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Sample records for crystal structure prediction

  1. Crystal structure prediction of rigid molecules.

    PubMed

    Elking, Dennis M; Fusti-Molnar, Laszlo; Nichols, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    A non-polarizable force field based on atomic multipoles fit to reproduce experimental crystal properties and ab initio gas-phase dimers is described. The Ewald method is used to calculate both long-range electrostatic and 1/r(6) dispersion energies of crystals. The dispersion energy of a crystal calculated by a cutoff method is shown to converge slowly to the exact Ewald result. A method for constraining space-group symmetry during unit-cell optimization is derived. Results for locally optimizing 4427 unit cells including volume, cell parameters, unit-cell r.m.s.d. and CPU timings are given for both flexible and rigid molecule optimization. An algorithm for randomly generating rigid molecule crystals is described. Using the correct experimentally determined space group, the average and maximum number of random crystals needed to find the correct experimental structure is given for 2440 rigid single component crystals. The force field energy rank of the correct experimental structure is presented for the same set of 2440 rigid single component crystals assuming the correct space group. A complete crystal prediction is performed for two rigid molecules by searching over the 32 most probable space groups. PMID:27484371

  2. Predicting polymeric crystal structures by evolutionary algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Sharma, Vinit; Oganov, Artem R.; Ramprasad, Ramamurthy

    2014-10-01

    The recently developed evolutionary algorithm USPEX proved to be a tool that enables accurate and reliable prediction of structures. Here we extend this method to predict the crystal structure of polymers by constrained evolutionary search, where each monomeric unit is treated as a building block with fixed connectivity. This greatly reduces the search space and allows the initial structure generation with different sequences and packings of these blocks. The new constrained evolutionary algorithm is successfully tested and validated on a diverse range of experimentally known polymers, namely, polyethylene, polyacetylene, poly(glycolic acid), poly(vinyl chloride), poly(oxymethylene), poly(phenylene oxide), and poly (p-phenylene sulfide). By fixing the orientation of polymeric chains, this method can be further extended to predict the structures of complex linear polymers, such as all polymorphs of poly(vinylidene fluoride), nylon-6 and cellulose. The excellent agreement between predicted crystal structures and experimentally known structures assures a major role of this approach in the efficient design of the future polymeric materials.

  3. Prediction of binary hard-sphere crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Filion, Laura; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2009-04-01

    We present a method based on a combination of a genetic algorithm and Monte Carlo simulations to predict close-packed crystal structures in hard-core systems. We employ this method to predict the binary crystal structures in a mixture of large and small hard spheres with various stoichiometries and diameter ratios between 0.4 and 0.84. In addition to known binary hard-sphere crystal structures similar to NaCl and AlB2, we predict additional crystal structures with the symmetry of CrB, gammaCuTi, alphaIrV, HgBr2, AuTe2, Ag2Se, and various structures for which an atomic analog was not found. In order to determine the crystal structures at infinite pressures, we calculate the maximum packing density as a function of size ratio for the crystal structures predicted by our GA using a simulated annealing approach. PMID:19518387

  4. Crystal Structure Prediction from First Principles: The Crystal Structures of Glycine

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Albert M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Orendt, Anita M.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the results of our unbiased searches of glycine polymorphs obtained using the Genetic Algorithms search implemented in Modified Genetic Algorithm for Crystals coupled with the local optimization and energy evaluation provided by Quantum Espresso. We demonstrate that it is possible to predict the crystal structures of a biomedical molecule using solely first principles calculations. We were able to find all the ambient pressure stable glycine polymorphs, which are found in the same energetic ordering as observed experimentally and the agreement between the experimental and predicted structures is of such accuracy that the two are visually almost indistinguishable. PMID:25843964

  5. Crystal structure prediction from first principles: The crystal structures of glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Albert M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Orendt, Anita M.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2015-04-01

    Here we present the results of our unbiased searches of glycine polymorphs obtained using the genetic algorithms search implemented in MGAC, modified genetic algorithm for crystals, coupled with the local optimization and energy evaluation provided by Quantum Espresso. We demonstrate that it is possible to predict the crystal structures of a biomedical molecule using solely first principles calculations. We were able to find all the ambient pressure stable glycine polymorphs, which are found in the same energetic ordering as observed experimentally and the agreement between the experimental and predicted structures is of such accuracy that the two are visually almost indistinguishable.

  6. Predicting inclusion behaviour and framework structures in organic crystals.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Day, Graeme M; Jones, William

    2009-12-01

    We have used well-established computational methods to generate and explore the crystal structure landscapes of four organic molecules of well-known inclusion behaviour. Using these methods, we are able to generate both close-packed crystal structures and high-energy open frameworks containing voids of molecular dimensions. Some of these high-energy open frameworks correspond to real structures observed experimentally when the appropriate guest molecules are present during crystallisation. We propose a combination of crystal structure prediction methodologies with structure rankings based on relative lattice energy and solvent-accessible volume as a way of selecting likely inclusion frameworks completely ab initio. This methodology can be used as part of a rational strategy in the design of inclusion compounds, and also for the anticipation of inclusion behaviour in organic molecules. PMID:19876969

  7. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure. PMID:19950907

  8. Tailor-made force fields for crystal-structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Marcus A

    2008-08-14

    A general procedure is presented to derive a complete set of force-field parameters for flexible molecules in the crystalline state on a case-by-case basis. The force-field parameters are fitted to the electrostatic potential as well as to accurate energies and forces generated by means of a hybrid method that combines solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations with an empirical van der Waals correction. All DFT calculations are carried out with the VASP program. The mathematical structure of the force field, the generation of reference data, the choice of the figure of merit, the optimization algorithm, and the parameter-refinement strategy are discussed in detail. The approach is applied to cyclohexane-1,4-dione, a small flexible ring. The tailor-made force field obtained for cyclohexane-1,4-dione is used to search for low-energy crystal packings in all 230 space groups with one molecule per asymmetric unit, and the most stable crystal structures are reoptimized in a second step with the hybrid method. The experimental crystal structure is found as the most stable predicted crystal structure both with the tailor-made force field and the hybrid method. The same methodology has also been applied successfully to the four compounds of the fourth CCDC blind test on crystal-structure prediction. For the five aforementioned compounds, the root-mean-square deviations between lattice energies calculated with the tailor-made force fields and the hybrid method range from 0.024 to 0.053 kcal/mol per atom around an average value of 0.034 kcal/mol per atom. PMID:18642947

  9. Predicting crystal structures ab initio: group 14 nitrides and phosphides.

    PubMed

    Hart, Judy N; Allan, Neil L; Claeyssens, Frederik

    2010-08-14

    Crystal structures are predicted for a range of group 14 nitrides and phosphides with 1 : 1 stoichiometry, following our method of starting from the known structures for a range of binary compounds and looking for trends in the preferred local bonding environments in the optimised structures. We have previously applied this method to predict the structures of carbon nitride and phosphorus carbide. Here, we use a similar approach to predict the structures of silicon and germanium nitrides and phosphides with 1 : 1 stoichiometry. We find that the local bonding environments in the preferred structures for the nitrides are the same as those for the 3 : 4 stoichiometry. For the phosphides, we have found several possible structures with similar energies. Structures containing hypervalent phosphorus must be considered as these are often low in energy, particularly for GeP; these have not been included in previous work. The greater tendency to form hypervalent phosphorus in GeP than SiP can be rationalised by considering the bond enthalpies for the two compositions. PMID:20603659

  10. EVO—Evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmann, Silvia; Kortus, Jens

    2013-06-01

    We present EVO—an evolution strategy designed for crystal structure search and prediction. The concept and main features of biological evolution such as creation of diversity and survival of the fittest have been transferred to crystal structure prediction. EVO successfully demonstrates its applicability to find crystal structures of the elements of the 3rd main group with their different spacegroups. For this we used the number of atoms in the conventional cell and multiples of it. Running EVO with different numbers of carbon atoms per unit cell yields graphite as the lowest energy structure as well as a diamond-like structure, both in one run. Our implementation also supports the search for 2D structures and was able to find a boron sheet with structural features so far not considered in literature. Program summaryProgram title: EVO Catalogue identifier: AEOZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 23488 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1830122 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python. Computer: No limitations known. Operating system: Linux. RAM: Negligible compared to the requirements of the electronic structure programs used Classification: 7.8. External routines: Quantum ESPRESSO (http://www.quantum-espresso.org/), GULP (https://projects.ivec.org/gulp/) Nature of problem: Crystal structure search is a global optimisation problem in 3N+3 dimensions where N is the number of atoms in the unit cell. The high dimensional search space is accompanied by an unknown energy landscape. Solution method: Evolutionary algorithms transfer the main features of biological evolution to use them in global searches. The combination of the "survival of the fittest" (deterministic) and the

  11. Combined crystal structure prediction and high-pressure crystallization in rational pharmaceutical polymorph screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, M. A.; van de Streek, J.; Fabbiani, F. P. A.; Hidber, P.; Grassmann, O.

    2015-07-01

    Organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and pigments, frequently form several crystal polymorphs with different physicochemical properties. Finding polymorphs has long been a purely experimental game of trial-and-error. Here we utilize in silico polymorph screening in combination with rationally planned crystallization experiments to study the polymorphism of the pharmaceutical compound Dalcetrapib, with 10 torsional degrees of freedom one of the most flexible molecules ever studied computationally. The experimental crystal polymorphs are found at the bottom of the calculated lattice energy landscape, and two predicted structures are identified as candidates for a missing, thermodynamically more stable polymorph. Pressure-dependent stability calculations suggested high pressure as a means to bring these polymorphs into existence. Subsequently, one of them could indeed be crystallized in the 0.02 to 0.50 GPa pressure range and was found to be metastable at ambient pressure, effectively derisking the appearance of a more stable polymorph during late-stage development of Dalcetrapib.

  12. Combined crystal structure prediction and high-pressure crystallization in rational pharmaceutical polymorph screening.

    PubMed

    Neumann, M A; van de Streek, J; Fabbiani, F P A; Hidber, P; Grassmann, O

    2015-01-01

    Organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and pigments, frequently form several crystal polymorphs with different physicochemical properties. Finding polymorphs has long been a purely experimental game of trial-and-error. Here we utilize in silico polymorph screening in combination with rationally planned crystallization experiments to study the polymorphism of the pharmaceutical compound Dalcetrapib, with 10 torsional degrees of freedom one of the most flexible molecules ever studied computationally. The experimental crystal polymorphs are found at the bottom of the calculated lattice energy landscape, and two predicted structures are identified as candidates for a missing, thermodynamically more stable polymorph. Pressure-dependent stability calculations suggested high pressure as a means to bring these polymorphs into existence. Subsequently, one of them could indeed be crystallized in the 0.02 to 0.50 GPa pressure range and was found to be metastable at ambient pressure, effectively derisking the appearance of a more stable polymorph during late-stage development of Dalcetrapib. PMID:26198974

  13. Combined crystal structure prediction and high-pressure crystallization in rational pharmaceutical polymorph screening

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, M. A.; van de Streek, J.; Fabbiani, F. P. A.; Hidber, P.; Grassmann, O.

    2015-01-01

    Organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and pigments, frequently form several crystal polymorphs with different physicochemical properties. Finding polymorphs has long been a purely experimental game of trial-and-error. Here we utilize in silico polymorph screening in combination with rationally planned crystallization experiments to study the polymorphism of the pharmaceutical compound Dalcetrapib, with 10 torsional degrees of freedom one of the most flexible molecules ever studied computationally. The experimental crystal polymorphs are found at the bottom of the calculated lattice energy landscape, and two predicted structures are identified as candidates for a missing, thermodynamically more stable polymorph. Pressure-dependent stability calculations suggested high pressure as a means to bring these polymorphs into existence. Subsequently, one of them could indeed be crystallized in the 0.02 to 0.50 GPa pressure range and was found to be metastable at ambient pressure, effectively derisking the appearance of a more stable polymorph during late-stage development of Dalcetrapib. PMID:26198974

  14. Ab initio NMR Confirmed Evolutionary Structure Prediction for Organic Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Cong-Huy; Kucukbenli, Emine; de Gironcoli, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio crystal structure prediction of even small organic compounds is extremely challenging due to polymorphism, molecular flexibility and difficulties in addressing the dispersion interaction from first principles. We recently implemented vdW-aware density functionals and demonstrated their success in energy ordering of aminoacid crystals. In this work we combine this development with the evolutionary structure prediction method to study cholesterol polymorphs. Cholesterol crystals have paramount importance in various diseases, from cancer to atherosclerosis. The structure of some polymorphs (e.g. ChM, ChAl, ChAh) have already been resolved while some others, which display distinct NMR spectra and are involved in disease formation, are yet to be determined. Here we thoroughly assess the applicability of evolutionary structure prediction to address such real world problems. We validate the newly predicted structures with ab initio NMR chemical shift data using secondary referencing for an improved comparison with experiments.

  15. Using crystal structure prediction to rationalize the hydration propensities of substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Sharmarke; Karothu, Durga Prasad; Naumov, Panče

    2016-08-01

    The crystal energy landscapes of the salts of two rigid pharmaceutically active molecules reveal that the experimental structure of amantadine hydrochloride is the most stable structure with the majority of low-energy structures adopting a chain hydrogen-bond motif and packings that do not have solvent accessible voids. By contrast, memantine hydrochloride which differs in the substitution of two methyl groups on the adamantane ring has a crystal energy landscape where all structures within 10 kJ mol(-1) of the global minimum have solvent-accessible voids ranging from 3 to 14% of the unit-cell volume including the lattice energy minimum that was calculated after removing water from the hydrated memantine hydrochloride salt structure. The success in using crystal structure prediction (CSP) to rationalize the different hydration propensities of these substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts allowed us to extend the model to predict under blind test conditions the experimental crystal structures of the previously uncharacterized 1-(methylamino)adamantane base and its corresponding hydrochloride salt. Although the crystal structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane was correctly predicted as the second ranked structure on the static lattice energy landscape, the crystallization of a Z' = 3 structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane hydrochloride reveals the limits of applying CSP when the contents of the crystallographic asymmetric unit are unknown. PMID:27484376

  16. Efficient method for predicting crystal structures at finite temperature: variable box shape simulations.

    PubMed

    Filion, Laura; Marechal, Matthieu; van Oorschot, Bas; Pelt, Daniël; Smallenburg, Frank; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2009-10-30

    We present an efficient and robust method based on Monte Carlo simulations for predicting crystal structures at finite temperature. We apply this method, which is surprisingly easy to implement, to a variety of systems, demonstrating its effectiveness for hard, attractive, and anisotropic interactions, binary mixtures, semi-long-range soft interactions, and truly long-range interactions where the truly long-range interactions are treated using Ewald sums. In the case of binary hard-sphere mixtures, star polymers, and binary Lennard-Jones mixtures, the crystal structures predicted by this algorithm are consistent with literature, providing confidence in the method. Finally, we predict new crystal structures for hard asymmetric dumbbell particles, bowl-like particles and hard oblate cylinders and present the phase diagram for the oblate cylinders based on full free energy calculations. PMID:19905838

  17. An adaptive genetic algorithm for crystal structure prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shunqing; Ji, Min; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Umemoto, K.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2013-12-18

    We present a genetic algorithm (GA) for structural search that combines the speed of structure exploration by classical potentials with the accuracy of density functional theory (DFT) calculations in an adaptive and iterative way. This strategy increases the efficiency of the DFT-based GA by several orders of magnitude. This gain allows a considerable increase in the size and complexity of systems that can be studied by first principles. The performance of the method is illustrated by successful structure identifications of complex binary and ternary intermetallic compounds with 36 and 54 atoms per cell, respectively. The discovery of a multi-TPa Mg-silicate phase with unit cell containing up to 56 atoms is also reported. Such a phase is likely to be an essential component of terrestrial exoplanetary mantles.

  18. Predictions of Crystal Structure Based on Radius Ratio: How Reliable Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Lawrence C.

    1985-01-01

    Discussion of crystalline solids in undergraduate curricula often includes the use of radius ratio rules as a method for predicting which type of crystal structure is likely to be adopted by a given ionic compound. Examines this topic, establishing more definitive guidelines for the use and reliability of the rules. (JN)

  19. Towards crystal structure prediction of complex organic compounds--a report on the fifth blind test.

    PubMed

    Bardwell, David A; Adjiman, Claire S; Arnautova, Yelena A; Bartashevich, Ekaterina; Boerrigter, Stephan X M; Braun, Doris E; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Day, Graeme M; Della Valle, Raffaele G; Desiraju, Gautam R; van Eijck, Bouke P; Facelli, Julio C; Ferraro, Marta B; Grillo, Damian; Habgood, Matthew; Hofmann, Detlef W M; Hofmann, Fridolin; Jose, K V Jovan; Karamertzanis, Panagiotis G; Kazantsev, Andrei V; Kendrick, John; Kuleshova, Liudmila N; Leusen, Frank J J; Maleev, Andrey V; Misquitta, Alston J; Mohamed, Sharmarke; Needs, Richard J; Neumann, Marcus A; Nikylov, Denis; Orendt, Anita M; Pal, Rumpa; Pantelides, Constantinos C; Pickard, Chris J; Price, Louise S; Price, Sarah L; Scheraga, Harold A; van de Streek, Jacco; Thakur, Tejender S; Tiwari, Siddharth; Venuti, Elisabetta; Zhitkov, Ilia K

    2011-12-01

    Following on from the success of the previous crystal structure prediction blind tests (CSP1999, CSP2001, CSP2004 and CSP2007), a fifth such collaborative project (CSP2010) was organized at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. A range of methodologies was used by the participating groups in order to evaluate the ability of the current computational methods to predict the crystal structures of the six organic molecules chosen as targets for this blind test. The first four targets, two rigid molecules, one semi-flexible molecule and a 1:1 salt, matched the criteria for the targets from CSP2007, while the last two targets belonged to two new challenging categories - a larger, much more flexible molecule and a hydrate with more than one polymorph. Each group submitted three predictions for each target it attempted. There was at least one successful prediction for each target, and two groups were able to successfully predict the structure of the large flexible molecule as their first place submission. The results show that while not as many groups successfully predicted the structures of the three smallest molecules as in CSP2007, there is now evidence that methodologies such as dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) are able to reliably do so. The results also highlight the many challenges posed by more complex systems and show that there are still issues to be overcome. PMID:22101543

  20. Convergence Properties of Crystal Structure Prediction by Quasi-Random Sampling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Generating sets of trial structures that sample the configurational space of crystal packing possibilities is an essential step in the process of ab initio crystal structure prediction (CSP). One effective methodology for performing such a search relies on low-discrepancy, quasi-random sampling, and our implementation of such a search for molecular crystals is described in this paper. Herein we restrict ourselves to rigid organic molecules and, by considering their geometric properties, build trial crystal packings as starting points for local lattice energy minimization. We also describe a method to match instances of the same structure, which we use to measure the convergence of our packing search toward completeness. The use of these tools is demonstrated for a set of molecules with diverse molecular characteristics and as representative of areas of application where CSP has been applied. An important finding is that the lowest energy crystal structures are typically located early and frequently during a quasi-random search of phase space. It is usually the complete sampling of higher energy structures that requires extended sampling. We show how the procedure can first be refined, through targetting the volume of the generated crystal structures, and then extended across a range of space groups to make a full CSP search and locate experimentally observed and lists of hypothetical polymorphs. As the described method has also been created to lie at the base of more involved approaches to CSP, which are being developed within the Global Lattice Energy Explorer (Glee) software, a few of these extensions are briefly discussed. PMID:26716361

  1. Prediction and Design of Materials from Crystal Structures to Nanocrystal Morphology and Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Richard

    2012-02-01

    Predictions of structure formation by computational methods have the potential to accelerate materials discovery and design. Here we present two computational approaches for the prediction of crystal structures and the morphology of nanoparticles. Many materials properties are controlled by composition and crystal structure. We show that evolutionary algorithms coupled to ab-initio relaxations can accurately predict the crystal structure and composition of compounds without any prior information about the system. We will discuss results for various systems including the prediction of unexpected quasi-1D and 2D electronic structures in Li-Be compounds under pressure [1] and of the crystal structure of the superconducting high-pressure phase of Eu [2]. The self-assembly of nanocrystals into mesoscale superlattices provides a path to the design of materials with tunable electronic, physical and chemical properties for various applications. The self-assembly is controlled by the nanocrystal shape and by ligand-mediated interactions between them. To understand this, it is necessary to know the effect of the ligands on the surface energies (which tune the nanocrystal shape), as well as the relative coverage of the different facets (which control the interactions). Density functional calculations for the binding energy of oleic acid-based ligands on PbSe nanocrystals determine the surface energies as a function of ligand coverage. The Wulff construction predicts the thermodynamic equilibrium shape of the PbSe nanocrystals as a function of the ligand coverage. We show that the different ligand binding energies on the 100 and 111 facets results in different ligand coverages on the facets and predict a transition in the equilibrium shape from octahedral to cubic when increasing the ligand concentration during synthesis. Our results furthermore suggest that the experimentally observed transformation of the nanocrystal superlattice structure from fcc to bcc is caused by the

  2. Ab-initio crystal structure prediction. A case study: NaBH{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, Riccarda; Tekin, Adem

    2011-07-15

    Crystal structure prediction from first principles is still one of the most challenging and interesting issue in condensed matter science. we explored the potential energy surface of NaBH{sub 4} by a combined ab-initio approach, based on global structure optimizations and quantum chemistry. In particular, we used simulated annealing (SA) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The methodology enabled the identification of several local minima, of which the global minimum corresponded to the tetragonal ground-state structure (P4{sub 2}/nmc), and the prediction of higher energy stable structures, among them a monoclinic (Pm) one was identified to be 22.75 kJ/mol above the ground-state at T=298 K. In between, orthorhombic and cubic structures were recovered, in particular those with Pnma and F4-bar 3m symmetries. - Graphical abstract: The total electron energy difference of the calculated stable structures. Here, the tetragonal (IT 137) and the monoclinic (IT 6) symmetry groups corresponded to the lowest and the highest energy structures, respectively. Highlights: > Potential energy surface of NaBH{sub 4} is investigated. > This is done a combination of global structure optimizations based on simulated annealing and density functional calculations. > We successfully reproduced experimentally found tetragonal and orthorhombic structures of NaBH{sub 4}. > Furthermore, we found a new stable high energy structure.

  3. Report on the sixth blind test of organic crystal structure prediction methods

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Anthony M.; Cooper, Richard I.; Adjiman, Claire S.; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Boese, A. Daniel; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bygrave, Peter J.; Bylsma, Rita; Campbell, Josh E.; Car, Roberto; Case, David H.; Chadha, Renu; Cole, Jason C.; Cosburn, Katherine; Cuppen, Herma M.; Curtis, Farren; Day, Graeme M.; DiStasio Jr, Robert A.; Dzyabchenko, Alexander; van Eijck, Bouke P.; Elking, Dennis M.; van den Ende, Joost A.; Facelli, Julio C.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Fusti-Molnar, Laszlo; Gatsiou, Christina-Anna; Gee, Thomas S.; de Gelder, René; Ghiringhelli, Luca M.; Goto, Hitoshi; Grimme, Stefan; Guo, Rui; Hofmann, Detlef W. M.; Hoja, Johannes; Hylton, Rebecca K.; Iuzzolino, Luca; Jankiewicz, Wojciech; de Jong, Daniël T.; Kendrick, John; de Klerk, Niek J. J.; Ko, Hsin-Yu; Kuleshova, Liudmila N.; Li, Xiayue; Lohani, Sanjaya; Leusen, Frank J. J.; Lund, Albert M.; Lv, Jian; Ma, Yanming; Marom, Noa; Masunov, Artëm E.; McCabe, Patrick; McMahon, David P.; Meekes, Hugo; Metz, Michael P.; Misquitta, Alston J.; Mohamed, Sharmarke; Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J.; Neumann, Marcus A.; Nyman, Jonas; Obata, Shigeaki; Oberhofer, Harald; Oganov, Artem R.; Orendt, Anita M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Pantelides, Constantinos C.; Pickard, Chris J.; Podeszwa, Rafal; Price, Louise S.; Price, Sarah L.; Pulido, Angeles; Read, Murray G.; Reuter, Karsten; Schneider, Elia; Schober, Christoph; Shields, Gregory P.; Singh, Pawanpreet; Sugden, Isaac J.; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Taylor, Christopher R.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Tuckerman, Mark E.; Vacarro, Francesca; Vasileiadis, Manolis; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Vogt, Leslie; Wang, Yanchao; Watson, Rona E.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Yang, Jack; Zhu, Qiang; Groom, Colin R.

    2016-01-01

    The sixth blind test of organic crystal structure prediction (CSP) methods has been held, with five target systems: a small nearly rigid molecule, a polymorphic former drug candidate, a chloride salt hydrate, a co-crystal and a bulky flexible molecule. This blind test has seen substantial growth in the number of participants, with the broad range of prediction methods giving a unique insight into the state of the art in the field. Significant progress has been seen in treating flexible molecules, usage of hierarchical approaches to ranking structures, the application of density-functional approximations, and the establishment of new workflows and ‘best practices’ for performing CSP calculations. All of the targets, apart from a single potentially disordered Z′ = 2 polymorph of the drug candidate, were predicted by at least one submission. Despite many remaining challenges, it is clear that CSP methods are becoming more applicable to a wider range of real systems, including salts, hydrates and larger flexible molecules. The results also highlight the potential for CSP calculations to complement and augment experimental studies of organic solid forms. PMID:27484368

  4. Report on the sixth blind test of organic crystal structure prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Anthony M; Cooper, Richard I; Adjiman, Claire S; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Boese, A Daniel; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bygrave, Peter J; Bylsma, Rita; Campbell, Josh E; Car, Roberto; Case, David H; Chadha, Renu; Cole, Jason C; Cosburn, Katherine; Cuppen, Herma M; Curtis, Farren; Day, Graeme M; DiStasio, Robert A; Dzyabchenko, Alexander; van Eijck, Bouke P; Elking, Dennis M; van den Ende, Joost A; Facelli, Julio C; Ferraro, Marta B; Fusti-Molnar, Laszlo; Gatsiou, Christina Anna; Gee, Thomas S; de Gelder, René; Ghiringhelli, Luca M; Goto, Hitoshi; Grimme, Stefan; Guo, Rui; Hofmann, Detlef W M; Hoja, Johannes; Hylton, Rebecca K; Iuzzolino, Luca; Jankiewicz, Wojciech; de Jong, Daniël T; Kendrick, John; de Klerk, Niek J J; Ko, Hsin Yu; Kuleshova, Liudmila N; Li, Xiayue; Lohani, Sanjaya; Leusen, Frank J J; Lund, Albert M; Lv, Jian; Ma, Yanming; Marom, Noa; Masunov, Artëm E; McCabe, Patrick; McMahon, David P; Meekes, Hugo; Metz, Michael P; Misquitta, Alston J; Mohamed, Sharmarke; Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J; Neumann, Marcus A; Nyman, Jonas; Obata, Shigeaki; Oberhofer, Harald; Oganov, Artem R; Orendt, Anita M; Pagola, Gabriel I; Pantelides, Constantinos C; Pickard, Chris J; Podeszwa, Rafal; Price, Louise S; Price, Sarah L; Pulido, Angeles; Read, Murray G; Reuter, Karsten; Schneider, Elia; Schober, Christoph; Shields, Gregory P; Singh, Pawanpreet; Sugden, Isaac J; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Taylor, Christopher R; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Tuckerman, Mark E; Vacarro, Francesca; Vasileiadis, Manolis; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Vogt, Leslie; Wang, Yanchao; Watson, Rona E; de Wijs, Gilles A; Yang, Jack; Zhu, Qiang; Groom, Colin R

    2016-08-01

    The sixth blind test of organic crystal structure prediction (CSP) methods has been held, with five target systems: a small nearly rigid molecule, a polymorphic former drug candidate, a chloride salt hydrate, a co-crystal and a bulky flexible molecule. This blind test has seen substantial growth in the number of participants, with the broad range of prediction methods giving a unique insight into the state of the art in the field. Significant progress has been seen in treating flexible molecules, usage of hierarchical approaches to ranking structures, the application of density-functional approximations, and the establishment of new workflows and `best practices' for performing CSP calculations. All of the targets, apart from a single potentially disordered Z' = 2 polymorph of the drug candidate, were predicted by at least one submission. Despite many remaining challenges, it is clear that CSP methods are becoming more applicable to a wider range of real systems, including salts, hydrates and larger flexible molecules. The results also highlight the potential for CSP calculations to complement and augment experimental studies of organic solid forms. PMID:27484368

  5. How important is thermal expansion for predicting molecular crystal structures and thermochemistry at finite temperatures?

    PubMed

    Heit, Yonaton N; Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-08-01

    Molecular crystals expand appreciably upon heating due to both zero-point and thermal vibrational motion, yet this expansion is often neglected in molecular crystal modeling studies. Here, a quasi-harmonic approximation is coupled with fragment-based hybrid many-body interaction calculations to predict thermal expansion and finite-temperature thermochemical properties in crystalline carbon dioxide, ice Ih, acetic acid and imidazole. Fragment-based second-order Möller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and coupled cluster theory with singles, doubles and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] predict the thermal expansion and the temperature dependence of the enthalpies, entropies and Gibbs free energies of sublimation in good agreement with experiment. The errors introduced by neglecting thermal expansion in the enthalpy and entropy cancel somewhat in the Gibbs free energy. The resulting ∼ 1-2 kJ mol(-1) errors in the free energy near room temperature are comparable to or smaller than the errors expected from the electronic structure treatment, but they may be sufficiently large to affect free-energy rankings among energetically close polymorphs. PMID:27484373

  6. Crystal Structure Prediction and its Application in Earth and Materials Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang

    First of all, we describe how to predict crystal structure by evolutionary approach, and extend this method to study the packing of organic molecules, by our specially designed constrained evolutionary algorithm. The main feature of this new approach is that each unit or molecule is treated as a whole body, which drastically reduces the search space and improves the efficiency. The improved method is possibly to be applied in the fields of (1) high pressure phase of simple molecules (H2O, NH3, CH4, etc); (2) pharmaceutical molecules (glycine, aspirin, etc); (3) complex inorganic crystals containing cluster or molecular unit, (Mg(BH4)2, Ca(BH4)2, etc). One application of the constrained evolutionary algorithm is given by the study of (Mg(BH4)2, which is a promising materials for hydrogen storage. Our prediction does not only reproduce the previous work on Mg(BH4)2 at ambient condition, but also yields two new tetragonal structures at high pressure, with space groups P4 and I41/acd are predicted to be lower in enthalpy, by 15.4 kJ/mol and 21.2 kJ/mol, respectively, than the earlier proposed P42nm phase. We have simulated X-ray diffraction spectra, lattice dynamics, and equations of state of these phases. The density, volume contraction, bulk modulus, and the simulated XRD patterns of P4 and I41/acd structures are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. Two kinds of oxides (Xe-O and Mg-O) have been studied under megabar pressures. For XeO, we predict the existence of thermodynamically stable Xe-O compounds at high pressures (XeO, XeO2 and XeO3 become stable at pressures of 83, 102 and 114 GPa, respectively). For Mg-O, our calculations find that two extraordinary compounds MgO2 and Mg3O 2 become thermodynamically stable at 116 GPa and 500 GPa, respectively. Our calculations indicate large charge transfer in these oxides for both systems, suggesting that large electronegativity difference and pressure are the key factors favouring their formations. We also

  7. XTALOPT version r7: An open-source evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonie, David C.; Zurek, Eva

    2011-10-01

    A new version of XTALOPT, a user-friendly GPL-licensed evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction, is available for download from the CPC library or the XTALOPT website, http://xtalopt.openmolecules.net. The new version now supports four external geometry optimization codes (VASP, GULP, PWSCF, and CASTEP), as well as three queuing systems: PBS, SGE, SLURM, and “Local”. The local queuing system allows the geometry optimizations to be performed on the user's workstation if an external computational cluster is unavailable. Support for the Windows operating system has been added, and a Windows installer is provided. Numerous bugfixes and feature enhancements have been made in the new release as well.

  8. XTALOPT: An open-source evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonie, David C.; Zurek, Eva

    2011-02-01

    The implementation and testing of XTALOPT, an evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction, is outlined. We present our new periodic displacement (ripple) operator which is ideally suited to extended systems. It is demonstrated that hybrid operators, which combine two pure operators, reduce the number of duplicate structures in the search. This allows for better exploration of the potential energy surface of the system in question, while simultaneously zooming in on the most promising regions. A continuous workflow, which makes better use of computational resources as compared to traditional generation based algorithms, is employed. Various parameters in XTALOPT are optimized using a novel benchmarking scheme. XTALOPT is available under the GNU Public License, has been interfaced with various codes commonly used to study extended systems, and has an easy to use, intuitive graphical interface. Program summaryProgram title:XTALOPT Catalogue identifier: AEGX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL v2.1 or later [1] No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 36 849 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 149 399 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: PCs, workstations, or clusters Operating system: Linux Classification: 7.7 External routines: QT [2], OpenBabel [3], AVOGADRO [4], SPGLIB [8] and one of: VASP [5], PWSCF [6], GULP [7]. Nature of problem: Predicting the crystal structure of a system from its stoichiometry alone remains a grand challenge in computational materials science, chemistry, and physics. Solution method: Evolutionary algorithms are stochastic search techniques which use concepts from biological evolution in order to locate the global minimum on their potential energy surface. Our evolutionary algorithm, XTALOPT, is freely

  9. First principles predictions of van der Waals bonded inorganic crystal structures: Test case, HgCl2

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Valentino R; Donald, Kelling J

    2015-01-01

    We study the crystals structure and stability of four possible polymorphs of HgCl2 using first principles density functional theory. Mercury (II) halides are a unique class of materials which, depending on the halide species, form in a wide range of crystal structures, ranging from densely packed solids to layered materials and molecular solids. Predicting the groundstate structure of any member of this group from first principles, therefore, requires a general purpose functional that treats van der Waals bonding and covalent/ionic bonding adequately. Here, we demonstrate that the non-local van der Waals density functional paired with the C09 exchange functional meets this bar for HgCl2. In particular, this functional is able to predict the correct groundstate among the structures tested as well as having extremely good agreement with the experimentally known crystal structure. These results highlight the maturity of this functional and open the door to using this method for truly first principles crystal structure predictions.

  10. Predicting crystal structure and habit of organic micro-crystals by experimentally assisted molecular modelling (EAMM). The case of n-octylamino-NBD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pèpe, Gérard; Fery-Forgues, Suzanne; Jouanna, Paul

    2011-10-01

    Experimentally Assisted Molecular Modelling (EAMM) is an original approach for predicting the structure of organic micro-crystals and deducing their habit in the presence of various solvents and additives. It is applied here in the case of n-octylamino-nitrobenzoxadiazole ( nOA-NBD), a fluorescent compound. This general approach is first of all described and validated by its blind application to three known and closely-related crystals. Then, the whole process is applied to predict the molecular crystal generated by n-octylamino-NBD, including the molecule conformation, its structure (cell parameters, molecular packing, X-ray powder diagrams) and its theoretical plus actual habits in the presence of a solvent ( p-xylene) and two additives (acetic acid and n-dodecane). The conformation of the predicted molecule is validated by comparison with two similar molecules embedded in observable crystals. Then, the choice between two proposed structures (with the same energy and two equiprobable packings) is based on the comparison between experimental and re-computed X-ray powder diffraction diagrams, and also on the interpretation of an actual TEM image in the light of the proposed cell parameters. This choice is confirmed by the comparison between the vapour-grown face development (proposed by the BFDH or the attachment energy models) and the actual face development in a pure solvent. Finally, the actual habit deduced from comparing the crystal attachment energy with the adsorption energy of solvent or additive molecules is validated by SEM images of NBD micro-crystals in presence of the solvent alone or in presence of both additives. In conclusion, the EAMM approach appears to be a decisive tool for quickly simulating structural and habit properties of the molecular crystals, accessible or not by experimentation. Thus, a numerical selection of molecules becomes possible in view of deriving organic materials with predetermined properties, such as the fluorescence

  11. Accurate prediction of lattice energies and structures of molecular crystals with molecular quantum chemistry methods.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tao; Li, Wei; Gu, Fangwei; Li, Shuhua

    2015-01-13

    We extend the generalized energy-based fragmentation (GEBF) approach to molecular crystals under periodic boundary conditions (PBC), and we demonstrate the performance of the method for a variety of molecular crystals. With this approach, the lattice energy of a molecular crystal can be obtained from the energies of a series of embedded subsystems, which can be computed with existing advanced molecular quantum chemistry methods. The use of the field compensation method allows the method to take long-range electrostatic interaction of the infinite crystal environment into account and make the method almost translationally invariant. The computational cost of the present method scales linearly with the number of molecules in the unit cell. Illustrative applications demonstrate that the PBC-GEBF method with explicitly correlated quantum chemistry methods is capable of providing accurate descriptions on the lattice energies and structures for various types of molecular crystals. In addition, this approach can be employed to quantify the contributions of various intermolecular interactions to the theoretical lattice energy. Such qualitative understanding is very useful for rational design of molecular crystals. PMID:26574207

  12. An Insight into Sodiation of Antimony from First-Principles Crystal Structure Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Riccarda

    2016-02-01

    Elemental antimony has recently become an attractive anode material for potential application in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries. I present a first-principles study of the structure-composition dependence of the Na-Sb system for both sodiation and desodiation processes. The enthalpy of reaction of x moles of sodium with the hexagonal structure of antimony reveals several stable crystal structures for 0 < x ≤ 3, with variable composition states for 1.25 < x < 2.75. The direct and reverse reactions pass through similar states in terms of enthalpy of formation and symmetry representation of the corresponding optimized structures, in particular for x = 1 and x = 3, confirming the two known phases, namely NaSb and Na3Sb. The calculations suggest that the optimal composition range for reversible sodiation of antimony is 1 < x ≤ 3, thus avoiding the global minimum at x = 1. This can help to rationalize the structure-composition dependence of the electrochemical performance of antimony in Na-ion batteries.

  13. Crystal structure prediction of Fe3Se4 using the evolutionary algorithm coupled with first principles DFT simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Aqtash, Nabil; Sabirianov, Renat

    2014-03-01

    The evolutionary algorithm coupled with the first-principles Density Functional Theory (DFT) method is used to identify the global energy minimum structure of Fe3Se4. The structure is processed by free-energy based evolutionary crystal structure optimization algorithms, as implemented USPEX and XtalOpt codes, which predict structure of the system solely based on the chemical formula without prior experimental information. This is very challenging task for verifying the validity of this approach on Fe3Se4 structure. Fe3Se4 has highly anisotropic structure, and its structure demonstrates ordering of vacancies that makes the system ``open'', i.e. breaking traditional coordination rules. By using USPEX and XtalOpt we identify the global minimum of Fe3Se4 structure. The randomly generated initial population had 20 structures. The enthalpy (tolerance of 0.002 eV), and space group were used for niching. The enthalpy of the lowest energy structure, out of 700 generated structures that were generated, is (-81.126 eV). Bulk Fe3Se4 has a monoclinic structure with a space group of I2/m and a = 6.208Å, b = 3.541Å, and c = 11.281Å. The crystal structure and the lattice parameters of Fe3Se4 optimized from our calculations are similar to the experimental existing structure parameters. Fe3Se4 exhibits large magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 6x106 erg/cm3 and coercivity up to 40kOe due to its unusual properties.

  14. In silico prediction and screening of modular crystal structures via a high-throughput genomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Li, Xu; Liu, Jiancong; Duan, Fangzheng; Yu, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput computational methods capable of predicting, evaluating and identifying promising synthetic candidates with desired properties are highly appealing to today's scientists. Despite some successes, in silico design of crystalline materials with complex three-dimensionally extended structures remains challenging. Here we demonstrate the application of a new genomic approach to ABC-6 zeolites, a family of industrially important catalysts whose structures are built from the stacking of modular six-ring layers. The sequences of layer stacking, which we deem the genes of this family, determine the structures and the properties of ABC-6 zeolites. By enumerating these gene-like stacking sequences, we have identified 1,127 most realizable new ABC-6 structures out of 78 groups of 84,292 theoretical ones, and experimentally realized 2 of them. Our genomic approach can extract crucial structural information directly from these gene-like stacking sequences, enabling high-throughput identification of synthetic targets with desired properties among a large number of candidate structures. PMID:26395233

  15. In silico prediction and screening of modular crystal structures via a high-throughput genomic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Li, Xu; Liu, Jiancong; Duan, Fangzheng; Yu, Jihong

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput computational methods capable of predicting, evaluating and identifying promising synthetic candidates with desired properties are highly appealing to today's scientists. Despite some successes, in silico design of crystalline materials with complex three-dimensionally extended structures remains challenging. Here we demonstrate the application of a new genomic approach to ABC-6 zeolites, a family of industrially important catalysts whose structures are built from the stacking of modular six-ring layers. The sequences of layer stacking, which we deem the genes of this family, determine the structures and the properties of ABC-6 zeolites. By enumerating these gene-like stacking sequences, we have identified 1,127 most realizable new ABC-6 structures out of 78 groups of 84,292 theoretical ones, and experimentally realized 2 of them. Our genomic approach can extract crucial structural information directly from these gene-like stacking sequences, enabling high-throughput identification of synthetic targets with desired properties among a large number of candidate structures.

  16. Prediction method of basic domain structure in Fe3%Si(110) single crystal with grooved surface

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, K.; Fujikura, M.; Arai, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2014-05-07

    This paper proposes the method to accurately predict the 180° basic domain width (D{sub w}) in demagnetized states of the grooved Fe3%Si(110) single crystal with the tilt angle of [001] out of the sheet surface (β). The evaluation of D{sub w} enables the estimation of the anomalous eddy current losses. In this paper, D{sub w} is optimized to minimize the magnetic Gibbs free energy represented by vector potentials using the finite element method and the conjugate gradient method. The μ*-method is adopted to approximate the magnetization relaxation. The stray field energy generated by the magnetic charges occurring on both grooves cross section and sheet surfaces is considered in our proposed method. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed by comparison with the observed D{sub w}. As a result, we could reveal the β dependence of D{sub w} against the groove depth. Moreover, the theoretical threshold of the domain refinement due to the grooves has been suggested.

  17. Assessment of Different Quantum Mechanical Methods for the Prediction of Structure and Cohesive Energy of Molecular Crystals.

    PubMed

    Cutini, Michele; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Corno, Marta; Orlando, Roberto; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Maschio, Lorenzo; Ugliengo, Piero

    2016-07-12

    A comparative assessment of the accuracy of different quantum mechanical methods for evaluating the structure and the cohesive energy of molecular crystals is presented. In particular, we evaluate the performance of the semiempirical HF-3c method in comparison with the B3LYP-D* and the Local MP2 (LMP2) methods by means of a fully periodic approach. Three benchmark sets have been investigated: X23, G60, and the new K7; for a total of 82 molecular crystals. The original HF-3c method performs well but shows a tendency at overbinding molecular crystals, in particular for weakly bounded systems. For the X23 set, the mean absolute error for the cohesive energies computed with the HF-3c method is comparable to the LMP2 one. A refinement of the HF-3c has been attempted by tuning the dispersion term in the HF-3c energy. While the performance on cohesive energy prediction slightly worsens, optimized unit cell volumes are in excellent agreement with experiment. Overall, the B3LYP-D* method combined with a TZP basis set gives the best results. For cost-effective calculations on molecular crystals, we propose to compute cohesive energies at the B3LYP-D*/TZP level of theory on the dispersion-scaled HF-3c optimized geometries (i.e., B3LYP-D*/TZP//HF-3c(0.27) also dubbed as SP-B3LYP-D*). Besides, for further benchmarking on molecular crystals, we propose to combine the three test sets in a new one denoted as MC82. PMID:27304925

  18. Genetic algorithm prediction of crystal structure of metastable Si-IX phase

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Yangang; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2013-12-14

    We performed genetic algorithm search for the atomic structure of the long Lime unsolved Si-IX phase. We found two new structures with space groups of P4(2)/m and P-4, respectively, which have lattice parameters in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The phonon calculations showed that the P4(2)/m structure exhibits a soft phonon mode, while the P-4 structure is dynamically stable. Our calculation also showed that the P-4 structure is a meta-stable structure in a pressure range from 0 to 40 GPa, The Si-IX phase could be a mixed phase consisting of the P4(2)/m and the P-4 structures. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Prediction of Stable Ruthenium Silicides from First-Principles Calculations: Stoichiometries, Crystal Structures, and Physical Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanzhao; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Jin, Yuanyuan; Lu, Cheng; Zhou, Dawei; Li, Peifang; Bao, Gang; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We present results of an unbiased structure search for stable ruthenium silicide compounds with various stoichiometries, using a recently developed technique that combines particle swarm optimization algorithms with first-principles calculations. Two experimentally observed structures of ruthenium silicides, RuSi (space group P2(1)3) and Ru2Si3 (space group Pbcn), are successfully reproduced under ambient pressure conditions. In addition, a stable RuSi2 compound with β-FeSi2 structure type (space group Cmca) was found. The calculations of the formation enthalpy, elastic constants, and phonon dispersions demonstrate the Cmca-RuSi2 compound is energetically, mechanically, and dynamically stable. The analysis of electronic band structures and densities of state reveals that the Cmca-RuSi2 phase is a semiconductor with a direct band gap of 0.480 eV and is stabilized by strong covalent bonding between Ru and neighboring Si atoms. On the basis of the Mulliken overlap population analysis, the Vickers hardness of the Cmca structure RuSi2 is estimated to be 28.0 GPa, indicating its ultra-incompressible nature. PMID:26576622

  20. Predicting crystals of Janus colloids.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Teun; Preisler, Zdenek; Smallenburg, Frank; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Sciortino, Francesco

    2013-04-28

    We present a numerical study on the phase diagram for a simple model of Janus colloids, including ordered and disordered structures. Using a range of techniques, we generate a set of crystal structures and investigate their relative stability field in the pressure-temperature and temperature-density planes by means of free-energy calculations and thermodynamic integration schemes. We find that despite the Janus colloids' simple architecture, they form stable crystal structures with complicated bond-topologies on an underlying face-centered-cubic or hexagonal-close-packed lattice. In addition, we find a phase consisting of wrinkled bilayer sheets, competing with both the fluid and the crystal phases. We detect a metastable gas-liquid coexistence which displays a micellization-driven re-entrant behavior. PMID:23635155

  1. Crystal-structure prediction via the Floppy-Box Monte Carlo algorithm: Method and application to hard (non)convex particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Joost; Filion, Laura; Marechal, Matthieu; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the way to set up the floppy-box Monte Carlo (FBMC) method [L. Filion, M. Marechal, B. van Oorschot, D. Pelt, F. Smallenburg, and M. Dijkstra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 188302 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.188302] to predict crystal-structure candidates for colloidal particles. The algorithm is explained in detail to ensure that it can be straightforwardly implemented on the basis of this text. The handling of hard-particle interactions in the FBMC algorithm is given special attention, as (soft) short-range and semi-long-range interactions can be treated in an analogous way. We also discuss two types of algorithms for checking for overlaps between polyhedra, the method of separating axes and a triangular-tessellation based technique. These can be combined with the FBMC method to enable crystal-structure prediction for systems composed of highly shape-anisotropic particles. Moreover, we present the results for the dense crystal structures predicted using the FBMC method for 159 (non)convex faceted particles, on which the findings in [J. de Graaf, R. van Roij, and M. Dijkstra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 155501 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.155501] were based. Finally, we comment on the process of crystal-structure prediction itself and the choices that can be made in these simulations.

  2. Crystal-structure prediction via the floppy-box Monte Carlo algorithm: method and application to hard (non)convex particles.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Joost; Filion, Laura; Marechal, Matthieu; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the way to set up the floppy-box Monte Carlo (FBMC) method [L. Filion, M. Marechal, B. van Oorschot, D. Pelt, F. Smallenburg, and M. Dijkstra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 188302 (2009)] to predict crystal-structure candidates for colloidal particles. The algorithm is explained in detail to ensure that it can be straightforwardly implemented on the basis of this text. The handling of hard-particle interactions in the FBMC algorithm is given special attention, as (soft) short-range and semi-long-range interactions can be treated in an analogous way. We also discuss two types of algorithms for checking for overlaps between polyhedra, the method of separating axes and a triangular-tessellation based technique. These can be combined with the FBMC method to enable crystal-structure prediction for systems composed of highly shape-anisotropic particles. Moreover, we present the results for the dense crystal structures predicted using the FBMC method for 159 (non)convex faceted particles, on which the findings in [J. de Graaf, R. van Roij, and M. Dijkstra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 155501 (2011)] were based. Finally, we comment on the process of crystal-structure prediction itself and the choices that can be made in these simulations. PMID:23231211

  3. Prediction of molecular crystal structures by a crystallographic QM/MM model with full space-group symmetry.

    PubMed

    Mörschel, Philipp; Schmidt, Martin U

    2015-01-01

    A crystallographic quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical model (c-QM/MM model) with full space-group symmetry has been developed for molecular crystals. The lattice energy was calculated by quantum-mechanical methods for short-range interactions and force-field methods for long-range interactions. The quantum-mechanical calculations covered the interactions within the molecule and the interactions of a reference molecule with each of the surrounding 12-15 molecules. The interactions with all other molecules were treated by force-field methods. In each optimization step the energies in the QM and MM shells were calculated separately as single-point energies; after adding both energy contributions, the crystal structure (including the lattice parameters) was optimized accordingly. The space-group symmetry was maintained throughout. Crystal structures with more than one molecule per asymmetric unit, e.g. structures with Z' = 2, hydrates and solvates, have been optimized as well. Test calculations with different quantum-mechanical methods on nine small organic molecules revealed that the density functional theory methods with dispersion correction using the B97-D functional with 6-31G* basis set in combination with the DREIDING force field reproduced the experimental crystal structures with good accuracy. Subsequently the c-QM/MM method was applied to nine compounds from the CCDC blind tests resulting in good energy rankings and excellent geometric accuracies. PMID:25537386

  4. Functional significance of protein assemblies predicted by the crystal structure of the restriction endonuclease BsaWI

    PubMed Central

    Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Rutkauskas, Marius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Grazulis, Saulius; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2015-01-01

    Type II restriction endonuclease BsaWI recognizes a degenerated sequence 5′-W/CCGGW-3′ (W stands for A or T, ‘/’ denotes the cleavage site). It belongs to a large family of restriction enzymes that contain a conserved CCGG tetranucleotide in their target sites. These enzymes are arranged as dimers or tetramers, and require binding of one, two or three DNA targets for their optimal catalytic activity. Here, we present a crystal structure and biochemical characterization of the restriction endonuclease BsaWI. BsaWI is arranged as an ‘open’ configuration dimer and binds a single DNA copy through a minor groove contacts. In the crystal primary BsaWI dimers form an indefinite linear chain via the C-terminal domain contacts implying possible higher order aggregates. We show that in solution BsaWI protein exists in a dimer-tetramer-oligomer equilibrium, but in the presence of specific DNA forms a tetramer bound to two target sites. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic experiments show that BsaWI is active as a tetramer and requires two target sites for optimal activity. We propose BsaWI mechanism that shares common features both with dimeric Ecl18kI/SgrAI and bona fide tetrameric NgoMIV/SfiI enzymes. PMID:26240380

  5. Functional significance of protein assemblies predicted by the crystal structure of the restriction endonuclease BsaWI.

    PubMed

    Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Rutkauskas, Marius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Grazulis, Saulius; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2015-09-18

    Type II restriction endonuclease BsaWI recognizes a degenerated sequence 5'-W/CCGGW-3' (W stands for A or T, '/' denotes the cleavage site). It belongs to a large family of restriction enzymes that contain a conserved CCGG tetranucleotide in their target sites. These enzymes are arranged as dimers or tetramers, and require binding of one, two or three DNA targets for their optimal catalytic activity. Here, we present a crystal structure and biochemical characterization of the restriction endonuclease BsaWI. BsaWI is arranged as an 'open' configuration dimer and binds a single DNA copy through a minor groove contacts. In the crystal primary BsaWI dimers form an indefinite linear chain via the C-terminal domain contacts implying possible higher order aggregates. We show that in solution BsaWI protein exists in a dimer-tetramer-oligomer equilibrium, but in the presence of specific DNA forms a tetramer bound to two target sites. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic experiments show that BsaWI is active as a tetramer and requires two target sites for optimal activity. We propose BsaWI mechanism that shares common features both with dimeric Ecl18kI/SgrAI and bona fide tetrameric NgoMIV/SfiI enzymes. PMID:26240380

  6. Characterization of some amino acid derivatives of benzoyl isothiocyanate: Crystal structures and theoretical prediction of their reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odame, Felix; Hosten, Eric C.; Betz, Richard; Lobb, Kevin; Tshentu, Zenixole R.

    2015-11-01

    The reaction of benzoyl isothiocyanate with L-serine, L-proline, D-methionine and L-alanine gave 2-[(benzoylcarbamothioyl)amino]-3-hydroxypropanoic acid (I), 1-(benzoylcarbamothioyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (II), 2-[(benzoylcarbamothioyl)amino]-4-(methylsulfanyl)butanoic acid (III) and 2-[(benzoylcarbamothioyl)amino]propanoic acid (IV), respectively. The compounds have been characterized by IR, NMR, microanalyses and mass spectrometry. The crystal structures of all the compounds have also been discussed. Compound II showed rotamers in solution. DFT calculations of the frontier orbitals of the compounds have been carried out to ascertain the groups that contribute to the HOMO and LUMO, and to study their contribution to the reactivity of these compounds. The calculations indicated that the carboxylic acid group in these compounds is unreactive hence making the conversion to benzimidazoles via cyclization on the carboxylic acids impractical. This has been further confirmed by the reaction of compounds I-IV, respectively, with o-phenylene diamine which was unsuccessful but gave compound V.

  7. Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) (PC database for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.

  8. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  9. Demonstration of Crystal Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neville, Joseph P.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment where equal parts of copper and aluminum are heated then cooled to show extremely large crystals. Suggestions are given for changing the orientation of crystals by varying cooling rates. Students are more receptive to concepts of microstructure after seeing this experiment. (DH)

  10. Crystal structure determination of Efavirenz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popeneciu, Horea; Tripon, Carmen; Borodi, Gheorghe; Pop, Mihaela Maria; Dumitru, Ristoiu

    2015-12-01

    Needle-shaped single crystals of the title compound, C14H9ClF3NO2, were obtained from a co-crystallization experiment of Efavirenz with maleic acid in a (1:1) ratio, using methanol as solvent. Crystal structure determination at room temperature revealed a significant anisotropy of the lattice expansion compared to the previously reported low-temperature structure. In both low- and room temperature structures the cyclopropylethynyl fragment in one of the asymmetric unit molecules is disordered. While at low-temperature only one C atom exhibits positional disorder, at room temperature the disorder is present for two C atoms of the cyclopropane ring.

  11. Generation of crystal structures using known crystal structures as analogues

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jason C.; Groom, Colin R.; Read, Murray G.; Giangreco, Ilenia; McCabe, Patrick; Reilly, Anthony M.; Shields, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    This analysis attempts to answer the question of whether similar molecules crystallize in a similar manner. An analysis of structures in the Cambridge Structural Database shows that the answer is yes – sometimes they do, particularly for single-component structures. However, one does need to define what we mean by similar in both cases. Building on this observation we then demonstrate how this correlation between shape similarity and packing similarity can be used to generate potential lattices for molecules with no known crystal structure. Simple intermolecular interaction potentials can be used to minimize these potential lattices. Finally we discuss the many limitations of this approach. PMID:27484374

  12. Concerning inorganic crystal structure types.

    PubMed

    Bergerhoff; Berndt; Brandenburg; Degen

    1999-04-01

    All representatives of an inorganic crystal structure type can be found systematically in the new database SICS (Standardized Inorganic Crystal Structures). It is derived from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) by selecting the best determination of each phase. In addition, each entry is given in a standardized description and complemented by searchable descriptors Delta, which give the difference between all structures of an isopointal set. Because of the large number of structures the full information on relationships present can only be found by means of the new database itself. Some examples are given here in printed form. The limitations and the possibilities of expansion of SICS in terms of the concept of 'structure types' are demonstrated. PMID:10927350

  13. Crystal structure of triclopyr

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seonghwa; Kim, Jineun; Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound {systematic name: 2-[(3,5,6-tri­chloro­pyridin-2-yl)­oxy]acetic acid}, the herbicide triclopyr, C7H4Cl3NO3, the asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol­ecules in which the dihedral angles between the mean plane of the carb­oxy­lic acid group and the pyridyl ring plane are 79.3 (6) and 83.8 (5)°. In the crystal, pairs of inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds form dimers through an R 2 2(8) ring motif and are extended into chains along [100] by weak π–π inter­actions [ring centroid separations = 3.799 (4) and 3.810 (4) Å]. In addition, short inter­molecular Cl⋯Cl contacts [3.458 (2) Å] connect the chains, yielding a two-dimensional architecture extending parallel to (020). The crystal studied was found to be non-merohedrally twinned with the minor component being 0.175 (4). PMID:25309266

  14. Crystal structure of triclopyr.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seonghwa; Kim, Jineun; Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-09-01

    In the title compound {systematic name: 2-[(3,5,6-tri-chloro-pyridin-2-yl)-oxy]acetic acid}, the herbicide triclopyr, C7H4Cl3NO3, the asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol-ecules in which the dihedral angles between the mean plane of the carb-oxy-lic acid group and the pyridyl ring plane are 79.3 (6) and 83.8 (5)°. In the crystal, pairs of inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds form dimers through an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif and are extended into chains along [100] by weak π-π inter-actions [ring centroid separations = 3.799 (4) and 3.810 (4) Å]. In addition, short inter-molecular Cl⋯Cl contacts [3.458 (2) Å] connect the chains, yielding a two-dimensional architecture extending parallel to (020). The crystal studied was found to be non-merohedrally twinned with the minor component being 0.175 (4). PMID:25309266

  15. Modeling Polymorphic Molecular Crystals with Electronic Structure Theory.

    PubMed

    Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-05-11

    Interest in molecular crystals has grown thanks to their relevance to pharmaceuticals, organic semiconductor materials, foods, and many other applications. Electronic structure methods have become an increasingly important tool for modeling molecular crystals and polymorphism. This article reviews electronic structure techniques used to model molecular crystals, including periodic density functional theory, periodic second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, fragment-based electronic structure methods, and diffusion Monte Carlo. It also discusses the use of these models for predicting a variety of crystal properties that are relevant to the study of polymorphism, including lattice energies, structures, crystal structure prediction, polymorphism, phase diagrams, vibrational spectroscopies, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Finally, tools for analyzing crystal structures and intermolecular interactions are briefly discussed. PMID:27008426

  16. Predicting complex mineral structures using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Mohn, Chris E; Kob, Walter

    2015-10-28

    We show that symmetry-adapted genetic algorithms are capable of finding the ground state of a range of complex crystalline phases including layered- and incommensurate super-structures. This opens the way for the atomistic prediction of complex crystal structures of functional materials and mineral phases. PMID:26441052

  17. Crystal structure determination of Efavirenz

    SciTech Connect

    Popeneciu, Horea Dumitru, Ristoiu; Tripon, Carmen Borodi, Gheorghe Pop, Mihaela Maria

    2015-12-23

    Needle-shaped single crystals of the title compound, C{sub 14}H{sub 9}ClF{sub 3}NO{sub 2}, were obtained from a co-crystallization experiment of Efavirenz with maleic acid in a (1:1) ratio, using methanol as solvent. Crystal structure determination at room temperature revealed a significant anisotropy of the lattice expansion compared to the previously reported low-temperature structure. In both low- and room temperature structures the cyclopropylethynyl fragment in one of the asymmetric unit molecules is disordered. While at low-temperature only one C atom exhibits positional disorder, at room temperature the disorder is present for two C atoms of the cyclopropane ring.

  18. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    PubMed Central

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors. PMID:25567568

  19. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  20. Nucleation and structural growth of cluster crystals.

