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Sample records for crystal structure particle

  1. Membrane protein structures without crystals, by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting period in membrane protein structural biology with a number of medically important protein structures determined at a rapid pace. However, two major hurdles still remain in the structural biology of membrane proteins. One is the inability to obtain large amounts of protein for crystallization and the other is the failure to get well-diffracting crystals. With single particle electron cryomicroscopy, both these problems can be overcome and high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and other labile protein complexes can be obtained with very little protein and without the need for crystals. In this review, I highlight recent advances in electron microscopy, detectors and software, which have allowed determination of medium to high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and complexes that have been difficult to study by other structural biological techniques. PMID:26435463

  2. Single crystal particles of a mesoporous mixed transition metal oxide with a wormhole structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, B; Lu, D; Kondo, J N; Domen, K

    2001-10-21

    A new type of mesoporous mixed transition metal oxide of Nb and Ta (NbTa-TIT-1) has been prepared through a two-step calcination, which consists of single crystal particles with wormhole mesoporous structure. PMID:12240191

  3. Finite particle size drives defect-mediated domain structures in strongly confined colloidal liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gârlea, Ioana C.; Mulder, Pieter; Alvarado, José; Dammone, Oliver; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.; Lettinga, M. Pavlik; Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Mulder, Bela M.

    2016-06-01

    When liquid crystals are confined to finite volumes, the competition between the surface anchoring imposed by the boundaries and the intrinsic orientational symmetry-breaking of these materials gives rise to a host of intriguing phenomena involving topological defect structures. For synthetic molecular mesogens, like the ones used in liquid-crystal displays, these defect structures are independent of the size of the molecules and well described by continuum theories. In contrast, colloidal systems such as carbon nanotubes and biopolymers have micron-sized lengths, so continuum descriptions are expected to break down under strong confinement conditions. Here, we show, by a combination of computer simulations and experiments with virus particles in tailor-made disk- and annulus-shaped microchambers, that strong confinement of colloidal liquid crystals leads to novel defect-stabilized symmetrical domain structures. These finite-size effects point to a potential for designing optically active microstructures, exploiting the as yet unexplored regime of highly confined liquid crystals.

  4. Tuning the colloidal crystal structure of magnetic particles by external field.

    PubMed

    Pal, Antara; Malik, Vikash; He, Le; Erné, Ben H; Yin, Yadong; Kegel, Willem K; Petukhov, Andrei V

    2015-02-01

    Manipulation of the self-assembly of magnetic colloidal particles by an externally applied magnetic field paves a way toward developing novel stimuli responsive photonic structures. Using microradian X-ray scattering technique we have investigated the different crystal structures exhibited by self-assembly of core-shell magnetite/silica nanoparticles. An external magnetic field was employed to tune the colloidal crystallization. We find that the equilibrium structure in absence of the field is random hexagonal close-packed (RHCP) one. External field drives the self-assembly toward a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) structure. Our findings are in good agreement with simulation results on the assembly of these particles. PMID:25510837

  5. Finite particle size drives defect-mediated domain structures in strongly confined colloidal liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gârlea, Ioana C.; Mulder, Pieter; Alvarado, José; Dammone, Oliver; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.; Lettinga, M. Pavlik; Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Mulder, Bela M.

    2016-01-01

    When liquid crystals are confined to finite volumes, the competition between the surface anchoring imposed by the boundaries and the intrinsic orientational symmetry-breaking of these materials gives rise to a host of intriguing phenomena involving topological defect structures. For synthetic molecular mesogens, like the ones used in liquid-crystal displays, these defect structures are independent of the size of the molecules and well described by continuum theories. In contrast, colloidal systems such as carbon nanotubes and biopolymers have micron-sized lengths, so continuum descriptions are expected to break down under strong confinement conditions. Here, we show, by a combination of computer simulations and experiments with virus particles in tailor-made disk- and annulus-shaped microchambers, that strong confinement of colloidal liquid crystals leads to novel defect-stabilized symmetrical domain structures. These finite-size effects point to a potential for designing optically active microstructures, exploiting the as yet unexplored regime of highly confined liquid crystals. PMID:27353002

  6. Crystal Structure and Proteomics Analysis of Empty Virus-like Particles of Cowpea Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Nhung T; Hesketh, Emma L; Saxena, Pooja; Meshcheriakova, Yulia; Ku, You-Chan; Hoang, Linh T; Johnson, John E; Ranson, Neil A; Lomonossoff, George P; Reddy, Vijay S

    2016-04-01

    Empty virus-like particles (eVLPs) of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) are currently being utilized as reagents in various biomedical and nanotechnology applications. Here, we report the crystal structure of CPMV eVLPs determined using X-ray crystallography at 2.3 Å resolution and compare it with previously reported cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of eVLPs and virion crystal structures. Although the X-ray and cryo-EM structures of eVLPs are mostly similar, there exist significant differences at the C terminus of the small (S) subunit. The intact C terminus of the S subunit plays a critical role in enabling the efficient assembly of CPMV virions and eVLPs, but undergoes proteolysis after particle formation. In addition, we report the results of mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis of coat protein subunits from CPMV eVLPs and virions that identify the C termini of S subunits undergo proteolytic cleavages at multiple sites instead of a single cleavage site as previously observed. PMID:27021160

  7. Crystal structures of enterovirus 71 (EV71) recombinant virus particles provide insights into vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Ke; Wang, Guang-Chuan; He, Ya-Ling; Han, Jian-Feng; Ye, Qing; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Chen, Rong

    2015-02-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) remains a major health concern in the Asia-Pacific regions, and its major causative agents include human enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16. A desirable vaccine against HFMD would be multivalent and able to elicit protective responses against multiple HFMD causative agents. Previously, we have demonstrated that a thermostable recombinant EV71 vaccine candidate can be produced by the insertion of a foreign peptide into the BC loop of VP1 without affecting viral replication. Here we present crystal structures of two different naturally occurring empty particles, one from a clinical C4 strain EV71 and the other from its recombinant virus containing an insertion in the VP1 BC loop. Crystal structure analysis demonstrated that the inserted foreign peptide is well exposed on the particle surface without significant structural changes in the capsid. Importantly, such insertions do not seem to affect the virus uncoating process as illustrated by the conformational similarity between an uncoating intermediate of another recombinant virus and that of EV71. Especially, at least 18 residues from the N terminus of VP1 are transiently externalized. Altogether, our study provides insights into vaccine development against HFMD. PMID:25492868

  8. Artificial silver sulfide Ag2S: Crystal structure and particle size in deposited powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.; Rempel, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Chemical deposition from aqueous solutions of silver nitrate and sodium sulfide was used for synthesis of coarse-crystalline and nanocrystalline silver sulfide Ag2S powders. Sodium citrate was used as a complexing and stabilizing agent during synthesis. X-ray diffraction study shows that synthesized Ag2S powders have monoclinic (space group P21/c) α-Ag2S acanthite type crystal structure. The unit cell of artificial monoclinic silver sulfide Ag2S contains four Ag2S formula units and has the following parameters: a = 0.42264 nm, b = 0.69282 nm, c = 0.95317 nm and β = 125.554°. The size of silver sulfide particles in deposited powders was estimated by the X-ray diffraction and BET methods. By varying the ratio between the concentrations of reagents in the initial reaction mixture it is possible to deposit Ag2S nanoparticles with average size ranging in the interval from ∼1000 to ∼30 nm. Ag2S nanopowders have no deformation distortions of the crystal lattice practically because the microstrains ε in the synthesized powders do not exceed 0.15%. All the Ag2S powders with different particle size have an identical morphology.

  9. Low temperature synthesis, crystal structure and thermal stability studies of nanocrystalline VN particles

    SciTech Connect

    Gajbhiye, N.S. . E-mail: nsg@iitk.ac.in; Ningthoujam, R.S.

    2006-09-14

    The simultaneous thermal decomposition and nitridation of [VO(NH{sub 2}O){sub 2}Gly].H{sub 2}O complex in NH{sub 3} atmosphere at 723-973 K gives the nanocrystalline vanadium nitride (VN) having crystallite size of 8-32 nm. It shows cubic NaCl structure with lattice parameter of a = 4.137 nm. XRD pattern Rietveld analysis program for crystal structure of VN shows the space group-Fm3m. The particle sizes measured by BET and SEM techniques are in the range of 26-100 nm. The particles are spherical and distributed homogeneously and found larger than XRD crystallite size because of agglomeration of crystallites. The fundamental IR absorption of VN material is found at 995 cm{sup -1} which gives the force constant of 634.3 Nm{sup -1}. The electrical resistivity and magnetic studies show the superconducting to normal transition (T {sub c}) at 9.2 K. Thermal decomposition of VN is carried out in O{sub 2} atmosphere which goes through the formation of an oxynitride (V-N {sub p}-O {sub q}) intermediate phase up to 913 K. Finally, nanocrystalline V{sub 2}O{sub 5} is formed at 973 K. The V{sub 2}O{sub 5} has orthorhombic structure with lattice parameters of a = 11.537, b = 3.568 and c = 4.380 A and the XRD crystallite size of 10 nm.

  10. Single crystal structure analysis of a single Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}N{sub 3} particle

    SciTech Connect

    Inami, Nobuhito Takeichi, Yasuo; Saito, Kotaro; Sagayama, Ryoko; Kumai, Reiji; Ono, Kanta; Ueno, Tetsuro

    2014-05-07

    We performed single crystal structure analysis of Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}N{sub 3} using X-ray diffraction. A pick-up system combined with a micromanipulation tool driven by piezoelectric actuators and a microgripper was used. A single Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}N{sub x} particle with the diameter of about 20 μm was picked up, and X-ray diffraction was measured using an X-ray diffractometer at the synchrotron radiation beamline at the Photon Factory, KEK. Single crystal structure analysis of a Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}N{sub 3} particle was performed and the structure was successfully determined from X-ray diffraction patterns. The space group and the lattice constants were determined to be R-3m (number sign166) a = b = 8.7206 Å and c = 12.6345 Å, respectively. Atomic positions of Sm and Fe atoms were accurately determined by single crystal structure analysis of only one particle.

  11. Characterization of synthetic nanocrystalline mackinawite: crystal structure, particle size, and specific surface area

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hoon Y.; Lee, Jun H.; Hayes, Kim F.

    2010-01-01

    Iron sulfide was synthesized by reacting aqueous solutions of sodium sulfide and ferrous chloride for 3 days. By X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), the resultant phase was determined to be primarily nanocrystalline mackinawite (space group: P4/nmm) with unit cell parameters a = b = 3.67 Å and c = 5.20 Å. Iron K-edge XAS analysis also indicated the dominance of mackinawite. Lattice expansion of synthetic mackinawite was observed along the c-axis relative to well-crystalline mackinawite. Compared with relatively short-aged phase, the mackinawite prepared here was composed of larger crystallites with less elongated lattice spacings. The direct observation of lattice fringes by HR-TEM verified the applicability of Bragg diffraction in determining the lattice parameters of nanocrystalline mackinawite from XRPD patterns. Estimated particle size and external specific surface area (SSAext) of nanocrystalline mackinawite varied significantly with the methods used. The use of Scherrer equation for measuring crystallite size based on XRPD patterns is limited by uncertainty of the Scherrer constant (K) due to the presence of polydisperse particles. The presence of polycrystalline particles may also lead to inaccurate particle size estimation by Scherrer equation, given that crystallite and particle sizes are not equivalent. The TEM observation yielded the smallest SSAext of 103 m2/g. This measurement was not representative of dispersed particles due to particle aggregation from drying during sample preparation. In contrast, EGME method and PCS measurement yielded higher SSAext (276–345 m2/g by EGME and 424 ± 130 m2/g by PCS). These were in reasonable agreement with those previously measured by the methods insensitive to particle aggregation. PMID:21085620

  12. Crystal-structure prediction via the Floppy-Box Monte Carlo algorithm: Method and application to hard (non)convex particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Joost; Filion, Laura; Marechal, Matthieu; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the way to set up the floppy-box Monte Carlo (FBMC) method [L. Filion, M. Marechal, B. van Oorschot, D. Pelt, F. Smallenburg, and M. Dijkstra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 188302 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.188302] to predict crystal-structure candidates for colloidal particles. The algorithm is explained in detail to ensure that it can be straightforwardly implemented on the basis of this text. The handling of hard-particle interactions in the FBMC algorithm is given special attention, as (soft) short-range and semi-long-range interactions can be treated in an analogous way. We also discuss two types of algorithms for checking for overlaps between polyhedra, the method of separating axes and a triangular-tessellation based technique. These can be combined with the FBMC method to enable crystal-structure prediction for systems composed of highly shape-anisotropic particles. Moreover, we present the results for the dense crystal structures predicted using the FBMC method for 159 (non)convex faceted particles, on which the findings in [J. de Graaf, R. van Roij, and M. Dijkstra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 155501 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.155501] were based. Finally, we comment on the process of crystal-structure prediction itself and the choices that can be made in these simulations.

  13. Crystal-structure prediction via the floppy-box Monte Carlo algorithm: method and application to hard (non)convex particles.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Joost; Filion, Laura; Marechal, Matthieu; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the way to set up the floppy-box Monte Carlo (FBMC) method [L. Filion, M. Marechal, B. van Oorschot, D. Pelt, F. Smallenburg, and M. Dijkstra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 188302 (2009)] to predict crystal-structure candidates for colloidal particles. The algorithm is explained in detail to ensure that it can be straightforwardly implemented on the basis of this text. The handling of hard-particle interactions in the FBMC algorithm is given special attention, as (soft) short-range and semi-long-range interactions can be treated in an analogous way. We also discuss two types of algorithms for checking for overlaps between polyhedra, the method of separating axes and a triangular-tessellation based technique. These can be combined with the FBMC method to enable crystal-structure prediction for systems composed of highly shape-anisotropic particles. Moreover, we present the results for the dense crystal structures predicted using the FBMC method for 159 (non)convex faceted particles, on which the findings in [J. de Graaf, R. van Roij, and M. Dijkstra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 155501 (2011)] were based. Finally, we comment on the process of crystal-structure prediction itself and the choices that can be made in these simulations. PMID:23231211

  14. Periodic dynamics, localization metastability, and elastic interaction of colloidal particles with confining surfaces and helicoidal structure of cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, Michael C. M.; Zhang, Qiaoxuan; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Silvestre, Nuno M.; Bertness, Kris A.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2014-12-01

    Nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals are three-dimensional fluids that possess long-range orientational ordering and can support both topological defects and chiral superstructures. Implications of this ordering remain unexplored even for simple dynamic processes such as the ones found in so-called "fall experiments," or motion of a spherical inclusion under the effects of gravity. Here we show that elastic and surface anchoring interactions prompt periodic dynamics of colloidal microparticles in confined cholesterics when gravity acts along the helical axis. We explore elastic interactions between colloidal microparticles and confining surfaces as well as with an aligned ground-state helical structure of cholesterics for different sizes of spheres relative to the cholesteric pitch, demonstrating unexpected departures from Stokes-like behavior at very low Reynolds numbers. We characterize metastable localization of microspheres under the effects of elastic and surface anchoring periodic potential landscapes seen by moving spheres, demonstrating the important roles played by anchoring memory, confinement, and topological defect transformation. These experimental findings are consistent with the results of numerical modeling performed through minimizing the total free energy due to colloidal inclusions at different locations along the helical axis and with respect to the confining substrates. A potential application emerging from this work is colloidal sorting based on particle shapes and sizes.

  15. Teaching with Crystal Structures: Helping Students Recognize and Classify the Smallest Repeating Particle in a Given Substance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithenry, Dennis W.

    2009-01-01

    Classifying a particle requires an understanding of the type of bonding that exists within and among the particles, which requires an understanding of atomic structure and electron configurations, which requires an understanding of the elements of periodic properties, and so on. Rather than getting tangled up in all of these concepts at the start…

  16. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2005-09-19

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We demonstrate guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode. We also discuss particle beam dynamics in the structure, presenting a novel method for focusing the beam. In addition we describe some potential coupling methods for the structure.

  17. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Vault, Largest Ribonucleoprotein Particle, with a Molecular Weight of 10 MDa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hideaki; Kato, Koji; Yamashita, Eiki

    Vaults are among the largest cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein particles and are found in numerous eukaryotic species. Although roles in multidrug resistance and innate immunity have been suggested, the cellular function remains unclear. We have determined the X-ray structure of rat liver vault at 3.5 Å resolution. A vault particle shell was composed of 78 MVP (Major vault protein) chains with 39-fold dihedral symmetry. The shoulder domain of MVP is structurally similar to SPFH (stomatin/prohibitin/flotillin/HflK/C) domain involved in lipid raft association.

  18. Colloidal particles embedded in liquid crystal droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchert, Drew; Sadati, Monirosadat; Zhou, Ye; de Pablo, Juan J.

    In this work, we encapsulate polystyrene and silica particles in nematic liquid crystal (LC) droplets dispersed in water using microfluidic glass capillary devices. While polystyrene particles induce planar anchoring on the surface, silica particles, treated with DMOAP, create homeotropic anchoring of the LC molecules at their surface. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is added to the aqueous phase to stabilize LC droplets and promote a radial configuration with point defect in the center of LC droplet. Our experimental and computational studies show that, when trapped inside the LC droplets, particles with both anchoring types become mostly localized at the defect point (at the center) and interact with the radial configuration. Interestingly, a twisting structure is observed for polystyrene particle with strong planar anchoring. Although localization of the particles at the droplet center is the most stable state and with the lowest free energy, off-center positions also emerge, displacing the defect point from the center to near the surface of a radial droplet. - Corresponding author - Second affiliation: Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA.

  19. Determination of particle-induced structural disorder depth profile in crystals using the grazing-angle incidence hard x-ray backscattering diffraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezirganyan, Hakob (Jacob P.; Bezirganyan, Siranush E.; Bezirganyan, Petros H., Jr.; Bezirganyan, Hayk H., Jr.

    2011-12-01

    In this theoretical paper, we propose an x-ray imaging method for determination of particle-induced structural disorder depth profile in the crystalline materials based on the extremely sensitive, high-resolution, and non-destructive grazing-angle incidence hard x-ray backscattering diffraction technique. A peculiar value of the Bragg angle is discovered within the specular beam suppression angular region for which the curve of x-ray reflectivity is very close to the profile of the corresponding structural disorder. The coincidence presents a unique opportunity for the direct registration of the structural disorder depth profile in particle-irradiated crystals. This paper is dedicated to Professor Dr Petros H Bezirganyan on the occasion of his 95th birthday on 15th December 2011.

  20. Passive particle dosimetry. [silver halide crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    Present methods of dosimetry are reviewed with emphasis on the processes using silver chloride crystals for ionizing particle dosimetry. Differences between the ability of various crystals to record ionizing particle paths are directly related to impurities in the range of a few ppm (parts per million). To understand the roles of these impurities in the process, a method for consistent production of high purity silver chloride, and silver bromide was developed which yields silver halides with detectable impurity content less than 1 ppm. This high purity silver chloride was used in growing crystals with controlled doping. Crystals were grown by both the Czochalski method and the Bridgman method, and the Bridgman grown crystals were used for the experiments discussed. The distribution coefficients of ten divalent cations were determined for the Bridgman crystals. The best dosimeters were made with silver chloride crystals containing 5 to 10 ppm of lead; other impurities tested did not produce proper dosimeters.

  1. The crystallization of small particles and droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    A general expression is derived for the volume fraction of material crystallized as a function of time for the situation where boundary effects may be important, and it is applied to a sample consisting of a monodisperse array of small particles. It is assumed that crystallization occurs via homogeneous nucleation followed by crystal growth. The crystallization rate is shown to be controlled by a single dimensionless parameter, beta. Beta exp 1/4 is a dimensionless particle radius which tends to be small when the growth rate is large or when the nucleation rate is small. When beta is large, the general expression for the volume fraction transformed reduces to the standard expression valid for bulk samples. When beta is small, it reduces to the formula used to compute the volume fraction crystallized in droplet undercooling experiments. Hence, the present results are pertinent for the interpretation of some droplet undercooling experiments as well as isothermal DSC and DTA experiments.

  2. Crystallization by Particle Attachment in Synthetic, Biogenic, and Geologic Environments

    SciTech Connect

    De Yoreo, James J.; Gilbert, Pupa U.; Sommerdijk, Nico; Penn, R. Lee; Whitelam, Stephen B.; Joester, Derk; Zhang, Hengzhong; Rimer, Jeffrey D.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Banfield, Jillian F.; Wallace, Adam F.; Michel, F. M.; Meldrum, Fiona C.; Colfen, Helmut; Dove, Patricia M.

    2015-07-31

    Field and laboratory observations show that crystals commonly form by the addition and attachment of particles that range from multi-ion complexes to fully formed nanoparticles. These non-classical pathways to crystallization are diverse, in contrast to classical models that consider the addition of monomeric chemical species. We review progress toward understanding crystal growth by particle attachment processes and show that multiple pathways result from the interplay of free energy landscapes and reaction dynamics. Much remains unknown about the fundamental aspects; particularly the relationships between solution structure, interfacial forces, and particle motion. Developing a predictive description that connects molecular details to ensemble behavior will require revisiting long-standing interpretations of crystal formation in synthetic systems and patterns of mineralization in natural environments.

  3. CRYSTAL GROWTH. Crystallization by particle attachment in synthetic, biogenic, and geologic environments.

    PubMed

    De Yoreo, James J; Gilbert, Pupa U P A; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Penn, R Lee; Whitelam, Stephen; Joester, Derk; Zhang, Hengzhong; Rimer, Jeffrey D; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Banfield, Jillian F; Wallace, Adam F; Michel, F Marc; Meldrum, Fiona C; Cölfen, Helmut; Dove, Patricia M

    2015-07-31

    Field and laboratory observations show that crystals commonly form by the addition and attachment of particles that range from multi-ion complexes to fully formed nanoparticles. The particles involved in these nonclassical pathways to crystallization are diverse, in contrast to classical models that consider only the addition of monomeric chemical species. We review progress toward understanding crystal growth by particle-attachment processes and show that multiple pathways result from the interplay of free-energy landscapes and reaction dynamics. Much remains unknown about the fundamental aspects, particularly the relationships between solution structure, interfacial forces, and particle motion. Developing a predictive description that connects molecular details to ensemble behavior will require revisiting long-standing interpretations of crystal formation in synthetic systems, biominerals, and patterns of mineralization in natural environments. PMID:26228157

  4. Ionizing particle detection based on phononic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aly, Arafa H. E-mail: arafa.hussien@science.bsu.edu.eg; Mehaney, Ahmed; Eissa, Mostafa F.

    2015-08-14

    Most conventional radiation detectors are based on electronic or photon collections. In this work, we introduce a new and novel type of ionizing particle detector based on phonon collection. Helium ion radiation treats tumors with better precision. There are nine known isotopes of helium, but only helium-3 and helium-4 are stable. Helium-4 is formed in fusion reactor technology and in enormous quantities during Big Bang nucleo-synthesis. In this study, we introduce a technique for helium-4 ion detection (sensing) based on the innovative properties of the new composite materials known as phononic crystals (PnCs). PnCs can provide an easy and cheap technique for ion detection compared with conventional methods. PnC structures commonly consist of a periodic array of two or more materials with different elastic properties. The two materials are polymethyl-methacrylate and polyethylene polymers. The calculations showed that the energies lost to target phonons are maximized at 1 keV helium-4 ion energy. There is a correlation between the total phonon energies and the transmittance of PnC structures. The maximum transmission for phonons due to the passage of helium-4 ions was found in the case of making polyethylene as a first layer in the PnC structure. Therefore, the concept of ion detection based on PnC structure is achievable.

  5. Ionizing particle detection based on phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Mehaney, Ahmed; Eissa, Mostafa F.

    2015-08-01

    Most conventional radiation detectors are based on electronic or photon collections. In this work, we introduce a new and novel type of ionizing particle detector based on phonon collection. Helium ion radiation treats tumors with better precision. There are nine known isotopes of helium, but only helium-3 and helium-4 are stable. Helium-4 is formed in fusion reactor technology and in enormous quantities during Big Bang nucleo-synthesis. In this study, we introduce a technique for helium-4 ion detection (sensing) based on the innovative properties of the new composite materials known as phononic crystals (PnCs). PnCs can provide an easy and cheap technique for ion detection compared with conventional methods. PnC structures commonly consist of a periodic array of two or more materials with different elastic properties. The two materials are polymethyl-methacrylate and polyethylene polymers. The calculations showed that the energies lost to target phonons are maximized at 1 keV helium-4 ion energy. There is a correlation between the total phonon energies and the transmittance of PnC structures. The maximum transmission for phonons due to the passage of helium-4 ions was found in the case of making polyethylene as a first layer in the PnC structure. Therefore, the concept of ion detection based on PnC structure is achievable.

  6. Structural Color Painting by Rubbing Particle Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Choojin; Koh, Kunsuk; Jeong, Unyong

    2015-02-01

    Structural colors originate from purely physical structures. Scientists have been inspired to mimic the structures found in nature, the realization of these structures still presents a great challenge. We have recently introduced unidirectional rubbing of a dry particle powder on a rubbery surface as a quick, highly reproducible means to fabricate a single crystal monolayer assembly of particles over an unlimited area. This study extends the particle-rubbing process to a novel fine-art painting, structural color painting (SCP). SCP is based on structural coloring with varying iridescence according to the crystal orientation, as controlled by the rubbing direction. This painting technique can be applied on curved surfaces, which enriches the objects to be painted and helps the painter mimic the structures found in nature. It also allows for quick fabrication of complicated particle-assembly patterns, which enables replication of paintings.

  7. Structural Color Painting by Rubbing Particle Powder

    PubMed Central

    Park, ChooJin; Koh, Kunsuk; Jeong, Unyong

    2015-01-01

    Structural colors originate from purely physical structures. Scientists have been inspired to mimic the structures found in nature, the realization of these structures still presents a great challenge. We have recently introduced unidirectional rubbing of a dry particle powder on a rubbery surface as a quick, highly reproducible means to fabricate a single crystal monolayer assembly of particles over an unlimited area. This study extends the particle-rubbing process to a novel fine-art painting, structural color painting (SCP). SCP is based on structural coloring with varying iridescence according to the crystal orientation, as controlled by the rubbing direction. This painting technique can be applied on curved surfaces, which enriches the objects to be painted and helps the painter mimic the structures found in nature. It also allows for quick fabrication of complicated particle-assembly patterns, which enables replication of paintings. PMID:25661669

  8. Dressed active particles in spherical crystals.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhenwei

    2016-08-17

    We investigate the dynamics of an active particle in two-dimensional spherical crystals, which provide an ideal environment to illustrate the interplay between active particles and crystallographic defects. A moving active particle is observed to be surrounded by localized topological defects, becoming a dressed active particle. Such a physical picture characterizes both the lattice distortion around the moving particle and the healing of the distorted lattice in its trajectory. We find that the dynamical behaviors of an active particle in both random and ballistic motions uniformly conform to this featured scenario, whether the particle is initially a defect or not. We further observe that the defect pattern around a dressed ballistic active particle randomly oscillates between two well-defined wing-like defect motifs regardless of its speed. The established physical picture of dressed active particles in this work partially deciphers the complexity of the intriguing nonequilibrium behaviors in active crystals, and opens the promising possibility of introducing the activity to engineer defects, which has strong connections with the design of materials. PMID:27491597

  9. Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) (PC database for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.

  10. Particles and curvatures in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Francesca; Luo, Yimin; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall D.; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    Elastic interactions in anisotropic fluids can be harnessed to direct particle interactions. A strategy to smoothly manipulate the director field in nematic liquid crystals is to vary the topography of the bounding surfaces. A rugged landscape with peaks and valleys create local deformations of the director field which can interact with particles in solution. We study this complex interaction in two different settings. The first consists of an array of shallow pores in a poly-dimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) membrane, whose curvature can be tuned either by swelling the PDMS membrane or by mechanical stretching. The second is a set of grooves with wavy walls, fabricated by photolithography, with various parameters of curvature and shapes. In this contexts we study how the motion of colloidal particles in nematic liquid crystals can be influenced by their interaction with the peaks and valleys of the bottom substrate or of the side walls. Particles with different associated topological defects (hedgehogs or Saturn rings) behave differently as they interact with the topographical features, favoring the docking on peaks or valleys. These experimental systems are also ideal to study the ``lock and key'' mechanism of particles in holes and to investigate a possible route for particle sorting.

  11. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  12. Demonstration of Crystal Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neville, Joseph P.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment where equal parts of copper and aluminum are heated then cooled to show extremely large crystals. Suggestions are given for changing the orientation of crystals by varying cooling rates. Students are more receptive to concepts of microstructure after seeing this experiment. (DH)

  13. Nucleation and structural growth of cluster crystals.

    PubMed

    Leitold, Christian; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-08-21

    We study the nucleation of crystalline cluster phases in the generalized exponential model with exponent n = 4. Due to the finite value of this pair potential for zero separation, at high densities the system forms cluster crystals with multiply occupied lattice sites. Here, we investigate the microscopic mechanisms that lead to the formation of cluster crystals from a supercooled liquid in the low-temperature region of the phase diagram. Using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling, we calculate the free energy as a function of the size of the largest crystalline nucleus in the system, and compare our results with predictions from classical nucleation theory. Employing bond-order parameters based on a Voronoi tessellation to distinguish different crystal structures, we analyze the average composition of crystalline nuclei. We find that even for conditions where a multiply occupied fcc crystal is the thermodynamically stable phase, the nucleation into bcc cluster crystals is strongly preferred. Furthermore, we study the particle mobility in the supercooled liquid and in the cluster crystal. In the cluster crystal, the motion of individual particles is captured by a simple reaction-diffusion model introduced previously to model the kinetics of hydrogen bonds. PMID:27544116

  14. Effect of particle size and particle size distribution on physical characteristics, morphology and crystal structure of explosively compacted high-T(sub c) superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotsis, I.; Enisz, M.; Oravetz, D.; Szalay, A.

    1995-01-01

    A superconductor, of composition Y(Ba,K,Na)2Cu3O(x)/F(y) and a composite of composition Y(Ba,K,Na)2Cu3O(x)/F(y) + Ag, with changing K, Na and F content but a constant silver content (Ag = 10 mass%) was prepared using a single heat treatment. the resulting material was ground in a corundum lined mill, separated to particle size fractions of 0-40 micron, 0-63 micron and 63-900 micron and explosively compacted, using an explosive pressure of 10(exp 4) MPa and a subsequent heat treatment. Best results were obtained with the 63-900 micron fraction of composition Y(Ba(1.95) K(0.01)Cu3O(x)F(0),(05)/Ag: porosity less than 0.01 cu cm/g and current density 2800 A/sq cm at 77K.

  15. Crystal structure determination of Efavirenz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popeneciu, Horea; Tripon, Carmen; Borodi, Gheorghe; Pop, Mihaela Maria; Dumitru, Ristoiu

    2015-12-01

    Needle-shaped single crystals of the title compound, C14H9ClF3NO2, were obtained from a co-crystallization experiment of Efavirenz with maleic acid in a (1:1) ratio, using methanol as solvent. Crystal structure determination at room temperature revealed a significant anisotropy of the lattice expansion compared to the previously reported low-temperature structure. In both low- and room temperature structures the cyclopropylethynyl fragment in one of the asymmetric unit molecules is disordered. While at low-temperature only one C atom exhibits positional disorder, at room temperature the disorder is present for two C atoms of the cyclopropane ring.

  16. Generation of crystal structures using known crystal structures as analogues

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jason C.; Groom, Colin R.; Read, Murray G.; Giangreco, Ilenia; McCabe, Patrick; Reilly, Anthony M.; Shields, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    This analysis attempts to answer the question of whether similar molecules crystallize in a similar manner. An analysis of structures in the Cambridge Structural Database shows that the answer is yes – sometimes they do, particularly for single-component structures. However, one does need to define what we mean by similar in both cases. Building on this observation we then demonstrate how this correlation between shape similarity and packing similarity can be used to generate potential lattices for molecules with no known crystal structure. Simple intermolecular interaction potentials can be used to minimize these potential lattices. Finally we discuss the many limitations of this approach. PMID:27484374

  17. Symmetry considerations for the targeted assembly of entropically stabilized colloidal crystals via Voronoi particles.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Benjamin A; Damasceno, Pablo F; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-03-24

    The relationship between colloidal building blocks and their assemblies is an active field of research. As a strategy for targeting novel crystal structures, we examine the use of Voronoi particles, which are hard, space-filling particles in the shape of Voronoi cells of a target structure. Although Voronoi particles stabilize their target structure in the limit of high pressure by construction, the thermodynamic assembly of the same structure at moderate pressure, close to the onset of crystallization, is not guaranteed. Indeed, we find that a more symmetric crystal is often preferred due to additional entropic contributions arising from configurational or occupational degeneracy. We characterize the assembly behavior of the Voronoi particles in terms of the symmetries of the building blocks as well as the symmetries of crystal structures and demonstrate how controlling the degeneracies through a modification of particle shape and field-directed assembly can significantly improve the assembly propensity. PMID:25692863

  18. Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2006-09-07

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We describe guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode, including particle beam dynamics and potential coupling methods for the structure. We also discuss possible materials and power sources for this structure and their effects on performance parameters, as well as possible manufacturing techniques and the required tolerances. In addition we describe the computational technique and possible improvements in numerical modeling that would aid development of photonic crystal structures.

  19. Concerning inorganic crystal structure types.

    PubMed

    Bergerhoff; Berndt; Brandenburg; Degen

    1999-04-01

    All representatives of an inorganic crystal structure type can be found systematically in the new database SICS (Standardized Inorganic Crystal Structures). It is derived from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) by selecting the best determination of each phase. In addition, each entry is given in a standardized description and complemented by searchable descriptors Delta, which give the difference between all structures of an isopointal set. Because of the large number of structures the full information on relationships present can only be found by means of the new database itself. Some examples are given here in printed form. The limitations and the possibilities of expansion of SICS in terms of the concept of 'structure types' are demonstrated. PMID:10927350

  20. Micropolar crystal plasticity simulation of particle strengthening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayeur, J. R.; McDowell, D. L.

    2015-09-01

    The yield and work hardening behavior of a small-scale initial-boundary value problem involving dislocation plasticity in an idealized particle strengthened system is investigated using micropolar single crystal plasticity and is compared with results for the same problem from dislocation dynamics simulations. A micropolar single crystal is a work-conjugate higher-order continuum that treats the lattice rotations as generalized displacements, and supports couple stresses that are work-conjugate to the lattice torsion-curvature, leading to a non-symmetric Cauchy stress. The resolved skew-symmetric component of the Cauchy stress tensor results in slip system level kinematic hardening during heterogeneous deformation that depends on gradients of lattice torsion-curvature. The scale-dependent mechanical response of the micropolar single crystal is dictated both by energetic (higher-order elastic constants) and dissipative (plastic torsion-curvature) intrinsic material length scales. We show that the micropolar model captures essential details of the average stress-strain behavior predicted by discrete dislocation dynamics and of the cumulative slip and dislocation density fields predicted by statistical dislocation dynamics.

  1. SSZ-13 Crystallization by Particle Attachment and Deterministic Pathways to Crystal Size Control.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manjesh; Luo, Helen; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2015-10-14

    Many synthetic and natural crystalline materials are either known or postulated to grow via nonclassical pathways involving the initial self-assembly of precursors that serve as putative growth units for crystallization. Elucidating the pathway(s) by which precursors attach to crystal surfaces and structurally rearrange (postattachment) to incorporate into the underlying crystalline lattice is an active and expanding area of research comprising many unanswered fundamental questions. Here, we examine the crystallization of SSZ-13, which is an aluminosilicate zeolite that possesses exceptional physicochemical properties for applications in separations and catalysis (e.g., methanol upgrading to chemicals and the environmental remediation of NO(x)). We show that SSZ-13 grows by two concerted mechanisms: nonclassical growth involving the attachment of amorphous aluminosilicate particles to crystal surfaces and classical layer-by-layer growth via the incorporation of molecules to advancing steps on the crystal surface. A facile, commercially viable method of tailoring SSZ-13 crystal size and morphology is introduced wherein growth modifiers are used to mediate precursor aggregation and attachment to crystal surfaces. We demonstrate that small quantities of polymers can be used to tune crystal size over 3 orders of magnitude (0.1-20 μm), alter crystal shape, and introduce mesoporosity. Given the ubiquitous presence of amorphous precursors in a wide variety of microporous crystals, insight of the SSZ-13 growth mechanism may prove to be broadly applicable to other materials. Moreover, the ability to selectively tailor the physical properties of SSZ-13 crystals through molecular design offers new routes to optimize their performance in a wide range of commercial applications. PMID:26376337

  2. Crystal structure of triclopyr

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seonghwa; Kim, Jineun; Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound {systematic name: 2-[(3,5,6-tri­chloro­pyridin-2-yl)­oxy]acetic acid}, the herbicide triclopyr, C7H4Cl3NO3, the asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol­ecules in which the dihedral angles between the mean plane of the carb­oxy­lic acid group and the pyridyl ring plane are 79.3 (6) and 83.8 (5)°. In the crystal, pairs of inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds form dimers through an R 2 2(8) ring motif and are extended into chains along [100] by weak π–π inter­actions [ring centroid separations = 3.799 (4) and 3.810 (4) Å]. In addition, short inter­molecular Cl⋯Cl contacts [3.458 (2) Å] connect the chains, yielding a two-dimensional architecture extending parallel to (020). The crystal studied was found to be non-merohedrally twinned with the minor component being 0.175 (4). PMID:25309266

  3. Crystal structure of triclopyr.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seonghwa; Kim, Jineun; Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-09-01

    In the title compound {systematic name: 2-[(3,5,6-tri-chloro-pyridin-2-yl)-oxy]acetic acid}, the herbicide triclopyr, C7H4Cl3NO3, the asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol-ecules in which the dihedral angles between the mean plane of the carb-oxy-lic acid group and the pyridyl ring plane are 79.3 (6) and 83.8 (5)°. In the crystal, pairs of inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds form dimers through an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif and are extended into chains along [100] by weak π-π inter-actions [ring centroid separations = 3.799 (4) and 3.810 (4) Å]. In addition, short inter-molecular Cl⋯Cl contacts [3.458 (2) Å] connect the chains, yielding a two-dimensional architecture extending parallel to (020). The crystal studied was found to be non-merohedrally twinned with the minor component being 0.175 (4). PMID:25309266

  4. The flow structure in the near field of jets and its effect on cavitation inception, and, Implementation of ferroelectric liquid crystal and birefringent crystal for image shifting in particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Shridhar

    1999-10-01

    Cavitation experiments performed in the near field of a 50-mm diameter (D) jet at ReD = 5 × 105, showed inception in the form of inclined ``cylindrical'' bubbles at axial distances (x/D) less than 0.55, with indices of 2.5. On tripping the boundary layer, cavitation inception occurred at x/D ~ 2, as distorted ``spherical'' bubbles with inception indices of 1.7. To investigate these substantial differences, the near field of the jet was measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Data on the primary flow, the strength distribution of the ``streamwise''vortices and the velocity profiles within the initial boundary layers were obtained. The untripped case showed a direct transition to three-dimensional flow in the near field (x/D < 0.7) even before rolling up to distinct vortex rings. Strong ``streamwise'' vortices with strengths up to 25% of the jet velocity times the characteristic wavelength were seen. Cavitation inception occurred in the core of these vortices. In contrast, in the tripped jet the vortex sheet rolled up to the familiar Kelvin- Helmholtz vortex rings with weak secondary vortices. Using the measured nuclei distribution, strengths and straining of the ``streamwise'' structures, the rates of cavitation events were estimated. The estimated results match very well with the measured cavitation rates. Also, the Reynolds stresses in the near field of the jet show similar trends and magnitudes to those of Browand & Latigo (1979) and Bell & Mehta (1990) for a plane shear layer. In the second part of this essay we discuss the implementation of electro-optical image shifting to resolve directional ambiguity in PIV measurements. The technique uses a ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) as an electro-optic half wave plate and a birefringent crystal (calcite) as the shifter. The system can be used with non-polarized light sources and fluorescent particles. The minimum shifting time is approximately 100μs. This compact electrooptical device usually is

  5. Crystal structure determination of Efavirenz

    SciTech Connect

    Popeneciu, Horea Dumitru, Ristoiu; Tripon, Carmen Borodi, Gheorghe Pop, Mihaela Maria

    2015-12-23

    Needle-shaped single crystals of the title compound, C{sub 14}H{sub 9}ClF{sub 3}NO{sub 2}, were obtained from a co-crystallization experiment of Efavirenz with maleic acid in a (1:1) ratio, using methanol as solvent. Crystal structure determination at room temperature revealed a significant anisotropy of the lattice expansion compared to the previously reported low-temperature structure. In both low- and room temperature structures the cyclopropylethynyl fragment in one of the asymmetric unit molecules is disordered. While at low-temperature only one C atom exhibits positional disorder, at room temperature the disorder is present for two C atoms of the cyclopropane ring.

  6. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    PubMed Central

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors. PMID:25567568

  7. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  8. Crystal structure of pyrazoxyfen

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Eunjin; Kim, Jineun; Kang, Gihaeng; Kim, Tae Ho

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C20H16Cl2N2O3 (systematic name: 2-{[4-(2,4-di­chloro­benzo­yl)-1,3-di­methyl­pyrazol-5-yl}­oxy}-1-phenyl­ethan-1-one), is the benzoyl­pyrazole herbicide pyrazoxyfen. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol­ecules, A and B, in which the pyrazole ring makes dihedral angles of 80.29 (10) and 61.70 (10)° and 87.60 (10) and 63.92 (8)°, respectively, with the di­chloro­phenyl and phenyl rings. In the crystal, C—H⋯O and C—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, and C—H⋯π and π–π [3.646 (2) Å] inter­actions link adjacent mol­ecules, forming a two-dimensional network parellel to (011). In addition, the networks are linked by weak inter­molecular C—Cl⋯π [3.356 (2), 3.950 (2), 3.250 (2) and 3.575 (2) Å] inter­actions, resulting in a three-dimensional architecture. PMID:26870483

  9. Crystal structure of pyrazoxyfen.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eunjin; Kim, Jineun; Kang, Gihaeng; Kim, Tae Ho

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, C20H16Cl2N2O3 (systematic name: 2-{[4-(2,4-di-chloro-benzo-yl)-1,3-di-methyl-pyrazol-5-yl}-oxy}-1-phenyl-ethan-1-one), is the benzoyl-pyrazole herbicide pyrazoxyfen. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol-ecules, A and B, in which the pyrazole ring makes dihedral angles of 80.29 (10) and 61.70 (10)° and 87.60 (10) and 63.92 (8)°, respectively, with the di-chloro-phenyl and phenyl rings. In the crystal, C-H⋯O and C-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, and C-H⋯π and π-π [3.646 (2) Å] inter-actions link adjacent mol-ecules, forming a two-dimensional network parellel to (011). In addition, the networks are linked by weak inter-molecular C-Cl⋯π [3.356 (2), 3.950 (2), 3.250 (2) and 3.575 (2) Å] inter-actions, resulting in a three-dimensional architecture. PMID:26870483

  10. Predicting patchy particle crystals: variable box shape simulations and evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Emanuela; Doppelbauer, Günther; Filion, Laura; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Kahl, Gerhard

    2012-06-01

    We consider several patchy particle models that have been proposed in literature and we investigate their candidate crystal structures in a systematic way. We compare two different algorithms for predicting crystal structures: (i) an approach based on Monte Carlo simulations in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble and (ii) an optimization technique based on ideas of evolutionary algorithms. We show that the two methods are equally successful and provide consistent results on crystalline phases of patchy particle systems. PMID:22697525

  11. Reversible switching of liquid crystal micro-particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Koki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-01-21

    Liquid crystal micro-particles are functional materials possessing optical and dielectric anisotropies originating from the arrangement of rod-like molecules within the particles. Although they can be switched by an electric field, particles dispersed in isotropic hosts usually cannot return to their original state, because there is no restoration force acting on the particles. Here, we describe reversible switching of liquid crystal micro-particles by dispersing them in a nematic liquid crystal host. We fabricate square micro-particles with unidirectional molecular alignment and investigate their static and dynamic electro-optic properties by applying an in-plane electric field. The behavior of the micro-particles is well-described by the theoretical model we construct, making this study potentially useful for the development of liquid crystal-liquid crystal particle composites with engineered properties. PMID:26514389

  12. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  13. Crystal structure of guggulsterone Z

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, V. K. Bandhoria, P.; Gupta, B. D.; Gupta, K. K.

    2006-03-15

    The crystal structure of the title compound (4,17(20)-trans-pregnadiene-3,16-dione, C{sub 21}H{sub 28}O{sub 2}) has been determined by direct methods using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The compound crystallizes into the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} with the unit cell parameters a = 7.908(2) A, b = 13.611(3) A, c = 16.309(4) A, and Z = 4. The structure has been refined to R = 0.058 for 3667 observed reflections. The bond distances and angles are in good agreement with guggulsterone E and other related steroid molecules. Ring A exists in the distorted sofa conformation, while rings B and C adopt the distorted chair conformation. Five-membered ring D is intermediate between the half-chair and envelope conformations. The A/B ring junction is quasi-trans, while ring systems B/C and C/D are trans fused about the C(8)-C(9) and C(13)-C(14) bonds, respectively. The steroid nucleus has a small twist, as shown by the C(19)-C(10)...C(13)-C(18) pseudo-torsion angle of 7.2{sup o}. The crystal structure is stabilized by intra-and intermolecular C-H...O hydrogen bonds.

  14. Particle jumps in structural glasses.

    PubMed

    Ciamarra, Massimo Pica; Pastore, Raffaele; Coniglio, Antonio

    2016-01-14

    Particles in structural glasses rattle around temporary equilibrium positions, that seldom change through a process which is much faster than the relaxation time, known as particle jump. Since the relaxation of the system is due to the accumulation of many such jumps, it could be possible to connect the single particle short time motion to the macroscopic relaxation by understanding the features of the jump dynamics. Here we review recent results in this research direction, clarifying the features of particle jumps that have been understood and those that are still under investigation, and examining the role of particle jumps in different theories of the glass transition. PMID:26481331

  15. The Surface Structure of Ground Metal Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boas, W.; Schmid, E.

    1944-01-01

    The changes produced on metallic surfaces as a result of grinding and polishing are not as yet fully understood. Undoubtedly there is some more or less marked change in the crystal structure, at least, in the top layer. Hereby a diffusion of separated crystal particles may be involved, or, on plastic material, the formation of a layer in greatly deformed state, with possible recrystallization in certain conditions. Czochralski verified the existence of such a layer on tin micro-sections by successive observations of the texture after repeated etching; while Thomassen established, roentgenographically by means of the Debye-Scherrer method, the existence of diffused crystal fractions on the surface of ground and polished tin bars, which he had already observed after turning (on the lathe). (Thickness of this layer - 0.07 mm). Whether this layer borders direct on the undamaged base material or whether deformed intermediate layers form the transition, nothing is known. One observation ty Sachs and Shoji simply states that after the turning of an alpha-brass crystal the disturbance starting from the surface, penetrates fairly deep (approx. 1 mm) into the crystal (proof by recrystallization at 750 C).

  16. Crystal Structures of Yeast-Produced Enterovirus 71 and Enterovirus 71/Coxsackievirus A16 Chimeric Virus-Like Particles Provide the Structural Basis for Novel Vaccine Design against Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Ke; He, Ya-Ling; Li, Hao-Yang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) are the two major causative agents for hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD). Previously, we demonstrated that a virus-like particle (VLP) for EV71 produced from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a potential vaccine candidate against EV71 infection, and an EV71/CVA16 chimeric VLP can elicit protective immune responses against both virus infections. Here, we presented the crystal structures of both VLPs, showing that both the linear and conformational neutralization epitopes identified in EV71 are mostly preserved on both VLPs. The replacement of only 4 residues in the VP1 GH loop converted strongly negatively charged surface patches formed by portions of the SP70 epitope in EV71 VLP into a relatively neutral surface in the chimeric VLP, which likely accounted for the additional neutralization capability of the chimeric VLP against CVA16 infection. Such local variations in the amino acid sequences and the surface charge potential are also present in different types of polioviruses. In comparison to EV71 VLP, the chimeric VLP exhibits structural changes at the local site of amino acid replacement and the surface loops of all capsid proteins. This is consistent with the observation that the VP1 GH loop located near the pseudo-3-fold junction is involved in extensive interactions with other capsid regions. Furthermore, portions of VP0 and VP1 in EV71 VLP are at least transiently exposed, revealing the structural flexibility of the VLP. Together, our structural analysis provided insights into the structural basis of enterovirus neutralization and novel vaccine design against HFMD and other enterovirus-associated diseases. IMPORTANCE Our previous studies demonstrated that the enterovirus 71 (EV71) virus-like particle (VLP) produced from yeast is a vaccine candidate against EV71 infection and that a chimeric EV71/coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) VLP with the replacement of 4 amino acids in the VP1 GH loop can confer

  17. Structural Dynamics of the Vault Ribonucleoprotein Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casañas, Arnau; Querol, Jordi; Fita, Ignasi; Verdaguer, Núria

    Vaults are ubiquitous, highly conserved, 13 MDa ribonucleoprotein particles, involved in a diversity of cellular processes, including multidrug resistance, transport mechanisms and signal transmission. There are between 104 and 106 vault particles per mammalian cell and they do not trigger autoimmunity. The vault particle shows a hollow barrel-shaped structure organized in two identical moieties, each consisting of 39 copies of the major vault protein (MVP). Other data indicated that vault halves can dissociate at acidic pH. The high resolution, crystal structure of the of the seven N-terminal domains (R1-R7) of MVP, forming the central vault barrel, together with that of the native vault particle (solved at 8 Å resolution), revealed the interactions governing vault association and suggested a pH-dependent mechanism for a reversible dissociation induced by low pH. Vault particles posses many features making them very promising vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic agents including self-assembly, 100 nm size range, emerging atomic-level structural information, natural presence in humans ensuring biocompability, recombinant production system, existing features for targeting species to the large lumen and a dynamic structure that may be controlled for manipulation of drug release kinetics. All these attributes provide vaults with enormous potential as a drug/gene delivery platform.

  18. Large Silver Halide Single Crystals as Charged Particle Track Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusmiss, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The trajectory of the particle is made visible under a microscope by the accumulation of metallic silver at regions of the lattice damaged by the particle. This decoration of the particle track is accomplished by exposure of the crystal to light. The decoration of normally present lattice imperfections such as dislocations can be suppressed by the addition to the crystal of less than ten parts per million of a suitable polyvalent metal impurity. An account of some preliminary attempts to grow thin single crystals of AgCl is given also, and suggestions for a more refined technique are offered.

  19. Crystal structures and freezing of dipolar fluids.

    PubMed

    Groh, B; Dietrich, S

    2001-02-01

    We investigate the crystal structure of classical systems of spherical particles with an embedded point dipole at T=0. The ferroelectric ground state energy is calculated using generalizations of the Ewald summation technique. Due to the reduced symmetry compared to the nonpolar case the crystals are never strictly cubic. For the Stockmayer (i.e., Lennard-Jones plus dipolar) interaction three phases are found upon increasing the dipole moment: hexagonal, body-centered orthorhombic, and body-centered tetragonal. An even richer phase diagram arises for dipolar soft spheres with a purely repulsive inverse power law potential approximately r(-n). A crossover between qualitatively different sequences of phases occurs near the exponent n=12. The results are applicable to electro- and magnetorheological fluids. In addition to the exact ground state analysis we study freezing of the Stockmayer fluid by density-functional theory. PMID:11308482

  20. Melting a crystal of self-propelled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Christopher; Muller, Michael; Walsh, Lee; Menon, Narayanan

    We experimentally study the kinetics of melting a two-dimensional non-cohesive crystal of hard, square-shaped millimeter-scale particles. Interactions between the square particles have four-fold rotational symmetry, but particles are designed with features such that when vibrated their predominant motion is polar along one body axis. We prepare the initial crystalline state with varying orientations of the particle polarity relative to the symmetry axes of the crystal. We then study the melting of this crystal when vertical vibrations are turned on. Orientational and translational order are initially strongly coupled, and during melting translational order is lost before orientational order. The spatial distribution of order parameters and the time scale for melting kinetics is strongly affected by compatibility between the polarity and the crystal axes in the initial condition.

  1. Crystal structure of human U1 snRNP, a small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle, reveals the mechanism of 5' splice site recognition.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    U1 snRNP binds to the 5' exon-intron junction of pre-mRNA and thus plays a crucial role at an early stage of pre-mRNA splicing. We present two crystal structures of engineered U1 sub-structures, which together reveal at atomic resolution an almost complete network of protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions within U1 snRNP, and show how the 5' splice site of pre-mRNA is recognised by U1 snRNP. The zinc-finger of U1-C interacts with the duplex between pre-mRNA and the 5'-end of U1 snRNA. The binding of the RNA duplex is stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions between U1-C and the RNA backbone around the splice junction but U1-C makes no base-specific contacts with pre-mRNA. The structure, together with RNA binding assays, shows that the selection of 5'-splice site nucleotides by U1 snRNP is achieved predominantly through basepairing with U1 snRNA whilst U1-C fine-tunes relative affinities of mismatched 5'-splice sites. PMID:25555158

  2. Crystal structure of human U1 snRNP, a small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle, reveals the mechanism of 5′ splice site recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    U1 snRNP binds to the 5′ exon-intron junction of pre-mRNA and thus plays a crucial role at an early stage of pre-mRNA splicing. We present two crystal structures of engineered U1 sub-structures, which together reveal at atomic resolution an almost complete network of protein–protein and RNA-protein interactions within U1 snRNP, and show how the 5′ splice site of pre-mRNA is recognised by U1 snRNP. The zinc-finger of U1-C interacts with the duplex between pre-mRNA and the 5′-end of U1 snRNA. The binding of the RNA duplex is stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions between U1-C and the RNA backbone around the splice junction but U1-C makes no base-specific contacts with pre-mRNA. The structure, together with RNA binding assays, shows that the selection of 5′-splice site nucleotides by U1 snRNP is achieved predominantly through basepairing with U1 snRNA whilst U1-C fine-tunes relative affinities of mismatched 5′-splice sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04986.001 PMID:25555158

  3. The structure of small penta-twinned gold particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Pei-Yu; Kunath, W.; Gleiter, H.; Weiss, K.

    1989-03-01

    The structural feathers of penta-twinned gold particles (size between 2 and 6 nm) generated by gas evaporation have been investigated by high resolution TEM. The structural characteristic of penta-twinned particles is different from that of quasi-crystals that the five coherent or incoherent twin boundaries separating the twin oriented segments do not join up along a common edge. The lattice parameter is reduced by 4 5% in comparison to that of bulk gold. The formation of the penta-twinned particles is proposed to occur by particle collision. The particles were observed to be crystalline at ambient temperature.

  4. Crystal Structure Effect on Electrical Properties of Ysz Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Gong, Shengkai; Zhou, Chungen; Xu, Huibin

    YSZ samples were prepared by Plasma Spray (PS) and Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) respectively. Microstructure and morphology were observed by SEM and XRD. Grain size of PS-YSZ was non-uniform caused by the inclusion of nano particle by molten particle and column crystal structure was observed for EB-PVD-YSZ. The Arrhenius plots of two samples were graphed by analysis of the measurement results of AC impedance spectra. The conductive mechanisms for EB-PVD and PS YSZ were different due to the crystal structure.

  5. Quantum effects for particles channeling in a bent crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feranchuk, Ilya; San, Nguyen Quang

    2016-09-01

    Quantum mechanical theory for channeling of the relativistic charged particles in the bent crystals is considered in the paper. Quantum effects of under-barrier tunneling are essential when the radius of the curvature is closed to its critical value. In this case the wave functions of the quasi-stationary states corresponding to the particles captured in a channel are presented in the analytical form. The efficiency of channeling of the particles and their angular distribution at the exit crystal surface are calculated. Characteristic experimental parameters for observation the quantum effects are estimated.

  6. Interaction of small spherical particles in confined cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, B. I.; Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Tovkach, O. M.; Chernyshuk, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    The theory of the elastic interaction of spherical colloidal particles immersed into a confined cholesteric liquid crystal is proposed. The case of weak anchoring on the particle surfaces is considered. We derive a general expression for the energy of the interaction between small spherical particles (with diameter much smaller than the cholesteric pitch) suspended in a cholesteric confined by two parallel planes. The resulting form of the interaction energy has a more complex spatial pattern and energy versus distance dependence than that in nematic colloids. The absence of translational symmetry related to helical periodicity and local nematic ordering in cholesteric liquid crystals manifest themselves in the complex nature of the interaction maps.

  7. Formation of a columnar liquid crystal in a simple one-component system of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metere, Alfredo; Sarman, Sten; Oppelstrup, Tomas; Dzugutov, Mikhail

    We report a molecular dynamics simulation demonstrating that a columnar liquid crystal, commonly formed by disc-shaped molecules, can be formed by identical particles interacting via a spherically symmetric potential. Upon isochoric cooling from a low-density isotropic liquid state the simulated system performed a weak first order phase transition which produced a liquid crystal phase composed of parallel particle columns arranged in a hexagonal pattern in the plane perpendicular to the column axis. The particles within columns formed a liquid structure and demonstrated a significant intracolumn diffusion. Further cooling resulted in another first-order transition whereby the column structure became periodically ordered in three dimensions transforming the liquid-crystal phase into a crystal. This result is the first observation of a liquid crystal formation in a simple one-component system of particles. Its conceptual significance is in that it demonstrated that liquid crystals that have so far only been produced in systems of anisometric molecules, can also be formed by mesoscopic soft-matter and colloidal systems of spherical particles with appropriately tuned interatomic potential.

  8. Photonic crystal devices formed by a charged-particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Koops, Hans W. P.

