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Sample records for crystal growth mechanisms

  1. Fluid mechanics in crystal growth - The 1982 Freeman scholar lecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, S.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to unify the current state of knowledge in crystal growth techniques and fluid mechanics. After identifying important fluid dynamic problems for such representative crystal growth processes as closed tube vapor transport, open reactor vapor deposition, and the Czochralski and floating zone melt growth techniques, research results obtained to date are presented. It is noted that the major effort to date has been directed to the description of the nature and extent of bulk transport under realistic conditions, where bulk flow determines the heat and solute transport which strongly influence the temperature and concentration fields in the vicinity of the growth interface. Proper treatment of near field, or interface, problems cannot be given until the far field, or global flow, involved in a given crystal growth technique has been adequately described.

  2. The mechanism of growth of quartz crystals into fused silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fratello, V. J.; Hays, J. F.; Spaepen, F.; Turnbull, D.

    1980-01-01

    It is proposed that the growth of quartz crystals into fused silica is effected by a mechanism involving the breaking of an Si-O bond and its association with an OH group, followed by cooperative motion of the nonbridging oxygen and the hydroxyl group which results in the crystallization of a row of several molecules along a crystalline-amorphous interfacial ledge. This mechanism explains, at least qualitatively, all the results of the earlier experimental study of the dependence of quartz crystal growth upon applied pressure: large negative activation volume; single activation enthalpy below Si-O bond energy; growth velocity constant in time, proportional to the hydroxyl and chlorine content, decreasing with increasing degree of reduction, and enhanced by nonhydrostatic stresses; lower pre-exponential for the synthetic than for the natural silica.

  3. Crystal growth mechanisms of the (0 1 0) face of α-lactose monohydrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, T. D.; Ogden, M. I.; Parkinson, G. M.

    2009-04-01

    The growth rates of the (0 1 0) face of α-lactose monohydrate crystals were measured at 30, 40 and 50 °C in the relative supersaturation range 0.55-2.33 in aqueous solutions. The mechanisms of growth were investigated. Spiral growth was found to be the mechanism of growth up to a critical relative supersaturation ( s-1) crit=1.9 at 30 °C. Above the critical relative supersaturation, the crystal growth mechanisms were predicted to change. All growth models fit equally well to the growth rates. No two-dimensional nucleation was observed above critical supersaturation by AFM. On the other hand increased step height and roughness on the edges of steps were observed. It was concluded that the growth mechanism of the (0 1 0) face of α-lactose monohydrate crystal is spiral growth. A parabolic relationship was obtained below critical supersaturation followed by a linear relationship with relative supersaturation.

  4. Growth Mechanism of the (110) Face of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadarajah, Arunan; Li, Meirong; Pusey, Marc L.

    1997-01-01

    The measured macroscopic growth rates of the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme show an unexpectedly complex dependence on the supersaturation. In earlier studies it has been shown that an aggregate growth unit could account for experimental growth-rate trends. In particular molecular packing and interactions in the growth of the crystal were favored by completion of the helices along the 4, axes. In this study the molecular orientations of the possible growth units and the molecular growth mechanism were identified. This indicated that growth was a two-step process: aggregate growth units corresponding to the 4, helix are first formed in the bulk solution by stronger intermolecular bonds and then attached to the crystal face by weaker bonds. A more comprehensive analysis of the measured (110) growth rates was also undertaken. They were compared with the predicted growth rates from several dislocation and two-dimensional nucleation growth models, employing tetramer and Octamer growth units in polydisperse solutions and monomer units in monodisperse solutions. The calculations consistently showed that the measured growth rates followed the expected model relations with octamer growth units, in agreement with the predictions from the molecular level analyses.

  5. Molecular modifiers reveal a mechanism of pathological crystal growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jihae; Granja, Ignacio; Taylor, Michael G; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Asplin, John R; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2016-08-25

    Crystalline materials are crucial to the function of living organisms, in the shells of molluscs, the matrix of bone, the teeth of sea urchins, and the exoskeletons of coccoliths. However, pathological biomineralization can be an undesirable crystallization process associated with human diseases. The crystal growth of biogenic, natural and synthetic materials may be regulated by the action of modifiers, most commonly inhibitors, which range from small ions and molecules to large macromolecules. Inhibitors adsorb on crystal surfaces and impede the addition of solute, thereby reducing the rate of growth. Complex inhibitor-crystal interactions in biomineralization are often not well elucidated. Here we show that two molecular inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization--citrate and hydroxycitrate--exhibit a mechanism that differs from classical theory in that inhibitor adsorption on crystal surfaces induces dissolution of the crystal under specific conditions rather than a reduced rate of crystal growth. This phenomenon occurs even in supersaturated solutions where inhibitor concentration is three orders of magnitude less than that of the solute. The results of bulk crystallization, in situ atomic force microscopy, and density functional theory studies are qualitatively consistent with a hypothesis that inhibitor-crystal interactions impart localized strain to the crystal lattice and that oxalate and calcium ions are released into solution to alleviate this strain. Calcium oxalate monohydrate is the principal component of human kidney stones and citrate is an often-used therapy, but hydroxycitrate is not. For hydroxycitrate to function as a kidney stone treatment, it must be excreted in urine. We report that hydroxycitrate ingested by non-stone-forming humans at an often-recommended dose leads to substantial urinary excretion. In vitro assays using human urine reveal that the molecular modifier hydroxycitrate is as effective an inhibitor of nucleation of

  6. Mechanism and estimation of Al(OH) 3 crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Fatollah; Babaheidary, Masoud Bahrami

    2002-02-01

    Precipitation is an important stage of the Bayer process. For simulation of this section, growth-rate estimation of Al(OH) 3 crystals, is vital for the solution of population balance. Various published equations for linear growth rate of Al(OH) 3 are reviewed. In all of these equations, a square exponent was considered for supersaturation terms. In some of the previous works, it was believed that BCF model is the governing mechanism for surface growth of crystals. It is shown that polynuclear model is the most probable mechanism. Also, a modification of the best previous correlation is performed, which results in a considerable improvement of the growth-rate estimation over the available published experimental data.

  7. An assessment of calcite crystal growth mechanisms based on crystal size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.; Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth experiments were undertaken to test a recently proposed model that relates crystal growth mechanisms to the shapes of crystal size distributions (CSDs). According to this approach, CSDs for minerals have three basic shapes: (1) asymptotic, which is related to a crystal growth mechanism having constant-rate nucleation accompanied by surface-controlled growth; (2) lognormal, which results from decaying-rate nucleation accompanied by surface-controlled growth; and (3) a theoretical, universal, steady-state curve attributed to Ostwald ripening. In addition, there is a fourth crystal growth mechanism that does not have a specific CSD shape, but which preserves the relative shapes of previously formed CSDs. This mechanism is attributed to supply-controlled growth. All three shapes were produced experimentally in the calcite growth experiments by modifying nucleation conditions and solution concentrations. The asymptotic CSD formed when additional reactants were added stepwise to the surface of solutions that were supersaturated with respect to calcite (initial Ω = 20, where Ω = 1 represents saturation), thereby leading to the continuous nucleation and growth of calcite crystals. Lognormal CSDs resulted when reactants were added continuously below the solution surface, via a submerged tube, to similarly supersaturated solutions (initial Ω = 22 to 41), thereby leading to a single nucleation event followed by surface-controlled growth. The Ostwald CSD resulted when concentrated reactants were rapidly mixed, leading initially to high levels of supersaturation (Ω >100), and to the formation and subsequent dissolution of very small nuclei, thereby yielding CSDs having small crystal size variances. The three CSD shapes likely were produced early in the crystallization process, in the nanometer crystal size range, and preserved during subsequent growth. Preservation of the relative shapes of the CSDs indicates that a supply-controlled growth mechanism

  8. Stable growth mechanisms of ice disk crystals in heavy water.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Satoshi; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Furukawa, Yoshinori; Shimaoka, Taro

    2011-11-01

    Ice crystal growth experiments in heavy water were carried out under microgravity to investigate the morphological transition from a disk crystal to a dendrite. Surprisingly, however, no transition was observed, namely, the disk crystal or dendrite maintained its shape throughout the experiments, unlike the results obtained on the ground. Therefore, we introduce a growth model to understand disk growth. The Gibbs-Thomson effect is taken into account as a stabilization mechanism. The model is numerically solved by varying both an interfacial tension of the prism plane and supercooling so that the final sizes of the crystals can become almost the same to determine the interfacial tension. The results are compared with the typical experimental ones and thus the interfacial tension is estimated to be 20 mJ/m(2). Next, the model is solved under two supercooling conditions by using the estimated interfacial tension to understand stable growth. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental results show that our model explains well the microgravity experiments. It is also found that the experimental setup has the capability of controlling temperature on the order of 1/100 K. PMID:22181428

  9. Telescoping low vibration pulling mechanism for Czochralski crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseler, G. W.

    1985-02-01

    A telescoping low vibration pulling mechanism is described for use in Czochralski crystal growth apparatus, comprising a broached brushing which defines an internal circumference of teeth on the circumference of a splined shaft. The brushing is coupled to the means for rotation via a hollow tube and the splined shaft, couplable to a seed shaft, and an elevation means telescopes through said brushing within said hollow tube.

  10. Molecular View of Protein Crystal Growth: Molecular Interactions, Surface Reconstruction and Growth Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadarajah, Arunan; Li, Huayu; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2000-01-01

    Studies of the growth and molecular packing of tetragonal lysozyme crystals suggest that there is an underlying molecular growth mechanism, in addition to the classical one involving screw dislocation/2D) nucleation growth. These crystals are constructed by strongly bonded molecular chains forming helices about the 43 axes. The helices are connected to each other by weaker bonds. Crystal growth proceeds by the formation of these 4(sub 3) helices, which would explain some unexpected observations by earlier investigators, such as bimolecular growth steps on the (110) face. Another consequence of these molecular considerations is that only one of two possible packing arrangements could occur on the crystal faces and that their growth unit was at least a tetramer corresponding to the 4(sub 3) helix. Two new high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were developed to directly confirm these predictions on tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Most earlier investigations of protein crystal growth with AFM were in the low resolution mode which is adequate to investigate the classical growth mechanisms, but cannot resolve molecular features and mechanisms. Employing the first of the newly developed techniques, high resolution AFM images of the (110) face were compared with the theoretically constructed images for the two possible packing arrangements on this face. The prediction that the molecular packing arrangement of these faces corresponded to that for complete 4(sub 3) helices was confirmed in this manner. This investigation also showed the occurrence of surface reconstruction on protein crystals. The molecules on the surface of the (110) face were found to pack closer along the 4(sub 3) axes than those in the interior. The second new AFM technique was used to follow the growth process by measuring the dimensions of individual growth units on the (110) face. Linescans across a growth step, performed near the saturation limit of the crystals, allowed the growth

  11. Two-step crystal growth mechanism during crystallization of an undercooled Ni50Al50 alloy

    PubMed Central

    An, Simin; Li, Jiahao; Li, Yang; Li, Shunning; Wang, Qi; Liu, Baixin

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization processes are always accompanied by the emergence of multiple intermediate states, of which the structures and transition dynamics are far from clarity, since it is difficult to experimentally observe the microscopic pathway. To insight the structural evolution and the crystallization dynamics, we perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the time-dependent crystallization behavior of the NiAl intermetallic upon rapid solidification. The simulation results reveal that the crystallization process occurs via a two-step growth mechanism, involving the formation of initial non-equilibrium long range order (NLRO) regions and of the subsequent equilibrium long range order (ELRO) regions. The formation of the NLRO regions makes the grains rather inhomogeneous, while the rearrangement of the NLRO regions into the ELRO regions makes the grains more ordered and compact. This two-step growth mechanism is actually controlled by the evolution of the coordination polyhedra, which are characterized predominantly by the transformation from five-fold symmetry to four-fold and six-fold symmetry. From liquids to NLRO and further to ELRO, the five-fold symmetry of these polyhedra gradually fades, and finally vanishes when B2 structure is distributed throughout the grain bulk. The energy decrease along the pathway further implies the reliability of the proposed crystallization processes. PMID:27486073

  12. Two-step crystal growth mechanism during crystallization of an undercooled Ni50Al50 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Simin; Li, Jiahao; Li, Yang; Li, Shunning; Wang, Qi; Liu, Baixin

    2016-08-01

    Crystallization processes are always accompanied by the emergence of multiple intermediate states, of which the structures and transition dynamics are far from clarity, since it is difficult to experimentally observe the microscopic pathway. To insight the structural evolution and the crystallization dynamics, we perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the time-dependent crystallization behavior of the NiAl intermetallic upon rapid solidification. The simulation results reveal that the crystallization process occurs via a two-step growth mechanism, involving the formation of initial non-equilibrium long range order (NLRO) regions and of the subsequent equilibrium long range order (ELRO) regions. The formation of the NLRO regions makes the grains rather inhomogeneous, while the rearrangement of the NLRO regions into the ELRO regions makes the grains more ordered and compact. This two-step growth mechanism is actually controlled by the evolution of the coordination polyhedra, which are characterized predominantly by the transformation from five-fold symmetry to four-fold and six-fold symmetry. From liquids to NLRO and further to ELRO, the five-fold symmetry of these polyhedra gradually fades, and finally vanishes when B2 structure is distributed throughout the grain bulk. The energy decrease along the pathway further implies the reliability of the proposed crystallization processes.

  13. Crystal Growth and Fluid Mechanics Problems in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, S.; Baker, G. R.; Foster, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of a more complete theoretical understanding of convection effects in a vertical Bridgman apparatus is described. The aim is to develop a clear understanding of scalings of various features of dendritic crystal growth in the case that both the surface energy and undercooling are small.

  14. VO{sub 2} (A): Reinvestigation of crystal structure, phase transition and crystal growth mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rao Popuri, Srinivasa; Artemenko, Alla; Labrugere, Christine; Miclau, Marinela; Villesuzanne, Antoine; Pollet, Michaël

    2014-05-01

    Well crystallized VO{sub 2} (A) microrods were grown via a single step hydrothermal reaction in the presence of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and oxalic acid. With the advantage of high crystalline samples, we propose P4/ncc as an appropriate space group at room temperature. From morphological studies, we found that the oriented attachment and layer by layer growth mechanisms are responsible for the formation of VO{sub 2} (A) micro rods. The structural and electronic transitions in VO{sub 2} (A) are strongly first order in nature, and a marked difference between the structural transition temperatures and electronic transitions temperature was evidenced. The reversible intra- (LTP-A to HTP-A) and irreversible inter- (HTP-A to VO{sub 2} (M1)) structural phase transformations were studied by in-situ powder X-ray diffraction. Attempts to increase the size of the VO{sub 2} (A) microrods are presented and the possible formation steps for the flower-like morphologies of VO{sub 2} (M1) are described. - Graphical abstract: Using a single step and template free hydrothermal synthesis, well crystallized VO{sub 2} (A) microrods were prepared and the P4/ncc space group was assigned to the room temperature crystal structure. Reversible and irreversible phase transitions among different VO{sub 2} polymorphs were identified and their progressive nature was highlighted. Attempts to increase the microrods size, involving layer by layer formation mechanisms, are presented. - Highlights: • Highly crystallized VO{sub 2} (A) microrods were grown via a single step hydrothermal process. • The P4/ncc space group was determined for VO{sub 2} (A) at room temperature. • The electronic structure and progressive nature of the structural phase transition were investigated. • A weak coupling between structural and electronic phase transitions was identified. • Different crystallite morphologies were discussed in relation with growth mechanisms.

  15. Crystal growth and fluid mechanics problems in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanveer, Saleh; Baker, Gregory R.; Foster, Michael R.

    1994-08-01

    Broadly speaking, our efforts have been concentrated in two aspects of directional solidification: (A) a more complete theoretical understanding of convection effects in a Bridgman apparatus; and (B) a clear understanding of scalings of various features of dendritic crystal growth in the sensitive limit of small capillary effects. For studies that fall within class A, the principal objectives are as follows: (A1) Derive analytical formulas for segregation, interfacial shape and fluid velocities in mathematically amenable asymptotic limits. (A2) Numerically verify and extend asymptotic results to other ranges of parameter space with a view to a broader physical understanding of the general trends. With respect to studies that fall within class B, the principal objectives include answering the following questions about dendritic crystal growth: (B1) Are there unsteady dendrite solutions in 2-D to the completely nonlinear time evolving equations in the small surface tension limit with only a locally steady tip region with well defined tip radius and velocity? Is anisotropy in surface tension necessary for the existence of such solutions as it is for a true steady state needle crystal? How does the size of such a local region depend on capillary effects, anisotropy and undercooling? (B2) How do the different control parameters affect the nonlinear amplification of tip noise and dendritic side branch coarsening?

  16. Crystal growth and fluid mechanics problems in directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, Saleh; Baker, Gregory R.; Foster, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Broadly speaking, our efforts have been concentrated in two aspects of directional solidification: (A) a more complete theoretical understanding of convection effects in a Bridgman apparatus; and (B) a clear understanding of scalings of various features of dendritic crystal growth in the sensitive limit of small capillary effects. For studies that fall within class A, the principal objectives are as follows: (A1) Derive analytical formulas for segregation, interfacial shape and fluid velocities in mathematically amenable asymptotic limits. (A2) Numerically verify and extend asymptotic results to other ranges of parameter space with a view to a broader physical understanding of the general trends. With respect to studies that fall within class B, the principal objectives include answering the following questions about dendritic crystal growth: (B1) Are there unsteady dendrite solutions in 2-D to the completely nonlinear time evolving equations in the small surface tension limit with only a locally steady tip region with well defined tip radius and velocity? Is anisotropy in surface tension necessary for the existence of such solutions as it is for a true steady state needle crystal? How does the size of such a local region depend on capillary effects, anisotropy and undercooling? (B2) How do the different control parameters affect the nonlinear amplification of tip noise and dendritic side branch coarsening?

  17. Mechanisms of protein and virus crystal growth: An atomic force microscopy study of canavalin and STMV crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T.A.; De Yoreo, J.J.; Malkin, A.J.; Kutznesov, Yu.G.; McPherson, A.

    1996-05-01

    The evolution of surface morphology and step dynamics during growth of rhombohedral crystals of the protein canavalin and crystals of the cubic satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) have been investigated for the first time by in situ atomic force microscopy. These two crystals were observed to grow by very different mechanisms. Growth of canavalin occurs on complex vicinal hillocks formed by multiple, independently acting screw dislocations. Small clusters were observed on the terraces. STMV on the other hand, was observed to grow by 2D nucleation of islands. No dislocations were found on the crystal. The results are used to determine the growth mechanisms and estimate the fundamental materials parameters. The images also illustrate the important mechanism of defect incorporation and provide insight to the processes that limit the growth rate and uniformity of these crystals.

  18. Deducing growth mechanisms for minerals from the shapes of crystal size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Drits, V.A.; Srodon, J.

    1998-01-01

    Crystal size distributions (CSDs) of natural and synthetic samples are observed to have several distinct and different shapes. We have simulated these CSDs using three simple equations: the Law of Proportionate Effect (LPE), a mass balance equation, and equations for Ostwald ripening. The following crystal growth mechanisms are simulated using these equations and their modifications: (1) continuous nucleation and growth in an open system, during which crystals nucleate at either a constant, decaying, or accelerating nucleation rate, and then grow according to the LPE; (2) surface-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with an essentially unlimited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (3) supply-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with a specified, limited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (4) supply- or surface-controlled Ostwald ripening in a closed system, during which the relative rate of crystal dissolution and growth is controlled by differences in specific surface area and by diffusion rate; and (5) supply-controlled random ripening in a closed system, during which the rate of crystal dissolution and growth is random with respect to specific surface area. Each of these mechanisms affects the shapes of CSDs. For example, mechanism (1) above with a constant nucleation rate yields asymptotically-shaped CSDs for which the variance of the natural logarithms of the crystal sizes (??2) increases exponentially with the mean of the natural logarithms of the sizes (??). Mechanism (2) yields lognormally-shaped CSDs, for which ??2 increases linearly with ??, whereas mechanisms (3) and (5) do not change the shapes of CSDs, with ??2 remaining constant with increasing ??. During supply-controlled Ostwald ripening (4), initial lognormally-shaped CSDs become more symmetric, with ??2 decreasing with increasing ??. Thus, crystal growth mechanisms often can be deduced by noting trends in ?? versus ??2 of CSDs for

  19. Crystal growth mechanisms in miarolitic cavities in the Lake George ring complex and vicinity, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Crystal Peak area of the Pikes Peak batholith, near Lake George in central Colorado, is world-renowned for its crystals of amazonite (the blue-green variety of microcline) and smoky quartz. Such crystals, collected from individual miarolitic pegmatites, have a remakably small variation in crystal size within each pegmatite, and the shapes of plots of their crystal size distributions (CSDs) are invariably lognormal or close to lognormal in all cases. These observations are explained by a crystal growth mechanism that was governed initially by surface-controlled kinetics, during which crystals tended to grow larger in proportion to their size, thereby establishing lognormal CSDs. Surface-controlled growth was followed by longer periods of supply controlled growth, during which growth rate was predominantly size-independent, consequently preserving the lognormal shapes of the CSDs and the small size variation. The change from surface- to supply controlled growth kinetics may have resulted from an increasing demand for nutrients that exceeded diffusion limitations of the system. The proposed model for crystal growth in this locality appears to be common in the geologic record, and can be used with other information, such as isotopic data, to deduce physico-chemical conditions during crystal formation.

  20. Crystal growth and mechanical hardness of In2Se2.7Sb0.3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Piyush; Vyas, S. M.; Patel, Vimal; Pavagadhi, Himanshu; Solanki, Mitesh; Jani, Maunik P.

    2015-08-01

    The III-VI compound semiconductors is important for the fabrication of ionizing radiation detectors, solid-state electrodes, and photosensitive heterostructures, solar cell and ionic batteries. In this paper, In2Se2.7 Sb0.3 single crystals were grown by the Bridgman method with temperature gradient of 60 °C/cm and the growth velocity 0.5cm/hr. The as-grown crystals were examined under the optical microscope for surface study, a various growth features observed on top free surface of the single crystal which is predominant of layers growth mechanism. The lattice parameters of as-grown crystal was determined by the XRD analysis. A Vickers' projection microscope were used for the study of microhardness on the as-cleaved, cold-worked and annealed samples of the crystals, the results were discussed, and reported in detail.

  1. Synthesis, crystal growth, structural, thermal, optical and mechanical properties of solution grown 4-methylpyridinium 4-hydroxybenzoate single crystal.

    PubMed

    Sudhahar, S; Krishna Kumar, M; Sornamurthy, B M; Mohan Kumar, R

    2014-01-24

    Organic nonlinear optical material, 4-methylpyridinium 4-hydroxybenzoate (4MPHB) was synthesized and single crystal was grown by slow evaporation solution growth method. Single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction analyses confirm the structure and crystalline perfection of 4MPHB crystal. Infrared, Raman and NMR spectroscopy techniques were used to elucidate the functional groups present in the compound. TG-DTA analysis was carried out in nitrogen atmosphere to study the decomposition stages, endothermic and exothermic reactions. UV-visible and Photoluminescence spectra were recorded for the grown crystal to estimate the transmittance and band gap energy respectively. Linear refractive index, birefringence, and SHG efficiency of the grown crystal were studied. Laser induced surface damage threshold and mechanical properties of grown crystal were studied to assess the suitability of the grown crystals for device applications. PMID:24184578

  2. TEM investigation of the microporous compound VSB-1: Building units and crystal growth mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Colmont, Marie Terasaki, Osamu

    2007-03-15

    Surface fine structure and structural defects in the open framework material VSB-1 have been investigated by electron microscopy. Crystal growth phenomena are proposed by a building unit model: (i) a unit is formed by two building units; (ii) they are linked to form first channels; and (iii) the whole network is grown via a layer-by-layer growth mechanism. A planar defect was observed in high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) image taken with the [0001] incidence, and diffuse streaks related to the presence of defects were observed in a series of electron diffraction (ED) patterns. The microstructure model derived from the defect structure gives information on crystal growth. These defects highlight an open site that could be the pillar of a new crystal growth process. The study of defects and crystal growth is important in understanding physical properties such as catalytic or magnetic properties, and in synthesising a new open framework structure. - Graphical abstract: TEM investigation of the microporous compound VSB-1 evidenced defects and information about building units and crystal growth. As usually observed for microporous materials, the crystal growth via a layer by layer mechanism.

  3. VO2 (A): Reinvestigation of crystal structure, phase transition and crystal growth mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao Popuri, Srinivasa; Artemenko, Alla; Labrugere, Christine; Miclau, Marinela; Villesuzanne, Antoine; Pollet, Michaël

    2014-05-01

    Well crystallized VO2 (A) microrods were grown via a single step hydrothermal reaction in the presence of V2O5 and oxalic acid. With the advantage of high crystalline samples, we propose P4/ncc as an appropriate space group at room temperature. From morphological studies, we found that the oriented attachment and layer by layer growth mechanisms are responsible for the formation of VO2 (A) micro rods. The structural and electronic transitions in VO2 (A) are strongly first order in nature, and a marked difference between the structural transition temperatures and electronic transitions temperature was evidenced. The reversible intra- (LTP-A to HTP-A) and irreversible inter- (HTP-A to VO2 (M1)) structural phase transformations were studied by in-situ powder X-ray diffraction. Attempts to increase the size of the VO2 (A) microrods are presented and the possible formation steps for the flower-like morphologies of VO2 (M1) are described.

