Science.gov

Sample records for crystallographic space groups

  1. Algorithms for deriving crystallographic space-group information. II: Treatment of special positions

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Adams, Paul D.

    2001-10-05

    Algorithms for the treatment of special positions in 3-dimensional crystallographic space groups are presented. These include an algorithm for the determination of the site-symmetry group given the coordinates of a point, an algorithm for the determination of the exact location of the nearest special position, an algorithm for the assignment of a Wyckoff letter given the site-symmetry group, and an alternative algorithm for the assignment of a Wyckoff letter given the coordinates of a point directly. All algorithms are implemented in ISO C++ and are integrated into the Computational Crystallography Toolbox. The source code is freely available.

  2. Prediction of molecular crystal structures by a crystallographic QM/MM model with full space-group symmetry.

    PubMed

    Mrschel, Philipp; Schmidt, Martin U

    2015-01-01

    A crystallographic quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical model (c-QM/MM model) with full space-group symmetry has been developed for molecular crystals. The lattice energy was calculated by quantum-mechanical methods for short-range interactions and force-field methods for long-range interactions. The quantum-mechanical calculations covered the interactions within the molecule and the interactions of a reference molecule with each of the surrounding 12-15 molecules. The interactions with all other molecules were treated by force-field methods. In each optimization step the energies in the QM and MM shells were calculated separately as single-point energies; after adding both energy contributions, the crystal structure (including the lattice parameters) was optimized accordingly. The space-group symmetry was maintained throughout. Crystal structures with more than one molecule per asymmetric unit, e.g. structures with Z' = 2, hydrates and solvates, have been optimized as well. Test calculations with different quantum-mechanical methods on nine small organic molecules revealed that the density functional theory methods with dispersion correction using the B97-D functional with 6-31G* basis set in combination with the DREIDING force field reproduced the experimental crystal structures with good accuracy. Subsequently the c-QM/MM method was applied to nine compounds from the CCDC blind tests resulting in good energy rankings and excellent geometric accuracies. PMID:25537386

  3. Orbits of crystallographic embedding of non-crystallographic groups and applications to virology.

    PubMed

    Twarock, Reidun; Valiunas, Motiejus; Zappa, Emilio

    2015-11-01

    The architecture of infinite structures with non-crystallographic symmetries can be modelled via aperiodic tilings, but a systematic construction method for finite structures with non-crystallographic symmetry at different radial levels is still lacking. This paper presents a group theoretical method for the construction of finite nested point sets with non-crystallographic symmetry. Akin to the construction of quasicrystals, a non-crystallographic group G is embedded into the point group {\\cal P} of a higher-dimensional lattice and the chains of all G-containing subgroups are constructed. The orbits of lattice points under such subgroups are determined, and it is shown that their projection into a lower-dimensional G-invariant subspace consists of nested point sets with G-symmetry at each radial level. The number of different radial levels is bounded by the index of G in the subgroup of {\\cal P}. In the case of icosahedral symmetry, all subgroup chains are determined explicitly and it is illustrated that these point sets in projection provide blueprints that approximate the organization of simple viral capsids, encoding information on the structural organization of capsid proteins and the genomic material collectively, based on two case studies. Contrary to the affine extensions previously introduced, these orbits endow virus architecture with an underlying finite group structure, which lends itself better to the modelling of dynamic properties than its infinite-dimensional counterpart. PMID:26522406

  4. Aqueous phase behavior of a 1-O-phytanyl-beta-D-xyloside/water system. Glycolipid-based bicontinuous cubic phases of crystallographic space groups Pn3m and Ia3d.

    PubMed

    Hato, Masakatsu; Yamashita, Itaru; Kato, Tadashi; Abe, Yutaka

    2004-12-21

    Temperature- and concentration-dependent aqueous phase diagram of a novel alkylglycoside, 1-O-phytanyl-beta-D-xyloside (beta-Xyl(Phyt)), was studied using small-angle X-ray scattering, polarizing optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The phases found in this system include an Lc phase, an Lalpha phase, an HII phase, two inverted cubic phases of crystallographic space groups Pn3m and Ia3d, and a fluid isotropic phase, FI. The phase diagram of the beta-Xyl(Phyt)/water system is similar to that for the 1-monooleylglycerol (MO)/water system, suggesting that the phase behavior is largely determined by the overall molecular shape rather than the details of surfactant molecular structure. Moreover, the structural parameters of the beta-Xyl(Phyt) liquid crystals are also similar to those of the MO/water, due primarily to the similar molecular dimensions of two molecules. As compared to the MO/water system, however, the beta-Xyl(Phyt)/water system displays a lower value of TK ( approximately 8.(5) degrees C) and a wider temperature window for the mesophases (8.(5)-120 degrees C). Moreover, beta-Xyl(Phyt) is chemically more robust than MO, as the ether linkage is more stable against hydrolysis than the ester linkage and the phytanyl chain is fully saturated. PMID:15595758

  5. Exact random-walk models in crystallographic statistics. VII. An all-space-group study of the effects of atomic heterogeneity on the P.D.F.'s of magnitude of [E].

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, S; Shmueli, U; Stein, Z; Shashua, R; Weiss, G H

    1991-07-01

    Exact expressions have been found for the probability density functions (p.d.f.'s) of the magnitude of the normalized structure factor for all the two-dimensional and most three-dimensional space groups [Part VI: Rabinovich, Shmueli, Stein, Shashua & Weiss (1991). Acta Cryst. A47, 328-335]. The results of that investigation are used in the present article to examine some effects of atomic heterogeneity, in the various space-group symmetries, on the p.d.f.'s. Some typical comparisons are made between p.d.f.'s based on the central limit theorem and p.d.f.'s computed from exact formulae. In addition, the exact results are compared to histograms of simulated values of magnitude of [E]. It is found that the p.d.f.'s for some space groups are influenced rather strongly by the presence of outstandingly heavy scatters, but they are quite insensitive to the presence of such scatterers in other space groups. The often made general statement 'The presence of outstandingly heavy scatterers may invalidate the indications of Wilson's statistics' is made more precise here, insofar as it depends on the particular space group. PMID:1910633

  6. The analysis of crystallographic symmetry types in finite groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, Atikah Mohd; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Adam, Nooraishikin; Zamri, Siti Norziahidayu Amzee

    2014-06-01

    Undeniably, it is human nature to prefer objects which are considered beautiful. Most consider beautiful as perfection, hence they try to create objects which are perfectly balance in shape and patterns. This creates a whole different kind of art, the kind that requires an object to be symmetrical. This leads to the study of symmetrical objects and pattern. Even mathematicians and ethnomathematicians are very interested with the essence of symmetry. One of these studies were conducted on the Malay traditional triaxial weaving culture. The patterns derived from this technique are symmetrical and this allows for further research. In this paper, the 17 symmetry types in a plane, known as the wallpaper groups, are studied and discussed. The wallpaper groups will then be applied to the triaxial patterns of food cover in Malaysia.

  7. Complete derivation of space groups of magnetic symmetry of crystals by numerical construction

    SciTech Connect

    Palistrant, A. F.

    2007-11-15

    The solution is given to the problem regarding the derivation of the so-called space groups of magnetic symmetry with crystallographic angles of rotation of the spin vector, which was formulated as far back as the early 1970s. The crystallographic P-symmetries that should be used in the generalization with the three-dimensional space Fedorov groups G{sub 3} are revealed. The space groups G{sub 3} are generalized with each of these P-symmetries.

  8. Novel Kac-Moody-type affine extensions of non-crystallographic Coxeter groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe; Bhm, Cline; Twarock, Reidun

    2012-07-01

    Motivated by recent results in mathematical virology, we present novel asymmetric {Z}[\\tau ]-integer-valued affine extensions of the non-crystallographic Coxeter groups H2, H3 and H4 derived in a Kac-Moody-type formalism. In particular, we show that the affine reflection planes which extend the Coxeter group H3 generate (twist) translations along two-, three- and five-fold axes of icosahedral symmetry, and we classify these translations in terms of the Fibonacci recursion relation applied to different start values. We thus provide an explanation of previous results concerning affine extensions of icosahedral symmetry in a Coxeter group context, and extend this analysis to the case of the non-crystallographic Coxeter groups H2 and H4. These results will enable new applications of group theory in physics (quasicrystals), biology (viruses) and chemistry (fullerenes).

  9. Torsional random walk statistics on lattices using convolution on crystallographic motion groups.

    PubMed Central

    Skliros, Aris; Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for generating the conformational statistics of lattice polymer models. The inputs to the algorithm are the distributions of poses (positions and orientations) of reference frames attached to sequentially proximal bonds in the chain as it undergoes all possible torsional motions in the lattice. If z denotes the number of discrete torsional motions allowable around each of the n bonds, our method generates the probability distribution in end-to-end pose corresponding to all of the zn independent lattice conformations in O(nD+1) arithmetic operations for lattices in D-dimensional space. This is achieved by dividing the chain into short segments and performing multiple generalized convolutions of the pose distribution functions for each segment. The convolution is performed with respect to the crystallographic space group for the lattice on which the chain is defined. The formulation is modified to include the effects of obstacles (excluded volumes), and to calculate the frequency of the occurrence of each conformation when the effects of pairwise conformational energy are included. In the latter case (which is for 3 dimensional lattices only) the computational cost is O(z4n4). This polynomial complexity is a vast improvement over the O(zn) exponential complexity associated with the brute force enumeration of all conformations. The distribution of end-to-end distances and average radius of gyration are calculated easily once the pose distribution for the full chain is found. The method is demonstrated with square, hexagonal, cubic and tetrahedral lattices. PMID:17898862

  10. Affine extensions of non-crystallographic Coxeter groups induced by projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe; BÅ`hm, Céline; Twarock, Reidun

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we show that affine extensions of non-crystallographic Coxeter groups can be derived via Coxeter-Dynkin diagram foldings and projections of affine extended versions of the root systems E8, D6, and A4. We show that the induced affine extensions of the non-crystallographic groups H4, H3, and H2 correspond to a distinguished subset of those considered in [P.-P. Dechant, C. Bœhm, and R. Twarock, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45, 285202 (2012)]. This class of extensions was motivated by physical applications in icosahedral systems in biology (viruses), physics (quasicrystals), and chemistry (fullerenes). By connecting these here to extensions of E8, D6, and A4, we place them into the broader context of crystallographic lattices such as E8, suggesting their potential for applications in high energy physics, integrable systems, and modular form theory. By inverting the projection, we make the case for admitting different number fields in the Cartan matrix, which could open up enticing possibilities in hyperbolic geometry and rational conformal field theory.

  11. Crystallographic topology and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.K.; Burnett, M.N.; Dunbar, W.D.

    1996-10-01

    Geometric topology and structural crystallography concepts are combined to define a new area we call Structural Crystallographic Topology, which may be of interest to both crystallographers and mathematicians. In this paper, we represent crystallographic symmetry groups by orbifolds and crystal structures by Morse - functions. The Morse function uses mildly overlapping Gaussian thermal-motion probability density functions centered on atomic sites to form a critical net with peak, pass, pale, and pit critical points joined into a graph by density gradient-flow separatrices. Critical net crystal structure drawings can be made with the ORTEP-III graphics pro- An orbifold consists of an underlying topological space with an embedded singular set that represents the Wyckoff sites of the crystallographic group. An orbifold for a point group, plane group, or space group is derived by gluing together equivalent edges or faces of a crystallographic asymmetric unit. The critical-net-on-orbifold model incorporates the classical invariant lattice complexes of crystallography and allows concise quotient-space topological illustrations to be drawn without the repetition that is characteristic of normal crystal structure drawings.

  12. Renormalization group in internal space

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, J.; Sailer, K.

    2005-01-15

    Renormalization group in the internal space consists of the gradual change of the coupling constants. Functional evolution equations corresponding to the change of the mass or the coupling constant are presented in the framework of a scalar model. The evolution in the mass which yields the functional generalization of the Callan-Symanzik equation for the one-particle irreducible effective action is given in its renormalized, cutoff-independent form. The evolution of the coupling constant generates an evolution equation for the two-particle irreducible effective action.

  13. Platinum Group Thiophenoxyimine Complexes: Syntheses,Crystallographic and Computational Studies of Structural Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Krinsky, Jamin L.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2006-10-03

    Monomeric thiosalicylaldiminate complexes of rhodium(I) and iridium(I) were prepared by ligand transfer from the homoleptic zinc(II) species. In the presence of strongly donating ligands, the iridium complexes undergo insertion of the metal into the imine carbon-hydrogen bond. Thiophenoxyketimines were prepared by non-templated reaction of o-mercaptoacetophenone with anilines, and were complexed with rhodium(I), iridium(I), nickel(II) and platinum(II). X-ray crystallographic studies showed that while the thiosalicylaldiminate complexes display planar ligand conformations, those of the thiophenoxyketiminates are strongly distorted. Results of a computational study were consistent with a steric-strain interpretation of the difference in preferred ligand geometries.

  14. The representation group and its application to space groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin-Quan; Gao, Mei-Juan; Ma, Guang-Qun

    1985-01-01

    A so-called representation (rep) group G is introduced which is formed by all the |G| distinct operators (or matrices) of an abstract group Ĝ in a rep space L and which is an m-fold covering group of another abstract group g. G forms a rep of Ĝ. The rep group differs from an abstract group in that its elements are not linearly independent and thus the number n of its linearly independent class operators is less than its class number N. A systematic theory is established for the rep group based on Dirac's CSCO (complete set of commuting operators) approach in quantum mechanics. This theory also comprises the rep theory for abstract groups as a special case of m=1. Three kinds of CSCO, the CSCO-I, -II, and -III, are defined which are the analogies of J2, (J2,Jz), and (J2,Jz,J¯z), respectively, for the rotation group SO3, where J¯z is the component of angular momentum in the intrinsic frame. The primitive characters, the irreducible basis and Clebsch-Gordan coefficients, and the irreducible matrices of the rep group G in any subgroup symmetry adaptation can be found by solving the eigenequations of the CSCO-I, -II, and -III of G, respectively, in appropriate vector spaces. It is shown that the rep group G has only n instead of N inequivalent irreducible representations (irreps), which are just the allowable irreps of the abstract group Ĝ in the space L. Therefore, the construction of the irreps of Ĝ in L can be replaced by that of G. The labor involved in the construction of the irreps of the rep group G with order |G| is no more than that for the group g with order |g|=|G|m, and thus tremendous labor can be saved by working with the rep group G instead of the abstract group Ĝ. Based on the rep-group theory, a new approach to the space-group rep theory is proposed, which is distinguished by its simplicity and applicability. Corresponding to each little group G(k), there is a rep group G'k. The n inequivalent irreps of G'k are essentially just the acceptable irreps of the little group G(k). Consequently the construction of the irreps of G(k) is almost as easy as that of the little co-group G0(k). An easily programmable algorithm is established for computing the Clebsch-Gordan series and Clebsch-Gordan coefficients of a space group simultaneously.

  15. Aeritalia Space Systems Group, Turin, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlan, Vincent

    1989-01-01

    Aeritalia has been involved in European space programs since the early 1960's. Space activities grew to the point that in 1984 Aeritalia established a separate Space Systems Group (SSG), located in Turin. Today, SSG is involved in dozens of projects, some of them jointly with NASA and U.S. aerospace companies. Here, several of the major projects, such as the Tethered Satellite system, HIPPARCOS, Columbus Pressurized Module, Italian Research Interim Stage, and others are briefly described.

  16. Distribution of mica polytypes among space groups.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, H.

    1971-01-01

    All the possible space groups for mica polytypes are deduced by making use of the characteristics of the mica unit layer and stacking mode. The algebraic properties of the vector-stacking symbol of Ross et al. (1966) are examined, and a simple algorithm for deducing the space group from this symbol is presented. A method considered for enumerating all possible stacking sequences of mica polytypes makes use of a computer.

  17. Crystallographic evidence of sulfate evaporites in the Kromberg Formation, Onverwacht Group, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.L.; Lowe, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The 3.5 Ga Kromberg Formation of the Onverwacht Group, Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa, includes a basal silicified shallow-water evaporite sequence deposited in a series of small fault-bounded basins. Other early Archean replaced and recrystallized evaporites have been interpreted to have included both primary gypsum and aragonite based on general crystal morphology and the overall similarity of these units to Phanerozoic evaporites. Crystal interfacial angle measurements, however, have not been widely reported to support interpretations of primary mineralogy. Although the primary evaporite minerals in the Kromberg Formation have been replaced by chert and druzy megaquartz, interfacial angles of silicified pseudohexagonal, prismatic to bladed crystals can be measured with a contact goniometer. Measurement of angles between the six prism faces display a biomodal distribution about 55/sup 0/ and 69/sup 0/. Within individual crystals, these angles show a general arrangement of two at 69/sup 0/ separated by sets of two angles at 55/sup 0/. These relationships closely resemble those of gypsum which has four angles of (010) (120)=55.75/sup 0/ and two of (120) (120)-68.50/sup 0/. No evidence has been found for the existence of aragonite which has six angles of (110) (110)=60/sup 0/. Textural and geometric crystal comparisons of these silicified crystals with Messinian algal-related selenite and modern gypsum support the proposal of a gypsum precursor. The common presence of gypsum in this and other greenstone belts suggests that the early Archean ocean may have been at or near saturation with respect to sulfate.

  18. Crystallographic Oxide Phase Identification of Char Deposits Obtained from Space Shuttle Columbia Window Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivas, J. D.; Wright, M. C.; Christoffersen, R.; Cone, D. M.; McDanels, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Analyzing the remains of Space Shuttle Columbia has proven technically beneficial years after the vehicle breakup. This investigation focused on charred deposits on fragments of Columbia overhead windowpanes. Results were unexpected relative to the engineering understanding of material performance in a reentry environment. The TEM analysis demonstrated that the oxides of aluminum and titanium mixed with silicon oxides to preserve a history of thermal conditions to which portions of the vehicle were exposed. The presence of Ti during the beginning of the deposition process, along with the thermodynamic phase precipitation upon cool down, indicate that temperatures well above the Ti melt point were experienced. The stratified observations implied that additional exothermic reaction, expectedly metal combustion of a Ti structure, had to be present for oxide formation. Results are significant for aerospace vehicles where thermal protection system (TPS) breaches cause substructures to be in direct path with the reentry plasma. 1

  19. NASA's Internal Space Weather Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Guhathakurta, M.; Bell, H.; Niemeyer, L.; Allen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements from many of NASA's scientific spacecraft are used routinely by space weather forecasters, both in the U.S. and internationally. ACE, SOHO (an ESA/NASA collaboration), STEREO, and SDO provide images and in situ measurements that are assimilated into models and cited in alerts and warnings. A number of years ago, the Space Weather laboratory was established at NASA-Goddard, along with the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. Within that organization, a space weather service center has begun issuing alerts for NASA's operational users. NASA's operational user community includes flight operations for human and robotic explorers; atmospheric drag concerns for low-Earth orbit; interplanetary navigation and communication; and the fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles, high altitude aircraft, and launch vehicles. Over the past three years we have identified internal stakeholders within NASA and formed a Working Group to better coordinate their expertise and their needs. In this presentation we will describe this activity and some of the challenges in forming a diverse working group.

  20. Actuator grouping optimization on flexible space reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

    2011-03-01

    With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. While studies have shown that domain control of space reflectors via Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) actuators is promising, the challenge is to realistically control a large number of distributed actuators with limited number of power supplies. In this research, a new En Mass Elimination method is synthesized to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the actuator number exceeds the number of power supplies available. An analytical model is developed and the methodology is demonstrated numerically through system simulation on the derived model.

  1. UCLA IGPP Space Plasma Simulation Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the past 10 years the UCLA IGPP Space Plasma Simulation Group has pursued its theoretical effort to develop a Mission Oriented Theory (MOT) for the International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program. This effort has been based on a combination of approaches: analytical theory, large scale kinetic (LSK) calculations, global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and self-consistent plasma kinetic (SCK) simulations. These models have been used to formulate a global interpretation of local measurements made by the ISTP spacecraft. The regions of applications of the MOT cover most of the magnetosphere: the solar wind, the low- and high-latitude magnetospheric boundary, the near-Earth and distant magnetotail, and the auroral region. Most recent investigations include: plasma processes in the electron foreshock, response of the magnetospheric cusp, particle entry in the magnetosphere, sources of observed distribution functions in the magnetotail, transport of oxygen ions, self-consistent evolution of the magnetotail, substorm studies, effects of explosive reconnection, and auroral acceleration simulations.