    2000-01-01

    A photonic crystal device and method. The photonic crystal device comprises a substrate with at least one photonic crystal formed thereon by a charged-particle beam deposition method. Each photonic crystal comprises a plurality of spaced elements having a composition different from the substrate, and may further include one or more impurity elements substituted for spaced elements. Embodiments of the present invention may be provided as electromagnetic wave filters, polarizers, resonators, sources, mirrors, beam directors and antennas for use at wavelengths in the range from about 0.2 to 200 microns or longer. Additionally, photonic crystal devices may be provided with one or more electromagnetic waveguides adjacent to a photonic crystal for forming integrated electromagnetic circuits for use at optical, infrared, or millimeter-wave frequencies.

  9. Improved synthesis of fine zinc borate particles using seed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürhan, Deniz; Çakal, Gaye Ö.; Eroğlu, İnci; Özkar, Saim

    2009-03-01

    Zinc borate is a flame retardant additive used in polymers, wood applications and textile products. There are different types of zinc borate having different chemical compositions and structures. In this study, the production of zinc borate having the molecular formula of 2ZnO·3B 2O 3·3.5H 2O was reexamined by studying the effects of reaction parameters on the properties of product as well as the reaction kinetics. Production of zinc borate from the reaction of boric acid and zinc oxide in the presence of seed crystals was performed in a continuously stirred, temperature-controlled batch reactor having a volume of 1.5 L. Samples taken in regular time intervals during the experiments were analyzed for the concentration of zinc oxide and boron oxide in the solid as well as for the conversion of zinc oxide to zinc borate versus time. The zinc borate production reaction was fit to the logistic model. The reaction rate, reaction completion time, composition and particle size distribution of zinc borate product were determined by varying the following parameters: the boric acid to zinc oxide ratio (H 3BO 3:ZnO=3:1, 3.5:1, 5:1 and 7:1), the particle size of zinc oxide (10 and 25 μm), stirring rate (275, 400, 800 and 1600 rpm), temperature (75, 85 and 95 °C) and the size of seed crystals (10 and 2 μm). The products were also analyzed for particle size distribution. The experimental results showed that the reaction rate increases with the increase in H 3BO 3:ZnO ratio, particle size of zinc oxide, stirring rate and temperature. Concomitantly, the reaction completion time is decreased by increasing the H 3BO 3:ZnO ratio, stirring rate and temperature. The average particle sizes of the zinc borate products are in the range 4.3-16.6 μm (wet dispersion analysis).

  10. Old and New Particle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Milo

    2002-05-01

    This discussion will compare the old concept of the structure of matter with Nature. How did the ancient model affect scientific thinking leading science down blind pathways producing paradoxes? What instead is the simple logic and surprising consequences of Nature's choice, the Wave Structure of Matter? The old concept due to the Greek Democritus was a discrete particle like a grain of sand. It has survived almost unchanged. Even today, we prefer to regard mathematical entities, the 'photon' and quarks, as tiny grains. Only recently has the wave structure of particles been determined. Human emotions prefer explanations that agree with personal experience. We know that atomic sizes are much smaller than our senses can reveal, but most people, including scientists, prefer to imagine the electron like a baseball or a bullet. It is not. The quantum Wave Structure of Matter reveals the origin of the Natural laws, and opens a door to research in chemistry, biology, energy, and micro-electronics. Why had this not been found before? Because the Democritus particle agreed with emotions. Few people looked elsewhere. Modern structure is at www.QuantumMatter.com

  11. Dexterous acoustic trapping and patterning of particles assisted by phononic crystal plate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tian; Ke, Manzhu Xu, Shengjun; Feng, Junheng; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-04-20

    In this letter, we present experimental demonstration of multi-particles trapping and patterning by the artificially engineered acoustic field of phononic crystal plate. Polystyrene particles are precisely trapped and patterned in two dimensional arrays, for example, the square, triangular, or quasi-periodic arrays, depending on the structures of the phononic crystal plates with varying sub-wavelength holes array. Analysis shows that the enhanced acoustic radiation force, induced by the resonant transmission field highly localized near the sub-wavelength apertures, accounts for the particles self-organizing. It can be envisaged that this kind of simple design of phononic crystal plates would pave an alternative route for self-assembly of particles and may be utilized in the lab-on-a-chip devices.

  12. Self-organized assemblies of colloidal particles obtained from an aligned chromonic liquid crystal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Natalie; Jünnemann-Held, Gisela; Collings, Peter J; Kitzerow, Heinz-S

    2015-02-28

    The behavior of mono-disperse colloidal particles in a chromonic liquid crystal was investigated. Poly(methyl methacrylate) spherical particles with three different functionalizations, with and without surface charges, were utilized in the nematic and columnar phases of disodium cromoglycate solutions. The nematic phase was completely aligned parallel to the glass substrates by a simple rubbing technique, and the columnar phase showed regions of similar alignment. The behavior of the colloidal particles in the chromonic liquid crystal depended critically on the functionality, with bromine functionalized particles not dispersing at all, and cationic trimethylammonium and epoxy functionalized particles dispersing well in the isotropic phase of the liquid crystal. At the transition to the nematic and especially the columnar phase, the colloidal particles were expelled into the remaining isotropic phase. Since the columnar phase grew in parallel ribbons, the colloidal particles ended up in chain-like assemblies. Such behavior opens the possibility of producing patterned assemblies of colloidal particles by taking advantage of the self-organized structure of chromonic liquid crystals. PMID:25589441

  13. [Theory and practice of electrospray crystallization in particle size reduction].

    PubMed

    Szunyogh, Tímea; Ambrus, Rita; Szabóné Révész, Piroska

    2015-01-01

    Nowdays, one of the most challenges for the researchers is the formulation of poorly water soluble drugs. Reduction of particle size of active agents to submicron range could result in a faster dissolution rate and higher bioavailability. Integration as crystallization process is an often used particle size decreasing technique. The aim of this study was to show the theoretical background and practical application of the electros pray crystallization as an innovative particle size decreasing technique. Our model drug was the niflumic acid (NIF), which belongs to the BCS Class II. After the optimization of the process parameters, the physico-chemical properties of the samples were characterized. Particle size and shape were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Crystalline state of NIF and the samples were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction. Physico-chemical properties were determined using dissolution test from simulated media. The electrospray crytallization resulted in particle size reduction but the aggregation of nanonized NIF crystals (NIF-nano) could not avoid without excipient. Aggregates with poor secondary forces are suitable for production of the interactive physical mixture. It was found that NIF-nano could be well distributed on the surface of the mannitol as carrier and the Poloxamer R protected the NIF-nano crystals (320 nm)from aggregation. Consequently, the physical mixture resulted in product with higher polarity, better wettability and faster dissolution rate of NIF as raw NIF or NIF-nano. PMID:26390735

  14. Crystal structure of prethrombin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhiwei; Pelc, Leslie A.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2010-11-15

    Prothrombin is the zymogen precursor of the clotting enzyme thrombin, which is generated by two sequential cleavages at R271 and R320 by the prothrombinase complex. The structure of prothrombin is currently unknown. Prethrombin-1 differs from prothrombin for the absence of 155 residues in the N-terminal domain and is composed of a single polypeptide chain containing fragment 2 (residues 156-271), A chain (residues 272-320), and B chain (residues 321-579). The X-ray crystal structure of prethrombin-1 solved at 2.2-{angstrom} resolution shows an overall conformation significantly different (rmsd = 3.6 {angstrom}) from that of its active form meizothrombin desF1 carrying a cleavage at R320. Fragment 2 is rotated around the y axis by 29{sup o} and makes only few contacts with the B chain. In the B chain, the oxyanion hole is disrupted due to absence of the I16-D194 ion pair and the Na{sup +} binding site and adjacent primary specificity pocket are highly perturbed. A remarkable feature of the structure is that the autolysis loop assumes a helical conformation enabling W148 and W215, located 17 {angstrom} apart in meizothrombin desF1, to come within 3.3 {angstrom} of each other and completely occlude access to the active site. These findings suggest that the zymogen form of thrombin possesses conformational plasticity comparable to that of the mature enzyme and have significant implications for the mechanism of prothrombin activation and the zymogen {yields} protease conversion in trypsin-like proteases.

  15. Structure of self - assembled two-dimensional spherical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bausch, Andreas R.

    2004-03-01

    Dense spherical particles on a flat surface usually pack into a simple triangular lattice, similar to billiard balls at the start of a game. The minimum energy configuration for interacting particles on the curved surface of a sphere, however, presents special difficulties, as recognized already by J.J. Thomson. We describe experimental investigations of the structure of two-dimensional spherical crystals. The crystals, formed by beads self-assembled on water droplets in oil, serve as model systems for exploring very general theories about the minimum energy configurations of particles with arbitrary repulsive interactions on curved surfaces. Above a critical system size we find that crystals develop distinctive high-angle grain boundaries or "scars" not found in planar crystals. The number of excess defects in a scar is shown to grow linearly with the dimensionless system size. First experiments where the melting of the crystal structure was observable will be discussed. Dynamic triangulation methods allow the analysis of the dynamics of the defects. Possible modifications towards mechanically stabilized self assembly structures result in so called Colloidosomes, which are promising for many different encapsulation purposes.

  16. Structural stability of vault particles.

    PubMed

    Esfandiary, Reza; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Rome, Leonard H; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell

    2009-04-01

    Vaults, at 13 MDa, are the largest ribonucleoprotein particles known. In vitro, expression of the major vault protein (MVP) alone in Sf9 insect cells results in the production of recombinant particles with characteristic vault structure. With the ultimate goal of using recombinant vaults as nanocapsules for the delivery of biomolecules, we have employed a variety of spectroscopic techniques (i.e., circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, and light scattering) along with electron microscopy, to characterize the structural stability of vaults over a wide range of pH (3-8) and temperature (10-90 degrees C). Ten different conformational states of the vaults were identified over the pH and temperature range studied with the most stable region at pH 6-8 below 40 degrees C and least stable at pH 4-6 above 60 degrees C. A unique intermediate molten globulelike state was also identified at pH 6 and approximately 55 degrees C. EM imaging showed the opening of intact vaults into flowerlike structures when transitioning from neutral to acidic pH. This information has potential use in the development of recombinant vaults into nanocapsules for drug delivery since one mechanism by which therapeutic agents entrapped in vaults could be released is through an opening of the intact vault structure. PMID:18683860

  17. Crystal structure of benzimidazolium salicylate

    PubMed Central

    Amudha, M.; Kumar, P. Praveen; Chakkaravarthi, G.

    2015-01-01

    In the anion of the title mol­ecular salt, C7H7N2 +·C7H5O3 − (systematic name: 1H-benzimidazol-3-ium 2-hy­droxy­ben­zo­ate), there is an intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond that generates an S(6) ring motif. The CO2 group makes a dihedral angle of 5.33 (15)° with its attached ring. In the crystal, the dihedral angle between the benzimidazolium ring and the anion benzene ring is 75.88 (5)°. Two cations bridge two anions via two pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, enclosing an R 4 4(16) ring motif, forming a four-membered centrosymmetric arrangement. These units are linked via C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains propagating along the b-axis direction. The chains are linked by C—H⋯π and π–π inter­actions [inter-centroid distances = 3.4156 (7) and 3.8196 (8) Å], forming a three-dimensional structure. PMID:26594483

  18. Crystal structure of a perfect carbyne

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Mavrinsky, V. V.

    2008-01-15

    The crystal structure of a perfect carbyne is calculated by the molecular mechanics methods. It is established that the carbyne crystals should consist of polycumulene chains arranged in hexagonal bundles. The unit cell of the perfect carbyne crystal is trigonal and contains one carbon atom. The unit cell parameters are as follows: a = b = c = 0.3580 nm, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 118.5{sup o}, and space group P3m1. The perfect carbyne single crystals have a stable structure at room temperature if the length of their constituent chains is larger than 500 nm.

  19. A novel approach to identifying the elemental composition of individual residue particles retained in single snow crystals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chang-Jin; Hwang, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to describe the chemical characteristics of individual residual particles in hexagonal snow crystals, which can provide a clue to the aerosol removal mechanism during snowfall. In the present study, to collect snow crystal individually and to identify the elemental composition of individual residues retained in a hexagonal crystal, an orchestration of the replication technique and micro-particle induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) analysis was carried out. Information concerning the elemental compositions and their abundance in the snow crystals showed a severe crystal-to-crystal fluctuation. The residues retained in the hexagonal snow crystals were dominated primarily by mineral components, such as silica and calcium. Based on the elemental mask and the spectrum of micro-PIXE, it was possible to presume the chemical inner-structure as well as the elemental mixing state in and/or on the individual residues retained in single snow crystals. PMID:23934568

  20. Ordered and disordered colloidal particle monolayers at liquid crystal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei-Shao; Lohr, Matthew; Gharbi, Mohamed Amine; Stebe, Kathleen; Yodh, A. G.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we investigate ordered colloidal particle monolayers at the air/liquid-crystal (LC) interface. Specifically, silica microparticles are treated with DMOAP to create homeotropic anchoring of LC mesogens at their surfaces. These particles are then spread on an air-exposed interface of the LC 5CB. Macroscopic ordered patterns of these microparticles form due to long-range interactions between particles that are mediated by elastic deformations of the underlying LC. Different confinement conditions lead to various self-assembled patterns ranging from hexagonal lattices to chain-like dipole formations. Using dark-field video microscopy, we track and analyze the dynamics of the colloidal particles in the hexagonal crystal packing, deriving mean squared displacements, phonon modes and density of states, etc., under several conditions. Further, heating of the nematic LC into its isotropic phase enables us to observe melting dynamics of this unusual quasi-2D crystal. The investigations provide insight into crystalline packings controlled by liquid-crystal mediated colloidal interactions. This work is funded by NSF Grant DMR12-05463, PENN MRSEC Grant DMR11-20901, and NASA Grant NNX08AO0G.

  1. Metal oxide superconducting powder comprised of flake-like single crystal particles

    DOEpatents

    Capone, D.W.; Dusek, J.

    1994-10-18

    Powder of a ceramic superconducting material is synthesized such that each particle of the powder is a single crystal having a flake-like, nonsymmetric morphology such that the c-axis is aligned parallel to the short dimension of the flake. Nonflake powder is synthesized by the normal methods and is pressed into pellets or other shapes and fired for excessive times to produce a coarse grained structure. The fired products are then crushed and ground producing the flake-like powder particles which exhibit superconducting characteristics when aligned with the crystal lattice. 3 figs.

  2. Metal oxide superconducting powder comprised of flake-like single crystal particles

    DOEpatents

    Capone, Donald W.; Dusek, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    Powder of a ceramic superconducting material is synthesized such that each particle of the powder is a single crystal having a flake-like, nonsymmetric morphology such that the c-axis is aligned parallel to the short dimension of the flake. Nonflake powder is synthesized by the normal methods and is pressed into pellets or other shapes and fired for excessive times to produce a coarse grained structure. The fired products are then crushed and ground producing the flake-like powder particles which exhibit superconducting characteristics when aligned with the crystal lattice.

  3. Exploiting MIC architectures for the simulation of channeling of charged particles in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagli, Enrico; Karpusenko, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    Coherent effects of ultra-relativistic particles in crystals is an area of science under development. DYNECHARM + + is a toolkit for the simulation of coherent interactions between high-energy charged particles and complex crystal structures. The particle trajectory in a crystal is computed through numerical integration of the equation of motion. The code was revised and improved in order to exploit parallelization on multi-cores and vectorization of single instructions on multiple data. An Intel Xeon Phi card was adopted for the performance measurements. The computation time was proved to scale linearly as a function of the number of physical and virtual cores. By enabling the auto-vectorization flag of the compiler a three time speedup was obtained. The performances of the card were compared to the Dual Xeon ones.

  4. Interaction between two spherical particles in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Jun-Ichi; Stark, Holger; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    We numerically investigate the interaction between two spherical particles in a nematic liquid crystal mediated by elastic distortions in the orientational order. We pay attention to the cases where two particles with equal radii R0 impose rigid normal anchoring on their surfaces and carry a pointlike topological defect referred to as a hyperbolic hedgehog. To describe the geometry of our system, we use bispherical coordinates, which prove useful in the implementation of boundary conditions at the particle surfaces and at infinity. We adopt the Landau de Gennes continuum theory in terms of a second-rank tensor order parameter Qij for the description of the orientational order of a nematic liquid crystal. We also utilize an adaptive mesh refinement scheme that has proven to be an efficient way of dealing with topological defects whose core size is much smaller than the particle size. When the two “dipoles,” composed of a particle and a hyperbolic hedgehog, are in parallel directions, the two-particle interaction potential is attractive for large interparticle distances D and proportional to D-3 as expected from the form of the dipole-dipole interaction, until the well-defined potential minimum at D≃2.46 R0 is reached. For the antiparallel configuration with no hedgehogs between the two particles, the interaction potential is repulsive and behaves as D-2 for D≲10 R0 , which is stronger than the dipole-dipole repulsion ( ˜ D-3 ) expected theoretically as an asymptotic behavior for large D .

  5. Strategies for crystallizing a chromatin protein in complex with the nucleosome core particle

    PubMed Central

    Makde, Ravindra D.; Tan, Song

    2013-01-01

    The molecular details for how chromatin factors and enzymes interact with the nucleosome are critical to understand fundamental genetic processes including cell division and gene regulation. A structural understanding of such processes has been hindered by the difficulty producing diffraction quality crystals of chromatin proteins in complex with the nucleosome. We describe here the steps used to grow crystals of the 300 kDa RCC1 chromatin factor/nucleosome core particle complex which diffract to 2.9 Å resolution. These steps included both pre- and post-crystallization strategies potentially useful to other complexes. We screened multiple variant RCC1-nucleosome core particle complexes assembled using different RCC1 homologs and deletion variants, and nucleosomes containing nucleosomal DNA with different sequences and lengths as well as histone deletion variants. We found that using RCC1 from different species produced different crystal forms of the RCC1-nucleosome complex consistent with key crystal packing interactions mediated by RCC1. Optimization of post-crystallization soaks to dehydrate the crystals dramatically improved the diffraction quality of the RCC1/nucleosome crystal from 5.0 to 2.9 Å resolution. PMID:23928047

  6. Brownian Dynamics of Colloidal Particles in Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Angel; Collings, Peter J.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    We employ video microscopy to study the Brownian dynamics of colloidal particles in the nematic phase of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs). These LCLCs (in this case, DSCG) are water soluble, and their nematic phases are characterized by an unusually large elastic anisotropy. Our preliminary measurements of particle mean-square displacement for polystyrene colloidal particles (~5 micron-diameter) show diffusive and sub-diffusive behaviors moving parallel and perpendicular to the nematic director, respectively. In order to understand these motions, we are developing models that incorporate the relaxation of elastic distortions of the surrounding nematic field. Further experiments to confirm these preliminary results and to determine the origin of these deviations compared to simple diffusion theory are ongoing; our results will also be compared to previous diffusion experiments in nematic liquid crystals. We gratefully acknowledge financial support through NSF DMR12-05463, MRSEC DMR11-20901, and NASA NNX08AO0G.

  7. Crystal structures of MBP fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Waugh, David S

    2016-03-01

    Although chaperone-assisted protein crystallization remains a comparatively rare undertaking, the number of crystal structures of polypeptides fused to maltose-binding protein (MBP) that have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) has grown dramatically during the past decade. Altogether, 102 fusion protein structures were detected by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. Collectively, these structures comprise a range of sizes, space groups, and resolutions that are typical of the PDB as a whole. While most of these MBP fusion proteins were equipped with short inter-domain linkers to increase their rigidity, fusion proteins with long linkers have also been crystallized. In some cases, surface entropy reduction mutations in MBP appear to have facilitated the formation of crystals. A comparison of the structures of fused and unfused proteins, where both are available, reveals that MBP-mediated structural distortions are very rare. PMID:26682969

  8. Particle trapping and transport achieved via an adjustable acoustic field above a phononic crystal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ke, M.; Qiu, C.; Liu, Z.

    2016-06-01

    We present the design for an acoustic system that can achieve particle trapping and transport using the acoustic force field above a phononic crystal plate. The phononic crystal plate comprised a thin brass plate with periodic slits alternately embedded with two kinds of elastic inclusions. Enhanced acoustic transmission and localized acoustic fields were achieved when the structure was excited by external acoustic waves. Because of the different resonant frequencies of the two elastic inclusions, the acoustic field could be controlled via the working frequency. Particles were transported between adjacent traps under the influence of the adjustable acoustic field. This device provides a new and versatile avenue for particle manipulation that would complement other means of particle manipulation.

  9. Budded baculovirus particle structure revisited.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiushi; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M; Rottier, Peter J; van Lent, Jan W M

    2016-02-01

    Baculoviruses are a group of enveloped, double-stranded DNA insect viruses with budded (BV) and occlusion-derived (ODV) virions produced during their infection cycle. BVs are commonly described as rod shaped particles with a high apical density of protein extensions (spikes) on the lipid envelope surface. However, due to the fragility of BVs the conventional purification and electron microscopy (EM) staining methods considerably distort the native viral structure. Here, we use cryo-EM analysis to reveal the near-native morphology of two intensively studied baculoviruses, Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Spodoptera exigua MNPV (SeMNPV), as models for BVs carrying GP64 and F as envelope fusion protein on the surface. The now well-preserved AcMNPV and SeMNPV BV particles have a remarkable elongated, ovoid shape leaving a large, lateral space between nucleocapsid (NC) and envelope. Consistent with previous findings the NC has a distinctive cap and base structure interacting tightly with the envelope. This tight interaction may explain the partial retaining of the envelope on both ends of the NC and the disappearance of the remainder of the BV envelope in the negative-staining EM images. Cryo-EM also reveals that the viral envelope contains two layers with a total thickness of ≈ 6-7 nm, which is significantly thicker than a usual biological membrane (<4 nm) as measured by X-ray scanning. Most spikes are densely clustered at the two apical ends of the virion although some envelope proteins are also found more sparsely on the lateral regions. The spikes on the surface of AcMNPV BVs appear distinctly different from those of SeMNPV. Based on our observations we propose a new near-native structural model of baculovirus BVs. PMID:26743500

  10. Compact Couplers for Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin; Lin, M.C.; Schwartz, Brian; Byer, Robert; McGuinness, Christopher; Colby, Eric; England, Robert; Noble, Robert; Spencer, James; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    Photonic crystal waveguides are promising candidates for laser-driven accelerator structures because of their ability to confine a speed-of-light mode in an all-dielectric structure. Because of the difference between the group velocity of the waveguide mode and the particle bunch velocity, fields must be coupled into the accelerating waveguide at frequent intervals. Therefore efficient, compact couplers are critical to overall accelerator efficiency. We present designs and simulations of high-efficiency coupling to the accelerating mode in a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide from a waveguide adjoining it at 90{sup o}. We discuss details of the computation and the resulting transmission. We include some background on the accelerator structure and photonic crystal-based optical acceleration in general.

  11. Dynamics of particles and defects on spherical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Rodrigo; Kelleher, Colm; Chaikin, Paul

    Repulsive particles confined to two dimensions can form nearly perfect crystals that melt via the well-know Kosterlitz-Thouless two-step process. By contrast, when identical particles are confined to the surface of a sphere, the curvature and topology of the surface distorts the crystal lattice and forces it to accommodate point-like disclinations and chains of dislocations. Extensive numerical and theoretical investigation has shown that these extended scars are intrinsic to the ground-state-energy configuration of these packings, as they relieve some of the stress induced by the curvature of the surface. Nevertheless, the effect of these defects on the kinetics and phase behavior of spherical crystals is not at all well understood. Here we present results of computer simulations and experiments that suggest that these scars facilitate the motion of particles close to them and fundamentally alter the nature of the mobility and liquid-to-solid transition of packings of particles confined to spherical surfaces.

  12. Pattern information extraction from crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyan, Erhan; Güdükbay, Uğur; Gülseren, Oğuz

    2007-04-01

    Determining the crystal structure parameters of a material is an important issue in crystallography and material science. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps in understanding the physical behavior of material. It can be difficult to obtain crystal parameters for complex structures, particularly those materials that show local symmetry as well as global symmetry. This work provides a tool that extracts crystal parameters such as primitive vectors, basis vectors and space groups from the atomic coordinates of crystal structures. A visualization tool for examining crystals is also provided. Accordingly, this work could help crystallographers, chemists and material scientists to analyze crystal structures efficiently. Program summaryTitle of program: BilKristal Catalogue identifier: ADYU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYU_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Programming language used: C, C++, Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1 and OpenGL Libraries Computer: Personal Computers with Windows operating system Operating system: Windows XP Professional RAM: 20-60 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:899 779 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test date, etc.:9 271 521 Distribution format:tar.gz External routines/libraries: Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1. For visualization tool, graphics card driver should also support OpenGL Nature of problem: Determining crystal structure parameters of a material is a quite important issue in crystallography. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps to understand physical behavior of material. For complex structures, particularly, for materials which also contain local symmetry as well as global symmetry, obtaining crystal parameters can be quite hard. Solution method: The tool extracts crystal parameters such as primitive vectors, basis vectors and identify the space group from

  13. Role of Surface Area, Primary Particle Size, and Crystal Phase on Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Dispersion Properties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing nanoparticle dispersions and understanding the effect of parameters that alter dispersion properties are important for both environmental applications and toxicity investigations. The role of particle surface area, primary particle size, and crystal phase on TiO2 nanoparticle dispersion properties is reported. Hydrodynamic size, zeta potential, and isoelectric point (IEP) of ten laboratory synthesized TiO2 samples, and one commercial Degussa TiO2 sample (P25) dispersed in different solutions were characterized. Solution ionic strength and pH affect titania dispersion properties. The effect of monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (MgCl2) inert electrolytes on dispersion properties was quantified through their contribution to ionic strength. Increasing titania particle surface area resulted in a decrease in solution pH. At fixed pH, increasing the particle surface area enhanced the collision frequency between particles and led to a higher degree of agglomeration. In addition to the synthesis method, TiO2 isoelectric point was found to be dependent on particle size. As anatase TiO2 primary particle size increased from 6 nm to 104 nm, its IEP decreased from 6.0 to 3.8 that also results in changes in dispersion zeta potential and hydrodynamic size. In contrast to particle size, TiO2 nanoparticle IEP was found to be insensitive to particle crystal structure. PMID:27502650

  14. Preliminary analysis of two and three dimensional crystals of vault ribonucleoprotein particles.

    PubMed

    Querol-Audí, Jordi; Perez-Luque, Rosa; Fita, Ignacio; Lopéz-Iglesias, Carmen; Castón, José R; Carrascosa, José L; Verdaguer, Nuria

    2005-07-01

    Vaults are large ribonucleoprotein particles found in a wide variety of eukaryotes. When imaged by electron-microscopy vaults present a strikingly conserved barrel-shaped structure with an invaginated waist and two protruding caps. In this work, we present two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) crystals of naturally produced vaults in murine and monkey cells, respectively. The 2D-crystals presented a hexagonal packing with the lattice parameter defined by the diameter of the vault barrel. Fourier transforms from images of the negatively stained 2D-crystals showed spots till about 45 A resolution. The 3D-crystals reached about 0.15 x 0.15 x 0.02 mm3 in size and presented a flat triangular morphology with well-developed faces. The preliminary characterization of these 3D-crystals, which diffract very weakly to approximately 10 A resolution, suggests a trigonal packing with the R32 space group symmetry. The 3D-crystals appear to be formed by adding layers of vaults, which retain the hexagonal organization seen in the 2D-crystals, with relative shifts that maximize the interdigitation of particles in adjacent layers. Accurate crystal symmetry in the 2D- and 3D-crystals requires neighbor particles interacting according to a 6-fold and a 3-fold dihedral symmetry, respectively. Compatibility with the reported 8-fold symmetry would imply multiples of 24-fold rotational symmetry, in agreement with the recently proposed 48-fold dihedral symmetry for reconstituted recombinant vaults. PMID:15964767

  15. Resonant optical propulsion of a particle inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Maslov, A V

    2016-07-01

    Resonant propulsion of small nonresonant particles inside metal waveguides due to the formation of resonant states by the guided modes below their cutoffs has been predicted in the past. Here it is shown that stable resonant propulsion exists in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers, which are all-dielectric structures and are a major platform for various photonic applications. Specific features of the resonant propulsion are discussed together with the fiber design issues. The results may enable power-efficient transport of particles over long distances, particle sorting, and sensitive detection. PMID:27367102

  16. Crystal structure prediction of rigid molecules.

    PubMed

    Elking, Dennis M; Fusti-Molnar, Laszlo; Nichols, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    A non-polarizable force field based on atomic multipoles fit to reproduce experimental crystal properties and ab initio gas-phase dimers is described. The Ewald method is used to calculate both long-range electrostatic and 1/r(6) dispersion energies of crystals. The dispersion energy of a crystal calculated by a cutoff method is shown to converge slowly to the exact Ewald result. A method for constraining space-group symmetry during unit-cell optimization is derived. Results for locally optimizing 4427 unit cells including volume, cell parameters, unit-cell r.m.s.d. and CPU timings are given for both flexible and rigid molecule optimization. An algorithm for randomly generating rigid molecule crystals is described. Using the correct experimentally determined space group, the average and maximum number of random crystals needed to find the correct experimental structure is given for 2440 rigid single component crystals. The force field energy rank of the correct experimental structure is presented for the same set of 2440 rigid single component crystals assuming the correct space group. A complete crystal prediction is performed for two rigid molecules by searching over the 32 most probable space groups. PMID:27484371

  17. Structures of cyano-biphenyl liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Yuan-Chao; Tsang, Tung; Rahimzadeh, E.; Yin, L.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of p-alkyl- p'-cyano- bicyclohexanes, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H10)(C6H10) CN (n-CCH), and p-alkyl- p'-cyano- biphenyls, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H4)(C6H4) CN (n-CBP), were studied. It is convenient to use an x ray image intensification device to search for symmetric x ray diffraction patterns. Despite the similarities in molecular structures of these compounds, very different crystal structures were found. For the smectic phase of 2CCH, the structure is close to rhombohedral with threefold symmetry. In contrast, the structure is close to hexagonal close-packed with two molecules per unit cell for 4CCH. Since intermolecular forces may be quite weak for these liquid crystals systems, it appears that crystal structures change considerably when the alkyl chain length is slightly altered. Different structures were also found in the crystalline phase of n-CBP for n = 6 to 9. For n = 7 to 9, the structures are close to monclinic. The structures are reminiscent of the smectic-A liquid crystal structures with the linear molecules slightly tilted away from the c-axis. In contrast, the structure is quite different for n = 6 with the molecules nearly perpendicular to the c-axis.

  18. Liquid crystal light valve structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koda, N. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An improved photosensor film and liquid crystal light valves embodying said film is provided. The photosensor film and liquid crystal light valve is characterized by a significant lower image retention time while maintaining acceptable photosensitivity. The photosensor film is produced by sputter depositing CdS onto an ITO substrate in an atmosphere of argon/H2S gas while maintaining the substrate at a temperature in the range of about 130 C to about 200 C and while introducing nitrogen gas into the system to the extent of not more than about 1% of plasma mixture. Following sputter deposition of the CdS, the film is annealed in an inert gas at temperatures ranging from about 300 C to about 425 C.

  19. Formation of the structure of gold nanoclusters during crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Gafner, Yu. Ya. Goloven'ko, Zh. V.; Gafner, S. L.

    2013-02-15

    The structure formation in gold nanoparticles 1.6-5.0 nm in diameter is studied by molecular dynamics simulation using a tight-binding potential. The simulation shows that the initial fcc phase in small Au clusters transforms into other structural modifications as temperature changes. As the cluster size increases, the transition temperature shifts toward the melting temperature of the cluster. The effect of various crystallization conditions on the formation of the internal structure of gold nanoclusters is studied in terms of microcanonical and canonical ensembles. The stability boundaries of various crystalline isomers are analyzed. The obtained dependences are compared with the corresponding data obtained for copper and nickel nanoparticles. The structure formation during crystallization is found to be characterized by a clear effect of the particle size on the stability of a certain isomer modification. Nickel and copper clusters are shown to exhibit common features in the formation of their structural properties, whereas gold clusters demonstrate much more complex behavior.

  20. Phononic crystals of spherical particles: A tight binding approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mattarelli, M.; Secchi, M.; Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Trento ; Montagna, M.

    2013-11-07

    The vibrational dynamics of a fcc phononic crystal of spheres is studied and compared with that of a single free sphere, modelled either by a continuous homogeneous medium or by a finite cluster of atoms. For weak interaction among the spheres, the vibrational dynamics of the phononic crystal is described by shallow bands, with low degree of dispersion, corresponding to the acoustic spheroidal and torsional modes of the single sphere. The phonon displacements are therefore related to the vibrations of a sphere, as the electron wave functions in a crystal are related to the atomic wave functions in a tight binding model. Important dispersion is found for the two lowest phonon bands, which correspond to zero frequency free translation and rotation of a free sphere. Brillouin scattering spectra are calculated at some values of the exchanged wavevectors of the light, and compared with those of a single sphere. With weak interaction between particles, given the high acoustic impedance mismatch in dry systems, the density of phonon states consist of sharp bands separated by large gaps, which can be well accounted for by a single particle model. Based on the width of the frequency gaps, tunable with the particle size, and on the small number of dispersive acoustic phonons, such systems may provide excellent materials for application as sound or heat filters.

  1. Two-Dimensional Crystal Structure Formed by Two Components of DNA Nanoparticles on a Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuno, Hiroyasu; Maegawa, Yuya; Sato, Masahide

    2016-07-01

    We study the two-dimensional crystal structure of two components of DNA nanoparticles on a substrate by Brownian dynamics simulation. We use the Lennard-Jones potential as the interaction potential between particles and assume that the interaction length between different types of particles, σAB, is smaller than that between the same types of particles, σ. Two types of particles form an alloy structure. With decreasing σAB/σ, the crystal structure changes from a triangular lattice, to a square lattice, a honeycomb lattice, a rectangular lattice, and a triangular lattice.

  2. Pholcodine monohydrate: Crystal structure and polymorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruševski, Gjorgji; Zbačnik, Marija; Kajdžanoska, Marina; Ugarkovic, Sonja; Trimčeski, Vase; Kaitner, Branko; Jovanovski, Gligor; Makreski, Petre

    2013-07-01

    The first crystal structure elucidation of pholcodine monohydrate, an important antitussive active pharmaceutical ingredient is reported herein. The studied compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system in the space group P212121. Each H2O molecule is shared by two pholcodine molecules via three strong hydrogen bonds. The detailed crystallization screening from several different organic solvents afforded single crystals with various quality, all exhibiting prism-to-needlelike micro morphology. The investigation of the obtained single crystals by means of several physico-chemical, solid-state instrumental techniques (FT-IR, DSC, TG/DTG and XRPD) proved that pholcodine monohydrate exists in a single crystalline modification, identical to the commercial form of the compound.

  3. Transfer-printing and host-guest properties of 3D supramolecular particle structures.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xing Yi; Phang, In Yee; Reinhoudt, David N; Vancso, G Julius; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2009-04-01

    Mechanically robust and crystalline supramolecular particle structures have been constructed by decoupling nanoparticle assembly and supramolecular glue infiltration into a sequential process. First, beta-cyclodextrin (CD)-functionalized polystyrene particles (d approximately 500 nm) were assembled on a CD-functionalized surface via convective assembly to form highly ordered, but mechanically unstable, particle crystals. Subsequently, the crystals were infiltrated by a solution of adamantyl-functionalized dendrimers, functioning as a supramolecular glue to bind neighboring particles together and to couple the entire particle crystal to the CD surface, both in a noncovalent manner. The supramolecular particle crystals are highly robust, as witnessed by their ability to withstand agitation by ultrasonication. When assembled on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp, the dendrimer-infiltrated particle crystals could be transfer-printed onto a CD-functionalized target surface. By variation of the geometry and size of the PDMS stamps, single particle lines, interconnected particle rings, and V-shaped particle assemblies were obtained. The particle structures served as 3D receptors for the binding of (multiple) complementary guest molecules, indicating that the supramolecular host functionalities of the particle crystals were retained throughout the fabrication process. PMID:20356024

  4. Dispersions of ellipsoidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Tasinkevych, Mykola; Mondiot, Frédéric; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Loudet, Jean-Christophe

    2014-03-28

    Colloidal particles dispersed in a partially ordered medium, such as a liquid crystal (LC) phase, disturb its alignment and are subject to elastic forces. These forces are long-ranged, anisotropic and tunable through temperature or external fields, making them a valuable asset to control colloidal assembly. The latter is very sensitive to the particle geometry since it alters the interactions between the colloids. We here present a detailed numerical analysis of the energetics of elongated objects, namely prolate ellipsoids, immersed in a nematic host. The results, complemented with qualitative experiments, reveal novel LC configurations with peculiar topological properties around the ellipsoids, depending on their aspect ratio and the boundary conditions imposed on the nematic order parameter. The latter also determine the preferred orientation of ellipsoids in the nematic field, because of elastic torques, as well as the morphology of particle aggregates. PMID:24651907

  5. Particle tracking from image sequences of complex plasma crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hadziavdic, Vedad; Melandsoe, Frank; Hanssen, Alfred

    2006-05-15

    In order to gather information about the physics of the complex plasma crystals from the experimental data, particles have to be tracked through a sequence of images. An application of the Kalman filter for that purpose is presented, using a one-dimensional approximation of the particle dynamics as a model for the filter. It is shown that Kalman filter is capable of tracking dust particles even with high levels of measurement noise. An inherent part of the Kalman filter, the innovation process, can be used to estimate values of the physical system parameters from the experimental data. The method is shown to be able to estimate the characteristic oscillation frequency from noisy data.

  6. Structural complexity and configurational entropy of crystals.

    PubMed

    Krivovichev, Sergey V

    2016-04-01

    Using a statistical approach, it is demonstrated that the complexity of a crystal structure measured as the Shannon information per atom [Krivovichev (2012). Acta Cryst. A68, 393-398] represents a negative contribution to the configurational entropy of a crystalline solid. This conclusion is in full accordance with the general agreement that information and entropy are reciprocal variables. It also agrees well with the understanding that complex structures possess lower entropies relative to their simpler counterparts. The obtained equation is consistent with the Landauer principle and points out that the information encoded in a crystal structure has a physical nature. PMID:27048729

  7. Crystal structure of anagyrine perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Turgunov, Kambarali K; Rakhimov, Shukhrat B; Vinogradova, Valentina I; Tashkhodjaev, Bakhodir

    2015-05-01

    The title mol-ecular salt, C15H21N2O(+)·ClO4 (-), crystallizes with four cations (A, B, C and D) and four anions in the chiral unit cell (space group P21). The alkaloid was isolated from the aerial parts of Genista Hispanica collected in the Samarkand region of Uzbekistan. Each cation is protonated at the N atom that bridges the alkaloid rings C and D. In each cation, ring A is almost planar and ring B adops a sofa conformation with the methyl-ene group bridging to the C ring as the flap. Rings C and D adopt chair conformations with a cis ring junction in all four cations. In the crystal, A+B and C+D dimeric pairs linked by pairs of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds are observed, which generate R 2 (2)(16) loops in each case. The dimers are consolidated by weak aromatic π-π stacking inter-actions between the A rings [centroid-centroid distances = 3.913 (3) and 3.915 (3) Å]. PMID:25995939

  8. Critical single domain grain sizes in chains of interacting greigite particles: Implications for magnetosome crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Williams, Wyn; Roberts, Andrew P.; Winklhofer, Michael; Chang, Liao; Pósfai, Mihály

    2013-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain chains of magnetically interacting crystals (magnetosomes), which aid navigation (magnetotaxis). To improve the efficiency of magnetotaxis, magnetosome crystals (which can consist of magnetite or greigite) should be magnetically stable single domain (SD) particles. Larger particles subdivide into nonuniform multidomain (MD) magnetic structures that produce weaker magnetic signals, while small SD particles become magnetically unstable due to thermal fluctuations and exhibit superparamagnetic (SP) behavior. In this study, we determined the stable SD range as a function of grain elongation and interparticle separation for chains of identical greigite grains using fundamental parameters recently determined for greigite. Interactions significantly increase the stable SD range. For example, for cube-shaped greigite grains the upper stable SD threshold size is increased from 107 nm for isolated grains to 204 nm for touching grains arranged in chains. The larger critical SD grain size for greigite means that, compared to magnetite magnetosomes, greigite magnetosomes can produce larger magnetic signals without the need for intergrain interactions.

  9. Crystal structure of levomepromazine maleate.

    PubMed

    Gál, Gyula Tamás; May, Nóra Veronika; Bombicz, Petra

    2016-05-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C19H25N2OS(+)·C4H3O4 (-) [systematic name: (S)-3-(2-meth-oxy-pheno-thia-zin-10-yl)-N,N,2-tri-methyl-propanaminium hydrogen maleate], comprises two (S)-levomepromazine cations and two hydrogen maleate anions. The conformations of the two cations are similar. The major difference relates to the orientation of the meth-oxy substituent at the pheno-thia-zine ring system. The crystal components form a three-dimensional supra-molecular network via N-H⋯O, C-H⋯O and C-H⋯π inter-actions. A comparison of the conformations of the levomepromazine cations with those of the neutral mol-ecule and similar protonated mol-ecules reveals significant conformational flexibility of the pheno-thia-zine ring system and the substituent at the pheno-thia-zine N atom. PMID:27308001

  10. Single crystal niobium tubes for particle colliders accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James E

    2013-02-28

    The objective of this research project is to produce single crystal niobium (Nb) tubes for use as particle accelerator cavities for the Fermi laboratory’s International Linear Collider project. Single crystal Nb tubes may have superior performance compared to a polycrystalline tubes because the absence of grain boundaries may permit the use of higher accelerating voltages. In addition, Nb tubes that are subjected to the high temperature, high vacuum crystallization process are very pure and well annealed. Any impurity with a significantly higher vapor pressure than Nb should be decreased by the relatively long exposure at high temperature to the high vacuum environment. After application of the single crystal process, the surfaces of the Nb tubes are bright and shiny, and the tube resembles an electro polished Nb tube. For these reasons, there is interest in single crystal Nb tubes and in a process that will produce single crystal tubes. To convert a polycrystalline niobium tube into a single crystal, the tube is heated to within a few hundred °C of the melting temperature of niobium, which is 2477 °C. RF heating is used to rapidly heat the tube in a narrow zone and after reaching the operating temperature, the hot zone is slowly passed along the length of the tube. For crystallization tests with Nb tubes, the traverse rate was in the range of 1-10 cm per hour. All the crystallization tests in this study were performed in a water-cooled, stainless steel chamber under a vacuum of 5 x10-6 torr or better. In earliest tests of the single crystal growth process, the Nb tubes had an OD of 1.9 cm and a wall thickness of 0.15 mm. With these relatively small Nb tubes, the single crystal process was always successful in producing single crystal tubes. In these early tests, the operating temperature was normally maintained at 2200 °C, and the traverse rate was 5 cm per hour. In the next test series, the Nb tube size was increased to 3.8 cm OD and the wall thickness was

  11. Soviet research on crystal channeling of charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassel, S.

    1985-03-01

    This report presents an overview of Soviet research in charged particle beam channeling in crystals from 1972 to the present, and the resulting electromagnetic emission, including Soviet proposals for channeling emission lasers in the X-ray region of the spectrum. It analyzes Soviet attitudes toward crystal channeling of charged particles as a subject of research, describes performers of the research, and indicates the level of effort involved. It presents a brief history of crystal channeling research, the differences between channeling and other kinds of electromagnetic radiation, the definition of the main research issues, and estimates of the potential capabilities of channeling radiation, all based on the Soviet viewpoint. It then describes Soviet proposals for laser systems utilizing the channeling radiation mechanism, and analyzes Soviet experimental work involving the observation and measurement of channeling radiation. The author concludes that the outstanding feature of Soviet research in this area is the optimistic belief of Soviet specialists in the technological potential of this research, but finds that the role of the laser proposals in Soviet planning is ambiguous.

  12. Polypeptide-Coated Silica Particles Dispersed in Lyotropic Liquid Crystals of the Same Polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Cornelia; Balamurugan, Sreelatha; Cueto, Rafael; Roy, Amitava; Russo, Paul S

    2016-07-28

    When a particle is introduced into a liquid crystal (LC), it distorts the LC director field, leading to new arrangements of the particles. This phenomenon is ordinarily studied using >100 nm particles and ∼2 nm mesogens. Usually the particle surface and mesogens are chemically distinct, which adds an enthalpic effect, even though the more interesting interactions are entropic. To raise the structures to the visible regime, while minimizing chemical differences between the particle surface and mesogen, silica particles coated with an α-helical polypeptide have been prepared and dispersed in lyotropic polypeptide LCs. The polypeptide is poly(γ-stearyl-α,l-glutamate) or PSLG. To make the particles easy to manipulate and easy to find, the silica core included superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) and covalently attached dye. Two methods were used to place polypeptides on these magnetic, fluorescent particles: a multistep grafting-to approach in which whole polypeptides were attached and a one-pot grafting-from approach in which the polymerization of the monomers was initiated from the particle surface. These approaches resulted in sparse and dense surface coverages, respectively. The influence of surface curvature and polypeptide molecular weight on the design of sparsely covered particles was investigated using the grafting-to approach. The aggregated grafting-from particles when freshly dispersed in a PSLG/solvent matrix disrupted the orientation of the characteristic cholesteric LC (ChLC) phase directors. In time, the hybrid particles were expelled from some domains, enabling the return of the familiar helical twist of the cholesteric mesophase. The sparsely coated grafting-to hybrid particles when inserted in the PSLG/solvent matrix assembled into stable islet-like formations that could not be disrupted even by an external magnetic field. The bulk particles aligned in chains that were easily manipulated by a magnetic field. These results indicate that

  13. Slip flow through colloidal crystals of varying particle diameter.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Benjamin J; Wirth, Mary J

    2013-01-22

    Slip flow of water through silica colloidal crystals was investigated experimentally for eight different particle diameters, which have hydraulic channel radii ranging from 15 to 800 nm. The particle surfaces were silylated to be low in energy, with a water contact angle of 83°, as determined for a silylated flat surface. Flow rates through centimeter lengths of colloidal crystal were measured using a commercial liquid chromatograph for accurate comparisons of water and toluene flow rates using pressure gradients as high as 10(10) Pa/m. Toluene exhibited no-slip Hagen-Poiseuille flow for all hydraulic channel radii. For water, the slip flow enhancement as a function of hydraulic channel radius was described well by the expected slip flow correction for Hagen-Poiseuille flow, and the data revealed a constant slip length of 63 ± 3 nm. A flow enhancement of 20 ± 2 was observed for the smallest hydraulic channel radius of 15 nm. The amount of slip flow was found to be independent of shear rate over a range of fluid velocities from 0.7 to 5.8 mm/s. The results support the applicability of the slip flow correction for channel radii as small as 15 nm. The work demonstrates that packed beds of submicrometer particles enable slip flow to be employed for high-volume flow rates. PMID:23237590

  14. Slip Flow through Colloidal Crystals of Varying Particle Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Benjamin J.; Wirth, Mary J.

    2012-01-01

    Slip flow of water through silica colloidal crystals was investigated experimentally for 8 different particle diameters, which have hydraulic channel radii ranging from 15 nm to 800 nm. The particle surfaces were silylated to be low in energy, with a water contact angle of 83°, as determined for a silylated flat surface. Flow rates through centimeter lengths of colloidal crystal were measured using a commercial liquid chromatograph for accurate comparisons of water and toluene flow rates using pressure gradients as high as 1010 Pa/m. Toluene exhibited no-slip Hagen-Poiseuille flow for all hydraulic channel radii. For water, the slip flow enhancement as a function of hydraulic channel radius was described well by the expected slip flow correction for Hagen-Poiseuille flow, and the data revealed a constant slip length of 63±3 nm. A flow enhancement of 20±2 was observed for the smallest hydraulic channel radius of 15 nm. The amount of slip flow was found to be independent of shear rate over a range of fluid velocities from 0.7 to 5.8 mm/s. The results support the applicability of the slip flow correction for channel radii as small as 15 nm. The work demonstrates that packed beds of submicrometer particles enable slip flow to be employed for high volume flow rates. PMID:23237590

  15. The crystal structure and crystal chemistry of fernandinite and corvusite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T., Jr.; Post, J.E.; Ross, D.R.; Nelen, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Using type material of fernandinite from Minasragra, Peru, and corvusite from the Jack Claim, La Sal Mountains, Utah, the properties and crystal chemistry of these minerals have been determined by Rietveld analysis of the powder X-ray-diffraction patterns. The crystal structure of both species is isotypic with the V2O5 -type layer first found for ??-Ag0.68V2O5; it consists of chains of VO6 octahedra linked by opposite corners (parallel to b) condensed by edge-sharing to form the layer. The vanadium has average valence 4.8, and the resulting layer-charge is balanced by varying amounts of Ca, Na, and K in the interlayer region accompanied by labile water. This study has confirmed the validity of fernandinite as a unique mineral species. It is closely related to corvusite, from which it is distinguished on the basis of the dominant interlayer cation: Ca for fernandinite, Na for curvusite. -Authors

  16. Flying particle sensors in hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, D. S.; Schmidt, O. A.; Euser, T. G.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-07-01

    Optical fibre sensors make use of diverse physical effects to measure parameters such as strain, temperature and electric field. Here we introduce a new class of reconfigurable fibre sensor, based on a ‘flying-particle’ optically trapped inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre and illustrate its use in electric field and temperature sensing with high spatial resolution. The electric field distribution near the surface of a multi-element electrode is measured with a resolution of ∼100 μm by monitoring changes in the transmitted light signal due to the transverse displacement of a charged silica microparticle trapped within the hollow core. Doppler-based velocity measurements are used to map the gas viscosity, and thus the temperature, along a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. The flying-particle approach represents a new paradigm in fibre sensors, potentially allowing multiple physical quantities to be mapped with high positional accuracy over kilometre-scale distances.

  17. Crystal structure of potassium sodium tartrate trihydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Egorova, A. E. Ivanov, V. A.; Somov, N. V.; Portnov, V. N.; Chuprunov, E. V.

    2011-11-15

    Crystals of potassium sodium tartrate trihydrate (dl-KNaC{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 6} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O) were obtained from an aqueous solution. The crystal shape was described. The atomic structure of the compound was determined and compared with the known structures of dl-KNaC{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 6} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O and l-KNaC{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 6} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O.

  18. Faceting and commensurability in crystal structures of colloidal thin films.

    PubMed

    Ramiro-Manzano, F; Meseguer, F; Bonet, E; Rodriguez, I

    2006-07-14

    This Letter investigates the influence of finite size effects on the particle arrangement of thin film colloidal crystals. A rich variety of crystallographic faceting with large single domain microcrystallites is shown. Optical reflectance experiments together with scanning electron microscopy permit the identification of the crystal symmetry and the facet orientation, as well as the exact number of monolayers. When the cell thickness is not commensurable with a high symmetry layering, particles arrange themselves in a periodic distribution of (111)- and (100)-orientated face centered cubic (fcc) microcrystallites separated by planar defects. These structures can be described as a fcc ordering orientated along a vicinal surface, modified by a periodic distribution of fcc (111) stacking faults. PMID:16907485

  19. Crystal structure of canagliflozin hemihydrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai-Hang; Gu, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Tang, Gu-Ping

    2016-05-01

    There are two canagliflozin mol-ecules (A and B) and one water mol-ecule in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C24H25FO5S·0.5H2O [systematic name: (2S,3R,4R,5S,6R)-2-(3-{[5-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)thio-phen-2-yl]meth-yl}-4-methylphen-yl)-6-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)-3,4,5,6-tetra-hydro-2H-pyran-3,4,5-triol hemihydrate]. The dihedral angles between the methyl-benzene and thio-phene rings are 115.7 (4) and 111.7 (4)°, while the dihedral angles between the fluoro-benzene and thio-phene rings are 24.2 (6) and 20.5 (9)° in mol-ecules A and B, respectively. The hydro-pyran ring exhibits a chair conformation in both canagliflozin mol-ecules. In the crystal, the canagliflozin mol-ecules and lattice water mol-ecules are connected via O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional supra-molecular architecture. PMID:27308030

  20. Crystal structure of canagliflozin hemihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai-Hang; Gu, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Tang, Gu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    There are two canagliflozin mol­ecules (A and B) and one water mol­ecule in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C24H25FO5S·0.5H2O [systematic name: (2S,3R,4R,5S,6R)-2-(3-{[5-(4-fluoro­phen­yl)thio­phen-2-yl]meth­yl}-4-methylphen­yl)-6-(hy­droxy­meth­yl)-3,4,5,6-tetra­hydro-2H-pyran-3,4,5-triol hemihydrate]. The dihedral angles between the methyl­benzene and thio­phene rings are 115.7 (4) and 111.7 (4)°, while the dihedral angles between the fluoro­benzene and thio­phene rings are 24.2 (6) and 20.5 (9)° in mol­ecules A and B, respectively. The hydro­pyran ring exhibits a chair conformation in both canagliflozin mol­ecules. In the crystal, the canagliflozin mol­ecules and lattice water mol­ecules are connected via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional supra­molecular architecture. PMID:27308030

  1. Crystal structure of levomepromazine maleate

    PubMed Central

    Gál, Gyula Tamás; May, Nóra Veronika; Bombicz, Petra

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C19H25N2OS+·C4H3O4 − [systematic name: (S)-3-(2-meth­oxy­pheno­thia­zin-10-yl)-N,N,2-tri­methyl­propanaminium hydrogen maleate], comprises two (S)-levomepromazine cations and two hydrogen maleate anions. The conformations of the two cations are similar. The major difference relates to the orientation of the meth­oxy substituent at the pheno­thia­zine ring system. The crystal components form a three-dimensional supra­molecular network via N—H⋯O, C—H⋯O and C—H⋯π inter­actions. A comparison of the conformations of the levomepromazine cations with those of the neutral mol­ecule and similar protonated mol­ecules reveals significant conformational flexibility of the pheno­thia­zine ring system and the substituent at the pheno­thia­zine N atom. PMID:27308001

  2. Computing stoichiometric molecular composition from crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Gražulis, Saulius; Merkys, Andrius; Vaitkus, Antanas; Okulič-Kazarinas, Mykolas

    2015-01-01

    Crystallographic investigations deliver high-accuracy information about positions of atoms in crystal unit cells. For chemists, however, the structure of a molecule is most often of interest. The structure must thus be reconstructed from crystallographic files using symmetry information and chemical properties of atoms. Most existing algorithms faithfully reconstruct separate molecules but not the overall stoichiometry of the complex present in a crystal. Here, an algorithm that can reconstruct stoichiometrically correct multimolecular ensembles is described. This algorithm uses only the crystal symmetry information for determining molecule numbers and their stoichiometric ratios. The algorithm can be used by chemists and crystallographers as a standalone implementation for investigating above-molecular ensembles or as a function implemented in graphical crystal analysis software. The greatest envisaged benefit of the algorithm, however, is for the users of large crystallographic and chemical databases, since it will permit database maintainers to generate stoichiometrically correct chemical representations of crystal structures automatically and to match them against chemical databases, enabling multidisciplinary searches across multiple databases. PMID:26089747

  3. Structure-property evolution during polymer crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Deepak

    The main theme of this research is to understand the structure-property evolution during crystallization of a semicrystalline thermoplastic polymer. A combination of techniques including rheology, small angle light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry and optical microscopy are applied to follow the mechanical and optical properties along with crystallinity and the morphology. Isothermal crystallization experiments on isotactic poly-1-butene at early stages of spherulite growth provide quantitative information about nucleation density, volume fraction of spherulites and their crystallinity, and the mechanism of connecting into a sample spanning structure. Optical microscopy near the fluid-to-solid transition suggests that the transition, as determined by time-resolved mechanical spectroscopy, is not caused by packing/jamming of spherulites but by the formation of a percolating network structure. The effect of strain, Weissenberg number (We ) and specific mechanical work (w) on rate of crystallization (nucleation followed by growth) and on growth of anisotropy was studied for shear-induced crystallization of isotactic poly-1-butene. The samples were sheared for a finite strain at the beginning of the experiment and then crystallized without further flow (Janeschitz-Kriegl protocol). Strain requirements to attain steady state/leveling off of the rate of crystallization were found to be much larger than the strain needed to achieve steady state of flow. The large strain and We>1 criteria were also observed for morphological transition from spherulitic growth to oriented growth. An apparatus for small angle light scattering (SALS) and light transmission measurements under shear was built and tested at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. As a new development, the polarization direction can be rotated by a liquid crystal polarization rotator (LCPR) with a short response time of 20 ms. The experiments were controlled and analyzed with a LabVIEW(TM) based

  4. Particle beam and crabbing and deflecting structure

    DOEpatents

    Delayen, Jean

    2011-02-08

    A new type of structure for the deflection and crabbing of particle bunches in particle accelerators comprising a number of parallel transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-resonant) lines operating in opposite phase from each other. Such a structure is significantly more compact than conventional crabbing cavities operating the transverse magnetic TM mode, thus allowing low frequency designs.

  5. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  6. Shear induced structures in crystallizing cocoa butter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Guthrie, Sarah E.; Sirota, Eric B.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2004-03-01

    Cocoa butter is the main structural component of chocolate and many cosmetics. It crystallizes in several polymorphs, called phases I to VI. We used Synchrotron X-ray diffraction to study the effect of shear on its crystallization. A previously unreported phase (phase X) was found and a crystallization path through phase IV under shear was observed. Samples were crystallized under shear from the melt in temperature controlled Couette cells, at final crystallization temperatures of 17.5^oC, 20^oC and 22.5^oC in Beamline X10A of NSLS. The formation of phase X was observed at low shear rates (90 s-1) and low crystallization temperature (17.5^oC), but was absent at high shear (720 s-1) and high temperature (20^oC). The d-spacing and melting point suggest that this new phase is a mixture rich on two of the three major components of cocoa butter. We also found that, contrary to previous reports, the transition from phase II to phase V can happen through the intermediate phase IV, at high shear rates and temperature.