    PubMed

    Leitold, Christian; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-08-21

    We study the nucleation of crystalline cluster phases in the generalized exponential model with exponent n = 4. Due to the finite value of this pair potential for zero separation, at high densities the system forms cluster crystals with multiply occupied lattice sites. Here, we investigate the microscopic mechanisms that lead to the formation of cluster crystals from a supercooled liquid in the low-temperature region of the phase diagram. Using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling, we calculate the free energy as a function of the size of the largest crystalline nucleus in the system, and compare our results with predictions from classical nucleation theory. Employing bond-order parameters based on a Voronoi tessellation to distinguish different crystal structures, we analyze the average composition of crystalline nuclei. We find that even for conditions where a multiply occupied fcc crystal is the thermodynamically stable phase, the nucleation into bcc cluster crystals is strongly preferred. Furthermore, we study the particle mobility in the supercooled liquid and in the cluster crystal. In the cluster crystal, the motion of individual particles is captured by a simple reaction-diffusion model introduced previously to model the kinetics of hydrogen bonds. PMID:27544116

  1. Crystal structure of pyrazoxyfen

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Eunjin; Kim, Jineun; Kang, Gihaeng; Kim, Tae Ho

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C20H16Cl2N2O3 (systematic name: 2-{[4-(2,4-di­chloro­benzo­yl)-1,3-di­methyl­pyrazol-5-yl}­oxy}-1-phenyl­ethan-1-one), is the benzoyl­pyrazole herbicide pyrazoxyfen. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol­ecules, A and B, in which the pyrazole ring makes dihedral angles of 80.29 (10) and 61.70 (10)° and 87.60 (10) and 63.92 (8)°, respectively, with the di­chloro­phenyl and phenyl rings. In the crystal, C—H⋯O and C—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, and C—H⋯π and π–π [3.646 (2) Å] inter­actions link adjacent mol­ecules, forming a two-dimensional network parellel to (011). In addition, the networks are linked by weak inter­molecular C—Cl⋯π [3.356 (2), 3.950 (2), 3.250 (2) and 3.575 (2) Å] inter­actions, resulting in a three-dimensional architecture. PMID:26870483

  2. Crystal structure of pyrazoxyfen.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eunjin; Kim, Jineun; Kang, Gihaeng; Kim, Tae Ho

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, C20H16Cl2N2O3 (systematic name: 2-{[4-(2,4-di-chloro-benzo-yl)-1,3-di-methyl-pyrazol-5-yl}-oxy}-1-phenyl-ethan-1-one), is the benzoyl-pyrazole herbicide pyrazoxyfen. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol-ecules, A and B, in which the pyrazole ring makes dihedral angles of 80.29 (10) and 61.70 (10)° and 87.60 (10) and 63.92 (8)°, respectively, with the di-chloro-phenyl and phenyl rings. In the crystal, C-H⋯O and C-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, and C-H⋯π and π-π [3.646 (2) Å] inter-actions link adjacent mol-ecules, forming a two-dimensional network parellel to (011). In addition, the networks are linked by weak inter-molecular C-Cl⋯π [3.356 (2), 3.950 (2), 3.250 (2) and 3.575 (2) Å] inter-actions, resulting in a three-dimensional architecture. PMID:26870483

  3. Crystal structure of guggulsterone Z

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, V. K. Bandhoria, P.; Gupta, B. D.; Gupta, K. K.

    2006-03-15

    The crystal structure of the title compound (4,17(20)-trans-pregnadiene-3,16-dione, C{sub 21}H{sub 28}O{sub 2}) has been determined by direct methods using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The compound crystallizes into the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} with the unit cell parameters a = 7.908(2) A, b = 13.611(3) A, c = 16.309(4) A, and Z = 4. The structure has been refined to R = 0.058 for 3667 observed reflections. The bond distances and angles are in good agreement with guggulsterone E and other related steroid molecules. Ring A exists in the distorted sofa conformation, while rings B and C adopt the distorted chair conformation. Five-membered ring D is intermediate between the half-chair and envelope conformations. The A/B ring junction is quasi-trans, while ring systems B/C and C/D are trans fused about the C(8)-C(9) and C(13)-C(14) bonds, respectively. The steroid nucleus has a small twist, as shown by the C(19)-C(10)...C(13)-C(18) pseudo-torsion angle of 7.2{sup o}. The crystal structure is stabilized by intra-and intermolecular C-H...O hydrogen bonds.

  4. Prediction of Giant Thermoelectric Efficiency in Crystals with Interlaced Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Puzyrev, Y S; Shen, X; Pantelides, S T

    2016-01-13

    We present a theoretical study of the thermoelectric efficiency of "interlaced crystals", recently discovered in hexagonal-CuInS2 nanoparticles. Interlaced crystals are I-III-VI2 or II-IV-V2 tetrahedrally bonded compounds. They have a perfect Bravais lattice in which the two cations have an infinite set of possible ordering patterns within the cation sublattice. The material comprises nanoscale interlaced domains and phases with corresponding boundaries. Here we employ density functional theory and large-scale molecular dynamics calculations based on model classical potentials to demonstrate that the phase and domain boundaries are effective phonon scatterers and greatly suppress thermal conductivity. However, the absence of both structural defects and strain in the interlaced material results in a minimal effect on electronic properties. We predict an increase of thermal resistivity of up to 2 orders of magnitude, which makes interlaced crystals an exceptional candidate for thermoelectric applications. PMID:26691292

  5. Universal prediction of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in organic crystals.

    PubMed

    Galek, Peter T A; Fábián, László; Allen, Frank H

    2010-04-01

    A complete exploration of intramolecular hydrogen bonds (IHBs) has been undertaken using a combination of statistical analyses of the Cambridge Structural Database and computation of ab initio interaction energies for prototypical hydrogen-bonded fragments. Notable correlations have been revealed between computed energies, hydrogen-bond geometries, donor and acceptor chemistry, and frequencies of occurrence. Significantly, we find that 95% of all observed IHBs correspond to the five-, six- or seven-membered rings. Our method to predict a propensity for hydrogen-bond occurrence in a crystal has been adapted for such IHBs, applying topological and chemical descriptors derived from our findings. In contrast to intermolecular hydrogen bonding, it is found that IHBs can be predicted across the complete chemical landscape from a single optimized probability model, which is presented. Predictivity of 85% has been obtained for generic organic structures, which can exceed 90% for discrete classes of IHB. PMID:20305358

  6. Predicting P-glycoprotein-mediated drug transport based on support vector machine and three-dimensional crystal structure of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bikadi, Zsolt; Hazai, Istvan; Malik, David; Jemnitz, Katalin; Veres, Zsuzsa; Hari, Peter; Ni, Zhanglin; Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M; Hazai, Eszter; Mao, Qingcheng

    2011-01-01

    Human P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter that confers resistance to a wide range of chemotherapeutic agents in cancer cells by active efflux of the drugs from cells. P-gp also plays a key role in limiting oral absorption and brain penetration and in facilitating biliary and renal elimination of structurally diverse drugs. Thus, identification of drugs or new molecular entities to be P-gp substrates is of vital importance for predicting the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, or tissue levels of drugs or drug candidates. At present, publicly available, reliable in silico models predicting P-gp substrates are scarce. In this study, a support vector machine (SVM) method was developed to predict P-gp substrates and P-gp-substrate interactions, based on a training data set of 197 known P-gp substrates and non-substrates collected from the literature. We showed that the SVM method had a prediction accuracy of approximately 80% on an independent external validation data set of 32 compounds. A homology model of human P-gp based on the X-ray structure of mouse P-gp as a template has been constructed. We showed that molecular docking to the P-gp structures successfully predicted the geometry of P-gp-ligand complexes. Our SVM prediction and the molecular docking methods have been integrated into a free web server (http://pgp.althotas.com), which allows the users to predict whether a given compound is a P-gp substrate and how it binds to and interacts with P-gp. Utilization of such a web server may prove valuable for both rational drug design and screening. PMID:21991360

  7. Predicting P-Glycoprotein-Mediated Drug Transport Based On Support Vector Machine and Three-Dimensional Crystal Structure of P-glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Bikadi, Zsolt; Hazai, Istvan; Malik, David; Jemnitz, Katalin; Veres, Zsuzsa; Hari, Peter; Ni, Zhanglin; Loo, Tip W.; Clarke, David M.; Hazai, Eszter; Mao, Qingcheng

    2011-01-01

    Human P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter that confers resistance to a wide range of chemotherapeutic agents in cancer cells by active efflux of the drugs from cells. P-gp also plays a key role in limiting oral absorption and brain penetration and in facilitating biliary and renal elimination of structurally diverse drugs. Thus, identification of drugs or new molecular entities to be P-gp substrates is of vital importance for predicting the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, or tissue levels of drugs or drug candidates. At present, publicly available, reliable in silico models predicting P-gp substrates are scarce. In this study, a support vector machine (SVM) method was developed to predict P-gp substrates and P-gp-substrate interactions, based on a training data set of 197 known P-gp substrates and non-substrates collected from the literature. We showed that the SVM method had a prediction accuracy of approximately 80% on an independent external validation data set of 32 compounds. A homology model of human P-gp based on the X-ray structure of mouse P-gp as a template has been constructed. We showed that molecular docking to the P-gp structures successfully predicted the geometry of P-gp-ligand complexes. Our SVM prediction and the molecular docking methods have been integrated into a free web server (http://pgp.althotas.com), which allows the users to predict whether a given compound is a P-gp substrate and how it binds to and interacts with P-gp. Utilization of such a web server may prove valuable for both rational drug design and screening. PMID:21991360

  8. LDA-Prediction of New Stable Crystal Structures within=0A= the Cu-Au and Ni-Pt Alloy Systems.^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanati, M.; Wang, L.; Zunger, Alex

    2002-03-01

    Cu-Au and Ni-Pt are among the best studied fcc alloy systems, exhibiting the famous L10 (AB) and L12 (A_3B) phases. We were wondering if a complete configurational search of the T=3D0 LDA total energies would reveal any unexpected phases. Total-energy calculations of ~ 30 arbitrarily chosen structures were used to construct a generalized (momentum-space) Ising Hamiltonian containing ~ 20 pair-interactions, ~ 5-10 many-body terms, as well as the long-range strain term. This Hamiltonian was tested carefully as to its ability to predict the LDA energies of other structures. Once accuracy is established, we searched the energies of all fcc configurations with 20 or less atoms per primitive cell ( ~ 2,700,000 structures), finding the known L1_0, L12 plus new, unsuspected structures. The new ground state structures are NiPt_7, Cu_2Au, and Cu_2Au_3. We find that LDA calculations of these structures confirm that they are ground states. We describe the band structure and other properties of these new structures. ^* Supported by DOE, SC-BES-DMS. abstract.

  9. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and predicting the second-order optical nonlinearity of a new dicobalt(III) complex with Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei, Seyed Amir; Piltan, Mohammad; Hassanzadeh, Keyumars; Akhtari, Keivan; Cinčić, Dominik

    2015-03-01

    The synthesis and characterization of dicobalt(III) complex [Co2L2(OMe)2] of the tetradentate Schiff base ligand N,N‧-bis(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (H2L) is reported. The crystal structure of the complex has been determined that exhibited the pseudo-octahedral geometry around both cobalt(III) ions. In the complexation process, H2L acts as two negatively charged tetradentate ligand, L2-, and methoxy group plays as bridging ligand. The geometry structure of the complex is optimized by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP/6-311G(d,p). The calculated geometric parameters are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data. Second-Order Nonlinear Optical (NLO) property of the complex is evaluated by DFT/B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) on the base of the optimized structure that shows the enhancement relative to the calculated value of H2L. The calculated NLO value of the complex is much greater than the corresponding value of urea.

  10. Metallic behavior in low-dimensional honeycomb SiB crystals: A first-principles prediction of atomic structure and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Anders; de Brito Mota, F.; Rivelino, Roberto

    2012-11-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the atomic and electronic structure of a two-dimensional monolayer of boron and silicon elements within periodic density functional theory. The proposed h-SiB sheet is a structural analog of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and exhibits a good structural stability, compared to the structure of silicene. The calculated cohesive energy of an infinite sheet of h-SiB is of 4.71 eV/atom, whereas the corresponding value for silicene is 4.09 eV/atom. However, h-SiB sheets are not able to be stacked into a three-dimensional graphitelike structure, leading to a new hexagonal phase. On the other hand, h-SiB is predicted to roll up into single-walled silicon boron nanotubes (SWSiBNTs) of which we examine the electronic properties of some zigzag and armchair tubes. The strain energy of the SWSiBNTs are four to five times lower than the strain energy of the corresponding carbon nanotubes. In contrast to more polar honeycomb monolayers, the h-SiB sheet is not semiconducting or semimetallic. It has a delocalized charge density like graphene, but the π band and the two highest occupied σ bands are only partly filled. This results in a high density of states around the Fermi level and a metallic behavior of the h-SiB sheet. Interestingly, all the low-dimensional h-SiB-based structures, including the smallest to the largest stable tubes studied here, are predicted to form metallic systems.

  11. Toolbox for Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; McGuffin, Liam James

    2016-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure prediction algorithms aim to predict, from amino acid sequence, the tertiary structure of a protein. In silico protein structure prediction methods have become extremely important, as in vitro-based structural elucidation is unable to keep pace with the current growth of sequence databases due to high-throughput next-generation sequencing, which has exacerbated the gaps in our knowledge between sequences and structures.Here we briefly discuss protein tertiary structure prediction, the biennial competition for the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and its role in shaping the field. We also discuss, in detail, our cutting-edge web-server method IntFOLD2-TS for tertiary structure prediction. Furthermore, we provide a step-by-step guide on using the IntFOLD2-TS web server, along with some real world examples, where the IntFOLD server can and has been used to improve protein tertiary structure prediction and aid in functional elucidation. PMID:26519323

  12. Optical phonon modes and crystal structure of NaLaF4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lage, Márcio Martins; Matinaga, Franklin Massami; Gesland, Jean-Yves; Moreira, Roberto Luiz

    2006-03-01

    Polarized Raman scattering and infrared reflectivity measurements have been used to investigate the crystal structure of Czochralski-grown NaLaF4 single crystals. The phonon symmetries, the simultaneous presence of polar modes in the infrared and Raman spectra, as well as the observation of piezoelectric resonance, helped us to identify the P6 group as the correct one for this crystal. This material belongs to a family of sodium lanthanide tetrafluorides (NaLnF4) crystals, whose photoluminescence efficiency is comparable to LiYF4. Therefore, NaLaF4 crystals may be important in the development of diode pumped up-conversion solid-state lasers. The number and behavior of the observed optical phonon modes were analyzed in terms of group theory predictions for the group symmetry found. A few anomalies in the phonon characteristics are discussed in terms of cationic disorder in the crystal lattice.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of [pi]-Stacking Quinodimethane Oligothiophenes. Predicting Semiconductor Behavior and Bandwidths from Crystal Structures and Molecular Orbital Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Janzen, Daron E.; Burand, Michael W.; Ewbank, Paul C.; Pappenfus, Ted M.; Higuchi, Hiroyuki; da Silva, Demetrio A.; Young, Victor G.; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Mann, Kent R.

    2010-11-16

    A series of new quinodimethane-substituted terthiophene and quaterthiophene oligomers has been investigated for comparison with a previously studied quinoid oligothiophene that has demonstrated high mobilities and ambipolar transport behavior in thin-film transistor devices. Each new quinoidal thiophene derivative shows a reversible one-electron oxidation between 0.85 and 1.32 V, a quasi-reversible one-electron second oxidation between 1.37 and 1.96 V, and a reversible two-electron reduction between -0.05 and -0.23 V. The solution UV-vis-NIR spectrum of each compound is dominated by an intense epsilon congruent with 100,000 M{sup -1} cm{sup -1} low energy pi-pi transition that has a lambda(max) ranging between 648 and 790 nm. All X-ray crystal structures exhibit very planar quinoidal backbones and short intermolecular pi-stacking distances (3.335-3.492 A). Structures exhibit a single pi-stacking distance with parallel cofacial stacking (sulfur atoms of equivalent rings pointed in the same direction) or with alternating distances and antiparallel cofacial stacking (sulfur atoms of equivalent rings pointed in the opposite direction). Examples of the layered and herringbone-packing motifs are observed for both the parallel and the antiparallel cofacial stacking. Analysis of the X-ray structures and molecular orbital calculations indicates that all of these compounds have one-dimensional electronic band structures as a result of the pi-stacking. For structures with a unique pi-stacking distance, a simple geometric overlap parameter calculated from the shape of the molecule and the slip from perfect registry in the pi-stack correlates well with the transfer integrals (t) calculated using molecular orbital theory. The calculated valence (633 meV) and conduction (834 meV) bandwidths for a quinoid quaterthiophene structure are similar to those calculated for the benchmark pentacene and indicate that both hole and electron mobilities could be significant.

  14. Crystal structure of prethrombin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhiwei; Pelc, Leslie A.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2010-11-15

    Prothrombin is the zymogen precursor of the clotting enzyme thrombin, which is generated by two sequential cleavages at R271 and R320 by the prothrombinase complex. The structure of prothrombin is currently unknown. Prethrombin-1 differs from prothrombin for the absence of 155 residues in the N-terminal domain and is composed of a single polypeptide chain containing fragment 2 (residues 156-271), A chain (residues 272-320), and B chain (residues 321-579). The X-ray crystal structure of prethrombin-1 solved at 2.2-{angstrom} resolution shows an overall conformation significantly different (rmsd = 3.6 {angstrom}) from that of its active form meizothrombin desF1 carrying a cleavage at R320. Fragment 2 is rotated around the y axis by 29{sup o} and makes only few contacts with the B chain. In the B chain, the oxyanion hole is disrupted due to absence of the I16-D194 ion pair and the Na{sup +} binding site and adjacent primary specificity pocket are highly perturbed. A remarkable feature of the structure is that the autolysis loop assumes a helical conformation enabling W148 and W215, located 17 {angstrom} apart in meizothrombin desF1, to come within 3.3 {angstrom} of each other and completely occlude access to the active site. These findings suggest that the zymogen form of thrombin possesses conformational plasticity comparable to that of the mature enzyme and have significant implications for the mechanism of prothrombin activation and the zymogen {yields} protease conversion in trypsin-like proteases.

  15. Determination of channeling perspectives for complex crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, W.R.

    1993-03-01

    Specification of the atomic arrangement for axes and planes of high symmetry is essential for crystal alignment using Rutherford backscattering and for studies of the lattice location of impurities in single crystals. By rotation of an inscribed orthogonal coordinate system, a visual image for a given perspective of a crystal structure can be specified. Knowledge of the atomic arrangement permits qualitative channeling perspectives to be visualized and calculation of continuum potentials for channeling. Channeling angular-yield profiles can then be analytically modeled and, subsequently, shadowing by host atoms of positions within the unit cell predicted. Software to calculate transformed atom positions for a channeling perspective in a single crystal are described and illustrated for the spinel crystal structure.

  16. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2005-09-19

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We demonstrate guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode. We also discuss particle beam dynamics in the structure, presenting a novel method for focusing the beam. In addition we describe some potential coupling methods for the structure.

  17. Crystal structure of benzimidazolium salicylate

    PubMed Central

    Amudha, M.; Kumar, P. Praveen; Chakkaravarthi, G.

    2015-01-01

    In the anion of the title mol­ecular salt, C7H7N2 +·C7H5O3 − (systematic name: 1H-benzimidazol-3-ium 2-hy­droxy­ben­zo­ate), there is an intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond that generates an S(6) ring motif. The CO2 group makes a dihedral angle of 5.33 (15)° with its attached ring. In the crystal, the dihedral angle between the benzimidazolium ring and the anion benzene ring is 75.88 (5)°. Two cations bridge two anions via two pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, enclosing an R 4 4(16) ring motif, forming a four-membered centrosymmetric arrangement. These units are linked via C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains propagating along the b-axis direction. The chains are linked by C—H⋯π and π–π inter­actions [inter-centroid distances = 3.4156 (7) and 3.8196 (8) Å], forming a three-dimensional structure. PMID:26594483

  18. Crystal structure of a perfect carbyne

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Mavrinsky, V. V.

    2008-01-15

    The crystal structure of a perfect carbyne is calculated by the molecular mechanics methods. It is established that the carbyne crystals should consist of polycumulene chains arranged in hexagonal bundles. The unit cell of the perfect carbyne crystal is trigonal and contains one carbon atom. The unit cell parameters are as follows: a = b = c = 0.3580 nm, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 118.5{sup o}, and space group P3m1. The perfect carbyne single crystals have a stable structure at room temperature if the length of their constituent chains is larger than 500 nm.

  19. Structural Transitions in Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Bukusoglu, Emre; Martínez-González, José A; Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler F; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-07-26

    Confinement of cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLC) into droplets leads to a delicate interplay between elasticity, chirality, and surface energy. In this work, we rely on a combination of theory and experiments to understand the rich morphological behavior that arises from that balance. More specifically, a systematic study of micrometer-sized ChLC droplets is presented as a function of chirality and surface energy (or anchoring). With increasing chirality, a continuous transition is observed from a twisted bipolar structure to a radial spherical structure, all within a narrow range of chirality. During such a transition, a bent structure is predicted by simulations and confirmed by experimental observations. Simulations are also able to capture the dynamics of the quenching process observed in experiments. Consistent with published work, it is found that nanoparticles are attracted to defect regions on the surface of the droplets. For weak anchoring conditions at the nanoparticle surface, ChLC droplets adopt a morphology similar to that of the equilibrium helical phase observed for ChLCs in the bulk. As the anchoring strength increases, a planar bipolar structure arises, followed by a morphological transition to a bent structure. The influence of chirality and surface interactions are discussed in the context of the potential use of ChLC droplets as stimuli-responsive materials for reporting molecular adsorbates. PMID:27249186

  20. Predicting patchy particle crystals: variable box shape simulations and evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Emanuela; Doppelbauer, Günther; Filion, Laura; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Kahl, Gerhard

    2012-06-01

    We consider several patchy particle models that have been proposed in literature and we investigate their candidate crystal structures in a systematic way. We compare two different algorithms for predicting crystal structures: (i) an approach based on Monte Carlo simulations in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble and (ii) an optimization technique based on ideas of evolutionary algorithms. We show that the two methods are equally successful and provide consistent results on crystalline phases of patchy particle systems. PMID:22697525

  1. Crystal structures of the human adiponectin receptors.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Iwabu, Masato; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Motoyama, Kanna; Ikeda, Mariko; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Terada, Takaho; Ohsawa, Noboru; Hato, Masakatsu; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Hino, Tomoya; Murata, Takeshi; Iwata, So; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-04-16

    Adiponectin stimulation of its receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, increases the activities of 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), respectively, thereby contributing to healthy longevity as key anti-diabetic molecules. AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 were predicted to contain seven transmembrane helices with the opposite topology to G-protein-coupled receptors. Here we report the crystal structures of human AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 at 2.9 and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively, which represent a novel class of receptor structure. The seven-transmembrane helices, conformationally distinct from those of G-protein-coupled receptors, enclose a large cavity where three conserved histidine residues coordinate a zinc ion. The zinc-binding structure may have a role in the adiponectin-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and UCP2 upregulation. Adiponectin may broadly interact with the extracellular face, rather than the carboxy-terminal tail, of the receptors. The present information will facilitate the understanding of novel structure-function relationships and the development and optimization of AdipoR agonists for the treatment of obesity-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. PMID:25855295

  2. Crystal structures of MBP fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Waugh, David S

    2016-03-01

    Although chaperone-assisted protein crystallization remains a comparatively rare undertaking, the number of crystal structures of polypeptides fused to maltose-binding protein (MBP) that have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) has grown dramatically during the past decade. Altogether, 102 fusion protein structures were detected by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. Collectively, these structures comprise a range of sizes, space groups, and resolutions that are typical of the PDB as a whole. While most of these MBP fusion proteins were equipped with short inter-domain linkers to increase their rigidity, fusion proteins with long linkers have also been crystallized. In some cases, surface entropy reduction mutations in MBP appear to have facilitated the formation of crystals. A comparison of the structures of fused and unfused proteins, where both are available, reveals that MBP-mediated structural distortions are very rare. PMID:26682969

  3. Crystal engineering with thioureas: A structure-based inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisner, Kathryn A.

    2011-12-01

    Structural trends applicable to crystal engineering were studied in three classes of thiourea-based compounds. The aim of the study was to identify, predict, and ultimately design reliable single-molecule structural features, which could then be used to engineer crystals with desirable properties. In one class of compounds, this goal was achieved: N-alkyl and N-aryl derivatives of N,N'-bis(3-thioureidopropyl)piperazine adopted an identical conformation in the solid state, which resulted in near-identical crystal packing. A second class of closely related compounds, N-substituted tris(2-thioureidoethyl)amines, showed no such reliability in the solid state, likely because the parent structure lacked hydrogen-bonding functionalities sufficient to control intramolecular structure. In the third class of compounds that we studied, 1-benzoyl-3-(2-pyridyl)thioureas, substitution patterns were often predictive of molecular conformation; however, these intramolecular trends did not lead to recognizable crystal packing motifs. Nevertheless, certain physical properties observed in this last class of compounds---color, solubility, and often crystallinity---were conformer-specific, interestingly without any apparent relevance to crystal lattice structure. Solution-state and solid-state conformational trends in these 1-benzoyl-3-(2-pyridyl)thioureas have been documented, and speculations as to the source of color in one of the two observed conformations have been noted.

  4. Pattern information extraction from crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyan, Erhan; Güdükbay, Uğur; Gülseren, Oğuz

    2007-04-01

    Determining the crystal structure parameters of a material is an important issue in crystallography and material science. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps in understanding the physical behavior of material. It can be difficult to obtain crystal parameters for complex structures, particularly those materials that show local symmetry as well as global symmetry. This work provides a tool that extracts crystal parameters such as primitive vectors, basis vectors and space groups from the atomic coordinates of crystal structures. A visualization tool for examining crystals is also provided. Accordingly, this work could help crystallographers, chemists and material scientists to analyze crystal structures efficiently. Program summaryTitle of program: BilKristal Catalogue identifier: ADYU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYU_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Programming language used: C, C++, Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1 and OpenGL Libraries Computer: Personal Computers with Windows operating system Operating system: Windows XP Professional RAM: 20-60 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:899 779 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test date, etc.:9 271 521 Distribution format:tar.gz External routines/libraries: Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1. For visualization tool, graphics card driver should also support OpenGL Nature of problem: Determining crystal structure parameters of a material is a quite important issue in crystallography. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps to understand physical behavior of material. For complex structures, particularly, for materials which also contain local symmetry as well as global symmetry, obtaining crystal parameters can be quite hard. Solution method: The tool extracts crystal parameters such as primitive vectors, basis vectors and identify the space group from

  5. Absolute analytical prediction of photonic crystal guided mode resonance wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron L. C.; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-08-18

    A class of photonic crystal resonant reflectors known as guided mode resonant filters are optical structures that are widely used in the field of refractive index sensing, particularly in biosensing. For the purposes of understanding and design, their behavior has traditionally been modeled numerically with methods such as rigorous coupled wave analysis. Here it is demonstrated how the absolute resonance wavelengths of such structures can be predicted by analytically modeling them as slab waveguides in which the propagation constant is determined by a phase matching condition. The model is experimentally verified to be capable of predicting the absolute resonance wavelengths to an accuracy of within 0.75 nm, as well as resonance wavelength shifts due to changes in cladding index within an accuracy of 0.45 nm across the visible wavelength regime in the case where material dispersion is taken into account. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the model is valid beyond the limit of low grating modulation, for periodically discontinuous waveguide layers, high refractive index contrasts, and highly dispersive media.

  6. De Novo Protein Structure Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ling-Hong; Ngan, Shing-Chung; Samudrala, Ram

    An unparalleled amount of sequence data is being made available from large-scale genome sequencing efforts. The data provide a shortcut to the determination of the function of a gene of interest, as long as there is an existing sequenced gene with similar sequence and of known function. This has spurred structural genomic initiatives with the goal of determining as many protein folds as possible (Brenner and Levitt, 2000; Burley, 2000; Brenner, 2001; Heinemann et al., 2001). The purpose of this is twofold: First, the structure of a gene product can often lead to direct inference of its function. Second, since the function of a protein is dependent on its structure, direct comparison of the structures of gene products can be more sensitive than the comparison of sequences of genes for detecting homology. Presently, structural determination by crystallography and NMR techniques is still slow and expensive in terms of manpower and resources, despite attempts to automate the processes. Computer structure prediction algorithms, while not providing the accuracy of the traditional techniques, are extremely quick and inexpensive and can provide useful low-resolution data for structure comparisons (Bonneau and Baker, 2001). Given the immense number of structures which the structural genomic projects are attempting to solve, there would be a considerable gain even if the computer structure prediction approach were applicable to a subset of proteins.

  7. Evolutionary Structure Prediction of Stoichiometric Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Oganov, Artem

    2014-03-01

    In general, for a given ionic compound AmBn\\ at ambient pressure condition, its stoichiometry reflects the valence state ratio between per chemical specie (i.e., the charges for each anion and cation). However, compounds under high pressure exhibit significantly behavior, compared to those analogs at ambient condition. Here we developed a method to solve the crystal structure prediction problem based on the evolutionary algorithms, which can predict both the stable compounds and their crystal structures at arbitrary P,T-conditions, given just the set of chemical elements. By applying this method to a wide range of binary ionic systems (Na-Cl, Mg-O, Xe-O, Cs-F, etc), we discovered a lot of compounds with brand new stoichimetries which can become thermodynamically stable. Further electronic structure analysis on these novel compounds indicates that several factors can contribute to this extraordinary phenomenon: (1) polyatomic anions; (2) free electron localization; (3) emergence of new valence states; (4) metallization. In particular, part of the results have been confirmed by experiment, which warrants that this approach can play a crucial role in new materials design under extreme pressure conditions. This work is funded by DARPA (Grants No. W31P4Q1210008 and W31P4Q1310005), NSF (EAR-1114313 and DMR-1231586).

  8. Crystal structure of riboflavin synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Wawrzak, Z.; Calabrese, J.C.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-05

    Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1'-D-ribityl)-lumazine to yield riboflavin and 4-ribitylamino-5-amino-2,6-dihydroxypyrimidine. The homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits has no cofactor requirements for catalysis. The enzyme is nonexistent in humans and is an attractive target for antimicrobial agents of organisms whose pathogenicity depends on their ability to biosynthesize riboflavin. The first three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method on the Escherichia coli protein containing selenomethionine residues. The homotrimer consists of an asymmetric assembly of monomers, each of which comprises two similar {beta} barrels and a C-terminal {alpha} helix. The similar {beta} barrels within the monomer confirm a prediction of pseudo two-fold symmetry that is inferred from the sequence similarity between the two halves of the protein. The {beta} barrels closely resemble folds found in phthalate dioxygenase reductase and other flavoproteins. The three active sites of the trimer are proposed to lie between pairs of monomers in which residues conserved among species reside, including two Asp-His-Ser triads and dyads of Cys-Ser and His-Thr. The proposed active sites are located where FMN (an analog of riboflavin) is modeled from an overlay of the {beta} barrels of phthalate dioxygenase reductase and riboflavin synthase. In the trimer, one active site is formed, and the other two active sites are wide open and exposed to solvent. The nature of the trimer configuration suggests that only one active site can be formed and be catalytically competent at a time.

  9. Structures of cyano-biphenyl liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Yuan-Chao; Tsang, Tung; Rahimzadeh, E.; Yin, L.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of p-alkyl- p'-cyano- bicyclohexanes, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H10)(C6H10) CN (n-CCH), and p-alkyl- p'-cyano- biphenyls, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H4)(C6H4) CN (n-CBP), were studied. It is convenient to use an x ray image intensification device to search for symmetric x ray diffraction patterns. Despite the similarities in molecular structures of these compounds, very different crystal structures were found. For the smectic phase of 2CCH, the structure is close to rhombohedral with threefold symmetry. In contrast, the structure is close to hexagonal close-packed with two molecules per unit cell for 4CCH. Since intermolecular forces may be quite weak for these liquid crystals systems, it appears that crystal structures change considerably when the alkyl chain length is slightly altered. Different structures were also found in the crystalline phase of n-CBP for n = 6 to 9. For n = 7 to 9, the structures are close to monclinic. The structures are reminiscent of the smectic-A liquid crystal structures with the linear molecules slightly tilted away from the c-axis. In contrast, the structure is quite different for n = 6 with the molecules nearly perpendicular to the c-axis.

  10. Liquid crystal light valve structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koda, N. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An improved photosensor film and liquid crystal light valves embodying said film is provided. The photosensor film and liquid crystal light valve is characterized by a significant lower image retention time while maintaining acceptable photosensitivity. The photosensor film is produced by sputter depositing CdS onto an ITO substrate in an atmosphere of argon/H2S gas while maintaining the substrate at a temperature in the range of about 130 C to about 200 C and while introducing nitrogen gas into the system to the extent of not more than about 1% of plasma mixture. Following sputter deposition of the CdS, the film is annealed in an inert gas at temperatures ranging from about 300 C to about 425 C.

  11. Datamining protein structure databanks for crystallization patterns of proteins.

    PubMed

    Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H; Valafar, Faramarz

    2002-12-01

    A study of 345 protein structures selected among 1,500 structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, revealed useful correlations between crystallization properties and several parameters for the studied proteins. NMR methods of structure determination do not require the growth of protein crystals, and hence allow comparison of properties of proteins that have or have not been the subject of crystallographic approaches. One- and two-dimensional statistical analyses of the data confirmed a hypothesized relation between the size of the molecule and its crystallization potential. Furthermore, two-dimensional Bayesian analysis revealed a significant relationship between relative ratio of different secondary structures and the likelihood of success for crystallization trials. The most immediate result is an apparent correlation of crystallization potential with protein size. Further analysis of the data revealed a relationship between the unstructured fraction of proteins and the success of its crystallization. Utilization of Bayesian analysis on the latter correlation resulted in a prediction performance of about 64%, whereas a two-dimensional Bayesian analysis succeeded with a performance of about 75%. PMID:12594078

  12. Crystal structure of a Trypanosoma brucei metacaspase

    PubMed Central

    McLuskey, Karen; Rudolf, Jana; Proto, William R.; Isaacs, Neil W.; Coombs, Graham H.; Moss, Catherine X.; Mottram, Jeremy C.

    2012-01-01

    Metacaspases are distantly related caspase-family cysteine peptidases implicated in programmed cell death in plants and lower eukaryotes. They differ significantly from caspases because they are calcium-activated, arginine-specific peptidases that do not require processing or dimerization for activity. To elucidate the basis of these differences and to determine the impact they might have on the control of cell death pathways in lower eukaryotes, the previously undescribed crystal structure of a metacaspase, an inactive mutant of metacaspase 2 (MCA2) from Trypanosoma brucei, has been determined to a resolution of 1.4 Å. The structure comprises a core caspase fold, but with an unusual eight-stranded β-sheet that stabilizes the protein as a monomer. Essential aspartic acid residues, in the predicted S1 binding pocket, delineate the arginine-specific substrate specificity. In addition, MCA2 possesses an unusual N terminus, which encircles the protein and traverses the catalytic dyad, with Y31 acting as a gatekeeper residue. The calcium-binding site is defined by samarium coordinated by four aspartic acid residues, whereas calcium binding itself induces an allosteric conformational change that could stabilize the active site in a fashion analogous to subunit processing in caspases. Collectively, these data give insights into the mechanistic basis of substrate specificity and mode of activation of MCA2 and provide a detailed framework for understanding the role of metacaspases in cell death pathways of lower eukaryotes. PMID:22529389

  13. Pholcodine monohydrate: Crystal structure and polymorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruševski, Gjorgji; Zbačnik, Marija; Kajdžanoska, Marina; Ugarkovic, Sonja; Trimčeski, Vase; Kaitner, Branko; Jovanovski, Gligor; Makreski, Petre

    2013-07-01

    The first crystal structure elucidation of pholcodine monohydrate, an important antitussive active pharmaceutical ingredient is reported herein. The studied compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system in the space group P212121. Each H2O molecule is shared by two pholcodine molecules via three strong hydrogen bonds. The detailed crystallization screening from several different organic solvents afforded single crystals with various quality, all exhibiting prism-to-needlelike micro morphology. The investigation of the obtained single crystals by means of several physico-chemical, solid-state instrumental techniques (FT-IR, DSC, TG/DTG and XRPD) proved that pholcodine monohydrate exists in a single crystalline modification, identical to the commercial form of the compound.

  14. Structural complexity and configurational entropy of crystals.

    PubMed

    Krivovichev, Sergey V

    2016-04-01

    Using a statistical approach, it is demonstrated that the complexity of a crystal structure measured as the Shannon information per atom [Krivovichev (2012). Acta Cryst. A68, 393-398] represents a negative contribution to the configurational entropy of a crystalline solid. This conclusion is in full accordance with the general agreement that information and entropy are reciprocal variables. It also agrees well with the understanding that complex structures possess lower entropies relative to their simpler counterparts. The obtained equation is consistent with the Landauer principle and points out that the information encoded in a crystal structure has a physical nature. PMID:27048729

  15. Crystal structure of anagyrine perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Turgunov, Kambarali K; Rakhimov, Shukhrat B; Vinogradova, Valentina I; Tashkhodjaev, Bakhodir

    2015-05-01

    The title mol-ecular salt, C15H21N2O(+)·ClO4 (-), crystallizes with four cations (A, B, C and D) and four anions in the chiral unit cell (space group P21). The alkaloid was isolated from the aerial parts of Genista Hispanica collected in the Samarkand region of Uzbekistan. Each cation is protonated at the N atom that bridges the alkaloid rings C and D. In each cation, ring A is almost planar and ring B adops a sofa conformation with the methyl-ene group bridging to the C ring as the flap. Rings C and D adopt chair conformations with a cis ring junction in all four cations. In the crystal, A+B and C+D dimeric pairs linked by pairs of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds are observed, which generate R 2 (2)(16) loops in each case. The dimers are consolidated by weak aromatic π-π stacking inter-actions between the A rings [centroid-centroid distances = 3.913 (3) and 3.915 (3) Å]. PMID:25995939

  16. Predicting equilibrium uranium isotope fractionation in crystals and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the rapidly growing interest in using 238U/235U measurements as a proxy for changes in oxygen abundance in surface and near-surface environments, the present theoretical understanding of uranium isotope fractionation is limited to a few simple gas-phase molecules and analogues of dissolved species (e.g., 1,2,3). Understanding uranium isotope fractionation behavior in more complicated species, such as crystals and adsorption complexes, will help in the design and interpretation of experiments and field studies, and may suggest other uses for 38U/235U measurements. In this study, a recently developed first-principles method for estimating the nuclear volume component of field shift fractionation in crystals and complex molecular species (4) is combined with mass-dependent fractionation theory to predict equilibrium 38U/235U fractionations in aqueous and crystalline uranium compounds, including uraninite (UO2). The nuclear field shift effect, caused by the interaction of electrons with the finite volume of the positive charge distribution in uranium nuclei, is estimated using Density Functional Theory and the Projector Augmented Wave method (DFT-PAW). Tests against relativistic electronic structure calculations and Mössbauer isomer shift data indicate that the DFT-PAW method is reasonably accurate, while being much better suited to models of complex and crystalline species. Initial results confirm previous predictions that the nuclear volume effect overwhelms mass depdendent fractionation in U(VI)-U(IV) exchange reactions, leading to higher 238U/235U in U(IV) species (i.e., for UO2 xtal vs. UO22+aq, ln αNV ≈ +1.8‰ , ln αMD ≈ -0.8‰, ln αTotal ≈ +1.0‰ at 25ºC). UO2 and U(H2O)94+, are within ~0.4‰ of each other, while U(VI) species appear to be more variable. This suggests that speciation is likely to significantly affect natural uranium isotope fractionations, in addition to oxidation state. Tentatively, it appears that uranyl-type (UO22

  17. Crystal structure of levomepromazine maleate.

    PubMed

    Gál, Gyula Tamás; May, Nóra Veronika; Bombicz, Petra

    2016-05-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C19H25N2OS(+)·C4H3O4 (-) [systematic name: (S)-3-(2-meth-oxy-pheno-thia-zin-10-yl)-N,N,2-tri-methyl-propanaminium hydrogen maleate], comprises two (S)-levomepromazine cations and two hydrogen maleate anions. The conformations of the two cations are similar. The major difference relates to the orientation of the meth-oxy substituent at the pheno-thia-zine ring system. The crystal components form a three-dimensional supra-molecular network via N-H⋯O, C-H⋯O and C-H⋯π inter-actions. A comparison of the conformations of the levomepromazine cations with those of the neutral mol-ecule and similar protonated mol-ecules reveals significant conformational flexibility of the pheno-thia-zine ring system and the substituent at the pheno-thia-zine N atom. PMID:27308001

  18. TRITIUM RESERVOIR STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.S.; Morgan, M.J

    2005-11-10

    The burst test is used to assess the material performance of tritium reservoirs in the surveillance program in which reservoirs have been in service for extended periods of time. A materials system model and finite element procedure were developed under a Savannah River Site Plant-Directed Research and Development (PDRD) program to predict the structural response under a full range of loading and aged material conditions of the reservoir. The results show that the predicted burst pressure and volume ductility are in good agreement with the actual burst test results for the unexposed units. The material tensile properties used in the calculations were obtained from a curved tensile specimen harvested from a companion reservoir by Electric Discharge Machining (EDM). In the absence of exposed and aged material tensile data, literature data were used for demonstrating the methodology in terms of the helium-3 concentration in the metal and the depth of penetration in the reservoir sidewall. It can be shown that the volume ductility decreases significantly with the presence of tritium and its decay product, helium-3, in the metal, as was observed in the laboratory-controlled burst tests. The model and analytical procedure provides a predictive tool for reservoir structural integrity under aging conditions. It is recommended that benchmark tests and analysis for aged materials be performed. The methodology can be augmented to predict performance for reservoir with flaws.

  19. Structure prediction of magnetosome-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Hila; Zarivach, Raz

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are Gram-negative bacteria that can navigate along geomagnetic fields. This ability is a result of a unique intracellular organelle, the magnetosome. These organelles are composed of membrane-enclosed magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) crystals ordered into chains along the cell. Magnetosome formation, assembly, and magnetic nano-crystal biomineralization are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins (MAPs). Most MAP-encoding genes are located in a conserved genomic region - the magnetosome island (MAI). The MAI appears to be conserved in all MTB that were analyzed so far, although the MAI size and organization differs between species. It was shown that MAI deletion leads to a non-magnetic phenotype, further highlighting its important role in magnetosome formation. Today, about 28 proteins are known to be involved in magnetosome formation, but the structures and functions of most MAPs are unknown. To reveal the structure-function relationship of MAPs we used bioinformatics tools in order to build homology models as a way to understand their possible role in magnetosome formation. Here we present a predicted 3D structural models' overview for all known Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 MAPs. PMID:24523717

  20. Defect structure around two colloids in a liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, O; Kim, E B; Grollau, S; Abbott, N L; de Pablo, J J

    2003-12-01

    This Letter investigates the defect structures that arise between two colloidal spheres immersed in a nematic liquid crystal. Molecular simulations and a dynamic field theory are employed to arrive at molecular-level and mesoscopic descriptions of the systems of interest. At large separations, each sphere is surrounded by a Saturn ring defect. However, at short separations both theory and simulation predict that a third disclination ring appears in between the spheres, in a plane normal to the Saturn rings. This feature gives rise to an effective binding of the particles. The structures predicted by field theory and molecular simulations are consistent with each other. PMID:14683198

  1. The crystal structure and crystal chemistry of fernandinite and corvusite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T., Jr.; Post, J.E.; Ross, D.R.; Nelen, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Using type material of fernandinite from Minasragra, Peru, and corvusite from the Jack Claim, La Sal Mountains, Utah, the properties and crystal chemistry of these minerals have been determined by Rietveld analysis of the powder X-ray-diffraction patterns. The crystal structure of both species is isotypic with the V2O5 -type layer first found for ??-Ag0.68V2O5; it consists of chains of VO6 octahedra linked by opposite corners (parallel to b) condensed by edge-sharing to form the layer. The vanadium has average valence 4.8, and the resulting layer-charge is balanced by varying amounts of Ca, Na, and K in the interlayer region accompanied by labile water. This study has confirmed the validity of fernandinite as a unique mineral species. It is closely related to corvusite, from which it is distinguished on the basis of the dominant interlayer cation: Ca for fernandinite, Na for curvusite. -Authors

  2. Crystal structure of potassium sodium tartrate trihydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Egorova, A. E. Ivanov, V. A.; Somov, N. V.; Portnov, V. N.; Chuprunov, E. V.

    2011-11-15

    Crystals of potassium sodium tartrate trihydrate (dl-KNaC{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 6} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O) were obtained from an aqueous solution. The crystal shape was described. The atomic structure of the compound was determined and compared with the known structures of dl-KNaC{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 6} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O and l-KNaC{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 6} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O.

  3. Crystal structure of canagliflozin hemihydrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai-Hang; Gu, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Tang, Gu-Ping

    2016-05-01

    There are two canagliflozin mol-ecules (A and B) and one water mol-ecule in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C24H25FO5S·0.5H2O [systematic name: (2S,3R,4R,5S,6R)-2-(3-{[5-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)thio-phen-2-yl]meth-yl}-4-methylphen-yl)-6-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)-3,4,5,6-tetra-hydro-2H-pyran-3,4,5-triol hemihydrate]. The dihedral angles between the methyl-benzene and thio-phene rings are 115.7 (4) and 111.7 (4)°, while the dihedral angles between the fluoro-benzene and thio-phene rings are 24.2 (6) and 20.5 (9)° in mol-ecules A and B, respectively. The hydro-pyran ring exhibits a chair conformation in both canagliflozin mol-ecules. In the crystal, the canagliflozin mol-ecules and lattice water mol-ecules are connected via O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional supra-molecular architecture. PMID:27308030

  4. Crystal structure of canagliflozin hemihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai-Hang; Gu, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Tang, Gu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    There are two canagliflozin mol­ecules (A and B) and one water mol­ecule in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C24H25FO5S·0.5H2O [systematic name: (2S,3R,4R,5S,6R)-2-(3-{[5-(4-fluoro­phen­yl)thio­phen-2-yl]meth­yl}-4-methylphen­yl)-6-(hy­droxy­meth­yl)-3,4,5,6-tetra­hydro-2H-pyran-3,4,5-triol hemihydrate]. The dihedral angles between the methyl­benzene and thio­phene rings are 115.7 (4) and 111.7 (4)°, while the dihedral angles between the fluoro­benzene and thio­phene rings are 24.2 (6) and 20.5 (9)° in mol­ecules A and B, respectively. The hydro­pyran ring exhibits a chair conformation in both canagliflozin mol­ecules. In the crystal, the canagliflozin mol­ecules and lattice water mol­ecules are connected via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional supra­molecular architecture. PMID:27308030

  5. Crystal structure of levomepromazine maleate

    PubMed Central

    Gál, Gyula Tamás; May, Nóra Veronika; Bombicz, Petra

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C19H25N2OS+·C4H3O4 − [systematic name: (S)-3-(2-meth­oxy­pheno­thia­zin-10-yl)-N,N,2-tri­methyl­propanaminium hydrogen maleate], comprises two (S)-levomepromazine cations and two hydrogen maleate anions. The conformations of the two cations are similar. The major difference relates to the orientation of the meth­oxy substituent at the pheno­thia­zine ring system. The crystal components form a three-dimensional supra­molecular network via N—H⋯O, C—H⋯O and C—H⋯π inter­actions. A comparison of the conformations of the levomepromazine cations with those of the neutral mol­ecule and similar protonated mol­ecules reveals significant conformational flexibility of the pheno­thia­zine ring system and the substituent at the pheno­thia­zine N atom. PMID:27308001

  6. Photonic crystal structures for efficent localization or extraction of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals offer the opportunity of light manipulation in all directions in space, but they are very difficult to fabricate. On the other hand, planar photonic crystals are much simpler to make, but they exhibit only a "quasi-3D" confinement, resulting from the combined action of 2D photonic crystal and internal reflection. The imperfect confinement in the third dimension produces some unwanted out-of-plane loss, which is usually a limiting factor in performance of these structures. This thesis proposes how to fully take advantage of the relatively simple fabrication of planar photonic crystals, by addressing a problem of loss-reduction. One of the greatest challenges in photonics is a construction of optical microcavities with small mode volumes and large quality factors, for efficient localization of light. Beside standard applications of these structures (such as lasers or filters), they can potentially be used for cavity QED experiments, or as building blocks for quantum networks. This work also presents the design and fabrication of optical microcavities based on planar photonic crystals, with mode volumes of the order of one half of cubic wavelength of light (measured in material) and with Q factors predicted to be even larger than 10 4. In addition to photonic crystals fabricated in semiconductors, we also address interesting properties of metallic photonic crystals and present our theoretical and experimental work on using them to improve the output of light emissive devices. Feature sizes of structures presented here are below those achievable by photolithography. Therefore, a high resolution lithography is necessary for their fabrication. The presently used e-beam writing techniques suffer from limitations in speed and wafer throughput, and they represent a huge obstacle to commercialization of photonic crystals. Our preliminary work on electron beam projection lithography, the technique that could provide us with the speed

  7. Computing stoichiometric molecular composition from crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Gražulis, Saulius; Merkys, Andrius; Vaitkus, Antanas; Okulič-Kazarinas, Mykolas

    2015-01-01

    Crystallographic investigations deliver high-accuracy information about positions of atoms in crystal unit cells. For chemists, however, the structure of a molecule is most often of interest. The structure must thus be reconstructed from crystallographic files using symmetry information and chemical properties of atoms. Most existing algorithms faithfully reconstruct separate molecules but not the overall stoichiometry of the complex present in a crystal. Here, an algorithm that can reconstruct stoichiometrically correct multimolecular ensembles is described. This algorithm uses only the crystal symmetry information for determining molecule numbers and their stoichiometric ratios. The algorithm can be used by chemists and crystallographers as a standalone implementation for investigating above-molecular ensembles or as a function implemented in graphical crystal analysis software. The greatest envisaged benefit of the algorithm, however, is for the users of large crystallographic and chemical databases, since it will permit database maintainers to generate stoichiometrically correct chemical representations of crystal structures automatically and to match them against chemical databases, enabling multidisciplinary searches across multiple databases. PMID:26089747

  8. Structure-property evolution during polymer crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Deepak

    The main theme of this research is to understand the structure-property evolution during crystallization of a semicrystalline thermoplastic polymer. A combination of techniques including rheology, small angle light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry and optical microscopy are applied to follow the mechanical and optical properties along with crystallinity and the morphology. Isothermal crystallization experiments on isotactic poly-1-butene at early stages of spherulite growth provide quantitative information about nucleation density, volume fraction of spherulites and their crystallinity, and the mechanism of connecting into a sample spanning structure. Optical microscopy near the fluid-to-solid transition suggests that the transition, as determined by time-resolved mechanical spectroscopy, is not caused by packing/jamming of spherulites but by the formation of a percolating network structure. The effect of strain, Weissenberg number (We ) and specific mechanical work (w) on rate of crystallization (nucleation followed by growth) and on growth of anisotropy was studied for shear-induced crystallization of isotactic poly-1-butene. The samples were sheared for a finite strain at the beginning of the experiment and then crystallized without further flow (Janeschitz-Kriegl protocol). Strain requirements to attain steady state/leveling off of the rate of crystallization were found to be much larger than the strain needed to achieve steady state of flow. The large strain and We>1 criteria were also observed for morphological transition from spherulitic growth to oriented growth. An apparatus for small angle light scattering (SALS) and light transmission measurements under shear was built and tested at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. As a new development, the polarization direction can be rotated by a liquid crystal polarization rotator (LCPR) with a short response time of 20 ms. The experiments were controlled and analyzed with a LabVIEW(TM) based

  9. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  10. Structure prediction of magnetosome-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nudelman, Hila; Zarivach, Raz

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are Gram-negative bacteria that can navigate along geomagnetic fields. This ability is a result of a unique intracellular organelle, the magnetosome. These organelles are composed of membrane-enclosed magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) crystals ordered into chains along the cell. Magnetosome formation, assembly, and magnetic nano-crystal biomineralization are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins (MAPs). Most MAP-encoding genes are located in a conserved genomic region – the magnetosome island (MAI). The MAI appears to be conserved in all MTB that were analyzed so far, although the MAI size and organization differs between species. It was shown that MAI deletion leads to a non-magnetic phenotype, further highlighting its important role in magnetosome formation. Today, about 28 proteins are known to be involved in magnetosome formation, but the structures and functions of most MAPs are unknown. To reveal the structure–function relationship of MAPs we used bioinformatics tools in order to build homology models as a way to understand their possible role in magnetosome formation. Here we present a predicted 3D structural models’ overview for all known Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 MAPs. PMID:24523717

  11. Shear induced structures in crystallizing cocoa butter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Guthrie, Sarah E.; Sirota, Eric B.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2004-03-01

    Cocoa butter is the main structural component of chocolate and many cosmetics. It crystallizes in several polymorphs, called phases I to VI. We used Synchrotron X-ray diffraction to study the effect of shear on its crystallization. A previously unreported phase (phase X) was found and a crystallization path through phase IV under shear was observed. Samples were crystallized under shear from the melt in temperature controlled Couette cells, at final crystallization temperatures of 17.5^oC, 20^oC and 22.5^oC in Beamline X10A of NSLS. The formation of phase X was observed at low shear rates (90 s-1) and low crystallization temperature (17.5^oC), but was absent at high shear (720 s-1) and high temperature (20^oC). The d-spacing and melting point suggest that this new phase is a mixture rich on two of the three major components of cocoa butter. We also found that, contrary to previous reports, the transition from phase II to phase V can happen through the intermediate phase IV, at high shear rates and temperature.

  12. Crystal structure of methane oxidation enzyme determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1994-01-10

    A team of chemists has determined to 2.2-[angstrom] resolution the crystal structure of the hydroxylase protein of methane monooxygenase, the enzyme system responsible for the biological oxidation of methane. The hydroxylase, at a molecular weight of 251,000 daltons, if by far the largest component of methane monooxygenase. Although the crystal structure of the hydroxylase did not reveal any startling surprises about the enzyme-many features of the hydroxylase had been inferred previously from modeling and spectroscopic studies -- obtaining it is a significant achievement. For one thing, the crystal structure unambiguously confirms aspects of the enzyme structure that been at least somewhat speculative. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, the chemist say, also provides important insight into biological methane oxidation, including how methane, a relatively inert gas, might diffuse to and bind near the active site of the enzyme. The structure points to particular amino acid residues that are likely to participate in catalysis, and clarifies the structure of the dinuclear iron core of the enzyme.

  13. Structure Prediction of Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiche

    Membrane proteins play a central role in many cellular and physiological processes. It is estimated that integral membrane proteins make up about 20-30% of the proteome (Krogh et al., 2001b; Stevens and Arkin, 2000; von Heijne, 1999). They are essential mediators of material and information transfer across cell membranes. Their functions include active and passive transport of molecules into and out of cells and organelles; transduction of energy among various forms (light, electrical, and chemical energy); as well as reception and transduction of chemical and electrical signals across membranes (Avdonin, 2005; Bockaert et al., 2002; Pahl, 1999; Rehling et al., 2004; Stack et al., 1995). Identifying these transmembrane (TM) proteins and deciphering their molecular mechanisms, then, is of great importance, particularly as applied to biomedicine. Membrane proteins are the targets of a large number of pharmacologically and toxicologically active substances, and are directly involved in their uptake, metabolism, and clearance (Bettler et al., 1998; Cohen, 2002; Heusser and Jardieu, 1997; Tibes et al., 2005; Xu et al., 2005). Despite the importance of membrane proteins, the knowledge of their high-resolution structures and mechanisms of action has lagged far behind in comparison to that of water-soluble proteins: less than 1% of all three-dimensional structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank are of membrane proteins. This unfortunate disparity stems from difficulties in overexpression and the crystallization of membrane proteins (Grisshammer and Tate, 1995; Michel, 1991).

  14. Crystal structure of monobasic sodium tartrate monohydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Titaeva, E. K. Somov, N. V.; Portnov, V. N.; Titaev, D. N.

    2015-01-15

    Crystals of a new polymorphic modification of monobasic sodium tartrate monohydrate NaHC{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 6} · H{sub 2}O have been grown in a metasilicate gel. Their atomic structure is solved by X-ray diffraction.

  15. Structure analysis on synthetic emerald crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Lee, Jiann-Shing; Huang, Eugene; Liao, Ju-Hsiou

    2013-05-01

    Single crystals of emerald synthesized by means of the flux method were adopted for crystallographic analyses. Emerald crystals with a wide range of Cr3+-doping content up to 3.16 wt% Cr2O3 were examined by X-ray single crystal diffraction refinement method. The crystal structures of the emerald crystals were refined to R 1 (all data) of 0.019-0.024 and w R 2 (all data) of 0.061-0.073. When Cr3+ substitutes for Al3+, the main adjustment takes place in the Al-octahedron and Be-tetrahedron. The effect of substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ in the beryl structure results in progressively lengthening of the Al-O distance, while the length of the other bonds remains nearly unchanged. The substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ may have caused the expansion of a axis, while keeping the c axis unchanged in the emerald lattice. As a consequence, the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Be bonding angles are found to decrease, while the angle of Si-O-Be increases as the Al-O distance increases during the Cr replacement.

  16. Crystal structure of a plectonemic RNA supercoil

    SciTech Connect

    Stagno, Jason R.; Ma, Buyong; Li, Jess; Altieri, Amanda S.; Byrd, R. Andrew; Ji, Xinhua

    2012-12-14

    Genome packaging is an essential housekeeping process in virtually all organisms for proper storage and maintenance of genetic information. Although the extent and mechanisms of packaging vary, the process involves the formation of nucleic-acid superstructures. Crystal structures of DNA coiled coils indicate that their geometries can vary according to sequence and/or the presence of stabilizers such as proteins or small molecules. However, such superstructures have not been revealed for RNA. Here we report the crystal structure of an RNA supercoil, which displays one level higher molecular organization than previously reported structures of DNA coiled coils. In the presence of an RNA-binding protein, two interlocking RNA coiled coils of double-stranded RNA, a 'coil of coiled coils', form a plectonemic supercoil. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that protein-RNA interaction is required for the stability of the supercoiled RNA. This study provides structural insight into higher order packaging mechanisms of nucleic acids.

  17. Crystal structure of zwitterionic bisimidazolium sulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohmoto, Shigeo; Okuyama, Shinpei; Yokota, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kishikawa, Keiki; Masu, Hyuma; Azumaya, Isao

    2012-05-01

    Crystal structures of three zwitterionic bisimidazolium salts 1-3 in which imidazolium sulfonate moieties were connected with aromatic linkers, p-xylylene, 4,4'-dimethylenebiphenyl, and phenylene, respectively, were examined. The latter two were obtained as hydrates. An S-shaped molecular structure in which the sulfonate moiety was placed on the imidazolium ring was observed for 1. A helical array of hydrated water molecules was obtained for 2 while a linear array of hydrated water molecules was observed for 3.

  18. Crystal Structure of Human Enterovirus 71

    SciTech Connect

    Plevka, Pavel; Perera, Rushika; Cardosa, Jane; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2013-04-08

    Enterovirus 71 is a picornavirus associated with fatal neurological illness in infants and young children. Here, we report the crystal structure of enterovirus 71 and show that, unlike in other enteroviruses, the 'pocket factor,' a small molecule that stabilizes the virus, is partly exposed on the floor of the 'canyon.' Thus, the structure of antiviral compounds may require a hydrophilic head group designed to interact with residues at the entrance of the pocket.

  19. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  20. A unified picture of the crystal structures of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderlind, Per; Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Wills, J. M.; Boring, A. M.

    1995-04-01

    THE crystal structures of the light actinides have intrigued physicists and chemists for several decades1. Simple metals and transition metals have close-packed, high-symmetry structures, such as body-centred cubic, face-centred cubic and hexagonal close packing. In contrast, the structures of the light actinides are very loosely packed and of low symmetry-tetragonal, orthorhombic and monoclinic. To understand these differences, we have performed total-energy calculations, as a function of volume, for both high-and low-symmetry structures of a simple metal (aluminium), a non-magnetic transition metal (niobium), a ferromagnetic transition metal (iron) and a light actinide (uranium). We find that the crystal structure of all of these metals is determined by the balance between electrostatic (Madelung) interactions, which favour high symmetry, and a Peierls distortion of the crystal lattice, which favours low symmetry. We show that simple metals and transition metals can adopt low-symmetry structures on expansion of the lattice; and we predict that, conversely, the light actinides will undergo transitions to structures of higher symmetry on compression.