  2. International Space Station Earth Observations Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.; Oikawa, Koki

    2015-01-01

    The multilateral Earth Observations Working Group (EOWG) was chartered in May 2012 in order to improve coordination and collaboration of Earth observing payloads, research, and applications on the International Space Station (ISS). The EOWG derives its authority from the ISS Program Science Forum, and a NASA representative serves as a permanent co-chair. A rotating co-chair position can be occupied by any of the international partners, following concurrence by the other partners; a JAXA representative is the current co-chair. Primary functions of the EOWG include, 1) the exchange of information on plans for payloads, from science and application objectives to instrument development, data collection, distribution and research; 2) recognition and facilitation of opportunities for international collaboration in order to optimize benefits from different instruments; and 3) provide a formal ISS Program interface for collection and application of remotely sensed data collected in response to natural disasters through the International Charter, Space and Major Disasters. Recent examples of EOWG activities include coordination of bilateral data sharing protocols between NASA and TsNIIMash for use of crew time and instruments in support of ATV5 reentry imaging activities; discussion of continued use and support of the Nightpod camera mount system by NASA and ESA; and review and revision of international partner contributions on Earth observations to the ISS Program Benefits to Humanity publication.

  3. Crystallographic autostereograms.

    PubMed

    Katrusiak, A

    2001-01-01

    Perspective drawings of crystal structures can be presented as autostereograms (or single-image stereograms), and their performance for in-depth perception is similar or even more advantageous than of stereopairs. The autostereograms offer a convenient means for realistic insight into crystal structures without excessive size reduction of their drawings, as required when preparing stereopairs; thus structures either as simple as elements or as complex as proteins can be illustrated in enhanced resolution. The mathematical background and guidelines for preparing crystallographic autostereograms are described. PMID:11449576

  4. Chain adaptation of space group representations and induced space group Clebsch-Gordan matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirl, R.; Davies, B. L.

    Specific subgroup chain adaptations of representations and corresponding CG-matrices are discussed. Simple applicable analytic formulas are derived which allow one to express supergroup CG-matrices in terms of subgroup CG-matrices. The results are applied to space groups.

  5. Crystallographic Topology 2: Overview and Work in Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.K.

    1999-08-01

    This overview describes an application of contemporary geometric topology and stochastic process concepts to structural crystallography. In this application, crystallographic groups become orbifolds, crystal structures become Morse functions on orbifolds, and vibrating atoms in a crystal become vector valued Gaussian measures with the Radon-Nikodym property. Intended crystallographic benefits include new methods for visualization of space groups and crystal structures, analysis of the thermal motion patterns seen in ORTEP drawings, and a classification scheme for crystal structures based on their Heegaard splitting properties.

  6. Retabulation of space group extinctions for electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, P.; Tanaka, M.

    The space group tables previously published by one of the authors and others are here presented in a revised and compacted form designed to make for compatability with existing tables for x ray diffraction. 136 of the 230 space groups are subject to dynamic extinctions due to glide planes and screw axes, and the observables from these space groups in specific settings are tabulated.

  7. Glide reflection symmetry, Brillouin zone folding, and superconducting pairing for the P 4 /n m m space group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nica, Emilian M.; Yu, Rong; Si, Qimiao

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by the studies of the superconducting pairing states in the iron-based superconductors, we analyze the effects of Brillouin zone folding procedure from a space-group symmetry perspective for a general class of materials with the P 4 /n m m space group. The Brillouin zone folding amounts to working with an effective 1-Fe unit cell, instead of the crystallographic 2-Fe unit cell. We show that the folding procedure can be justified by the validity of a glide reflection symmetry throughout the crystallographic Brillouin zone and by the existence of a minimal double degeneracy along the edges of the latter. We also demonstrate how the folding procedure fails when a local spin-orbit coupling is included although the latter does not break any of the space-group symmetries of the bare Hamiltonian. In light of these general symmetry considerations, we further discuss the implications of the glide reflection symmetry for the superconducting pairing in an effective multiorbital t -J1-J2 model. We find that, for spin-singlet pairing states, the P4/n m m space-group symmetry allows only even parity under the glide reflection and zero total momentum.

  8. Space station group activities habitability module study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, David

    1986-01-01

    This study explores and analyzes architectural design approaches for the interior of the Space Station Habitability Module (originally defined as Habitability Module 1 in Space Station Reference Configuration Decription, JSC-19989, August 1984). In the Research Phase, architectural program and habitability design guidelines are specified. In the Schematic Design Phase, a range of alternative concepts is described and illustrated with drawings, scale-model photographs and design analysis evaluations. Recommendations are presented on the internal architectural, configuration of the Space Station Habitability Module for such functions as the wardroom, galley, exercise facility, library and station control work station. The models show full design configurations for on-orbit performance.

  9. X-ray Crystallographic Studies Reveal That the Incorporation of Spacer Groups in Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors Causes Alternate Binding Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher,S.; Govindasamy, L.; Boyle, N.; Agbandje-McKenna, M.; Silverman, D.; Blackburn, G.; McKenna, R.

    2006-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are well studied targets for the development of inhibitors for pharmaceutical applications. The crystal structure of human CA II has been determined in complex with two CA inhibitors (CAIs) containing conventional sulfonamide and thiadiazole moieties separated by a -CF{sub 2}- or -CHNH{sub 2}- spacer group. The structures presented here reveal that these spacer groups allow novel binding modes for the thiadiazole moiety compared with conventional CAIs.

  10. Exceptional groups, symmetric spaces and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cerchiai, Bianca L.; Cacciatori, Sergio L.

    2009-03-31

    In this article we provide a detailed description of a technique to obtain a simple parameterization for different exceptional Lie groups, such as G{sub 2}, F{sub 4} and E{sub 6}, based on their fibration structure. For the compact case, we construct a realization which is a generalization of the Euler angles for SU(2), while for the non compact version of G{sub 2(2)}/SO(4) we compute the Iwasawa decomposition. This allows us to obtain not only an explicit expression for the Haar measure on the group manifold, but also for the cosets G{sub 2}/SO(4), G{sub 2}/SU(3), F{sub 4}/Spin(9), E{sub 6}/F{sub 4} and G{sub 2(2)}/SO(4) that we used to find the concrete realization of the general element of the group. Moreover, as a by-product, in the simplest case of G{sub 2}/SO(4), we have been able to compute an Einstein metric and the vielbein. The relevance of these results in physics is discussed.

  11. Professional Discussion Groups: Informal Learning in a Third Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    In this ethnographic study, I explored two discussion groups and discovered Third Space elements such as cultural hybridity, counterscript, and sharing of experiences and resources contributed to a safe learning environment existing at the boundaries between participant personal and professional spaces. The groups operated under the auspices of a

  12. Professional Discussion Groups: Informal Learning in a Third Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    In this ethnographic study, I explored two discussion groups and discovered Third Space elements such as cultural hybridity, counterscript, and sharing of experiences and resources contributed to a safe learning environment existing at the boundaries between participant personal and professional spaces. The groups operated under the auspices of a…

  13. The International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Ronald J.; Rabin, Robert; Lujan, Barbara F.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout the 1980s, ESA and the space agencies of Canada, Germany, France, Japan, and the U.S. have pursued cooperative projects bilaterally and multilaterally to prepare for, and to respond to, opportunities in space life sciences research previously unapproachable in scale and sophistication. To cope effectively with likely future space research opportunities, broad, multilateral, coordinated strategic planning is required. Thus, life scientists from these agencies have allied to form the International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group. This Group is formally organized under a charter that specifies the purpose of the Working Group as the development of an international strategic plan for the space life sciences, with periodic revisions as needed to keep the plan current. The plan will be policy-, not operations-oriented. The Working Group also may establish specific implementation teams to coordinate multilateral science policy in specific areas; such teams have been established for space station utilization, and for sharing of flight equipment.

  14. Actuator Grouping Optimization on Flexible Space Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required surface accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. For this study, an analytical model is shown which combines a flexible Kapton reflector with Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) actuators for surface control. Surface errors are introduced that are similar to real world scenarios, and a least squares control algorithm is developed for surface control. Experimental results on a 2.4 meter reflector show that while the analytical reflector model is generally correct, due to idiosyncrasies in the reflector it cannot be used for online control. A new method called the En Mass Elimination algorithm is used to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the number of actuators in the system exceeds the number of power supplies available.

  15. Group structure and group process for effective space station astronaut teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholas, J. M.; Kagan, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Space Station crews will encounter new problems, many derived from the social interaction of groups working in space for extended durations. Solutions to these problems must focus on the structure of groups and the interaction of individuals. A model of intervention is proposed to address problems of interpersonal relationships and emotional stress, and improve the morale, cohesiveness, and productivity of astronaut teams.

  16. Group theoretical construction of planar noncommutative phase spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ngendakumana, Ancille Todjihoundé, Leonard; Nzotungicimpaye, Joachim

    2014-01-15

    Noncommutative phase spaces are generated and classified in the framework of centrally extended anisotropic planar kinematical Lie groups as well as in the framework of noncentrally abelian extended planar absolute time Lie groups. Through these constructions the coordinates of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of naturally introduced fields giving rise to minimal couplings. By symplectic realizations methods, physical interpretations of generators coming from the obtained structures are given.

  17. Pile Groups Analysis in Layered Elastic Half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Baiyong; Xu, Guoping; Gao, Heng

    2010-05-01

    The classical Poulos's elastic theory method which based on the Mindlin solution in elastic half-space is only suitable for the analysis of pile groups in elastic half-space. It cannot take the layered soil into account. By using stress and displacement solutions of axisymmetric problem in layered elastic half-space, the interaction factor method is extended to the analysis of pile groups in layered elastic half-space. Solutions of single pile and interaction of two piles in layered elastic half-space are performed by finite difference method firstly. Then the vertical settlement analysis of pile groups in layered elastic half-space is presented by considering pile to pile interaction by Poulos's interaction factor method. Example analysis shows that calculation in two layered elastic half-space indicates that method of this paper is more rigorous that that of Poulos, and agreeable with BEM method of Chin and Chow whose method based on the accurate solution of two layered elastic half-space.

  18. SHELXT - integrated space-group and crystal-structure determination.

    PubMed

    Sheldrick, George M

    2015-01-01

    The new computer program SHELXT employs a novel dual-space algorithm to solve the phase problem for single-crystal reflection data expanded to the space group P1. Missing data are taken into account and the resolution extended if necessary. All space groups in the specified Laue group are tested to find which are consistent with the P1 phases. After applying the resulting origin shifts and space-group symmetry, the solutions are subject to further dual-space recycling followed by a peak search and summation of the electron density around each peak. Elements are assigned to give the best fit to the integrated peak densities and if necessary additional elements are considered. An isotropic refinement is followed for non-centrosymmetric space groups by the calculation of a Flack parameter and, if appropriate, inversion of the structure. The structure is assembled to maximize its connectivity and centred optimally in the unit cell. SHELXT has already solved many thousand structures with a high success rate, and is optimized for multiprocessor computers. It is, however, unsuitable for severely disordered and twinned structures because it is based on the assumption that the structure consists of atoms. PMID:25537383

  19. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 2: Atmospheric and space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Atmospheric and Space Physics working group of the space shuttle mission planning activity are presented. The principal objectives defined by the group are: (1) to investigate the detailed mechanisms which control the near-space environment of the earth, (2) to perform plasma physics investigations not feasible in ground-based laboratories, and (3) to conduct investigations which are important in understanding planetary and cometary phenomena. The core instrumentation and laboratory configurations for conducting the investigations are defined.

  20. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 10: Space technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Space Technology group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The elements of the space technology program are: (1) long duration exposure facility, (2) advanced technology laboratory, (3) physics and chemistry laboratory, (4) contamination experiments, and (5) laser information/data transmission technology. The space technology mission model is presented in tabular form. The proposed experiments to be conducted by each test facility are described. Recommended approaches for user community interfacing are included.

  1. Gaussian distributions, Jacobi group, and Siegel-Jacobi space

    SciTech Connect

    Molitor, Mathieu

    2014-12-15

    Let N be the space of Gaussian distribution functions over ℝ, regarded as a 2-dimensional statistical manifold parameterized by the mean μ and the deviation σ. In this paper, we show that the tangent bundle of N, endowed with its natural Kähler structure, is the Siegel-Jacobi space appearing in the context of Number Theory and Jacobi forms. Geometrical aspects of the Siegel-Jacobi space are discussed in detail (completeness, curvature, group of holomorphic isometries, space of Kähler functions, and relationship to the Jacobi group), and are related to the quantum formalism in its geometrical form, i.e., based on the Kähler structure of the complex projective space. This paper is a continuation of our previous work [M. Molitor, “Remarks on the statistical origin of the geometrical formulation of quantum mechanics,” Int. J. Geom. Methods Mod. Phys. 9(3), 1220001, 9 (2012); M. Molitor, “Information geometry and the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics,” e-print arXiv (2012); M. Molitor, “Exponential families, Kähler geometry and quantum mechanics,” J. Geom. Phys. 70, 54–80 (2013)], where we studied the quantum formalism from a geometric and information-theoretical point of view.

  2. Gaussian distributions, Jacobi group, and Siegel-Jacobi space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molitor, Mathieu

    2014-12-01

    Let N be the space of Gaussian distribution functions over ?, regarded as a 2-dimensional statistical manifold parameterized by the mean ? and the deviation ?. In this paper, we show that the tangent bundle of N , endowed with its natural Khler structure, is the Siegel-Jacobi space appearing in the context of Number Theory and Jacobi forms. Geometrical aspects of the Siegel-Jacobi space are discussed in detail (completeness, curvature, group of holomorphic isometries, space of Khler functions, and relationship to the Jacobi group), and are related to the quantum formalism in its geometrical form, i.e., based on the Khler structure of the complex projective space. This paper is a continuation of our previous work [M. Molitor, "Remarks on the statistical origin of the geometrical formulation of quantum mechanics," Int. J. Geom. Methods Mod. Phys. 9(3), 1220001, 9 (2012); M. Molitor, "Information geometry and the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics," e-print arXiv (2012); M. Molitor, "Exponential families, Khler geometry and quantum mechanics," J. Geom. Phys. 70, 54-80 (2013)], where we studied the quantum formalism from a geometric and information-theoretical point of view.

  3. The space shuttle payload planning working groups: Volume 9: Materials processing and space manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Materials Processing and Space Manufacturing group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The effects of weightlessness on the levitation processes, mixture stability, and control over heat and mass transport in fluids are considered for investigation. The research and development projects include: (1) metallurgical processes, (2) electronic materials, (3) biological applications, and (4)nonmetallic materials and processes. Additional recommendations are provided concerning the allocation of payload space, acceptance of experiments for flight, flight qualification, and private use of the space shuttle.

  4. Homology decompositions for classifying spaces of compact Lie groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strounine, Alexei

    1998-08-01

    Let p be a prime number and G be a compact Lie group. A homology decomposition for the classifying space BG is a way of building BG up to mod p homology as a homotopy colimit of classifying spaces of subgroups of G. In this thesis we develop techniques for constructing such homology decompositions. Jackowski, McClure and Oliver construct a homology decomposition of BG by classifying spaces of p-stubborn subgroups of G. Their decomposition is based on the existence of a finite-dimensional mod p acyclic G-CW-complex with restricted set of orbit types. We apply our techniques to give a parallel proof of the p-stubborn decomposition of BG which does not use this geometric construction.

  5. System theory on group manifolds and coset spaces.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study questions regarding controllability, observability, and realization theory for a particular class of systems for which the state space is a differentiable manifold which is simultaneously a group or, more generally, a coset space. We show that it is possible to give rather explicit expressions for the reachable set and the set of indistinguishable states in the case of autonomous systems. We also establish a type of state space isomorphism theorem. Our objective is to reduce all questions about the system to questions about Lie algebras generated from the coefficient matrices entering in the description of the system and in that way arrive at conditions which are easily visualized and tested.

  6. Differential calculus on quantum spaces and quantum groups

    SciTech Connect

    Zumino, B

    1992-12-10

    A review of recent developments in the quantum differential calculus. The quantum group GLq(n) is treated by considering it as a particular quantum space. Functions on SLq(n) are defined as a subclass of functions on GLq(n). The case of SOq(n) is also briefly considered. These notes cover part of a lecture given at the XIX International Conference on Group Theoretic Methods in Physics, Salamanca, Spain 1992.

  7. National facilities study. Volume 4: Space operations facilities task group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The principal objectives of the National Facilities Study (NFS) were to: (1) determine where U.S. facilities do not meet national aerospace needs; (2) define new facilities required to make U.S. capabilities 'world class' where such improvements are in the national interest; (3) define where consolidation and phase-out of existing facilities is appropriate; and (4) develop a long-term national plan for world-class facility acquisition and shared usage. The Space Operations Facilities Task Group defined discrete tasks to accomplish the above objectives within the scope of the study. An assessment of national space operations facilities was conducted to determine the nation's capability to meet the requirements of space operations during the next 30 years. The mission model used in the study to define facility requirements is described in Volume 3. Based on this model, the major focus of the Task Group was to identify any substantive overlap or underutilization of space operations facilities and to identify any facility shortfalls that would necessitate facility upgrades or new facilities. The focus of this initial study was directed toward facility recommendations related to consolidations, closures, enhancements, and upgrades considered necessary to efficiently and effectively support the baseline requirements model. Activities related to identifying facility needs or recommendations for enhancing U.S. international competitiveness and achieving world-class capability, where appropriate, were deferred to a subsequent study phase.

  8. The Lorentzian oscillator group as a geodesic orbit space

    SciTech Connect

    Batat, W.; Gadea, P. M.; Oubina, J. A.

    2012-10-15

    We prove that the four-dimensional oscillator group Os, endowed with any of its usual left-invariant Lorentzian metrics, is a Lorentzian geodesic (so, in particular, null-geodesic) orbit space with some of its homogeneous descriptions corresponding to certain homogeneous Lorentzian structures. Each time that Os is endowed with a suitable metric and an appropriate homogeneous Lorentzian structure, it is a candidate for constructing solutions in d-dimensional supergravity with at least 24 of the 32 possible supersymmetries.

  9. Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

    1991-02-01

    This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

  10. Structure of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase R2 in space group P6[subscript 1]22

    SciTech Connect

    Sommerhalter, Monika; Saleh, Lana; Bollinger Jr., J. Martin; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-07-20

    A new crystal form of wild-type ribonucleotide reductase R2 from Escherichia coli was obtained. Crystals grow in space group P6{sub 1}22 with one R2 monomer in the asymmetric unit. A twofold crystallographic symmetry axis generates the physiological dimeric form of R2. Co-crystallization with CoCl{sub 2} or MnCl{sub 2} results in full occupancy of the dinuclear metal site. The structure of the Mn{sup II}-loaded form was determined to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution by molecular replacement. The crystallization conditions, backbone conformation, crystal-packing interactions and metal centers are compared with those of previously determined crystal forms.

  11. Recommendations of the Space Interferometry Science Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D.

    1995-12-01

    The Space Interferometry Science Working Group (SISWG), soon to be disbanded, has spent four years helping with NASA's entry into space interferometry. The Working Group's initial charge was to help with the selection of the Astrometric Interferometry Mission (AIM) design and to advise on long term interferometry strategy. Events have overtaken the original goals. Programmatic concerns and the Future Mission Concepts reviews resulted in the focus landing on the Orbiting Stellar Interferometer (OSI) design. The rapidly developing roadmap for the detection and characterization of Earth-like planets has created a need for early technology development in interferometry. And the dramatic gains in the fields of adaptive optics and ground-based interferometry have shown that space is not the only location for high-spatial-resolution imaging and spectroscopy. Against this background, the science enabled by a 1000-fold improvement in wide angle positional accuracy (compared to Hipparchus) coupled with the major role in technology development, leaves the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM, an expanded OSI instrument) in a secure role. The narrowly focused, but electrifying science of the nulling IR interferometer/spectrometer designed for the planet search is correspondingly unique and secure. Funding of conceptual studies through the Future Missions Concepts program is allowing a close look at the potential of a mid-IR, 25m baseline, imaging interferometer (the Dilute Lens Imager) and of a widely Separated Spacecraft Interferometer (SSI) designed to test a highly dilute interferometer over baselines of up to 10 km. While not without complications, the birth of optical/IR interferometry in space seems well on schedule.

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of DehI, a group I ?-haloacid dehalogenase from Pseudomonas putida strain PP3

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidberger, Jason W.; Wilce, Jackie A.; Weightman, Andrew J.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.