  7. Crystal structure of methane oxidation enzyme determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1994-01-10

    A team of chemists has determined to 2.2-[angstrom] resolution the crystal structure of the hydroxylase protein of methane monooxygenase, the enzyme system responsible for the biological oxidation of methane. The hydroxylase, at a molecular weight of 251,000 daltons, if by far the largest component of methane monooxygenase. Although the crystal structure of the hydroxylase did not reveal any startling surprises about the enzyme-many features of the hydroxylase had been inferred previously from modeling and spectroscopic studies -- obtaining it is a significant achievement. For one thing, the crystal structure unambiguously confirms aspects of the enzyme structure that been at least somewhat speculative. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, the chemist say, also provides important insight into biological methane oxidation, including how methane, a relatively inert gas, might diffuse to and bind near the active site of the enzyme. The structure points to particular amino acid residues that are likely to participate in catalysis, and clarifies the structure of the dinuclear iron core of the enzyme.

  8. Defect structure around two colloids in a liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, O; Kim, E B; Grollau, S; Abbott, N L; de Pablo, J J

    2003-12-01

    This Letter investigates the defect structures that arise between two colloidal spheres immersed in a nematic liquid crystal. Molecular simulations and a dynamic field theory are employed to arrive at molecular-level and mesoscopic descriptions of the systems of interest. At large separations, each sphere is surrounded by a Saturn ring defect. However, at short separations both theory and simulation predict that a third disclination ring appears in between the spheres, in a plane normal to the Saturn rings. This feature gives rise to an effective binding of the particles. The structures predicted by field theory and molecular simulations are consistent with each other. PMID:14683198

  9. Surface-induced structures in nematic liquid crystal colloids.

    PubMed

    Chernyshuk, S B; Tovkach, O M; Lev, B I

    2014-08-01

    We predict theoretically the existence of a class of colloidal structures in nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cells, which are induced by surface patterns on the plates of the cell (like cells with UV-irradiated polyamide surfaces using micron sized masks in front of the cell). These bulk structures arise from nonuniform boundary conditions for the director distortions at the confining surfaces. In particular, we demonstrate that quadrupole spherical particles (like spheres with boojums or Saturn-ring director configurations) form a square lattice inside a planar NLC cell, which has checkerboard patterns on both its plates. PMID:25215675

  10. Crystal structure of monobasic sodium tartrate monohydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Titaeva, E. K. Somov, N. V.; Portnov, V. N.; Titaev, D. N.

    2015-01-15

    Crystals of a new polymorphic modification of monobasic sodium tartrate monohydrate NaHC{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 6} · H{sub 2}O have been grown in a metasilicate gel. Their atomic structure is solved by X-ray diffraction.

  11. Structure analysis on synthetic emerald crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Lee, Jiann-Shing; Huang, Eugene; Liao, Ju-Hsiou

    2013-05-01

    Single crystals of emerald synthesized by means of the flux method were adopted for crystallographic analyses. Emerald crystals with a wide range of Cr3+-doping content up to 3.16 wt% Cr2O3 were examined by X-ray single crystal diffraction refinement method. The crystal structures of the emerald crystals were refined to R 1 (all data) of 0.019-0.024 and w R 2 (all data) of 0.061-0.073. When Cr3+ substitutes for Al3+, the main adjustment takes place in the Al-octahedron and Be-tetrahedron. The effect of substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ in the beryl structure results in progressively lengthening of the Al-O distance, while the length of the other bonds remains nearly unchanged. The substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ may have caused the expansion of a axis, while keeping the c axis unchanged in the emerald lattice. As a consequence, the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Be bonding angles are found to decrease, while the angle of Si-O-Be increases as the Al-O distance increases during the Cr replacement.

  12. Charged-particle spectroscopy in organic semiconducting single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavatti, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Basiricò, L.; Fraleoni-Morgera, A.; Fraboni, B.

    2016-04-01

    The use of organic materials as radiation detectors has grown, due to the easy processability in liquid phase at room temperature and the possibility to cover large areas by means of low cost deposition techniques. Direct charged-particle detectors based on solution-grown Organic Semiconducting Single Crystals (OSSCs) are shown to be capable to detect charged particles in pulse mode, with very good peak discrimination. The direct charged-particle detection in OSSCs has been assessed both in the planar and in the vertical axes, and a digital pulse processing algorithm has been used to perform pulse height spectroscopy and to study the charge collection efficiency as a function of the applied bias voltage. Taking advantage of the charge spectroscopy and the good peak discrimination of pulse height spectra, an Hecht-like behavior of OSSCs radiation detectors is demonstrated. It has been possible to estimate the mobility-lifetime value in organic materials, a fundamental parameter for the characterization of radiation detectors, whose results are equal to μτcoplanar = (5 .5 ± 0.6 ) × 10-6 cm2/V and μτsandwich = (1 .9 ± 0.2 ) × 10-6 cm2/V, values comparable to those of polycrystalline inorganic detectors. Moreover, alpha particles Time-of-Flight experiments have been carried out to estimate the drift mobility value. The results reported here indicate how charged-particle detectors based on OSSCs possess a great potential as low-cost, large area, solid-state direct detectors operating at room temperature. More interestingly, the good detection efficiency and peak discrimination observed for charged-particle detection in organic materials (hydrogen-rich molecules) are encouraging for their further exploitation in the detection of thermal and high-energy neutrons.

  13. Crystal structure of a plectonemic RNA supercoil

    SciTech Connect

    Stagno, Jason R.; Ma, Buyong; Li, Jess; Altieri, Amanda S.; Byrd, R. Andrew; Ji, Xinhua

    2012-12-14

    Genome packaging is an essential housekeeping process in virtually all organisms for proper storage and maintenance of genetic information. Although the extent and mechanisms of packaging vary, the process involves the formation of nucleic-acid superstructures. Crystal structures of DNA coiled coils indicate that their geometries can vary according to sequence and/or the presence of stabilizers such as proteins or small molecules. However, such superstructures have not been revealed for RNA. Here we report the crystal structure of an RNA supercoil, which displays one level higher molecular organization than previously reported structures of DNA coiled coils. In the presence of an RNA-binding protein, two interlocking RNA coiled coils of double-stranded RNA, a 'coil of coiled coils', form a plectonemic supercoil. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that protein-RNA interaction is required for the stability of the supercoiled RNA. This study provides structural insight into higher order packaging mechanisms of nucleic acids.

  14. Crystal structure of zwitterionic bisimidazolium sulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohmoto, Shigeo; Okuyama, Shinpei; Yokota, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kishikawa, Keiki; Masu, Hyuma; Azumaya, Isao

    2012-05-01

    Crystal structures of three zwitterionic bisimidazolium salts 1-3 in which imidazolium sulfonate moieties were connected with aromatic linkers, p-xylylene, 4,4'-dimethylenebiphenyl, and phenylene, respectively, were examined. The latter two were obtained as hydrates. An S-shaped molecular structure in which the sulfonate moiety was placed on the imidazolium ring was observed for 1. A helical array of hydrated water molecules was obtained for 2 while a linear array of hydrated water molecules was observed for 3.

  15. Crystal Structure of Human Enterovirus 71

    SciTech Connect

    Plevka, Pavel; Perera, Rushika; Cardosa, Jane; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2013-04-08

    Enterovirus 71 is a picornavirus associated with fatal neurological illness in infants and young children. Here, we report the crystal structure of enterovirus 71 and show that, unlike in other enteroviruses, the 'pocket factor,' a small molecule that stabilizes the virus, is partly exposed on the floor of the 'canyon.' Thus, the structure of antiviral compounds may require a hydrophilic head group designed to interact with residues at the entrance of the pocket.

  16. Structure of Cometary Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Hadamcik, E.; Lasue, J.

    2004-11-01

    The recent encounter of Stardust with comet 81P/Wild 2 has provided highly spatially resolved data about dust particles in the coma. They show intense swarms and bursts of particles, suggest the existence of fragmenting low-density particles formed of higher density sub-micrometer components [1], and definitely confirm previous results (inferred from Giotto encounter with comet Grigg-Skjellerup [2] and remote light scattering observations [3]). The light scattering properties (mostly polarization, which does not depend upon disputable normalizations) of dust in cometary comae will be summarized, with emphasis on the spatial changes and on the wavelength and phase angle dependence. Experimental and numerical simulations are needed to translate these observed light scattering properties in terms of physical properties of the dust particles (e.g. size, morphology, albedo, porosity). New experimental simulations (with fluffy mixtures of sub-micron sized silica and carbon grains) and new numerical simulations (with fractal aggregates of homogeneous or core-mantled silicate and organic grains) will be presented. The results are in favor of highly porous particles built up (by ballistic-cluster-cluster agglomeration) from grains of interstellar origin. The perspectives offered by laboratory simulations with aggregates built under conditions representative of the early solar system on board the International Space Station will be presented, together with the perspectives offered by future experiments on board the Rosetta cometary probe. Supports from CNES and ESA are acknowledged [1] Tuzzolino et al., Science, 304, 1776, 2004, [2] N. McBride et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 289, p. 535-553, 1997, [3] Levasseur-Regourd and Hadamcik, J. Quant. Spectros. Radiat. Transfer, 79-80, 903-910, 2003.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of recombinant hepatitis E virus-like particle

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Che-Yen; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Higashiura, Akifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Li, Tian-Cheng; Takeda, Naokazu; Xing, Li; Hjalmarsson, Erik; Friberg, Claes; Liou, Der-Ming; Sung, Yen-Jen; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Cheng, R. Holland

    2008-04-01

    A recombinant virus-like particle that is a potential oral hepatitis E vaccine was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 8.3 Å resolution and the X-ray structure was phased with the aid of a low-resolution density map determined using cryo-electron microscopy data. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) accounts for the majority of enterically transmitted hepatitis infections worldwide. Currently, there is no specific treatment for or vaccine against HEV. The major structural protein is derived from open reading frame (ORF) 2 of the viral genome. A potential oral vaccine is provided by the virus-like particles formed by a protein construct of partial ORF3 protein (residue 70–123) fused to the N-terminus of the ORF2 protein (residues 112–608). Single crystals obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K diffract X-rays to 8.3 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 337, b = 343, c = 346 Å, α = β = γ = 90°, and contain one particle per asymmetric unit.

  18. Crystal structure of riboflavin synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Wawrzak, Z.; Calabrese, J.C.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-05

    Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1'-D-ribityl)-lumazine to yield riboflavin and 4-ribitylamino-5-amino-2,6-dihydroxypyrimidine. The homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits has no cofactor requirements for catalysis. The enzyme is nonexistent in humans and is an attractive target for antimicrobial agents of organisms whose pathogenicity depends on their ability to biosynthesize riboflavin. The first three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method on the Escherichia coli protein containing selenomethionine residues. The homotrimer consists of an asymmetric assembly of monomers, each of which comprises two similar {beta} barrels and a C-terminal {alpha} helix. The similar {beta} barrels within the monomer confirm a prediction of pseudo two-fold symmetry that is inferred from the sequence similarity between the two halves of the protein. The {beta} barrels closely resemble folds found in phthalate dioxygenase reductase and other flavoproteins. The three active sites of the trimer are proposed to lie between pairs of monomers in which residues conserved among species reside, including two Asp-His-Ser triads and dyads of Cys-Ser and His-Thr. The proposed active sites are located where FMN (an analog of riboflavin) is modeled from an overlay of the {beta} barrels of phthalate dioxygenase reductase and riboflavin synthase. In the trimer, one active site is formed, and the other two active sites are wide open and exposed to solvent. The nature of the trimer configuration suggests that only one active site can be formed and be catalytically competent at a time.

  19. Absorption enhancement in graphene photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Khaleque, Abdul; Hattori, Haroldo T

    2016-04-10

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, is attracting significant interest because of its potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Although graphene exhibits almost uniform absorption within a large wavelength range, its interaction with light is weak. In this paper, the enhancement of the optical absorption in graphene photonic crystal structures is studied: the structure is modified by introducing scatterers and mirrors. It is shown that the absorption of the graphene photonic crystal structure can be enhanced about four times (nearly 40%) with respect to initial reference absorption of 9.8%. The study can be a useful tool for investigating graphene physics in different optical settings. PMID:27139857

  20. Crystal structure of low-symmetry rondorfite

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Zadov, A. E.; Chukanov, N. V.

    2008-03-15

    The crystal structure of an aluminum-rich variety of the mineral rondorfite with the composition Ca{sub 16}[Mg{sub 2}(Si{sub 7}Al)(O{sub 31}OH)]Cl{sub 4} from the skarns of the Verkhne-Chegemskoe plateau (the Kabardino-Balkarian Republic, the Northern Caucasus Region, Russia) was solved in the triclinic space group with the unit-cell parameters a = 15.100(2) A, b = 15.110(2) A, c = 15.092(2) A, {alpha} = 90.06(1) deg., {beta} = 90.01(1) deg., {gamma} = 89.93(1) deg., Z = 4, sp. gr. P1. The structural model consisting of 248 independent atoms was determined by the phase-correction method and refined to R = 3.8% with anisotropic displacement parameters based on all 7156 independent reflections with 7156 F > 3{sigma}(F). The crystal structure is based on pentamers consisting of four Si tetrahedra linked by the central Mg tetrahedron. The structure can formally be refined in the cubic space group (a = 15.105 A, sp. gr. Fd-bar 3, seven independent positions) with anisotropic displacement parameters to R = 2.74% based on 579 reflections with F > 3{sigma}(F) without accounting for more than 1000 observed reflections, which are inconsistent with the cubic symmetry of the crystal structure.

  1. Crystal structure of low-symmetry rondorfite

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Zadov, A. E.; Chukanov, N. V.

    2008-03-15

    The crystal structure of an aluminum-rich variety of the mineral rondorfite with the composition Ca{sub 16}[Mg{sub 2}(Si{sub 7}Al)(O{sub 31}OH)]Cl{sub 4} from the skarns of the Verkhne-Chegemskoe plateau (the Kabardino-Balkarian Republic, the Northern Caucasus Region, Russia) was solved in the triclinic space group with the unit-cell parameters a = 15.100(2) Angstrom-Sign , b = 15.110(2) Angstrom-Sign , c = 15.092(2) Angstrom-Sign , {alpha} = 90.06(1) Degree-Sign , {beta} = 90.01(1) Degree-Sign , {gamma} = 89.93(1) Degree-Sign , Z = 4, sp. gr. P1. The structural model consisting of 248 independent atoms was determined by the phase-correction method and refined to R = 3.8% with anisotropic displacement parameters based on all 7156 independent reflections with 7156 F > 3{sigma}(F). The crystal structure is based on pentamers consisting of four Si tetrahedra linked by the central Mg tetrahedron. The structure can formally be refined in the cubic space group (a = 15.105 Angstrom-Sign , sp. gr. Fd 3 bar , seven independent positions) with anisotropic displacement parameters to R = 2.74% based on 579 reflections with F > 3{sigma}(F) without accounting for more than 1000 observed reflections, which are inconsistent with the cubic symmetry of the crystal structure.

  2. Effect of Pigment Particle Dispersion on the Crystallization Behavior of Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bafna, Ayush; Agashe, Nikhil; Beaucage, Gregory; Mirabella, Francis

    2002-03-01

    Polypropylenes containing pigment particles dispersed uniformly in the polymer were studied for the affect of the pigment particle dispersion on the crystallization behavior of the polymer. Wide varieties of dispersible pigment particles with structure varying from nano to colloidal form were studied. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) gave quantitative data regarding the lamellar thickness of polypropylenes both with and without pigment particles dispersed in it. SAXS showed a decrease in lamellar thickness of polypropylene with addition of pigment particles. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to get the degree of crystallinity in the polymer. DSC showed a decrease in melting temperature parallel to the decrease in lamellar thickness observed in SAXS. XRD was also used to identify the type of crystalline units present both in the bulk and on the surface of the polymer sample. Earlier studies had mentioned transition from alpha to gamma phase in the polymer on addition of pigment particles. No such transition was observed. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) gave qualitative data on the effect of pigment particle dispersion on the lamellar growth and distribution. Dispersing pigment particles in the polymer matrix significantly affected the lamellar thickness. The reasons behind such behavior will be discussed

  3. Persistent hydrogen bonding in polymorphic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Galek, Peter T A; Fábián, László; Allen, Frank H

    2009-02-01

    The significance of hydrogen bonding and its variability in polymorphic crystal structures is explored using new automated structural analysis methods. The concept of a chemically equivalent hydrogen bond is defined, which may be identified in pairs of structures, revealing those types of bonds that may persist, or not, in moving from one polymorphic form to another. Their frequency and nature are investigated in 882 polymorphic structures from the Cambridge Structural Database. A new method to compare conformations of equivalent molecules is introduced and applied to derive distinct subsets of conformational and packing polymorphs. The roles of chemical functionality and hydrogen-bond geometry in persistent interactions are systematically explored. Detailed structural comparisons reveal a large majority of persistent hydrogen bonds that are energetically crucial to structural stability. PMID:19155561

  4. Crystal structure control in Au-free self-seeded InSb wire growth.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Bernhard; Dick, Kimberly A; Kriegner, Dominik; Keplinger, Mario; Bauer, Günther; Stangl, Julian; Deppert, Knut

    2011-04-01

    In this work we demonstrate experimentally the dependence of InSb crystal structure on the ratio of Sb to In atoms at the growth front. Epitaxial InSb wires are grown by a self-seeded particle assisted growth technique on several different III-V substrates. Detailed investigations of growth parameters and post-growth energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy indicate that the seed particles initially consist of In and incorporate up to 20 at.% Sb during growth. By applying this technique we demonstrate the formation of zinc-blende, 4H and wurtzite structure in the InSb wires (identified by transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction), and correlate this sequential change in crystal structure to the increasing Sb/In ratio at the particle-wire interface. The low ionicity of InSb and the large diameter of the wire structures studied in this work are entirely outside the parameters for which polytype formation is predicted by current models of particle seeded wire growth, suggesting that the V/III ratio at the interface determines crystal structure in a manner well beyond current understanding. These results therefore provide important insight into the relationship between the particle composition and the crystal structure, and demonstrate the potential to selectively tune the crystal structure in other III-V compound materials as well. PMID:21346304

  5. Self-assembled structures of Gaussian nematic particles.

    PubMed

    Nikoubashman, Arash; Likos, Christos N

    2010-03-17

    We investigate the stable crystalline configurations of a nematic liquid crystal made of soft parallel ellipsoidal particles interacting via a repulsive, anisotropic Gaussian potential. For this purpose, we use genetic algorithms (GA) in order to predict all relevant and possible solid phase candidates into which this fluid can freeze. Subsequently we present and discuss the emerging novel structures and the resulting zero-temperature phase diagram of this system. The latter features a variety of crystalline arrangements, in which the elongated Gaussian particles in general do not align with any one of the high-symmetry crystallographic directions, a compromise arising from the interplay and competition between anisotropic repulsions and crystal ordering. Only at very strong degrees of elongation does a tendency of the Gaussian nematics to align with the longest axis of the elementary unit cell emerge. PMID:21389441

  6. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Gold Nanobelts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanobelts were synthesized by the reduction of tetrachloroauric acid with ascorbic acid in the presence of the surfactants cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium dodecylsulfate. The resulting structures have rectangular cross sectional dimensions that are tens of nanometers and lengths that are tens to hundreds of micrometers. We find that the nanobelt yield and resulting structures are very sensitive to temperature which is likely due to the transition of the surfactant solution from wormlike micelles to spherical micelles. The nanobelt crystal structure contains a mixture of face centered cubic and hexagonally close packed lattice phases that can be isolated and examined individually due to the unique nanobelt size and shape. PMID:24803725

  7. Stability and dynamics of crystals and glasses of motorized particles

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tongye; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    Many of the large structures of the cell, such as the cytoskeleton, are assembled and maintained far from equilibrium. We study the stabilities of various structures for a simple model of such a far-from-equilibrium organized assembly in which spherical particles move under the influence of attached motors. From the variational solutions of the many-body master equation for Brownian motion with motorized kicking we obtain a closed equation for the order parameter of localization. Thus, we obtain the transition criterion for localization and stability limits for the crystalline phase and frozen amorphous structures of motorized particles. The theory also allows an estimate of nonequilibrium effective temperatures characterizing the response and fluctuations of motorized asemblies. PMID:15173584

  8. Coagulation factor XII protease domain crystal structure

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, M; Wilmann, P; Awford, J; Li, C; Hamad, BK; Fischer, PM; Dreveny, I; Dekker, LV; Emsley, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor XII is a serine protease that is important for kinin generation and blood coagulation, cleaving the substrates plasma kallikrein and FXI. Objective To investigate FXII zymogen activation and substrate recognition by determining the crystal structure of the FXII protease domain. Methods and results A series of recombinant FXII protease constructs were characterized by measurement of cleavage of chromogenic peptide and plasma kallikrein protein substrates. This revealed that the FXII protease construct spanning the light chain has unexpectedly weak proteolytic activity compared to β-FXIIa, which has an additional nine amino acid remnant of the heavy chain present. Consistent with these data, the crystal structure of the light chain protease reveals a zymogen conformation for active site residues Gly193 and Ser195, where the oxyanion hole is absent. The Asp194 side chain salt bridge to Arg73 constitutes an atypical conformation of the 70-loop. In one crystal form, the S1 pocket loops are partially flexible, which is typical of a zymogen. In a second crystal form of the deglycosylated light chain, the S1 pocket loops are ordered, and a short α-helix in the 180-loop of the structure results in an enlarged and distorted S1 pocket with a buried conformation of Asp189, which is critical for P1 Arg substrate recognition. The FXII structures define patches of negative charge surrounding the active site cleft that may be critical for interactions with inhibitors and substrates. Conclusions These data provide the first structural basis for understanding FXII substrate recognition and zymogen activation. PMID:25604127

  9. Phase behaviour of liquid-crystal monolayers of rod-like and plate-like particles.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; Varga, Szabolcs; Velasco, Enrique

    2014-05-28

    Orientational and positional ordering properties of liquid crystal monolayers are examined by means of Fundamental-Measure Density Functional Theory. Particles forming the monolayer are modeled as hard parallelepipeds of square section of size σ and length L. Their shapes are controlled by the aspect ratio κ = L/σ (>1 for prolate and <1 for oblate shapes). The particle centers of mass are restricted to a flat surface and three possible and mutually perpendicular orientations (in-plane and along the layer normal) of their uniaxial axes are allowed. We find that the structure of the monolayer depends strongly on particle shape and density. In the case of rod-like shapes, particles align along the layer normal in order to achieve the lowest possible occupied area per particle. This phase is a uniaxial nematic even at very low densities. In contrast, for plate-like particles, the lowest occupied area can be achieved by random in-plane ordering in the monolayer, i.e., planar nematic ordering takes place even at vanishing densities. It is found that the random in-plane ordering is not favorable at higher densities and the system undergoes an in-plane ordering transition forming a biaxial nematic phase or crystallizes. For certain values of the aspect ratio, the uniaxial-biaxial nematic phase transition is observed for both rod-like and plate-like shapes. The stability region of the biaxial nematic phase enhances with decreasing aspect ratios for plate-like particles, while the rod-like particles exhibit a reentrant phenomenon, i.e., a sequence of uniaxial-biaxial-uniaxial nematic ordering with increasing density if the aspect ratio is larger than 21.34. In addition to this, packing fraction inversion is observed with increasing surface pressure due to the alignment along the layers normal. At very high densities the nematic phase destabilizes to a nonuniform phases (columnar, smectic, or crystalline phases) for both shapes. PMID:24880324

  10. Photonic crystal and photonic wire device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rue, Richard; Sorel, Marc; Johnson, Nigel; Rahman, Faiz; Ironside, Charles; Cronin, Lee; Watson, Ian; Martin, Robert; Jin, Chongjun; Pottier, Pierre; Chong, Harold; Gnan, Marco; Jugessur, Aju; Camargo, Edilson; Erwin, Grant; Md Zain, Ahmad; Ntakis, Iraklis; Hobbs, Lois; Zhang, Hua; Armenise, Mario; Ciminelli, Caterina; Coquillat, Dominique

    2005-09-01

    Photonic devices that exploit photonic crystal (PhC) principles in a planar environment continue to provide a fertile field of research. 2D PhC based channel waveguides can provide both strong confinement and controlled dispersion behaviour. In conjunction with, for instance, various electro-optic, thermo-optic and other effects, a range of device functionality is accessible in very compact PhC channel-guide devices that offer the potential for high-density integration. Low enough propagation losses are now being obtained with photonic crystal channel-guide structures that their use in real applications has become plausible. Photonic wires (PhWs) can also provide strong confinement and low propagation losses. Bragg-gratings imposed on photonic wires can provide dispersion and frequency selection in device structures that are intrinsically simpler than 2D PhC channel guides--and can compete with them under realistic conditions.

  11. Observations on the crystal structures of lueshite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Roger H.; Burns, Peter C.; Knight, Kevin S.; Howard, Christopher J.; Chakhmouradian, Anton R.

    2014-06-01

    Laboratory powder XRD patterns of the perovskite-group mineral lueshite from the type locality (Lueshe, Kivu, DRC) and pure NaNbO3 demonstrate that lueshite does not adopt the same space group ( Pbma; #57) as the synthetic compound. The crystal structures of lueshite (2 samples) from Lueshe, Mont Saint-Hilaire (Quebec, Canada) and Sallanlatvi (Kola, Russia) have been determined by single-crystal CCD X-ray diffraction. These room temperature X-ray data for all single-crystal samples can be satisfactorily refined in the orthorhombic space group Pbnm (#62). Cell dimensions, atomic coordinates of the atoms, bond lengths and octahedron tilt angles are given for four crystals. Conventional neutron diffraction patterns for Lueshe lueshite recorded over the temperature range 11-1,000 K confirm that lueshite does not adopt space group Pbma within these temperatures. Neutron diffraction indicates no phase changes on cooling from room temperature to 11 K. None of these neutron diffraction data give satisfactorily refinements but suggest that this is the space group Pbnm. Time-of-flight neutron diffraction patterns for Lueshe lueshite recorded from room temperature to 700 °C demonstrate phase transitions above 550 °C from Cmcm through P4 /mbm to above 650 °C. Cell dimensions and atomic coordinates of the atoms are given for the three high-temperature phases. The room temperature to 400 °C structures cannot be satisfactorily resolved, and it is suggested that the lueshite at room temperature consists of domains of pinned metastable phases with orthorhombic and/or monoclinic structures. However, the sequence of high-temperature phase transitions observed is similar to those determined for synthetic NaTaO3, suggesting that the equilibrated room temperature structure of lueshite is orthorhombic Pbnm.

  12. Crystal Structures of New Ammonium 5-Aminotetrazolates

    PubMed Central

    Lampl, Martin; Salchner, Robert; Laus, Gerhard; Braun, Doris E.; Kahlenberg, Volker; Wurst, Klaus; Fuhrmann, Gerda; Schottenberger, Herwig; Huppertz, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of three salts of anionic 5-aminotetrazole are described. The tetramethylammonium salt (P1‒) forms hydrogen-bonded ribbons of anions which accept weak C–H⋯N contacts from the cations. The cystamine salt (C2/c) shows wave-shaped ribbons of anions linked by hydrogen bonds to screw-shaped dications. The tetramethylguanidine salt (P21/c) exhibits layers of anions hydrogen-bonded to the cations. PMID:26753100

  13. Electron Cryomicroscopy of Membrane Proteins: Specimen Preparation for Two-Dimensional Crystals and Single Particles

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Krey, Ingeborg; Rubinstein, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Membrane protein structure and function can be studied by two powerful and highly complementary electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) methods: electron crystallography of two-dimensional (2D) crystals and single particle analysis of detergent-solubilized protein complexes. To obtain the highest-possible resolution data from membrane proteins, whether prepared as 2D crystals or single particles, cryo-EM samples must be vitrified with great care. Grid preparation for cryo-EM of 2D crystals is possible by back-injection, the carbon sandwich technique, drying in sugars before cooling in the electron microscope, or plunge-freezing. Specimen grids for single particle cryo-EM studies of membrane proteins are usually produced by plunge-freezing protein solutions, supported either by perforated or a continuous carbon film substrate. This review outlines the different techniques available and the suitability of each method for particular samples and studies. Experimental considerations in sample preparation and preservation include the protein itself and the presence of lipid or detergent. The appearance of cryo-EM samples in different conditions is also discussed. PMID:20678942

  14. Predicting polymeric crystal structures by evolutionary algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Sharma, Vinit; Oganov, Artem R.; Ramprasad, Ramamurthy

    2014-10-01

    The recently developed evolutionary algorithm USPEX proved to be a tool that enables accurate and reliable prediction of structures. Here we extend this method to predict the crystal structure of polymers by constrained evolutionary search, where each monomeric unit is treated as a building block with fixed connectivity. This greatly reduces the search space and allows the initial structure generation with different sequences and packings of these blocks. The new constrained evolutionary algorithm is successfully tested and validated on a diverse range of experimentally known polymers, namely, polyethylene, polyacetylene, poly(glycolic acid), poly(vinyl chloride), poly(oxymethylene), poly(phenylene oxide), and poly (p-phenylene sulfide). By fixing the orientation of polymeric chains, this method can be further extended to predict the structures of complex linear polymers, such as all polymorphs of poly(vinylidene fluoride), nylon-6 and cellulose. The excellent agreement between predicted crystal structures and experimentally known structures assures a major role of this approach in the efficient design of the future polymeric materials.

  15. Bio-Inspired Approaches to Crystals with Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldrum, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    Advances in technology demand an ever-increasing degree of control over material structure, properties and function. As the properties of monolithic materials are necessary limited, one route to extending them is to create a composite by combining contrasting materials. The potential of this approach is beautifully illustrated by the formation of biominerals where organic macromolecules are combined with brittle minerals such as calcite to create crystals with considerable fracture toughness. This talk will discuss how bio-inspired approaches can be used to generate single crystals with composite crystals through a simple one-pot method. By precipitating calcite crystals in the presence of ``occlusion species'' ranging from latex particles, to organic and inorganic nanoparticles and finally small molecules we demonstrate that high amounts of foreign species can be incorporated through control over the additive surface chemistry, and that this can lead to an enhancement of the mechanical properties of the calcite. Occlusion of 20 nm anionic diblock copolymer micelles was achieved at levels of over 13 wt%, and the properties of the resuktant composite calcite crystals were measured using a range of techniques including IR spectroscopy, high resolution powder XRD and high resolution TEM. Incorporation of these macromolecules leads to crystals with structures and mechanical properties similar to those of biominerals. With sizes in the range of some intracrystalline proteins, the micelles act as ``pseudo-proteins'', thereby providing an excellent model system for investigation of the mechanism of macromolecule insertion within biominerals. Extension of these studies to the incorporation of small molecules (amino acids) again demonstrated high levels of incorporation without any change in the crystal morphology. Further, occlusion of these small molecules within the calcite lattice again resulted in a significant increase in the hardness of the calcite, a result which

  16. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination--Part III: X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is single crystal X-ray crystal structure analysis. A common link between the NMR imaging and the traditional X-ray crystal structure analysis is reported. Claims that comparisons aid in the understanding of both techniques. (MVL)

  17. Design of sustained release fine particles using two-step mechanical powder processing: particle shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with polymer nanoparticle agglomerate.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Keita; Ito, Natsuki; Niwa, Toshiyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2013-09-10

    We attempted to prepare sustained release fine particles using a two-step mechanical powder processing method; particle-shape modification and dry particle coating. First, particle shape of bulk drug was modified by mechanical treatment to yield drug crystals suitable for the coating process. Drug crystals became more rounded with increasing rotation speed, which demonstrates that powerful mechanical stress yields spherical drug crystals with narrow size distribution. This process is the result of destruction, granulation and refinement of drug crystals. Second, the modified drug particles and polymer coating powder were mechanically treated to prepare composite particles. Polymer nanoparticle agglomerate obtained by drying poly(meth)acrylate aqueous dispersion was used as a coating powder. The porous nanoparticle agglomerate has superior coating performance, because it is completely deagglomerated under mechanical stress to form fine fragments that act as guest particles. As a result, spherical drug crystals treated with porous agglomerate were effectively coated by poly(meth)acrylate powder, showing sustained release after curing. From these findings, particle-shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with nanoparticle agglomerate using a mechanical powder processor is expected as an innovative technique for preparing controlled-release coated particles having high drug content and size smaller than 100 μm. PMID:23796831

  18. Crystal Structure of the Protealysin Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Demidyuk, Ilya V.; Gromova, Tania Yu.; Polyakov, Konstantin M.; Melik-Adamyan, William R.; Kuranova, Inna P.; Kostrov, Sergey V.

    2010-01-01

    Protealysin (PLN) belongs to the M4 family of peptidases that are commonly known as thermolysin-like proteases (TLPs). All TLPs are synthesized as precursors containing N-terminal propeptides. According to the primary structure of the N-terminal propeptides, the family is divided into two distinct groups. Representatives of the first group including thermolysin and all TLPs with known three-dimensional structures have long prosequences (∼200 amino acids). Enzymes of the second group, whose prototype is protealysin, have short (∼50 amino acids) propeptides. Here, we present the 1.8 Å crystal structure of PLN precursor (proPLN), which is the first three-dimensional structure of a TLP precursor. Whereas the structure of the catalytic domain of proPLN is similar overall to previously reported structures of mature TLPs, it has specific features, including the absence of calcium-binding sites, and different structures of the N-terminal region and substrate-binding site. PLN propeptide forms a separate domain in the precursor and likely acts as an inhibitor that blocks the substrate-binding site and fixes the “open” conformation of the active site, which is unfavorable for catalysis. Furthermore the conserved PPL motif identified in our previous studies directly interacts with the S′ subsites of the active center being a critical element of the propeptide-catalytic domain interface. Comparison of the primary structures of TLPs with short propeptides suggests that the specific features revealed in the proPLN crystal structure are typical for all protealysin-like enzymes. Thus, such proteins can be considered as a separate subfamily of TLPs. PMID:19915005

  19. Effect of polymer matrix on structure of Se particles formed in aqueous solutions during redox process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorova, E. I.; Klechkovskaya, V. V.

    2010-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive microanalysis study of the structure of particles formed during the reduction of Se(IV) to Se(0) in aqueous solutions in the presence of amphiphilic polymers showed the formation of Se/polymer composite particles. The content of carbon inside the particles can be as large as 80 at %. Polymers deeply influence the structure of particles. Depending on polymers, the composite particles may be unstable with time and they spontaneously evolve from Se/polymer composite particles to crystalline particles of monoclinic Se. For the stable ones, addition of bacterial cellulose Acetobacter xylinum gel-film can induce crystallization in the particles which expel the polymeric material. The Se/polymer composite particles and Se crystalline particles exhibit different sensitivity to electron irradiation and stiffness.

  20. Effect of polymer matrix on structure of Se particles formed in aqueous solutions during redox process

    SciTech Connect

    Suvorova, E. I. Klechkovskaya, V. V.

    2010-12-15

    Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive microanalysis study of the structure of particles formed during the reduction of Se(IV) to Se(0) in aqueous solutions in the presence of amphiphilic polymers showed the formation of Se/polymer composite particles. The content of carbon inside the particles can be as large as 80 at %. Polymers deeply influence the structure of particles. Depending on polymers, the composite particles may be unstable with time and they spontaneously evolve from Se/polymer composite particles to crystalline particles of monoclinic Se. For the stable ones, addition of bacterial cellulose Acetobacter xylinum gel-film can induce crystallization in the particles which expel the polymeric material. The Se/polymer composite particles and Se crystalline particles exhibit different sensitivity to electron irradiation and stiffness.

  1. Crystal structure of natural phaeosphaeride A.

    PubMed

    Abzianidze, Victoria V; Poluektova, Ekaterina V; Bolshakova, Ksenia P; Panikorovskii, Taras L; Bogachenkov, Alexander S; Berestetskiy, Alexander O

    2015-08-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C15H23NO5, contains two independent mol-ecules. Phaeosphaeride A contains two primary sections, an alkyl chain consisting of five C atoms and a cyclic system consisting of fused five- and six-membered rings with attached substituents. In the crystal, the mol-ecules form layered structures. Nearly planar sheets, parallel to the (001) plane, form bilayers of two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks with the hy-droxy groups located on the inter-ior of the bilayer sheets. The network is constructed primarily of four O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which form a zigzag pattern in the (001) plane. The butyl chains inter-digitate with the butyl chains on adjacent sheets. The crystal was twinned by a twofold rotation about the c axis, with refined major-minor occupancy fractions of 0.718 (6):0.282 (6). PMID:26396831

  2. Lagrangian coherent structures and inertial particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudharsan, M.; Brunton, Steven L.; Riley, James J.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we investigate the dynamics of inertial particles using finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE). In particular, we characterize the attractor and repeller structures underlying preferential concentration of inertial particles in terms of FTLE fields of the underlying carrier fluid. Inertial particles that are heavier than the ambient fluid (aerosols) attract onto ridges of the negative-time fluid FTLE. This negative-time FTLE ridge becomes a repeller for particles that are lighter than the carrier fluid (bubbles). We also examine the inertial FTLE (iFTLE) determined by the trajectories of inertial particles evolved using the Maxey-Riley equations with nonzero Stokes number and density ratio. Finally, we explore the low-pass filtering effect of Stokes number. These ideas are demonstrated on two-dimensional numerical simulations of the unsteady double-gyre flow.

  3. The First Mammalian Aldehyde Oxidase Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Catarina; Mahro, Martin; Trincão, José; Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.; Ramos, Maria João; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Leimkühler, Silke; Romão, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidases (AOXs) are homodimeric proteins belonging to the xanthine oxidase family of molybdenum-containing enzymes. Each 150-kDa monomer contains a FAD redox cofactor, two spectroscopically distinct [2Fe-2S] clusters, and a molybdenum cofactor located within the protein active site. AOXs are characterized by broad range substrate specificity, oxidizing different aldehydes and aromatic N-heterocycles. Despite increasing recognition of its role in the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics, the physiological function of the protein is still largely unknown. We have crystallized and solved the crystal structure of mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 to 2.9 Å. This is the first mammalian AOX whose structure has been solved. The structure provides important insights into the protein active center and further evidence on the catalytic differences characterizing AOX and xanthine oxidoreductase. The mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 three-dimensional structure combined with kinetic, mutagenesis data, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics studies make a decisive contribution to understand the molecular basis of its rather broad substrate specificity. PMID:23019336

  4. Crystal structure of MboIIA methyltransferase.

    SciTech Connect

    Osipiuk, J.; Walsh, M. A.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Gdansk; Medical Research Council France

    2003-09-15

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases) are sequence-specific enzymes which transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) to the amino group of either cytosine or adenine within a recognized DNA sequence. Methylation of a base in a specific DNA sequence protects DNA from nucleolytic cleavage by restriction enzymes recognizing the same DNA sequence. We have determined at 1.74 {angstrom} resolution the crystal structure of a {beta}-class DNA MTase MboIIA (M {center_dot} MboIIA) from the bacterium Moraxella bovis, the smallest DNA MTase determined to date. M {center_dot} MboIIA methylates the 3' adenine of the pentanucleotide sequence 5'-GAAGA-3'. The protein crystallizes with two molecules in the asymmetric unit which we propose to resemble the dimer when M {center_dot} MboIIA is not bound to DNA. The overall structure of the enzyme closely resembles that of M {center_dot} RsrI. However, the cofactor-binding pocket in M {center_dot} MboIIA forms a closed structure which is in contrast to the open-form structures of other known MTases.

  5. Dynamic self-assembly and control of microfluidic particle crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonhee; Amini, Hamed; Stone, Howard A.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2010-01-01

    Engineered two-phase microfluidic systems have recently shown promise for computation, encryption, and biological processing. For many of these systems, complex control of dispersed-phase frequency and switching is enabled by nonlinearities associated with interfacial stresses. Introducing nonlinearity associated with fluid inertia has recently been identified as an easy to implement strategy to control two-phase (solid-liquid) microscale flows. By taking advantage of inertial effects we demonstrate controllable self-assembling particle systems, uncover dynamics suggesting a unique mechanism of dynamic self-assembly, and establish a framework for engineering microfluidic structures with the possibility of spatial frequency filtering. Focusing on the dynamics of the particle–particle interactions reveals a mechanism for the dynamic self-assembly process; inertial lift forces and a parabolic flow field act together to stabilize interparticle spacings that otherwise would diverge to infinity due to viscous disturbance flows. The interplay of the repulsive viscous interaction and inertial lift also allow us to design and implement microfluidic structures that irreversibly change interparticle spacing, similar to a low-pass filter. Although often not considered at the microscale, nonlinearity due to inertia can provide a platform for high-throughput passive control of particle positions in all directions, which will be useful for applications in flow cytometry, tissue engineering, and metamaterial synthesis. PMID:21149674

  6. Crystal Structure of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit from Thermus Thermophilus. Purification, Crystallization and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, William M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; McCutcheonn, John P.; May, Joanna L.C.; Carter, Andrew P.; Morgan-Warren, Robert J.; Wimberly, Brian T.; Ramakrishnan, Venki

    2009-10-07

    We describe the crystallization and structure determination of the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Previous reports of crystals that diffracted to 10 {angstrom} resolution were used as a starting point to improve the quality of the diffraction. Eventually, ideas such as the addition of substrates or factors to eliminate conformational heterogeneity proved less important than attention to detail in yielding crystals that diffracted beyond 3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite improvements in technology and methodology in the last decade, the structure determination of the 30 S subunit presented some very challenging technical problems because of the size of the asymmetric unit, crystal variability and sensitivity to radiation damage. Some steps that were useful for determination of the atomic structure were: the use of anomalous scattering from the LIII edges of osmium and lutetium to obtain the necessary phasing signal; the use of tunable, third-generation synchrotron sources to obtain data of reasonable quality at high resolution; collection of derivative data precisely about a mirror plane to preserve small anomalous differences between Bijvoet mates despite extensive radiation damage and multi-crystal scaling; the pre-screening of crystals to ensure quality, isomorphism and the efficient use of scarce third-generation synchrotron time; pre-incubation of crystals in cobalt hexaammine to ensure isomorphism with other derivatives; and finally, the placement of proteins whose structures had been previously solved in isolation, in conjunction with biochemical data on protein-RNA interactions, to map out the architecture of the 30 S subunit prior to the construction of a detailed atomic-resolution model.

  7. Crystal structure of plant photosystem I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Frolow, Felix; Nelson, Nathan

    2003-12-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal producer of both oxygen and organic matter on Earth. The conversion of sunlight into chemical energy is driven by two multisubunit membrane protein complexes named photosystem I and II. We determined the crystal structure of the complete photosystem I (PSI) from a higher plant (Pisum sativum var. alaska) to 4.4Å resolution. Its intricate structure shows 12 core subunits, 4 different light-harvesting membrane proteins (LHCI) assembled in a half-moon shape on one side of the core, 45 transmembrane helices, 167 chlorophylls, 3 Fe-S clusters and 2 phylloquinones. About 20 chlorophylls are positioned in strategic locations in the cleft between LHCI and the core. This structure provides a framework for exploration not only of energy and electron transfer but also of the evolutionary forces that shaped the photosynthetic apparatus of terrestrial plants after the divergence of chloroplasts from marine cyanobacteria one billion years ago.

  8. Flowing crystals: nonequilibrium structure of foam.

    PubMed

    Garstecki, Piotr; Whitesides, George M

    2006-07-14

    Bubbles pushed through a quasi-two-dimensional channel self-organize into a variety of periodic lattices. The structures of these lattices correspond to local minima of the interfacial energy. The "flowing crystals" are long-lived metastable states, a small subset of possible local minima of confined quasi-two-dimensional foams [P. Garstecki and G. M. Whitesides, Phys. Rev. E 73, 031603 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevE.73.031603]. Experimental results suggest that the choice of the structures that we observe is dictated by the dynamic stability of the cyclic processes of their formation. Thus, the dynamic system that we report provides a unique example of nonequilibrium self-organization that results in structures that correspond to local minima of the relevant energy functional. PMID:16907453

  9. Crystal Structure Prediction from First Principles: The Crystal Structures of Glycine

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Albert M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Orendt, Anita M.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the results of our unbiased searches of glycine polymorphs obtained using the Genetic Algorithms search implemented in Modified Genetic Algorithm for Crystals coupled with the local optimization and energy evaluation provided by Quantum Espresso. We demonstrate that it is possible to predict the crystal structures of a biomedical molecule using solely first principles calculations. We were able to find all the ambient pressure stable glycine polymorphs, which are found in the same energetic ordering as observed experimentally and the agreement between the experimental and predicted structures is of such accuracy that the two are visually almost indistinguishable. PMID:25843964

  10. Crystal structure prediction from first principles: The crystal structures of glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Albert M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Orendt, Anita M.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2015-04-01

    Here we present the results of our unbiased searches of glycine polymorphs obtained using the genetic algorithms search implemented in MGAC, modified genetic algorithm for crystals, coupled with the local optimization and energy evaluation provided by Quantum Espresso. We demonstrate that it is possible to predict the crystal structures of a biomedical molecule using solely first principles calculations. We were able to find all the ambient pressure stable glycine polymorphs, which are found in the same energetic ordering as observed experimentally and the agreement between the experimental and predicted structures is of such accuracy that the two are visually almost indistinguishable.

  11. Structural studies of large nucleoprotein particles, vaults.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideaki; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2012-01-01

    Vault is the largest nonicosahedral cytosolic nucleoprotein particle ever described. The widespread presence and evolutionary conservation of vaults suggest important biologic roles, although their functions have not been fully elucidated. X-ray structure of vault from rat liver was determined at 3.5 Å resolution. It exhibits an ovoid shape with a size of 40 × 40 × 67 nm(3). The cage structure of vault consists of a dimer of half-vaults, with each half-vault comprising 39 identical major vault protein (MVP) chains. Each MVP monomer folds into 12 domains: nine structural repeat domains, a shoulder domain, a cap-helix domain and a cap-ring domain. Interactions between the 42-turn-long cap-helix domains are key to stabilizing the particle. The other components of vaults, telomerase-associated proteins, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases and small RNAs, are in location in the vault particle by electron microscopy. PMID:23060231

  12. Structural investigation of the potassium vanadomolybdate crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mucha, D.; Olszewski, P.K.; Napruszewska, B.

    1999-08-01

    Potassium vanadomolybdate KVMoO{sub 6} crystallizes in the orthorhombic system (space group Pnma, a = 10.3478(1) {angstrom}, b = 3.6967(1) {angstrom}, c = 13.3769(2) {angstrom}, Z = 4). With an X-ray powder diffraction technique, its structure was solved and refined by direct and Rietveld methods, respectively (R{sub F} = 3.33, R{sub 1} = 4.70, R{sub wp} = 12.44). The crystals are isostructural with PbV{sub 2}O{sub 6}. Octahedra of two types build chains parallel to the b direction; there is disorder in the octahedra described by different occupation numbers of V and Mo atoms: 0.721(4) and 0.279(4), respectively. Potassium atoms occupy the space between the octahedra chains. They play a decisive role, due to the large ionic radius, in generating both KVMoO{sub 6} and pseudobrannerite, K{sub x}V{sub x}Mo{sub 2{minus}x}O{sub 6} (0.76 {le} x {le} 0.82) structures, contrary to other alkali-metal vanadomolybdates of the brannerite structure type. The melting point of KVMoO{sub 6} was detected at 480 C using the DTA method.

  13. Crystal structure of a DNA catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Salvatierra, Almudena; Wawrzyniak-Turek, Katarzyna; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Höbartner, Claudia; Pena, Vladimir

    2016-01-14

    Catalysis in biology is restricted to RNA (ribozymes) and protein enzymes, but synthetic biomolecular catalysts can also be made of DNA (deoxyribozymes) or synthetic genetic polymers. In vitro selection from synthetic random DNA libraries identified DNA catalysts for various chemical reactions beyond RNA backbone cleavage. DNA-catalysed reactions include RNA and DNA ligation in various topologies, hydrolytic cleavage and photorepair of DNA, as well as reactions of peptides and small molecules. In spite of comprehensive biochemical studies of DNA catalysts for two decades, fundamental mechanistic understanding of their function is lacking in the absence of three-dimensional models at atomic resolution. Early attempts to solve the crystal structure of an RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme resulted in a catalytically irrelevant nucleic acid fold. Here we report the crystal structure of the RNA-ligating deoxyribozyme 9DB1 (ref. 14) at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure captures the ligation reaction in the post-catalytic state, revealing a compact folding unit stabilized by numerous tertiary interactions, and an unanticipated organization of the catalytic centre. Structure-guided mutagenesis provided insights into the basis for regioselectivity of the ligation reaction and allowed remarkable manipulation of substrate recognition and reaction rate. Moreover, the structure highlights how the specific properties of deoxyribose are reflected in the backbone conformation of the DNA catalyst, in support of its intricate three-dimensional organization. The structural principles underlying the catalytic ability of DNA elucidate differences and similarities in DNA versus RNA catalysts, which is relevant for comprehending the privileged position of folded RNA in the prebiotic world and in current organisms. PMID:26735012

  14. Temperature dependent spin structures in Hexaferrite crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Y. C.; Lin, J. G.; Chun, S. H.; Kim, K. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Hexaferrite Ba0.5Sr1.5Zn2Fe12O22 (BSZFO) is studied due to its interesting characteristics of long-wavelength spin structure. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is used to probe the magnetic states of BSZFO single crystal and its temperature dependence behavior is analyzed by decomposing the multiple lines of FMR spectra into various phases. Distinguished phase transition is observed at 110 K for one line, which is assigned to the ferro(ferri)-magnetic transition from non-collinear to collinear spin state.

  15. Method of using triaxial magnetic fields for making particle structures

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Anderson, Robert A.; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2005-01-18

    A method of producing three-dimensional particle structures with enhanced magnetic susceptibility in three dimensions by applying a triaxial energetic field to a magnetic particle suspension and subsequently stabilizing said particle structure. Combinations of direct current and alternating current fields in three dimensions produce particle gel structures, honeycomb structures, and foam-like structures.

  16. Structural Diversity of DNA-Coated Particle Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Francis W.

    2012-02-01

    Custom designed nanoparticles (NP) or colloids with specific recognition offer the possibility to control the phase behavior and structure of particle assemblies for a range of applications. One approach to realize these new materials is by attaching DNA to a core particle; the hybridization of double-stranded DNA between particles results in the spontaneous assembly of higher-order structures. Control of the assembled state can be achieved by adjusting several parameters, including sequence selectivity, DNA link orientation, DNA length and flexibility, and the balance between the length of links and non-specific repulsive interactions. I will discuss the results of a coarse-grained molecular model for DNA-linked nanoparticles that helps to rationalize experimental findings and demonstrate new routes to control the assembled structure. We examine how the number and orientation of strands affects the structure, phase behavior, and dynamics. We show that it is possible to realize unusual phase diagrams with many thermodynamically distinct phases, both amorphous and crystal. We further examine the parameters that control the pathways of assembly, which are critical to avoid kinetic bottlenecks. Finally, we discuss strategies to create highly anisoptropic structures using both isotropic and anisotropic core units.

  17. Crystal structure of yeast Sco1

    SciTech Connect

    Abajian, Carnie; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-03-05

    The Sco family of proteins are involved in the assembly of the dinuclear CuA site in cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme in aerobic respiration. These proteins, which are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, are characterized by a conserved CXXXC sequence motif that binds copper ions and that has also been proposed to perform a thiol:disulfide oxidoreductase function. The crystal structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae apo Sco1 (apo-ySco1) and Sco1 in the presence of copper ions (Cu-ySco1) were determined to 1.8- and 2.3-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. Yeast Sco1 exhibits a thioredoxin-like fold, similar to that observed for human Sco1 and a homolog from Bacillus subtilis. The Cu-ySco1 structure, obtained by soaking apo-ySco1 crystals in copper ions, reveals an unexpected copper-binding site involving Cys181 and Cys216, cysteine residues present in ySco1 but not in other homologs. The conserved CXXXC cysteines, Cys148 and Cys152, can undergo redox chemistry in the crystal. An essential histidine residue, His239, is located on a highly flexible loop, denoted the Sco loop, and can adopt positions proximal to both pairs of cysteines. Interactions between ySco1 and its partner proteins yeast Cox17 and yeast COX2 are likely to occur via complementary electrostatic surfaces. This high-resolution model of a eukaryotic Sco protein provides new insight into Sco copper binding and function.

  18. The structure of particle cloud premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.; Berlad, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of premixed flames propagating in combustible systems containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel particles in an oxidizing gas mixture is analyzed. This analysis is motivated by experiments conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center on the structure of flames propagating in combustible mixtures of lycopodium particles and air. Several interesting modes of flame propagation were observed in these experiments depending on the number density and the initial size of the fuel particle. The experimental results show that steady flame propagation occurs even if the initial equivalence ratio of the combustible mixture based on the gaseous fuel available in the particles, phi sub u, is substantially larger than unity. A model is developed to explain these experimental observations. In the model, it is presumed that the fuel particles vaporize first to yield a gaseous fuel of known chemical composition which then reacts with oxygen in a one-step overall process. The activation energy of the chemical reaction is presumed to be large. The activation energy characterizing the kinetics of vaporization is also presumed to be large. The equations governing the structure of the flame were integrated numerically. It is shown that the interplay of vaporization kinetics and oxidation process can result in steady flame propagation in combustible mixtures where the value of phi sub u is substantially larger than unity. This prediction is in agreement with experimental observations.

  19. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction of virus-like particles from a piscine betanodavirus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yu-Chun; Wang, Chun-Hsiung; Wu, Yi-Min; Liu, Wangta; Lu, Ming-Wei; Lin, Chan-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Dragon grouper nervous necrosis virus (DGNNV), a member of the genus Betanodavirus, causes high mortality of larvae and juveniles of the grouper fish Epinephelus lanceolatus. Currently, there is no reported crystal structure of a fish nodavirus. The DGNNV virion capsid is derived from a single open reading frame that encodes a 338-amino-acid protein of approximately 37 kDa. The capsid protein of DGNNV was expressed to form virus-like particles (VLPs) in Escherichia coli. The VLP shape is T = 3 quasi-symmetric with a diameter of ∼38 nm in cryo-electron microscopy images and is highly similar to the native virion. In this report, crystals of DGNNV VLPs were grown to a size of 0.27 mm within two weeks by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 283 K and diffracted X-rays to ∼7.5 Å resolution. In-house X-ray diffraction data of the DGNNV VLP crystals showed that the crystals belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 353.00, c = 800.40 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. 23 268 unique reflections were acquired with an overall R merge of 18.2% and a completeness of 93.2%. Self-rotation function maps confirmed the fivefold, threefold and twofold symmetries of the icosahedron of DGNNV VLPs. PMID:25084387

  20. Structural ordering and glass forming of soft spherical particles with harmonic repulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Bin; Sun, Zhiwei; Ouyang, Wenze Xu, Shenghua

    2014-04-07

    We carry out dissipative particle dynamics simulations to investigate the dynamic process of phase transformation in the system with harmonic repulsion particles. Just below the melting point, the system undergoes liquid state, face-centered cubic crystallization, body-centered cubic crystallization, and reentrant melting phase transition upon compression, which is in good agreement with the phase diagram constructed previously via thermodynamic integration. However, when the temperature is decreased sufficiently, the system is trapped into an amorphous and frustrated glass state in the region of intermediate density, where the solid phase and crystal structure should be thermodynamically most stable.

  1. Irregular snow crystals: structural features as revealed by low temperature scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wergin, William P; Rango, Albert; Foster, James; Erbe, Eric F; Pooley, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    For nearly 50 years, investigators using light microscopy have vaguely alluded to a unique type of snow crystal that has become known as an irregular snow crystal. However, the limited resolution and depth-of-field of the light microscope has prevented investigators from characterizing these crystals. In this study, a field-emission scanning electron microscope, equipped with a cold stage, was used to document the structural features, physical associations, and atmospheric metamorphosis of irregular snow crystals. The crystals appear as irregular hexagons, measuring 60 to 90 mm across, when viewed from the a-axis. Their length (c-axis) rarely exceeds the diameter. The irregular crystals are occasionally found as secondary particles on other larger forms of snow crystals; however, they most frequently occur in aggregates consisting of more than 100 irregular crystals. In the aggregates, the irregular crystals have their axes oriented parallel to one another and, collectively, tend to form columnar structures. Occasionally, these columnar structures exhibit rounded faces along one side, suggesting atmospheric metamorphoses during formation and descent. In extreme cases of metamorphoses, the aggregates would be difficult to distinguish from graupel. Frost, consisting of irregular crystals, has also been encountered, suggesting that atmospheric conditions that favor their growth can also occur terrestrially. PMID:12392356

  2. The Effect of Crystal Structure on the Morphology of Marine Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucci, A.; Kanters, R. M.; Veghte, D. P.; Freedman, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Particle morphology impacts atmospheric processes and climate through its consequences for aerosol radiative properties, ice nucleation, and heterogeneous chemistry. To investigate the morphology of laboratory proxies for marine aerosol particles, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) were used to study dry particles composed of mixtures of sodium chloride, sodium bromine, and sodium iodide. Our SAED patterns show that NaCl is a single crystal, while NaBr and NaI are polycrystalline. In particles composed of internal mixtures of sodium chloride and sodium bromide, we observe that particles form partially engulfed structures in which both components are single crystals. In contrast, particles composed of sodium chloride and sodium iodide form core-shell structures in which the sodium chloride component is a single crystal and the sodium iodide is polycrystalline. Our results suggest that the morphology and crystallinity of internally mixed particles are determined by the difference in lattice spacing of the two components. We have also extended our studies to investigate other species of marine and continental relevance. In addition, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used as a proxy for natural surfactants found in the ocean and significantly disrupted the particle morphology. Through these investigations of particle morphology, better physical and chemical parameters for aerosols can be developed, which will allow us to more accurately predict future changes to the climate.

  3. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann-Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann-Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  4. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann–Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann–Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  5. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO2. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia.