  4. Structural Correspondence of the Oriented Attachment Growth Mechanism of Crystals of the Pharmaceutical Dirithromycin.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zuozhong; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Wei; Han, Xianglong; Chen, Jian-Feng; Xue, Chunyu; Zhao, Hong

    2015-12-29

    The oriented attachment (OA) mechanism is promising for designing novel nanomaterials, yet an intensive understanding of the relationship between the crystal structure and attachment orientation is still lacking. In this work, we report layered hexagonal crystals of the pharmaceutical dirithromycin (DIR) containing multiple layers fabricated via a solvothermal method for a certain period of time at 40 °C. These elongated hexagonal crystals experience an OA that is preferentially on the face (001) of the initial crystals to assemble the final crystals into layered stacks. Through agreement with molecular modeling calculations, we predicted the final crystal growth morphology and confirmed the favored attachment surface based on the energy change ΔE following an OA event. These simulation results at the molecular level yielded good agreement with the crystal growth experiments. This study demonstrates the critical importance of combining experiments with a computational approach to understand the intrinsic molecular details of the OA growth mechanism of other compounds and to design nanomaterials with a desirable morphology and physical and chemical properties. PMID:26632998

  5. Kinetics and mechanisms of crystal growth inhibition of indomethacin by model precipitation inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Dhaval

    Supersaturating Drug Delivery Systems (SDDS) could enhance oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs (PWSD). Precipitation inhibitors (PIs) in SDDS could maintain supersaturation by inhibiting nucleation, crystal growth, or both. The mechanisms by which these effects are realized are generally unknown. The goal of this dissertation was to explore the mechanisms underpinning the effects of model PIs including hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrins (HP-beta-CD), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on the crystal growth of indomethacin, a model PWSD. At high degrees of supersaturation (S), the crystal growth kinetics of indomethacin was bulk diffusion-controlled, which was attributed to a high energy form deposited on the seed crystals. At lower S, indomethacin growth kinetics was surface integration-controlled. The effect of HP-beta-CD at high S was successfully modeled using the reactive diffusion layer theory. The superior effects of PVP and HPMC as compared to HP-beta-CD at high S were attributed to a change in the rate limiting step from bulk diffusion to surface integration largely due to prevention of the high energy form formation. The effects of PIs at low S were attributed to significant retardation of the surface integration rate, a phenomenon that may reflect the adsorption of PIs onto the growing surface. PVP was selected to further understand the relationship between adsorption and crystal growth inhibition. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm model fit the adsorption isotherms of PVP and N-vinylpyrrolidone well. The affinity and extent of adsorption of PVP were significantly higher than those of N-vinylpyrrolidone, which was attributed to cooperative interactions between PVP and indomethacin. The extent of PVP adsorption on a weight-basis was greater for higher molecular weight PVP but less on a molar-basis indicating an increased percentage of loops and tails for higher molecular weight PVPs. PVP significantly inhibited

  6. Mechanism of abnormally slow crystal growth of CuZr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. Q.; Lü, Y. J.

    2015-10-28

    Crystal growth of the glass-forming CuZr alloy is shown to be abnormally slow, which suggests a new method to identify the good glass-forming alloys. The crystal growth of elemental Cu, Pd and binary NiAl, CuZr alloys is systematically studied with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature dependence of the growth velocity indicates the different growth mechanisms between the elemental and the alloy systems. The high-speed growth featuring the elemental metals is dominated by the non-activated collision between liquid-like atoms and interface, and the low-speed growth for NiAl and CuZr is determined by the diffusion across the interface. We find that, in contrast to Cu, Pd, and NiAl, a strong stress layering arisen from the density and the local order layering forms in front of the liquid-crystal interface of CuZr alloy, which causes a slow diffusion zone. The formation of the slow diffusion zone suppresses the interface moving, resulting in much small growth velocity of CuZr alloy. We provide a direct evidence of this explanation by applying the compressive stress normal to the interface. The compression is shown to boost the stress layering in CuZr significantly, correspondingly enhancing the slow diffusion zone, and eventually slowing down the crystal growth of CuZr alloy immediately. In contrast, the growth of Cu, Pd, and NiAl is increased by the compression because the low diffusion zones in them are never well developed.

  7. Total immersion crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Crystals of wide band gap materials are produced by positioning a holder receiving a seed crystal at the interface between a body of molten wide band gap material and an overlying layer of temperature-controlled, encapsulating liquid. The temperature of the layer decreases from the crystallization temperature of the crystal at the interface with the melt to a substantially lower temperature at which formation of crystal defects does not occur, suitably a temperature of 200 to 600 C. After initiation of crystal growth, the leading edge of the crystal is pulled through the layer until the leading edge of the crystal enters the ambient gas headspace which may also be temperature controlled. The length of the column of liquid encapsulant may exceed the length of the crystal such that the leading edge and trailing edge of the crystal are both simultaneously with the column of the crystal. The crystal can be pulled vertically by means of a pulling-rotation assembly or horizontally by means of a low-angle withdrawal mechanism.

  8. Stability of amorphous pharmaceutical solids: crystal growth mechanisms and effect of polymer additives.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ye; Zhu, Lei; Wu, Tian; Cai, Ting; Gunn, Erica M; Yu, Lian

    2012-09-01

    We review recent progress toward understanding and enhancing the stability of amorphous pharmaceutical solids against crystallization. As organic liquids are cooled to become glasses, fast modes of crystal growth can emerge. One such growth mode, the glass-to-crystal or GC mode, occurs in the bulk, and another exists at the free surface, both leading to crystal growth much faster than predicted by theories that assume diffusion defines the kinetic barrier of crystallization. These phenomena have received different explanations, and we propose that GC growth is a solid-state transformation enabled by local mobility in glasses and that fast surface crystal growth is facilitated by surface molecular mobility. In the second part, we review recent findings concerning the effect of polymer additives on crystallization in organic glasses. Low-concentration polymer additives can strongly inhibit crystal growth in the bulk of organic glasses, while having weaker effect on surface crystal growth. Ultra-thin polymer coatings can inhibit surface crystallization. Recent work has shown the importance of molecular weight for crystallization inhibitors of organic glasses, besides "direct intermolecular interactions" such as hydrogen bonding. Relative to polyvinylpyrrolidone, the VP dimer is far less effective in inhibiting crystal growth in amorphous nifedipine. Further work is suggested for better understanding of crystallization of amorphous organic solids and the prediction of their stability. PMID:22434258

  9. Growth, mechanical, thermal and dielectric properties of pure and doped KHP single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Lakshmipriya.; Babu, D. Rajan; Vizhi, R. Ezhil

    2015-06-01

    L-Arginine doped potassium hydrogen phthalate and L-Histidine doped potassium hydrogen phthalate single crystals were grown by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The grown crystal crystallizes in orthorhombic system which is confirmed by single crystal XRD analysis. The grown crystals are subjected to thermal, mechanical and dielectric analysis.

  10. Growth, mechanical, thermal and spectral properties of Cr3+:MgMoO4 crystal.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingyun; Huang, Yisheng; Zhang, Lizhen; Lin, Zhoubin; Wang, Guofu

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the growth, mechanical, thermal and spectral properties of Cr(3+):MgMoO(4) crystals. The Cr(3+):MgMoO(4) crystals with dimensions up to 30 mm×18 mm×14 mm were obtained by TSSG method. The absorption cross-sections of (4)A(2)→(4)T(1) and (4)A(2)→(4)T(2) transitions are 12.94×10(-20) cm(2) at 493 nm and 7.89×10(-20) cm(2) at 705 nm for E//N(g), respectively. The Cr(3+):MgMoO(4) crystal shows broad band emission extending from 750 nm to 1300 nm with peak at about 705 nm. The emission cross-section with FWHM of 188 nm is 119.88×10(-20) cm(2) at 963 nm for E//N(g). The investigated results showed that the Cr(3+):MgMoO(4) crystal may be regarded as a potential tunable laser gain medium. PMID:22291935

  11. Supra- and nanocrystallinity: specific properties related to crystal growth mechanisms and nanocrystallinity.

    PubMed

    Pileni, M P

    2012-11-20

    The natural arrangement of atoms or nanocrystals either in well-defined assemblies or in a disordered fashion induces changes in their physical properties. For example, diamond and graphite show marked differences in their physical properties though both are composed of carbon atoms. Natural colloidal crystals have existed on earth for billions of years. Very interestingly, these colloidal crystals are made of a fixed number of polyhedral magnetite particles uniform in size. Hence, opals formed of assemblies of silicate particles in the micrometer size range exhibit interesting intrinsic optical properties. A colorless opal is composed of disordered particles, but changes in size segregation within the self-ordered silica particles can lead to distinct color changes and patterning. In this Account, we rationalize two simultaneous supracrystal growth processes that occur under saturated conditions, which form both well-defined 3D superlattices at the air-liquid interface and precipitated 3D assemblies with well-defined shapes. The growth processes of these colloidal crystals, called super- or supracrystals, markedly change the mechanical properties of these assemblies and induce the crystallinity segregation of nanocrystals. Therefore, single domain nanocrystals are the primary basis in the formation of these supracrystals, while multiply twinned particles (MTPs) and polycrystals remain dispersed within the colloidal suspension. Nanoindentation measurements show a drop in the Young's moduli for interfacial supracrystals in comparison with the precipitated supracrystals. In addition, the value of the Young's modulus changes markedly with the supracrystal growth mechanism. Using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, we successfully imaged very thick supracrystals (from 200 nm up to a few micrometers) with remarkable conductance homogeneity and showed electronic fingerprints of isolated nanocrystals. This discovery of nanocrystal fingerprints within supracrystals

  12. Exploring the in meso crystallization mechanism by characterizing the lipid mesophase microenvironment during the growth of single transmembrane α-helical peptide crystals.

    PubMed

    van 't Hag, Leonie; Knoblich, Konstantin; Seabrook, Shane A; Kirby, Nigel M; Mudie, Stephen T; Lau, Deborah; Li, Xu; Gras, Sally L; Mulet, Xavier; Call, Matthew E; Call, Melissa J; Drummond, Calum J; Conn, Charlotte E

    2016-07-28

    The proposed mechanism for in meso crystallization of transmembrane proteins suggests that a protein or peptide is initially uniformly dispersed in the lipid self-assembly cubic phase but that crystals grow from a local lamellar phase, which acts as a conduit between the crystal and the bulk cubic phase. However, there is very limited experimental evidence for this theory. We have developed protocols to investigate the lipid mesophase microenvironment during crystal growth using standard procedures readily available in crystallography laboratories. This technique was used to characterize the microenvironment during crystal growth of the DAP12-TM peptide using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with a micro-sized X-ray beam. Crystal growth was found to occur from the gyroid cubic mesophase. For one in four crystals, a highly oriented local lamellar phase was observed, providing supporting evidence for the proposed mechanism for in meso crystallization. A new observation of this study was that we can differentiate diffraction peaks from crystals grown in meso, from peaks originating from the surrounding lipid matrix, potentially opening up the possibility of high-throughput SAXS analysis of in meso grown crystals.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298442

  13. Mechanism for diamond nucleation and growth on single crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, T. P.; Xiong, Fulin; Chang, R. P. H.; White, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of diamond crystals on single-crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon ions is studied. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition is used for diamond growth. The single-crystal copper substrates were implanted either at room or elevated temperature with carbon ions prior to diamond nucleation. This procedure leads to the formation of a graphite film on the copper surface which greatly enhances diamond crystallite nucleation. A simple lattice model is constructed for diamond growth on graphite as 111 line (diamond) parallel to 0001 line (graphite) and 110 line (diamond) parallel to 1 1 -2 0 (graphite).

  14. Growth, optical, thermal and mechanical studies of methyl 4-hydroxybenzoate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, N.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Gunasekaran, M.; Gopalakrishnan, R.; Ramasamy, P.

    2003-08-01

    Bulk single crystals of methyl 4-hydroxy benzoate have been successfully grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. The grown crystals have been subjected to spectroscopic studies like FT-IR and FT-Raman. The hardness of the crystal was measured by Vicker's microhardness tester. The lattice parameters have been calculated by X-ray diffraction technique and the values are in good agreement with the reported JCPDS file.

  15. Crystal growth and mechanical hardness of In{sub 2}Se{sub 2.7}Sb{sub 0.3} single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Piyush Vyas, S. M. Patel, Vimal; Pavagadhi, Himanshu; Solanki, Mitesh; Jani, Maunik P.

    2015-08-28

    The III-VI compound semiconductors is important for the fabrication of ionizing radiation detectors, solid-state electrodes, and photosensitive heterostructures, solar cell and ionic batteries. In this paper, In{sub 2}Se{sub 2.7} Sb{sub 0.3} single crystals were grown by the Bridgman method with temperature gradient of 60 °C/cm and the growth velocity 0.5cm/hr. The as-grown crystals were examined under the optical microscope for surface study, a various growth features observed on top free surface of the single crystal which is predominant of layers growth mechanism. The lattice parameters of as-grown crystal was determined by the XRD analysis. A Vickers’ projection microscope were used for the study of microhardness on the as-cleaved, cold-worked and annealed samples of the crystals, the results were discussed, and reported in detail.

  16. Mechanism of Rare Earth Incorporation and Crystal Growth of Rare Earth Containing Type-I Clathrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Type-I clathrates possess extremely low thermal conductivities, a property that makes them promising materials for thermoelectric applications. The incorporation of cerium into one such clathrate has recently been shown to lead to a drastic enhancement of the thermopower, another property determining the thermoelectric efficiency. Here we explore the mechanism of the incorporation of rare earth elements into type-I clathrates. Our investigation of the crystal growth and the composition of the phase Ba8–xRExTMySi46–y (RE = rare earth element; TM = Au, Pd, Pt) reveals that the RE content x is mainly governed by two factors, the free cage space and the electron balance. PMID:26823658

  17. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into an adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  18. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into and adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  19. Determining the Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystal faces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Huayu; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) study had shown that the molecular packing on the tetragonal lysozyme (110) face corresponded to only one of two possible packing arrangements, suggesting that growth layers on this face were of bimolecular height (Li et al., 1998). Theoretical analyses of the packing had also indicated that growth of this face should proceed by the addition of growth units of at least tetramer size corresponding to the 43 helices in the crystal. In this study an AFM linescan technique was devised to measure the dimensions of individual growth units on protein crystal faces. The growth process of tetragonal lysozyme crystals was slowed down by employing very low supersaturations. As a result images of individual growth events on the (110) face were observed, shown by jump discontinuities in the growth step in the linescan images. The growth unit dimension in the scanned direction was obtained by suitably averaging these images. A large number of scans in two directions on the (110) face were performed and the distribution of lysozyme aggregate sizes were obtained. A variety of growth units, all of which were 43 helical lysozyme aggregates, were shown to participate in the growth process with a 43 tetramer being the minimum observed size. This technique represents a new application for AFM allowing time resolved studies of molecular process to be carried out.

  20. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  1. Crystal growth and dielectric, mechanical, electrical and ferroelectric characterization of n-bromo succinimide doped triglycine sulphate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Chitharanjan; Byrappa, K.; Dharmaprakash, S. M.

    2011-09-01

    Single crystals of triglycine sulphate (TGS) doped with n-bromo succinimide (NBS) were grown at ambient temperature by the slow evaporation technique. An aqueous solution containing 1-20 mol% of n-bromo succinimide as dopant was used for the growth of NBSTGS crystals. The incorporation of NBS in TGS crystals has been qualitatively confirmed by FTIR spectral data. The effect of the dopant on morphology and crystal properties was investigated. The cell parameters of the doped crystal were determined by the powder X-ray diffraction technique. The dielectric constant of NBS doped TGS crystal was calculated along the ferroelectric direction over the temperature range of 30-60 °C. The dielectric constant of NBSTGS crystals decrease with the increase in NBS concentration and considerable shift in the phase transition temperature ( TC) towards the higher temperature observed. Pyroelectric studies on doped TGS were carried out to determine the pyroelectric coefficient. The emergence of internal bias field due to doping was studied by collecting P- E hysteresis data. Temperature dependence of DC conductivity of the doped crystals was studied and gradual increase in the conductivity with the increase of dopant concentration was observed. The activation energy (Δ E) calculated was found to be lower in both the ferroelectric and the paraelectric phases for doped crystals compared to that of pure TGS. The micro-hardness studies were carried out at room temperature on thin plates cut perpendicular to the b-axis. Less doped TGS crystals show higher hardness values compared to pure TGS. Piezoelectric measurements were also carried out on 010 plates of doped TGS crystals at room temperature.

  2. Crystal growth, structural, thermal and mechanical behavior of L-arginine 4-nitrophenolate 4-nitrophenol dihydrate (LAPP) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, M.; Ramachandran, K.; Anandan, P.; Arivanandhan, M.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Single crystals of L-arginine 4-nitrophenolate 4-nitrophenol dihydrate (LAPP) have been grown successfully from the solution of L-arginine and 4-nitrophenol. Slow evaporation of solvent technique was adopted to grow the bulk single crystals. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the grown crystal has monoclinic crystal system with space group of P21. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis shows the good crystalline nature. The crystalline perfection of the grown single crystals was analyzed by HRXRD by employing a multicrystal X-ray diffractometer. The functional groups were identified from proton NMR spectroscopic analysis. Linear and nonlinear optical properties were determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometer and Kurtz powder technique respectively. It is found that the grown crystal has no absorption in the green wavelength region and the SHG efficiency was found to be 2.66 times that of the standard KDP. The Thermal stability of the crystal was found by obtaining TG/DTA curve. The mechanical behavior of the grown crystal has been studied by Vicker's microhardness method.

  3. Determining the Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystal Faces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadarajah, Arunan; Li, Huayu; Pusey, Marc L.

    1999-01-01

    A high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) study had shown that the molecular packing on the tetragonal lysozyme (110) face corresponded to only one of two possible packing arrangements, suggesting that growth layers on this face were of bimolecular height. Theoretical analyses of the packing also indicated that growth of this face should proceed by the addition of growth units of at least tetramer size corresponding to the 43 helices in the crystal. In this study an AFM linescan technique was devised to measure the dimensions of individual growth units on protein crystal faces as they were being incorporated into the lattice. Images of individual growth events on the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme crystals were observed, shown by jump discontinuities in the growth step in the linescan images as shown in the figure. The growth unit dimension in the scanned direction was obtained from these images. A large number of scans in two directions on the (110) face were performed and the distribution of lysozyme growth unit sizes were obtained. A variety of unit sizes corresponding to 43 helices, were shown to participate in the growth process, with the 43 tetramer being the minimum observed size. This technique represents a new application for AFM allowing time resolved studies of molecular process to be carried out.

  4. Mercury iodide crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadoret, R.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the Mercury Iodide Crystal Growth (MICG) experiment is the growth of near-perfect single crystals of mercury Iodide (HgI2) in a microgravity environment which will decrease the convection effects on crystal growth. Evaporation and condensation are the only transformations involved in this experiment. To accomplish these objectives, a two-zone furnace will be used in which two sensors collect the temperature data (one in each zone).

  5. Surface characterization and growth mechanism of laminated Ti 3SiC 2 crystals fabricated by hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Li, Changsheng; Tang, Hua

    2010-09-01

    Laminated Ti 3SiC 2 crystals were prepared by hot isostatic pressing from Ti, Si, C and Al powders with NaCl additive in argon at 1350 °C. The morphology and microstructure of Ti 3SiC 2 crystals were investigated by means of XRD, SEM, and TEM. The high symmetry and crystalline was revealed by high resolution transmission electronic microscope (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The growth mechanism of Ti 3SiC 2 crystals controlled by two-dimensional nucleation was put forward. The growth pattern of layered steps implies that the growth of the (0 0 2) face should undergo two steps, the intermittent two-dimensional nucleation and the continuous lateral spreading of layers on growth faces.

  6. Mechanism for enhanced single-crystal GaN growth in the C-assisted Na-flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Takahiro; Imabayashi, Hiroki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Imade, Mamoru; Yoshimura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke; Morikawa, Yoshitada

    2016-01-01

    First-principles molecular dynamics simulations are used to examine the effect of C addition in Na-flux growth of GaN. The mechanism for suppression of polycrystalline growth and the enhancement of single-crystal growth was identified by systematically calculating activation free energies for the formation and dissociation of C-N bonds. The energy barrier for C-N dissociation in a Ga-Na melt is ≥3 eV; thus, dissociation is inhibited and the growth of polycrystals is suppressed. However, at kink sites at a Na/GaN interface with excess Ga atoms, the barrier is only ˜1.0 eV, allowing C-N dissociation and growth of GaN single crystals.

  7. Monitoring Crystal Growth From Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental system for monitoring growth of triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals from solution is being studied. System consists of outer cell containing distilled water heated and stirred to maintain constant temperature to within plus or minus 0.1 degrees C, inner (growth) cell containing supersaturated solution of TGS, and seed crystal mounted in plastic-covered stainless-steel sting equiped with controlled cooling mechanism and temperature sensors.

  8. Investigation on growth, structural, optical, thermal, dielectric and mechanical properties of organic L-prolinium trichloroacetate single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathi, K.; Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2012-09-15

    Graphical abstract: L-Prolinium trichloroacetate is an organic nonlinear optical crystal has been grown from the aqueous solution by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that L-PTCA crystallizes in trigonal crystal system. The optical band gab is found to be 4.26 eV. Second harmonic conversion efficiency of L-PTCA has been found to be half that of KDP. Highlights: ► It deals with the synthesis, growth and characterization of L-PTCA an organic NLO crystal. ► Wide optical transparency window between 260 nm and 1100 nm. ► Thermal study reveals that the grown crystal is stable up to 127 °C. ► L-PTCA crystal exhibits the second order nonlinear optical properties. -- Abstract: A new organic nonlinear optical material L-prolinium trichloroacetate (L-PTCA) single crystal has been synthesized and grown by slow solvent evaporation technique at room temperature using water as solvent. Single-crystal X-ray diffractometer was utilized to measure unit cell parameters and to confirm lattice parameter. The powder X-ray diffraction pattern of the grown L-PTCA has been indexed. The modes of vibration of different molecular groups present in the sample were identified by the FTIR spectral analysis. The optical transmittance window and the lower cutoff wavelength of the L-PTCA have been identified by UV–vis–NIR studies. Thermal stability of the L-prolinium trichloroacetate was determined by TGA/DTA measurements. Dielectric measurements were carried out at various temperatures at frequency range 10–1 MHz. The mechanical properties of the grown crystals have been analyzed by Vickers microhardness method. The chemical etching studies were carried out on the grown crystals. Its SHG efficiency has been tested by Kurtz powder method.

  9. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Proteins account for 50% or more of the dry weight of most living systems and play a crucial role in virtually all biological processes. Since the specific functions of essentially all biological molecules are determined by their three-dimensional structures, it is obvious that a detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. At the present time, protein crystallography has no substitute, it is the only technique available for elucidating the atomic arrangements within complicated biological molecules. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting and promising projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. There is a pressing need to better understand protein crystal growth, and to develop new techniques that can be used to enhance the size and quality of protein crystals. There are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor that might be expected to alter crystal growth processes in space is the elimination of density-driven convective flow. Another factor that can be readily controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystal in a gravitational field. Another potential advantage of microgravity for protein crystal growth is the option of doing containerless crystal growth. One can readily understand why the microgravity environment established by Earth-orbiting vehicles is perceived to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. The near term objectives of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  10. Crystal growth, structural, crystalline perfection, optical and mechanical properties of Nd3+ doped sulfamic acid (SA) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkir, Mohd.; Riscob, B.; Ganesh, V.; Vijayan, N.; Gupta, Rahul; Plaza, J. L.; Dieguez, E.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2013-10-01

    Sulfamic acid (SA) single crystals, both pure and doped with 1, 2.5 and 5 mol% Nd, were grown successfully in an aqueous solution by the slow cooling method. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns were recorded to check the variation in the lattice parameters and phase of the crystals. The optical transparency was found to be higProd. Type: FTPhest (∼80%) for the 1 mol% Nd3+ doped SA single crystal. The optical band gap was also calculated and found to be ∼4.31, 4.20 and 3.67 eV. The influence of Nd3+ doping on the crystalline perfection was assessed by a high resolution X-ray diffractometer (HRXRD) and shows that the grown crystals could accommodate Nd3+ at the interstitial positions in the crystalline matrix of SA up to some critical concentration without any deterioration in the crystalline perfection. The etching studies were carried out and the etch pits densities were calculated. The mechanical property of grown single crystals was also studied.

  11. Self-catalytic crystal growth, formation mechanism, and optical properties of indium tin oxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yuan-Chang; Zhong, Hua

    2013-08-01

    In-Sn-O nanostructures with rectangular cross-sectional rod-like, sword-like, and bowling pin-like morphologies were successfully synthesized through self-catalytic growth. Mixed metallic In and Sn powders were used as source materials, and no catalyst layer was pre-coated on the substrates. The distance between the substrate and the source materials affected the size of the Sn-rich alloy particles during crystal growth in a quartz tube. This caused In-Sn-O nanostructures with various morphologies to form. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscope and a transmittance electron microscope with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer were used to investigate the elemental binding states and compositions of the as-synthesized nanostructures. The Sn doping and oxygen vacancies in the In2O3 crystals corresponded to the blue-green and yellow-orange emission bands of the nanostructures, respectively.

  12. Self-catalytic crystal growth, formation mechanism, and optical properties of indium tin oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuan-Chang; Zhong, Hua

    2013-01-01

    In-Sn-O nanostructures with rectangular cross-sectional rod-like, sword-like, and bowling pin-like morphologies were successfully synthesized through self-catalytic growth. Mixed metallic In and Sn powders were used as source materials, and no catalyst layer was pre-coated on the substrates. The distance between the substrate and the source materials affected the size of the Sn-rich alloy particles during crystal growth in a quartz tube. This caused In-Sn-O nanostructures with various morphologies to form. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscope and a transmittance electron microscope with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer were used to investigate the elemental binding states and compositions of the as-synthesized nanostructures. The Sn doping and oxygen vacancies in the In2O3 crystals corresponded to the blue-green and yellow-orange emission bands of the nanostructures, respectively. PMID:23965167

  13. Crystal growth and crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Selected topics that may be of interest for both crystal-structure and crystal-growth communities are overviewed. The growth of protein crystals, along with that of some other compounds, is one of the topics, and recent insights into related phenomena are considered as examples of applications of general principles. The relationship between crystal growth shape and structure is reviewed and an attempt to introduce semiquantitative characterization of binding for proteins is made. The concept of kinks for complex structures is briefly discussed. Even at sufficiently low supersaturations, the fluctuation of steps may not be sufficient to implement the Gibbs-Thomson law if the kink density is low enough. Subsurface ordering of liquids and growth of rough interfaces from melts is discussed. Crystals growing in microgravity from solution should be more perfect if they preferentially trap stress-inducing impurities, thus creating an impurity-depleted zone around themselves. Evidently, such a zone is developed only around the crystals growing in the absence of convection. Under terrestrial conditions, the self-purified depleted zone is destroyed by convection, the crystal traps more impurity and grows stressed. The stress relief causes mosaicity. In systems containing stress-inducing but poorly trapped impurities, the crystals grown in the absence of convection should be worse than those of their terrestrial counterparts.