    2008-07-01

    The ?-haloacid dehalogenase DehI from P. putida strain PP3 was cloned into a vector with an N-terminal His tag and expressed in E. coli Nova Blue strain. Purified protein was crystallized in a primitive monoclinic form and a complete native data set was collected and analysed. Pseudomonas putida strain PP3 produces two dehalogenases, DehI and DehII, which belong to the group I and II ?-haloacid dehalogenases, respectively. Group I dehalogenases catalyse the removal of halides from d-haloalkanoic acids and in some cases also the l-enantiomers, both substituted at their chiral centres. Studies of members of this group have resulted in the proposal of general catalytic mechanisms, although no structural information is available in order to better characterize their function. This work presents the initial stages of the structural investigation of the group I ?-haloacid dehalogenase DehI. The DehI gene was cloned into a pET15b vector with an N-terminal His tag and expressed in Escherichia coli Nova Blue strain. Purified protein was crystallized in 25% PEG 3350, 0.4 M lithium sulfate and 0.1 M bis-tris buffer pH 6.0. The crystals were primitive monoclinic (space group P2{sub 1}), with unit-cell parameters a = 68.32, b = 111.86, c = 75.13 , ? = 90, ? = 93.7, ? = 90, and a complete native data set was collected. Molecular replacement is not an option for structure determination, so further experimental phasing methods will be necessary.

  13. Space station group activities habitability module study: A synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, David; Glassman, Terry

    1987-01-01

    Space station habitability was studied by investigating crew activity routines, proximities, ergonomic envelopes, and group volumes. Ten alternative schematic interior designs were proposed. Preliminary conclusions include: (1) in-service interior modifications may be necessary and should be planned for; (2) design complexity will be increased if the module cluster is reduced from five to three; (3) the increased crew circulation attendant upon enhancement of space station activity may produce human traffic bottlenecks and should be planned for; (4) a single- or two-person quiet area may be desirable to provide crew members with needed solitude during waking hours; and (5) the decision to choose a two-shift or three-shift daily cycle will have a significant impact on the design configuration and operational efficiency of the human habitat.

  14. Working Group 2 summary: Space charge effects in bending systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.; Emma, P.J.

    2000-02-01

    At the start of the Workshop, the authors asked the Working Group 2 participants to concentrate on three basic goals: (1) survey the status of how comprehensively the physics concerning space-charge effects in bends is understood and how complete is the available ensemble of analytic and computational tools; (2) guided by data from experiments and operational experience, identify sources of, and cures for, beam degradation; and (3) review space-charge physics in rings and the limitations it introduces. As the Workshop unfolded, the third goal naturally folded into the other two goals, and these goals, they believe, were fulfilled in that the Working Group was able to compile an end product consisting of a set of recommendations for potentially fruitful future work. This summary constitutes an overview of the deliberations of the Working Group, and it is their hope that the summary clarifies the motivation for the recommended work listed at the end. The summary is organized according to the two aforementioned goals, and the prime topics of discussion appear as subsections under these goals.

  15. Grouping Miller-Nicely by linear vector space rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budhlakoti, Suvrat; Allen, Jont B.; Larsen, Erik

    2001-05-01

    Human speech recognition has been studied using response to CV speech stimuli. Miller and Nicely (1955) studied such data in the form of confusion matrices to obtain insight into the psychological structure of the phone in noise. Here, the confusion matrices are modeled as phone coordinates in a high dimensional perceptual vector space. The model generalizes to an eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) [Allen (2004)]. This is followed by agglomerative hierarchical clustering of the transformed data, and an automated process is used to identify the main clusters. The resulting EVD clustering is very similar to other Miller-Nicely groupings, based on both production and MDS derived features, but is more model based. It was found that there is a gradual and highly consistent change in the clustering of sounds, independent of cluster size and configuration. By examining the change in similarity between various speech sounds, it is hoped that perceptual features may be uniquely identified.

  16. Metrics for comparison of crystallographic maps

    PubMed Central

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical comparison of crystallographic contour maps is used extensively in structure solution and model refinement, analysis and validation. However, traditional metrics such as the map correlation coefficient (map CC, real-space CC or RSCC) sometimes contradict the results of visual assessment of the corresponding maps. This article explains such apparent contradictions and suggests new metrics and tools to compare crystallographic contour maps. The key to the new methods is rank scaling of the Fourier syntheses. The new metrics are complementary to the usual map CC and can be more helpful in map comparison, in particular when only some of their aspects, such as regions of high density, are of interest. PMID:25286844

  17. Metrics for comparison of crystallographic maps

    SciTech Connect

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-10-01

    Numerical comparison of crystallographic contour maps is used extensively in structure solution and model refinement, analysis and validation. However, traditional metrics such as the map correlation coefficient (map CC, real-space CC or RSCC) sometimes contradict the results of visual assessment of the corresponding maps. This article explains such apparent contradictions and suggests new metrics and tools to compare crystallographic contour maps. The key to the new methods is rank scaling of the Fourier syntheses. The new metrics are complementary to the usual map CC and can be more helpful in map comparison, in particular when only some of their aspects, such as regions of high density, are of interest.

  18. A structural group-connectome in standard stereotactic (MNI) space.

    PubMed

    Horn, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    A group connectome of 20 subjectshas been normalized into standard stereotactic (MNI) space. Data has been processed using the Gibbs' Tracking approach(Reisert et al., 2011) [11] and normalized into standard space using DARTEL(Ashburner, 2007) [1]. All data has been acquired within the scope of the study A. Horn, D. Ostwald, M. Reisert, F. Blankenburg, The structural-functional connectome and the default mode network of the human brain, NeuroImage 102 (2013) 142-151. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.09.069. The utility of this dataset can be described by the following points: In medical studies in which subject-specific dMRI is not available, a standardized connectome may help to gain some canonical insight into white-matter connectivity. The dataset enables scientists who use different modalities (like EEG, MEG etc.) without access to MRI, to combine studies obtained using other methodology with insights from the brain's inner structural formation. The dataset could also extend possible claims made by meta-analyzes/literature-based studies. PMID:26543893

  19. Space Weather Activities of IONOLAB Group: IONOLAB-TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, F.; Sezen, U.; Arikan, O.; Ugurlu, O.; Nayir, H.

    2009-04-01

    Space Weather (SW) is the concept of changing environmental conditions in outer space and affect Earth and its technological systems. SW is a consequence of the solar activities and the coupling of solar energy on Earth's atmosphere due to the Earth's magnetic field. The monitoring and prediction of SW has utmost importance for HF communication, Satellite communication, navigation and guidance systems, Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite systems, Space Craft exit and entry into the atmosphere. Ionosphere is the plasma layer of the atmosphere that is ionized by solar radiation and it is a key player of SW. Ionosphere is a temporally and spatially varying, dispersive, anisotropic and inhomogeneous medium that is characterized primarily by its electron density distribution. IONOLAB is a group of researchers of various disciplines, getting together to handle challenges of the Earth's ionosphere. The team has researchers from Hacettepe University and Bilkent University, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering and General Command of Mapping of Turkish Army. One of the most important contributions of IONOLAB group is the automated web-based computation service for Total Electron Content (TEC). TEC corresponds to the line integral of electron density distribution on a given path. TEC can also be expressed as the amount of free electrons within 1 m2 cross-sectional area of the cylinder on the ray path. Global Position System (GPS) provides a cost-effective medium for monitoring of ionosphere using the signals recorded by stationary GPS receivers in estimating TEC. IONOLAB group has developed IONOLAB-TEC for reliable and robust estimates for all latitudes and both calm and disturbed days by using RINEX, IONEX and satellite ephemeris data provided from the IGS centers. IONOLAB-TEC consists of a regularized signal estimation algorithm which combines signals from all GPS satellites for a given instant and a given receiver, for a desired time period or for 24 hours, with 30 s time resolution. IONOLAB-TEC values also include the receiver differential code bias (DCB) for each GPS station estimated uniquely by the IONOLAB-BIAS algorithm. The web based computation program is written in JAVA and it is provided both in Turkish and English at www.ionolab.org. The IONOLAB-TEC computation requires no installation or licensing on the client side. The application has a layered design. Developed components are modular that allows possible changes regarding the estimation method can be easily adapted. Same flexibility is also provided for the data access. Also, presentation of estimation data is architected to support different client types. Currently, the user can login to the IONOLAB-TEC web site and choose the desired location and dates on-line for TEC estimation. The carrier phase leveled TEC estimates of IONOLAB-TEC are provided for the chosen station/s and for the chosen day/s along with two-hourly GIM-TEC estimates of IGS centers. The output is provided in the user designated form either in graphs or an excel data sheet. The IONOLAB-TEC provides robust, reliable, and high resolution TEC estimates and provides a medium for comparison of the GIM-TEC values from the IGS centers.

  20. Crystallographic CourseWare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Margaret E.; Vasbinder, Eric; Kowalcyzk, Deborah; Jackson, Sean; Giammalvo, Joseph; Braun, James; Dimarco, Keith

    2000-09-01

    Literature Cited

    1. International Tables for Crystallography: Volume A: Space Group Symmetry; Hanh, T., Ed.; D. Reidel: Boston, 1983.
    2. International Tables for Crystallography, Brief Teaching Edition of Volume A, Space-Group Symmetry, 3rd ed.; Hanh, T., Ed.; Dordrecht: Boston, 1993.
    3. Kastner, M. E. J. Appl. Crystallogr. 1999, 32, 327-331.
    4. Macromedia Director, version 6.5; Macromedia, Inc., San Francisco, CA; 1998.
    5. QuickTime, version 3.0; Apple Computer: Cupertino, CA, 1998.
    6. ToolBook II, Instructor, version 6.0; Asymetrix: Bellevue, WA, 1998.
    7. HyperCard 2.3.5; Apple Computer: Cupertino, CA, 1998.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of acetophenone reductase from Geotrichum candidum NBRC 4597.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yosuke; Senda, Miki; Senda, Toshiya; Matsuda, Tomoko

    2015-03-01

    Acetophenone reductase (APRD) from Geotrichum candidium NBRC 4597 was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as a precipitant. The crystal belonged to space group P6522, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 104.5, c = 273.7?, and diffracted to 2.6? resolution. Phasing using the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction method was successful. Model building and crystallographic refinement are in progress. PMID:25760708

  2. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of three peptidic inhibitors in complex with ?-thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho Figueiredo, Ana; Clement, Cristina C.; Philipp, Manfred; Barbosa Pereira, Pedro Jos

    2011-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a major role in thrombosis and haemostasis. This has driven interest in thrombin inhibitors as potential antithrombotic drugs. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human ?-thrombin in complex with three noncovalent peptide inhibitors of the general sequence d-Phe-Pro-d-Arg-P1?-CONH2 are reported. The crystals belonged tothe orthorhombic space group P212121 and diffracted to beyond 1.3? resolution. PMID:21206024

  3. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 1: Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The space astronomy missions to be accomplished by the space shuttle are discussed. The principal instrument is the Large Space Telescope optimized for the ultraviolet and visible regions of the spectrum, but usable also in the infrared. Two infrared telescopes are also proposed and their characteristics are described. Other instruments considered for the astronomical observations are: (1) a very wide angle ultraviolet camera, (2) a grazing incidence telescope, (3) Explorer-class free flyers to measure the cosmic microwave background, and (4) rocket-class instruments which can fly frequently on a variety of missions. The stability requirements of the space shuttle for accomplishing the astronomy mission are defined.

  4. Student "Facebook" Groups as a Third Space: Between Social Life and Schoolwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaen, Janus; Dalsgaard, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines educational potentials of "Facebook" groups that are created and managed by students without any involvement from teachers. The objective is to study student-managed "Facebook" groups as a "third space" between the institutional space of teacher-managed "Facebook" groups and the…

  5. Student "Facebook" Groups as a Third Space: Between Social Life and Schoolwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaen, Janus; Dalsgaard, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines educational potentials of "Facebook" groups that are created and managed by students without any involvement from teachers. The objective is to study student-managed "Facebook" groups as a "third space" between the institutional space of teacher-managed "Facebook" groups and the

  6. Ferroelectric--paraelectric phase transitions with no group--supergroup relation between the space groups of both phases?

    PubMed

    Kroumova, E; Aroyo, M I; Prez-Mato, J M; Hundt, R

    2001-08-01

    The structures of Sr(3)(FeF(6))(2), beta-NbO(2), TlBO(2) and CrOF(3), previously reported as possible ferroelectrics with no group-supergroup relation between the ferroelectric and the paraelectric symmetries, have been carefully studied. We could not confirm any structural pseudosymmetry with respect to a space group which is not a supergroup of their room-temperature polar space group. In all cases, pseudosymmetry was indeed detected, but only for non-polar supergroups of the actual space groups of the structures. In this sense, the four compounds are possible ferroelectrics, but fulfilling the usual group-supergroup relation between the phase symmetries. PMID:11468387

  7. Mineralogical, chemical, and crystallographic properties of supergene jarosite-group minerals from the Xitieshan Pb-Zn sulfide deposit, northern Tibetan Plateau, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Lei; Li, Jian-Wei; Rye, Robert O.; Benzel, William H.; Lowers, H.A.; He, Ming-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Supergene jarosite-group minerals are widespread in weathering profiles overlying Pb-Zn sulfide ores at Xitieshan, northern Tibetan Plateau, China. They consist predominantly of K-deficient natrojarosite, with lesser amounts of K-rich natrojarosite and plumbojarosite. Electron microprobe (EMP) analyses, scanning electron microcopy (SEM) investigation, and X-ray mapping reveal that the jarosite-group minerals are characterized by spectacular oscillatory zoning composed of alternating growth bands of K-deficient and K-bearing natrojarosite (K2O >1 wt.%). Plumbojarosite, whenever present, occurs as an overgrowth in the outermost bands, and its composition can be best represented by K0.29Na0.19Pb0.31Fe2.66Al0.22(SO4)1.65(PO4)0.31(AsO4)0.04(OH)7.37. The substitution of monovalent for divalent cations at the A site of plumbojarosite is charge balanced by the substitution of five-valent for six-valent anions in XO,4/sub> at the X site. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of representative samples reveal mass losses of 11.46 wt.% at 446.6 °C and 21.42 wt.% at 683.4 °C due to dehydroxylation and desulfidation, respectively. TGA data also indicate that the natrojarosite structure collapses at 446.6 °C, resulting in the formation of NaFe(SO4)2 and minor hematite. The decomposition products of NaFe(SO4) are hematite and Na,2SO4. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses show that the jarosite-group minerals have mean unit-cell parameters of a=7.315 ä and c=016.598 ä. XRD and EMP data support the view that substitutions of Na for K in the A site and full Fe occupancy in the B site can considerably decrease the unit-cell parameter c, but only slightly increase a. The results from this study suggest that the observed oscillatory zoning of jarosite-group minerals at Xitieshan resulted mainly from substitutions of K for Na at the A site and P for S at the X site.

  8. Preliminary joint neutron time-of-flight and X-ray crystallographic study of human ABO(H) blood group A glycosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Schuman, B; Fisher, S Z; Kovalevsky, A; Borisova, S N; Palcic, M M; Coates, L; Langan, P; Evans, S V

    2011-02-01

    The biosyntheses of oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates are conducted by glycosyltransferases. These extraordinarily diverse and widespread enzymes catalyze the formation of glycosidic bonds through the transfer of a monosaccharide from a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule, with the stereochemistry about the anomeric carbon being either inverted or retained. Human ABO(H) blood group A ?-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GTA) generates the corresponding antigen by the transfer of N-acetylgalactosamine from UDP-GalNAc to the blood group H antigen. To understand better how specific active-site-residue protons and hydrogen-bonding patterns affect substrate recognition and catalysis, neutron diffraction studies were initiated at the Protein Crystallography Station (PCS) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). A large single crystal was subjected to H/D exchange prior to data collection and time-of-flight neutron diffraction data were collected to 2.5? resolution at the PCS to ?85% overall completeness, with complementary X-ray diffraction data collected from a crystal from the same drop and extending to 1.85? resolution. Here, the first successful neutron data collection from a glycosyltransferase is reported. PMID:21301100

  9. Working Group 2 Summary:. Space Charge Effects in Bending Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Courtlandt L.; Emma, Paul J.

    2000-12-01

    Participants in Working Group 2 included: Y. Batygin, C. Bohn, B. Carlsten, J. Ellison, P. Emma, Z. Huang, A. Kabel, R. Kishek, R. Li, P. Musumeci, S. Nagaitsev, J. Qiang, M. Reiser, A. Ruggerio, R. Warnock, and M. Zeitlin.

  10. Group calls for space policies to transcend politics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-06-01

    At a 22 May briefing, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) called on Congress to establish space exploration policy goals which transcend partisan political differences. AIAA president and former NASA administrator Michael Griffin said the goal of establishing human capability to b e a space-faring species is not a short-term goal, nor is it a goal that belongs to only one political party. We will not reach long-term goals without a stable, coherent, sensible plan that transcends elections and leaders, said Griffin, who has provided advice to Republican U.S. presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Griffin pointed to NASA's 2008 authorization as providing the kind of vision needed for NASA. The act called for human return to the Moon and preparation for the capability for permanent bases on the Moon, among other things, he said. That's the kind of thing that we need. All of the goals espoused by the 2008 act were long-term, generational, strategic in scope, Griffin said, adding that the act, which had bipartisan support, demonstrated the kind of societal support, rather than political support, that I believe our space program deserves.

  11. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ?-carbonic anhydrase psCA3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pinard, Melissa; Lotlikar, Shalaka; Patrauchan, Marianna A.; McKenna, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes life-threatening infections in susceptible individuals and is resistant to most clinically available antimicrobials. Genomic and proteomic studies have identified three genes, pa0102, pa2053 and pa4676, in P. aeruginosa PAO1 encoding three functional ?-carbonic anhydrases (?-CAs): psCA1, psCA2 and psCA3, respectively. These ?-CAs could serve as novel antimicrobial drug targets for this pathogen. X-ray crystallographic structural studies have been initiated to characterize the structure and function of these proteins. This communication describes the production of two crystal forms (A and B) of ?-CA psCA3. Form A diffracted to a resolution of 2.9?; it belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.9, b = 84.9, c = 124.2?, and had a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.23?3?Da?1 assuming four molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Form B diffracted to a resolution of 3.0?; it belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.9, b = 77.7, c=88.5?, and had a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.48?3?Da?1 assuming two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Preliminary molecular-replacement solutions have been determined with the PHENIX AutoMR wizard and refinement of both crystal forms is currently in progress. PMID:23908036

  12. Metrics for comparison of crystallographic maps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-10-01

    Numerical comparison of crystallographic contour maps is used extensively in structure solution and model refinement, analysis and validation. However, traditional metrics such as the map correlation coefficient (map CC, real-space CC or RSCC) sometimes contradict the results of visual assessment of the corresponding maps. This article explains such apparent contradictions and suggests new metrics and tools to compare crystallographic contour maps. The key to the new methods is rank scaling of the Fourier syntheses. The new metrics are complementary to the usual map CC and can be more helpful in map comparison, in particular when only some of their aspects,more » such as regions of high density, are of interest.« less

  13. Polyimides Containing Pendent Phosphine Oxide Groups for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Watson, K. A.; Connell, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    As part of an ongoing materials development activity to produce high performance polymers that are durable to the space environment, phosphine oxide containing polyimides have been under investigation. A novel dianhydride was prepared from 2,5-dihydroxyphenyldiphenylphosphine oxide in good yield. The dianhydride was reacted with commercially available diamines, and a previously reported diamine was reacted with commercially available dianhydrides to prepare isomeric polyimides. The physical and mechanical properties, particularly thermal and optical properties, of the polymers were determined. One material exhibited a high glass transition temperature, high tensile properties, and low solar absorptivity. The chemistry, physical, and mechanical properties of these resins will be discussed.

  14. Marathons versus Spaced Groups: Skin Conductance and the Effects of Time Distribution on Encounter Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loomis, Thomas P.