  6. The Crystal Structure of Human Argonaute2

    SciTech Connect

    Schirle, Nicole T.; MacRae, Ian J.

    2012-07-18

    Argonaute proteins form the functional core of the RNA-induced silencing complexes that mediate RNA silencing in eukaryotes. The 2.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of human Argonaute2 (Ago2) reveals a bilobed molecule with a central cleft for binding guide and target RNAs. Nucleotides 2 to 6 of a heterogeneous mixture of guide RNAs are positioned in an A-form conformation for base pairing with target messenger RNAs. Between nucleotides 6 and 7, there is a kink that may function in microRNA target recognition or release of sliced RNA products. Tandem tryptophan-binding pockets in the PIWI domain define a likely interaction surface for recruitment of glycine-tryptophan-182 (GW182) or other tryptophan-rich cofactors. These results will enable structure-based approaches for harnessing the untapped therapeutic potential of RNA silencing in humans.

  7. Crystal structure of human nicotinamide riboside kinase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed A; Xiang, Song; Tong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD(+) as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 A resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 A resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel beta sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations. PMID:17698003

  8. Crystal Structure of Human Nicotinamide Riboside Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Xiang, S.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel {beta} sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations.

  9. The crystal structure of human Argonaute2.

    PubMed

    Schirle, Nicole T; MacRae, Ian J

    2012-05-25

    Argonaute proteins form the functional core of the RNA-induced silencing complexes that mediate RNA silencing in eukaryotes. The 2.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of human Argonaute2 (Ago2) reveals a bilobed molecule with a central cleft for binding guide and target RNAs. Nucleotides 2 to 6 of a heterogeneous mixture of guide RNAs are positioned in an A-form conformation for base pairing with target messenger RNAs. Between nucleotides 6 and 7, there is a kink that may function in microRNA target recognition or release of sliced RNA products. Tandem tryptophan-binding pockets in the PIWI domain define a likely interaction surface for recruitment of glycine-tryptophan-182 (GW182) or other tryptophan-rich cofactors. These results will enable structure-based approaches for harnessing the untapped therapeutic potential of RNA silencing in humans. PMID:22539551

  10. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-09-28

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO{sub 2}. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia.

  11. The measurement results of carbon ion beam structure extracted by bent crystal from U-70 accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, A. G.; Barnov, E. V.; Britvich, G. I.; Chesnokov, Yu A.; Chirkov, P. N.; Durum, A. A.; Kostin, M. Yu; Maisheev, V. A.; Pitalev, V. I.; Reshetnikov, S. F.; Yanovich, A. A.; Nazhmudinov, R. M.; Kubankin, A. S.; Shchagin, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    The carbon ion +6C beam with energy 25 GeV/nucleon was extracted by bent crystal from the U-70 ring. The bent angle of silicon crystal was 85 mrad. About 2×105 particles for 109 circulated ions in the ring were observed in beam line 4a after bent crystal. Geometrical parameters, time structure and ion beam structure were measured. The ability of the bent monocrystal to extract and generate ion beam with necessary parameters for regular usage in physical experiments is shown in the first time.

  12. Structural studies of tubular discotic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindyuk, Oksana Yaroslavovna

    1999-11-01

    Discotic liquid crystals based on the rigid ring-shaped phenylacetylene macrocycle molecule (PAM) are of great interest due to their potential organization into supramolecular channels. We have used high resolution X-ray diffraction to study the structure of pure and doped PAM and to demonstrate that PAM forms a tubular columnar liquid crystal with an unexpected distortion and doubling of the underlying hexagonal lattice. We have doped PAM with different percentages of silver ions and determined that doping did not change peak positions on the powder diffraction data but significantly altered the intensity of the peaks. This implies that the silver ions were most likely intercalated within the channels formed by the PAM molecules, thus leaving the lattice parameters unaffected. We have also used grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity to study Langmuir films of PAM. PAM adopts an "edge-on" molecular arrangement at the air-water interface. We will discuss the direct observation of the structural reorganization within macromolecular Langmuir films of disc-shaped ionophoric molecules arising from interactions with potassium and cesium ions in the subphase. The columnar order is disrupted by CsCl in the subphase and strongly enhanced by KCl in the subphase, thus effectively tailoring the structural properties of the Langmuir films for potential applications. We have also used X-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GID) to study Langmuir films of another macrocyclic ionophore: torand (tributyldodecahydrohexaazakekulene, "TBDK") molecules. TBDK is a rigid, triangular molecule; it has been investigated as a potential surface-active complexing agent. The system forms a stable monolayer at the air-water interface and exhibits two distinct structural phases at lower and higher pressures.

  13. Photoresponsive Release from Azobenzene-Modified Single Cubic Crystal NaCl/Silica Particles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Nanguo; Assink, Roger A.; Jiang, Yingbing; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Azobenzene ligands were uniformly anchored to the pore surfaces of nanoporous silica particles with single crystal NaCl using 4-(3-triethoxysilylpropylureido)azobenzene (TSUA). The functionalization delayed the release of NaCl significantly. The modified particles demonstrated a photocontrolled release by trans/cis isomerization of azobenzene moieties. The addition of amphiphilic solvents, propylene glycol (PG), propylene glycol propyl ether (PGPE), and dipropylene glycol propyl ether (DPGPE) delayed the release in water, although the wetting behavior was improved and the delay is the most for the block molecules with the longest carbon chain. The speedup by UV irradiation suggests a strong dependence of diffusion on the switchablemore » pore size. TGA, XRD, FTIR, and NMR techniques were used to characterize the structures.« less

  14. Bragg scattering and Brownian motion dynamics in optically induced crystals of submicron particles.

    PubMed

    Sapiro, R E; Slama, B N; Raithel, G

    2013-05-01

    A set of four confocal laser beams of 1064-nm wavelength is used to prepare optically induced crystals of submicron particles in aqueous solution. Thousands of polystyrene spheres of about 200 nm in diameter are trapped in three dimensions. Bragg scattering patterns obtained with a probe beam of 532-nm wavelength are in agreement with the calculated lattice structure and its polarization dependence. The decay and rise of the Bragg scattering intensity upon switching the lattice off and on reveal the Brownian motion dynamics of the particles in the periodic optical trapping potential. Experimental results agree well with results from trajectory simulations based on the Langevin equation. The results exhibit the interplay between Brownian motion and deterministic forces in an inhomogeneous (near-)periodic optical trapping potential. PMID:23767544

  15. Prediction of binary hard-sphere crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Filion, Laura; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2009-04-01

    We present a method based on a combination of a genetic algorithm and Monte Carlo simulations to predict close-packed crystal structures in hard-core systems. We employ this method to predict the binary crystal structures in a mixture of large and small hard spheres with various stoichiometries and diameter ratios between 0.4 and 0.84. In addition to known binary hard-sphere crystal structures similar to NaCl and AlB2, we predict additional crystal structures with the symmetry of CrB, gammaCuTi, alphaIrV, HgBr2, AuTe2, Ag2Se, and various structures for which an atomic analog was not found. In order to determine the crystal structures at infinite pressures, we calculate the maximum packing density as a function of size ratio for the crystal structures predicted by our GA using a simulated annealing approach. PMID:19518387

  16. Crystal structure of bacterioferritin from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Xu, Yongbin; Piao, Shunfu; Priyadarshi, Amit; Lee, Eun Hye; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Jeon, Young Ho; Ha, Nam-Chul; Hwang, Kwang Yeon

    2010-01-01

    Iron is essential for the survival of organisms, but either excess or deficient levels of iron induce oxidative stress, thereby causing cell damage. As a result, iron regulation is essential for proper cell growth and proliferation in most organisms. Bacterioferritin is a ferritin-like family protein that contains a heme molecule and a ferroxidase site at the di-iron center. This protein plays a primary role in intracellular iron storage for iron homeostasis, as well as in the maintenance of iron in a soluble and non-toxic form. Although several bacterioferritin structures have been determined, no structural studies have successfully elucidated the molecular function of the heme molecule and the ferroxidase center. Here, we report the crystal structure of bacterioferritin from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. This protein exists in a roughly spherical configuration via the assembly of 24 subunits. We describe the oligomeric arrangement, ferroxidase center and heme-binding site based on this structure. The protein contains a single iron-binding configuration in the ferroxidase center, which allows for the release of iron by His130 when the protein is in the intermediate state. The heme molecule in RsBfr is stabilized by shifting of the van der Waals interaction center between the porphyrin of the heme and Trp26. We anticipate that further structural analysis will provide a more complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of members of the ferritin-like family.

  17. Structural Transitions in Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Bukusoglu, Emre; Martínez-González, José A; Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler F; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-07-26

    Confinement of cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLC) into droplets leads to a delicate interplay between elasticity, chirality, and surface energy. In this work, we rely on a combination of theory and experiments to understand the rich morphological behavior that arises from that balance. More specifically, a systematic study of micrometer-sized ChLC droplets is presented as a function of chirality and surface energy (or anchoring). With increasing chirality, a continuous transition is observed from a twisted bipolar structure to a radial spherical structure, all within a narrow range of chirality. During such a transition, a bent structure is predicted by simulations and confirmed by experimental observations. Simulations are also able to capture the dynamics of the quenching process observed in experiments. Consistent with published work, it is found that nanoparticles are attracted to defect regions on the surface of the droplets. For weak anchoring conditions at the nanoparticle surface, ChLC droplets adopt a morphology similar to that of the equilibrium helical phase observed for ChLCs in the bulk. As the anchoring strength increases, a planar bipolar structure arises, followed by a morphological transition to a bent structure. The influence of chirality and surface interactions are discussed in the context of the potential use of ChLC droplets as stimuli-responsive materials for reporting molecular adsorbates. PMID:27249186

  18. Crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Lígia R; Low, John Nicolson; Magalhães E Silva, Diogo; Cagide, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-03-01

    The crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives, viz. 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-(3-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethan-1-one (1), C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethan-1-one (2), C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-(4-chloro-phen-yl)ethan-1-one (3), C15H11ClN4O2S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-(4-bromo-phen-yl)ethan-1-one (4), C15H11BrN4O2S, and 1-(3-meth-oxy-phen-yl)-2-[(9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]ethan-1-one (5), C14H12N4O2S. Compounds (2), (3) and (4) are isomorphous and accordingly their mol-ecular and supra-molecular structures are similar. An analysis of the dihedral angles between the purine and exocyclic phenyl rings show that the mol-ecules of (1) and (5) are essentially planar but that in the case of the three isomorphous compounds (2), (3) and (4), these rings are twisted by a dihedral angle of approximately 38°. With the exception of (1) all mol-ecules are linked by weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds in their crystals. There is π-π stacking in all compounds. A Cambridge Structural Database search revealed the existence of 11 deposited compounds containing the 1-phenyl-2-sulfanyl-ethanone scaffold; of these, only eight have a cyclic ring as substituent, the majority of these being heterocycles. PMID:27006794

  19. Crystal structure of strontium dinickel iron orthophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ouaatta, Said; Assani, Abderrazzak; Saadi, Mohamed; El Ammari, Lahcen

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, SrNi2Fe(PO4)3, synthesized by solid-state reaction, crystallizes in an ordered variant of the α-CrPO4 structure. In the asymmetric unit, two O atoms are in general positions, whereas all others atoms are in special positions of the space group Imma: the Sr cation and one P atom occupy the Wyckoff position 4e (mm2), Fe is on 4b (2/m), Ni and the other P atom are on 8g (2), one O atom is on 8h (m) and the other on 8i (m). The three-dimensional framework of the crystal structure is built up by [PO4] tetra­hedra, [FeO6] octa­hedra and [Ni2O10] dimers of edge-sharing octa­hedra, linked through common corners or edges. This structure comprises two types of layers stacked alternately along the [100] direction. The first layer is formed by edge-sharing octa­hedra ([Ni2O10] dimer) linked to [PO4] tetra­hedra via common edges while the second layer is built up from a strontium row followed by infinite chains of alternating [PO4] tetra­hedra and FeO6 octa­hedra sharing apices. The layers are held together through vertices of [PO4] tetra­hedra and [FeO6] octa­hedra, leading to the appearance of two types of tunnels parallel to the a- and b-axis directions in which the Sr cations are located. Each Sr cation is surrounded by eight O atoms. PMID:26594419

  20. Scattering of millimeter waves by snow crystals and equivalent homogeneous symmetric particles.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, S G; Goedecke, G H

    1988-06-15

    The digitized Green's function code was used to compute differential and total cross sections of several model snow crystals and of several homogeneous highly symmetric equivalent particles of the same general shape and size as the snow crystals at a wavelength of 10 mm. Optical constants of equivalent particles were derived using the Biot-Arago, Lorentz-Lorenz, and Bruggemann mixing rules. Reasonable agreement was found for equivalent particles whose mass distributions were most similar to those of the snow crystals. Overall, the Bruggemann mixing rule produced the best match. PMID:20531775

  1. Modeling Polymorphic Molecular Crystals with Electronic Structure Theory.

    PubMed

    Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-05-11

    Interest in molecular crystals has grown thanks to their relevance to pharmaceuticals, organic semiconductor materials, foods, and many other applications. Electronic structure methods have become an increasingly important tool for modeling molecular crystals and polymorphism. This article reviews electronic structure techniques used to model molecular crystals, including periodic density functional theory, periodic second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, fragment-based electronic structure methods, and diffusion Monte Carlo. It also discusses the use of these models for predicting a variety of crystal properties that are relevant to the study of polymorphism, including lattice energies, structures, crystal structure prediction, polymorphism, phase diagrams, vibrational spectroscopies, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Finally, tools for analyzing crystal structures and intermolecular interactions are briefly discussed. PMID:27008426

  2. Flash Nanoprecipitation: Particle Structure and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pustulka, Kevin M.; Wohl, Adam R.; Lee, Han Seung; Michel, Andrew R.; Han, Jing; Hoye, Thomas R.; McCormick, Alon V.; Panyam, Jayanth; Macosko, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) is a process that, through rapid mixing, stabilizes an insoluble low molecular weight compound in a nano-sized, polymer-stabilized delivery vehicle. The polymeric components are typically amphiphilic diblock copolymers (BCPs). In order to fully exploit the potential of FNP, factors affecting particle structure, size, and stability must be understood. Here we show that polymer type, hydrophobicity and crystallinity of the small molecule, and small molecule loading levels all affect particle size and stability. Of the four block copolymers (BCP) that we have studied here, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PEG-b-PLGA) was most suitable for potential drug delivery applications due to its ability to give rise to stable nanoparticles, its biocompatibility, and its degradability. We found little difference in particle size when using PLGA block sizes over the range of 5 to 15kDa. The choice of hydrophobic small molecule was important, as molecules with a calculated water-octanol partition coefficient (clogP) below 6 gave rise to particles that were unstable and underwent rapid Ostwald ripening. Studies probing the internal structure of nanoparticles were also performed. Analysis of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and 1H-NMR experiments support a three-layer core-shell-corona nanoparticle structure. PMID:24053447

  3. Crystal structures of the human adiponectin receptors.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Iwabu, Masato; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Motoyama, Kanna; Ikeda, Mariko; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Terada, Takaho; Ohsawa, Noboru; Hato, Masakatsu; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Hino, Tomoya; Murata, Takeshi; Iwata, So; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-04-16

    Adiponectin stimulation of its receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, increases the activities of 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), respectively, thereby contributing to healthy longevity as key anti-diabetic molecules. AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 were predicted to contain seven transmembrane helices with the opposite topology to G-protein-coupled receptors. Here we report the crystal structures of human AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 at 2.9 and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively, which represent a novel class of receptor structure. The seven-transmembrane helices, conformationally distinct from those of G-protein-coupled receptors, enclose a large cavity where three conserved histidine residues coordinate a zinc ion. The zinc-binding structure may have a role in the adiponectin-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and UCP2 upregulation. Adiponectin may broadly interact with the extracellular face, rather than the carboxy-terminal tail, of the receptors. The present information will facilitate the understanding of novel structure-function relationships and the development and optimization of AdipoR agonists for the treatment of obesity-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. PMID:25855295

  4. Crystal structure of natural phaeosphaeride A

    PubMed Central

    Abzianidze, Victoria V.; Poluektova, Ekaterina V.; Bolshakova, Ksenia P.; Panikorovskii, Taras L.; Bogachenkov, Alexander S.; Berestetskiy, Alexander O.

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C15H23NO5, contains two independent mol­ecules. Phaeosphaeride A contains two primary sections, an alkyl chain consisting of five C atoms and a cyclic system consisting of fused five- and six-membered rings with attached substituents. In the crystal, the mol­ecules form layered structures. Nearly planar sheets, parallel to the (001) plane, form bilayers of two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks with the hy­droxy groups located on the inter­ior of the bilayer sheets. The network is constructed primarily of four O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which form a zigzag pattern in the (001) plane. The butyl chains inter­digitate with the butyl chains on adjacent sheets. The crystal was twinned by a twofold rotation about the c axis, with refined major–minor occupancy fractions of 0.718 (6):0.282 (6). PMID:26396831

  5. Crystal Structures of Respiratory Pathogen Neuraminidases

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Y.; Parker, D; Ratner, A; Prince, A; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is pressing need to develop novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of infections by the human respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The neuraminidases of these pathogens are important for host colonization in animal models of infection and are attractive targets for drug discovery. To aid in the development of inhibitors against these neuraminidases, we have determined the crystal structures of the P. aeruginosa enzyme NanPs and S. pneumoniae enzyme NanA at 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In situ proteolysis with trypsin was essential for the crystallization of our recombinant NanA. The active site regions of the two enzymes are strikingly different. NanA contains a deep pocket that is similar to that in canonical neuraminidases, while the NanPs active site is much more open. The comparative studies suggest that NanPs may not be a classical neuraminidase, and may have distinct natural substrates and physiological functions. This work represents an important step in the development of drugs to prevent respiratory tract colonization by these two pathogens.

  6. Chemical and structural studies of 'Brownlee' particles. [extraterrestrial dust in upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Fraundorf, P.; Shirck, J.; Walker, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Several techniques were applied to the study of small particles (around 10 microns) collected in the upper atmosphere by U-2 aircraft. The major element chemistry of roughly 1/3 of the particles is similar to that of chondritic meteorites, although considerable variation of element ratios is observed from particle to particle, and even within a given particle. All particles of 'chondritic' composition are polycrystalline aggregates. About half have fully re-entrant structures; the remaining ones have more compact structures ranging from platey to spherical morphologies. Micro-crystallites with various internal structures are observed in the size range from less than 100 A to several microns. Although tracks are clearly observed in transmission electron microscope examination of terrestrial analog crystals, no tracks of solar flare origin have yet been identified in the U-2 particles. Induced fission track analysis of one aggregate shows that the U concentration is less than 15 ppbm, lending support to the extraterrestrial origin hypothesis.

  7. Crystal Structure of the VS ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Suslov, Nikolai B.; DasGupta, Saurja; Huang, Hao; Fuller, James R.; Lilley, David M.J.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Varkud Satellite (VS) ribozyme mediates rolling circle replication of a plasmid found in the Neurospora mitochondria. We report crystal structures of this ribozyme at 3.1Å resolution, revealing an intertwined dimer formed by an exchange of substrate helices. Within each protomer, an arrangement of three-way helical junctions organizes seven helices into a global fold that creates a docking site for the substrate helix of the other protomer, resulting in the formation of two active sites in trans. This mode of RNA-RNA association resembles the process of domain swapping in proteins and has implications for RNA regulation and evolution. Within each active site, adenine and guanine nucleobases abut the scissile phosphate, poised to serve direct roles in catalysis. Similarities to the active sites of the hairpin and hammerhead ribozymes highlight the functional significance of active site features, underscore the ability of RNA to access functional architectures from distant regions of sequence space, and suggest convergent evolution. PMID:26414446

  8. Crystal structure of oligoacenes under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Oehzelt, M.; Aichholzer, A.; Resel, R.; Heimel, G.; Venuti, E.; Della Valle, R. G.

    2006-09-01

    We report crystal structures of anthracene, tetracene, and pentacene under pressure. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments up to 9 GPa were performed. Quasiharmonic lattice dynamics calculations are compared to the experimental results and show excellent agreement. The results are discussed with particular emphasis on the pressure dependence of the unit cell dimensions and the rearrangement of the molecules. The high pressure data also allow an analysis of the equation of state of these substances as a function of molecular length. We report the bulk modulus of tetracene and pentacene (B{sub 0}=9.0 and 9.6 GPa, respectively) and its pressure derivative (B{sub 0}{sup '}=7.9 and 6.4, respectively). We find that the unit-cell volume and bulk modulus at ambient pressure follow a linear relationship with the molecular length.

  9. Exploring structural phase transitions of ion crystals

    PubMed Central

    Yan, L. L.; Wan, W.; Chen, L.; Zhou, F.; Gong, S. J.; Tong, X.; Feng, M.

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions have been a research focus in many-body physics over past decades. Cold ions, under strong Coulomb repulsion, provide a repealing paradigm of exploring phase transitions in stable confinement by electromagnetic field. We demonstrate various conformations of up to sixteen laser-cooled 40Ca+ ion crystals in a home-built surface-electrode trap, where besides the usually mentioned structural phase transition from the linear to the zigzag, two additional phase transitions to more complicated two-dimensional configurations are identified. The experimental observation agrees well with the numerical simulation. Heating due to micromotion of the ions is analysed by comparison of the numerical simulation with the experimental observation. Our investigation implies very rich and complicated many-body behaviour in the trapped-ion systems and provides effective mechanism for further exploring quantum phase transitions and quantum information processing with ultracold trapped ions. PMID:26865229

  10. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  11. Crystal structure of human GDF11.

    PubMed

    Padyana, Anil K; Vaidialingam, Bhamini; Hayes, David B; Gupta, Priyanka; Franti, Michael; Farrow, Neil A

    2016-03-01

    Members of the TGF-β family of proteins are believed to play critical roles in cellular signaling processes such as those involved in muscle differentiation. The extent to which individual family members have been characterized and linked to biological function varies greatly. The role of myostatin, also known as growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8), as an inhibitor of muscle differentiation is well understood through genetic linkages. In contrast, the role of growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) is much less well understood. In humans, the mature forms of GDF11 and myostatin are over 94% identical. In order to understand the role that the small differences in sequence may play in the differential signaling of these molecules, the crystal structure of GDF11 was determined to a resolution of 1.50 Å. A comparison of the GDF11 structure with those of other family members reveals that the canonical TGF-β domain fold is conserved. A detailed structural comparison of GDF11 and myostatin shows that several of the differences between these proteins are likely to be localized at interfaces that are critical for the interaction with downstream receptors and inhibitors. PMID:26919518

  12. Crystal Structure of Amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Joo, Seongjoon; Kim, Sangwoo; Seo, Hogyun; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2016-07-20

    Amylomaltase is an essential enzyme in maltose utilization and maltodextrin metabolism, and it has been industrially used for the production of cyclodextrin and modification of starch. We determined the crystal structure of amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAM) at a resolution of 1.7 Å. Although CgAM forms a dimer without NaCl, it exists as a monomer in physiological concentration of NaCl. CgAM is composed of N- and C-terminal domains, which can be further divided into two and four subdomains, respectively. It exhibits a unique structural feature at the functionally unknown N-domain and also shows two striking differences at the C-domain compared to other amylomaltases. These differences at extended edge of the substrate-binding site might affect substrate specificity for large cyclodextrin formation. The bis-tris methane and sulfate molecules bound at the substrate-binding site of our current structure mimic the binding of the hydroxyl groups of glucose bound at subsites -1 and -2, respectively. PMID:27366969

  13. The Crystal Structure of Triuranyl Diphosphate Tetrahydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locock, Andrew J.; Burns, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    The hydrated neutral uranyl phosphate, (UO2)3(PO4)2(H2O)4, was synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Intensity data were collected using MoKα radiation and a CCD-based area detector. The crystal structure was solved by direct methods and refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques to agreement indices wR2=0.116 for all data, and R1=0.040, calculated for the 2764 unique observed reflections (∣Fo∣≥4σF). The compound is orthorhombic, space group Pnma, Z=4, a=7.063(1) Å, b=17.022(3) Å, c=13.172(3) Å, V=1583.5(5) Å3. The structure consists of sheets of phosphate tetrahedra and uranyl pentagonal bipyramids, with composition [(UO2)(PO4)]- and the uranophane sheet anion topology. The sheets are connected by a uranyl pentagonal bipyramid in the interlayer that shares corners with a phosphate tetrahedron on each of two adjacent sheets, resulting in an open framework with isolated H2O groups in the larger cavities of the structure.

  14. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss-Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  15. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss–Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  16. Crystal Structure of Homo Sapiens Kynureninase†

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Santiago; Kristoforov, Roman; Momany, Cory; Phillips, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Kynureninase is a member of a large family of catalytically diverse but structurally homologous pyridoxal-5′-phosphate dependent enzymes known as the aspartate aminotransferase superfamily or α-family. The Homo sapiens and other eukaryotic constitutive kynureninases preferentially catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine to produce 3-hydroxyanthranilate and L-alanine, while L-kynurenine is the substrate of many prokaryotic inducible kynureninases. The human enzyme was cloned with an N-terminal hexahistidine tag, expressed, and purified from a bacterial expression system using Ni-metal ion affinity chromatography. Kinetic characterization of the recombinant enzyme reveals classic Michaelis-Menten behavior, with a Km= 28.3 ± 1.9 μM, and a specific activity of 1.75 μmol min-1 mg-1 for 3-hydroxy-DL-kynurenine. Crystals of recombinant kynureninase were obtained that diffracted to 2.0 Å, and the atomic structure of the PLP-bound holoenzyme was solved by molecular replacement using the Pseudomonas fluorescens kynureninase structure (PDB accession 1qz9) as the phasing model. A structural superposition with the P. fluorescens kynureninase revealed that these two structures resemble the “open” and “closed” conformations of aspartate aminotransferase. The comparison illustrates the dynamic nature of these proteins’ small domains and reveals a role for Arg-434 similar to that in other AAT α-family members. Docking of 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine into the human kynureninase active site suggests that Asn-333 and His-102 are involved in substrate binding and molecular discrimination between inducible and constitutive kynureninase substrates. PMID:17300176

  17. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure. PMID:19950907

  18. Multiscale models of colloidal dispersion of particles in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Bennett, T P; D'Alessandro, G; Daly, K R

    2014-12-01

    We use homogenization theory to develop a multiscale model of colloidal dispersion of particles in nematic liquid crystals under weak-anchoring conditions. We validate the model by comparing it with simulations by using the Landau-de Gennes free energy and show that the agreement is excellent. We then use the multiscale model to study the effect that particle anisotropy has on the liquid crystal: spherically symmetric particles always reduce the effective elastic constant. Asymmetric particles introduce an effective alignment field that can increase the Fredericks threshold and decrease the switch-off time. PMID:25615117

  19. Efficient method for predicting crystal structures at finite temperature: variable box shape simulations.

    PubMed

    Filion, Laura; Marechal, Matthieu; van Oorschot, Bas; Pelt, Daniël; Smallenburg, Frank; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2009-10-30

    We present an efficient and robust method based on Monte Carlo simulations for predicting crystal structures at finite temperature. We apply this method, which is surprisingly easy to implement, to a variety of systems, demonstrating its effectiveness for hard, attractive, and anisotropic interactions, binary mixtures, semi-long-range soft interactions, and truly long-range interactions where the truly long-range interactions are treated using Ewald sums. In the case of binary hard-sphere mixtures, star polymers, and binary Lennard-Jones mixtures, the crystal structures predicted by this algorithm are consistent with literature, providing confidence in the method. Finally, we predict new crystal structures for hard asymmetric dumbbell particles, bowl-like particles and hard oblate cylinders and present the phase diagram for the oblate cylinders based on full free energy calculations. PMID:19905838

  20. Diffraction phenomena in spontaneous and stimulated radiation by relativistic particles in crystals (Review)

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshevsky, V.G.; Dubovskaya, I.Ya.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses: the dispersion characteristics of parametric x-ray radiation (PXR) and diffraction radiation of oscillator; cooperative effects in x-radiation by charged particles in crystals; and diffraction x-radiation by relativistic oscillator.

  1. Liquid-crystal patterns of rectangular particles in a square nanocavity.

    PubMed

    González-Pinto, Miguel; Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; Velasco, Enrique

    2013-09-01

    Using density-functional theory in the restricted-orientation approximation, we analyze the liquid-crystal patterns and phase behavior of a fluid of hard rectangular particles confined in a two-dimensional square nanocavity of side length H composed of hard inner walls. Patterning in the cavity is governed by surface-induced order as well as capillary and frustration effects and depends on the relative values of the particle aspect ratio κ≡L/σ, with L the length and σ the width of the rectangles (L≥σ), and cavity size H. Ordering may be very different from bulk (H→∞) behavior when H is a few times the particle length L (nanocavity). Bulk and confinement properties are obtained for the cases κ=1, 3, and 6. In bulk the isotropic phase is always stable at low packing fractions η=Lσρ_{0} (with ρ_{0} the average density) and nematic, smectic, columnar, and crystal phases can be stabilized at higher η depending on κ: For increasing η the sequence of isotropic to columnar is obtained for κ=1 and 3, whereas for κ=6 we obtain isotropic to nematic to smectic (the crystal being unstable in all three cases for the density range explored). In the confined fluid surface-induced frustration leads to fourfold symmetry breaking in all phases (which become twofold symmetric). Since no director distortion can arise in our model by construction, frustration in the director orientation is relaxed by the creation of domain walls (where the director changes by 90^{∘}); this configuration is necessary to stabilize periodic phases. For κ=1 the crystal becomes stable with commensurate transitions taking place as H is varied. These transitions involve structures with different number of peaks in the local density. In the case κ=3 the commensurate transitions involve columnar phases with different number of columns. In the case κ=6 the high-density region of the phase diagram is dominated by commensurate transitions between smectic structures; at lower densities

  2. Soot Aerosol Particles as Cloud Condensation Nuclei: from Ice Nucleation Activity to Ice Crystal Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirim, Claire; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Ortega, Isamel Kenneth; Carpentier, Yvain; Focsa, Cristian; Chazallon, Bertrand; Ouf, François-Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of solid-state particles (soot) from engine exhausts due to incomplete fuel combustion is considered to influence ice and liquid water cloud droplet activation [1]. The activity of these aerosols would originate from their ability to be important centers of ice-particle nucleation, as they would promote ice formation above water homogeneous freezing point. Soot particles are reported to be generally worse ice nuclei than mineral dust because they activate nucleation at higher ice-supersaturations for deposition nucleation and at lower temperatures for immersion freezing than ratios usually expected for homogeneous nucleation [2]. In fact, there are still numerous opened questions as to whether and how soot's physico-chemical properties (structure, morphology and chemical composition) can influence their nucleation ability. Therefore, systematic investigations of soot aerosol nucleation activity via one specific nucleation mode, here deposition nucleation, combined with thorough structural and compositional analyzes are needed in order to establish any association between the particles' activity and their physico-chemical properties. In addition, since the morphology of the ice crystals can influence their radiative properties [3], we investigated their morphology as they grow over both soot and pristine substrates at different temperatures and humidity ratios. In the present work, Combustion Aerosol STandart soot samples were produced from propane using various experimental conditions. Their nucleation activity was studied in deposition mode (from water vapor), and monitored using a temperature-controlled reactor in which the sample's relative humidity is precisely measured with a cryo-hygrometer. Formation of water/ice onto the particles is followed both optically and spectroscopically, using a microscope coupled to a Raman spectrometer. Vibrational signatures of hydroxyls (O-H) emerge when the particle becomes hydrated and are used to characterize ice

  3. Structure and properties of detonation soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    MalKOV, I.Y.; Titiov, V.M.

    1996-05-01

    The influence of TNT/RDX (50/50) detonation parameters and conservation conditions of detonation products during their expansion in hermetic detonation chamber on structure and phase composition of the detonation carbon has been considered. Systematic studies made it possible to establish the real structure of detonation carbon depending on experimental conditions. It has been shown that both during explosion in a chamber and thermal annealing in vacuum the nanoparticles of diamond have the tendency to transform not into graphite particles, as was assumed earlier, but into onionlike structures of fullerene series, composed of closed concentric carbon shells, the so-called carbon onions. The nanometer carbon particles have been obtained which comprise a diamond nucleus surrounded by a graphite-like mantle composed of quasi-spherical carbon shells which are the intermediate products of annealing of nanodiamond. The influence of initial sizes of the diamond particles and temperature on the annealing of diamond has been studied. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Enabling tablet product development of 5-fluorocytosine through integrated crystal and particle engineering.

    PubMed

    Perumalla, Sathyanarayana Reddy; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2014-04-01

    The antifungal drug, 5-fluorocytosine (FC), is marketed as a capsule (250 or 500 mg strength) instead of the preferred tablet dosage form. Through systematic characterization of solid-state properties, including mechanical properties, we identify tabletability and poor physical stability of FC as the problems that likely have prevented the successful development of a FC tablet product. We then design an FC oxalate 2:1 salt (FCOXA21), based on established relationship between crystal structure and properties, to address these deficient properties. FCOXA21 is subsequently used to develop a direct compression tablet product using predictive and material-sparing powder characterization tools, that is, ring shear cell for powder flowability and compaction simulator for powder tabletability. The initial tablet formulation, which contains 84.5% (wt %) FCOXA21, exhibits excellent tabletability but inadequate flowability. We solve the powder flowability problem through controlling the particle size of FCOXA21. A batch of FCOXA21 tablets (500 mg FC equivalent dose) is then prepared. Finally, systematic evaluation on tablet weight variation, content uniformity, friability, and dissolution using standard methods confirms the commercial manufacturability of FC tablets. Through this work, we have demonstrated the potential of integrated crystal and particle engineering in expediting the development of tablet products of challenging drugs using the economical direct compression process. PMID:24515970

  5. Structure dependent hydrogen induced etching features of graphene crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraja, Amutha; Shinde, Sachin M.; Kalita, Golap; Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Sharma, Kamal P.; Tanemura, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    H2 induced etching of graphene is of significant interest to understand graphene growth process as well as to fabricate nanoribbons and various other structures. Here, we demonstrate the structure dependent H2 induced etching behavior of graphene crystals. We synthesized graphene crystals on electro-polished Cu foil by an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition process, where some of the crystals showed hexagonal shaped snowflake-dendritic morphology. Significant differences in H2 induced etching behavior were observed for the snowflake-dendritic and regular graphene crystals by annealing in a gas mixture of H2 and Ar. The regular graphene crystals were etched anisotropically creating hexagonal holes with pronounced edges, while etching of all the dendritic crystals occurred from the branches of lobs creating symmetrical fractal structures. The etching behavior provides important clue of graphene nucleation and growth as well as their selective etching to fabricate well-defined structures for nanoelectronics.

  6. Crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Lígia R.; Low, John Nicolson; Magalhães e Silva, Diogo; Cagide, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives, viz. 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]-1-(3-meth­oxy­phen­yl)ethan-1-one (1), C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]-1-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)ethan-1-one (2), C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]-1-(4-chloro­phen­yl)ethan-1-one (3), C15H11ClN4O2S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]-1-(4-bromo­phen­yl)ethan-1-one (4), C15H11BrN4O2S, and 1-(3-meth­oxy­phen­yl)-2-[(9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]ethan-1-one (5), C14H12N4O2S. Compounds (2), (3) and (4) are isomorphous and accordingly their mol­ecular and supra­molecular structures are similar. An analysis of the dihedral angles between the purine and exocyclic phenyl rings show that the mol­ecules of (1) and (5) are essentially planar but that in the case of the three isomorphous compounds (2), (3) and (4), these rings are twisted by a dihedral angle of approximately 38°. With the exception of (1) all mol­ecules are linked by weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds in their crystals. There is π–π stacking in all compounds. A Cambridge Structural Database search revealed the existence of 11 deposited compounds containing the 1-phenyl-2-sulfanyl­ethanone scaffold; of these, only eight have a cyclic ring as substituent, the majority of these being heterocycles. PMID:27006794

  7. Synthesis and textural evolution of alumina particles with mesoporous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xun; Peng Tianyou; Yao Jinchun; Lv Hongjin; Huang Cheng

    2010-06-15

    Alumina particles with mesostructures were synthesized through a chemical precipitation method by using different inorganic aluminum salts followed by a heterogeneous azeotropic distillation and calcination process. The obtained mesoporous {gamma}-alumina particles were systematically characterized by the X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. Effects of the aluminum salt counter anion, pH value and the azeotropic distillation process on the structural or textural evolution of alumina particles were investigated. It is found that Cl{sup -} in the reaction solution can restrain the textural evolution of the resultant precipitates into two-dimensional crystallized pseudoboehmite lamellae during the heterogeneous azeotropic distillation, and then transformed into {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles with mesostructures after further calcination at 1173 K, whereas coexisting SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} can promote above morphology evolution and then transformed into {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofibers after calcination at 1173 K. Moreover nearly all materials retain relatively high specific surface areas larger than 100 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} even after calcinations at 1173 K. - Graphical abstract: Co-existing Cl{sup -} is beneficial for the formation of {gamma}-alumina nanoparticles with mesostructures during the precipitation process. Interparticle and intraparticle mesopores can be derived from acidic solution and near neutral solution, respectively.

  8. Crystal structure of a Trypanosoma brucei metacaspase

    PubMed Central

    McLuskey, Karen; Rudolf, Jana; Proto, William R.; Isaacs, Neil W.; Coombs, Graham H.; Moss, Catherine X.; Mottram, Jeremy C.

    2012-01-01

    Metacaspases are distantly related caspase-family cysteine peptidases implicated in programmed cell death in plants and lower eukaryotes. They differ significantly from caspases because they are calcium-activated, arginine-specific peptidases that do not require processing or dimerization for activity. To elucidate the basis of these differences and to determine the impact they might have on the control of cell death pathways in lower eukaryotes, the previously undescribed crystal structure of a metacaspase, an inactive mutant of metacaspase 2 (MCA2) from Trypanosoma brucei, has been determined to a resolution of 1.4 Å. The structure comprises a core caspase fold, but with an unusual eight-stranded β-sheet that stabilizes the protein as a monomer. Essential aspartic acid residues, in the predicted S1 binding pocket, delineate the arginine-specific substrate specificity. In addition, MCA2 possesses an unusual N terminus, which encircles the protein and traverses the catalytic dyad, with Y31 acting as a gatekeeper residue. The calcium-binding site is defined by samarium coordinated by four aspartic acid residues, whereas calcium binding itself induces an allosteric conformational change that could stabilize the active site in a fashion analogous to subunit processing in caspases. Collectively, these data give insights into the mechanistic basis of substrate specificity and mode of activation of MCA2 and provide a detailed framework for understanding the role of metacaspases in cell death pathways of lower eukaryotes. PMID:22529389

  9. Crystal Structure of Human Kynurenine Aminotransferase ll*

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Li, J.

    2008-01-01

    Human kynurenine aminotransferase II (hKAT-II) efficiently catalyzes the transamination of knunrenine to kynurenic acid (KYNA). KYNA is the only known endogenous antagonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and is also an antagonist of 7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Abnormal concentrations of brain KYNA have been implicated in the pathogenesis and development of several neurological and psychiatric diseases in humans. Consequently, enzymes involved in the production of brain KYNA have been considered potential regulatory targets. In this article, we report a 2.16 Angstroms crystal structure of hKAT-II and a 1.95 Angstroms structure of its complex with kynurenine. The protein architecture of hKAT-II reveals that it belongs to the fold-type I pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. In comparison with all subclasses of fold-type I-PLP-dependent enzymes, we propose that hKAT-II represents a novel subclass in the fold-type I enzymes because of the unique folding of its first 65 N-terminal residues. This study provides a molecular basis for future effort in maintaining physiological concentrations of KYNA through molecular and biochemical regulation of hKAT-II.

  10. Dry-growth of silver single-crystal nanowires from porous Ag structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuantong; Nagao, Shijo; Jiu, Jinting; Zhang, Hao; Sugahara, Tohru; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2016-06-01

    A fabrication method of single crystal Ag nanowires in large scale is introduced without any chemical synthesis in wet processes, which usually generates fivefold twinned nanowires of fcc metals. Dense single-crystal nanowires grow on a mechanically polished surface of micro-porous Ag structure, which is created from Ag micro-particles. The diameter and the length of the nanowires can be controlled simply by changing the temperature and the time of the heating during the nanowire growth in air. Unique growth mechanism is described in detail, based on stress-induced migration accelerated by the micro-porous structure where the origin of Ag nanowires growth is incubated. Transmission electron microscopy analysis on the single crystal nanowires is also presented. This simple method offered an alternative preparation for metallic nanowires, especially with the single crystal structure in numerous applications.

  11. Electric field generation of Skyrmion-like structures in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Laura; Kos, Žiga; Savoini, Matteo; Kouwer, Paul; Rowan, Alan; Ravnik, Miha; Muševič, Igor; Rasing, Theo

    2016-01-21

    Skyrmions are particle-like topological objects that are increasingly drawing attention in condensed matter physics, where they are connected to inversion symmetry breaking and chirality. Here we report the generation of stable Skyrmion-like structures in a thin nematic liquid crystal film on chemically patterned patchy surfaces. Using the interplay of material elasticity and surface boundary conditions, we use a strong electric field to quench the nematic liquid crystal from a fully aligned phase to vortex-like nematic liquid crystal structures, centered on patterned patches, which carry two different sorts of topological defects. Numerical calculations reveal that these are Skyrmion-like structures, seeded from the surface boojum topological defects and swirling towards the second confining surface. These observations, supported by numerical methods, demonstrate the possibility to generate, manipulate and study Skyrmion-like objects in nematic liquid crystals on patterned surfaces. PMID:26549212

  12. Crystallization and Structure Determination of Superantigens and Immune Receptor Complexes.

    PubMed

    Rödström, Karin E J; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Structure determination of superantigens and the complexes they form with immune receptors have over the years provided insight in their modes of action. This technique requires growing large and highly ordered crystals of the superantigen or receptor-superantigen complex, followed by exposure to X-ray radiation and data collection. Here, we describe methods for crystallizing superantigens and superantigen-receptor complexes using the vapor diffusion technique, how the crystals may be optimized, and lastly data collection and structure determination. PMID:26676036

  13. Dynamics of ordered colloidal particle monolayers at nematic liquid crystal interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei-Shao; Gharbi, Mohamed Amine; Lohr, Matthew A; Still, Tim; Gratale, Matthew D; Lubensky, T C; Stebe, Kathleen J; Yodh, A G

    2016-05-25

    We prepare two-dimensional crystalline packings of colloidal particles on surfaces of the nematic liquid crystal (NLC) 5CB, and we investigate the diffusion and vibrational phonon modes of these particles using video microscopy. Short-time particle diffusion at the air-NLC interface is well described by a Stokes-Einstein model with viscosity similar to that of 5CB. Crystal phonon modes, measured by particle displacement covariance techniques, are demonstrated to depend on the elastic constants of 5CB through interparticle forces produced by LC defects that extend from the interface into the underlying bulk material. The displacement correlations permit characterization of transverse and longitudinal sound velocities of the crystal packings, as well as the particle interactions produced by the LC defects. All behaviors are studied in the nematic phase as a function of increasing temperature up to the nematic-isotropic transition. PMID:27109759

  14. Monodispersepoly[BMA-co-(COPS-I)] Particles by Soap-Free Emulsion Copolymerization and Its Optical Properties as Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Chang; Choo, Hun Seung

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization of benzyl methacrylate (BMA) with sodium 1-allyloxy-2-hydroxypropane sulfonate (COPS-I) and the resulting optical properties, a series of experiments was carried out at various reaction conditions such as the changes of BMA concentration, COPS-I concentration, BMA concentration under a fixed COPS-I amount, initiator and divinyl benzene (DVB) concentration. All the latices showed highly monodispersed spherical particles in the size range of 144~435 nm and the respective shiny structural colors from their colloidal photonic crystals. It is found that the changes in such polymerization factors greatly affect the number of particles and particle diameter, polymerization rate, molecular weight, zeta-potential, and refractive indices. The increase of number of particles led to the increased rate of polymerization and zeta-potential of the latices, on the other hand, to the decreased molecular weight. Refractive indices and the reflectivity increased with COPS-I concentration, on the other hand, and decreased with DVB concentration. Especially, refractive indices of the resulting poly[BMA-co-(COPS-I)] colloidal photonic crystals showed much higher values of 1.65~2.21 than that of polystyrene, due to the formation of core-shell shaped morphology. Monodisperse and high refractive index of poly[BMA-co-(COPS-I)] particles prepared in this work could be used for the study in photonic crystals and electrophoretic display. PMID:26726393

  15. Undergraduates Improve upon Published Crystal Structure in Class Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Scott; Koldewey, Philipp; Bardwell, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, 57 undergraduate students at the University of Michigan were assigned the task of solving a crystal structure, given only the electron density map of a 1.3 Å crystal structure from the electron density server, and the position of the N-terminal amino acid. To test their knowledge of amino acid chemistry, the students were not given the…

  16. A facile method for the structure control of TiO2 particles at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoqing; Zhu, Yun; Wang, Lianwen; Wang, Jiatai; Guo, Qian; Li, Jiangong

    2015-11-01

    Crystalline and amorphous TiO2 particles have important potential applications in photocatalysis, structural ceramics, solar batteries and nanoglasses. Hence controlling the structure of TiO2 particles is of practical importance. Crystalline TiO2 particles are usually prepared by calcination of their amorphous precursor. Here a facile method was developed to control the structure of TiO2 particles at a low temperature. TiO2 particles were prepared by sol-gel method; and it was found that during the washing process, the TiO2 particles washed with water are crystalline whereas the TiO2 particles washed with ethanol are amorphous. Further analyses indicate that ethanol washing may introduce an organic cover layer on the TiO2 particles which hinders the crystallization of amorphous TiO2 particles. Therefore, the structure of TiO2 particles, amorphous or crystalline (anatase), can be controlled just by changing the washing medium, water or ethanol. This method seems a common method for controlling the (amorphous or crystalline) structure of metal oxides and hydroxides and was verified in the preparation of ZrO2, FeO(OH), and Al(OH)3 particles.

  17. Use of Pom Pons to Illustrate Cubic Crystal Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Susan G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method that uses olefin pom pons to illustrate cubic crystal structure. Facilitates hands-on examination of different packing arrangements such as hexagonal close-packed and cubic close-packed structures. (JRH)

  18. Orientational defects near colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Feng, James J; Zhou, Chixing

    2004-01-01

    We study the interaction between a surface-anchoring colloidal particle and a liquid-crystalline host, and in particular the formation of orientational defects near the particle. A mean-field theory based on the nonlocal Marrucci-Greco nematic potential is used to represent molecular interactions in an inhomogeneous orientational field. An evolution equation for the molecular configuration tensor is solved numerically whose steady state minimizes the total free energy of the system. With strong homeotropic anchoring on the particle surface, three types of solutions may appear depending on initial conditions and particle size: Saturn rings, satellite point defects, and polar rings. The Saturn ring remains stable on micrometer-sized particles, contrary to previous calculations but consistent with experiments. A phase diagram is constructed for the three regimes. Based on the free energy, the most stable state is the Saturn ring for smaller particles and the satellite defect for larger ones. PMID:14651897

  19. Simulation studies of crystal-photodetector assemblies for the Turkish accelerator center particle factory electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocak, F.

    2015-07-01

    The Turkish Accelerator Center Particle Factory detector will be constructed for the detection of the produced particles from the collision of a 1 GeV electron beam against a 3.6 GeV positron beam. PbWO4 and CsI(Tl) crystals are considered for the construction of the electromagnetic calorimeter part of the detector. The generated optical photons in these crystals are detected by avalanche or PIN photodiodes. Geant4 simulation code has been used to estimate the energy resolution of the calorimeter for these crystal-photodiode assemblies.

  20. Fabricating large two-dimensional single colloidal crystals by doping with active particles.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, B; Filion, L; Dijkstra, M

    2016-04-14

    Using simulations we explore the behaviour of two-dimensional colloidal (poly)crystals doped with active particles. We show that these active dopants can provide an elegant new route to removing grain boundaries in polycrystals. Specifically, we show that active dopants both generate and are attracted to defects, such as vacancies and interstitials, which leads to clustering of dopants at grain boundaries. The active particles both broaden and enhance the mobility of the grain boundaries, causing rapid coarsening of the crystal domains. The remaining defects recrystallize upon turning off the activity of the dopants, resulting in a large-scale single-domain crystal. PMID:26936131

  1. Circular permutation as a tool to reduce surface entropy triggers crystallization of the signal recognition particle receptor beta subunit.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas U; Walczak, Rudolf; Blobel, Günter

    2004-10-01

    The production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a difficult obstacle on the road to high-resolution structural characterization of proteins. This is primarily a result of the empirical nature of the process. Although crystallization is not predictable, factors inhibiting it are well established. First, crystal formation is always entropically unfavorable. Reducing the entropic cost of crystallizing a given protein is thus desirable. It is common practice to map boundaries and remove unstructured regions surrounding the folded protein domain. However, a problem arises when flexible regions are not at the boundaries but within a domain. Such regions cannot be deleted without adding new restraints to the domain. We encountered this problem during an attempt to crystallize the beta subunit of the eukaryotic signal recognition particle (SRbeta), bearing a long and flexible internal loop. Native SRbeta did not crystallize. However, after circularly permuting the protein by connecting the spatially close N and C termini with a short heptapeptide linker GGGSGGG and removing 26 highly flexible loop residues within the domain, we obtained diffraction-quality crystals. This protein-engineering method is simple and should be applicable to other proteins, especially because N and C termini of protein domains are often close in space. The success of this method profits from prior knowledge of the domain fold, which is becoming increasingly common in today's postgenomic era. PMID:15340174

  2. Phase transitions of aqueous atmospheric particles: Crystallization of ammonium salts promoted by oxide mineral constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jeong-Ho

    2001-09-01

    Knowledge of the hygroscopic response of aerosols is a fundamental factor necessary for the accurate quantitative modeling of visibility degradation, global warming, PM-10 health issues, cloud microphysics, and the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. At the present time, however, our current understanding of phase transitions is insufficient to develop accurate quantitative models. The discrepancy between current atmospheric models and field measurements originates mainly from a lack of understanding of the efflorescence of real atmospheric particles. While there have been many studies on the homogeneous nucleation of the soluble organic, inorganic, or multi-component materials, many recent in situ field measurements with single-particle mass spectrometry reveal that the individual particles in the troposphere are primarily composed of more than one component. One of the common mixed component particle types contains both water- soluble and insoluble components. Through atmospheric processes, the soluble component can be expected to form a coating around the insoluble constituents. This type of atmospheric particles is very important because the insoluble constituent can play a role as a template for the crystallization of the soluble components by heterogeneous nucleation. In the atmosphere, the most prevalent insoluble constituents are mineral dusts, which have their origin from Saharan and Gobbi deserts. The existence of these coated particles has been supported by several field measurements as well as model studies. Therefore, it becomes imperative to simulate more realistic atmospheric particles for more exact (or realistic) understanding the phase transition of the ambient aerosol particles in the real world. In this context, a series of studies has been completed to solve the aforementioned problems in the phase transition study and to better understand the heterogeneous nucleation of these internally mixed particles. An in-line tube furnace has been

  3. Crystallographic structure of the T=1 particle of brome mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Larson, Steven B; Lucas, Robert W; McPherson, Alexander

    2005-02-25

    T=1 icosahedral particles of amino terminally truncated brome mosaic virus (BMV) protein were created by treatment of the wild-type T=3 virus with 1M CaCl2 and crystallized from sodium malonate. Diffraction data were collected from frozen crystals to beyond 2.9 A resolution and the structure determined by molecular replacement and phase extension. The particles are composed of pentameric capsomeres from the wild-type virions which have reoriented with respect to the original particle pentameric axes by rotations of 37 degrees , and formed tenuous interactions with one another, principally through conformationally altered C-terminal polypeptides. Otherwise, the pentamers are virtually superimposable upon those of the original T=3 BMV particles. The T=1 particles, in the crystals, are not perfect icosahedra, but deviate slightly from exact symmetry, possibly due to packing interactions. This suggests that the T=1 particles are deformable, which is consistent with the loose arrangement of pentamers and latticework of holes that penetrate the surface. Atomic force microscopy showed that the T=3 to T=1 transition could occur by shedding of hexameric capsomeres and restructuring of remaining pentamers accompanied by direct condensation. Knowledge of the structures of the BMV wild-type and T=1 particles now permit us to propose a tentative model for that process. A comparison of the BMV T=1 particles was made with the reassembled T=1 particles produced from the coat protein of trypsin treated alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV), another bromovirus. There is little resemblance between the two particles. The BMV particle, with a maximum diameter of 195 A, is made from distinctive pentameric capsomeres with large holes along the 3-fold axis, while the AlMV particle, of approximate maximum diameter 220 A, has subunits closely packed around the 3-fold axis, large holes along the 5-fold axis, and few contacts within pentamers. In both particles crucial linkages are made about

  4. Two-Dimensional Crystallization of P22 Virus-Like Particles.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Hideyuki; Edwards, Ethan; Uchida, Masaki; McCoy, Kimberly; Roychoudhury, Raj; Schwarz, Benjamin; Patterson, Dustin; Douglas, Trevor

    2016-07-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are well established platforms for constructing functional biomimetic materials. The VLP from the bacteriophage P22 can be used as a nanocontainer to sequester active enzymes, at high concentration, within its cavity through a process of directed self-assembly. Construction of ordered 2D assemblies of these catalytic VLPs can be envisioned as a functional membrane. To achieve this, it is important to establish methods to fabricate densely packed monolayers of VLPs. Highly ordered assemblies of P22 can also be utilized as a two-dimensional (2D) crystal for electron crystallography to get precise structural information on the VLP. Here we report 2D crystallization of different P22 morphologies: P22 procapsid (PC), enzyme encapsulated PC (β-glycosidase and enhanced green fluorescent protein), empty shell (PC without scaffold proteins, ES), the expanded form of P22 (EX), and enzyme encapsulated EX (NADH oxidase). The 2D crystals of P22 VLPs were formed on a positively charged lipid monolayer at the water-air interface with a subphase containing 1% trehalose. A P22 solution, injected underneath the lipid monolayer, floated to the surface because of the density difference between the subphase and protein solution. The lipid monolayer, with adsorbed P22, was transferred to a holey carbon grid and was examined by electron microscopy. 2D crystals were obtained from a subphase containing 100 mM NaCl, 10 mM MES (pH 5.0), and 1% trehalose. The diffraction spots from the transferred film extended to the sixth order in negatively stained samples and the 10th order in cryo-electron microscopy samples. PMID:27125277

  5. Microstructure and Crystal Structure in TAGS Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A. J.; Sharp, J; Rawn, Claudia J

    2009-01-01

    GeTe, a small bandgap semiconductor that has native p-type defects due to Ge vacancies, is an important constituent in the thermoelectric material known as TAGS. TAGS is an acronym for alloys of GeTe with AgSbTe{sub 2}, and compositions are normally designated as TAGS-x, where x is the fraction of GeTe. TAGS-85 is the most important with regard to applications, and there is also commercial interest in TAGS-80. The crystal structure of GeTe{sub 1+{delta}} has a composition-dependent phase transformation at a temperature ranging from 430 C ({delta} = 0) to {approx}400 C ({delta} = 0.02). The high-temperature form is cubic. The low-temperature form is rhombohedral for {delta} < 0.01, as is the case for good thermoelectric performance. Addition of AgSbTe{sub 2} shifts the phase transformation to lower temperatures, and one of the goals of this work is a systematic study of the dependence of transformation temperature on the parameter x. We present results on phase transformations and associated instabilities in TAGS compositions in the range of 70 at.% to 85 at.% GeTe.

  6. Crystal structure of tolyl­fluanid

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seonghwa; Kim, Jineun; Kang, Gihaeng; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-01-01

    The title compound, C10H13Cl2FN2O2S2 {systematic name: N-[(di­chloro­fluoro­methyl)­sulfanyl]-N′,N′-dimethyl-N-p-tolyl­sulfamide}, is a well known fungicide. The dihedral angle between the mean plane of the di­methyl­amino group and that of the benzene ring is 32.3 (3)°. One Cl atom and one F atom of the di­chloro­fluoro­methyl­thio group are disordered over two sets of sites with an occupancy ratio of 0.605 (9):0.395 (9). In the crystal structure, two C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds link adjacent mol­ecules, forming dimers with R 2 2(14) loops. C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link pairs of dimers into chains along the b-axis direction. These chains are joined by an additional C—H⋯O contact, generating a sheet in the ab plane. PMID:25484703

  7. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Nicole M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A; Lisher, John P; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P; Spiller, Benjamin W; Melnyk, Roman A; Lacy, D Borden

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon(1,2). The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host(3,4). The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics. PMID:27571750

  8. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon1,2. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host3,4. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics. PMID:27512603

  9. Fabrication of large binary colloidal crystals with a NaCl structure

    PubMed Central

    Vermolen, E. C. M.; Kuijk, A.; Filion, L. C.; Hermes, M.; Thijssen, J. H. J.; Dijkstra, M.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2009-01-01

    Binary colloidal crystals offer great potential for tuning material properties for applications in, for example, photonics, semiconductors and spintronics, because they allow the positioning of particles with quite different characteristics on one lattice. For micrometer-sized colloids, it is believed that gravity and slow crystallization rates hinder the formation of high-quality binary crystals. Here, we present methods for growing binary colloidal crystals with a NaCl structure from relatively heavy, hard-sphere-like, micrometer-sized silica particles by exploring the following external fields: electric, gravitational, and dielectrophoretic fields and a structured surface (colloidal epitaxy). Our simulations show that the free-energy difference between the NaCl and NiAs structures, which differ in their stacking of the hexagonal planes of the larger spheres, is very small (≈0.002 kBT). However, we demonstrate that the fcc stacking of the large spheres, which is crucial for obtaining the pure NaCl structure, can be favored by using a combination of the above-mentioned external fields. In this way, we have successfully fabricated large, 3D, oriented single crystals having a NaCl structure without stacking disorder. PMID:19805259

  10. Spectroscopic, thermal and structural studies on manganous malate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J. Lincy, A. Mahalakshmi, V.; Saban, K. V.