  1. Absorption enhancement in graphene photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Khaleque, Abdul; Hattori, Haroldo T

    2016-04-10

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, is attracting significant interest because of its potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Although graphene exhibits almost uniform absorption within a large wavelength range, its interaction with light is weak. In this paper, the enhancement of the optical absorption in graphene photonic crystal structures is studied: the structure is modified by introducing scatterers and mirrors. It is shown that the absorption of the graphene photonic crystal structure can be enhanced about four times (nearly 40%) with respect to initial reference absorption of 9.8%. The study can be a useful tool for investigating graphene physics in different optical settings. PMID:27139857

  2. Crystal structure of low-symmetry rondorfite

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Zadov, A. E.; Chukanov, N. V.

    2008-03-15

    The crystal structure of an aluminum-rich variety of the mineral rondorfite with the composition Ca{sub 16}[Mg{sub 2}(Si{sub 7}Al)(O{sub 31}OH)]Cl{sub 4} from the skarns of the Verkhne-Chegemskoe plateau (the Kabardino-Balkarian Republic, the Northern Caucasus Region, Russia) was solved in the triclinic space group with the unit-cell parameters a = 15.100(2) A, b = 15.110(2) A, c = 15.092(2) A, {alpha} = 90.06(1) deg., {beta} = 90.01(1) deg., {gamma} = 89.93(1) deg., Z = 4, sp. gr. P1. The structural model consisting of 248 independent atoms was determined by the phase-correction method and refined to R = 3.8% with anisotropic displacement parameters based on all 7156 independent reflections with 7156 F > 3{sigma}(F). The crystal structure is based on pentamers consisting of four Si tetrahedra linked by the central Mg tetrahedron. The structure can formally be refined in the cubic space group (a = 15.105 A, sp. gr. Fd-bar 3, seven independent positions) with anisotropic displacement parameters to R = 2.74% based on 579 reflections with F > 3{sigma}(F) without accounting for more than 1000 observed reflections, which are inconsistent with the cubic symmetry of the crystal structure.

  3. Crystal structure of low-symmetry rondorfite

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Zadov, A. E.; Chukanov, N. V.

    2008-03-15

    The crystal structure of an aluminum-rich variety of the mineral rondorfite with the composition Ca{sub 16}[Mg{sub 2}(Si{sub 7}Al)(O{sub 31}OH)]Cl{sub 4} from the skarns of the Verkhne-Chegemskoe plateau (the Kabardino-Balkarian Republic, the Northern Caucasus Region, Russia) was solved in the triclinic space group with the unit-cell parameters a = 15.100(2) Angstrom-Sign , b = 15.110(2) Angstrom-Sign , c = 15.092(2) Angstrom-Sign , {alpha} = 90.06(1) Degree-Sign , {beta} = 90.01(1) Degree-Sign , {gamma} = 89.93(1) Degree-Sign , Z = 4, sp. gr. P1. The structural model consisting of 248 independent atoms was determined by the phase-correction method and refined to R = 3.8% with anisotropic displacement parameters based on all 7156 independent reflections with 7156 F > 3{sigma}(F). The crystal structure is based on pentamers consisting of four Si tetrahedra linked by the central Mg tetrahedron. The structure can formally be refined in the cubic space group (a = 15.105 Angstrom-Sign , sp. gr. Fd 3 bar , seven independent positions) with anisotropic displacement parameters to R = 2.74% based on 579 reflections with F > 3{sigma}(F) without accounting for more than 1000 observed reflections, which are inconsistent with the cubic symmetry of the crystal structure.

  4. Protein structural domains: definition and prediction.

    PubMed

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; Tress, Michael L

    2011-11-01

    Recognition and prediction of structural domains in proteins is an important part of structure and function prediction. This unit lists the range of tools available for domain prediction, and describes sequence and structural analysis tools that complement domain prediction methods. Also detailed are the basic domain prediction steps, along with suggested strategies for different protein sequences and potential pitfalls in domain boundary prediction. The difficult problem of domain orientation prediction is also discussed. All the resources necessary for domain boundary prediction are accessible via publicly available Web servers and databases and do not require computational expertise. PMID:22045561

  5. The Surface Structure of Ground Metal Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boas, W.; Schmid, E.

    1944-01-01

    The changes produced on metallic surfaces as a result of grinding and polishing are not as yet fully understood. Undoubtedly there is some more or less marked change in the crystal structure, at least, in the top layer. Hereby a diffusion of separated crystal particles may be involved, or, on plastic material, the formation of a layer in greatly deformed state, with possible recrystallization in certain conditions. Czochralski verified the existence of such a layer on tin micro-sections by successive observations of the texture after repeated etching; while Thomassen established, roentgenographically by means of the Debye-Scherrer method, the existence of diffused crystal fractions on the surface of ground and polished tin bars, which he had already observed after turning (on the lathe). (Thickness of this layer - 0.07 mm). Whether this layer borders direct on the undamaged base material or whether deformed intermediate layers form the transition, nothing is known. One observation ty Sachs and Shoji simply states that after the turning of an alpha-brass crystal the disturbance starting from the surface, penetrates fairly deep (approx. 1 mm) into the crystal (proof by recrystallization at 750 C).

  6. Persistent hydrogen bonding in polymorphic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Galek, Peter T A; Fábián, László; Allen, Frank H

    2009-02-01

    The significance of hydrogen bonding and its variability in polymorphic crystal structures is explored using new automated structural analysis methods. The concept of a chemically equivalent hydrogen bond is defined, which may be identified in pairs of structures, revealing those types of bonds that may persist, or not, in moving from one polymorphic form to another. Their frequency and nature are investigated in 882 polymorphic structures from the Cambridge Structural Database. A new method to compare conformations of equivalent molecules is introduced and applied to derive distinct subsets of conformational and packing polymorphs. The roles of chemical functionality and hydrogen-bond geometry in persistent interactions are systematically explored. Detailed structural comparisons reveal a large majority of persistent hydrogen bonds that are energetically crucial to structural stability. PMID:19155561

  7. Ab initio modelling: Genesis of crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Walle, Axel

    2005-05-01

    Genetic algorithms prove useful to distil a complex quantum mechanical calculation of interatomic interactions down to its simplest mathematical expression. This makes it possible to predict the structure of new compounds from first principles.

  8. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Gold Nanobelts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanobelts were synthesized by the reduction of tetrachloroauric acid with ascorbic acid in the presence of the surfactants cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium dodecylsulfate. The resulting structures have rectangular cross sectional dimensions that are tens of nanometers and lengths that are tens to hundreds of micrometers. We find that the nanobelt yield and resulting structures are very sensitive to temperature which is likely due to the transition of the surfactant solution from wormlike micelles to spherical micelles. The nanobelt crystal structure contains a mixture of face centered cubic and hexagonally close packed lattice phases that can be isolated and examined individually due to the unique nanobelt size and shape. PMID:24803725

  9. Coagulation factor XII protease domain crystal structure

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, M; Wilmann, P; Awford, J; Li, C; Hamad, BK; Fischer, PM; Dreveny, I; Dekker, LV; Emsley, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor XII is a serine protease that is important for kinin generation and blood coagulation, cleaving the substrates plasma kallikrein and FXI. Objective To investigate FXII zymogen activation and substrate recognition by determining the crystal structure of the FXII protease domain. Methods and results A series of recombinant FXII protease constructs were characterized by measurement of cleavage of chromogenic peptide and plasma kallikrein protein substrates. This revealed that the FXII protease construct spanning the light chain has unexpectedly weak proteolytic activity compared to β-FXIIa, which has an additional nine amino acid remnant of the heavy chain present. Consistent with these data, the crystal structure of the light chain protease reveals a zymogen conformation for active site residues Gly193 and Ser195, where the oxyanion hole is absent. The Asp194 side chain salt bridge to Arg73 constitutes an atypical conformation of the 70-loop. In one crystal form, the S1 pocket loops are partially flexible, which is typical of a zymogen. In a second crystal form of the deglycosylated light chain, the S1 pocket loops are ordered, and a short α-helix in the 180-loop of the structure results in an enlarged and distorted S1 pocket with a buried conformation of Asp189, which is critical for P1 Arg substrate recognition. The FXII structures define patches of negative charge surrounding the active site cleft that may be critical for interactions with inhibitors and substrates. Conclusions These data provide the first structural basis for understanding FXII substrate recognition and zymogen activation. PMID:25604127

  10. Photonic crystal and photonic wire device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rue, Richard; Sorel, Marc; Johnson, Nigel; Rahman, Faiz; Ironside, Charles; Cronin, Lee; Watson, Ian; Martin, Robert; Jin, Chongjun; Pottier, Pierre; Chong, Harold; Gnan, Marco; Jugessur, Aju; Camargo, Edilson; Erwin, Grant; Md Zain, Ahmad; Ntakis, Iraklis; Hobbs, Lois; Zhang, Hua; Armenise, Mario; Ciminelli, Caterina; Coquillat, Dominique

    2005-09-01

    Photonic devices that exploit photonic crystal (PhC) principles in a planar environment continue to provide a fertile field of research. 2D PhC based channel waveguides can provide both strong confinement and controlled dispersion behaviour. In conjunction with, for instance, various electro-optic, thermo-optic and other effects, a range of device functionality is accessible in very compact PhC channel-guide devices that offer the potential for high-density integration. Low enough propagation losses are now being obtained with photonic crystal channel-guide structures that their use in real applications has become plausible. Photonic wires (PhWs) can also provide strong confinement and low propagation losses. Bragg-gratings imposed on photonic wires can provide dispersion and frequency selection in device structures that are intrinsically simpler than 2D PhC channel guides--and can compete with them under realistic conditions.

  11. Surface-induced structures in nematic liquid crystal colloids.

    PubMed

    Chernyshuk, S B; Tovkach, O M; Lev, B I

    2014-08-01

    We predict theoretically the existence of a class of colloidal structures in nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cells, which are induced by surface patterns on the plates of the cell (like cells with UV-irradiated polyamide surfaces using micron sized masks in front of the cell). These bulk structures arise from nonuniform boundary conditions for the director distortions at the confining surfaces. In particular, we demonstrate that quadrupole spherical particles (like spheres with boojums or Saturn-ring director configurations) form a square lattice inside a planar NLC cell, which has checkerboard patterns on both its plates. PMID:25215675

  12. Unified approach for determining tetragonal tungsten bronze crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, M; Saint-Grégoire, P

    2014-05-01

    Tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) oxides are one of the most important classes of ferroelectrics. Many of these framework structures undergo ferroelastic transformations related to octahedron tilting deformations. Such tilting deformations are closely related to the rigid unit modes (RUMs). This paper discusses the whole set of RUMs in an ideal TTB lattice and possible crystal structures which can emerge owing to the condensation of some of them. Analysis of available experimental data for the TTB-like niobates lends credence to the obtained theoretical predictions. PMID:24815976

  13. Observations on the crystal structures of lueshite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Roger H.; Burns, Peter C.; Knight, Kevin S.; Howard, Christopher J.; Chakhmouradian, Anton R.

    2014-06-01

    Laboratory powder XRD patterns of the perovskite-group mineral lueshite from the type locality (Lueshe, Kivu, DRC) and pure NaNbO3 demonstrate that lueshite does not adopt the same space group ( Pbma; #57) as the synthetic compound. The crystal structures of lueshite (2 samples) from Lueshe, Mont Saint-Hilaire (Quebec, Canada) and Sallanlatvi (Kola, Russia) have been determined by single-crystal CCD X-ray diffraction. These room temperature X-ray data for all single-crystal samples can be satisfactorily refined in the orthorhombic space group Pbnm (#62). Cell dimensions, atomic coordinates of the atoms, bond lengths and octahedron tilt angles are given for four crystals. Conventional neutron diffraction patterns for Lueshe lueshite recorded over the temperature range 11-1,000 K confirm that lueshite does not adopt space group Pbma within these temperatures. Neutron diffraction indicates no phase changes on cooling from room temperature to 11 K. None of these neutron diffraction data give satisfactorily refinements but suggest that this is the space group Pbnm. Time-of-flight neutron diffraction patterns for Lueshe lueshite recorded from room temperature to 700 °C demonstrate phase transitions above 550 °C from Cmcm through P4 /mbm to above 650 °C. Cell dimensions and atomic coordinates of the atoms are given for the three high-temperature phases. The room temperature to 400 °C structures cannot be satisfactorily resolved, and it is suggested that the lueshite at room temperature consists of domains of pinned metastable phases with orthorhombic and/or monoclinic structures. However, the sequence of high-temperature phase transitions observed is similar to those determined for synthetic NaTaO3, suggesting that the equilibrated room temperature structure of lueshite is orthorhombic Pbnm.

  14. Crystal Structures of New Ammonium 5-Aminotetrazolates

    PubMed Central

    Lampl, Martin; Salchner, Robert; Laus, Gerhard; Braun, Doris E.; Kahlenberg, Volker; Wurst, Klaus; Fuhrmann, Gerda; Schottenberger, Herwig; Huppertz, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of three salts of anionic 5-aminotetrazole are described. The tetramethylammonium salt (P1‒) forms hydrogen-bonded ribbons of anions which accept weak C–H⋯N contacts from the cations. The cystamine salt (C2/c) shows wave-shaped ribbons of anions linked by hydrogen bonds to screw-shaped dications. The tetramethylguanidine salt (P21/c) exhibits layers of anions hydrogen-bonded to the cations. PMID:26753100

  15. Crystal structures and properties of nylon polymers from theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.; Goddard, W.A. III; Hammond, W.B.

    1996-12-11

    A complete force field (MSXX) for simulation of all nylon polymers is derived from ab initio quantum calculations. Special emphasis is given to the accuracy of the hydrogen bond potential for the amide unit and the torsional potential between the peptide and alkane fragments. The MSXX force field was used to predict the structures, moduli, and detailed geometries of all nine nylons for which there are experimental crystal data plus one other. For nylon-(2n) with 2n = 6, the {alpha} crystal structure (with all-trans CH{sub 2} chains nearly coplanar with the hydrogen bonding plane) is more stable, while for 2n > 6, {gamma} (with the alkane plane twisted by 70{degree}) is more stable. This change results from the increased importance of methylene packing interactions over H bonds for larger 2n. We find the highest Young`s modulus for nylon-7. 51 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Crystal structure of ammonia dihydrate II.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Gareth I G; Fortes, A Dominic; Pickard, Chris J; Needs, R J

    2012-05-01

    We have used density-functional-theory (DFT) methods together with a structure searching algorithm to make an experimentally constrained prediction of the structure of ammonia dihydrate II (ADH-II). The DFT structure is in good agreement with neutron diffraction data and verifies the prediction. The structure consists of the same basic structural elements as ADH-I, with a modest alteration to the packing, but a considerable reduction in volume. The phase diagram of the known ADH and ammonia monohydrate + water-ice structures is calculated with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof density functional, and the effects of a semi-empirical dispersion corrected functional are investigated. The results of our DFT calculations of the finite-pressure elastic constants of ADH-II are compared with the available experimental data for the elastic strain coefficients. PMID:22583254

  17. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination--Part III: X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is single crystal X-ray crystal structure analysis. A common link between the NMR imaging and the traditional X-ray crystal structure analysis is reported. Claims that comparisons aid in the understanding of both techniques. (MVL)

  18. Crystal Structure of the Protealysin Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Demidyuk, Ilya V.; Gromova, Tania Yu.; Polyakov, Konstantin M.; Melik-Adamyan, William R.; Kuranova, Inna P.; Kostrov, Sergey V.

    2010-01-01

    Protealysin (PLN) belongs to the M4 family of peptidases that are commonly known as thermolysin-like proteases (TLPs). All TLPs are synthesized as precursors containing N-terminal propeptides. According to the primary structure of the N-terminal propeptides, the family is divided into two distinct groups. Representatives of the first group including thermolysin and all TLPs with known three-dimensional structures have long prosequences (∼200 amino acids). Enzymes of the second group, whose prototype is protealysin, have short (∼50 amino acids) propeptides. Here, we present the 1.8 Å crystal structure of PLN precursor (proPLN), which is the first three-dimensional structure of a TLP precursor. Whereas the structure of the catalytic domain of proPLN is similar overall to previously reported structures of mature TLPs, it has specific features, including the absence of calcium-binding sites, and different structures of the N-terminal region and substrate-binding site. PLN propeptide forms a separate domain in the precursor and likely acts as an inhibitor that blocks the substrate-binding site and fixes the “open” conformation of the active site, which is unfavorable for catalysis. Furthermore the conserved PPL motif identified in our previous studies directly interacts with the S′ subsites of the active center being a critical element of the propeptide-catalytic domain interface. Comparison of the primary structures of TLPs with short propeptides suggests that the specific features revealed in the proPLN crystal structure are typical for all protealysin-like enzymes. Thus, such proteins can be considered as a separate subfamily of TLPs. PMID:19915005

  19. Crystal structure of natural phaeosphaeride A.

    PubMed

    Abzianidze, Victoria V; Poluektova, Ekaterina V; Bolshakova, Ksenia P; Panikorovskii, Taras L; Bogachenkov, Alexander S; Berestetskiy, Alexander O

    2015-08-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C15H23NO5, contains two independent mol-ecules. Phaeosphaeride A contains two primary sections, an alkyl chain consisting of five C atoms and a cyclic system consisting of fused five- and six-membered rings with attached substituents. In the crystal, the mol-ecules form layered structures. Nearly planar sheets, parallel to the (001) plane, form bilayers of two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks with the hy-droxy groups located on the inter-ior of the bilayer sheets. The network is constructed primarily of four O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which form a zigzag pattern in the (001) plane. The butyl chains inter-digitate with the butyl chains on adjacent sheets. The crystal was twinned by a twofold rotation about the c axis, with refined major-minor occupancy fractions of 0.718 (6):0.282 (6). PMID:26396831

  20. Crystal structures and freezing of dipolar fluids.

    PubMed

    Groh, B; Dietrich, S

    2001-02-01

    We investigate the crystal structure of classical systems of spherical particles with an embedded point dipole at T=0. The ferroelectric ground state energy is calculated using generalizations of the Ewald summation technique. Due to the reduced symmetry compared to the nonpolar case the crystals are never strictly cubic. For the Stockmayer (i.e., Lennard-Jones plus dipolar) interaction three phases are found upon increasing the dipole moment: hexagonal, body-centered orthorhombic, and body-centered tetragonal. An even richer phase diagram arises for dipolar soft spheres with a purely repulsive inverse power law potential approximately r(-n). A crossover between qualitatively different sequences of phases occurs near the exponent n=12. The results are applicable to electro- and magnetorheological fluids. In addition to the exact ground state analysis we study freezing of the Stockmayer fluid by density-functional theory. PMID:11308482

  1. Crystal structure optimisation using an auxiliary equation of state.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Adam J; Skelton, Jonathan M; Hendon, Christopher H; Butler, Keith T; Walsh, Aron

    2015-11-14

    Standard procedures for local crystal-structure optimisation involve numerous energy and force calculations. It is common to calculate an energy-volume curve, fitting an equation of state around the equilibrium cell volume. This is a computationally intensive process, in particular, for low-symmetry crystal structures where each isochoric optimisation involves energy minimisation over many degrees of freedom. Such procedures can be prohibitive for non-local exchange-correlation functionals or other "beyond" density functional theory electronic structure techniques, particularly where analytical gradients are not available. We present a simple approach for efficient optimisation of crystal structures based on a known equation of state. The equilibrium volume can be predicted from one single-point calculation and refined with successive calculations if required. The approach is validated for PbS, PbTe, ZnS, and ZnTe using nine density functionals and applied to the quaternary semiconductor Cu2ZnSnS4 and the magnetic metal-organic framework HKUST-1. PMID:26567640

  2. Crystal structure optimisation using an auxiliary equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Adam J.; Skelton, Jonathan M.; Hendon, Christopher H.; Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron

    2015-11-14

    Standard procedures for local crystal-structure optimisation involve numerous energy and force calculations. It is common to calculate an energy–volume curve, fitting an equation of state around the equilibrium cell volume. This is a computationally intensive process, in particular, for low-symmetry crystal structures where each isochoric optimisation involves energy minimisation over many degrees of freedom. Such procedures can be prohibitive for non-local exchange-correlation functionals or other “beyond” density functional theory electronic structure techniques, particularly where analytical gradients are not available. We present a simple approach for efficient optimisation of crystal structures based on a known equation of state. The equilibrium volume can be predicted from one single-point calculation and refined with successive calculations if required. The approach is validated for PbS, PbTe, ZnS, and ZnTe using nine density functionals and applied to the quaternary semiconductor Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} and the magnetic metal-organic framework HKUST-1.

  3. Crystal structure optimisation using an auxiliary equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Adam J.; Skelton, Jonathan M.; Hendon, Christopher H.; Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron

    2015-11-01

    Standard procedures for local crystal-structure optimisation involve numerous energy and force calculations. It is common to calculate an energy-volume curve, fitting an equation of state around the equilibrium cell volume. This is a computationally intensive process, in particular, for low-symmetry crystal structures where each isochoric optimisation involves energy minimisation over many degrees of freedom. Such procedures can be prohibitive for non-local exchange-correlation functionals or other "beyond" density functional theory electronic structure techniques, particularly where analytical gradients are not available. We present a simple approach for efficient optimisation of crystal structures based on a known equation of state. The equilibrium volume can be predicted from one single-point calculation and refined with successive calculations if required. The approach is validated for PbS, PbTe, ZnS, and ZnTe using nine density functionals and applied to the quaternary semiconductor Cu2ZnSnS4 and the magnetic metal-organic framework HKUST-1.

  4. The First Mammalian Aldehyde Oxidase Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Catarina; Mahro, Martin; Trincão, José; Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.; Ramos, Maria João; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Leimkühler, Silke; Romão, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidases (AOXs) are homodimeric proteins belonging to the xanthine oxidase family of molybdenum-containing enzymes. Each 150-kDa monomer contains a FAD redox cofactor, two spectroscopically distinct [2Fe-2S] clusters, and a molybdenum cofactor located within the protein active site. AOXs are characterized by broad range substrate specificity, oxidizing different aldehydes and aromatic N-heterocycles. Despite increasing recognition of its role in the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics, the physiological function of the protein is still largely unknown. We have crystallized and solved the crystal structure of mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 to 2.9 Å. This is the first mammalian AOX whose structure has been solved. The structure provides important insights into the protein active center and further evidence on the catalytic differences characterizing AOX and xanthine oxidoreductase. The mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 three-dimensional structure combined with kinetic, mutagenesis data, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics studies make a decisive contribution to understand the molecular basis of its rather broad substrate specificity. PMID:23019336

  5. Crystal structure of MboIIA methyltransferase.

    SciTech Connect

    Osipiuk, J.; Walsh, M. A.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Gdansk; Medical Research Council France

    2003-09-15

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases) are sequence-specific enzymes which transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) to the amino group of either cytosine or adenine within a recognized DNA sequence. Methylation of a base in a specific DNA sequence protects DNA from nucleolytic cleavage by restriction enzymes recognizing the same DNA sequence. We have determined at 1.74 {angstrom} resolution the crystal structure of a {beta}-class DNA MTase MboIIA (M {center_dot} MboIIA) from the bacterium Moraxella bovis, the smallest DNA MTase determined to date. M {center_dot} MboIIA methylates the 3' adenine of the pentanucleotide sequence 5'-GAAGA-3'. The protein crystallizes with two molecules in the asymmetric unit which we propose to resemble the dimer when M {center_dot} MboIIA is not bound to DNA. The overall structure of the enzyme closely resembles that of M {center_dot} RsrI. However, the cofactor-binding pocket in M {center_dot} MboIIA forms a closed structure which is in contrast to the open-form structures of other known MTases.

  6. Growth, structural, optical and electrical study of Na-substituted potassium hydrogen tartrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, F. A.

    2012-02-01

    K1-xNaxHC4H4O6 · H2O (x = 0.3 and 0.7) single crystals have been grown by the gel encapsulation technique. The composition-related structural, optical and electrical properties are investigated. All the crystals have an orthorhombic structure. With the increase of Na content, the transparency of the crystals increases and the band gap values decrease. Good optical transmission of these crystals predicts them to be potential candidates for nonlinear optical applications. From the study on electrical conductivity, a semiconducting behavior is observed for these crystals. Resistivity, activation energy and hoping range are found to decrease with Na doping. DC conductivity behavior observed in these crystals is found to follow a variable-range hopping model. A clear indication of disorder induced in these crystals after Na doping is observed.

  7. Practical lessons from protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Ginalski, Krzysztof; Grishin, Nick V.; Godzik, Adam; Rychlewski, Leszek

    2005-01-01

    Despite recent efforts to develop automated protein structure determination protocols, structural genomics projects are slow in generating fold assignments for complete proteomes, and spatial structures remain unknown for many protein families. Alternative cheap and fast methods to assign folds using prediction algorithms continue to provide valuable structural information for many proteins. The development of high-quality prediction methods has been boosted in the last years by objective community-wide assessment experiments. This paper gives an overview of the currently available practical approaches to protein structure prediction capable of generating accurate fold assignment. Recent advances in assessment of the prediction quality are also discussed. PMID:15805122

  8. Crystal Structure of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit from Thermus Thermophilus. Purification, Crystallization and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, William M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; McCutcheonn, John P.; May, Joanna L.C.; Carter, Andrew P.; Morgan-Warren, Robert J.; Wimberly, Brian T.; Ramakrishnan, Venki

    2009-10-07

    We describe the crystallization and structure determination of the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Previous reports of crystals that diffracted to 10 {angstrom} resolution were used as a starting point to improve the quality of the diffraction. Eventually, ideas such as the addition of substrates or factors to eliminate conformational heterogeneity proved less important than attention to detail in yielding crystals that diffracted beyond 3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite improvements in technology and methodology in the last decade, the structure determination of the 30 S subunit presented some very challenging technical problems because of the size of the asymmetric unit, crystal variability and sensitivity to radiation damage. Some steps that were useful for determination of the atomic structure were: the use of anomalous scattering from the LIII edges of osmium and lutetium to obtain the necessary phasing signal; the use of tunable, third-generation synchrotron sources to obtain data of reasonable quality at high resolution; collection of derivative data precisely about a mirror plane to preserve small anomalous differences between Bijvoet mates despite extensive radiation damage and multi-crystal scaling; the pre-screening of crystals to ensure quality, isomorphism and the efficient use of scarce third-generation synchrotron time; pre-incubation of crystals in cobalt hexaammine to ensure isomorphism with other derivatives; and finally, the placement of proteins whose structures had been previously solved in isolation, in conjunction with biochemical data on protein-RNA interactions, to map out the architecture of the 30 S subunit prior to the construction of a detailed atomic-resolution model.

  9. Crystal structure of plant photosystem I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Frolow, Felix; Nelson, Nathan

    2003-12-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal producer of both oxygen and organic matter on Earth. The conversion of sunlight into chemical energy is driven by two multisubunit membrane protein complexes named photosystem I and II. We determined the crystal structure of the complete photosystem I (PSI) from a higher plant (Pisum sativum var. alaska) to 4.4Å resolution. Its intricate structure shows 12 core subunits, 4 different light-harvesting membrane proteins (LHCI) assembled in a half-moon shape on one side of the core, 45 transmembrane helices, 167 chlorophylls, 3 Fe-S clusters and 2 phylloquinones. About 20 chlorophylls are positioned in strategic locations in the cleft between LHCI and the core. This structure provides a framework for exploration not only of energy and electron transfer but also of the evolutionary forces that shaped the photosynthetic apparatus of terrestrial plants after the divergence of chloroplasts from marine cyanobacteria one billion years ago.

  10. Flowing crystals: nonequilibrium structure of foam.

    PubMed

    Garstecki, Piotr; Whitesides, George M

    2006-07-14

    Bubbles pushed through a quasi-two-dimensional channel self-organize into a variety of periodic lattices. The structures of these lattices correspond to local minima of the interfacial energy. The "flowing crystals" are long-lived metastable states, a small subset of possible local minima of confined quasi-two-dimensional foams [P. Garstecki and G. M. Whitesides, Phys. Rev. E 73, 031603 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevE.73.031603]. Experimental results suggest that the choice of the structures that we observe is dictated by the dynamic stability of the cyclic processes of their formation. Thus, the dynamic system that we report provides a unique example of nonequilibrium self-organization that results in structures that correspond to local minima of the relevant energy functional. PMID:16907453

  11. Structural investigation of the potassium vanadomolybdate crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mucha, D.; Olszewski, P.K.; Napruszewska, B.

    1999-08-01

    Potassium vanadomolybdate KVMoO{sub 6} crystallizes in the orthorhombic system (space group Pnma, a = 10.3478(1) {angstrom}, b = 3.6967(1) {angstrom}, c = 13.3769(2) {angstrom}, Z = 4). With an X-ray powder diffraction technique, its structure was solved and refined by direct and Rietveld methods, respectively (R{sub F} = 3.33, R{sub 1} = 4.70, R{sub wp} = 12.44). The crystals are isostructural with PbV{sub 2}O{sub 6}. Octahedra of two types build chains parallel to the b direction; there is disorder in the octahedra described by different occupation numbers of V and Mo atoms: 0.721(4) and 0.279(4), respectively. Potassium atoms occupy the space between the octahedra chains. They play a decisive role, due to the large ionic radius, in generating both KVMoO{sub 6} and pseudobrannerite, K{sub x}V{sub x}Mo{sub 2{minus}x}O{sub 6} (0.76 {le} x {le} 0.82) structures, contrary to other alkali-metal vanadomolybdates of the brannerite structure type. The melting point of KVMoO{sub 6} was detected at 480 C using the DTA method.

  12. Crystal structure of a DNA catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Salvatierra, Almudena; Wawrzyniak-Turek, Katarzyna; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Höbartner, Claudia; Pena, Vladimir

    2016-01-14

    Catalysis in biology is restricted to RNA (ribozymes) and protein enzymes, but synthetic biomolecular catalysts can also be made of DNA (deoxyribozymes) or synthetic genetic polymers. In vitro selection from synthetic random DNA libraries identified DNA catalysts for various chemical reactions beyond RNA backbone cleavage. DNA-catalysed reactions include RNA and DNA ligation in various topologies, hydrolytic cleavage and photorepair of DNA, as well as reactions of peptides and small molecules. In spite of comprehensive biochemical studies of DNA catalysts for two decades, fundamental mechanistic understanding of their function is lacking in the absence of three-dimensional models at atomic resolution. Early attempts to solve the crystal structure of an RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme resulted in a catalytically irrelevant nucleic acid fold. Here we report the crystal structure of the RNA-ligating deoxyribozyme 9DB1 (ref. 14) at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure captures the ligation reaction in the post-catalytic state, revealing a compact folding unit stabilized by numerous tertiary interactions, and an unanticipated organization of the catalytic centre. Structure-guided mutagenesis provided insights into the basis for regioselectivity of the ligation reaction and allowed remarkable manipulation of substrate recognition and reaction rate. Moreover, the structure highlights how the specific properties of deoxyribose are reflected in the backbone conformation of the DNA catalyst, in support of its intricate three-dimensional organization. The structural principles underlying the catalytic ability of DNA elucidate differences and similarities in DNA versus RNA catalysts, which is relevant for comprehending the privileged position of folded RNA in the prebiotic world and in current organisms. PMID:26735012

  13. Temperature dependent spin structures in Hexaferrite crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Y. C.; Lin, J. G.; Chun, S. H.; Kim, K. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Hexaferrite Ba0.5Sr1.5Zn2Fe12O22 (BSZFO) is studied due to its interesting characteristics of long-wavelength spin structure. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is used to probe the magnetic states of BSZFO single crystal and its temperature dependence behavior is analyzed by decomposing the multiple lines of FMR spectra into various phases. Distinguished phase transition is observed at 110 K for one line, which is assigned to the ferro(ferri)-magnetic transition from non-collinear to collinear spin state.

  14. Crystal structure of yeast Sco1

    SciTech Connect

    Abajian, Carnie; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-03-05

    The Sco family of proteins are involved in the assembly of the dinuclear CuA site in cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme in aerobic respiration. These proteins, which are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, are characterized by a conserved CXXXC sequence motif that binds copper ions and that has also been proposed to perform a thiol:disulfide oxidoreductase function. The crystal structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae apo Sco1 (apo-ySco1) and Sco1 in the presence of copper ions (Cu-ySco1) were determined to 1.8- and 2.3-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. Yeast Sco1 exhibits a thioredoxin-like fold, similar to that observed for human Sco1 and a homolog from Bacillus subtilis. The Cu-ySco1 structure, obtained by soaking apo-ySco1 crystals in copper ions, reveals an unexpected copper-binding site involving Cys181 and Cys216, cysteine residues present in ySco1 but not in other homologs. The conserved CXXXC cysteines, Cys148 and Cys152, can undergo redox chemistry in the crystal. An essential histidine residue, His239, is located on a highly flexible loop, denoted the Sco loop, and can adopt positions proximal to both pairs of cysteines. Interactions between ySco1 and its partner proteins yeast Cox17 and yeast COX2 are likely to occur via complementary electrostatic surfaces. This high-resolution model of a eukaryotic Sco protein provides new insight into Sco copper binding and function.

  15. Use of moments of momentum to predict the crystal habit in potassium hydrogen phthalate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Patrick G.; Petty, John T.

    1990-01-01

    A relatively simple calculation of the moments of momentum predicts the morphological order of crystal faces for potassium hydrogen phthalate. The effects on the habit caused by the addition of monomeric, dimeric, and larger aggregates during crystal growth are considered. The first six of the seven observed crystal faces are predicted with this method.

  16. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann-Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann-Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  17. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann–Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann–Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  18. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO2. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia.

  19. The Crystal Structure of Human Argonaute2

    SciTech Connect

    Schirle, Nicole T.; MacRae, Ian J.

    2012-07-18

    Argonaute proteins form the functional core of the RNA-induced silencing complexes that mediate RNA silencing in eukaryotes. The 2.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of human Argonaute2 (Ago2) reveals a bilobed molecule with a central cleft for binding guide and target RNAs. Nucleotides 2 to 6 of a heterogeneous mixture of guide RNAs are positioned in an A-form conformation for base pairing with target messenger RNAs. Between nucleotides 6 and 7, there is a kink that may function in microRNA target recognition or release of sliced RNA products. Tandem tryptophan-binding pockets in the PIWI domain define a likely interaction surface for recruitment of glycine-tryptophan-182 (GW182) or other tryptophan-rich cofactors. These results will enable structure-based approaches for harnessing the untapped therapeutic potential of RNA silencing in humans.

  20. Crystal structure of human nicotinamide riboside kinase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed A; Xiang, Song; Tong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD(+) as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 A resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 A resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel beta sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations. PMID:17698003

  1. Crystal Structure of Human Nicotinamide Riboside Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Xiang, S.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel {beta} sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations.

  2. The crystal structure of human Argonaute2.

    PubMed

    Schirle, Nicole T; MacRae, Ian J

    2012-05-25

    Argonaute proteins form the functional core of the RNA-induced silencing complexes that mediate RNA silencing in eukaryotes. The 2.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of human Argonaute2 (Ago2) reveals a bilobed molecule with a central cleft for binding guide and target RNAs. Nucleotides 2 to 6 of a heterogeneous mixture of guide RNAs are positioned in an A-form conformation for base pairing with target messenger RNAs. Between nucleotides 6 and 7, there is a kink that may function in microRNA target recognition or release of sliced RNA products. Tandem tryptophan-binding pockets in the PIWI domain define a likely interaction surface for recruitment of glycine-tryptophan-182 (GW182) or other tryptophan-rich cofactors. These results will enable structure-based approaches for harnessing the untapped therapeutic potential of RNA silencing in humans. PMID:22539551

  3. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-09-28

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO{sub 2}. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia.

  4. Predicting photoisomerization profile of the highly polymerized nematic azobenzene liquid crystal network: First principle calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, J.; Li, C.; Chung, H.; Choi, J.; Cho, M.

    2015-05-01

    The cis profile of azobenzene is a key factor in predicting the photodeformation of the nematic azobenzene liquid crystal network (LCN). An ab initio based method for predicting the photoisomerization profile of azobenzene is developed by coupling the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) method with non-linear Beers law, and compared with experimental data. Using this combined method, we calculate the photoisomerization profile of azobenzene with various light input conditions. We identify the cis profile of the nematic LCN structure evolves into a step-like decaying shape when the direction of polarized light is parallel to the nematic direction.

  5. Structural studies of tubular discotic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindyuk, Oksana Yaroslavovna

    1999-11-01

    Discotic liquid crystals based on the rigid ring-shaped phenylacetylene macrocycle molecule (PAM) are of great interest due to their potential organization into supramolecular channels. We have used high resolution X-ray diffraction to study the structure of pure and doped PAM and to demonstrate that PAM forms a tubular columnar liquid crystal with an unexpected distortion and doubling of the underlying hexagonal lattice. We have doped PAM with different percentages of silver ions and determined that doping did not change peak positions on the powder diffraction data but significantly altered the intensity of the peaks. This implies that the silver ions were most likely intercalated within the channels formed by the PAM molecules, thus leaving the lattice parameters unaffected. We have also used grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity to study Langmuir films of PAM. PAM adopts an "edge-on" molecular arrangement at the air-water interface. We will discuss the direct observation of the structural reorganization within macromolecular Langmuir films of disc-shaped ionophoric molecules arising from interactions with potassium and cesium ions in the subphase. The columnar order is disrupted by CsCl in the subphase and strongly enhanced by KCl in the subphase, thus effectively tailoring the structural properties of the Langmuir films for potential applications. We have also used X-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GID) to study Langmuir films of another macrocyclic ionophore: torand (tributyldodecahydrohexaazakekulene, "TBDK") molecules. TBDK is a rigid, triangular molecule; it has been investigated as a potential surface-active complexing agent. The system forms a stable monolayer at the air-water interface and exhibits two distinct structural phases at lower and higher pressures.

  6. Shotgun crystallization strategy for structural genomics: an optimized two-tiered crystallization screen against the Thermotoga maritima proteome.

    PubMed

    Page, Rebecca; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Canaves, Jaume M; Spraggon, Glen; Kreusch, Andreas; Kuhn, Peter; Stevens, Raymond C; Lesley, Scott A

    2003-06-01

    As the field of structural genomics continues to grow and new technologies are developed, novel strategies are needed to efficiently crystallize large numbers of protein targets, thus increasing output, not just throughput [Chayen & Saridakis (2002). Acta Cryst. D58, 921-927]. One strategy, developed for the high-throughput structure determination of the Thermotoga maritima proteome, is to quickly determine which proteins have a propensity for crystal formation followed by focused SeMet-incorporated protein crystallization attempts. This experimental effort has resulted in over 320 000 individual crystallization experiments. As such, it has provided one of the most extensive systematic data sets of commonly used crystallization conditions against a wide range of proteins to date. Analysis of this data shows that many of the original screening conditions are redundant, as all of the T. maritima proteins that crystallize readily could be identified using just 23% of the original conditions. It also shows that proteins that contain selenomethionine and are more extensively purified often crystallize in distinctly different conditions from those of their native less pure counterparts. Most importantly, it shows that the two-tiered strategy employed here is extremely successful for predicting which proteins will readily crystallize, as greater than 99% of the proteins identified as having a propensity to crystallize under non-optimal native conditions did so again as selenomethionine derivatives during the focused crystallization trials. This crystallization strategy can be adopted for both large-scale genomics programs and individual protein studies with multiple constructs and has the potential to significantly accelerate future crystallographic efforts. PMID:12777766

  7. Crystal structure of bacterioferritin from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Xu, Yongbin; Piao, Shunfu; Priyadarshi, Amit; Lee, Eun Hye; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Jeon, Young Ho; Ha, Nam-Chul; Hwang, Kwang Yeon

    2010-01-01

    Iron is essential for the survival of organisms, but either excess or deficient levels of iron induce oxidative stress, thereby causing cell damage. As a result, iron regulation is essential for proper cell growth and proliferation in most organisms. Bacterioferritin is a ferritin-like family protein that contains a heme molecule and a ferroxidase site at the di-iron center. This protein plays a primary role in intracellular iron storage for iron homeostasis, as well as in the maintenance of iron in a soluble and non-toxic form. Although several bacterioferritin structures have been determined, no structural studies have successfully elucidated the molecular function of the heme molecule and the ferroxidase center. Here, we report the crystal structure of bacterioferritin from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. This protein exists in a roughly spherical configuration via the assembly of 24 subunits. We describe the oligomeric arrangement, ferroxidase center and heme-binding site based on this structure. The protein contains a single iron-binding configuration in the ferroxidase center, which allows for the release of iron by His130 when the protein is in the intermediate state. The heme molecule in RsBfr is stabilized by shifting of the van der Waals interaction center between the porphyrin of the heme and Trp26. We anticipate that further structural analysis will provide a more complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of members of the ferritin-like family.

  8. Crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Lígia R; Low, John Nicolson; Magalhães E Silva, Diogo; Cagide, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-03-01

    The crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives, viz. 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-(3-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethan-1-one (1), C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethan-1-one (2), C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-(4-chloro-phen-yl)ethan-1-one (3), C15H11ClN4O2S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-(4-bromo-phen-yl)ethan-1-one (4), C15H11BrN4O2S, and 1-(3-meth-oxy-phen-yl)-2-[(9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]ethan-1-one (5), C14H12N4O2S. Compounds (2), (3) and (4) are isomorphous and accordingly their mol-ecular and supra-molecular structures are similar. An analysis of the dihedral angles between the purine and exocyclic phenyl rings show that the mol-ecules of (1) and (5) are essentially planar but that in the case of the three isomorphous compounds (2), (3) and (4), these rings are twisted by a dihedral angle of approximately 38°. With the exception of (1) all mol-ecules are linked by weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds in their crystals. There is π-π stacking in all compounds. A Cambridge Structural Database search revealed the existence of 11 deposited compounds containing the 1-phenyl-2-sulfanyl-ethanone scaffold; of these, only eight have a cyclic ring as substituent, the majority of these being heterocycles. PMID:27006794

  9. Crystal structure of strontium dinickel iron orthophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ouaatta, Said; Assani, Abderrazzak; Saadi, Mohamed; El Ammari, Lahcen

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, SrNi2Fe(PO4)3, synthesized by solid-state reaction, crystallizes in an ordered variant of the α-CrPO4 structure. In the asymmetric unit, two O atoms are in general positions, whereas all others atoms are in special positions of the space group Imma: the Sr cation and one P atom occupy the Wyckoff position 4e (mm2), Fe is on 4b (2/m), Ni and the other P atom are on 8g (2), one O atom is on 8h (m) and the other on 8i (m). The three-dimensional framework of the crystal structure is built up by [PO4] tetra­hedra, [FeO6] octa­hedra and [Ni2O10] dimers of edge-sharing octa­hedra, linked through common corners or edges. This structure comprises two types of layers stacked alternately along the [100] direction. The first layer is formed by edge-sharing octa­hedra ([Ni2O10] dimer) linked to [PO4] tetra­hedra via common edges while the second layer is built up from a strontium row followed by infinite chains of alternating [PO4] tetra­hedra and FeO6 octa­hedra sharing apices. The layers are held together through vertices of [PO4] tetra­hedra and [FeO6] octa­hedra, leading to the appearance of two types of tunnels parallel to the a- and b-axis directions in which the Sr cations are located. Each Sr cation is surrounded by eight O atoms. PMID:26594419

  10. Crystal structure of natural phaeosphaeride A

    PubMed Central

    Abzianidze, Victoria V.; Poluektova, Ekaterina V.; Bolshakova, Ksenia P.; Panikorovskii, Taras L.; Bogachenkov, Alexander S.; Berestetskiy, Alexander O.

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C15H23NO5, contains two independent mol­ecules. Phaeosphaeride A contains two primary sections, an alkyl chain consisting of five C atoms and a cyclic system consisting of fused five- and six-membered rings with attached substituents. In the crystal, the mol­ecules form layered structures. Nearly planar sheets, parallel to the (001) plane, form bilayers of two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks with the hy­droxy groups located on the inter­ior of the bilayer sheets. The network is constructed primarily of four O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which form a zigzag pattern in the (001) plane. The butyl chains inter­digitate with the butyl chains on adjacent sheets. The crystal was twinned by a twofold rotation about the c axis, with refined major–minor occupancy fractions of 0.718 (6):0.282 (6). PMID:26396831

  11. Crystal Structures of Respiratory Pathogen Neuraminidases

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Y.; Parker, D; Ratner, A; Prince, A; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is pressing need to develop novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of infections by the human respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The neuraminidases of these pathogens are important for host colonization in animal models of infection and are attractive targets for drug discovery. To aid in the development of inhibitors against these neuraminidases, we have determined the crystal structures of the P. aeruginosa enzyme NanPs and S. pneumoniae enzyme NanA at 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In situ proteolysis with trypsin was essential for the crystallization of our recombinant NanA. The active site regions of the two enzymes are strikingly different. NanA contains a deep pocket that is similar to that in canonical neuraminidases, while the NanPs active site is much more open. The comparative studies suggest that NanPs may not be a classical neuraminidase, and may have distinct natural substrates and physiological functions. This work represents an important step in the development of drugs to prevent respiratory tract colonization by these two pathogens.

  12. Crystal Structure of a Ube2S-Ubiquitin Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Sonja; Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Feiler, Christian; Rape, Michael; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination occurs through the sequential formation and reorganization of specific protein-protein interfaces. Ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) enzymes, such as Ube2S, catalyze the formation of an isopeptide linkage between the C-terminus of a "donor" ubiquitin and a primary amino group of an "acceptor" ubiquitin molecule. This reaction involves an intermediate, in which the C-terminus of the donor ubiquitin is thioester-bound to the active site cysteine of the E2 and a functionally important interface is formed between the two proteins. A docked model of a Ube2S-donor ubiquitin complex was generated previously, based on chemical shift mapping by NMR, and predicted contacts were validated in functional studies. We now present the crystal structure of a covalent Ube2S-ubiquitin complex. The structure contains an interface between Ube2S and ubiquitin in trans that resembles the earlier model in general terms, but differs in detail. The crystallographic interface is more hydrophobic than the earlier model and is stable in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Remarkably, the docked Ube2S-donor complex converges readily to the configuration seen in the crystal structure in 3 out of 8 MD trajectories. Since the crystallographic interface is fully consistent with mutational effects, this indicates that the structure provides an energetically favorable representation of the functionally critical Ube2S-donor interface. PMID:26828794

  13. Crystal Structure of a Ube2S-Ubiquitin Conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Sonja; Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Feiler, Christian; Rape, Michael; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination occurs through the sequential formation and reorganization of specific protein-protein interfaces. Ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) enzymes, such as Ube2S, catalyze the formation of an isopeptide linkage between the C-terminus of a “donor” ubiquitin and a primary amino group of an “acceptor” ubiquitin molecule. This reaction involves an intermediate, in which the C-terminus of the donor ubiquitin is thioester-bound to the active site cysteine of the E2 and a functionally important interface is formed between the two proteins. A docked model of a Ube2S-donor ubiquitin complex was generated previously, based on chemical shift mapping by NMR, and predicted contacts were validated in functional studies. We now present the crystal structure of a covalent Ube2S-ubiquitin complex. The structure contains an interface between Ube2S and ubiquitin in trans that resembles the earlier model in general terms, but differs in detail. The crystallographic interface is more hydrophobic than the earlier model and is stable in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Remarkably, the docked Ube2S-donor complex converges readily to the configuration seen in the crystal structure in 3 out of 8 MD trajectories. Since the crystallographic interface is fully consistent with mutational effects, this indicates that the structure provides an energetically favorable representation of the functionally critical Ube2S-donor interface. PMID:26828794

  14. Local backbone structure prediction of proteins.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, Alexandre G; Benros, Cristina; Gautier, Romain; Valadié, Héléne; Hazout, Serge; Etchebest, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the PDB structures has led us to define a new set of small 3D structural prototypes called Protein Blocks (PBs). This structural alphabet includes 16 PBs, each one is defined by the (phi, psi) dihedral angles of 5 consecutive residues. The amino acid distributions observed in sequence windows encompassing these PBs are used to predict by a Bayesian approach the local 3D structure of proteins from the sole knowledge of their sequences. LocPred is a software which allows the users to submit a protein sequence and performs a prediction in terms of PBs. The prediction results are given both textually and graphically. PMID:15724288

  15. Structure prediction, disorder and dynamics in a DMSO solvate of carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Day, Graeme M; Jones, William

    2011-07-28

    We have applied crystal structure prediction methods to understand and predict the formation of a DMSO solvate of the anti-convulsant drug carbamazepine (CBZ), in which the DMSO molecules are disordered. Crystal structure prediction calculations on the 1:1 CBZ:DMSO solvate revealed the generation of two similar low energy structures which differ only in the orientation of the DMSO molecules. Analysis of crystal energy landscapes generated at 0 K suggests the possibility of solvent disorder. A combined computational and experimental study of the changes in the orientation of the DMSO within the crystal structure revealed that the nature of the disorder changes with temperature. At low temperature, the DMSO disorder is static whilst at high temperature the DMSO configurations can interconvert by a 180° rotation of the DMSO molecules within the lattice. This 180° rotation of the DMSO molecules drives a phase change from a high temperature dynamically disordered phase to a low temperature phase with static disorder. Crystallisation of a DMSO solvate of the related molecule epoxycarbamazepine resulted in a different degree of DMSO disorder in the crystal structure, despite the similarity of the carbamazepine and epoxycarbamazepine molecules. We believe consideration of disorder and its contribution to entropy and crystal free energies at temperature other than 0 K is fundamental for the accuracy of future energy rankings in crystal structure prediction calculations of similar solvated structures. PMID:21670828

  16. Are the Crystal Structures of Enantiopure and Racemic Mandelic Acids Determined by Kinetics or Thermodynamics?

    PubMed

    Hylton, Rebecca K; Tizzard, Graham J; Threlfall, Terence L; Ellis, Amy L; Coles, Simon J; Seaton, Colin C; Schulze, Eric; Lorenz, Heike; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Stein, Matthias; Price, Sarah L

    2015-09-01

    Mandelic acids are prototypic chiral molecules where the sensitivity of crystallized forms (enantiopure/racemic compound/polymorphs) to both conditions and substituents provides a new insight into the factors that may allow chiral separation by crystallization. The determination of a significant number of single crystal structures allows the analysis of 13 enantiopure and 30 racemic crystal structures of 21 (F/Cl/Br/CH3/CH3O) substituted mandelic acid derivatives. There are some common phenyl packing motifs between some groups of racemic and enantiopure structures, although they show very different hydrogen-bonding motifs. The computed crystal energy landscape of 3-chloromandelic acid, which has at least two enantiopure and three racemic crystal polymorphs, reveals that there are many more possible structures, some of which are predicted to be thermodynamically more favorable as well as slightly denser than the known forms. Simulations of mandelic acid dimers in isolation, water, and toluene do not differentiate between racemic and enantiopure dimers and also suggest that the phenyl ring interactions play a major role in the crystallization mechanism. The observed crystallization behavior of mandelic acids does not correspond to any simple "crystal engineering rules" as there is a range of thermodynamically feasible structures with no distinction between the enantiopure and racemic forms. Nucleation and crystallization appear to be determined by the kinetics of crystal growth with a statistical bias, but the diversity of the mandelic acid crystallization behavior demonstrates that the factors that influence the kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth are not yet adequately understood. PMID:26244445

  17. Crystal Structure of the VS ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Suslov, Nikolai B.; DasGupta, Saurja; Huang, Hao; Fuller, James R.; Lilley, David M.J.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Varkud Satellite (VS) ribozyme mediates rolling circle replication of a plasmid found in the Neurospora mitochondria. We report crystal structures of this ribozyme at 3.1Å resolution, revealing an intertwined dimer formed by an exchange of substrate helices. Within each protomer, an arrangement of three-way helical junctions organizes seven helices into a global fold that creates a docking site for the substrate helix of the other protomer, resulting in the formation of two active sites in trans. This mode of RNA-RNA association resembles the process of domain swapping in proteins and has implications for RNA regulation and evolution. Within each active site, adenine and guanine nucleobases abut the scissile phosphate, poised to serve direct roles in catalysis. Similarities to the active sites of the hairpin and hammerhead ribozymes highlight the functional significance of active site features, underscore the ability of RNA to access functional architectures from distant regions of sequence space, and suggest convergent evolution. PMID:26414446

  18. Crystal structure of oligoacenes under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Oehzelt, M.; Aichholzer, A.; Resel, R.; Heimel, G.; Venuti, E.; Della Valle, R. G.

    2006-09-01

    We report crystal structures of anthracene, tetracene, and pentacene under pressure. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments up to 9 GPa were performed. Quasiharmonic lattice dynamics calculations are compared to the experimental results and show excellent agreement. The results are discussed with particular emphasis on the pressure dependence of the unit cell dimensions and the rearrangement of the molecules. The high pressure data also allow an analysis of the equation of state of these substances as a function of molecular length. We report the bulk modulus of tetracene and pentacene (B{sub 0}=9.0 and 9.6 GPa, respectively) and its pressure derivative (B{sub 0}{sup '}=7.9 and 6.4, respectively). We find that the unit-cell volume and bulk modulus at ambient pressure follow a linear relationship with the molecular length.

  19. Exploring structural phase transitions of ion crystals

    PubMed Central

    Yan, L. L.; Wan, W.; Chen, L.; Zhou, F.; Gong, S. J.; Tong, X.; Feng, M.

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions have been a research focus in many-body physics over past decades. Cold ions, under strong Coulomb repulsion, provide a repealing paradigm of exploring phase transitions in stable confinement by electromagnetic field. We demonstrate various conformations of up to sixteen laser-cooled 40Ca+ ion crystals in a home-built surface-electrode trap, where besides the usually mentioned structural phase transition from the linear to the zigzag, two additional phase transitions to more complicated two-dimensional configurations are identified. The experimental observation agrees well with the numerical simulation. Heating due to micromotion of the ions is analysed by comparison of the numerical simulation with the experimental observation. Our investigation implies very rich and complicated many-body behaviour in the trapped-ion systems and provides effective mechanism for further exploring quantum phase transitions and quantum information processing with ultracold trapped ions. PMID:26865229

  20. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  1. Crystal structure of human GDF11.

    PubMed

    Padyana, Anil K; Vaidialingam, Bhamini; Hayes, David B; Gupta, Priyanka; Franti, Michael; Farrow, Neil A

    2016-03-01

    Members of the TGF-β family of proteins are believed to play critical roles in cellular signaling processes such as those involved in muscle differentiation. The extent to which individual family members have been characterized and linked to biological function varies greatly. The role of myostatin, also known as growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8), as an inhibitor of muscle differentiation is well understood through genetic linkages. In contrast, the role of growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) is much less well understood. In humans, the mature forms of GDF11 and myostatin are over 94% identical. In order to understand the role that the small differences in sequence may play in the differential signaling of these molecules, the crystal structure of GDF11 was determined to a resolution of 1.50 Å. A comparison of the GDF11 structure with those of other family members reveals that the canonical TGF-β domain fold is conserved. A detailed structural comparison of GDF11 and myostatin shows that several of the differences between these proteins are likely to be localized at interfaces that are critical for the interaction with downstream receptors and inhibitors. PMID:26919518

  2. Crystal Structure of Amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Joo, Seongjoon; Kim, Sangwoo; Seo, Hogyun; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2016-07-20

    Amylomaltase is an essential enzyme in maltose utilization and maltodextrin metabolism, and it has been industrially used for the production of cyclodextrin and modification of starch. We determined the crystal structure of amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAM) at a resolution of 1.7 Å. Although CgAM forms a dimer without NaCl, it exists as a monomer in physiological concentration of NaCl. CgAM is composed of N- and C-terminal domains, which can be further divided into two and four subdomains, respectively. It exhibits a unique structural feature at the functionally unknown N-domain and also shows two striking differences at the C-domain compared to other amylomaltases. These differences at extended edge of the substrate-binding site might affect substrate specificity for large cyclodextrin formation. The bis-tris methane and sulfate molecules bound at the substrate-binding site of our current structure mimic the binding of the hydroxyl groups of glucose bound at subsites -1 and -2, respectively. PMID:27366969

  3. The Crystal Structure of Triuranyl Diphosphate Tetrahydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locock, Andrew J.; Burns, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    The hydrated neutral uranyl phosphate, (UO2)3(PO4)2(H2O)4, was synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Intensity data were collected using MoKα radiation and a CCD-based area detector. The crystal structure was solved by direct methods and refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques to agreement indices wR2=0.116 for all data, and R1=0.040, calculated for the 2764 unique observed reflections (∣Fo∣≥4σF). The compound is orthorhombic, space group Pnma, Z=4, a=7.063(1) Å, b=17.022(3) Å, c=13.172(3) Å, V=1583.5(5) Å3. The structure consists of sheets of phosphate tetrahedra and uranyl pentagonal bipyramids, with composition [(UO2)(PO4)]- and the uranophane sheet anion topology. The sheets are connected by a uranyl pentagonal bipyramid in the interlayer that shares corners with a phosphate tetrahedron on each of two adjacent sheets, resulting in an open framework with isolated H2O groups in the larger cavities of the structure.

  4. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss-Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  5. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss–Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  6. Crystal Structure of Homo Sapiens Kynureninase†

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Santiago; Kristoforov, Roman; Momany, Cory; Phillips, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Kynureninase is a member of a large family of catalytically diverse but structurally homologous pyridoxal-5′-phosphate dependent enzymes known as the aspartate aminotransferase superfamily or α-family. The Homo sapiens and other eukaryotic constitutive kynureninases preferentially catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine to produce 3-hydroxyanthranilate and L-alanine, while L-kynurenine is the substrate of many prokaryotic inducible kynureninases. The human enzyme was cloned with an N-terminal hexahistidine tag, expressed, and purified from a bacterial expression system using Ni-metal ion affinity chromatography. Kinetic characterization of the recombinant enzyme reveals classic Michaelis-Menten behavior, with a Km= 28.3 ± 1.9 μM, and a specific activity of 1.75 μmol min-1 mg-1 for 3-hydroxy-DL-kynurenine. Crystals of recombinant kynureninase were obtained that diffracted to 2.0 Å, and the atomic structure of the PLP-bound holoenzyme was solved by molecular replacement using the Pseudomonas fluorescens kynureninase structure (PDB accession 1qz9) as the phasing model. A structural superposition with the P. fluorescens kynureninase revealed that these two structures resemble the “open” and “closed” conformations of aspartate aminotransferase. The comparison illustrates the dynamic nature of these proteins’ small domains and reveals a role for Arg-434 similar to that in other AAT α-family members. Docking of 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine into the human kynureninase active site suggests that Asn-333 and His-102 are involved in substrate binding and molecular discrimination between inducible and constitutive kynureninase substrates. PMID:17300176

  7. Structure dependent hydrogen induced etching features of graphene crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraja, Amutha; Shinde, Sachin M.; Kalita, Golap; Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Sharma, Kamal P.; Tanemura, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    H2 induced etching of graphene is of significant interest to understand graphene growth process as well as to fabricate nanoribbons and various other structures. Here, we demonstrate the structure dependent H2 induced etching behavior of graphene crystals. We synthesized graphene crystals on electro-polished Cu foil by an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition process, where some of the crystals showed hexagonal shaped snowflake-dendritic morphology. Significant differences in H2 induced etching behavior were observed for the snowflake-dendritic and regular graphene crystals by annealing in a gas mixture of H2 and Ar. The regular graphene crystals were etched anisotropically creating hexagonal holes with pronounced edges, while etching of all the dendritic crystals occurred from the branches of lobs creating symmetrical fractal structures. The etching behavior provides important clue of graphene nucleation and growth as well as their selective etching to fabricate well-defined structures for nanoelectronics.