    1988-01-01

    Randomly assigned 41 students to 2 twice-weekly groups, which met for 3 hours eight times; 2 marathons, which met continuously for 24 hours; and nontreatment control group. Treatment groups had significant positive changes on 14 of 15 measured personality variables between pre- and post-test, and positive change on all dependent measures between…

  15. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of RraB from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Liu, Huihui; Wang, Hong; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2013-01-01

    RraB, an inhibitor of the essential endoribonuclease RNE in Escherichia coli, is essential in regulating the abundance of RNA by directly interacting with RNE. In this study, RraB from E. coli was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.59, b = 58.34, c = 156.95?. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.9?. Analysis of the native Patterson map revealed a peak of ?37% the height of the origin peak in the ? = 0.5 Harker section, suggesting twofold noncrystallographic symmetry parallel to the b crystallographic axis. The Matthews coefficient and the solvent content were estimated to be 4.09?3?Da?1 and 69.94%, respectively, assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24192366

  16. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus NDK: preliminary crystallographic analysis of the first viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jeudy, Sandra; Coutard, Bruno; Lebrun, Rgine; Abergel, Chantal

    2005-01-01

    The complete sequence of the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, has recently been determined [Raoult et al. (2004 ?), Science, 306, 13441350] and revealed numerous genes not expected to be found in a virus. A comprehensive structural and functional study of these gene products was initiated [Abergel et al. (2005 ?), Acta Cryst. F61, 212215] both to better understand their role in the virus physiology and to obtain some clues to the origin of DNA viruses. Here, the preliminary crystallographic analysis of the viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase protein is reported. The crystal belongs to the cubic space group P213, with unit-cell parameter 99.425?. The self-rotation function confirms that there are two monomers per asymmetric unit related by a twofold non-crystallographic axis and that the unit cell thus contains four biological entities. PMID:16511098

  17. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus NDK: preliminary crystallographic analysis of the first viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Sandra; Coutard, Bruno; Lebrun, Rgine; Abergel, Chantal

    2005-06-01

    The complete sequence of the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, has recently been determined [Raoult et al. (2004), Science, 306, 1344-1350] and revealed numerous genes not expected to be found in a virus. A comprehensive structural and functional study of these gene products was initiated [Abergel et al. (2005), Acta Cryst. F61, 212-215] both to better understand their role in the virus physiology and to obtain some clues to the origin of DNA viruses. Here, the preliminary crystallographic analysis of the viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase protein is reported. The crystal belongs to the cubic space group P2(1)3, with unit-cell parameter 99.425 A. The self-rotation function confirms that there are two monomers per asymmetric unit related by a twofold non-crystallographic axis and that the unit cell thus contains four biological entities. PMID:16511098

  18. Production, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of adeno-associated virus serotype 7

    SciTech Connect

    Quesada, Odayme; Gurda, Brittney; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; McKenna, Robert; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Aslanidi, George; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2007-12-01

    Crystals of baculovirus-expressed adeno-associated virus serotype 7 capsids have been produced which diffract X-rays to ?3.0 resolution. Crystals of baculovirus-expressed adeno-associated virus serotype 7 capsids diffract X-rays to ?3.0 resolution. The crystals belong to the rhombohedral space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = 252.4, c = 591.2 in the hexagonal setting. The diffraction data were processed and reduced to an overall completeness of 79.0% and an R{sub merge} of 12.0%. There are three viral capsids in the unit cell. The icosahedral threefold axis is coincident with the crystallographic threefold axis, resulting in one third of a capsid (20 monomers) per crystallographic asymmetric unit. The orientation of the viral capsid has been determined by rotation-function searches and is positioned at (0, 0, 0) by packing considerations.

  19. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 6: Communications and navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Communications and Navigation working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The basic goals to be accomplished are to increase the use of space systems and to develop new space capabilities for providing communication and navigation services to the user community in the 1980 time period. Specific experiments to be conducted for improving space communication and navigation capabilities are defined. The characteristics of the experimental equipment required to accomplish the mission are discussed.

  20. MCMC-Particle-based group tracking of space objects within Bayesian framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; Hu, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    With the intense increase in space objects, especially space debris, it is necessary to efficiently track and catalog the extensive dense clusters of space objects. As the main instrument for low earth orbit (LEO) space surveillance, ground-based radar system is usually limited by its resolution while tracking small space debris with high density. Thus, the obtained measurement information could have been seriously missed, which makes the traditional tracking method inefficient. To address this issue, we conceived the concept of group tracking. For group tracking, the overall tendency of the group objects is expected to be revealed, and the trajectories of individual objects are simultaneously reconstructed explicitly. According to model the interaction between the group center and individual trajectories using the Markov random field (MRF) within Bayesian framework, the objects' number and individual trajectory can be estimated more accurately in the condition of high miss alarm probability. The Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC)-Particle algorithm was utilized for solving the Bayesian integral problem. Furthermore, we introduced the mechanism for describing the behaviors of groups merging and splitting, which can expand the single group tracking algorithm to track variable multiple groups. Finally, simulation of the group tracking of space objects was carried out to validate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  1. Unusual space-group pseudo symmetry in crystals of human phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Manoj, N.; Ealick, S.E.

    2010-12-01

    Phosphopantothenoylcysteine (PPC) decarboxylase is an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of coenzyme A and catalyzes the decarboxylation of PPC to phosphopantetheine. Human PPC decarboxylase has been expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The Laue class of the diffraction data appears to be {bar 3}m, suggesting space group R32 with two monomers per asymmetric unit. However, the crystals belong to the space group R3 and the asymmetric unit contains four monomers. The structure has been solved using molecular replacement and refined to a current R factor of 29%. The crystal packing can be considered as two interlaced lattices, each consistent with space group R32 and with the corresponding twofold axes parallel to each other but separated along the threefold axis. Thus, the true space group is R3 with four monomers per asymmetric unit.

  2. SHELXT – Integrated space-group and crystal-structure determination

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    SHELXT automates routine small-molecule structure determination starting from single-crystal reflection data, the Laue group and a reasonable guess as to which elements might be present. The new computer program SHELXT employs a novel dual-space algorithm to solve the phase problem for single-crystal reflection data expanded to the space group P1. Missing data are taken into account and the resolution extended if necessary. All space groups in the specified Laue group are tested to find which are consistent with the P1 phases. After applying the resulting origin shifts and space-group symmetry, the solutions are subject to further dual-space recycling followed by a peak search and summation of the electron density around each peak. Elements are assigned to give the best fit to the integrated peak densities and if necessary additional elements are considered. An isotropic refinement is followed for non-centrosymmetric space groups by the calculation of a Flack parameter and, if appropriate, inversion of the structure. The structure is assembled to maximize its connectivity and centred optimally in the unit cell. SHELXT has already solved many thousand structures with a high success rate, and is optimized for multiprocessor computers. It is, however, unsuitable for severely disordered and twinned structures because it is based on the assumption that the structure consists of atoms.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic data of the major albumin from Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.

    PubMed

    Dayan, S M; Van Donkelaar, A; Kortt, A A

    1987-07-25

    The major seed albumin from Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC, winged bean albumin 1, has been crystallized from ethanol as rhombic needles in a form suitable for high resolution x-ray crystallographic studies. The space group is I4(1)22 with cell parameters a = b = 95.6 A, and c = 86.0 A. Amino acid sequence homology between winged bean albumin 1 and legume 7 S globulins suggests that the former may be related to a structural domain of the 7 S globulins. PMID:3611061

  4. SHELXT – Integrated space-group and crystal-structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    The new computer program SHELXT employs a novel dual-space algorithm to solve the phase problem for single-crystal reflection data expanded to the space group P1. Missing data are taken into account and the resolution extended if necessary. All space groups in the specified Laue group are tested to find which are consistent with the P1 phases. After applying the resulting origin shifts and space-group symmetry, the solutions are subject to further dual-space recycling followed by a peak search and summation of the electron density around each peak. Elements are assigned to give the best fit to the integrated peak densities and if necessary additional elements are considered. An isotropic refinement is followed for non-centrosymmetric space groups by the calculation of a Flack parameter and, if appropriate, inversion of the structure. The structure is assembled to maximize its connectivity and centred optimally in the unit cell. SHELXT has already solved many thousand structures with a high success rate, and is optimized for multiprocessor computers. It is, however, unsuitable for severely disordered and twinned structures because it is based on the assumption that the structure consists of atoms. PMID:25537383

  5. Expanding Trauma through Space and Time: Mapping the Rhetorical Strategies of Trauma Carrier Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degloma, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I detail two rhetorical strategies that trauma carrier groups--including social movement organizations, professional mental health associations, and patient advocacy groups--use to expand the relevance of trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) through space and time: the social transmission of trauma and the social

  6. The determination of some crystallographic parameters of quartz, in the sand dunes of Ouargla, Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddiaf, Samiha; Chihi, Smail; Leghrieb, Youcef

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the crystallographic phase, degree of crystallinity, crystal system, space group and unit cell parameters of quartz in the Ouargla region (Algeria) sand dunes have been determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mid-infrared absorption spectrum showed the characteristic doublet for α-quartz at 796 and 779 cm-1. The observed principle diffractions at the d-spacings of 3.7937, 3.3539 and 1.8204 Å confirm the presence of α-quartz in Ouargla sand. The calculated absorption ratio (degree of crystallinity) of A796 /A779 ≅ 1.756 indicated that our quartz exhibits a highly crystalline nature. The crystallographic parameters of quartz in Ouargla sand have been determined through analysis of X-ray diffraction data, carried out using the simulation code DICVOL06. These parameters were found as: hexagonal crystal system, space group P3221 (154), unit cell parameters: a = b = 4.9294 Å, c = 5.4093 Å and V = 113.832 Å3.

  7. A Hilbert Space Operator Representation of Abelian Po-Groups of Bilinear Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janda, Ji?; Paseka, Jan

    2015-12-01

    The existence of a non-trivial singular positive bilinear form Simon (J. Funct. Analysis 28, 377-385 (1978)) yields that on an infinite-dimensional complex Hilbert space {{H}} the set of bilinear forms {{F}}({H}) is richer than the set of linear operators {{V}}({H}). We show that there exists an structure preserving embedding of partially ordered groups from the abelian po-group {{S}}D({H}) of symmetric bilinear forms with a fixed domain D on a Hilbert space {{H}} into the po-group of linear symmetric operators on a dense linear subspace of an infinite dimensional complex Hilbert space l 2( M). Moreover, if we restrict ourselves to the positive parts of the above mentioned po-groups, we can embed positive bilinear forms into corresponding positive linear operators.

  8. Current Activities and Capabilities of the Terrestrial Environment Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Batts, Wade

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) designated Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) the center of excellence for space transportation. The Aerospace Environments and Effects (AEE) team of the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch (EL23) in the Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory at MSFC, supports the center of excellence designation by providing near-Earth space, deep space, planetary, and terrestrial environments expertise to projects as required. The Terrestrial Environment (TE) group within the AEE team maintains an extensive TE data base. Statistics and models derived from this data are applied to the design and development of new aerospace vehicles, as well as performance enhancement of operational vehicles such as the Space Shuttle. The TE is defined as the Earth's atmospheric environment extending from the surface to orbital insertion altitudes (approximately 90 km).

  9. National facilities study. Volume 5: Space research and development facilities task group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    With the beginnings of the U.S. space program, there was a pressing need to develop facilities that could support the technology research and development, testing, and operations of evolving space systems. Redundancy in facilities that was once and advantage in providing flexibility and schedule accommodation is instead fast becoming a burden on scarce resources. As a result, there is a clear perception in many sectors that the U.S. has many space R&D facilities that are under-utilized and which are no longer cost-effective to maintain. At the same time, it is clear that the U.S. continues to possess many space R&D facilities which are the best -- or among the best -- in the world. In order to remain world class in key areas, careful assessment of current capabilities and planning for new facilities is needed. The National Facility Study (NFS) was initiated in 1992 to develop a comprehensive and integrated long-term plan for future aerospace facilities that meets current and projected government and commercial needs. In order to assess the nation's capability to support space research and development (R&D), a Space R&D Task Group was formed. The Task Group was co-chaired by NASA and DOD. The Task Group formed four major, technologically- and functionally- oriented working groups: Human and Machine Operations; Information and Communications; Propulsion and Power; and Materials, Structures, and Flight Dynamics. In addition to these groups, three supporting working groups were formed: Systems Engineering and Requirements; Strategy and Policy; and Costing Analysis. The Space R&D Task Group examined several hundred facilities against the template of a baseline mission and requirements model (developed in common with the Space Operations Task Group) and a set of excursions from the baseline. The model and excursions are described in Volume 3 of the NFS final report. In addition, as a part of the effort, the group examined key strategic issues associated with space R&D facilities planning for the U.S., and these are discussed in Section 4 of this volume.

  10. A simple assay to study social behavior in Drosophila: measurement of social space within a group.

    PubMed

    Simon, A F; Chou, M-T; Salazar, E D; Nicholson, T; Saini, N; Metchev, S; Krantz, D E

    2012-03-01

    We have established a new simple behavioral paradigm in Drosophila melanogaster to determine how genes and the environment influence the behavior of flies within a social group. Specifically, we measure social space as the distance between two flies. The majority of Canton-s flies, regardless of their gender, are within two body lengths from each other. Their social experience affects this behavior, with social isolation reducing and mating enhancing social space respectively, in both males and females. Unlike several other social behaviors in the fly, including the formation of social groups themselves (a well-described behavior), social space does not require the perception of the previously identified aggregation pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate. Conversely, performance of the assay in darkness or mutations in the eye pigmentation gene white increased social space. Our results establish a new assay for the genetic dissection of a fundamental mode of social interaction. PMID:22010812

  11. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 3: High energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the High Energy Astrophysics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The objectives to be accomplished during space shuttle missions are defined as: (1) X-ray astronomy, (2) hard X-ray and gamma ray astronomy, and (3) cosmic ray astronomy. The instruments and test equipment required to accomplish the mission are identified. Recommendations for managing the installation of the equipment and conducting the missions are included.

  12. Johnson Space Center's Risk and Reliability Analysis Group 2008 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, Mark; Boyer, Roger; Cross, Bob; Hamlin, Teri; Roelant, Henk; Stewart, Mike; Bigler, Mark; Winter, Scott; Reistle, Bruce; Heydorn,Dick

    2009-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) Directorate s Risk and Reliability Analysis Group provides both mathematical and engineering analysis expertise in the areas of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) analysis, and data collection and analysis. The fundamental goal of this group is to provide National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) decisionmakers with the necessary information to make informed decisions when evaluating personnel, flight hardware, and public safety concerns associated with current operating systems as well as with any future systems. The Analysis Group includes a staff of statistical and reliability experts with valuable backgrounds in the statistical, reliability, and engineering fields. This group includes JSC S&MA Analysis Branch personnel as well as S&MA support services contractors, such as Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) and SoHaR. The Analysis Group s experience base includes nuclear power (both commercial and navy), manufacturing, Department of Defense, chemical, and shipping industries, as well as significant aerospace experience specifically in the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and Constellation Programs. The Analysis Group partners with project and program offices, other NASA centers, NASA contractors, and universities to provide additional resources or information to the group when performing various analysis tasks. The JSC S&MA Analysis Group is recognized as a leader in risk and reliability analysis within the NASA community. Therefore, the Analysis Group is in high demand to help the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) continue to fly safely, assist in designing the next generation spacecraft for the Constellation Program (CxP), and promote advanced analytical techniques. The Analysis Section s tasks include teaching classes and instituting personnel qualification processes to enhance the professional abilities of our analysts as well as performing major probabilistic assessments used to support flight rationale and help establish program requirements. During 2008, the Analysis Group performed more than 70 assessments. Although all these assessments were important, some were instrumental in the decisionmaking processes for the Shuttle and Constellation Programs. Two of the more significant tasks were the Space Transportation System (STS)-122 Low Level Cutoff PRA for the SSP and the Orion Pad Abort One (PA-1) PRA for the CxP. These two activities, along with the numerous other tasks the Analysis Group performed in 2008, are summarized in this report. This report also highlights several ongoing and upcoming efforts to provide crucial statistical and probabilistic assessments, such as the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) PRA for the Hubble Space Telescope service mission and the first fully integrated PRAs for the CxP's Lunar Sortie and ISS missions.

  13. Identifying the multiplicity of crystallographically equivalent variants generated by iterative phase transformations in Ti.

    PubMed

    Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Pond, Robert Charles

    2016-02-01

    This work describes phase transformations in Ti from a purely crystallographic perspective. Iterative heating and cooling above and below 1155 K induce phase transitions between a low-temperature h.c.p. (hexagonal close packed) ({6 \\over m}mm) and a high-temperature b.c.c. (body centred cubic) (m\\bar 3m) structure. The crystallography of the two phases has been found to be related by the Burgers Orientation Relationship (Burgers OR). The transitions are accompanied by changes in texture, as an ever-increasing number of crystallographically equivalent variants occur with every cycle. Identifying their multiplicity is important to relate the textures before and after the transformation, in order to predict the resultant one and refine its microstructure. The four-dimensional Frank space was utilized to describe both h.c.p. and b.c.c. structures within the same orthogonal framework, and thus allow for their easy numerical manipulation through matrix algebra. Crystallographic group decomposition showed that the common symmetry maintained in both groups was that of group 2/m; therefore, the symmetry operations that generated the variants were of groups 3m and 23 for cubic and hexagonal generations, respectively. The number of all potential variants was determined for the first three variant generations, and degeneracy was indeed detected, reducing the number of variants from 72 to 57 and from 432 to 180 for the second and third generations, respectively. Degeneracy was attributed on some special alignments of symmetry operators, as a result of the Burgers OR connecting the relative orientation of the two structures. PMID:26830797

  14. Status of the IAA study group on traffic management rules for space operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contant, Corinne; Lala, Petr; Schrogl, Kai-Uwe

    2007-10-01

    The investigation of space traffic and its management has only recently become a point of wider discussion. In particular, the series of workshops organized by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and other international organizations on international cooperation highlighted the issue. It was discussed thoroughly at the workshops, which took place in 1999 and 2001, respectively. It was at the 2001 workshop, when the suggestion was made that an International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) Study on the subject of space traffic management should be prepared. This suggestion was taken up and a proposal was presented to the Board of Trustees of IAA, which, in late 2001, accepted this proposal. Following this, an interdisciplinary study group of around 20 persons was composed. One early milestone in the process of work was the conduct of an International Institute of Space Law (IISL)/European Center of Space Law (ECSL) Symposium alongside the 2002 session of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS) Legal Subcommittee. This symposium consisted of presentations of members of the IAA study group. Also, close coordination with other study projects of IAA, in particular with the one on space debris, is sought. This paper presents the status of work of the study group, in particular, the approach and the scope of the study as well as its preliminary findings. The study group intends to finalize its work in early 2004, in order to be able to put the study before IAA and launch its review process before the 2004 International Astronautical Congress. Following this review, the study will be published and may be expected to make an impact in fora like the UNCOPUOS. The authors of this paper act as the coordinators/the rapporteur to this study. The paper will be presented in the IAAas well as the IISLsession dealing with space traffic, by that bridging the two areas and seeking input from various sources.

  15. Production, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of adeno-associated virus serotype 1

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Edward B.; Gurda-Whitaker, Brittney; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; McKenna, Robert; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2006-12-01

    Crystals of baculovirus-expressed adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) capsids have been grown in the rhombohedral space group R32 (unit-cell parameters a = 254.7 , ? = 62.3) and shown to diffract X-rays to at least 2.5 resolution. Crystals of baculovirus-expressed adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) capsids have been grown in the rhombohedral space group R32 (unit-cell parameters a = 254.7 , ? = 62.3) and shown to diffract X-rays to at least 2.5 resolution. The diffraction data were subsequently processed and reduced with an overall R{sub sym} of 12.3% and a completeness of 89.0%. Based on the unit-cell volume, rotation-function and translation-function results and packing considerations, there is one virus capsid (60 viral proteins) per unit cell and there are ten viral proteins per crystallographic asymmetric unit. The AAV1 capsid shares both the twofold and threefold crystallographic symmetry operators. The AAV1 data have been initially phased using a polyalanine model (based on the crystal structure of AAV4) to 4.0 resolution and the structure determination and refinement is in progress using tenfold noncrystallographic symmetry electron-density averaging.

  16. INFLUENCE OF SPAWNING GROUP SIZE AND SPACE ON REPRODUCTION BY SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS, CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cripe, G.M., R.L. Hemmer and L.R. Goodman. In press. Influence of Spawning Group Size and Space on Reproduction Variability of Sheepshead Minnows, Cyprinodon variegatus (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB...

  17. School Mathematics Study Group, Unit Number One. Chapter 1 - Structuring Space. Chapter 2 - Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    This is the first unit of a 15-unit School Mathematics Study Group (SMSG) mathematics text for high school students. Topics presented in the first chapter (Structuring Space) include: lines and points; planes; intersections; intersections of lines and planes; betweenness and segments; separation; angles; locating positions and points; coordinates;

  18. School Mathematics Study Group, Unit Number One. Chapter 1 - Structuring Space. Chapter 2 - Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    This is the first unit of a 15-unit School Mathematics Study Group (SMSG) mathematics text for high school students. Topics presented in the first chapter (Structuring Space) include: lines and points; planes; intersections; intersections of lines and planes; betweenness and segments; separation; angles; locating positions and points; coordinates;…

  19. Crystallographic Data and Model Quality.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Kay

    2016-01-01

    This article gives a consistent classification of sources of random and systematic errors in crystallographic data, and their influence on the averaged dataset obtained from a diffraction experiment. It discusses the relation between precision and accuracy and the crystallographic indicators used to estimate them, as well as topics like completeness and high-resolution cutoff. These concepts are applied in the context of presenting good practices for data processing with a widely used package, XDS. Recommendations are given for how to minimize the impact of several typical problems, like ice rings and shaded areas. Then, procedures for optimizing the processing parameters are explained. Finally, a simple graphical expression of some basic relations between data error and model error is suggested. PMID:26227042

  20. Future In-Space Operations (FISO): A Working Group and Community Engagement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Lester, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Long-duration human capabilities beyond low Earth orbit (LEO), either in support of or as an alternative to lunar surface operations, have been assessed at least since the late 1960s. Over the next few months, we will present short histories of concepts for long-duration, free-space human habitation beyond LEO from the end of the Apollo program to the Decadal Planning Team (DPT)/NASA Exploration Team (NExT), which was active in 1999 2000 (see Forging a vision: NASA s Decadal Planning Team and the origins of the Vision for Space Exploration , The Space Review, December 19, 2005). Here we summarize the brief existence of the Future In-Space Operations (FISO) working group in 2005 2006 and its successor, a telecon-based colloquium series, which we co-moderate.