  14. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy uses laser technology to reveal a defect, a double-screw dislocation, on the surface of this crystal of canavalin, a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. When a crystal grows, attachment kinetics and transport kinetics are competing for control of the molecules. As a molecule gets close to the crystal surface, it has to attach properly for the crystal to be usable. NASA has funded investigators to look at those attachment kinetics from a theoretical standpoint and an experimental standpoint. Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine, is one of those investigators. He uses X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy in his laboratory to answer some of the many questions about how protein crystals grow. Atomic force microscopy provides a means of looking at how individual molecules are added to the surface of growing protein crystals. This helps McPherson understand the kinetics of protein crystal growth. McPherson asks, How fast do crystals grow? What are the forces involved? Investigators funded by NASA have clearly shown that such factors as the level of supersaturation and the rate of growth all affect the habit [characteristic arrangement of facets] of the crystal and the defects that occur in the crystal.

  15. Mechanisms for Species-Selective Oriented Crystal Growth at Organic Templates

    SciTech Connect

    Kewalramani,S.; Kim, K.; Evmenenko, G.; Zschack, P.; Karapetrova, E.; Bai, J.; Dutta, P.

    2007-01-01

    Langmuir monolayers floating on supersaturated aqueous subphases can act as templates for the growth of oriented inorganic films--a 'bioinspired' nucleation process. We have performed in situ grazing incidence x-ray diffraction studies of the selective nucleation of BaClF and BaF2 under fatty acid monolayers. The arrangement of the fatty acid headgroups, the monolayer charge, and ion-specific effects all play important roles in selecting the inorganic species. When the monolayer is in a neutral state, both BaClF and BaF2 nucleate at the interface and are well aligned, but when the monolayer headgroup is deprotonated, only oriented BaF2 grows at the interface. We also observe an enhanced alignment of BaF2 crystals during growth from highly supersaturated solutions, presumably due to reorganization of preformed crystals at the organic template. These results show that a delicate interplay between multiple factors governs the oriented growth of inorganic films at organic templates.

  16. Studies on the growth, structural, optical, mechanical properties of 8-hydroxyquinoline single crystal by vertical Bridgman technique

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakaran, SP.; Babu, R. Ramesh; Velusamy, P.; Ramamurthi, K.

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Growth of bulk single crystal of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) by vertical Bridgman technique for the first time. {yields} The crystalline perfection is reasonably good. {yields} The photoluminescence spectrum shows that the material is suitable for blue light emission. -- Abstract: Single crystal of organic nonlinear optical material, 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) of dimension 52 mm (length) x 12 mm (dia.) was grown from melt using vertical Bridgman technique. The crystal system of the material was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystalline perfection of the grown crystal was examined by high-resolution X-ray diffraction study. Low angular spread around 400'' of the diffraction curve and the low full width half maximum values show that the crystalline perfection is reasonably good. The recorded photoluminescence spectrum shows that the material is suitable for blue light emission. Optical transmittance for the UV and visible region was measured and mechanical strength was estimated from Vicker's microhardness test along the growth face of the grown crystal.

  17. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in protein crystallization and those parameters which influence the growth process and crystalline perfection were studied. The analysis of the flows around growing crystals is detailed. The preliminary study of the growth of isocitrate lyase and the crystal morphologies found are discussed. Preliminary results of controlled nucleation studies are presented.

  18. Crystal Growth Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Batur, Celal; Bennett, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    We present an innovative design of a vertical transparent multizone furnace which can operate in the temperature range of 25 C to 750 C and deliver thermal gradients of 2 C/cm to 45 C/cm for the commercial applications to crystal growth. The operation of the eight zone furnace is based on a self-tuning temperature control system with a DC power supply for optimal thermal stability. We show that the desired thermal profile over the entire length of the furnace consists of a functional combination of the fundamental thermal profiles for each individual zone obtained by setting the set-point temperature for that zone. The self-tuning system accounts for the zone to zone thermal interactions. The control system operates such that the thermal profile is maintained under thermal load, thus boundary conditions on crystal growth ampoules can be predetermined prior to crystal growth. Temperature profiles for the growth of crystals via directional solidification, vapor transport techniques, and multiple gradient applications are shown to be easily implemented. The unique feature of its transparency and ease of programming thermal profiles make the furnace useful for scientific and commercial applications for the determination of process parameters to optimize crystal growth conditions.

  19. Growth, spectral, optical, thermal, and mechanical behaviour of an organic single crystal: Quinolinium 2-carboxy 6-nitrophthalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohana, J.; Ahila, G.; Bharathi, M. Divya; Anbalagan, G.

    2016-09-01

    Organic single crystals of quinolinium 2-carboxy 6-nitrophthalate monohydrate (QN) were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique using ethanol and water as a mixed solvent. X-ray powder diffraction analysis revealed that the crystal belongs to the monoclinic crystal system with space group of P21/c. The functional groups present in the crystallized material confirmed its molecular structure. The optical transparency range and the lower cutoff wavelength were identified from the UV-vis spectrum. The optical constants were determined by UV-visible transmission spectrum at normal incidence, measured over the 200-700 nm spectral range. The dispersion of the refractive index was discussed in terms of the single-oscillator Wemple and DiDomenico model. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that the charge transfer occur within the molecule. Electronic excitation properties were discussed within the framework of two level model on the basis of an orbital analysis. The nonlinear optical absorption coefficient (β) and nonlinear refraction (n2) of QN was measured by Z-scan technique and reported here. Thermal stability of QN was determined using TGA/DSC curves. Vicker's microhardness studies were carried out on the (1 1 ̅0) plane to understand the mechanical properties of the grown crystal. The microhardness measurements showed a Vickers hardness value as 18.4 kg/mm2 which is comparable to well-known organic crystal, urea.

  20. Translation effects on vertical Bridgman growth and optical, mechanical and surface analysis of 2-phenylphenol single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhasivam, S.; Perumal, Rajesh Narayana

    2016-05-01

    2-phenylphenol optical crystals were grown in cone ampoules using vertical Bridgman technique. Single crystal of 2-phenylphenol with 150 mm length has been grown. The inclination on the conical part of the ampoule reduces the growth defects in the 2-phenylphenol single crystal. The lattice parameters and structure studied using single crystal X-ray diffraction method. 2-phenylphenol single crystal belongs to orthorhombic space group Fdd2. The micro translation rate affects crystal growth of 2-phenylphenol crystal was studied. The translation rate dependent defects present in the crystal were investigated by transmittance, indentation and etching characterizations. The dislocation induced indentation crack lengths variations were studied. Etch pits and striations observed for the selective etchants furnish significant information on growth aspects and degree of defect present in the crystal.

  1. Bridgman crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this theoretical research effort was to improve the understanding of the growth of Pb(x)Sn(1-x)Te and especially how crystal quality could be improved utilizing the microgravity environment of space. All theoretical growths are done using the vertical Bridgman method. It is believed that improved single crystal yields can be achieved by systematically identifying and studying system parameters both theoretically and experimentally. A computational model was developed to study and eventually optimize the growth process. The model is primarily concerned with the prediction of the thermal field, although mass transfer in the melt and the state of stress in the crystal were of considerable interest. The evolution is presented of the computer simulation and some of the important results obtained. Diffusion controlled growth was first studied since it represented a relatively simple, but nontheless realistic situation. In fact, results from this analysis prompted a study of the triple junction region where the melt, crystal, and ampoule wall meet. Since microgravity applications were sought because of the low level of fluid movement, the effect of gravitational field strength on the thermal and concentration field was also of interest. A study of the strength of coriolis acceleration on the growth process during space flight was deemed necessary since it would surely produce asymmetries in the flow field if strong enough. Finally, thermosolutal convection in a steady microgravity field for thermally stable conditions and both stable and unstable solutal conditions was simulated.

  2. Quartz crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Baughman, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    A process for growing single crystals from an amorphous substance that can undergo phase transformation to the crystalline state in an appropriate solvent. The process is carried out in an autoclave having a lower dissolution zone and an upper crystallization zone between which a temperature differential (.DELTA.T) is maintained at all times. The apparatus loaded with the substance, solvent, and seed crystals is heated slowly maintaining a very low .DELTA.T between the warmer lower zone and cooler upper zone until the amorphous substance is transformed to the crystalline state in the lower zone. The heating rate is then increased to maintain a large .DELTA.T sufficient to increase material transport between the zones and rapid crystallization. .alpha.-Quartz single crystal can thus be made from fused quartz in caustic solvent by heating to 350.degree. C. stepwise with a .DELTA.T of 0.25.degree.-3.degree. C., increasing the .DELTA.T to about 50.degree. C. after the fused quartz has crystallized, and maintaining these conditions until crystal growth in the upper zone is completed.

  3. Fluid mechanics and mass transfer in melt crystal growth: Analysis of the floating zone and vertical Bridgman processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    This research program focuses on analysis of the transport mechanisms in solidification processes, especially one of interest to the Microgravity Sciences and Applications Program of NASA. Research during the last year has focused on analysis of the dynamics of the floating zone process for growth of small-scale crystals, on studies of the effect of applied magnetic fields on convection and solute segregation in directional solidification, and on the dynamics of microscopic cell formation in two-dimensional solidification of binary alloys. Significant findings are given.

  4. Measurements of Protein Crystal Face Growth Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal growth rates will be determined for several hyperthermophile proteins.; The growth rates will be assessed using available theoretical models, including kinetic roughening.; If/when kinetic roughening supersaturations are established, determinations of protein crystal quality over a range of supersaturations will also be assessed.; The results of our ground based effort may well address the existence of a correlation between fundamental growth mechanisms and protein crystal quality.

  5. Mechanisms of classical crystal growth theory explain quartz and silicate dissolution behavior

    PubMed Central

    Dove, Patricia M.; Han, Nizhou; De Yoreo, James J.

    2005-01-01

    The central control of mineral weathering rates on biogeochemical systems has motivated studies of dissolution for more than 50 years. A complete physical picture that explains widely observed variations in dissolution behavior is lacking, and some data show apparent serious inconsistencies that cannot be explained by the largely empirical kinetic “laws.” Here, we show that mineral dissolution can, in fact, be understood through the same mechanistic theory of nucleation developed for mineral growth. In principle, this theory should describe dissolution but has never been tested. By generalizing nucleation rate equations to include dissolution, we arrive at a model that predicts how quartz dissolution processes change with undersaturation from step retreat, to defect-driven and homogeneous etch pit formation. This finding reveals that the “salt effect,” recognized almost 100 years ago, arises from a crossover in dominant nucleation mechanism to greatly increase step density. The theory also explains the dissolution kinetics of major weathering aluminosilicates, kaolinite and K-feldspar. In doing so, it provides a sensible origin of discrepancies reported for the dependence of kaolinite dissolution and growth rates on saturation state by invoking a temperature-activated transition in the nucleation process. Although dissolution by nucleation processes was previously unknown for oxides or silicates, our mechanism-based findings are consistent with recent observations of dissolution (i.e., demineralization) in biological minerals. Nucleation theory may be the missing link to unifying mineral growth and dissolution into a mechanistic and quantitative framework across the continuum of driving force. PMID:16230632

  6. Protein crystal growth tray assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Miller, Teresa Y. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A protein crystal growth tray assembly includes a tray that has a plurality of individual crystal growth chambers. Each chamber has a movable pedestal which carries a protein crystal growth compartment at an upper end. The several pedestals for each tray assembly are ganged together for concurrent movement so that the solutions in the various pedestal growth compartments can be separated from the solutions in the tray's growth chambers until the experiment is to be activated.

  7. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblum, William M.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances have been made in several of the experimental aspects of protein crystallography, leaving protein crystallization as one of the few remaining bottlenecks. As a result, it has become important that the science of protein crystal growth is better understood and that improved methods for protein crystallization are developed. Preliminary experiments with both small molecules and proteins indicate that microgravity may beneficially affect crystal growth. For this reason, a series of protein crystal growth experiments using the Space Shuttle was initiated. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth. Various optical techniques are being utilized to monitor the crystal growth process from the incipient or nucleation stage and throughout the growth phase. The eventual goal of these studies is to develop a system which utilizes optical monitoring for dynamic control of the crystallization process.

  8. Growth, spectral, thermal, optical, mechanical and etching studies of L-lysine semi-maleate (L-LSM) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, V.; Renuka, N.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Ramamurthi, K.

    2015-02-01

    Organic nonlinear optical material, L-lysine semi-maleate (L-LSM) single crystals were grown by slow cooling solution growth technique. The crystal system of grown L-LSM was confirmed by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction analyzes. Functional groups of the grown crystal have been identified by Fourier Transform Infrared spectral analysis. The proton and carbon NMR spectral studies confirm the presence of hydrogen and carbon in the grown L-LSM. The melting and thermal decomposition temperatures of the crystal were determined using thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses. Optical transparency, second harmonic generation efficiency, micro hardness, dielectric constant and loss, refractive index and birefringence have also been measured. Further, the growth patterns and dislocations present in the grown crystal are studied.

  9. Physical vapor transport crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoel, Dave W.; Anderson, Elmer; Wu, Maw-Kuen; Cheng, H. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of this research are two-fold: to study effective means of growing ZnSe crystals of good optical quality and to determine the advantages of growing such crystals in microgravity. As of this date the optimal conditions for crystal growth have not been determined. However, successful growth runs were made in two furnances and the results are given.

  10. The mechanism of deceleration of nucleation and crystal growth by the small addition of transition metals to lithium disilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Katrin; Avramov, Isak; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of niobium or tantalum oxide to lithium disilicate glass provokes a drastic decrease of the steady-state nucleation rates and the crystal growth velocities. The viscosity of the residual glassy matrix is considered as a function of the crystallization degree in the course of a non-isothermal crystallization. For simplification, a homogeneous distribution of the added oxides in the glass matrix is assumed. While the viscosity initially decreases, it significantly increases again for higher crystallization degrees hindering crystal growth. However, it was shown that the additives are enriched at the crystal interface. Several possible reasons for the inhibition of nucleation and growth kinetics such as viscosity, interfacial energy crystal/glassy phase, thermodynamic driving force or impingement rate are discussed. Since the crystallization front is blocked by the additives the impingement rate is decreased with increasing additive concentration. Since small concentrations of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 have a drastic effect on the nucleation, these components should be enriched at the interface crystal/glass. This will only take place, if it leads to a decrease in the interfacial energy. Since this effect alone should result in an increase of the nucleation rate, it must be overcompensated by kinetic effects. PMID:27150844

  11. The mechanism of deceleration of nucleation and crystal growth by the small addition of transition metals to lithium disilicate glasses

    PubMed Central

    Thieme, Katrin; Avramov, Isak; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of niobium or tantalum oxide to lithium disilicate glass provokes a drastic decrease of the steady-state nucleation rates and the crystal growth velocities. The viscosity of the residual glassy matrix is considered as a function of the crystallization degree in the course of a non-isothermal crystallization. For simplification, a homogeneous distribution of the added oxides in the glass matrix is assumed. While the viscosity initially decreases, it significantly increases again for higher crystallization degrees hindering crystal growth. However, it was shown that the additives are enriched at the crystal interface. Several possible reasons for the inhibition of nucleation and growth kinetics such as viscosity, interfacial energy crystal/glassy phase, thermodynamic driving force or impingement rate are discussed. Since the crystallization front is blocked by the additives the impingement rate is decreased with increasing additive concentration. Since small concentrations of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 have a drastic effect on the nucleation, these components should be enriched at the interface crystal/glass. This will only take place, if it leads to a decrease in the interfacial energy. Since this effect alone should result in an increase of the nucleation rate, it must be overcompensated by kinetic effects. PMID:27150844

  12. Crystal growth of artificial snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, S.; Oka, A.; Taki, M.; Kuwano, R.; Ono, H.; Nagura, R.; Narimatsu, Y.; Tanii, J.; Kamimiytat, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Snow crystals were grown onboard the space shuttle during STS-7 and STS-8 to facilitate the investigation of crystal growth under conditions of weightlessness. The experimental design and hardware are described. Space-grown snow crystals were polyhedrons looking like spheres, which were unlike snow crystals produced in experiments on Earth.

  13. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Smith, Craig D.; Smith, H. Wilson; Vijay-Kumar, Senadhi; Senadhi, Shobha E.; Ealick, Steven E.; Carter, Daniel C.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    The crystals of most proteins or other biological macromolecules are poorly ordered and diffract to lower resolutions than those observed for most crystals of simple organic and inorganic compounds. Crystallization in the microgravity environment of space may improve crystal quality by eliminating convection effects near growing crystal surfaces. A series of 11 different protein crystal growth experiments was performed on U.S. Space Shuttle flight STS-26 in September 1988. The microgravity-grown crystals of gamma-interferon D1, porcine elastase, and isocitrate lyase are larger, display more uniform morphologies, and yield diffraction data to significantly higher resolutions than the best crystals of these proteins grown on earth.

  14. Crystal Shape Evolution in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detached (or dewetted) Bridgman crystal growth defines that process in which a gap exists between a growing crystal and the crucible wall. Existence of the gap provides several advantages, including no sticking of the crystal to the crucible wall, reduced thermal and mechanical stresses, reduced dislocations, and no heterogeneous nucleation by the crucible. Numerical calculations are used to determine the conditions in which a gap can exist. According to crystal shape stability theory, only some of these gap widths will be dynamically stable. Beginning with a crystal diameter that differs from stable conditions, the transient crystal growth process is analyzed. In microgravity, dynamic stability depends only on capillary effects and is decoupled from heat transfer. Depending on the initial conditions and growth parameters, the crystal shape will evolve towards the crucible wall, towards a stable gap width, or towards the center of the crucible, collapsing the meniscus. The effect of a tapered crucible on dynamic stability is also described.

  15. Crystal Shape Evolution in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detached (or dewetted) Bridgman crystal growth defines that process in which a gap exists between a growing crystal and the crucible wall. Existence of the gap provides several advantages, including no sticking of the crystal to the crucible wall, reduced thermal and mechanical stresses, reduced dislocations, and no heterogeneous nucleation by the crucible. Numerical calculations are used to determine the conditions in which a gap can exist. According to crystal shape stability theory, only some of these gap widths will be dynamically stable. Beginning with a crystal diameter that differs from stable conditions, the transient crystal growth process is analyzed. In microgravity, dynamic stability depends only on capillary effects and is decoupled from heat transfer. Depending on the initial conditions and growth parameters, the crystal shape will evolve towards the crucible wall, towards a stable gap width, or towards the center of the crucible, collapsing the meniscus. The effect of a tapered crucible on dynamic stability is also described

  16. Protein Crystals and their Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent results on binding between protein molecules in crystal lattice, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties and strength and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed in the first half of this paper (Sea 2-4). In the second par&, some basic approaches to solubility of proteins are followed by overview on crystal nucleation and growth (Sec 5). It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source for scattering of crystal number ultimately appearing in the batch. Frequency at which new molecules join crystal lattice is measured by kinetic coefficient and related to the observable crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria to discriminate diffusion and kinetic limited growth are discussed on this basis in Sec 7. In Sec 8, creation of defects is discussed with the emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal I;erfection.

  17. Protein crystals and their growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    Recent results on the associations between protein molecules in crystal lattices, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties, strength, and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed. In addition, some basic approaches to understanding the solubility of proteins are followed by an overview of crystal nucleation and growth. It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source of the variation in the number of crystals ultimately appearing in the sample. The frequency at which new molecules join a crystal lattice is measured by the kinetic coefficient and is related to the observed crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria used to discriminate diffusion- and kinetic-limited growth are discussed on this basis. Finally, the creation of defects is discussed with an emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal perfection.

  18. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, C. E.; Clifford, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    The advantages of protein crystallization in space, and the applications of protein crystallography to drug design, protein engineering, and the design of synthetic vaccines are examined. The steps involved in using protein crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein are discussed. The growth chamber design and the hand-held apparatus developed for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques (hanging-drop method) are described; the experimental data from the four Shuttle missions are utilized to develop hardware for protein crystal growth in space and to evaluate the effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  19. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, C.Y.; Chen, P.C.

    1995-04-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes are most commonly utilized to remove sulfur dioxide from stack gases of coal- or oil-fired plants. In the simple slurry technology, SO{sub 2} is absorbed by a slurry of lime/limestone to form calcium sulfite crystals of acicular habit and its strong agglomeration, requiring large clarifiers and filters to dewater the sludge to make an acceptable landfill. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals from solution were studied by reacting Ca(OH){sub 2} with NaHSO{sub 3} in a pH-stat semibatch crystallizer. Single platelet crystals and agglomerates of platelet crystals were produced in the pH range from 5.80 to 6.80. The crystallization mechanism changed from primary nucleation to crystal growth in the progressive precipitation. Using the titration curves, the growth rate was calculated from the titration rate at the final stage of operation. The crystal growth rates of calcium sulfate hemihydrate crystals were found to obey the parabolic rate law in the low supersaturation range. Another point to be noted is that the precipitates of calcium sulfite hemihydrate in agitated suspensions have a tendency to form agglomerates. It was found that the degree of agglomeration is a weak function of relative supersaturation and magma density, while the pH value is a key factor that affects the degree of agglomeration. Addition of EDTA also has an effect on the agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrates.

  20. MCT crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.

    1988-01-01

    Convection and segregation in directional solidification and crystal growth by the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique are traditionally treated by assuming axisymmetric thermal condition on the ampoule wall. It is, however, difficult to achieve such a condition in an experimental setup. Any deviation from an axisymmetric temperature field on the wall of a vertical ampoule represents a horizontal temperature gradient. The horizontal density gradient that results from thermal expansion in the melt under this condition must lead on earth to some buoyance-driven convection, no matter what the axial (vertical) temperature distribution that is imposed on the melt. The magnitude of such convective flows for conditions representative of the MSFC mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) Bridgman setup is studied.

  1. Growth, optical, luminescence, thermal and mechanical behavior of an organic single crystal: 3-Acetyl-2-methyl-4-phenylquinolin-1-ium chloride.

    PubMed

    Nirosha, M; Kalainathan, S; Sarveswari, S; Vijayakumar, V

    2014-04-01

    A single crystal of 3-acetyl-2-methyl-4-phenylquinolin-1-ium chloride has grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique using ethanol as solvent. The structural, thermal, optical and mechanical property has studied for the grown crystal. Single crystal XRD revealed that the crystal belongs to monoclinic system with space group P21/c. The presences of Functional groups in the crystallized material have confirmed using the FTIR vibrational spectrum. The optical absorbance spectrum recorded from 190 to 1100nm shows the cut-off wavelength occurs at 371nm. The material shows its transparency in the entire region of the visible spectrum. The photoluminescence spectrum shows the ultraviolet and blue emission in the crystal. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis reveal the thermal stability of the grown crystal. Etching study shows the grown mechanism and surface features of the crystal. Vickers microhardness studies have carried out on the (01-1) plane to understand the mechanical properties of the grown crystal. The hardness of the title compound increases on increasing the load. The Meyer's index number (n), and the stiffness constants for different loads has calculated and reported. PMID:24389003

  2. Growth of ADP-KDP mixed crystal and its optical, mechanical, dielectric, piezoelectric and laser damage threshold studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2013-01-01

    Good quality ADP-KDP mixed crystal (90:10) is grown by slow cooling method. The size of the grown crystal is 80×10×10 mm3. The mounted seed size was 5×10×10 mm3 and the crystal was grown along the 'c' axis. HRXRD studies have been done in the near and far regions of the seed crystal. The FWHM of these diffraction curves are 28 and 29 arcsec, which are almost the same. The close values of FWHM of both the specimens indicate that the quality of the crystal remains nearly the same throughout the crystal. 80% of transparency is observed from the UV-vis studies in the entire visible region. Vickers hardness studies indicate that the mixed crystal is mechanically more stable compared to the ADP. Higher piezoelectric coefficient is observed in mixed crystals. Dielectric measurements are carried out. From the laser damage threshold studies, it is observed that higher energy is required to damage the mixed crystal and it indicates that the laser stability of the mixed crystal is high.

  3. Growth, structural, thermal, dielectric, mechanical and optical characterization of 2, 3-Dimethoxy-10-oxostrychnidinium hydrogen oxalate dihydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, P.; Gayathri, K.; Jayasakthi, M.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anbalagan, G.

    2013-11-01

    Single crystal of 2, 3-Dimethoxy-10-oxostrychnidinium hydrogen oxalate dihydrate has been grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique (SEST) using ethanol-water solution at room temperature. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with space group of P212121. The crystalline perfection of the grown single crystal has been examined by high resolution X-ray diffraction analysis (HRXRD). The optical absorption studies show that the crystal is transparent in the visible region with a lower cut-off wavelength of 342 nm and the optical energy band gap Eg is found to be 3.52 eV. The electrical properties have been assessed by dielectric measurement at different temperatures. Hardness values measured using Vickers hardness indenter show considerable anisotropy. Laser damage threshold study is also carried out for the grown crystal.

  4. Crack growth phenomena in micro-machined single crystal silicon and design implications for micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Alissa Mirella

    The creation of micron-sized mechanisms using semiconductor processing technology is known collectively as MEMS, or Micro Electro Mechanical Systems. Many MEMS devices, such as accelerometers and switches, have mechanical structures fabricated from single crystal silicon, a brittle material. The reliability and longevity of these devices depends on minimizing the probability of fracture, and therefore requires a thorough understanding of crack growth phenomena in silicon. In this study, a special micro-machined fracture specimen, the compression-loaded double cantilever beam, was developed to study fracture phenomena in single crystal silicon on a size scale relevant to MEMS. The decreasing stress intensity geometry of this sample provided stable, controllable crack propagation in test sections as thin as 100 mum. Several common MEMS fabrication methods (plasma and chemical etch) were used to achieve a range of surface finishes. A 650 A thick titanium crack gage was used to directly measure crack extension as a function of time using the potential drop technique. High speed (100 MHz) data acquisition techniques were employed to capture fracture events on the sub-microsecond time scale. The stability of the sample design and the micron-scale resolution of the crack gage facilitated investigation into the existence of a stress corrosion effect in silicon. No evidence of sub-critical crack growth due to exposure to humid air was found in carefully controlled tests lasting up to 24 hours. Rapid crack propagation velocities (>1 km/s) during quasi-static loading were recorded using high speed data acquisition techniques. Unique evidence was found of reflected stress waves causing multiple, momentary arrests during rapid fracture events. These measurements, along with atomic force microscope scans of the fracture surfaces, offer new insight into the kinetics of the fracture process in silicon. Over 100 micro-machined samples were fractured in this research. Weibull

  5. Direct flow crystal growth system

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    1992-01-01

    A crystal is grown in a constantly filtered solution which is flowed directly into the growing face of a crystal. In a continuous flow system, solution at its saturation temperature is removed from a crystal growth tank, heated above its saturation temperature, filtered, cooled back to its saturation temperature, and returned to the tank.