  8. Crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Lígia R.; Low, John Nicolson; Magalhães e Silva, Diogo; Cagide, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives, viz. 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]-1-(3-meth­oxy­phen­yl)ethan-1-one (1), C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]-1-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)ethan-1-one (2), C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]-1-(4-chloro­phen­yl)ethan-1-one (3), C15H11ClN4O2S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]-1-(4-bromo­phen­yl)ethan-1-one (4), C15H11BrN4O2S, and 1-(3-meth­oxy­phen­yl)-2-[(9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]ethan-1-one (5), C14H12N4O2S. Compounds (2), (3) and (4) are isomorphous and accordingly their mol­ecular and supra­molecular structures are similar. An analysis of the dihedral angles between the purine and exocyclic phenyl rings show that the mol­ecules of (1) and (5) are essentially planar but that in the case of the three isomorphous compounds (2), (3) and (4), these rings are twisted by a dihedral angle of approximately 38°. With the exception of (1) all mol­ecules are linked by weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds in their crystals. There is π–π stacking in all compounds. A Cambridge Structural Database search revealed the existence of 11 deposited compounds containing the 1-phenyl-2-sulfanyl­ethanone scaffold; of these, only eight have a cyclic ring as substituent, the majority of these being heterocycles. PMID:27006794

  9. Crystal Structure of Human Kynurenine Aminotransferase ll*

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Li, J.

    2008-01-01

    Human kynurenine aminotransferase II (hKAT-II) efficiently catalyzes the transamination of knunrenine to kynurenic acid (KYNA). KYNA is the only known endogenous antagonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and is also an antagonist of 7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Abnormal concentrations of brain KYNA have been implicated in the pathogenesis and development of several neurological and psychiatric diseases in humans. Consequently, enzymes involved in the production of brain KYNA have been considered potential regulatory targets. In this article, we report a 2.16 Angstroms crystal structure of hKAT-II and a 1.95 Angstroms structure of its complex with kynurenine. The protein architecture of hKAT-II reveals that it belongs to the fold-type I pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. In comparison with all subclasses of fold-type I-PLP-dependent enzymes, we propose that hKAT-II represents a novel subclass in the fold-type I enzymes because of the unique folding of its first 65 N-terminal residues. This study provides a molecular basis for future effort in maintaining physiological concentrations of KYNA through molecular and biochemical regulation of hKAT-II.

  10. Crystallization and Structure Determination of Superantigens and Immune Receptor Complexes.

    PubMed

    Rödström, Karin E J; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Structure determination of superantigens and the complexes they form with immune receptors have over the years provided insight in their modes of action. This technique requires growing large and highly ordered crystals of the superantigen or receptor-superantigen complex, followed by exposure to X-ray radiation and data collection. Here, we describe methods for crystallizing superantigens and superantigen-receptor complexes using the vapor diffusion technique, how the crystals may be optimized, and lastly data collection and structure determination. PMID:26676036

  11. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermannová, Lada Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  12. Undergraduates Improve upon Published Crystal Structure in Class Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Scott; Koldewey, Philipp; Bardwell, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, 57 undergraduate students at the University of Michigan were assigned the task of solving a crystal structure, given only the electron density map of a 1.3 Å crystal structure from the electron density server, and the position of the N-terminal amino acid. To test their knowledge of amino acid chemistry, the students were not given the…

  13. Geometric prediction structure for multiview video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seok; Wey, Ho-Cheon; Park, Du-Sik

    2010-02-01

    One of the critical issues to successful service of 3D video is how to compress huge amount of multi-view video data efficiently. In this paper, we described about geometric prediction structure for multi-view video coding. By exploiting the geometric relations between each camera pose, we can make prediction pair which maximizes the spatial correlation of each view. To analyze the relationship of each camera pose, we defined the mathematical view center and view distance in 3D space. We calculated virtual center pose by getting mean rotation matrix and mean translation vector. We proposed an algorithm for establishing the geometric prediction structure based on view center and view distance. Using this prediction structure, inter-view prediction is performed to camera pair of maximum spatial correlation. In our prediction structure, we also considered the scalability in coding and transmitting the multi-view videos. Experiments are done using JMVC (Joint Multiview Video Coding) software on MPEG-FTV test sequences. Overall performance of proposed prediction structure is measured in the PSNR and subjective image quality measure such as PSPNR.

  14. Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2006-09-07

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We describe guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode, including particle beam dynamics and potential coupling methods for the structure. We also discuss possible materials and power sources for this structure and their effects on performance parameters, as well as possible manufacturing techniques and the required tolerances. In addition we describe the computational technique and possible improvements in numerical modeling that would aid development of photonic crystal structures.

  15. Use of Pom Pons to Illustrate Cubic Crystal Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Susan G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method that uses olefin pom pons to illustrate cubic crystal structure. Facilitates hands-on examination of different packing arrangements such as hexagonal close-packed and cubic close-packed structures. (JRH)

  16. Interface Structure Prediction from First-Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Shu, Qiang; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Yangang; Ji, Min; Xiang, Hongjun; Ho, Kai-Ming; Gong, Xingao; Wang, Cai-Zhuang

    2014-05-08

    Information about the atomic structures at solid–solid interfaces is crucial for understanding and predicting the performance of materials. Due to the complexity of the interfaces, it is very challenging to resolve their atomic structures using either experimental techniques or computer simulations. In this paper, we present an efficient first-principles computational method for interface structure prediction based on an adaptive genetic algorithm. This approach significantly reduces the computational cost, while retaining the accuracy of first-principles prediction. The method is applied to the investigation of both stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric SrTiO3 Σ3(112)[1¯10] grain boundaries with unit cell containing up to 200 atoms. Several novel low-energy structures are discovered, which provide fresh insights into the structure and stability of the grain boundaries.

  17. Statistics of Dislocation Slip Avalanches in Nanosized Single Crystals Show Tuned Critical Behavior Predicted by a Simple Mean Field Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Nir; Jennings, Andrew T.; Tsekenis, Georgios; Kim, Ju-Young; Tao, Molei; Uhl, Jonathan T.; Greer, Julia R.; Dahmen, Karin A.

    2012-08-01

    We show that slowly sheared metallic nanocrystals deform via discrete strain bursts (slips), whose size distributions follow power laws with stress-dependent cutoffs. We show for the first time that plasticity reflects tuned criticality, by collapsing the stress-dependent slip-size distributions onto a predicted scaling function. Both power-law exponents and scaling function agree with mean-field theory predictions. Our study of 7 materials and 2 crystal structures, at various deformation rates, stresses, and crystal sizes down to 75 nm, attests to the universal characteristics of plasticity.

  18. Microstructure and Crystal Structure in TAGS Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A. J.; Sharp, J; Rawn, Claudia J

    2009-01-01

    GeTe, a small bandgap semiconductor that has native p-type defects due to Ge vacancies, is an important constituent in the thermoelectric material known as TAGS. TAGS is an acronym for alloys of GeTe with AgSbTe{sub 2}, and compositions are normally designated as TAGS-x, where x is the fraction of GeTe. TAGS-85 is the most important with regard to applications, and there is also commercial interest in TAGS-80. The crystal structure of GeTe{sub 1+{delta}} has a composition-dependent phase transformation at a temperature ranging from 430 C ({delta} = 0) to {approx}400 C ({delta} = 0.02). The high-temperature form is cubic. The low-temperature form is rhombohedral for {delta} < 0.01, as is the case for good thermoelectric performance. Addition of AgSbTe{sub 2} shifts the phase transformation to lower temperatures, and one of the goals of this work is a systematic study of the dependence of transformation temperature on the parameter x. We present results on phase transformations and associated instabilities in TAGS compositions in the range of 70 at.% to 85 at.% GeTe.

  19. Crystal structure of tolyl­fluanid

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seonghwa; Kim, Jineun; Kang, Gihaeng; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-01-01

    The title compound, C10H13Cl2FN2O2S2 {systematic name: N-[(di­chloro­fluoro­methyl)­sulfanyl]-N′,N′-dimethyl-N-p-tolyl­sulfamide}, is a well known fungicide. The dihedral angle between the mean plane of the di­methyl­amino group and that of the benzene ring is 32.3 (3)°. One Cl atom and one F atom of the di­chloro­fluoro­methyl­thio group are disordered over two sets of sites with an occupancy ratio of 0.605 (9):0.395 (9). In the crystal structure, two C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds link adjacent mol­ecules, forming dimers with R 2 2(14) loops. C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link pairs of dimers into chains along the b-axis direction. These chains are joined by an additional C—H⋯O contact, generating a sheet in the ab plane. PMID:25484703

  20. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Nicole M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A; Lisher, John P; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P; Spiller, Benjamin W; Melnyk, Roman A; Lacy, D Borden

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon(1,2). The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host(3,4). The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics. PMID:27571750

  1. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon1,2. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host3,4. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics. PMID:27512603

  2. Spectroscopic, thermal and structural studies on manganous malate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J. Lincy, A. Mahalakshmi, V.; Saban, K. V.

    2013-01-15

    Prismatic crystals of manganous malate have been prepared by controlled ionic diffusion in hydrosilica gel. The structure was elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystals are orthorhombic with space group Pbca. Vibrations of the functional groups were identified by the FTIR spectrum. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TG-DTA) were carried out to explore the thermal decomposition pattern of the material. Structural information derived from FTIR and TG-DTA studies is in conformity with the single crystal XRD data.

  3. A structural alphabet for local protein structures: improved prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Etchebest, Catherine; Benros, Cristina; Hazout, Serge; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2005-06-01

    Three-dimensional protein structures can be described with a library of 3D fragments that define a structural alphabet. We have previously proposed such an alphabet, composed of 16 patterns of five consecutive amino acids, called Protein Blocks (PBs). These PBs have been used to describe protein backbones and to predict local structures from protein sequences. The Q16 prediction rate reaches 40.7% with an optimization procedure. This article examines two aspects of PBs. First, we determine the effect of the enlargement of databanks on their definition. The results show that the geometrical features of the different PBs are preserved (local RMSD value equal to 0.41 A on average) and sequence-structure specificities reinforced when databanks are enlarged. Second, we improve the methods for optimizing PB predictions from sequences, revisiting the optimization procedure and exploring different local prediction strategies. Use of a statistical optimization procedure for the sequence-local structure relation improves prediction accuracy by 8% (Q16 = 48.7%). Better recognition of repetitive structures occurs without losing the prediction efficiency of the other local folds. Adding secondary structure prediction improved the accuracy of Q16 by only 1%. An entropy index (Neq), strongly related to the RMSD value of the difference between predicted PBs and true local structures, is proposed to estimate prediction quality. The Neq is linearly correlated with the Q16 prediction rate distributions, computed for a large set of proteins. An "expected" prediction rate QE16 is deduced with a mean error of 5%. PMID:15822101

  4. Characteristics and Prediction of RNA Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Daming; Zhang, Caiming; Han, Huijian; Crandall, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots are often predicted by minimizing free energy, which is NP-hard. Most RNAs fold during transcription from DNA into RNA through a hierarchical pathway wherein secondary structures form prior to tertiary structures. Real RNA secondary structures often have local instead of global optimization because of kinetic reasons. The performance of RNA structure prediction may be improved by considering dynamic and hierarchical folding mechanisms. This study is a novel report on RNA folding that accords with the golden mean characteristic based on the statistical analysis of the real RNA secondary structures of all 480 sequences from RNA STRAND, which are validated by NMR or X-ray. The length ratios of domains in these sequences are approximately 0.382L, 0.5L, 0.618L, and L, where L is the sequence length. These points are just the important golden sections of sequence. With this characteristic, an algorithm is designed to predict RNA hierarchical structures and simulate RNA folding by dynamically folding RNA structures according to the above golden section points. The sensitivity and number of predicted pseudoknots of our algorithm are better than those of the Mfold, HotKnots, McQfold, ProbKnot, and Lhw-Zhu algorithms. Experimental results reflect the folding rules of RNA from a new angle that is close to natural folding. PMID:25110687

  5. Predicting protein dynamics from structural ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperman, J.; Guenza, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The biological properties of proteins are uniquely determined by their structure and dynamics. A protein in solution populates a structural ensemble of metastable configurations around the global fold. From overall rotation to local fluctuations, the dynamics of proteins can cover several orders of magnitude in time scales. We propose a simulation-free coarse-grained approach which utilizes knowledge of the important metastable folded states of the protein to predict the protein dynamics. This approach is based upon the Langevin Equation for Protein Dynamics (LE4PD), a Langevin formalism in the coordinates of the protein backbone. The linear modes of this Langevin formalism organize the fluctuations of the protein, so that more extended dynamical cooperativity relates to increasing energy barriers to mode diffusion. The accuracy of the LE4PD is verified by analyzing the predicted dynamics across a set of seven different proteins for which both relaxation data and NMR solution structures are available. Using experimental NMR conformers as the input structural ensembles, LE4PD predicts quantitatively accurate results, with correlation coefficient ρ = 0.93 to NMR backbone relaxation measurements for the seven proteins. The NMR solution structure derived ensemble and predicted dynamical relaxation is compared with molecular dynamics simulation-derived structural ensembles and LE4PD predictions and is consistent in the time scale of the simulations. The use of the experimental NMR conformers frees the approach from computationally demanding simulations.

  6. Predicting structure in nonsymmetric sparse matrix factorizations

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.R.; Ng, E.

    1991-12-31

    Many computations on sparse matrices have a phase that predicts the nonzero structure of the output, followed by a phase that actually performs the numerical computation. We study structure prediction for computations that involve nonsymmetric row and column permutations and nonsymmetric or non-square matrices. Our tools are bipartite graphs, matchings, and alternating paths. Our main new result concerns LU factorization with partial pivoting. We show that if a square matrix A has the strong Hall property (i.e., is fully indecomposable) then an upper bound due to George and Ng on the nonzero structure of L + U is as tight as possible. To show this, we prove a crucial result about alternating paths in strong Hall graphs. The alternating-paths theorem seems to be of independent interest: it can also be used to prove related results about structure prediction for QR factorization that are due to Coleman, Edenbrandt, Gilbert, Hare, Johnson, Olesky, Pothen, and van den Driessche.

  7. Predicting structure in nonsymmetric sparse matrix factorizations

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.R. ); Ng, E. )

    1991-01-01

    Many computations on sparse matrices have a phase that predicts the nonzero structure of the output, followed by a phase that actually performs the numerical computation. We study structure prediction for computations that involve nonsymmetric row and column permutations and nonsymmetric or non-square matrices. Our tools are bipartite graphs, matchings, and alternating paths. Our main new result concerns LU factorization with partial pivoting. We show that if a square matrix A has the strong Hall property (i.e., is fully indecomposable) then an upper bound due to George and Ng on the nonzero structure of L + U is as tight as possible. To show this, we prove a crucial result about alternating paths in strong Hall graphs. The alternating-paths theorem seems to be of independent interest: it can also be used to prove related results about structure prediction for QR factorization that are due to Coleman, Edenbrandt, Gilbert, Hare, Johnson, Olesky, Pothen, and van den Driessche.

  8. Predicting structure in nonsymmetric sparse matrix factorizations

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.R. ); Ng, E.G. )

    1992-10-01

    Many computations on sparse matrices have a phase that predicts the nonzero structure of the output, followed by a phase that actually performs the numerical computation. We study structure prediction for computations that involve nonsymmetric row and column permutations and nonsymmetric or non-square matrices. Our tools are bipartite graphs, matchings, and alternating paths. Our main new result concerns LU factorization with partial pivoting. We show that if a square matrix A has the strong Hall property (i.e., is fully indecomposable) then an upper bound due to George and Ng on the nonzero structure of L + U is as tight as possible. To show this, we prove a crucial result about alternating paths in strong Hall graphs. The alternating-paths theorem seems to be of independent interest: it can also be used to prove related results about structure prediction for QR factorization that are due to Coleman, Edenbrandt, Gilbert, Hare, Johnson, Olesky, Pothen, and van den Driessche.

  9. Novel photonic crystal cavities and related structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    The key accomplishment of this project is to achieve a much more in-depth understanding of the thermal emission physics of metallic photonic crystal through theoretical modeling and experimental measurements. An improved transfer matrix technique was developed to enable incorporation of complex dielectric function. Together with microscopic theory describing emitter radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics, a non-equilibrium thermal emission model is developed. Finally, experimental methodology was developed to measure absolute emissivity of photonic crystal at high temperatures with accuracy of +/-2%. Accurate emissivity measurements allow us to validate the procedure to treat the effect of the photonic crystal substrate.

  10. A Dominant Factor for Structural Classification of Protein Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fei; Fudo, Satoshi; Neya, Saburo; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2015-08-24

    With the increasing number of solved protein crystal structures, much information on protein shape and atom geometry has become available. It is of great interest to know the structural diversity for a single kind of protein. Our preliminary study suggested that multiple crystal structures of a single kind of protein can be classified into several groups from the viewpoint of structural similarity. In order to broadly examine this finding, cluster analysis was applied to the crystal structures of hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin (Mb), human serum albumin (HSA), hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR), downloaded from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). As a result of classification by cluster analysis, 146 crystal structures of Hb were separated into five groups. The crystal structures of Mb (n = 284), HEWL (n = 336), HSA (n = 63), and HIV-1 PR (n = 488) were separated into six, five, three, and six groups, respectively. It was found that a major factor causing these structural separations is the space group of crystals and that crystallizing agents have an influence on the crystal structures. Amino acid mutation is a minor factor for the separation because no obvious point mutation making a specific cluster group was observed for the five kinds of proteins. In the classification of Hb and Mb, the species of protein source such as humans, rabbits, and mice is another significant factor. When the difference in amino sequence is large among species, the species of protein source is the primary factor causing cluster separation in the classification of crystal structures. PMID:26230289

  11. Photonic crystal structures with tunable structure color as colorimetric sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Colorimetric sensing, which transduces environmental changes into visible color changes, provides a simple yet powerful detection mechanism that is well-suited to the development of low-cost and low-power sensors. A new approach in colorimetric sensing exploits the structural color of photonic crystals (PCs) to create environmentally-influenced color-changeable materials. PCs are composed of periodic dielectrics or metallo-dielectric nanostructures that affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves (EM) by defining the allowed and forbidden photonic bands. Simultaneously, an amazing variety of naturally occurring biological systems exhibit iridescent color due to the presence of PC structures throughout multi-dimensional space. In particular, some kinds of the structural colors in living organisms can be reversibly changed in reaction to external stimuli. Based on the lessons learned from natural photonic structures, some specific examples of PCs-based colorimetric sensors are presented in detail to demonstrate their unprecedented potential in practical applications, such as the detections of temperature, pH, ionic species, solvents, vapor, humidity, pressure and biomolecules. The combination of the nanofabrication technique, useful design methodologies inspired by biological systems and colorimetric sensing will lead to substantial developments in low-cost, miniaturized and widely deployable optical sensors. PMID:23539027

  12. Photonic Crystal Structures with Tunable Structure Color as Colorimetric Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Colorimetric sensing, which transduces environmental changes into visible color changes, provides a simple yet powerful detection mechanism that is well-suited to the development of low-cost and low-power sensors. A new approach in colorimetric sensing exploits the structural color of photonic crystals (PCs) to create environmentally-influenced color-changeable materials. PCs are composed of periodic dielectrics or metallo-dielectric nanostructures that affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves (EM) by defining the allowed and forbidden photonic bands. Simultaneously, an amazing variety of naturally occurring biological systems exhibit iridescent color due to the presence of PC structures throughout multi-dimensional space. In particular, some kinds of the structural colors in living organisms can be reversibly changed in reaction to external stimuli. Based on the lessons learned from natural photonic structures, some specific examples of PCs-based colorimetric sensors are presented in detail to demonstrate their unprecedented potential in practical applications, such as the detections of temperature, pH, ionic species, solvents, vapor, humidity, pressure and biomolecules. The combination of the nanofabrication technique, useful design methodologies inspired by biological systems and colorimetric sensing will lead to substantial developments in low-cost, miniaturized and widely deployable optical sensors. PMID:23539027

  13. In vivo protein crystallization opens new routes in structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Koopmann, Rudolf; Cupelli, Karolina; Redecke, Lars; Nass, Karol; DePonte, Daniel P; White, Thomas A; Stellato, Francesco; Rehders, Dirk; Liang, Mengning; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Bogan, Michael J; Bostedt, Christoph; Boutet, Sébastien; Bozek, John D; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; Davidsson, Jan; Doak, R Bruce; Ekeberg, Tomas; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Hunter, Mark S; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A; Lomb, Lukas; Maia, Filipe R N C; Kimmel, Nils; Martin, Andrew V; Messerschmidt, Marc; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L; Sierra, Raymond G; Soltau, Heike; Stern, Stephan; Strüder, Lothar; Timneanu, Nicusor; Ullrich, Joachim; Wang, Xiaoyu; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; Williams, Garth J; Wunderer, Cornelia B; Fromme, Petra; Spence, John C H; Stehle, Thilo; Chapman, Henry N; Betzel, Christian; Duszenko, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Protein crystallization in cells has been observed several times in nature. However, owing to their small size these crystals have not yet been used for X-ray crystallographic analysis. We prepared nano-sized in vivo–grown crystals of Trypanosoma brucei enzymes and applied the emerging method of free-electron laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography to record interpretable diffraction data. This combined approach will open new opportunities in structural systems biology. PMID:22286384

  14. Structural and Thermoelectric Properties of Tungsten Diselenide Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, K. K.; Patel, K. D.; Patel, Mayur; Patel, C. A.; Pathak, V. M.; Srivastava, R.

    2011-12-01

    Crystals of Tungsten diselenide (WSe2) have been grown by direct vapour transport (DVT) technique using micro processor controlled dual zone horizontal furnace. The chemical composition and structure of grown crystals were confirmed using energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In the present investigation thermoelectric power measurements (TEP) have been carried out on the grown crystals. Different electrical transport parameters of semiconductors have been determined and discussed in the paper.

  15. Predicting Odor Perceptual Similarity from Odor Structure

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Tali; Frumin, Idan; Khan, Rehan M.; Sobel, Noam

    2013-01-01

    To understand the brain mechanisms of olfaction we must understand the rules that govern the link between odorant structure and odorant perception. Natural odors are in fact mixtures made of many molecules, and there is currently no method to look at the molecular structure of such odorant-mixtures and predict their smell. In three separate experiments, we asked 139 subjects to rate the pairwise perceptual similarity of 64 odorant-mixtures ranging in size from 4 to 43 mono-molecular components. We then tested alternative models to link odorant-mixture structure to odorant-mixture perceptual similarity. Whereas a model that considered each mono-molecular component of a mixture separately provided a poor prediction of mixture similarity, a model that represented the mixture as a single structural vector provided consistent correlations between predicted and actual perceptual similarity (r≥0.49, p<0.001). An optimized version of this model yielded a correlation of r = 0.85 (p<0.001) between predicted and actual mixture similarity. In other words, we developed an algorithm that can look at the molecular structure of two novel odorant-mixtures, and predict their ensuing perceptual similarity. That this goal was attained using a model that considers the mixtures as a single vector is consistent with a synthetic rather than analytical brain processing mechanism in olfaction. PMID:24068899

  16. A silicon photonic quasi-crystal structure obtained by interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, S.; Zakrzewski, A.; Gryglewicz, J.; Oleszkiewicz, W.; Patela, S.

    2012-06-01

    Photonic quasi-crystal structures have been prepared and investigated. Symmetrical patterns were fabricated by interference lithography in negative tone photoresist and transferred to silicon by reactive ion etching. Theoretical influences of pattern detail (radius of hole) on the photonic band gap have been studied. Three types of 2D photonic quasi-crystals have been prepared: 8-fold, 10-fold and 12-fold pattern. Finally, finite-difference time-domain method was used for theoretically prediction of transmission spectrum for fabricated 12-fold quasi-crystal.

  17. Base-pairing potential identified by in vitro selection predicts the kinked RNA backbone observed in the crystal structure of the alfalfa mosaic virus RNA-coat protein complex.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Michael; Scott, Felicia; Guogas, Laura M; Gehrke, Lee

    2006-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the 3' terminus of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA in complex with an amino-terminal coat protein peptide revealed an unusual RNA fold with inter-AUGC basepairing stabilized by key arginine residues (Guogas, et al., 2004). To probe viral RNA interactions with the full-length coat protein, we have used in vitro genetic selection to characterize potential folding patterns among RNAs isolated from a complex randomized pool. Nitrocellulose filter retention, electrophoretic mobility bandshift analysis, and hydroxyl radical footprinting techniques were used to define binding affinities and to localize the potential RNA-protein interaction sites. Minimized binding sites were identified that included both the randomized domain and a portion of the constant regions of the selected RNAs. The selected RNAs, identified by their ability to bind full-length coat protein, have the potential to form the same unusual inter-AUGC Watson-Crick base pairs observed in the crystal structure, although the primary sequences diverge from the wild-type RNA. A constant feature of both the wild-type RNA and the selected RNAs is a G ribonucleotide in the third position of an AUGC-like repeat. Competitive binding assays showed that substituting adenosine for the constant guanosine in either the wild-type or selected RNAs impaired coat protein binding. These data suggest that the interactions observed in the RNA-peptide structure are likely recapitulated when the full-length protein binds. Further, the results underscore the power of in vitro genetic selection for probing RNA-protein structure and function. PMID:16312015

  18. Structural, spectral and mechanical studies of bimetallic crystal: cadmium manganese thiocyanate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M.; Vijaya Prasath, G.; Bhagavannarayan, G.; Vijayan, N.; Mahalingam, T.; Ravi, G.

    2012-09-01

    A nonlinear optical bimetallic thiocyanate complex crystal, cadmium manganese thiocyanate (CMTC) has been successfully synthesized. The growth of single crystals of cadmium manganese thiocyanate has been accomplished from aqueous solution using slow evaporation method. The presence of manganese and cadmium in the synthesized material was confirmed through energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) analysis. Structural analysis was carried out using powder X-ray diffractometer (PXRD) and crystalline perfection of the grown crystals was ascertained by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum was taken to confirm the functional groups. The transmittance spectrum of the crystal in the UV-visible region has been recorded and the cutoff wavelength has been determined. The dielectric measurements for the crystals were performed for various frequencies and temperatures. The mechanical properties were evaluated by Vickers microhardness testing, which reveals hardness and stiffness constant of the crystals.

  19. Low-voltage tunable photonics devices: grove on thin porous structures containing liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criante, Luigino; Moretti, Luca; Scotognella, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    In this study we demonstrate the fabrication of one-dimensional porous multilayer photonic crystals made by metal oxide nanoparticles. We show the infiltration of these porous structures with a liquid crystal via a very simple method, resulting in a red shift of the photonic band gap due to increase of the effective refractive index of the medium. Taking advantage of structure thickness of only few micrometers, we have observed a blue shift of the photonic band gap owing the non-linear response of the liquid crystals by applying a very low external electric voltage, i.e. 8 V. The experimental observation of electric voltage tuning on the transmission spectrum has been corroborated by transfer matrix method simulations, by taking into account the non-linear optical properties of the liquid crystal. In this framework, we propose how the optical properties of these structure can be accurately predicted by our simulation software in terms of diffraction efficiency, of photonic band gap position when the porous photonic crystals is doped with a liquid crystal, of modulation of the photonic band gap position (electro-optic tuning) in the presence of applied voltage. According with results carried out by the custom simulation software it is possible to control the optical proprieties of the photonics crystal in very thin structures. Furthermore, the presented device could be very interesting for applications where high sensitivity sensor and selective color tunability is needed with the use of cheap and low voltage power supplies.

  20. Protein Structure Prediction with Evolutionary Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, W.E.; Krasnogor, N.; Pelta, D.A.; Smith, J.

    1999-02-08

    Evolutionary algorithms have been successfully applied to a variety of molecular structure prediction problems. In this paper we reconsider the design of genetic algorithms that have been applied to a simple protein structure prediction problem. Our analysis considers the impact of several algorithmic factors for this problem: the confirmational representation, the energy formulation and the way in which infeasible conformations are penalized, Further we empirically evaluated the impact of these factors on a small set of polymer sequences. Our analysis leads to specific recommendations for both GAs as well as other heuristic methods for solving PSP on the HP model.

  1. Structural and mechanical studies of cadmium manganese thiocyanate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M. R.; Vijayaprasath, G.; babu, G. Anandha; Bhagavannarayan, G.; Vijayan, N.; Ravi, G.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of cadmium manganese thiocyanate (CMTC) have been synthesized successfully and grown by slow evaporation method. The structural perfection of the grown crystals has been analyzed by High resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), which shows the crystalline perfection of the grown crystal is quite good. Optical behavior was assessed by UV-Vis analysis and found that no absorption in the UV visible region and it may be useful for second harmonic applications. The mechanical hardness of the grown crystals was studied and Vicker's microhardness, Stiffness constant was calculated.

  2. Hydroflux synthesis and crystal structure of new lanthanide tungstate oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latshaw, Allison M.; Smith, Mark D.; Chance, W. Michael; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2015-04-01

    Single crystals of Na5Ln(OH)6WO4 where Ln = Er, Tm, and Yb were grown out of a NaOH hydroflux. The crystals were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and were found to crystallize in the monoclinic space group I2/a. The lattice parameter ranges for the three structures are a = 11.2024(7) Å-11.2412(6) Å, b = 16.1850(10) Å-16.2220(10) Å, and c = 11.9913(7) Å-12.0323(7) Å while the β angle range is 101.999(2)°-102.025(2)°.

  3. Prediction of photonic crystal fiber characteristics by Neuro-Fuzzy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmahyabadi, M.; Mohammad Nejad, S.

    2009-10-01

    The most common methods applied in the analysis of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are finite difference time/frequency domain (FDTD/FDFD) method and finite element method (FEM). These methods are very general and reliable (well tested). They describe arbitrary structure but are numerically intensive and require detailed treatment of boundaries and complex definition of calculation mesh. So these conventional models that simulate the photonic response of PCFs are computationally expensive and time consuming. Therefore, a practical design process with trial and error cannot be done in a reasonable amount of time. In this article, an artificial intelligence method such as Neuro-Fuzzy system is used to establish a model that can predict the properties of PCFs. Simulation results show that this model is remarkably effective in predicting the properties of PCF such as dispersion, dispersion slope and loss over the C communication band.

  4. Multipass Membrane Protein Structure Prediction Using Rosetta

    PubMed Central

    Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Schonbrun, Jack; Baker, David

    2006-01-01

    We describe the adaptation of the Rosetta de novo structure prediction method for prediction of helical transmembrane protein structures. The membrane environment is modeled by embedding the protein chain into a model membrane represented by parallel planes defining hydrophobic, interface, and polar membrane layers for each energy evaluation. The optimal embedding is determined by maximizing the exposure of surface hydrophobic residues within the membrane and minimizing hydrophobic exposure outside of the membrane. Protein conformations are built up using the Rosetta fragment assembly method and evaluated using a new membrane-specific version of the Rosetta low-resolution energy function in which residue–residue and residue–environment interactions are functions of the membrane layer in addition to amino acid identity, distance, and density. We find that lower energy and more native-like structures are achieved by sequential addition of helices to a growing chain, which may mimic some aspects of helical protein biogenesis after translocation, rather than folding the whole chain simultaneously as in the Rosetta soluble protein prediction method. In tests on 12 membrane proteins for which the structure is known, between 51 and 145 residues were predicted with root-mean-square deviation <4Å from the native structure. PMID:16372357

  5. Errors in Crystal structure of HINT from Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Maize, Kimberly M.

    2016-01-01

    Inaccuracies in the article, Crystal structure of HINT from Helicobacter pylori by Tarique et al. [(2016) Acta Cryst. F72, 42–48] are presented, and a brief history of HINT nomenclature is discussed. PMID:27050269

  6. Ko Displacement Theory for Structural Shape Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of the Ko displacement theory for predictions of structure deformed shapes was motivated in 2003 by the Helios flying wing, which had a 247-ft (75-m) wing span with wingtip deflections reaching 40 ft (12 m). The Helios flying wing failed in midair in June 2003, creating the need to develop new technology to predict in-flight deformed shapes of unmanned aircraft wings for visual display before the ground-based pilots. Any types of strain sensors installed on a structure can only sense the surface strains, but are incapable to sense the overall deformed shapes of structures. After the invention of the Ko displacement theory, predictions of structure deformed shapes could be achieved by feeding the measured surface strains into the Ko displacement transfer functions for the calculations of out-of-plane deflections and cross sectional rotations at multiple locations for mapping out overall deformed shapes of the structures. The new Ko displacement theory combined with a strain-sensing system thus created a revolutionary new structure- shape-sensing technology.

  7. Theoretical exploration of various lithium peroxide crystal structures in a Li-air battery

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Kah; Qiu, Dantong; Luo, Xiangyi; Greeley, Jeffrey; Curtiss, Larry; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-14

    We describe a series of metastable Li₂O₂ crystal structures involving different orientations and displacements of the O₂²⁻ peroxy ions based on the known Li₂O₂ crystal structure. Within the vicinity of the chemical potential ΔG ~ 0.20 eV/Li from the thermodynamic ground state of the Li₂O₂ crystal structure (i.e., Föppl structure), all of these newly found metastable Li₂O₂ crystal structures are found to be insulating and high-k materials, and they have a common unique signature of an O₂²⁻ O-O vibration mode (ω ~ 799–865 cm⁻¹), which is in the range of that commonly observed in Li-air battery experiments, regardless of the random O₂²⁻ orientations and the symmetry in the crystal lattice. From XRD patterns analysis, the commercially available Li₂O₂ powder is confirmed to be the thermodynamic ground state Föppl-like structure. However, for Li₂O₂ compounds that are grown electrochemically under the environment of Li-O₂ cells, we found that the XRD patterns alone are not sufficient for structural identification of these metastable Li₂O₂ crystalline phases due to the poor crystallinity of the sample. In addition, the commonly known Raman signal of O₂²⁻ vibration mode is also found to be insufficient to validate the possible existence of these newly predicted Li₂O₂ crystal structures, as all of them similarly share the similar O₂²⁻ vibration mode. However considering that the discharge voltage in most Li-O₂ cells are typically several tenths of an eV below the thermodynamic equilibrium for the formation of ground state Föppl structure, the formation of these metastable Li₂O₂ crystal structures appears to be thermodynamically feasible.

  8. Theoretical exploration of various lithium peroxide crystal structures in a Li-air battery

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lau, Kah; Qiu, Dantong; Luo, Xiangyi; Greeley, Jeffrey; Curtiss, Larry; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-14

    We describe a series of metastable Li₂O₂ crystal structures involving different orientations and displacements of the O₂²⁻ peroxy ions based on the known Li₂O₂ crystal structure. Within the vicinity of the chemical potential ΔG ~ 0.20 eV/Li from the thermodynamic ground state of the Li₂O₂ crystal structure (i.e., Föppl structure), all of these newly found metastable Li₂O₂ crystal structures are found to be insulating and high-k materials, and they have a common unique signature of an O₂²⁻ O-O vibration mode (ω ~ 799–865 cm⁻¹), which is in the range of that commonly observed in Li-air battery experiments, regardless of themore » random O₂²⁻ orientations and the symmetry in the crystal lattice. From XRD patterns analysis, the commercially available Li₂O₂ powder is confirmed to be the thermodynamic ground state Föppl-like structure. However, for Li₂O₂ compounds that are grown electrochemically under the environment of Li-O₂ cells, we found that the XRD patterns alone are not sufficient for structural identification of these metastable Li₂O₂ crystalline phases due to the poor crystallinity of the sample. In addition, the commonly known Raman signal of O₂²⁻ vibration mode is also found to be insufficient to validate the possible existence of these newly predicted Li₂O₂ crystal structures, as all of them similarly share the similar O₂²⁻ vibration mode. However considering that the discharge voltage in most Li-O₂ cells are typically several tenths of an eV below the thermodynamic equilibrium for the formation of ground state Föppl structure, the formation of these metastable Li₂O₂ crystal structures appears to be thermodynamically feasible.« less

  9. Crystal structure of inhibitor of ;#954;B kinase [beta

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guozhou; Lo, Yu-Chih; Li, Qiubai; Napolitano, Gennaro; Wu, Xuefeng; Jiang, Xuliang; Dreano, Michel; Karin, Michael; Wu, Hao

    2011-07-26

    Inhibitor of {kappa}B (I{kappa}B) kinase (IKK) phosphorylates I{kappa}B proteins, leading to their degradation and the liberation of nuclear factor {kappa}B for gene transcription. Here we report the crystal structure of IKK{beta} in complex with an inhibitor, at a resolution of 3.6 {angstrom}. The structure reveals a trimodular architecture comprising the kinase domain, a ubiquitin-like domain (ULD) and an elongated, {alpha}-helical scaffold/dimerization domain (SDD). Unexpectedly, the predicted leucine zipper and helix-loop-helix motifs do not form these structures but are part of the SDD. The ULD and SDD mediate a critical interaction with I{kappa}B{alpha} that restricts substrate specificity, and the ULD is also required for catalytic activity. The SDD mediates IKK{beta} dimerization, but dimerization per se is not important for maintaining IKK{beta} activity and instead is required for IKK{beta} activation. Other IKK family members, IKK{alpha}, TBK1 and IKK-i, may have a similar trimodular architecture and function.

  10. Crystal Structure and Crystal Chemistry of Some Common REE Minerals and Nanpingite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yunxiang

    1995-01-01

    Part I. Crystal structure and crystal chemistry of fluorocarbonate minerals. The crystal structure of bastnasite-(Ce) have been solved in P-62c and refined to R = 0.018. The structure is composed of (001) (CeF) layers interspersed with (CO_3) layers in a 1:1 ratio. The Ce atom is coordinated in rm CeO_6F_3 polyhedra. The atomic arrangement of synchysite-(Ce) has been solved and refined to R = 0.036 with a monoclinic space group C2/c. It possesses a (001) layer structure, with layers of (Ca) and (CeF) separated by layers of carbonate groups. The layers stack in a manner analogous to C2/c muscovite. Polytypism similar to the micas may exist in synchysite. The crystal structures of cordylite-(Ce) have been solved in P6 _3/mmc and refined to R = 0.023. The structure and chemical formula are different from those deduced by Oftedal. The formula is rm MBaCe_2(CO _3)_4F, where M is rm Na^+, Ca^{2+}_{1/2 }+ O_{1/2}, or any solution. The presence of (NaF) layer in the structure is the key difference from the Oftedal's structure. This redefinition of the chemical formula and crystal structure of cordylite will be proposed to IMA-CNMMN. Part II. Crystal structure and crystal chemistry of monazite-xenotime series. Monazite is monoclinic, P2 _1/n, and xenotime is isostructural with zircon (I4_1/amd). Both atomic arrangements are based on (001) chains of intervening phosphate tetrahedra and RE polyhedra, with a REO_8 polyhedron in xenotime that accommodates HRE (Tb - Lu) and a REO_9 polyhedron in monazite that preferentially incorporates LRE (La - Gd). As the structure "transforms" from xenotime to monazite, the crystallographic properties are comparable along the (001) chains, with structural adjustments of 2.2 A along (010) to accommodate the different size RE atoms. Part III. Crystal structure of nanpingite-2M _2, the Cs end-member of muscovite. The crystal structure of nanpingite has been refined to R = 0.058. Compared to K^+ in muscovite, the largest interlayer Cs^+ in

  11. Crystal structure of a methimazole-based ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Gaitor, Jamie C; Zayas, Manuel Sanchez; Myrthil, Darrel J; White, Frankie; Hendrich, Jeffrey M; Sykora, Richard E; O'Brien, Richard A; Reilly, John T; Mirjafari, Arsalan

    2015-12-01

    The structure of 1-methyl-2-(prop-2-en-1-ylsulfan-yl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium bromide, C7H11N2S(+)·Br(-), has monoclinic (P21/c) symmetry. In the crystal, the components are linked by N-H⋯Br and C-H⋯Br hydrogen bonds. The crystal structure of the title compound undeniably proves that methimazole reacts through the thione tautomer, rather than the thiol tautomer in this system. PMID:26870468

  12. The Crystal and Molecular Structure of Dianhydrogossypol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dianhydrogossypol (4,4'-dihydroxy-5,5'-diisopropyl-7,7'-dimethyl-bis(3H-naphtho[1,8-bc]furan-3-one)) was made by refluxing gossypol in m-xylene. Proton NMR confirmed that complete conversion was achieved over several hours. Single crystals were obtained by slow evaporation of the product from dichl...

  13. Allophycocyanin and phycocyanin crystal structures reveal facets of phycobilisome assembly.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Adir, Noam

    2013-03-01

    X-ray crystal structures of the isolated phycobiliprotein components of the phycobilisome have provided high resolution details to the description of this light harvesting complex at different levels of complexity and detail. The linker-independent assembly of trimers into hexamers in crystal lattices of previously determined structures has been observed in almost all of the phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC) structures available in the Protein Data Bank. In this paper we describe the X-ray crystal structures of PC and APC from Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942, PC from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and PC from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus crystallized in the presence of urea. All five structures are highly similar to other PC and APC structures on the levels of subunits, monomers and trimers. The Synechococcus APC forms a unique loose hexamer that may show the structural requirements for core assembly and rod attachment. While the Synechococcus PC assembles into the canonical hexamer, it does not further assemble into rods. Unlike most PC structures, the Synechocystis PC fails to form hexamers. Addition of low concentrations of urea to T. vulcanus PC inhibits this proteins propensity to form hexamers, resulting in a crystal lattice composed of trimers. The molecular source of these differences in assembly and their relevance to the phycobilisome structure is discussed. PMID:23201474

  14. Structure based prediction of protein folding intermediates.

    PubMed

    Xie, D; Freire, E

    1994-09-01

    The complete unfolding of a protein involves the disruption of non-covalent intramolecular interactions within the protein and the subsequent hydration of the backbone and amino acid side-chains. The magnitude of the thermodynamic parameters associated with this process is known accurately for a growing number of globular proteins for which high-resolution structures are also available. The existence of this database of structural and thermodynamic information has facilitated the development of statistical procedures aimed at quantifying the relationships existing between protein structure and the thermodynamic parameters of folding/unfolding. Under some conditions proteins do not unfold completely, giving rise to states (commonly known as molten globules) in which the molecule retains some secondary structure and remains in a compact configuration after denaturation. This phenomenon is reflected in the thermodynamics of the process. Depending on the nature of the residual structure that exists after denaturation, the observed enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity changes will deviate in a particular and predictable way from the values expected for complete unfolding. For several proteins, these deviations have been shown to exhibit similar characteristics, suggesting that their equilibrium folding intermediates exhibit some common structural features. Employing empirically derived structure-energetic relationships, it is possible to identify in the native structure of the protein those regions with the higher probability of being structured in equilibrium partly folded states. In this work, a thermodynamic search algorithm aimed at identifying the structural determinants of the molten globule state has been applied to six globular proteins; alpha-lactalbumin, barnase, IIIGlc, interleukin-1 beta, phage T4 lysozyme and phage 434 repressor. Remarkably, the structural features of the predicted equilibrium intermediates coincide to a large extent with the known

  15. Prediction of the structure of symmetrical protein assemblies

    PubMed Central

    André, Ingemar; Bradley, Philip; Wang, Chu; Baker, David

    2007-01-01

    Biological supramolecular systems are commonly built up by the self-assembly of identical protein subunits to produce symmetrical oligomers with cyclical, icosahedral, or helical symmetry that play roles in processes ranging from allosteric control and molecular transport to motor action. The large size of these systems often makes them difficult to structurally characterize using experimental techniques. We have developed a computational protocol to predict the structure of symmetrical protein assemblies based on the structure of a single subunit. The method carries out simultaneous optimization of backbone, side chain, and rigid-body degrees of freedom, while restricting the search space to symmetrical conformations. Using this protocol, we can reconstruct, starting from the structure of a single subunit, the structure of cyclic oligomers and the icosahedral virus capsid of satellite panicum virus using a rigid backbone approximation. We predict the oligomeric state of EscJ from the type III secretion system both in its proposed cyclical and crystallized helical form. Finally, we show that the method can recapitulate the structure of an amyloid-like fibril formed by the peptide NNQQNY from the yeast prion protein Sup35 starting from the amino acid sequence alone and searching the complete space of backbone, side chain, and rigid-body degrees of freedom. PMID:17978193

  16. Thermodynamic and structural aspects of sulfonamide crystals and solutions.

    PubMed

    Perlovich, German L; Tkachev, Valery V; Strakhova, Nadezda N; Kazachenko, Vladimir P; Volkova, Tatyana V; Surov, Oleg V; Schaper, Klaus-Jürgen; Raevsky, Oleg A

    2009-12-01

    The crystal structures of three sulfonamides with the general structure 4-NH(2)-C(6)H(4)-SO(2)NH-C(6)H(4/3)-R (R = 4-Et; 4-OMe; 5-Cl-2-Me) have been determined by X-ray diffraction. On the basis of our previous data and the results obtained a comparative analysis of crystal properties was performed: molecular conformational states, packing architecture, and hydrogen bond networks using graph set notations. The thermodynamic aspects of the sulfonamide sublimation process have been studied by investigating the temperature dependence of vapor pressure using the transpiration method. A regression equation was derived describing the correlation between sublimation entropy terms and crystal density data calculated from X-ray diffraction results. Also correlations between sublimation Gibbs energies and melting points, on the one hand, and between sublimation enthalpies and fusion enthalpies at 298 K, on the other hand, were found. These dependencies give the opportunity to predict sublimation thermodynamic parameters by simple thermo-physical experiments (fusion characteristics). Solubility processes of the compounds in water, n-hexane, and n-octanol (as phases modeling various drug delivery pathways and different types of membranes) were investigated and corresponding thermodynamic functions were calculated as well. Thermodynamic characteristics of sulfonamide solvation were evaluated. For compounds with similar structures processes of transfer from one solvent to another one were studied by a diagram method combined with analysis of enthalpic and entropic terms. Distinguishing between enthalpy and entropy, as is possible through the present approach, leads to the insight that the contribution of these terms is different for different molecules (entropy- or enthalpy-determined). Thus, in contrast to interpretation of only the Gibbs energy of transfer, being extensively used for pharmaceuticals in the form of the partition coefficient (log P), the analysis of

  17. Crystal structure control in Au-free self-seeded InSb wire growth.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Bernhard; Dick, Kimberly A; Kriegner, Dominik; Keplinger, Mario; Bauer, Günther; Stangl, Julian; Deppert, Knut

    2011-04-01

    In this work we demonstrate experimentally the dependence of InSb crystal structure on the ratio of Sb to In atoms at the growth front. Epitaxial InSb wires are grown by a self-seeded particle assisted growth technique on several different III-V substrates. Detailed investigations of growth parameters and post-growth energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy indicate that the seed particles initially consist of In and incorporate up to 20 at.% Sb during growth. By applying this technique we demonstrate the formation of zinc-blende, 4H and wurtzite structure in the InSb wires (identified by transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction), and correlate this sequential change in crystal structure to the increasing Sb/In ratio at the particle-wire interface. The low ionicity of InSb and the large diameter of the wire structures studied in this work are entirely outside the parameters for which polytype formation is predicted by current models of particle seeded wire growth, suggesting that the V/III ratio at the interface determines crystal structure in a manner well beyond current understanding. These results therefore provide important insight into the relationship between the particle composition and the crystal structure, and demonstrate the potential to selectively tune the crystal structure in other III-V compound materials as well. PMID:21346304

  18. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Bahnson, B

    2008-01-01

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A{sub 2}. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5{angstrom}. It has a classic lipase {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser{sup 273}, His{sup 351}, and Asp{sup 296}. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser{sup 273}. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  19. Membrane protein structures without crystals, by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting period in membrane protein structural biology with a number of medically important protein structures determined at a rapid pace. However, two major hurdles still remain in the structural biology of membrane proteins. One is the inability to obtain large amounts of protein for crystallization and the other is the failure to get well-diffracting crystals. With single particle electron cryomicroscopy, both these problems can be overcome and high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and other labile protein complexes can be obtained with very little protein and without the need for crystals. In this review, I highlight recent advances in electron microscopy, detectors and software, which have allowed determination of medium to high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and complexes that have been difficult to study by other structural biological techniques. PMID:26435463

  20. Quantitative crystal structure descriptors from multiplicative congruential generators.

    PubMed

    Hornfeck, Wolfgang

    2012-03-01

    Special types of number-theoretic relations, termed multiplicative congruential generators (MCGs), exhibit an intrinsic sublattice structure. This has considerable implications within the crystallographic realm, namely for the coordinate description of crystal structures for which MCGs allow for a concise way of encoding the numerical structural information. Thus, a conceptual framework is established, with some focus on layered superstructures, which proposes the use of MCGs as a tool for the quantitative description of crystal structures. The multiplicative congruential method eventually affords an algorithmic generation of three-dimensional crystal structures with a near-uniform distribution of atoms, whereas a linearization procedure facilitates their combinatorial enumeration and classification. The outlook for homometric structures and dual-space crystallography is given. Some generalizations and extensions are formulated in addition, revealing the connections of MCGs with geometric algebra, discrete dynamical systems (iterative maps), as well as certain quasicrystal approximants. PMID:22338652

  1. RNA secondary structure prediction using soft computing.

    PubMed

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of RNA structure is invaluable in creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. Several deterministic algorithms and soft computing-based techniques have been developed for more than a decade to determine the structure from a known RNA sequence. Soft computing gained importance with the need to get approximate solutions for RNA sequences by considering the issues related with kinetic effects, cotranscriptional folding, and estimation of certain energy parameters. A brief description of some of the soft computing-based techniques, developed for RNA secondary structure prediction, is presented along with their relevance. The basic concepts of RNA and its different structural elements like helix, bulge, hairpin loop, internal loop, and multiloop are described. These are followed by different methodologies, employing genetic algorithms, artificial neural networks, and fuzzy logic. The role of various metaheuristics, like simulated annealing, particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, and tabu search is also discussed. A relative comparison among different techniques, in predicting 12 known RNA secondary structures, is presented, as an example. Future challenging issues are then mentioned. PMID:23702539

  2. Fractal structure enables temporal prediction in music.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Summer K; Fink, Philip W; Large, Edward W

    2014-10-01

    1/f serial correlations and statistical self-similarity (fractal structure) have been measured in various dimensions of musical compositions. Musical performances also display 1/f properties in expressive tempo fluctuations, and listeners predict tempo changes when synchronizing. Here the authors show that the 1/f structure is sufficient for listeners to predict the onset times of upcoming musical events. These results reveal what information listeners use to anticipate events in complex, non-isochronous acoustic rhythms, and this will entail innovative models of temporal synchronization. This finding could improve therapies for Parkinson's and related disorders and inform deeper understanding of how endogenous neural rhythms anticipate events in complex, temporally structured communication signals. PMID:25324107

  3. PREDICTING RNA STRUCTURE BY MULTIPLE TEMPLATE HOMOLOGY MODELING

    PubMed Central

    FLORES, SAMUEL C.; WAN, YAQI; RUSSELL, RICK; ALTMAN, RUSS B.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the importance of 3D structure to understand the myriad functions of RNAs in cells, most RNA molecules remain out of reach of crystallographic and NMR methods. However, certain structural information such as base pairing and some tertiary contacts can be determined readily for many RNAs by bioinformatics or relatively low cost experiments. Further, because RNA structure is highly modular, it is possible to deduce local 3D structure from the solved structures of evolutionarily related RNAs or even unrelated RNAs that share the same module. RNABuilder is a software package that generates model RNA structures by treating the kinematics and forces at separate, multiple levels of resolution. Kinematically, bonds in bases, certain stretches of residues, and some entire molecules are rigid while other bonds remain flexible. Forces act on the rigid bases and selected individual atoms. Here we use RNABuilder to predict the structure of the 200-nucleotide Azoarcus group I intron by homology modeling against fragments of the distantly-related Twort and Tetrahymena group I introns and by incorporating base pairing forces where necessary. In the absence of any information from the solved Azoarcus intron crystal structure, the model accurately depicts the global topology, secondary and tertiary connections, and gives an overall RMSD value of 4.6 Å relative to the crystal structure. The accuracy of the model is even higher in the intron core (RMSD = 3.5 Å), whereas deviations are modestly larger for peripheral regions that differ more substantially between the different introns. These results lay the groundwork for using this approach for larger and more diverse group I introns, as well for still larger RNAs and RNA-protein complexes such as group II introns and the ribosomal subunits. PMID:19908374

  4. Predicting structured metadata from unstructured metadata

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Lisa; Panahiazar, Maryam; Dumontier, Michel; Gevaert, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Enormous amounts of biomedical data have been and are being produced by investigators all over the world. However, one crucial and limiting factor in data reuse is accurate, structured and complete description of the data or data about the data—defined as metadata. We propose a framework to predict structured metadata terms from unstructured metadata for improving quality and quantity of metadata, using the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) microarray database. Our framework consists of classifiers trained using term frequency-inverse document frequency (TF-IDF) features and a second approach based on topics modeled using a Latent Dirichlet Allocation model (LDA) to reduce the dimensionality of the unstructured data. Our results on the GEO database show that structured metadata terms can be the most accurately predicted using the TF-IDF approach followed by LDA both outperforming the majority vote baseline. While some accuracy is lost by the dimensionality reduction of LDA, the difference is small for elements with few possible values, and there is a large improvement over the majority classifier baseline. Overall this is a promising approach for metadata prediction that is likely to be applicable to other datasets and has implications for researchers interested in biomedical metadata curation and metadata prediction. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/

  5. Prediction and assignment of site occupation and energy levels for Pb 2+ ions in crystal hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang; Wang, Jing; Shi, Jinsheng

    2010-05-01

    The environmental factor h e of the host was calculated quantitatively in Pb 2+-doped 23 compounds based on the dielectric theory of chemical bond for complex crystals. The relationship between the A band energy E A of Pb 2+ and the environmental factor h e was intensively studied. The results indicate that E A of Pb 2+ decreases linearly with increasing of h e. A linear model was proposed which allows us to correctly predict and assign the site occupations and the position of A band for Pb 2+-doped compounds if the crystal structure and the refraction index were known. Applied to SrGa 2O 4:Pb 2+, CaAl 2B 2O 7:Pb 2+ and SrAl 2B 2O 7:Pb 2+, the theoretical predictions are in very good agreement with the experimental data. In SrGa 2O 4:Pb 2+, the excitation spectrum of Pb 2+ from two different cation sites was identified: the higher energy band of A (265 nm) from the site of Sr2, and the lower ones (280 nm) from the site of Sr1.

  6. High-Pressure Crystal Structure, Lattice Vibrations, and Band Structure of BiSbO4.

    PubMed

    Errandonea, Daniel; Muñoz, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Hernández, Placida; Gomis, Oscar; Achary, S Nagabhusan; Popescu, Catalin; Patwe, Sadeque J; Tyagi, Avesh K

    2016-05-16

    The high-pressure crystal structure, lattice-vibrations, and electronic band structure of BiSbO4 were studied by ab initio simulations. We also performed Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and diffuse-reflectance measurements, as well as synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. High-pressure X-ray diffraction measurements show that the crystal structure of BiSbO4 remains stable up to at least 70 GPa, unlike other known MTO4-type ternary oxides. These experiments also give information on the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameters. Calculations properly describe the crystal structure of BiSbO4 and the changes induced by pressure on it. They also predict a possible high-pressure phase. A room-temperature pressure-volume equation of state is determined, and the effect of pressure on the coordination polyhedron of Bi and Sb is discussed. Raman- and infrared-active phonons were measured and calculated. In particular, calculations provide assignments for all the vibrational modes as well as their pressure dependence. In addition, the band structure and electronic density of states under pressure were also calculated. The calculations combined with the optical measurements allow us to conclude that BiSbO4 is an indirect-gap semiconductor, with an electronic band gap of 2.9(1) eV. Finally, the isothermal compressibility tensor for BiSbO4 is given at 1.8 GPa. The experimental (theoretical) data revealed that the direction of maximum compressibility is in the (0 1 0) plane at ∼33° (38°) to the c-axis and 47° (42°) to the a-axis. The reliability of the reported results is supported by the consistency between experiments and calculations. PMID:27128858

  7. Crystal structure of the co-crystal butyl­paraben–isonicotinamide (1/1)

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Rajni M.; Yang, Huaiyu; Florence, Alastair J.

    2016-01-01

    The title 1:1 co-crystal, C11H14O3·C6H6N2O [systematic name: butyl 4-hy­droxy­benzoate–isonicotinamide (1/1)], crystallizes with one mol­ecule of butyl­paraben (BPN) and one mol­ecule of isonicotinamide (ISN) in the asymmetric unit. In the crystal, BPN and ISN mol­ecules form hydrogen-bonded (O—H⋯N and N—H⋯O) dimers of paired BPN and ISN mol­ecules. These dimers are further connected to each other via N—H⋯O=C hydrogen bonds, creating ribbons in [011] which further stack along the a axis to form a layered structure with short C⋯C contacts of 3.285 (3) Å. Packing inter­actions within the crystal structure were assessed using PIXEL calculations. PMID:26870584

  8. Growth, characterization, and crystal structure of a new chalcone derivative single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shettigar, Venkataraya; Dharmaprakash, S. M.

    2006-09-01

    A new organic nonlinear optical (NLO) chalcone derivative viz.1- ( 4- methoxyphenyl )-3- (3,4 - dimethoxy phenyl ) - 2 - propene-1-one, has been synthesized by Claisen-Schmidt condensation method. The synthesized compound was purified by repeated recrystallization process. To confirm the identity of the synthesized compound, FTIR spectra was recorded and various functional groups present were identified. NMR spectra were recorded for structural identity and purity confirmation of the synthesized compound. Good quality single crystals were grown by solvent evaporation and slow cooling technique using acetone as solvent. The grown crystals were characterized by UV-Visible , differential thermal analysis and linear refractive index measurement. The hardness of the crystal was determined using Vicker's indentation method. The single crystal structure analysis of the crystal was performed and it is found that the crystal belongs to monoclinic system with space group P2 I. The powder second harmonic generation(SHG)frequency conversion efficiency of the crystal was determined using Nd: YAG laser(λ = 1064nm)and it is 15 times that of Urea.

  9. Evolution of molecular crystal optical phonons near structural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michki, Nigel; Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Markelz, Andrea

    Molecular crystals are increasingly important photonic and electronic materials. For example organic semiconductors are lightweight compared to inorganic semiconductors and have inexpensive scale up processing with roll to roll printing. However their implementation is limited by their environmental sensitivity, in part arising from the weak intermolecular interactions of the crystal. These weak interactions result in optical phonons in the terahertz frequency range. We examine the evolution of intermolecular interactions near structural phase transitions by measuring the optical phonons as a function of temperature and crystal orientation using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The measured orientation dependence of the resonances provides an additional constraint for comparison of the observed spectra with the density functional calculations, enabling us to follow specific phonon modes. We observe crystal reorganization near 350 K for oxalic acid as it transforms from dihydrate to anhydrous form. We also report the first THz spectra for the molecular crystal fructose through its melting point.

  10. Effect of structural imperfections on lasing characteristics of diode-pumped YVO{sub 4}, GdVO{sub 4} and mixed rare-earth vanadate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Orlova, G Yu; Vlasov, V I; Zavartsev, Yu D; Zagumennyi, A I; Kalashnikova, I I; Kutovoi, S A; Naumov, V S; Sirotkin, A A

    2012-03-31

    The efficiency of diode-pumped lasers with gain elements made from yttrium, gadolinium, yttrium - gadolinium and yttrium - scandium orthovanadate crystals has been shown for the first time to be influenced by structural imperfections (quality) of the crystals. This allows one to predict lasing parameters of such crystals in a preliminary step, without fabricating gain elements.

  11. Effect of structural imperfections on lasing characteristics of diode-pumped YVO4, GdVO4 and mixed rare-earth vanadate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, G. Yu; Vlasov, V. I.; Zavartsev, Yu D.; Zagumennyi, A. I.; Kalashnikova, I. I.; Kutovoi, S. A.; Naumov, V. S.; Sirotkin, A. A.

    2012-03-01

    The efficiency of diode-pumped lasers with gain elements made from yttrium, gadolinium, yttrium — gadolinium and yttrium — scandium orthovanadate crystals has been shown for the first time to be influenced by structural imperfections (quality) of the crystals. This allows one to predict lasing parameters of such crystals in a preliminary step, without fabricating gain elements.

