presence of the H3 center in areas of high strain. The absence of the H3 center and the presence of the N-V PL center was correlated to lower average crush force. A hierarchy has been developed that relates microscopic properties to average crush force. {copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  13. Energy dissipation in micron- and submicron-thick single crystal diamond mechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Meiyong; Toda, Masaya; Sang, Liwen; Hishita, Shunichi; Tanaka, Shuji; Koide, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    The authors report the resonance frequency and the energy dissipation of single crystal diamond cantilevers with different dimensions, which were fabricated by ion implantation assisted technique. The resonance frequency well followed the inverse power law relationship with the length of the cantilevers and exhibited a high reproducibility with varying the dimensions. The energy dissipation decreased with increasing the cantilever length and saturated or reduced at a certain value. For the shorter cantilevers, clamping loss governed the energy dissipation. As the cantilever length increased to a certain value, defects relaxation or surface effect became dominant. The possible origins for these energy dissipations were discussed.

  14. Development of high-purity optical grade single-crystal CVD diamond for intracavity cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Andrew M.; Wickham, Benjamin J.; Dhillon, Harpreet K.; Chen, Ying; Webster, Scott; Turri, Giorgio; Bass, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Microwave assisted chemical vapour deposited bulk diamond products have been used in a range of high power laser systems, due to low absorption across a range of wavelengths and exceptional thermal properties. However the application of polycrystalline products has frequently been limited to applications at longer wavelengths or thermal uses outside of the optical path due to the birefringence and scatter that are intrinsic properties of the polycrystalline materials. However, there are some solid state structures, including thin disc gain modules and amplifiers, that will gain significantly in terms of potential output powers if diamond could be used as a heat spreader in the optical path as well as a heat spreader on the rear surface of the disk. Therefore single crystal grades of diamond have been developed that overcome the limitations of the polycrystalline material, with low absorption, low scatter and low birefringence grades for demanding optical applications. We will present new data, characterising the performance of these materials across infra-red and visible wavelengths with absorption coefficient measured by laser calorimetry at a range of wavelengths from 1064 nm to 452 nm.

  15. Enhanced growth of high quality single crystal diamond by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at high gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Qi; Chin Chengyi; Lai, Joseph; Yan Chihshiue; Meng Yufei; Mao Hokwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2009-01-12

    Single crystals of diamond up to 18 mm in thickness have been grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at gas pressures of up to 350 torr. Growth rates of up to 165 {mu}m/h at 300 torr at high power density have been achieved. The processes were evaluated by optical emission spectroscopy. The high-quality single-crystal diamond grown at optimized conditions was characterized by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The measurements reveal a direct relationship between residual absorption and nitrogen content in the gas chemistry. Fabrication of high quality single-crystal diamond at higher growth rates should be possible with improved reactor design that allows still higher gas synthesis pressures.

  16. Enhanced Optical Properties of Chemical Vapor Deposited Single Crystal Diamond by Low-Pressure/High-Temperature Annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Y.; Yan, C; Lai, Y; Krasnicki, S; Shu, H; Yu, T; Liang, Q; Mao, H; Hemley, R

    2008-01-01

    Single crystal diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at very high growth rates (up to 150 em/h) has been successfully annealed without graphitization at temperatures up to 2200 C and pressures <300 torr. Crystals were annealed in a hydrogen environment by using microwave plasma techniques for periods of time ranging from a fraction of minute to a few hours. This low-pressure/high-temperature (LPHT) annealing enhances the optical properties of this high-growth rate CVD single crystal diamond. Significant decreases are observed in UV, visible, and infrared absorption and photoluminescence spectra. The decrease in optical absorption after the LPHT annealing arises from the changes in defect structure associated with hydrogen incorporation during CVD growth. There is a decrease in sharp line spectral features indicating a reduction in nitrogen-vacancy-hydrogen (NVH-) defects. These measurements indicate an increase in relative concentration of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in nitrogen-containing LPHT-annealed diamond as compared with as-grown CVD material. The large overall changes in optical properties and the specific types of alterations in defect structure induced by this facile LPHT processing of high-growth rate single-crystal CVD diamond will be useful in the creation of diamond for a variety of scientific and technological applications.

  17. Characterization of a new commercial single crystal diamond detector for photon- and proton-beam dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Akino, Yuichi; Gautam, Archana; Coutinho, Len; Würfel, Jan; Das, Indra J.

    2015-01-01

    A synthetic single crystal diamond detector (SCDD) is commercially available and is characterized for radiation dosimetry in various radiation beams in this study. The characteristics of the commercial SCDD model 60019 (PTW) with 6- and 15-MV photon beams, and 208-MeV proton beams, were investigated and compared with the pre-characterized detectors: Semiflex (model 31010) and PinPoint (model 31006) ionization chambers (PTW), the EDGE diode detector (Sun Nuclear Corp) and the SFD Stereotactic Dosimetry Diode Detector (IBA). To evaluate the effects of the pre-irradiation, the diamond detector, which had not been irradiated on the day, was set up in the water tank, and the response to 100 MU was measured every 20 s. The depth–dose and profiles data were collected for various field sizes and depths. For all radiation types and field sizes, the depth–dose data of the diamond chamber showed identical curves to those of the ionization chambers. The profile of the diamond detector was very similar to those of the EDGE and SFD detectors, although the Semiflex and PinPoint chambers showed volume-averaging effects in the penumbrae region. The temperature dependency was within 0.7% in the range of 4–41°C. A dose of 900 cGy and 1200 cGy was needed to stabilize the chamber to the level within 0.5% and 0.2%, respectively. The PTW type 60019 SCDD detector showed suitable characteristics for radiation dosimetry, for relative dose, depth–dose and profile measurements for a wide range of field sizes. However, at least 1000 cGy of pre-irradiation will be needed for accurate measurements. PMID:26268483

  18. Presentation of a research project addressed to the realisation of a diamond-based cellular biosensing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boarino, Luca; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio; Genovese, Marco; Gosso, Sara; Olivero, Paolo; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Picollo, Federico; Traina, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    In this proceedings we will present a research project financed by Piedmont regional government (Italy; finalized to the realization and commercialization of functional devices for cellular bio-sensing based on diamond. Partners of the project are: Crisel Instruments, Torino University, Torino Polytechnic, INRIM, Politronica, Bionica Tech, Ulm University Here the main features of the final devices will be briefly summarized. We envisage an active diamond-based cellular substrate that can simultaneously stimulate and detect a variety of signals (chemical, optical, electrical) to and from neuroendocrine cells, in a fully biocompatible environment for the cellular system under test. Such a device can be realized by fully exploiting the peculiar properties of diamond: optical transparency, biocompatibility, chemical inertness, accessibility to a conductive graphite-like phase; properties that will be further explored and tested during the project.

  19. Turnbuckle diamond anvil cell for high-pressure measurements in a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Giriat, Gaétan; Wang, Weiwei; Attfield, J Paul; Huxley, Andrew D; Kamenev, Konstantin V

    2010-07-01

    We have developed a miniature diamond anvil cell for magnetization measurements in a widely used magnetic property measurement system commercial magnetometer built around a superconducting quantum interference device. The design of the pressure cell is based on the turnbuckle principle in which force can be created and maintained by rotating the body of the device while restricting the counterthreaded end-nuts to translational movement. The load on the opposed diamond anvils and the sample between them is generated using a hydraulic press. The load is then locked by rotating the body of the cell with respect to the end-nuts. The dimensions of the pressure cell have been optimized by use of finite element analysis. The cell is approximately a cylinder 7 mm long and 7 mm in diameter and weighs only 1.5 g. Due to its small size the cell thermalizes rapidly. It is capable of achieving pressures in excess of 10 GPa while allowing measurements to be performed with the maximum sensitivity of the magnetometer. The performance of the pressure cell is illustrated by a high pressure magnetic study of Mn(3)[Cr(CN)(6)](2) x xH(2)O Prussian blue analog up to 10.3 GPa. PMID:20687740

  20. Turnbuckle diamond anvil cell for high-pressure measurements in a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giriat, Gaétan; Wang, Weiwei; Attfield, J. Paul; Huxley, Andrew D.; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2010-07-01

    We have developed a miniature diamond anvil cell for magnetization measurements in a widely used magnetic property measurement system commercial magnetometer built around a superconducting quantum interference device. The design of the pressure cell is based on the turnbuckle principle in which force can be created and maintained by rotating the body of the device while restricting the counterthreaded end-nuts to translational movement. The load on the opposed diamond anvils and the sample between them is generated using a hydraulic press. The load is then locked by rotating the body of the cell with respect to the end-nuts. The dimensions of the pressure cell have been optimized by use of finite element analysis. The cell is approximately a cylinder 7 mm long and 7 mm in diameter and weighs only 1.5 g. Due to its small size the cell thermalizes rapidly. It is capable of achieving pressures in excess of 10 GPa while allowing measurements to be performed with the maximum sensitivity of the magnetometer. The performance of the pressure cell is illustrated by a high pressure magnetic study of Mn3[Cr(CN)6]2ṡxH2O Prussian blue analog up to 10.3 GPa.

  1. Cholesteric liquid crystal photonic crystal lasers and photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying

    This dissertation discusses cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) and polymers based photonic devices including one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal lasers and broadband circular polarizers. CLCs showing unique self-organized chiral structures have been widely used in bistable displays, flexible displays, and reflectors. However, the photonic band gap they exhibit opens a new way for generating laser light at the photonic band edge (PBE) or inside the band gap. When doped with an emissive laser dye, cholesteric liquid crystals provide distributed feedback so that mirrorless lasing is hence possible. Due to the limited surface anchoring, the thickness of gain medium and feedback length is tens of micrometers. Therefore lasing efficiency is quite limited and laser beam is highly divergent. To meet the challenges, we demonstrated several new methods to enhance the laser emission while reducing the beam divergence from a cholesteric liquid crystal laser. Enhanced laser emission is demonstrated by incorporating a single external CLC reflector as a polarization conserved reflector. Because the distributed feedback from the active layer is polarization selective, a CLC reflector preserves the original polarization of the reflected light and a further stimulated amplification ensues. As a result of virtually doubled feedback length, the output is dramatically enhanced in the same circular polarization state. Meanwhile, the laser beam divergence is dramatically reduced due to the increased cavity length from micrometer to millimeter scale. Enhanced laser emission is also demonstrated by the in-cell metallic reflector because the active layer is pumped twice. Unlike a CLC reflector, the output from a mirror-reflected CLC laser is linearly polarized as a result of coherent superposition of two orthogonal circular polarization states. The output linear polarization direction can be well controlled and fine tuned by varying the operating temperature and cell gap. Enhanced laser

  2. Electron-beam induced diamond-like-carbon passivation of plasmonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaur, Eugeniu; Sadatnajafi, Catherine; Langley, Daniel; Lin, Jiao; Kou, Shan Shan; Abbey, Brian

    2015-12-01

    Engineered materials with feature sizes on the order of a few nanometres offer the potential for producing metamaterials with properties which may differ significantly from their bulk counterpart. Here we describe the production of plasmonic colour filters using periodic arrays of nanoscale cross shaped apertures fabricated in optically opaque silver films. Due to its relatively low loss in the visible and near infrared range, silver is a popular choice for plasmonic devices, however it is also unstable in wet or even ambient conditions. Here we show that ultra-thin layers of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) can be used to prevent degradation due to oxidative stress, ageing and corrosion. We demonstrate that DLC effectively protects the sub-micron features which make up the plasmonic colour filter under both atmospheric conditions and accelerated aging using iodine gas. Through a systematic study we confirm that the nanometre thick DLC layers have no effect on the device functionality or performance.

  3. Crystal forms and surface textures of alluvial diamonds from the Western Region of the Central African Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Censier, C.; Tourenq, J.