  1. Definition of spacecraft standard interfaces by the NASA Space Assembly and Servicing Working Group (SASWG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radtke, Robert; Woolley, Charles; Arnold, Lana

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Space Assembly and Servicing Working Group (SASWG) is to study enabling technologies for on-orbit spacecraft maintenance and servicing. One key technology required for effective space logistics activity is the development of standard spacecraft interfaces, including the 'Basic Set' defined by NASA, the U.S. Space Command, and industry panelists to be the following: (1) navigation aids; (2) grasping, berthing, and docking; and (3) utility connections for power, data, and fluids. Draft standards have been prepared and referred to professional standards organizations, including the AIAA, EIA, and SAE space standards committee. The objective of the SASWG is to support these committees with the technical expertise required to prepare standards, guidelines, and recommended practices which will be accepted by the ANSI and international standards organizations, including the ISO, IEC, and PASC.

  2. Environmental interactions in Space Exploration: Announcement of the formation of an Environmental Interactions Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph C.; Hillard, G. Barry

    1991-01-01

    With the advent of the Space Exploration Initiative, the possibility of designing and using systems on scales not heretofore attempted presents exciting new challenges in systems design and space science. The environments addressed by the Space Exploration Initiative include the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, as well as the varied plasma and field environments which will be encountered by humans and cargo enroute to these destinations. Systems designers will need to understand environmental interactions and be able to model these mechanisms from the earliest conceptual design stages through design completion. To the end of understanding environmental interactions and establishing robotic precursor mission requirements, an Environmental Interactions Working Group has been established as part of the Robotic Missions Working Group. The current paper describes the working group and gives an update of its current activities. Working group charter and operation are reviewed, background information on the environmental interactions and their characteristics is offered, and the current status of the group's activities is presented along with anticipations for the future.

  3. Group and individual sow behavior is altered in early gestation by space allowance in the days immediately following grouping.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, E C; Plush, K J; van Wettere, W H E J; Hughes, P E

    2016-01-01

    Aggression between domestic sows is greatest when sows are first introduced to each other and hierarchies form. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a spacious "mixing pen" on sow aggression and stress. Sows were mixed into groups of 6 and allowed 2 (LOW; 8 groups and 48 sows), 4 (MED; 7 groups and 42 sows), or 6 m/sow (HIGH; 7 groups and 42 sows) for 4 d after mixing, at which point all pens were equalized to 2 m/sow. Salivary cortisol concentration and injury counts were measured on d -1, 0, 1, 3, and 4 relative to mixing, and behavior was also recorded on each of these days following mixing. Reproductive performance was assessed at farrowing. A linear mixed model was applied to the data. Data are presented as least squares means and standard error of the mean. Where transformations occurred, nontransformed adjusted means are presented in parentheses following the presentation of transformed data. In the primary analyses where measures were considered at the pen level, there were no effect of space allowance on fight number per sow, duration of fights, percentage of total time spent fighting, displacements, bites, knocks, and lunges ( > 0.05). These measures were higher on d 0 (i.e., fight number 1.0 0.1 [13.8]) compared with d 1 (0.4 0.1 [4.2]), 3 (0.7 0.1 [5.3]), and 4 (0.7 0.1 [5.5]; < 0.05), with no increase in aggression on d 4 when pen sizes were standardized ( > 0.05). There was increased percentage of time spent active (1.5 0.02 [33.7] for LOW, 1.5 0.02 [36.5] for MED, and 1.6 0.02 [43.4] for HIGH) and time spent exploring (1.8 0.1 [3.5] for LOW, 2.0 0.1 [4.0] for MED, and 2.3 0.1 [5.7] for HIGH) and number of nonaggressive sow-sow contacts (0.3 0.09 [2.2] for LOW, 0.4 0.07 [3.2] for MED, and 0.5 0.07 [4.5] for HIGH) in HIGH compared with LOW ( < 0.05). Farrowing rate and total piglets born were not affected by treatment ( > 0.05). A secondary analysis was conducted that examined individual sow behavior within each pen, and this identified increased injury number in the lowest ranked sows (involved in no fights on d 0 and no displacements on d0 to d4) in LOW (9.3 1.2 [107.9] for LOW, 6.2 0.8 [53.0] for MED, and 5.1 0.8 [28.1] for HIGH) and also decreased fight number and duration in HIGH compared with LOW on d 0 and 1 ( < 0.05). Our primary data analysis demonstrates positive exploratory and social behaviors with increased space and suggests that a reduction in space following hierarchy formation is not a significant stressor. Additionally, there is some evidence at an individual sow level that increased space at mixing benefits sow welfare parameters, especially for low-ranked sows. PMID:26812343

  4. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 7: Earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Earth Observations working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The objectives of the Earth Observation experiments are: (1) establishment of quantitative relationships between observable parameters and geophysical variables, (2) development, test, calibration, and evaluation of eventual flight instruments in experimental space flight missions, (3) demonstration of the operational utility of specific observation concepts or techniques as information inputs needed for taking actions, and (4) deployment of prototype and follow-on operational Earth Observation systems. The basic payload capability, mission duration, launch sites, inclinations, and payload limitations are defined.

  5. Communication: Active space decomposition with multiple sites: Density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Shane M.; Shiozaki, Toru

    2014-12-07

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few ?E{sub h} or less) with M = 128 in both cases. This rapid convergence is because the renormalization steps are used only for the interfragment electron correlation.

  6. Communication: Active space decomposition with multiple sites: density matrix renormalization group algorithm.

    PubMed

    Parker, Shane M; Shiozaki, Toru

    2014-12-01

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few ?E(h) or less) with M = 128 in both cases. This rapid convergence is because the renormalization steps are used only for the interfragment electron correlation. PMID:25481122

  7. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 8: Earth and ocean physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Earth and Ocean Physics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The requirements for the space shuttle mission are defined as: (1) precision measurement for earth and ocean physics experiments, (2) development and demonstration of new and improved sensors and analytical techniques, (3) acquisition of surface truth data for evaluation of new measurement techniques, (4) conduct of critical experiments to validate geophysical phenomena and instrumental results, and (5) development and validation of analytical/experimental models for global ocean dynamics and solid earth dynamics/earthquake prediction. Tables of data are presented to show the flight schedule estimated costs, and the mission model.

  8. Range Commanders Council Meteorology Group 88th Meeting: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Task Report, 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2004-01-01

    Supported Return-to-Flight activities by providing surface climate data from Kennedy Space Center used primarily for ice and dew formation studies, and upper air wind analysis primarily used for ascent loads analyses. The MSFC Environments Group's Terrestrial and Planetary Environments Team documented Space Shuttle day-of-launch support activities by publishing a document in support of SSP Return-to-Flight activities entitled "Space Shuttle Program Flight Operations Support". The team also formalized the Shuttle Natural Environments Technical Panel and chaired the first special session of the SSP Natural Environments Panel meeting at KSC, November 4-7,2003.58 participants from NASA, DOD and other government agencies from across the country attended the meeting.

  9. The NASA EEE parts assurance group (NEPAG) - An evolving approach to maximizing space parts assurance resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, M. J.

    2002-12-01

    This paper describes the activities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Electrical, Electronic and Electromechanical (EEE) Parts Assurance Group (NEPAG) in its role as a resource sharing and coordinating force in EEE Parts assurance for space flight missions. NEPAG is a new organization, barely two years old. The EEE parts world for space applications faces a number of challenges as we enter the 21st Century but the most significant is clearly the economic incorporation of Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) parts without sacrificing reliability. NEPAG has collaborated in designing a NASA-funded evaluation plan to take a comprehensive look at COTS. A cost/benefit study has been performed to compare the cost of ownership of the US MIL parts NASA has traditionally used with COTS parts screened to an equivalent reliability level.

  10. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  11. Testing the accuracy of redshift-space group-finding algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederic, James J.

    1995-04-01

    Using simulated redshift surveys generated from a high-resolution N-body cosmological structure simulation, we study algorithms used to identify groups of galaxies in redshift space. Two algorithms are investigated; both are friends-of-friends schemes with variable linking lengths in the radial and transverse dimenisons. The chief difference between the algorithms is in the redshift linking length. The algorithm proposed by Huchra & Geller (1982) uses a generous linking length designed to find 'fingers of god,' while that of Nolthenius & White (1987) uses a smaller linking length to minimize contamination by projection. We find that neither of the algorithms studied is intrinsically superior to the other; rather, the ideal algorithm as well as the ideal algorithm parameters depends on the purpose for which groups are to be studied. The Huchra & Geller algorithm misses few real groups, at the cost of including some spurious groups and members, while the Nolthenius & White algorithm misses high velocity dispersion groups and members but is less likely to include interlopers in its group assignments. Adjusting the parameters of either algorithm results in a trade-off between group accuracy and completeness. In a companion paper we investigate the accuracy of virial mass estimates and clustering properties of groups identified using these algorithms.

  12. Methods of space-group determination - a supplement dealing with twinned crystals and metric specialization.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2015-10-01

    Tables for the determination of space group for single crystals, twinned crystals and crystals with a specialized metric are presented in the form of a spreadsheet for use on a computer. There are 14 tables, one for each of the Bravais-lattice types. The content of the tables is arranged so that at the intersection of rows, displaying the conditions for reflection, and of columns, displaying the Laue and crystal classes, one finds those space groups compatible with the observed Bravais-lattice type, the conditions for reflection and the Laue and crystal classes. The tables are intended to be of direct use to an experimentalist working with an unknown structure. PMID:26422223

  13. Exploiting space-group symmetry in fragment-based molecular crystal calculations.

    PubMed

    Heit, Yonaton; Beran, Gregory J O

    2014-11-15

    Recent developments in fragment-based methods make it increasingly feasible to use high-level ab initio electronic structure techniques to molecular crystals. Such studies remain computationally demanding, however. Here, we describe a straightforward algorithm for exploiting space-group symmetry in fragment-based methods which often provides computational speed-ups of several fold or more. This algorithm does not require a priori specification of the space group or symmetry operators. Rather, the symmetrically equivalent fragments are identified automatically by aligning the individual fragments along their principle axes of inertia and testing for equivalence with other fragments. The symmetry operators relating equivalent fragments can then be worked out easily. Implementation of this algorithm for computing energies, nuclear gradients with respect to both atomic coordinates and lattice parameters, and the nuclear hessian is described. PMID:25270380

  14. Fredholm and spectral properties of Toeplitz operators on H{sup p} spaces over ordered groups

    SciTech Connect

    Mirotin, Adolf R

    2011-05-31

    We consider Toeplitz operators on the spaces H{sup p}(G), 1< p<{infinity}, associated with a compact connected Abelian group G whose character group is ordered and, in the case of total order, prove a theorem on the Fredholm index for those operators which have continuous symbols which generalizes the classical Gohberg-Krein theorem. The results thus obtained are applied to the spectral theory of Toeplitz operators and examples where the index is evaluated explicitly are considered. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  15. Charge density wave depinning transition: a real space renormalization group approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglioti, E.; Celino, M.

    1993-01-01

    We study analytically and numerically the depinning transition of a pinned charge density wave. We introduce a real space renormalization group approach with the method of decimation, which allows to determine the threshold both in the strong and weak pinning limit. We also perform a numerical renormalization of the system that allows to avoid the difficulties due to the large fluctuations in the weak pinning limit. The analytical results turn out to be in good agreement with the simulations.

  16. Cohomologies of Configuration Spaces and Higher-Dimensional Polylogarithms in Renormalization Group Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolov, Nikolay M.

    2010-06-17

    The deviation from commutativity of the renormalization and the action of all linear partial differential operators is the main source of the anomalies in quantum field theory, including the renormalization group action. This deviation is characterized by certain 'renormalization cocycles' that are related to cohomologies of the so called (ordered) configuration spaces. Cohomological differential equations that determine the renormalization cocycles up to the renormalization freedom are obtained. The solution of these equations requires introducing transcendental extensions related to higher-dimensional polylogarithms.

  17. Report from the MPP Working Group to the NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James R.; Grosch, Chester; Mcanulty, Michael; Odonnell, John; Storey, Owen

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) gave a select group of scientists the opportunity to test and implement their computational algorithms on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) located at Goddard Space Flight Center, beginning in late 1985. One year later, the Working Group presented its report, which addressed the following: algorithms, programming languages, architecture, programming environments, the way theory relates, and performance measured. The findings point to a number of demonstrated computational techniques for which the MPP architecture is ideally suited. For example, besides executing much faster on the MPP than on conventional computers, systolic VLSI simulation (where distances are short), lattice simulation, neural network simulation, and image problems were found to be easier to program on the MPP's architecture than on a CYBER 205 or even a VAX. The report also makes technical recommendations covering all aspects of MPP use, and recommendations concerning the future of the MPP and machines based on similar architectures, expansion of the Working Group, and study of the role of future parallel processors for space station, EOS, and the Great Observatories era.

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human cystathionine ?-synthase

    PubMed Central

    Oyenarte, Iker; Majtan, Tomas; Ereo, June; Corral-Rodrguez, Mara Angeles; Kraus, Jan P.; Martnez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Human cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS) is a pyridoxal-5?-phosphate-dependent hemeprotein, whose catalytic activity is regulated by S-adenosylmethionine. CBS catalyzes the ?-replacement reaction of homocysteine (Hcy) with serine to yield cystathionine. CBS is a key regulator of plasma levels of the thrombogenic Hcy and deficiency in CBS is the single most common cause of homocystinuria, an inherited metabolic disorder of sulfur amino acids. The properties of CBS enzymes, such as domain organization, oligomerization degree or regulatory mechanisms, are not conserved across the eukaryotes. The current body of knowledge is insufficient to understand these differences and their impact on CBS function and physiology. To overcome this deficiency, we have addressed the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a protein construct (hCBS516525) that contains the full-length CBS from Homo sapiens (hCBS) and just lacks amino-acid residues 516525, which are located in a disordered loop. The human enzyme yielded crystals belonging to space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.98, b = 136.33, c = 169.83? and diffracting X-rays to a resolution of 3.0?. The crystal structure appears to contain two molecules in the asymmetric unit which presumably correspond to a dimeric form of the enzyme. PMID:23143240

  19. Phormidium phycoerythrin forms hexamers in crystals: a crystallographic study.

    PubMed

    Sonani, Ravi Raghav; Sharma, Mahima; Gupta, Gagan Deep; Kumar, Vinay; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-08-01

    The crystallographic analysis of a marine cyanobacterium (Phormidium sp. A09DM) phycoerythrin (PE) that shows distinct sequence features compared with known PE structures from cyanobacteria and red algae is reported. Phormidium PE was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Diffraction data were collected on the protein crystallography beamline at the Indus-2 synchrotron. The crystals diffracted to about 2.1? resolution at 100?K. The crystals, with an apparent hexagonal morphology, belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 108.3, b = 108.4?, c = 116.6?, ? = 78.94, ? = 82.50, ? = 60.34. The molecular-replacement solution confirmed the presence of 12 ?? monomers in the P1 cell. The Phormidium PE elutes as an (??)3 trimer of ?? monomers from a molecular-sieve column and exists as [(??)3]2 hexamers in the crystal lattice. Unlike red algal PE proteins, the hexamers of Phormidium PE do not form higher-order structures in the crystals. The existence of only one characteristic visual absorption band at 564?nm suggests the presence of phycoerythrobilin chromophores, and the absence of any other types of bilins, in the Phormidium PE assembly. PMID:26249689

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of dipeptidyl aminopeptidase BII from Pseudoxanthomonas mexicana WO24

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Ippei; Tateoka, Chika; Roppongi, Saori; Okada, Hirofumi; Nonaka, Takamasa; Morikawa, Yasushi; Nakamura, Kazuo T.; Ogasawara, Wataru; Tanaka, Nobutada

    2014-01-01

    Dipeptidyl aminopeptidase BII from Pseudoxanthomonas mexicana WO24 (DAP BII) is able to cleave a variety of dipeptides from the amino-terminus of substrate peptides. For crystallographic studies, DAP BII was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data to 2.3? resolution were collected using an orthorhombic crystal form belonging to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.55, b = 130.86, c = 170.87?. Structural analysis by the multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction method is in progress. PMID:24637761

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the CBS-domain protein MJ1004 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    PubMed Central

    Oyenarte, Iker; Lucas, Mara; Gmez Garca, Inmaculada; Martnez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    The purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the archaeal CBS-domain protein MJ1004 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii are described. The native protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized in the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.4, b = 53.8, c=82.6?, ?=106.1. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.7? resolution using synchrotron radiation. Matthews-volume calculations suggested the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit that are likely to correspond to a dimeric species, which is also observed in solution. PMID:21393835

  2. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Tokuoka, Keiji; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Okamoto, Naoki; Okano, Yousuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Inaka, Koji; Urade, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Old yellow enzyme (OYE) is an NADPH oxidoreductase that contains a flavin mononucleotide as a prosthetic group. The OYE from Trypanosoma cruzi, which produces prostaglandin F2α, a potent mediator of various physiological and pathological processes, from prostaglandin H2. The protein was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.3, b = 78.8, c = 78.8 Å, β = 93.4° and two molecules per asymmetric unit. The crystals were suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies and diffracted to 1.70 Å resolution. A Patterson search method is in progress using the structure of OYE from Pseudomonas putida as a starting model. PMID:17909300

  3. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Tokuoka, Keiji; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Okamoto, Naoki; Okano, Yousuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Inaka, Koji; Urade, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2007-10-01

    Old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Old yellow enzyme (OYE) is an NADPH oxidoreductase that contains a flavin mononucleotide as a prosthetic group. The OYE from Trypanosoma cruzi, which produces prostaglandin F{sub 2α}, a potent mediator of various physiological and pathological processes, from prostaglandin H2. The protein was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.3, b = 78.8, c = 78.8 Å, β = 93.4° and two molecules per asymmetric unit. The crystals were suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies and diffracted to 1.70 Å resolution. A Patterson search method is in progress using the structure of OYE from Pseudomonas putida as a starting model.

  4. The redshift-space neighborhoods of 36 loose groups of galaxies. 1: The data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramella, Massimo; Geller, Margaret J.; Hurchra, John P.; Thorstensen, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We have selected 36 loose groups of galaxies (RGH89) with at least five members, and with mean redshift average value of CZ is greater than 3200 km/s. These groups all lie within the first two slices of the CfA redshift survey 8(sup h) less than or equal to alpha less than or equal to 17(sup h) and 26.5 deg less than or equal to delta less than or equal to 38.5 deg). For each of these groups, we define the redshift-space neighborhood as a region centered on the group coordinates and delimited by a circle of projected radius R(sub cir) = 1.5/h Mpc on the sky, and by a velocity interval delta (sub cz) = 3000 km/s. Here we give the redshifts of 334 galaxies in these redshift-space neighborhoods. For completeness, we also give the redshifts of the 232 original members. These data include 199 new redshifts. We demonstrate that these samples of fainter galaxies significantly increase the number of members.

  5. Processor-Group Aware Runtime Support for Shared-and Global-Address Space Models

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Tipparaju, Vinod; Palmer, Bruce; Nieplocha, Jarek

    2004-12-07

    Exploiting multilevel parallelism using processor groups is becoming increasingly important for programming on high-end systems. This paper describes a group-aware run-time support for shared-/global- address space programming models. The current effort has been undertaken in the context of the Aggregate Remote Memory Copy Interface (ARMCI) [5], a portable runtime system used as a communication layer for Global Arrays [6], Co-Array Fortran (CAF) [9], GPSHMEM [10], Co-Array Python [11], and also end-user applications. The paper describes the management of shared memory, integration of shared memory communication and RDMA on clusters with SMP nodes, and registration. These are all required for efficient multi- method and multi-protocol communication on modern systems. Focus is placed on techniques for supporting process groups while maximizing communication performance and efficiently managing global memory system-wide.