  6. Nucleation kinetics, growth, crystalline perfection, mechanical, thermal, optical and electrical characterization of brucinium 2-carboxy-6-nitrophthalate dihydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, P.; Gayathri, K.; Sivakumar, N.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anbalagan, G.

    2014-06-01

    Single crystals of brucinium 2-carboxy-6-nitrophthalate dihydrate (B2C6ND) have been grown by the slow evaporation solution technique at room temperature using water-ethanol (1:1) mixed solvent. The metastable zone width and induction period have been experimentally determined for the growth conditions. Nucleation kinetics and fundamental growth parameters such as surface free energy, critical radius and critical free energy change are also evaluated according to the experimental data. The crystal system and the lattice parameters have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystalline perfection of the grown B2C6ND crystals has been characterized by HRXRD method. Optical band gap and Urbach tail width of the sample have been studied employing UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The Vickers microhardness number (Hv), yield strength (σv) and stiffness constant (C11) of the grown crystal have been evaluated. The dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss of the grown B2C6ND crystal have been investigated as a function of frequency in the temperature range 313-353 K. The laser damage threshold value of B2C6ND crystal was estimated to be 2.8 GW/cm2 using a Nd:YAG laser.

  7. High density protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouleau, Robyn (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence (Inventor); Hedden, Douglas Keith (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A protein crystal growth assembly including a crystal growth cell and further including a cell body having a top side and a bottom side and a first aperture defined therethrough, the cell body having opposing first and second sides and a second aperture defined therethrough. A cell barrel is disposed within the cell body, the cell barrel defining a cavity alignable with the first aperture of the cell body, the cell barrel being rotatable within the second aperture. A reservoir is coupled to the bottom side of the cell body and a cap having a top side is disposed on the top side of the cell body. The protein crystal growth assembly may be employed in methods including vapor diffusion crystallization, liquid to liquid crystallization, batch crystallization, and temperature induction batch mode crystallization.

  8. Cessation of growth in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcón Rodríguez, C.; Aguilera Morales, S.; Falcón Rodríguez, F.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model that explains the cessation of growth of protein crystals as a consequence of the increment of bond weakness between adjacent protein molecules is presented. It is assumed that the main factor increasing the bond weakness is the concentration of precipitating salts generally used in protein crystal growth practice.

  9. Bioengineering single crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Hsuan; Park, Alexander; Joester, Derk

    2011-02-16

    Biomineralization is a "bottom-up" synthesis process that results in the formation of inorganic/organic nanocomposites with unrivaled control over structure, superior mechanical properties, adaptive response, and the capability of self-repair. While de novo design of such highly optimized materials may still be out of reach, engineering of the biosynthetic machinery may offer an alternative route to design advanced materials. Herein, we present an approach using micro-contact-printed lectins for patterning sea urchin embryo primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) in vitro. We demonstrate not only that PMCs cultured on these substrates show attachment to wheat germ agglutinin and concanavalin A patterns but, more importantly, that the deposition and elongation of calcite spicules occurs cooperatively by multiple cells and in alignment with the printed pattern. This allows us to control the placement and orientation of smooth, cylindrical calcite single crystals where the crystallographic c-direction is parallel to the cylinder axis and the underlying line pattern. PMID:21265521

  10. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Bugg, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment in space are described with special attention given to the crystal growth facilities and the techniques used in Space Shuttle experiments. The properties of large space-grown crystals of gamma interferon, elastase, lathyros ochrus lectin I, and few other proteins grown on various STS flights are described. A comparison of the microgravity-grown crystals with the bast earth-grown crystals demonstrated that the space-grown crystals are more highly ordered at the molecular level than their earth-grown counterparts. When crystallization conditions were optimized, the microgravity-grown protein crystals were larger, displayed more uniform morphologies, and yielded diffraction data to significantly higher resolution than their earth-grown counterparts.

  11. Characterization and modeling of illite crystal particles and growth mechanisms in a zoned hydrothermal deposit, Lake City, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, D.J.; Eberl, D.D.; McCarty, D.K.; Meeker, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    Mean thickness measurements and crystal-thickness distributions (CTDs) of illite particles vary systematically with changes in hydrothermal alteration type, fracture density, and attendant mineralization in a large acid-sulfate/Mo-porphyry hydrothermal system at Red Mountain, near Lake City, Colorado. The hydrothermal illites characterize an extensive zone of quartz-sericite-pyrite alteration beneath two deeply rooted bodies of magmatic-related, quartz-alunite altered rock. Nineteen illites from a 3000 ft vertical drill hole were analyzed by XRD using the PVP-10 intercalation method and the computer program MudMaster (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique). Mean crystallite thicknesses, as determined from 001 reflections, range from 5-7 nanometers (nm) at depths from 0-1700 ft, then sharply increase to 10-16 nm at depths between 1800-2100 ft, and decrease again to 4-5 nm below this level. The interval of largest particle thickness correlates strongly with the zone of most intense quartz-sericite-pyrite alteration (QSP) and attendant high-density stockwork fracturing, and with the highest concentrations of Mo within the drill core. CTD shapes for the illite particles fall into two main categories: asymptotic and lognormal. The shapes of the CTDs are dependent on conditions of illite formation. The asymptotic CTDs correspond to a nucleation and growth mechanism, whereas surface-controlled growth was the dominant mechanism for the lognormal CTDs. Lognormal CTDs coincide with major through-going fractures or stockwork zones, whereas asymptotic CTDs are present in wallrock distal to these intense fracture zones. The increase in illite particle size and the associated zone of intense QSP alteration and stockwork veining was related by proximity to the dacitic magma(s), which supplied both reactants and heat to the hydrothermal system. However, no changes in illite polytype, which in other studies reflect temperature transitions, were observed within this interval.

  12. Growth, optical, mechanical and electrical properties of L-serine acetate: A promising semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, K.; Kumar, P. Praveen; Zamara, A.; Thirugnanam, A.

    2013-06-01

    L-Serine Acetate (LSA) single crystal was successfully grown by slow solvent evaporation technique. Cell parameters are determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction study. Various functional groups presented in the crystal were confirmed by FT-IR Analysis. The transmission of the crystal was found by UV analysis and band gap energy of the grown crystal was also calculated. Dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the crystal was determined using dielectric studies. Hardness studies were employed to characterize the mechanical strength of the grown crystal. Nonlinear optical property has been studied by Kurtz Perry technique. The second harmonic generation conversion efficiency of the grown crystal shows the suitability of the grown crystal for frequency conversion applications. Due to a publication oversight, the PDF file of this article was accidentally substituted by a PDF file containing a different article. The PDF file of the correct article was published on June 12, 2013. AIP Publishing would like to apologize to the authors and editors for any inconvenience this may have caused.

  13. Synthesis, growth, structural, spectral, thermal, chemical etching, linear and nonlinear optical and mechanical studies of an organic single crystal 4-chloro 4-nitrostilbene (CONS): A potential NLO material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinakaran, Paul M.; Kalainathan, S.

    2013-07-01

    4-Chloro 4-nitrostilbene (CONS) a new organic nonlinear optical material has been synthesized. Employing slow evaporation method, good optical quality single crystals (dimensions up to 6 × 2 × 3 mm3) have been grown using ethyl methyl ketone (EMK) as a solvent. The grown crystals have been subjected to various characterizations such as single crystal X-ray diffraction, powder XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton NMR, solid UV absorption, SHG studies. Single crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that the crystal system belongs to monoclinic with noncentrosymmetric space group P21. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum has been recorded and found that the cut off wavelength is 380 nm. Functional groups and the structure of the title compound have been confirmed by FTIR and 1H NMR spectroscopic analyses respectively. Molecular mass of the CONS confirmed by the high resolution mass spectral analysis .The thermal behavior of the grown crystal has been studied by TG/DTA analysis and it shows the melting point is at 188.66 °C. Dislocations and growth pattern present in the grown crystal revealed by the etching study. The mechanical strength of the CONS crystal has been studied by Vicker's hardness measurement. The SHG efficiency of the grown crystal has been determined by Kurtz and Perry powder test which revealed that the CONS crystal (327 mV) has 15 times greater efficiency than that of KDP (21.7 mV).

  14. Asteroid core crystallization by inward dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haack, Henning; Scott, Edward R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The physics of the asteroid core crystallization process in metallic asteroids is investigated, with special attention given to the initial conditions for core crystallization, the manner of crystallization, the mechanisms acting in the stirring of the liquid, and the effects of elements such as sulfur on crystallization of Fe-Ni. On the basis of theoretical considerations and the published data on iron meteorites, it is suggested that the mode of crystallization in asteroid core was different from the apparent outward concentric crystallization of the earth core, in that the crystallization of asteroidal cores commenced at the base of the mantle and proceeded inward. The inward crystallization resulted in complex dendritic growth. These dendrites may have grown to lengths of hundreds of meters or perhaps even as large as the core radius, thereby dividing the core into separate magma chambers.

  15. Protein crystal growth - Growth kinetics for tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, M. L.; Snyder, R. S.; Naumann, R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from theoretical and experimental studies of the growth rate of lysozyme as a function of diffusion in earth-gravity conditions. The investigations were carried out to form a comparison database for future studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of space. A diffusion-convection model is presented for predicting crystal growth rates in the presence of solutal concentration gradients. Techniques used to grow and monitor the growth of hen egg white lysozyme are detailed. The model calculations and experiment data are employed to discuss the effects of transport and interfacial kinetics in the growth of the crystals, which gradually diminished the free energy in the growth solution. Density gradient-driven convection, caused by presence of the gravity field, was a limiting factor in the growth rate.

  16. Unidirectional growth of potassium hydrogen malate single crystals and its characterizations on optical, mechanical, dielectric, laser damage threshold studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopathi, K.; Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2013-02-01

    Single crystals of potassium hydrogen malate (PHM) were successfully grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method and conventional slow evaporation solution technique which have the sizes of 35 mm in length, 20 mm in diameter and 15 × 10 × 3 mm3 respectively. The grown PHM crystals have been subjected to single crystal X-ray diffractometer, UV-Vis NIR studies, dielectric measurements, Vickers microhardness analysis and Laser damage threshold. The range and percentage of optical transmission is represented by recording UV-Vis-NIR analysis. The dielectric constant and loss measurement was made as function of temperature in the range of 40-150°C. Mechanical strength and laser stability of the SR method grown crystals was higher than the conventional method grown crystal.

  17. Structure, crystal growth, optical and mechanical studies of poly bis (thiourea) silver (I) nitrate single crystal: A new semi organic NLO material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, N.; Kanagathara, N.; Varghese, B.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anbalagan, G.

    2014-01-01

    A new semi organic non linear optical polymeric crystal, bis (thiourea) silver (I) nitrate (TuAgN) with dimension 8 × 7 × 1.5 mm3 has been successfully grown from aqueous solution by slow evaporation solution technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study reveals that the crystal belongs to orthorhombic system with non centrosymmetric space group C2221. The crystalline perfection of the crystal was analyzed by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) rocking curve measurements. Functional groups present in the crystal were analyzed qualitatively by infrared and Confocal Raman spectral analysis. Effects due to coordination of thiourea with metal ions were also discussed. Optical absorption study on TuAgN crystal shows the minimum absorption in the entire UV-Vis region and the lower cut off wavelength of TuAgN is found to be 318 nm. Thermal analysis shows that the material is thermally stable up to 180 °C. The mechanical strength and its parameters of the grown crystal were estimated by Vicker's microhardness test. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of the crystal was measured by Kurtz's powder technique infers that the crystal has nonlinear optical (NLO) efficiency 0.85 times that of KDP.

  18. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The solubility and growth mechanism of canavalin were studied, and the applicability of the Schlieren technique to protein crystal growth was investigated. Canavalin which may be crystallized from a basic solution by the addition of hydrogen (H+) ions was shown to have normal solubility characteristics over the range of temperatures (5 to 25 C) and pH (5 to 7.5) studied. The solubility data combined with growth rate data gathered from the seeded growth of canavalin crystals indicated that the growth mechanism at high supersaturation ratios (>1.28) is screw dislocation like. A Schlieren apparatus was constructed and flow patterns were observed in Rochelle salt (sodium potassium tartrate), lysozyme, and canavalin. The critical parameters were identified as the change in density with concentration (dp/dc) and the change in index of refraction with concentration (dn/dc). Some of these values were measured for the materials listed.

  19. Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In order to rapidly and efficiently grow crystals, tools were needed to automatically identify and analyze the growing process of protein crystals. To meet this need, Diversified Scientific, Inc. (DSI), with the support of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center, developed CrystalScore(trademark), the first automated image acquisition, analysis, and archiving system designed specifically for the macromolecular crystal growing community. It offers automated hardware control, image and data archiving, image processing, a searchable database, and surface plotting of experimental data. CrystalScore is currently being used by numerous pharmaceutical companies and academic and nonprofit research centers. DSI, located in Birmingham, Alabama, was awarded the patent Method for acquiring, storing, and analyzing crystal images on March 4, 2003. Another DSI product made possible by Marshall SBIR funding is VaporPro(trademark), a unique, comprehensive system that allows for the automated control of vapor diffusion for crystallization experiments.

  20. Automated protein crystal growth facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donald, Stacey

    1994-01-01

    A customer for the protein crystal growth facility fills the specially designed chamber with the correct solutions, fills the syringes with their quenching solutions, and submits the data needed for the proper growth of their crystal. To make sure that the chambers and syringes are filled correctly, a NASA representative may assist the customer. The data needed is the approximate growth time, the growth temperature, and the desired crystal size, but this data can be changed anytime from the ground, if needed. The chambers are gathered and placed into numbered slots in special drawers. Then, data is entered into a computer for each of the chambers. Technicians map out when each chamber's growth should be activated so that all of the chambers have enough time to grow. All of this data is up-linked to the space station when the previous growth session is over. Anti-vibrational containers need to be constructed for the high forces encountered during the lift off and the landing of the space shuttle, and though our team has not designed these containers, we do not feel that there is any reason why a suitable one could not be made. When the shuttle reaches the space station, an astronaut removes a drawer of quenched chambers from the growth facility and inserts a drawer of new chambers. All twelve of the drawers can be replaced in this fashion. The optical disks can also be removed this way. The old drawers are stored for the trip back to earth. Once inside the growth facility, a chamber is removed by the robot and placed in one of 144 active sites at a time previously picked by a technician. Growth begins when the chamber is inserted into an active site. Then, the sensing system starts to determine the size of the protein crystal. All during the crystal's growth, the customer can view the crystal and read all of the crystal's data, such as growth rate and crystal size. When the sensing system determines that the crystal has reached the predetermined size, the robot is

  1. Interface control and snow crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jessica; Schaposnik, Laura P.

    2016-02-01

    The growth of snow crystals is dependent on the temperature and saturation of the environment. In the case of dendrites, Reiter's local two-dimensional model provides a realistic approach to the study of dendrite growth. In this paper we obtain a new geometric rule that incorporates interface control, a basic mechanism of crystallization that is not taken into account in the original Reiter model. By defining two new variables, growth latency and growth direction, our improved model gives a realistic model not only for dendrite but also for plate forms.

  2. Interface control and snow crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Jessica; Schaposnik, Laura P

    2016-02-01

    The growth of snow crystals is dependent on the temperature and saturation of the environment. In the case of dendrites, Reiter's local two-dimensional model provides a realistic approach to the study of dendrite growth. In this paper we obtain a new geometric rule that incorporates interface control, a basic mechanism of crystallization that is not taken into account in the original Reiter model. By defining two new variables, growth latency and growth direction, our improved model gives a realistic model not only for dendrite but also for plate forms. PMID:26986434

  3. Crystal growth inside an octant.

    PubMed

    Olejarz, Jason; Krapivsky, P L

    2013-08-01

    We study crystal growth inside an infinite octant on a cubic lattice. The growth proceeds through the deposition of elementary cubes into inner corners. After rescaling by the characteristic size, the interface becomes progressively more deterministic in the long-time limit. Utilizing known results for the crystal growth inside a two-dimensional corner, we propose a hyperbolic partial differential equation for the evolution of the limiting shape. This equation is interpreted as a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, which helps in finding an analytical solution. Simulations of the growth process are in excellent agreement with analytical predictions. We then study the evolution of the subleading correction to the volume of the crystal, the asymptotic growth of the variance of the volume of the crystal, and the total number of inner and outer corners. We also show how to generalize the results to arbitrary spatial dimension. PMID:24032777

  4. Surrogate Seeds For Growth Of Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Larger crystals of higher quality grown. Alternative method for starting growth of crystal involves use of seed crystal of different material instead of same material as solution. Intended for growing single-crystal proteins for experiments but applicable in general to growth of crystals from solutions and to growth of semiconductor or other crystals from melts.

  5. Plenum type crystal growth process

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.

    1992-01-01

    Crystals are grown in a tank which is divided by a baffle into a crystal growth region above the baffle and a plenum region below the baffle. A turbine blade or stirring wheel is positioned in a turbine tube which extends through the baffle to generate a flow of solution from the crystal growing region to the plenum region. The solution is pressurized as it flows into the plenum region. The pressurized solution flows back to the crystal growing region through return flow tubes extending through the baffle. Growing crystals are positioned near the ends of the return flow tubes to receive a direct flow of solution.

  6. Dynamically controlled crystal growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Terry L. (Inventor); Kim, Larry J. (Inventor); Harrington, Michael (Inventor); DeLucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Crystal growth can be initiated and controlled by dynamically controlled vapor diffusion or temperature change. In one aspect, the present invention uses a precisely controlled vapor diffusion approach to monitor and control protein crystal growth. The system utilizes a humidity sensor and various interfaces under computer control to effect virtually any evaporation rate from a number of different growth solutions simultaneously by means of an evaporative gas flow. A static laser light scattering sensor can be used to detect aggregation events and trigger a change in the evaporation rate for a growth solution. A control/follower configuration can be used to actively monitor one chamber and accurately control replicate chambers relative to the control chamber. In a second aspect, the invention exploits the varying solubility of proteins versus temperature to control the growth of protein crystals. This system contains miniature thermoelectric devices under microcomputer control that change temperature as needed to grow crystals of a given protein. Complex temperature ramps are possible using this approach. A static laser light scattering probe also can be used in this system as a non-invasive probe for detection of aggregation events. The automated dynamic control system provides systematic and predictable responses with regard to crystal size. These systems can be used for microgravity crystallization projects, for example in a space shuttle, and for crystallization work under terrestial conditions. The present invention is particularly useful for macromolecular crystallization, e.g. for proteins, polypeptides, nucleic acids, viruses and virus particles.

  7. Crystal Growth Using MEPHISTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III

    1999-01-01

    The shuttle flight experiment "In Situ Monitoring of Crystal Growth Using MEPHISTO" was accomplished during STS-87 as part of the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-4), which was flown from November 19 to December 5, 1997. The data returned from that flight are just now beginning to yield quantitative results. This project is an international collaboration: the furnace system known as MEPHISTO was built in France by CNES (French National Space Agency) and CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission); the principal investigator, Prof. Reza Abbaschian, is from the University of Florida at Gainesville; and numerical and analytical modeling support includes collaborators from the University of New South Wales, Australia, the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the NASA Lewis Research Center. MEPHISTO is a French acronym that translates into English as Materials for the Study of Interesting Phenomena of Solidification on Earth and in Orbit. Since this was the fourth flight of the MEPHISTO furnace, the experiment is referred to as MEPHISTO-4. MEPHISTO-4 was a directional solidification experiment that studied the liquid-to-solid transformation of bismuth alloyed with tin. Directional solidification is a freezing technique common to the processing of the electronic materials used in integrated circuits and detectors, such as silicon and germanium. When liquids are frozen on Earth, they must be cooled. The cooling causes stirring because of density variations in the liquid. This stirring, known as natural convection, influences the quality of the resulting solid. During freezing, regions of high and low concentrations of tin are created. This introduces another important phenomenon: diffusion, or the movement by molecular action of matter from regions of high concentration to regions of lower concentration. In MEPHISTO-4, it is tin that diffuses from the high-concentration region in front of the

  8. Studies on the growth, spectral, structural, electrical, optical and mechanical properties of Uronium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate single crystal for third-order nonlinear optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, A.; Krishna Kumar, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, A.; Md Zahid, I.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Umarani, P. R.

    2015-05-01

    Organic Uronium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate (UCHBS) nonlinear optical single crystal was grown by solution growth technique. The solubility and nucleation studies were performed for UCHBS at different temperatures 30, 35, 40, 45, 50 and 55 °C. The crystal structure of UCHBS was elucidated from single crystal X-ray diffraction study. High resolution X-ray diffraction technique was employed to study the perfection and internal defects of UCHBS crystal. Infrared and Raman spectra were recorded to analyze the vibrational behavior of chemical bonds and its functional groups. The physico-chemical changes, stability and decomposition stages of the UCHBS compound were established by TG-DTA studies. The dielectric phenomenon of UCHBS crystal was studied at different temperatures with respect to frequency. Linear optical properties of transmittance, cut-off wavelength, band gap of UCHBS were found from UV-visible spectral studies. Third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, nonlinear refractive index, nonlinear optical absorption coefficient values were measured by Z-scan technique. The mechanical properties of UCHBS crystal was studied by using Vicker's microhardness test. The growth features of UCHBS crystal were analyzed from etching studies.

  9. Effects of impurities on crystal growth in fructose crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Y. D.; Shiau, L. D.; Berglund, K. A.

    1989-10-01

    The influence of impurities on the crystallization of anhydrous fructose from aqueous solution was studied. The growth kinetics of fructose crystals in the fructose-water-glucose and fructose-water-difructose dianhydrides systems were investigated using photomicroscopic contact nucleation techniques. Glucose is the major impurity likely to be present in fructose syrup formed during corn wet milling, while several difructose dianhydrides are formed in situ under crystallization conditions and have been proposed as a cause in the decrease of overall yields. Both sets of impurities were found to cause inhibition of crystal growth, but the mechanisms responsible in each case are different. It was found that the presence of glucose increases the solubility of fructose in water and thus lowers the supersaturation of the solution. This is probably the main effect responsible for the decrease of crystal growth. Since the molecular structures of difructose dianhydrides are similar to that of fructose, they are probably "tailor-made" impurities. The decrease of crystal growth is probably caused by the incorporation of these impurities into or adsorption to the crystal surface which would accept fructose molecules in the orientation that existed in the difructose dianhydride.

  10. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The overall scientific goals and rationale for growing protein crystals in microgravity are discussed. Data on the growth of human serum albumin crystals which were produced during the First International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) are presented. Potential scientific advantages of the utilization of Space Station Freedom are discussed.

  11. Czochralski crystal growth: Modeling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudukovic, M. P.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Srivastava, R. K.; Dorsey, D.

    1986-01-01

    The modeling study of Czochralski (Cz) crystal growth is reported. The approach was to relate in a quantitative manner, using models based on first priniciples, crystal quality to operating conditions and geometric variables. The finite element method is used for all calculations.

  12. Vapor-phase synthesis, growth mechanism and thickness-independent elastic modulus of single-crystal tungsten nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiliang; Chen, Guoliang; Huang, Han; Ma, Shujun; Xu, Hongyi; He, Yuehui; Zou, Jin

    2013-12-20

    Single-crystal tungsten nanobelts with thicknesses from tens to hundreds of nanometers, widths of several micrometers and lengths of tens of micrometers were synthesized using chemical vapor deposition. Surface energy minimization was believed to have played a crucial role in the growth of the synthesized nanobelts enclosed by the low-energy {110} crystal planes of body-centered-cubic structure. The anisotropic growth of the crystallographically equivalent {110} crystal planes could be attributable to the asymmetric concentration distribution of the tungsten atom vapor around the nanobelts during the growth process. The elastic moduli of the synthesized tungsten nanobelts with thicknesses ranging from 65 to 306 nm were accurately measured using a newly developed thermal vibration method. The measured modulus values of the tungsten nanobelts were thickness-dependent. After eliminating the effect of surface oxidization using a core-shell model, the elastic modulus of tungsten nanobelts became constant, which is close to that of the bulk tungsten value of 410 GPa. PMID:24270939

  13. Ultraslow growth rates of giant gypsum crystals

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, A. E. S.; García-Ruíz, J. M.; Tsukamoto, K.; Patiño-Lopez, L. D.; Satoh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralogical processes taking place close to equilibrium, or with very slow kinetics, are difficult to quantify precisely. The determination of ultraslow dissolution/precipitation rates would reveal characteristic timing associated with these processes that are important at geological scale. We have designed an advanced high-resolution white-beam phase-shift interferometry microscope to measure growth rates of crystals at very low supersaturation values. To test this technique, we have selected the giant gypsum crystals of Naica ore mines in Chihuahua, Mexico, a challenging subject in mineral formation. They are thought to form by a self-feeding mechanism driven by solution-mediated anhydrite-gypsum phase transition, and therefore they must be the result of an extremely slow crystallization process close to equilibrium. To calculate the formation time of these crystals we have measured the growth rates of the {010} face of gypsum growing from current Naica waters at different temperatures. The slowest measurable growth rate was found at 55 °C, 1.4 ± 0.2 × 10-5 nm/s, the slowest directly measured normal growth rate for any crystal growth process. At higher temperatures, growth rates increase exponentially because of decreasing gypsum solubility and higher kinetic coefficient. At 50 °C neither growth nor dissolution was observed indicating that growth of giant crystals of gypsum occurred at Naica between 58 °C (gypsum/anhydrite transition temperature) and the current temperature of Naica waters, confirming formation temperatures determined from fluid inclusion studies. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of applying advanced optical techniques in laboratory experiments to gain a better understanding of crystal growth processes occurring at a geological timescale. PMID:21911400

  14. Two puzzling aspects of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. L.; Saville, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of several mechanisms which may reduce crystal growth rates and or terminate crystal growth. It is found that salt gradients which change the local chemical potential of the protein are insufficient to account for the slow crystal growth rates which have been reported. Contaminants which adsorb protein from solution may reduce the effective protein concentration, but the impurity's concentration and its affinity for protein are unknown. Association of protein molecules in bulk solution can reduce the monomer concentration significantly, but extant theory and experiment are not sensitive enough to determine the actual concentration of aggregates in solution. For systems of interest, shear-induced effects were found to be too weak to interfere with normal binding of incoming protein molecules. Although we found that most crystal growth occurs in a regime where both interfacial kinetics and diffusion influence crystal growth, the role of mass transfer rates on the terminal size of crystals is unknown, primarily because no data exist which cover the size range of interest (0.1 mm to 1 mm in length).