    1995-06-01

    The most common crystal forms of the diamonds from the alluvial deposits in the Western Region of the Central African Republic were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM) in an attempt to determine their geological history. The marks observed are related to two distinct periods in the geological history of the diamonds: the magmatic episode and their hydraulic transport. The effects of significant magmatic corrosion undergone by the diamonds during their ascent from the upper mantle are shown by the predominance of rhombododecahedral forms over octahedral forms and the frequent occurrence on the crystal faces of pyramidal depressions with triangular (111) or square (100) bases, as well as of V-shaped figures (111) or stepped figures (on the faces around the ternary axes). Some impact marks probably occurred during the explosive episode of kimberlite extrusion. Other impact marks, the marks of general wear, and the high proportion of gemstone-quality diamonds indicate the lengthy transport. They thus also indicate that the diamonds have undergone a prolonged geological history after the erosion of the kimberlite. This suggests that the kimberlite are separated from the Carnot Sandstone Formation by a considerable distance. The diamonds were stored in Albian-Maastrichtian rocks before they become concentrated in the Recent alluvium.

  4. Practical approach for a rod-connected diamond photonic crystal operating at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kanna

    2009-11-01

    Production of a rod-connected diamond (RCD) photonic crystal structure in a semiconductor material is proposed. Periodic shifting of only one building block can create a complicated three-dimensional network, with a RCD structure exhibiting a full bandgap as wide as 0.20 on a gap/midgap (Δω /ωM) basis. A point defect cavity in the structure sustains single-mode resonance throughout the operative range because of its low symmetry. The resonant mode's highest quality factor (Q-factor) was calculated as 1.5×104 for a crystal of 11.5ax×4.25ay×12az for ai (i =x,y,z) representing three axes' period lengths.

  5. Cryptic iridescence in a fossil weevil generated by single diamond photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Maria E; Saranathan, Vinod; Locatelli, Emma R; Noh, Heeso; Briggs, Derek E G; Orr, Patrick J; Cao, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Nature's most spectacular colours originate in integumentary tissue architectures that scatter light via nanoscale modulations of the refractive index. The most intricate biophotonic nanostructures are three-dimensional crystals with opal, single diamond or single gyroid lattices. Despite intense interest in their optical and structural properties, the evolution of such nanostructures is poorly understood, due in part to a lack of data from the fossil record. Here, we report preservation of single diamond (Fd-3m) three-dimensional photonic crystals in scales of a 735,000 year old specimen of the brown Nearctic weevil Hypera diversipunctata from Gold Run, Canada, and in extant conspecifics. The preserved red to green structural colours exhibit near-field brilliancy yet are inconspicuous from afar; they most likely had cryptic functions in substrate matching. The discovery of pristine fossil examples indicates that the fossil record is likely to yield further data on the evolution of three-dimensional photonic nanostructures and their biological functions. PMID:25185581

  6. Crystallization effects and diamond formation in amorphous carbon films under low energy ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsalas, P.; Logothetidis, S.

    2001-05-01

    The crystallization effects occurring in various types of amorphous carbon (a-C) thin films with different structure and bonding induced by post-growth low energy (<1.5 keV) Ar + ion beam irradiation are presented. Detailed X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were used to identify several allotropic forms of carbon such as graphite and diamond as well as SiC detected in a-C films after ion irradiation. The diamond and SiC nucleation occurs close to the a-C/Si interface, beyond the ion penetration depth suggesting a non-direct nucleation mechanism. The relative content, grain size, distribution and orientation of each particular crystalline phase in the films depend strongly on the microstructural characteristics of the as-grown films. We also consider the effects of ion energy and fluence and substrate material on the crystallization process in an effort to get a deeper insight of the fundamental mechanisms occurring during the interaction of various carbon materials with low energy ion beams.

  7. Methane-related diamond crystallization in the Earth's mantle: Stable isotope evidences from a single diamond-bearing xenolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomassot, E.; Cartigny, P.; Harris, J. W.; (Fanus) Viljoen, K. S.

    2007-05-01

    Mineralogical studies of deep-seated xenoliths and mineral inclusions in diamonds indicate that there is significant variability in oxygen fugacity within the Earth's upper mantle. This variability is consistent both with the occurrence of reduced (methane-bearing) or oxidized (CO 2/carbonate-bearing) fluids. Invariably, direct sampling of reduced deep fluids is not possible as they are unquenchable and re-equilibrate with either the surrounding mantle or are affected by degassing. Key information about the nature of such fluids might be found in diamond if it were possible to study a population related to a single source. Usually, diamonds within a kimberlite pipe have different parageneses and can be shown to have formed at different times and depths. We studied 59 diamonds extracted from a single diamondiferous peridotite xenolith (with a volume of only 27 cm 3), from the Cullinan mine (formerly called the Premier mine) in South Africa. Diamond sizes range from 0.0005 to 0.169 carats (0.1 to 33.8 mg). A correlation between the nitrogen contents of the diamonds (range 40 to 1430 ppm) and their nitrogen aggregation state (varying from 10 to 85% of IaB defects) is compatible with a single growth event. δ 13C-values range from - 4.2‰ to - 0.1‰, with slight internal variability measured in the largest diamonds. Nitrogen isotope measurements show δ 15N ranging from - 1.2‰ to + 7.2‰. On the centimeter scale of this upper mantle rock, the variations for nitrogen content, nitrogen aggregation state, carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions, respectively, cover 64%, 75%, 15% and 23% of the ranges known for peridotitic diamonds. In spite of such large ranges, N-content, δ 13C and δ 15N within this diamond population are distinctly coupled. These relationships do not support a mixing of carbon sources, but are best explained by a Rayleigh distillation within the sub-continental mantle at depths > 150 km and T > 1200 °C, which precipitates diamonds from methane

  8. Crystal growth of device quality GaAs in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.

    1983-01-01

    GaAs device technology has recently reached a new phase of rapid advancement, made possible by the improvement of the quality of GaAs bulk crystals. At the same time, the transition to the next generation of GaAs integrated circuits and optoelectronic systems for commercial and government applications hinges on new quantum steps in three interrelated areas: crystal growth, device processing and device-related properties and phenomena. Special emphasis is placed on the establishment of quantitative relationships among crystal growth parameters-material properties-electronic properties and device applications. The overall program combines studies of crystal growth on novel approaches to engineering of semiconductor material (i.e., GaAs and related compounds); investigation and correlation of materials properties and electronic characteristics on a macro- and microscale; and investigation of electronic properties and phenomena controlling device applications and device performance.

  9. A new single crystal diamond dosimeter for small beam: comparison with different commercial active detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsolat, F.; Tromson, D.; Tranchant, N.; Pomorski, M.; Le Roy, M.; Donois, M.; Moignau, F.; Ostrowsky, A.; De Carlan, L.; Bassinet, C.; Huet, C.; Derreumaux, S.; Chea, M.; Cristina, K.; Boisserie, G.; Bergonzo, P.

    2013-11-01

    Recent developments of new therapy techniques using small photon beams, such as stereotactic radiotherapy, require suitable detectors to determine the delivered dose with a high accuracy. The dosimeter has to be as close as possible to tissue equivalence and to exhibit a small detection volume compared to the size of the irradiation field, because of the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium in small beam. Characteristics of single crystal diamond (tissue equivalent material Z = 6, high density) make it an ideal candidate to fulfil most of small beam dosimetry requirements. A commercially available Element Six electronic grade synthetic diamond was used to develop a single crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) with a small detection volume (0.165 mm3). Long term stability was studied by irradiating the SCDDo in a 60Co beam over 14 h. A good stability (deviation less than ± 0.1%) was observed. Repeatability, dose linearity, dose rate dependence and energy dependence were studied in a 10 × 10 cm2 beam produced by a Varian Clinac 2100 C linear accelerator. SCDDo lateral dose profile, depth dose curve and output factor (OF) measurements were performed for small photon beams with a micro multileaf collimator m3 (BrainLab) attached to the linac. This study is focused on the comparison of SCDDo measurements to those obtained with different commercially available active detectors: an unshielded silicon diode (PTW 60017), a shielded silicon diode (Sun Nuclear EDGE), a PinPoint ionization chamber (PTW 31014) and two natural diamond detectors (PTW 60003). SCDDo presents an excellent spatial resolution for dose profile measurements, due to its small detection volume. Low energy dependence (variation of 1.2% between 6 and 18 MV photon beam) and low dose rate dependence of the SCDDo (variation of 1% between 0.53 and 2.64 Gy min-1) are obtained, explaining the good agreement between the SCDDo and the efficient unshielded diode (PTW 60017) in depth dose curve measurements. For

  10. Processing of Diamond for Integrated Optic Devices Using Q-Switched Nd:YAG Laser at Different Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, S. K.; Pillai, V. P. Mahadevan; Nayar, V. U.

    In the present investigation, a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is used to study the various aspects of diamond processing for fabricating integrated optic and UV optoelectronic devices. Diamond is a better choice of substrate compared to silicon and gallium arsenide for the fabrication of waveguides to perform operations such as modulation, switching, multiplexing, and filtering, particularly in the ultraviolet spectrum. The experimental setup of the present investigation consists of two Q-Switched Nd:YAG lasers capable of operating at wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm. The diamond cutting is performed using these two wavelengths by making the "V"-shaped groove with various opening angle. The variation of material loss of diamond during cutting is noted for the two wavelengths. The cut surface morphology and elemental and structural analysis of graphite formed during processing in both cases are compared using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser Raman spectroscopy. Both the Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser systems (at 1064 nm and 532 nm) show very good performance in terms of peak-to-peak output stability, minimal spot diameter, smaller divergence angle, higher peak power in Q-switched mode, and good fundamental TEM00 mode quality for processing natural diamond stones. Less material loss and minimal micro cracks are achieved with wavelength 532 nm whereas a better diamond cut surface is achieved with processing at 1064 nm with minimum roughness.

  11. Photonic crystal devices formed by a charged-particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Koops, Hans W. P.

    2000-01-01

    A photonic crystal device and method. The photonic crystal device comprises a substrate with at least one photonic crystal formed thereon by a charged-particle beam deposition method. Each photonic crystal comprises a plurality of spaced elements having a composition different from the substrate, and may further include one or more impurity elements substituted for spaced elements. Embodiments of the present invention may be provided as electromagnetic wave filters, polarizers, resonators, sources, mirrors, beam directors and antennas for use at wavelengths in the range from about 0.2 to 200 microns or longer. Additionally, photonic crystal devices may be provided with one or more electromagnetic waveguides adjacent to a photonic crystal for forming integrated electromagnetic circuits for use at optical, infrared, or millimeter-wave frequencies.

  12. Design of a three-dimensional photonic crystal nanocavity based on a \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajiri, Takeyoshi; Takahashi, Shun; Tandaechanurat, Aniwat; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We design a three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal (PC) nanocavity based on a \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond structure. The designed structure, comprised of self-sustainable layers, is suitable for fabrication by layer stacking techniques. Quality factors (Q-factors) of nanocavities were calculated for the \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond and a commonly-used woodpile structures, both of which are generated from the same diamond lattice with a lattice constant adiamond. The Q-factor of the designed nanocavity can reach as high as 230,000 with 35 stacked layers and a square in-plane PC area of the length of one side of 5\\sqrt{2} a^{\\text{diamond}}. This is 1.5 times higher than that of a 3D PC nanocavity based on the woodpile structure with the same in-plane PC size and with the same number of stacked layers. The higher Q-factor in the \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond structure originates from its stronger in-plane light confinement over the woodpile structure. The \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond structure will be beneficial for improving experimentally attainable Q-factors of 3D PC nanocavities particularly fabricated by a micromanipulation method.

  13. Device Design of Diamond Schottky-pn Diode for Low-Loss Power Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Toshiharu; Kato, Hiromitsu; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Ogura, Masahiko; Okushi, Hideyo; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2012-09-01

    The device parameters of a novel diamond diode, namely, a Schottky-pn diode (SPND), are analyzed to realize a fast switching time, a low on-resistance, and a high blocking voltage simultaneously. The SPND is composed of an n-type active layer sandwiched between a highly doped p+-type layer and a Schottky metal. The key structure is the fully depleted n-type layer. From the simulations of the energy band diagram based on the key structure of the SPND using Poisson's equations, it is concluded that the low donor density in the n-type layer and the high acceptor density in the p+-type layer are key points for the high-performance SPND.