  12. Structural load prediction methods for space payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    The state of the art in structural loads prediction procedures for spacecraft is summarized. Three categories of prediction techniques delineated by cost, complexity, comprehensiveness, accuracy, and applications are outlined. The lowest cost method has been used for earth resources, communications, and weather satellites, the medium cost method for sun-synchronous orbits and the large space telescope, and the most expensive for planetary missions, comet rendezvous, and out-of-ecliptic orbits, all assuming Shuttle launch. The lowest cost method involves a mass-acceleration curve. A shock spectra technique predicts a least upper bound for loads. A recovered transient method analyzes the interface acceleration of two connected launch vehicles. The most accurate method devised thus far is a transient analysis of the total launch vehicle/payload dynamic system.

  13. A Structured Approach to Sediment Transport Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, Peter

    2013-04-01

    There are two types of sediment transport problem. One, flow competence, concerns the conditions that initiate motion of grains on the bed surface. The other, transport capacity, concerns the rate at which sediment is transported and involves sediment found locally on the bed as well as sediment delivered from upstream. The two problems can be linked by the critical stress for incipient motion. A model for critical stress is used directly to predict flow competence. The Ashida/Parker similarity hypothesis provides a useful approximation of transport rates and incorporates local sediment effects entirely via the reference stress, a surrogate for critical stress. Although critical stress is key to both predictions, its application is quite different. The difficult problem of wash load - sizes found in transport in quantities much larger than would be predicted by their presence in the bed - makes the distinction clear and challenges any attempt to predict transport rate from a competence-like approach based on hydraulics and bed material alone. The Shields Diagram and a hiding function provide models for critical stress for uni-size and mixed-size sediment. In addition to grain size - both absolute and relative - other factors alter the critical stress of bed material. These include the proportion of fine-grained material, the aging or freshening of bed material via biologically mediated processes, and the development of bed structure at flows close to the critical stress. Although these factors directly influence the prediction of competent flows, their effect on transport rate is less clear. As flow increases, to what extent does bed strengthening through structuring and other mechanisms persist in dampening transport rate? The answer involves the condition of partial transport in which some grains in a size fraction are active and others remain inactive. Tracing of grains in the flume and field provide guidance on the domain of partial transport and thus on the

  14. Mg intercalation in layered and spinel host crystal structures for Mg batteries.

    PubMed

    Emly, Alexandra; Van der Ven, Anton

    2015-05-01

    We investigate electrochemical properties of Mg in layered and spinel intercalation compounds from first-principles using TiS2 as a model system. Our calculations predict that Mg(x)TiS2 in both the layered and spinel crystal structures exhibits sloping voltage profiles with steps at stoichiometric compositions due to Mg-vacancy ordering. Mg ions are predicted to occupy the octahedral sites in both layered and spinel TiS2 with diffusion mediated by hops between octahedral sites that pass through adjacent tetrahedral sites. Predicted migration barriers are substantially higher than typical Li-migration barriers in intercalation compounds. The migration barriers are shown to be very sensitive to lattice parameters of the host crystal structure. We also discuss the possible role of rehybridization between the transition metal and the anion in affecting migration barriers. PMID:25905428

  15. Crystal structure of benzobi-cyclon.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gihaeng; Kim, Jineun; Lim, Hansu; Kim, Tae Ho

    2015-12-01

    In the title compound, C22H19ClO4S2 [systematic name: 3-(2-chloro-4-mesylbenzo-yl)-4-(phenyl-sulfan-yl)bi-cyclo-[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one], which is an unclassified herbicide, the dihedral angle between the plane of the phenyl and chloro-benzene rings is 19.9 (2)°. In the crystal, C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link adjacent mol-ecules, generating two-dimensional networks extending parellel to (011). PMID:26870484

  16. Optical and structural properties of chalcone NLO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh Kumar, P. C.; Ravindrachary, V.; Janardhana, K.; Manjunath, H. R.; Karegouda, Prakash; Crasta, Vincent; Sridhar, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    Organic compound (E)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-(2,3,5-trichlorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one [MPTCPP] with molecular formula C 16H 11Cl 3O 2 was synthesized using Claisen-Schmidt condensation reaction method. 1H NMR spectra was recorded to identify the various functional groups present in the compound and confirm the chemical structure. The single crystals were grown using slow evaporation solution growth technique. The UV-Visible spectrum study reveals that the crystal is transparent in the entire visible region and the absorption is observed at 364 nm. The Kurtz powder second harmonic generation (SHG) test shows that the MPTCPP is NLO active and its SHG efficiency is three times that of urea. Single crystal XRD study shows that the compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system with a space group Cc. The corresponding lattice parameters of the crystal are a = 28.215(5) Å, b = 3.9740(4) Å, c = 16.178(3) Å and V = 1503.0(4) Å 3. The micro hardness test was carried out and the work hardening coefficient value ( n) of the crystal was found to be 1.48. This indicates that the crystal is hard and is suitable for device application. The thermal study reveals that the thermal stability of the crystal is good.

  17. Single-Crystal Structure of a Covalent Organic Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, YB; Su, J; Furukawa, H; Yun, YF; Gandara, F; Duong, A; Zou, XD; Yaghi, OM

    2013-11-06

    The crystal structure of a new covalent organic framework, termed COF-320, is determined by single-crystal 3D electron diffraction using the rotation electron diffraction (RED) method for data collection. The COF crystals are prepared by an imine condensation of tetra-(4-anilyl)methane and 4,4'-biphenyldialdehyde in 1,4-dioxane at 120 degrees C to produce a highly porous 9-fold interwoven diamond net. COF-320 exhibits permanent porosity with a Langmuir surface area of 2400 m(2)/g and a methane total uptake of 15.0 wt % (176 cm(3)/cm(3)) at 25 degrees C and 80 bar. The successful determination of the structure of COF-320 directly from single-crystal samples is an important advance in the development of COF chemistry.

  18. The different conformations and crystal structures of dihydroergocristine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönch, B.; Kraus, W.; Köppen, R.; Emmerling, F.

    2016-02-01

    The identification of different forms of dihydroergocristine (DHEC) was carried out by crystallization from different organic solvents. DHEC was identified as potential template for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the epimeric specific analysis of ergot alkaloids (EAs) in food. DHEC was crystallized from different solvents in order to mimic the typical MIP synthesis conditions. Four new solvatomorphs of DHEC were obtained. All solvatomorphs contain a water molecule in the crystal structure, whereas three compounds contain an additional solvent molecule. Based on the conformation of DHEC a comparison with typical EA molecules was possible. The analysis showed that DHEC is a suitable template for MIPs for EAs.

  19. Crystal Structure of L-Histidinium 2-Nitrobenzoate

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Subramanian; Moovendaran, Kalimuthu; Kalyana Sundar, Jeyaperumal; Ravikumar, Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    A new nonlinear optical organic compound, namely, L-histidinium 2-nitrobenzoate (abbreviated as LH2NB (I); ([C6H10N3O2]+ [C7H4NO4]−)), was synthesized. The molecular structure of LH2NB (I) was elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of this compound is about two times that of the standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals. PMID:22536482

  20. Boron-oxygen polyanion in the crystal structure of tunellite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.

    1963-01-01

    The crystal structure of tunellite, SrO??3B2O 3??4H2O, with infinite sheets of composition n[B6O9(OH)2]2-, has cations and water molecules in the spaces within the sheets. Adjacent sheets are held together by hydrogen bonding through the water molecules. The boron-oxygen polyanions provide the first example in hydrated borate crystals of one oxygen linked to three borons.

  1. Structure of ice crystallized from supercooled water

    PubMed Central

    Malkin, Tamsin L.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Brukhno, Andrey V.; Anwar, Jamshed; Salzmann, Christoph G.

    2012-01-01

    The freezing of water to ice is fundamentally important to fields as diverse as cloud formation to cryopreservation. At ambient conditions, ice is considered to exist in two crystalline forms: stable hexagonal ice and metastable cubic ice. Using X-ray diffraction data and Monte Carlo simulations, we show that ice that crystallizes homogeneously from supercooled water is neither of these phases. The resulting ice is disordered in one dimension and therefore possesses neither cubic nor hexagonal symmetry and is instead composed of randomly stacked layers of cubic and hexagonal sequences. We refer to this ice as stacking-disordered ice I. Stacking disorder and stacking faults have been reported earlier for metastable ice I, but only for ice crystallizing in mesopores and in samples recrystallized from high-pressure ice phases rather than in water droplets. Review of the literature reveals that almost all ice that has been identified as cubic ice in previous diffraction studies and generated in a variety of ways was most likely stacking-disordered ice I with varying degrees of stacking disorder. These findings highlight the need to reevaluate the physical and thermodynamic properties of this metastable ice as a function of the nature and extent of stacking disorder using well-characterized samples. PMID:22232652

  2. New crystal structural families of lanthanide chloride alcohol/water complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Custelcean, Radu; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Boatner, Lynn A

    2012-01-01

    The exploration of lanthanide chloride compounds as possible scintillation materials for gamma ray and neutron detection has led to the discovery of several new families of crystal structures with the general formula LnCl3(CH3OH)x(H2O)y. The specific crystal structure depends on the water/methanol content and lanthanide ion. The coordination of the light (large) lanthanides is the typical value of 8 and reduces to 7 for the heavier (small) lanthanides. The binding energy of water versus alcohol ligands is comparable, so that if water is present in the system, it is typically incorporated as a ligand in the crystal. In these crystals, the molecular adducts occur as monomers, dimers, and dichloro-bridged chains. These, in turn, form 3-D frameworks through H-bonds to the Cl atoms. Other distinct crystal structures are predicted, given the volume changes due to the lanthanide contraction, the water content of the crystal growth solutions, and the specific halide.

  3. Atomic density functional and diagram of structures in the phase field crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankudinov, V. E.; Galenko, P. K.; Kropotin, N. V.; Krivilyov, M. D.

    2016-02-01

    The phase field crystal model provides a continual description of the atomic density over the diffusion time of reactions. We consider a homogeneous structure (liquid) and a perfect periodic crystal, which are constructed from the one-mode approximation of the phase field crystal model. A diagram of 2D structures is constructed from the analytic solutions of the model using atomic density functionals. The diagram predicts equilibrium atomic configurations for transitions from the metastable state and includes the domains of existence of homogeneous, triangular, and striped structures corresponding to a liquid, a body-centered cubic crystal, and a longitudinal cross section of cylindrical tubes. The method developed here is employed for constructing the diagram for the homogeneous liquid phase and the body-centered iron lattice. The expression for the free energy is derived analytically from density functional theory. The specific features of approximating the phase field crystal model are compared with the approximations and conclusions of the weak crystallization and 2D melting theories.

  4. Heterogeneous Crystallization on Pairs of Pre-Structured Seeds

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effects of small pre-structured seeds on the crystallization transition in an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid with transition interface path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the impact of the simultaneous presence of two seeds with various structures. In the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures, we find that decreasing the seed-to-seed distance enhances the probability of the crystalline clusters formed on one of the seeds to grow beyond the critical size, thus, increasing the crystal nucleation rates. In contrast, when seeds have an icosahedral structure, the crystalline clusters form mostly in the bulk. The crystal nucleation rate, however, is also determined by the distance between the seeds with regular structure in which the lattice spacing is equal to the bulk lattice constant, pointing to a heterogeneous crystal nucleation that occurs away from the icosahedrally structured seeds. For slightly squeezed seeds, the effects of the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures are reduced in comparison to the regular seeds, and we do not see any effect of the presence of the second seed for seeds with squeezed icosahedral structure. PMID:27479875

  5. Isolation, crystallization and crystal structure determination of bovine kidney Na(+),K(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Jonas Lindholt; Mattle, Daniel; Fedosova, Natalya U; Nissen, Poul; Reinhard, Linda

    2016-04-01

    Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is responsible for the transport of Na(+) and K(+) across the plasma membrane in animal cells, thereby sustaining vital electrochemical gradients that energize channels and secondary transporters. The crystal structure of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase has previously been elucidated using the enzyme from native sources such as porcine kidney and shark rectal gland. Here, the isolation, crystallization and first structure determination of bovine kidney Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in a high-affinity E2-BeF3(-)-ouabain complex with bound magnesium are described. Crystals belonging to the orthorhombic space group C2221 with one molecule in the asymmetric unit exhibited anisotropic diffraction to a resolution of 3.7 Å with full completeness to a resolution of 4.2 Å. The structure was determined by molecular replacement, revealing unbiased electron-density features for bound BeF3(-), ouabain and Mg(2+) ions. PMID:27050261

  6. [The crystal ball: reflections on the prediction of disease].

    PubMed

    Smulders, Yvo

    2015-01-01

    How exactly to take the family history so that it renders maximum diagnostic or predictive yield is controversial. This comment discusses a paper that suggests that asking for the presence of risk in children of patients may have added value in terms of predicting first or recurrent cardiovascular events in their parents. PMID:26629604

  7. Ytterbium- and neodymium-doped vanadate laser hose crystals having the apatite crystal structure

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Kway, Wayne L.; DeLoach, Laura D.; Krupke, William F.; Chai, Bruce H. T.

    1994-01-01

    Yb.sup.3+ and Nd.sup.3+ doped Sr.sub.5 (VO.sub.4).sub.3 F crystals serve as useful infrared laser media that exhibit low thresholds of oscillation and high slope efficiencies, and can be grown with high optical quality. These laser media possess unusually high absorption and emission cross sections, which provide the crystals with the ability to generate greater gain for a given amount of pump power. Many related crystals such as Sr.sub.5 (VO.sub.4).sub.3 F crystals doped with other rare earths, transition metals, or actinides, as well as the many structural analogs of Sr.sub.5 (VO.sub.4).sub.3 F, where the Sr.sup.2+ and F.sup.- ions are replaced by related chemical species, have similar properties.

  8. Ytterbium- and neodymium-doped vanadate laser hose crystals having the apatite crystal structure

    DOEpatents

    Payne, S.A.; Kway, W.L.; DeLoach, L.D.; Krupke, W.F.; Chai, B.H.T.

    1994-08-23

    Yb[sup 3+] and Nd[sup 3+] doped Sr[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]F crystals serve as useful infrared laser media that exhibit low thresholds of oscillation and high slope efficiencies, and can be grown with high optical quality. These laser media possess unusually high absorption and emission cross sections, which provide the crystals with the ability to generate greater gain for a given amount of pump power. Many related crystals such as Sr[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]F crystals doped with other rare earths, transition metals, or actinides, as well as the many structural analogs of Sr[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]F, where the Sr[sup 2+] and F[sup [minus

  9. Incorporation of iodine into apatite structure: a crystal chemistry approach using Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei

    2015-06-01

    Materials with apatite crystal structure provide a great potential for incorporating the long-lived radioactive iodine isotope (129I) in the form of iodide (I-) from nuclear waste streams. Because of its durability and potentially high iodine content, the apatite waste form can reduce iodine release rate and minimize the waste volume. Crystal structure and composition of apatite was investigated for iodide incorporation into the channel of the structure using Artificial Neural Network. A total of 86 experimentally determined apatite crystal structures of different compositions were compiled from literature, and 46 of them were used to train the networks and 42 were used to test the performance of the trained networks. The results show that the performances of the networks are satisfactory for predictions of unit cell parameters a and c and channel size of the structure. The trained and tested networks were then used to predict unknown compositions of apatite that incorporates iodide. With a crystal chemistry consideration, chemical compositions that lead to matching the size of the structural channel to the size of iodide were then predicted to be able to incorporate iodide in the structural channel. The calculations suggest that combinations of A site cations of Ag+, K+, Sr2+, Pb2+, Ba2+, and Cs+, and X site cations, mostly formed tetrahedron, of Mn5+, As5+, Cr5+, V5+, Mo5+, Si4+, Ge4+, and Re7+ are possible apatite compositions that are able to incorporate iodide. The charge balance of different apatite compositions can be achieved by multiple substitutions at a single site or coupled substitutions at both A and X sites. The results give important clues for designing experiments to synthesize new apatite compositions and also provide a fundamental understanding how iodide is incorporated in the apatite structure. This understanding can provide important insights for apatite waste forms design by optimizing the chemical composition and synthesis procedure.

  10. Compact Couplers for Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin; Lin, M.C.; Schwartz, Brian; Byer, Robert; McGuinness, Christopher; Colby, Eric; England, Robert; Noble, Robert; Spencer, James; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    Photonic crystal waveguides are promising candidates for laser-driven accelerator structures because of their ability to confine a speed-of-light mode in an all-dielectric structure. Because of the difference between the group velocity of the waveguide mode and the particle bunch velocity, fields must be coupled into the accelerating waveguide at frequent intervals. Therefore efficient, compact couplers are critical to overall accelerator efficiency. We present designs and simulations of high-efficiency coupling to the accelerating mode in a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide from a waveguide adjoining it at 90{sup o}. We discuss details of the computation and the resulting transmission. We include some background on the accelerator structure and photonic crystal-based optical acceleration in general.

  11. Free-Standing Photonic Crystal Films with Gradient Structural Colors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haibo; Liu, Cihui; Ye, Baofen; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-03-23

    Hydrogel colloidal crystal composite materials have a demonstrated value in responsive photonic crystals (PhCs) via controllable stimuli. Although they have been successfully exploited to generate a gradient of color distribution, the soft hydrogels have limitations in terms of stability and storage caused by dependence on environment. Here, we present a practical strategy to fabricate free-standing PhC films with a stable gradient of structural colors using binary polymer networks. A colloidal crystal hydrogel film was prepared for this purpose, with continuously varying photonic band gaps corresponding to the gradient of the press. Then, a second polymer network was used to lock the inside non-close-packed PhC structures and color distribution of the hydrogel film. It was demonstrated that our strategy could bring about a solution to the angle-dependent structural colors of the PhC films by coating the surface with special microstructures. PMID:26962967

  12. The high-resolution crystal structure of human LCAT.

    PubMed

    Piper, Derek E; Romanow, William G; Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N; Fordstrom, Preston; Masterman, Stephanie; Pan, Oscar; Thibault, Stephen T; Zhang, Richard; Meininger, David; Schwarz, Margrit; Wang, Zhulun; King, Chadwick; Zhou, Mingyue; Walker, Nigel P C

    2015-09-01

    LCAT is intimately involved in HDL maturation and is a key component of the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway which removes excess cholesterol molecules from the peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. Patients with loss-of-function LCAT mutations exhibit low levels of HDL cholesterol and corneal opacity. Here we report the 2.65 Å crystal structure of the human LCAT protein. Crystallization required enzymatic removal of N-linked glycans and complex formation with a Fab fragment from a tool antibody. The crystal structure reveals that LCAT has an α/β hydrolase core with two additional subdomains that play important roles in LCAT function. Subdomain 1 contains the region of LCAT shown to be required for interfacial activation, while subdomain 2 contains the lid and amino acids that shape the substrate binding pocket. Mapping the naturally occurring mutations onto the structure provides insight into how they may affect LCAT enzymatic activity. PMID:26195816

  13. Modulated crystal structure of InMo4O6.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Peter; Simon, Arndt; Oeckler, Oliver

    2016-08-01

    The (3 + 1)-dimensional modulated crystal structure of the metal-rich cluster compound InMo4O6 was solved and refined from single-crystal data in the superspace group P4/mbm(00γ)00ss [q = 0, 0, 0.1536 (4); a = 9.6664 (9), c = 2.8645 (3) Å; R1(all) = 0.046, wR(all) = 0.076]. The crystal structure is closely related to the NaMo4O6 structure type. It is built from rods of Mo6 clusters condensed via trans edges. These form channels parallel to [001], in which In6 and In7 oligomers alternate. Weak diffuse planes parallel to (001)* interconnect the satellite reflections; they occur due to two-dimensional rod disorder of the In oligomer chains. PMID:27484384

  14. The clouded crystal ball: Comments on geophysical prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    The concepts of prediction in the geophysical domain are considered with emphasis on the areas of difficulties and the nature of these difficulties. Differences in defining and determining the validity and significance of hypotheses and observational correlations are covered.

  15. A protein structural classes prediction method based on predicted secondary structure and PSI-BLAST profile.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuyan; Li, Yan; Shi, Zhuoxing; Yan, Shoujiang

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge of protein secondary structural classes plays an important role in understanding protein folding patterns. In this paper, 25 features based on position-specific scoring matrices are selected to reflect evolutionary information. In combination with other 11 rational features based on predicted protein secondary structure sequences proposed by the previous researchers, a 36-dimensional representation feature vector is presented to predict protein secondary structural classes for low-similarity sequences. ASTRALtraining dataset is used to train and design our method, other three low-similarity datasets ASTRALtest, 25PDB and 1189 are used to test the proposed method. Comparisons with other methods show that our method is effective to predict protein secondary structural classes. Stand alone version of the proposed method (PSSS-PSSM) is written in MATLAB language and it can be downloaded from http://letsgob.com/bioinfo_PSSS_PSSM/. PMID:24067326

  16. The Crystal Structure of GXGD Membrane Protease FlaK

    SciTech Connect

    J Hu; Y Xue; S Lee; Y Ha

    2011-12-31

    The GXGD proteases are polytopic membrane proteins with catalytic activities against membrane-spanning substrates that require a pair of aspartyl residues. Representative members of the family include preflagellin peptidase, type 4 prepilin peptidase, presenilin and signal peptide peptidase. Many GXGD proteases are important in medicine. For example, type 4 prepilin peptidase may contribute to bacterial pathogenesis, and mutations in presenilin are associated with Alzheimer's disease. As yet, there is no atomic-resolution structure in this protease family. Here we report the crystal structure of FlaK, a preflagellin peptidase from Methanococcus maripaludis, solved at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure contains six transmembrane helices. The GXGD motif and a short transmembrane helix, helix 4, are positioned at the centre, surrounded by other transmembrane helices. The crystal structure indicates that the protease must undergo conformational changes to bring the GXGD motif and a second essential aspartyl residue from transmembrane helix 1 into close proximity for catalysis. A comparison of the crystal structure with models of presenilin derived from biochemical analysis reveals three common transmembrane segments that are similarly arranged around the active site. This observation reinforces the idea that the prokaryotic and human proteases are evolutionarily related. The crystal structure presented here provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of the GXGD proteases, and may facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that target specific members of the family.

  17. The crystal structure of GXGD membrane protease FlaK

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian; Xue, Yi; Lee, Sangwon; Ha, Ya

    2011-09-20

    The GXGD proteases are polytopic membrane proteins with catalytic activities against membrane-spanning substrates that require a pair of aspartyl residues. Representative members of the family include preflagellin peptidase, type 4 prepilin peptidase, presenilin and signal peptide peptidase. Many GXGD proteases are important in medicine. For example, type 4 prepilin peptidase may contribute to bacterial pathogenesis, and mutations in presenilin are associated with Alzheimer's disease. As yet, there is no atomic-resolution structure in this protease family. Here we report the crystal structure of FlaK, a preflagellin peptidase from Methanococcus maripaludis, solved at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure contains six transmembrane helices. The GXGD motif and a short transmembrane helix, helix 4, are positioned at the centre, surrounded by other transmembrane helices. The crystal structure indicates that the protease must undergo conformational changes to bring the GXGD motif and a second essential aspartyl residue from transmembrane helix 1 into close proximity for catalysis. A comparison of the crystal structure with models of presenilin derived from biochemical analysis reveals three common transmembrane segments that are similarly arranged around the active site. This observation reinforces the idea that the prokaryotic and human proteases are evolutionarily related. The crystal structure presented here provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of the GXGD proteases, and may facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that target specific members of the family.

  18. Structural Correspondence of the Oriented Attachment Growth Mechanism of Crystals of the Pharmaceutical Dirithromycin.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zuozhong; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Wei; Han, Xianglong; Chen, Jian-Feng; Xue, Chunyu; Zhao, Hong

    2015-12-29

    The oriented attachment (OA) mechanism is promising for designing novel nanomaterials, yet an intensive understanding of the relationship between the crystal structure and attachment orientation is still lacking. In this work, we report layered hexagonal crystals of the pharmaceutical dirithromycin (DIR) containing multiple layers fabricated via a solvothermal method for a certain period of time at 40 °C. These elongated hexagonal crystals experience an OA that is preferentially on the face (001) of the initial crystals to assemble the final crystals into layered stacks. Through agreement with molecular modeling calculations, we predicted the final crystal growth morphology and confirmed the favored attachment surface based on the energy change ΔE following an OA event. These simulation results at the molecular level yielded good agreement with the crystal growth experiments. This study demonstrates the critical importance of combining experiments with a computational approach to understand the intrinsic molecular details of the OA growth mechanism of other compounds and to design nanomaterials with a desirable morphology and physical and chemical properties. PMID:26632998

  19. Constraints and restraints in crystal structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Immirzi, Attilio

    2009-01-01

    The widely used restraint-based approach to structural analysis using diffraction data is critiqued. The convenience of using rigid constraints, through the use of internal coordinates, is discussed. PMID:22477768

  20. Crystal Structure of the Nipah Virus Phosphoprotein Tetramerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bruhn, Jessica F.; Barnett, Katherine C.; Bibby, Jaclyn; Thomas, Jens M. H.; Keegan, Ronan M.; Rigden, Daniel J.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    The Nipah virus phosphoprotein (P) is multimeric and tethers the viral polymerase to the nucleocapsid. We present the crystal structure of the multimerization domain of Nipah virus P: a long, parallel, tetrameric, coiled coil with a small, α-helical cap structure. Across the paramyxoviruses, these domains share little sequence identity yet are similar in length and structural organization, suggesting a common requirement for scaffolding or spatial organization of the functions of P in the virus life cycle. PMID:24155387

  1. Electronic structure of the CuBS2 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basalaev, Yu. M.; Gordienko, A. B.; Filippov, S. I.

    2012-09-01

    The band structure and spectra of the total and projected densities of states of a new crystal of the chalcopyrite family, namely, CuBS2, have been calculated in terms of the density functional theory. It has been found that the crystal is a pseudo-direct-band-gap semiconductor, and the best theoretical estimate of the optical band gap is 3.44 eV. The upper valence band of the CuBS2 crystal basically consists of the contributions from the p states of S atoms and the d states of Cu atoms. The crystal splitting is 0.2 eV. The bottom of the conduction band is basically formed by the sp states of boron and sulfur atoms with an admixture of the s states of copper atoms.

  2. Utilization of Protein Crystal Structures in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kohki

    In industry, protein crystallography is used in mainly two technologies. One is structure-based drug design, and the other is structure-based enzyme engineering. Some successful cases together with recent advances are presented in this article. The cases include the development of an anti-influenza drug, and the introduction of engineered acid phosphatase to the manufacturing process of nucleotides used as umami seasoning.

  3. Direct band gap silicon crystals predicted by an inverse design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Young Jun; Lee, In-Ho; Lee, Jooyoung; Kim, Sunghyun; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-03-01

    Cubic diamond silicon has an indirect band gap and does not absorb or emit light as efficiently as other semiconductors with direct band gaps. Thus, searching for Si crystals with direct band gaps around 1.3 eV is important to realize efficient thin-film solar cells. In this work, we report various crystalline silicon allotropes with direct and quasi-direct band gaps, which are predicted by the inverse design method which combines a conformation space annealing algorithm for global optimization and first-principles density functional calculations. The predicted allotropes exhibit energies less than 0.3 eV per atom and good lattice matches, compared with the diamond structure. The structural stability is examined by performing finite-temperature ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and calculating the phonon spectra. The absorption spectra are obtained by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation together with the quasiparticle G0W0 approximation. For several allotropes with the band gaps around 1 eV, photovoltaic efficiencies are comparable to those of best-known photovoltaic absorbers such as CuInSe2. This work is supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (2005-0093845 and 2008-0061987), Samsung Science and Technology Foundation (SSTF-BA1401-08), KIAS Center for Advanced Computation, and KISTI (KSC-2013-C2-040).

  4. Crystal morphology prediction of 1,3,3-trinitroazetidine in ethanol solvent by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenyan; Chu, Yuting; Xia, Mingzhu; Lei, Wu; Wang, Fengyun

    2016-03-01

    In order to understand the mechanism of the effect of solvent on the crystal morphology of explosives, and be convenient for the choice of crystallization solvent, the attachment energy (AE) model was performed to predict the growth morphology and the main crystal faces of 1,3,3-trinitroazetidine (TNAZ) in vacuum. The molecular dynamics simulation was applied to investigate the interactions of TNAZ crystal faces and ethanol solvent, and the growth habit of TNAZ in ethanol solvent was predicted using the modified AE model. The results indicate that the morphology of TNAZ crystal in vacuum is dominated by the six faces of [021], [112], [002], [102], [111] and [020], and the crystal shape is similar to polyhedron. In ethanol solvent, The binding strength of ethanol with TNAZ faces changes in the order of [021]>[112]>[002]>[102]>[111]>[020], which causes that [111] and [020] faces disappear and the crystal morphology becomes more regular. The radial distribution function analysis shows that the interactions between solvent and crystal faces mainly consist of coulomb interaction, van der Waals force and hydrogen bonds. PMID:26811871

  5. Crystal chemistry and structure refinement of five hydrated calcium borates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.; Appleman, D.E.; Christ, C.L.

    1964-01-01

    The crystal structures of the five known members of the series Ca2B6O11??xH2O (x = 1, 5, 5, 7, 9, and 13) have been refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques, yielding bond distances and angles with standard errors of less than 0??01 A?? and 0??5??, respectively. The results illustrate the crystal chemical principles that govern the structures of hydrated borate compounds. The importance of hydrogen bonding in the ferroelectric transition of colemanite is confirmed by more accurate proton assignments. ?? 1964.

  6. Photonic crystals, light manipulation, and imaging in complex nematic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravnik, Miha; Å timulak, Mitja; Mur, Urban; Čančula, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-03-01

    Three selected approaches for manipulation of light by complex nematic colloidal and non-colloidal structures are presented using different own custom developed theoretical and modelling approaches. Photonic crystals bands of distorted cholesteric liquid crystal helix and of nematic colloidal opals are presented, also revealing distinct photonic modes and density of states. Light propagation along half-integer nematic disclinations is shown with changes in the light polarization of various winding numbers. As third, simulated light transmission polarization micrographs of nematic torons are shown, offering a new insight into the complex structure characterization. Finally, this work is a contribution towards using complex soft matter in optics and photonics for advanced light manipulation.

  7. Crystal Structure Effect on Electrical Properties of Ysz Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Gong, Shengkai; Zhou, Chungen; Xu, Huibin

    YSZ samples were prepared by Plasma Spray (PS) and Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) respectively. Microstructure and morphology were observed by SEM and XRD. Grain size of PS-YSZ was non-uniform caused by the inclusion of nano particle by molten particle and column crystal structure was observed for EB-PVD-YSZ. The Arrhenius plots of two samples were graphed by analysis of the measurement results of AC impedance spectra. The conductive mechanisms for EB-PVD and PS YSZ were different due to the crystal structure.

  8. Coupled melt flow and thermal stress predictions for Czochralski crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Y.F.; Zhang, H.; Prasad, V.

    1995-12-31

    A coupled finite volume-finite element algorithm is developed to simulate the melt flows and predict the temperature distributions and thermal stresses in the Czochralski grown crystals. The computer model employs a multizone adaptive grid generation scheme together with curvilinear finite column discretization (MASTRAPP) to predict the transport phenomena associated with the crystal growth processes as well as the nonplanar melt/crystal interface shape and its dynamics (Zhang and Prasad, 1995a). The MASTRAPP has proven to be a robust and efficient scheme for the problems involving moving interfaces and free surfaces. Thermal stresses in the crystal are obtained by using a commercial finite element code, ALGOR, that uses the curvilinear mesh generated by the MASTRAPP. The numerical results show that the melt flows have a strong influence on thermal stresses in the crystal near the melt/crystal interface, and hence, melt convection must be included in the computer model for accurate stress predictions. The predicted stress phenomena agrees qualitatively with the report results.

  9. AFM Studies of Salt Concentration Effects on the (110) Surface Structure of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc Lee; Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Konnert, John

    2002-01-01

    Previous high resolution AFM studies of the (110) surface of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme crystals had shown that only one of two possible molecular surfaces is present, those constituting the completed 43 helices. These suggested that the crystal growth process was by the solution-phase assembly of the growth units, which then attach to the surface. However, the best fit for the imaged surfaces, vs. those predicted based upon the bulk crystallographic coordinates, were obtained when the packing about the 43 helices was "tightened up", while maintaining the underlying crystallographic unit cell spacing. This results in a widening of the gap between adjacent helices, and the top- most layer(s) may no longer be in contact. We postulated that the tightened packing about the helices is a result of the high salt concentrations in the bulk solution, used to crystallize the protein, driving hydrophobic interactions. Once the crystal surface is sufficiently buried by subsequent growth layers the ratio of salt to protein molecules decreases and the helices relax to their bulk crystallographic coordinates. The crystal surface helix structure is thus a reflection of the solution structure, and the tightness of the packing about the 43 helices would be a function of the bulk salt concentration. AFM images of the (110) surface of tetragonal lysozyme crystals grown under low (2%) and high (5%) NaCl concentrations reveal differences in the packing about the 43 helices consistent with the above proposal.

  10. Prediction of Fretting Crack Location and Orientation in a Single Crystal Nickel Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlik, J. F.; Farris, T. N.; Haynes, J.; Swanson, G. R.; Ham-Battista, G.

    2005-01-01

    Fretting is a structural damage mechanism arising between two nominally clamped surfaces subjected to an oscillatory loading. A critical location for fretting induced damage has been identified at the blade/disk and blade/damper interfaces of gas turbine engine turbomachinery and space propulsion components. The high- temperature, high-frequency loading environment seen by these components lead to severe stress gradients at the edge-of-contact that could potentially foster crack growth leading to component failure. These contact stresses drive crack nucleation in fretting and are very sensitive to the geometry of the contacting bodies, the contact loads, materials, temperature, and contact surface tribology (friction). Recently, a high-frequency, high-temperature load frame has been designed for experimentally investigating fretting damage of single crystal nickel materials employed in aircraft and spacecraft turbomachinery. A modeling method for characterizing the fretting stresses of the spherical fretting contact stress behavior in this experiment is developed and described. The calculated fretting stresses for a series of experiments are then correlated to the observed fretting damage. Results show that knowledge of the normal stresses and resolved shear stresses on each crystal plane can aid in predicting crack locations and orientations.

  11. Crystal structure and high-field magnetism of La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Reehuis, M.; Ulrich, C.; Keimer, B.; Prokes, K.; Gozar, A.; Blumberg, G.; Komiya, Seiki; Ando, Yoichi; Pattison, P.

    2006-04-01

    Neutron diffraction was used to determine the crystal structure and magnetic ordering pattern of a La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} single crystal, with and without applied magnetic field. A previously unreported, subtle monoclinic distortion of the crystal structure away from the orthorhombic space group Bmab was detected. The distortion is also present in lightly Sr-doped crystals. A refinement of the crystal structure shows that the deviation from orthorhombic symmetry is predominantly determined to drive a continuous reorientation of the copper spins from the orthorhombic b axis to the c axis, directly confirming predictions based on prior magnetoresistance and Raman scattering experiments. A spin-flop transition induced by a c-axis oriented field previously reported for nonstoichiometric La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} is also observed, but the transition field (11.5 T) is significantly larger than that in the previous work.

  12. The unexpected structure of the designed protein Octarellin V.1 forms a challenge for protein structure prediction tools.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Maximiliano; Sleutel, Mike; Vandevenne, Marylene; Parvizi, Gregory; Attout, Sophie; Jacquin, Olivier; Vandenameele, Julie; Fischer, Axel W; Damblon, Christian; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Urvoas, Agathe; Durand, Dominique; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Minard, Philippe; Maes, Dominique; Meiler, Jens; Matagne, André; Martial, Joseph A; Van de Weerdt, Cécile

    2016-07-01

    Despite impressive successes in protein design, designing a well-folded protein of more 100 amino acids de novo remains a formidable challenge. Exploiting the promising biophysical features of the artificial protein Octarellin V, we improved this protein by directed evolution, thus creating a more stable and soluble protein: Octarellin V.1. Next, we obtained crystals of Octarellin V.1 in complex with crystallization chaperons and determined the tertiary structure. The experimental structure of Octarellin V.1 differs from its in silico design: the (αβα) sandwich architecture bears some resemblance to a Rossman-like fold instead of the intended TIM-barrel fold. This surprising result gave us a unique and attractive opportunity to test the state of the art in protein structure prediction, using this artificial protein free of any natural selection. We tested 13 automated webservers for protein structure prediction and found none of them to predict the actual structure. More than 50% of them predicted a TIM-barrel fold, i.e. the structure we set out to design more than 10years ago. In addition, local software runs that are human operated can sample a structure similar to the experimental one but fail in selecting it, suggesting that the scoring and ranking functions should be improved. We propose that artificial proteins could be used as tools to test the accuracy of protein structure prediction algorithms, because their lack of evolutionary pressure and unique sequences features. PMID:27181418

  13. Structure of self - assembled two-dimensional spherical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bausch, Andreas R.

    2004-03-01

    Dense spherical particles on a flat surface usually pack into a simple triangular lattice, similar to billiard balls at the start of a game. The minimum energy configuration for interacting particles on the curved surface of a sphere, however, presents special difficulties, as recognized already by J.J. Thomson. We describe experimental investigations of the structure of two-dimensional spherical crystals. The crystals, formed by beads self-assembled on water droplets in oil, serve as model systems for exploring very general theories about the minimum energy configurations of particles with arbitrary repulsive interactions on curved surfaces. Above a critical system size we find that crystals develop distinctive high-angle grain boundaries or "scars" not found in planar crystals. The number of excess defects in a scar is shown to grow linearly with the dimensionless system size. First experiments where the melting of the crystal structure was observable will be discussed. Dynamic triangulation methods allow the analysis of the dynamics of the defects. Possible modifications towards mechanically stabilized self assembly structures result in so called Colloidosomes, which are promising for many different encapsulation purposes.

  14. Photonics of liquid-crystal structures: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Palto, S. P. Blinov, L. M.; Barnik, M. I.; Lazarev, V. V.; Umanskii, B. A.; Shtykov, N. M.

    2011-07-15

    The original results of studies of the electro-optical and laser effects which have been performed at the Laboratory of Liquid Crystals of the Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, over the last few years are reviewed. Cholesteric liquid crystals as vivid representatives of photonic structures and their behavior in an electric field are considered in detail. The formation of higher harmonics in the periodic distribution of the director field in a helical liquid crystal structure and, correspondingly, the new (anharmonic) mode of electro-optical effects are discussed. Another group of studies is devoted to bistable light switching by an electric field in chiral nematics. Polarization diffraction gratings controlled by an electric field are also considered. The results of studies devoted to microlasers on various photonic structures with cholesteric and nematic liquid crystals are considered in detail. Particular attention is given to the new regime: leaky-mode lasing. Designs of liquid crystal light amplifiers and their polarization, field, and spectral characteristics are considered in the last section.

  15. Crystal structures of two engineered thiol trypsins.

    PubMed

    McGrath, M E; Wilke, M E; Higaki, J N; Craik, C S; Fletterick, R J

    1989-11-28

    We have determined the three-dimensional structures of engineered rat trypsins which mimic the active sites of two classes of cysteine proteases. The catalytic serine was replaced with cysteine (S195C) to test the ability of sulfur to function as a nucleophile in a serine protease environment. This variant mimics the cysteine trypsin class of thiol proteases. An additional mutation of the active site aspartate to an asparagine (D102N) created the catalytic triad of the papain-type cysteine proteases. Rat trypsins S195C and D102N,S195C were solved to 2.5 and 2.0 A, respectively. The refined structures were analyzed to determine the structural basis for the 10(6)-fold loss of activity of trypsin S195C and the 10(8)-fold loss of activity of trypsin D102N,S195C, relative to rat trypsin. The active site thiols were found in a reduced state in contrast to the oxidized thiols found in previous thiol protease structures. These are the first reported structures of serine proteases with the catalytic centers of sulfhydryl proteases. Structure analysis revealed only subtle global changes in enzyme conformation. The substrate binding pocket is unaltered, and active site amino acid 102 forms hydrogen bonds to H57 and S214 as well as to the backbone amides of A56 and H57. In trypsin S195C, D102 is a hydrogen-bond acceptor for H57 which allows the other imidazole nitrogen to function as a base during catalysis. In trypsin D102N,S195C, the asparagine at position 102 is a hydrogen-bond donor to H57 which places a proton on the imidazole nitrogen proximal to the nucleophile. This tautomer of H57 is unable to act as a base in catalysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2611228

  16. Predicting road accidents: Structural time series approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junus, Noor Wahida Md; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the model for occurrence of road accidents in Malaysia between the years of 1970 to 2010 was developed and throughout this model the number of road accidents have been predicted by using the structural time series approach. The models are developed by using stepwise method and the residual of each step has been analyzed. The accuracy of the model is analyzed by using the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and the best model is chosen based on the smallest Akaike information criterion (AIC) value. A structural time series approach found that local linear trend model is the best model to represent the road accidents. This model allows level and slope component to be varied over time. In addition, this approach also provides useful information on improving the conventional time series method.

  17. Formation of the structure of gold nanoclusters during crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Gafner, Yu. Ya. Goloven'ko, Zh. V.; Gafner, S. L.

    2013-02-15

    The structure formation in gold nanoparticles 1.6-5.0 nm in diameter is studied by molecular dynamics simulation using a tight-binding potential. The simulation shows that the initial fcc phase in small Au clusters transforms into other structural modifications as temperature changes. As the cluster size increases, the transition temperature shifts toward the melting temperature of the cluster. The effect of various crystallization conditions on the formation of the internal structure of gold nanoclusters is studied in terms of microcanonical and canonical ensembles. The stability boundaries of various crystalline isomers are analyzed. The obtained dependences are compared with the corresponding data obtained for copper and nickel nanoparticles. The structure formation during crystallization is found to be characterized by a clear effect of the particle size on the stability of a certain isomer modification. Nickel and copper clusters are shown to exhibit common features in the formation of their structural properties, whereas gold clusters demonstrate much more complex behavior.

  18. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF A PUTATIVE OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Baig, M.; Brown, A.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative enteric bacterium, is found in nosocomial infections which are acquired during hospital stays for about 10% of hospital patients in the United States. The crystal structure of a putative oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae has been determined. The structural information of this K. pneumoniae protein was used to understand its function. Crystals of the putative oxidoreductase enzyme were obtained by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method using Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, Bis-Tris buffer, pH 5.5 as precipitant. These crystals were used to collect X-ray data at beam line X12C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The crystal structure was determined using the SHELX program and refi ned with CNS 1.1. This protein, which is involved in the catalysis of an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction, has an alpha/beta structure. It utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) or nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to perform its function. This structure could be used to determine the active and co-factor binding sites of the protein, information that could help pharmaceutical companies in drug design and in determining the protein’s relationship to disease treatment such as that for pneumonia and other related pathologies.

  19. The crystal structure of aluminum doped β-rhombohedral boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykova, Elena; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2012-10-01

    A crystal structure of aluminum doped β-rhombohedral boron was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 80 K. The crystals were synthesized using high-pressure high temperature technique at 3 GPa and 2100 K. The structure is based on three-dimensional framework made of B12 icosahedra with voids occupied by the B28-B-B28 units, it has the R-3m space group with a=10.9014(3), c=23.7225(7) Å lattice dimensions in hexagonal setting. Aluminum atoms are located in A1 and D special positions of the β-B structure with occupancies of 82.7(6)% and 11.3(4)%, respectively. Additional boron atoms are located near the D-site. Their possible distribution is discussed. Finally we have found two appropriate structural models whose refinement suggests two possible chemical compositions, AlB44.8(5) and AlB37.8(5), which are in a good agreement with the chemical analysis data obtained from EDX. The crystal structure of AlB44.8(5) is described in detail.

  20. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    K.R. Maskaly

    2005-06-01

    increasing RMS roughness. Again, the homogenization approximation is able to predict these results. The problem of surface scratches on 1D photonic crystals is also addressed. Although the reflectivity decreases are lower in this study, up to a 15% change in reflectivity is observed in certain scratched photonic crystal structures. However, this reflectivity change can be significantly decreased by adding a low index protective coating to the surface of the photonic crystal. Again, application of homogenization theory to these structures confirms its predictive power for this type of imperfection as well. Additionally, the problem of a circular pores in 2D photonic crystals is investigated, showing that almost a 50% change in reflectivity can occur for some structures. Furthermore, this study reveals trends that are consistent with the 1D simulations: parameter changes that increase the absolute reflectivity of the photonic crystal will also increase its tolerance to structural imperfections. Finally, experimental reflectance spectra from roughened 1D photonic crystals are compared to the results predicted computationally in this thesis. Both the computed and experimental spectra correlate favorably, validating the findings presented herein.

  1. Crystal structure of HINT from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tarique, K F; Devi, S; Abdul Rehman, S A; Gourinath, S

    2016-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the histidine triad (HIT) superfamily bind nucleotides and use the histidine triad motif to carry out dinucleotidyl hydrolase, nucleotidyltransferase and phosphoramidite hydrolase activities. Five different branches of this superfamily are known to exist. Defects in these proteins in humans are linked to many diseases such as ataxia, diseases of RNA metabolism and cell-cycle regulation, and various types of cancer. The histidine triad nucleotide protein (HINT) is nearly identical to proteins that have been classified as protein kinase C-interacting proteins (PKCIs), which also have the ability to bind and inhibit protein kinase C. The structure of HINT, which exists as a homodimer, is highly conserved from humans to bacteria and shares homology with the product of fragile histidine triad protein (FHit), a tumour suppressor gene of this superfamily. Here, the structure of HINT from Helicobacter pylori (HpHINT) in complex with AMP is reported at a resolution of 3 Å. The final model has R and Rfree values of 26 and 28%, respectively, with good electron density. Structural comparison with previously reported homologues and phylogenetic analysis shows H. pylori HINT to be the smallest among them, and suggests that it branched out separately during the course of evolution. Overall, this structure has contributed to a better understanding of this protein across the animal kingdom. PMID:26750483

  2. Determining complex crystal structures from high pressure single-crystal diffraction data collected on synchrotron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, M. I.; Loa, I.; Stinton, G. W.; Lundegaard, L. F.

    2013-08-01

    As part of a Long Term Project, single-crystal diffraction techniques have been developed for use at the high pressure beamlines ID09 and ID27 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, and have been utilised to determine the crystal structures of various high pressure phases, including those with incommensurate structures, at both high and low temperatures. The same techniques have also been used to determine the structures of high pressure phases at the SRS, Diamond and Petra-III synchrotron sources. In this paper, we describe technical details of the methods developed, and describe some of the considerations necessary for planning experiments and collecting and processing the data. We then illustrate the quality of data that can be obtained, and the complexity of the structures that can be refined, using recent results obtained from complex high pressure phases of N2 and Ba.

  3. Crystallization of interleukin-18 for structure-based inhibitor design

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Brian; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine belonging to the IL-1 superfamily. IL-18 plays an important role in host innate and acquired immune defense, with its activity being modulated in vivo by its naturally occurring antagonist IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP). Recent crystal structures of human IL-18 (hIL-18) in complex with its antagonist or cognate receptor(s) have revealed a conserved binding interface on hIL-18 representing a promising drug target. An important step in this process is obtaining crystals of apo hIL-18 or hIL-18 in complex with small-molecule inhibitors, preferably under low ionic strength conditions. In this study, surface-entropy reduction (SER) and rational protein design were employed to facilitate the crystallization of hIL-18. The results provide an excellent platform for structure-based drug design. PMID:26057800

  4. Preparation, structural, and calorimetric characterization of bicomponent metallic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, M. E.; Murthy, N. S.; Udod, I.; Khayrullin, I. I.; Baughman, R. H.; Zakhidov, A. A.

    2007-03-01

    We report preparation and characterization of novel bicomponent metal-based photonic crystals having submicron three-dimensional (3D) periodicity. Fabricated photonic crystals include SiO2 sphere lattices infiltrated interstitially with metals, carbon inverse lattices filled with metal or metal alloy spheres, Sb inverse lattices, and Sb inverse lattices filled with Bi spheres. Starting from a face centered SiO2 lattice template, these materials were obtained by sequences of either templating and template extraction or templating, template extraction, and retemplating. Surprising high fidelity was obtained for all templating and template extraction steps. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to characterize the structure and the effects of the structure on calorimetric properties. To the best of our knowledge, SAXS data on metallic photonic crystals were collected for first time.

  5. On lattice protein structure prediction revisited.

    PubMed

    Dotu, Ivan; Cebrián, Manuel; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Clote, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is regarded as a highly challenging problem both for the biology and for the computational communities. In recent years, many approaches have been developed, moving to increasingly complex lattice models and off-lattice models. This paper presents a Large Neighborhood Search (LNS) to find the native state for the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) model on the Face-Centered Cubic (FCC) lattice or, in other words, a self-avoiding walk on the FCC lattice having a maximum number of H-H contacts. The algorithm starts with a tabu-search algorithm, whose solution is then improved by a combination of constraint programming and LNS. The flexible framework of this hybrid algorithm allows an adaptation to the Miyazawa-Jernigan contact potential, in place of the HP model, thus suggesting its potential for tertiary structure prediction. Benchmarking statistics are given for our method against the hydrophobic core threading program HPstruct, an exact method which can be viewed as complementary to our method. PMID:21358007

  6. Phylogenetic Approaches to Natural Product Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Ziemert, Nadine; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetics is the study of the evolutionary relatedness among groups of organisms. Molecular phylogenetics uses sequence data to infer these relationships for both organisms and the genes they maintain. With the large amount of publicly available sequence data, phylogenetic inference has become increasingly important in all fields of biology. In the case of natural product research, phylogenetic relationships are proving to be highly informative in terms of delineating the architecture and function of the genes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases provide model examples in which individual domain phylogenies display different predictive capacities, resolving features ranging from substrate specificity to structural motifs associated with the final metabolic product. This chapter provides examples in which phylogeny has proven effective in terms of predicting functional or structural aspects of secondary metabolism. The basics of how to build a reliable phylogenetic tree are explained along with information about programs and tools that can be used for this purpose. Furthermore, it introduces the Natural Product Domain Seeker, a recently developed Web tool that employs phylogenetic logic to classify ketosynthase and condensation domains based on established enzyme architecture and biochemical function. PMID:23084938

  7. The crystal structure of a novel SAM-dependent methyltransferase PH1915 from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W.; Xu, X.; Pavlova, M.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.; Christendat, D.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Toronto; Univ. Health Network

    2005-01-01

    The S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases represent a diverse and biologically important class of enzymes. These enzymes utilize the ubiquitous methyl donor SAM as a cofactor to methylate proteins, small molecules, lipids, and nucleic acids. Here we present the crystal structure of PH1915 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a predicted SAM-dependent methyltransferase. This protein belongs to the Cluster of Orthologous Group 1092, and the presented crystal structure is the first representative structure of this protein family. Based on sequence and 3D structure analysis, we have made valuable functional insights that will facilitate further studies for characterizing this group of proteins. Specifically, we propose that PH1915 and its orthologs are rRNA- or tRNA-specific methyltransferases.

  8. Can antimonide-based nanowires form wurtzite crystal structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorji Ghalamestani, Sepideh; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of antimonide-based nanowires has become an attractive subject due to their interesting properties required for various applications such as long-wavelength IR detectors. The studies conducted on antimonide-based nanowires indicate that they preferentially crystallize in the zinc blende (ZB) crystal structure rather than wurtzite (WZ), which is common in other III-V nanowire materials. Also, with the addition of small amounts of antimony to arsenide- and phosphide-based nanowires grown under conditions otherwise leading to WZ structure, the crystal structure of the resulting ternary nanowires favors the ZB phase. Therefore, the formation of antimonide-based nanowires with the WZ phase presents fundamental challenges and is yet to be explored, but is particularly interesting for understanding the nanowire crystal phase in general. In this study, we examine the formation of Au-seeded InSb and GaSb nanowires under various growth conditions using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. We address the possibility of forming other phases than ZB such as WZ and 4H in binary nanowires and demonstrate the controlled formation of WZ InSb nanowires. We further discuss the fundamental aspects of WZ growth in Au-seeded antimonide-based nanowires.The epitaxial growth of antimonide-based nanowires has become an attractive subject due to their interesting properties required for various applications such as long-wavelength IR detectors. The studies conducted on antimonide-based nanowires indicate that they preferentially crystallize in the zinc blende (ZB) crystal structure rather than wurtzite (WZ), which is common in other III-V nanowire materials. Also, with the addition of small amounts of antimony to arsenide- and phosphide-based nanowires grown under conditions otherwise leading to WZ structure, the crystal structure of the resulting ternary nanowires favors the ZB phase. Therefore, the formation of antimonide-based nanowires with the WZ phase presents

  9. Accurate Prediction of Docked Protein Structure Similarity.

    PubMed

    Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Pomplun, Marc; Haspel, Nurit

    2015-09-01

    One of the major challenges for protein-protein docking methods is to accurately discriminate nativelike structures. The protein docking community agrees on the existence of a relationship between various favorable intermolecular interactions (e.g. Van der Waals, electrostatic, desolvation forces, etc.) and the similarity of a conformation to its native structure. Different docking algorithms often formulate this relationship as a weighted sum of selected terms and calibrate their weights against specific training data to evaluate and rank candidate structures. However, the exact form of this relationship is unknown and the accuracy of such methods is impaired by the pervasiveness of false positives. Unlike the conventional scoring functions, we propose a novel machine learning approach that not only ranks the candidate structures relative to each other but also indicates how similar each candidate is to the native conformation. We trained the AccuRMSD neural network with an extensive dataset using the back-propagation learning algorithm. Our method achieved predicting RMSDs of unbound docked complexes with 0.4Å error margin. PMID:26335807

  10. The closo-Si12C12 molecule from cluster to crystal: A theoretical prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaofeng F.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2016-03-01

    The structure of closo-Si12C12 is unique among stable SinCm isomers (n, m > 4) because of its high symmetry, π-π stacking of C6 rings and unsaturated silicon atoms at symmetrical peripheral positions. Dimerization potential surfaces reveal various dimerization reactions that form between two closo-Si12C12 molecules through Si-Si bonds at unsaturated Si atoms. As a result the closo-Si12C12 molecule is capable of polymerization to form stable 1D polymer chains, 2D crystal layers, and 3D crystals. 2D crystal structures formed by side-side polymerization satisfy eight Si valences on each monomer without large distortion of the monomer structure. 3D crystals are formed by stacking 2D structures in the Z direction, preserving registry of C6 rings in monomer moiety.

  11. Structural and optical properties of a new chalcone single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh Kumar, P. C.; Ravindrachary, V.; Janardhana, K.; Poojary, Boja

    2012-09-01

    A new nonlinear optical material 1-(4-methylthiophenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one with molecular formula C17H16O2S was synthesized by using the Claisen-Schmidt condensation reaction method. The Various functional groups present in the compound were identified using recorded FT-IR spectrum. The crystal growth parameters have been studied using solubility test and acetone is found to be a very good solvent for the crystal growth at an ambient temperature. The transparent high quality single crystals up to a size of 26×2×2 mm3 were grown using the slow evaporation solution growth technique. UV-visible study was carried out and the spectrum reveals that the crystal is transparent in the entire visible region and absorptive in the UV region. The refractive index is determined using Brewster's angle method. The optical energy band gap of the material is measured using Tauc's plot and the direct method. The single crystal XRD of MMPP crystal shows the following cell parameters: a=5.9626(2) Å, b=15.3022(6) Å, c=16.0385(7) Å, α=β=γ=90°, volume=1463.37(10) Å3 with a space group of Pna21. The compound MMPP exhibits optical nonlinearity (NLO) and its second order NLO efficiency is 3.15 times to that of urea. The effect of functional groups OCH3 and SCH3 on the non-linearity as well as the structural property of the compound has been discussed. The crystal is thermally stable. High NLO efficiency, good thermal stability, good transparency and ability to grow as a high quality single crystal make this material very attractive for opto-electronic applications.

  12. Crystal structures of fusion proteins with large-affinity tags.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Douglas R; Mrozkiewicz, Marek K; McGrath, William J; Listwan, Pawel; Kobe, Bostjan

    2003-07-01

    The fusion of a protein of interest to a large-affinity tag, such as the maltose-binding protein (MBP), thioredoxin (TRX), or glutathione-S-transferase (GST), can be advantageous in terms of increased expression, enhanced solubility, protection from proteolysis, improved folding, and protein purification via affinity chromatography. Unfortunately, crystal growth is hindered by the conformational heterogeneity induced by the fusion tag, requiring that the tag is removed by a potentially problematic cleavage step. The first three crystal structures of fusion proteins with large-affinity tags have been reported recently. All three structures used a novel strategy to rigidly fuse the protein of interest to MBP via a short three- to five-amino acid spacer. This strategy has the potential to aid structure determination of proteins that present particular experimental challenges and are not conducive to more conventional crystallization strategies (e.g., membrane proteins). Structural genomics initiatives may also benefit from this approach as a way to crystallize problematic proteins of significant interest. PMID:12824478

  13. Redetermination of the crystal structure of NbF4.

    PubMed

    Bandemehr, Jascha; Conrad, Matthias; Kraus, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Single crystals of NbF4, niobium(IV) tetra-fluoride, were synthesized by disproportionation of Nb2F5 at 1273 K in a sealed niobium tube, extracted and studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Previous reports on the crystal structure of NbF4 were based on X-ray powder diffraction data and the observed isotypicity to SnF4 [Gortsema & Didchenko (1965 ▸). Inorg. Chem. 4, 182-186; Schäfer et al. (1965 ▸). J. Less Common Met. 9, 95-104]. The data obtained from a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study meant the atomic coordinates could now be refined as well as their anisotropic displacement parameters, leading to a significant improvement of the structural model of NbF4. In the structure, the Nb atom is octahedron-like surrounded by six F atoms of which four are bridging to other NbF6 octa-hedra, leading to a layer structure extending parallel to the ab plane. PMID:27536416

  14. Redetermination of the crystal structure of NbF4

    PubMed Central

    Bandemehr, Jascha; Conrad, Matthias; Kraus, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Single crystals of NbF4, niobium(IV) tetra­fluoride, were synthesized by disproportionation of Nb2F5 at 1273 K in a sealed niobium tube, extracted and studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Previous reports on the crystal structure of NbF4 were based on X-ray powder diffraction data and the observed isotypicity to SnF4 [Gortsema & Didchenko (1965 ▸). Inorg. Chem. 4, 182–186; Schäfer et al. (1965 ▸). J. Less Common Met. 9, 95–104]. The data obtained from a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study meant the atomic coordinates could now be refined as well as their anisotropic displacement parameters, leading to a significant improvement of the structural model of NbF4. In the structure, the Nb atom is octahedron-like surrounded by six F atoms of which four are bridging to other NbF6 octa­hedra, leading to a layer structure extending parallel to the ab plane. PMID:27536416

  15. Unusual Features of Crystal Structures of Some Simple Copper Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Bodie

    2009-01-01

    Some simple copper compounds have unusual crystal structures. Cu[subscript 3]N is cubic with N atoms at centers of octahedra formed by 6 Cu atoms. Cu[subscript 2]O (cuprite) is also cubic; O atoms are in tetrahedra formed by 4 Cu atoms. These tetrahedra are linked by sharing vertices forming two independent networks without linkages between them.…

  16. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  17. The diammoniate of diborane: Crystal structure and hydrogen release

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Mark E.; Heldebrant, David J.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Proffen, Thomas E.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Autrey, Thomas

    2010-10-12

    [(NH3)2BH2]+[BH4]- is formed from the room temperature decomposition of NH4+BH4-, via a NH3BH3 intermediate. Its crystal structure has been determined and contains disordered BH4- ions in 2 distinct sites. Hydrogen release is similar to that from NH3BH3 but with faster kinetics.