  6. A Perceptual Phonetic Similarity Space for Languages: Evidence from Five Native Language Listener Groups1

    PubMed Central

    Bradlow, Ann; Clopper, Cynthia; Smiljanic, Rajka; Walter, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to devise a means of representing languages in a perceptual similarity space based on their overall phonetic similarity. In Experiment 1, native English listeners performed a free classification task in which they grouped 17 diverse languages based on their perceived phonetic similarity. A similarity matrix of the grouping patterns was then submitted to clustering and multidimensional scaling analyses. In Experiment 2, an independent group of native English listeners sorted the group of 17 languages in terms of their distance from English. Experiment 3 repeated Experiment 2 with four groups of non-native English listeners: Dutch, Mandarin, Turkish and Korean listeners. Taken together, the results of these three experiments represent a step towards establishing an approach to assessing the overall phonetic similarity of languages. This approach could potentially provide the basis for developing predictions regarding foreign-accented speech intelligibility for various listener groups, and regarding speech perception accuracy in the context of background noise in various languages. PMID:21179563

  7. Toward a standardized structural-functional group connectome in MNI space.

    PubMed

    Horn, Andreas; Blankenburg, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the structural architecture of the human brain in terms of connectivity between its subregions has provided profound insights into its underlying functional organization and has coined the concept of the "connectome", a structural description of the elements forming the human brain and the connections among them. Here, as a proof of concept, we introduce a novel group connectome in standard space based on a large sample of 169 subjects from the Enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (eNKI-RS). Whole brain structural connectomes of each subject were estimated with a global tracking approach, and the resulting fiber tracts were warped into standard stereotactic (MNI) space using DARTEL. Employing this group connectome, the results of published tracking studies (i.e., the JHU white matter and Oxford thalamic connectivity atlas) could be largely reproduced directly within MNI space. In a second analysis, a study that examined structural connectivity between regions of a functional network, namely the default mode network, was reproduced. Voxel-wise structural centrality was then calculated and compared to others' findings. Furthermore, including additional resting-state fMRI data from the same subjects, structural and functional connectivity matrices between approximately forty thousand nodes of the brain were calculated. This was done to estimate structure-function agreement indices of voxel-wise whole brain connectivity. Taken together, the combination of a novel whole brain fiber tracking approach and an advanced normalization method led to a group connectome that allowed (at least heuristically) performing fiber tracking directly within MNI space. Such an approach may be used for various purposes like the analysis of structural connectivity and modeling experiments that aim at studying the structure-function relationship of the human connectome. Moreover, it may even represent a first step toward a standard DTI template of the human brain in stereotactic space. The standardized group connectome might thus be a promising new resource to better understand and further analyze the anatomical architecture of the human brain on a population level. PMID:26327244

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human aquaporin 1 at a resolution of 3.28?.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Carrillo, David; To Yiu Ying, Janet; Darwis, Dina; Soon, Cin Huang; Cornvik, Tobias; Torres, Jaume; Lescar, Julien

    2014-12-01

    Aquaporin water channels (AQPs) are found in almost every organism from humans to bacteria. In humans, 13 classes of AQPs control water and glycerol homeostasis. Knockout studies have suggested that modulating the activity of AQPs could be beneficial for the treatment of several pathologies. In particular, aquaporin 1 is a key factor in cell migration and angiogenesis, and constitutes a possible target for anticancer compounds and also for the treatment of glaucoma. Here, a preliminary crystallographic analysis at 3.28? resolution of crystals of human aquaporin 1 (hAQP1) obtained from protein expressed in Sf9 insect cells is reported. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 89.28, c = 174.9?, and contained one monomer per asymmetric unit. The hAQP1 biological tetramer is generated via the crystallographic fourfold axis. This work extends previous electron crystallographic studies that used material extracted from human red blood cells, in which the resolution was limited to approximately 3.8?. It will inform efforts to improve lattice contacts and the diffraction limit for the future structure-based discovery of specific hAQP1 inhibitors. PMID:25484221

  9. Recombinant production, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic structure determination of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Ronny C.; McFeeters, Hana; Coates, Leighton; McFeeters, Robert L.

    2014-10-15

    The peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase enzyme from the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pth; EC 3.1.1.29) has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized for X-ray structural analysis. Suitable crystals were grown using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method after one week of incubation against a reservoir solution consisting of 20% polyethylene glycol 4000, 100 mM Tris pH 7.5, 10%(v/v) isopropyl alcohol. The crystals were used to obtain the three-dimensional structure of the native protein at 1.77 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement of the crystallographic data processed in space group P6122 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 63.62,c = 155.20 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. The asymmetric unit of the crystallographic lattice was composed of a single copy of the enzyme molecule with a 43% solvent fraction, corresponding to a Matthews coefficient of 2.43 Å3 Da-1. The crystallographic structure reported here will serve as the foundation for future structure-guided efforts towards the development of novel small-molecule inhibitors specific to bacterial Pths.

  10. A Bruhat decomposition for the loop space of a compact group: A new approach to results of Bott

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Howard; Raghunathan, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    We give a new proof of Bott's result, that the loop space of a compact, simply connected, simple Lie group has a cellular decomposition of a certain type. In particular, one obtains the Poincar polynomial for the loop space and Bott periodicity for the unitary group. PMID:16592292

  11. Operator evolution in the three-body space via the similarity renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Micah; Quaglioni, Sofia; Johnson, Calvin; Jurgenson, Eric; Navratil, Petr

    2014-03-01

    Performing quantitative calculations of nuclear observables in terms of nucleons interacting through two- and three-nucleon forces is a guiding principle of ab initio nuclear theory. Computationally, this is complicated by the large model spaces needed to reach convergence in many-body approaches, such as the no-core shell model (NCSM). In recent years, the similarity renormalization group (SRG) has provided a powerful tool to soften interactions for ab initio structure calculations, thus leading to convergence within smaller model spaces. SRG has been very successful when applied to the Hamiltonian of the nuclear system. However, when computing observables other than spectra, one must evolve the relevant operators using the same transformation that was applied to the Hamiltonian. Here we compute the root mean square (RMS) radius of 3H to show that evolving the \\rcirc2 operator in the three-body space, thus including two- and three-body SRG induced terms, will yield an exactly unitary transformation. We then extend our calculations to 4He and compute the RMS radius and total strength of the dipole transition using operators evolved in the three-body space. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Support came from U.S. DOE/SC/NP (work proposal SCW1158), IMRR: LLNL-ABS-647982.

  12. 'Seeing' atoms: the crystallographic revolution.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbach, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Laue's experiment in 1912 of the diffraction of X-rays by crystals led to one of the most influential discoveries in the history of science: the first determinations of crystal structures, NaCl and diamond in particular, by W. L. Bragg in 1913. For the first time, the visualisation of the structure of matter at the atomic level became possible. X-ray diffraction provided a sort of microscope with atomic resolution, atoms became observable physical objects and their relative positions in space could be seen. All branches of science concerned with matter, solid-state physics, chemistry, materials science, mineralogy and biology, could now be firmly anchored on the spatial arrangement of atoms. During the ensuing 100 years, structure determination by diffraction methods has matured into an indispensable method of chemical analysis. We trace the history of the development of 'small-structure' crystallography (excepting macromolecular structures) in Switzerland. Among the pioneers figure Peter Debye and Paul Scherrer with powder diffraction, and Paul Niggli and his Zurich School with space group symmetry and geometrical crystallography. Diffraction methods were applied early on by chemists at the Universities of Bern and Geneva. By the 1970s, X-ray crystallography was firmly established at most Swiss Universities, directed by full professors. Today, chemical analysis by structure determination is the task of service laboratories. However, the demand of diffraction methods to solve problems in all disciplines of science is still increasing and powerful radiation sources and detectors are being developed in Switzerland and worldwide. PMID:24801690

  13. Quantum scalar fields in de Sitter space from the nonperturbative renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilleux, Maxime; Serreau, Julien

    2015-10-01

    We investigate scalar field theories in de Sitter space by means of nonperturbative renormalization group techniques. We compute the functional flow equation for the effective potential of O (N ) theories in the local potential approximation and we study the onset of curvature-induced effects as quantum fluctuations are progressively integrated out from subhorizon to superhorizon scales. This results in a dimensional reduction of the original action to an effective zero-dimensional Euclidean theory. We show that the latter is equivalent both to the late-time equilibrium state of the stochastic approach of Starobinsky and Yokoyama and to the effective theory for the zero mode on Euclidean de Sitter space. We investigate the immediate consequences of this dimensional reduction: symmetry restoration and dynamical mass generation.

  14. Group-galaxy correlations in redshift space as a probe of the growth of structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, F. G.; de la Torre, S.; Bianchi, D.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the use of the cross-correlation between galaxies and galaxy groups to measure redshift-space distortions (RSD) and thus probe the growth rate of cosmological structure. This is compared to the classical approach based on using galaxy auto-correlation. We make use of realistic simulated galaxy catalogues that have been constructed by populating simulated dark matter haloes with galaxies through halo occupation prescriptions. We adapt the classical RSD Dispersion model to the case of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function and estimate the RSD parameter β by fitting both the full anisotropic correlation function ξs(rp, π) and its multipole moments. In addition, we define a modified version of the latter statistics by truncating the multipole moments to exclude strongly non-linear distortions at small transverse scales. We fit these three observable quantities in our set of simulated galaxy catalogues and estimate statistical and systematic errors on β for the case of galaxy-galaxy, group-group, and group-galaxy correlation functions. When ignoring off-diagonal elements of the covariance matrix in the fitting, the truncated multipole moments of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function provide the most accurate estimate, with systematic errors below 3% when fitting transverse scales larger than 10 h-1Mpc. Including the full data covariance enlarges statistical errors but keep unchanged the level of systematic error. Although statistical errors are generally larger for groups, the use of group-galaxy cross-correlation can potentially allow the reduction of systematics while using simple linear or Dispersion models.

  15. The Community-based Organizations Working Group of the Space Science Education Support Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, J. H.; Lowes, L. L.; Asplund, S.

    2004-12-01

    The NASA Space Science Support Network Community-based Organizations Working Group (CBOWG) has been working for the past two years on issues surrounding afterschool programs and programs for youth (e.g., Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Boys and Girls Clubs, 4-H, summer camps, afterschool and weekend programs for various ages, programs with emphases on minority youth). In this session the co-leaders of the CBOWG will discuss the challenges of working with community-based organizations on a regional or national level. We will highlight some ties that we have forged with the National Institute for Out of School Time (NIOST) and the National Afterschool Association (NAA). We will also talk about efforts to coordinate how various entities within NASA cooperate with community-based organizations to serve the best interests of these groups. We will give a couple of examples of how NASA space science organizations have partnered with community-based organizations. The session will include some handouts of information and resources that the CBOWG has found useful in developing an understanding of this segment of informal education groups. We would like to thank NASA for providing resources to support the work of the CBOWG.

  16. Seitz symbols for crystallographic symmetry operations.

    PubMed

    Glazer, A Michael; Aroyo, Mois I; Authier, Andr

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the Seitz notation for symmetry operations adopted by the Commission on Crystallographic Nomenclature as the standard convention for Seitz symbolism of the International Union of Crystallography. The established notation follows the existing crystallographic conventions in the descriptions of symmetry operations. PMID:24815978

  17. Unfolding of electronic structure through induced representations of space groups: Application to Fe-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomi?, Milan; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valent, Roser

    2014-11-01

    We revisit the problem that relevant parts of band structures for a given cell choice can reflect exact or approximate higher symmetries of subsystems in the cell and can therefore be significantly simplified by an unfolding procedure that recovers the higher symmetry. We show that band-structure unfolding can be understood as projection onto induced irreducible representations of a group obtained by extending the original group of translations with a number of additional symmetry operations. The resulting framework allows us to define a generalized unfolding procedure that includes the point group operations and can be applied to any quantity in the reciprocal space. The unfolding of the Brillouin zone follows naturally from the properties of the induced irreducible representations. In this context, we also introduce a procedure to derive tight-binding models of reduced dimensionality by making use of point group symmetries. Further, we show that careful consideration of unfolding has important consequences on the interpretation of angle-resolved photoemission experiments. Finally, we apply the unfolding procedure to various representative examples of Fe-based superconductor compounds and show that the one-iron picture arises as an irreducible representation of the glide-reflection group, and we comment on the consequences for the interpretation of one-iron versus two-iron Brillouin zone representations.

  18. Protein stability: a crystallographer's perspective.

    PubMed

    Deller, Marc C; Kong, Leopold; Rupp, Bernhard

    2016-02-01

    Protein stability is a topic of major interest for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and food industries, in addition to being a daily consideration for academic researchers studying proteins. An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification, formulation, storage and structural studies of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability, on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. The differences between protein conformational stability and protein compositional stability will be discussed, along with a brief introduction to key methods useful for analyzing protein stability. Finally, tactics for addressing protein-stability issues during protein expression, purification and crystallization will be discussed. PMID:26841758

  19. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 4: Life sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Life Sciences working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The objectives of the Life Sciences investigations are: (1) to continue the research directed at understanding the origin of life and the search for extraterrestrial evidence of life, (2) biomedical research to understand mechanisms and provide criteria for support of manned flight, (3) technology development for life support, protective systems, and work aids for providing environmental control, and (4) to study basic biological functions at all levels or organization influenced by gravity, radiation, and circadian rhythms. Examples of candidate experimental schedules and the experimental package functional requirements are included.

  20. Pressure and equilibrium measures for actions of amenable groups on the space of configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Bufetov, Aleksei I

    2011-03-31

    The model of statistical physics on a countable amenable group G is considered. For the natural action of G on the space of configurations S{sup G}, |S|<{infinity}, and for any closed invariant set X subset of S{sup G} we prove that there exists pressure which corresponds to a potential with finite norm on X (in the sense of the limit with respect to any Foelner sequence of sets in G). The existence of an equilibrium measure is established. Bibliography: 8 titles.

  1. Real space renormalization group and totalitarian paradox of majority rule voting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galam, Serge

    2000-09-01

    The effect of majority rule voting in hierarchical structures is studied using the basic concepts from real space renormalization group. It shows in particular that a huge majority can be self-eliminated while climbing up the hierarchy levels. This majority democratic self-elimination articulates around the existence of fixed points in the voting flow. An unstable fixed point determines the critical threshold to full and total power. It can be varied from 50% up to 77% of initial support. Our model could shed new light on the last century eastern European communist collapse.

  2. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 5: Solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Solar Physics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The areas to be investigated by the solar physics experiments are: (1) the production of mechanical energy in the subphotospheric layers and its transport and dissipation in the upper layers of the atmosphere, (2) the mass flux from the subphotospheric layers into the chromosphere and corona and beyond the solar wind, (3) solar activity and its relationship to magnetic fields, and (4) the production of solar flares. The approach to be followed in conducting the experiments and the equipment required are defined.

  3. Density-matrix renormalization group algorithm with multi-level active space.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingjin; Wen, Jing; Ma, Haibo

    2015-07-21

    The density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method, which can deal with a large active space composed of tens of orbitals, is nowadays widely used as an efficient addition to traditional complete active space (CAS)-based approaches. In this paper, we present the DMRG algorithm with a multi-level (ML) control of the active space based on chemical intuition-based hierarchical orbital ordering, which is called as ML-DMRG with its self-consistent field (SCF) variant ML-DMRG-SCF. Ground and excited state calculations of H2O, N2, indole, and Cr2 with comparisons to DMRG references using fixed number of kept states (M) illustrate that ML-type DMRG calculations can obtain noticeable efficiency gains. It is also shown that the orbital re-ordering based on hierarchical multiple active subspaces may be beneficial for reducing computational time for not only ML-DMRG calculations but also DMRG ones with fixed M values. PMID:26203012

  4. Intraspecific variation in space use, group size, and mating systems of caviomorph rodents

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Christine R.; Burger, Joseph Robert

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in social systems is widely recognized across many taxa, and specific models, including polygamy potential, resource defense, and resource dispersion, have been developed to explain the relationship between ecological variation and social organization. Although mammals from temperate North America and Eurasia have provided many insights into this relationship, rodents from the Neotropics and temperate South America have largely been ignored. In this review we focus on reports documenting intraspecific variation in spacing systems, group size, and mating systems of caviomorphs. This large group of New World hystricognath rodents occupies a diverse array of habitats; thus, members of the same species potentially exhibit different social systems in response to different ecological conditions. Spatial patterns vary in response to a diverse array of factors, including predation, food availability, population density, and soil characteristics. Changes in group size typically correlate with changes in resource availability, particularly food. Mating systems generally reflect the ability of males to control access to females, which may depend on population density or food distribution. In general, social organization in caviomorphs fits predictions of resource-based models; however, most studies have been purely observational, involving small numbers of animals over short time periods and reporting qualitative rather than quantitative levels of ecological correlates. In future studies the use of molecular techniques and controlled, experimental manipulations can increase our understanding of intraspecific variation in caviomorph social systems. This understudied group of rodents offers excellent opportunities to provide insights into the influence of ecological conditions on behavior such as social systems. PMID:22328790

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of rabbit l-gulonate 3-dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Asada, Yukuhiko; Kuroishi, Chizu; Ukita, Yoko; Sumii, Rie; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hara, Akira; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-03-01

    The preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of rabbit l-gulonate 3-dehydrogenase is described. Rabbit l-gulonate 3-dehydrogenase was crystallized using the oil-microbatch method at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.70 resolution from a crystal at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the C-centred monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.81, b = 69.08, c = 65.64 , ? = 102.7. Assuming the presence of a monomeric protomer in the asymmetric unit gives a V{sub M} value of 2.21 {sup 3} Da{sup ?1} and a solvent content of 44.4%. A cocrystal with NADH, which was isomorphous to the apo form, was also prepared and diffraction data were collected to 1.85 resolution using Cu K? radiation at 100 K.

  6. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human Rad GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Yanuar, Arry; Sakurai, Shigeru; Kitano, Ken; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2005-11-01

    Human Rad has been crystallized. A diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 1.8 Å. Human Rad is a new member of the Ras GTPase superfamily and is overexpressed in human skeletal muscle of individuals with type II diabetes. The GTPase core domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified for crystallization. Crystals were obtained at 293 K by vapour diffusion using a crystallization robot. The crystals were found to belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.2, b = 58.6, c = 53.4 Å, β = 97.9°, and contained two Rad molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. A diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 1.8 Å using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8.

  7. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of Pru du amandin, an allergenic protein from Prunus dulcis

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Vineet; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2008-01-01

    The purification, identification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an allergy-related protein, Pru du amandin, from P. dulcis nuts are reported. Food allergies appear to be one of the foremost causes of hypersensitivity reactions. Nut allergies account for most food allergies and are often permanent. The 360 kDa hexameric protein Pru du amandin, a known allergen, was purified from almonds (Prunus dulcis) by ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion-exchange chromatography. The protein was identified by a BLAST homology search against the nonredundant sequence database. Pru du amandin belongs to the 11S legumin family of seed storage proteins characterized by the presence of a cupin motif. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 150.7, c = 164.9 Å.

  8. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a 2S albumin seed protein from Lens culinaris

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Pankaj; Gaur, Vineet; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2008-08-01

    A 2S albumin from L. culinaris was purified and crystallized and preliminary crystallographic studies were carried out. Lens culinaris (lentil) is a widely consumed high-protein-content leguminous crop. A 2S albumin protein (26.5 kDa) has been identified using NH{sub 2}-terminal sequencing from a 90% ammonium sulfate saturation fraction of total L. culinaris seed protein extract. The NH{sub 2}-terminal sequence shows very high homology to PA2, an allergy-related protein from Pisum sativum. The 2S albumin protein was purified using a combination of size-exclusion and ion-exchange chromatography. Crystals of the 2S seed albumin obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and were indexed in space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 78.6, c = 135.2 Å.

  9. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) from Halothermothrix orenii

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, Frederick; Tan, Tien-Chye; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Patel, Bharat K. C.

    2005-01-01

    The first crystallographic study of a sucrose phosphate synthase from H. orenii, an organism that is both thermophilic and halophilic, is reported. The protein crystal diffracts X-rays to 3.01 . This is the first report of the crystallization of a sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS; EC 2.4.1.14). It also constitutes the first study of a sucrose phosphate synthase from a non-photosynthetic thermohalophilic anaerobic bacterium, Halothermothrix orenii. The purified recombinant spsA protein has been crystallized in the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 154.2, b = 47.9, c = 72.3 , ? = 103.16, using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal diffracts X-rays to a resolution limit of 3.01 . Heavy-metal and halide-soaking trials are currently in progress to solve the structure.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase

    SciTech Connect

    Qamra, Rohini; Prakash, Prachee; Aruna, Bandi; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Mande, Shekhar C.

    2005-05-01

    Chorismate mutase from M. tuberculosis has been crystallized. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies reveal the occurrence of a dimeric molecule in the crystal asymmetric unit. Chorismate mutase catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine in bacteria, fungi and higher plants. The recent re-annotation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome has revealed the presence of a duplicate set of genes coding for chorismate mutase. The mycobacterial gene Rv1885c bears <20% sequence homology to other bacterial chorismate mutases, thus serving as a potential target for the development of inhibitors specific to the pathogen. The M. tuberculosis chorismate mutase was crystallized in space group C2 and the crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function calculations revealed the presence of two monomers in the asymmetric unit.