  14. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Stephen D.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Cerqua, Kathleen A.

    1991-01-01

    Composite optical devices using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T.sub.g) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device.

  15. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, S.D.; Marshall, K.L.; Cerqua, K.A.

    1991-10-08

    Composite optical devices are disclosed using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T[sub g]) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device. 7 figures.

  16. Electrical transport behavior of n-ZnO nanorods/p-diamond heterojunction device at higher temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, D. D.; Li, H. D.; Cheng, S. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Yu, Q.; Yang, Y. Z.

    2012-08-01

    The n-ZnO nanorods (NRs)/p-diamond heterojunction structures are fabricated by thermal vapor growing ZnO NRs on chemical vapor deposited boron-doped diamond film. Temperature dependent current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the p-n heterojunction are examined from 25 °C to 220 °C. The turn-on voltage and ideality factor of the devices decrease with increasing temperature, whereas the reverse saturation current increases at higher temperatures. The carrier injection efficiency is effectively enhanced at high temperatures. The electrical transport behaviors are investigated at various temperatures and bias voltages.

  17. Amorphous diamond-structured photonic crystal in the feather barbs of the scarlet macaw

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Haiwei; Dong, Biqin; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhan, Tianrong; Shi, Lei; Zi, Jian; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Noniridescent coloration by the spongy keratin in parrot feather barbs has fascinated scientists. Nonetheless, its ultimate origin remains as yet unanswered, and a quantitative structural and optical description is still lacking. Here we report on structural and optical characterizations and numerical simulations of the blue feather barbs of the scarlet macaw. We found that the sponge in the feather barbs is an amorphous diamond-structured photonic crystal with only short-range order. It possesses an isotropic photonic pseudogap that is ultimately responsible for the brilliant noniridescent coloration. We further unravel an ingenious structural optimization for attaining maximum coloration apparently resulting from natural evolution. Upon increasing the material refractive index above the level provided by nature, there is an interesting transition from a photonic pseudogap to a complete bandgap. PMID:22615350

  18. Demonstration of a three-dimensional photonic crystal nanocavity in a 〈110〉-layered diamond structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tajiri, T.; Takahashi, S.; Ota, Y.; Tatebayashi, J.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2015-08-17

    We experimentally demonstrate a three-dimensional photonic crystal (3D PC) nanocavity in a 〈110〉-layered diamond structure with a quality factor (Q-factor) of 12 800 at a wavelength of 1.1 μm. The observed Q is 1.2 times higher than that of a 3D PC nanocavity in a woodpile structure with the same in-plane size and the same number of stacked layers. This result indicates the potential importance of the 〈110〉-layered diamond structure for getting high Q 3D PC nanocavities within a limited in-plane space.

  19. Fine Structure in the Secondary Electron Emission Peak for Diamond Crystal with (100) Negative Electron Affinity Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnin, V. M.; Krainsky, I. L.

    1998-01-01

    A fine structure was discovered in the low-energy peak of the secondary electron emission spectra of the diamond surface with negative electron affinity. We studied this structure for the (100) surface of the natural type-IIb diamond crystal. We have found that the low-energy peak consists of a total of four maxima. The relative energy positions of three of them could be related to the electron energy minima near the bottom of the conduction band. The fourth peak, having the lowest energy, was attributed to the breakup of the bulk exciton at the surface during the process of secondary electron emission.

  20. Single Crystal Preparation for High-Pressure Experiments in the Diamond Anvil Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Aracne, C; Farber, D; Benterou, J; Occelli, F; Krisch, M; Antonangeli, D; Requardt, H; Fiquet, G

    2003-07-01

    Most research conducted in diamond anvil cells (DAC) is performed on polycrystalline samples. While data from polycrystalline samples are sufficient for determining the bulk properties, high-pressure experiments on single crystals allow for measurements on a range of tensor properties such as: thermal and electrical conductivity; magnetic susceptibility; elasticity; and plasticity. However, in order to achieve pressures above 1 Mbar in a DAC, single crystal samples must be <50 m in diameter and <15 m thick while maintaining a high degree of crystallinity. Thus, we have developed new procedures for producing extremely high-quality micro single crystal samples from commercially available material. Our sample preparation steps include cutting, classical metallographic polishing, and laser ablation. The key to our new process is the preservation of crystallinity during cutting and thinning. We have been successful in maintaining orientation, along with an extremely high degree of crystallinity in completed metal samples. To date, we have analyzed cobalt and molybdenum samples with both white-light interferometry and synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and are in the process of extending these methods to other metals and ceramics.

  1. Crystal growth of device quality GaAs in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.

    1984-01-01

    The crystal growth, device processing and device related properties and phenomena of GaAs are investigated. Our GaAs research evolves about these key thrust areas. The overall program combines: (1) studies of crystal growth on novel approaches to engineering of semiconductor materials (i.e., GaAs and related compounds); (2) investigation and correlation of materials properties and electronic characteristics on a macro- and microscale; (3) investigation of electronic properties and phenomena controlling device applications and device performance. The ground based program is developed which would insure successful experimentation with and eventually processing of GaAs in a near zero gravity environment.

  2. Sites of the N1 nitrogen paramagnetic centers in natural diamond crystals: Dissymmetrization of the structure as a result of plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titkov, S. V.; Mineeva, R. M.; Ryabchikov, I. D.; Speransky, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Using the method of EPR spectroscopy, it is shown that the N1 nitrogen centers (N-C-N+) are unevenly distributed over possible sites in natural brown crystals of plastically deformed diamonds. The influence of deformational dissymmetrization of the structure on the anisotropy of some physical properties of natural diamonds is discussed.

  3. Secondary electron emission in extreme-UV detectors: Application to diamond based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciancaglioni, I.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.

    2011-07-01

    A study on the effect of secondary electron emission, which strongly affects the detection of extreme-UV radiation, was performed on diamond detectors. Two different structures were compared: interdigitated contacts and a transverse Schottky diode configuration. Both devices were electrically characterized by I-V measurements and their responsivity was measured in the extreme UV spectral region (20-120 nm) by using He-Ne gas discharge radiation sources and a toroidal grating vacuum monochromator. Through an ad-hoc measurement configuration, the contributions of the internal photocurrent and of the photoemission current have been analyzed and separately evaluated. The results showed that secondary electron emission, which clearly depends on the experimental conditions (e.g., external electric field, pressure, etc.), is one of the most relevant processes affecting the spectral responsivity in the extreme UV band. In particular, for interdigitated devices, extreme care must be taken in order to obtain an absolute value of their responsivity, while detectors in the transverse configuration can be shielded in such a way to avoid secondary electron current contribution and therefore provide a more correct and reliable response.

  4. Lithium niobate single-crystal and photo-functional device

    DOEpatents

    Gopalan, Venkatraman; Mitchell, Terrence E.; Kitamura, Kenji; Furukawa, Yasunori

    2001-01-01

    Provided are lithium niobate single-crystal that requires a low voltage of not larger than 10 kV/nm for its ferroelectric polarization inversion and of which the polarization can be periodically inverted with accuracy even at such a low voltage, and a photo-functional device comprising the crystal. The crystal has a molar fraction of Li.sub.2 O/(Nb.sub.2 O.sub.5 +Li.sub.2 O) of falling between 0.49 and 0.52. The photo-functional device can convert a laser ray being incident thereon.

  5. Bandgap properties of diamond structure photonic crystal heterostructures with inclined and curved interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Haitao; Li, Yong; Wang, Hong

    2014-06-14

    The 3D (dimensional) diamond structure photonic crystal heterostructures with different lattice constants were prepared using rapid prototyping and gel casting with alumina. In this paper, heterostructures with inclined and curved interfaces were designed and its bandgap properties were studied. The normalized resonant intensity of electromagnetic wave in heterostructure with inclined and curved interface is stronger than that in the ordinary heterostructure without modified interface. The influence of curved interface on transmission properties of electromagnetic wave was investigated with the radius of curvature ranging from 17 mm to 37 mm at 5 mm interval. The results show that two resonant modes appear in the photonic band gap, being similar to the band gap characteristics of the photonic crystals with two defects inside. With the increasing of the radius of curvature, the resonant mode shift to higher frequency. In the structure with a radius of curvature of 32 mm, a guiding band appears in the photonic band gap. Further increase in the radius of curvature, the guiding band will split into two resonant modes again and the two resonant modes shift to lower frequencies.

  6. Radiation tolerance of a high quality synthetic single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond detector irradiated by 14.8 MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Aielli, G.; Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2008-09-01

    Diamond exhibits many properties such as an outstanding radiation hardness and fast response time both important to design detectors working in extremely radioactive environments. Among the many applications these devices can be used for, there is the development of a fast and radiation hard neutron detector for the next generation of fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project, under construction at Cadarache in France. A technology to routinely produce electronic grade synthetic single crystal diamond detectors was recently developed by our group. One of such detectors, with an energy resolution of 0.9% as measured using an {sup 241}Am{alpha} particle source, has been heavily irradiated with 14.8 MeV neutrons produced by the Frascati Neutron Generator. The modifications of its spectroscopic properties have been studied as a function of the neutron fluence up to 2.0x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}. In the early stage of the irradiation procedure an improvement in the spectroscopic performance of the detector was observed. Subsequently the detection performance remains stable for all the given neutron fluence up to the final one thus assessing a remarkable radiation hardness of the device. The neutron damage in materials has been calculated and compared with the experimental results. This comparison is discussed within the nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) hypothesis, which states that performance degradation is proportional to NIEL.

  7. Radiation tolerance of a high quality synthetic single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond detector irradiated by 14.8 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Aielli, G.; Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2008-09-01

    Diamond exhibits many properties such as an outstanding radiation hardness and fast response time both important to design detectors working in extremely radioactive environments. Among the many applications these devices can be used for, there is the development of a fast and radiation hard neutron detector for the next generation of fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project, under construction at Cadarache in France. A technology to routinely produce electronic grade synthetic single crystal diamond detectors was recently developed by our group. One of such detectors, with an energy resolution of 0.9% as measured using an A241m α particle source, has been heavily irradiated with 14.8 MeV neutrons produced by the Frascati Neutron Generator. The modifications of its spectroscopic properties have been studied as a function of the neutron fluence up to 2.0×1014 n/cm2. In the early stage of the irradiation procedure an improvement in the spectroscopic performance of the detector was observed. Subsequently the detection performance remains stable for all the given neutron fluence up to the final one thus assessing a remarkable radiation hardness of the device. The neutron damage in materials has been calculated and compared with the experimental results. This comparison is discussed within the nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) hypothesis, which states that performance degradation is proportional to NIEL.

  8. Design of a diamond-crystal monochromator for the LCLS hard x-ray self-seeding project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, D.; Shvyd'ko, Y.; Amann, J.; Emma, P.; Stoupin, S.; Quintana, J.

    2013-03-01

    As the result of collaborations between the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory, and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we have designed and constructed a diamond crystal monochromator for the LCLS hard x-ray self-seeding project. The novel monochromator is ultrahigh-vacuum compatible to meet the LCLS linear accelerator vacuum environmental requirement. A special graphite holder was designed for strain-free mount of the 110-μm thin synthetic diamond crystal plate provided by Technological Institute for Super-hard and Novel Carbon Materials of Russia (TISNCM). An in-vacuum multi-axis precision positioning mechanism is designed to manipulate the thin-film diamond holder with resolutions and stabilities required by the hard x-ray self-seeding physics. Optical encoders, limit switches, and hardware stops are established in the mechanism to ensure system reliability and to meet the accelerator personal and equipment safety interlock requirements. Molybdenum shields are installed in the monochromator to protect the encoders and associated electronics from radiation damage. Mechanical specifications, designs, and preliminary test results of the diamond monochromator are presented in this paper.