    2013-01-15

    Prismatic crystals of manganous malate have been prepared by controlled ionic diffusion in hydrosilica gel. The structure was elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystals are orthorhombic with space group Pbca. Vibrations of the functional groups were identified by the FTIR spectrum. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TG-DTA) were carried out to explore the thermal decomposition pattern of the material. Structural information derived from FTIR and TG-DTA studies is in conformity with the single crystal XRD data.

  11. Infrared response from metallic particles embedded in a single-crystal Si matrix - The layered internal photoemission sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Iannelli, J. M.; Nieh, C. W.; Hashimoto, Shin

    1990-01-01

    Infrared radiation at wavelengths of 1-2 microns has been detected in a new device labeled the layered internal photoemission sensor. The device structure, which is grown by molecular beam epitaxy, incorporates epitaxial CoSi2 particles with dimensions of 10-50 nm. Radiation absorbed by these particles photoexcites carriers into a surrounding single-crystal silicon matrix. A peak quantum efficiency of 1.3 percent is measured, which is approximately six times higher than in planar CoSi2 Schottky diodes with 5-nm silicide thickness.

  12. Effect of direction of an external force on crystallization of colloidal particles in a V-shaped groove by sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masahide

    2016-09-01

    We carried out Langevin dynamics simulations to study the effect of the direction of a uniform external force on the crystallization of colloidal particles in a V-shaped groove. When the inclination of the side walls of a groove was set to a suitable value and the external force bisected the angle, the face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure grew with a {100} growth interface. When the external force was inclined, the number of solidified particles decreased with increasing inclination, which is different from the growth in an inverted pyramidal container.

  13. Enhanced high-temperature ice nucleation ability of crystallized aerosol particles after preactivation at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2014-07-01

    In cloud chamber experiments with crystallized aqueous ammonium sulfate, oxalic acid, and succinic acid solution droplets, we have studied a preactivation mechanism that markedly enhances the particles' heterogeneous ice nucleation ability. First cloud expansion experiments were performed at a high temperature (267-244 K) where the crystallized particles did not promote any heterogeneous ice nucleation. Ice nucleation at this temperature, however, could be triggered by temporarily cooling the crystallized particles to a lower temperature. This is because upon crystallization, residuals of the aqueous solution are trapped within the crystals. These captured liquids can freeze when cooled below their respective homogeneous or heterogeneous freezing temperature, leading to the formation of ice pockets in the crystalline particles. When warmed again to the higher temperature, ice formation by the preactivated particles occurred via depositional and deliquescence-induced ice growth, with ice active fractions ranging from 1 to 4% and from 4 to 20%, respectively. Preactivation disappeared above the eutectic temperature, which for the organic acids are close to the melting point of ice. This mechanism could therefore contribute to the very small fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles that are still ice active well above 263 K.

  14. Topological defects and self-assembly of cuboidal colloidal particles with sharp edges in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo, Juan J.; Sadati, Monirosadat; Armas-Perez, Julio C.; Soni, Vishal; Irvine, William T. M.

    The geometry of colloidal particles defines the topology and self-assembly of colloidal superstructures in nematic liquid crystals. Past research has largely focused on the defects that arise around spherical colloids, and the defect-induced aggregation between them. In this work, we examine experimentally and theoretically, the effect of edge curvature of colloidal particles on their defect configurations and self-assembly in a nematic liquid crystal (5CB). The polarized images of the particles with homeotropic surface anchoring in 5CB show that the presence of sharp edges can reshape completely the defect ring. The defect makes sharp turns and follows the edge of the cube particles, which significantly affects the interaction between particles and their eventual self-assembly. In agreement with our experimental results, our computational studies indicate that the gradual increase of the edges sharpness that occurs as we transition from spheres to cubes, changes the defect structure from a Saturn ring to a twisted ring, which is pinned to the edges of the cube particle. The wide variety of topological defects achievable by changing the curvature could provide new tools to tune colloidal self-assembly.

  15. Novel photonic crystal cavities and related structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    The key accomplishment of this project is to achieve a much more in-depth understanding of the thermal emission physics of metallic photonic crystal through theoretical modeling and experimental measurements. An improved transfer matrix technique was developed to enable incorporation of complex dielectric function. Together with microscopic theory describing emitter radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics, a non-equilibrium thermal emission model is developed. Finally, experimental methodology was developed to measure absolute emissivity of photonic crystal at high temperatures with accuracy of +/-2%. Accurate emissivity measurements allow us to validate the procedure to treat the effect of the photonic crystal substrate.

  16. A Dominant Factor for Structural Classification of Protein Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fei; Fudo, Satoshi; Neya, Saburo; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2015-08-24

    With the increasing number of solved protein crystal structures, much information on protein shape and atom geometry has become available. It is of great interest to know the structural diversity for a single kind of protein. Our preliminary study suggested that multiple crystal structures of a single kind of protein can be classified into several groups from the viewpoint of structural similarity. In order to broadly examine this finding, cluster analysis was applied to the crystal structures of hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin (Mb), human serum albumin (HSA), hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR), downloaded from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). As a result of classification by cluster analysis, 146 crystal structures of Hb were separated into five groups. The crystal structures of Mb (n = 284), HEWL (n = 336), HSA (n = 63), and HIV-1 PR (n = 488) were separated into six, five, three, and six groups, respectively. It was found that a major factor causing these structural separations is the space group of crystals and that crystallizing agents have an influence on the crystal structures. Amino acid mutation is a minor factor for the separation because no obvious point mutation making a specific cluster group was observed for the five kinds of proteins. In the classification of Hb and Mb, the species of protein source such as humans, rabbits, and mice is another significant factor. When the difference in amino sequence is large among species, the species of protein source is the primary factor causing cluster separation in the classification of crystal structures. PMID:26230289

  17. Programmably structured plasma waveguide for development of table-top photon and particle sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, T.-S.; Ho, Y.-C.; Wong, S.-J.; Chen, S.-Y.; Chang, Y.-L.; Chu, H.-H.; Lin, J.-Y.; Wang, J.

    2012-06-15

    Programmable fabrication of longitudinal spatial structures in an optically preformed plasma waveguide in a gas jet was achieved, by using laser machining with a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator as the pattern mask. Fabrication of periodic structures with a minimal period of 200 {mu}m and density-ramp structures with a minimal slope length of 100 {mu}m was attained. The technique is useful for the optimization of various laser-plasma-based photon and particle sources.

  18. Ice nucleation: elemental identification of particles in snow crystals.

    PubMed

    Parungo, F P; Pueschel, R F

    1973-06-01

    A scanning field-emission electron microscope combined with an x-ray analyzer is used to locate the ice nucleus within a three-dimensional image of a snow crystal and determine the chemical composition of the nucleus. This makes it possible to better understand the effect of nuclei in cloud seeding. PMID:17806581

  19. Photonic crystal structures with tunable structure color as colorimetric sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Colorimetric sensing, which transduces environmental changes into visible color changes, provides a simple yet powerful detection mechanism that is well-suited to the development of low-cost and low-power sensors. A new approach in colorimetric sensing exploits the structural color of photonic crystals (PCs) to create environmentally-influenced color-changeable materials. PCs are composed of periodic dielectrics or metallo-dielectric nanostructures that affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves (EM) by defining the allowed and forbidden photonic bands. Simultaneously, an amazing variety of naturally occurring biological systems exhibit iridescent color due to the presence of PC structures throughout multi-dimensional space. In particular, some kinds of the structural colors in living organisms can be reversibly changed in reaction to external stimuli. Based on the lessons learned from natural photonic structures, some specific examples of PCs-based colorimetric sensors are presented in detail to demonstrate their unprecedented potential in practical applications, such as the detections of temperature, pH, ionic species, solvents, vapor, humidity, pressure and biomolecules. The combination of the nanofabrication technique, useful design methodologies inspired by biological systems and colorimetric sensing will lead to substantial developments in low-cost, miniaturized and widely deployable optical sensors. PMID:23539027

  20. Photonic Crystal Structures with Tunable Structure Color as Colorimetric Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Colorimetric sensing, which transduces environmental changes into visible color changes, provides a simple yet powerful detection mechanism that is well-suited to the development of low-cost and low-power sensors. A new approach in colorimetric sensing exploits the structural color of photonic crystals (PCs) to create environmentally-influenced color-changeable materials. PCs are composed of periodic dielectrics or metallo-dielectric nanostructures that affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves (EM) by defining the allowed and forbidden photonic bands. Simultaneously, an amazing variety of naturally occurring biological systems exhibit iridescent color due to the presence of PC structures throughout multi-dimensional space. In particular, some kinds of the structural colors in living organisms can be reversibly changed in reaction to external stimuli. Based on the lessons learned from natural photonic structures, some specific examples of PCs-based colorimetric sensors are presented in detail to demonstrate their unprecedented potential in practical applications, such as the detections of temperature, pH, ionic species, solvents, vapor, humidity, pressure and biomolecules. The combination of the nanofabrication technique, useful design methodologies inspired by biological systems and colorimetric sensing will lead to substantial developments in low-cost, miniaturized and widely deployable optical sensors. PMID:23539027

  1. Monodisperse spherical mesoporous silica particles: fast synthesis procedure and fabrication of photonic-crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimova, E. Yu; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Kukushkina, Yu A.; Nashchekin, A. V.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Golubev, V. G.

    2013-04-01

    A procedure for the synthesis of monodisperse spherical mesoporous silica particles (MSMSPs) via the controlled coagulation of silica/surfactant clusters into spherical aggregates with mean diameters of 250-1500 nm has been developed. The synthesis is fast (taking less than 1 h) because identical clusters are simultaneously formed in the reaction mixture. The results of microscopic, x-ray diffraction, adsorption and optical measurements allowed us to conclude that the clusters are ˜15 nm in size and have hexagonally packed cylindrical pore channels. The channel diameters in MSMSPs obtained with cethyltrimethylammonium bromide and decyltrimethylammonium bromide as structure-directing agents were 3.1 ± 0.15 and 2.3 ± 0.12 nm, respectively. The specific surface area and the pore volume of MSMSP were, depending on synthesis conditions, 480-1095 m2 g-1 and 0.50-0.65 cm3 g-1. The MSMSP were used to grow opal-like photonic-crystal films possessing a hierarchical macro-mesoporous structure, with pores within and between the particles. A selective filling of mesopore channels with glycerol, based on the difference between the capillary pressures in macro- and mesopores, was demonstrated. It is shown that this approach makes it possible to control the photonic bandgap position in mesoporous opal films by varying the degree of mesopore filling with glycerol.

  2. In vivo protein crystallization opens new routes in structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Koopmann, Rudolf; Cupelli, Karolina; Redecke, Lars; Nass, Karol; DePonte, Daniel P; White, Thomas A; Stellato, Francesco; Rehders, Dirk; Liang, Mengning; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Bogan, Michael J; Bostedt, Christoph; Boutet, Sébastien; Bozek, John D; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; Davidsson, Jan; Doak, R Bruce; Ekeberg, Tomas; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Hunter, Mark S; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A; Lomb, Lukas; Maia, Filipe R N C; Kimmel, Nils; Martin, Andrew V; Messerschmidt, Marc; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L; Sierra, Raymond G; Soltau, Heike; Stern, Stephan; Strüder, Lothar; Timneanu, Nicusor; Ullrich, Joachim; Wang, Xiaoyu; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; Williams, Garth J; Wunderer, Cornelia B; Fromme, Petra; Spence, John C H; Stehle, Thilo; Chapman, Henry N; Betzel, Christian; Duszenko, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Protein crystallization in cells has been observed several times in nature. However, owing to their small size these crystals have not yet been used for X-ray crystallographic analysis. We prepared nano-sized in vivo–grown crystals of Trypanosoma brucei enzymes and applied the emerging method of free-electron laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography to record interpretable diffraction data. This combined approach will open new opportunities in structural systems biology. PMID:22286384

  3. Structural and Thermoelectric Properties of Tungsten Diselenide Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, K. K.; Patel, K. D.; Patel, Mayur; Patel, C. A.; Pathak, V. M.; Srivastava, R.

    2011-12-01

    Crystals of Tungsten diselenide (WSe2) have been grown by direct vapour transport (DVT) technique using micro processor controlled dual zone horizontal furnace. The chemical composition and structure of grown crystals were confirmed using energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In the present investigation thermoelectric power measurements (TEP) have been carried out on the grown crystals. Different electrical transport parameters of semiconductors have been determined and discussed in the paper.

  4. Crystal structure of a core spliceosomal protein interface.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Matthew J; Edwards, Ross A; Ritchie, Dustin B; Kent, Oliver A; Golas, Monika M; Stark, Holger; Lührmann, Reinhard; Glover, J N Mark; MacMillan, Andrew M

    2006-01-31

    The precise excision of introns from precursor mRNAs (pre-mRNAs) in eukaryotes is accomplished by the spliceosome, a complex assembly containing five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles. Human p14, a component of the spliceosomal U2 and U11/U12 snRNPs, has been shown to associate directly with the pre-mRNA branch adenosine early in spliceosome assembly and within the fully assembled spliceosome. Here we report the 2.5-A crystal structure of a complex containing p14 and a peptide derived from the p14-associated U2 snRNP component SF3b155. p14 contains an RNA recognition motif (RRM), the surface of which is largely occluded by a C-terminal alpha-helix and a portion of the SF3b155 peptide. An analysis of RNA.protein crosslinking to wild-type and mutant p14 shows that the branch adenosine directly interacts with a conserved aromatic within a pocket on the surface of the complex. This result, combined with a comparison of the structure with known RRMs and pseudoRRMs as well as model-building by using the electron cryomicroscopy structure of a spliceosomal U11/U12 di-snRNP, suggests that p14.SF3b155 presents a noncanonical surface for RNA recognition at the heart of the mammalian spliceosome. PMID:16432215

  5. Crystal structure of an HIV assembly and maturation switch.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jonathan M; Zadrozny, Kaneil K; Chrustowicz, Jakub; Purdy, Michael D; Yeager, Mark; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Virus assembly and maturation proceed through the programmed operation of molecular switches, which trigger both local and global structural rearrangements to produce infectious particles. HIV-1 contains an assembly and maturation switch that spans the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the capsid (CA) region and the first spacer peptide (SP1) of the precursor structural protein, Gag. The crystal structure of the CTD-SP1 Gag fragment is a goblet-shaped hexamer in which the cup comprises the CTD and an ensuing type II β-turn, and the stem comprises a 6-helix bundle. The β-turn is critical for immature virus assembly and the 6-helix bundle regulates proteolysis during maturation. This bipartite character explains why the SP1 spacer is a critical element of HIV-1 Gag but is not a universal property of retroviruses. Our results also indicate that HIV-1 maturation inhibitors suppress unfolding of the CA-SP1 junction and thereby delay access of the viral protease to its substrate. PMID:27416583

  6. Crystal structure of an HIV assembly and maturation switch

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jonathan M; Zadrozny, Kaneil K; Chrustowicz, Jakub; Purdy, Michael D; Yeager, Mark; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Virus assembly and maturation proceed through the programmed operation of molecular switches, which trigger both local and global structural rearrangements to produce infectious particles. HIV-1 contains an assembly and maturation switch that spans the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the capsid (CA) region and the first spacer peptide (SP1) of the precursor structural protein, Gag. The crystal structure of the CTD-SP1 Gag fragment is a goblet-shaped hexamer in which the cup comprises the CTD and an ensuing type II β-turn, and the stem comprises a 6-helix bundle. The β-turn is critical for immature virus assembly and the 6-helix bundle regulates proteolysis during maturation. This bipartite character explains why the SP1 spacer is a critical element of HIV-1 Gag but is not a universal property of retroviruses. Our results also indicate that HIV-1 maturation inhibitors suppress unfolding of the CA-SP1 junction and thereby delay access of the viral protease to its substrate. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17063.001 PMID:27416583

  7. Slow light performance enhancement of Bragg slot photonic crystal waveguide with particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Kambiz; Mirjalili, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    Recently, majority of current research in the field of designing Phonic Crystal Waveguides (PCW) focus in extracting the relations between output slow light properties of PCW and structural parameters through a huge number of tedious non-systematic simulations in order to introduce better designs. This paper proposes a novel systematic approach which can be considered as a shortcut to alleviate the difficulties and human involvements in designing PCWs. In the proposed method, the problem of PCW design is first formulated as an optimization problem. Then, an optimizer is employed in order to automatically find the optimum design for the formulated PCWs. Meanwhile, different constraints are also considered during optimization with the purpose of applying physical limitations to the final optimum structure. As a case study, the structure of a Bragg-like Corrugation Slotted PCWs (BCSPCW) is optimized by using the proposed method. One of the most computationally powerful techniques in Computational Intelligence (CI) called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is employed as an optimizer to automatically find the optimum structure for BCSPCW. The optimization process is done by considering five constraints to guarantee the feasibility of the final optimized structures and avoid band mixing. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to find an optimum structure for BCSPCW with 172% and 100% substantial improvements in the bandwidth and Normalized Delay-Bandwidth Product (NDBP) respectively compared to the best current structure in the literature. Moreover, there is a time domain analysis at the end of the paper which verifies the performance of the optimized structure and proves that this structure has low distortion and attenuation simultaneously.

  8. X-ray diffraction scattering by particles of a dispersed phase with a spatially ordered distribution in a crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitgarts, M. I.

    2007-05-01

    X-ray diffraction scattering by precipitates (particles of a disperse phase) placed in the crystal in sites of a simple cubic lattice has been considered in the assumption that the precipitates have a cubic lattice of the same type as that of the matrix but differing from the matrix in that they have an ordered structure with a structure amplitude that is the same for all the particles. The scattering by such an ensemble of particles leads to the formation of satellite reflections which are located in the sites of a microlattice that is reciprocal to the macrolattice formed by the precipitates. The satellites are grouped in the vicinity of reciprocal-lattice (RL) points of the elastically deformed precipitate and have peaked intensity distributions that reflect the shape and dimensions of the crystal itself. One of the group of satellite sites of a given reflection from precipitates, which is taken to be reference, coincides with the point of the RL which corresponds to the average lattice parameter of a crystal with precipitates.

  9. Structural, spectral and mechanical studies of bimetallic crystal: cadmium manganese thiocyanate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M.; Vijaya Prasath, G.; Bhagavannarayan, G.; Vijayan, N.; Mahalingam, T.; Ravi, G.

    2012-09-01

    A nonlinear optical bimetallic thiocyanate complex crystal, cadmium manganese thiocyanate (CMTC) has been successfully synthesized. The growth of single crystals of cadmium manganese thiocyanate has been accomplished from aqueous solution using slow evaporation method. The presence of manganese and cadmium in the synthesized material was confirmed through energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) analysis. Structural analysis was carried out using powder X-ray diffractometer (PXRD) and crystalline perfection of the grown crystals was ascertained by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum was taken to confirm the functional groups. The transmittance spectrum of the crystal in the UV-visible region has been recorded and the cutoff wavelength has been determined. The dielectric measurements for the crystals were performed for various frequencies and temperatures. The mechanical properties were evaluated by Vickers microhardness testing, which reveals hardness and stiffness constant of the crystals.

  10. Optical phonon modes and crystal structure of NaLaF4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lage, Márcio Martins; Matinaga, Franklin Massami; Gesland, Jean-Yves; Moreira, Roberto Luiz

    2006-03-01

    Polarized Raman scattering and infrared reflectivity measurements have been used to investigate the crystal structure of Czochralski-grown NaLaF4 single crystals. The phonon symmetries, the simultaneous presence of polar modes in the infrared and Raman spectra, as well as the observation of piezoelectric resonance, helped us to identify the P6 group as the correct one for this crystal. This material belongs to a family of sodium lanthanide tetrafluorides (NaLnF4) crystals, whose photoluminescence efficiency is comparable to LiYF4. Therefore, NaLaF4 crystals may be important in the development of diode pumped up-conversion solid-state lasers. The number and behavior of the observed optical phonon modes were analyzed in terms of group theory predictions for the group symmetry found. A few anomalies in the phonon characteristics are discussed in terms of cationic disorder in the crystal lattice.

  11. Two-particle problem in comblike structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliari, Elena; Cassi, Davide; Cattivelli, Luca; Sartori, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Encounters between walkers performing a random motion on an appropriate structure can describe a wide variety of natural phenomena ranging from pharmacokinetics to foraging. On homogeneous structures the asymptotic encounter probability between two walkers is (qualitatively) independent of whether both walkers are moving or one is kept fixed. On infinite comblike structures this is no longer the case and here we deepen the mechanisms underlying the emergence of a finite probability that two random walkers will never meet, while one single random walker is certain to visit any site. In particular, we introduce an analytical approach to address this problem and even more general problems such as the case of two walkers with different diffusivity, particles walking on a finite comb and on arbitrary bundled structures, possibly in the presence of loops. Our investigations are both analytical and numerical and highlight that, in general, the outcome of a reaction involving two reactants on a comblike architecture can strongly differ according to whether both reactants are moving (no matter their relative diffusivities) or only one is moving and according to the density of shortcuts among the branches.

  12. 'Crystal Collimator' Measurement of CESR particle-beam Source Size

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, K.D.; Bazarov, Ivan; White, Jeffrey; Revesz, Peter

    2004-05-12

    We have measured electron and positron beam source size at CHESS when the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) is run dedicated for the production of synchrotron radiation. Horizontal source size at several beamlines is expected to shrink by a factor of two but synchrotron (visible) light measurements only provide the vertical size. Therefore a 'crystal collimator' using two Bragg reflection in dispersive (+,+) orientation has been built to image the horizontal (vertical) source by passing x-rays parallel to within 5 microradians to an imaging screen and camera. With the 'crystal collimator' we observe rms sizes of 1.2 mm horizontal by 0.28 mm vertical, in good agreement with the 1.27 mm size calculated from lattice functions, and 0.26 mm observed using a synchrotron light interferometer.

  13. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Bahnson, B

    2008-01-01

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A{sub 2}. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5{angstrom}. It has a classic lipase {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser{sup 273}, His{sup 351}, and Asp{sup 296}. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser{sup 273}. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  14. Liquid Crystal Phase Behaviour of Attractive Disc-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; Jackson, George; Müller, Erich A.

    2013-01-01

    We employ a generalized van der Waals-Onsager perturbation theory to construct a free energy functional capable of describing the thermodynamic properties and orientational order of the isotropic and nematic phases of attractive disc particles. The model mesogen is a hard (purely repulsive) cylindrical disc particle decorated with an anisotropic square-well attractive potential placed at the centre of mass. Even for isotropic attractive interactions, the resulting overall inter-particle potential is anisotropic, due to the orientation-dependent excluded volume of the underlying hard core. An algebraic equation of state for attractive disc particles is developed by adopting the Onsager trial function to characterize the orientational order in the nematic phase. The theory is then used to represent the fluid-phase behaviour (vapour-liquid, isotropic-nematic, and nematic-nematic) of the oblate attractive particles for varying values of the molecular aspect ratio and parameters of the attractive potential. When compared to the phase diagram of their athermal analogues, it is seen that the addition of an attractive interaction facilitates the formation of orientationally-ordered phases. Most interestingly, for certain aspect ratios, a coexistence between two anisotropic nematic phases is exhibited by the attractive disc-like fluids. PMID:23965962

  15. Structural and mechanical studies of cadmium manganese thiocyanate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M. R.; Vijayaprasath, G.; babu, G. Anandha; Bhagavannarayan, G.; Vijayan, N.; Ravi, G.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of cadmium manganese thiocyanate (CMTC) have been synthesized successfully and grown by slow evaporation method. The structural perfection of the grown crystals has been analyzed by High resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), which shows the crystalline perfection of the grown crystal is quite good. Optical behavior was assessed by UV-Vis analysis and found that no absorption in the UV visible region and it may be useful for second harmonic applications. The mechanical hardness of the grown crystals was studied and Vicker's microhardness, Stiffness constant was calculated.

  16. Hydroflux synthesis and crystal structure of new lanthanide tungstate oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latshaw, Allison M.; Smith, Mark D.; Chance, W. Michael; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2015-04-01

    Single crystals of Na5Ln(OH)6WO4 where Ln = Er, Tm, and Yb were grown out of a NaOH hydroflux. The crystals were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and were found to crystallize in the monoclinic space group I2/a. The lattice parameter ranges for the three structures are a = 11.2024(7) Å-11.2412(6) Å, b = 16.1850(10) Å-16.2220(10) Å, and c = 11.9913(7) Å-12.0323(7) Å while the β angle range is 101.999(2)°-102.025(2)°.

  17. Optically Generated Reconfigurable Photonic Structures of Elastic Quasiparticles in Frustrated Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyukh,, I. I.; Kaputa, D.; Kachynski, A. V.; Kuzmin, A. N.; Ackerman, P. J.; Twombly, C. W.; Lee, T.; Trivedi, R. P.; Prasad, P. N.

    2012-03-26

    We describe laser-induced two-dimensional periodic photonic structures formed by localized particle-like excitations in an untwisted confined cholesteric liquid crystal. The individual particle-like excitations (dubbed 'Torons') contain three-dimensional twist of the liquid crystal director matched to the uniform background director field by topological point defects. Using both single-beam-steering and holographic pattern generation approaches, the periodic crystal lattices are tailored by tuning their periodicity, reorienting their crystallographic axes, and introducing defects. Moreover, these lattices can be dynamically reconfigurable: generated, modified, erased and then recreated, depending on the needs of a particular photonic application. This robust control is performed by tightly focused laser beams of power 10-100 mW and by low-frequency electric fields at voltages {approx}10 V applied to the transparent electrodes.

  18. Crystal structure engineering for improved performance of emerging nanoscale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimalgi, Vinay Uday

    Recent advances in growth techniques and increasing number of experimental studies have made nanostructures grown along different crystallographic directions a reality. These new structures could not only benefit the electronic devices used in mainstream information technology but also show great promise for applications in lasers, solid-state lighting, near-field photolithography, free-space quantum cryptography, consumer displays, quantum computation, as well as diagnostic medicine and imaging. However, only few theoretical investigations have been performed on these structures due to the complex nature of the interplay of atomicity, structural fields, polarization, and quantum size-quantization, all strong function of the crystallographic direction. The objective of this work is mainly four-fold: (1) Integrate a computational framework employing a combination of fully atomistic valence force-field molecular mechanics and 20-band sp3s*d5-SO tight-binding based electronic band­structure models, and numerically investigate the effects of internal fields on the electronic and optical properties of zincblende InAs/GaAs quantum dots grown on (100), (110), and (111) orientated substrates. (2) Augment/extend the open source NEMO 3-D bandstructure simulator by incorporating a recently proposed first principles based model to gauge the importance of nonlinear piezoelectricity on the single-particle electronic states and interband optical transitions in emerging In(Ga)N/GaN disk-in-wire LED structures having c-plane and m-plane wurtzite crystal symmetry. (3) Coupling the NEMO 3-D software toolkit with a commercial TCAD simulator to determine the terminal electrical and optical characteristics of InGaN/GaN disk-in-wire LEDs; and (4) Finding an optimum crystallographic device for InGaN/GaN disk-in-wire LEDs to achieve improved internal quantum efficiency (IQE).

  19. Magnetization Reversal Process of Single Crystal α-Fe Containing a Nonmagnetic Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiu-Lin; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-25

    The magnetization reversal process and hysteresis loops in a single crystal α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated in this work based on the Landau-Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. The evolutions of the magnetic domain morphology are studied, and our analyses show that the magnetization reversal process is affected by the interaction between the moving domain wall and the existing nonmagnetic particles. This interaction strongly depends on the size of the particles, and it is found that particles with a particular size contribute the most to magnetic hardening.

  20. Synchronization of particle motion induced by mode coupling in a two-dimensional plasma crystal.

    PubMed

    Couëdel, L; Zhdanov, S; Nosenko, V; Ivlev, A V; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E

    2014-05-01

    The kinematics of dust particles during the early stage of mode-coupling induced melting of a two-dimensional plasma crystal is explored. It is found that the formation of the hybrid mode causes the particle vibrations to partially synchronize at the hybrid frequency. Phase- and frequency-locked hybrid particle motion in both vertical and horizontal directions (hybrid mode) is observed. The system self-organizes in a rhythmic pattern of alternating in-phase and antiphase oscillating chains of particles. The spatial orientation of the synchronization pattern correlates well with the directions of the maximal increment of the shear-free hybrid mode. PMID:25353905

  1. Acceleration and orbits of charged particles beneath a monolayer plasma crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, V. A.; Schweigert, I. V.; Nosenko, V.; Goree, J.

    2002-11-01

    Experiments and simulations are reported for a monolayer plasma crystal that is disturbed by an extra particle moving in a plane below the monolayer. Numerical simulations and experiments are performed to find an explanation for the motion of the extra particle. In contrast to earlier simulations where an extra particle did not move spontaneously as in the experiment, here an ion wakefield downstream of the monolayer of particles is included. This resulted in the spontaneous motion of an extra particle as in the experiment, so that it is concluded that the wakefield produces this motion. In both the experiment and the simulation a trend is observed where the orbit of an extra particle becomes more crooked and less energetic when the gas damping is stronger. The simulation reveals that the energy of the extra particle exhibits distinctive transitions between three regimes.

  2. Errors in Crystal structure of HINT from Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Maize, Kimberly M.

    2016-01-01

    Inaccuracies in the article, Crystal structure of HINT from Helicobacter pylori by Tarique et al. [(2016) Acta Cryst. F72, 42–48] are presented, and a brief history of HINT nomenclature is discussed. PMID:27050269

  3. Determination of channeling perspectives for complex crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, W.R.

    1993-03-01

    Specification of the atomic arrangement for axes and planes of high symmetry is essential for crystal alignment using Rutherford backscattering and for studies of the lattice location of impurities in single crystals. By rotation of an inscribed orthogonal coordinate system, a visual image for a given perspective of a crystal structure can be specified. Knowledge of the atomic arrangement permits qualitative channeling perspectives to be visualized and calculation of continuum potentials for channeling. Channeling angular-yield profiles can then be analytically modeled and, subsequently, shadowing by host atoms of positions within the unit cell predicted. Software to calculate transformed atom positions for a channeling perspective in a single crystal are described and illustrated for the spinel crystal structure.

  4. Crystal Structure and Crystal Chemistry of Some Common REE Minerals and Nanpingite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yunxiang

    1995-01-01

    Part I. Crystal structure and crystal chemistry of fluorocarbonate minerals. The crystal structure of bastnasite-(Ce) have been solved in P-62c and refined to R = 0.018. The structure is composed of (001) (CeF) layers interspersed with (CO_3) layers in a 1:1 ratio. The Ce atom is coordinated in rm CeO_6F_3 polyhedra. The atomic arrangement of synchysite-(Ce) has been solved and refined to R = 0.036 with a monoclinic space group C2/c. It possesses a (001) layer structure, with layers of (Ca) and (CeF) separated by layers of carbonate groups. The layers stack in a manner analogous to C2/c muscovite. Polytypism similar to the micas may exist in synchysite. The crystal structures of cordylite-(Ce) have been solved in P6 _3/mmc and refined to R = 0.023. The structure and chemical formula are different from those deduced by Oftedal. The formula is rm MBaCe_2(CO _3)_4F, where M is rm Na^+, Ca^{2+}_{1/2 }+ O_{1/2}, or any solution. The presence of (NaF) layer in the structure is the key difference from the Oftedal's structure. This redefinition of the chemical formula and crystal structure of cordylite will be proposed to IMA-CNMMN. Part II. Crystal structure and crystal chemistry of monazite-xenotime series. Monazite is monoclinic, P2 _1/n, and xenotime is isostructural with zircon (I4_1/amd). Both atomic arrangements are based on (001) chains of intervening phosphate tetrahedra and RE polyhedra, with a REO_8 polyhedron in xenotime that accommodates HRE (Tb - Lu) and a REO_9 polyhedron in monazite that preferentially incorporates LRE (La - Gd). As the structure "transforms" from xenotime to monazite, the crystallographic properties are comparable along the (001) chains, with structural adjustments of 2.2 A along (010) to accommodate the different size RE atoms. Part III. Crystal structure of nanpingite-2M _2, the Cs end-member of muscovite. The crystal structure of nanpingite has been refined to R = 0.058. Compared to K^+ in muscovite, the largest interlayer Cs^+ in

  5. Crystal structure of a methimazole-based ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Gaitor, Jamie C; Zayas, Manuel Sanchez; Myrthil, Darrel J; White, Frankie; Hendrich, Jeffrey M; Sykora, Richard E; O'Brien, Richard A; Reilly, John T; Mirjafari, Arsalan

    2015-12-01

    The structure of 1-methyl-2-(prop-2-en-1-ylsulfan-yl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium bromide, C7H11N2S(+)·Br(-), has monoclinic (P21/c) symmetry. In the crystal, the components are linked by N-H⋯Br and C-H⋯Br hydrogen bonds. The crystal structure of the title compound undeniably proves that methimazole reacts through the thione tautomer, rather than the thiol tautomer in this system. PMID:26870468

  6. The Crystal and Molecular Structure of Dianhydrogossypol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dianhydrogossypol (4,4'-dihydroxy-5,5'-diisopropyl-7,7'-dimethyl-bis(3H-naphtho[1,8-bc]furan-3-one)) was made by refluxing gossypol in m-xylene. Proton NMR confirmed that complete conversion was achieved over several hours. Single crystals were obtained by slow evaporation of the product from dichl...

  7. Allophycocyanin and phycocyanin crystal structures reveal facets of phycobilisome assembly.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Adir, Noam

    2013-03-01

    X-ray crystal structures of the isolated phycobiliprotein components of the phycobilisome have provided high resolution details to the description of this light harvesting complex at different levels of complexity and detail. The linker-independent assembly of trimers into hexamers in crystal lattices of previously determined structures has been observed in almost all of the phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC) structures available in the Protein Data Bank. In this paper we describe the X-ray crystal structures of PC and APC from Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942, PC from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and PC from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus crystallized in the presence of urea. All five structures are highly similar to other PC and APC structures on the levels of subunits, monomers and trimers. The Synechococcus APC forms a unique loose hexamer that may show the structural requirements for core assembly and rod attachment. While the Synechococcus PC assembles into the canonical hexamer, it does not further assemble into rods. Unlike most PC structures, the Synechocystis PC fails to form hexamers. Addition of low concentrations of urea to T. vulcanus PC inhibits this proteins propensity to form hexamers, resulting in a crystal lattice composed of trimers. The molecular source of these differences in assembly and their relevance to the phycobilisome structure is discussed. PMID:23201474

  8. Phase separations in mixtures of a liquid crystal and a nanocolloidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2009-11-01

    We present a mean field theory to describe phase separations in mixtures of a liquid crystal and a nanocolloidal particle. By taking into account a nematic, a smectic A ordering of the liquid crystal, and a crystalline ordering of the nanoparticle, we calculate the phase diagrams on the temperature-concentration plane. We predict various phase separations, such as a smectic A-crystal phase separation and a smectic A-isotropic-crystal triple point, etc., depending on the interactions between the liquid crystal and the colloidal surface. Inside binodal curves, we find new unstable and metastable regions, which are important in the phase ordering dynamics. We also find a crystalline ordering of the nanoparticles dispersed in a smectic A phase and a nematic phase. The cooperative phenomena between liquid-crystalline ordering and crystalline ordering induce a variety of phase diagrams.

  9. Phase separations in mixtures of a liquid crystal and a nanocolloidal particle.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2009-11-28

    We present a mean field theory to describe phase separations in mixtures of a liquid crystal and a nanocolloidal particle. By taking into account a nematic, a smectic A ordering of the liquid crystal, and a crystalline ordering of the nanoparticle, we calculate the phase diagrams on the temperature-concentration plane. We predict various phase separations, such as a smectic A-crystal phase separation and a smectic A-isotropic-crystal triple point, etc., depending on the interactions between the liquid crystal and the colloidal surface. Inside binodal curves, we find new unstable and metastable regions, which are important in the phase ordering dynamics. We also find a crystalline ordering of the nanoparticles dispersed in a smectic A phase and a nematic phase. The cooperative phenomena between liquid-crystalline ordering and crystalline ordering induce a variety of phase diagrams. PMID:19947706

  10. Some new results on the frequency characteristics on quartz crystals irradiated by ionizing and particle radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadur, H.; Parshad, R.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency behavior of AT-cut quartz crystals irradiated by X -, gamma rays and fast neutrons. Initial instability in frequency for gamma and neutron irradiated crystals was found. All the different radiations first give a negative frequency shift at lower doses which are followed by positive frequency shift for increased doses. Results are explained in terms of the fundamental crystal structure. Applications of the frequency results for radiation hardening are proposed.

  11. Quantitative crystal structure descriptors from multiplicative congruential generators.

    PubMed

    Hornfeck, Wolfgang

    2012-03-01

    Special types of number-theoretic relations, termed multiplicative congruential generators (MCGs), exhibit an intrinsic sublattice structure. This has considerable implications within the crystallographic realm, namely for the coordinate description of crystal structures for which MCGs allow for a concise way of encoding the numerical structural information. Thus, a conceptual framework is established, with some focus on layered superstructures, which proposes the use of MCGs as a tool for the quantitative description of crystal structures. The multiplicative congruential method eventually affords an algorithmic generation of three-dimensional crystal structures with a near-uniform distribution of atoms, whereas a linearization procedure facilitates their combinatorial enumeration and classification. The outlook for homometric structures and dual-space crystallography is given. Some generalizations and extensions are formulated in addition, revealing the connections of MCGs with geometric algebra, discrete dynamical systems (iterative maps), as well as certain quasicrystal approximants. PMID:22338652

  12. Model solution for volume reflection of relativistic particles in a bent crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenco, M. V.

    2010-10-15

    For volume reflection process in a bent crystal, exact analytic expressions for positively- and negatively-charged particle trajectories are obtained within a model of parabolic continuous potential in each interplanar interval, with the neglect of incoherent multiple scattering. In the limit of the crystal bending radius greatly exceeding the critical value, asymptotic formulas are obtained for the particle mean deflection angle in units of Lindhard's critical angle, and for the final beam profile. Volume reflection of negatively charged particles is shown to contain effects of rainbow scattering and orbiting, whereas with positively charged particles none of these effects arise within the given model. The model predictions are compared with experimental results and numerical simulations. Estimates of the volume reflection mean angle and the final beam profile robustness under multiple scattering are performed.

  13. Effect of Complex Inclusion Particles on the Solidification Structure of Fe-Ni-Mn-Mo Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Seok; Lee, Changhee; Park, Joo Hyun

    2012-12-01

    The effect of combinations of several deoxidizers, i.e., Mg-Al, Mg-Ti, Al-Ti, and Ce-Al, on the solidification structure of Fe-2 mass pct Ni-1 mass pct Mn-1 mass pct Mo alloy melt was investigated using a melt sampling and quenching method. Using this method, we evaluated the catalytic potency of several complex inclusion particles by taking the inclusion evolution process into account. Fine equiaxed crystals were obtained in the Mg-Ti-deoxidized steel wherein the MgO(MgAl2O4)-TiN complex compounds formed. However, the longer the holding time at high temperatures, the larger the fraction of Ti2O3, and very fine TiN formed because of microsegregation during solidification, resulting in poor equiaxed crystals. When the steel was deoxidized with Mg-Al, the initial structure was dominantly columnar. However, the longer the holding time, the larger the fraction of MgAl2O4 spinel, resulting in the formation of fine equiaxed crystals. Ce-Al complex deoxidation provided a relatively small portion of equiaxed crystals, whereas Ti-Al deoxidation produced the fewest equiaxed crystals because of the formation of alumina. The effectiveness of each inoculant particle for the crystallization of the primary δ-iron was explained well by the lattice disregistry concept.

  14. Decagonal and hexagonal structures in small gold particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José-Yacamán, M.; Herrera, R.; Gómez, A.; Tehuacanero, S.; Schabes-Retchkiman, P.

    1990-11-01

    In the present work we report the study of gold particles using HREM and image processing. Particles which are not conventional fcc are discussed as well as penta-twinned particles which show twin boundaries that do not join along a common point. It is shown that there are particles with an hcp structure. This structure is probably due to repeated faulting and excess vacancies.

  15. Spontaneous pairing and cooperative movements of micro-particles in a two dimensional plasma crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, S. K.; Couëdel, L.; Nosenko, V.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2015-05-15

    In an argon plasma of 20 W rf discharge at a pressure of 1.38 Pa, a stable highly ordered monolayer of microparticles is suspended. We observe spontaneous particle pairing when suddenly reducing the gas pressure. Special types of dynamical activity, in particular, entanglement and cooperative movements of coupled particles have been registered. In the course of the experiment first appeared single vertical pairs of particles, in further they gradually accumulated causing melting of the entire crystal. To record pairing events, the particle suspension is side-view imaged using a vertically extended laser sheet. The long-lasting pre-melting phase assured the credible recording and identification of isolated particle pairs. The high monolayer charge density is crucial to explain the spontaneous pairing events observed in our experiments as the mutual repulsion between the particles comprising the monolayer make its vertical extend thicker.

  16. Predicting inclusion behaviour and framework structures in organic crystals.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Day, Graeme M; Jones, William

    2009-12-01

    We have used well-established computational methods to generate and explore the crystal structure landscapes of four organic molecules of well-known inclusion behaviour. Using these methods, we are able to generate both close-packed crystal structures and high-energy open frameworks containing voids of molecular dimensions. Some of these high-energy open frameworks correspond to real structures observed experimentally when the appropriate guest molecules are present during crystallisation. We propose a combination of crystal structure prediction methodologies with structure rankings based on relative lattice energy and solvent-accessible volume as a way of selecting likely inclusion frameworks completely ab initio. This methodology can be used as part of a rational strategy in the design of inclusion compounds, and also for the anticipation of inclusion behaviour in organic molecules. PMID:19876969

  17. Crystal structure of the co-crystal butyl­paraben–isonicotinamide (1/1)

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Rajni M.; Yang, Huaiyu; Florence, Alastair J.

    2016-01-01

    The title 1:1 co-crystal, C11H14O3·C6H6N2O [systematic name: butyl 4-hy­droxy­benzoate–isonicotinamide (1/1)], crystallizes with one mol­ecule of butyl­paraben (BPN) and one mol­ecule of isonicotinamide (ISN) in the asymmetric unit. In the crystal, BPN and ISN mol­ecules form hydrogen-bonded (O—H⋯N and N—H⋯O) dimers of paired BPN and ISN mol­ecules. These dimers are further connected to each other via N—H⋯O=C hydrogen bonds, creating ribbons in [011] which further stack along the a axis to form a layered structure with short C⋯C contacts of 3.285 (3) Å. Packing inter­actions within the crystal structure were assessed using PIXEL calculations. PMID:26870584

  18. Growth, characterization, and crystal structure of a new chalcone derivative single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shettigar, Venkataraya; Dharmaprakash, S. M.

    2006-09-01

    A new organic nonlinear optical (NLO) chalcone derivative viz.1- ( 4- methoxyphenyl )-3- (3,4 - dimethoxy phenyl ) - 2 - propene-1-one, has been synthesized by Claisen-Schmidt condensation method. The synthesized compound was purified by repeated recrystallization process. To confirm the identity of the synthesized compound, FTIR spectra was recorded and various functional groups present were identified. NMR spectra were recorded for structural identity and purity confirmation of the synthesized compound. Good quality single crystals were grown by solvent evaporation and slow cooling technique using acetone as solvent. The grown crystals were characterized by UV-Visible , differential thermal analysis and linear refractive index measurement. The hardness of the crystal was determined using Vicker's indentation method. The single crystal structure analysis of the crystal was performed and it is found that the crystal belongs to monoclinic system with space group P2 I. The powder second harmonic generation(SHG)frequency conversion efficiency of the crystal was determined using Nd: YAG laser(λ = 1064nm)and it is 15 times that of Urea.

  19. Evolution of molecular crystal optical phonons near structural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michki, Nigel; Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Markelz, Andrea

    Molecular crystals are increasingly important photonic and electronic materials. For example organic semiconductors are lightweight compared to inorganic semiconductors and have inexpensive scale up processing with roll to roll printing. However their implementation is limited by their environmental sensitivity, in part arising from the weak intermolecular interactions of the crystal. These weak interactions result in optical phonons in the terahertz frequency range. We examine the evolution of intermolecular interactions near structural phase transitions by measuring the optical phonons as a function of temperature and crystal orientation using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The measured orientation dependence of the resonances provides an additional constraint for comparison of the observed spectra with the density functional calculations, enabling us to follow specific phonon modes. We observe crystal reorganization near 350 K for oxalic acid as it transforms from dihydrate to anhydrous form. We also report the first THz spectra for the molecular crystal fructose through its melting point.

  20. Datamining protein structure databanks for crystallization patterns of proteins.

    PubMed

    Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H; Valafar, Faramarz

    2002-12-01

    A study of 345 protein structures selected among 1,500 structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, revealed useful correlations between crystallization properties and several parameters for the studied proteins. NMR methods of structure determination do not require the growth of protein crystals, and hence allow comparison of properties of proteins that have or have not been the subject of crystallographic approaches. One- and two-dimensional statistical analyses of the data confirmed a hypothesized relation between the size of the molecule and its crystallization potential. Furthermore, two-dimensional Bayesian analysis revealed a significant relationship between relative ratio of different secondary structures and the likelihood of success for crystallization trials. The most immediate result is an apparent correlation of crystallization potential with protein size. Further analysis of the data revealed a relationship between the unstructured fraction of proteins and the success of its crystallization. Utilization of Bayesian analysis on the latter correlation resulted in a prediction performance of about 64%, whereas a two-dimensional Bayesian analysis succeeded with a performance of about 75%. PMID:12594078

  1. Toxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles to Escherichia coli: effects of particle size, crystal phase and water chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiuchun; Li, Jingyi; Ma, Si; Liu, Gesheng; Yang, Kun; Tong, Meiping; Lin, Daohui

    2014-01-01

    Controversial and inconsistent results on the eco-toxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are commonly found in recorded studies and more experimental works are therefore warranted to elucidate the nanotoxicity and its underlying precise mechanisms. Toxicities of five types of TiO2 NPs with different particle sizes (10∼50 nm) and crystal phases were investigated using Escherichia coli as a test organism. The effect of water chemistry on the nanotoxicity was also examined. The antibacterial effects of TiO2 NPs as revealed by dose-effect experiments decreased with increasing particle size and rutile content of the TiO2 NPs. More bacteria could survive at higher solution pH (5.0-10.0) and ionic strength (50-200 mg L(-1) NaCl) as affected by the anatase TiO2 NPs. The TiO2 NPs with anatase crystal structure and smaller particle size produced higher content of intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, in line with their greater antibacterial effect. Transmission electron microscopic observations showed the concentration buildup of the anatase TiO2 NPs especially those with smaller particle sizes on the cell surfaces, leading to membrane damage and internalization. These research results will shed new light on the understanding of ecological effects of TiO2 NPs. PMID:25310452

  2. Toxicity of TiO2 Nanoparticles to Escherichia coli: Effects of Particle Size, Crystal Phase and Water Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiuchun; Li, Jingyi; Ma, Si; Liu, Gesheng; Yang, Kun; Tong, Meiping; Lin, Daohui

    2014-01-01

    Controversial and inconsistent results on the eco-toxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are commonly found in recorded studies and more experimental works are therefore warranted to elucidate the nanotoxicity and its underlying precise mechanisms. Toxicities of five types of TiO2 NPs with different particle sizes (10∼50 nm) and crystal phases were investigated using Escherichia coli as a test organism. The effect of water chemistry on the nanotoxicity was also examined. The antibacterial effects of TiO2 NPs as revealed by dose-effect experiments decreased with increasing particle size and rutile content of the TiO2 NPs. More bacteria could survive at higher solution pH (5.0–10.0) and ionic strength (50–200 mg L−1 NaCl) as affected by the anatase TiO2 NPs. The TiO2 NPs with anatase crystal structure and smaller particle size produced higher content of intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, in line with their greater antibacterial effect. Transmission electron microscopic observations showed the concentration buildup of the anatase TiO2 NPs especially those with smaller particle sizes on the cell surfaces, leading to membrane damage and internalization. These research results will shed new light on the understanding of ecological effects of TiO2 NPs. PMID:25310452

  3. Effects of dust particle internal structure on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Jeong, G. Y.

    2015-07-01

    There is a large variety of internal structures inside atmospheric dust particles, making them inherently inhomogeneous. Such structures may have a large effect on ground-level and atmospheric radiation. So far, dust particle internal structures and their effect on the light scattering properties have proved to be hard to quantify, in part due to challenges in obtaining information about these structures. Recently, internal structures of individual dust particles were revealed through focused ion beam milling and analyzed. Here, we perform a sensitivity study to evaluate the optical impacts of some of the typical internal structures revealed. To obtain suitable model particles, the first step is to generate inhomogeneous particles with varying internal structures by using an algorithm that is based on three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. The parameters for the particle generation are obtained from studies of real-world Asian dust particles. The second step is to generate homogeneous versions of the generated particles by using an effective-medium approximation, for comparison. Third, light scattering by both versions of these particles is simulated with discrete-dipole approximation code. This allows us to see how different internal structures affect light scattering, and how important it is to account for these structures explicitly. Further, this allows us to estimate the potential inaccuracies caused by using only homogeneous model particles for atmospheric studies and remote sensing measurements. The results show that the effects vary greatly between different kinds of internal structures and single-scattering quantity considered, but for most structure types the effects are overall notable. Most significantly, hematite inclusions in particles impact light scattering heavily. Furthermore, internal pores and hematite-rich coating both affect some form of light scattering noticeably. Based on this work, it seems that it is exceedingly important that the

  4. Effects of dust particle internal structure on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Jeong, G. Y.

    2015-10-01

    There is a large variety of internal structures inside atmospheric dust particles, making them inherently inhomogeneous. Such structures may have a large effect on ground-level and atmospheric radiation. So far, dust particle internal structures and their effect on the light scattering properties have proved to be hard to quantify, in part due to challenges in obtaining information about these structures. Recently, internal structures of individual dust particles were revealed through focused ion beam milling and analyzed. Here, we perform a sensitivity study to evaluate the optical impacts of some of the typical internal structures revealed. To obtain suitable model particles, the first step is to generate inhomogeneous particles with varying internal structures by using an algorithm that is based on three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. The parameters for the particle generation are obtained from studies of real-world Asian dust particles. The second step is to generate homogeneous versions of the generated particles by using an effective-medium approximation, for comparison. Third, light scattering by both versions of these particles is simulated with discrete dipole approximation code. This allows us to see how different internal structures affect light scattering, and how important it is to account for these structures explicitly. Further, this allows us to estimate the potential inaccuracies caused by using only homogeneous model particles for atmospheric studies and remote-sensing measurements. The results show that the effects vary greatly between different kinds of internal structures and single-scattering quantity considered, but for most structure types the effects are overall notable. Most significantly, hematite inclusions in particles impact light scattering heavily. Furthermore, internal pores and hematite-rich coating both affect some form of light scattering noticeably. Based on this work, it seems that it is exceedingly important that the

  5. Crystal Perfection of Particle Monolayer at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Shinotsuka, Kei; Kajita, Yasuhito; Hongo, Koki; Hatta, Yoshihisa

    2015-10-27

    Crystal growth in colloidal particle monolayers fabricated by Langmuir-Blodgett method on 4 in. sapphire wafers was investigated under the condition of two techniques, that is, ultrasonic annealing at 1.2 to 1.5 MHz and barrier-sway process at 0.2 to 0.5 Hz. Significant increases of the ordered area were obtained by the both techniques and more than 60 times growth was confirmed. The remaining crystal defects after the growth were categorized as grain boundary, vacancy, and line defect. Both techniques exhibited different features regarding the component ratio of the defects, and different mechanisms for the reorientation of particles are discussed. The driving force of these re-orientations is thought to be associated with the 2D Ostwald ripening of colloidal crystals. PMID:26434777

  6. Lactose particle engineering: Influence of ultrasound and anti-solvent on crystal habit and particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kougoulos, E.; Marziano, I.; Miller, P. R.

    2010-11-01

    This study focuses on ultrasound-assisted anti-solvent crystallization of lactose, expanding on previous studies and presenting, for the first time, the results of large scale implementation of sonocrystallization for lactose. The results further clarify the interplay between solution chemistry - namely the role of β-lactose - and crystallization, representing a step forward in the fine tuning of lactose properties for pharmaceutical manufacturing applications. Batches manufactured at laboratory and pilot scales were extensively characterised, including an approach for the quantification of β-lactose in α-lactose based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), which is described here.

  7. Crystallization and X-ray analysis of the T = 4 particle of hepatitis B capsid protein with an N-terminal extension

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Wen Siang; McNae, Iain W.; Ho, Kok Lian; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.

    2007-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus capsids have significant potential as carriers for immunogenic peptides. The crystal structure of the T = 4 particle of hepatitis B core protein containing an N-terminal extension reveals that the fusion peptide is exposed on the exterior of the particle. Hepatitis B core (HBc) particles have been extensively exploited as carriers for foreign immunological epitopes in the development of multicomponent vaccines and diagnostic reagents. Crystals of the T = 4 HBc particle were grown in PEG 20 000, ammonium sulfate and various types of alcohols. A temperature jump from 277 or 283 to 290 K was found to enhance crystal growth. A crystal grown using MPD as a cryoprotectant diffracted X-rays to 7.7 Å resolution and data were collected to 99.6% completeness at 8.9 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 352.3, b = 465.5, c = 645.0 Å. The electron-density map reveals a protrusion that is consistent with the N-terminus extending out from the surface of the capsid. The structure presented here supports the idea that N-terminal insertions can be exploited in the development of diagnostic reagents, multicomponent vaccines and delivery vehicles into mammalian cells.

  8. Crystal structure of benzobi-cyclon.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gihaeng; Kim, Jineun; Lim, Hansu; Kim, Tae Ho

    2015-12-01

    In the title compound, C22H19ClO4S2 [systematic name: 3-(2-chloro-4-mesylbenzo-yl)-4-(phenyl-sulfan-yl)bi-cyclo-[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one], which is an unclassified herbicide, the dihedral angle between the plane of the phenyl and chloro-benzene rings is 19.9 (2)°. In the crystal, C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link adjacent mol-ecules, generating two-dimensional networks extending parellel to (011). PMID:26870484

  9. Optical and structural properties of chalcone NLO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh Kumar, P. C.; Ravindrachary, V.; Janardhana, K.; Manjunath, H. R.; Karegouda, Prakash; Crasta, Vincent; Sridhar, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    Organic compound (E)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-(2,3,5-trichlorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one [MPTCPP] with molecular formula C 16H 11Cl 3O 2 was synthesized using Claisen-Schmidt condensation reaction method. 1H NMR spectra was recorded to identify the various functional groups present in the compound and confirm the chemical structure. The single crystals were grown using slow evaporation solution growth technique. The UV-Visible spectrum study reveals that the crystal is transparent in the entire visible region and the absorption is observed at 364 nm. The Kurtz powder second harmonic generation (SHG) test shows that the MPTCPP is NLO active and its SHG efficiency is three times that of urea. Single crystal XRD study shows that the compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system with a space group Cc. The corresponding lattice parameters of the crystal are a = 28.215(5) Å, b = 3.9740(4) Å, c = 16.178(3) Å and V = 1503.0(4) Å 3. The micro hardness test was carried out and the work hardening coefficient value ( n) of the crystal was found to be 1.48. This indicates that the crystal is hard and is suitable for device application. The thermal study reveals that the thermal stability of the crystal is good.

  10. Single-Crystal Structure of a Covalent Organic Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, YB; Su, J; Furukawa, H; Yun, YF; Gandara, F; Duong, A; Zou, XD; Yaghi, OM

    2013-11-06

    The crystal structure of a new covalent organic framework, termed COF-320, is determined by single-crystal 3D electron diffraction using the rotation electron diffraction (RED) method for data collection. The COF crystals are prepared by an imine condensation of tetra-(4-anilyl)methane and 4,4'-biphenyldialdehyde in 1,4-dioxane at 120 degrees C to produce a highly porous 9-fold interwoven diamond net. COF-320 exhibits permanent porosity with a Langmuir surface area of 2400 m(2)/g and a methane total uptake of 15.0 wt % (176 cm(3)/cm(3)) at 25 degrees C and 80 bar. The successful determination of the structure of COF-320 directly from single-crystal samples is an important advance in the development of COF chemistry.

  11. The different conformations and crystal structures of dihydroergocristine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönch, B.; Kraus, W.; Köppen, R.; Emmerling, F.

    2016-02-01

    The identification of different forms of dihydroergocristine (DHEC) was carried out by crystallization from different organic solvents. DHEC was identified as potential template for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the epimeric specific analysis of ergot alkaloids (EAs) in food. DHEC was crystallized from different solvents in order to mimic the typical MIP synthesis conditions. Four new solvatomorphs of DHEC were obtained. All solvatomorphs contain a water molecule in the crystal structure, whereas three compounds contain an additional solvent molecule. Based on the conformation of DHEC a comparison with typical EA molecules was possible. The analysis showed that DHEC is a suitable template for MIPs for EAs.