  15. A study of crystal growth by solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of crystal growth by solution technique was studied. A low temperature solution crystal growth setup was developed. Crystals of triglycine sulfate (TGS) were grown using this arrangement. Some additional tasks were performed toward fabrication of experiments for future space flight.

  16. Bulk crystal growth, optical, mechanical and ferroelectric properties of new semiorganic nonlinear optical and piezoelectric Lithium nitrate monohydrate oxalate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Jyoti; Kumar, Binay

    2016-01-01

    New semiorganic nonlinear optical single crystals of Lithium nitrate oxalate monohydrate (LNO) were grown by slow evaporation solution technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study indicated that LNO crystal belongs to the triclinic system with space group P1. Various functional groups present in the material were identified by FTIR and Raman analysis. UV-vis study showed the high transparency of crystals with a wide band gap 5.01 eV. Various Optical constants i.e. Urbach energy (Eu), extinction coefficient (K), refractive index, optical conductivity, electric susceptibility with real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant were calculated using the transmittance data which have applications in optoelectronic devices. A sharp emission peak was found at 438 nm in photoluminescence measurement, which revealed suitability of crystal for fabricating violet lasers. In dielectric studies, a peak has been observed at 33 °C which is due to ferroelectric to paraelectric phase transition. Piezoelectric charge coefficients (d33 = 9.2 pC/N and g33) have been calculated, which make it a suitable for piezoelectric devices applications. In ferroelectric studies, a saturated loop was found in which the values of coercive field and remnant polarization were found to be 2.18 kV/cm and 0.39 μC/cm2, respectively. Thermal behavior was studied by TGA and DSC studies. The relative SHG efficiency of LNO was found to be 1.2 times that of KDP crystal. In microhardness study, Meyer's index value was found to be 1.78 which revealed its soft nature. These optical, dielectric, piezoelectric, ferroelectric, mechanical and non-linear optical properties of grown crystal establish the usefulness of this material for optoelectronics, non-volatile memory and piezoelectric devices applications.

  17. Containerless protein crystal growth method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Chung, Sang K.

    1991-01-01

    A method of growing protein crystals from levitated drops is introduced and unique features of containerless approach in 1-g and micro-G laboratories are discussed. Electrostatic multidrop levitation system which is capable of simultaneous four drop levitation is described. A method of controlling protein saturation level in a programmed way is introduced and discussed. Finally, some of the unique features of containerless approach of protein crystal growth in space are discussed and summarized.

  18. Hydrothermal Growth of Polyscale Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrappa, Kullaiah

    In this chapter, the importance of the hydrothermal technique for growth of polyscale crystals is discussed with reference to its efficiency in synthesizing high-quality crystals of various sizes for modern technological applications. The historical development of the hydrothermal technique is briefly discussed, to show its evolution over time. Also some of the important types of apparatus used in routine hydrothermal research, including the continuous production of nanosize crystals, are discussed. The latest trends in the hydrothermal growth of crystals, such as thermodynamic modeling and understanding of the solution chemistry, are elucidated with appropriate examples. The growth of some selected bulk, fine, and nanosized crystals of current technological significance, such as quartz, aluminum and gallium berlinites, calcite, gemstones, rare-earth vanadates, electroceramic titanates, and carbon polymorphs, is discussed in detail. Future trends in the hydrothermal technique, required to meet the challenges of fast-growing demand for materials in various technological fields, are described. At the end of this chapter, an Appendix 18.A containing a more or less complete list of the characteristic families of crystals synthesized by the hydrothermal technique is given with the solvent and pressure-temperature (PT) conditions used in their synthesis.

  19. A study of crystal growth by solution technique. [triglycine sulfate single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    The advantages and mechanisms of crystal growth from solution are discussed as well as the effects of impurity adsorption on the kinetics of crystal growth. Uncertainities regarding crystal growth in a low gravity environment are examined. Single crystals of triglycine sulfate were grown using a low temperature solution technique. Small components were assembled and fabricated for future space flights. A space processing experiment proposal accepted by NASA for the Spacelab-3 mission is included.

  20. Growth rate study of canavalin single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demattei, R. C.; Feigelson, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    The dependence on supersaturation of the growth rate of single crystals of the protein canavalin is studied. In the supersaturation ranges studied, the rate-limiting step for growth is best described by a screw dislocation mechanism associated with interface attachment kinetics. Using a ln-ln plot, the growth-rate data is found to fit a predictive relationship of the form G = 0.012 x the supersaturation to the 6.66, which, together with the solubility curves, allows the growth rate to be estimated under a variety of conditions.

  1. Biomolecular Modification of Inorganic Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    De Yoreo, J J

    2007-04-27

    The fascinating shapes and hierarchical designs of biomineralized structures are an inspiration to materials scientists because of the potential they suggest for biomolecular control over materials synthesis. Conversely, the failure to prevent or limit tissue mineralization in the vascular, skeletal, and urinary systems is a common source of disease. Understanding the mechanisms by which organisms direct or limit crystallization has long been a central challenge to the biomineralization community. One prevailing view is that mineral-associated macromolecules are responsible for either inhibiting crystallization or initiating and stabilizing non-equilibrium crystal polymorphs and morphologies through interactions between anionic moieties and cations in solution or at mineralizing surfaces. In particular, biomolecules that present carboxyl groups to the growing crystal have been implicated as primary modulators of growth. Here we review the results from a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling (MM) studies to investigate the effect of specific interactions between carboxylate-rich biomolecules and atomic steps on crystal surfaces during the growth of carbonates, oxalates and phosphates of calcium. Specifically, we how the growth kinetics and morphology depend on the concentration of additives that include citrate, simple amino acids, synthetic Asp-rich polypeptides, and naturally occurring Asp-rich proteins found in both functional and pathological mineral tissues. The results reveal a consistent picture of shape modification in which stereochemical matching of modifiers to specific atomic steps drives shape modification. Inhibition and other changes in growth kinetics are shown to be due to a range of mechanisms that depend on chemistry and molecular size. Some effects are well described by classic crystal growth theories, but others, such as step acceleration due to peptide charge and hydrophylicity, were previously unrealized

  2. Optical analysis of crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Passeur, Andrea; Harper, Sabrina

    1994-01-01

    Processing and data reduction of holographic images from Spacelab presents some interesting challenges in determining the effects of microgravity on crystal growth processes. Evaluation of several processing techniques, including the Computerized Holographic Image Processing System and the image processing software ITEX150, will provide fundamental information for holographic analysis of the space flight data.

  3. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin. The major storage protein of leguminous plants and a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. It is studied in efforts to enhance nutritional value of proteins through protein engineerings. It is isolated from Jack Bean because of it's potential as a nutritional substance. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Alex McPherson.

  4. Crystal growth in fused solvent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Noone, M. J.; Spear, K. E.; White, W. B.; Henry, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported on the growth of electronic ceramic single crystals from solution for the future growth of crystals in a microgravity environment. Work included growth from fused or glass solvents and aqueous solutions. Topics discussed include: crystal identification and selection; aqueous solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS); and characterization of TGS.

  5. Nucleation-trap crystallizer for growth of crystals from solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnal, A. K.; Saxena, A.; Ganesamoorthy, S.; Bhaumik, Indranil; Wadhawan, V. K.; Bhat, H. L.; Gupta, P. K.

    2006-12-01

    Stability of the solution against spurious nucleation plays a dominant role in the growth of crystals at high growth rates requiring high levels of supersaturation. If any spurious nucleation does occur during a growth run, it becomes practically impossible to grow a very large crystal. A novel nucleation-trap crystallizer has been developed and used for the growth of crystals from aqueous solution so as to trap any unwanted nuclei and the particles that appear and settle at the bottom of the crystallizer during the growth process. In this crystallizer, any particles and nuclei nucleating during the growth are forced into the nucleation trap (or well) and subsequently by manipulating the temperature of the well; the growth of the nuclei is arrested. DKDP and ammonium acid phthalate crystals were grown in the developed system. X-ray rocking curve measurements on DKDP and ammonium acid phthalate crystals yielded FWHM of 89.1 and 29.71 arcsec, respectively.

  6. Silicon crystal growth in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1982-01-01

    The most developed process for silicon crystal growth is the Czochralski (CZ) method which was in production for over two decades. In an effort to reduce cost of single crystal silicon for photovoltaic applications, a directional solidification technique, Heat Exchanger Method (HEM), was adapted. Materials used in HEM and CZ furnaces are quite similar (heaters, crucibles, insulation, etc.). To eliminate the cost of high purity argon, it was intended to use vacuum operation in HEM. Two of the major problems encountered in vacuum processing of silicon are crucible decomposition and silicon carbide formation in the melt.

  7. Modeling of Czochralski crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, P.A.; Dudukovic, M.P. . Chemical Reaction Engineering Lab.)

    1991-05-01

    The manufacture of high quality silicon crystals especially for power device applications requires the understanding and full quantification of the relationship between the process variables and the crystal properties. This cannot be achieved solely by experimental work and a systematic modeling study is needed. This document presents the results of such a study. A detailed finite element program was developed for the heat transfer in the crystal and the melt of the CZ process. A model was developed to predict the oxygen content of the CZ grown silicon as a function of the operating variables: crucible rotation rate, crystal rotation, crucible temperature and the heat flux to the melt. Preliminary work was also done to assess the effect of the magnetic field on the crystal oxygen content. A complete thermal stress a model was developed for the calculation of the resolved shear stresses in the crystal as a function of its growth history. Multivariable control theory was applied to CZ process and new control methods were suggested. 46 refs., 47 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Computational analyses of crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dakhoul, Youssef M.

    1987-01-01

    Two important aspects of Hg/Cd/Te crystal growth processes are discussed. First, the thermal field and second, the fluid movement in the melt zone. The thermal analysis includes numerical calculation of axisymmetric heat conduction within the sample. It also includes a three-dimensional radiation model to calculate the radiative heat exchange between the furnace and the crystal as determined by the complex geometry of the furnace and the adiabatic shield. The thermal analysis also includes a crystal conductivity which is dependent on temperature and composition. To tackle the fluid flow aspect of the problem, an attempt was made to use a newly developed incompressible flow code based on the slight compressibility, and hence the finite sound speed, of all real fluids.

  9. Growth and dielectric, mechanical, thermal and etching studies of an organic nonlinear optical L-arginine trifluoroacetate (LATF) single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Arjunan, S.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Mohan, R.; Jayavel, R.

    2008-08-04

    L-arginine trifluoroacetate, an organic nonlinear optical material, has been synthesized from aqueous solution. Bulk single crystal of dimension 57 mm x 5 mm x 3 mm has been grown by temperature lowering technique. Powder X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the monoclinic structure of the grown L-arginine trifluoroacetate crystal. Linear optical property of the grown crystal has been studied by UV-vis spectrum. Dielectric response of the L-arginine trifluoroacetate crystal was analysed for different frequencies and temperatures in detail. Microhardness study on the sample reveals that the crystal possesses relatively higher hardness compared to many organic crystals. Thermal analyses confirmed that the L-arginine trifluoroacetate material is thermally stable upto 212 deg. C. The etching studies have been performed to assess the perfection of the L-arginine trifluoroacetate crystal. Kurtz powder second harmonic generation test confirms the nonlinear optical properties of the as-grown L-arginine trifluoroacetate crystal.

  10. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    The solubility and growth of the protein canavalin, and the application of the schlieren technique to study fluid flow in protein crystal growth systems were investigated. These studies have resulted in the proposal of a model to describe protein crystal growth and the preliminary plans for a long-term space flight experiment. Canavalin, which may be crystallized from a basic solution by the addition of hydrogen (H+) ions, was shown to have normal solubility characteristics over the range of temperatures (5 to 25 C) and pH (5 to 7.5) studies. The solubility data combined with growth rate data gathered from the seeded growth of canavalin crystals indicated that the growth rate limiting step is a screw dislocation mechanism. A schlieren apparatus was constructed and flow patterns were observed in Rochelle salt (sodium potassium tartrate), lysozyme, and canavalin. The critical parameters were identified as the change in density with concentration (dp/dc) and the change in index of refraction with concentration (dn/dc). Some of these values were measured for the materials listed. The data for lyrozyme showed non-linearities in plots of optical properties and density vs. concentration. In conjunction with with W. A. Tiller, a model based on colloid stability theory was proposed to describe protein crystallization. The model was used to explain observations made by ourselves and others. The results of this research has lead to the development for a preliminary design for a long-term, low-g experiment. The proposed apparatus is univeral and capable of operation under microprocessor control.

  11. Synthesis, growth, structural, optical, thermal and mechanical properties of an organic Urea maleic acid single crystals for nonlinear optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinothkumar, P.; Kumar, R. Mohan; Jayavel, R.; Bhaskaran, A.

    2016-07-01

    A potential organic urea maleic acid (UMA) was synthesized and single crystals were grown at room temperature by slow evaporation and seed rotation methods. The grown crystal has been subjected to single crystal XRD analysis and found to have been crystallized in a noncentrosymmetric monoclinic crystal system with Cc as space group. The High resolution X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the specimen is free from structural grain boundaries. The transparency of the grown crystal was confirmed by optical absorption and transmittance spectra with lower cut-off wavelength of 285 nm. The microhardness test was carried out on different planes to study the load dependent hardness values. The dislocation density of the UMA crystal was estimated from the etching studies. The dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss of the grown crystal was carried out as a function of frequency for different temperatures along three crystallographic axes. Thermal properties of UMA crystals were studied by TG-DTA analysis and it is stable upto 112 °C. The laser induced surface damage threshold of the grown crystal was measured using Nd: YAG laser. The birefringence of the crystal measured in the visible region was found to vary with the wavelength. The particle size dependent SHG of the sample was measured with different input energies by Kurtz's powder method using Nd:YAG laser.

  12. Sealed silica pressure ampoules for crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of vitreous silica and the mechanics of thick walled pressure vessels are reviewed with regard to the construction of sealed silica crucibles such as are used in the growth of mercury-cadmium telluride crystals. Data from destructive rupture tests are reported, failure modes discussed, and recommendations for design given. Ordinary commercial clear vitreous silica from flame fused quartz can withstand a surface stress of 20 MPa or more in this application.

  13. Efg Crystal Growth Apparatus And Method

    SciTech Connect

    Mackintosh, Brian H.; Ouellette, Marc

    2003-05-13

    An improved mechanical arrangement controls the introduction of silicon particles into an EFG (Edge-defined Film-fed Growth) crucible/die unit for melt replenishment during a crystal growth run. A feeder unit injects silicon particles upwardly through a center hub of the crucible/die unit and the mechanical arrangement intercepts the injected particles and directs them so that they drop into the melt in a selected region of the crucible and at velocity which reduces splashing, whereby to reduce the likelihood of interruption of the growth process due to formation of a solid mass of silicon on the center hub and adjoining components. The invention also comprises use of a Faraday ring to alter the ratio of the electrical currents flowing through primary and secondary induction heating coils that heat the crucible die unit and the mechanical arrangement.

  14. Crystal growth and annealing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gianoulakis, Steven E.; Sparrow, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing crystals that minimizes birefringence even at large crystal sizes, and is suitable for production of CaF.sub.2 crystals. The method of the present invention comprises annealing a crystal by maintaining a minimal temperature gradient in the crystal while slowly reducing the bulk temperature of the crystal. An apparatus according to the present invention includes a thermal control system added to a crystal growth and annealing apparatus, wherein the thermal control system allows a temperature gradient during crystal growth but minimizes the temperature gradient during crystal annealing. An embodiment of the present invention comprises a secondary heater incorporated into a conventional crystal growth and annealing apparatus. The secondary heater supplies heat to minimize the temperature gradients in the crystal during the annealing process. The secondary heater can mount near the bottom of the crucible to effectively maintain appropriate temperature gradients.

  15. Protein crystal growth in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    Protein crystal growth is a major experimental problem and is the bottleneck in widespread applications of protein crystallography. Research efforts now being pursued and sponsored by NASA are making fundamental contributions to the understanding of the science of protein crystal growth. Microgravity environments offer the possibility of performing new types of experiments that may produce a better understanding of protein crystal growth processes and may permit growth environments that are more favorable for obtaining high quality protein crystals. A series of protein crystal growth experiments using the space shuttle was initiated. The first phase of these experiments was focused on the development of micro-methods for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques, using a space version of the hanging drop method. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  16. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research is to study the effect of low gravity on the growth of protein crystals and those parameters which will affect growth and crystal quality. The application of graphoepitaxy (artificial epitaxy) to proteins is detailed. The development of a method for the control of nucleation is discussed. The factor affecting the morphology of isocitrate lyase crystals is presented.

  17. Protein crystal growth; Proceedings of the First International Conference, Stanford University, CA, August 14-16, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, R. S. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Papers are presented on mechanisms of nucleation and growth of protein crystals, the role of purification in the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids, and the effect of chemical impurities in polyethylene glycol on macromolecular crystallization. Also considered are growth kinetics of tetragonal lysozyme crystals, thermodynamic and kinetic considerations for crystal growth of complex molecules from solution, protein single-crystal growth under microgravity, and growth of organic crystals in a microgravity environment. Papers are also presented on preliminary investigations of protein crystal growth using the Space Shuttle, convective diffusion in protein crystal growth, and the growth and characterization of membrane protein crystals.

  18. Method of Promoting Single Crystal Growth During Melt Growth of Semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The method of the invention promotes single crystal growth during fabrication of melt growth semiconductors. A growth ampoule and its tip have a semiconductor source material placed therein. The growth ampoule is placed in a first thermal environment that raises the temperature of the semiconductor source material to its liquidus temperature. The growth ampoule is then transitioned to a second thermal environment that causes the semiconductor source material in the growth ampoule's tip to attain a temperature that is below the semiconductor source material's solidus temperature. The growth ampoule so-transitioned is then mechanically perturbed to induce single crystal growth at the growth ampoule's tip.

  19. Calcium oxalate crystal growth in human urinary stones

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.M.; Johnson, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Calcium oxalate stones are very common and increasing. Crystal growth is no less important than the crystal nucleation in the pathogenesis of stone formation. The crystal growth was studied in human calcium oxalate stones by a combined electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The main mode of weddellite growth was interpenetration twinning of tetrahedral bipyramids. Bipyramids may form as initial crystal seeds, develop from anhedral crystals (crystals which lack flat symmetric faces) of spherular or mulberry shape, develop on the surface of preformed bipyramids by spiral dislocation mechanisms, or develop on whewellite crystal by heterogeneous nucleation and epitaxy. Heterogeneous nucleations of whewellite on weddellite, and calcium apatite on whewellite were also observed. Whewellite grew mainly by parallel twinning. Interpenetration twinning was exceptional. Transformation of anhedral to euhedral (completely bounded by flat faces that are set ar fixed angles to one another) whewellite occurred by parallel fissurations followed by brick wall like stacking of the crystals, while euhedral transformation of weddellite occurred by protrusion of bipyramids frm anhedral crystal surface. Occasionally, an evidence of crystal dissolution was noted. Although an aggregation of crystals is believed to play a pivotal role in stone nidus formation, growth in size of the formed crystals, and twinning and epitactic crystal intergrowth apparently play a significant role in the obstructive urinary stone formation.

  20. Hanging drop crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor); Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Bugg, Charles E. (Inventor); Suddath, Fred L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates generally to control systems for controlling crystal growth, and more particularly to such a system which uses a beam of light refracted by the fluid in which crystals are growing to detect concentration of solutes in the liquid. In a hanging drop apparatus, a laser beam is directed onto drop which refracts the laser light into primary and secondary bows, respectively, which in turn fall upon linear diode detector arrays. As concentration of solutes in drop increases due to solvent removal, these bows move farther apart on the arrays, with the relative separation being detected by arrays and used by a computer to adjust solvent vapor transport from the drop. A forward scattering detector is used to detect crystal nucleation in drop, and a humidity detector is used, in one embodiment, to detect relative humidity in the enclosure wherein drop is suspended. The novelty of this invention lies in utilizing angular variance of light refracted from drop to infer, by a computer algorithm, concentration of solutes therein. Additional novelty is believed to lie in using a forward scattering detector to detect nucleating crystallites in drop.

  1. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    1992-07-21

    A method is disclosed for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B[sub x]O[sub y] are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T[sub m1] of the oxide of boron (T[sub m1]=723 K for boron oxide B[sub 2]O[sub 3]), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T[sub m2] of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm[sup 2]. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 [mu]m. 7 figs.

  2. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    1992-01-01

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B.sub.x O.sub.y are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T.sub.m1 of the oxide of boron (T.sub.m1 =723.degree. K. for boron oxide B.sub.2 O.sub.3), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T.sub.m2 of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm.sup.2. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 .mu.m.

  3. Reversed Crystal Growth of RHO Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework (ZIF).

    PubMed

    Self, Katherine; Telfer, Michael; Greer, Heather F; Zhou, Wuzong

    2015-12-21

    RHO zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF), Zn1.33 (O.OH)0.33 (nim)1.167 (pur), crystals with a rhombic dodecahedral morphology were synthesized by a solvothermal process. The growth of the crystals was studied over time using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses, and a reversed crystal growth mechanism was revealed. Initially, precursor materials joined together to form disordered aggregates, which then underwent surface recrystallization forming a core-shell structure, in which a disordered core is encased in a layer of denser, less porous crystal. When the growth continued, the shell became less and less porous, until it was a layer of true single crystal. The crystallization then extended from the surface to the core over a six-week period until, eventually, true single crystals were formed. PMID:26577835

  4. Reversed Crystal Growth of RHO Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework (ZIF)

    PubMed Central

    Self, Katherine; Telfer, Michael; Greer, Heather F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract RHO zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF), Zn1.33(O.OH)0.33(nim)1.167(pur), crystals with a rhombic dodecahedral morphology were synthesized by a solvothermal process. The growth of the crystals was studied over time using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X‐ray diffraction (PXRD) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses, and a reversed crystal growth mechanism was revealed. Initially, precursor materials joined together to form disordered aggregates, which then underwent surface recrystallization forming a core–shell structure, in which a disordered core is encased in a layer of denser, less porous crystal. When the growth continued, the shell became less and less porous, until it was a layer of true single crystal. The crystallization then extended from the surface to the core over a six‐week period until, eventually, true single crystals were formed. PMID:26577835

  5. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of low gravity on the growth of protein crystals and those parameters which will affect growth and crystal quality was studied. The proper design of the flight hardware and experimental protocols are highly dependent on understanding the factors which influence the nucleation and growth of crystals of biological macromolecules. Thus, those factors are investigated and the body of knowledge which has been built up for small molecule crystallization. These data also provide a basis of comparison for the results obtained from low-g experiments. The flows around growing crystals are detailed. The preliminary study of the growth of isocitrate lyase, the crystal morphologies found and the preliminary x ray results are discussed. The design of two apparatus for protein crystal growth by temperature control are presented along with preliminary results.

  6. Physical phenomena related to crystal growth in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism of crystal growth which may be affected by the space environment was studied. Conclusions as to the relative technical and scientific advantages of crystal growth in space over earth bound growth, without regard to economic advantage, were deduced. It was concluded that the crucibleless technique will most directly demonstrate the unique effects of the greatly reduced gravity in the space environment. Several experiments, including crucibleless crystal growth using solar energy and determination of diffusion coefficients of common dopants in liquid silicon were recommended.

  7. Analytics of crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Chang, C. E.; Shlichta, P. J.; Chen, P. S.; Kim, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    Two crystal growth processes considered for spacelab experiments were studied to anticipate and understand phenomena not ordinarily encountered on earth. Computer calculations were performed on transport processes in floating zone melting and on growth of a crystal from solution in a spacecraft environment. Experiments intended to simulate solution growth at micro accelerations were performed.

  8. Compact spaceflight solution crystal-growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.; Lal, Ravindra; Vikram, Chandra; Witherow, William

    1991-01-01

    A versatile, miniaturized, stand alone, crystal solution growth chamber design is presented which is based on fiber optics, diode lasers, and holographic optical elements in conjunction with knowledge gained from previous Spacelab work. Diagnostics instrumentation is based on a crystal growth monitor, a growth/dissolution monitor with feedback, solution diagnostics, multiple wavelength holography, and single wavelength or color Schlieren with video recording.

  9. Modelling the growth of feather crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, H.J.; Hunt, J.D.; Evans, P.V.

    1997-02-01

    An existing numerical model of dendritic growth has been adapted to model the growth of twinned columnar dendrites (feather crystals) in a binary aluminium alloy, Examination of the effect of dendrite tip angle on growth has led to an hypothesis regarding the stability of a pointed tip morphology in these crystals.

  10. Unidirectional growth of L-asparagine monohydrate single crystal: First time observation of NLO nature and other studies of crystalline perfection, optical, mechanical and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, Mohd.; Riscob, B.; Maurya, K. K.; Ganesh, V.; Wahab, M. A.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2010-10-01

    L-asparagine monohydrate (LAM), a new amino acid single crystal, was grown by slow evaporation solution technique (SEST) as well as by recently invented Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method in aqueous medium. Using SR method, LAM single crystal of diameter ˜18 mm and length ˜52 mm was grown for the first time. The growth conditions were optimized and the maximum growth rate of 1.0 mm per day was observed for the SR crystal. The crystal structure was confirmed by powder XRD. The crystalline perfection was assessed by high resolution XRD and etching studies and found that the quality of the SR crystal is better than the SEST crystal. The UV-vis-NIR spectroscopic study revealed that the SR crystal has good optical transparency than that of SEST crystal. The relative second harmonic generation efficiency was measured and found to be ˜0.35 times to that of KDP. The laser damage threshold (LDT) was measured and found that the SR crystal has higher LDT value (5.76 GW cm -2) than SEST crystal (4.75 GW cm -2). The Vickers's microhardness and dielectric studies were also carried out and discussed.