  9. Device for isolation of seed crystals during processing of solution

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.; Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Deyoreo, James J.; Vital, Russell L.

    1999-01-01

    A device for isolation of see crystals during processing of solutions. The device enables a seed crystal to be introduced into the solution without exposing the solution to contaminants or to sources of drying and cooling. The device constitutes a seed protector which allows the seed to be present in the growth solution during filtration and overheating operations while at the same time preventing the seed from being dissolved by the under saturated solution. When the solution processing has been completed and the solution cooled to near the saturation point, the seed protector is opened, exposing the seed to the solution and allowing growth to begin.

  10. Device for isolation of seed crystals during processing of solution

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, K.E.; Zaitseva, N.P.; Deyoreo, J.J.; Vital, R.L.

    1999-05-18

    A device is described for isolation of seed crystals during processing of solutions. The device enables a seed crystal to be introduced into the solution without exposing the solution to contaminants or to sources of drying and cooling. The device constitutes a seed protector which allows the seed to be present in the growth solution during filtration and overheating operations while at the same time preventing the seed from being dissolved by the under saturated solution. When the solution processing has been completed and the solution cooled to near the saturation point, the seed protector is opened, exposing the seed to the solution and allowing growth to begin. 3 figs.

  11. A plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    A fully tunable plasma photonic crystal is used to control the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X bands of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes forms a simple square crystal structure with the individual plasma dielectric constant tuned through variation in the plasma density. We show, through simulations and experiments, that transverse electric mode bandgaps exist, arising from the positive and negative dielectric constant regimes of the plasma, and that the respective bandgap frequencies can be shifted through changing the dielectric constant by varying discharge current density.

  12. Charge multiplication effect in thin diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skukan, N.; Grilj, V.; Sudić, I.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Makino, T.; Kambayashi, Y.; Andoh, Y.; Onoda, S.; Sato, S.; Ohshima, T.; Kamiya, T.; Jakšić, M.

    2016-07-01

    Herein, we report on the enhanced sensitivity for the detection of charged particles in single crystal chemical vapour deposition (scCVD) diamond radiation detectors. The experimental results demonstrate charge multiplication in thin planar diamond membrane detectors, upon impact of 18 MeV O ions, under high electric field conditions. Avalanche multiplication is widely exploited in devices such as avalanche photo diodes, but has never before been reproducibly observed in intrinsic CVD diamond. Because enhanced sensitivity for charged particle detection is obtained for short charge drift lengths without dark counts, this effect could be further exploited in the development of sensors based on avalanche multiplication and radiation detectors with extreme radiation hardness.

  13. Nano-inclusions in diamond: Evidence of diamond genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, R.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Focused Ion Beam technology (FIB) for TEM sample preparation introduced approximately 15 years ago revolutionized the application of TEM in Geosciences. For the first time, FIB enabled cutting samples for TEM use from exactly the location we are interested in. Applied to diamond investigation, this technique revealed the presence of nanometre-sized inclusions in diamond that have been simply unknown before. Nanoinclusions in diamond from different location and origin such as diamonds from the Lower and Upper Mantle, metamorphic diamonds (Kazakhstan, Erzgebirge, Bohemia), diamonds from ophiolites (Tibet, Mongolia, Xinjiang, Ural Mountains), diamonds from igneous rocks (Hawaii, Kamchatka) and impact diamonds (Popigai Crater, Siberia) have been investigated during the last 15 years. The major conclusion of all these TEM studies is, that the nanoinclusions, their phases and phase composition together with the micro- and nanostructure evidence the origin of diamond and genesis of diamond. We can discriminate Five different mechanisms of diamond genesis in nature are observed: Diamond crystallized from a high-density fluid (Upper mantle and metamorphic diamond). Diamond crystallized from carbonatitic melt (Lower mantle diamond). Diamond precipitates from a metal alloy melt (Diamond from ophiolites). Diamond crystallized by gas phase condensation or chemical vapour condensation (CVD) (Lavas from Kamchatka, xenoliths in Hawaiian lavas). Direct transformation of graphite into diamond.

  14. Single Crystal Preparation for High Pressure Experiments in the Diamond Anvil Cell.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aracne, C. M.; Farber, D. L.; Occelli, F.; Antonangeli, D.; Badro, J.

    2003-12-01

    Measuring the effects of pressure on geomaterials in deep Earth's P-T conditions using the diamond anvil cell (DAC) is essential for understanding the phase transition mechanisms, the mechanical properties (which derives directly from the determination of the elastic constants), and the transport properties of deep-Earth materials. To date, most DAC research has been performed with polycrystalline samples. While these are sufficient for determining orientationally averaged properties of solids (i.e. bulk modulus, P-waves and S-wave aggregate velocities, etc\\ldots), single crystals offer the ability to measure a range of direction dependent properties (i.e. thermal and electrical conductivity, elasticity and plasticity, etc\\ldots). Subsequent comparison of measurements on single-\\ and poly-crystalline materials can, for instance, make it possible to address the effects of pressure on the elastic anisotropy and preferred orientations in deep Earth's conditions. In order to achieve pressures above 1 Mbar, one must produce single crystal samples ˜25 μ m in diameter and less than 10 μ m thick. We have developed procedures to produce extremely high-quality metallic single crystals of this size from commercially available material with millimeter dimensions. Critical to the final product is the preservation of crystallinity during thinning and cutting. Our surface preparation methods include the use of selected abrasives, colloidal silica polishing and chemical etching. Samples are cut to final shape using a laser-ablation facility that can handle both conductive and insulating materials. To date, we have been successful in maintaining an extremely high degree of crystallinity and orientation in the final samples. Presently, we have analyzed cobalt and molybdenum samples with both white-light interferometry and synchrotron x-ray diffraction and are in the process of extending these methods to other metals and minerals, such as zinc, sapphire, and olivine.

  15. Evaluation of the dosimetric properties of a synthetic single crystal diamond detector in high energy clinical proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mandapaka, A. K.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Patyal, B.; Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric properties of a synthetic single crystal diamond Schottky diode for accurate relative dose measurements in large and small field high-energy clinical proton beams.Methods: The dosimetric properties of a synthetic single crystal diamond detector were assessed by comparison with a reference Markus parallel plate ionization chamber, an Exradin A16 microionization chamber, and Exradin T1a ion chamber. The diamond detector was operated at zero bias voltage at all times. Comparative dose distribution measurements were performed by means of Fractional depth dose curves and lateral beam profiles in clinical proton beams of energies 155 and 250 MeV for a 14 cm square cerrobend aperture and 126 MeV for 3, 2, and 1 cm diameter circular brass collimators. ICRU Report No. 78 recommended beam parameters were used to compare fractional depth dose curves and beam profiles obtained using the diamond detector and the reference ionization chamber. Warm-up/stability of the detector response and linearity with dose were evaluated in a 250 MeV proton beam and dose rate dependence was evaluated in a 126 MeV proton beam. Stem effect and the azimuthal angle dependence of the diode response were also evaluated.Results: A maximum deviation in diamond detector signal from the average reading of less than 0.5% was found during the warm-up irradiation procedure. The detector response showed a good linear behavior as a function of dose with observed deviations below 0.5% over a dose range from 50 to 500 cGy. The detector response was dose rate independent, with deviations below 0.5% in the investigated dose rates ranging from 85 to 300 cGy/min. Stem effect and azimuthal angle dependence of the diode signal were within 0.5%. Fractional depth dose curves and lateral beam profiles obtained with the diamond detector were in good agreement with those measured using reference dosimeters.Conclusions: The observed dosimetric properties of the synthetic single

  16. Large-surface-area diamond (111) crystal plates for applications in high-heat-load wavefront-preserving X-ray crystal optics.

    PubMed

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Antipov, Sergey; Butler, James E; Kolyadin, Alexander V; Katrusha, Andrey

    2016-09-01

    Fabrication and results of high-resolution X-ray topography characterization of diamond single-crystal plates with large surface area (10 mm × 10 mm) and (111) crystal surface orientation for applications in high-heat-load X-ray crystal optics are reported. The plates were fabricated by laser-cutting of the (111) facets of diamond crystals grown using high-pressure high-temperature methods. The intrinsic crystal quality of a selected 3 mm × 7 mm crystal region of one of the studied samples was found to be suitable for applications in wavefront-preserving high-heat-load crystal optics. Wavefront characterization was performed using sequential X-ray diffraction topography in the pseudo plane wave configuration and data analysis using rocking-curve topography. The variations of the rocking-curve width and peak position measured with a spatial resolution of 13 µm × 13 µm over the selected region were found to be less than 1 µrad. PMID:27577765

  17. Two dimensional liquid crystal devices and their computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin

    The main focus of the dissertation is design and optimization two dimensional liquid crystal devices, which means the liquid crystal director configurations vary in two dimensions. Several optimized and designed devices are discussed in the dissertation. They include long-term bistable twisted nematic liquid crystal display (BTN LCD), which is very low power consumption LCD and suitable for E-book application; wavelength tunable liquid crystal Fabry-Perot etalon filter, which is one of the key components in fiber optic telecommunications; high speed refractive index variable devices, which can be used in infrared beam steering and telecommunications; high density polymer wall diffractive liquid crystal on silicon (PWD-LCoS) light valve, which is a promising candidate for larger screen projection display and also can be used in other display applications. Two dimensional liquid crystal director simulation program (relaxation method) and two dimensional optical propagation simulation program (finite-difference time-domain, FDTD method) are developed. The algorithms of these programs are provided. It has been proved that they are the very efficient tools that used in design and optimization the devices described above.

  18. Quartz Crystal Micro-Balance Gas Sensor with Ink-Jet Printed Nano-Diamond Sensitive Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulha, Pavel; Kroutil, Jiří; Laposa, Alexandr; Procházka, Václav; Husák, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    the paper presents fabrication and characterization of a Quartz Crystal Microbalance based gas sensor with a diamond powder sensitive layer deposited using the ink-jet printing technique. The sensor was exposed to a low concentration of ammonia, acetone vapors and different levels of humidity. Impedance characteristics close to the natural resonant frequency of 10 MHz were examined. The sensor exhibits significant shifts in serial resonant frequency under different gas environments.

  19. Diamond/aluminium nitride composites for efficient thermal management applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervenka, J.; Dontschuk, N.; Ladouceur, F.; Duvall, S. G.; Prawer, S.

    2012-07-01

    Synthetic diamond/AlN composite materials have been fabricated by a combination of microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. These wide band gap semiconductor heterojunctions show promises for many applications, including thermal management, deep ultraviolet light emitting devices, and high power and high temperature electronics. Here, we report results of an interface study of polycrystalline diamond layers grown on single crystal AlN(0001). High resolution transmission microscopy revealed atomically sharp interfaces between diamond and AlN. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy measurements showed reduced thermal resistance on diamond-coated AlN substrates compared to uncoated AlN at temperatures above 330 K.

  20. Diamond/aluminium nitride composites for efficient thermal management applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cervenka, J.; Dontschuk, N.; Prawer, S.; Ladouceur, F.; Duvall, S. G.

    2012-07-30

    Synthetic diamond/AlN composite materials have been fabricated by a combination of microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. These wide band gap semiconductor heterojunctions show promises for many applications, including thermal management, deep ultraviolet light emitting devices, and high power and high temperature electronics. Here, we report results of an interface study of polycrystalline diamond layers grown on single crystal AlN(0001). High resolution transmission microscopy revealed atomically sharp interfaces between diamond and AlN. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy measurements showed reduced thermal resistance on diamond-coated AlN substrates compared to uncoated AlN at temperatures above 330 K.

  1. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, R.

    1994-08-09

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device including a photorefractive crystal and a laser is disclosed. The laser produces a coherent light beam which is split by a beam splitter into a first laser beam and a second laser beam. After passing through the crystal the first laser beam is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror, creating a third laser beam. The laser beams are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal by vibration of the crystal. In the third laser beam, modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal. 3 figs.