  12. Modes of surface premelting in colloidal crystals composed of attractive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Di; Peng, Yi; Ni, Ran; Han, Yilong

    2016-03-01

    Crystal surfaces typically melt into a thin liquid layer at temperatures slightly below the melting point of the crystal. Such surface premelting is prevalent in all classes of solids and is important in a variety of metallurgical, geological and meteorological phenomena. Premelting has been studied using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, but the lack of single-particle resolution makes it hard to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Colloids are good model systems for studying phase transitions because the thermal motions of individual micrometre-sized particles can be tracked directly using optical microscopy. Here we use colloidal spheres with tunable attractions to form equilibrium crystal–vapour interfaces, and study their surface premelting behaviour at the single-particle level. We find that monolayer colloidal crystals exhibit incomplete premelting at their perimeter, with a constant liquid-layer thickness. In contrast, two- and three-layer crystals exhibit conventional complete melting, with the thickness of the surface liquid diverging as the melting point is approached. The microstructures of the surface liquids differ in certain aspects from what would be predicted by conventional premelting theories. Incomplete premelting in the monolayer crystals is triggered by a bulk isostructural solid–solid transition and truncated by a mechanical instability that separately induces homogeneous melting within the bulk. This finding is in contrast to the conventional assumption that two-dimensional crystals melt heterogeneously from their free surfaces (that is, at the solid–vapour interface). The unexpected bulk melting that we observe for the monolayer crystals is accompanied by the formation of grain boundaries, which supports a previously proposed grain-boundary-mediated two-dimensional melting theory. The observed interplay between surface premelting, bulk melting and solid–solid transitions challenges existing theories of

  13. Crystal Structure of L-Histidinium 2-Nitrobenzoate

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Subramanian; Moovendaran, Kalimuthu; Kalyana Sundar, Jeyaperumal; Ravikumar, Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    A new nonlinear optical organic compound, namely, L-histidinium 2-nitrobenzoate (abbreviated as LH2NB (I); ([C6H10N3O2]+ [C7H4NO4]−)), was synthesized. The molecular structure of LH2NB (I) was elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of this compound is about two times that of the standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals. PMID:22536482

  14. Boron-oxygen polyanion in the crystal structure of tunellite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.

    1963-01-01

    The crystal structure of tunellite, SrO??3B2O 3??4H2O, with infinite sheets of composition n[B6O9(OH)2]2-, has cations and water molecules in the spaces within the sheets. Adjacent sheets are held together by hydrogen bonding through the water molecules. The boron-oxygen polyanions provide the first example in hydrated borate crystals of one oxygen linked to three borons.

  15. Structure of ice crystallized from supercooled water

    PubMed Central

    Malkin, Tamsin L.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Brukhno, Andrey V.; Anwar, Jamshed; Salzmann, Christoph G.

    2012-01-01

    The freezing of water to ice is fundamentally important to fields as diverse as cloud formation to cryopreservation. At ambient conditions, ice is considered to exist in two crystalline forms: stable hexagonal ice and metastable cubic ice. Using X-ray diffraction data and Monte Carlo simulations, we show that ice that crystallizes homogeneously from supercooled water is neither of these phases. The resulting ice is disordered in one dimension and therefore possesses neither cubic nor hexagonal symmetry and is instead composed of randomly stacked layers of cubic and hexagonal sequences. We refer to this ice as stacking-disordered ice I. Stacking disorder and stacking faults have been reported earlier for metastable ice I, but only for ice crystallizing in mesopores and in samples recrystallized from high-pressure ice phases rather than in water droplets. Review of the literature reveals that almost all ice that has been identified as cubic ice in previous diffraction studies and generated in a variety of ways was most likely stacking-disordered ice I with varying degrees of stacking disorder. These findings highlight the need to reevaluate the physical and thermodynamic properties of this metastable ice as a function of the nature and extent of stacking disorder using well-characterized samples. PMID:22232652

  16. Magnetically responsive gourd-shaped colloidal particles in cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Varney, Michael C M; Lopez, Javier A; Wang, Sijia; Wu, Ning; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2014-08-28

    Particle shape and medium chirality are two key features recently used to control anisotropic colloidal self-assembly and dynamics in liquid crystals. Here, we study magnetically responsive gourd-shaped colloidal particles dispersed in cholesteric liquid crystals with periodicity comparable or smaller than the particle's dimensions. Using magnetic manipulation and optical tweezers, which allow one to position colloids near the confining walls, we measured the elastic repulsive interactions of these particles with confining surfaces and found that separation-dependent particle-wall interaction force is a non-monotonic function of separation and shows oscillatory behavior. We show that gourd-shaped particles in cholesterics reside not on a single sedimentation level, but on multiple long-lived metastable levels separated by a distance comparable to cholesteric periodicity. Finally, we demonstrate three-dimensional laser tweezers assisted assembly of gourd-shaped particles taking advantage of both orientational order and twist periodicity of cholesterics, potentially allowing new forms of orientationally and positionally ordered colloidal organization in these media. PMID:24994521

  17. Crystallization and immersion freezing ability of oxalic and succinic acid in multicomponent aqueous organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Höhler, Kristina; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of immersed oxalic and succinic acid crystals in the temperature range from 245 to 215 K, as investigated with expansion cooling experiments using suspended particles. In contrast to previous laboratory work with emulsified solution droplets where the precipitation of solid inclusions required a preceding freezing/evaporation cycle, we show that immersed solids readily form by homogeneous crystallization within aqueous solution droplets of multicomponent organic mixtures, which have noneutonic compositions with an excess of oxalic or succinic acid. Whereas succinic acid crystals did not act as heterogeneous ice nuclei, immersion freezing by oxalic acid dihydrate crystals led to a reduction of the ice saturation ratio at freezing onset by 0.066-0.072 compared to homogeneous freezing, which is by a factor of 2 higher than previously reported laboratory data. These observations emphasize the importance of oxalic acid in heterogeneous ice nucleation.

  18. Heterogeneous Crystallization on Pairs of Pre-Structured Seeds

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effects of small pre-structured seeds on the crystallization transition in an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid with transition interface path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the impact of the simultaneous presence of two seeds with various structures. In the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures, we find that decreasing the seed-to-seed distance enhances the probability of the crystalline clusters formed on one of the seeds to grow beyond the critical size, thus, increasing the crystal nucleation rates. In contrast, when seeds have an icosahedral structure, the crystalline clusters form mostly in the bulk. The crystal nucleation rate, however, is also determined by the distance between the seeds with regular structure in which the lattice spacing is equal to the bulk lattice constant, pointing to a heterogeneous crystal nucleation that occurs away from the icosahedrally structured seeds. For slightly squeezed seeds, the effects of the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures are reduced in comparison to the regular seeds, and we do not see any effect of the presence of the second seed for seeds with squeezed icosahedral structure. PMID:27479875

  19. Crystal engineering with thioureas: A structure-based inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisner, Kathryn A.

    2011-12-01

    Structural trends applicable to crystal engineering were studied in three classes of thiourea-based compounds. The aim of the study was to identify, predict, and ultimately design reliable single-molecule structural features, which could then be used to engineer crystals with desirable properties. In one class of compounds, this goal was achieved: N-alkyl and N-aryl derivatives of N,N'-bis(3-thioureidopropyl)piperazine adopted an identical conformation in the solid state, which resulted in near-identical crystal packing. A second class of closely related compounds, N-substituted tris(2-thioureidoethyl)amines, showed no such reliability in the solid state, likely because the parent structure lacked hydrogen-bonding functionalities sufficient to control intramolecular structure. In the third class of compounds that we studied, 1-benzoyl-3-(2-pyridyl)thioureas, substitution patterns were often predictive of molecular conformation; however, these intramolecular trends did not lead to recognizable crystal packing motifs. Nevertheless, certain physical properties observed in this last class of compounds---color, solubility, and often crystallinity---were conformer-specific, interestingly without any apparent relevance to crystal lattice structure. Solution-state and solid-state conformational trends in these 1-benzoyl-3-(2-pyridyl)thioureas have been documented, and speculations as to the source of color in one of the two observed conformations have been noted.

  20. Isolation, crystallization and crystal structure determination of bovine kidney Na(+),K(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Jonas Lindholt; Mattle, Daniel; Fedosova, Natalya U; Nissen, Poul; Reinhard, Linda

    2016-04-01

    Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is responsible for the transport of Na(+) and K(+) across the plasma membrane in animal cells, thereby sustaining vital electrochemical gradients that energize channels and secondary transporters. The crystal structure of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase has previously been elucidated using the enzyme from native sources such as porcine kidney and shark rectal gland. Here, the isolation, crystallization and first structure determination of bovine kidney Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in a high-affinity E2-BeF3(-)-ouabain complex with bound magnesium are described. Crystals belonging to the orthorhombic space group C2221 with one molecule in the asymmetric unit exhibited anisotropic diffraction to a resolution of 3.7 Å with full completeness to a resolution of 4.2 Å. The structure was determined by molecular replacement, revealing unbiased electron-density features for bound BeF3(-), ouabain and Mg(2+) ions. PMID:27050261

  1. Origin of particle accumulation structures in liquid bridges: Particle-boundary-interactions versus inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muldoon, Frank H.; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C.

    2016-07-01

    The formation of particle-accumulation structures in the flow in a cylindrical liquid bridge driven by the thermocapillary effect is studied with the aim of determining the physical mechanism which forms the structures. The flow is modeled using the incompressible Navier-Stokes and energy equations with the assumption of constant fluid properties except for surface tension, which is assumed to depend linearly on temperature. Different models for the motion of small non-interacting spherical particles at low concentration are employed, taking into account particle inertia due to density differences between fluid and particles and the restricted particle motion near the boundaries of the flow domain. Attention is focused on differences in formation time between particle-accumulation structures arising as a result of inertial effects only, particle-boundary-interaction effects only, and a combination of the two.

  2. Splitting of surface plasmon frequencies of metal particles in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung Yong; Stroud, D.

    2004-10-01

    We calculate the effective dielectric function for a suspension of small metallic particles immersed in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) host. For a random suspension of such particles in the dilute limit, we calculate the effective dielectric tensor exactly and show that the surface plasmon resonance of such particles splits into two resonances, polarized parallel and perpendicular to the NLC director. At higher concentrations, we calculate this splitting using a generalized Maxwell-Garnett approximation (MGA), which can also be applied to a small metal particle coated with NLC. To confirm the accuracy of the MGA for NLC-coated spheres, we also use the discrete dipole approximation. The calculated splitting is comparable to that observed in recent experiments on NLC-coated small metal particles.

  3. Crystal structure of ammonia dihydrate II.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Gareth I G; Fortes, A Dominic; Pickard, Chris J; Needs, R J

    2012-05-01

    We have used density-functional-theory (DFT) methods together with a structure searching algorithm to make an experimentally constrained prediction of the structure of ammonia dihydrate II (ADH-II). The DFT structure is in good agreement with neutron diffraction data and verifies the prediction. The structure consists of the same basic structural elements as ADH-I, with a modest alteration to the packing, but a considerable reduction in volume. The phase diagram of the known ADH and ammonia monohydrate + water-ice structures is calculated with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof density functional, and the effects of a semi-empirical dispersion corrected functional are investigated. The results of our DFT calculations of the finite-pressure elastic constants of ADH-II are compared with the available experimental data for the elastic strain coefficients. PMID:22583254

  4. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  5. Ytterbium- and neodymium-doped vanadate laser hose crystals having the apatite crystal structure

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Kway, Wayne L.; DeLoach, Laura D.; Krupke, William F.; Chai, Bruce H. T.

    1994-01-01

    Yb.sup.3+ and Nd.sup.3+ doped Sr.sub.5 (VO.sub.4).sub.3 F crystals serve as useful infrared laser media that exhibit low thresholds of oscillation and high slope efficiencies, and can be grown with high optical quality. These laser media possess unusually high absorption and emission cross sections, which provide the crystals with the ability to generate greater gain for a given amount of pump power. Many related crystals such as Sr.sub.5 (VO.sub.4).sub.3 F crystals doped with other rare earths, transition metals, or actinides, as well as the many structural analogs of Sr.sub.5 (VO.sub.4).sub.3 F, where the Sr.sup.2+ and F.sup.- ions are replaced by related chemical species, have similar properties.

  6. Ytterbium- and neodymium-doped vanadate laser hose crystals having the apatite crystal structure

    DOEpatents

    Payne, S.A.; Kway, W.L.; DeLoach, L.D.; Krupke, W.F.; Chai, B.H.T.

    1994-08-23

    Yb[sup 3+] and Nd[sup 3+] doped Sr[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]F crystals serve as useful infrared laser media that exhibit low thresholds of oscillation and high slope efficiencies, and can be grown with high optical quality. These laser media possess unusually high absorption and emission cross sections, which provide the crystals with the ability to generate greater gain for a given amount of pump power. Many related crystals such as Sr[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]F crystals doped with other rare earths, transition metals, or actinides, as well as the many structural analogs of Sr[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]F, where the Sr[sup 2+] and F[sup [minus

  7. Combined crystal structure prediction and high-pressure crystallization in rational pharmaceutical polymorph screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, M. A.; van de Streek, J.; Fabbiani, F. P. A.; Hidber, P.; Grassmann, O.

    2015-07-01

    Organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and pigments, frequently form several crystal polymorphs with different physicochemical properties. Finding polymorphs has long been a purely experimental game of trial-and-error. Here we utilize in silico polymorph screening in combination with rationally planned crystallization experiments to study the polymorphism of the pharmaceutical compound Dalcetrapib, with 10 torsional degrees of freedom one of the most flexible molecules ever studied computationally. The experimental crystal polymorphs are found at the bottom of the calculated lattice energy landscape, and two predicted structures are identified as candidates for a missing, thermodynamically more stable polymorph. Pressure-dependent stability calculations suggested high pressure as a means to bring these polymorphs into existence. Subsequently, one of them could indeed be crystallized in the 0.02 to 0.50 GPa pressure range and was found to be metastable at ambient pressure, effectively derisking the appearance of a more stable polymorph during late-stage development of Dalcetrapib.

  8. Photonic crystal structures for efficent localization or extraction of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals offer the opportunity of light manipulation in all directions in space, but they are very difficult to fabricate. On the other hand, planar photonic crystals are much simpler to make, but they exhibit only a "quasi-3D" confinement, resulting from the combined action of 2D photonic crystal and internal reflection. The imperfect confinement in the third dimension produces some unwanted out-of-plane loss, which is usually a limiting factor in performance of these structures. This thesis proposes how to fully take advantage of the relatively simple fabrication of planar photonic crystals, by addressing a problem of loss-reduction. One of the greatest challenges in photonics is a construction of optical microcavities with small mode volumes and large quality factors, for efficient localization of light. Beside standard applications of these structures (such as lasers or filters), they can potentially be used for cavity QED experiments, or as building blocks for quantum networks. This work also presents the design and fabrication of optical microcavities based on planar photonic crystals, with mode volumes of the order of one half of cubic wavelength of light (measured in material) and with Q factors predicted to be even larger than 10 4. In addition to photonic crystals fabricated in semiconductors, we also address interesting properties of metallic photonic crystals and present our theoretical and experimental work on using them to improve the output of light emissive devices. Feature sizes of structures presented here are below those achievable by photolithography. Therefore, a high resolution lithography is necessary for their fabrication. The presently used e-beam writing techniques suffer from limitations in speed and wafer throughput, and they represent a huge obstacle to commercialization of photonic crystals. Our preliminary work on electron beam projection lithography, the technique that could provide us with the speed

  9. Fractal Particles: Titan's Thermal Structure and IR Opacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, C. P.; Rannou, P.; Guez, L.; Young, E. F.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Titan's haze particles are the principle opacity at solar wavelengths. Most past work in modeling these particles has assumed spherical particles. However, observational evidence strongly favors fractal shapes for the haze particles. We consider the implications of fractal particles for the thermal structure and near infrared opacity of Titan's atmosphere. We find that assuming fractal particles with the optical properties based on laboratory tholin material and with a production rate that allows for a match to the geometric albedo results in warmer troposphere and surface temperatures compared to spherical particles. In the near infrared (1-3 microns) the predicted opacity of the fractal particles is up to a factor of two less than for spherical particles. This has implications for the ability of Cassini to image Titan's surface at 1 micron.

  10. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals.

  11. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction.

    PubMed

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals. PMID:26984298

  12. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    PubMed Central

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals. PMID:26984298

  13. Free-Standing Photonic Crystal Films with Gradient Structural Colors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haibo; Liu, Cihui; Ye, Baofen; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-03-23

    Hydrogel colloidal crystal composite materials have a demonstrated value in responsive photonic crystals (PhCs) via controllable stimuli. Although they have been successfully exploited to generate a gradient of color distribution, the soft hydrogels have limitations in terms of stability and storage caused by dependence on environment. Here, we present a practical strategy to fabricate free-standing PhC films with a stable gradient of structural colors using binary polymer networks. A colloidal crystal hydrogel film was prepared for this purpose, with continuously varying photonic band gaps corresponding to the gradient of the press. Then, a second polymer network was used to lock the inside non-close-packed PhC structures and color distribution of the hydrogel film. It was demonstrated that our strategy could bring about a solution to the angle-dependent structural colors of the PhC films by coating the surface with special microstructures. PMID:26962967

  14. The high-resolution crystal structure of human LCAT.

    PubMed

    Piper, Derek E; Romanow, William G; Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N; Fordstrom, Preston; Masterman, Stephanie; Pan, Oscar; Thibault, Stephen T; Zhang, Richard; Meininger, David; Schwarz, Margrit; Wang, Zhulun; King, Chadwick; Zhou, Mingyue; Walker, Nigel P C

    2015-09-01

    LCAT is intimately involved in HDL maturation and is a key component of the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway which removes excess cholesterol molecules from the peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. Patients with loss-of-function LCAT mutations exhibit low levels of HDL cholesterol and corneal opacity. Here we report the 2.65 Å crystal structure of the human LCAT protein. Crystallization required enzymatic removal of N-linked glycans and complex formation with a Fab fragment from a tool antibody. The crystal structure reveals that LCAT has an α/β hydrolase core with two additional subdomains that play important roles in LCAT function. Subdomain 1 contains the region of LCAT shown to be required for interfacial activation, while subdomain 2 contains the lid and amino acids that shape the substrate binding pocket. Mapping the naturally occurring mutations onto the structure provides insight into how they may affect LCAT enzymatic activity. PMID:26195816

  15. Modulated crystal structure of InMo4O6.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Peter; Simon, Arndt; Oeckler, Oliver

    2016-08-01

    The (3 + 1)-dimensional modulated crystal structure of the metal-rich cluster compound InMo4O6 was solved and refined from single-crystal data in the superspace group P4/mbm(00γ)00ss [q = 0, 0, 0.1536 (4); a = 9.6664 (9), c = 2.8645 (3) Å; R1(all) = 0.046, wR(all) = 0.076]. The crystal structure is closely related to the NaMo4O6 structure type. It is built from rods of Mo6 clusters condensed via trans edges. These form channels parallel to [001], in which In6 and In7 oligomers alternate. Weak diffuse planes parallel to (001)* interconnect the satellite reflections; they occur due to two-dimensional rod disorder of the In oligomer chains. PMID:27484384

  16. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-21

    In this work, we propose "single-image analysis", as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis. PMID:24056758

  17. Disclination loops, standing alone and around solid particles, in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentjev, E. M.

    1995-02-01

    A suspended particle with specific director anchoring on its surface introduces a complex distortion field in a nematic liquid crystal matrix. Topological defects-disclination loops, boojums, and hedgehogs, are needed to match the director near the particle surface with that at the far distance, which is determined by boundary conditions on the sample. This paper analyzes the elastic energy and stability of a singular loop of wedge disclination and the first-order transition of the radial hedgehog into a wide singular loop, driven by an external magnetic field. The far field of distortions, created by a ``Saturn ring'' of disclination around the spherical radial particle, allows one to calculate the potential of interaction between such particles and with the surface of the liquid crystal. Particles are repelled from each other and from the rigidly anchored surface with the potential U~1/r3. If the sample surface has soft anchoring, the particle is attracted to it at close distances and is repelled, if beyond the anchoring coherence length ξw. Several experiments to test these conclusions are suggested.

  18. The Crystal Structure of GXGD Membrane Protease FlaK

    SciTech Connect

    J Hu; Y Xue; S Lee; Y Ha

    2011-12-31

    The GXGD proteases are polytopic membrane proteins with catalytic activities against membrane-spanning substrates that require a pair of aspartyl residues. Representative members of the family include preflagellin peptidase, type 4 prepilin peptidase, presenilin and signal peptide peptidase. Many GXGD proteases are important in medicine. For example, type 4 prepilin peptidase may contribute to bacterial pathogenesis, and mutations in presenilin are associated with Alzheimer's disease. As yet, there is no atomic-resolution structure in this protease family. Here we report the crystal structure of FlaK, a preflagellin peptidase from Methanococcus maripaludis, solved at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure contains six transmembrane helices. The GXGD motif and a short transmembrane helix, helix 4, are positioned at the centre, surrounded by other transmembrane helices. The crystal structure indicates that the protease must undergo conformational changes to bring the GXGD motif and a second essential aspartyl residue from transmembrane helix 1 into close proximity for catalysis. A comparison of the crystal structure with models of presenilin derived from biochemical analysis reveals three common transmembrane segments that are similarly arranged around the active site. This observation reinforces the idea that the prokaryotic and human proteases are evolutionarily related. The crystal structure presented here provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of the GXGD proteases, and may facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that target specific members of the family.

  19. The crystal structure of GXGD membrane protease FlaK

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian; Xue, Yi; Lee, Sangwon; Ha, Ya

    2011-09-20

    The GXGD proteases are polytopic membrane proteins with catalytic activities against membrane-spanning substrates that require a pair of aspartyl residues. Representative members of the family include preflagellin peptidase, type 4 prepilin peptidase, presenilin and signal peptide peptidase. Many GXGD proteases are important in medicine. For example, type 4 prepilin peptidase may contribute to bacterial pathogenesis, and mutations in presenilin are associated with Alzheimer's disease. As yet, there is no atomic-resolution structure in this protease family. Here we report the crystal structure of FlaK, a preflagellin peptidase from Methanococcus maripaludis, solved at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure contains six transmembrane helices. The GXGD motif and a short transmembrane helix, helix 4, are positioned at the centre, surrounded by other transmembrane helices. The crystal structure indicates that the protease must undergo conformational changes to bring the GXGD motif and a second essential aspartyl residue from transmembrane helix 1 into close proximity for catalysis. A comparison of the crystal structure with models of presenilin derived from biochemical analysis reveals three common transmembrane segments that are similarly arranged around the active site. This observation reinforces the idea that the prokaryotic and human proteases are evolutionarily related. The crystal structure presented here provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of the GXGD proteases, and may facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that target specific members of the family.

  20. Constraints and restraints in crystal structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Immirzi, Attilio

    2009-01-01

    The widely used restraint-based approach to structural analysis using diffraction data is critiqued. The convenience of using rigid constraints, through the use of internal coordinates, is discussed. PMID:22477768

  1. Ab initio modelling: Genesis of crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Walle, Axel

    2005-05-01

    Genetic algorithms prove useful to distil a complex quantum mechanical calculation of interatomic interactions down to its simplest mathematical expression. This makes it possible to predict the structure of new compounds from first principles.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Nipah Virus Phosphoprotein Tetramerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bruhn, Jessica F.; Barnett, Katherine C.; Bibby, Jaclyn; Thomas, Jens M. H.; Keegan, Ronan M.; Rigden, Daniel J.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    The Nipah virus phosphoprotein (P) is multimeric and tethers the viral polymerase to the nucleocapsid. We present the crystal structure of the multimerization domain of Nipah virus P: a long, parallel, tetrameric, coiled coil with a small, α-helical cap structure. Across the paramyxoviruses, these domains share little sequence identity yet are similar in length and structural organization, suggesting a common requirement for scaffolding or spatial organization of the functions of P in the virus life cycle. PMID:24155387

  3. Electronic structure of the CuBS2 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basalaev, Yu. M.; Gordienko, A. B.; Filippov, S. I.

    2012-09-01

    The band structure and spectra of the total and projected densities of states of a new crystal of the chalcopyrite family, namely, CuBS2, have been calculated in terms of the density functional theory. It has been found that the crystal is a pseudo-direct-band-gap semiconductor, and the best theoretical estimate of the optical band gap is 3.44 eV. The upper valence band of the CuBS2 crystal basically consists of the contributions from the p states of S atoms and the d states of Cu atoms. The crystal splitting is 0.2 eV. The bottom of the conduction band is basically formed by the sp states of boron and sulfur atoms with an admixture of the s states of copper atoms.

  4. Utilization of Protein Crystal Structures in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kohki

    In industry, protein crystallography is used in mainly two technologies. One is structure-based drug design, and the other is structure-based enzyme engineering. Some successful cases together with recent advances are presented in this article. The cases include the development of an anti-influenza drug, and the introduction of engineered acid phosphatase to the manufacturing process of nucleotides used as umami seasoning.

  5. Synthesis, growth, structural, optical, thermal and mechanical properties of an organic Urea maleic acid single crystals for nonlinear optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinothkumar, P.; Kumar, R. Mohan; Jayavel, R.; Bhaskaran, A.

    2016-07-01

    A potential organic urea maleic acid (UMA) was synthesized and single crystals were grown at room temperature by slow evaporation and seed rotation methods. The grown crystal has been subjected to single crystal XRD analysis and found to have been crystallized in a noncentrosymmetric monoclinic crystal system with Cc as space group. The High resolution X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the specimen is free from structural grain boundaries. The transparency of the grown crystal was confirmed by optical absorption and transmittance spectra with lower cut-off wavelength of 285 nm. The microhardness test was carried out on different planes to study the load dependent hardness values. The dislocation density of the UMA crystal was estimated from the etching studies. The dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss of the grown crystal was carried out as a function of frequency for different temperatures along three crystallographic axes. Thermal properties of UMA crystals were studied by TG-DTA analysis and it is stable upto 112 °C. The laser induced surface damage threshold of the grown crystal was measured using Nd: YAG laser. The birefringence of the crystal measured in the visible region was found to vary with the wavelength. The particle size dependent SHG of the sample was measured with different input energies by Kurtz's powder method using Nd:YAG laser.

  6. Structural and magnetic characterization of electro-crystallized magnetite nanoparticles under constant current

    SciTech Connect

    Mosivand, Saba; Kazeminezhad, Iraj

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Structural and magnetic properties of electro-crystallized magnetite nanoparticles under constant current were studied. All samples were characterized using XRD, SEM, VSM, and Mössbauer spectrometry. - Highlights: • The effect of applied current on morphology and properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is studied. • The particle size and morphology are controllable by adjusting the current. • The magnetization depends on particle size, type of surfactant and applied current. • The clear correlation between magnetization and the mean particle size is observed. - Abstract: The effect of applied current on the morphology, particle size, structure, and magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles prepared by electro-crystallization method was studied. The synthesis was performed in an electrochemical cell containing two iron electrodes and an aqueous solution of sodium sulfate, and either thiourea, sodium butanoate, or β-cyclodextrine as organic stabilizer. All the samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, VSM, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction patterns, clearly confirmed that all products have the cubic spinel Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} crystal structure. Electron microscope images of the samples showed that their mean particle size is in the range 20–80 nm, and depends critically on the applied current and type of the organic additives. Specific magnetization of the samples at room temperature ranges from 60 to 90 A m{sup 2} kg{sup −1}, depending on the growth conditions. Room temperature Mössbauer spectra are typical of nonstoichiometric Fe{sub 3−δ}O{sub 4}, with a small excess of Fe{sup 3+}, 0.06 ≤ δ ≤ 0.17.

  7. Crystal chemistry and structure refinement of five hydrated calcium borates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.; Appleman, D.E.; Christ, C.L.

    1964-01-01

    The crystal structures of the five known members of the series Ca2B6O11??xH2O (x = 1, 5, 5, 7, 9, and 13) have been refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques, yielding bond distances and angles with standard errors of less than 0??01 A?? and 0??5??, respectively. The results illustrate the crystal chemical principles that govern the structures of hydrated borate compounds. The importance of hydrogen bonding in the ferroelectric transition of colemanite is confirmed by more accurate proton assignments. ?? 1964.

  8. Photonic crystals, light manipulation, and imaging in complex nematic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravnik, Miha; Å timulak, Mitja; Mur, Urban; Čančula, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-03-01

    Three selected approaches for manipulation of light by complex nematic colloidal and non-colloidal structures are presented using different own custom developed theoretical and modelling approaches. Photonic crystals bands of distorted cholesteric liquid crystal helix and of nematic colloidal opals are presented, also revealing distinct photonic modes and density of states. Light propagation along half-integer nematic disclinations is shown with changes in the light polarization of various winding numbers. As third, simulated light transmission polarization micrographs of nematic torons are shown, offering a new insight into the complex structure characterization. Finally, this work is a contribution towards using complex soft matter in optics and photonics for advanced light manipulation.

  9. Crystal structure of an amphiphilic foldamer reveals a 48-mer assembly comprising a hollow truncated octahedron.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Vincenzo; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Merlino, Antonello; Lombardi, Angela; Wu, Yibing; DeGrado, William F

    2014-01-01

    Foldamers provide an attractive medium to test the mechanisms by which biological macromolecules fold into complex three-dimensional structures, and ultimately to design novel protein-like architectures with properties unprecedented in nature. Here, we describe a large cage-like structure formed from an amphiphilic arylamide foldamer crystallized from aqueous solution. Forty-eight copies of the foldamer assemble into a 5-nm cage-like structure, an omnitruncated octahedron filled with well-ordered ice-like water molecules. The assembly is stabilized by a mix of arylamide stacking interaction, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic forces. The omnitruncated octahedra tessellate to form a cubic crystal. These findings may provide an important step towards the design of nanostructured particles resembling spherical viruses. PMID:24705140

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of fast particle irradiation on the single crystal CeO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasajima, Y.; Ajima, N.; Osada, T.; Ishikawa, N.; Iwase, A.

    2013-11-01

    We used a molecular dynamics method to simulate structural relaxation caused by the high-energy-ion irradiation of single crystal CeO2. As the initial condition, we assumed high thermal energy was supplied to the individual atoms within a cylindrical region of nanometer-order diameter located in the center of the single crystal. The potential proposed by Inaba et al. was utilized to calculate interactions between atoms [H. Inaba, R. Sagawa, H. Hayashi, K. Kawamura, Solid State Ionics 122 (1999) 95-103]. The supplied thermal energy was first spent to change the crystal structure into an amorphous one within a short period of about 0.3 ps, then it was dissipated in the crystal. We compared the obtained results with those of computer simulations for UO2 and found that CeO2 was more stable than UO2 when supplied with high thermal energy.

  11. Photonics of liquid-crystal structures: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Palto, S. P. Blinov, L. M.; Barnik, M. I.; Lazarev, V. V.; Umanskii, B. A.; Shtykov, N. M.

    2011-07-15

    The original results of studies of the electro-optical and laser effects which have been performed at the Laboratory of Liquid Crystals of the Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, over the last few years are reviewed. Cholesteric liquid crystals as vivid representatives of photonic structures and their behavior in an electric field are considered in detail. The formation of higher harmonics in the periodic distribution of the director field in a helical liquid crystal structure and, correspondingly, the new (anharmonic) mode of electro-optical effects are discussed. Another group of studies is devoted to bistable light switching by an electric field in chiral nematics. Polarization diffraction gratings controlled by an electric field are also considered. The results of studies devoted to microlasers on various photonic structures with cholesteric and nematic liquid crystals are considered in detail. Particular attention is given to the new regime: leaky-mode lasing. Designs of liquid crystal light amplifiers and their polarization, field, and spectral characteristics are considered in the last section.

  12. Crystal structures of two engineered thiol trypsins.

    PubMed

    McGrath, M E; Wilke, M E; Higaki, J N; Craik, C S; Fletterick, R J

    1989-11-28

    We have determined the three-dimensional structures of engineered rat trypsins which mimic the active sites of two classes of cysteine proteases. The catalytic serine was replaced with cysteine (S195C) to test the ability of sulfur to function as a nucleophile in a serine protease environment. This variant mimics the cysteine trypsin class of thiol proteases. An additional mutation of the active site aspartate to an asparagine (D102N) created the catalytic triad of the papain-type cysteine proteases. Rat trypsins S195C and D102N,S195C were solved to 2.5 and 2.0 A, respectively. The refined structures were analyzed to determine the structural basis for the 10(6)-fold loss of activity of trypsin S195C and the 10(8)-fold loss of activity of trypsin D102N,S195C, relative to rat trypsin. The active site thiols were found in a reduced state in contrast to the oxidized thiols found in previous thiol protease structures. These are the first reported structures of serine proteases with the catalytic centers of sulfhydryl proteases. Structure analysis revealed only subtle global changes in enzyme conformation. The substrate binding pocket is unaltered, and active site amino acid 102 forms hydrogen bonds to H57 and S214 as well as to the backbone amides of A56 and H57. In trypsin S195C, D102 is a hydrogen-bond acceptor for H57 which allows the other imidazole nitrogen to function as a base during catalysis. In trypsin D102N,S195C, the asparagine at position 102 is a hydrogen-bond donor to H57 which places a proton on the imidazole nitrogen proximal to the nucleophile. This tautomer of H57 is unable to act as a base in catalysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2611228

  13. Directed self-assembly of colloidal particles onto the chemically anchoring patterned surface in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Armas-Pérez, Julio; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan; de Pablo, Juan; Nealey, Paul

    The defects assisted assembly of colloidal particles works are more focused on the defects created in the bulk or the interface of nematic liquid crystal, which usually observe a group of particles spontaneously forming a chain or aggregating over the defects. The confining surface with specific 3D sculptured structures, such as pyramid or zig-zag grooves, offers the opportunity to isolate the trapped particles into certain position. Here, we explore a new method to direct self-assemble the colloidal particles through manipulating defects on the 2D geometry confined anchoring surface. Since the director of the preferred planar orientation of LCs could be manipulated by the pattern geometry and dimension, the topological defects could be engineered based on multi-stable orientation by designed 2D geometry pattern of different controllable direction at sub-micrometer dimension. We demonstrate that the designed one single middle straight stripe with disjoint two groups of straight stripe array on both side of the middle stripe as 45 angle of different orientation director could control the distortion of the disjoint gap space thus acting as defects template to trap the colloidal particles directed self-assembly at the designed positions. Through anchoring distribution on the pattern areas, geometry design of pattern, and also the external electric field applied on the system, those defects areas could be generate, erase, resume or even correct.

  14. Crystal form control and particle size control of RG3487, a nicotinic α7 receptor partial agonist.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shanming; Zhang, Pingsheng; Dong, Eric Z; Jennings, Geremia; Zhao, Baoshu; Pierce, Michael

    2016-07-11

    This paper describes solid form control and particle size control of RG3487, a nicotinic receptor partial agonist. Four crystal forms were identified by polymorph screen under ∼100 varying conditions. Form A and Form B are anhydrates, while Forms C and D are solvates. Forms A, which is enantiotropically related to Form B, is the more thermodynamically stable form under ambient conditions and the desired form selected for clinical development. The crystal form control of Form A was achieved by crystallization solvent selection which consistently produced the desired form. Several process parameters impacting particle size of Form A in the final crystallization step were identified and investigated through both online and offline particle size measurement. The investigation results were utilized to control crystallization processes which successfully produced Form A with different particle size in 500g scale. PMID:27167333

  15. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF A PUTATIVE OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Baig, M.; Brown, A.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative enteric bacterium, is found in nosocomial infections which are acquired during hospital stays for about 10% of hospital patients in the United States. The crystal structure of a putative oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae has been determined. The structural information of this K. pneumoniae protein was used to understand its function. Crystals of the putative oxidoreductase enzyme were obtained by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method using Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, Bis-Tris buffer, pH 5.5 as precipitant. These crystals were used to collect X-ray data at beam line X12C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The crystal structure was determined using the SHELX program and refi ned with CNS 1.1. This protein, which is involved in the catalysis of an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction, has an alpha/beta structure. It utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) or nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to perform its function. This structure could be used to determine the active and co-factor binding sites of the protein, information that could help pharmaceutical companies in drug design and in determining the protein’s relationship to disease treatment such as that for pneumonia and other related pathologies.

  16. The crystal structure of aluminum doped β-rhombohedral boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykova, Elena; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2012-10-01

    A crystal structure of aluminum doped β-rhombohedral boron was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 80 K. The crystals were synthesized using high-pressure high temperature technique at 3 GPa and 2100 K. The structure is based on three-dimensional framework made of B12 icosahedra with voids occupied by the B28-B-B28 units, it has the R-3m space group with a=10.9014(3), c=23.7225(7) Å lattice dimensions in hexagonal setting. Aluminum atoms are located in A1 and D special positions of the β-B structure with occupancies of 82.7(6)% and 11.3(4)%, respectively. Additional boron atoms are located near the D-site. Their possible distribution is discussed. Finally we have found two appropriate structural models whose refinement suggests two possible chemical compositions, AlB44.8(5) and AlB37.8(5), which are in a good agreement with the chemical analysis data obtained from EDX. The crystal structure of AlB44.8(5) is described in detail.

  17. Optofluidic immobility of particles trapped in liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Garbos, M K; Euser, T G; Russell, P St J

    2011-09-26

    We study the conditions under which a particle, laser-guided in a vertically-oriented hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with liquid, can be kept stationary against a microfluidic counter-flow. An immobility parameter-the fluid flow rate required to immobilize a particle against the radiation force produced by unit guided optical power-is introduced to quantify the conditions under which this occurs, including radiation, viscous and gravity forces. Measurements show that this parameter depends strongly on the ratio of particle radius a to core radius R, peaking at an intermediate value of a/R. The results follow fairly well the theoretical estimates of the optical (calculated approximately using a ray optics approach) and numerically simulated drag forces. We suggest that the system has potential applications in, e.g., measurement of the diameter, refractive index and density of particles, synthesis and biomedical research. PMID:21996905

  18. Equilibrium state of a cylindrical particle with flat ends in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. Masoomeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A continuum theory is employed to numerically study the equilibrium orientation and defect structures of a circular cylindrical particle with flat ends under a homeotropic anchoring condition in a uniform nematic medium. Different aspect ratios of this colloidal geometry from thin discotic to long rodlike shapes and several colloidal length scales ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale are investigated. We show that the equilibrium state of this colloidal geometry is sensitive to the two geometrical parameters: aspect ratio and length scale of the particle. For a large enough mesoscopic particle, there is a specific asymptotic equilibrium angle associated to each aspect ratio. Upon reducing the particle size to nanoscale, the equilibrium angle follows a descending or ascending trend in such a way that the equilibrium angle of a particle with the aspect ratio bigger than 1:1 (a discotic particle) goes to a parallel alignment with respect to the far-field nematic, whereas the equilibrium angle for a particle with the aspect ratio 1:1 and smaller (a rodlike particle) tends toward a perpendicular alignment to the uniform nematic direction. The discrepancy between the equilibrium angles of the mesoscopic and nanoscopic particles originates from the significant differences between their defect structures. The possible defect structures related to mesoscopic and nanoscopic colloidal particles of this geometry are also introduced.

  19. Equilibrium state of a cylindrical particle with flat ends in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, S Masoomeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A continuum theory is employed to numerically study the equilibrium orientation and defect structures of a circular cylindrical particle with flat ends under a homeotropic anchoring condition in a uniform nematic medium. Different aspect ratios of this colloidal geometry from thin discotic to long rodlike shapes and several colloidal length scales ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale are investigated. We show that the equilibrium state of this colloidal geometry is sensitive to the two geometrical parameters: aspect ratio and length scale of the particle. For a large enough mesoscopic particle, there is a specific asymptotic equilibrium angle associated to each aspect ratio. Upon reducing the particle size to nanoscale, the equilibrium angle follows a descending or ascending trend in such a way that the equilibrium angle of a particle with the aspect ratio bigger than 1:1 (a discotic particle) goes to a parallel alignment with respect to the far-field nematic, whereas the equilibrium angle for a particle with the aspect ratio 1:1 and smaller (a rodlike particle) tends toward a perpendicular alignment to the uniform nematic direction. The discrepancy between the equilibrium angles of the mesoscopic and nanoscopic particles originates from the significant differences between their defect structures. The possible defect structures related to mesoscopic and nanoscopic colloidal particles of this geometry are also introduced. PMID:25679634

  20. Crystal structure of HINT from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tarique, K F; Devi, S; Abdul Rehman, S A; Gourinath, S

    2016-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the histidine triad (HIT) superfamily bind nucleotides and use the histidine triad motif to carry out dinucleotidyl hydrolase, nucleotidyltransferase and phosphoramidite hydrolase activities. Five different branches of this superfamily are known to exist. Defects in these proteins in humans are linked to many diseases such as ataxia, diseases of RNA metabolism and cell-cycle regulation, and various types of cancer. The histidine triad nucleotide protein (HINT) is nearly identical to proteins that have been classified as protein kinase C-interacting proteins (PKCIs), which also have the ability to bind and inhibit protein kinase C. The structure of HINT, which exists as a homodimer, is highly conserved from humans to bacteria and shares homology with the product of fragile histidine triad protein (FHit), a tumour suppressor gene of this superfamily. Here, the structure of HINT from Helicobacter pylori (HpHINT) in complex with AMP is reported at a resolution of 3 Å. The final model has R and Rfree values of 26 and 28%, respectively, with good electron density. Structural comparison with previously reported homologues and phylogenetic analysis shows H. pylori HINT to be the smallest among them, and suggests that it branched out separately during the course of evolution. Overall, this structure has contributed to a better understanding of this protein across the animal kingdom. PMID:26750483

  1. Determining complex crystal structures from high pressure single-crystal diffraction data collected on synchrotron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, M. I.; Loa, I.; Stinton, G. W.; Lundegaard, L. F.

    2013-08-01

    As part of a Long Term Project, single-crystal diffraction techniques have been developed for use at the high pressure beamlines ID09 and ID27 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, and have been utilised to determine the crystal structures of various high pressure phases, including those with incommensurate structures, at both high and low temperatures. The same techniques have also been used to determine the structures of high pressure phases at the SRS, Diamond and Petra-III synchrotron sources. In this paper, we describe technical details of the methods developed, and describe some of the considerations necessary for planning experiments and collecting and processing the data. We then illustrate the quality of data that can be obtained, and the complexity of the structures that can be refined, using recent results obtained from complex high pressure phases of N2 and Ba.

  2. Contact efflorescence as a pathway for crystallization of atmospherically relevant particles

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ryan D.; Lance, Sara; Gordon, Joshua A.; Ushijima, Shuichi B.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate knowledge of the phase state of atmospheric particles represents a source of uncertainty in global climate and air quality models. Hygroscopic aqueous inorganic particles are often assumed to remain liquid throughout their atmospheric lifetime or only (re)crystallize at low relative humidity (RH) due to the kinetic limitations of efflorescence (salt crystal nucleation and growth from an aqueous solution). Here we present experimental observations of a previously unexplored heterogeneous nucleation pathway that we have termed “contact efflorescence,” which describes efflorescence initiated by an externally located solid particle coming into contact with the surface of a metastable aqueous microdroplet. This study demonstrates that upon a single collision, contact efflorescence is a pathway for crystallization of atmospherically relevant aqueous particles at high ambient RH (≤80%). Soluble inorganic crystalline particles were used as contact nuclei to induce efflorescence of aqueous ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2SO4], sodium chloride (NaCl), and ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), with efflorescence being observed in several cases close to their deliquescence RH values (80%, 75%, and 62%, respectively). To our knowledge, these observations represent the highest reported efflorescence RH values for microdroplets of these salts. These results are particularly important for considering the phase state of NH4NO3, where the contact efflorescence RH (∼20–60%) is in stark contrast to the observation that NH4NO3 microdroplets do not homogeneously effloresce, even when exposed to extremely arid conditions (<1% RH). Considering the occurrence of particle collisions in the atmosphere (i.e., coagulation), these observations of contact efflorescence challenge many assumptions made about the phase state of inorganic aerosol. PMID:26668396

  3. Contact efflorescence as a pathway for crystallization of atmospherically relevant particles.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ryan D; Lance, Sara; Gordon, Joshua A; Ushijima, Shuichi B; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2015-12-29

    Inadequate knowledge of the phase state of atmospheric particles represents a source of uncertainty in global climate and air quality models. Hygroscopic aqueous inorganic particles are often assumed to remain liquid throughout their atmospheric lifetime or only (re)crystallize at low relative humidity (RH) due to the kinetic limitations of efflorescence (salt crystal nucleation and growth from an aqueous solution). Here we present experimental observations of a previously unexplored heterogeneous nucleation pathway that we have termed "contact efflorescence," which describes efflorescence initiated by an externally located solid particle coming into contact with the surface of a metastable aqueous microdroplet. This study demonstrates that upon a single collision, contact efflorescence is a pathway for crystallization of atmospherically relevant aqueous particles at high ambient RH (≤80%). Soluble inorganic crystalline particles were used as contact nuclei to induce efflorescence of aqueous ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2SO4], sodium chloride (NaCl), and ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), with efflorescence being observed in several cases close to their deliquescence RH values (80%, 75%, and 62%, respectively). To our knowledge, these observations represent the highest reported efflorescence RH values for microdroplets of these salts. These results are particularly important for considering the phase state of NH4NO3, where the contact efflorescence RH (∼20-60%) is in stark contrast to the observation that NH4NO3 microdroplets do not homogeneously effloresce, even when exposed to extremely arid conditions (<1% RH). Considering the occurrence of particle collisions in the atmosphere (i.e., coagulation), these observations of contact efflorescence challenge many assumptions made about the phase state of inorganic aerosol. PMID:26668396

  4. Diffusion and mobility of anisotropic particles in tilted periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-chun; Chen, Qun; Wang, Rang; Ai, Bao-quan

    2015-02-01

    We numerically investigated the transport of anisotropic particles in tilted periodic structures. The diffusion and mobility of the particles demonstrate distinct behaviors dependence on the shape of the particles. In two-dimensional (2D) periodic potentials, we find that the mobility is influenced a little by the anisotropy of the particle, while the diffusion increases monotonically with the increasing of the particle anisotropy for large enough biased force. However, due to the sensitivity of the channels for the particle anisotropy, the transport in smooth channels is obviously different from that in energy potentials. The mobility decreases monotonically with the increasing of the particle anisotropy, while the diffusion can be a non-monotonic function of the particle anisotropy with a peak under appropriate biased force.

  5. Crystallization of interleukin-18 for structure-based inhibitor design

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Brian; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine belonging to the IL-1 superfamily. IL-18 plays an important role in host innate and acquired immune defense, with its activity being modulated in vivo by its naturally occurring antagonist IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP). Recent crystal structures of human IL-18 (hIL-18) in complex with its antagonist or cognate receptor(s) have revealed a conserved binding interface on hIL-18 representing a promising drug target. An important step in this process is obtaining crystals of apo hIL-18 or hIL-18 in complex with small-molecule inhibitors, preferably under low ionic strength conditions. In this study, surface-entropy reduction (SER) and rational protein design were employed to facilitate the crystallization of hIL-18. The results provide an excellent platform for structure-based drug design. PMID:26057800

  6. Preparation, structural, and calorimetric characterization of bicomponent metallic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, M. E.; Murthy, N. S.; Udod, I.; Khayrullin, I. I.; Baughman, R. H.; Zakhidov, A. A.

    2007-03-01

    We report preparation and characterization of novel bicomponent metal-based photonic crystals having submicron three-dimensional (3D) periodicity. Fabricated photonic crystals include SiO2 sphere lattices infiltrated interstitially with metals, carbon inverse lattices filled with metal or metal alloy spheres, Sb inverse lattices, and Sb inverse lattices filled with Bi spheres. Starting from a face centered SiO2 lattice template, these materials were obtained by sequences of either templating and template extraction or templating, template extraction, and retemplating. Surprising high fidelity was obtained for all templating and template extraction steps. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to characterize the structure and the effects of the structure on calorimetric properties. To the best of our knowledge, SAXS data on metallic photonic crystals were collected for first time.

  7. Can antimonide-based nanowires form wurtzite crystal structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorji Ghalamestani, Sepideh; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of antimonide-based nanowires has become an attractive subject due to their interesting properties required for various applications such as long-wavelength IR detectors. The studies conducted on antimonide-based nanowires indicate that they preferentially crystallize in the zinc blende (ZB) crystal structure rather than wurtzite (WZ), which is common in other III-V nanowire materials. Also, with the addition of small amounts of antimony to arsenide- and phosphide-based nanowires grown under conditions otherwise leading to WZ structure, the crystal structure of the resulting ternary nanowires favors the ZB phase. Therefore, the formation of antimonide-based nanowires with the WZ phase presents fundamental challenges and is yet to be explored, but is particularly interesting for understanding the nanowire crystal phase in general. In this study, we examine the formation of Au-seeded InSb and GaSb nanowires under various growth conditions using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. We address the possibility of forming other phases than ZB such as WZ and 4H in binary nanowires and demonstrate the controlled formation of WZ InSb nanowires. We further discuss the fundamental aspects of WZ growth in Au-seeded antimonide-based nanowires.The epitaxial growth of antimonide-based nanowires has become an attractive subject due to their interesting properties required for various applications such as long-wavelength IR detectors. The studies conducted on antimonide-based nanowires indicate that they preferentially crystallize in the zinc blende (ZB) crystal structure rather than wurtzite (WZ), which is common in other III-V nanowire materials. Also, with the addition of small amounts of antimony to arsenide- and phosphide-based nanowires grown under conditions otherwise leading to WZ structure, the crystal structure of the resulting ternary nanowires favors the ZB phase. Therefore, the formation of antimonide-based nanowires with the WZ phase presents

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured SnO particles through crystal growth in the presence of gelatin

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, Hiroaki Nakanishi, Shunsuke; Kozuka, Hiromitsu

    2014-09-15

    Crystalline SnO particles were obtained from Sn{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4} by the hydrothermal treatment in aqueous solutions containing gelatin at 150 °C for 24 h, where the morphologies of the SnO products changed from blocks to layered disks, stacked plates and unshaped aggregates with increasing amount of gelatin in the solutions. Such morphological changes of SnO particles were thought to be attributed to the suppression of the growth of SnO crystals by the adsorbed gelatin. - Graphical abstract: Nanostructured SnO particles were obtained from Sn{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4} by the hydrothermal treatment in gelatin solutions. - Highlights: • SnO particles were prepared from Sn{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4} by the hydrothermal treatment. • The adsorption of gelatin suppressed the growth of SnO crystals. • The shape of SnO particles depends on the amount of gelatin. • Blocks, disks, stacked plates and unshaped aggregates were obtained.

  9. Hierarchical self-assembly of telechelic star polymers: from soft patchy particles to gels and diamond crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Barbara; Coluzza, Ivan; Blaak, Ronald; Lo Verso, Federica; Likos, Christos N.

    2013-09-01

    The design of self-assembling materials in the nanometer scale focuses on the fabrication of a class of organic and inorganic subcomponents that can be reliably produced on a large scale and tailored according to their vast applications for, e.g. electronics, therapeutic vectors and diagnostic imaging agent carriers, or photonics. In a recent publication (Capone et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 238301), diblock copolymer stars have been shown to be a novel system, which is able to hierarchically self-assemble first into soft patchy particles and thereafter into more complex structures, such as the diamond and cubic crystal. The self-aggregating single star patchy behavior is preserved from extremely low up to high densities. Its main control parameters are related to the architecture of the building blocks, which are the number of arms (functionality) and the fraction of attractive end-monomers. By employing a variety of computational and theoretical tools, ranging from the microscopic to the mesoscopic, coarse-grained level in a systematic fashion, we investigate the crossover between the formation of microstructure versus macroscopic phase separation, as well as the formation of gels and networks in these systems. We finally show that telechelic star polymers can be used as building blocks for the fabrication of open crystal structures, such as the diamond or the simple-cubic lattice, taking advantage of the strong correlation between single-particle patchiness and lattice coordination at finite densities.

  10. Orientational order and translational dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Peroukidis, Stavros D; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-08-10

    Implementing extensive molecular dynamics simulations we explore the organization of magnetic particle assemblies (clusters) in a uniaxial liquid crystalline matrix comprised of rodlike particles. The magnetic particles are modelled as soft dipolar spheres with diameter significantly smaller than the width of the rods. Depending on the dipolar strength coupling the magnetic particles arrange into head-to-tail configurations forming various types of clusters including rings (closed loops) and chains. In turn, the liquid crystalline matrix induces long range orientational ordering to these structures and promotes their diffusion along the director of the phase. Different translational dynamics are exhibited as the liquid crystalline matrix transforms either from isotropic to nematic or from nematic to smectic state. This is caused due to different collective motion of the magnetic particles into various clusters in the anisotropic environments. Our results offer a physical insight for understanding both the structure and dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystalline matrices. PMID:27460190

  11. Crystallization Behavior of Amorphous Si3N4 and Particle Size Control of the Crystallized α-Si3N4.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yong-Kwon; Kim, Shin-A; Koo, Jae-Hong; Oh, Hyeon-Cheol; Chi, Eun-Ok; Hahn, Jee-Hyun; Park, Chan

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride powder prepared by low-temperature vapor-phase reaction was heat treated at various temperatures for different periods of time to examine the crystallization behavior. The effects of the heat-treatment temperature and duration on the degree of crystallization were investigated along with the effect of the heat-up rate on the particle size, and its distribution, of the crystallized α-phase silicon nitride powder. A phase transition from amorphous to α-phase occurred at a temperature above 1400 degrees C. The crystallization. process was completed after heat treatment at 1500 degrees C for 3 h or at 1550 degrees C for 1 h. The crystallization process starts at the surface of the amorphous particle: while the outer regions of the particle become crystalline, the inner part remains amorphous. The re-arrangement of the Si and N atoms on the surface of the amorphous particle leads to the formation of hexagonal crystals that are separated from the host amorphous particle. The particle size and size distribution can be controlled by varying the heat-treatment profile (namely, the heat-treatment temperature, heating rate, and heating duration at the specified temperature), which can be used to control the relative extent of the nucleation and growth. The completion of most of the nucleation process by lowering the heat-up rate can be used to achieve a singlet particle size distribution. Bimodal particle size distribution can be achieved by fast heat-up during the crystallization process. PMID:27483939

  12. A unified picture of the crystal structures of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderlind, Per; Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Wills, J. M.; Boring, A. M.

    1995-04-01

    THE crystal structures of the light actinides have intrigued physicists and chemists for several decades1. Simple metals and transition metals have close-packed, high-symmetry structures, such as body-centred cubic, face-centred cubic and hexagonal close packing. In contrast, the structures of the light actinides are very loosely packed and of low symmetry-tetragonal, orthorhombic and monoclinic. To understand these differences, we have performed total-energy calculations, as a function of volume, for both high-and low-symmetry structures of a simple metal (aluminium), a non-magnetic transition metal (niobium), a ferromagnetic transition metal (iron) and a light actinide (uranium). We find that the crystal structure of all of these metals is determined by the balance between electrostatic (Madelung) interactions, which favour high symmetry, and a Peierls distortion of the crystal lattice, which favours low symmetry. We show that simple metals and transition metals can adopt low-symmetry structures on expansion of the lattice; and we predict that, conversely, the light actinides will undergo transitions to structures of higher symmetry on compression.

  13. Three-dimensional Dielectric Photonic Crystal Structures for Laser-driven Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.; /Tech-X, Boulder /SLAC

    2007-12-14

    We present the design and simulation of a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide for linear laser-driven acceleration in vacuum. The structure confines a synchronous speed-of-light accelerating mode in both transverse dimensions. We report the properties of this mode, including sustainable gradient and optical-to-beam efficiency. We present a novel method for confining a particle beam using optical fields as focusing elements. This technique, combined with careful structure design, is shown to have a large dynamic aperture and minimal emittance growth, even over millions of optical wavelengths.

  14. Structural and optical properties of a new chalcone single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh Kumar, P. C.; Ravindrachary, V.; Janardhana, K.; Poojary, Boja

    2012-09-01

    A new nonlinear optical material 1-(4-methylthiophenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one with molecular formula C17H16O2S was synthesized by using the Claisen-Schmidt condensation reaction method. The Various functional groups present in the compound were identified using recorded FT-IR spectrum. The crystal growth parameters have been studied using solubility test and acetone is found to be a very good solvent for the crystal growth at an ambient temperature. The transparent high quality single crystals up to a size of 26×2×2 mm3 were grown using the slow evaporation solution growth technique. UV-visible study was carried out and the spectrum reveals that the crystal is transparent in the entire visible region and absorptive in the UV region. The refractive index is determined using Brewster's angle method. The optical energy band gap of the material is measured using Tauc's plot and the direct method. The single crystal XRD of MMPP crystal shows the following cell parameters: a=5.9626(2) Å, b=15.3022(6) Å, c=16.0385(7) Å, α=β=γ=90°, volume=1463.37(10) Å3 with a space group of Pna21. The compound MMPP exhibits optical nonlinearity (NLO) and its second order NLO efficiency is 3.15 times to that of urea. The effect of functional groups OCH3 and SCH3 on the non-linearity as well as the structural property of the compound has been discussed. The crystal is thermally stable. High NLO efficiency, good thermal stability, good transparency and ability to grow as a high quality single crystal make this material very attractive for opto-electronic applications.