  18. Co-crystal formation based on structural matching.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liping; Dodd, Stephanie; Capacci-Daniel, Christina; Garad, Sudhakar; Panicucci, Riccardo; Sethuraman, Vijay

    2016-06-10

    A co-crystal is defined as a single crystalline structure composed of two or more components with no proton transfer which are solid at room temperature. Our group has come up with the following rationale selection of co-formers for initial co-crystal screening: 1) selection of co-formers with the highest potential for hydrogen bonding with the API and 2) selection of co-formers with diversity of secondary structural characteristics. We demonstrate the feasibility of this technique with a Novartis drug candidate A. In the first tier, 20 co-formers were screened and two hits were identified. By examining the two co-formers, which worked from the first round, a second round of screening was undertaken with more focused chemical matter. Nineteen co-crystal formers closely related to the two hits in the first screen were screened in the second tier. From this screen five hits were identified. All the hits were compared for their physical and chemical stability and dissolution profile. Based on the comparison 4-aminobenzoic co-crystal was chosen for in-vivo comparison with the free form. The co-crystal had 12 times higher exposure than the free form thus overcoming the solubility limited exposure. PMID:26948852

  19. Analysis of voids in crystal structures: the methods of 'dual' crystal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Blatov, V A; Shevchenko, A P

    2003-01-01

    The theoretical basics of the analysis of voids in crystal structures by means of Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra (VDP) and of the graph theory are stated. Topological relations are considered between VDPs and atomic domains in a crystal field. These relations allow the separation of two non-intersecting topological subspaces in a crystal structure, whose connectednesses are defined by two finite 'reduced' graphs. The first, 'direct', subspace includes the atoms (VDP centres) and the network of interatomic bonds (VDP faces), the second, 'dual', one comprises the void centres (VDP vertices) and the system of channels (VDP edges) between them. Computer methods of geometrical-topological analysis of the 'dual' subspace are developed and implemented within the program package TOPOS. They are designed for automatically restoring the system of channels, visualizing and sizing voids and void conglomerates, dimensional analysis of continuous void systems, and comparative topological analysis of 'dual' subspaces for various substances. The methods of analysis of 'dual' and 'direct' subspaces are noted to differ from each other only in some details that allows the term 'dual' crystal chemistry to be introduced. The efficiency of the methods is shown with the analysis of compounds of different chemical nature: simple substances, ionic structures, superionic conductors, zeolites, clathrates, organic supramolecular complexes. PMID:12496460

  20. Crystal growth, structure analysis and characterisation of 2 - (1, 3 - dioxoisoindolin - 2 - yl) acetic acid single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Sankari, R. Siva; Perumal, Rajesh Narayana

    2014-04-24

    Single crystal of dielectric material 2 - (1, 3 - dioxoisoindolin - 2 - yl) acetic acid has been grown by slow evaporation solution growth method. The grown crystal was harvested in 25 days. The crystal structure was analyzed by Single crystal X - ray diffraction. UV-vis-NIR analysis was performed to examine the optical property of the grown crystal. The thermal property of the grown crystal was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The dielectric measurements were carried out and the dielectric constant was calculated and plotted at all frequencies.

  1. Comparison of finite element and fast Fourier transform crystal plasticity solvers for texture prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Raabe, D.; Roters, F.; Eisenlohr, P.; Lebensohn, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    We compare two full-field formulations, i.e. a crystal plasticity fast Fourier transform-based (CPFFT) model and the crystal plasticity finite element model (CPFEM) in terms of the deformation textures predicted by both approaches. Plane-strain compression of a 1024-grain ensemble is simulated with CPFFT and CPFEM to assess the models in terms of their predictions of texture evolution for engineering applications. Different combinations of final textures and strain distributions are obtained with the CPFFT and CPFEM models for this 1024-grain polycrystal. To further understand these different predictions, the correlation between grain rotations and strain gradients is investigated through the simulation of plane-strain compression of bicrystals. Finally, a study of the influence of the initial crystal orientation and the crystallographic neighborhood on grain rotations and grain subdivisions is carried out by means of plane-strain compression simulations of a 64-grain cluster.

  2. Crystal structure of SiB/sub 6/

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasse, M.; Slack, G.A.; Garbauskas, M.; Kasper, J.S.; Viala, J.C.

    1986-06-01

    The accurate and detailed structure of the compound SiB/sub 6/ has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The final R value was 6.1% for 4225 reflections. The cell is orthorhombic with space group Pnnm and a = 14.397(7) A, b = 18.318(9) A, c = 9.911(7) A, and from the electron density appears to contain 43 silicon atoms and 238 boron atoms. The structure contains many features found in other structures of boron-rich phases, and obeys the crystal chemistry rules established for them. It contains interconnected icosahedra, icosihexahedra, as well as several isolated boron and silicon atoms. An unusual feature of this structure is the presence of icosihexahedra containing silicon atoms similar to those found previously in BeB/sub 3/.

  3. Domain Structures in Nematic Liquid Crystals on a Polycarbonate Surface

    PubMed Central

    Parshin, Alexander M.; Gunyakov, Vladimir A.; Zyryanov, Victor Y.; Shabanov, Vasily F.

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  4. Domain structures in nematic liquid crystals on a polycarbonate surface.

    PubMed

    Parshin, Alexander M; Gunyakov, Vladimir A; Zyryanov, Victor Y; Shabanov, Vasily F

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  5. Crystal Structure of the Bacillus subtilis Superoxide Dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ping; Ewis, H.E.; Huang, Y.-J; Lu, C.-D.; Tai, P.C.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-01

    The sodA gene of Bacillus subtilis was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal structure of MnSOD was solved by molecular replacement with four dimers per asymmetric unit and refined to an R factor of 21.1% at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. The dimer structure is very similar to that of the related enzyme from B. anthracis. Larger structural differences were observed with the human MnSOD, which has one less helix in the helical domain and a longer loop between two -strands and also showed differences in three amino acids at the intersubunit interface in the dimer compared with the two bacterial MnSODs. These structural differences can be exploited in the design of drugs that selectively target the Bacillus enzymes.

  6. VO{sub 2} (A): Reinvestigation of crystal structure, phase transition and crystal growth mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rao Popuri, Srinivasa; Artemenko, Alla; Labrugere, Christine; Miclau, Marinela; Villesuzanne, Antoine; Pollet, Michaël

    2014-05-01

    Well crystallized VO{sub 2} (A) microrods were grown via a single step hydrothermal reaction in the presence of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and oxalic acid. With the advantage of high crystalline samples, we propose P4/ncc as an appropriate space group at room temperature. From morphological studies, we found that the oriented attachment and layer by layer growth mechanisms are responsible for the formation of VO{sub 2} (A) micro rods. The structural and electronic transitions in VO{sub 2} (A) are strongly first order in nature, and a marked difference between the structural transition temperatures and electronic transitions temperature was evidenced. The reversible intra- (LTP-A to HTP-A) and irreversible inter- (HTP-A to VO{sub 2} (M1)) structural phase transformations were studied by in-situ powder X-ray diffraction. Attempts to increase the size of the VO{sub 2} (A) microrods are presented and the possible formation steps for the flower-like morphologies of VO{sub 2} (M1) are described. - Graphical abstract: Using a single step and template free hydrothermal synthesis, well crystallized VO{sub 2} (A) microrods were prepared and the P4/ncc space group was assigned to the room temperature crystal structure. Reversible and irreversible phase transitions among different VO{sub 2} polymorphs were identified and their progressive nature was highlighted. Attempts to increase the microrods size, involving layer by layer formation mechanisms, are presented. - Highlights: • Highly crystallized VO{sub 2} (A) microrods were grown via a single step hydrothermal process. • The P4/ncc space group was determined for VO{sub 2} (A) at room temperature. • The electronic structure and progressive nature of the structural phase transition were investigated. • A weak coupling between structural and electronic phase transitions was identified. • Different crystallite morphologies were discussed in relation with growth mechanisms.

  7. Prediction of crystal densities of organic explosives by group additivity

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, J R

    1981-08-01

    The molar volume of crystalline organic compound is assumed to be a linear combination of its constituent volumes. Compounds consisting only of the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine are considered. The constituent volumes are taken to be the volumes of atoms in particular bonding environments and are evaluated from a large set of crystallographic data. The predicted density has an expected error of about 3%. These results are applied to a large number of explosives compounds.

  8. Single Crystal Structure Determination of Alumina to 1 Mbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Zhang, L.; Prakapenka, V.; Mao, H.

    2014-12-01

    Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) is an important ceramic material and a major oxide in the earth. Additionally, alumina is a widely used pressure standard in static high-pressure experiments (Cr3+-bearing corundum, ruby). The changes of its crystal structure with pressure (P) and temperature (T) are important for its applications and understanding its physical properties in the deep Earth. There have been numerous reports on the high P-T polymorphs of alumina. Previous theoretical calculations and experiments suggest that the crystal structure of Al2O3 evolves greatly at high P-T. In this study, we used the newly developed multigrain crystallography method combined with single-crystal x-ray diffraction analysis technique for the structure determination of alumina at high P-T to provide single-crystal structure refinement for high-pressure phases of Al2O3. Alumina powder was mixed with ~10% Pt and Ne was used as both pressure transmitting media and thermal insulating layers during laser-heating. Coarse-grained aggregates of Al2O3 were synthesized in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The structure change of Al2O3 was monitored by in situ x-ray diffraction at ~1 Mbar and 2700 K. The results allow us to distinguish the structural differences between the Rh2O3 (II) structure (space group Pbcn) and perovskite structure (space group Pbnm) for the first high-pressure phase of Al2O3. More detailed results will be discussed in the later work.

  9. Crystal structure of new AsS2 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotina, N. B.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Dyuzheva, T. I.; Lityagina, L. M.; Kulikova, L. F.; Nikolaev, N. A.; Verin, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    AsS2 single crystals have been obtained for the first time from an As2S3 melt at pressures above 6 GPa and temperatures above 800 K in the As2S3 → AsS + AsS2 reaction. The monoclinic structure of the new high-pressure phase is solved by X-ray diffraction analysis and compared to the structure of high-pressure AsS phase, which was studied previously.

  10. Evaluation, analysis and prediction of geologic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Nicholas B.

    2012-08-01

    Balanced cross-sections claim to be better because they apply a rigorous set of rules to develop the conceptual model of the structures present in an area. Balanced cross-sections can be further improved and become more useful to understanding real physical problems by collection of additional data such as seismic reflection surveys, collection of additional stratigraphic data, or collection of rock fabric information. The additional information validates the initial model and provides details on deformation conditions and on local rock responses to the deformation. Although individual cross-sections are two dimensional, the objective of evaluation and analysis of deformed regions should be three dimensional whenever possible to recognize the challenges of the real world. Subsurface system analysis derived from the hydrologic community emphasizes conceptual model development through model verification, validation, uncertainty quantification, benchmarking and meta-analysis. Their approach includes many steps informally used by the structural geology community but in a much more explicit way. Newer geological applications of structural geology would benefit from this more rigorous approach for designing and doing performance predictions as technological needs become more socially sensitive such as for carbon storage sites, new areas of energy exploration in higher population density areas, or for nuclear waste storage facilities.

  11. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Z.A.; Dong, K.J.; Yu, A.B.

    2015-03-15

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald’s rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid–solid phase transition. - Highlights: • A comprehensive structural analysis is conducted focusing on crystallization. • The involved atoms in our analysis are more than 90% for all samples concerned. • A series of distinct intermediate states are found in crystallization of silver melt. • A novelty icosahedron-saturated state breeds the metastable bcc state.

  12. Solution- and Adsorbed-State Structural Ensembles Predicted for the Statherin-Hydroxyapatite System

    PubMed Central

    Masica, David L.; Gray, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We have developed a multiscale structure prediction technique to study solution- and adsorbed-state ensembles of biomineralization proteins. The algorithm employs a Metropolis Monte Carlo-plus-minimization strategy that varies all torsional and rigid-body protein degrees of freedom. We applied the technique to fold statherin, starting from a fully extended peptide chain in solution, in the presence of hydroxyapatite (HAp) (001), (010), and (100) monoclinic crystals. Blind (unbiased) predictions capture experimentally observed macroscopic and high-resolution structural features and show minimal statherin structural change upon adsorption. The dominant structural difference between solution and adsorbed states is an experimentally observed folding event in statherin's helical binding domain. Whereas predicted statherin conformers vary slightly at three different HAp crystal faces, geometric and chemical similarities of the surfaces allow structurally promiscuous binding. Finally, we compare blind predictions with those obtained from simulation biased to satisfy all previously published solid-state NMR (ssNMR) distance and angle measurements (acquired from HAp-adsorbed statherin). Atomic clashes in these structures suggest a plausible, alternative interpretation of some ssNMR measurements as intermolecular rather than intramolecular. This work demonstrates that a combination of ssNMR and structure prediction could effectively determine high-resolution protein structures at biomineral interfaces. PMID:19383454

  13. Crystal Structure of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Hexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiu-Gong; Maldonado, Ernesto; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Tuena de Gomez-Puyou, Marietta; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Rodriguez-Romero, Adela

    1999-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms of enzyme catalysis in organic solvents, the x-ray structure of some monomeric enzymes in organic solvents was determined. However, it remained to be explored whether the structure of oligomeric proteins is also amenable to such analysis. The field acquired new perspectives when it was proposed that the x-ray structure of enzymes in nonaqueous media could reveal binding sites for organic solvents that in principle could represent the starting point for drug design. Here, a crystal of the dimeric enzyme triosephosphate isomerase from the pathogenic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi was soaked and diffracted in hexane and its structure solved at 2- angstrom resolution. Its overall structure and the dimer interface were not altered by hexane. However, there were differences in the orientation of the side chains of several amino acids, including that of the catalytic Glu-168 in one of the monomers. No hexane molecules were detected in the active site or in the dimer interface. However, three hexane molecules were identified on the surface of the protein at sites, which in the native crystal did not have water molecules. The number of water molecules in the hexane structure was higher than in the native crystal. Two hexanes localized at <4 angstrom from residues that form the dimer interface; they were in close proximity to a site that has been considered a potential target for drug design.

  14. On calculating the equilibrium structure of molecular crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2010-03-01

    The difficulty of calculating the ambient properties of molecular crystals, such as the explosive PETN, has long hampered much needed computational investigations of these materials. One reason for the shortcomings is that the exchange-correlation functionals available for Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations do not correctly describe the weak intermolecular van der Waals' forces present in molecular crystals. However, this weak interaction also poses other challenges for the computational schemes used. We will discuss these issues in the context of calculations of lattice constants and structure of PETN with a number of different functionals, and also discuss if these limitations can be circumvented for studies at non-ambient conditions.

  15. Structural, magnetic and optical properties of two concomitant molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Manuela Ramos; Milne, Bruce; Coutinho, Joana T.; Pereira, Laura C. J.; Martín-Ramos, Pablo; Pereira da Silva, Pedro S.; Martín-Gil, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    A new 1D complex has been prepared and characterized. X-ray single crystal structure confirms that the Cu(II) ions assemble in alternating chains with Cu … Cu distances of 2.5685(4) and 3.1760(4) Å. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility reveals an antiferromagnetic interaction between the paddle-wheel copper centers with an exchange of -300 cm-1. The exchange integral was also determined by quantum chemical ab-initio calculations, using polarised and unpolarised basis sets reproducing well the experimental value. The second harmonic generation efficiency of a concomitantly crystallized material was evaluated and was found to be comparable to urea.

  16. Solvent-controlled assembly of crystal structures: From centrosymmetric structure to noncentrosymmetric structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Le; Dang, Lilong; Luo, Feng; Feng, Xuefeng

    2016-02-01

    Reported here are two isomeric organic crystals and two HgI2-based coordination compounds by solvo(hydro)thermal method: [(TPTA)·H2O]n (1, Cc), [(TPTA)·H2O]n (2, Pbca), [Hg1.5I3(TPTA)0.5(CH3CN)·(H2O)0.5]n (3, P21) and [HgI2(TPTA)·H2O]n (4, P21/c) (TPTA = N,N‧,N″-tris(3-pyridyl)trimesic amide). Single crystal X-ray diffraction show that they afford noncentrosymmetric and centrosymmetric structures, respectively. Note that this kind of formations can be precisely controlled by changing the reaction solvent, thus indicating a facile method towards generating noncentrosymmetric structure.

  17. Optimizing nondecomposable loss functions in structured prediction.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mani; Lan, Tian; Wang, Yang; Robinovitch, Steven N; Li, Ze-Nian; Mori, Greg

    2013-04-01

    We develop an algorithm for structured prediction with nondecomposable performance measures. The algorithm learns parameters of Markov Random Fields (MRFs) and can be applied to multivariate performance measures. Examples include performance measures such as Fβ score (natural language processing), intersection over union (object category segmentation), Precision/Recall at k (search engines), and ROC area (binary classifiers). We attack this optimization problem by approximating the loss function with a piecewise linear function. The loss augmented inference forms a Quadratic Program (QP), which we solve using LP relaxation. We apply this approach to two tasks: object class-specific segmentation and human action retrieval from videos. We show significant improvement over baseline approaches that either use simple loss functions or simple scoring functions on the PASCAL VOC and H3D Segmentation datasets, and a nursing home action recognition dataset. PMID:22868650

  18. Predicting missing links via structural similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Guo-Dong; Fan, Chang-Jun; Yu, Lian-Fei; Xiu, Bao-Xin; Zhang, Wei-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Predicting missing links in networks plays a significant role in modern science. On the basis of structural similarity, our paper proposes a new node-similarity-based measure called biased resource allocation (BRA), which is motivated by the resource allocation (RA) measure. Comparisons between BRA and nine well-known node-similarity-based measures on five real networks indicate that BRA performs no worse than RA, which was the best node-similarity-based index in previous researches. Afterwards, based on localPath (LP) and Katz measure, we propose another two improved measures, named Im-LocalPath and Im-Katz respectively. Numerical results show that the prediction accuracy of both Im-LP and Im-Katz measure improve compared with the original LP and Katz measure. Finally, a new path-similarity-based measure and its improved measure, called LYU and Im-LYU measure, are proposed and especially, Im-LYU measure is shown to perform more remarkably than other mentioned measures.

  19. Can antimonide-based nanowires form wurtzite crystal structure?

    PubMed

    Gorji Ghalamestani, Sepideh; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A

    2016-02-01

    The epitaxial growth of antimonide-based nanowires has become an attractive subject due to their interesting properties required for various applications such as long-wavelength IR detectors. The studies conducted on antimonide-based nanowires indicate that they preferentially crystallize in the zinc blende (ZB) crystal structure rather than wurtzite (WZ), which is common in other III-V nanowire materials. Also, with the addition of small amounts of antimony to arsenide- and phosphide-based nanowires grown under conditions otherwise leading to WZ structure, the crystal structure of the resulting ternary nanowires favors the ZB phase. Therefore, the formation of antimonide-based nanowires with the WZ phase presents fundamental challenges and is yet to be explored, but is particularly interesting for understanding the nanowire crystal phase in general. In this study, we examine the formation of Au-seeded InSb and GaSb nanowires under various growth conditions using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. We address the possibility of forming other phases than ZB such as WZ and 4H in binary nanowires and demonstrate the controlled formation of WZ InSb nanowires. We further discuss the fundamental aspects of WZ growth in Au-seeded antimonide-based nanowires. PMID:26763161

  20. Projection structure of frog rhodopsin in two crystal forms.

    PubMed Central

    Schertler, G F; Hargrave, P A

    1995-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor that upon light activation triggers the visual transduction cascade. Rod cell outer segment disc membranes were isolated from dark-adapted frog retinas and were extracted with Tween detergents to obtain two-dimensional rhodopsin crystals for electron crystallography. When Tween 80 was used, tubular structures with a p2 lattice (a = 32 A, b = 83 A, gamma = 91 degrees) were formed. The use of a Tween 80/Tween 20 mixture favored the formation of larger p22(1)2(1) lattices (a = 40 A, b = 146 A, gamma = 90 degrees). Micrographs from frozen hydrated frog rhodopsin crystals were processed, and projection structures to 7-A resolution for the p22(1)2(1) form and to 6-A resolution for the p2 form were calculated. The maps of frog rhodopsin in both crystal forms are very similar to the 9-A map obtained previously for bovine rhodopsin and show that the arrangement of the helices is the same. In a tentative topographic model, helices 4, 6, and 7 are nearly perpendicular to the plane of the membrane. In the higher-resolution projection maps of frog rhodopsin, helix 5 looks more tilted than it appeared previously. The quality of the two frog rhodopsin crystals suggests that they would be suitable to obtain a three-dimensional structure in which all helices would be resolved. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 6 PMID:8524807

  1. Thermodynamic stability and structural properties of cluster crystals formed by amphiphilic dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Dominic A.; Mladek, Bianca M.; Likos, Christos N.; Blaak, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    We pursue the goal of finding real-world examples of macromolecular aggregates that form cluster crystals, which have been predicted on the basis of coarse-grained, ultrasoft pair potentials belonging to a particular mathematical class [B. M. Mladek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 045701 (2006)]. For this purpose, we examine in detail the phase behavior and structural properties of model amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of monomer-resolved computer simulations. On augmenting the density of these systems, a fluid comprised of clusters that contain several overlapping and penetrating macromolecules is spontaneously formed. Upon further compression of the system, a transition to multi-occupancy crystals takes place, the thermodynamic stability of which is demonstrated by means of free-energy calculations, and where the FCC is preferred over the BCC-phase. Contrary to predictions for coarse-grained theoretical models in which the particles interact exclusively by effective pair potentials, the internal degrees of freedom of these molecules cause the lattice constant to be density-dependent. Furthermore, the mechanical stability of monodisperse BCC and FCC cluster crystals is restricted to a bounded region in the plane of cluster occupation number versus density. The structural properties of the dendrimers in the dense crystals, including their overall sizes and the distribution of monomers are also thoroughly analyzed.

  2. Nonorthogonal FDTD simulations for photonic band structures, states density, and transmission/reflection of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Zichun; Yang, Yang; Quan, Bisheng; Wang, Weibiao; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Chi, Yongjiang; Ma, Lingfang

    2005-01-01

    Photonic crystals have been widely studied in the fields of physics, material science and optical information technology. In general, the standard rectangular finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to predict the performances of photonic crystals. It is however very time consuming and inefficient. The current authors developed a software called GCFE, which is based on a non-orthogonal FDTD method. The software can be used to predict the photonic band structures, photonic states density and transmission and/or reflection coefficients for one-dimensional to three-dimensional photonic crystals. In the present paper, the derivations of the discrete Maxwell"s equations in time-domain and space-domain and the derivation of the discrete transfer matrix in real-space domain are briefly described firstly. In addition, the design idea and the functions of GCFE version 2.0.00 are introduced. Moreover, the band structures, transmission and reflection coefficients and photonic states density for the photonic crystal with cube lattice are calculated by our GCFE software, and numerical application results are also shown.

  3. Thermodynamic stability and structural properties of cluster crystals formed by amphiphilic dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Dominic A; Mladek, Bianca M; Likos, Christos N; Blaak, Ronald

    2016-05-28

    We pursue the goal of finding real-world examples of macromolecular aggregates that form cluster crystals, which have been predicted on the basis of coarse-grained, ultrasoft pair potentials belonging to a particular mathematical class [B. M. Mladek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 045701 (2006)]. For this purpose, we examine in detail the phase behavior and structural properties of model amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of monomer-resolved computer simulations. On augmenting the density of these systems, a fluid comprised of clusters that contain several overlapping and penetrating macromolecules is spontaneously formed. Upon further compression of the system, a transition to multi-occupancy crystals takes place, the thermodynamic stability of which is demonstrated by means of free-energy calculations, and where the FCC is preferred over the BCC-phase. Contrary to predictions for coarse-grained theoretical models in which the particles interact exclusively by effective pair potentials, the internal degrees of freedom of these molecules cause the lattice constant to be density-dependent. Furthermore, the mechanical stability of monodisperse BCC and FCC cluster crystals is restricted to a bounded region in the plane of cluster occupation number versus density. The structural properties of the dendrimers in the dense crystals, including their overall sizes and the distribution of monomers are also thoroughly analyzed. PMID:27250325

  4. Structure and melting behavior of classical bilayer crystals of dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Xin; Wu Changqin; Micheli, Andrea; Pupillo, Guido

    2008-07-01

    We study the structure and melting of a classical bilayer system of dipoles in a setup where the dipoles are oriented perpendicular to the planes of the layers and the density of dipoles is the same in each layer. Due to the anisotropic character of the dipole-dipole interactions, we find that the ground-state configuration is given by two hexagonal crystals positioned on top of each other, independent of the interlayer spacing and dipolar density. For large interlayer distances these crystals are independent, while in the opposite limit of small interlayer distances the system behaves as a two-dimensional crystal of paired dipoles. Within the harmonic approximation for the phonon excitations, the melting temperature of these crystalline configurations displays a nonmonotonic dependence on the interlayer distance, which is associated with a re-entrant melting behavior in the form of solid-liquid-solid-liquid transitions at fixed temperature.

  5. Crystal structure and density of helium to 232 kbar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, H. K.; Wu, Y.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Bassett, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of helium and hydrogen at high pressure are topics of great interest to the understanding of planetary interiors. These materials constitute 95 percent of the entire solar system. A technique was presented for the measurement of X-ray diffraction from single-crystals of low-Z condenses gases in a diamond-anvil cell at high pressure. The first such single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements on solid hydrogen to 26.5 GPa were presented. The application of this technique to the problem of the crystal structure, equation of state, and phase diagram of solid helium is reported. Crucial for X-ray diffraction studies of these materials is the use of a synchrotron radiation source which provides high brillance, narrow collimation of the incident and diffracted X-ray beams to reduce the background noise, and energy-dispersive diffraction techniques with polychromatic (white) radiation, which provides high detection efficiency.

  6. Crystal structure and density of helium to 232 kbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H. K.; Wu, Y.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Bassett, W. A.

    The properties of helium and hydrogen at high pressure are topics of great interest to the understanding of planetary interiors. These materials constitute 95 percent of the entire solar system. A technique was presented for the measurement of X-ray diffraction from single-crystals of low-Z condenses gases in a diamond-anvil cell at high pressure. The first such single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements on solid hydrogen to 26.5 GPa were presented. The application of this technique to the problem of the crystal structure, equation of state, and phase diagram of solid helium is reported. Crucial for X-ray diffraction studies of these materials is the use of a synchrotron radiation source which provides high brillance, narrow collimation of the incident and diffracted X-ray beams to reduce the background noise, and energy-dispersive diffraction techniques with polychromatic (white) radiation, which provides high detection efficiency.

  7. High-throughput study of crystal structures and stability of strengthening precipitates in Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongshu; Amsler, Maxmilian; Hegde, Vinay; Saal, James; Issa, Ahmed; Zeng, Xiaoqin; Wolverton, Christopher

    Age hardening, in which precipitates form and impede the movement of dislocations, can be applied to magnesium alloys in order to increase their limited strengthening behavior. To help clarify the energetics of precipitation hardening of Mg alloys, we employed first principles density functional theory calculations to elucidate both crystal structures and energetics of a very large set of precipitates in Mg alloys. We find the enthalpy changes of (stable and metastable) observed precipitates during the age hardening process are consistent with the experimental sequence of formation for many Mg binary alloys (Mg- {Nd, Gd, Y, Sn, Al, Zn}). For cases where the metastable precipitate crystal structure is unavailable, we search over several prototypes and predict structures/stoichiometries for several ternary precipitates. In addition, high-throughput calculations are performed to construct hcp-based based convex hulls, which assist the identification of coherent GP zones and new metastable phases in age-hardened hcp systems.

  8. Use of Pom Pons To Illustrate Cubic Crystal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Susan G.

    1997-07-01

    In general chemistry classes, students are introduced to the ways in which atoms are arranged in cubic crystal structures. Transposing the textbook illustrations into three dimensional structures is difficult for some students. This transitions is easier if a three dimensional model is available for examination. Several 3D models are cited. A quick to assemble, inexpensive, colorful, and durable alternative to these models and styrofoam balls is the use of olefin pom pons. Different sized pom pons can be used to demonstrate how the atomic radius will vary when comparing the different types of cubic crystal unit cells. Being made of a coarse material, pom pons can be stacked to illustrate different packing arrangements such as hexagonal close-packed and cubic close-packed structures. Pom pons make great atoms.

  9. Crystal structure of Brinzolamide: a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huirong; Lou, Benyong

    2016-05-01

    In crystal structure of the title compound, C12H21N3O5S3 [systematic name: (R)-4-ethyl-amino-2-(3-meth-oxy-prop-yl)-3,4-di-hydro-2H-thieno[3,2-e][1,2]thia-zine-6-sulfonamide 1,1-dioxide], there exist three kinds of hydrogen-bonding inter-actions. The sulfonamide group is involved in hydrogen bonding with the secondary amine and the meth-oxy O atom, resulting in the formation of layers parallel to the bc plane. The layers are linked by an N-H⋯O hydrogen bond involving a sulfonamide O atom as acceptor and the secondary amine H atom as donor, which gives rise to the formation of a unique bilayer structure. The absolute structure of the mol-ecule in the crystal was determined by resonant scattering [Flack parameter = 0.01 (4)]. PMID:27308020

  10. Crystal structure and spectroscopic elucidation of 3-phenylpyridinium hydrogensquarate.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Bojidarka B; Kolev, Tsonko; Tsanev, Tsanko; Kotov, Stefan; Mayer-Figge, Heike; Spiteller, Michael; Sheldrick, William S

    2010-01-01

    The novel 3-phenylpyridinium hydrogensquarate (1) has been synthesized and its structure and properties are elucidated spectroscopically, thermally and structurally, using single crystal X-ray diffraction, linear-polarized solid-state IR-spectroscopy, UV-spectroscopy, TGA, DSC, DTA and ESI MS. Quantum chemical calculations were used to obtain the electronic structure, vibrational data and electronic spectrum. 3-Phenylpyridinium hydrogensquarate, crystallizes in the space group P-1 and the ions in the unit cell are joined into layers by intermolecular NH...O=C((Sq)) bonds with bond lengths of 2.625 and 2.626 A, respectively. Hydrogentartarates form dimers by strong O=COH...OCO interactions (2.499 A). PMID:19931483

  11. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide. PMID:26022515

  12. Structural engineering of three-dimensional phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpero, Tommaso; Schoenwald, Stefan; Zemp, Armin; Bergamini, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Artificially-structured materials are attracting the research interest of a growing community of scientists for the possibility to develop novel materials with advantageous properties that arise from the ability to tailor the propagation of elastic waves, and thus energy, through them. In this work, we propose a three-dimensional phononic crystal whose unit cell has been engineered to obtain a strong wave-attenuation band in the middle of the acoustic frequency range. The combination of its acoustic properties with the dimensions of the unit cell and its static mechanical properties makes it an interesting material for possibly several applications in civil and mechanical engineering, for instance as the core of an acoustically insulating sandwich panel. A sample of this crystal has been manufactured and experimentally tested with respect to its acoustic transmissibility. The performance of the phononic crystal core is remarkable both in terms of amplitude reduction in the transmissibility and width of the attenuation band. A parametric study has been finally conducted on selected geometrical parameters of the unit cell and on their effect on the macroscopic properties of the crystal. This work represents an application-oriented example of how the macroscopic properties of an artificially-structured material can be designed, according to specific needs, by a conventional engineering of its unit cell.

  13. One dimensional coordination polymers: Synthesis, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaağaç, Dursun; Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Şenyel, Mustafa; Şahin, Onur

    2016-11-01

    Two new one dimensional (1D) cyanide complexes, namely [M(4-aepy)2(H2O)2][Pt(CN)4], (4-aepy = 4-(2-aminoethyl)pyridine M = Cu(II) (1) or Zn(II) (2)), have been synthesized and characterized by vibrational (FT-IR and Raman) spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, thermal and elemental analyses techniques. The crystallographic analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are isomorphous and isostructural, and crystallize in the monoclinic system and C2 space group. The Pt(II) ions are coordinated by four cyanide-carbon atoms in the square-planar geometry and the [Pt(CN)4]2- ions act as a counter ion. The M(II) ions display an N4O2 coordination sphere with a distorted octahedral geometry, the nitrogen donors belonging to four molecules of the organic 4-aepy that act as unidentate ligands and two oxygen atoms from aqua ligands. The crystal structures of 1 and 2 are similar each other and linked via intermolecular hydrogen bonding, Pt⋯π interactions to form 3D supramolecular network. Vibration assignments of all the observed bands are given and the spectral features also supported to the crystal structures of the complexes.

  14. Lattice dynamics of crystals having R2MX6 structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. I.; Freire, J. D.; Katiyar, R. S.

    1997-10-01

    The theory of lattice dynamics in the harmonic approximation using a rigid-ion model due to Born and Huang [Dynamical Theory of Crystal Lattices (Oxford University Press, New York, 1954)], is applied to ionic crystals of the R2MX6 type with antifluorite structure namely, K2SnCl6, K2PtBr6, Cs2SnBr6, and Rb2SnBr6 in the cubic phase. The model expresses the potential energy as the sum of long-range Coulomb interactions and repulsive short-range interactions between ions in the primitive cell. A function of axially symmetric type is used to approximate the short-range part, and the number of force constant parameters were reduced utilizing stability conditions in the manner described by Katiyar [J. Phys. C 3, 1087 (1970)]. The remaining constants were determined by a nonlinear least-squares analysis of some experimental frequencies at the critical point Γ. The long-range contributions were calculated using the Ewald transformation as described by Cowley [Acta Crystallogr. 15, 687 (1962)]. Phonon frequencies and the normal modes of vibrations at the zone center were obtained; of particular interest is the resulting lowest librational frequency for each crystal. We obtained excellent agreement between the calculated and the observed frequencies. The resulting effective charge parameters indicated that these crystals are partially ionic. In general, the results offered a better vision of the structural phase transition mechanism involving the rotational mode T1g.

  15. Crystal structure of four-stranded Oxytricha telomeric DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C.; Zhang, X.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1992-01-01

    The sequence d(GGGGTTTTGGGG) from the 3' overhang of the Oxytricha telomere has been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure solved to 2.5 A resolution. The oligonucleotide forms hairpins, two of which join to make a four-stranded helical structure with the loops containing four thymine residues at either end. The guanine residues are held together by cyclic hydrogen bonding and an ion is located in the centre. The four guanine residues in each segment have a glycosyl conformation that alternates between anti and syn. There are two four-stranded molecules in the asymmetric unit showing that the structure has some intrinsic flexibility.

  16. Revisiting the crystal structure of rhombohedral lead metaniobate.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Gerhard Henning; Sørby, Magnus Helgerud; Hauback, Bjørn Christian; Selbach, Sverre Magnus; Grande, Tor

    2014-09-15

    Lead metaniobate (PbNb2O6) can exist both as a stable rhombohedral and a metastable orthorhombic tungsten-bronze-type polymorph. Although the orthorhombic is a well-known ferroelectric material, the rhombohedral polymorph has been far less studied. The crystal structure and energetic stability of the stable rhombohedral polymorph of lead metaniobate is re-examined by powder X-ray diffraction and powder neutron diffraction in combination with ab initio calculations. We show that this structure is described by the polar space group R3, in contradiction to the previously reported space group R3m. The crystal structure is unusual, consisting of edge-sharing dimers of NbO(6/2) octahedra forming layers with 6- and 3-fold rings of octahedra and lead ions in channels formed by these rings. The layers are connected by corner-sharing between octahedra. Finally, the crystal structure is discussed in relation to other AB2O6 compounds with B = Nb, Ta. PMID:25167129

  17. Tunable photonic structures based on silicon and liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perova, Tatiana S.; Tolmachev, Vladimir A.; Astrova, Ekaterina V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is focused on the design, fabrication and characterization of the conventional and tunable photonic devices based on grooved silicon, serving as one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal. The advantages of these photonic structures are as follows: the large refractive index contrast, in-plane moulding of the light flow, the possibility to fabricate a composite photonic structures by filling the grooves with a different compounds and compatibility with current semiconductor processing techniques. The optical properties of grooved Si structures were simulated using a transfer matrix method and gap map method and have been verified experimentally using FTIR microscopy. The air spaces in the basic silicon-air matrices were infiltrated with nematic liquid crystal E7. It is shown that the optical properties of the obtained composite 1D photonic crystals can be tuned by means of electro- and thermo-optical effects. Such a structures suit well for the various elements of the integrated optics and can serve as a building blocks for optical interconnects.

  18. Structural phase transitions and topological defects in ion Coulomb crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Partner, Heather L.; Nigmatullin, Ramil; Burgermeister, Tobias; Keller, Jonas; Pyka, Karsten; Plenio, Martin B.; Retzker, Alex; Zurek, Wojciech Hubert; del Campo, Adolfo; Mehlstaubler, Tanja E.

    2014-11-19

    We use laser-cooled ion Coulomb crystals in the well-controlled environment of a harmonic radiofrequency ion trap to investigate phase transitions and defect formation. Topological defects in ion Coulomb crystals (kinks) have been recently proposed for studies of nonlinear physics with solitons and as carriers of quantum information. Defects form when a symmetry breaking phase transition is crossed non-adiabatically. For a second order phase transition, the Kibble-Zurek mechanism predicts that the formation of these defects follows a power law scaling in the rate of the transition. We demonstrate a scaling of defect density and describe kink dynamics and stability. We further discuss the implementation of mass defects and electric fields as first steps toward controlled kink preparation and manipulation.

  19. Synthesis of a mixed-valent tin nitride and considerations of its possible crystal structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Caskey, Christopher M.; Holder, Aaron; Shulda, Sarah; Christensen, Steven T.; Diercks, David; Schwartz, Craig P.; Biagioni, David; Nordlund, Dennis; Kukliansky, Alon; Natan, Amir; et al

    2016-04-12

    Recent advances in theoretical structure prediction methods and high-throughput computational techniques are revolutionizing experimental discovery of the thermodynamically stable inorganic materials. Metastable materials represent a new frontier for these studies, since even simple binary non ground state compounds of common elements may be awaiting discovery. However, there are significant research challenges related to non-equilibrium thin film synthesis and crystal structure predictions, such as small strained crystals in the experimental samples and energy minimization based theoretical algorithms. Here we report on experimental synthesis and characterization, as well as theoretical first-principles calculations of a previously unreported mixed-valent binary tin nitride. Thin filmmore » experiments indicate that this novel material is N-deficient SnN with tin in the mixed II/IV valence state and a small low-symmetry unit cell. Theoretical calculations suggest that the most likely crystal structure has the space group 2 (SG2) related to the distorted delafossite (SG166), which is nearly 0.1 eV/atom above the ground state SnN polymorph. This observation is rationalized by the structural similarity of the SnN distorted delafossite to the chemically related Sn3N4 spinel compound, which provides a fresh scientific insight into the reasons for growth of polymorphs of the metastable material. In addition to reporting on the discovery of the simple binary SnN compound, this study illustrates a possible way of combining a wide range of advanced characterization techniques with the first-principle property calculation methods, to elucidate the most likely crystal structure of the previously unreported metastable materials.« less

  20. Synthesis of a mixed-valent tin nitride and considerations of its possible crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Caskey, Christopher M; Holder, Aaron; Shulda, Sarah; Christensen, Steven T; Diercks, David; Schwartz, Craig P; Biagioni, David; Nordlund, Dennis; Kukliansky, Alon; Natan, Amir; Prendergast, David; Orvananos, Bernardo; Sun, Wenhao; Zhang, Xiuwen; Ceder, Gerbrand; Ginley, David S; Tumas, William; Perkins, John D; Stevanovic, Vladan; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Lany, Stephan; Richards, Ryan M; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-04-14

    Recent advances in theoretical structure prediction methods and high-throughput computational techniques are revolutionizing experimental discovery of the thermodynamically stable inorganic materials. Metastable materials represent a new frontier for these studies, since even simple binary non-ground state compounds of common elements may be awaiting discovery. However, there are significant research challenges related to non-equilibrium thin film synthesis and crystal structure predictions, such as small strained crystals in the experimental samples and energy minimization based theoretical algorithms. Here, we report on experimental synthesis and characterization, as well as theoretical first-principles calculations of a previously unreported mixed-valent binary tin nitride. Thin film experiments indicate that this novel material is N-deficient SnN with tin in the mixed ii/iv valence state and a small low-symmetry unit cell. Theoretical calculations suggest that the most likely crystal structure has the space group 2 (SG2) related to the distorted delafossite (SG166), which is nearly 0.1 eV/atom above the ground state SnN polymorph. This observation is rationalized by the structural similarity of the SnN distorted delafossite to the chemically related Sn3N4 spinel compound, which provides a fresh scientific insight into the reasons for growth of polymorphs of metastable materials. In addition to reporting on the discovery of the simple binary SnN compound, this paper illustrates a possible way of combining a wide range of advanced characterization techniques with the first-principle property calculation methods, to elucidate the most likely crystal structure of the previously unreported metastable materials. PMID:27083713

  1. Synthesis of a mixed-valent tin nitride and considerations of its possible crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caskey, Christopher M.; Holder, Aaron; Shulda, Sarah; Christensen, Steven T.; Diercks, David; Schwartz, Craig P.; Biagioni, David; Nordlund, Dennis; Kukliansky, Alon; Natan, Amir; Prendergast, David; Orvananos, Bernardo; Sun, Wenhao; Zhang, Xiuwen; Ceder, Gerbrand; Ginley, David S.; Tumas, William; Perkins, John D.; Stevanovic, Vladan; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Lany, Stephan; Richards, Ryan M.; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in theoretical structure prediction methods and high-throughput computational techniques are revolutionizing experimental discovery of the thermodynamically stable inorganic materials. Metastable materials represent a new frontier for these studies, since even simple binary non-ground state compounds of common elements may be awaiting discovery. However, there are significant research challenges related to non-equilibrium thin film synthesis and crystal structure predictions, such as small strained crystals in the experimental samples and energy minimization based theoretical algorithms. Here, we report on experimental synthesis and characterization, as well as theoretical first-principles calculations of a previously unreported mixed-valent binary tin nitride. Thin film experiments indicate that this novel material is N-deficient SnN with tin in the mixed ii/iv valence state and a small low-symmetry unit cell. Theoretical calculations suggest that the most likely crystal structure has the space group 2 (SG2) related to the distorted delafossite (SG166), which is nearly 0.1 eV/atom above the ground state SnN polymorph. This observation is rationalized by the structural similarity of the SnN distorted delafossite to the chemically related Sn3N4 spinel compound, which provides a fresh scientific insight into the reasons for growth of polymorphs of metastable materials. In addition to reporting on the discovery of the simple binary SnN compound, this paper illustrates a possible way of combining a wide range of advanced characterization techniques with the first-principle property calculation methods, to elucidate the most likely crystal structure of the previously unreported metastable materials.

  2. Micro-spectroscopic mapping: revealing internal structures of zircon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasdala, L.; Reiners, P. W.; Hanchar, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Natural zircon crystals typically deviate from perfect crystallinity and ideal chemical composition. If non-ideality features are not homogeneously distributed within a crystal but show a heterogeneity pattern, this is referred to as its "internal structure". Internal structures of zircon are mostly first caused by the heterogeneous incorporation of trace elements during crystal growth. Over time, these primary patterns may become more complex after being overprinted by radioactive self-irradiation and heterogeneous alteration or recrystallization. Internal structures may provide valuable information about the origin and post-growth history of zircon crystals. Further, they need to be recognized for sound microprobe dating, for instance to avoid biased results when straddling zones of different age. Revealing internal structures has thus become an important tool in zircon research. It is mostly done by means of backscattered electrons or cathodoluminescence imaging. These two techniques are advantageous over optical microscopy in the cross-polarized mode as the volume resolution is better and simple polished mounts instead of doubly-sided sections are needed. A disadvantage, however, is that the impact of electron beam during analysis causes local structural changes. Quantitative studies of the real structure of zircon samples, such as determination of the degree of the radiation damage, is therefore tainted with potential uncertainty when being done after electron probe analysis. As an alternative, we present images of internal zircon structures generated through visible laser excitation and mapping of the Raman and photoluminescence light. Due to the time-consuming mapping procedure, such images will perhaps not be routinely used. For detailed studies, however, they may provide most valuable information. Photoluminescence maps provide, for instance, information on both the distribution of rare earth elements (band integrals) and the short-range order (band

  3. Structure development in silicon sheet by shaped crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.; De Angelis, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Models are presented for the development of a parallel twinned structure of the 110 plane type and the 112 line type in silicon ribbons. The models are believed to be mutually compatible and operable. The first model relates the requirements for super-cooling during crystallization. The existence of reentrant angles associated with the twin structure is proposed to provide a rough interface to reduce super-cooling. The spacing of the twins is proposed to be limited by the geometrical relationship between the thermal gradient in the liquid and the dimensions of the twinned crystallization front. The second model relates the thermal stress configuration to detail dislocation reactions which would be expected to develop twins. While a specific dislocation mechanism cannot yet be defined, a number of alternatives are presented. All of these various dislocation mechanisms would result in the observed crystalline configuration and the choice among them is not critical.

  4. The crystal structure of ice under mesospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Benjamin J.; Malkin, Tamsin L.; Salzmann, Christoph G.

    2015-05-01

    Ice clouds form in the summer high latitude mesopause region, which is the coldest part of the Earth's atmosphere. At these very low temperatures (<150 K) ice can exist in metastable forms, but the nature of these ices remains poorly understood. In this paper we show that ice which is grown at mesospherically relevant temperatures does not have a structure corresponding to the well-known hexagonal form or the metastable cubic form. Instead, the ice which forms under mesospheric conditions is a material in which cubic and hexagonal sequences of ice are randomly arranged to produce stacking disordered ice (ice Isd). The structure of this ice is in the trigonal crystal system, rather than the cubic or hexagonal systems, and is expected to produce crystals with aspect ratios consistent with lidar observations.

  5. Crystal structure of tris-(hydroxyl-ammonium) orthophosphate.

    PubMed

    Leinemann, Malte; Jess, Inke; Boeckmann, Jan; Näther, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The crystal structure of the title salt, ([H3NOH](+))3·[PO4](3-), consists of discrete hydroxyl-ammonium cations and ortho-phos-phate anions. The atoms of the cation occupy general positions, whereas the anion is located on a threefold rotation axis that runs through the phospho-rus atom and one of the phosphate O atoms. In the crystal structure, cations and anions are linked by inter-molecular O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network. Altogether, one very strong O-H⋯O, two N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds of medium strength and two weaker bifurcated N-H⋯O inter-actions are observed. PMID:26594525

  6. Crystal structure of the human mitochondrial chaperonin symmetrical football complex.

    PubMed

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Yaniv, Oren; Parnas, Avital; Frolow, Felix; Azem, Abdussalam

    2015-05-12

    Human mitochondria harbor a single type I chaperonin system that is generally thought to function via a unique single-ring intermediate. To date, no crystal structure has been published for any mammalian type I chaperonin complex. In this study, we describe the crystal structure of a football-shaped, double-ring human mitochondrial chaperonin complex at 3.15 Å, which is a novel intermediate, likely representing the complex in an early stage of dissociation. Interestingly, the mitochondrial chaperonin was captured in a state that exhibits subunit asymmetry within the rings and nucleotide symmetry between the rings. Moreover, the chaperonin tetradecamers show a different interring subunit arrangement when compared to GroEL. Our findings suggest that the mitochondrial chaperonins use a mechanism that is distinct from the mechanism of the well-studied Escherichia coli system. PMID:25918392

  7. Crystal structure of the human mitochondrial chaperonin symmetrical football complex

    PubMed Central

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Yaniv, Oren; Parnas, Avital; Frolow, Felix; Azem, Abdussalam

    2015-01-01

    Human mitochondria harbor a single type I chaperonin system that is generally thought to function via a unique single-ring intermediate. To date, no crystal structure has been published for any mammalian type I chaperonin complex. In this study, we describe the crystal structure of a football-shaped, double-ring human mitochondrial chaperonin complex at 3.15 Å, which is a novel intermediate, likely representing the complex in an early stage of dissociation. Interestingly, the mitochondrial chaperonin was captured in a state that exhibits subunit asymmetry within the rings and nucleotide symmetry between the rings. Moreover, the chaperonin tetradecamers show a different interring subunit arrangement when compared to GroEL. Our findings suggest that the mitochondrial chaperonins use a mechanism that is distinct from the mechanism of the well-studied Escherichia coli system. PMID:25918392

  8. Crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Verburg, P. C.; Smillie, L. A.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Haberl, B.; Bradby, J. E.; Williams, J. S.; Huis in ’t Veld, A. J.

    2015-06-04

    Laser-induced subsurface modification of dielectric materials is a well-known technology. Applications include the production of optical components and selective etching. In addition to dielectric materials, the subsurface modification technology can be applied to silicon, by employing near to mid-infrared radiation. An application of subsurface modifications in silicon is laser-induced subsurface separation, which is a method to separate wafers into individual dies. Other applications for which proofs of concept exist are the formation of waveguides and resistivity tuning. However, limited knowledge is available about the crystal structure of subsurface modifications in silicon. In this paper, we investigate the geometry and crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in monocrystalline silicon wafers. Finally, in addition to the generation of lattice defects, we found that transformations to amorphous silicon and Si-iii/Si-xii occur as a result of the laser irradiation.

  9. Crystal structure of tris­(hydroxyl­ammonium) orthophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Leinemann, Malte; Jess, Inke; Boeckmann, Jan; Näther, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title salt, ([H3NOH]+)3·[PO4]3−, consists of discrete hydroxyl­ammonium cations and ortho­phos­phate anions. The atoms of the cation occupy general positions, whereas the anion is located on a threefold rotation axis that runs through the phospho­rus atom and one of the phosphate O atoms. In the crystal structure, cations and anions are linked by inter­molecular O—H⋯O and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network. Altogether, one very strong O—H⋯O, two N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds of medium strength and two weaker bifurcated N—H⋯O inter­actions are observed. PMID:26594525

  10. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  11. Crystal architecture of R(2)SnS(5) (R = Pr, Nd, Gd and Tb): crystal structure relationships in chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Daszkiewicz, Marek; Gulay, Lubomir D; Shemet, Vasylyna Ya

    2008-04-01

    The crystal structure of the R(2)SnS(5) (R = Pr, Nd, Gd and Tb) compounds has been investigated using X-ray single-crystal diffraction. Crystal architecture and structural relationships among U(3)S(5), Y(2)HfS(5), R(2)SnS(5) compounds are discussed and a structural origin is determined. It is shown that the complex architecture of the crystal structure of Eu(5)Sn(3)S(12) is a result of interweaving of the simple crystal structures. The location of the copper ions in the non-stoichiometric compound Y(2)Cu(0.20)Sn(0.95)S(5) is proposed on the basis of comparative analysis of the R-S interatomic distances in the R(2)SnS(5) series of compounds. PMID:18369288

  12. Crystal Structures of Cisplatin Bound to a Human Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-08-16

    Copper trafficking proteins, including the chaperone Atox1 and the P{sub 1B}-type ATPase ATP7B, have been implicated in cellular resistance to the anticancer drug cisplatin. We have determined two crystal structures of cisplatin-Atox1 adducts that reveal platinum coordination by the conserved CXXC copper-binding motif. Direct interaction of cisplatin with this functionally relevant site has significant implications for understanding the molecular basis for resistance mediated by copper transport pathways.

  13. Crystal Structure of the Human Laminin Receptor Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson,K.; Wu, J.; Hubbard, S.; Meruelo, D.

    2008-01-01

    The human laminin receptor (LamR) interacts with many ligands, including laminin, prions, Sindbis virus, and the polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and has been implicated in a number of diseases. LamR is overexpressed on tumor cells, and targeting LamR elicits anti-cancer effects. Here, we report the crystal structure of human LamR, which provides insights into its function and should facilitate the design of novel therapeutics targeting LamR.

  14. Structural considerations on acridine/acridinium derivatives: Synthesis, crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wera, Michał; Storoniak, Piotr; Serdiuk, Illia E.; Zadykowicz, Beata

    2016-02-01

    This article describes a detailed study of the molecular packing and intermolecular interactions in crystals of four derivatives of acridine, i.e. 9-methyl-, 9-ethyl, 9-bromomethyl- and 9-piperidineacridine (1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively) and three 10-methylacridinium salts containing the trifluoromethanesulphonate anion and 9-vinyl-, 9-bromomethyl, and 9-phenyl-10-methylacridinium cations (5, 6 and 7, respectively). The crystal structures of all of the compounds are stabilized by long-range electrostatic interactions, as well as by a network of short-range C-HṡṡṡO (in hydrates and salts 3 and 5-7, respectively), C-Hṡṡṡπ, π-π, C-Fṡṡṡπ and S-Oṡṡṡπ (in salts 5-7) interactions. Hirshfeld surface analysis shows that various intermolecular contacts play an important role in the crystal packing, graphically exhibiting the differences in spatial arrangements of the acridine/acridinium derivatives under scrutiny here. Additionally, computational methods have been used to compare the intermolecular interactions in the crystal structures of the investigated compounds. Computations have confirmed the great contribution of dispersive interactions for crystal lattice stability in the case of 9-substituted acridine and electrostatic interactions for the crystal lattice stability in the case of 9-substituted 10-methylacridinium trifluoromethanesulphonates. The value of crystal lattice energy and the electrostatic contribution in the crystal lattice energy of monohydrated acridine derivatives have confirmed that these compounds have behave as acridinium derivatives.

  15. Crystal Structures of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, William I.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rasmussen, Søren G. F.; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Yao, Xiao-Jie; Day, Peter W.; Parnot, Charles; Fung, Juan J.; Ratnala, Venkata R. P.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A.; Kuhn, Peter; Stevens, Raymond C.; Edwards, Patricia C.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Burghammer, Manfred; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Fischetti, Robert F.; Masood, Asna; Rohrer, Daniel K.

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome, and are responsible for the majority of signal transduction events involving hormones and neuro-transmitters across the cell membrane. GPCRs that bind to diffusible ligands have low natural abundance, are relatively unstable in detergents, and display basal G protein activation even in the absence of ligands. To overcome these problems two approaches were taken to obtain crystal structures of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), a well-characterized GPCR that binds cate-cholamine hormones. The receptor was bound to the partial inverse agonist carazolol and co-crystallized with a Fab made to a three-dimensional epitope formed by the third intracellular loop (ICL3), or by replacement of ICL3 with T4 lysozyme. Small crystals were obtained in lipid bicelles (β2AR-Fab) or lipidic cubic phase (β2AR-T4 lysozyme), and diffraction data were obtained using microfocus technology. The structures provide insights into the basal activity of the receptor, the structural features that enable binding of diffusible ligands, and the coupling between ligand binding and G-protein activation.

  16. Structural contribution to the roughness of supersmooth crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Butashin, A. V.; Muslimov, A. E. Kanevsky, V. M.; Deryabin, A. N.; Pavlov, V. A.; Asadchikov, V. E.

    2013-05-15

    Technological advances in processing crystals (Si, sapphire {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC, GaN, LiNbO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, etc.) of substrate materials and X-ray optics elements make it possible to obtain supersmooth surfaces with a periodicity characteristic of the crystal structure. These periodic structures are formed by atomically smooth terraces and steps of nano- and subnanometer sizes, respectively. A model surface with such nanostructures is proposed, and the relations between its roughness parameters and the height of atomic steps are determined. The roughness parameters calculated from these relations almost coincide with the experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) data obtained from 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 and 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 {mu}m areas on the surface of sapphire plates with steps. The minimum roughness parameters for vicinal crystal surfaces, which are due to the structural contribution, are calculated based on the approach proposed. A comparative analysis of the relief and roughness parameters of sapphire plate surfaces with different degrees of polishing is performed. A size effect is established: the relief height distribution changes from stochastic to regular with a decrease in the surface roughness.

  17. Nanoconfinement-Induced Structures in Chiral Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Melle, Michael; Theile, Madlona; Hall, Carol K.; Schoen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations in a specialized isothermal-isobaric and in the grand canonical ensemble to study structure formation in chiral liquid crystals as a function of molecular chirality. Our model potential consists of a simple Lennard-Jones potential, where the attractive contribution has been modified to represent the orientation dependence of the interaction between a pair of chiral liquid-crystal molecules. The liquid crystal is confined between a pair of planar and atomically smooth substrates onto which molecules are anchored in a hybrid fashion. Hybrid anchoring allows for the formation of helical structures in the direction perpendicular to the substrate plane without exposing the helix to spurious strains. At low chirality, we observe a cholesteric phase, which is transformed into a blue phase at higher chirality. More specifically, by studying the unit cell and the spatial arrangement of disclination lines, this blue phase can be established as blue phase II. If the distance between the confining substrates and molecular chirality are chosen properly, we see a third structure, which may be thought of as a hybrid, exhibiting mixed features of a cholesteric and a blue phase. PMID:23989605

  18. Accurate Structure Prediction and Conformational Analysis of Cyclic Peptides with Residue-Specific Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hao; Jiang, Fan; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-05-19

    Cyclic peptides (CPs) are promising candidates for drugs, chemical biology tools, and self-assembling nanomaterials. However, the development of reliable and accurate computational methods for their structure prediction has been challenging. Here, 20 all-trans CPs of 5-12 residues selected from Cambridge Structure Database have been simulated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics with four different force fields. Our recently developed residue-specific force fields RSFF1 and RSFF2 can correctly identify the crystal-like conformations of more than half CPs as the most populated conformation. The RSFF2 performs the best, which consistently predicts the crystal structures of 17 out of 20 CPs with rmsd < 1.1 Å. We also compared the backbone (ϕ, ψ) sampling of residues in CPs with those in short linear peptides and in globular proteins. In general, unlike linear peptides, CPs have local conformational free energies and entropies quite similar to globular proteins. PMID:27128113

  19. Ab initio molecular crystal structures, spectra, and phase diagrams.

    PubMed

    Hirata, So; Gilliard, Kandis; He, Xiao; Li, Jinjin; Sode, Olaseni

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Molecular crystals are chemists' solids in the sense that their structures and properties can be understood in terms of those of the constituent molecules merely perturbed by a crystalline environment. They form a large and important class of solids including ices of atmospheric species, drugs, explosives, and even some organic optoelectronic materials and supramolecular assemblies. Recently, surprisingly simple yet extremely efficient, versatile, easily implemented, and systematically accurate electronic structure methods for molecular crystals have been developed. The methods, collectively referred to as the embedded-fragment scheme, divide a crystal into monomers and overlapping dimers and apply modern molecular electronic structure methods and software to these fragments of the crystal that are embedded in a self-consistently determined crystalline electrostatic field. They enable facile applications of accurate but otherwise prohibitively expensive ab initio molecular orbital theories such as Møller-Plesset perturbation and coupled-cluster theories to a broad range of properties of solids such as internal energies, enthalpies, structures, equation of state, phonon dispersion curves and density of states, infrared and Raman spectra (including band intensities and sometimes anharmonic effects), inelastic neutron scattering spectra, heat capacities, Gibbs energies, and phase diagrams, while accounting for many-body electrostatic (namely, induction or polarization) effects as well as two-body exchange and dispersion interactions from first principles. They can fundamentally alter the role of computing in the studies of molecular crystals in the same way ab initio molecular orbital theories have transformed research practices in gas-phase physical chemistry and synthetic chemistry in the last half century. In this Account, after a brief summary of formalisms and algorithms, we discuss applications of these methods performed in our group as compelling

  20. The crystal structure of aluminum doped {beta}-rhombohedral boron

    SciTech Connect

    Bykova, Elena; Materialphysik und Technologie, Lehrstuhl fuer Kristallographie, Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bayreuth, Universitaetsstrasse 30, D-95440 Bayreuth ; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; Materialphysik und Technologie, Lehrstuhl fuer Kristallographie, Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bayreuth, Universitaetsstrasse 30, D-95440 Bayreuth ; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2012-10-15

    A crystal structure of aluminum doped {beta}-rhombohedral boron was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 80 K. The crystals were synthesized using high-pressure high temperature technique at 3 GPa and 2100 K. The structure is based on three-dimensional framework made of B{sub 12} icosahedra with voids occupied by the B{sub 28}-B-B{sub 28} units, it has the R-3m space group with a=10.9014(3), c=23.7225(7) A lattice dimensions in hexagonal setting. Aluminum atoms are located in A1 and D special positions of the {beta}-B structure with occupancies of 82.7(6)% and 11.3(4)%, respectively. Additional boron atoms are located near the D-site. Their possible distribution is discussed. Finally we have found two appropriate structural models whose refinement suggests two possible chemical compositions, AlB{sub 44.8(5)} and AlB{sub 37.8(5)}, which are in a good agreement with the chemical analysis data obtained from EDX. The crystal structure of AlB{sub 44.8(5)} is described in detail. - Graphical abstract: The atomic distribution near the B(15) atom (non-labeled atom in the center of the picture) shown along the c axis. Anisotropic displacement ellipses for Al(2) (D-site) and B(15) are shown with 50 % probability level. The mirror plane with Miller indices (1 1 0) and related to it (-1 2 0) and (-2 1 0) generated by the 3-fold rotation-inversion axis parallel to the c axis splits the position of B(16) over two sites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure of the AlB{sub 44.8(5)} has been refined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminum atoms partially fill certain types of voids (the A1- and D-sites). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have got two possible models of atomic distribution near the D-site.