  2. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1994-01-11

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device (10) including a photorefractive crystal (26) and a laser (12). The laser (12 ) produces a coherent light beam (14) which is split by a beam splitter (18) into a first laser beam (20) and a second laser beam (22). After passing through the crystal (26) the first laser beam (20) is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror (32), creating a third laser beam (30). The laser beams (20, 22, 30) are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal (26) by vibration of the crystal (30). In the third laser beam (30), modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector (34) into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal (26).

  3. Small Device for Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter (center), president of New Century Pharmaceuticals, and Dr. Joseph Ho (right), vice president, examine a diffusion Controlled Apparatus for Microgravity (DCAM). At left, Dr. John Ruble, a senior scientist, examines some specimens. The plastic DCAM has two chambers joined by a porous plug through which fluids can diffuse at a controlled rate. This allows researchers to mix protein solutions on Earth and load them aboard the Space Shuttle shortly before launch. The diffusion and crystallization processes are already under way, but at such a slow pace that crystals do not start growing before the DCAM is in orbit aboard the Shuttle or a space station. Dozens of DCAM units can be flown in a small volume and require virtually no crew attention. Specimens are returned to Earth for analysis. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  4. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: HPHT Synthesis of Micron Grade Boron-Doped Diamond Single Crystal in Fe-Ni-C-B Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He-Min; Zang, Chuan-Yi; Li, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Hong-An; Li, Shang-Sheng; Zhou, Sheng-Guo; Guo, Wei; Jia, Xiao-Peng

    2008-07-01

    Micron grade boron-doped diamond crystals with octahedral morphology are successfully synthesized in a Fe—Ni—C—B system under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT). The effects of the additive boron on synthesis conditions, nucleation and growth, crystal morphology of diamond are studied. The synthesized micron grade diamond crystals were characterized by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The research results show that the V-shaped section of synthetic diamond moves downwards to the utmost extent due to 0.3a wt% (a is a constant.) boron added in the synthesis system. The crystal colour is black, and the average crystal size is about 25 μm. The crystal faces of synthetic diamond are mainly {111} face. The synthesis of this kind of diamond is few reported, and it will have important and widely applications.

  5. Modeling of Optical Aberration Correction using a Liquid Crystal Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xinghua, Wang; Bin, Wang; McManamon, Paul F.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    Gruneisen (sup 1-3), has shown that small, light weight, liquid crystal based devices can correct for the optical distortion caused by an imperfect primary mirror in a telescope and has discussed the efficiency of this correction. In this paper we expand on that work and propose a semi-analytical approach for quantifying the efficiency of a liquid crystal based wavefront corrector for this application.

  6. Effect of N2O on high-rate homoepitaxial growth of CVD single crystal diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Li, H. D.; Cheng, S. H.; Zhang, Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Lv, X. Y.; Zou, G. T.; Pei, X. Q.; Xie, J. G.

    2012-07-01

    Various gases such as N2, O2, and CO2 have been introduced in the typical reaction atmosphere of CH4/H2 and proposed to improve the growth of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) single-crystal diamonds (SCDs). In this paper, we study the influence of a new adding gas nitrous oxide (N2O) on the growth rate, morphology, and optical properties of homoepitaxy (100) CVD SCDs. The reaction pressure (H2/CH4 flow rates) was fixed at 300 Torr (750/90 in sccm) with the addition of a small amount of N2O gas varied at flow rates of 0, 2, 5, 8 and 10 sccm. With the appropriate addition of N2O, the growth rate was increased up to 135 μm/h and the surface roughness was decreased to around 2 nm. Furthermore, adding N2O is favorable for inhibiting the generation of large anti-pyramidal pits on the top surface of SCDs, which generally appeared in the products synthesized in CH4/H2 ambient. The combined effect of the nitrogen- and oxygen-related radicals decomposed from N2O on the growth and properties of the CVD SCDs is discussed. As a result, the addition of N2O provides a new route to realize high-rate growth CVD SCDs instead of the traditional nitrogen.

  7. Dynamic Diamond Anvil Cell (dDAC): A novel device for studying the dynamic-pressure properties of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, W J; Yoo, C; Lee, G W; Cynn, H; Lipp, M J; Visbeck, K

    2007-02-23

    We have developed a unique device, a dynamic diamond anvil cell (dDAC), which repetitively applies a time-dependent load/pressure profile to a sample. This capability allows studies of the kinetics of phase transitions and metastable phases at compression (strain) rates of up to 500 GPa/sec ({approx}0.16 s{sup -1} for a metal). Our approach adapts electromechanical piezoelectric actuators to a conventional diamond anvil cell design, which enables precise specification and control of a time-dependent applied load/pressure. Existing DAC instrumentation and experimental techniques are easily adapted to the dDAC to measure the properties of a sample under the varying load/pressure conditions. This capability addresses the sparsely studied regime of dynamic phenomena between static research (diamond anvil cells and large volume presses) and dynamic shock-driven experiments (gas guns, explosive and laser shock). We present an overview of a variety of experimental measurements that can be made with this device.

  8. Studies of phase composition of contact sites of diamond crystals and the surrounding rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsova, V. L.; Samoylovich, M. I.; Belyanin, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    The composition, structure, and morphology of iron-containing diamond-kimberlite contact sites were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The data obtained confirm the hypothesis of the similarity of mechanisms of diamond formation in nature and in experiments.

  9. The effect of substrate temperature and growth rate on the doping efficiency of single crystal boron doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Demlow, SN; Rechenberg, R; Grotjohn, T

    2014-10-01

    The substrate growth temperature dependence of the plasma gas-phase to solid-phase doping efficiency in single crystal, boron doped diamond (BDD) deposition is investigated. Single crystal diamond (SCD) is grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPACVD) on high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) type Ib substrates. Samples are grown at substrate temperatures of 850-950 degrees C for each of five doping concentration levels, to determine the effect of the growth temperature on the doping efficiency and defect morphology. The substrate temperature during growth is shown to have a significant effect on the grown sample defect morphology, and a temperature dependence of the doping efficiency is also shown. The effect of the growth rate on the doping efficiency is discussed, and the ratio of the boron concentration in the gas phase to the flux of carbon incorporated into the solid diamond phase is shown to be a more predictive measure of the resulting boron concentration than the gas phase boron to carbon ratio that is more commonly reported. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hybrid graphene nematic liquid crystal light scattering device.

    PubMed

    Qasim, M M; Khan, A A; Kostanyan, A; Kidambi, P R; Cabrero-Vilatela, A; Braeuninger-Weimer, P; Gardiner, D J; Hofmann, S; Wilkinson, T D

    2015-09-01

    A hybrid graphene nematic liquid crystal (LC) light scattering device is presented. This device exploits the inherent poly-crystallinity of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene films to induce directional anchoring and formation of LC multi-domains. This thereby enables efficient light scattering without the need for crossed polarisers or separate alignment layers/additives. The hybrid LC device exhibits switching thresholds at very low electric fields (< 1 V μm(-1)) and repeatable, hysteresis free characteristics. This exploitation of LC alignment effects on CVD graphene films enables a new generation of highly efficient nematic LC scattering displays as well as many other possible applications. PMID:26243047

  11. Use of a miniature diamond-anvil cell in high-pressure single-crystal neutron Laue diffraction.

    PubMed

    Binns, Jack; Kamenev, Konstantin V; McIntyre, Garry J; Moggach, Stephen A; Parsons, Simon

    2016-05-01

    The first high-pressure neutron diffraction study in a miniature diamond-anvil cell of a single crystal of size typical for X-ray diffraction is reported. This is made possible by modern Laue diffraction using a large solid-angle image-plate detector. An unexpected finding is that even reflections whose diffracted beams pass through the cell body are reliably observed, albeit with some attenuation. The cell body does limit the range of usable incident angles, but the crystallographic completeness for a high-symmetry unit cell is only slightly less than for a data collection without the cell. Data collections for two sizes of hexamine single crystals, with and without the pressure cell, and at 300 and 150 K, show that sample size and temperature are the most important factors that influence data quality. Despite the smaller crystal size and dominant parasitic scattering from the diamond-anvil cell, the data collected allow a full anisotropic refinement of hexamine with bond lengths and angles that agree with literature data within experimental error. This technique is shown to be suitable for low-symmetry crystals, and in these cases the transmission of diffracted beams through the cell body results in much higher completeness values than are possible with X-rays. The way is now open for joint X-ray and neutron studies on the same sample under identical conditions. PMID:27158503

  12. Use of a miniature diamond-anvil cell in high-pressure single-crystal neutron Laue diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Binns, Jack; Kamenev, Konstantin V.; McIntyre, Garry J.; Moggach, Stephen A.; Parsons, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The first high-pressure neutron diffraction study in a miniature diamond-anvil cell of a single crystal of size typical for X-ray diffraction is reported. This is made possible by modern Laue diffraction using a large solid-angle image-plate detector. An unexpected finding is that even reflections whose diffracted beams pass through the cell body are reliably observed, albeit with some attenuation. The cell body does limit the range of usable incident angles, but the crystallographic completeness for a high-symmetry unit cell is only slightly less than for a data collection without the cell. Data collections for two sizes of hexamine single crystals, with and without the pressure cell, and at 300 and 150 K, show that sample size and temperature are the most important factors that influence data quality. Despite the smaller crystal size and dominant parasitic scattering from the diamond-anvil cell, the data collected allow a full anisotropic refinement of hexamine with bond lengths and angles that agree with literature data within experimental error. This technique is shown to be suitable for low-symmetry crystals, and in these cases the transmission of diffracted beams through the cell body results in much higher completeness values than are possible with X-rays. The way is now open for joint X-ray and neutron studies on the same sample under identical conditions. PMID:27158503

  13. Tool wear of a single-crystal diamond tool in nano-groove machining of a quartz glass plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Masahiko; Nakajima, Satoshi; Terano, Motoki

    2015-12-01

    Tool wear characteristics of a diamond tool in ductile mode machining are presented in this paper. Nano-groove machining of a quartz glass plate was conducted to examine the tool wear rate of a single-crystal diamond tool. Effects of lubrication on the tool wear rate were also evaluated. A numerical simulation technique was developed to evaluate the tool temperature and normal stress acting on the wear surface. From the simulation results it was found that the tool temperature does not increase during the machining experiment. It is also demonstrated that tool wear is attributed to the abrasive wear mechanism, but the effect of the adhesion wear mechanism is minor in nano-groove machining. It is found that the tool wear rate is reduced by using water or kerosene as a lubricant.

  14. Soft x-ray measurements using photoconductive type-IIa and single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Bentley, C. D.; Foster, J. M.; Goedhart, G.; Graham, P.; Taylor, M. J.; Hellewell, E.

    2008-10-15

    Photoconductive detectors (PCDs) are routinely used alongside vacuum x-ray diodes (XRDs) to provide an alternative x-ray flux measurement at laser facilities such as HELEN at AWE Aldermaston, UK, and Omega at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. To evaluate diamond PCDs as an alternative to XRD arrays, calibration measurements made at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory are used to accurately calculate the x-ray flux from a laser-heated target. This is compared to a flux measurement using the Dante XRD diagnostic. Estimates indicate that the photoinduced conductivity from measurements made at Omega are too large, and calculations using the radiometric calibrations made at the NSLS agree with this hypothesis. High-purity, single-crystal, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond samples are compared to natural type-IIa PCDs and show promising high resistivity effects, the corollary of which preliminary results show is a slower response time.

  15. Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Seals, Roland D.; Price, R. Eugene

    1997-01-01

    A method and composition for the deposition of a thick layer (10) of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition (12) including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate (20). The softened or molten composition (18) crystallizes on the substrate (20) to form a thick deposition layer (10) comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition (12) includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent (14) and may include at least one secondary constituent (16). Preferably, the secondary constituents (16) are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) powder and mixtures thereof.

  16. Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Seals, R.D.; Price, R.E.