  11. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Horse Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Horse Serum Albumin crystals grown during the USML-1 (STS-50) mission's Protein Crystal Growth Glovebox Experiment. These crystals were grown using a vapor diffusion technique at 22 degrees C. The crystals were allowed to grow for nine days while in orbit. Crystals of 1.0 mm in length were produced. The most abundant blood serum protein, regulates blood pressure and transports ions, metabolites, and therapeutic drugs. Principal Investigator was Edward Meehan.

  12. The growth and dissolution of ammonium perchlorate crystals in a fluidized bed crystallizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanrikulu, S. Ü.; Eroğlu, I.; Bulutcu, A. N.; Özkar, S.

    1998-11-01

    The growth and the dissolution of ammonium perchlorate crystals were studied in pure and in sodium chloride containing aqueous solutions, in a fluidized bed crystallizer. The presence of sodium chloride in the solution reduced the growth and the dissolution rates of ammonium perchlorate crystals. The growth rates were interpreted in terms of supersaturation levels. The orders and rate constants were reported. The effectiveness factors were estimated from the growth rate data to evaluate the relative magnitude of the two resistances in series, diffusion and integration. The controlling mechanism is mainly by diffusion for the crystal growth of ammonium perchlorate in pure aqueous solution. However, both diffusion and integration steps affect the growth of ammonium perchlorate crystals in the presence of sodium chloride in solution.

  13. Optical Diagnostics of Solution Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yongkee; Reddy, B. R.; George, T. G.; Lal, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    Non-contact optical techniques such as, optical heterodyne, ellipsometry and interferometry, for real time in-situ monitoring of solution crystal growth are demonstrated. Optical heterodyne technique has the capability of measuring the growth rate as small as 1A/sec. In a typical Michelson interferometer set up, the crystal is illuminated by a Zeeman laser with frequency omega(sub 1) and the reference beam with frequency omega(sub 2). As the crystal grows, the phase of the rf signal changes with respect to the reference beam and this phase change is related to the crystal growth rate. This technique is demonstrated with two examples: (1) by measuring the copper tip expansion/shrinkage rate and (2) by measuring the crystal growth rate of L-Arginine Phosphate (LAP). The first test shows that the expansion/shrinkage rate of copper tip was fast in the beginning, and gets slower as the expansion begins to stabilize with time. In crystal growth, the phase change due the crystal growth is measured using a phase meter and a strip chart recorder. Our experimental results indicate a varied growth rate from 69.4 to 92.6A per sec. The ellipsometer is used to study the crystal growth interface. From these measurements and a theoretical modeling of the interface, the various optical parameters can be deduced. Interferometry can also be used to measure the growth rate and concentration gradient in the vicinity of the crystal.

  14. Advanced protein crystal growth programmatic sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the costs of various APCG (Advanced Protein Crystal Growth) program options and to determine the parameters which, if changed, impact the costs and goals of the programs and to what extent. This was accomplished by developing and evaluating several alternate programmatic scenarios for the microgravity Advanced Protein Crystal Growth program transitioning from the present shuttle activity to the man tended Space Station to the permanently manned Space Station. These scenarios include selected variations in such sensitivity parameters as development and operational costs, schedules, technology issues, and crystal growth methods. This final report provides information that will aid in planning the Advanced Protein Crystal Growth Program.

  15. A study of the growth rates and growth habits of ice crystals in a solution of antifreeze (glyco) proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qianzhong; Luo, Liaofu

    1996-12-01

    The mechanism of the antifreeze glycoprotein/antifreeze protein interaction on the surface of ice is analyzed. The theory of ice crystal growth in an AF(G)P solution is presented. A quantitative calculation of the growth rates for gain growth has been obtained. The anisotropic growth habits and growth rates of ice crystals in an AF(G)P solution are explained.

  16. Zinc Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, B. P.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Lilleleht, Lembit U.

    2003-06-01

    We report one of the first direct measurements of the efficiency of vapor-to-crystalline-solid growth in a microgravity environment aboard NASA's Reduced Gravity Research Facility. Zinc vapor is produced from a heater in a vacuum chamber containing argon gas. Vapor-phase nucleation is induced by cooling as the vapor expands away from the heat source, and its onset is easily detected visually by the appearance of a cloud of solid, crystalline zinc particles. The size distribution of these particles is monitored in situ by photon correlation spectroscopy. Samples were also extracted from the vapor for later analysis by scanning electron microscopy. The initial, rapid increase in the particle size distribution as a function of time is used to calculate the sticking efficiency for zinc atoms at growing crystal sites. Only a few of every 105 zinc atoms that collide with the grain surfaces are incorporated into the growing crystals. If the large (>10 μm) graphite or SiC grains extracted from meteorites grow with comparable efficiency, then such materials could not have formed on timescales compatible with circumstellar outflows. However, these grains could have formed in equilibrium in stellar atmospheres prior to the initiation of the outflow.

  17. Investigation of crystal growth from solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyagawa, I.

    1975-01-01

    Growth of organic compounds from solution, in particular Rochelle salt and triglycine sulphate, was investigated. Ground-based experiments showed that gravity-driven convection currents in the growth solution influenced defect production in crystals, degraded ferroelectric quality, and indicated that an experiment done in a zero-gravity environment would be beneficial. A crystal of Rochelle salt was grown on board Skylab-4. The quality of this crystal was compared to earth-grown crystals and its unusual features were studied. A typical defect produced in this convection-free environment was a long straight tube extending in the direction of the c crystal axis. These tubes were much longer and more regularly arranged than in similar earth-grown crystals. The crystal was actually several crystals with corresponding axes parallel to each other. Ferroelectric hysteresis experiments showed that some parts of the crystal had many defects, while other parts were of extremely good quality.

  18. CuBi{sub 2}O{sub 4} single crystal nanorods prepared by hydrothermal method: Growth mechanism and optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulkarem, A.M.; Li, Jialin; Aref, A.A.; Ren, Lu; Elssfah, E.M.; Wang, Hui; Ge, Yunke; Yu, Ying

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} CuBi{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanorods with single crystal structure by hydrothermal method are firstly synthesized. {yields} They are evolved from particles with oriented attachment-dissolution-splitting process. {yields} The optical properties of the samples are explored. -- Abstract: The synthesis of copper bismuth oxide (CuBi{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanorods with single crystal structure by hydrothermal method is first reported here. The prepared CuBi{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanorods are characterized by X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM. It is found that the concentration of reagent cupric acetate has strong effect on the purity and microstructure of the prepared samples. The growth process is investigated in detail. It is proposed that the nanorods are evolved from spherical particles with oriented attachment mechanism followed by dissolution-splitting process. The optical properties of the samples are detected by UV-vis spectrometer and photoluminescence spectrometer and exhibit strong dependence on surface defect states and microstructure feature, which is mainly determined by preparation conditions.

  19. Crystallization with oils: a new dimension in macromolecular crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayen, Naomi E.

    1999-01-01

    The crystal growth of biological macromolecules is a complicated process involving numerous parameters. This paper presents an approach which employs the use of oil as a major aid to crystal growth, and which has opened up a new dimension in the field of macromolecular crystallization. The presence of oil is a parameter which can contribute to the accuracy, the cleanliness and to the increase in the reproducibility of the experiments. Furthermore, the oil has a role in the protection of the trials during the course of their duration and in maintaining the stability of the resulting crystals. The use of oil also applies to the crystallization of membrane proteins. The results of a wide range of experiments which exploit the presence of oil to abet macromolecular crystal growth using both vapour diffusion and microbatch are presented.

  20. Innovation in crystal growth: A personal perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, J. B.

    2008-04-01

    The evolution of crystal growth has been crucially dependent on revolutionary innovations and initiatives involving ideas, technology and communication. A personal perspective is presented on some of these aspects in connection with the early history of semiconductors that have helped evolve our knowledge and advance the science and technology of crystal growth. The presentation considers examples from work on germanium, silicon, indium antimonide, gallium arsenide, indium phosphide, gallium phosphide and mercury cadmium telluride. In connection with metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), the influence of adduct purification for alkyls is noted together with the growth of Hg xCd 1-xTe. The role of crystal growth organisations together with initiatives in the publication of the Journal of Crystal Growth (JCG) and the pivotal role of the International Organisation of Crystal Growth (IOCG) are also highlighted in the quest for scientific excellence.

  1. Growth of triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals by solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.; Kroes, R. L.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    The growth of crystals from solution is greatly influenced by buoyancy driven convection. In a low-g environment, convection is greatly suppressed and diffusion becomes the predominant mechanism for thermal and mass transport. An experiment to grow TGS crystals by solution technique during the orbital Spacelab III mission has been designed. Crystals are grown by a new and unique technique of extracting heat from the crystal through a sting. The cooling at the sting tip is responsible for the desired supersaturation near the growing crystal. Calculations indicate that the cooled sting technique for solution crystal growth is necessary in low-g to maintain a maximum growth rate of 1 mm/day. Results of groundbased work in support of the flight experiment are discussed.

  2. Development of crystal supporting system for diameter of 400 mm silicon crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, T.; Machida, N.; Takase, N.; Takano, K.; Matsubara, J.; Shiraishi, Y.; Kuramoto, M.; Yamagishi, H.

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this project is the development of a crystal supporting system (CSS) for silicon crystals with large diameters of 400 mm. Amongst the many technical problems the one that the Super Silicon Crystal Research Institute Corp. (SSi) has directed its energies is to support a weight in excess of the ability of the Dash neck to support this weight. After considering various solutions, we developed a CSS that mechanically supports the silicon subsidiary cone formed between the Dash neck and crystal shoulder. Using this method, an approximately 400 kg ingot was successfully grown from 500 kg of molten silicon in a 36-in. quartz crucible. We confirmed that the CSS mechanism worked correctly through the entire crystal growth process. This paper presents some of the anticipated problems in the mechanical supporting method and the corresponding solutions. Finally, results from real crystal growth to test and verify machine operation are reported.

  3. Mechanics of Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Morrison, Barclay; Holmes, Jeffrey W.; Hung, Clark T.

    2012-01-01

    Cell growth describes an essential feature of biological tissues. This growth process may be modeled by using a set of relatively simple governing equations based on the axioms of mass and momentum balance, and using a continuum framework that describes cells and tissues as mixtures of a solid matrix, a solvent and multiple solutes. In this model the mechanics of cell growth is driven by osmotic effects, regulated by the cells’ active uptake of solutes and passive uptake of solvent. By accounting for the anisotropy of the cells’ cytoskeletal structures or extracellular matrix, as well as external constraints, a wide variety of growing shapes may be produced as illustrated in various examples. PMID:22904576

  4. Economic analysis of crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Chung, A. M.; Yan, C. S.; Mccreight, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    Many advanced electronic technologies and devices for the 1980's are based on sophisticated compound single crystals, i.e. ceramic oxides and compound semiconductors. Space processing of these electronic crystals with maximum perfection, purity, and size is suggested. No ecomonic or technical justification was found for the growth of silicon single crystals for solid state electronic devices in space.

  5. Nucleation and Convection Effects in Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilow, Peter G.

    1998-01-01

    Our work under this grant has significantly contributed to the goals of the NASA supported protein crystallization program. We have achieved the main objectives of the proposed work, as outlined in the original proposal: (1) We have provided important insight into protein nucleation and crystal growth mechanisms to facilitate a rational approach to protein crystallization; (2) We have delineated the factors that currently limit the x-ray diffraction resolution of protein crystals, and their correlation to crystallization conditions; (3) We have developed novel technologies to study and monitor protein crystal nucleation and growth processes, in order to increase the reproducibility and yield of protein crystallization. We have published 17 papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals and books and made more than 15 invited and 9 contributed presentations of our results at international and national scientific meetings.

  6. Faceting transitions in crystal growth and heteroepitaxial growth in the anisotropic phase-field crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Chen, Zheng; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Du, Xiu-Juan

    2012-11-01

    We modify the anisotropic phase-field crystal model (APFC), and present a semi-implicit spectral method to numerically solve the dynamic equation of the APFC model. The process results in the acceleration of computations by orders of magnitude relative to the conventional explicit finite-difference scheme, thereby, allowing us to work on a large system and for a long time. The faceting transitions introduced by the increasing anisotropy in crystal growth are then discussed. In particular, we investigate the morphological evolution in heteroepitaxial growth of our model. A new formation mechanism of misfit dislocations caused by vacancy trapping is found. The regular array of misfit dislocations produces a small-angle grain boundary under the right conditions, and it could significantly change the growth orientation of epitaxial layers.

  7. Nb:BST: Crystal growth and ferroelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varatharajan, R.; Madeswaran, S.; Jayavel, R.

    2001-05-01

    Nb substituted barium strontium titanate single crystals were grown by the high-temperature solution growth technique with different Nb concentrations. The growth conditions were optimized to grow good quality large sized single crystals. Nb doping reduced the twin formation considerably and yielded bulk single crystals. A surface morphology observation indicates layer and hopper growth mechanisms. Powder X-ray diffraction studies show an increase in c/a ratio with Nb content, and ferroelectric studies revealed a decrease in curie temperature and a sharp increase in dielectric constant and spontaneous polarization.

  8. Optical diagnostics of solution crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yongkee; Reddy, B. R.; George, Tharayil G.; Lal, Ravindra B.

    1995-01-01

    Solution crystal growth monitoring of LAP/TGS crystals by various optical diagnostics systems, such as conventional and Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) interferometers, optical heterodyne technique, and ellipsometry, is under development. The study of the dynamics of the crystal growth process requires a detailed knowledge of crystal growth rate and the concentration gradient near growing crystals in aqueous solution. Crystal growth rate can be measured using conventional interferometry. Laser beam reflections from the crystal front as well as the back surface interfere with each other, and the fringe shift due to the growing crystal yields information about the growth rate. Our preliminary results indicate a growth rate of 6 A/sec for LAP crystals grown from solution. Single wavelength M-Z interferometry is in use to calculate the concentration gradient near the crystal. Preliminary investigation is in progress using an M-Z interferometer with 2 cm beam diameter to cover the front region of the growing crystal. In the optical heterodyne technique, phase difference between two rf signals (250 KHZ) is measured of which one is a reference signal, and the other growth signal, whose phase changes due to a change in path length as the material grows. From the phase difference the growth rate can also be calculated. Our preliminary results indicate a growth rate of 1.5 A/sec. the seed and solution temperatures were 26.46 C and 27.92 C respectively, and the solution was saturated at 29.0 C. an ellipsometer to measure the growth rate and interface layer is on order from JOBIN YVON, France. All these systems are arranged in such a manner that measurements can be made either sequentially or simultaneously. These techniques will be adapted for flight experiment.

  9. Convective instability in protein crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, D.; de Wit, A.

    2004-08-01

    The conditions for the onset of convection during protein crystalization from a solution are studied theoretically on the basis of diffusion-convection evolution equations for the concentrations coupled to the Navier-Stokes equation describing the flow velocity. We consider that the density of the solution depends on the concentration of two species, namely, a protein and a precipitating agent, a salt. While the protein is crystallized at the crystal/solution interface, the salt is rejected, and these mechanisms are described by means of boundary conditions for the interface. We find the base profiles for both protein and salt concentrations and perform a linear stability analysis of this basic state with regard to buoyancy induced perturbations. This gives information on the critical diameter of capillaries above which convection may be observed, as well as on the influence of the speed of growth V of the crystal interface on the stability of the system. Numerical integration of the model shows good agreement with the predictions of the linear stability analysis.

  10. Alternative growth mechanisms in the natural diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Gafitullina, D.S.; Ashurov, M.Kh.; Oksengendler, B.L.

    1995-12-31

    On the base of autoradiography method including digital treatment it was investigated the impurity distribution in natural diamonds. It was established the alternation of zonal and fibruilar distribution of several impurities. This phenomenon treatment may be realized on the base of combaing of Cahn-Routburd-Shklowskii growth theory with Prigogine` like synergetic idea. According to the type of crystallization mechanisms depends on relation between crystallization moviting force and value of combaine parameter, depending of boundary wide A lot of regimes of crystallization including the alternation of normal and tangential mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Diffusion, Viscosity and Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myerson, Allan S.

    1996-01-01

    The diffusivity of TriGlycine Sulfate (TGS), Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP), Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADF) and other compounds of interest to microgravity crystal growth, in supersaturated solutions as a function of solution concentration, 'age' and 'history was studied experimentally. The factors that affect the growth of crystals from water solutions in microgravity have been examined. Three non-linear optical materials have been studied, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and triglycine sulfate (TGC). The diffusion coefficient and viscosity of supersaturated water solutions were measured. Also theoretical model of diffusivity and viscosity in a metastable state, model of crystal growth from solution including non-linear time dependent diffusivity and viscosity effect and computer simulation of the crystal growth process which allows simulation of the microgravity crystal growth were developed.

  12. Laser Irradiated Growth of Protein Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Hosokawa, Youichiroh; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Yoshimura, Masashi; Tsunaka, Yasuo; Morikawa, Masaaki; Kanaya, Shigenori; Masuhara, Hiroshi; Kai, Yasushi; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2003-07-01

    We succeeded in the first ever generation of protein crystals by laser irradiation. We call this process Laser Irradiated Growth Technique (LIGHT). Effective crystallization was confirmed by applying an intense femtosecond laser. The crystallization period was dramatically shortened by LIGHT. In addition, protein crystals were obtained by LIGHT from normally uncrystallized conditions. These results indicate that intense femtosecond laser irradiation generates crystal nuclei; protein crystals can then be grown from the nuclei that act as seeds in a supersaturated solution. The nuclei formation is possible primarily due to nonlinear nucleation processes of an intense femtosecond laser with a peak intensity of over a gigawatt (GW).

  13. Determination of induction period and crystal growth mechanism of dexamethasone sodium phosphate in methanol-acetone system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Hongxun; Wang, Jingkang; Wang, Yongli

    2005-02-01

    The induction period of dexamethasone sodium phosphate at different supersaturation was experimentally determined in a methanol-acetone system. The laser monitoring observation technique was used to determine the appearance of the first nucleus in solution. The effect of solution composition on induction period was discussed. Based on classical homogeneous nucleation theory, the solid-liquid interfacial tension and surface entropy factor were calculated from the induction period data. The experimentally determined values of interfacial tension are in agreement with the theoretical values predicted by the Mersmann equation. It was found that the nucleus of dexamethasone sodium phosphate grows continuously in pure methanol and turns from continuous growth to birth and spread growth with increasing acetone content in a methanol-acetone mixture.

  14. Salt-induced aggregation of lysozyme: Implications for crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lori J.

    1994-01-01

    Crystallization of proteins is a prerequisite for structural analysis by x-ray crystallography. While improvements in protein crystals have been obtained in microgravity onboard the U.S. Space Shuttle, attempts to improve the crystal growth process both on the ground and in space have been limited by our lack of understanding of the mechanisms involved. Almost all proteins are crystallized with the aid of a precipitating agent. Many of the common precipitating agents are inorganic salts. An understanding of the role of salts on the aggregation of protein monomers is the key to the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in protein crystallization. In order for crystallization to occur individual molecules must self-associate into aggregates. Detection and characterization of aggregates in supersaturated protein solutions is the first step in understanding salt-induced crystallization.

  15. Salt-induced aggregation of lysozyme: Implications for crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Lori J.

    1994-10-01

    Crystallization of proteins is a prerequisite for structural analysis by x-ray crystallography. While improvements in protein crystals have been obtained in microgravity onboard the U.S. Space Shuttle, attempts to improve the crystal growth process both on the ground and in space have been limited by our lack of understanding of the mechanisms involved. Almost all proteins are crystallized with the aid of a precipitating agent. Many of the common precipitating agents are inorganic salts. An understanding of the role of salts on the aggregation of protein monomers is the key to the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in protein crystallization. In order for crystallization to occur individual molecules must self-associate into aggregates. Detection and characterization of aggregates in supersaturated protein solutions is the first step in understanding salt-induced crystallization.

  16. Thermal crystallization mechanism of silk fibroin protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao

    stage before crystallization. (3) The beta-sheet crystallization kinetics in silk fibroin protein were measured using X-ray, FTIR and heat flow, and the structure reveals the formation mechanism of the silk crystal network. Avrami kinetics theories, which were established for studies of synthetic polymer crystal growth, were for the first time extended to investigate protein self-assembly in multiblock silk fibroin samples. The Avrami exponent, n, was close to two for all methods, indicating formation of beta sheet crystals in silk proteins is different from the 3-D spherulitic crystal growth found in most synthetic homopolymers. A microphase separation pattern after chymotrypsin enzyme biodegradation was shown in the protein structures using scanning electron microscopy. A model was then used to explain the crystallization of silk fibroin protein by analogy to block copolymers. (4) The effects of metal ions during the crystallization of silk fibroin was investigated using thermal analysis. Advanced thermal analysis methods were used to analyze the thermal protein-metallic ion interactions in silk fibroin proteins. Results show that K+ and Ca2+ metallic salts play different roles in silk fibroin proteins, which either reduce (K+) or increase (Ca2+ ) the glass transition (Tg) of pure silk protein and affect the thermal stability of this structure.

  17. Transport and Growth Kinetics in Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otalora, F.; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.; Carotenuto, L.; Castagnolo, D.; Novella, M. L.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic coupling between mass transport and incorporation of growth units into the surface of a crystal growing from solution in microgravity is used to derive quantitative information on the crystal growth kinetics. To this end, new procedures for experiment preparation, interferometric data processing and model fitting have been developed. The use of experimental data from the bulk diffusive maw transport together with a model for steady state stagnant crystal growth allows the detailed quantitative understanding of the kinetics of both the concentration depletion zone around the crystal and the growth of the crystal interface. The protein crystal used in the experiment is shown to be growing in the mixed kinetic regime (0.2 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second less than beta R/D less than 0.9 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second).

  18. Microscopic kinetic model for polymer crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenbing

    2011-03-01

    Linear crystal growth rates characterize the net result of competition between growth and melting at the liquid-solid interfaces. The rate equation for polymer crystal growth can be derived with a barrier term for crystal growth and with a driving force term of excess lamellar thickness, provided that growth and melting share the same rate-determining steps at the growth front. Such an ansatz can be verified by the kinetic symmetry between growth and melting around the melting point of lamellar crystals, as made in our recent dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. The profile of the growth/melting front appears as wedge-shaped, with the free energy barrier for intramolecular secondary crystal nucleation at its top, and with the driving force gained via instant thickening at its bottom. Such a scenario explains unique phenomena on polymer crystal growth, such as chain folding, regime transitions, molecular segregation of polydisperse polymers, self-poisoning with integer-number chain-folding of short chains, and colligative growth rates of binary mixtures of two chain lengths. Financial support from NNSFC No. 20825415 and NBRPC No. 2011CB606100 is acknowledged.

  19. Materials discovery through crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of new materials and associated desirable properties has been a driving force behind chemical innovation for centuries. When we look at some of the many recent technological advances, and how widespread and significant their impact has been, we appreciate how much they have relied on new materials. The increase in hard drive storage capacity due to new giant magneto-resistive materials, the ever-shrinking cell phone due to improved microwave dielectric materials, the enhancement in lithium battery storage capacity due to new intercalation materials, or the improved capacitor due to new ferroelectric materials are all excellent examples. How were these materials discovered? While there is no single answer, in all cases there was a First-Material, the archetype in which the phenomenon was first observed, the one that led to further investigations and the subsequent preparation of improved 2nd or 3rd generation materials. It is this First-Material, the archetype, that was discovered - often via crystal growth.

  20. Analysis of Monomer Aggregation and Crystal Growth Rates of Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadarajah, Arunan

    1996-01-01

    This project was originally conceived to analyze the extensive data of tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth rates collected at NASA/MSFC by Dr. Marc L. Pusey's research group. At that time the lack of analysis of the growth rates was hindering progress in understanding the growth mechanism of tetragonal lysozyme and other protein crystals. After the project was initiated our initial analysis revealed unexpected complexities in the growth rate behavior. This resulted in an expansion in the scope of the project to include a comprehensive investigation of the growth mechanisms of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. A discussion of this research is included as well a list of presentations and publications resulting from the research. This project contributed significantly toward the education of several students and fostered extensive collaborations between investigators.

  1. Protein-crystal growth experiment (planned)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, S.; Asano, K.; Hashitani, T.; Kitakohji, T.; Nemoto, H.; Kitamura, S.

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a microgravity environment on protein crystal growth, a system was developed using 5 cubic feet Get Away Special payload canister. In the experiment, protein (myoglobin) will be simultaneously crystallized from an aqueous solution in 16 crystallization units using three types of crystallization methods, i.e., batch, vapor diffusion, and free interface diffusion. Each unit has two compartments: one for the protein solution and the other for the ammonium sulfate solution. Compartments are separated by thick acrylic or thin stainless steel plates. Crystallization will be started by sliding out the plates, then will be periodically recorded up to 120 hours by a still camera. The temperature will be passively controlled by a phase transition thermal storage component and recorded in IC memory throughout the experiment. Microgravity environment can then be evaluated for protein crystal growth by comparing crystallization in space with that on Earth.

  2. Crack propagation driven by crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    A. Royne; Paul Meaking; A. Malthe-Sorenssen; B. Jamtveit; D. K. Dysthe

    2011-10-01

    Crystals that grow in confinement may exert a force on their surroundings and thereby drive crack propagation in rocks and other materials. We describe a model of crystal growth in an idealized crack geometry in which the crystal growth and crack propagation are coupled through the stress in the surrounding bulk solid. Subcritical crack propagation takes place during a transient period, which may be very long, during which the crack velocity is limited by the kinetics of crack propagation. When the crack is sufficiently large, the crack velocity becomes limited by the kinetics of crystal growth. The duration of the subcritical regime is determined by two non-dimensional parameters, which relate the kinetics of crack propagation and crystal growth to the supersaturation of the fluid and the elastic properties of the surrounding material.