  11. Structure of ?-Bi 2O 3 from density functional theory: A systematic crystallographic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Wachsman, Eric D.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Nino, Juan C.

    2009-05-01

    A systematic crystallographic analysis of the <110> and <111> vacancy-ordered structure of cubic ?-Bi 2O 3 obtained from electronic-structure calculations is presented. The ordering of vacancies leads to a doubling of the unit-cell that results in a 222 fluorite super-structure, with an associated reduction in its space group symmetry from Fm3m to Fm3. The Bi atoms present inside the <111> vacancy-ordered oxygen sublattice have equal Bi-O bond lengths, whereas, those present inside the <110> vacancy-ordered oxygen sublattice have three different pairs of Bi-O bond lengths. The specific ionic displacements and electronic charge configurations also depend on the nature of vacancy ordering in the oxygen sub-lattice.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of type 1 RNase H from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii 7

    SciTech Connect

    You, Dong-Ju; Chon, Hyongi; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2006-08-01

    Type 1 RNase H from the hyperthermophilic archaeon S. tokodaii 7 was overproduced in E. coli, purified, and crystallized. Preliminary crystallographic studies indicated that the crystal belongs to space group P4{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 39.21, c = 91.15 Å. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of type 1 RNase H from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii 7 were performed. A crystal was grown at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Native X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation from station BL41XU at SPring-8. The crystal belongs to space group P4{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 39.21, c = 91.15 Å. Assuming the presence of one molecule in the asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient V{sub M} was calculated to be 2.1 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and the solvent content was 40.5%. The structure of a selenomethionine Sto-RNase HI mutant obtained using a MAD data set is currently being analysed.

  13. Real-space renormalization group method for quantum 1/2 spins on the pyrochlore lattice.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Adeva, Angel J

    2014-04-01

    A simple phenomenological real-space renormalization group method for quantum Heisenberg spins with nearest and next nearest neighbour interactions on a pyrochlore lattice is presented. Assuming a scaling law for the order parameter of two clusters of different sizes, a set of coupled equations that gives the fixed points of the renormalization group transformation and, thus, the critical temperatures and ordered phases of the system is found. The particular case of spins 1/2 is studied in detail. Furthermore, to simplify the mathematical details, from all the possible phases arising from the renormalization group transformation, only those phases in which the magnetic lattice is commensurate with a subdivision of the crystal lattice into four interlocked face-centred cubic sublattices are considered. These correspond to a quantum spin liquid, ferromagnetic order, or non-collinear order in which the total magnetic moment of a tetrahedral unit is zero. The corresponding phase diagram is constructed and the differences with respect to the classical model are analysed. It is found that this method reproduces fairly well the phase diagram of the pyrochlore lattice under the aforementioned constraints. PMID:24625859

  14. Exploring for 3D photonic bandgap structures in the 11 f.c.c. space groups.

    PubMed

    Maldovan, Martin; Ullal, Chaitanya K; Carter, W Craig; Thomas, Edwin L

    2003-10-01

    The promise of photonic crystals and their potential applications has attracted considerable attention towards the establishment of periodic dielectric structures that in addition to possessing robust complete bandgaps, can be easily fabricated with current techniques. A number of theoretical structures have been proposed. To date, the best complete photonic bandgap structure is that of diamond networks having Fd3m symmetry (2-3 gap). The only other known complete bandgap in a face-centred-cubic (f.c.c.) lattice structure is that of air spheres in a dielectric matrix (8-9 gap; the so called 'inverse-opal' structure). Importantly, there is no systematic approach to discovering champion photonic crystal structures. Here we propose a level-set approach based on crystallography to systematically examine for photonic bandgap structures and illustrate this approach by applying it to the 11 f.c.c. groups. This approach gives us an insight into the effects of symmetry and connectivity. We classify the F-space groups into four fundamental geometries on the basis of the connectivity of high-symmetry Wyckoff sites. Three of the fundamental geometries studied display complete bandgaps--including two: the F-RD structure with Fm3m symmetry and a group 216 structure with F43m symmetry that have not been reported previously. By using this systematic approach we were able to open gaps between the 2-3, 5-6 and 8-9 bands in the f.c.c. systems. PMID:12970758

  15. Velocity space diffusion and nongyrotropy of pickup water group ions at comet Grigg-Skjellerup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, A. J.; Johnstone, A. D.; Wilken, B.; Neubauer, Fritz M.

    1993-01-01

    The diffusion of water group cometary ions in velocity space at comet Grigg-Skjellerup was measured during the Giotto spacecraft encounter. The evolution of the collapsed pitch angle and energy distributions during the inbound and outbound passes shows that the timescale for energy diffusion may be similar to that for pitch angle diffusion. Fully isotropic pitch angle distributions were never seen. Also the bulk parameters of the three-dimensional distributions are examined. Transformation of these parameters into a field-aligned solar wind frame allows us to test the gyrotropy of the distributions. These observations imply that there were deviations from gyrotropy throughout the encounter becoming most important near to closest approach.

  16. Fisher's Zeros as the Boundary of Renormalization Group Flows in Complex Coupling Spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Denbleyker, A.; Du Daping; Liu Yuzhi; Meurice, Y.; Zou Haiyuan

    2010-06-25

    We propose new methods to extend the renormalization group transformation to complex coupling spaces. We argue that Fisher's zeros are located at the boundary of the complex basin of attraction of infrared fixed points. We support this picture with numerical calculations at finite volume for two-dimensional O(N) models in the large-N limit and the hierarchical Ising model. We present numerical evidence that, as the volume increases, the Fisher's zeros of four-dimensional pure gauge SU(2) lattice gauge theory with a Wilson action stabilize at a distance larger than 0.15 from the real axis in the complex {beta}=4/g{sup 2} plane. We discuss the implications for proofs of confinement and searches for nontrivial infrared fixed points in models beyond the standard model.

  17. Real-space renormalization-group studies of low-dimensional quantum antiferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Lepetit, M. ); Manousakis, E. )

    1993-07-01

    We study the ground state of one- and two-dimensional (square-lattice) spin-1/2 quantum antiferromagnets using a numerical real-space renormalization-group (RG) approach. In our RG approach we consider blocks of various sizes but with an odd number of sites; we retain only the doublet ground state and we integrate out the higher-energy states by means of second-order quasidegenerate perturbation theory. That is, we assume that the role of the excited states of a block, in the RG iteration process, is to renormalize the effective coupling parameters between blocks. We compute the ground-state energy of a spin-1/2 linear chain for various block sizes and find close agreement with the Bethe-ansatz exact solution. In the case of the spin-1/2 square-lattice quantum antiferromagnet, the obtained ground-state energy is in reasonable agreement with the available numerical estimates.

  18. Nuclear safety policy working group recommendations on nuclear propulsion safety for the space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Albert C.; Lee, James H.; Mcculloch, William H.; Sawyer, J. Charles, Jr.; Bari, Robert A.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Hardy, Alva C.; Niederauer, George F.; Remp, Kerry; Rice, John W.

    1993-01-01

    An interagency Nuclear Safety Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program. These recommendations, which are contained in this report, should facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG has recommended a top-level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the SEI nuclear propulsion safety program. In addition, the NSPWG has reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. These recommendations should be useful for the development of the program's top-level requirements for safety functions (referred to as Safety Functional Requirements). The safety requirements and guidelines address the following topics: reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, safeguards, risk/reliability, operational safety, ground testing, and other considerations.

  19. International Space Station Air Quality Assessed According to Toxicologically-Grouped Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Beck, Steve; Cheng, Patti F.; deVera, Vanessa J.; Hand, Jennifer; Macatangay, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    Scores of compounds are found in the International Space Station (ISS) atmospheric samples that are returned to the Johnson Space Center Toxicology Laboratory for analysis. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) are set with the view that each compound is present as if there were no other compounds present. In order to apply SMACs to the interpretation of the analytical data, the toxicologist must employ some method of combining the potential effects of the aggregate of compounds found in the atmospheric samples. The simplest approach is to assume that each quantifiable compound has the potential for some effect in proportion to the applicable SMAC, and then add all the proportions. This simple paradigm disregards the fact that most compounds have potential to adversely affect only a few physiological systems, and their effects would be independent rather than additive. An improved approach to dealing with exposure to mixtures is to add the proportions only for compounds that adversely affect the same physiological system. For example, toxicants that cause respiratory irritation are separated from those that cause neurotoxicity or cardio-toxicity. Herein we analyze ISS air quality data according to toxicological groups with a view that this could be used for understanding any crew symptoms occurring at the time of the sample acquisition. In addition, this approach could be useful in post-flight longitudinal surveys where the flight surgeon may need to identify post-flight, follow-up medical studies because of on-orbit exposures that target specific physiological systems.

  20. Outreach of Astronomy with emphasis to the Solar System by the Space group in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussas, X.; Dialynas, K.; Babasides, G.; Fasoulopoulos, G.; Dimitropoulou, V.; Prassopoulos, D.; Kouphos, S.; Spandagos, E.; Strikis, J.

    We have a long tradition in Space and Solar System outreach at the University of Athens (Space Group). We have contributed with many popular science articles in encyclopaedias (a total of some 200000 words), magazines and newspapers, public lectures around Greece and radio and TV programmes. We contribute in exhibitions for the public on many occasions (e.g. The British Exploration of the Planets, an exhibition organized by the British Council, at Eugenides Foundation and The Planetarium, where I prepared some 15 posters). We are preparing an outreach site of Astrophysics with sections for the planets, the exploration of the solar system and solar terrestrial relations. I am preparing several posters for the planets. We organize with the Hellenic Physical Union a series of Astrophysics Lectures at the University of Athens. Together with the Hellenic Physical Union we are planning to produce a theatrical play and CD or DVD concerning the planets. We have excellent collaboration with the amateur astronomers allover Greece and Cyprus. We organize, together with Physics or mathematics teachers in high schools several events related to astronomical observations (e.g. Venus transit, solar eclipe, astronomy nights). 1 We also organize popular science programmes in TV channels. I brief we consider Astronomy and especially the planetary system as a "Great Attractor" of pupil and the general public to science and we use it on every occasion for the benefit of the pupil and science. 2

  1. International Space Station Air Quality Assessed According to Toxicologically-Grouped Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Limero, Tom; DeVera, Vanessa; Cheng, Patti; Hand, Jennifer; Macatangay, Ariel; Beck, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Scores of compounds are found in the International Space Station (ISS) atmospheric samples that are returned to the Johnson Space Center Toxicology Laboratory for analysis. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) are set with the view that each compound is present as if there were no other compounds present. In order to apply SMACs to the interpretation of the analytical data, the toxicologist must employ some method of combining the potential effects of the aggregate of compounds found in the atmospheric samples. The simplest approach is to assume that each quantifiable compound has the potential for some effect in proportion to the applicable SMAC, and then add all the proportions. This simple paradigm disregards the fact that most compounds have potential to adversely affect only a few physiological systems, and their effects would be independent rather than additive. An improved approach to dealing with exposure to mixtures is to add the proportions only for compounds that adversely affect the same physiological system. For example, toxicants that cause respiratory irritation are separated from those that cause neurotoxicity or cardio-toxicity. Herein we analyze ISS air quality data according to toxicological groups with a view that this could be used for understanding any crew symptoms occurring at the time of the sample. In addition, this approach could be useful in post-flight longitudinal surveys where the flight surgeon may need to identify post-flight, follow-up medical studies because of on-orbit exposures that target specific physiological systems.

  2. Application of the renormalization group to the calculation of the vacuum decay rate in flat and curved space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Metaxas, Dimitrios

    2007-02-15

    I show that an application of renormalization group arguments may lead to significant corrections to the vacuum decay rate for phase transitions in flat and curved space-time. It can also give some information regarding its dependence on the parameters of the theory, including the cosmological constant in the case of decay in curved space-time.

  3. Quantum groups, roots of unity and particles on quantized Anti-de Sitter space

    SciTech Connect

    Steinacker, H

    1997-05-23

    Quantum groups in general and the quantum Anti-de Sitter group U{sub q}(so(2,3)) in particular are studied from the point of view of quantum field theory. The author shows that if q is a suitable root of unity, there exist finite-dimensional, unitary representations corresponding to essentially all the classical one-particle representations with (half) integer spin, with the same structure at low energies as in the classical case. In the massless case for spin {ge} 1, {open_quotes}naive{close_quotes} representations are unitarizable only after factoring out a subspace of {open_quotes}pure gauges{close_quotes}, as classically. Unitary many-particle representations are defined, with the correct classical limit. Furthermore, the author identifies a remarkable element Q in the center of U{sub q}(g), which plays the role of a BRST operator in the case of U{sub q}(so(2,3)) at roots of unity, for any spin {ge} 1. The associated ghosts are an intrinsic part of the indecomposable representations. The author shows how to define an involution on algebras of creation and anihilation operators at roots of unity, in an example corresponding to non-identical particles. It is shown how nonabelian gauge fields appear naturally in this framework, without having to define connections on fiber bundles. Integration on Quantum Euclidean space and sphere and on Anti-de Sitter space is studied as well. The author gives a conjecture how Q can be used in general to analyze the structure of indecomposable representations, and to define a new, completely reducible associative (tensor) product of representations at roots of unity, which generalizes the standard {open_quotes}truncated{close_quotes} tensor product as well as many-particle representations.

  4. Group space allowance has little effect on sow health, productivity, or welfare in a free-access stall system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Free-access stalls allow sows to choose the protection of a stall or use of a shared group space. This study investigated the effect of group space width: 0.91 (SS), 2.13 (IS), and 3.05 (LS) m on the health, production, behavior, and welfare of gestating sows. At gestational day (GD) 35.4 ± 2.3, 21 ...

  5. Hubble Space Telescope Snapshot Search for Planetary Nebulae in Globular Clusters of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    2015-04-01

    Single stars in ancient globular clusters (GCs) are believed incapable of producing planetary nebulae (PNs), because their post-asymptotic-giant-branch evolutionary timescales are slower than the dissipation timescales for PNs. Nevertheless, four PNs are known in Galactic GCs. Their existence likely requires more exotic evolutionary channels, including stellar mergers and common-envelope binary interactions. I carried out a snapshot imaging search with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for PNs in bright Local Group GCs outside the Milky Way. I used a filter covering the 5007 nebular emission line of [O iii], and another one in the nearby continuum, to image 66 GCs. Inclusion of archival HST frames brought the total number of extragalactic GCs imaged at 5007 to 75, whose total luminosity slightly exceeds that of the entire Galactic GC system. I found no convincing PNs in these clusters, aside from one PN in a young M31 cluster misclassified as a GC, and two PNs at such large angular separations from an M31 GC that membership is doubtful. In a ground-based spectroscopic survey of 274 old GCs in M31, Jacoby et al. found three candidate PNs. My HST images of one of them suggest that the [O iii] emission actually arises from ambient interstellar medium rather than a PN; for the other two candidates, there are broadband archival UV HST images that show bright, blue point sources that are probably the PNs. In a literature search, I also identified five further PN candidates lying near old GCs in M31, for which follow-up observations are necessary to confirm their membership. The rates of incidence of PNs are similar, and small but nonzero, throughout the GCs of the Local Group. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, and from the data archive at STScI, which are operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  6. Space station needs, attributes and architectural options study commercialization working group briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The benefits for each of the following commercial areas was investigated: communications, remote sensing, materials processing in space, low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite assembly, testing, and servicing, and space tourism. In each case, where economic benefits are derived, the costs for accomplishing tasks with the Space Station are compared with the cost with the Space Transportation System only.

  7. Target selection and comparison of mission design for space debris removal by DLR's advanced study group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pas, Niels; Lousada, Joao; Terhes, Claudia; Bernabeu, Marc; Bauer, Waldemar

    2014-09-01

    Space debris is a growing problem. Models show that the Kessler syndrome, the exponential growth of debris due to collisions, has become unavoidable unless an active debris removal program is initiated. The debris population in LEO with inclination between 60° and 95° is considered as the most critical zone. In order to stabilize the debris population in orbit, especially in LEO, 5 to 10 objects will need to be removed every year. The unique circumstances of such a mission could require that several objects are removed with a single launch. This will require a mission to rendezvous with a multitude of objects orbiting on different altitudes, inclinations and planes. Removal models have assumed that the top priority targets will be removed first. However this will lead to a suboptimal mission design and increase the ΔV-budget. Since there is a multitude of targets to choose from, the targets can be selected for an optimal mission design. In order to select a group of targets for a removal mission the orbital parameters and political constraints should also be taken into account. Within this paper a number of the target selection criteria are presented. The possible mission targets and their order of retrieval is dependent on the mission architecture. A comparison between several global mission architectures is given. Under consideration are 3 global missions of which a number of parameters are varied. The first mission launches multiple separate deorbit kits. The second launches a mother craft with deorbit kits. The third launches an orbital tug which pulls the debris in a lower orbit, after which a deorbit kit performs the final deorbit burn. A RoM mass and cost comparison is presented. The research described in this paper has been conducted as part of an active debris removal study by the Advanced Study Group (ASG). The ASG is an interdisciplinary student group working at the DLR, analyzing existing technologies and developing new ideas into preliminary concepts.

  8. On the reflection type decomposition of the adjoint reduced phase space of a compact semisimple Lie group

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, M.; Rudolph, G.; Schmidt, M.

    2013-08-15

    We consider a system with symmetries whose configuration space is a compact Lie group, acted upon by inner automorphisms. The classical reduced phase space of this system decomposes into connected components of orbit type subsets. To investigate hypothetical quantum effects of this decomposition one has to construct the associated costratification of the Hilbert space of the quantum system in the sense of Huebschmann. In the present paper, instead of the decomposition by orbit types, we consider the related decomposition by reflection types (conjugacy classes of reflection subgroups). These two decompositions turn out to coincide, e.g., for the classical groups SU(n) and Sp(n). We derive defining relations for reflection type subsets in terms of irreducible characters and discuss how to obtain from that the corresponding costratification of the Hilbert space of the system. To illustrate the method, we give explicit results for some low rank classical groups.

  9. On the reflection type decomposition of the adjoint reduced phase space of a compact semisimple Lie group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M.; Rudolph, G.; Schmidt, M.

    2013-08-01

    We consider a system with symmetries whose configuration space is a compact Lie group, acted upon by inner automorphisms. The classical reduced phase space of this system decomposes into connected components of orbit type subsets. To investigate hypothetical quantum effects of this decomposition one has to construct the associated costratification of the Hilbert space of the quantum system in the sense of Huebschmann. In the present paper, instead of the decomposition by orbit types, we consider the related decomposition by reflection types (conjugacy classes of reflection subgroups). These two decompositions turn out to coincide, e.g., for the classical groups SU(n) and Sp(n). We derive defining relations for reflection type subsets in terms of irreducible characters and discuss how to obtain from that the corresponding costratification of the Hilbert space of the system. To illustrate the method, we give explicit results for some low rank classical groups.

  10. Lost in Transmission: Using Study Groups to Provide Space for Creativity and Reflexivity in an Instrumentalist University Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Jane; Crouch, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Since independent study groups can be important in providing spaces for students in creative disciplines to develop a critically reflexive approach to their creative practice, tutors in an Australian university introduced independent group learning to students studying in creative disciplines. However, student responses to the experience of

  11. Marital sexual relationships and birth spacing among two Yoruba sub-groups.

    PubMed

    Adeokun, L A

    1982-01-01

    Discussion focuses on the marital sexual relationships (MSR) and the timing of the next child among the Ekiti and Ikale subgroups of the Yoruba (Nigeria). Contrasts in postpartum sexual practices between the 2 groups allows for demonstration of the importance of parents' perception of their child's growth and their observance of prohibitions on sexual intercourse during the wife's lactation as factors shaping their decision to have another child. It is argued that the similarity in birth spacing among the 2 groups, derived from contrasting attitudes to postpartum abstinence, is evidence of an explicit decision on the timing of the next child. Such a decision considers the role of the child's growth and social development as it affects adults in the performance of their daily social and economic routines and goes beyond an unquestioned response to quasi-religious taboos. A questionnaire was administered in the local dialect to 535 Ekiti women and 460 Ikale women, currently married and aged 14-49 years. Appropriately modified male questionnaires were completed for 398 and 380 husbands of eligible women in the respective locations. Due in part to conservatism in sexual behavior and family formation, the main features of Yoruba postpartum practices such as extended and demand breastfeeding, the taboo on sexual intercourse during lactation, and the devotion to child welfare are believed to, and do, occur in Ekiti. Socioeconomic development has brought many changes, but the combination of these practices with the high infant mortality resulting from limited access to modern health care and the lack of basic amenities assures that children are born at substantial ages apart. The need for the surviving child to reach a consciously determined age and/or stage of growth and development assures the adequacy and rationality of child spacing in this age conscious society. The Ikale are an exception to the general rule concerning sexual abstinence during lactation. The theme of a mother's trials and concern over her children is also valid with the Ikale. The Ikale mother supplements the natural protection offered by postpartum amenorrhea with the use of traditional methods of contraception, most notably the rhythm method. The crude birthrates for the 2 groups were hardly different--54.7 in Ekiti and 54.4 in Ikale. There was only a negligible difference in fertility rates. In both groups only negligible proportions of women would breastfeed for less than 6 months. Only 7.4% of Ikale women would breastfeed beyond 2 years, but 12.9% of Ekiti women were breastfeeding that long. In Ikale there was a higher awareness of the association between extended breastfeeding and the delay in the onset of menstruation. The main implication of this discussion is to challenge the emphasis on lactational abstinence as the main determinant of changes in fertility behavior. The Ikale case shows that such an assumption is not valid. PMID:12264950

  12. Transformation of Air Quality Monitor Data from the International Space Station into Toxicological Effect Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Zalesak, Selina M.