    1997-06-03

    A method and composition is disclosed for the deposition of a thick layer of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate. The softened or molten composition crystallizes on the substrate to form a thick deposition layer comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent and may include at least one secondary constituent. Preferably, the secondary constituents are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) powder and mixtures thereof. 9 figs.

  17. Crystal growth of device quality GaAs in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.

    1985-01-01

    The present program has been aimed at solving the fundamental and technological problems associated with Crystal Growth of Device Quality in Space. The initial stage of the program was devoted strictly to ground-based research. The unsolved problems associated with the growth of bulk GaAs in the presence of gravitational forces were explored. Reliable chemical, structural and electronic characterization methods were developed which would permit the direct relation of the salient materials parameters (particularly those affected by zero gravity conditions) to the electronic characteristics of single crystal GaAs, in turn to device performance. These relationships are essential for the development of optimum approaches and techniques. It was concluded that the findings on elemental semiconductors Ge and Si regarding crystal growth, segregation, chemical composition, defect interactions, and materials properties-electronic properties relationships are not necessarily applicable to GaAs (and to other semiconductor compounds). In many instances totally unexpected relationships were found to prevail.

  18. Theoretical design of photonic crystal devices for integrated optical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekis, Attila

    2000-12-01

    In this thesis we investigate novel photonic crystal devices that can be used as building blocks of all- optical circuits. We contrast the behavior of light in photonic crystal systems and in their traditional counterparts. We exhibit that bends in photonic crystals are able to transmit light with over 90% efficiency for large bandwidths and with 100% efficiency for specific frequencies. In contrast to traditional waveguides, bound states in photonic crystal waveguides can also exist in constrictions and above the cutoff frequency. We discuss how to lower reflections encountered when photonic crystal waveguides are terminated, both in an experimental setup as well as in numerical simulations. We show that light can be very efficiently coupled into and out of photonic crystal waveguides using tapered dielectric waveguides. In time-domain simulations of photonic crystal waveguides, spurious reflections from cell edges can be eliminated by terminating the waveguide with a Bragg reflector waveguide. We demonstrate novel lasing action in two-dimensional photonic crystal slabs with gain media, where lasing occurs at saddle points in the band structure, in contrast to one-dimensional photonic crystals. We also design a photonic crystal slab with organic gain media that has a TE-like pseudogap. We demonstrate that such a slab can support a high- Q defect mode, enabling low threshold lasing, and we discuss how the quality factor depends on the design parameters. We also propose to use two- dimensional photonic crystal slabs as directionally efficient free-space couplers. We draft methods to calculate the coupling constant both numerically and analytically, using a finite-difference time-domain method and the volume current method with a Green's function approach, respectively. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  19. CMOS-liquid-crystal-based image transceiver device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efron, Uzi; Davidov, Isak; Sinelnikov, Vladimir; Levin, Ilya

    2001-05-01

    A CMOS-Liquid Crystal-Based Image Transceiver Device (ITD) is under development at the Holon Institute of Technology. The device combines both functions of imaginary and display in a single array structure. This unique structure allows the combination of see-through, aiming, imaging and the displaying of a superposed image to be combined in a single, compact, head mounted display. The CMOS-based pixel elements are designed to provide image sensor part of the pixel is based on an n-well photodiode and a three-transistors readout circuit. The imaging function is based on a back- illuminated sensor configuration. In order to provide a high imager fill-factor, two pixel configuration are proposed: 1) A p++/p-/p-well silicon structure using twin- well CMOS process; 2) an n-well processed silicon structure with a micro-lens array. The display portion of the IT device is to be fabricate don a silicon-based reflective, active matrix driver, using nematic liquid crystal material. The reflective display pixel electrode is driven by an n-MOS transistor, formed in the corresponding pixel region on the silicon substrate. The timing, sequencing and control of the IT device array are designed in a pipeline array processing scheme. A preliminary prototype system and device design have been performed and the first test device is currently being tested. Details of the device design as well as its smart goggle applications are presented.

  20. SU-F-BRE-02: Characterization of a New Commercial Single Crystal Diamond Detector in Photon, Electron and Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Y; Das, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Diamond detectors even with superior characteristics have become obsolete due to poor design, selection of crystal and cost. Recently, microDiamond using synthetic single crystal diamond detector (SCDD) is commercially available which is characterized in various radiation beams in this study. Methods: The characteristics of a commercial SCDD model 60019 (PTW) to a 6- and 15-MV photon beams, 6- and 20-MeV electron beams, and 208 MeV proton beams were investigated and compared to the pre-characterized detectors: TN31010 (0.125 cm{sup 3}) and TN30006 (pinpoint) ionization chambers (PTW), EDGE detector (Sun Nuclear Corp), and SFD Stereotactic Dosimetry Diode Detector (IBA). The depth-dose and profiles data were collected for various field sizes and depths. The dose linearity and dose rate dependency were also evaluated. To evaluate the effects of the preirradiation, the diamond detector which had not been irradiated on the day was set up in the water tank and the response to 100 MU was measured every 20 s. The temperature dependency was tested for the range of 4–60 °C. Angular dependency was evaluated in water phantom by rotating the SCDD. Results: For all radiation types and field sizes, the depth-dose data of the diamond chamber showed identical curve to those of ionization chambers. The profile of the diamond detector was very similar to those of the Edge and SFD detectors, although the 0.125 cm{sup 3} and pinpoint chambers showed averaging effects in the penumbrae region. The temperature dependency was within 0.7% in the range of 4–41°C. A dose of 900 cGy and 1200 cGy were needed to stabilize the chamber to the level within 0.5% and 0.2%, respectively. Conclusion: The type 60019 SCDD detector showed suitable characteristics for depth-dose and profile measurements for wide range of field sizes. However, at least 1000 cGy of pre-irradiation is needed for accurate measurements.

  1. Diamond nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Beha, Katja; Wolfer, Marco; Becker, Merle C; Siyushev, Petr; Jamali, Mohammad; Batalov, Anton; Hinz, Christopher; Hees, Jakob; Kirste, Lutz; Obloh, Harald; Gheeraert, Etienne; Naydenov, Boris; Jakobi, Ingmar; Dolde, Florian; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Twittchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Dregely, Daniel; Giessen, Harald; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Nebel, Christoph E; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Summary We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen–vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon–vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition. PMID:23365803

  2. Growth of large size diamond single crystals by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition: Recent achievements and remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallaire, Alexandre; Achard, Jocelyn; Silva, François; Brinza, Ovidiu; Gicquel, Alix

    2013-02-01

    Diamond is a material with outstanding properties making it particularly suited for high added-value applications such as optical windows, power electronics, radiation detection, quantum information, bio-sensing and many others. Tremendous progresses in its synthesis by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition have allowed obtaining single crystal optical-grade material with thicknesses of up to a few millimetres. However the requirements in terms of size, purity and crystalline quality are getting more and more difficult to achieve with respect to the forecasted applications, thus pushing the synthesis method to its scientific and technological limits. In this paper, after a short description of the operating principles of the growth technique, the challenges of increasing crystal dimensions both laterally and vertically, decreasing and controlling point and extended defects as well as modulating crystal conductivity by an efficient doping will be detailed before offering some insights into ways to overcome them.

  3. Boron Arsenide and Boron Phosphide for High Temperature and Luminescent Devices. [semiconductor devices - crystal growth/crystal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    The crystal growth of boron arsenide and boron phosphide in the form of bulk crystals and epitaxial layers on suitable substrates is discussed. The physical, chemical, and electrical properties of the crystals and epitaxial layers are examined. Bulk crystals of boron arsenide were prepared by the chemical transport technique, and their carrier concentration and Hall mobility were measured. The growth of boron arsenide crystals from high temperature solutions was attempted without success. Bulk crystals of boron phosphide were also prepared by chemical transport and solution growth techniques. Techniques required for the fabrication of boron phosphide devices such as junction shaping, diffusion, and contact formation were investigated. Alloying techniques were developed for the formation of low-resistance ohmic contacts to boron phosphide. Four types of boron phosphide devices were fabricated: (1) metal-insulator-boron phosphide structures, (2) Schottky barriers; (3) boron phosphide-silicon carbide heterojunctions; and (4) p-n homojunctions. Easily visible red electroluminescence was observed from both epitaxial and solution grown p-n junctions.

  4. Ion implantation of diamond: Damage, doping, and lift-off

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, N.R.; McGucken, E.; Swanson, M.L.; Hunn, J.D.; White, C.W.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1993-09-01

    In order to make good quality economical diamond electronic devices, it is essential to grow films and to dope these films to obtain n- and p- type conductivity. This review talk discuss first doping by ion implantation plus annealing of the implantation damage, and second flow to make large area single crystal diamonds. C implantation damage below an estimated Frenkel defect concentration of 7% could be recovered almost completely by annealing at 950C. For a defect concentration between 7 and 10%, a stable damage form of diamond (``green diamond``) was formed by annealing. At still higher damage levels, the diamond graphitized. To introduce p-type doping, we have co-implanted B and C into natural diamond at 77K, followed by annealing up to 1100C. The resulting semiconducting material has electrical properties similar to those of natural B-doped diamond. To create n-type diamond, we have implanted Na{sup +}, P+ and As{sup +} ions and have observed semiconducting behavior. This has been compared with carbon or noble element implantation, in an attempt to isolate the effect of radiation damage. Recently, in order to obtain large area signal crystals, we have developed a novel technique for removing thin layers of diamond from bulk or homoepitaxial films. This method consists of ion implantation, followed by selective etching. High energy (4--5 MeV) implantation of carbon or oxygen ions creates a well-defined layer of damaged diamond buried at a controlled depth. This layer is graphitized and selectivity etched either by heating at 550C in an oxygen ambient or by electrolysis. This process successfully lifts off the diamond plate above the graphite layer. The lift-off method, combined with well-established homoepitaxial growth processes, has potential for fabrication of large area single-crystal diamond sheets.

  5. Note: Laser ablation technique for electrically contacting a buried implant layer in single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, M. P.; Baldwin, J. W.; Butler, J. E.; Pate, B. B.; Feygelson, T. I.

    2011-05-15

    The creation of thin, buried, and electrically conducting layers within an otherwise insulating diamond by annealed ion implantation damage is well known. Establishing facile electrical contact to the shallow buried layer has been an unmet challenge. We demonstrate a new method, based on laser micro-machining (laser ablation), to make reliable electrical contact to a buried implant layer in diamond. Comparison is made to focused ion beam milling.

  6. Nanomedicine crystals-inspired optoelectronic device materials and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yan; Wang, Fangzhang; Wu, Rong

    2012-02-01

    Aim: Organic, biological materials and soft matters with optoelectronic donors and acceptors are postulated to be novel optoelectronic device materials. Methods: Molecular self-assemblies of nanomedicine crystals are employed by inelastic electron tunneling interaction force, which is a quantum force to make basic units of organic, biological and soft matter with optoelectronic donors and acceptors to be enlarged from nanometers to micrometers on silicon chips. Results: Self-assembled topographic structures and corresponding conducting with kondo effects and photoluminescence properties of self-assembled nanomedicine crystal building blocks are demonstrated by conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) images and current-voltage curves, and laser micro- photoluminescence (PL) spectra. By contrast to top-down processing, the bottom-up processing of molecular self-assembly is low cost on large scale industrial manufacturing. Conclusion: The self-assembled nanomedicine crystal building blocks with optoelectronic donors and acceptors are candidates of novel optoelectronic device materials to be in the emerging discipline of information technology (IT) in its broadest sense, i.e. bioelectronics & biosensors, optoelectronic devices, data storage devices; simple to complex quantum entanglements and superposition for quantum bits computing, a novel strategy for 2020 IT and beyond.