  3. Crystal growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. P.; Gaur, S. S.; Sheehan, M. E.; Nancollas, G. H.

    1988-02-01

    The kinetics of crystal growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate has been investigated up to very large extents of growth over a range of supersaturations maintained using the Constant Composition technique. It is suggested that the initial rapid growth of aged seed crystals resulting in marked lattice perfection, reduces the density of growth sites on the crystal surfaces. A method for the preparation of perfected crystallites of calcium oxalate monohydrate through pregrowth of aged crystals has been developed. At large extents of growth with respect to initial seed crystals ( > 200% for aged crystals and 30-60% for pregrown crystals), the rates of crystallization at constant supersaturation undergo marked increases accompanying the formulation of secondary nuclei. These nucleation thresholds depend both upon supersaturation and upon the initial specific surface area of the crystallites and may be important factors in the formation of calcium oxalate stones in vivo. Experiments in whole urine suggest that the kinetics of growth, secondary nucleation, aggregation and cementation of particles may be important factors in kidney stone formation.

  4. Mechanisms for the Crystallization of ZBLAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Tucker, Dennis S.; Kaukler, William; Antar, Basil

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this ground based study is to test the hypothesis that shear thinning (the non-Newtonian response of viscosity to shear rate) is a viable mechanism to explain the observation of enhanced glass formation in numerous low-g experiments. In 1-g, fluid motion results from buoyancy forces and surface tension driven convection. This fluid flow will introduce shear in undercooled liquids in 1-g. In low-g it is known that fluid flows are greatly reduced so that the shear rate in fluids can be extremely low. It is believed that some fluids may have weak structure in the absence of flow. Very small shear rates could cause this structure to collapse in response to shear resulting in a lowering of the viscosity of the fluid. The hypothesis of this research is that: Shear thinning in undercooled liquids decreases the viscosity, increasing the rate of nucleation and crystallization of glass forming melts. Shear in the melt can be reduced in low-g, thus enhancing undercooling and glass formation. The viscosity of a model glass (lithium di-silicate, L2S) often used for crystallization studies has been measured at very low shear rates using a dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer. Our results are consistent with increasing viscosity with a lowering of shear rates. The viscosity of L2S may vary as much as an order of magnitude depending on the shear rate in the temperature region of maximum nucleation and crystal growth. Classical equations for nucleation and crystal growth rates, are inversely related to the viscosity and viscosity to the third power respectively. An order of magnitude variation in viscosity (with shear) at a given temperature would have dramatic effects on glass crystallization Crystallization studies with the heavy metal fluoride glass ZBLAN (ZrF2-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF) to examine the effect of shear on crystallization are being initiated. Samples are to be melted and quenched under quiescent conditions at different shear rates to determine the effect

  5. Growth and characterization of ammonium acid phthalate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, A.; Ramasamy, P.

    2013-04-01

    Ammonium acid phthalate (AAP) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The unit cell parameters were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and it belongs to orthorhombic system with the space group of Pcab. The high resolution X-ray diffraction studies revealed the crystalline perfection of the grown crystal. The various functional groups of AAP were identified by FT-IR and Raman spectral analyses. Thermal stability of the grown crystals was studied by TGA/DTA. The optical properties of the grown crystals were analyzed by UV-Vis-NIR and photoluminescence spectral studies. The mechanical property of the grown crystal was studied by Vickers microhardness measurement. The growth features of AAP were analyzed by chemical etching.

  6. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth on STS-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Mission Specialist George (Pinky) D. Nelson uses a 35 mm camera to photograph a protein crystal grown during the STS-26 Protein Crystal Growth (PCG-II-01) experiment. The protein crystal growth (PCG) carrier is shown deployed from the PCG Refrigerator/Incubator Mocule (R/IM) located in the middeck forward locker. The R/IM contained three Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDS) trays (one of which is shown). A total of sixty protein crystal samples were processed during the STS-26 mission.

  7. The Nucleation and Growth of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Obtaining crystals of suitable size and high quality continues to be a major bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. Currently, structural genomics efforts are achieving on average about a 10% success rate in going from purified protein to a deposited crystal structure. Growth of crystals in microgravity was proposed as a means of overcoming size and quality problems, which subsequently led to a major NASA effort in microgravity crystal growth, with the agency also funding research into understanding the process. Studies of the macromolecule crystal nucleation and growth process were carried out in a number of labs in an effort to understand what affected the resultant crystal quality on Earth, and how microgravity improved the process. Based upon experimental evidence, as well as simple starting assumptions, we have proposed that crystal nucleation occurs by a series of discrete self assembly steps, which 'set' the underlying crystal symmetry. This talk will review the model developed, and its origins, in our laboratory for how crystals nucleate and grow, and will then present, along with preliminary data, how we propose to use this model to improve the success rate for obtaining crystals from a given protein.

  8. On growth rate hysteresis and catastrophic crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Cecília; Rocha, Fernando A.; Damas, Ana M.; Martins, Pedro M.

    2013-04-01

    Different crystal growth rates as supersaturation is increasing or decreasing in impure media is a phenomenon called growth rate hysteresis (GRH) that has been observed in varied systems and applications, such as protein crystallization or during biomineralization. We have recently shown that the transient adsorption of impurities onto newly formed active sites for growth (or kinks) is sensitive to the direction and rate of supersaturation variation, thus providing a possible explanation for GRH [6]. In the present contribution, we expand on this concept by deriving the analytical expressions for transient crystal growth based on the energetics of growth hillock formation and kink occupation by impurities. Two types of GRH results are described according to the variation of kink density with supersaturation: for nearly constant density, decreasing or increasing supersaturation induce, respectively, growth promoting or inhibiting effects relative to equilibrium conditions. This is the type of GRH measured by us during the crystallization of egg-white lysozyme. For variable kink density, slight changes in the supersaturation level may induce abrupt variations in the crystal growth rate. Different literature examples of this so-called 'catastrophic' crystal growth are discussed in terms of their fundamental consequences.

  9. Research support for cadmium telluride crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Banish, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Work performed during the period 11 Feb. 1992 to 10 Aug. 1993 on research support for cadmium telluride crystal growth is reported. Work on chemical impurity characterization and mass spectroscopy is described.

  10. Onboard photo: Crystal Growth Furnace experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-50) astronaut Bornie Dunbar wears protective goggles to assemble a zeolite sample cartridge for the Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) in the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) science module.

  11. The Growth of Large Single Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Carl D.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an experiment which demonstrates principles of experimental design, solubility, and crystal growth and structure. Materials, procedures and results are discussed. Suggestions for adapting this activity to the high school laboratory are provided. (CW)

  12. Silicon carbide - Progress in crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of two processes for producing large-area high-quality single crystals of SiC is described: (1) a modified Lely process for the growth of the alpha polytypes (e.g., 6H SiC) initially developed by Tairov and Tsvetkov (1978, 1981) and Ziegler et al. (1983), and (2) a process for the epitaxial growth of the beta polytype on single-crystal silicon or other substrates. Growth of large-area cubic SiC on Si is described together with growth of defect-free beta-SiC films on alpha-6H SiC crystals and TiC lattice. Semiconducting qualities of silicon carbide crystals grown by various techniques are discussed.

  13. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Porcine Elastase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Porcine Elastase. This enzyme is associated with the degradation of lung tissue in people suffering from emphysema. It is useful in studying causes of this disease. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  14. Protein crystal growth (5-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins (enzymes, hormones, immunoglobulins) account for 50 pct. or more of the dry weight of most living systems. A detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. In principle, there are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor is the elimination of density driven convective flow. Other factors that can be controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystals in a gravitational field, and the potential advantage of doing containerless crystal growth. As a result of these theories and facts, one can readily understand why the microgravity environment of an Earth orbiting vehicle seems to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. This perception has led to the establishment of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project. The results of experiments already performed during STS missions have in many cases resulted in large protein crystals which are structurally correct. Thus, the near term objective of the PCG/ME project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  15. Growth Of Oriented Crystals At Polymerized Membranes

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah H. , Berman, Amir

    2000-01-25

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the growth and alignment of crystals at biopolymeric films. The methods and compositions of the present invention provide means to generate a variety of dense crystalline ceramic films, with totally aligned crystals, at low temperatures and pressures, suitable for use with polymer and plastic substrates.

  16. Convection effects in protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1988-01-01

    Protein crystals for X-ray diffraction study are usually grown resting on the bottom of a hanging drop of a saturated protein solution, with slow evaporation to the air in a small enclosed cell. The evaporation rate is controlled by hanging the drop above a reservoir of water, with its saturation vapor pressure decreased by a low concentration of a passive solute. The drop has a lower solute concentration, and its volume shrinks by evaporation until the molecular concentrations match. Protein crystals can also be grown from a seed crystal suspended or supported in the interior of a supersaturated solution. The main analysis of this report concerns this case because it is less complicated than hanging-drop growth. Convection effects have been suggested as the reason for the apparent cessation of growth at a certain rather small crystal size. It seeems that as the crystal grows, the number of dislocations increases to a point where further growth is hindered. Growth in the microgravity environment of an orbiting space vehicle has been proposed as a method for obtaining larger crystals. Experimental observations of convection effects during the growth of protein crystals have been reported.

  17. A Multiscale simulation method for ice crystallization and frost growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Miad

    2015-11-01

    Formation of ice crystals and frost is associated with physical mechanisms at immensely separated scales. The primary focus of this work is on crystallization and frost growth on a cold plate exposed to the humid air. The nucleation is addressed through Gibbs energy barrier method based on the interfacial energy of crystal and condensate as well as the ambient and surface conditions. The supercooled crystallization of ice crystals is simulated through a phase-field based method where the variation of degree of surface tension anisotropy and its mode in the fluid medium is represented statistically. In addition, the mesoscale width of the interface is quantified asymptotically which serves as a length-scale criterion into a so-called ``Adaptive'' AMR (AAMR) algorithm to tie the grid resolution at the interface to local physical properties. Moreover, due to the exposure of crystal to humid air, a secondary non-equilibrium growth process contributes to the formation of frost at the tip of the crystal. A Monte-Carlo implementation of Diffusion Limited Aggregation method addresses the formation of frost during the crystallization. Finally, a virtual boundary based Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) is adapted to address the interaction of ice crystal with convective air during its growth.

  18. Growth rates of gibbsite single crystals determined using in situ optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mei-yin; Parkinson, Gordon M.

    1999-03-01

    Although the crystallization of gibbsite via the Bayer process is an established industry, the mechanism by which gibbsite crystallizes is not well understood. In the microscopic investigation of gibbsite crystal growth, the phenomenon of growth rate dispersion was observed. The study of the growth rate dependence on supersaturation showed that growth of the prismatic faces is occurring via a spiral growth mechanism. In the case of the basal face, above a relative supersaturation of 0.67, birth and spread is the principal mechanism operating, while spiral growth is the major mechanism operating below a relative supersaturation of 0.67.

  19. Growth kinetics and morphology of polymer crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Akihiko

    2007-03-01

    Originating from the nature of chain folding, polymer single crystals are quite unique in the growth kinetics and morphology. The developments of the understanding in the past 50 years are discussed and the unsolved important issues will be suggested. Polymer single crystals are thin lamellae with the thickness in the order of 10nm determined by the period of chain folding, which keeps a constant value for the isothermal crystallization. The growth of polymer single crystals is modeled by the kinetics of creation and annihilation of growth steps on a rectangular substrate with the pre-determined thickness. The growth face is therefore regarded as a one-dimensional substrate and the kinks and anti-kinks on the substrate correspond to the growth steps propagating in the opposite directions. The kinetic equations of those kinks proposed by Seto and Frank well describe the transition of growth regime as a crossover from single nucleation to multi-nucleation on the basis of the standard model of chain-folded polymer crystallization with surface nucleation proposed by Lauritzen and Hoffman. However, the analysis of the growth kinetics and morphology of single crystals having curved growth front suggests an unusual behavior of the step propagation velocity. The anomaly can be accounted for by a self-poisoning of the growth step interrupted by polymer chains with folding shorter than required. An entropic barrier of pinning proposed by Sadler and Gilmer is a possible candidate of the self-poisoning and is in accordance with recent computer simulation results suggesting the kinetics on a rugged free energy landscape having a resemblance to protein folding. Therefore, the quantitative evaluation of the kinetic barriers of surface nucleation and pinning has been an important issue. In addition, examination of the kinetics of melting will have valuable information because melting of a crystal must be free from nucleation but can still be limited by the entropic barrier.

  20. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    This Final Technical Report for NASA Grant NAG8-774 covers the period from April 27, 1989 through December 31, 1992. It covers five main topics: fluid flow studies, the influence of growth conditions on the morphology of isocitrate lyase crystals, control of nucleation, the growth of lysozyme by the temperature gradient method and graphoepitaxy of protein crystals. The section on fluid flow discusses the limits of detectability in the Schlieren imaging of fluid flows around protein crystals. The isocitrate lyase study compares crystals grown terrestrially under a variety of conditions with those grown in space. The controlling factor governing the morphology of the crystals is the supersaturation. The lack of flow in the interface between the drop and the atmosphere in microgravity causes protein precipitation in the boundary layer and a lowering of the supersaturation in the drop. This lowered supersaturation leads to improved crystal morphology. Preliminary experiments with lysozyme indicated that localized temperature gradients could be used to nucleate crystals in a controlled manner. An apparatus (thermonucleator) was designed to study the controlled nucleation of protein crystals. This apparatus has been used to nucleate crystals of materials with both normal (ice-water, Rochelle salt and lysozyme) and retrograde (horse serum albumin and alpha chymotrypsinogen A) solubility. These studies have lead to the design of an new apparatus that small and more compatible with use in microgravity. Lysozyme crystals were grown by transporting nutrient from a source (lysozyme powder) to the crystal in a temperature gradient. The influence of path length and cross section on the growth rate was demonstrated. This technique can be combined with the thermonucleator to control both nucleation and growth. Graphoepitaxy utilizes a patterned substrate to orient growing crystals. In this study, silicon substrates with 10 micron grooves were used to grow crystals of catalase

  1. Solution growth of crystals in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    A series of experiments will be performed in which triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals will be grown by a low-temperature solution growth technique in the microgravity environment of the orbital Spacelab. Triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals will be grown in the Fluid Experiment System (FES) facility on Spacelab 3 by slowly extracting heat at a controlled rate through a seed crystal of TGS suspended on an insulated sting in a saturated solution of TGS. The FES rack assembly designed for SL-3 is shown in Figure I-1, and a detailed view of the test cell layout is presented in Figure I-2. Variations in the liquid density, solution concentration and temperature around the growing crystal will be studied using a variety of techniques, such as schlieren, shadowgraph, and interferometric measurements. Growth in Earth gravity will also be studied by the same optical techniques, and in both cases the resulting crystalline features will be compared and correlated with the growth conditions.

  2. Growth of organic benzimidazole (BMZ) single crystal by vertical Bridgman technique and its structural, spectral, thermal, optical, mechanical and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuraja, A.; Kalainathan, S.

    2015-09-01

    Benzimidazole (BMZ) single crystal was successfully grown by the vertical Bridgman technique (VBT). The crystal system was identified and lattice parameters have been measured from the powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) measurement. Fourier transforms infrared spectral studies have been carried out to find out the functional groups of BMZ crystal. The optical transmittance and the cut-off wavelength of BMZ were identified using UV-Vis NIR studies and the cut-off wavelength was found to be 294 nm. The dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss as a function of frequency and temperature was measured for the grown BMZ crystal. Vickers microhardness analysis was carried out to identify the mechanical stability of the grown crystal. Chemical etching study was carried out using different etchants and the etch pit density (EPD) was calculated and compared. The third order nonlinear optical property of BMZ crystal was studied by using Z-scan technique with He-Ne laser (632.8 nm). The magnitude of nonlinear refractive index (n2), nonlinear absorption (β) and third order nonlinear susceptibility (χ3) have been found to be in the range of 10-11 m2/W, 10-4 m/W and 10-5 esu respectively. Photoluminescence spectrum was recorded using a xenon lamp in the range of 330-585 nm and it exhibits ultraviolet light emission.

  3. Modeling and design of PVT growth of silicon carbide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ronghui

    2003-10-01

    Physical vapor transport method (PVT) is an important technique for growing SiC bulk crystals, which is a promising semiconductor material for electrical and optoelectronic applications in the areas of high power, high temperature, high frequency and strong radiation. The ever-increasing demand for SiC substrates of high quality and large diameter has motivated extensive research effort on the growth of SiC boule using PVT method. The PVT growth process involves highly complex physics and elaborate system that significantly affect the rate of growth, growth area and defect density. This dissertation is aimed at developing a fundamental understanding of the growth process and identifying the foremost process conditions and parameters that affect crystal productivity and quality. To achieve this goal, we have developed a comprehensive model that involves major physical mechanisms of PVT growth, i.e. , transport of energy and vapor species, chemical reaction, growth kinetics, and anisotropic thermal stresses. Moreover, the multiplication of dislocation is integrated into this model to correlate thermal stresses to dislocation distribution. Through this work a relationship is established between the transport phenomena at the macroscale and defect development at the microscale. Finite volume method with adaptive non-orthogonal grid has been used for the thermal and mechanical calculations in the complex geometry. Using this integrated model, we have carried out numerical simulation of SiC growth process to predict the global temperature distribution in the furnace, the rate of growth and the shape of the as-grown crystals. In addition, the thermal stresses in the growing crystal and the dislocation distribution are also calculated. It is found that the temperature distribution in the induction-heated growth chamber is quite non-uniform. Under the growth temperatures, thermal radiation is the dominant heat transfer mode and accurate modeling is essential. The rate of

  4. Growth rate dispersion of small ammonium alum crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodossiev, N.

    1987-01-01

    The growth rates of small (below 60 μm) and large (about 1 mm) crystals of ammonium alum was measured during batch crystallization from aqueous solutions. The growth rate distribution of small crystals is close to normal. With increasing supersaturation the growth rate of the large crystals increases more rapidly than that of small crystals.

  5. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lyase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lyase. Target enzyme for fungicides. A better understanding of this enzyme should lead to the discovery of more potent fungicides to treat serious crop diseases such as rice blast. It regulates the flow of metabolic intermediates required for cell growth. Principal Investigator for STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  6. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lysase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lysase. Target enzyme for fungicides. A better understanding of this enzyme should lead to the discovery of more potent fungicides to treat serious crop diseases such as rice blast. It regulates the flow of metabolic intermediates required for cell growth. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  7. Promoting microstructural uniformity during floating-zone crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Lee, C. P.; Anilkumar, A. V.; Wang, T. G.; Shen, X. F.; Cröll, A.; Bune, A.

    1999-01-01

    It is demonstrated in floating-zone configurations utilizing silicone oil and nitrate salts that mechanically induced vibration effectively minimizes detrimental, gravity independent, thermocapillary flow. The processing parameters leading to crystal improvement and aspects of the on-going modeling effort are discussed. Plans for applying the crystal growth technique to commercially relevant materials, e.g., silicon, as well as the value of processing in a microgravity environment are presented.

  8. Stability limits for the horizontal ribbon growth of silicon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daggolu, Parthiv; Yeckel, Andrew; Bleil, Carl E.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    A rigorous, thermal-capillary model, developed to couple heat transfer, melt convection and capillary physics, is employed to assess stability limits of the HRG system for growing silicon ribbons. Extending the prior understanding of this process put forth by Daggolu et al. [Thermal-capillary analysis of the horizontal ribbon growth of silicon crystals, Journal of Crystal Growth 355 (2012) 129-139], model results presented here identify additional failure mechanisms, including the bridging of crystal onto crucible, the spilling of melt from the crucible, and the undercooling of melt at the ribbon tip, that are consistent with prior experimental observations. Changes in pull rate, pull angle, melt height, and other parameters are shown to give rise to limits, indicating that only narrow operating windows exist in multi-dimensional parameter space for stable growth conditions that circumvent these failure mechanisms.

  9. Growth Modes and Energetics of 101 Face Lysozyme Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, L.

    2004-01-01

    From analyses of lysozyme 101 face growth rate data using a 2D nucleation model for layer-by-layer growth, we find the effective barrier for crystal growth to be gamma = 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. The magnitude of the effective barrier is 2.4 +/- 0.5 k(sub beta)T, at 22 C. We also find that beyond a critical solution supersaturation, sigma(sub c), crystal growth rates are more accurately described by a kinetic roughening hypothesis. Beyond sigma(sub c), crystals grow by the continuous addition of molecules anywhere on the crystal surface rather than layer-by-layer. The magnitude of the critical supersaturation (sigma(sub c), = 1.7 +/- 0.2) for a crossover from a layer-by-layer to continuous growth is found to be statistically independent of the solution conditions that vary with buffer pH, temperature or precipitant concentration. Using the experimentally determined values for gamma and sigma(sub c), we find the crystal growth unit to be comprised of 7 +/- 3 molecules. The energy barrier, E(sub c), for the continuous addition of the growth Units is 6.2 +/- 0.3 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule or 15 +/1 1 k(sub beta)T at 22C.

  10. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1995-01-01

    During the fifth semi-annual period under this grant we have pursued the following activities: (1) Characterization of the purity and further purification of lysozyme solutions, these efforts are summarized in Section 2; (2) Crystal growth morphology and kinetics studies with tetragonal lysozyme, our observation on the dependence of lysozyme growth kinetics on step sources and impurities has been summarized in a manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; (3) Numerical modelling of the interaction between bulk transport and interface kinetics, for a detailed summary of this work see the manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; and (4) Light scattering studies, this work has been summarized in a manuscript that has been submitted for publication to the Journal of Chemical Physics.

  11. Sublimation Growth of Titanium Nitride Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Li; Edgar, J H; Kenik, Edward A; Meyer III, Harry M

    2009-01-01

    The sublimation-recondensation growth of titanium nitride crystal with N/Ti ratio of 0.99 on tungsten substrate is reported. The growth rate dependence on temperature and pressure was determined, and the calculated activation energy is 775.8 29.8kJ/mol. The lateral and vertical growth rates changed with the time of growth and the fraction of the tungsten substrate surface covered. The orientation relationship of TiN (001) || W (001) with TiN [100] || W [110], a 45o angle between TiN [100] and W [100], occurs not only for TiN crystals deposited on W (001) textured tungsten but also for TiN crystals deposited on randomly orientated tungsten. This study demonstrates that this preferred orientational relationship minimizes the lattice mismatch between the TiN and tungsten.

  12. Crystal Growth by Physical Vapor Transport: Experiments and Simulation Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Worlikar, A.; Su, Ching-Hua; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Crystal growth from the vapor phase has various advantages over melt growth. The main advantage is from a lower processing temperature, which makes the process more amenable in instances where the melting temperature of the crystal is high. Other benefits stem from the inherent purification mechanism in the process due to differences in the vapor pressures of the native elements and impurities, and the enhanced interfacial morphological stability during the growth process. Further, the implementation of PVT growth in closed ampoules affords experimental simplicity with minimal needs for complex process control, which makes it an ideal candidate for space investigations in systems where gravity tends to have undesirable effects on the growth process. Bulk growth of wide band gap II-VI semiconductors by PVT has been developed and refined over the past several years at NASA MSFC. A new modeling approach for PVT has also been recently formulated and its validation and testing is the main objective of this work.

  13. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  14. Research support for cadmium telluride crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1995-01-01

    The growth of single crystals of zinc selenide was carried out by both closed ampoule physical vapor transport and effusive ampoule physical vapor transport (EAPVT). The latter technique was shown to be a much more efficient method for the seeded growth of zinc selenide, resulting in higher transport rates. Furthermore, EAPVT work on CdTe has shown that growth onto (n 11) seeds is advantageous for obtaining reduced twinning and defect densities in II-VI sphalerite materials.

  15. Lead chloride crystal growth from boiling solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Rodríguez-Clemente, R.; Torrent-Burgues, J.

    1993-03-01

    Lead chloride single crystals can be grown from boiling solutions using KNO3-H20 solutions as a solvent. Crystals of 1 mm size produced by gel-growth technique were used as seeds. The solubility of PbC12 increases almost linearly with the KNO3 molality being 0.63m in a 7m KNO3 aqueous solutions at 105°C and pH = 2.6; this increase is related to the decrease of the activity coefficient of lead chloride in these solutions. In the first experiments, the supersaturation was attained by solvent extraction, but due to the simultaneous changes in the concentration of the KNO3 mineralizer during the extraction, the growth rate was irregular and defective crystals were obtained. The experimental set-up was therefore modified and a transport technique was added to the system in order to feed the boiling reactor continuously with fresh lead chloride solution. The growth of the crystals takes place at constant concentration of KNO3 in these new conditions. With this experimental modification, isometric PbCI2 crystals of up to lcm size were obtained in three weeks. The observed morphology is close to that calculated by Woensdregt and Hartmann [J. Crystal Growth 87(1988)561].