  1. Fabrication and optical transmission characteristics of polymers woodpile photonic crystal structures with different crystal planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ling-Jing; Dong, Xian-Zi; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    The photonic band gap effect which originates from the translational invariance of the periodic lattice of dielectrics has been widely applied in the technical applications of microwave, telecommunication and visible wavelengths. Among the various examples, polymers based three dimensional (3D) photonic crystals (PhCs) have attracted considerable interest because they can be easily fabricated by femo-second (fs) ultrafast laser direct writing (DLW) method. However, it is difficult to realize complete band gap in polymers PhCs due to the low index contrast between polymers and air. Here, we report the design and experimental realization of light's nonreciprocal propagation in woodpile PhCs fabricated with DLW method. Firstly, we fabricated several polymers woodpile PhCs on glass substrate with different crystal planes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements are in agreement with the theoretical predictions, which proves the validity and the accuracy of our DLW method. Further measurements of the transmission spectra with respect to the incident angle reveal that the surface crystal planes and incident wave vectors play important roles in the optical response. Furthermore, we designed and fabricated a 30° PhC wedge. And we find nonreciprocal transmission effect between the forward and backward waves, resulting from the nonsymmetrical refraction of the light in different planes. Our results may find potential applications in future 3D photonic integrated circuits and pave the way for the fabrication of other photonic and optical devices with DLW method.

  2. Crystal structure of a COG4313 outer membrane channel

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Bert van den; Bhamidimarri, Satya Prathyusha; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    COG4313 proteins form a large and widespread family of outer membrane channels and have been implicated in the uptake of a variety of hydrophobic molecules. Structure-function studies of this protein family have so far been hampered by a lack of structural information. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of Pput2725 from the biodegrader Pseudomonas putida F1, a COG4313 channel of unknown function, using data to 2.3 Å resolution. The structure shows a 12-stranded barrel with an N-terminal segment preceding the first β-strand occluding the lumen of the barrel. Single channel electrophysiology and liposome swelling experiments suggest that while the narrow channel visible in the crystal structure does allow passage of ions and certain small molecules in vitro, Pput2725 is unlikely to function as a channel for hydrophilic molecules. Instead, the presence of bound detergent molecules inside the barrel suggests that Pput2725 mediates uptake of hydrophobic molecules. Sequence alignments and the locations of highly conserved residues suggest the presence of a dynamic lateral opening through which hydrophobic molecules might gain entry into the cell. Our results provide the basis for structure-function studies of COG4313 family members with known function, such as the SphA sphingosine uptake channel of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:26149193

  3. Crystal structures and ligand binding of PurM proteins from Thermus thermophilus and Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Kanagawa, Mayumi; Baba, Seiki; Watanabe, Yuzo; Nakagawa, Noriko; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sampei, Gen-Ichi; Kawai, Gota

    2016-03-01

    Crystal structures of 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) synthetase, also known as PurM, from Thermus thermophilus (Tt) and Geobacillus kaustophilus (Gk) were determined. For TtPurM, the maximum resolution was 2.2 Å and the space group was P21212 with four dimers in an asymmetric unit. For GkPurM, the maximum resolution was 2.2 Å and the space group was P21212 with one monomer in asymmetric unit. The biological unit is dimer for both TtPurM and GkPurM and the dimer structures were similar to previously determined structures of PurM in general. For TtPurM, ∼50 residues at the amino terminal were disordered in the crystal structure whereas, for GkPurM, the corresponding region covered the ATP-binding site forming an α helix in part, suggesting that the N-terminal region of PurM changes its conformation upon binding of ligands. FGAM binding site was predicted by the docking simulation followed by the MD simulation based on the SO4 (2-) binding site found in the crystal structure of TtPurM. PMID:26515187

  4. Bio-Inspired Approaches to Crystals with Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldrum, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    Advances in technology demand an ever-increasing degree of control over material structure, properties and function. As the properties of monolithic materials are necessary limited, one route to extending them is to create a composite by combining contrasting materials. The potential of this approach is beautifully illustrated by the formation of biominerals where organic macromolecules are combined with brittle minerals such as calcite to create crystals with considerable fracture toughness. This talk will discuss how bio-inspired approaches can be used to generate single crystals with composite crystals through a simple one-pot method. By precipitating calcite crystals in the presence of ``occlusion species'' ranging from latex particles, to organic and inorganic nanoparticles and finally small molecules we demonstrate that high amounts of foreign species can be incorporated through control over the additive surface chemistry, and that this can lead to an enhancement of the mechanical properties of the calcite. Occlusion of 20 nm anionic diblock copolymer micelles was achieved at levels of over 13 wt%, and the properties of the resuktant composite calcite crystals were measured using a range of techniques including IR spectroscopy, high resolution powder XRD and high resolution TEM. Incorporation of these macromolecules leads to crystals with structures and mechanical properties similar to those of biominerals. With sizes in the range of some intracrystalline proteins, the micelles act as ``pseudo-proteins'', thereby providing an excellent model system for investigation of the mechanism of macromolecule insertion within biominerals. Extension of these studies to the incorporation of small molecules (amino acids) again demonstrated high levels of incorporation without any change in the crystal morphology. Further, occlusion of these small molecules within the calcite lattice again resulted in a significant increase in the hardness of the calcite, a result which

  5. Crystal structure of inactive form of Rab3B

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yang; Jiao, Ronghong; Liu, Yanli; Deng, Lingfu; Qi, Chao

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first structural information of human Rab3B. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To provides a structural basis for the GDP/GTP switch in controlling the activity of Rab3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The charge distribution of Rab3B indicates its unique roles in vesicular trafficking. -- Abstract: Rab proteins are the largest family of ras-related GTPases in eukaryotic cells. They act as directional molecular switches at membrane trafficking, including vesicle budding, cargo sorting, transport, tethering, and fusion. Here, we generated and crystallized the Rab3B:GDP complex. The structure of the complex was solved to 1.9 A resolution and the structural base comparison with other Rab3 members provides a structural basis for the GDP/GTP switch in controlling the activity of small GTPase. The comparison of charge distribution among the members of Rab3 also indicates their different roles in vesicular trafficking.

  6. Crystal structure of a soluble cleaved HIV-1 envelope trimer.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Cupo, Albert; Sok, Devin; Stanfield, Robyn L; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Deller, Marc C; Klasse, Per-Johan; Burton, Dennis R; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-12-20

    HIV-1 entry into CD4(+) target cells is mediated by cleaved envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers that have been challenging to characterize structurally. Here, we describe the crystal structure at 4.7 angstroms of a soluble, cleaved Env trimer that is stabilized and antigenically near-native (termed the BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140 trimer) in complex with a potent broadly neutralizing antibody, PGT122. The structure shows a prefusion state of gp41, the interaction between the component gp120 and gp41 subunits, and how a close association between the gp120 V1/V2/V3 loops stabilizes the trimer apex around the threefold axis. The complete epitope of PGT122 on the trimer involves gp120 V1, V3, and several surrounding glycans. This trimer structure advances our understanding of how Env functions and is presented to the immune system, and provides a blueprint for structure-based vaccine design. PMID:24179159

  7. Conformational Transitions upon Ligand Binding: Holo-Structure Prediction from Apo Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Seeliger, Daniel; de Groot, Bert L.

    2010-01-01

    Biological function of proteins is frequently associated with the formation of complexes with small-molecule ligands. Experimental structure determination of such complexes at atomic resolution, however, can be time-consuming and costly. Computational methods for structure prediction of protein/ligand complexes, particularly docking, are as yet restricted by their limited consideration of receptor flexibility, rendering them not applicable for predicting protein/ligand complexes if large conformational changes of the receptor upon ligand binding are involved. Accurate receptor models in the ligand-bound state (holo structures), however, are a prerequisite for successful structure-based drug design. Hence, if only an unbound (apo) structure is available distinct from the ligand-bound conformation, structure-based drug design is severely limited. We present a method to predict the structure of protein/ligand complexes based solely on the apo structure, the ligand and the radius of gyration of the holo structure. The method is applied to ten cases in which proteins undergo structural rearrangements of up to 7.1 Å backbone RMSD upon ligand binding. In all cases, receptor models within 1.6 Å backbone RMSD to the target were predicted and close-to-native ligand binding poses were obtained for 8 of 10 cases in the top-ranked complex models. A protocol is presented that is expected to enable structure modeling of protein/ligand complexes and structure-based drug design for cases where crystal structures of ligand-bound conformations are not available. PMID:20066034

  8. Molecular-Level Understanding of Structural Changes of Organic Crystals Induced by Macroscopic Mechanical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Seki, Tomohiro; Ito, Hajime

    2016-03-18

    Structural changes to molecular crystals upon mechanical stimulation have attracted attention for sensing, recording, and microactuation. Comprehensive structure information is required to understand relationships between the mechanical force applied, the crystal structure, and the bulk property changes in order to develop general design concepts for mechanoresponsive compounds. Unfortunately, mechanical stimulation of organic crystals typically deteriorates their integrity, preventing detailed structure analyses by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. However, in the past three years, several interesting studies have been reported in which molecular crystals retain their integrity even after a mechanically induced crystalline structure change. These materials have allowed us to investigate how macroscopic mechanical forces affect the microscopic structures of molecular crystals by single-crystal XRD analyses. This Minireview summarizes current knowledge of mechanically induced structure changes in molecular crystals, which will facilitate research in this field. PMID:26748640

  9. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  10. Crystal structure of new AsS{sub 2} compound

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotina, N. B.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Dyuzheva, T. I.; Lityagina, L. M.; Kulikova, L. F.; Nikolaev, N. A.; Verin, I. A.

    2013-01-15

    AsS{sub 2} single crystals have been obtained for the first time from an As{sub 2}S{sub 3} melt at pressures above 6 GPa and temperatures above 800 K in the As{sub 2}S{sub 3} {yields} AsS + AsS{sub 2} reaction. The monoclinic structure of the new high-pressure phase is solved by X-ray diffraction analysis and compared to the structure of high-pressure AsS phase, which was studied previously.

  11. Holographic liquid crystal polarization grating with Fabry-Perot structure.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Moritsugu; Yamaguchi, Haruki; Noda, Kohei; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    A holographic liquid crystal polarization grating with a Fabry-Perot structure was developed. Because of its resonant structure, the device offers high levels of control of the diffraction properties of incident-polarized light beams, depending on the resonance conditions. The diffracted light beams are emitted in both the reflection and transmission directions, and the device thus works as a multibranch polarization grating with double optical paths, unlike a conventional polarization grating. These device features were experimentally demonstrated and were also explained theoretically. PMID:26977643

  12. Predictive crystal-chemical relations in Ti-silicates based on the TS block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, E. V.

    2010-10-01

    III, Ti = 3 apfu, Ti occurs in the O and H sheets, and (Si2O7) groups link to the Ti octahedron of the O sheet (linkage 1). In Group IV, Ti = 4 apfu (the maximum possible content of Ti in the TS block), Ti occurs in the O and H sheets, and (Si2O7) groups link to two Ti octahedra of the O sheet adjacent along t 1 (linkage 3). The stability of the TS block is due to the ability of Ti (Nb) to have an extremely wide range in Ti (Nb)-anion bond lengths, 1.68-2.30 Å, which allows the chemical composition of the TS block to vary widely. In crystal structures so far known, only one type of TS block occurs in a structure. The TS block propagates close-packing of cations onto the I block. The general structural principles and the relation between structure topology and chemical composition are described for the TS-block minerals. These principles allow prediction of structural arrangements and possible chemical compositions, and testing whether or not all aspects of the structure and chemical formula of a mineral are correct. Here, I show how these principles work, and review recent results that show the effectiveness of these principles as a predictive technique.

  13. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  14. Can the low-resolution structures of photointermediates of bacteriorhodopsin explain their crystal structures?

    PubMed

    Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio

    2005-03-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism of light-driven proton pumps, the structures of the photointermediates of bacteriorhodopsin have been intensively investigated. Low-resolution diffraction techniques have demonstrated substantial conformational changes at the helix level in the M and N intermediates, between which there are noticeable differences. The intermediate structures at atomic resolution have also been solved by x-ray crystallography. Although the crystal structures have demonstrated local structural changes, such as hydrogen bond network rearrangements including water molecules, the large conformational changes at the helix level are not necessarily observed. Furthermore, the two reported crystal structures of an intermediate accumulated using a common method were distinct. To reconcile these apparent discrepancies, low-resolution projection maps were calculated from the crystal structures and compared to the low-resolution intermediate structures obtained using native membranes. The crystal structures can be categorized into three groups, which qualitatively correspond to the low-resolution structures of the M1-type, M2-type, and N-type determined in the native membrane. Based on these results, we conclude that at least three types of intermediate structures play a role during the photocycle. PMID:15596495

  15. The Structure, Thermodynamics and Solubility of Organic Crystals from Simulation with a Polarizable Force Field

    PubMed Central

    Schnieders, Michael J.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Shi, Yue; Chattree, Gaurav; Zheng, Lianqing; Yang, Wei; Ren, Pengyu

    2012-01-01

    An important unsolved problem in materials science is prediction of the thermodynamic stability of organic crystals and their solubility from first principles. Solubility can be defined as the saturating concentration of a molecule within a liquid solvent, where the physical picture is of solvated molecules in equilibrium with their solid phase. Despite the importance of solubility in determining the oral bioavailability of pharmaceuticals, prediction tools are currently limited to quantitative structure–property relationships that are fit to experimental solubility measurements. For the first time, we describe a consistent procedure for the prediction of the structure, thermodynamic stability and solubility of organic crystals from molecular dynamics simulations using the polarizable multipole AMOEBA force field. Our approach is based on a thermodynamic cycle that decomposes standard state solubility into the sum of solid-vapor sublimation and vapor-liquid solvation free energies ΔGsolubilityo=ΔGsubo+ΔGsolvo, which are computed via the orthogonal space random walk (OSRW) sampling strategy. Application to the n-alkylamides series from aeetamide through octanamide was selected due to the dependence of their solubility on both amide hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect, which are each fundamental to protein structure and solubility. On average, the calculated absolute standard state solubility free energies are accurate to within 1.1 kcal/mol. The experimental trend of decreasing solubility as a function of n-alkylamide chain length is recapitulated by the increasing stability of the crystalline state and to a lesser degree by decreasing favorability of solvation (i.e. the hydrophobic effect). Our results suggest that coupling the polarizable AMOEBA force field with an orthogonal space based free energy algorithm, as implemented in the program Force Field X, is a consistent procedure for predicting the structure, thermodynamic stability and solubility of

  16. The crystal structure of ^7Li2ND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Masami; Sorby, Magnus H.; Hino, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Hauback, Bjorn C.; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2008-03-01

    Recently much attention has been given to reversible hydrogen storage materials possessing high gravimetric capacity. Lithium amide/imide systems are promising candidates. Chen et al.[1] found that a mixture of lithium amide and lithium hydride can reversibly store hydrogen up to 6.5 mass% forming lithium imide (Li2NH). Among them, the crystal structure of Li2NH is still controversial. Balogh et al.[2] have reported a cubic structure model. However, this model differs significantly from theoretical structure models. In this work, the crystal structure of the isotopically substituted ^7Li2ND has been investigated by powder neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments. In our data some peaks, which should be a single peak for cubic symmetry, were obviously split indicating a lower symmetry than cubic for lithium imide. The structure of ^7Li2ND will be described. [1] P. Chen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 10967. [2] M.P. Balogh et al., J. Alloys Compd. 420 (2006) 326.

  17. From protein structure to function via single crystal optical spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Luca; Bruno, Stefano; Bettati, Stefano; Storici, Paola; Mozzarelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The more than 100,000 protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography provide a wealth of information for the characterization of biological processes at the molecular level. However, several crystallographic “artifacts,” including conformational selection, crystallization conditions and radiation damages, may affect the quality and the interpretation of the electron density maps, thus limiting the relevance of structure determinations. Moreover, for most of these structures, no functional data have been obtained in the crystalline state, thus posing serious questions on their validity in infereing protein mechanisms. In order to solve these issues, spectroscopic methods have been applied for the determination of equilibrium and kinetic properties of proteins in the crystalline state. These methods are UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, IR, EPR, Raman, and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Some of these approaches have been implemented with on-line instruments at X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Here, we provide an overview of investigations predominantly carried out in our laboratory by single crystal polarized absorption UV-vis microspectrophotometry, the most applied technique for the functional characterization of proteins in the crystalline state. Studies on hemoglobins, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate dependent enzymes and green fluorescent protein in the crystalline state have addressed key biological issues, leading to either straightforward structure-function correlations or limitations to structure-based mechanisms. PMID:25988179

  18. Manganese oxide minerals: Crystal structures and economic and environmental significance

    PubMed Central

    Post, Jeffrey E.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese oxide minerals have been used for thousands of years—by the ancients for pigments and to clarify glass, and today as ores of Mn metal, catalysts, and battery material. More than 30 Mn oxide minerals occur in a wide variety of geological settings. They are major components of Mn nodules that pave huge areas of the ocean floor and bottoms of many fresh-water lakes. Mn oxide minerals are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and participate in a variety of chemical reactions that affect groundwater and bulk soil composition. Their typical occurrence as fine-grained mixtures makes it difficult to study their atomic structures and crystal chemistries. In recent years, however, investigations using transmission electron microscopy and powder x-ray and neutron diffraction methods have provided important new insights into the structures and properties of these materials. The crystal structures for todorokite and birnessite, two of the more common Mn oxide minerals in terrestrial deposits and ocean nodules, were determined by using powder x-ray diffraction data and the Rietveld refinement method. Because of the large tunnels in todorokite and related structures there is considerable interest in the use of these materials and synthetic analogues as catalysts and cation exchange agents. Birnessite-group minerals have layer structures and readily undergo oxidation reduction and cation-exchange reactions and play a major role in controlling groundwater chemistry. PMID:10097056

  19. Synthesis, crystal growth, structural, thermal, optical and mechanical properties of solution grown 4-methylpyridinium 4-hydroxybenzoate single crystal.

    PubMed

    Sudhahar, S; Krishna Kumar, M; Sornamurthy, B M; Mohan Kumar, R

    2014-01-24

    Organic nonlinear optical material, 4-methylpyridinium 4-hydroxybenzoate (4MPHB) was synthesized and single crystal was grown by slow evaporation solution growth method. Single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction analyses confirm the structure and crystalline perfection of 4MPHB crystal. Infrared, Raman and NMR spectroscopy techniques were used to elucidate the functional groups present in the compound. TG-DTA analysis was carried out in nitrogen atmosphere to study the decomposition stages, endothermic and exothermic reactions. UV-visible and Photoluminescence spectra were recorded for the grown crystal to estimate the transmittance and band gap energy respectively. Linear refractive index, birefringence, and SHG efficiency of the grown crystal were studied. Laser induced surface damage threshold and mechanical properties of grown crystal were studied to assess the suitability of the grown crystals for device applications. PMID:24184578

  20. Crystal structure and crystal chemistry of melanovanadite, a natural vanadium bronze.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konnert, J.A.; Evans, H.T., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The crystal structure of melanovanadite from Minas Ragra, Peru, has been determined in space group P1. The triclinic unit cell (non-standard) has a 6.360(2), b 18.090(9), c 6.276(2) A, alpha 110.18(4)o, beta 101.62(3)o, gamma 82.86(4)o. A subcell with b' = b/2 was found by crystal-structure analysis to contain CaV4O10.5H2O. The subcell has a layer structure in which the vanadate sheet consists of corner-shared tetrahedral VO4 and double square-pyramidal V2O8 groups, similar to that previously found in synthetic CsV2O5. Refinement of the full structure (R = 0.056) showed that the Ca atom, which half-occupies a general position in the subcell, is 90% ordered at one of these sites in the whole unit cell. Bond length-bond strength estimates indicate that the tetrahedra contain V5+, and the square pyramids, V4+.-J.A.Z.

  1. Crystal structure of bile salt hydrolase from Lactobacillus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuzhou; Guo, Fangfang; Hu, Xiao Jian; Lin, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Bile salt hydrolase (BSH) is a gut-bacterial enzyme that negatively influences host fat digestion and energy harvesting. The BSH enzyme activity functions as a gateway reaction in the small intestine by the deconjugation of glycine-conjugated or taurine-conjugated bile acids. Extensive gut-microbiota studies have suggested that BSH is a key mechanistic microbiome target for the development of novel non-antibiotic food additives to improve animal feed production and for the design of new measures to control obesity in humans. However, research on BSH is still in its infancy, particularly in terms of the structural basis of BSH function, which has hampered the development of BSH-based strategies for improving human and animal health. As an initial step towards the structure-function analysis of BSH, C-terminally His-tagged BSH from Lactobacillus salivarius NRRL B-30514 was crystallized in this study. The 1.90 Å resolution crystal structure of L. salivarius BSH was determined by molecular replacement using the structure of Clostridium perfringens BSH as a starting model. It revealed this BSH to be a member of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily. Crystals of apo BSH belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 90.79, b = 87.35, c = 86.76 Å (PDB entry 5hke). Two BSH molecules packed perfectly as a dimer in one asymmetric unit. Comparative structural analysis of L. salivarius BSH also identified potential residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity. PMID:27139829

  2. Crystal structures of intermediates in the nitroalkane oxidase reaction.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Annie; Bozinovski, Dragana M; Valley, Michael P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F; Orville, Allen M

    2009-04-21

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 A resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes [Valley, M. P., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2003) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 8738-8739]. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped [Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066]. The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle. PMID:19265437

  3. Crystal Structures of Intermediates in the Nitroalkane Oxidase Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, A.; Bozinovski, D; Valley, M; Fitzpatrick, P; Orville, A

    2009-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped (Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066). The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle.

  4. Identifying duplicate crystal structures: XTALCOMP, an open-source solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonie, David C.; Zurek, Eva

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of XTALCOMP, an efficient, reliable, and open-source library that tests if two crystal descriptions describe the same underlying structure. The algorithm has been tested and found to correctly identify duplicate structures in spite of the "real-world" difficulties that arise from working with numeric crystal representations: degenerate unit cell lattices, numerical noise, periodic boundaries, and the lack of a canonical coordinate origin. The library is portable, open, and not dependent on any external packages. A web interface to the algorithm is publicly accessible at http://xtalopt.openmolecules.net/xtalcomp/xtalcomp.html. Program summaryProgram title: XtalComp Catalogue identifier: AEKV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: "New" (3-clause) BSD [1] No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3148 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 21 860 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: No restrictions Operating system: All operating systems with a compliant C++ compiler. Classification: 7.8 Nature of problem: Computationally identifying duplicate crystal structures taken from the output of modern solid state calculations is a non-trivial exercise for many reasons. The translation vectors in the description are not unique — they may be transformed into linear combinations of themselves and continue to describe the same extended structure. The coordinates and cell parameters contain numerical noise. The periodic boundary conditions at the unit cell faces, edges, and corners can cause very small displacements of atomic coordinates to result in very different representations. The positions of all atoms may be uniformly translated by an arbitrary vector without modifying the underlying structure. Additionally, certain

  5. Crystal structure of the Fe-member of usovite.

    PubMed

    Weil, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Crystals of the title compound, with the idealized composition Ba2CaFeAl2F14, dibarium calcium iron(II) dialuminium tetra-deca-fluoride, were obtained serendipitously by reacting a mixture of the binary fluorides BaF2, CaF2 and AlF3 in a leaky steel reactor. The compound crystallizes in the usovite structure type (Ba2CaMgAl2F14), with Fe(2+) cations replacing the Mg(2+) cations. The principal building units are distorted [CaF8] square-anti-prisms (point group symmetry 2), [FeF6] octa-hedra (point group symmetry -1) and [AlF6] octa-hedra that are condensed into undulating (2) ∞[CaFeAl2F14](4-) layers parallel (100). The Ba(2+) cations separate the layers and exhibit a coordination number of 12. Two crystal structure models with a different treatment of the disordered Fe site [mixed Fe/Ca occupation, model (I), versus underoccupation of Fe, model (II)], are discussed, leading to different refined formulae Ba2Ca1.310 (15)Fe0.690 (15)Al2F14 [model (I)] and Ba2CaFe0.90 (1)Al2F14 [model (II)]. PMID:26090139

  6. N-methylcodeinium iodide—Crystal structure and spectroscopic elucidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, R. W.; Bakalska, B. R.; Kolev, T.; Vassilev, D.; Mayer-Figge, H.; Spiteller, M.; Sheldrick, W. S.; Koleva, B. B.

    2009-07-01

    The correlation between the structure and the spectroscopic properties of N-methylcodeinium iodide ( 1) has been studied, using the methods of single crystal X-ray diffraction, IR-LD spectroscopy of oriented samples as a suspension in nematic liquid crystals, UV-vis spectroscopy and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. HPLC tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC ESI MS/MS) and thermal methods were also employed. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed with a view to obtaining the electronic structure and vibrational properties of the title compound. Compound ( 1) crystallizes in the space group P2 12 12 1 and its cations and anions are joined by moderate intermolecular OH…I - interaction of length 3.442 Å. The codeine molecule exhibits the classical T-shape for opiates. A dihedral angle value of 86.4(5)° between the A/B/C and D/E planes is obtained. Rings A and B are effectively coplanar with an interplanar angle of 3.6(3)°.

  7. Crystal structure of the Fe-member of usovite

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Crystals of the title compound, with the idealized composition Ba2CaFeAl2F14, dibarium calcium iron(II) dialuminium tetra­deca­fluoride, were obtained serendipitously by reacting a mixture of the binary fluorides BaF2, CaF2 and AlF3 in a leaky steel reactor. The compound crystallizes in the usovite structure type (Ba2CaMgAl2F14), with Fe2+ cations replacing the Mg2+ cations. The principal building units are distorted [CaF8] square-anti­prisms (point group symmetry 2), [FeF6] octa­hedra (point group symmetry -1) and [AlF6] octa­hedra that are condensed into undulating 2 ∞[CaFeAl2F14]4− layers parallel (100). The Ba2+ cations separate the layers and exhibit a coordination number of 12. Two crystal structure models with a different treatment of the disordered Fe site [mixed Fe/Ca occupation, model (I), versus underoccupation of Fe, model (II)], are discussed, leading to different refined formulae Ba2Ca1.310 (15)Fe0.690 (15)Al2F14 [model (I)] and Ba2CaFe0.90 (1)Al2F14 [model (II)]. PMID:26090139

  8. Statistical energy analysis response prediction methods for structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an effort to document methods for accomplishing response predictions for commonly encountered aerospace structural configurations is presented. Application of these methods to specified aerospace structure to provide sample analyses is included. An applications manual, with the structural analyses appended as example problems is given. Comparisons of the response predictions with measured data are provided for three of the example problems.

  9. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes. PMID:24250115

  10. Crystal structures of three (trichloromethyl)(carbamoyl)disulfanes

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Barbara L.; Young Jr, Victor G.; Barany, George

    2015-01-01

    The present paper reports crystallographic studies on three related compounds that were of inter­est as precursors for synthetic and mechanistic work in organosulfur chemistry, as well as to model nitro­gen-protecting groups: (N-methyl­carbamo­yl)(tri­chloro­meth­yl)disulfane, C3H4Cl3NOS2, (1), (N-benzyl­carbamo­yl)(tri­chloro­meth­yl)disulfane, C9H8Cl3NOS2, (2), and (N-methyl-N-phenyl­carbamo­yl)(tri­chloro­meth­yl)disulfane, C9H8Cl3NOS2, (3). Their mol­ecular structures, with similar bond lengths and angles for the CCl3SS(C=O)N moieties, are confirmed. Compounds (1) and (3) both crystallized with two independent mol­ecules in the asymmetric unit. Classical hydrogen bonding, as well as chlorine-dense regions, are evident in the crystal packing for (1) and (2). In the crystal of (1), mol­ecules are linked via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds forming chains along [110], which are linked by short Cl⋯Cl and S⋯O contacts forming sheets parallel to (001). In the crystal of (2), mol­ecules are linked via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds forming chains along [001], which in turn are linked by pairs of short O⋯Cl contacts forming ribbons along the c-axis direction. In the crystal of (3), there are no classical hydrogen bonds present and the chlorine-dense regions observed in (1) and (2) are lacking. PMID:26594398

  11. Structural and excited-state properties of oligoacene crystals from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel, Tonatiuh; Berland, Kristian; Sharifzadeh, Sahar; Brown-Altvater, Florian; Lee, Kyuho; Hyldgaard, Per; Kronik, Leeor; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    2016-03-01

    Molecular crystals are a prototypical class of van der Waals (vdW) bound organic materials with excited-state properties relevant for optoelectronics applications. Predicting the structure and excited-state properties of molecular crystals presents a challenge for electronic structure theory, as standard approximations to density functional theory (DFT) do not capture long-range vdW dispersion interactions and do not yield excited-state properties. In this work, we use a combination of DFT including vdW forces, using both nonlocal correlation functionals and pairwise correction methods, together with many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) to study the geometry and excited states, respectively, of the entire series of oligoacene crystals, from benzene to hexacene. We find that vdW methods can predict lattice constants within 1% of the experimental measurements, on par with the previously reported accuracy of pairwise approximations for the same systems. We further find that excitation energies are sensitive to geometry, but if optimized geometries are used MBPT can yield excited-state properties within a few tenths of an eV from experiment. We elucidate trends in MBPT-computed charged and neutral excitation energies across the acene series and discuss the role of common approximations used in MBPT.

  12. Crystal structure searching by free energy surface trekking: application to carbon at 1 TPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Suzuki, N.; Shimizu, K.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed an ab-initio crystal structure searching method, free energy surface trekking (FEST). This method consists of an ascent-run and a descent-run. First, the system is forced to climb up a free energy surface following by the inversion of the restoring forces acting on the simulation cell (ascent-run). Then, the system climbs down the surface toward neighboring local minima according to the release from the constraint of the inversion immediately after the system crosses the ridges of the surface (descent-run). We have applied the FEST simulations to carbon at terapascal pressures and obtained a BC8-like structure with a tetragonal I41 in addition to the earlier-predicted BC8, R8, and simple cubic structures. This structure is mechanically stable in the pressure range of at least 0.5-3.5 TPa, and has a potential to survive as a metastable structure in carbon at terapascal pressures.

  13. The crystal and molecular structure of triethanol-ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracuti, A. J.

    1992-12-01

    The liquid propellant used in the 155-mm regenerative liquid propellant gun is XM46. XM46 is a solution of 60 percent hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN), 20 percent triethanolammonium nitrate (TEAN), and 20 percent water. This material exhibits rather unusual liquid properties that have been attributed to its being a 'molten eutectic' of fused salts rather than a normal aqueous solution of two different nitrate salts. A hydrogen-bonded liquid structure for eutectic LP1946 was proposed previously based on the known structures of neat HAN and water and a best-guess estimate of the TEAN structure. To verify this estimate, the molecular structure of neat TEAN was recently determined. This investigation revealed TEAN has very unusual and interesting bifurcated intermolecular and trifurcated intramolecular hydrogen bonding configurations within the crystal. If these hydrogen bonding configurations are retained in aqueous solution, they could be responsible in some part to the observed unusual liquid properties of liquid propellant XM46.

  14. Crystal Structure of a Fructokinase Homolog from Halothermothrix orenii

    SciTech Connect

    Khiang, C.; Seetharaman, J; Kasprzak, J; Cherlyn, N; Patel, B; Love, C; Bujnicki, J; Sivaraman, J

    2010-01-01

    Fructokinase (FRK; EC 2.7.1.4) catalyzes the phosphorylation of D-fructose to D-fructose 6-phosphate (F6P). This irreversible and near rate-limiting step is a central and regulatory process in plants and bacteria, which channels fructose into a metabolically active state for glycolysis. Towards understanding the mechanism of FRK, here we report the crystal structure of a FRK homolog from a thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii (Hore{_}18220 in sequence databases). The structure of the Hore{_}18220 protein reveals a catalytic domain with a Rossmann-like fold and a b-sheet 'lid' for dimerization. Based on comparison of Hore{_}18220 to structures of related proteins, we propose its mechanism of action, in which the lid serves to regulate access to the substrate binding sites. Close relationship of Hore{_}18220 and plant FRK enzymes allows us to propose a model for the structure and function of FRKs.

  15. Crystal structure of homoserine O-acetyltransferase from Leptospira interrogans

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Mingzhu; Liu Lin; Wang Yanli; Wei Zhiyi; Zhang Ping; Li Yikun; Jiang Xiaohua; Xu Hang Gong Weimin

    2007-11-30

    Homoserine O-acetyltransferase (HTA, EC 2.3.1.31) initiates methionine biosynthesis pathway by catalyzing the transfer of acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to homoserine. This study reports the crystal structure of HTA from Leptospira interrogans determined at 2.2 A resolution using selenomethionyl single-wavelength anomalous diffraction method. HTA is modular and consists of two structurally distinct domains-a core {alpha}/{beta} domain containing the catalytic site and a helical bundle called the lid domain. Overall, the structure fold belongs to {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase superfamily with the characteristic 'catalytic triad' residues in the active site. Detailed structure analysis showed that the catalytic histidine and serine are both present in two conformations, which may be involved in the catalytic mechanism for acetyl transfer.

  16. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins. PMID:16600295

  17. RNAComposer and RNA 3D structure prediction for nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Biesiada, Marcin; Pachulska-Wieczorek, Katarzyna; Adamiak, Ryszard W; Purzycka, Katarzyna J

    2016-07-01

    RNAs adopt specific, stable tertiary architectures to perform their activities. Knowledge of RNA tertiary structure is fundamental to understand RNA functions beginning with transcription and ending with turnover. Contrary to advanced RNA secondary structure prediction algorithms, which allow good accuracy when experimental data are integrated into the prediction, tertiary structure prediction of large RNAs still remains a significant challenge. However, the field of RNA tertiary structure prediction is rapidly developing and new computational methods based on different strategies are emerging. RNAComposer is a user-friendly and freely available server for 3D structure prediction of RNA up to 500 nucleotide residues. RNAComposer employs fully automated fragment assembly based on RNA secondary structure specified by the user. Importantly, this method allows incorporation of distance restraints derived from the experimental data to strengthen the 3D predictions. The potential and limitations of RNAComposer are discussed and an application to RNA design for nanotechnology is presented. PMID:27016145

  18. Crystal structure of 4,4'-diethynylbiphen-yl.

    PubMed

    Tagg, Tei; McAdam, C John; Robinson, Brian H; Simpson, Jim

    2015-07-01

    The title compound, C16H10, crystallizes with four unique mol-ecules, designated 1-4, in the asymmetric unit of the monoclinic unit cell. None of the mol-ecules is planar, with the benzene rings of mol-ecules 1-4 inclined to one another at angles of 42.41 (4), 24.07 (6), 42.59 (4) and 46.88 (4)°, respectively. In the crystal, weak C-H⋯π(ring) interactions, augmented by even weaker C C-H⋯π(alkyne) contacts, generate a three-dimensional network structure with inter-linked columns of mol-ecules formed along the c-axis direction. PMID:26279875

  19. Crystal structure of (1Z,2E)-cinnamaldehyde oxime

    PubMed Central

    Bugenhagen, Bernhard; Al Soom, Nuha; Al Jasem, Yosef; Thiemann, Thies

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C9H9NO, crystallized with two independent mol­ecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit. The conformation of the two mol­ecules differs slightly with the phenyl ring in mol­ecule A, forming a dihedral angle of 15.38 (12)° with the oxime group (O—N=C), compared to the corresponding angle of 26.29 (11)° in mol­ecule B. In the crystal, the A and B mol­ecules are linked head-to-head by O—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming –A–B–A–B– zigzag chains along [010]. Within the chains and between neighbouring chains there are C—H⋯π inter­actions present, forming a three-dimensional structure. PMID:26870499

  20. Faceting and commensurability in crystal structures of colloidal thin films.

    PubMed

    Ramiro-Manzano, F; Meseguer, F; Bonet, E; Rodriguez, I

    2006-07-14

    This Letter investigates the influence of finite size effects on the particle arrangement of thin film colloidal crystals. A rich variety of crystallographic faceting with large single domain microcrystallites is shown. Optical reflectance experiments together with scanning electron microscopy permit the identification of the crystal symmetry and the facet orientation, as well as the exact number of monolayers. When the cell thickness is not commensurable with a high symmetry layering, particles arrange themselves in a periodic distribution of (111)- and (100)-orientated face centered cubic (fcc) microcrystallites separated by planar defects. These structures can be described as a fcc ordering orientated along a vicinal surface, modified by a periodic distribution of fcc (111) stacking faults. PMID:16907485

  1. Single crystal growth and X-ray structure analysis of non-peripheral octahexyl phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Masashi; Nakano, Chika; Higashi, Takuya; Miyano, Tetsuya; Tohnai, Norimitsu; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-07-01

    The single-crystal structure of metal-free non-peripheral octahexyl-substituted phthalocyanine (C6PcH2) has been investigated by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. Two types of C6PcH2 single crystal, bulk and needle crystals, were separately grown by controlling the recrystallization conditions. The structures of the two types of crystal were determined, and were found to be completely different, that is, C6PcH2 exhibits structural polymorphism. It has been clarified that the C6PcH2 microcrystals in thin films used in previously reported electronic devices have the needle structure.

  2. Structural chemistry and number theory amalgamized: crystal structure of Na11Hg52.

    PubMed

    Hornfeck, Wolfgang; Hoch, Constantin

    2015-12-01

    The recently elucidated crystal structure of the technologically important amalgam Na11Hg52 is described by means of a method employing some fundamental concept of number theory, namely modular arithmetical (congruence) relations observed between a slightly idealized set of atomic coordinates. In combination with well known ideas from group theory, regarding lattice-sublattice transformations, these allow for a deeper mutual understanding of both and provide the structural chemist with a slightly different kind of spectacles, thus enabling a distinct viw on complex crystal structures in general. PMID:26634733

  3. Crystal Structure of Rat Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Esser, V.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the {beta}-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

  4. Crystal structure of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1.

    PubMed

    Cabanos, Cerrone; Urabe, Hiroyuki; Tandang-Silvas, Mary Rose; Utsumi, Shigeru; Mikami, Bunzo; Maruyama, Nobuyuki

    2011-10-01

    Ara h 1, a 7S globulin, is one of the three major peanut allergens. We previously reported the crystallization of the core region of recombinant Ara h 1. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Ara h 1 core at a resolution of 2.43 Å. We also assayed the Ara h 1 core thermal stability and compared its final structure against other 7S globulins. The Ara h 1 core has a thermal denaturation temperature of 88.3°C and a structure that is very similar to other 7S globulins. Previously identified linear IgE epitopes were also mapped on the three-dimensional structure. Most linear epitopes were found in the extended loop domains and the coils between the N- and C-terminal modules, while others were found in the less accessible β-sheets of the C-terminal core β-barrel domain of each monomer. Most of these epitopes become either slightly or significantly buried upon trimer formation, implying that allergen digestion in the gut is required for these epitopes to be accessible to immunoglobulins. Our findings also suggest that both intact and partially degraded allergens should be employed in future diagnostic and immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:21903274

  5. Crystal Structure of a Rhomboid Family Intramembrane Protease.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,Y.; Zhang, Y.; Ha, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli GlpG is an integral membrane protein that belongs to the widespread rhomboid protease family. Rhomboid proteases, like site-2 protease (S2P) and {gamma}-secretase, are unique in that they cleave the transmembrane domain of other membrane proteins. Here we describe the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the GlpG core domain. This structure contains six transmembrane segments. Residues previously shown to be involved in catalysis, including a Ser-His dyad, and several water molecules are found at the protein interior at a depth below the membrane surface. This putative active site is accessible by substrate through a large 'V-shaped' opening that faces laterally towards the lipid, but is blocked by a half-submerged loop structure. These observations indicate that, in intramembrane proteolysis, the scission of peptide bonds takes place within the hydrophobic environment of the membrane bilayer. The crystal structure also suggests a gating mechanism for GlpG that controls substrate access to its hydrophilic active site.

  6. Crystal Structure of Baculovirus RNA Triphosphatase Complexed with Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Changela, Anita; Martin, Alexandra; Shuman, Stewart; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-03-05

    Baculovirus RNA 5'-triphosphatase (BVP) exemplifies a family of RNA-specific cysteine phosphatases that includes the RNA triphosphatase domains of metazoan and plant mRNA capping enzymes. Here we report the crystal structure of BVP in a phosphate-bound state at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. BVP adopts the characteristic cysteine-phosphatase {alpha}/{beta} fold and binds two phosphate ions in the active site region, one of which is proposed to mimic the phosphate of the product complex after hydrolysis of the covalent phosphoenzyme intermediate. The crystal structure highlights the role of backbone amides and side chains of the P-loop motif {sup 118}HCTHGXNRT{sup 126} in binding the cleavable phosphate and stabilizing the transition state. Comparison of the BVP structure to the apoenzyme of mammalian RNA triphosphatase reveals a concerted movement of the Arg-125 side chain (to engage the phosphate directly) and closure of an associated surface loop over the phosphate in the active site. The structure highlights a direct catalytic role of Asn-124, which is the signature P-loop residue of the RNA triphosphatase family and a likely determinant of the specificity of BVP for hydrolysis of phosphoanhydride linkages.

  7. Crystal structure of rat carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yu-Shan; Jogl, Gerwald; Esser, Victoria; Tong, Liang

    2010-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Å resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria. PMID:16781677

  8. Crystal structure studies on sulfur oxygenase reductase from Acidianus tengchongensis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Mei; Chen Zhiwei; Zhang Pingfeng; Pan Xiaowei; Jiang Chengying; An Xiaomin; Liu Shuangjiang; Chang Wenrui

    2008-05-09

    Sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR) simultaneously catalyzes oxidation and reduction of elemental sulfur to produce sulfite, thiosulfate, and sulfide in the presence of molecular oxygen. In this study, crystal structures of wild type and mutants of SOR from Acidianus tengchongensis (SOR-AT) in two different crystal forms were determined and it was observed that 24 identical SOR monomers form a hollow sphere. Within the icosatetramer sphere, the tetramer and trimer channels were proposed as the paths for the substrate and products, respectively. Moreover, a comparison of SOR-AT with SOR-AA (SOR from Acidianus ambivalens) structures showed that significant differences existed at the active site. Firstly, Cys31 is not persulfurated in SOR-AT structures. Secondly, the iron atom is five-coordinated rather than six-coordinated, since one of the water molecules ligated to the iron atom in the SOR-AA structure is lost. Consequently, the binding sites of substrates and a hypothetical catalytic process of SOR were proposed.

  9. Diterbium hepta­nickel: a crystal structure redetermination

    PubMed Central

    Levytskyy, Volodymyr; Babizhetskyy, Volodymyr; Kotur, Bohdan; Smetana, Volodymyr

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, Tb2Ni7, was redetermined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. In comparison with previous studies based on powder X-ray diffraction data [Lemaire et al. (1967). C. R. Acad. Sci. Ser. B, 265, 1280–1282; Lemaire & Paccard (1969). Bull. Soc. Fr. Mineral. Cristallogr. 92, 9–16; Buschow & van der Goot (1970). J. Less-Common Met. 22, 419–428], the present redetermination affords refined coordinates and anisotropic displacement parameters for all atoms. A partial occupation for one Tb atom results in the non-stoichiometric composition Tb1.962 (4)Ni7. The title compound adopts the Ce2Ni7 structure type and can also be derived from the CaCu5 structure type as an inter­growth structure. The asymmetric unit contains two Tb sites (both site symmetries 3m.) and five Ni sites (.m., mm2, 3m., 3m., -3m.). The two different coordination polyhedra of Tb are a Frank–Kasper polyhedron formed by four Tb and 12 Ni atoms and a pseudo Frank–Kasper polyhedron formed by two Tb and 18 Ni atoms. The four different coordination polyhedra of Ni are Frank–Kasper icosa­hedra formed by five Tb and seven Ni atoms, four Tb and eight Ni atoms, three Tb and nine Ni atoms, and six Tb and six Ni atoms, respectively. PMID:25249871

  10. Crystal Structure of the Japanese Encephalitis Virus Envelope Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Luca, Vincent C.; AbiMansour, Jad; Nelson, Christopher A.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2012-03-13

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading global cause of viral encephalitis. The JEV envelope protein (E) facilitates cellular attachment and membrane fusion and is the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. We have determined the 2.1-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the JEV E ectodomain refolded from bacterial inclusion bodies. The E protein possesses the three domains characteristic of flavivirus envelopes and epitope mapping of neutralizing antibodies onto the structure reveals determinants that correspond to the domain I lateral ridge, fusion loop, domain III lateral ridge, and domain I-II hinge. While monomeric in solution, JEV E assembles as an antiparallel dimer in the crystal lattice organized in a highly similar fashion as seen in cryo-electron microscopy models of mature flavivirus virions. The dimer interface, however, is remarkably small and lacks many of the domain II contacts observed in other flavivirus E homodimers. In addition, uniquely conserved histidines within the JEV serocomplex suggest that pH-mediated structural transitions may be aided by lateral interactions outside the dimer interface in the icosahedral virion. Our results suggest that variation in dimer structure and stability may significantly influence the assembly, receptor interaction, and uncoating of virions.

  11. [A prediction model for the activity of insecticidal crystal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis based on support vector machine].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Cai, Fu-Ying; Zhang, Guang-Ya

    2007-01-01

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) model in terms of amino acid composition and the activity of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal proteins was established. Support vector machine (SVM) is a novel general machine-learning tool based on the structural risk minimization principle that exhibits good generalization when fault samples are few; it is especially suitable for classification, forecasting, and estimation in cases where small amounts of samples are involved such as fault diagnosis; however, some parameters of SVM are selected based on the experience of the operator, which has led to decreased efficiency of SVM in practical application. The uniform design (UD) method was applied to optimize the running parameters of SVM. It was found that the average accuracy rate approached 73% when the penalty factor was 0.01, the epsilon 0.2, the gamma 0.05, and the range 0.5. The results indicated that UD might be used an effective method to optimize the parameters of SVM and SVM and could be used as an alternative powerful modeling tool for QSPR studies of the activity of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal crystal proteins. Therefore, a novel method for predicting the insecticidal activity of Bt insecticidal crystal proteins was proposed by the authors of this study. PMID:17366901

  12. Crystal and molecular structure of perindopril erbumine salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, M.; Bojarska, J.; Ježko, P.; Sieroń, L.; Olczak, A.; Maniukiewicz, W.

    2011-06-01

    The crystal structure of perindopril (2S,3aS,7aS)-1-[(2S)-2-[[(2S)-1-ethoxy-1-oxopentan-2-yl]amino]propanoyl]-2,3,3a,4,5,6,7,7a-octahydroindole-2-carboxylic acid) erbumine salt C 23H 43N 3O 5, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, was determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic, non-centrosymetric space group P1, with unit cell dimensions a = 6.575(3), b = 12.165(5), c = 16.988(8) Å and α = 97.153(4), β = 94.417(4), γ = 90.349(4)°, Z = 2. The structure was refined by full matrix least squares methods to R = 0.037. In the solid state ionized molecules of perindopril and erbumine are linked together forming a complex via O⋯HN + hydrogen bonds between the positively charged amino groups of the erbuminium cations and oxygen atoms of the perindopril carboxylate groups. Intermolecular N sbnd H⋯O and C sbnd H⋯O contacts seem to be effective in the stabilization of the structure, resulting in the formation of a three-dimensional network. The gas-phase structure of perindopril-erbumine complex was optimized by the HF/6-31G(d) and Becke3LYP/6-31G(d) methods. The conformational behavior of this salt in water was examined using the CPCM and Onsager models. In both the gas phase and water solution the perindopril erbumine will exist in prevailing triclinic form.

  13. Lithium-cation conductivity and crystal structure of lithium diphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, V.I.; Sherstobitova, E.A.; Blatov, V.A.; Shekhtman, G.Sh.

    2014-03-15

    The electrical conductivity of lithium diphosphate Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been measured and jump-like increasing of ionic conductivity at 913 K has been found. The crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction at 300–1050 K. At 913 K low temperature triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=8.8261(4) Å, b=5.2028(4) Å, c=13.3119(2) Å, β=104.372(6)°. The migration maps of Li{sup +} cations based on experimental data implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. It was found that lithium cations in both low- and high temperature forms of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} migrate in three dimensions. Cross sections of the migrations channels extend as the temperature rises, but at the phase transition point have a sharp growth showing a strong “crystal structure – ion conductivity” correlation. -- Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} at 950 K. Red balls represent oxygen atoms; black lines show Li{sup +} ion migration channels in the layers perpendicular to [001] direction. Highlights: • Structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction. • At 913 K triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one. • The migration maps of Li{sup +} implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. • Cross sections of the migrations channels at the phase transition have a sharp growth.

  14. Structure, Hydrodynamics, and Phase Transition of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Noel A.

    2000-01-01

    Smectic liquid crystals are phases of rod shaped molecules organized into one dimensionally (1D) periodic arrays of layers, each layer being between one and two molecular lengths thick. In the least ordered smectic phases, the smectics A and C, each layer is a two dimensional (2D) liquid. Additionally there are a variety of more ordered smectic phases having hexatic short range translational order or 2D crystalline quasi long range translational order within the layers. The inherent fluid-layer structure and low vapor pressure of smectic liquid crystals enable the long term stabilization of freely suspended, single component, layered fluid films as thin as 30A, a single molecular layer. The layering forces the films to be an integral number of smectic layers thick, quantizing their thickness in layer units and forcing a film of a particular number of layers to be physically homogeneous with respect to its layer structure over its entire area. Optical reflectivity enables the precise determination of the number of layers. These ultrathin freely suspended liquid crystal films are structures of fundamental interest in condensed matter and fluid physics. They are the thinnest known stable condensed phase fluid structures and have the largest surface-to-volume ratio of any stable fluid preparation, making them ideal for the study of the effects of reduced dimensionality on phase behavior and on fluctuation and interface phenomena. Their low vapor pressure and quantized thickness enable the effective use of microgravity to extend the study of basic capillary phenomena to ultrathin fluid films. Freely suspended films have been a wellspring of new liquid crystal physics. They have been used to provide unique experimental conditions for the study of condensed phase transitions in two dimensions. They are the only system in which the hexatic has been unambiguously identified as a phase of matter, and the only physical system in which fluctuations of a 2D XY system and

  15. Protein structure prediction and analysis using the Robetta server

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David E.; Chivian, Dylan; Baker, David

    2004-01-01

    The Robetta server (http://robetta.bakerlab.org) provides automated tools for protein structure prediction and analysis. For structure prediction, sequences submitted to the server are parsed into putative domains and structural models are generated using either comparative modeling or de novo structure prediction methods. If a confident match to a protein of known structure is found using BLAST, PSI-BLAST, FFAS03 or 3D-Jury, it is used as a template for comparative modeling. If no match is found, structure predictions are made using the de novo Rosetta fragment insertion method. Experimental nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) constraints data can also be submitted with a query sequence for RosettaNMR de novo structure determination. Other current capabilities include the prediction of the effects of mutations on protein–protein interactions using computational interface alanine scanning. The Rosetta protein design and protein–protein docking methodologies will soon be available through the server as well. PMID:15215442

  16. Investigation of crystal structure and associated electronic structure of Sr 6BP 5O 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenberg, Helmut; Laubach, Sonja; Schmidt, P. C.; McSweeney, R.; Knapp, M.; Mishra, K. C.

    2006-04-01

    Strontium borophosphate phosphate (Sr 6BP 5O 20, SrBP), activated by divalent europium ions is a bluish-green phosphor emitting in a broad band with the emission peak near 480 nm. In this paper, we report the crystal structure of SrBP determined from an analysis of the X-ray diffraction pattern of a prismatic single crystal (size 60 μm×50 μm×40 μm). This crystal was chosen from undoped phosphor powder samples prepared for this purpose by solid-state reaction. SrBP is observed to crystallize in a body-centered tetragonal lattice with the lattice parameters a=9.7895(7) Å and c=19.032(3) Å, the associated space group being I4¯c2 (space group 120). Using the structural data from this study, we have also calculated its electronic structure using the augmented spherical wave method and the local density approximation (LDA). We show the ordering of the electronic states by the density of states (DOS) and the partial DOS plots. The LDA gives a direct optical band gap at the Γ point of about 5 eV. The significance of the crystal structure and associated electronic structure is discussed with respect to maintenance of this phosphor in Hg-discharge lamps.

  17. Theoretical prediction of stable tin oxides: stoichiometry, electronic structure and possible applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junjie; Umezawa, Naoto; Theoretical design of environmental remediation materials Team

    2015-03-01

    We have carried out a computational materials search for stable crystal phases of tin oxides in different composition ratios under ambient pressure condition. By employing density-functional theory calculations combined with evolutionary algorithm, we have identified several thermodynamically stable phases of tin oxides and investigated their dynamical stabilities by computing phonon vibration frequencies. We revealed the mechanism of determining the electronic structures of tin oxide crystals/van der Waals heterostructures through a systematic computational study of chemical bonding, band structure and Bader charges. Based on our theoretical analysis, we demonstrated that the predicted structures can lead to a desirable band structure for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from water solution. Therefore, the tin oxides proposed in the present work have great potential as an abundant, cheap and environmentally-benign solar-energy conversion catalyst.

  18. Determination of structure and properties of molecular crystals from first principles.

    PubMed

    Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: Until recently, it had been impossible to predict structures of molecular crystals just from the knowledge of the chemical formula for the constituent molecule(s). A solution of this problem has been achieved using intermolecular force fields computed from first principles. These fields were developed by calculating interaction energies of molecular dimers and trimers using an ab initio method called symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) based on density-functional theory (DFT) description of monomers [SAPT(DFT)]. For clusters containing up to a dozen or so atoms, interaction energies computed using SAPT(DFT) are comparable in accuracy to the results of the best wave function-based methods, whereas the former approach can be applied to systems an order of magnitude larger than the latter. In fact, for monomers with a couple dozen atoms, SAPT(DFT) is about equally time-consuming as the supermolecular DFT approach. To develop a force field, SAPT(DFT) calculations are performed for a large number of dimer and possibly also trimer configurations (grid points in intermolecular coordinates), and the interaction energies are then fitted by analytic functions. The resulting force fields can be used to determine crystal structures and properties by applying them in molecular packing, lattice energy minimization, and molecular dynamics calculations. In this way, some of the first successful determinations of crystal structures were achieved from first principles, with crystal densities and lattice parameters agreeing with experimental values to within about 1%. Crystal properties obtained using similar procedures but empirical force fields fitted to crystal data have typical errors of several percent due to low sensitivity of empirical fits to interactions beyond those of the nearest neighbors. The first-principles approach has additional advantages over the empirical approach for notional crystals and cocrystals since empirical force fields can only be

  19. Germanium FCC structure from a colloidal crystal template

    SciTech Connect

    Miguez, H.; Meseguer, F.; Lopez, C.; Holgado, M.; Andreasen, G.; Mifsud, A.; Fornes, V.

    2000-05-16

    Here, the authors show a method to fabricate a macroporous structure in which the pores, essentially identical, arrange regularly in a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice. The result is a network of air spheres in a germanium medium. This structure presents the highest dielectric contrast ({epsilon}{sub Ge}/{epsilon}{sub air} = 16) ever achieved in the optical regime in such periodic structures, which could result in important applications in photonics. The authors employ solid silica colloidal crystals (opals) as templates within which a cyclic germanium growth process is carried out. Thus, the three-dimensional periodicity of the host is inherited by the guest. Afterward, the silica is removed and a germanium opal replica is obtained.

  20. Crystal structure of Homo sapiens protein LOC79017

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-02-08

    LOC79017 (MW 21.0 kDa, residues 1-188) was annotated as a hypothetical protein encoded by Homo sapiens chromosome 7 open reading frame 24. It was selected as a target by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) because it did not share more than 30% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known. The biological function of the protein has not been established yet. Parts of LOC79017 were identified as members of uncharacterized Pfam families (residues 1-95 as PB006073 and residues 104-180 as PB031696). BLAST searches revealed homologues of LOC79017 in many eukaryotes, but none of them have been functionally characterized. Here, we report the crystal structure of H. sapiens protein LOC79017 (UniGene code Hs.530024, UniProt code O75223, CESG target number go.35223).

  1. Crystal Structure of Antagonist Bound Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Roth, Christopher B.; Terakado, Masahiko; Kurata, Haruto; Omi, Rie; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Warshaviak, Dora; Nakade, Shinji; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Mileni, Mauro; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Griffith, Mark T.; Rodgers, Caroline; Han, Gye Won; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Chun, Jerold; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid biology continues to emerge as an area of significant therapeutic interest, particularly as the result of an enhanced understanding of the wealth of signaling molecules with diverse physiological properties. This growth in knowledge is epitomized by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which functions through interactions with six cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Herein we present three crystal structures of LPA1 in complex with antagonist tool compounds selected and designed through structural and stability analysis. Structural analysis combined with molecular dynamics identified a basis for ligand access to the LPA1 binding pocket from the extracellular space contrasting with the proposed access for the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor. Characteristics of the LPA1 binding pocket raise the possibility of promiscuous ligand recognition of phosphorylated endocannabinoids. Cell-based assays confirmed this hypothesis, linking the distinct receptor systems through metabolically related ligands with potential functional and therapeutic implications for treatment of disease. PMID:26091040

  2. Crystal Structure of a Self-Spliced Group ll Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Toor,N.; Keating, K.; Taylor, S.; Pyle, A.

    2008-01-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that catalyze their own excision from precursor transcripts and insertion into new genetic locations. Here we report the crystal structure of an intact, self-spliced group II intron from Oceanobacillus iheyensis at 3.1 angstrom resolution. An extensive network of tertiary interactions facilitates the ordered packing of intron subdomains around a ribozyme core that includes catalytic domain V. The bulge of domain V adopts an unusual helical structure that is located adjacent to a major groove triple helix (catalytic triplex). The bulge and catalytic triplex jointly coordinate two divalent metal ions in a configuration that is consistent with a two-metal ion mechanism for catalysis. Structural and functional analogies support the hypothesis that group II introns and the spliceosome share a common ancestor.

  3. Crystal Structure of a Self-Spliced Group II Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, Navtej; Keating, Kevin S.; Taylor, Sean D.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2008-04-10

    Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that catalyze their own excision from precursor transcripts and insertion into new genetic locations. Here we report the crystal structure of an intact, self-spliced group II intron from Oceanobacillus iheyensis at 3.1 angstrom resolution. An extensive network of tertiary interactions facilitates the ordered packing of intron subdomains around a ribozyme core that includes catalytic domain V. The bulge of domain V adopts an unusual helical structure that is located adjacent to a major groove triple helix (catalytic triplex). The bulge and catalytic triplex jointly coordinate two divalent metal ions in a configuration that is consistent with a two-metal ion mechanism for catalysis. Structural and functional analogies support the hypothesis that group II introns and the spliceosome share a common ancestor.