  7. Nanomedicine crystals-inspired optoelectronic device materials and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yan; Wang, Fangzhang; Wu, Rong

    2011-11-01

    Aim: Organic, biological materials and soft matters with optoelectronic donors and acceptors are postulated to be novel optoelectronic device materials. Methods: Molecular self-assemblies of nanomedicine crystals are employed by inelastic electron tunneling interaction force, which is a quantum force to make basic units of organic, biological and soft matter with optoelectronic donors and acceptors to be enlarged from nanometers to micrometers on silicon chips. Results: Self-assembled topographic structures and corresponding conducting with kondo effects and photoluminescence properties of self-assembled nanomedicine crystal building blocks are demonstrated by conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) images and current-voltage curves, and laser micro- photoluminescence (PL) spectra. By contrast to top-down processing, the bottom-up processing of molecular self-assembly is low cost on large scale industrial manufacturing. Conclusion: The self-assembled nanomedicine crystal building blocks with optoelectronic donors and acceptors are candidates of novel optoelectronic device materials to be in the emerging discipline of information technology (IT) in its broadest sense, i.e. bioelectronics & biosensors, optoelectronic devices, data storage devices; simple to complex quantum entanglements and superposition for quantum bits computing, a novel strategy for 2020 IT and beyond.

  8. Device and method for screening crystallization conditions in solution crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A device and method for detecting optimum protein crystallization conditions and for growing protein crystals in either 1g or microgravity environments comprising a housing, defining at least one pair of chambers for containing crystallization solutions is presented. The housing further defines an orifice therein for providing fluid communication between the chambers. The orifice is adapted to receive a tube which contains a gelling substance for limiting the rate of diffusive mixing of the crystallization solutions. The solutions are diffusively mixed over a period of time defined by the quantity of gelling substance sufficient to achieve equilibration and to substantially reduce density driven convection disturbances therein. The device further includes endcaps to seal the first and second chambers. One of the endcaps includes a dialysis chamber which contains protein solution in which protein crystals are grown. Once the endcaps are in place, the protein solution is exposed to the crystallization solutions wherein the solubility of the protein solution is reduced at a rate responsive to the rate of diffusive mixing of the crystallization solutions. This allows for a controlled approach to supersaturation and allows for screening of crystal growth conditions at preselected intervals.

  9. Device and Method for Screening Crystallization Conditions in Solution Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A device and method for detecting optimum protein crystallization conditions and for growing protein crystals in either 1 g or microgravity environments comprising a housing defining at least one pair of chambers for containing crystallization solutions. The housing further defines an orifice therein for providing fluid communication between the chambers. The orifice is adapted to receive a tube which contains a gelling substance for limiting the rate of diffusive mixing of the crystallization solutions. The solutions are diffusively mixed over a period of time defined by the quantity of gelling substance sufficient to achieve equilibration and to substantially reduce density driven convection disturbances therein. The device further includes endcaps to seal the first and second chambers. One of the endcaps includes a dialysis chamber which contains protein solution in which protein crystals are grown. Once the endcaps are in place. the protein solution is exposed to the crystallization solutions wherein the solubility of the protein solution is reduced at a rate responsive to the rate of diffusive mixing of the crystallization solutions. This allows for a controlled approach to supersaturation and allows for screening of crystal growth conditions at preselected intervals.

  10. Single crystal diamond detector measurements of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutrons in Joint European Torus fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzaniga, C. Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Binda, F.; Ericsson, G.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Griesmayer, E.; Kaveney, G.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-04-15

    First simultaneous measurements of deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium neutrons from deuterium plasmas using a Single crystal Diamond Detector are presented in this paper. The measurements were performed at JET with a dedicated electronic chain that combined high count rate capabilities and high energy resolution. The deposited energy spectrum from DD neutrons was successfully reproduced by means of Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response function and simulations of neutron emission from the plasma, including background contributions. The reported results are of relevance for the development of compact neutron detectors with spectroscopy capabilities for installation in camera systems of present and future high power fusion experiments.

  11. Single crystal diamond detector measurements of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutrons in Joint European Torus fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Binda, F.; Croci, G.; Ericsson, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Griesmayer, E.; Grosso, G.; Kaveney, G.; Nocente, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Rebai, M.; Syme, B.; Tardocchi, M.

    2014-04-01

    First simultaneous measurements of deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium neutrons from deuterium plasmas using a Single crystal Diamond Detector are presented in this paper. The measurements were performed at JET with a dedicated electronic chain that combined high count rate capabilities and high energy resolution. The deposited energy spectrum from DD neutrons was successfully reproduced by means of Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response function and simulations of neutron emission from the plasma, including background contributions. The reported results are of relevance for the development of compact neutron detectors with spectroscopy capabilities for installation in camera systems of present and future high power fusion experiments.

  12. Diamond Measuring Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulic, J.F.

    2000-01-27

    The fundamental goal of this project was to develop additional capabilities to the diamond measuring prototype, work out technical difficulties associated with the original device, and perform automated measurements which are accurate and repeatable. For this project, FM and T was responsible for the overall system design, edge extraction, and defect extraction and identification. AccuGem provided a lab and computer equipment in Lawrence, 3D modeling, industry expertise, and sets of diamonds for testing. The system executive software which controls stone positioning, lighting, focusing, report generation, and data acquisition was written in Microsoft Visual Basic 6, while data analysis and modeling were compiled in C/C++ DLLs. All scanning parameters and extracted data are stored in a central database and available for automated analysis and reporting. The Phase 1 study showed that data can be extracted and measured from diamond scans, but most of the information had to be manually extracted. In this Phase 2 project, all data required for geometric modeling and defect identification were automatically extracted and passed to a 3D modeling module for analysis. Algorithms were developed which automatically adjusted both light levels and stone focus positioning for each diamond-under-test. After a diamond is analyzed and measurements are completed, a report is printed for the customer which shows carat weight, summarizes stone geometry information, lists defects and their size, displays a picture of the diamond, and shows a plot of defects on a top view drawing of the stone. Initial emphasis of defect extraction was on identification of feathers, pinpoints, and crystals. Defects were plotted color-coded by industry standards for inclusions (red), blemishes (green), and unknown defects (blue). Diamonds with a wide variety of cut quality, size, and number of defects were tested in the machine. Edge extraction, defect extraction, and modeling code were tested for

  13. Ultrananocrystalline diamond-CMOS device integration route for high acuity retinal prostheses.

    PubMed

    Ahnood, A; Escudie, M C; Cicione, R; Abeyrathne, C D; Ganesan, K; Fox, K E; Garrett, D J; Stacey, A; Apollo, N V; Lichter, S G; Thomas, C D L; Tran, N; Meffin, H; Prawer, S

    2015-01-01

    High density electrodes are a new frontier for biomedical implants. Increasing the density and the number of electrodes used for the stimulation of retinal ganglion cells is one possible strategy for enhancing the quality of vision experienced by patients using retinal prostheses. The present work presents an integration strategy for a diamond based, high density, stimulating electrode array with a purpose built application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The strategy is centered on flip-chip bonding of indium bumps to create high count and density vertical interconnects between the stimulator ASIC and an array of diamond neural stimulating electrodes. The use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) housing prevents cross-contamination of the biocompatible diamond electrode with non-biocompatible materials, such as indium, used in the microfabrication process. Micro-imprint lithography allowed edge-to-edge micro-scale pattering of the indium bumps on non-coplanar substrates that have a form factor that can conform to body organs and thus are ideally suited for biomedical applications. Furthermore, micro-imprint lithography ensures the compatibility of lithography with the silicon ASIC and aluminum contact pads. Although this work focuses on 256 stimulating diamond electrode arrays with a pitch of 150 μm, the use of indium bump bonding technology and vertical interconnects facilitates implants with tens of thousands electrodes with a pitch as low as 10 μm, thus ensuring validity of the strategy for future high acuity retinal prostheses, and bionic implants in general. PMID:25877379

  14. Crystal growth of device quality GaAs in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, Harry C.; Lagowski, Jacek

    1989-01-01

    The program on Crystal Growth of Device Quality GaAs in Space was initiated in 1977. The initial stage covering 1977 to 1984 was devoted strictly to ground-based research. By 1985 the program had evolved into its next logical stage aimed at space growth experiments; however, since the Challenger disaster, the program has been maintained as a ground-based program awaiting activation of experimentation in space. The overall prgram has produced some 80 original scientific publications on GaAs crystal growth, crystal characterization, and new approaches to space processing. Publication completed in the last three years are listed. Their key results are outlined and discussed in the twelve publications included as part of the report.

  15. Electronic Impact of Inclusions in Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, E.M.; Smedley, J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Gaowei, M.; Keister, J.W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dudley, M.; Wu, Q.

    2010-04-07

    X-ray topography data are compared with photodiode responsivity maps to identify potential candidates for electron trapping in high purity, single crystal diamond. X-ray topography data reveal the defects that exist in the diamond material, which are dominated by non-electrically active linear dislocations. However, many diamonds also contain defects configurations (groups of threading dislocations originating from a secondary phase region or inclusion) in the bulk of the wafer which map well to regions of photoconductive gain, indicating that these inclusions are a source of electron trapping which affect the performance of diamond X-ray detectors. It was determined that photoconductive gain is only possible with the combination of an injecting contact and charge trapping in the near surface region. Typical photoconductive gain regions are 0.2 mm across; away from these near-surface inclusions the device yields the expected diode responsivity.

  16. Diamond Analyzed by Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.

    1998-01-01

    Diamond is a promising semiconductor material for novel electronic applications because of its chemical stability and inertness, heat conduction properties, and so-called negative electron affinity (NEA). When a surface has NEA, electrons generated inside the bulk of the material are able to come out into the vacuum without any potential barrier (work function). Such a material would have an extremely high secondary electron emission coefficient o, very high photoelectron (quantum) yield, and would probably be an efficient field emitter. Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films have even more advantages than diamond single crystals. Their fabrication is relatively easy and inexpensive, and they can be grown with high levels of doping--consequently, they can have relatively high conductivity. Because of these properties, diamond can be used for cold cathodes and photocathodes in high-power electronics and in high-frequency and high-temperature semiconductor devices.

  17. 75 FR 74080 - In the Matter of Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors, Televisions, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... COMMISSION Inv. No. 337-TA-749 In the Matter of Certain Liquid Crystal Display Devices, Including Monitors... sale within the United States after importation of certain liquid crystal display devices, including... importation of certain liquid crystal display devices, including monitors, televisions, and modules,...

  18. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs. PMID:27356177

  19. Hierarchical self-assembly of telechelic star polymers: from soft patchy particles to gels and diamond crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Barbara; Coluzza, Ivan; Blaak, Ronald; Lo Verso, Federica; Likos, Christos N.

    2013-09-01

    The design of self-assembling materials in the nanometer scale focuses on the fabrication of a class of organic and inorganic subcomponents that can be reliably produced on a large scale and tailored according to their vast applications for, e.g. electronics, therapeutic vectors and diagnostic imaging agent carriers, or photonics. In a recent publication (Capone et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 238301), diblock copolymer stars have been shown to be a novel system, which is able to hierarchically self-assemble first into soft patchy particles and thereafter into more complex structures, such as the diamond and cubic crystal. The self-aggregating single star patchy behavior is preserved from extremely low up to high densities. Its main control parameters are related to the architecture of the building blocks, which are the number of arms (functionality) and the fraction of attractive end-monomers. By employing a variety of computational and theoretical tools, ranging from the microscopic to the mesoscopic, coarse-grained level in a systematic fashion, we investigate the crossover between the formation of microstructure versus macroscopic phase separation, as well as the formation of gels and networks in these systems. We finally show that telechelic star polymers can be used as building blocks for the fabrication of open crystal structures, such as the diamond or the simple-cubic lattice, taking advantage of the strong correlation between single-particle patchiness and lattice coordination at finite densities.