  16. Growth and characterization of diammonium copper disulphate hexahydrate single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Siva Sankari, R.; Perumal, Rajesh Narayana

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Diammonium copper disulphate hexahydrate (DACS) is one of the most promising inorganic dielectric crystals with exceptional mechanical properties. Good quality crystals of DACS were grown by using solution method in a period of 30 days. The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis in order to establish their crystalline nature. Thermo gravimetric, differential thermal analysis, FTIR, and UV–vis–NIR analysis were performed for the crystal. Several solid state physical parameters have been determined for the grown crystals. The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss and AC conductivity of the grown crystal were studied as a function of frequency and temperature has been calculated and plotted. - Highlights: • Diammonium copper disulphate is grown for the first time and CCDC number obtained. • Thermal analysis is done to see the stability range of the crystals. • Band gap and UV cut off wavelength of the crystal are determined to be 2.4 eV and 472.86 nm, respectively. • Dielectric constant, dielectric loss and AC conductivity are plotted as a function of applied field. - Abstract: Diammonium copper disulphate hexahydrate is one of the most promising inorganic crystals with exceptional dielectric properties. A good quality crystal was harvested in a 30-day period using solution growth method. The grown crystal was subjected to various characterization techniques like single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo gravimetric, differential thermal analysis, FTIR, and UV–vis–NIR analysis. Unit cell dimensions of the grown crystal have been identified from XRD studies. Functional groups of the title compounds have been identified from FTIR studies. Thermal stability of the samples was checked by TG/DTA studies. Band gap of the crystal was calculated. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss were studied as a function of frequency of the applied field. AC conductivity was plotted as a function

  17. Protein Crystal Growth Dynamics and Impurity Incorporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alex A.; Thomas, Bill

    2000-01-01

    The general concepts and theories of crystal growth are proven to work for biomolecular crystallization. This allowed us to extract basic parameters controlling growth kinetics - free surface energy, alpha, and kinetic coefficient, beta, for steps. Surface energy per molecular site in thermal units, alpha(omega)(sup 2/3)/kT approx. = 1, is close to the one for inorganic crystals in solution (omega is the specific molecular volume, T is the temperature). Entropic restrictions on incorporation of biomolecules into the lattice reduce the incorporation rate, beta, by a factor of 10(exp 2) - 10(exp 3) relative to inorganic crystals. A dehydration barrier of approx. 18kcal/mol may explain approx. 10(exp -6) times difference between frequencies of adding a molecule to the lattice and Brownian attempts to do so. The latter was obtained from AFM measurements of step and kink growth rates on orthorhombic lysozyme. Protein and many inorganic crystals typically do not belong to the Kossel type, thus requiring a theory to account for inequivalent molecular positions within its unit cell. Orthorhombic lysozyme will serve as an example of how to develop such a theory. Factors deteriorating crystal quality - stress and strain, mosaicity, molecular disorder - will be reviewed with emphasis on impurities. Dimers in ferritin and lysozyme and acetylated lysozyme, are microheterogeneous i.e. nearly isomorphic impurities that are shown to be preferentially trapped by tetragonal lysozyme and ferritin crystals, respectively. The distribution coefficient, K defined as a ratio of the (impurity/protein) ratios in crystal and in solution is a measure of trapping. For acetylated lysoyzme, K = 2.15 or, 3.42 for differently acetylated forms, is independent of both the impurity and the crystallizing protein concentration. The reason is that impurity flux to the surface is constant while the growth rate rises with supersaturation. About 3 times lower dimer concentration in space grown ferritin and

  18. Method for solid state crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Nolas, George S.; Beekman, Matthew K.

    2013-04-09

    A novel method for high quality crystal growth of intermetallic clathrates is presented. The synthesis of high quality pure phase crystals has been complicated by the simultaneous formation of both clathrate type-I and clathrate type-II structures. It was found that selective, phase pure, single-crystal growth of type-I and type-II clathrates can be achieved by maintaining sufficient partial pressure of a chemical constituent during slow, controlled deprivation of the chemical constituent from the primary reactant. The chemical constituent is slowly removed from the primary reactant by the reaction of the chemical constituent vapor with a secondary reactant, spatially separated from the primary reactant, in a closed volume under uniaxial pressure and heat to form the single phase pure crystals.

  19. Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus for Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Dowling, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus for growing protein crystals under microgravity environment includes a plurality of protein growth assemblies stacked one above the other within a canister. Each of the protein growth assemblies includes a tray having a number of spaced apart growth chambers recessed below an upper surface. the growth chambers each having an upstanding pedestal and an annular reservoir about the pedestal for receiving a wick and precipitating agents. A well is recessed below the top of each pedestal to define a protein crystal growth receptacle. A flexible membrane is positioned on the upper surface of each tray and a sealing plate is positioned above each membrane, each sealing plate having a number of bumpers corresponding in number and alignment to the pedestals for forcing the membrane selectively against the upper end of the respective pedestal to seal the reservoir and the receptacle when the sealing plate is forced down.

  20. Crack growth in single-crystal silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Crack growth in single-crystal silicon at room temperature in air was evaluated by double torsion (DT) load-relaxation method and monitored by acoustic emission (AE) technique. Both DT and AE methods indicated lack of subcritical crack growth in silicon. At the critical stress intensity factor, the crack front was found to be jumping several times in a 'mirror' region and then followed by fast crack growth in a 'hackle' region. Hackle marks were found to be associated with plastic deformation at the tip of the fast moving crack. No dislocation etch pits were found in the 'mirror' region, in which crack growth may result from interatomic bonds broken at the crack tip under stress without any plastic deformation. Acoustic emission appears to be spontaneously generated from both interatomic bonds broken and dislocation generation at the moving crack tip during the crack growth in single-crystal silicon.

  1. Space-based crystal growth and thermocapillary flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Yong-Hong

    1994-01-01

    The demand for larger crystals is increasing especially in applications associated with the electronic industry, where large and pure electronic crystals (notably silicon) are the essential material to make high-performance computer chips. Crystal growth under weightless conditions has been considered an ideal way to produce bigger and hopefully better crystals. One technique which may benefit from a microgravity environment is the float-zone crystal-growth process, a containerless method for producing high-quality electronic material. In this method, a rod of material to be refined is moved slowly through a heating device which melts a portion of it. Ideally, as the melt resolidifies it does so as a single crystal which is then used as substrate for building microelectronic devices. The possibility of contamination by contact with other material is reduced because of the 'float' configuration. However, since the weight of the material contained in the zone is supported by the surface-tension force, the size of the resulting crystal is limited in Earth-based productions; in fact, some materials have properties which prevent this process from being used to manufacture crystals of reasonable size. Consequently, there has been a great deal of interest in exploiting the microgravity environment of space to grow larger size crystals of electronic material using the float-zone method. In addition to allowing larger crystals to be grown, a microgravity environment would also significantly reduce the magnitude of convection induced by buoyancy forces during the melting state. This type of convection was once thought to be at least partially responsible for the presence of undesirable nonuniformities--called striations--in material properties observed in float-zone material. However, past experiments on crystal growth under weightless conditions found that even with the absence of gravity, the float-zone method sometimes still results striations. It is believed that another

  2. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    The long-term stability of the interferometric setup for the monitoring of protein morphologies has been improved. Growth or dissolution of a crystal on a 100 A scale can now be clearly distinguished from dimensional changes occurring within the optical path of the interferometer. This capability of simultaneously monitoring the local interfacial displacement at several widely-spaced positions on the crystal surface with high local depth resolution, has already yielded novel results. We found with lysozyme that (1) the normal growth rate is oscillatory, and (2) the mean growth step density is greater at the periphery of a facet than in its center. The repartitioning of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied for a wide range of crystallization conditions. A nucleation-growth-repartitioning model was developed to interpret the large body of data in a unified way. The results strongly suggests that (1) the ion to lysozyme ratio in the crystal depends mostly on kinetic rather than crystallographic parameters, and (2) lysozyme crystals possess a salt-rich core with a diameter on the order of 10 microns. The computational model for diffusive-convective transport in protein crystallization (see the First Report) has been applied to a realistic growth cell geometry, taking into account the findings of the above repartitioning studies. These results show that some elements of a moving boundary problem must be incorporated into the model in order to obtain a more realistic description. Our experimental setup for light scattering investigations of aggregation and nucleation in protein solutions has been extensively tested. Scattering intensity measurements with a true Rayleigh scatterer produced systematically increased forward scattering, indicating problems with glare. These have been resolved. Preliminary measurements with supersaturated lysozyme solutions revealed that the scatterers grow with time. Work has begun on a computer program

  3. Crystal growth under external electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Uda, Satoshi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Nozawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Kozo

    2014-10-06

    This is a review article concerning the crystal growth under external electric fields that has been studied in our lab for the past 10 years. An external field is applied electrostatically either through an electrically insulating phase or a direct injection of an electric current to the solid-interface-liquid. The former changes the chemical potential of both solid and liquid and controls the phase relationship while the latter modifies the transport and partitioning of ionic solutes in the oxide melt during crystallization and changes the solute distribution in the crystal.

  4. Drop deployment system for crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Pusey, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A crystal growth apparatus is presented. It utilizes a vapor diffusion method for growing protein crystals, and particularly such an apparatus wherein a ball mixer is used to mix the fluids that form a drop within which crystals are grown. Particular novelty of this invention lies in utilizing a ball mixer to completely mix the precipitate and protein solutions prior to forming the drop. Additional novelty lies in details of construction of the vials, the fluid deployment system, and the fluid storage system of the preferred embodiment.

  5. Interphase and capillary phenomena in crystal growth and melting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidich, Yu. V.; Grigorenko, N. F.; Perevertailo, V. M.

    1981-05-01

    The wettability of different faces of a number of single crystals (thymol, diphenylamine, dibenzyl, salol, benxophenone, sodium thiosulphate, germanium) by their own melt in the course of their growth was studied using various methods (bubble method, sessile drop method, by the melt meniscus shape). The wettability of the crystals by the own melt is incomplete, the wetting angle differs from zero and is dissimilar for different faces (wettability anisotropy). The highest values of the wetting angles are displayed by the faces having the greatest reticular density. For thynol crystals, the kinetics of face growth has been studied simultaneously with investigating the wettability. The gtowth of close-packed faces featuring the largest wetting angles has been found to be governed by a tangential mechanism. The process of melting of different faces of the above single crystals has been studied by means of microfilming (including that in vacuum at a high temperature). It has been ascertained that the crystal-melt transition at the closest-packed faces proceeds by layers. The liquid phase resulting from layer destruction forms droplets wetting the face with a wetting angle to that in crystal growth. The observed melting mechanism has been termed a "droplayered" one.

  6. Pathways to self-organization: Crystallization via nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, S; Dellago, C

    2016-08-01

    Crystallization, a prototypical self-organization process during which a disordered state spontaneously transforms into a crystal characterized by a regular arrangement of its building blocks, usually proceeds by nucleation and growth. In the initial stages of the transformation, a localized nucleus of the new phase forms in the old one due to a random fluctuation. Most of these nuclei disappear after a short time, but rarely a crystalline embryo may reach a critical size after which further growth becomes thermodynamically favorable and the entire system is converted into the new phase. In this article, we will discuss several theoretical concepts and computational methods to study crystallization. More specifically, we will address the rare event problem arising in the simulation of nucleation processes and explain how to calculate nucleation rates accurately. Particular attention is directed towards discussing statistical tools to analyze crystallization trajectories and identify the transition mechanism. PMID:27498980

  7. Modeling the Growth Rates of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Faces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Meirong; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    The measured macroscopic growth rates of the (110) and (101) faces of tetragonal lysozyme show an unexpectedly complex dependence on the supersaturation. The growth rates decay asymptotically to zero when the supersaturation is lowered to zero and increase rapidly when the supersaturation is increased. When supersaturations are increased still further the growth rates attain a maximum before starting to decrease. However, growth of these crystals is known to proceed by the classical dislocation and 2D nucleation growth mechanisms. This anomaly can be explained if growth is assumed to occur not by monomer units but by lysozyme aggregates. Analysis of the molecular packing of these crystals revealed that they were constructed of strongly bonded 4(sub 3) helices, while weaker bonds were responsible for binding the helices to each other. It follows that during crystal growth the stronger bonds are formed before the weaker ones. Thus, the growth of these crystals could be viewed as a two step process: aggregate growth units corresponding to the 4(sub 3) helix are first formed in the bulk solution by stronger intermolecular bonds and then attached to the crystal face by weaker bonds on dislocation hillocks or 2D islands. This will lead to a distribution of aggregates in the solution with monomers and lower order aggregates being predominant at low supersaturations and higher order aggregates being predominant at high supersaturations. If the crystal grows mostly by higher order aggregates, such as tetramers and octamers, it would explain the anomalous dependence of the growth rates on the supersaturation. Besides the analysis of molecular packing, a comprehensive analysis of the measured (110) and (101) growth rates was also undertaken in this study. The distribution of aggregates in lysozyme nutrient solutions at various solution conditions were determined from reversible aggregation reactions at equilibrium. The supersaturation was defined for each aggregate species

  8. Phase-Field Simulations of Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plapp, Mathis

    2010-07-01

    This course gives an elementary introduction to the phase-field method and to its applications for the modeling of crystal growth. Two different interpretations of the phase-field variable are given and discussed. It can be seen as a physical order parameter that characterizes a phase transition, or as a smoothed indicator function that tracks domain boundaries. Elementary phase-field models for solidification and epitaxial growth are presented and are applied to the dendritic growth of a pure substance and the step-flow growth on a vicinal surface.

  9. Study on micro-crystallization, growth, optical properties and defects of a nonlinear optical crystal: MnHg(SCN) 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xitao; Wang, Xinqiang; Sun, Zhihua; Lin, Xiaojing; Zhang, Guanghui; Xu, Dong

    2011-02-01

    High optical quality single crystals of a nonlinear optical material, manganese mercury thiocyanate, MnHg(SCN) 4 (MMTC), with dimensions up to 21×14×13 mm 3 have been grown by the solvent evaporation method. The growth habit of MMTC crystal crystallized under different conditions was investigated by means of micro-crystallization method. Two typical growth morphologies of the crystal were indexed and compared with the morphology deduced from the single crystal structure data. The results show that two novel {1 0 0} and {1 1 2} facets appear during the crystal growth. Powder second harmonic generation and spectral transmittance measurements were also performed. The results indicate that MMTC is phase-matchable and the UV transparency cutoff occurs at 373 nm. Various defects were found in MMTC crystal. Their formation mechanisms and the methods to eliminate these defects are discussed.

  10. Mechanical Properties Of Large Sodium Iodide Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry M.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents data on mechanical properties of large crystals of thallium-doped sodium iodide. Five specimens in shape of circular flat plates subjected to mechanical tests. Presents test results for each specimen as plots of differential pressure versus center displacement and differential pressure versus stress at center. Also tabulates raw data. Test program also developed procedure for screening candidate crystals for gamma-ray sensor. Procedure eliminates potentially weak crystals before installed and ensures material yielding kept to minimum.

  11. An Apparatus for Growth of Small Crystals From Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitrovic, Mico M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for crystal growth that was designed to study growth kinetics of small crystals from solutions and to obtain crystals of various substances. Describes the use of the apparatus in laboratory practical experiments in the field of crystal growth physics within the course "Solid State Physics". (JRH)

  12. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    A high-resolution microscopic interferometric setup for the monitoring of protein morphologies has been developed. Growth or dissolution of a crystal can be resolved with a long-term depth resolution of 200 A and a lateral resolution of 2 microns. This capability of simultaneously monitoring the interfacial displacement with high local depth resolution has yielded several novel results. We have found with lysozyme that (1) the normal growth rate is oscillatory, and (2) depending on the impurity content of the solution, the growth step density is either greater or lower at the periphery of a facet than in its center. The repartitioning of Na plus and Cl minus ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied for a wide range of crystallization conditions. A nucleation-growth-repartitioning model was developed, to interpret the large body of data in unified way. The results strongly suggest that (1) the ion to lysozyne ratio in the crystal depends mostly on kinetic rather than crystallographic parameters, and (2) lysozyme crystals possess a salt-rich core with a diameter electron microscopy results appear to confirm this finding, which could have far-reaching consequences for x-ray diffraction studies. A computational model for diffusive-convective transport in protein crystallization has been applied to a realistic growth cell geometry, taking into account the findings of the above repartitioning studies and our kinetics data for the growth of lysozyme. The results show that even in the small cell employed, protein concentration nonuniformities and gravity-driven solutal convection can be significant. The calculated convection velocities are of the same order to magnitude as those found in earlier experiments. As expected, convective transport, i.e., at Og, lysozyme crystal growth remains kinetically limited. The salt distribution in the crystal is predicted to be non-uniform at both 1g and 0g, as a consequence of protein depletion in the solution. Static and

  13. A phase-field/Monte-Carlo model describing organic crystal growth from solution. Investigation of the diffusion-influenced growth of hydroquinone crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, J.; Yürüdü, C.; Ulrich, J.; Emmerich, H.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper work we present a phase-field/Monte-Carlo hybrid algorithm for the simulation of solutal growth of organic crystals. The algorithm is subsequently used for an investigation of diffusion effects on the growth mechanisms. This method combines a two-scale phase-field model of the liquid phase epitaxial growth and a Monte-Carlo algorithm of the 2D nucleation and thus is faster than previous purely Monte Carlo simulations of crystal growth. The inclusion of supersaturation and diffusion in the method allows the study of crystal growth under various growth conditions. Parameters used in the hybrid algorithm are bound to the energetic parameters of crystal faces, which can be estimated from a detailed study of the actual crystal structure based on a connected nets analysis, which allows the prediction of the shape and morphology of real crystals. The study of the diffusion effect is carried out based on an example of a hydroquinone crystal, which grows from the water solution at various supersaturations. The dependencies of the growth rate and the nucleation rate on the supersaturation indicate the change of the growth mechanism from spiral growth to 2D nucleation. The difference in the growth rate for various faces is in agreement with the crystal morphologies derived from the attachment energy method and observed experimentally. The main result of the simulation is the evaluation of engineering limits for choosing appropriate external process conditions.

  14. Method for crystal growth control

    DOEpatents

    Yates, Douglas A.; Hatch, Arthur E.; Goldsmith, Jeff M.

    1981-01-01

    The growth of a crystalline body of a selected material is controlled so that the body has a selected cross-sectional shape. The apparatus is of the type which includes the structure normally employed in known capillary die devices as well as means for observing at least the portion of the surfaces of the growing crystalline body and the meniscus (of melt material from which the body is being pulled) including the solid/liquid/vapor junction in a direction substantially perpendicular to the meniscus surface formed at the junction when the growth of the crystalline body is under steady state conditions. The cross-sectional size of the growing crystalline body can be controlled by determining which points exhibit a sharp change in the amount of reflected radiation of a preselected wavelength and controlling the speed at which the body is being pulled or the temperature of the growth pool of melt so as to maintain those points exhibiting a sharp change at a preselected spatial position relative to a predetermined reference position. The improvement comprises reference object means positioned near the solid/liquid/vapor junction and capable of being observed by the means for observing so as to define said reference position so that the problems associated with convection current jitter are overcome.

  15. Crack Growth in Single-Crystal Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes experiments on crack growth in single-crystal silicon at room temperature in air. Crack growth in (111) cleavage plane of wafers, 50 by 100 by 0.76 mm in dimension, cut from Czochralski singlecrystal silicon studied by double-torsion load-relaxation method and by acoustic-emission measurements. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray topography also employed. Results aid in design and fabrication of silicon photovoltaic and microelectronic devices.

  16. Optical monitoring of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudry, A.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of using various optical techniques for detecting the onset of nucleation in protein crystal growth was investigated. Direct microscopy, general metrologic techniques, light scattering, ultraviolet absorption, and interferometry are addressed along with techniques for determining pH value. The necessity for collecting basic data on the optical properties of the growth solution as a prerequisite to the evaluation of monitoring techniques is pointed out.

  17. Growth of Solid Solution Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, Sandor L.; Szofran, Frank R.; Gillies, Donald C.; Watring, Dale A.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the study is to establish the effects of processing semiconducting, solid solution, single crystals in a microgravity environment on the metallurgical, compositional, electrical, and optical characteristics of the crystals. The alloy system being investigated is the solid solution semiconductor Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, with x-values appropriate for infrared detector applications in the 8 to 14 mm wavelength region. Both melt and Te-solvent growth are being performed. The study consists of an extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research effort followed by flight experimentation where appropriate. The ground-based portion of the investigation also includes the evaluation of the relative effectiveness of stabilizing techniques, such as applied magnetic fields, for suppressing convective flow during the melt growth of the crystals.

  18. Crystal growth furnace safety system validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, D. W.; Hartfield, R.; Bhavnani, S. H.; Belcher, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    The findings are reported regarding the safe operation of the NASA crystal growth furnace (CGF) and potential methods for detecting containment failures of the furnace. The main conclusions are summarized by ampoule leak detection, cartridge leak detection, and detection of hazardous species in the experiment apparatus container (EAC).

  19. Meniscus Imaging for Crystal-Growth Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachs, E. M.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon crystal growth monitored by new video system reduces operator stress and improves conditions for observation and control of growing process. System optics produce greater magnification vertically than horizontally, so entire meniscus and melt is viewed with high resolution in both width and height dimensions.

  20. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lysase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Comparison of Earth grown and Space grown Isocitrate Lysase crystals. Target enzyme for fungicides. A better understanding of this enzyme should lead to the discovery of more potent fungicides to treat serious crop diseases such as rice blast. It regulates the flow of metabolic intermediates required for cell growth. Principal Investigator was Charles Bugg.

  1. A clarified gel for crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, P. G.; Simpson, N. R.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for preparing clarified sodium silicate gels suitable for crystal growth is described. In the method described here, the silicate stock is clarified by pretreating it with cation exchange resins before preparing the gels. Also, a modified recipe is proposed for preparing gels to achieve improved transparency.

  2. Spacelab 3 vapor crystal growth experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnepple, W.; Vandenberg, L.; Skinner, N.; Ortale, C.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger, with Spacelab 3 as its payload, was launched into orbit April 29, 1985. The mission, number 51-B, emphasized materials processing in space, although a wide variety of experiments in other disciplines were also carried onboard. One of the materials processing experiments on this flight is described, specifically the growth of single crystals of mercuric iodide by physical vapor transport.

  3. Growth of Organic Crystals by Ostwald Ripening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egbert, W.; Podsiadly, C.; Naumann, R.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the growth of various organic crystals by chemical precipitation and Ostwald ripening. Six precipitation reactors were flown on STS-51A. Five of the reactors contained proprietary materials. The sixth contained urea dissolved in ethanol with toluene as the precipitating agent. The size distribution will be analyzed and compared with a similar model being developed.

  4. Apparatus for monitoring crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Sachs, Emanual M.

    1981-01-01

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring the growth of a crystalline body from a liquid meniscus in a furnace. The system provides an improved human/machine interface so as to reduce operator stress, strain and fatigue while improving the conditions for observation and control of the growing process. The system comprises suitable optics for forming an image of the meniscus and body wherein the image is anamorphic so that the entire meniscus can be viewed with good resolution in both the width and height dimensions. The system also comprises a video display for displaying the anamorphic image. The video display includes means for enhancing the contrast between any two contrasting points in the image. The video display also comprises a signal averager for averaging the intensity of at least one preselected portions of the image. The value of the average intensity, can in turn be utilized to control the growth of the body. The system and method are also capable of observing and monitoring multiple processes.

  5. Method of monitoring crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Sachs, Emanual M.

    1982-01-01

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring the growth of a crystalline body from a liquid meniscus in a furnace. The system provides an improved human/machine interface so as to reduce operator stress, strain and fatigue while improving the conditions for observation and control of the growing process. The system comprises suitable optics for forming an image of the meniscus and body wherein the image is anamorphic so that the entire meniscus can be viewed with good resolution in both the width and height dimensions. The system also comprises a video display for displaying the anamorphic image. The video display includes means for enhancing the contrast between any two contrasting points in the image. The video display also comprises a signal averager for averaging the intensity of at least one preselected portions of the image. The value of the average intensity, can in turn be utilized to control the growth of the body. The system and method are also capable of observing and monitoring multiple processes.

  6. Crystal growth in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L. (Inventor); Reiss, Donald A. (Inventor); Lehoczky, Sandor L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational phenomena, including convection, sedimentation, and interactions of materials with their containers all affect the crystal growth process. If they are not taken into consideration they can have adverse effects on the quantity and quality of crystals produced. As a practical matter, convection, and sedimentation can be completely eliminated only under conditions of low gravity attained during orbital flight. There is, then, an advantage to effecting crystallization in space. In the absence of convection in a microgravity environment cooling proceeds by thermal diffusion from the walls to the center of the solution chamber. This renders control of nucleation difficult. Accordingly, there is a need for a new improved nucleation process in space. Crystals are nucleated by creating a small localized region of high relative supersaturation in a host solution at a lower degree of supersaturation.

  7. Fe 2O 3 single crystals: hydrothermal growth, crystal chemistry and growth morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demianets, L. N.; Pouchko, S. V.; Gaynutdinov, R. V.

    2003-11-01

    Hematite single crystals have been grown under hydrothermal conditions. The analysis of atomic structures of the {h k i l} faces has been made, and the sequence of the growth rate change has been explained on the basis of that analysis. Optical and AFM study show two main mechanisms of α-Fe 2O 3 growth. They are layer-by-layer growth and island growth. The morphological characteristics of {1 1 2¯ 0} surfaces are given. Large flat terraces with height h 100-150 nm, width d˜10000 nm are observed of the face surface. Terraces are composed from the steps ( h 15-65, d 100-1200 nm). AFM-images of small steps demonstrate that they consist of globules with rounded or elongated shapes. Typical heights of globules are 0.5-5 nm, and typical lengths are 30-60 nm. These globules are orderly packed on the face, the elongation being along [1 0 1¯ 0] direction.

  8. Surface Phenomena and Parameters of Crystal Growth: Simple Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, A. A.

    2010-07-22

    Basic concepts of crystal growth and their practical use to semi-quantitatively estimate growth processes are explained: surface energy and free energy, driving force of crystallization, atomically rough vs smooth interface structure and the corresponding normal vs layer-by-layer growth modes, application of the activated complex concept to derive kinetic coefficient characterizing crystal growth rate at a given driving force. The Reader is supposed to be familiar with general physics and chemistry. No specific knowledge in crystal growth is required.

  9. Nucleation and growth control in protein crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Nyce, Thomas A.; Meehan, Edward J.; Sowers, Jennifer W.; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1990-01-01

    The five topics summarized in this final report are as follows: (1) a technique for the expedient, semi-automated determination of protein solubilities as a function of temperature and application of this technique to proteins other than lysozyme; (2) a small solution cell with adjustable temperature gradients for the growth of proteins at a predetermined location through temperature programming; (3) a microscopy system with image storage and processing capability for high resolution optical studies of temperature controlled protein growth and etching kinetics; (4) growth experiments with lysozyme in thermosyphon flow ; and (5) a mathematical model for the evolution of evaporation/diffusion induced concentration gradients in the hanging drop protein crystallization technique.

  10. Effect of Co2+ doping on solubility, crystal growth and properties of ADP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, V.; Shkir, Mohd.; AlFaify, S.; Yahia, I. S.

    2016-09-01

    Bulk size crystal growth of ADP with different concentrations doping of cobalt (Co2+) has been done by low cost slow evaporation technique at ambient conditions. The solubility measurement was carried out on pure and doped crystals and found that the solubility is decreasing with doping concentrations. The presence of Co2+ ion in crystalline matrix of ADP has been confirmed by structural, vibrational and elemental analyses. Scanning electron microscopic study reveals that the doping has strong effect on the quality of the crystals. The optical absorbance and transmission confirms the enhancement of quality of ADP crystals due to Co2+ doping and so the optical band gap. Further the dislocation, photoluminescence, dielectric and mechanical studies confirms that the properties of grown crystals with Co2+ doping has been enriched and propose it as a better candidate for optoelectronic applications.