  15. Dengue Virus Non-structural Protein 1 Modulates Infectious Particle Production via Interaction with the Structural Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Scaturro, Pietro; Cortese, Mirko; Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Fischl, Wolfgang; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is one of the most enigmatic proteins of the Dengue virus (DENV), playing distinct functions in immune evasion, pathogenesis and viral replication. The recently reported crystal structure of DENV NS1 revealed its peculiar three-dimensional fold; however, detailed information on NS1 function at different steps of the viral replication cycle is still missing. By using the recently reported crystal structure, as well as amino acid sequence conservation, as a guide for a comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis study, we discovered that in addition to being essential for RNA replication, DENV NS1 is also critically required for the production of infectious virus particles. Taking advantage of a trans-complementation approach based on fully functional epitope-tagged NS1 variants, we identified previously unreported interactions between NS1 and the structural proteins Envelope (E) and precursor Membrane (prM). Interestingly, coimmunoprecipitation revealed an additional association with capsid, arguing that NS1 interacts via the structural glycoproteins with DENV particles. Results obtained with mutations residing either in the NS1 Wing domain or in the β-ladder domain suggest that NS1 might have two distinct functions in the assembly of DENV particles. By using a trans-complementation approach with a C-terminally KDEL-tagged ER-resident NS1, we demonstrate that the secretion of NS1 is dispensable for both RNA replication and infectious particle production. In conclusion, our results provide an extensive genetic map of NS1 determinants essential for viral RNA replication and identify a novel role of NS1 in virion production that is mediated via interaction with the structural proteins. These studies extend the list of NS1 functions and argue for a central role in coordinating replication and assembly/release of infectious DENV particles. PMID:26562291

  16. Crystal structures of fusion proteins with large-affinity tags.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Douglas R; Mrozkiewicz, Marek K; McGrath, William J; Listwan, Pawel; Kobe, Bostjan

    2003-07-01

    The fusion of a protein of interest to a large-affinity tag, such as the maltose-binding protein (MBP), thioredoxin (TRX), or glutathione-S-transferase (GST), can be advantageous in terms of increased expression, enhanced solubility, protection from proteolysis, improved folding, and protein purification via affinity chromatography. Unfortunately, crystal growth is hindered by the conformational heterogeneity induced by the fusion tag, requiring that the tag is removed by a potentially problematic cleavage step. The first three crystal structures of fusion proteins with large-affinity tags have been reported recently. All three structures used a novel strategy to rigidly fuse the protein of interest to MBP via a short three- to five-amino acid spacer. This strategy has the potential to aid structure determination of proteins that present particular experimental challenges and are not conducive to more conventional crystallization strategies (e.g., membrane proteins). Structural genomics initiatives may also benefit from this approach as a way to crystallize problematic proteins of significant interest. PMID:12824478

  17. Redetermination of the crystal structure of NbF4.

    PubMed

    Bandemehr, Jascha; Conrad, Matthias; Kraus, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Single crystals of NbF4, niobium(IV) tetra-fluoride, were synthesized by disproportionation of Nb2F5 at 1273 K in a sealed niobium tube, extracted and studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Previous reports on the crystal structure of NbF4 were based on X-ray powder diffraction data and the observed isotypicity to SnF4 [Gortsema & Didchenko (1965 ▸). Inorg. Chem. 4, 182-186; Schäfer et al. (1965 ▸). J. Less Common Met. 9, 95-104]. The data obtained from a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study meant the atomic coordinates could now be refined as well as their anisotropic displacement parameters, leading to a significant improvement of the structural model of NbF4. In the structure, the Nb atom is octahedron-like surrounded by six F atoms of which four are bridging to other NbF6 octa-hedra, leading to a layer structure extending parallel to the ab plane. PMID:27536416

  18. Redetermination of the crystal structure of NbF4

    PubMed Central

    Bandemehr, Jascha; Conrad, Matthias; Kraus, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Single crystals of NbF4, niobium(IV) tetra­fluoride, were synthesized by disproportionation of Nb2F5 at 1273 K in a sealed niobium tube, extracted and studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Previous reports on the crystal structure of NbF4 were based on X-ray powder diffraction data and the observed isotypicity to SnF4 [Gortsema & Didchenko (1965 ▸). Inorg. Chem. 4, 182–186; Schäfer et al. (1965 ▸). J. Less Common Met. 9, 95–104]. The data obtained from a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study meant the atomic coordinates could now be refined as well as their anisotropic displacement parameters, leading to a significant improvement of the structural model of NbF4. In the structure, the Nb atom is octahedron-like surrounded by six F atoms of which four are bridging to other NbF6 octa­hedra, leading to a layer structure extending parallel to the ab plane. PMID:27536416

  19. Unusual Features of Crystal Structures of Some Simple Copper Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Bodie

    2009-01-01

    Some simple copper compounds have unusual crystal structures. Cu[subscript 3]N is cubic with N atoms at centers of octahedra formed by 6 Cu atoms. Cu[subscript 2]O (cuprite) is also cubic; O atoms are in tetrahedra formed by 4 Cu atoms. These tetrahedra are linked by sharing vertices forming two independent networks without linkages between them.…

  20. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  1. The diammoniate of diborane: Crystal structure and hydrogen release

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Mark E.; Heldebrant, David J.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Proffen, Thomas E.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Autrey, Thomas

    2010-10-12

    [(NH3)2BH2]+[BH4]- is formed from the room temperature decomposition of NH4+BH4-, via a NH3BH3 intermediate. Its crystal structure has been determined and contains disordered BH4- ions in 2 distinct sites. Hydrogen release is similar to that from NH3BH3 but with faster kinetics.

  2. Orientation control of liquid crystals using carbon-nanotube-magnetic particle hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon Su; Youn, Sang Cheon; Kim, Yun Ho; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-06-28

    We have developed a simple yet versatile method for aligning liquid crystals (LCs) by using magnetic-field oriented single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) that were modified with magnetic particles. A high degree of homeotropic/planar LC alignment was achieved by SWNTs being exposed to a very low strength magnetic field, combined with strong π-π interactions between the biphenyl group in the LCs and the wall of the SWNTs. PMID:23676827

  3. Particles as Fundaments of Discourse Structuring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Vest, M. M. Jocelyne

    A serious study of discourse particles (DIPs) must be founded on the analysis of orality in its two main dimensions: oral communication in its ordinary functioning (i.e., discourse, conversation, enunciation), but also in expression ritualized by the oral tradition of cultures that do not have a writing system. The association of the two…

  4. Layered periodic disperse structures of spherical alumina particles: Coherent transmittance and reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskevich, Alexander A.; Loiko, Valery A.

    2014-03-01

    Coherent transmittance and reflectance spectra of multilayers consisting of plane-parallel monolayers of spherical monodisperse alumina particles are investigated. In the quasicrystalline approximation (QCA) of the statistical theory of multiple scattering of waves the coherent transmission and reflection coefficients of constituent monolayers are computed. Using the coefficients obtained, the transmittance and reflectance of the multilayers are calculated using the transfer matrix method (TMM) within the wavelength range of 0.3-2.0 μm. Multilayers consisting of close-to-regularly-packed monolayers (planar photonic crystals with nonideal lattice) and partially-ordered monolayers of particles are investigated. Three types of coherent transmittance minima caused by the wave interference are singled out. The spectral positions and values of these minima are determined by optical constants, size, concentration, and the arrangement of particles in a monolayer, as well as by the spacing between the monolayer and their thicknesses. The results are in good agreement with the known theoretical and experimental data. They can be used to solve the problem of a lattice quality control in photonic crystals. Coherent transmittance and reflectance spectra of a system consisting of a glass plate coated with monolayers of spherical alumina particles are analyzed. Monolayer parameters for creating antireflection coatings, diffuse light scattering structures, and filters of transmitted and reflected light are considered. The approach developed can be applied to disperse structures of isotropic particles of other materials.

  5. Co-crystal formation based on structural matching.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liping; Dodd, Stephanie; Capacci-Daniel, Christina; Garad, Sudhakar; Panicucci, Riccardo; Sethuraman, Vijay

    2016-06-10

    A co-crystal is defined as a single crystalline structure composed of two or more components with no proton transfer which are solid at room temperature. Our group has come up with the following rationale selection of co-formers for initial co-crystal screening: 1) selection of co-formers with the highest potential for hydrogen bonding with the API and 2) selection of co-formers with diversity of secondary structural characteristics. We demonstrate the feasibility of this technique with a Novartis drug candidate A. In the first tier, 20 co-formers were screened and two hits were identified. By examining the two co-formers, which worked from the first round, a second round of screening was undertaken with more focused chemical matter. Nineteen co-crystal formers closely related to the two hits in the first screen were screened in the second tier. From this screen five hits were identified. All the hits were compared for their physical and chemical stability and dissolution profile. Based on the comparison 4-aminobenzoic co-crystal was chosen for in-vivo comparison with the free form. The co-crystal had 12 times higher exposure than the free form thus overcoming the solubility limited exposure. PMID:26948852

  6. Critical superparamagnetic/single-domain grain sizes in interacting magnetite particles: implications for magnetosome crystals

    PubMed Central

    Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Williams, Wyn

    2009-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain chains of magnetically interacting crystals (magnetosome crystals), which they use for navigation (magnetotaxis). To improve magnetotaxis efficiency, the magnetosome crystals (usually magnetite or greigite in composition) should be magnetically stable single-domain (SSD) particles. Smaller single-domain particles become magnetically unstable owing to thermal fluctuations and are termed superparamagnetic (SP). Previous calculations for the SSD/SP threshold size or blocking volume did not include the contribution of magnetic interactions. In this study, the blocking volume has been calculated as a function of grain elongation and separation for chains of identical magnetite grains. The inclusion of magnetic interactions was found to decrease the blocking volume, thereby increasing the range of SSD behaviour. Combining the results with previously published calculations for the SSD to multidomain threshold size in chains of magnetite reveals that interactions significantly increase the SSD range. We argue that chains of interacting magnetosome crystals found in magnetotactic bacteria have used this effect to improve magnetotaxis. PMID:19091684

  7. Critical superparamagnetic/single-domain grain sizes in interacting magnetite particles: implications for magnetosome crystals.

    PubMed

    Muxworthy, Adrian R; Williams, Wyn

    2009-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain chains of magnetically interacting crystals (magnetosome crystals), which they use for navigation (magnetotaxis). To improve magnetotaxis efficiency, the magnetosome crystals (usually magnetite or greigite in composition) should be magnetically stable single-domain (SSD) particles. Smaller single-domain particles become magnetically unstable owing to thermal fluctuations and are termed superparamagnetic (SP). Previous calculations for the SSD/SP threshold size or blocking volume did not include the contribution of magnetic interactions. In this study, the blocking volume has been calculated as a function of grain elongation and separation for chains of identical magnetite grains. The inclusion of magnetic interactions was found to decrease the blocking volume, thereby increasing the range of SSD behaviour. Combining the results with previously published calculations for the SSD to multidomain threshold size in chains of magnetite reveals that interactions significantly increase the SSD range. We argue that chains of interacting magnetosome crystals found in magnetotactic bacteria have used this effect to improve magnetotaxis. PMID:19091684

  8. Effect of Gravity Level on the Particle Shape and Size During Zeolite Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Hong-Wei; Ilebusi, Olusegun J.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A microscopic diffusion model is developed to represent solute transport in the boundary layer of a growing zeolite crystal. This model is used to describe the effect of gravity on particle shape and solute distribution. Particle dynamics and crystal growth kinetics serve as the boundary conditions of flow and convection-diffusion equations. A statistical rate theory is used to obtain the rate of solute transport across the growing interface, which is expressed in terms of concentration and velocity of solute species. Microgravity can significantly decrease the solute velocity across the growing interface compared to its earth-based counterpart. The extent of this reduction highly depends on solute diffusion constant in solution. Under gravity, the flow towards the crystal enhances solute transport rate across the growing interface while the flow away from crystals reduces this rate, suggesting a non-uniform growth rate and thus an elliptic final shape. However, microgravity can significantly reduce the influence of flow and obtain a final product with perfect spherical shape. The model predictions compare favorably with the data of space experiment of zeolites grown in space.

  9. Analysis of voids in crystal structures: the methods of 'dual' crystal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Blatov, V A; Shevchenko, A P

    2003-01-01

    The theoretical basics of the analysis of voids in crystal structures by means of Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra (VDP) and of the graph theory are stated. Topological relations are considered between VDPs and atomic domains in a crystal field. These relations allow the separation of two non-intersecting topological subspaces in a crystal structure, whose connectednesses are defined by two finite 'reduced' graphs. The first, 'direct', subspace includes the atoms (VDP centres) and the network of interatomic bonds (VDP faces), the second, 'dual', one comprises the void centres (VDP vertices) and the system of channels (VDP edges) between them. Computer methods of geometrical-topological analysis of the 'dual' subspace are developed and implemented within the program package TOPOS. They are designed for automatically restoring the system of channels, visualizing and sizing voids and void conglomerates, dimensional analysis of continuous void systems, and comparative topological analysis of 'dual' subspaces for various substances. The methods of analysis of 'dual' and 'direct' subspaces are noted to differ from each other only in some details that allows the term 'dual' crystal chemistry to be introduced. The efficiency of the methods is shown with the analysis of compounds of different chemical nature: simple substances, ionic structures, superionic conductors, zeolites, clathrates, organic supramolecular complexes. PMID:12496460

  10. Crystal growth, structure analysis and characterisation of 2 - (1, 3 - dioxoisoindolin - 2 - yl) acetic acid single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Sankari, R. Siva; Perumal, Rajesh Narayana

    2014-04-24

    Single crystal of dielectric material 2 - (1, 3 - dioxoisoindolin - 2 - yl) acetic acid has been grown by slow evaporation solution growth method. The grown crystal was harvested in 25 days. The crystal structure was analyzed by Single crystal X - ray diffraction. UV-vis-NIR analysis was performed to examine the optical property of the grown crystal. The thermal property of the grown crystal was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The dielectric measurements were carried out and the dielectric constant was calculated and plotted at all frequencies.

  11. Crystal structure of SiB/sub 6/

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasse, M.; Slack, G.A.; Garbauskas, M.; Kasper, J.S.; Viala, J.C.

    1986-06-01

    The accurate and detailed structure of the compound SiB/sub 6/ has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The final R value was 6.1% for 4225 reflections. The cell is orthorhombic with space group Pnnm and a = 14.397(7) A, b = 18.318(9) A, c = 9.911(7) A, and from the electron density appears to contain 43 silicon atoms and 238 boron atoms. The structure contains many features found in other structures of boron-rich phases, and obeys the crystal chemistry rules established for them. It contains interconnected icosahedra, icosihexahedra, as well as several isolated boron and silicon atoms. An unusual feature of this structure is the presence of icosihexahedra containing silicon atoms similar to those found previously in BeB/sub 3/.

  12. Domain Structures in Nematic Liquid Crystals on a Polycarbonate Surface

    PubMed Central

    Parshin, Alexander M.; Gunyakov, Vladimir A.; Zyryanov, Victor Y.; Shabanov, Vasily F.

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  13. Domain structures in nematic liquid crystals on a polycarbonate surface.

    PubMed

    Parshin, Alexander M; Gunyakov, Vladimir A; Zyryanov, Victor Y; Shabanov, Vasily F

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  14. Crystal Structure of the Bacillus subtilis Superoxide Dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ping; Ewis, H.E.; Huang, Y.-J; Lu, C.-D.; Tai, P.C.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-01

    The sodA gene of Bacillus subtilis was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal structure of MnSOD was solved by molecular replacement with four dimers per asymmetric unit and refined to an R factor of 21.1% at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. The dimer structure is very similar to that of the related enzyme from B. anthracis. Larger structural differences were observed with the human MnSOD, which has one less helix in the helical domain and a longer loop between two -strands and also showed differences in three amino acids at the intersubunit interface in the dimer compared with the two bacterial MnSODs. These structural differences can be exploited in the design of drugs that selectively target the Bacillus enzymes.

  15. VO{sub 2} (A): Reinvestigation of crystal structure, phase transition and crystal growth mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rao Popuri, Srinivasa; Artemenko, Alla; Labrugere, Christine; Miclau, Marinela; Villesuzanne, Antoine; Pollet, Michaël

    2014-05-01

    Well crystallized VO{sub 2} (A) microrods were grown via a single step hydrothermal reaction in the presence of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and oxalic acid. With the advantage of high crystalline samples, we propose P4/ncc as an appropriate space group at room temperature. From morphological studies, we found that the oriented attachment and layer by layer growth mechanisms are responsible for the formation of VO{sub 2} (A) micro rods. The structural and electronic transitions in VO{sub 2} (A) are strongly first order in nature, and a marked difference between the structural transition temperatures and electronic transitions temperature was evidenced. The reversible intra- (LTP-A to HTP-A) and irreversible inter- (HTP-A to VO{sub 2} (M1)) structural phase transformations were studied by in-situ powder X-ray diffraction. Attempts to increase the size of the VO{sub 2} (A) microrods are presented and the possible formation steps for the flower-like morphologies of VO{sub 2} (M1) are described. - Graphical abstract: Using a single step and template free hydrothermal synthesis, well crystallized VO{sub 2} (A) microrods were prepared and the P4/ncc space group was assigned to the room temperature crystal structure. Reversible and irreversible phase transitions among different VO{sub 2} polymorphs were identified and their progressive nature was highlighted. Attempts to increase the microrods size, involving layer by layer formation mechanisms, are presented. - Highlights: • Highly crystallized VO{sub 2} (A) microrods were grown via a single step hydrothermal process. • The P4/ncc space group was determined for VO{sub 2} (A) at room temperature. • The electronic structure and progressive nature of the structural phase transition were investigated. • A weak coupling between structural and electronic phase transitions was identified. • Different crystallite morphologies were discussed in relation with growth mechanisms.

  16. Single Crystal Structure Determination of Alumina to 1 Mbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Zhang, L.; Prakapenka, V.; Mao, H.

    2014-12-01

    Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) is an important ceramic material and a major oxide in the earth. Additionally, alumina is a widely used pressure standard in static high-pressure experiments (Cr3+-bearing corundum, ruby). The changes of its crystal structure with pressure (P) and temperature (T) are important for its applications and understanding its physical properties in the deep Earth. There have been numerous reports on the high P-T polymorphs of alumina. Previous theoretical calculations and experiments suggest that the crystal structure of Al2O3 evolves greatly at high P-T. In this study, we used the newly developed multigrain crystallography method combined with single-crystal x-ray diffraction analysis technique for the structure determination of alumina at high P-T to provide single-crystal structure refinement for high-pressure phases of Al2O3. Alumina powder was mixed with ~10% Pt and Ne was used as both pressure transmitting media and thermal insulating layers during laser-heating. Coarse-grained aggregates of Al2O3 were synthesized in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The structure change of Al2O3 was monitored by in situ x-ray diffraction at ~1 Mbar and 2700 K. The results allow us to distinguish the structural differences between the Rh2O3 (II) structure (space group Pbcn) and perovskite structure (space group Pbnm) for the first high-pressure phase of Al2O3. More detailed results will be discussed in the later work.

  17. Crystal structure of new AsS2 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotina, N. B.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Dyuzheva, T. I.; Lityagina, L. M.; Kulikova, L. F.; Nikolaev, N. A.; Verin, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    AsS2 single crystals have been obtained for the first time from an As2S3 melt at pressures above 6 GPa and temperatures above 800 K in the As2S3 → AsS + AsS2 reaction. The monoclinic structure of the new high-pressure phase is solved by X-ray diffraction analysis and compared to the structure of high-pressure AsS phase, which was studied previously.

  18. Self-powdering and nonlinear optical domain structures in ferroelastic beta'-Gd{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} crystals formed in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukada, Y.; Honma, T.; Komatsu, T.

    2009-08-15

    Ferroelastic beta'-Gd{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3}, (GMO), crystals are formed through the crystallization of 21.25Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-63.75MoO{sub 3}-15B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass (mol%), and two scientific curious phenomena are observed. (1) GMO crystals formed in the crystallization break into small pieces with a triangular prism or pyramid shape having a length of 50-500 {mu}m spontaneously during the crystallizations in the inside of an electric furnace, not during the cooling in air after the crystallization. This phenomenon is called 'self-powdering phenomenon during crystallization' in this paper. (2) Each self-powdered GMO crystal grain shows a periodic domain structure with different refractive indices, and a spatially periodic second harmonic generation (SHG) depending on the domain structure is observed. It is proposed from polarized micro-Raman scattering spectra and the azimuthal dependence of second harmonic intensities that GMO crystals are oriented in each crystal grain and the orientation of (MoO{sub 4}){sup 2-} tetrahedra in GMO crystals changes periodically due to spontaneous strains in ferroelastic GMO crystals. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the polarized optical photograph at room temperature for a particle (piece) obtained by a heat treatment of the glass at 590 deg. C for 2 h in an electric furnace in air. This particle was obtained through the self-powdering behavior in the crystallization of glass. The periodic domain structure is observed. Ferroelastic beta'-Gd{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} crystals are formed in the particle, and second harmonic generations are detected, depending on the domain structure.

  19. Tailor-made force fields for crystal-structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Marcus A

    2008-08-14

    A general procedure is presented to derive a complete set of force-field parameters for flexible molecules in the crystalline state on a case-by-case basis. The force-field parameters are fitted to the electrostatic potential as well as to accurate energies and forces generated by means of a hybrid method that combines solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations with an empirical van der Waals correction. All DFT calculations are carried out with the VASP program. The mathematical structure of the force field, the generation of reference data, the choice of the figure of merit, the optimization algorithm, and the parameter-refinement strategy are discussed in detail. The approach is applied to cyclohexane-1,4-dione, a small flexible ring. The tailor-made force field obtained for cyclohexane-1,4-dione is used to search for low-energy crystal packings in all 230 space groups with one molecule per asymmetric unit, and the most stable crystal structures are reoptimized in a second step with the hybrid method. The experimental crystal structure is found as the most stable predicted crystal structure both with the tailor-made force field and the hybrid method. The same methodology has also been applied successfully to the four compounds of the fourth CCDC blind test on crystal-structure prediction. For the five aforementioned compounds, the root-mean-square deviations between lattice energies calculated with the tailor-made force fields and the hybrid method range from 0.024 to 0.053 kcal/mol per atom around an average value of 0.034 kcal/mol per atom. PMID:18642947

  20. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Z.A.; Dong, K.J.; Yu, A.B.

    2015-03-15

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald’s rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid–solid phase transition. - Highlights: • A comprehensive structural analysis is conducted focusing on crystallization. • The involved atoms in our analysis are more than 90% for all samples concerned. • A series of distinct intermediate states are found in crystallization of silver melt. • A novelty icosahedron-saturated state breeds the metastable bcc state.

  1. Crystal Structure of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Hexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiu-Gong; Maldonado, Ernesto; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Tuena de Gomez-Puyou, Marietta; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Rodriguez-Romero, Adela

    1999-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms of enzyme catalysis in organic solvents, the x-ray structure of some monomeric enzymes in organic solvents was determined. However, it remained to be explored whether the structure of oligomeric proteins is also amenable to such analysis. The field acquired new perspectives when it was proposed that the x-ray structure of enzymes in nonaqueous media could reveal binding sites for organic solvents that in principle could represent the starting point for drug design. Here, a crystal of the dimeric enzyme triosephosphate isomerase from the pathogenic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi was soaked and diffracted in hexane and its structure solved at 2- angstrom resolution. Its overall structure and the dimer interface were not altered by hexane. However, there were differences in the orientation of the side chains of several amino acids, including that of the catalytic Glu-168 in one of the monomers. No hexane molecules were detected in the active site or in the dimer interface. However, three hexane molecules were identified on the surface of the protein at sites, which in the native crystal did not have water molecules. The number of water molecules in the hexane structure was higher than in the native crystal. Two hexanes localized at <4 angstrom from residues that form the dimer interface; they were in close proximity to a site that has been considered a potential target for drug design.

  2. Structures and properties of Fe-C fine particles prepared by AC arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Liu, Cunye; Zhao, Baogang; Lin, Yaoqiang; Deng, Zhaojing

    1999-05-01

    Fe-C fine particles are produced by an alternating arc discharge between iron and carbon electrodes in an Ar gas atmosphere at pressures of 8, 14 and 18 kPa. The crystal structure, morphology and surface composition have been studied, respectively, by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Magnetic properties and Curie temperatures have also been determined by a vibrating sample magnetometer. Results show that the particles are of two different crystal structures, one is hexagonal FeC and the other is cubic iron. The iron particles have a multi-layered structure composed of an α-Fe core wrapped by Fe 3O 4, FeO and FeO(OH) shells. It is found that the compositions and the specific saturation magnetization of the Fe-C particles prepared in different pressures of Ar gas are not the same, but their Curie temperatures are all 580±5°C.

  3. Structural characterization of particle systems using spherical harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Feinauer, Julian; Spettl, Aaron; Manke, Ingo; Strege, Stefan; Kwade, Arno; Pott, Andres; Schmidt, Volker

    2015-08-15

    Many important properties of particulate materials are heavily influenced by the size and shape of the constituent particles. Thus, in order to control and improve product quality, it is important to develop a good understanding of the shape and size of the particles that make up a given particulate material. In this paper, we show how the spherical harmonics expansion can be used to approximate particles obtained from tomographic 3D images. This yields an analytic representation of the particles which can be used to calculate structural characteristics. We present an estimation method for the optimal length of expansion depending on individual particle shapes, based on statistical hypothesis testing. A suitable choice of this parameter leads to a smooth approximation that preserves the main shape features of the original particle. To show the wide applicability of this procedure, we use it to approximate particles obtained from two different tomographic 3D datasets of particulate materials. The first one describes an anode material from lithium-ion cells that consists of sphere-like particles with different sizes. The second dataset describes a powder of highly non-spherical titanium dioxide particles. - Highlights: • Complex particle shapes are described analytically by spherical harmonics expansion. • The optimal length of the expansion is estimated for each particle individually. • Characteristics like, e.g., particle surface areas can be calculated efficiently. • The method is applied to two tomographic datasets of particulate materials.

  4. On calculating the equilibrium structure of molecular crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2010-03-01

    The difficulty of calculating the ambient properties of molecular crystals, such as the explosive PETN, has long hampered much needed computational investigations of these materials. One reason for the shortcomings is that the exchange-correlation functionals available for Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations do not correctly describe the weak intermolecular van der Waals' forces present in molecular crystals. However, this weak interaction also poses other challenges for the computational schemes used. We will discuss these issues in the context of calculations of lattice constants and structure of PETN with a number of different functionals, and also discuss if these limitations can be circumvented for studies at non-ambient conditions.

  5. Structural, magnetic and optical properties of two concomitant molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Manuela Ramos; Milne, Bruce; Coutinho, Joana T.; Pereira, Laura C. J.; Martín-Ramos, Pablo; Pereira da Silva, Pedro S.; Martín-Gil, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    A new 1D complex has been prepared and characterized. X-ray single crystal structure confirms that the Cu(II) ions assemble in alternating chains with Cu … Cu distances of 2.5685(4) and 3.1760(4) Å. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility reveals an antiferromagnetic interaction between the paddle-wheel copper centers with an exchange of -300 cm-1. The exchange integral was also determined by quantum chemical ab-initio calculations, using polarised and unpolarised basis sets reproducing well the experimental value. The second harmonic generation efficiency of a concomitantly crystallized material was evaluated and was found to be comparable to urea.

  6. Solvent-controlled assembly of crystal structures: From centrosymmetric structure to noncentrosymmetric structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Le; Dang, Lilong; Luo, Feng; Feng, Xuefeng

    2016-02-01

    Reported here are two isomeric organic crystals and two HgI2-based coordination compounds by solvo(hydro)thermal method: [(TPTA)·H2O]n (1, Cc), [(TPTA)·H2O]n (2, Pbca), [Hg1.5I3(TPTA)0.5(CH3CN)·(H2O)0.5]n (3, P21) and [HgI2(TPTA)·H2O]n (4, P21/c) (TPTA = N,N‧,N″-tris(3-pyridyl)trimesic amide). Single crystal X-ray diffraction show that they afford noncentrosymmetric and centrosymmetric structures, respectively. Note that this kind of formations can be precisely controlled by changing the reaction solvent, thus indicating a facile method towards generating noncentrosymmetric structure.

  7. Influence of particle aspect ratio on the midinfrared extinction spectra of wavelength-sized ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Benz, Stefan; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Leisner, Thomas

    2007-12-20

    We have used the T-matrix method and the discrete dipole approximation to compute the midinfrared extinction cross-sections (4500-800 cm(-1)) of randomly oriented circular ice cylinders for aspect ratios extending up to 10 for oblate and down to 1/6 for prolate particle shapes. Equal-volume sphere diameters ranged from 0.1 to 10 microm for both particle classes. A high degree of particle asphericity provokes a strong distortion of the spectral habitus compared to the extinction spectrum of compactly shaped ice crystals with an aspect ratio around 1. The magnitude and the sign (increase or diminution) of the shape-related changes in both the absorption and the scattering cross-sections crucially depend on the particle size and the values for the real and imaginary part of the complex refractive index. When increasing the particle asphericity for a given equal-volume sphere diameter, the values for the overall extinction cross-sections may change in opposite directions for different parts of the spectrum. We have applied our calculations to the analysis of recent expansion cooling experiments on the formation of cirrus clouds, performed in the large coolable aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of 210 K. Depending on the nature of the seed particles and the temperature and relative humidity characteristics during the expansion, ice crystals of various shapes and aspect ratios could be produced. For a particular expansion experiment, using Illite mineral dust particles coated with a layer of secondary organic matter as seed aerosol, we have clearly detected the spectral signatures characteristic of strongly aspherical ice crystal habits in the recorded infrared extinction spectra. We demonstrate that the number size distributions and total number concentrations of the ice particles that were generated in this expansion run can only be accurately derived from the recorded infrared spectra when employing aspect ratios as high as

  8. Flexible particle array structures by controlling polymer graft architecture.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jihoon; Dong, Hongchen; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Bockstaller, Michael R

    2010-09-15

    Surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization is used to synthesize particle brushes with controlled fraction of extended and relaxed conformations of surface-grafted chains. In the semidilute brush limit, the grafting of polymeric ligands is shown to facilitate the formation of ordered yet plastic-compliant particle array structures in which chain entanglements give rise to fracture through a polymer-like crazing process that dramatically increases the toughness and flexibility of the particle assembly. PMID:20726581

  9. 3D Structural Fluctuation of IgG1 Antibody Revealed by Individual Particle Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, we derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions. PMID:25940394

  10. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, we derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.

  11. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, wemore » derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.« less

  12. Can antimonide-based nanowires form wurtzite crystal structure?

    PubMed

    Gorji Ghalamestani, Sepideh; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A

    2016-02-01

    The epitaxial growth of antimonide-based nanowires has become an attractive subject due to their interesting properties required for various applications such as long-wavelength IR detectors. The studies conducted on antimonide-based nanowires indicate that they preferentially crystallize in the zinc blende (ZB) crystal structure rather than wurtzite (WZ), which is common in other III-V nanowire materials. Also, with the addition of small amounts of antimony to arsenide- and phosphide-based nanowires grown under conditions otherwise leading to WZ structure, the crystal structure of the resulting ternary nanowires favors the ZB phase. Therefore, the formation of antimonide-based nanowires with the WZ phase presents fundamental challenges and is yet to be explored, but is particularly interesting for understanding the nanowire crystal phase in general. In this study, we examine the formation of Au-seeded InSb and GaSb nanowires under various growth conditions using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. We address the possibility of forming other phases than ZB such as WZ and 4H in binary nanowires and demonstrate the controlled formation of WZ InSb nanowires. We further discuss the fundamental aspects of WZ growth in Au-seeded antimonide-based nanowires. PMID:26763161

  13. Projection structure of frog rhodopsin in two crystal forms.

    PubMed Central

    Schertler, G F; Hargrave, P A

    1995-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor that upon light activation triggers the visual transduction cascade. Rod cell outer segment disc membranes were isolated from dark-adapted frog retinas and were extracted with Tween detergents to obtain two-dimensional rhodopsin crystals for electron crystallography. When Tween 80 was used, tubular structures with a p2 lattice (a = 32 A, b = 83 A, gamma = 91 degrees) were formed. The use of a Tween 80/Tween 20 mixture favored the formation of larger p22(1)2(1) lattices (a = 40 A, b = 146 A, gamma = 90 degrees). Micrographs from frozen hydrated frog rhodopsin crystals were processed, and projection structures to 7-A resolution for the p22(1)2(1) form and to 6-A resolution for the p2 form were calculated. The maps of frog rhodopsin in both crystal forms are very similar to the 9-A map obtained previously for bovine rhodopsin and show that the arrangement of the helices is the same. In a tentative topographic model, helices 4, 6, and 7 are nearly perpendicular to the plane of the membrane. In the higher-resolution projection maps of frog rhodopsin, helix 5 looks more tilted than it appeared previously. The quality of the two frog rhodopsin crystals suggests that they would be suitable to obtain a three-dimensional structure in which all helices would be resolved. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 6 PMID:8524807

  14. Structure of RCC1 chromatin factor bound to the nucleosome core particle

    SciTech Connect

    Makde, Ravindra D.; England, Joseph R.; Yennawar, Hemant P.; Tan, Song

    2010-11-11

    The small GTPase Ran enzyme regulates critical eukaryotic cellular functions including nuclear transport and mitosis through the creation of a RanGTP gradient around the chromosomes. This concentration gradient is created by the chromatin-bound RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) protein, which recruits Ran to nucleosomes and activates Ran's nucleotide exchange activity. Although RCC1 has been shown to bind directly with the nucleosome, the molecular details of this interaction were not known. Here we determine the crystal structure of a complex of Drosophila RCC1 and the nucleosome core particle at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, providing an atomic view of how a chromatin protein interacts with the histone and DNA components of the nucleosome. Our structure also suggests that the Widom 601 DNA positioning sequence present in the nucleosomes forms a 145-base-pair nucleosome core particle, not the expected canonical 147-base-pair particle.

  15. Structure and melting behavior of classical bilayer crystals of dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Xin; Wu Changqin; Micheli, Andrea; Pupillo, Guido

    2008-07-01

    We study the structure and melting of a classical bilayer system of dipoles in a setup where the dipoles are oriented perpendicular to the planes of the layers and the density of dipoles is the same in each layer. Due to the anisotropic character of the dipole-dipole interactions, we find that the ground-state configuration is given by two hexagonal crystals positioned on top of each other, independent of the interlayer spacing and dipolar density. For large interlayer distances these crystals are independent, while in the opposite limit of small interlayer distances the system behaves as a two-dimensional crystal of paired dipoles. Within the harmonic approximation for the phonon excitations, the melting temperature of these crystalline configurations displays a nonmonotonic dependence on the interlayer distance, which is associated with a re-entrant melting behavior in the form of solid-liquid-solid-liquid transitions at fixed temperature.

  16. Crystal structure and density of helium to 232 kbar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, H. K.; Wu, Y.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Bassett, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of helium and hydrogen at high pressure are topics of great interest to the understanding of planetary interiors. These materials constitute 95 percent of the entire solar system. A technique was presented for the measurement of X-ray diffraction from single-crystals of low-Z condenses gases in a diamond-anvil cell at high pressure. The first such single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements on solid hydrogen to 26.5 GPa were presented. The application of this technique to the problem of the crystal structure, equation of state, and phase diagram of solid helium is reported. Crucial for X-ray diffraction studies of these materials is the use of a synchrotron radiation source which provides high brillance, narrow collimation of the incident and diffracted X-ray beams to reduce the background noise, and energy-dispersive diffraction techniques with polychromatic (white) radiation, which provides high detection efficiency.

  17. Crystal structure and density of helium to 232 kbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H. K.; Wu, Y.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Bassett, W. A.

    The properties of helium and hydrogen at high pressure are topics of great interest to the understanding of planetary interiors. These materials constitute 95 percent of the entire solar system. A technique was presented for the measurement of X-ray diffraction from single-crystals of low-Z condenses gases in a diamond-anvil cell at high pressure. The first such single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements on solid hydrogen to 26.5 GPa were presented. The application of this technique to the problem of the crystal structure, equation of state, and phase diagram of solid helium is reported. Crucial for X-ray diffraction studies of these materials is the use of a synchrotron radiation source which provides high brillance, narrow collimation of the incident and diffracted X-ray beams to reduce the background noise, and energy-dispersive diffraction techniques with polychromatic (white) radiation, which provides high detection efficiency.

  18. Mechanism and kinetics of organic matter degradation based on particle structure variation during pig manure aerobic composting.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jinyi; Huang, Guangqun; Huang, Jing; Zeng, Jianfei; Han, Lujia

    2015-07-15

    Characterization of the dynamic structure of composting particles may facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms of organic matter degradation during pig manure-wheat straw aerobic composting. In this study, changes in the size, shape, pores, chemical compositions, and crystal structures of pig manure particles during composting were investigated. The results showed that the median diameter (D50) decreased exponentially, while the particle aspect ratio and sphericity were unchanged, suggesting that particles were degraded uniformly along different radial directions. Pores had a mean diameter of 15-30 μm and were elliptical. The particle porosity increased linearly mainly because of hemicellulose degradation. Furthermore, the influence of particle structure variation on the first order rate constant (k) of organic matter degradation was corrected, which may facilitate the optimization of operation conditions. The k value was proportional to the reciprocal of D50 according to the specific surface area of particles, and it decreased with increased porosity due to the stabilized chemical compositions and crystal structures of particles. However, the applicability of these data to other composting materials should be verified. PMID:25781372

  19. Use of Pom Pons To Illustrate Cubic Crystal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Susan G.

    1997-07-01

    In general chemistry classes, students are introduced to the ways in which atoms are arranged in cubic crystal structures. Transposing the textbook illustrations into three dimensional structures is difficult for some students. This transitions is easier if a three dimensional model is available for examination. Several 3D models are cited. A quick to assemble, inexpensive, colorful, and durable alternative to these models and styrofoam balls is the use of olefin pom pons. Different sized pom pons can be used to demonstrate how the atomic radius will vary when comparing the different types of cubic crystal unit cells. Being made of a coarse material, pom pons can be stacked to illustrate different packing arrangements such as hexagonal close-packed and cubic close-packed structures. Pom pons make great atoms.

  20. Crystal structure of Brinzolamide: a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huirong; Lou, Benyong

    2016-05-01

    In crystal structure of the title compound, C12H21N3O5S3 [systematic name: (R)-4-ethyl-amino-2-(3-meth-oxy-prop-yl)-3,4-di-hydro-2H-thieno[3,2-e][1,2]thia-zine-6-sulfonamide 1,1-dioxide], there exist three kinds of hydrogen-bonding inter-actions. The sulfonamide group is involved in hydrogen bonding with the secondary amine and the meth-oxy O atom, resulting in the formation of layers parallel to the bc plane. The layers are linked by an N-H⋯O hydrogen bond involving a sulfonamide O atom as acceptor and the secondary amine H atom as donor, which gives rise to the formation of a unique bilayer structure. The absolute structure of the mol-ecule in the crystal was determined by resonant scattering [Flack parameter = 0.01 (4)]. PMID:27308020

  1. Crystal structure and spectroscopic elucidation of 3-phenylpyridinium hydrogensquarate.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Bojidarka B; Kolev, Tsonko; Tsanev, Tsanko; Kotov, Stefan; Mayer-Figge, Heike; Spiteller, Michael; Sheldrick, William S

    2010-01-01

    The novel 3-phenylpyridinium hydrogensquarate (1) has been synthesized and its structure and properties are elucidated spectroscopically, thermally and structurally, using single crystal X-ray diffraction, linear-polarized solid-state IR-spectroscopy, UV-spectroscopy, TGA, DSC, DTA and ESI MS. Quantum chemical calculations were used to obtain the electronic structure, vibrational data and electronic spectrum. 3-Phenylpyridinium hydrogensquarate, crystallizes in the space group P-1 and the ions in the unit cell are joined into layers by intermolecular NH...O=C((Sq)) bonds with bond lengths of 2.625 and 2.626 A, respectively. Hydrogentartarates form dimers by strong O=COH...OCO interactions (2.499 A). PMID:19931483

  2. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide. PMID:26022515

  3. Separation-independent attractive force between like particles mediated by nematic-liquid-crystal distortions.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Jun-Ichi; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2005-04-15

    We investigate numerically with the aid of the Landau-de Gennes continuum theory the interaction between two spherical particles carrying the same topological charges +1 mediated by the elastic distortion of a nematic liquid crystal. We consider the case where an escaped nontopological ring disclination is situated between the particles; the director is continuous everywhere and no counterdefects are present. We find that the interaction is attractive and its potential energy depends linearly on the interparticle distance D. This behavior yields the D-independent interaction force, which was observed experimentally by Poulin, Cabuil, and Weitz [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 4862 (1997)] in the presence of narrow strings of birefringent regions ("bubble-gum" configuration) between the particles. PMID:15904120

  4. Structure of Two-Dimensional Plasma Crystals in Anharmonic Penning Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    2013-10-01

    In several recent experiments charged particles have been trapped and cooled in two-dimensional (2D) crystalline configurations using a Penning trap. Usually in such traps the applied trap potential is harmonic (i.e. depending quadratically on position), and consequently the 2D crystal structure is nonuniform and riddled with defects. This poster derives a closed-form analytic expression for the density per unit area of the 2D crystal when an arbitrary anharmonic trap potential is employed, expressed as a multipole expansion. This expression is used to find the optimum potential, with a given number of multipoles, for trapping a plasma crystal with the most uniform possible density per unit area. Image charge effects are included to lowest order in (plasma size)/(electrode radius). Minimum energy states in such an optimized trap potential (including only quadrupole and octopole terms) are evaluated numerically and the resulting crystals are shown to be defect-free over the central region where the density is most nearly uniform. The poster also explores using an l = 3 rotating wall trap potential in order to produce near-perfect crystals with triangular boundaries and no defects. Supported by PHY-0903877 and DE-SC0002541.

  5. Phase Transitions in Liquid Crystal Doped with Magnetic Particles of Different Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopčanský, P.; Tomašovičová, N.; Koneracká, M.; Timko, M.; Závišová, V.; Džarová, A.; Jadzyn, J.; Beaugnon, E.; Chaud, X.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, observations of structural transitions in ferronematics based on the thermotropic nematic 4- trans-4'- n-hexyl-cyclohexyl-isothiocyanato-benzene (6CHBT) are described. Droplets of the nematic phase in the isotropic phase were observed in solutions of nematogenic 6CHBT dissolved in phenyl isocyanate and 6CHBT dissolved in phenyl isocyanate and doped with magnetic particles of different shapes (nanorods and chain-like particles). Magneto-dielectric measurements of structural transitions in these new systems enable to estimate of the type of anchoring of the nematic molecules on the magnetic particles surface.

  6. Photoinduced Directional Motions of Microparticles at Air-Liquid-Crystal Interfaces of Azobenzene-Doped Liquid-Crystal Films with Homeotropic or Homogeneous Alignment Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Yoshida, Masaru

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the effects of liquid-crystal (LC) alignments on photoinduced motions of microparticles at air-LC interfaces of azobenzene-doped LC films. In homeotropically aligned LC films, the lattice spacings of pseudo-hexagonal structures of microparticles site-selectively exhibited reversible expansion or contraction on alternating irradiation with ultraviolet and visible light. The particle motions were probably driven by photochemical deformation of LC surfaces. In homogeneously aligned films, alternating irradiation induced macroscopic convective flows followed by rapid gathering or dispersion of linear chains of microparticles. Particle motions were significantly influenced by LC alignments as well as the light wavelength.

  7. Azimuthal structures of produced particles in heavy-ion interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vokal, S. Orlova, G. I.; Lehocka, S.

    2009-02-15

    The angular structures of particles produced in {sup 208}Pb at 158 A GeV/c and {sup 197}Au at 11.6 A GeV/c induced interactions with Ag(Br) nuclei in emulsion detector have been investigated. Nonstatistical well-ordered ring-like structures of produced particles in azimuthal plane of a collision have been found, and their parameters have been determined.

  8. Structural engineering of three-dimensional phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpero, Tommaso; Schoenwald, Stefan; Zemp, Armin; Bergamini, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Artificially-structured materials are attracting the research interest of a growing community of scientists for the possibility to develop novel materials with advantageous properties that arise from the ability to tailor the propagation of elastic waves, and thus energy, through them. In this work, we propose a three-dimensional phononic crystal whose unit cell has been engineered to obtain a strong wave-attenuation band in the middle of the acoustic frequency range. The combination of its acoustic properties with the dimensions of the unit cell and its static mechanical properties makes it an interesting material for possibly several applications in civil and mechanical engineering, for instance as the core of an acoustically insulating sandwich panel. A sample of this crystal has been manufactured and experimentally tested with respect to its acoustic transmissibility. The performance of the phononic crystal core is remarkable both in terms of amplitude reduction in the transmissibility and width of the attenuation band. A parametric study has been finally conducted on selected geometrical parameters of the unit cell and on their effect on the macroscopic properties of the crystal. This work represents an application-oriented example of how the macroscopic properties of an artificially-structured material can be designed, according to specific needs, by a conventional engineering of its unit cell.

  9. One dimensional coordination polymers: Synthesis, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaağaç, Dursun; Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Şenyel, Mustafa; Şahin, Onur

    2016-11-01

    Two new one dimensional (1D) cyanide complexes, namely [M(4-aepy)2(H2O)2][Pt(CN)4], (4-aepy = 4-(2-aminoethyl)pyridine M = Cu(II) (1) or Zn(II) (2)), have been synthesized and characterized by vibrational (FT-IR and Raman) spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, thermal and elemental analyses techniques. The crystallographic analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are isomorphous and isostructural, and crystallize in the monoclinic system and C2 space group. The Pt(II) ions are coordinated by four cyanide-carbon atoms in the square-planar geometry and the [Pt(CN)4]2- ions act as a counter ion. The M(II) ions display an N4O2 coordination sphere with a distorted octahedral geometry, the nitrogen donors belonging to four molecules of the organic 4-aepy that act as unidentate ligands and two oxygen atoms from aqua ligands. The crystal structures of 1 and 2 are similar each other and linked via intermolecular hydrogen bonding, Pt⋯π interactions to form 3D supramolecular network. Vibration assignments of all the observed bands are given and the spectral features also supported to the crystal structures of the complexes.

  10. Lattice dynamics of crystals having R2MX6 structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. I.; Freire, J. D.; Katiyar, R. S.

    1997-10-01

    The theory of lattice dynamics in the harmonic approximation using a rigid-ion model due to Born and Huang [Dynamical Theory of Crystal Lattices (Oxford University Press, New York, 1954)], is applied to ionic crystals of the R2MX6 type with antifluorite structure namely, K2SnCl6, K2PtBr6, Cs2SnBr6, and Rb2SnBr6 in the cubic phase. The model expresses the potential energy as the sum of long-range Coulomb interactions and repulsive short-range interactions between ions in the primitive cell. A function of axially symmetric type is used to approximate the short-range part, and the number of force constant parameters were reduced utilizing stability conditions in the manner described by Katiyar [J. Phys. C 3, 1087 (1970)]. The remaining constants were determined by a nonlinear least-squares analysis of some experimental frequencies at the critical point Γ. The long-range contributions were calculated using the Ewald transformation as described by Cowley [Acta Crystallogr. 15, 687 (1962)]. Phonon frequencies and the normal modes of vibrations at the zone center were obtained; of particular interest is the resulting lowest librational frequency for each crystal. We obtained excellent agreement between the calculated and the observed frequencies. The resulting effective charge parameters indicated that these crystals are partially ionic. In general, the results offered a better vision of the structural phase transition mechanism involving the rotational mode T1g.

  11. Crystal structure of four-stranded Oxytricha telomeric DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C.; Zhang, X.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1992-01-01

    The sequence d(GGGGTTTTGGGG) from the 3' overhang of the Oxytricha telomere has been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure solved to 2.5 A resolution. The oligonucleotide forms hairpins, two of which join to make a four-stranded helical structure with the loops containing four thymine residues at either end. The guanine residues are held together by cyclic hydrogen bonding and an ion is located in the centre. The four guanine residues in each segment have a glycosyl conformation that alternates between anti and syn. There are two four-stranded molecules in the asymmetric unit showing that the structure has some intrinsic flexibility.

  12. Revisiting the crystal structure of rhombohedral lead metaniobate.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Gerhard Henning; Sørby, Magnus Helgerud; Hauback, Bjørn Christian; Selbach, Sverre Magnus; Grande, Tor

    2014-09-15

    Lead metaniobate (PbNb2O6) can exist both as a stable rhombohedral and a metastable orthorhombic tungsten-bronze-type polymorph. Although the orthorhombic is a well-known ferroelectric material, the rhombohedral polymorph has been far less studied. The crystal structure and energetic stability of the stable rhombohedral polymorph of lead metaniobate is re-examined by powder X-ray diffraction and powder neutron diffraction in combination with ab initio calculations. We show that this structure is described by the polar space group R3, in contradiction to the previously reported space group R3m. The crystal structure is unusual, consisting of edge-sharing dimers of NbO(6/2) octahedra forming layers with 6- and 3-fold rings of octahedra and lead ions in channels formed by these rings. The layers are connected by corner-sharing between octahedra. Finally, the crystal structure is discussed in relation to other AB2O6 compounds with B = Nb, Ta. PMID:25167129

  13. Crystal structure optimisation using an auxiliary equation of state.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Adam J; Skelton, Jonathan M; Hendon, Christopher H; Butler, Keith T; Walsh, Aron

    2015-11-14

    Standard procedures for local crystal-structure optimisation involve numerous energy and force calculations. It is common to calculate an energy-volume curve, fitting an equation of state around the equilibrium cell volume. This is a computationally intensive process, in particular, for low-symmetry crystal structures where each isochoric optimisation involves energy minimisation over many degrees of freedom. Such procedures can be prohibitive for non-local exchange-correlation functionals or other "beyond" density functional theory electronic structure techniques, particularly where analytical gradients are not available. We present a simple approach for efficient optimisation of crystal structures based on a known equation of state. The equilibrium volume can be predicted from one single-point calculation and refined with successive calculations if required. The approach is validated for PbS, PbTe, ZnS, and ZnTe using nine density functionals and applied to the quaternary semiconductor Cu2ZnSnS4 and the magnetic metal-organic framework HKUST-1. PMID:26567640

  14. Crystal structure optimisation using an auxiliary equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Adam J.; Skelton, Jonathan M.; Hendon, Christopher H.; Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron

    2015-11-14

    Standard procedures for local crystal-structure optimisation involve numerous energy and force calculations. It is common to calculate an energy–volume curve, fitting an equation of state around the equilibrium cell volume. This is a computationally intensive process, in particular, for low-symmetry crystal structures where each isochoric optimisation involves energy minimisation over many degrees of freedom. Such procedures can be prohibitive for non-local exchange-correlation functionals or other “beyond” density functional theory electronic structure techniques, particularly where analytical gradients are not available. We present a simple approach for efficient optimisation of crystal structures based on a known equation of state. The equilibrium volume can be predicted from one single-point calculation and refined with successive calculations if required. The approach is validated for PbS, PbTe, ZnS, and ZnTe using nine density functionals and applied to the quaternary semiconductor Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} and the magnetic metal-organic framework HKUST-1.

  15. Tunable photonic structures based on silicon and liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perova, Tatiana S.; Tolmachev, Vladimir A.; Astrova, Ekaterina V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is focused on the design, fabrication and characterization of the conventional and tunable photonic devices based on grooved silicon, serving as one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal. The advantages of these photonic structures are as follows: the large refractive index contrast, in-plane moulding of the light flow, the possibility to fabricate a composite photonic structures by filling the grooves with a different compounds and compatibility with current semiconductor processing techniques. The optical properties of grooved Si structures were simulated using a transfer matrix method and gap map method and have been verified experimentally using FTIR microscopy. The air spaces in the basic silicon-air matrices were infiltrated with nematic liquid crystal E7. It is shown that the optical properties of the obtained composite 1D photonic crystals can be tuned by means of electro- and thermo-optical effects. Such a structures suit well for the various elements of the integrated optics and can serve as a building blocks for optical interconnects.

  16. Crystal structure optimisation using an auxiliary equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Adam J.; Skelton, Jonathan M.; Hendon, Christopher H.; Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron

    2015-11-01

    Standard procedures for local crystal-structure optimisation involve numerous energy and force calculations. It is common to calculate an energy-volume curve, fitting an equation of state around the equilibrium cell volume. This is a computationally intensive process, in particular, for low-symmetry crystal structures where each isochoric optimisation involves energy minimisation over many degrees of freedom. Such procedures can be prohibitive for non-local exchange-correlation functionals or other "beyond" density functional theory electronic structure techniques, particularly where analytical gradients are not available. We present a simple approach for efficient optimisation of crystal structures based on a known equation of state. The equilibrium volume can be predicted from one single-point calculation and refined with successive calculations if required. The approach is validated for PbS, PbTe, ZnS, and ZnTe using nine density functionals and applied to the quaternary semiconductor Cu2ZnSnS4 and the magnetic metal-organic framework HKUST-1.

  17. Association of Suprathermal Particles with Coherent Structures and Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessein, J.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Osman, K.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Giacalone, J.

    2013-12-01

    Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain observed suprathermal particle populations in the solar wind, including direct acceleration at flares, stochastic acceleration, shock acceleration and acceleration by random compression or reconnection sites. Using magnetic field and suprathermal ion data from ACE, we identify coherent structures and interplanetary shocks, and analyze the temporal association of energetic particle fluxes with these coherent structures. Coherent structures having a range of intensities are identified using the magnetic PVI statistic, essentially a normalized vector increment. A stronger association of particle flux in the 0.047-4.75 MeV range is found with intense magnetic discontinuities than is found with shocks. The main results presented are on ions, but similar results have been found for electrons. The average profile of suprathermal particles near shocks is consistent with the expectations of diffusive shock acceleration. Significant fluxes of energetic particles as well as high occurrence rates of strong discontinuities are found within four hours after the passage a shock. Beyond that there appears to be a sharper drop-off in energetic particle intensity. This evidence supports the view that multiple mechanisms contribute to the acceleration and transport of interplanetary suprathermal particles. To make a statement about any specific mechanism we also study observed pitch angle distributions as well as comparisons with test particle simulations.

  18. Thermodynamic stability and structural properties of cluster crystals formed by amphiphilic dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Dominic A.; Mladek, Bianca M.; Likos, Christos N.; Blaak, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    We pursue the goal of finding real-world examples of macromolecular aggregates that form cluster crystals, which have been predicted on the basis of coarse-grained, ultrasoft pair potentials belonging to a particular mathematical class [B. M. Mladek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 045701 (2006)]. For this purpose, we examine in detail the phase behavior and structural properties of model amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of monomer-resolved computer simulations. On augmenting the density of these systems, a fluid comprised of clusters that contain several overlapping and penetrating macromolecules is spontaneously formed. Upon further compression of the system, a transition to multi-occupancy crystals takes place, the thermodynamic stability of which is demonstrated by means of free-energy calculations, and where the FCC is preferred over the BCC-phase. Contrary to predictions for coarse-grained theoretical models in which the particles interact exclusively by effective pair potentials, the internal degrees of freedom of these molecules cause the lattice constant to be density-dependent. Furthermore, the mechanical stability of monodisperse BCC and FCC cluster crystals is restricted to a bounded region in the plane of cluster occupation number versus density. The structural properties of the dendrimers in the dense crystals, including their overall sizes and the distribution of monomers are also thoroughly analyzed.

  19. Thermodynamic stability and structural properties of cluster crystals formed by amphiphilic dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Dominic A; Mladek, Bianca M; Likos, Christos N; Blaak, Ronald

    2016-05-28

    We pursue the goal of finding real-world examples of macromolecular aggregates that form cluster crystals, which have been predicted on the basis of coarse-grained, ultrasoft pair potentials belonging to a particular mathematical class [B. M. Mladek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 045701 (2006)]. For this purpose, we examine in detail the phase behavior and structural properties of model amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of monomer-resolved computer simulations. On augmenting the density of these systems, a fluid comprised of clusters that contain several overlapping and penetrating macromolecules is spontaneously formed. Upon further compression of the system, a transition to multi-occupancy crystals takes place, the thermodynamic stability of which is demonstrated by means of free-energy calculations, and where the FCC is preferred over the BCC-phase. Contrary to predictions for coarse-grained theoretical models in which the particles interact exclusively by effective pair potentials, the internal degrees of freedom of these molecules cause the lattice constant to be density-dependent. Furthermore, the mechanical stability of monodisperse BCC and FCC cluster crystals is restricted to a bounded region in the plane of cluster occupation number versus density. The structural properties of the dendrimers in the dense crystals, including their overall sizes and the distribution of monomers are also thoroughly analyzed. PMID:27250325

  20. Variational quantum Monte Carlo calculation of electronic and structural properties of crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, S.G.

    1989-09-01

    Calculation of the electronic and structural properties of solids using a variational quantum Monte Carlo nonlocal pseudopotential approach is described. Ionization potentials and electron affinities for atoms, and binding energies and structural properties for crystals are found to be in very good agreement with experiment. The approach employs a correlated many-electron wavefunction of the Jastrow-Slater form and the exact Coulomb interaction between valence electrons. One- and two-body terms in the Jastrow factor are used and found necessary for an accurate description of the electron-electron energy for the systems considered. The method has further been applied to compute various single-particle properties for solids including the single-particle orbital occupancy, electron pair correlation functions, and quasiparticle excitation energies. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. EVO—Evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmann, Silvia; Kortus, Jens

    2013-06-01

    We present EVO—an evolution strategy designed for crystal structure search and prediction. The concept and main features of biological evolution such as creation of diversity and survival of the fittest have been transferred to crystal structure prediction. EVO successfully demonstrates its applicability to find crystal structures of the elements of the 3rd main group with their different spacegroups. For this we used the number of atoms in the conventional cell and multiples of it. Running EVO with different numbers of carbon atoms per unit cell yields graphite as the lowest energy structure as well as a diamond-like structure, both in one run. Our implementation also supports the search for 2D structures and was able to find a boron sheet with structural features so far not considered in literature. Program summaryProgram title: EVO Catalogue identifier: AEOZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 23488 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1830122 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python. Computer: No limitations known. Operating system: Linux. RAM: Negligible compared to the requirements of the electronic structure programs used Classification: 7.8. External routines: Quantum ESPRESSO (http://www.quantum-espresso.org/), GULP (https://projects.ivec.org/gulp/) Nature of problem: Crystal structure search is a global optimisation problem in 3N+3 dimensions where N is the number of atoms in the unit cell. The high dimensional search space is accompanied by an unknown energy landscape. Solution method: Evolutionary algorithms transfer the main features of biological evolution to use them in global searches. The combination of the "survival of the fittest" (deterministic) and the

  2. Magnetopause structure and the question of particle accessibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E. C.; Hill, J. R.; Nichols, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A simple plane model of the magnetopause is used to address the question of particle accessibility. Particle motion in the current sheet region is analyzed, showing that the concept of gyromotion is useful even when the electric and magnetic fields vary significantly over the gyroradius, as long as the variation is perpendicular to the drift direction. The first adiabatic invariant for particle motion is defined in such a way that it is preserved in regions of large field gradients, provided that the gradients are in a direction primarily perpendicular to the particle drifts. This generalized invariant provides an adiabatically conserved quantity that can be used to characterize particles as they move from a source region through the drift region and into the magnetopause itself, helping to resolve the accessibility question. Some preliminary results are given for the magnetopause structure based on the location of particle guiding points.