  4. Crystal Structure of a Lipid G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Michael A; Roth, Christopher B; Jo, Euijung; Griffith, Mark T; Scott, Fiona L; Reinhart, Greg; Desale, Hans; Clemons, Bryan; Cahalan, Stuart M; Schuerer, Stephan C; Sanna, M Germana; Han, Gye Won; Kuhn, Peter; Rosen, Hugh; Stevens, Raymond C

    2012-03-01

    The lyso-phospholipid sphingosine 1-phosphate modulates lymphocyte trafficking, endothelial development and integrity, heart rate, and vascular tone and maturation by activating G protein-coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. Here, we present the crystal structure of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 fused to T4-lysozyme (S1P1-T4L) in complex with an antagonist sphingolipid mimic. Extracellular access to the binding pocket is occluded by the amino terminus and extracellular loops of the receptor. Access is gained by ligands entering laterally between helices I and VII within the transmembrane region of the receptor. This structure, along with mutagenesis, agonist structure-activity relationship data, and modeling, provides a detailed view of the molecular recognition and requirement for hydrophobic volume that activates S1P1, resulting in the modulation of immune and stromal cell responses.

  5. Crystal structure of the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin type A.

    PubMed Central

    Schad, E M; Zaitseva, I; Zaitsev, V N; Dohlsten, M; Kalland, T; Schlievert, P M; Ohlendorf, D H; Svensson, L A

    1995-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins are prototype superantigens characterized by their ability to bind to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and subsequently activate a large fraction of T-lymphocytes. The crystal structure of staphylococcal enterotoxin type A (SEA), a 27 kDa monomeric protein, was determined to 1.9 A resolution with an R-factor of 19.9% by multiple isomorphous replacement. SEA is a two domain protein composed of a beta-barrel and a beta-grasp motif demonstrating the same general structure as staphylococcal enterotoxins SEB and TSST-1. Unique for SEA, however, is a Zn2+ coordination site involved in MHC class II binding. Four amino acids including Ser1, His187, His225 and Asp227 were found to be involved in direct coordination of the metal ion. SEA is the first Zn2+ binding enterotoxin that has been structurally determined. Images PMID:7628431

  6. Phase-field-crystal methodology for modeling of structural transformations.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Michael; Rottler, Jörg; Provatas, Nikolas

    2011-03-01

    We introduce and characterize free-energy functionals for modeling of solids with different crystallographic symmetries within the phase-field-crystal methodology. The excess free energy responsible for the emergence of periodic phases is inspired by classical density-functional theory, but uses only a minimal description for the modes of the direct correlation function to preserve computational efficiency. We provide a detailed prescription for controlling the crystal structure and introduce parameters for changing temperature and surface energies, so that phase transformations between body-centered-cubic (bcc), face-centered-cubic (fcc), hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), and simple-cubic (sc) lattices can be studied. To illustrate the versatility of our free-energy functional, we compute the phase diagram for fcc-bcc-liquid coexistence in the temperature-density plane. We also demonstrate that our model can be extended to include hcp symmetry by dynamically simulating hcp-liquid coexistence from a seeded crystal nucleus. We further quantify the dependence of the elastic constants on the model control parameters in two and three dimensions, showing how the degree of elastic anisotropy can be tuned from the shape of the direct correlation functions. PMID:21517507

  7. Synthesis and crystal structure of MgB{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Adasch, Volker; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Vojteer, Natascha; Hillebrecht, Harald . E-mail: harald.hillebrecht@ac.uni-freiburg.de

    2006-09-15

    Single crystals of MgB{sub 12} were synthesized from the elements in a Mg/Cu melt at 1600deg. C. MgB{sub 12} crystallizes orthorhombic in space group Pnma with a=16.632(3)A, b=17.803(4)A and c=10.396(2)A. The crystal structure (Z=30, 5796 reflections, 510 variables, R{sub 1}(F)=0.049, wR{sub 2}(I)=0.134) consists of a three dimensional net of B{sub 12} icosahedra and B{sub 21} units in a ratio 2:1. The B{sub 21} units are observed for the first time in a solid compound. Mg is on positions with partial occupation. The summation reveals the composition MgB{sub 12.35} or Mg{sub 0.97}B{sub 12} , respectively. This is in good agreement with the value of MgB{sub 11.25} as expected by electronic reasons to stabilize the boron polyhedra B{sub 12}{sup 2-} and B{sub 21}{sup 4-}.

  8. Crystal structure and spectroscopic investigations of an organic monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaouadi, H.; Marouani, H. Rzaigui, M.; Madani, A.

    2008-12-01

    Single crystals of (p-ClC{sub 6}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} are synthesized in water by interaction of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and (p-ClC{sub 6}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}). This compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with the Pbca space group. Its unit-cell parameters are a = 9.724(3), b = 7.861(1), c = 25.078(6) A, V = 1917.1(6) A{sup 3} and Z = 8. The crystal structure has been solved and refined to R = 0.039, using 4298 independent reflections. The atomic arrangement can be described by inorganic layers parallel to ab plane, between which the organic cations are located. This compound exhibits a reversible phase transition at 403 K. The electrical conductivity measurements show that the (p-ClC{sub 6}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} has a conductivity value which goes from {sigma} = 0.88 x 10{sup -6} {omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1} at room temperature (293 K) to 3.31 x 10{sup -4} {omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1} at 433 K. Its characterisation by TA, NMR and IR is reported too.

  9. Supressed Water Crystallization in Nano-Structured Physical Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Clinton; Vogt, Bryan; Weiss, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Suppressed water crystallization occurs in some organisms, such as the common wood frog, which allows it to hibernate in a frozen state without damage to its cells. Knowledge of the behavior of supercooled water and alternate ice forms may have many implications to many fields of science. Supercooling of water by several degrees below the normal freezing point is often observed in hydrogels that have attractive interactions with water, e.g., hydrogen bonding. Repulsive confinement, such as in hydrophobic porous carbon, can have even more significant effects on the supercooling of the entrapped water. This talk describes the freezing behavior in nano-structured, hydrophobically modified poly(dimethyl acrylamide) hydrogels that possess attractive and repulsive interactions with water and are physically crosslinked by hydrophobic nanodomains. Three distinct water freezing regimes were observed in the hydrogel swollen to about 50% water by weight. Differential scanning calorimetry detected three crystallization exotherms at 254K, 244K, and 227K. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments have shown that although the water mobility was suppressed at room temperature, the water remained significantly mobile below the normal freezing point of water. The talk will discuss how tuning the concentration of the hydrophobic composition of the hydrogel affects the porous length scales in the hydrogel, which may alter the state of water and the crystal form produced by supercooling.

  10. Exploring Solid-State Structure and Physical Properties: A Molecular and Crystal Model Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    A crystal model laboratory exercise is presented that allows students to examine relations among the microscopic-macroscopic-symbolic levels, using crystalline mineral samples and corresponding crystal models. Students explore the relationship between solid-state structure and crystal form. Other structure-property relationships are explored. The…

  11. Protein short loop prediction in terms of a structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Manoj; Bornot, Aurélie; Offmann, Bernard; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2009-08-01

    Loops connect regular secondary structures. In many instances, they are known to play crucial biological roles. To bypass the limitation of secondary structure description, we previously defined a structural alphabet composed of 16 structural prototypes, called Protein Blocks (PBs). It leads to an accurate description of every region of 3D protein backbones and has been used in local structure prediction. In the present study, we used our structural alphabet to predict the loops connecting two repetitive structures. Thus, we showed interest to take into account the flanking regions, leading to prediction rate improvement up to 19.8%, but we also underline the sensitivity of such an approach. This research can be used to propose different structures for the loops and to probe and sample their flexibility. It is a useful tool for ab initio loop prediction and leads to insights into flexible docking approach. PMID:19625218

  12. Crystal Structure of the Vanadate-Inhibited Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Johannes D; Bublitz, Maike; Arnou, Bertrand; Olesen, Claus; Andersen, Jens Peter; Møller, Jesper Vuust; Nissen, Poul

    2016-04-01

    Vanadate is the hallmark inhibitor of the P-type ATPase family; however, structural details of its inhibitory mechanism have remained unresolved. We have determined the crystal structure of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase with bound vanadate in the absence of Ca(2+). Vanadate is bound at the catalytic site as a planar VO3(-) in complex with water and Mg(2+) in a dephosphorylation transition-state-like conformation. Validating bound VO3(-) by anomalous difference Fourier maps using long-wavelength data we also identify a hitherto undescribed Cl(-) site near the dephosphorylation site. Crystallization was facilitated by trinitrophenyl (TNP)-derivatized nucleotides that bind with the TNP moiety occupying the binding pocket that normally accommodates the adenine of ATP, rationalizing their remarkably high affinity for E2P-like conformations of the Ca(2+)-ATPase. A comparison of the configurations of bound nucleotide analogs in the E2·VO3(-) structure with that in E2·BeF3(-) (E2P ground state analog) reveals multiple binding modes to the Ca(2+)-ATPase. PMID:27050689

  13. Crystal Structure of Te 2O 3F 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ider, A.; Laval, J. P.; Frit, B.; Carré, J.; Bastide, J. P.

    1996-04-01

    Te2O3F2crystallizes with the triclinic symmetry (space groupP-1) and the unit cell parametersa= 515.3(1) pm,b= 625.7(1) pm,c= 688.8(1) pm, α = 98.71(1)°, β = 110.31(1)°, γ = 92.72(1)°,Z= 2. Its structure was solved and refined toRvaluesR1= 0.024 and wR2= 0.059 on the basis of 699 independent reflections recorded on a single crystal with an automatic four-circle diffractometer. The two Te atoms are, respectively, fourfold and fivefold coordinated and their lone pairEis stereochemically active. The bond valence calculation shows a perfect O/F order. The Te(1)O3FEand Te(2)O4FEpolyhedra form, by sharing O-O edges, bipolyhedral units with a very short Te-Te distance (319 pm). These units, by sharing corners, constitute independent sheets parallel tox0y. All the F atoms are nonbridging and orientated, together with the lone pairsE, toward the interlayer space. The structural relationships with the α-TeO2structure have been evidenced and analyzed.

  14. Nonconvex energy minimization and dislocation structures in ductile single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M.; Repetto, E. a.

    1999-02-01

    Plastically deformed crystals are often observed to develop intricate dislocation patterns such as the labyrinth, mosaic, fence and carpet structures. In this paper, such dislocation structures are given an energetic interpretation with the aid of direct methods of the calculus of variations. We formulate the theory in terms of deformation fields and regard the dislocations as manifestations of the incompatibility of the plastic deformation gradient field. Within this framework, we show that the incremental displacements of inelastic solids follow as minimizers of a suitably defined pseudoelastic energy function. In crystals exhibiting latent hardening, the energy function is nonconvex and has wells corresponding to single-slip deformations. This favors microstructures consisting locally of single slip. Deformation microstructures constructed in accordance with this prescription are shown to be in correspondence with several commonly observed dislocation structures. Finally, we show that a characteristic length scale can be built into the theory by taking into account the self energy of the dislocations. The extended theory leads to scaling laws which appear to be in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with observation.

  15. Refinement of the crystal structure of lithium-bearing uvite

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhdestvenskaya, I. V. Frank-Kamenetskaya, O. V.; Kuznetsova, L. G.; Bannova, I. I.; Bronzova, Yu. M.

    2007-03-15

    The crystal structure of a natural calcium tourmaline, i.e., uvite with a high lithium content (0.51 au per formula (aupf) at the Y site, is refined to R = 0.019, R{sub w} = 0.020, and S = 1.11. It is shown that, in nature, there exist uvites in which the charge balance in the case where the Z site is occupied by trivalent cations is provided by the replacement of part of the divalent magnesium cations at the Y site by univalent cations, divalent calcium cations at the X site by sodium cations, and univalent anions at the W site by oxygen anions. The W site is found to be split into two sites, namely, the W1 and W11 sites (the W1-W11 distance is 0.14 A), which are partially occupied by the fluorine and oxygen anions, respectively. An analysis of the results obtained in this study and the data available in the literature on the crystal structure of uvites allows the conclusion that uvite can be considered a superspecies and that the nomenclature of this mineral group needs refinement with the use of structural data.

  16. Crystal structure of Brinzolamide: a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huirong; Lou, Benyong

    2016-01-01

    In crystal structure of the title compound, C12H21N3O5S3 [systematic name: (R)-4-ethyl­amino-2-(3-meth­oxy­prop­yl)-3,4-di­hydro-2H-thieno[3,2-e][1,2]thia­zine-6-sulfonamide 1,1-dioxide], there exist three kinds of hydrogen-bonding inter­actions. The sulfonamide group is involved in hydrogen bonding with the secondary amine and the meth­oxy O atom, resulting in the formation of layers parallel to the bc plane. The layers are linked by an N—H⋯O hydrogen bond involving a sulfonamide O atom as acceptor and the secondary amine H atom as donor, which gives rise to the formation of a unique bilayer structure. The absolute structure of the mol­ecule in the crystal was determined by resonant scattering [Flack parameter = 0.01 (4)]. PMID:27308020

  17. Deformation of chlorin rings in the Photosystem II crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Saito, Keisuke; Umena, Yasufumi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Shen, Jian-Ren; Kamiya, Nobuo; Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2012-05-29

    The crystal structure of Photosystem II (PSII) analyzed at a resolution of 1.9 Å revealed deformations of chlorin rings in the chlorophylls for the first time. We investigated the degrees of chlorin ring deformation and factors that contributed to them in the PSII crystal structure, using a normal-coordinate structural decomposition procedure. The out-of-plane distortion of the P(D1) chlorin ring can be described predominantly by a large "doming mode" arising from the axial ligand, D1-His198, as well as the chlorophyll side chains and PSII protein environment. In contrast, the deformation of P(D2) was caused by a "saddling mode" arising from the D2-Trp191 ring and the doming mode arising from D2-His197. Large ruffling modes, which were reported to lower the redox potential in heme proteins, were observed in P(D1) and Chl(D1), but not in P(D2) and Chl(D2). Furthermore, as P(D1) possessed the largest doming mode among the reaction center chlorophylls, the corresponding bacteriochlorophyll P(L) possessed the largest doming mode in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers. However, the majority of the redox potential shift in the protein environment was determined by the electrostatic environment. The difference in the chlorin ring deformation appears to directly refer to the difference in "the local steric protein environment" rather than the redox potential value in PSII. PMID:22568617

  18. Crystal Structure of the Yeast Nicotinamidase Pnc1p

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gang; Taylor, Alexander B.; McAlister-Henn, Lee; Hart, P. John

    2007-01-01

    The yeast nicotinamidase Pnc1p acts in transcriptional silencing by reducing levels of nicotinamide, an inhibitor of the histone deacetylase Sir2p. The Pnc1p structure was determined at 2.9 Å resolution using MAD and MIRAS phasing methods after inadvertent crystallization during the pursuit of the structure of histidine-tagged yeast isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). Pnc1p displays a cluster of surface histidine residues likely responsible for its co-fractionation with IDH from Ni2+-coupled chromatography resins. Researchers expressing histidine-tagged proteins in yeast should be aware of the propensity of Pnc1p to crystallize, even when overwhelmed in concentration by the protein of interest. The protein assembles into extended helical arrays interwoven to form an unusually robust, yet porous superstructure. Comparison of the Pnc1p structure with those of three homologous bacterial proteins reveals a common core fold punctuated by amino acid insertions unique to each protein. These insertions mediate the self-interactions that define the distinct higher order oligomeric states attained by these molecules. Pnc1p also acts on pyrazinamide, a substrate analog converted by the nicotinamidase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis into a product toxic to that organism. However, we find no evidence for detrimental effects of the drug on yeast cell growth. PMID:17382284

  19. Analysis of the crystal structure of an active MCM hexamer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Justin M; Arachea, Buenafe T; Epling, Leslie B; Enemark, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    In a previous Research article (Froelich et al., 2014), we suggested an MCM helicase activation mechanism, but were limited in discussing the ATPase domain because it was absent from the crystal structure. Here we present the crystal structure of a nearly full-length MCM hexamer that is helicase-active and thus has all features essential for unwinding DNA. The structure is a chimera of Sulfolobus solfataricus N-terminal domain and Pyrococcus furiosus ATPase domain. We discuss three major findings: 1) a novel conformation for the A-subdomain that could play a role in MCM regulation; 2) interaction of a universally conserved glutamine in the N-terminal Allosteric Communication Loop with the AAA+ domain helix-2-insert (h2i); and 3) a recessed binding pocket for the MCM ssDNA-binding motif influenced by the h2i. We suggest that during helicase activation, the h2i clamps down on the leading strand to facilitate strand retention and regulate ATP hydrolysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03433.001 PMID:25262915

  20. Crystal Structure of the Monomeric Porin OmpG

    SciTech Connect

    Subbarao,G.; van den Berg, B.

    2006-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria contains a large number of channel proteins that mediate the uptake of ions and nutrients necessary for growth and functioning of the cell. An important group of OM channel proteins are the porins, which mediate the non-specific, diffusion-based passage of small (<600 Da) polar molecules. All porins of Gram-negative bacteria that have been crystallized to date form stable trimers, with each monomer composed of a 16-stranded {beta}-barrel with a relatively narrow central pore. In contrast, the OmpG porin is unique, as it appears to function as a monomer. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of OmpG from Escherichia coli to a resolution of 2.3 Angstroms. The structure shows a 14-stranded {beta}{beta}-barrel with a relatively simple architecture. Due to the absence of loops that fold back into the channel, OmpG has a large ({approx}13 Angstroms) central pore that is considerably wider than those of other E. coli porins, and very similar in size to that of the toxin a-hemolysin. The architecture of the channel, together with previous biochemical and other data, suggests that OmpG may form a non-specific channel for the transport of larger oligosaccharides. The structure of OmpG provides the starting point for engineering studies aiming to generate selective channels and for the development of biosensors.

  1. Characteristics and crystal structure of bacterial inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Evans, G.; Rotella, F. J.; Westbrook, E. M.; Beno, D.; Huberman, E.; Joachimiak, A.; Collart, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is an essential enzyme that catalyzes the first step unique to GTP synthesis. To provide a basis for the evaluation of IMPDH inhibitors as antimicrobial agents, we have expressed and characterized IMPDH from the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes. Our results show that the biochemical and kinetic characteristics of S. pyogenes IMPDH are similar to other bacterial IMPDH enzymes. However, the lack of sensitivity to mycophenolic acid and the K{sub m} for NAD (1180 {mu}M) exemplify some of the differences between the bacterial and mammalian IMPDH enzymes, making it an attractive target for antimicrobial agents. To evaluate the basis for these differences, we determined the crystal structure of the bacterial enzyme at 1.9 {angstrom} with substrate bound in the catalytic site. The structure was determined using selenomethionine-substituted protein and multiwavelength anomalous (MAD) analysis of data obtained with synchrotron radiation from the undulator beamline (19ID) of the Structural Biology Center at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source. S. pyogenes IMPDH is a tetramer with its four subunits related by a crystallographic 4-fold axis. The protein is composed of two domains: a TIM barrel domain that embodies the catalytic framework and a cystathione {beta}-synthase (CBS) dimer domain of so far unknown function. Using information provided by sequence alignments and the crystal structure, we prepared several site-specific mutants to examine the role of various active site regions in catalysis. These variants implicate the active site flap as an essential catalytic element and indicate there are significant differences in the catalytic environment of bacterial and mammalian IMPDH enzymes. Comparison of the structure of bacterial IMPDH with the known partial structures from eukaryotic organisms will provide an explanation of their distinct properties and contribute to the design of specific bacterial IMPDH inhibitors.

  2. Crystal structure of human tooth enamel studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouladdiaf, Bachir; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Goutaudier, Christelle; Ouladdiaf, Selma; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Pradelle, Nelly; Colon, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Crystal structure of human tooth enamel was investigated using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. Excellent agreement between observed and refined patterns is obtained, using the hexagonal hydroxyapatite model for the tooth enamel, where a large hydroxyl deficiency ˜70% is found in the 4e site. Rietveld refinements method combined with the difference Fourier maps have revealed, however, that the hydroxyl ions are not only disordered along the c-axis but also within the basal plane. Additional H ions located at the 6h site and forming HPO42- anions were found.

  3. Crystal Structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Factor Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, Timothy J.; Worzalla, Gregory A.; Ginster, Aaron M.; Forest, Katrina T.

    2012-09-07

    Virulence factor regulator (Vfr) enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity through its role as a global transcriptional regulator. The crystal structure of Vfr shows that it is a winged-helix DNA-binding protein like its homologue cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). In addition to an expected primary cyclic AMP-binding site, a second ligand-binding site is nestled between the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain. Unlike CRP, Vfr is a symmetric dimer in the absence of DNA. Removal of seven disordered N-terminal residues of Vfr prvents the growth of P. aeruginosa.

  4. Study of the crystal structure of silicon nanoislands on sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Krivulin, N. O. Pirogov, A. V.; Pavlov, D. A.; Bobrov, A. I.

    2015-02-15

    The results of studies of the crystal structure of silicon nanoislands on sapphire are reported. It is shown that the principal defects in silicon nanoislands on sapphire are twinning defects. As a result of the formation of such defects, different crystallographic orientations are formed in silicon nanoislands on sapphire. In the initial stages of the molecular-beam epitaxy of silicon on sapphire, there are two basic orientations: the (001) orientation parallel to the surface and the (001) orientation at an angle of 70° to the surface.

  5. Difluoromethylenated polyhydroxylated pyrrolidines: facile synthesis, crystal structure and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruo-Wen; Xu, Jun; Lopez, Oscar; Bols, Mikael; Qing, Feng-Ling

    2009-08-01

    In our ongoing program aimed at the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel gem-difluoromethylenated glycosidase inhibitors, the gem-difluoromethylenated polyhydroxylated pyrrolidines as analogues of 2,5-dideoxy-2,5-imino-D-mannitol (DMDP) were designed and prepared. The crystal structure of gem-difluoromethylenated polyhydroxylated pyrrolidine 17 contains an N-H…F intermolecular hydrogen bond. The biological assessment of gem-difluoromethylenated polyhydroxylated pyrrolidines showed that the modification by the gem-difluoromethylene group decreased the inhibitory activities of DMDP. PMID:21426093

  6. Electrical and Structural Characterization of Web Dendrite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, G. H.; Koliwad, K.; Dumas, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime distributions in silicon web dendrites are measured. Emphasis is placed on measuring areal homogeneity of lifetime, show its dependency on structural defects, and its unique change during hot processing. The internal gettering action of defect layers present in web crystals and their relation to minority carrier lifetime distributions is discussed. Minority carrier lifetime maps of web dendrites obtained before and after high temperature heat treatment are compared to similar maps obtained from 100 mm diameter Czochralski silicon wafers. Such maps indicate similar or superior areal homogeneity of minority carrier lifetime in webs.

  7. Crystal Structure of the Human NKX2.5 Homeodomain in Complex with DNA Target

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, Lagnajeet; Genis, Caroli; Scone, Peyton; Weinberg, Ellen O.; Kasahara, Hideko; Nam, Hyun-Joo

    2012-10-16

    NKX2.5 is a homeodomain containing transcription factor regulating cardiac formation and function, and its mutations are linked to congenital heart disease. Here we provide the first report of the crystal structure of the NKX2.5 homeodomain in complex with double-stranded DNA of its endogenous target, locating within the proximal promoter -242 site of the atrial natriuretic factor gene. The crystal structure, determined at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, demonstrates that NKX2.5 homeodomains occupy both DNA binding sites separated by five nucleotides without physical interaction between themselves. The two homeodomains show identical conformation despite the differences in the DNA sequences they bind, and no significant bending of the DNA was observed. Tyr54, absolutely conserved in NK2 family proteins, mediates sequence-specific interaction with the TAAG motif. This high resolution crystal structure of NKX2.5 protein provides a detailed picture of protein and DNA interactions, which allows us to predict DNA binding of mutants identified in human patients.

  8. Crystal Structure Searching by Free Energy Surface Trekking: Application to Carbon above 1 TPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Suzuki, Naoshi; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2013-06-01

    Crystal structure determination of materials under extreme conditions has been one of grand challenges in high-pressure materials science. In computer simulations, the crystal structure searching is carried out by exploring Gibbs free energy surface (GFES) at given pressures and temperatures. Here, we propose a new crystal structure searching technique named as free energy surface trekking (FEST). FEST is based on a very simple idea and consists of an ascent-run and a descent-run. In the ascent-run, the system is forced to ascend GFES from a starting local minimum by following the inversion of the driving force acting on the simulation cell. Then, the system descends it toward a neighboring local minimum by flipping the inverted force at the ridge of GFES. The details of GFES around the starting local minimum are more correctly obtained by more investigating different trekking routes. We have applied FEST to carbon at 1.2 TPa and at 300 K, and successfully obtained the transition from the cubic diamond phase to the previously predicted BC8 phase. In this transition, 3 cell-angles concurrently increase from 90° to 101° in the ascent-run and become 109° through the descent-run, in which the activation energy is approximately 0.17 Ry/atom.

  9. Crystal structure of the oxygen-dependant coproporphyrinogen oxidase (Hem13p) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Phillips, John D; Whitby, Frank G; Warby, Christy A; Labbe, Pierre; Yang, Cheng; Pflugrath, James W; Ferrara, Joseph D; Robinson, Howard; Kushner, James P; Hill, Christopher P

    2004-09-10

    Coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO) is an essential enzyme that catalyzes the sixth step of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Unusually for heme biosynthetic enzymes, CPO exists in two evolutionarily and mechanistically distinct families, with eukaryotes and some prokaryotes employing members of the highly conserved oxygen-dependent CPO family. Here, we report the crystal structure of the oxygen-dependent CPO from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Hem13p), which was determined by optimized sulfur anomalous scattering and refined to a resolution of 2.0 A. The protein adopts a novel structure that is quite different from predicted models and features a central flat seven-stranded anti-parallel sheet that is flanked by helices. The dimeric assembly, which is seen in different crystal forms, is formed by packing of helices and a short isolated strand that forms a beta-ladder with its counterpart in the partner subunit. The deep active-site cleft is lined by conserved residues and has been captured in open and closed conformations in two different crystal forms. A substratesized cavity is completely buried in the closed conformation by the approximately 8-A movement of a helix that forms a lid over the active site. The structure therefore suggests residues that likely play critical roles in catalysis and explains the deleterious effect of many of the mutations associated with the disease hereditary coproporphyria. PMID:15194705

  10. Structure and Dynamics of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Noel A.

    2004-01-01

    Smectic liquid crystals are phases of rod shaped molecules organized into one dimensionally (1 D) periodic arrays of layers, each layer being between one and two molecular lengths thick. In the least ordered smectic phases, the smectics A and C, each layer is a two dimensional (2D) liquid. Additionally there are a variety of more ordered smectic phases having hexatic short range translational order or 2D crystalline or quasi long range translational order within the layers. The inherent fluid-layer structure and low vapor pressure of smectic liquid crystals enables the long term stabilization of freely suspended, single component, layered fluid films as thin as 30A, a single molecular layer. The layering forces the films to be an integral number of smectic layers thick, quantizing their thickness in layer units and forcing a film of a particular number of layers to be physically homogeneous with respect to its layer structure over its entire area. Optical reflectivity enables the precise determination of the number of layers. These ultrathin freely suspended liquid crystal films are structures of fundamental interest in condensed matter and fluid physics. They are the thinnest known stable fluid structures and have the largest surface-to-volume ratio of any stable fluid preparation, making them ideal for the study of the effects of reduced dimensionality on phase behavior and on fluctuation and interface phenomena. Their low vapor pressure and quantized thickness enable the effective use of microgravity to extend the study of basic capillary phenomena to ultrathin fluid films. Freely suspended films have been a wellspring of new LC physics. They have been used to provide unique experimental conditions for the study of condensed phase transitions in two dimensions. They are the only system in which the hexatic has been unambiguously identified as a phase of matter, and the only physical system in which fluctuations of a 2D XY system and Kosterlitz Thouless phase

  11. Predicting Sizes of Hexagonal and Gyroid Metal Nanostructures from Liquid Crystal Templating.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Kaleem A; Rowlands, Daniel A; Elliott, Joanne M; Squires, Adam M

    2015-11-24

    We describe a method to predict and control the lattice parameters of hexagonal and gyroid mesoporous materials formed by liquid crystal templating. In the first part, we describe a geometric model with which the lattice parameters of different liquid crystal mesophases can be predicted as a function of their water/surfactant/oil volume fractions, based on certain geometric parameters relating to the constituent surfactant molecules. We demonstrate the application of this model to the lamellar (Lα), hexagonal (H1), and gyroid bicontinuous cubic (V1) mesophases formed by the binary Brij-56 (C16EO10)/water system and the ternary Brij-56/hexadecane/water system. In this way, we demonstrate predictable and independent control over the size of the cylinders (with hexadecane) and their spacing (with water). In the second part, we produce mesoporous platinum using as templates hexagonal and gyroid phases with different compositions and show that in each case the symmetry and lattice parameter of the metal nanostructure faithfully replicate those of the liquid crystal template, which is itself in agreement with the model. This demonstrates a rational control over the geometry, size, and spacing of pores in a mesoporous metal. PMID:26493862

  12. Enhancing transmission efficiency of bending waveguide based on graded sonic crystals using antireflection structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liang-Yu; Chen, Lien-Wen

    2012-06-01

    The conventional antireflection coating (ARC) structure for sonic crystal devices is to place the cylinders at the interface between a sonic crystal device and a background medium. The radius of ARC cylinders and the distance between the ARC and the sonic crystal device are adjusted to obtain an optimal antireflection effect. We propose that ARC structures are directly designed by using the conventional ARC theory instead of scanning the geometric and spatial parameters of the conventional ARC structures. According to the concept of the effective refractive index of sonic crystals, the exact ARC structures can be implemented by sonic crystals. The transmission efficiency of a bending waveguide designed by graded sonic crystals can be enhanced by introducing the ARC structures based on sonic crystals. The performances of different ARC structure designs are compared and discussed.

  13. Toward a structure determination method for biomineral-associated protein using combined solid-state NMR and computational structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Masica, David L.; Ash, Jason T.; Ndao, Moise; Drobny, Gary P.; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2010-01-01

    Summary Protein-biomineral interactions are paramount to materials production in biology, including the mineral phase of hard tissue. Unfortunately, the structure of biomineral-associated proteins cannot be determined by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR. Here we report a method for determining the structure of biomineral-associated proteins. The method combines solid-state NMR (ssNMR) and ssNMR-biased computational structure prediction. In addition, the algorithm is able to identify lattice geometries most compatible with ssNMR constraints, representing a quantitative, novel method for investigating crystal-face binding specificity. We use this new method to determine most of the structure of human salivary statherin interacting with the mineral phase of tooth enamel. Computation and experiment converge on an ensemble of related structures and identify preferential binding at three crystal surfaces. The work represents a significant advance toward determining structure of biomineral-adsorbed protein using experimentally biased structure prediction. This method is generally applicable to proteins that can be chemically synthesized. PMID:21134646

  14. Structural coding versus free-energy predictive coding.

    PubMed

    van der Helm, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Focusing on visual perceptual organization, this article contrasts the free-energy (FE) version of predictive coding (a recent Bayesian approach) to structural coding (a long-standing representational approach). Both use free-energy minimization as metaphor for processing in the brain, but their formal elaborations of this metaphor are fundamentally different. FE predictive coding formalizes it by minimization of prediction errors, whereas structural coding formalizes it by minimization of the descriptive complexity of predictions. Here, both sides are evaluated. A conclusion regarding competence is that FE predictive coding uses a powerful modeling technique, but that structural coding has more explanatory power. A conclusion regarding performance is that FE predictive coding-though more detailed in its account of neurophysiological data-provides a less compelling cognitive architecture than that of structural coding, which, for instance, supplies formal support for the computationally powerful role it attributes to neuronal synchronization. PMID:26407895

  15. SAM-T08, HMM-based protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Karplus, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The SAM-T08 web server is a protein structure prediction server that provides several useful intermediate results in addition to the final predicted 3D structure: three multiple sequence alignments of putative homologs using different iterated search procedures, prediction of local structure features including various backbone and burial properties, calibrated E-values for the significance of template searches of PDB and residue–residue contact predictions. The server has been validated as part of the CASP8 assessment of structure prediction as having good performance across all classes of predictions. The SAM-T08 server is available at http://compbio.soe.ucsc.edu/SAM_T08/T08-query.html PMID:19483096

  16. Growth, molecular structure, NBO analysis and vibrational spectral analysis of l-tartaric acid single crystal.

    PubMed

    Sasikala, V; Sajan, D; Vijayan, N; Chaitanya, K; Babu Raj, M S; Selin Joy, B H

    2014-04-01

    Single crystal of l-tartaric acid (LTA) has been grown by slow evaporation technique. The experimental and theoretical studies on molecular structure, vibrational spectra, electronic absorption spectra and non-linear optical property of the crystal are studied. The FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis-NIR experimental spectra of LTA crystal have been recorded in the range 400-4000cm(-1), 100-3700cm(-1) and 190-1100nm, respectively. Density functional theory calculations with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis sets was used to determine ground state molecular geometries, vibrational frequencies, ICT interactions, Mulliken population analysis on atomic charge, HOMO-LUMO analysis, non-linear optical response properties and thermodynamic properties for LTA and the results were discussed. Vibrational analysis confirms the formation of intramolecular OH⋯O hydrogen bonding. The stability of the molecule has been analyzed using NBO analysis. The results of electronic absorptions in gas phase and water phase LTA were calculated using TD-DFT method. The third-order nonlinear absorption behaviour of LTA was studied using open aperture Z-scan technique, with 5ns laser pulses at 532nm and the nonlinear absorption coefficient of the grown crystal was measured. The predicted NLO properties, UV absorption and Z-scan studies indicate that LTA is an attractive material for laser frequency doubling and optical limiting applications. PMID:24394529

  17. Magnetic and Crystal Structure of α-RuCl3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Jennifer

    The layered honeycomb material α-RuCl3 has been proposed as a candidate material to show significant bond-dependent Kitaev type interactions. This has prompted several recent studies of magnetism in this material that have found evidence for multiple magnetic transitions in the temperature range of 8-14 K. We will present elastic neutron scattering measurements collected using a co-aligned array of α-RuCl3 crystals, identifying zigzag magnetic order within the honeycomb planes with an ordering temperature of ~8 K. It has been reported that the ordering temperature depends on the c axis periodicity of the layered structure, with ordering temperatures of 8 and 14 K for three and two-layer periodicity respectively. While the in-plane magnetic order has been identified, it is clear that a complete understanding of magnetic ordering and interactions will depend on the three dimensional structure of the crystal. Evidence of a structural transition at ~150 K has been reported and questions remain about the structural details, in particular the stacking of the honeycomb layers. We will present x-ray diffraction measurements investigating the low and high temperature structures and stacking disorder in α-RuCl3. Finally, we will present inelastic neutron scattering measurements of magnetic excitations in this material. Work done in collaboration with K. W. Plumb (Johns Hopkins University), J. P. Clancy, Young-June Kim (University of Toronto), J. Britten (McMaster University), Yu-Sheng Chen (Argonne National Laboratory), Y. Qiu, Y. Zhao, D. Parshall, and J. W. Lynn (NCNR).

  18. Analysis of zinc binding sites in protein crystal structures.

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, I. L.; Nadassy, K.; Wodak, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    The geometrical properties of zinc binding sites in a dataset of high quality protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank have been examined to identify important differences between zinc sites that are directly involved in catalysis and those that play a structural role. Coordination angles in the zinc primary coordination sphere are compared with ideal values for each coordination geometry, and zinc coordination distances are compared with those in small zinc complexes from the Cambridge Structural Database as a guide of expected trends. We find that distances and angles in the primary coordination sphere are in general close to the expected (or ideal) values. Deviations occur primarily for oxygen coordinating atoms and are found to be mainly due to H-bonding of the oxygen coordinating ligand to protein residues, bidentate binding arrangements, and multi-zinc sites. We find that H-bonding of oxygen containing residues (or water) to zinc bound histidines is almost universal in our dataset and defines the elec-His-Zn motif. Analysis of the stereochemistry shows that carboxyl elec-His-Zn motifs are geometrically rigid, while water elec-His-Zn motifs show the most geometrical variation. As catalytic motifs have a higher proportion of carboxyl elec atoms than structural motifs, they provide a more rigid framework for zinc binding. This is understood biologically, as a small distortion in the zinc position in an enzyme can have serious consequences on the enzymatic reaction. We also analyze the sequence pattern of the zinc ligands and residues that provide elecs, and identify conserved hydrophobic residues in the endopeptidases that also appear to contribute to stabilizing the catalytic zinc site. A zinc binding template in protein crystal structures is derived from these observations. PMID:10082367

  19. Predicting Career Advancement with Structural Equation Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimler, Ronald; Rosenberg, Stuart; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the authors' prior findings concerning basic employability skills in order to determine which skills best predict career advancement potential. Design/methodology/approach: Utilizing survey responses of human resource managers, the employability skills showing the largest relationships to career…

  20. Crystal structures of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and their use in drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mark P; Potter, Barry VL

    2014-01-01

    Cortisol is synthesized by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, inhibitors of which may treat disease associated with excessive cortisol levels. The crystal structures of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 that have been released may aid drug discovery. The crystal structures have been analyzed in terms of the interactions between the protein and the ligands. Despite a variety of structurally different inhibitors the crystal structures of the proteins are quite similar. However, the differences are significant for drug discovery. The crystal structures can be of use in drug discovery, but care needs to be taken when selecting structures for use in virtual screening and ligand docking. PMID:21446847

  1. Crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophytochrome: Photoconversion and signal transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaojing; Kuk, Jane; Moffat, Keith

    2008-11-12

    Phytochromes are red-light photoreceptors that regulate light responses in plants, fungi, and bacteria via reversible photoconversion between red (Pr) and far-red (Pfr) light-absorbing states. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution of a bacteriophytochrome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with an intact, fully photoactive photosensory core domain in its dark-adapted Pfr state. This structure reveals how unusual interdomain interactions, including a knot and an 'arm' structure near the chromophore site, bring together the PAS (Per-ARNT-Sim), GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA), and PHY (phytochrome) domains to achieve Pr/Pfr photoconversion. The PAS, GAF, and PHY domains have topologic elements in common and may have a single evolutionary origin. We identify key interactions that stabilize the chromophore in the Pfr state and provide structural and mutational evidence to support the essential role of the PHY domain in efficient Pr/Pfr photoconversion. We also identify a pair of conserved residues that may undergo concerted conformational changes during photoconversion. Modeling of the full-length bacteriophytochrome structure, including its output histidine kinase domain, suggests how local structural changes originating in the photosensory domain modulate interactions between long, cross-domain signaling helices at the dimer interface and are transmitted to the spatially distant effector domain, thereby regulating its histidine kinase activity.

  2. Crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophytochrome: photoconversion and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojing; Kuk, Jane; Moffat, Keith

    2008-09-23

    Phytochromes are red-light photoreceptors that regulate light responses in plants, fungi, and bacteria via reversible photoconversion between red (Pr) and far-red (Pfr) light-absorbing states. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.9 A resolution of a bacteriophytochrome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with an intact, fully photoactive photosensory core domain in its dark-adapted Pfr state. This structure reveals how unusual interdomain interactions, including a knot and an "arm" structure near the chromophore site, bring together the PAS (Per-ARNT-Sim), GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA), and PHY (phytochrome) domains to achieve Pr/Pfr photoconversion. The PAS, GAF, and PHY domains have topologic elements in common and may have a single evolutionary origin. We identify key interactions that stabilize the chromophore in the Pfr state and provide structural and mutational evidence to support the essential role of the PHY domain in efficient Pr/Pfr photoconversion. We also identify a pair of conserved residues that may undergo concerted conformational changes during photoconversion. Modeling of the full-length bacteriophytochrome structure, including its output histidine kinase domain, suggests how local structural changes originating in the photosensory domain modulate interactions between long, cross-domain signaling helices at the dimer interface and are transmitted to the spatially distant effector domain, thereby regulating its histidine kinase activity. PMID:18799746

  3. Defining and predicting structurally conserved regions in protein superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ivan K.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The structures of homologous proteins are generally better conserved than their sequences. This phenomenon is demonstrated by the prevalence of structurally conserved regions (SCRs) even in highly divergent protein families. Defining SCRs requires the comparison of two or more homologous structures and is affected by their availability and divergence, and our ability to deduce structurally equivalent positions among them. In the absence of multiple homologous structures, it is necessary to predict SCRs of a protein using information from only a set of homologous sequences and (if available) a single structure. Accurate SCR predictions can benefit homology modelling and sequence alignment. Results: Using pairwise DaliLite alignments among a set of homologous structures, we devised a simple measure of structural conservation, termed structural conservation index (SCI). SCI was used to distinguish SCRs from non-SCRs. A database of SCRs was compiled from 386 SCOP superfamilies containing 6489 protein domains. Artificial neural networks were then trained to predict SCRs with various features deduced from a single structure and homologous sequences. Assessment of the predictions via a 5-fold cross-validation method revealed that predictions based on features derived from a single structure perform similarly to ones based on homologous sequences, while combining sequence and structural features was optimal in terms of accuracy (0.755) and Matthews correlation coefficient (0.476). These results suggest that even without information from multiple structures, it is still possible to effectively predict SCRs for a protein. Finally, inspection of the structures with the worst predictions pinpoints difficulties in SCR definitions. Availability: The SCR database and the prediction server can be found at http://prodata.swmed.edu/SCR. Contact: 91huangi@gmail.com or grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics

  4. RBO Aleph: leveraging novel information sources for protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Mahmoud; Putz, Ines; Werner, Tim; Schneider, Michael; Neeb, Moritz; Bartels, Philipp; Brock, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    RBO Aleph is a novel protein structure prediction web server for template-based modeling, protein contact prediction and ab initio structure prediction. The server has a strong emphasis on modeling difficult protein targets for which templates cannot be detected. RBO Aleph's unique features are (i) the use of combined evolutionary and physicochemical information to perform residue–residue contact prediction and (ii) leveraging this contact information effectively in conformational space search. RBO Aleph emerged as one of the leading approaches to ab initio protein structure prediction and contact prediction during the most recent Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction experiment (CASP11, 2014). In addition to RBO Aleph's main focus on ab initio modeling, the server also provides state-of-the-art template-based modeling services. Based on template availability, RBO Aleph switches automatically between template-based modeling and ab initio prediction based on the target protein sequence, facilitating use especially for non-expert users. The RBO Aleph web server offers a range of tools for visualization and data analysis, such as the visualization of predicted models, predicted contacts and the estimated prediction error along the model's backbone. The server is accessible at http://compbio.robotics.tu-berlin.de/rbo_aleph/. PMID:25897112

  5. RBO Aleph: leveraging novel information sources for protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Mahmoud; Putz, Ines; Werner, Tim; Schneider, Michael; Neeb, Moritz; Bartels, Philipp; Brock, Oliver

    2015-07-01

    RBO Aleph is a novel protein structure prediction web server for template-based modeling, protein contact prediction and ab initio structure prediction. The server has a strong emphasis on modeling difficult protein targets for which templates cannot be detected. RBO Aleph's unique features are (i) the use of combined evolutionary and physicochemical information to perform residue-residue contact prediction and (ii) leveraging this contact information effectively in conformational space search. RBO Aleph emerged as one of the leading approaches to ab initio protein structure prediction and contact prediction during the most recent Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction experiment (CASP11, 2014). In addition to RBO Aleph's main focus on ab initio modeling, the server also provides state-of-the-art template-based modeling services. Based on template availability, RBO Aleph switches automatically between template-based modeling and ab initio prediction based on the target protein sequence, facilitating use especially for non-expert users. The RBO Aleph web server offers a range of tools for visualization and data analysis, such as the visualization of predicted models, predicted contacts and the estimated prediction error along the model's backbone. The server is accessible at http://compbio.robotics.tu-berlin.de/rbo_aleph/. PMID:25897112

  6. Crystal structure of pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae

    PubMed Central

    Buddrus, Lisa; Andrews, Emma S. V.; Leak, David J.; Danson, Michael J.; Arcus, Vickery L.; Crennell, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) is a thiamine pyrophosphate- and Mg2+ ion-dependent enzyme that catalyses the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. It is rare in bacteria, but is a key enzyme in homofermentative metabolism, where ethanol is the major product. Here, the previously unreported crystal structure of the bacterial pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae is presented. The crystals were shown to diffract to 2.15 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 204.56, b = 177.39, c = 244.55 Å and R r.i.m. = 0.175 (0.714 in the highest resolution bin). The structure was solved by molecular replacement using PDB entry 2vbi as a model and the final R values were R work = 0.186 (0.271 in the highest resolution bin) and R free = 0.220 (0.300 in the highest resolution bin). Each of the six tetramers is a dimer of dimers, with each monomer sharing its thiamine pyrophosphate across the dimer interface, and some contain ethylene glycol mimicking the substrate pyruvate in the active site. Comparison with other bacterial PDCs shows a correlation of higher thermostability with greater tetramer interface area and number of interactions. PMID:27599861

  7. Crystal structures of human peroxiredoxin 6 in different oxidation states.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Lee, Weontae; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong

    2016-09-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a family of antioxidant enzymes found ubiquitously. Prxs function not only as H2O2 scavengers but also as highly sensitive H2O2 sensors and signal transducers. Since reactive oxygen species are involved in many cellular metabolic and signaling processes, Prxs play important roles in various diseases. Prxs can be hyperoxidized to the sulfinic acid (SO2H) or sulfonic acid (SO3H) forms in the presence of high concentrations of H2O2. It is known that oligomerization of Prx is changed accompanying oxidation states, and linked to the function. Among the six Prxs in mammals, Prx6 is the only 1-Cys Prx. It is found in all organs in humans, unlike some 2-Cys Prxs, and is present in all species from bacteria to humans. In addition, Prx6 has Ca(2+)-independent phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity. Thus far only the crystal structure of Prx in the oxidized state has been reported. In this study, we present the crystal structures of human Prx6 in the reduced (SH) and the sulfinic acid (SO2H) forms. PMID:27353378

  8. Crystal structures of vortioxetine and its methanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin-Bo; Gu, Jian-Ming; Sun, Meng-ying; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Wu, Su-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Vortioxetine, C18H22N2S, (1), systematic name 1-{2-[(2,4-di­methyl­phen­yl)sulfan­yl]phen­yl}piperazine, a new drug used to treat patients with major depressive disorder, has been crystallized as the free base and its methanol monosolvate, C18H22N2S·CH3OH, (2). In both structures, the vortioxetine mol­ecules have similar conformations: in (1), the dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 80.04 (16)° and in (2) it is 84.94 (13)°. The C—S—C bond angle in (1) is 102.76 (14)° and the corresponding angle in (2) is 103.41 (11)°. The piperazine ring adopts a chair conformation with the exocyclic N—C bond in a pseudo-equatorial orientation in both structures. No directional inter­actions beyond normal van der Waals contacts could be identified in the crystal of (1), whereas in (2), the vortioxetine and methanol mol­ecules are linked by N—H⋯O and O—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, generating [001] chains. PMID:26396746

  9. Characterization and crystal structure of D-mannitol hemihydrate.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Cletus; Suryanarayanan, Raj; Botez, Cristian E; Stephens, Peter W

    2004-11-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to isolate and characterize mannitol hydrate, and (ii) to solve its crystal structure from high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. Mannitol hydrate was prepared by freeze-drying aqueous mannitol solutions (5% w/v) under controlled conditions. X-ray powder diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analyses indicated that mannitol exists as a hemihydrate (C(6)H(14)O(6) . 0.5H(2)O). Synchrotron data were collected on the X3B1 beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The simulated annealing program PSSP was used to solve the structure, which was subsequently refined by Rietveld analysis using the program package GSAS. The compound crystallizes in space group P1, with a = 9.8963 A, b = 10.5424 A, c = 4.7860 A, alpha = 102.589 degrees , beta = 86.092 degrees , and gamma = 116.079 degrees . The unit cell contains two dissimilar D-mannitol molecules and one water molecule, forming a hydrogen bonding pattern significantly different from that seen in the anhydrous polymorphs. PMID:15368529

  10. Crystal structure of pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae.

    PubMed

    Buddrus, Lisa; Andrews, Emma S V; Leak, David J; Danson, Michael J; Arcus, Vickery L; Crennell, Susan J

    2016-09-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) is a thiamine pyrophosphate- and Mg(2+) ion-dependent enzyme that catalyses the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. It is rare in bacteria, but is a key enzyme in homofermentative metabolism, where ethanol is the major product. Here, the previously unreported crystal structure of the bacterial pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae is presented. The crystals were shown to diffract to 2.15 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 204.56, b = 177.39, c = 244.55 Å and Rr.i.m. = 0.175 (0.714 in the highest resolution bin). The structure was solved by molecular replacement using PDB entry 2vbi as a model and the final R values were Rwork = 0.186 (0.271 in the highest resolution bin) and Rfree = 0.220 (0.300 in the highest resolution bin). Each of the six tetramers is a dimer of dimers, with each monomer sharing its thiamine pyrophosphate across the dimer interface, and some contain ethylene glycol mimicking the substrate pyruvate in the active site. Comparison with other bacterial PDCs shows a correlation of higher thermostability with greater tetramer interface area and number of interactions. PMID:27599861

  11. Crystal structures of superconducting sodium intercalates of hafnium nitride chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Oro-Sole, J.; Frontera, C.; Beltran-Porter, D.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Fuertes, A. . E-mail: amparo.fuertes@icmab.es

    2006-05-25

    Sodium intercalation compounds of HfNCl have been prepared at room temperature in naphtyl sodium solutions in tetrahydrofuran and their crystal structure has been investigated by Rietveld refinement using X-ray powder diffraction data and high-resolution electron microscopy. The structure of two intercalates with space group R3-bar m and lattice parameters a=3.58131(6)A, c=57.752(6)A, and a=3.58791(8)A, c=29.6785(17)A is reported, corresponding to the stages 2 and 1, respectively, of Na{sub x}HfNCl. For the stage 2 phase an ordered model is presented, showing two crystallographically independent [HfNCl] units with an alternation of the Hf-Hf interlayer distance along the c-axis, according with the occupation by sodium atoms of one out of two van der Waals gaps. Both stages 1 and 2 phases are superconducting with critical temperatures between 20 and 24K, they coexist in different samples with proportions depending on the synthesis conditions, and show a variation in c spacing that can be correlated with the sodium stoichiometry. High-resolution electron microscopy images of the host and intercalated samples show bending of the HfNCl bilayers as well as stacking faults in some regions, which coexist in the same crystal with ordered domains.

  12. Crystal structures of vortioxetine and its methanol monosolvate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin-Bo; Gu, Jian-Ming; Sun, Meng-Ying; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Wu, Su-Xiang

    2015-08-01

    Vortioxetine, C18H22N2S, (1), systematic name 1-{2-[(2,4-di-methyl-phen-yl)sulfan-yl]phen-yl}piperazine, a new drug used to treat patients with major depressive disorder, has been crystallized as the free base and its methanol monosolvate, C18H22N2S·CH3OH, (2). In both structures, the vortioxetine mol-ecules have similar conformations: in (1), the dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 80.04 (16)° and in (2) it is 84.94 (13)°. The C-S-C bond angle in (1) is 102.76 (14)° and the corresponding angle in (2) is 103.41 (11)°. The piperazine ring adopts a chair conformation with the exocyclic N-C bond in a pseudo-equatorial orientation in both structures. No directional inter-actions beyond normal van der Waals contacts could be identified in the crystal of (1), whereas in (2), the vortioxetine and methanol mol-ecules are linked by N-H⋯O and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, generating [001] chains. PMID:26396746

  13. The 5S rRNA loop E: chemical probing and phylogenetic data versus crystal structure.

    PubMed Central

    Leontis, N B; Westhof, E

    1998-01-01

    A significant fraction of the bases in a folded, structured RNA molecule participate in noncanonical base pairing interactions, often in the context of internal loops or multi-helix junction loops. The appearance of each new high-resolution RNA structure provides welcome data to guide efforts to understand and predict RNA 3D structure, especially when the RNA in question is a functionally conserved molecule. The recent publication of the crystal structure of the "Loop E" region of bacterial 5S ribosomal RNA is such an event [Correll CC, Freeborn B, Moore PB, Steitz TA, 1997, Cell 91:705-712]. In addition to providing more examples of already established noncanonical base pairs, such as purine-purine sheared pairings, trans-Hoogsteen UA, and GU wobble pairs, the structure provides the first high-resolution views of two new purine-purine pairings and a new GU pairing. The goal of the present analysis is to expand the capabilities of both chemical probing and phylogenetic analysis to predict with greater accuracy the structures of RNA molecules. First, in light of existing chemical probing data, we investigate what lessons could be learned regarding the interpretation of this widely used method of RNA structure probing. Then we analyze the 3D structure with reference to molecular phylogeny data (assuming conservation of function) to discover what alternative base pairings are geometrically compatible with the structure. The comparisons between previous modeling efforts and crystal structures show that the intricate involvements of ions and water molecules in the maintenance of non-Watson-Crick pairs render the process of correctly identifying the interacting sites in such pairs treacherous, except in cases of trans-Hoogsteen A/U or sheared A/G pairs for the adenine N1 site. The phylogenetic analysis identifies A/A, A/C, A/U and C/A, C/C, and C/U pairings isosteric with sheared A/G, as well as A/A and A/C pairings isosteric with both G/U and G/G bifurcated pairings

  14. Structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping; Hawley, Marilyn; Bauer, Eric D; Stockum, Phil B; Manoharan, Hari C

    2009-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution STM images for a uranium compound taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the USb{sub 2} crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. The a and b dimensions were equal, with the atoms arranged in a cubic pattern. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the DOS measured by STM. Some strange features observed in the STM will be discussed in conjunction with ab initio calculations. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the power of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques combined with a theoretical underpinning to determine the surface atomic structure and properties of actinide materials, such as the quasi 2-dimensional uranium dipnictide USb{sub 2} single crystal, thereby contributing to the understanding of their surface structural and electronic properties. The members of this interesting UX{sub 2} (X=P, As, Sb, Bi) series of compounds display dual localized and itinerant 5f electron behavior within the same compound due to the hybridization of the 5f orbitals with the conduction band. With the exception of UO{sub 2}, which has to be studied at elevated temperature to generate enough carriers for STM imaging, STM techniques have not been applied successfully to the characterization of the surface atomic structure of any other single crystal actinide compound, to the best of our knowledge. However, STM has been used to a limited extent for the study of some cerium compounds. STM probes electronic properties at the atomic level and can directly provide information about the local density of filled and empty states (LDOS) states simultaneously. A STM topograph provides the local atomic arrangement and spacing of the atoms on the surface, local defect structures (e.g. steps, vacancies, and kink sites) and the presence of contaminants

  15. A scoring function based on solvation thermodynamics for protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shiqiao; Harano, Yuichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro; Sakurai, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    We predict protein structure using our recently developed free energy function for describing protein stability, which is focused on solvation thermodynamics. The function is combined with the current most reliable sampling methods, i.e., fragment assembly (FA) and comparative modeling (CM). The prediction is tested using 11 small proteins for which high-resolution crystal structures are available. For 8 of these proteins, sequence similarities are found in the database, and the prediction is performed with CM. Fairly accurate models with average Cα root mean square deviation (RMSD) ∼ 2.0 Å are successfully obtained for all cases. For the rest of the target proteins, we perform the prediction following FA protocols. For 2 cases, we obtain predicted models with an RMSD ∼ 3.0 Å as the best-scored structures. For the other case, the RMSD remains larger than 7 Å. For all the 11 target proteins, our scoring function identifies the experimentally determined native structure as the best structure. Starting from the predicted structure, replica exchange molecular dynamics is performed to further refine the structures. However, we are unable to improve its RMSD toward the experimental structure. The exhaustive sampling by coarse-grained normal mode analysis around the native structures reveals that our function has a linear correlation with RMSDs < 3.0 Å. These results suggest that the function is quite reliable for the protein structure prediction while the sampling method remains one of the major limiting factors in it. The aspects through which the methodology could further be improved are discussed.

  16. New Ground-State Crystal Structure of Elemental Boron.

    PubMed

    An, Qi; Reddy, K Madhav; Xie, Kelvin Y; Hemker, Kevin J; Goddard, William A

    2016-08-19

    Elemental boron exhibits many polymorphs in nature based mostly on an icosahedral shell motif, involving stabilization of 13 strong multicenter intraicosahedral bonds. It is commonly accepted that the most thermodynamic stable structure of elemental boron at atmospheric pressure is the β rhombohedral boron (β-B). Surprisingly, using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that pure boron powder contains grains of two different types, the previously identified β-B containing a number of randomly spaced twins and what appears to be a fully transformed twinlike structure. This fully transformed structure, denoted here as τ-B, is based on the Cmcm orthorhombic space group. Quantum mechanics predicts that the newly identified τ-B structure is 13.8  meV/B more stable than β-B. The τ-B structure allows 6% more charge transfer from B_{57} units to nearby B_{12} units, making the net charge 6% closer to the ideal expected from Wade's rules. Thus, we predict the τ-B structure to be the ground state structure for elemental boron at atmospheric pressure. PMID:27588864

  17. New Ground-State Crystal Structure of Elemental Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qi; Reddy, K. Madhav; Xie, Kelvin Y.; Hemker, Kevin J.; Goddard, William A.

    2016-08-01

    Elemental boron exhibits many polymorphs in nature based mostly on an icosahedral shell motif, involving stabilization of 13 strong multicenter intraicosahedral bonds. It is commonly accepted that the most thermodynamic stable structure of elemental boron at atmospheric pressure is the β rhombohedral boron (β -B ). Surprisingly, using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that pure boron powder contains grains of two different types, the previously identified β -B containing a number of randomly spaced twins and what appears to be a fully transformed twinlike structure. This fully transformed structure, denoted here as τ -B , is based on the C m c m orthorhombic space group. Quantum mechanics predicts that the newly identified τ -B structure is 13.8 meV /B more stable than β -B . The τ -B structure allows 6% more charge transfer from B57 units to nearby B12 units, making the net charge 6% closer to the ideal expected from Wade's rules. Thus, we predict the τ -B structure to be the ground state structure for elemental boron at atmospheric pressure.

  18. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylation-coupled Saccharide Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Y Cao; X Jin; E Levin; H Huang; Y Zong; W Hendrickson; J Javitch; K Rajashankar; M Zhou; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Saccharides have a central role in the nutrition of all living organisms. Whereas several saccharide uptake systems are shared between the different phylogenetic kingdoms, the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system exists almost exclusively in bacteria. This multi-component system includes an integral membrane protein EIIC that transports saccharides and assists in their phosphorylation. Here we present the crystal structure of an EIIC from Bacillus cereus that transports diacetylchitobiose. The EIIC is a homodimer, with an expansive interface formed between the amino-terminal halves of the two protomers. The carboxy-terminal half of each protomer has a large binding pocket that contains a diacetylchitobiose, which is occluded from both sides of the membrane with its site of phosphorylation near the conserved His250 and Glu334 residues. The structure shows the architecture of this important class of transporters, identifies the determinants of substrate binding and phosphorylation, and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of sugar translocation.

  19. The first crystal structure of an archaeal helical repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Tsuge, Hideaki; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Kawabata, Takeshi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structure of ST1625p, a protein encoded by a hypothetical open reading frame ST1625 in the genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii, was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The only sequence similarity exhibited by the amino-acid sequence of ST1625p was a 33% identity with the sequence of SSO0983p from S. solfataricus. The 19 kDa monomeric protein was observed to consist of a right-handed superhelix assembled from a tandem repeat of ten α-­helices. A structural homology search using the DALI and MATRAS algorithms indicates that this protein can be classified as a helical repeat protein. PMID:16511116

  20. Crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in Si

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Verburg, P. C.; Smillie, L. A.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Haberl, B.; Bradby, J. E.; Williams, J. S.; Huis in ’t Veld, A. J.

    2015-06-04

    Laser-induced subsurface modification of dielectric materials is a well-known technology. Applications include the production of optical components and selective etching. In addition to dielectric materials, the subsurface modification technology can be applied to silicon, by employing near to mid-infrared radiation. An application of subsurface modifications in silicon is laser-induced subsurface separation, which is a method to separate wafers into individual dies. Other applications for which proofs of concept exist are the formation of waveguides and resistivity tuning. However, limited knowledge is available about the crystal structure of subsurface modifications in silicon. In this paper, we investigate the geometry and crystalmore » structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in monocrystalline silicon wafers. Finally, in addition to the generation of lattice defects, we found that transformations to amorphous silicon and Si-iii/Si-xii occur as a result of the laser irradiation.« less