  20. Thermal and fast neutron detection in chemical vapor deposition single-crystal diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Angelone, M.; Lattanzi, D.; Pillon, M.; Montereali, R. M.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2008-03-01

    Recently, a compact solid-state neutron detector capable of simultaneously detecting thermal and fast neutrons was proposed [M. Marinelli et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 143509 (2006)]. Its design is based on a p-type/intrinsic/metal layered structure obtained by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of homoepitaxial diamond followed by thermal evaporation of an Al contact and a L6iF converting layer. Fast neutrons are directly detected in the CVD diamond bulk, since they have enough energy to produce the C12(n,α)B9e reaction in diamond. Thermal neutrons are instead converted into charged particles in the L6iF layer through the L6i(n ,α)T nuclear reaction. These charged particles are then detected in the diamond layer. The thickness of the L6iF converting layer and the CVD diamond sensing layer affect the counting efficiency and energy resolution of the detector both for low- (thermal) and high-energy neutrons. An analysis is carried out on the dynamics of the L6i(n ,α)T and the C12(n,α)B9e reactions products, and the distribution of the energy released inside the sensitive layer is calculated. The detector counting efficiency and energy resolution were accordingly derived as a function of the thickness of the L6iF and CVD diamond layers, both for thermal and fast neutrons, thus allowing us to choose the optimum detector design for any particular application. Comparison with experimental results is also reported.

  1. Switchable Solar Window Devices Based on Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joseph; Ma, Dakang; Munday, Jeremy

    Windows are an interesting target for photovoltaics due to the potential for large area of deployment and because glass is already a ubiquitous component of solar cell devices. Many demonstrations of solar windows in recent years have used photovoltaic devices which are semitransparent in the visible region. Much research has focused on enhancing device absorption in the UV and IR ranges as a means to circumvent the basic tradeoff between efficiency and transparency to visible light. Use of switchable solar window is a less investigated alternative approach; these windows utilize the visible spectrum but can toggle between high transparency and high efficiency as needed. We present a novel switchable solar window device based on Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals (PDLC). By applying an electric field to the PDLC layer, the device can be switched from an opaque, light diffusing, efficient photovoltaic cell to a clear, transparent window. In the off state (i.e. scattering state), these devices have the added benefits of increased reflectivity for reduced lighting and cooling costs and haze for privacy. Further, we demonstrate that these windows have the potential for self-powering due to the very low power required to maintain the on, or high transparency, state. Support From: University of Maryland and Maryland Nano-center and its Fablab.

  2. Confocal luminescence study of nitrogen-vacancy distribution within nitrogen-rich single crystal CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shershulin, V. A.; Samoylenko, S. R.; Kudryavtsev, O. S.; Bolshakov, A. P.; Ashkinazi, E. E.; Yurov, V. Yu; Ralchenko, V. G.; Konov, V. I.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2016-01-01

    Confocal photoluminescence (PL) microscopy was used to study a distribution of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) defects within a surface and in a cross section of a homoepitaxial chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond layer intentionally grown with a nitrogen concentration close to the solubility limit. A variation in the PL intensity within the whole sample was found to exceed no more than 30% of the intensity maximum. The diamond layers with densely packed NV- arrays are a promising material platform for the design of highly sensitive magnetic field and temperature sensors, as well as for using this material in quantum optics and informatics technologies based on NV- spins.

  3. The effect of pressure on the kinetics of γ-anhydrite crystallization investigated by diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanjiang; Zheng, Haifei; Du, Jianguo; Wang, Duojun

    2015-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of γ-anhydrite was investigated in the temperature and pressure ranges of 373-473 K and 1094-1903 MPa using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) and Raman spectroscopy. A calcium sulfate solution was formed by dissolving gypsum in water at high pressure, and γ-anhydrite crystallized due to the increasing temperature. The relationship among the reaction rate, k, the temperature, T, and the pressure, P was established as k=-1.75×10-3+1.83×10-6P+3.57×10-7T, with an R2 value of 0.943, of which the applicable range is 373 K≤T≤473 K and 1196 MPa≤P≤1903 MPa. An elevation of T or P will accelerate the crystallization rate of γ-anhydrite. The time exponent n obtained between 0.96 and 1.29 indicates that the process of crystallization should be controlled by instant nucleation on the grain boundary and diffusion controlled growth. In the process of crystallization, the volume is reduced because of the decrease of pressure, and the volume change ΔV is equal to -6.05×10-6 m3/mol. The calculated activation energy Ea is 10.7 kJ/mol, and the pre-exponential factor A is 2.27×10-2 s-1.

  4. Surface finish in ultra-precision diamond turning of single-crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayomoh, M.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.

    2015-10-01

    Silicon is an optical material widely used in the production of infrared optics. However, silicon as a brittle material exhibits some difficulties when ultra-precision machined by mono-crystalline single point diamond. Finish turning of silicon with mono- crystalline diamond inserts results in accelerated tool wear rates if the right combination of the machining parameters is not properly selected. In this study, we conducted a series of machining tests on an ultra-high precision machine tool using finish turning conditions when using mono-crystalline diamond inserts with negative rake angle and relatively big nose radius. The study yields some recommendations on the best combination of machining parameters that will result in maximum material removal rates with smallest possible surface finish. In this work, standard non-controlled waviness diamond inserts having nose radius of about 1.5 mm, rake angle of negative 25°, and clearance angle of 5° were used to produce flat surfaces on silicon disk. From the results, it has been established that feed rate has the most influential effect followed by the depth of cut and cutting speed.

  5. A nitrogen doped low-dislocation density free-standing single crystal diamond plate fabricated by a lift-off process

    SciTech Connect

    Mokuno, Yoshiaki Kato, Yukako; Tsubouchi, Nobuteru; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Yamada, Hideaki; Shikata, Shinichi

    2014-06-23

    A nitrogen-doped single crystal diamond plate with a low dislocation density is fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a high pressure high temperature synthetic type IIa seed substrate by ion implantation and lift-off processes. To avoid sub-surface damage, the seed surface was subjected to deep ion beam etching. In addition, we introduced a nitrogen flow during the CVD step to grow low-strain diamond at a relatively high growth rate. This resulted in a plate with low birefringence and a dislocation density as low as 400 cm{sup −2}, which is the lowest reported value for a lift-off plate. Reproducing this lift-off process may allow mass-production of single crystal CVD diamond plates with low dislocation density and consistent quality.

  6. Applicability check of ZnO crystals for device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Mithun; Ullrich, Bruno; Ariza, David; Xi, Haowen

    2014-03-01

    There has always been vital interest in wide-band gap semiconductors for their applicability in short-wavelength photonic devices and in electronic devices operating in high frequency regime. Historically, ZnO was never favored as a potential material for the above applications primarily because of difficulty in growing it. This situation, however, has improved drastically in the past decade thereby renewing the attention on this material system. Hence, ZnO is being proposed for potential light emitting devices in the blue and UV regions of electromagnetic spectrum. ZnO single crystals are also being considered for high power transistors. In this work, we present investigations of optical properties of pure (99.99%) ZnO performing transmittance, reflectance, Raman, and photoluminescence measurements. The ZnO single crystals employed in this work, were obtained commercially. We present detailed analysis of the measured data through theoretical calculations. Our results identify the state-of-the-art application potential of commercially available ZnO, revealing its advantages and limitations when compared to similar materials such as GaN.

  7. Fundamentals and technology for monolithically integrated RF MEMS switches with ultra-nanocrystaline diamond dielectric/CMOS devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Sumant, A.; Goldsmith, C.; O'Brien, S.; Sampath, S.; Gudeman, C; Wang, W.; Hwang, J.; Swonger, J.; Carlisle, J.; Balachandran, S.; MEMtronics Corp.; Innovative Micro Technology; Lehigh Univ.; Peregrine Semiconductor; Advanced Diamond Technologies

    2010-01-01

    Most current capacitive RF-MEMS switch technology is based on conventional dielectric materials such as SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. However, they suffer not only from charging problems but also stiction problems leading to premature failure of an RF-MEMS switch. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD{sup (R)}) (2-5 nm grains) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) (10-100 nm grains) films exhibit one of the highest Young's modulus ({approx} 980-1100 GPa) and demonstrated MEMS resonators with the highest quality factor (Q {ge} 10,000 in air for NCD) today, they also exhibit the lowest force of adhesion among MEMS/NEMS materials ({approx}10 mJ/m{sup 2}-close to van der Waals attractive force for UNCD) demonstrated today. Finally, UNCD exhibits dielectric properties (fast discharge) superior to those of Si and SiO{sub 2}, as shown in this paper. Thus, UNCD and NCD films provide promising platform materials beyond Si for a new generation of important classes of high-performance MEMS/NEMS devices.

  8. Microwave Plasma Source for Fabrication of Micro- and Nano-Crystalline Diamond Thin Films for Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paosawatyanyong, Boonchoat; Rujisamphan, Nopporn; Bhanthumnavin, Worawan

    2013-01-01

    The design and utilization of an affordable compact-size high-density plasma reactor for micro- and nano-crystalline diamond (MCD/NCD) thin film deposition is presented. The system is based on a 2.45 GHz domestic microwave oven magnetron. A switching power supply module, which yields a low-voltage high-current AC filament feeding and a high-voltage low-current DC cathode bias, is constructed to serve as the magnetron power source. With a high stability of the power module combined with the usage of water cooling gaskets, over 100 h of plasma processing time was achieved without overheating or causing any damage to the magnetron. Depositions of well-faceted MCD/NCD thin films, with distinct diamond Raman characteristics, were obtained using H2-CH4 discharge with 1-5% CH4. Metal-semiconductor diode structures were fabricated using gold and aluminum as ohmic and rectifying contacts, respectively, and their responses to DC signals revealed a high rectification ratio of up to 106 in the intrinsic MCD/NCD devices.

  9. Effect of grain size of polycrystalline diamond on its heat spreading properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Roland B.; Anaya, Julian; Faili, Firooz; Balmer, Richard; Williams, Gruffudd T.; Twitchen, Daniel J.; Kuball, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The exceptionally high thermal conductivity of polycrystalline diamond (>2000 W m‑1 K‑1) makes it a very attractive material for optimizing the thermal management of high-power devices. In this paper, the thermal conductivity of a diamond sample capturing grain size evolution from nucleation towards the growth surface is studied using an optimized 3ω technique. The thermal conductivity is found to decrease with decreasing grain size, which is in good agreement with theory. These results clearly reveal the minimum film thickness and polishing thickness from nucleation needed to achieve single-crystal diamond performance, and thus enable production of an optimal polycrystalline diamond for heat-spreading applications.

  10. Sub-band gap photo-enhanced secondary electron emission from high-purity single-crystal chemical-vapor-deposited diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yater, J. E.; Shaw, J. L.; Pate, B. B.; Feygelson, T. I.

    2016-02-01

    Secondary-electron-emission (SEE) current measured from high-purity, single-crystal (100) chemical-vapor-deposited diamond is found to increase when sub-band gap (3.06 eV) photons are incident on the hydrogenated surface. Although the light does not produce photoemission directly, the SEE current increases by more than a factor of 2 before saturating with increasing laser power. In energy distribution curves (EDCs), the emission peak shows a corresponding increase in intensity with increasing laser power. However, the emission-onset energy in the EDCs remains constant, indicating that the bands are pinned at the surface. On the other hand, changes are observed on the high-energy side of the distribution as the laser power increases, with a well-defined shoulder becoming more pronounced. From an analysis of this feature in the EDCs, it is deduced that upward band bending is present in the near-surface region during the SEE measurements and this band bending suppresses the SEE yield. However, sub-band gap photon illumination reduces the band bending and thereby increases the SEE current. Because the bands are pinned at the surface, we conclude that the changes in the band levels occur below the surface in the electron transport region. Sample heating produces similar effects as observed with sub-band gap photon illumination, namely, an increase in SEE current and a reduction in band bending. However, the upward band bending is not fully removed by either increasing laser power or temperature, and a minimum band bending of ˜0.8 eV is established in both cases. The sub-band gap photo-excitation mechanism is under further investigation, although it appears likely at present that defect or gap states play a role in the photo-enhanced SEE process. In the meantime, the study demonstrates the ability of visible light to modify the electronic properties of diamond and enhance the emission capabilities, which may have potential impact for diamond-based vacuum electron