  3. Combined crystal structure prediction and high-pressure crystallization in rational pharmaceutical polymorph screening.

    PubMed

    Neumann, M A; van de Streek, J; Fabbiani, F P A; Hidber, P; Grassmann, O

    2015-01-01

    Organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and pigments, frequently form several crystal polymorphs with different physicochemical properties. Finding polymorphs has long been a purely experimental game of trial-and-error. Here we utilize in silico polymorph screening in combination with rationally planned crystallization experiments to study the polymorphism of the pharmaceutical compound Dalcetrapib, with 10 torsional degrees of freedom one of the most flexible molecules ever studied computationally. The experimental crystal polymorphs are found at the bottom of the calculated lattice energy landscape, and two predicted structures are identified as candidates for a missing, thermodynamically more stable polymorph. Pressure-dependent stability calculations suggested high pressure as a means to bring these polymorphs into existence. Subsequently, one of them could indeed be crystallized in the 0.02 to 0.50 GPa pressure range and was found to be metastable at ambient pressure, effectively derisking the appearance of a more stable polymorph during late-stage development of Dalcetrapib. PMID:26198974

  4. Combined crystal structure prediction and high-pressure crystallization in rational pharmaceutical polymorph screening

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, M. A.; van de Streek, J.; Fabbiani, F. P. A.; Hidber, P.; Grassmann, O.

    2015-01-01

    Organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and pigments, frequently form several crystal polymorphs with different physicochemical properties. Finding polymorphs has long been a purely experimental game of trial-and-error. Here we utilize in silico polymorph screening in combination with rationally planned crystallization experiments to study the polymorphism of the pharmaceutical compound Dalcetrapib, with 10 torsional degrees of freedom one of the most flexible molecules ever studied computationally. The experimental crystal polymorphs are found at the bottom of the calculated lattice energy landscape, and two predicted structures are identified as candidates for a missing, thermodynamically more stable polymorph. Pressure-dependent stability calculations suggested high pressure as a means to bring these polymorphs into existence. Subsequently, one of them could indeed be crystallized in the 0.02 to 0.50 GPa pressure range and was found to be metastable at ambient pressure, effectively derisking the appearance of a more stable polymorph during late-stage development of Dalcetrapib. PMID:26198974

  5. Micro-spectroscopic mapping: revealing internal structures of zircon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasdala, L.; Reiners, P. W.; Hanchar, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Natural zircon crystals typically deviate from perfect crystallinity and ideal chemical composition. If non-ideality features are not homogeneously distributed within a crystal but show a heterogeneity pattern, this is referred to as its "internal structure". Internal structures of zircon are mostly first caused by the heterogeneous incorporation of trace elements during crystal growth. Over time, these primary patterns may become more complex after being overprinted by radioactive self-irradiation and heterogeneous alteration or recrystallization. Internal structures may provide valuable information about the origin and post-growth history of zircon crystals. Further, they need to be recognized for sound microprobe dating, for instance to avoid biased results when straddling zones of different age. Revealing internal structures has thus become an important tool in zircon research. It is mostly done by means of backscattered electrons or cathodoluminescence imaging. These two techniques are advantageous over optical microscopy in the cross-polarized mode as the volume resolution is better and simple polished mounts instead of doubly-sided sections are needed. A disadvantage, however, is that the impact of electron beam during analysis causes local structural changes. Quantitative studies of the real structure of zircon samples, such as determination of the degree of the radiation damage, is therefore tainted with potential uncertainty when being done after electron probe analysis. As an alternative, we present images of internal zircon structures generated through visible laser excitation and mapping of the Raman and photoluminescence light. Due to the time-consuming mapping procedure, such images will perhaps not be routinely used. For detailed studies, however, they may provide most valuable information. Photoluminescence maps provide, for instance, information on both the distribution of rare earth elements (band integrals) and the short-range order (band

  6. Structure development in silicon sheet by shaped crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.; De Angelis, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Models are presented for the development of a parallel twinned structure of the 110 plane type and the 112 line type in silicon ribbons. The models are believed to be mutually compatible and operable. The first model relates the requirements for super-cooling during crystallization. The existence of reentrant angles associated with the twin structure is proposed to provide a rough interface to reduce super-cooling. The spacing of the twins is proposed to be limited by the geometrical relationship between the thermal gradient in the liquid and the dimensions of the twinned crystallization front. The second model relates the thermal stress configuration to detail dislocation reactions which would be expected to develop twins. While a specific dislocation mechanism cannot yet be defined, a number of alternatives are presented. All of these various dislocation mechanisms would result in the observed crystalline configuration and the choice among them is not critical.

  7. The crystal structure of ice under mesospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Benjamin J.; Malkin, Tamsin L.; Salzmann, Christoph G.

    2015-05-01

    Ice clouds form in the summer high latitude mesopause region, which is the coldest part of the Earth's atmosphere. At these very low temperatures (<150 K) ice can exist in metastable forms, but the nature of these ices remains poorly understood. In this paper we show that ice which is grown at mesospherically relevant temperatures does not have a structure corresponding to the well-known hexagonal form or the metastable cubic form. Instead, the ice which forms under mesospheric conditions is a material in which cubic and hexagonal sequences of ice are randomly arranged to produce stacking disordered ice (ice Isd). The structure of this ice is in the trigonal crystal system, rather than the cubic or hexagonal systems, and is expected to produce crystals with aspect ratios consistent with lidar observations.

  8. Crystal structure of tris-(hydroxyl-ammonium) orthophosphate.

    PubMed

    Leinemann, Malte; Jess, Inke; Boeckmann, Jan; Näther, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The crystal structure of the title salt, ([H3NOH](+))3·[PO4](3-), consists of discrete hydroxyl-ammonium cations and ortho-phos-phate anions. The atoms of the cation occupy general positions, whereas the anion is located on a threefold rotation axis that runs through the phospho-rus atom and one of the phosphate O atoms. In the crystal structure, cations and anions are linked by inter-molecular O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network. Altogether, one very strong O-H⋯O, two N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds of medium strength and two weaker bifurcated N-H⋯O inter-actions are observed. PMID:26594525

  9. Crystal structure of the human mitochondrial chaperonin symmetrical football complex.

    PubMed

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Yaniv, Oren; Parnas, Avital; Frolow, Felix; Azem, Abdussalam

    2015-05-12

    Human mitochondria harbor a single type I chaperonin system that is generally thought to function via a unique single-ring intermediate. To date, no crystal structure has been published for any mammalian type I chaperonin complex. In this study, we describe the crystal structure of a football-shaped, double-ring human mitochondrial chaperonin complex at 3.15 Å, which is a novel intermediate, likely representing the complex in an early stage of dissociation. Interestingly, the mitochondrial chaperonin was captured in a state that exhibits subunit asymmetry within the rings and nucleotide symmetry between the rings. Moreover, the chaperonin tetradecamers show a different interring subunit arrangement when compared to GroEL. Our findings suggest that the mitochondrial chaperonins use a mechanism that is distinct from the mechanism of the well-studied Escherichia coli system. PMID:25918392

  10. Crystal structure of the human mitochondrial chaperonin symmetrical football complex

    PubMed Central

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Yaniv, Oren; Parnas, Avital; Frolow, Felix; Azem, Abdussalam

    2015-01-01

    Human mitochondria harbor a single type I chaperonin system that is generally thought to function via a unique single-ring intermediate. To date, no crystal structure has been published for any mammalian type I chaperonin complex. In this study, we describe the crystal structure of a football-shaped, double-ring human mitochondrial chaperonin complex at 3.15 Å, which is a novel intermediate, likely representing the complex in an early stage of dissociation. Interestingly, the mitochondrial chaperonin was captured in a state that exhibits subunit asymmetry within the rings and nucleotide symmetry between the rings. Moreover, the chaperonin tetradecamers show a different interring subunit arrangement when compared to GroEL. Our findings suggest that the mitochondrial chaperonins use a mechanism that is distinct from the mechanism of the well-studied Escherichia coli system. PMID:25918392

  11. Crystal structures and properties of nylon polymers from theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.; Goddard, W.A. III; Hammond, W.B.

    1996-12-11

    A complete force field (MSXX) for simulation of all nylon polymers is derived from ab initio quantum calculations. Special emphasis is given to the accuracy of the hydrogen bond potential for the amide unit and the torsional potential between the peptide and alkane fragments. The MSXX force field was used to predict the structures, moduli, and detailed geometries of all nine nylons for which there are experimental crystal data plus one other. For nylon-(2n) with 2n = 6, the {alpha} crystal structure (with all-trans CH{sub 2} chains nearly coplanar with the hydrogen bonding plane) is more stable, while for 2n > 6, {gamma} (with the alkane plane twisted by 70{degree}) is more stable. This change results from the increased importance of methylene packing interactions over H bonds for larger 2n. We find the highest Young`s modulus for nylon-7. 51 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Verburg, P. C.; Smillie, L. A.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Haberl, B.; Bradby, J. E.; Williams, J. S.; Huis in ’t Veld, A. J.

    2015-06-04

    Laser-induced subsurface modification of dielectric materials is a well-known technology. Applications include the production of optical components and selective etching. In addition to dielectric materials, the subsurface modification technology can be applied to silicon, by employing near to mid-infrared radiation. An application of subsurface modifications in silicon is laser-induced subsurface separation, which is a method to separate wafers into individual dies. Other applications for which proofs of concept exist are the formation of waveguides and resistivity tuning. However, limited knowledge is available about the crystal structure of subsurface modifications in silicon. In this paper, we investigate the geometry and crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in monocrystalline silicon wafers. Finally, in addition to the generation of lattice defects, we found that transformations to amorphous silicon and Si-iii/Si-xii occur as a result of the laser irradiation.

  13. Crystal structure of tris­(hydroxyl­ammonium) orthophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Leinemann, Malte; Jess, Inke; Boeckmann, Jan; Näther, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title salt, ([H3NOH]+)3·[PO4]3−, consists of discrete hydroxyl­ammonium cations and ortho­phos­phate anions. The atoms of the cation occupy general positions, whereas the anion is located on a threefold rotation axis that runs through the phospho­rus atom and one of the phosphate O atoms. In the crystal structure, cations and anions are linked by inter­molecular O—H⋯O and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network. Altogether, one very strong O—H⋯O, two N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds of medium strength and two weaker bifurcated N—H⋯O inter­actions are observed. PMID:26594525

  14. Coupled particle dispersion by three-dimensional vortex structures

    SciTech Connect

    Troutt, T.R.; Chung, J.N.; Crowe, C.T.

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this research program is to obtain understanding concerning the role of three-dimensional vortex structures in the dispersion of particles and droplets in free shear flows. This research program builds on previous studies which focused on the nature of particle dispersion in large scale quasi two-dimensional vortex structures. This investigation employs time dependent experimental and numerical techniques to provide information concerning the particulate dispersion produced by three dimensional vortex structures in free shear layers. The free shear flows investigated include modified plane mixing layers, and modified plane wakes. The modifications to these flows involve slight perturbations to the initiation boundary conditions such that three-dimensional vortex structures are rapidly generated by the experimental and numerical flow fields. Recent results support the importance of these vortex structures in the particle dispersion process.

  15. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  16. Crystal architecture of R(2)SnS(5) (R = Pr, Nd, Gd and Tb): crystal structure relationships in chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Daszkiewicz, Marek; Gulay, Lubomir D; Shemet, Vasylyna Ya

    2008-04-01

    The crystal structure of the R(2)SnS(5) (R = Pr, Nd, Gd and Tb) compounds has been investigated using X-ray single-crystal diffraction. Crystal architecture and structural relationships among U(3)S(5), Y(2)HfS(5), R(2)SnS(5) compounds are discussed and a structural origin is determined. It is shown that the complex architecture of the crystal structure of Eu(5)Sn(3)S(12) is a result of interweaving of the simple crystal structures. The location of the copper ions in the non-stoichiometric compound Y(2)Cu(0.20)Sn(0.95)S(5) is proposed on the basis of comparative analysis of the R-S interatomic distances in the R(2)SnS(5) series of compounds. PMID:18369288

  17. Crystal Structures of Cisplatin Bound to a Human Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-08-16

    Copper trafficking proteins, including the chaperone Atox1 and the P{sub 1B}-type ATPase ATP7B, have been implicated in cellular resistance to the anticancer drug cisplatin. We have determined two crystal structures of cisplatin-Atox1 adducts that reveal platinum coordination by the conserved CXXC copper-binding motif. Direct interaction of cisplatin with this functionally relevant site has significant implications for understanding the molecular basis for resistance mediated by copper transport pathways.

  18. Crystal Structure of the Human Laminin Receptor Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson,K.; Wu, J.; Hubbard, S.; Meruelo, D.

    2008-01-01

    The human laminin receptor (LamR) interacts with many ligands, including laminin, prions, Sindbis virus, and the polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and has been implicated in a number of diseases. LamR is overexpressed on tumor cells, and targeting LamR elicits anti-cancer effects. Here, we report the crystal structure of human LamR, which provides insights into its function and should facilitate the design of novel therapeutics targeting LamR.

  19. Dynamics of colloidal particles in electrohydrodynamic convection of nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kentaro; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2014-07-01

    We have studied the dynamics of micrometer-sized colloidal particles in electrohydrodynamic convection of nematic liquid crystal. Above the onset voltage of electroconvection, the parallel array of convection rolls appears to be perpendicular to the nematic field at first. The particles are forced to rotate by convection flow and are trapped within a single roll in this voltage regime. A slow glide motion along the roll axis is also observed. The frequency of rotational motion and the glide velocity increase with the applied voltage. Under a much larger voltage where the roll axis temporally fluctuates, the particles occasionally hop to the neighbor rolls. In this voltage regime, the motion of the particles becomes two-dimensional. The motion perpendicular to the roll axis exhibits diffusion behavior at a long time period. The effective diffusion constant is 103-104 times larger than the molecular one. The observed behavior is compared with the result obtained by a simple stochastic model for the transport of the particles in convection. The enhancement of diffusion can be quantitatively described well by the rotation frequency in a roll, the width of the roll, and the hopping probability to the neighbor rolls.

  20. Dynamics of colloidal particles in electrohydrodynamic convection of nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kentaro; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2014-07-01

    We have studied the dynamics of micrometer-sized colloidal particles in electrohydrodynamic convection of nematic liquid crystal. Above the onset voltage of electroconvection, the parallel array of convection rolls appears to be perpendicular to the nematic field at first. The particles are forced to rotate by convection flow and are trapped within a single roll in this voltage regime. A slow glide motion along the roll axis is also observed. The frequency of rotational motion and the glide velocity increase with the applied voltage. Under a much larger voltage where the roll axis temporally fluctuates, the particles occasionally hop to the neighbor rolls. In this voltage regime, the motion of the particles becomes two-dimensional. The motion perpendicular to the roll axis exhibits diffusion behavior at a long time period. The effective diffusion constant is 10(3)-10(4) times larger than the molecular one. The observed behavior is compared with the result obtained by a simple stochastic model for the transport of the particles in convection. The enhancement of diffusion can be quantitatively described well by the rotation frequency in a roll, the width of the roll, and the hopping probability to the neighbor rolls. PMID:25122319

  1. Structural considerations on acridine/acridinium derivatives: Synthesis, crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wera, Michał; Storoniak, Piotr; Serdiuk, Illia E.; Zadykowicz, Beata

    2016-02-01

    This article describes a detailed study of the molecular packing and intermolecular interactions in crystals of four derivatives of acridine, i.e. 9-methyl-, 9-ethyl, 9-bromomethyl- and 9-piperidineacridine (1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively) and three 10-methylacridinium salts containing the trifluoromethanesulphonate anion and 9-vinyl-, 9-bromomethyl, and 9-phenyl-10-methylacridinium cations (5, 6 and 7, respectively). The crystal structures of all of the compounds are stabilized by long-range electrostatic interactions, as well as by a network of short-range C-HṡṡṡO (in hydrates and salts 3 and 5-7, respectively), C-Hṡṡṡπ, π-π, C-Fṡṡṡπ and S-Oṡṡṡπ (in salts 5-7) interactions. Hirshfeld surface analysis shows that various intermolecular contacts play an important role in the crystal packing, graphically exhibiting the differences in spatial arrangements of the acridine/acridinium derivatives under scrutiny here. Additionally, computational methods have been used to compare the intermolecular interactions in the crystal structures of the investigated compounds. Computations have confirmed the great contribution of dispersive interactions for crystal lattice stability in the case of 9-substituted acridine and electrostatic interactions for the crystal lattice stability in the case of 9-substituted 10-methylacridinium trifluoromethanesulphonates. The value of crystal lattice energy and the electrostatic contribution in the crystal lattice energy of monohydrated acridine derivatives have confirmed that these compounds have behave as acridinium derivatives.

  2. Surface and zeta-potentials of silver halide single crystals: pH-dependence in comparison to particle systems.

    PubMed

    Selmani, Atiða; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Kallay, Nikola; Preočanin, Tajana

    2014-06-18

    We have carried out surface and zeta-potential measurements on AgCl and AgBr single crystals. As for particle systems we find that, surprisingly and previously unnoted, the zeta-potential exhibits pH-dependence, while the surface potential does not. A possible interpretation of these observations is the involvement of water ions in the interfacial equilibria and in particular, stronger affinity of the hydroxide ion compared to the proton. The pH-dependence of the zeta-potential can be suppressed at sufficiently high silver concentrations, which agrees with previous measurements in particle systems where no pH-dependence was found at high halide ion concentrations. The results suggest a subtle interplay between the surface potential determining the halide and silver ion concentrations, and the water ions. Whenever the charge due to the halide and silver ions is sufficiently high, the influence of the proton/hydroxide ion on the zeta-potential vanishes. This might be related to the water structuring at the relevant interfaces which should be strongly affected by the surface potential. Another interesting observation is accentuation of the assumed water ion effect on the zeta-potential at the flat single crystal surfaces compared to the corresponding silver halide colloids. Previous generic MD simulations have indeed predicted that hydroxide ion adsorption is accentuated on flat/rigid surfaces. A thermodynamic model for AgI single crystals was developed to describe the combined effects of iodide, silver and water ions, based on two independently previously published models for AgI (that only consider constituent and background electrolyte ions) and inert surfaces (that only consider water and background electrolyte ions). The combined model correctly predicts all the experimentally observed trends. PMID:24863080

  3. Optically driven translational and rotational motions of microrod particles in a nematic liquid crystal

    PubMed Central

    Eremin, Alexey; Hirankittiwong, Pemika; Chattham, Nattaporn; Nádasi, Hajnalka; Stannarius, Ralf; Limtrakul, Jumras; Haba, Osamu; Yonetake, Koichiro; Takezoe, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    A small amount of azo-dendrimer molecules dissolved in a liquid crystal enables translational and rotational motions of microrods in a liquid crystal matrix under unpolarized UV light irradiation. This motion is initiated by a light-induced trans-to-cis conformational change of the dendrimer adsorbed at the rod surface and the associated director reorientation. The bending direction of the cis conformers is not random but is selectively chosen due to the curved local director field in the vicinity of the dendrimer-coated surface. Different types of director distortions occur around the rods, depending on their orientations with respect to the nematic director field. This leads to different types of motions driven by the torques exerted on the particles by the director reorientations. PMID:25624507

  4. High frequency single mode traveling wave structure for particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyan, M. I.; Danielyan, V. A.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Tsakanov, V. M.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of the new high frequency slow traveling wave structures is one of the promising directions in accomplishment of charged particles high acceleration gradient. The disc and dielectric loaded structures are the most known structures with slowly propagating modes. In this paper a large aperture high frequency metallic two-layer accelerating structure is studied. The electrodynamical properties of the slowly propagating TM01 mode in a metallic tube with internally coated low conductive thin layer are examined.

  5. Crystal Structures of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, William I.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rasmussen, Søren G. F.; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Yao, Xiao-Jie; Day, Peter W.; Parnot, Charles; Fung, Juan J.; Ratnala, Venkata R. P.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A.; Kuhn, Peter; Stevens, Raymond C.; Edwards, Patricia C.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Burghammer, Manfred; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Fischetti, Robert F.; Masood, Asna; Rohrer, Daniel K.

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome, and are responsible for the majority of signal transduction events involving hormones and neuro-transmitters across the cell membrane. GPCRs that bind to diffusible ligands have low natural abundance, are relatively unstable in detergents, and display basal G protein activation even in the absence of ligands. To overcome these problems two approaches were taken to obtain crystal structures of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), a well-characterized GPCR that binds cate-cholamine hormones. The receptor was bound to the partial inverse agonist carazolol and co-crystallized with a Fab made to a three-dimensional epitope formed by the third intracellular loop (ICL3), or by replacement of ICL3 with T4 lysozyme. Small crystals were obtained in lipid bicelles (β2AR-Fab) or lipidic cubic phase (β2AR-T4 lysozyme), and diffraction data were obtained using microfocus technology. The structures provide insights into the basal activity of the receptor, the structural features that enable binding of diffusible ligands, and the coupling between ligand binding and G-protein activation.

  6. Structural contribution to the roughness of supersmooth crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Butashin, A. V.; Muslimov, A. E. Kanevsky, V. M.; Deryabin, A. N.; Pavlov, V. A.; Asadchikov, V. E.

    2013-05-15

    Technological advances in processing crystals (Si, sapphire {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC, GaN, LiNbO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, etc.) of substrate materials and X-ray optics elements make it possible to obtain supersmooth surfaces with a periodicity characteristic of the crystal structure. These periodic structures are formed by atomically smooth terraces and steps of nano- and subnanometer sizes, respectively. A model surface with such nanostructures is proposed, and the relations between its roughness parameters and the height of atomic steps are determined. The roughness parameters calculated from these relations almost coincide with the experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) data obtained from 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 and 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 {mu}m areas on the surface of sapphire plates with steps. The minimum roughness parameters for vicinal crystal surfaces, which are due to the structural contribution, are calculated based on the approach proposed. A comparative analysis of the relief and roughness parameters of sapphire plate surfaces with different degrees of polishing is performed. A size effect is established: the relief height distribution changes from stochastic to regular with a decrease in the surface roughness.

  7. Nanoconfinement-Induced Structures in Chiral Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Melle, Michael; Theile, Madlona; Hall, Carol K.; Schoen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations in a specialized isothermal-isobaric and in the grand canonical ensemble to study structure formation in chiral liquid crystals as a function of molecular chirality. Our model potential consists of a simple Lennard-Jones potential, where the attractive contribution has been modified to represent the orientation dependence of the interaction between a pair of chiral liquid-crystal molecules. The liquid crystal is confined between a pair of planar and atomically smooth substrates onto which molecules are anchored in a hybrid fashion. Hybrid anchoring allows for the formation of helical structures in the direction perpendicular to the substrate plane without exposing the helix to spurious strains. At low chirality, we observe a cholesteric phase, which is transformed into a blue phase at higher chirality. More specifically, by studying the unit cell and the spatial arrangement of disclination lines, this blue phase can be established as blue phase II. If the distance between the confining substrates and molecular chirality are chosen properly, we see a third structure, which may be thought of as a hybrid, exhibiting mixed features of a cholesteric and a blue phase. PMID:23989605

  8. Single-particle electron microscopy in the study of membrane protein structure.

    PubMed

    De Zorzi, Rita; Mi, Wei; Liao, Maofu; Walz, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Single-particle electron microscopy (EM) provides the great advantage that protein structure can be studied without the need to grow crystals. However, due to technical limitations, this approach played only a minor role in the study of membrane protein structure. This situation has recently changed dramatically with the introduction of direct electron detection device cameras, which allow images of unprecedented quality to be recorded, also making software algorithms, such as three-dimensional classification and structure refinement, much more powerful. The enhanced potential of single-particle EM was impressively demonstrated by delivering the first long-sought atomic model of a member of the biomedically important transient receptor potential channel family. Structures of several more membrane proteins followed in short order. This review recounts the history of single-particle EM in the study of membrane proteins, describes the technical advances that now allow this approach to generate atomic models of membrane proteins and provides a brief overview of some of the membrane protein structures that have been studied by single-particle EM to date. PMID:26470917

  9. Ab initio molecular crystal structures, spectra, and phase diagrams.

    PubMed

    Hirata, So; Gilliard, Kandis; He, Xiao; Li, Jinjin; Sode, Olaseni

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Molecular crystals are chemists' solids in the sense that their structures and properties can be understood in terms of those of the constituent molecules merely perturbed by a crystalline environment. They form a large and important class of solids including ices of atmospheric species, drugs, explosives, and even some organic optoelectronic materials and supramolecular assemblies. Recently, surprisingly simple yet extremely efficient, versatile, easily implemented, and systematically accurate electronic structure methods for molecular crystals have been developed. The methods, collectively referred to as the embedded-fragment scheme, divide a crystal into monomers and overlapping dimers and apply modern molecular electronic structure methods and software to these fragments of the crystal that are embedded in a self-consistently determined crystalline electrostatic field. They enable facile applications of accurate but otherwise prohibitively expensive ab initio molecular orbital theories such as Møller-Plesset perturbation and coupled-cluster theories to a broad range of properties of solids such as internal energies, enthalpies, structures, equation of state, phonon dispersion curves and density of states, infrared and Raman spectra (including band intensities and sometimes anharmonic effects), inelastic neutron scattering spectra, heat capacities, Gibbs energies, and phase diagrams, while accounting for many-body electrostatic (namely, induction or polarization) effects as well as two-body exchange and dispersion interactions from first principles. They can fundamentally alter the role of computing in the studies of molecular crystals in the same way ab initio molecular orbital theories have transformed research practices in gas-phase physical chemistry and synthetic chemistry in the last half century. In this Account, after a brief summary of formalisms and algorithms, we discuss applications of these methods performed in our group as compelling

  10. The crystal structure of aluminum doped {beta}-rhombohedral boron

    SciTech Connect

    Bykova, Elena; Materialphysik und Technologie, Lehrstuhl fuer Kristallographie, Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bayreuth, Universitaetsstrasse 30, D-95440 Bayreuth ; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; Materialphysik und Technologie, Lehrstuhl fuer Kristallographie, Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bayreuth, Universitaetsstrasse 30, D-95440 Bayreuth ; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2012-10-15

    A crystal structure of aluminum doped {beta}-rhombohedral boron was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 80 K. The crystals were synthesized using high-pressure high temperature technique at 3 GPa and 2100 K. The structure is based on three-dimensional framework made of B{sub 12} icosahedra with voids occupied by the B{sub 28}-B-B{sub 28} units, it has the R-3m space group with a=10.9014(3), c=23.7225(7) A lattice dimensions in hexagonal setting. Aluminum atoms are located in A1 and D special positions of the {beta}-B structure with occupancies of 82.7(6)% and 11.3(4)%, respectively. Additional boron atoms are located near the D-site. Their possible distribution is discussed. Finally we have found two appropriate structural models whose refinement suggests two possible chemical compositions, AlB{sub 44.8(5)} and AlB{sub 37.8(5)}, which are in a good agreement with the chemical analysis data obtained from EDX. The crystal structure of AlB{sub 44.8(5)} is described in detail. - Graphical abstract: The atomic distribution near the B(15) atom (non-labeled atom in the center of the picture) shown along the c axis. Anisotropic displacement ellipses for Al(2) (D-site) and B(15) are shown with 50 % probability level. The mirror plane with Miller indices (1 1 0) and related to it (-1 2 0) and (-2 1 0) generated by the 3-fold rotation-inversion axis parallel to the c axis splits the position of B(16) over two sites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure of the AlB{sub 44.8(5)} has been refined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminum atoms partially fill certain types of voids (the A1- and D-sites). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have got two possible models of atomic distribution near the D-site.

  11. Effect of crystal thickness and geometry on the alpha-particle resolution of CsI (Tl)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinez, P.; Senftle, F.E.

    1960-01-01

    The resolution of CsI(Tl) for Po210 alpha particles has been measured as a function of crystal thickness. The best resolution of a 12;-in. diam cylindrical crystal was obtained for a thickness of 0.38 mm, and the effect of thickness on the resolution is discussed. Based on the proposed model, a conical crystal was designed, which yielded a line width of 1.8% for Po 210 alpha particles with a selected photomultiplier tube. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  12. Effect of Hf-Rich Particles on the Creep Life of a High-strength Nial Single Crystal Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, A.; Raj, S. V.; Darolia, R.

    1995-01-01

    Additions of small amounts of Hf and Si to NiAl single crystals significantly improve their high-temperature strength and creep properties. However, if large Hf-rich dendritic particles formed during casting of the alloyed single crystals are not dissolved completely during homogenization heat treatment, a large variation in creep rupture life can occur. This behavior, observed in five samples of a Hf containing NiAl single crystal alloy tested at 1144 K under an initial stress of 241.4 MPa, is described in detail highlighting the role of interdendritic Hf-rich particles in limiting creep rupture life.

  13. Crystal structure of a COG4313 outer membrane channel

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Bert van den; Bhamidimarri, Satya Prathyusha; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    COG4313 proteins form a large and widespread family of outer membrane channels and have been implicated in the uptake of a variety of hydrophobic molecules. Structure-function studies of this protein family have so far been hampered by a lack of structural information. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of Pput2725 from the biodegrader Pseudomonas putida F1, a COG4313 channel of unknown function, using data to 2.3 Å resolution. The structure shows a 12-stranded barrel with an N-terminal segment preceding the first β-strand occluding the lumen of the barrel. Single channel electrophysiology and liposome swelling experiments suggest that while the narrow channel visible in the crystal structure does allow passage of ions and certain small molecules in vitro, Pput2725 is unlikely to function as a channel for hydrophilic molecules. Instead, the presence of bound detergent molecules inside the barrel suggests that Pput2725 mediates uptake of hydrophobic molecules. Sequence alignments and the locations of highly conserved residues suggest the presence of a dynamic lateral opening through which hydrophobic molecules might gain entry into the cell. Our results provide the basis for structure-function studies of COG4313 family members with known function, such as the SphA sphingosine uptake channel of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:26149193

  14. Preparation of poly(BMA-co-MMA) particles by soap-free emulsion polymerization and its optical properties as photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Chang; Choo, Hun-Seung

    2014-11-01

    Narrowly dispersed poly(BMA-co-MMA) and PBMA latices with particle diameters ranging within 216-435 nm were synthesized successfully by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization with KPS and AIBA. The average particle diameter and particle size distribution, average molecular weight and its distribution, glass transition temperature, reflectance spectra in visible wavelength, and refractive indices for the respective poly(BMA-co-MMA) latices and their photonic crystals were systematically investigated in terms of BMA/MMA ratio, BMA content, polymerization temperature, and DVB effect. The rate of polymerization increased with increasing MMA concentration in BMA/MMA ratio. The particle diameter increased with BMA concentration in BMA/MMA ratio. The molecular weight increased with BMA concentration in BMA/MMA ratio and monomer concentration. The drying of the latices offered self-assembled shiny colloidal crystal films showing the characteristic structural colors in visible wavelength. All the poly(BMA-co-MMA) latices prepared in the study were fallen within the range of photonic grade microspheres. The reflectance measurement on the colloidal photonic crystals having different particle diameters clearly exhibited narrow stopbands. The reflection maxima (λ(max)) measured in this study were well close to the λ(max) calculated, derived from the Bragg's equation. The refractive indices of poly(BMA-co-MMA) photonic crystals were found to be almost same as the theoretical values and increased proportionally from 1.50 to 1.57 with BMA content in BMA/MMA ratios. It was, thus, found that the optical reflectance properties of the poly(BMA-co-MMA) colloidal photonic crystals can be controlled easily by adjusting the reaction conditions and BMA/MMA ratio in soap-free emulsion copolymerization of BMA and MMA. PMID:25958515

  15. Effect of the polydispersion in the crystallization and micro-structure of the high charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Bañuelos, Efraín; Aranda-Espinosa, Helim; Chasvez-Paez, Martin

    2008-03-01

    In this work we investigate the effect of the polydipersion in the crystallization and micro-structure of the high charged colloids particles with tow and three different types and different concentrations of that types. This results were obtained by computer simulation, the particles interaction was modeled by a screened Coulomb potential. We used 4000 particles in our simulation cell to let them evolution from an initial random configuration, periodic boundary conditions was imposed to simulate the bulk. The temporal evolutions of the configuration show long-ranged self-ordering and a crystalline transition, the crystalline nucleation depend of the concentrations of different kinds as well as of types of particle. The common neighbor analysis (CNA) exhibit the competition of two micro-structures, icosahedral and bcc, in the equilibrium bcc crystalline order is dominant with relative abundance over the other micro-structures. 1.- U. Gasser, Eric R. Weeks et al, Science, 292 (258), 2001. 2.- Stefan Auer, Daan Frenkel, Letter of Nature, 409 (1020), 2001. 3.- J.P. Hoogenboom, et al , Phys. Rev. Leeters, 89 (256104), 2002. 4.- M. Ch'avez-P'aez, E. Urrutia-Bañuelos and M. Medina --Noyola, Phys. Rev. E, 58 (681),1998 5.- Andrew S. Clarke and Hannes J'onsson, Phys. Rev. E, 47 (3975), 1993.

  16. Structure and magnetic properties of Nd2Fe14B fine particles produced by spark erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, H.; Berkowitz, A. E.

    1994-11-01

    At present Nd2Fe14B is the best permanent magnet because of its extremely high coercivity and energy product. Optimum properties of Nd2Fe14B magnets can be attained by producing single domain particles, and then aligning and compacting them. Due to the reactivity of the Nd constitutent, it is challenging to produce and handle a large amount of fine particles of this material. We have prepared fine particles of Nd2Fe14B by spark erosion with various dielectric media. Yield, size, size distribution, structure, and magnetic properties are discussed. The Nd2Fe14B particles were made by the sharker pot spark erosion method. Relaxation oscillators or a pulse generator were used to power the park erosion. Commercial Neomax 35 was employed as the primary material. The dielectric media were liquid Ar, Ar gas, and hydrocarbons, which provided an oxygen free environment. Structure and size were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction. Magnetic properties were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) with temperatures in range of 4.2-1200 K. The particles produced in these three different dielectric media had different microstructures and crystal structures. The particles made in Ar gas were pure Nd2Fe14B phase. The particles made in liquid Ar were a mixture of amorphous and crystalline Nd2Fe14B, because the liquid Ar provided a much higher quench rate than Ar gas, which produced some amorphous Nd2Fe14B. Upon annealing, the amorphous particles became crystalline. The fine particles produced in hydrocarbons, such as pentane and dodecane, had more complex mixed phases, since the rare earth reacted with the hydrocarbons during the sparking process. The phases were NdC2, alpha-Fe, and amorphous and crystalline Nd2Fe14B. The effects of power parameters, such as voltage and capacitance, on particle size were investigated. Particle sizes from 20 nm to 50 microns were obtained.

  17. Crystal structure of inactive form of Rab3B

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yang; Jiao, Ronghong; Liu, Yanli; Deng, Lingfu; Qi, Chao

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first structural information of human Rab3B. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To provides a structural basis for the GDP/GTP switch in controlling the activity of Rab3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The charge distribution of Rab3B indicates its unique roles in vesicular trafficking. -- Abstract: Rab proteins are the largest family of ras-related GTPases in eukaryotic cells. They act as directional molecular switches at membrane trafficking, including vesicle budding, cargo sorting, transport, tethering, and fusion. Here, we generated and crystallized the Rab3B:GDP complex. The structure of the complex was solved to 1.9 A resolution and the structural base comparison with other Rab3 members provides a structural basis for the GDP/GTP switch in controlling the activity of small GTPase. The comparison of charge distribution among the members of Rab3 also indicates their different roles in vesicular trafficking.

  18. Crystal structure of a soluble cleaved HIV-1 envelope trimer.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Cupo, Albert; Sok, Devin; Stanfield, Robyn L; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Deller, Marc C; Klasse, Per-Johan; Burton, Dennis R; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-12-20

    HIV-1 entry into CD4(+) target cells is mediated by cleaved envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers that have been challenging to characterize structurally. Here, we describe the crystal structure at 4.7 angstroms of a soluble, cleaved Env trimer that is stabilized and antigenically near-native (termed the BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140 trimer) in complex with a potent broadly neutralizing antibody, PGT122. The structure shows a prefusion state of gp41, the interaction between the component gp120 and gp41 subunits, and how a close association between the gp120 V1/V2/V3 loops stabilizes the trimer apex around the threefold axis. The complete epitope of PGT122 on the trimer involves gp120 V1, V3, and several surrounding glycans. This trimer structure advances our understanding of how Env functions and is presented to the immune system, and provides a blueprint for structure-based vaccine design. PMID:24179159

  19. Molecular-Level Understanding of Structural Changes of Organic Crystals Induced by Macroscopic Mechanical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Seki, Tomohiro; Ito, Hajime

    2016-03-18

    Structural changes to molecular crystals upon mechanical stimulation have attracted attention for sensing, recording, and microactuation. Comprehensive structure information is required to understand relationships between the mechanical force applied, the crystal structure, and the bulk property changes in order to develop general design concepts for mechanoresponsive compounds. Unfortunately, mechanical stimulation of organic crystals typically deteriorates their integrity, preventing detailed structure analyses by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. However, in the past three years, several interesting studies have been reported in which molecular crystals retain their integrity even after a mechanically induced crystalline structure change. These materials have allowed us to investigate how macroscopic mechanical forces affect the microscopic structures of molecular crystals by single-crystal XRD analyses. This Minireview summarizes current knowledge of mechanically induced structure changes in molecular crystals, which will facilitate research in this field. PMID:26748640

  20. Synthesis of bulk nanostructured aluminum containing in situ crystallized amorphous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhihui

    5083 Al containing in situ crystallized Al85Ni10La 5 amorphous particles (10% and 20% in volume fraction) was synthesized through a powder metallurgy route consisting of cold isostatic pressing, degassing and hot extrusion. The nanostructured 5083 Al powders (grain size ˜28 nm) were produced through mechanical milling in liquid nitrogen. The Al 85Ni10La5 powders were produced via gas atomization using helium gas and the fraction in the size range of <500 mesh (<25 mum), which appeared to be fully amorphous on the basis of X-ray diffraction studies, was isolated for further investigation. The amorphous Al85Ni10La5 alloy exhibited a glass transition at ˜259°C (at a heating rate of 40°C/min) and nanoscale crystallites (< 100 nm) with an equiaxed morphology formed during the subsequent crystallization reactions. At temperatures higher than 283°C, only the equilibrium phases Al, Al3Ni and Al11La 3 were formed. An unusually high nucleation density (1021-22 /m3) was recorded in the crystallization process. The copious nucleation sites were rationalized from the presence of quenched-in Al nuclei, which were evidenced by isothermal calorimetric tracing (235°C) and a direct HRTEM observation of the amorphous Al85Ni10La 5 powders. The feasibility of preparation of nanocrystalline/amorphous particles via melt spinning followed by ball milling was also studied. In the as-extruded composites, the amorphous Al85Ni10 La5 particles underwent complete crystallization resulting in a grain size of 100 ˜ 200 nm; the 5083 Al matrix had a grain size around 200 nm in the fine-grained region interspersed by coarse-grained region with a grain size of 600 ˜ 1500 nm. A metallurgical bond formed between the 5083 Al matrix and Al85Ni10La5 particles showing a grain-boundary-like interface. The compressive fracture strength of the as-extruded 10% and 20% Al85Ni10La5 composites were determined to be 1025 MPa and 837 MPa, respectively. The influence of secondary processing, i.e., swaging

  1. Unified approach for determining tetragonal tungsten bronze crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, M; Saint-Grégoire, P

    2014-05-01

    Tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) oxides are one of the most important classes of ferroelectrics. Many of these framework structures undergo ferroelastic transformations related to octahedron tilting deformations. Such tilting deformations are closely related to the rigid unit modes (RUMs). This paper discusses the whole set of RUMs in an ideal TTB lattice and possible crystal structures which can emerge owing to the condensation of some of them. Analysis of available experimental data for the TTB-like niobates lends credence to the obtained theoretical predictions. PMID:24815976

  2. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  3. Crystal structure of new AsS{sub 2} compound

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotina, N. B.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Dyuzheva, T. I.; Lityagina, L. M.; Kulikova, L. F.; Nikolaev, N. A.; Verin, I. A.

    2013-01-15

    AsS{sub 2} single crystals have been obtained for the first time from an As{sub 2}S{sub 3} melt at pressures above 6 GPa and temperatures above 800 K in the As{sub 2}S{sub 3} {yields} AsS + AsS{sub 2} reaction. The monoclinic structure of the new high-pressure phase is solved by X-ray diffraction analysis and compared to the structure of high-pressure AsS phase, which was studied previously.

  4. Holographic liquid crystal polarization grating with Fabry-Perot structure.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Moritsugu; Yamaguchi, Haruki; Noda, Kohei; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    A holographic liquid crystal polarization grating with a Fabry-Perot structure was developed. Because of its resonant structure, the device offers high levels of control of the diffraction properties of incident-polarized light beams, depending on the resonance conditions. The diffracted light beams are emitted in both the reflection and transmission directions, and the device thus works as a multibranch polarization grating with double optical paths, unlike a conventional polarization grating. These device features were experimentally demonstrated and were also explained theoretically. PMID:26977643

  5. Influence of colloidal particle transfer on the quality of self-assembling colloidal photonic crystal under confined condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong-Qiang; Li, Juan; Liu, Qiu-Yan; Dong, Wen-Jun; Chen, Ben-Yong; Li, Chao-Rong

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between colloidal particle transfer and the quality of colloidal photonic crystal (CPC) is investigated by comparing colloidal particle self-assembling under the vertical channel (VC) and horizontal channel (HC) conditions. Both the theoretical analyses and the experimental measurements indicate that crystal quality depends on the stability of mass transfer. For the VC, colloidal particle transfer takes place in a stable laminar flow, which is conducive to forming high-quality crystal. In contrast, it happens in an unstable turbulent flow for the HC. Crystals with cracks and an uneven surface formed under the HC condition can be seen from the images of a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning microscope (LSM), respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91122022 and 51172209) and the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University (PCSIRT), China (Grant No. IRT13097).

  6. Can the low-resolution structures of photointermediates of bacteriorhodopsin explain their crystal structures?

    PubMed

    Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio

    2005-03-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism of light-driven proton pumps, the structures of the photointermediates of bacteriorhodopsin have been intensively investigated. Low-resolution diffraction techniques have demonstrated substantial conformational changes at the helix level in the M and N intermediates, between which there are noticeable differences. The intermediate structures at atomic resolution have also been solved by x-ray crystallography. Although the crystal structures have demonstrated local structural changes, such as hydrogen bond network rearrangements including water molecules, the large conformational changes at the helix level are not necessarily observed. Furthermore, the two reported crystal structures of an intermediate accumulated using a common method were distinct. To reconcile these apparent discrepancies, low-resolution projection maps were calculated from the crystal structures and compared to the low-resolution intermediate structures obtained using native membranes. The crystal structures can be categorized into three groups, which qualitatively correspond to the low-resolution structures of the M1-type, M2-type, and N-type determined in the native membrane. Based on these results, we conclude that at least three types of intermediate structures play a role during the photocycle. PMID:15596495

  7. Tuning the self-assembled monolayer formation on nanoparticle surfaces with different curvatures: Investigations on spherical silica particles and plane-crystal-shaped zirconia particles

    PubMed Central

    Feichtenschlager, Bernhard; Lomoschitz, Christoph J.; Kickelbick, Guido

    2011-01-01

    The ordering of dodecyl-chain self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on different nanoscopic surfaces was investigated by FT-IR studies. As model systems plane-crystal-shaped ZrO2 nanoparticles and spherical SiO2 nanoparticles were examined. The type of capping agent was chosen dependent on the substrate, therefore dodecylphosphonic acid and octadecylphosphonic acid were used for ZrO2 and dodecyltrimethoxysilane for SiO2 samples. The plane ZrO2 nanocrystals yielded more ordered alkyl-chain structures whereas spherical SiO2 nanoparticles showed significantly lower alkyl-chain ordering. Submicron-sized silica spheres revealed a significantly higher alkyl chain ordering, comparable to an analogously prepared SAM on a non-curved plane oxidized Si-wafer. In the case of ZrO2 nanocrystals an intense alkyl-chain alignment could be disturbed by decreasing the grafting density from the maximum of 2.1 molecules/nm2 through the variation of coupling agent concentration to lower values. Furthermore, the co-adsorption of a different coupling agent, such as phenylphosphonic acid for ZrO2 and phenyltrimethoxysilane for SiO2, resulted in a significantly lower alkyl-chain ordering for ZrO2 plane crystals and for large SiO2 spherical particles at high grafting density. An increasing amount of order-disturbing molecules leads to a gradual decrease in alkyl-chain alignment on the surface of the inorganic nanoparticles. In the case of the ZrO2 nanoparticle system it is shown via dynamic light scattering (DLS) that the mixed monolayer formation on the particle surface impacts the dispersion quality in organic solvents such as n-hexane. PMID:21549385

  8. Tuning the self-assembled monolayer formation on nanoparticle surfaces with different curvatures: investigations on spherical silica particles and plane-crystal-shaped zirconia particles.

    PubMed

    Feichtenschlager, Bernhard; Lomoschitz, Christoph J; Kickelbick, Guido

    2011-08-01

    The ordering of dodecyl-chain self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on different nanoscopic surfaces was investigated by FT-IR studies. As model systems plane-crystal-shaped ZrO(2) nanoparticles and spherical SiO(2) nanoparticles were examined. The type of capping agent was chosen dependent on the substrate, therefore dodecylphosphonic acid and octadecylphosphonic acid were used for ZrO(2) and dodecyltrimethoxysilane for SiO(2) samples. The plane ZrO(2) nanocrystals yielded more ordered alkyl-chain structures whereas spherical SiO(2) nanoparticles showed significantly lower alkyl-chain ordering. Submicron-sized silica spheres revealed a significantly higher alkyl chain ordering, comparable to an analogously prepared SAM on a non-curved plane oxidized Si-wafer. In the case of ZrO(2) nanocrystals an intense alkyl-chain alignment could be disturbed by decreasing the grafting density from the maximum of 2.1 molecules/nm(2) through the variation of coupling agent concentration to lower values. Furthermore, the co-adsorption of a different coupling agent, such as phenylphosphonic acid for ZrO(2) and phenyltrimethoxysilane for SiO(2), resulted in a significantly lower alkyl-chain ordering for ZrO(2) plane crystals and for large SiO(2) spherical particles at high grafting density. An increasing amount of order-disturbing molecules leads to a gradual decrease in alkyl-chain alignment on the surface of the inorganic nanoparticles. In the case of the ZrO(2) nanoparticle system it is shown via dynamic light scattering (DLS) that the mixed monolayer formation on the particle surface impacts the dispersion quality in organic solvents such as n-hexane. PMID:21549385

  9. Structure of crystal defects in damaged RDX as revealed by an AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, J.; Hoover, S. M.; Coffey, C. S.; Tompa, A. S.; Sandusky, H. W.; Armstrong, R. W.; Elban, W. L.

    1998-07-10

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) was employed to reveal the structure of defects produced in single crystals of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), damaged either by indentation, heat or underwater shock. In general, all of these stimuli produced dislocation pits, cracks, fissures and mosaics, however, the details were different. Indentation generated a large number of triangular dislocation pits, which in their turn produced fissures, cracks and holes by coalescing. Heat produced fine parallel cracks. Slivers as thin as sixty molecules across were observed. Shock caused the crystal to become a three-dimensional mosaic structure, 100-500 nm in size, produced by intensive cleavage and delamination. In all cases very fine particles, 20-500 nm in size, were ejected onto the surface as debris from the formation of defects. The AFM has revealed for the first time un-etched dislocation pits in their pristine condition, so that their internal structure could be investigated. A dislocation density of 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} has been observed. RDX is found to behave like a very fragile crystal in which numerous imperfections show up at a level of the stimuli, far below that necessary for the start of chemical reaction.

  10. The crystal structure of ^7Li2ND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Masami; Sorby, Magnus H.; Hino, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Hauback, Bjorn C.; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2008-03-01

    Recently much attention has been given to reversible hydrogen storage materials possessing high gravimetric capacity. Lithium amide/imide systems are promising candidates. Chen et al.[1] found that a mixture of lithium amide and lithium hydride can reversibly store hydrogen up to 6.5 mass% forming lithium imide (Li2NH). Among them, the crystal structure of Li2NH is still controversial. Balogh et al.[2] have reported a cubic structure model. However, this model differs significantly from theoretical structure models. In this work, the crystal structure of the isotopically substituted ^7Li2ND has been investigated by powder neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments. In our data some peaks, which should be a single peak for cubic symmetry, were obviously split indicating a lower symmetry than cubic for lithium imide. The structure of ^7Li2ND will be described. [1] P. Chen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 10967. [2] M.P. Balogh et al., J. Alloys Compd. 420 (2006) 326.

  11. From protein structure to function via single crystal optical spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Luca; Bruno, Stefano; Bettati, Stefano; Storici, Paola; Mozzarelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The more than 100,000 protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography provide a wealth of information for the characterization of biological processes at the molecular level. However, several crystallographic “artifacts,” including conformational selection, crystallization conditions and radiation damages, may affect the quality and the interpretation of the electron density maps, thus limiting the relevance of structure determinations. Moreover, for most of these structures, no functional data have been obtained in the crystalline state, thus posing serious questions on their validity in infereing protein mechanisms. In order to solve these issues, spectroscopic methods have been applied for the determination of equilibrium and kinetic properties of proteins in the crystalline state. These methods are UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, IR, EPR, Raman, and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Some of these approaches have been implemented with on-line instruments at X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Here, we provide an overview of investigations predominantly carried out in our laboratory by single crystal polarized absorption UV-vis microspectrophotometry, the most applied technique for the functional characterization of proteins in the crystalline state. Studies on hemoglobins, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate dependent enzymes and green fluorescent protein in the crystalline state have addressed key biological issues, leading to either straightforward structure-function correlations or limitations to structure-based mechanisms. PMID:25988179

  12. Manganese oxide minerals: Crystal structures and economic and environmental significance

    PubMed Central

    Post, Jeffrey E.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese oxide minerals have been used for thousands of years—by the ancients for pigments and to clarify glass, and today as ores of Mn metal, catalysts, and battery material. More than 30 Mn oxide minerals occur in a wide variety of geological settings. They are major components of Mn nodules that pave huge areas of the ocean floor and bottoms of many fresh-water lakes. Mn oxide minerals are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and participate in a variety of chemical reactions that affect groundwater and bulk soil composition. Their typical occurrence as fine-grained mixtures makes it difficult to study their atomic structures and crystal chemistries. In recent years, however, investigations using transmission electron microscopy and powder x-ray and neutron diffraction methods have provided important new insights into the structures and properties of these materials. The crystal structures for todorokite and birnessite, two of the more common Mn oxide minerals in terrestrial deposits and ocean nodules, were determined by using powder x-ray diffraction data and the Rietveld refinement method. Because of the large tunnels in todorokite and related structures there is considerable interest in the use of these materials and synthetic analogues as catalysts and cation exchange agents. Birnessite-group minerals have layer structures and readily undergo oxidation reduction and cation-exchange reactions and play a major role in controlling groundwater chemistry. PMID:10097056

  13. Automated detection and characterization of microstructural features: application to eutectic particles in single crystal Ni-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschopp, M. A.; Groeber, M. A.; Fahringer, R.; Simmons, J. P.; Rosenberger, A. H.; Woodward, C.

    2010-03-01

    Serial sectioning methods continue to produce an abundant amount of image data for quantifying the three-dimensional nature of material microstructures. Here, we discuss a methodology to automate detecting and characterizing eutectic particles taken from serial images of a production turbine blade made of a heat-treated single crystal Ni-based superalloy (PWA 1484). This method includes two important steps for unassisted eutectic particle characterization: automatically identifying a seed point within each particle and segmenting the particle using a region growing algorithm with an automated stop point. Once detected, the segmented eutectic particles are used to calculate microstructural statistics for characterizing and reconstructing statistically representative synthetic microstructures for single crystal Ni-based superalloys. The significance of this work is its ability to automate characterization for analysing the 3D nature of eutectic particles.

  14. Synthesis, crystal growth, structural, thermal, optical and mechanical properties of solution grown 4-methylpyridinium 4-hydroxybenzoate single crystal.

    PubMed

    Sudhahar, S; Krishna Kumar, M; Sornamurthy, B M; Mohan Kumar, R

    2014-01-24

    Organic nonlinear optical material, 4-methylpyridinium 4-hydroxybenzoate (4MPHB) was synthesized and single crystal was grown by slow evaporation solution growth method. Single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction analyses confirm the structure and crystalline perfection of 4MPHB crystal. Infrared, Raman and NMR spectroscopy techniques were used to elucidate the functional groups present in the compound. TG-DTA analysis was carried out in nitrogen atmosphere to study the decomposition stages, endothermic and exothermic reactions. UV-visible and Photoluminescence spectra were recorded for the grown crystal to estimate the transmittance and band gap energy respectively. Linear refractive index, birefringence, and SHG efficiency of the grown crystal were studied. Laser induced surface damage threshold and mechanical properties of grown crystal were studied to assess the suitability of the grown crystals for device applications. PMID:24184578

  15. Crystal structure and crystal chemistry of melanovanadite, a natural vanadium bronze.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konnert, J.A.; Evans, H.T., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The crystal structure of melanovanadite from Minas Ragra, Peru, has been determined in space group P1. The triclinic unit cell (non-standard) has a 6.360(2), b 18.090(9), c 6.276(2) A, alpha 110.18(4)o, beta 101.62(3)o, gamma 82.86(4)o. A subcell with b' = b/2 was found by crystal-structure analysis to contain CaV4O10.5H2O. The subcell has a layer structure in which the vanadate sheet consists of corner-shared tetrahedral VO4 and double square-pyramidal V2O8 groups, similar to that previously found in synthetic CsV2O5. Refinement of the full structure (R = 0.056) showed that the Ca atom, which half-occupies a general position in the subcell, is 90% ordered at one of these sites in the whole unit cell. Bond length-bond strength estimates indicate that the tetrahedra contain V5+, and the square pyramids, V4+.-J.A.Z.

  16. Crystal structure of bile salt hydrolase from Lactobacillus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuzhou; Guo, Fangfang; Hu, Xiao Jian; Lin, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Bile salt hydrolase (BSH) is a gut-bacterial enzyme that negatively influences host fat digestion and energy harvesting. The BSH enzyme activity functions as a gateway reaction in the small intestine by the deconjugation of glycine-conjugated or taurine-conjugated bile acids. Extensive gut-microbiota studies have suggested that BSH is a key mechanistic microbiome target for the development of novel non-antibiotic food additives to improve animal feed production and for the design of new measures to control obesity in humans. However, research on BSH is still in its infancy, particularly in terms of the structural basis of BSH function, which has hampered the development of BSH-based strategies for improving human and animal health. As an initial step towards the structure-function analysis of BSH, C-terminally His-tagged BSH from Lactobacillus salivarius NRRL B-30514 was crystallized in this study. The 1.90 Å resolution crystal structure of L. salivarius BSH was determined by molecular replacement using the structure of Clostridium perfringens BSH as a starting model. It revealed this BSH to be a member of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily. Crystals of apo BSH belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 90.79, b = 87.35, c = 86.76 Å (PDB entry 5hke). Two BSH molecules packed perfectly as a dimer in one asymmetric unit. Comparative structural analysis of L. salivarius BSH also identified potential residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity. PMID:27139829

  17. Crystal structures of intermediates in the nitroalkane oxidase reaction.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Annie; Bozinovski, Dragana M; Valley, Michael P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F; Orville, Allen M

    2009-04-21

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 A resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes [Valley, M. P., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2003) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 8738-8739]. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped [Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066]. The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle. PMID:19265437

  18. Crystal Structures of Intermediates in the Nitroalkane Oxidase Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, A.; Bozinovski, D; Valley, M; Fitzpatrick, P; Orville, A

    2009-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped (Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066). The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle.

  19. Controlling Chirality of Entropic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasceno, Pablo F.; Karas, Andrew S.; Schultz, Benjamin A.; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal crystal structures with complexity and diversity rivaling atomic and molecular crystals have been predicted and obtained for hard particles by entropy maximization. However, thus far homochiral colloidal crystals, which are candidates for photonic metamaterials, are absent. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that chiral polyhedra exhibiting weak directional entropic forces self-assemble either an achiral crystal or a chiral crystal with limited control over the crystal handedness. Building blocks with stronger faceting exhibit higher selectivity and assemble a chiral crystal with handedness uniquely determined by the particle chirality. Tuning the strength of directional entropic forces by means of particle rounding or the use of depletants allows for reconfiguration between achiral and homochiral crystals. We rationalize our findings by quantifying the chirality strength of each particle, both from particle geometry and potential of mean force and torque diagrams.

  20. Controlling Chirality of Entropic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Pablo F; Karas, Andrew S; Schultz, Benjamin A; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal crystal structures with complexity and diversity rivaling atomic and molecular crystals have been predicted and obtained for hard particles by entropy maximization. However, thus far homochiral colloidal crystals, which are candidates for photonic metamaterials, are absent. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that chiral polyhedra exhibiting weak directional entropic forces self-assemble either an achiral crystal or a chiral crystal with limited control over the crystal handedness. Building blocks with stronger faceting exhibit higher selectivity and assemble a chiral crystal with handedness uniquely determined by the particle chirality. Tuning the strength of directional entropic forces by means of particle rounding or the use of depletants allows for reconfiguration between achiral and homochiral crystals. We rationalize our findings by quantifying the chirality strength of each particle, both from particle geometry and potential of mean force and torque diagrams. PMID:26550757