    2011-01-01

    The primary reason for monitoring air quality aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is to determine whether air pollutants have collectively reached a concentration where the crew could experience adverse health effects. These effects could be near-real-time (e.g. headache, respiratory irritation) or occur late in the mission or even years later (e.g. cancer, liver toxicity). Secondary purposes for monitoring include discovery that a potentially harmful compound has leaked into the atmosphere or that air revitalization system performance has diminished. Typical ISS atmospheric trace pollutants consist of alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic compounds, halo-carbons, siloxanes, and silanols. Rarely, sulfur-containing compounds and alkanes are found at trace levels. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) have been set in cooperation with a subcommittee of the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology. For each compound and time of exposure, the limiting adverse effect(s) has been identified. By factoring the analytical data from the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), which is in use as a prototype instrument aboard the ISS, through the array of compounds and SMACs, the risk of 16 specific adverse effects can be estimated. Within each adverse-effect group, we have used an additive model proportioned to each applicable 180-day SMAC to estimate risk. In the recent past this conversion has been performed using archival data, which can be delayed for months after an air sample is taken because it must be returned to earth for analysis. But with the AQM gathering in situ data each week, NASA is in a position to follow toxic-effect groups and correlate these with any reported crew symptoms. The AQM data are supplemented with data from real-time CO2 instruments aboard the ISS and from archival measurements of formaldehyde, which the AQM cannot detect.

  13. LDEF meteoroid and debris special investigation group investigations and activities at the Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    See, Thomas H.; Warren, Jack L.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Sapp, Clyde A.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Dardano, Claire B.

    1995-01-01

    Since the return of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) in January, 1990, members of the Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas have been examining LDEF hardware in an effort to expand the knowledge base regarding the low-Earth orbit (LEO) particulate environment. In addition to the various investigative activities, JSC is also the location of the general Meteoroid & Debris database. This publicly accessible database contains information obtained from the various M&D SIG investigations, as well as limited data obtained by individual LDEF Principal Investigators. LDEF exposed approximately 130 m(exp 2) of surface area to the LEO particulate environment, approximately 15.4 m(exp 2) of which was occupied by structural frame components (i.e., longerons and intercoastals) of the spacecraft. The data reported here was obtained as a result of detailed scans of LDEF intercoastals, 68 of which reside at JSC. The limited amount of data presently available on the A0178 thermal control blankets was reported last year and will not be reiterated here. The data presented here are limited to measurements of crater diameters and their frequency of occurrence (i.e., flux).

  14. Effects of incentives on psychosocial performances in simulated space-dwelling groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienz, Robert D.; Brady, Joseph V.; Hursh, Steven R.; Gasior, Eric D.; Spence, Kevin R.; Emurian, Henry H.

    Prior research with individually isolated 3-person crews in a distributed, interactive, planetary exploration simulation examined the effects of communication constraints and crew configuration changes on crew performance and psychosocial self-report measures. The present report extends these findings to a model of performance maintenance that operationalizes conditions under which disruptive affective responses by crew participants might be anticipated to emerge. Experiments evaluated the effects of changes in incentive conditions on crew performance and self-report measures in simulated space-dwelling groups. Crews participated in a simulated planetary exploration mission that required identification, collection, and analysis of geologic samples. Results showed that crew performance effectiveness was unaffected by either positive or negative incentive conditions, while self-report measures were differentially affectednegative incentive conditions produced pronounced increases in negative self-report ratings and decreases in positive self-report ratings, while positive incentive conditions produced increased positive self-report ratings only. Thus, incentive conditions associated with simulated spaceflight missions can significantly affect psychosocial adaptation without compromising task performance effectiveness in trained and experienced crews.

  15. X-ray Crystallographic, Scanning Microprobe X-ray Diffraction, and Cross-Polarized/Magic Angle Spinning [superscript 13]C NMR Studies of the Structure of Cellulose III[subscript II

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Masahisa; Heux, Laurent; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Langan, Paul

    2009-03-16

    The X-ray crystallographic structure of cellulose III{sub II} is characterized by disorder; the unit cell (space group P2{sub 1}; a = 4.45 {angstrom}, b = 7.64 {angstrom}, c = 10.36 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 106.96{sup o}) is occupied by one chain that is the average of statistically disordered antiparallel chains. {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR studies reveal the presence of three distinct molecular conformations that can be interpreted as a mixture of two different crystal forms, one equivalent to cellulose III{sub I}, and another with two independent glucosyl conformations in the asymmetric unit. Both X-ray crystallographic and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic results are consistent with an aggregated microdomain structure for cellulose III{sub II}. This structure can be generated from a new crystal form (space group P2{sub 1}; a = 4.45 {angstrom}, b = 14.64 {angstrom}, c = 10.36 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 90.05{sup o}; two crystallographically independent and antiparallel chains; gt hydroxymethyl groups) by multiple dislocation defects. These defects produce microdomains of the new crystal form and cellulose III{sub I} that scanning microprobe diffraction studies show are distributed consistently through the cellulose III{sub II} fiber.

  16. Gas and dust in the beta Pictoris moving group as seen by the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Barrado, D.; Montesinos, B.; Duchêne, G.; Bouy, H.; Pinte, C.; Menard, F.; Donaldson, J.; Eiroa, C.; Krivov, A. V.; Kamp, I.; Mendigutía, I.; Dent, W. R. F.; Lillo-Box, J.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Debris discs are thought to be formed through the collisional grinding of planetesimals, and then can be considered as the outcome of planet formation. Understanding the properties of gas and dust in debris discs can help us comprehend the architecture of extrasolar planetary systems. Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared (IR) photometry and spectroscopy have provided a valuable dataset for the study of debris discs gas and dust composition. This paper is part of a series of papers devoted to the study of Herschel-PACS observations of young stellar associations. Aims: This work aims at studying the properties of discs in the beta Pictoris moving group (BPMG) through far-IR PACS observations of dust and gas. Methods: We obtained Herschel-PACS far-IR photometric observations at 70, 100, and 160 μm of 19 BPMG members, together with spectroscopic observations for four of them. These observations were centred at 63.18 μm and 157 μm, aiming to detect [OI] and [CII] emission. We incorporated the new far-IR observations in the SED of BPMG members and fitted modified blackbody models to better characterise the dust content. Results: We have detected far-IR excess emission towards nine BPMG members, including the first detection of an IR excess towards HD 29391.The star HD 172555, shows [OI] emission, while HD 181296 shows [CII] emission, expanding the short list of debris discs with a gas detection. No debris disc in BPMG is detected in both [OI] and [CII]. The discs show dust temperatures in the range 55-264 K, with low dust masses (<6.6 × 10-5 M⊕ to 0.2 M⊕) and radii from blackbody models in the range 3 to ~82 AU. All the objects with a gas detection are early spectral type stars with a hot dust component. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  17. Bilateral deep neck space infection in the paediatric age group: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Songu, M; Demiray, U; Adibelli, Z H; Adibelli, H

    2011-06-01

    Deep neck space infections can occur at any age but require more intimate management in the paediatric age group because of their rapidly progressive nature. Concurrent abscess in distinct neck spaces has rarely been reported in healthy children. Herewith, a rare case of bilateral neck abscess is reported in a 16-month-old female and the clinical presentation and management are discussed with a review of the literature. PMID:22058596

  18. Surface structure, crystallographic and ice-nucleating properties of cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Möhler, Ottmar; Kiselev, Alexei; Saathoff, Harald; Weidler, Peter; Shutthanandan, Shuttha; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Jantsch, Evelyn; Koop, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence of the high diversity and efficient freezing ability of biological ice-nucleating particles is driving a reevaluation of their impact upon climate. Despite their potential importance, little is known about their atmospheric abundance and ice nucleation efficiency, especially non-proteinaceous ones, in comparison to non-biological materials (e.g., mineral dust). Recently, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC; non-proteinaceous plant structural polymer) has been identified as a potential biological ice-nucleating particle. However, it is still uncertain if the ice-nucleating activity is specific to the MCC structure or generally relevant to all cellulose materials, such that the results of MCC can be representatively scaled up to the total cellulose content in the atmosphere to address its role in clouds and the climate system. Here we use the helium ion microscopy (HIM) imaging and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique to characterize the nanoscale surface structure and crystalline properties of the two different types of cellulose (MCC and fibrous cellulose extracted from natural wood pulp) as model proxies for atmospheric cellulose particles and to assess their potential accessibility for water molecules. To complement these structural characterizations, we also present the results of immersion freezing experiments using the cold stage-based droplet freezing BINARY (Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARaY) technique. The HIM results suggest that both cellulose types have a complex porous morphology with capillary spaces between the nanoscale fibrils over the microfiber surface. These surface structures may make cellulose accessible to water. The XRD results suggest that the structural properties of both cellulose materials are in agreement (i.e., P21 space group; a=7.96 Å, b=8.35 Å, c=10.28 Å) and comparable to the crystallographic properties of general monoclinic cellulose (i.e., Cellulose Iβ). The results obtained from the BINARY measurements suggest that there is no significant difference of the immersion ice nucleation activity of MCC and fibrous cellulose in supercooled water. Overall, our findings support the view that MCC may be a good proxy for inferring water uptake, wettability and ice nucleating properties of various cellulose materials. In addition, we discuss the ice-nucleating efficiencies of both cellulose samples and plant debris from the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) chamber experiments in comparison to the BINARY results. The influence of the acid processing of cellulose on its ice nucleation propensity may also be discussed to further demonstrate their atmospheric relevancy. Acknowledgement: We acknowledge support by German Research Society (DFG) and Ice Nuclei research UnIT (FOR 1525 INUIT).

  19. Rigidity of automorphism groups of invariant domains in homogeneous Stein spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, F.; Zhou, X. Yu

    2014-02-01

    For a large class of Stein manifolds which are homogeneous under a complex reductive Lie group, we prove a rigidity property of the automorphism groups of domains invariant with respect to a compact form of this complex group.

  20. Overview of the Space Propulsion Synergy Group (SPSG) strategic planning support efforts for earth to orbit transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dankhoff, Walter F.; Hope, William P., Jr.

    1993-06-01

    An essential requirement of a successful space program is the assurance of a safe affordable routine access to space. In view of this, a national organization known as the Space Propulsion Synergy Group (SPSG) has been directed for the past two years toward supporting strategic planning for earth-to-orbit space transportation and propulsion systems. This paper presents a short description of the approach the SPSG followed in their space transportation and propulsion systems strategic planning support activities. The SPSG study emphasized the identification of the transportation systems users/customers and the characteristics of attributes most valued by them in earth-to-LEO payload transportation services. The study initiated the process known as Quality Function Deployment to ensure that the customer/user real requirements and needs are properly addressed and that the transportation system concepts advocated had the greatest probability of satisfying the custosmer's requirements and desired attributes.

  1. Proceedings of the Space Shuttle Sortie Workshop. Volume 2: Working group reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Details are presented on the mission planning progress in each of the working paper reports. The general topics covered are the following: space technology; materials processing and space manufacturing; communications and navigation; earth and ocean physics; oceanography; earth resources and surface environmental quality; meteorology and atmospheric environmental quality; life sciences; atmospheric and space physics; solar physics; high energy cosmic rays; X-ray and gamma ray astronomy; ultraviolet-optical astronomy; planetary astronomy; and infrared astronomy.

  2. Predicting stable stoichiometries of compounds via evolutionary global space-group optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimarchi, Giancarlo; Freeman, Arthur J.; Zunger, Alex

    2009-09-01

    Whereas the Daltonian atom-to-atom ratios in ordinary molecules are well understood via the traditional theory of valence, the naturally occurring stoichiometries in intermetallic compounds ApBq , as revealed by phase-diagram compilations, are often surprising. Even equal-valence elements A and B give rise to unequal (p,q) stoichiometries, e.g., the 1:2, 2:1, and 3:1 ratios in AlpScq . Moreover, sometimes different stoichiometries are associated with different lattice types and hence rather different physical properties. Here, we extend the fixed-composition global space-group optimization (GSGO) approach used to predict, via density-functional calculations, fixed-composition lattice types [G. Trimarchi and A. Zunger, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 20, 295212 (2008)] to identify simultaneously all the minimum-energy lattice types throughout the composition range. Starting from randomly selected lattice vectors, atomic positions and stoichiometries, we construct the T=0 convex hull of energy vs composition. Rather than repeat a set of GSGO searches over a fixed list of stoichiometries, we minimize the distance to the convex hull. This approach is far more efficient than the former one as a single evolutionary search sequence simultaneously identifies the lowest-energy structures at each composition and among these it selects those that are ground states. For Al-Sc we correctly identify the stable stoichiometries and relative structure types: AlSc2-B82 , AlSc-B2, and Al2Sc-C15 in the Nat=6 periodic cells, and Al2Sc6-D019 , AlSc-B2, and Al3Sc-L10 in the Nat=8 periodic cells. This extended evolutionary GSGO algorithm represents a step toward a fully ab initio materials synthesis, where compounds are predicted starting from sole knowledge of the chemical species of the constituents.

  3. Confessions of an icosahedral virus crystallographer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, John E.

    2013-01-01

    This is a personal history of my structural studies of icosahedral viruses that evolved from crystallographic studies, to hybrid methods with electron cryo-microscopy and image reconstruction (cryoEM) and then developed further by incorporating a variety of physical methods to augment the high resolution crystallographic studies. It is not meant to be comprehensive, even for my own work, but hopefully provides some perspective on the growth of our understanding of these remarkable biologic assemblies. The goal is to provide a historical perspective for those new to the field and to emphasize the limitations of any one method, even those that provide atomic resolution information about viruses. PMID:23291268

  4. Group theoretical quantization of a phase space S1×R+ and the mass spectrum of Schwarzschild black holes in D space-time dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, M.; Kastrup, H. A.; Schramm, F.; Strobl, T.

    2000-08-01

    The symplectic reduction of pure spherically symmetric (Schwarzschild) classical gravity in D space-time dimensions yields a two-dimensional phase space of observables consisting of the mass M (>0) and a canonically conjugate (Killing) time variable T. Imposing (mass-dependent) periodic boundary conditions in time on the associated quantum-mechanical plane waves which represent the Schwarzschild system in the period just before or during the formation of a black hole yields an energy spectrum of the hole which realizes the old Bekenstein postulate that the quanta of the horizon AD-2 are multiples of a basic area quantum. In the present paper it is shown that the phase space of such Schwarzschild black holes in D space-time dimensions is symplectomorphic to a symplectic manifold S=\\{(φ∈R mod 2π, p~AD-2∈R+)\\} with the symplectic form dφ∧dp. As the action of the group SO↑(1,2) on that manifold is transitive, effective and Hamiltonian, it can be used for a group theoretical quantization of the system. The area operator p⁁ for the horizon corresponds to the generator of the compact subgroup SO(2) and becomes quantized accordingly: The positive discrete series of the irreducible unitary representations of the group SO↑(1,2) yields an (horizon) area spectrum ~(k+n), where k=1,2,..., characterizes the representation and n=0,1,2,..., the number of area quanta. If one employs the unitary representations of the universal covering group of SO↑(1,2), the number k can take any fixed positive real value (θ parameter). The unitary representations of the positive discrete series provide concrete Hilbert spaces for quantum Schwarzschild black holes.

  5. Canonical Groups for Quantization on the Two-Dimensional Sphere and One-Dimensional Complex Projective Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Sumadi A. H.; H, Zainuddin

    2014-11-01

    Using Isham's group-theoretic quantization scheme, we construct the canonical groups of the systems on the two-dimensional sphere and one-dimensional complex projective space, which are homeomorphic. In the first case, we take SO(3) as the natural canonical Lie group of rotations of the two-sphere and find all the possible Hamiltonian vector fields, and followed by verifying the commutator and Poisson bracket algebra correspondences with the Lie algebra of the group. In the second case, the same technique is resumed to define the Lie group, in this case SU (2), of CP'.We show that one can simply use a coordinate transformation from S2 to CP1 to obtain all the Hamiltonian vector fields of CP1. We explicitly show that the Lie algebra structures of both canonical groups are locally homomorphic. On the other hand, globally their corresponding canonical groups are acting on different geometries, the latter of which is almost complex. Thus the canonical group for CP1 is the double-covering group of SO(3), namely SU(2). The relevance of the proposed formalism is to understand the idea of CP1 as a space of where the qubit lives which is known as a Bloch sphere.

  6. Responding to the Concerns of Student Cultural Groups: Redesigning Spaces for Cultural Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Anise Mazone; Higbee, Jeanne L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the engagement of a student committee in redesigning an entire floor of a university union to accommodate student cultural centers and provide space in a fair and equitable manner. The reorganization focused on the process as well as the task of allocating space, with an emphasis on the opportunity to foster the development of…

  7. Functional gene groups are concentrated within chromosomes, among chromosomes and in the nuclear space of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Thévenin, Annelyse; Ein-Dor, Liat; Ozery-Flato, Michal; Shamir, Ron

    2014-09-01

    Genomes undergo changes in organization as a result of gene duplications, chromosomal rearrangements and local mutations, among other mechanisms. In contrast to prokaryotes, in which genes of a common function are often organized in operons and reside contiguously along the genome, most eukaryotes show much weaker clustering of genes by function, except for few concrete functional groups. We set out to check systematically if there is a relation between gene function and gene organization in the human genome. We test this question for three types of functional groups: pairs of interacting proteins, complexes and pathways. We find a significant concentration of functional groups both in terms of their distance within the same chromosome and in terms of their dispersal over several chromosomes. Moreover, using Hi-C contact map of the tendency of chromosomal segments to appear close in the 3D space of the nucleus, we show that members of the same functional group that reside on distinct chromosomes tend to co-localize in space. The result holds for all three types of functional groups that we tested. Hence, the human genome shows substantial concentration of functional groups within chromosomes and across chromosomes in space. PMID:25056310

  8. Ultraviolet-Optical Space Astronomy Beyond HST Conference (Origins Conference and UV-Optical Working Group Support)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Morse, Jon

    2001-01-01

    This grant supported three major activities, from 1997-2001. (1) Origins Conference. The funds from this grant were used, initially, to support a Conference on "Origins", held May 19-23, 1997 at Estes Park, CO and attended by a wide range of astronomers, planetary scientists, and astrobiologists. The scientific proceedings of this meeting were published in 1998 by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific: "Origins" (1998) "Proceedings of the International Origins Conference". (2) UV-Optical Space Astronomy. Conference Additional funds provided by the NASA Office of Space Science were used to support a meeting held August 5-7, 1998 at Boulder, CO and attended by ultraviolet and optical astronomers and instrumentalists interested in a UV-O successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. The scientific proceedings of this meeting were published in 1999: "Ultraviolet-Optical Space Astronomy Beyond the Hubble Space Telescope" (1999), NASA provided funds and commissioned the UVOWG (Ultraviolet-Optical Working Group), charged with recommending a set of fundamental scientific problems and new space missions in the UV/Optical wavelength bands. The working group was chaired by J. M. Shull, and included ten other astrophysicists. Their report was published as a "White Paper" (Nov. 1999) entitled "The Emergence of the Modern Universe: Tracing the Cosmic Web" available. The results of this report were used in the NASA Strategic Planning ("Roadmap") exercise and by the NRC Astronomy/Astrophysics Decade Committee.

  9. Group Dynamics as a Critical Component of Successful Space Exploration: Conceptual Theory and Insights from the Biosphere 2 Closure Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark; Allen, John P.

    As space exploration and eventually habitation achieves longer durations, successfully managing group dynamics of small, physically isolated groups will become vital. The paper summarizes important underlying research and conceptual theory and how these manifested in a well-documented example: the closure experiments of Biosphere 2. Key research breakthroughs in discerning the operation of small human groups comes from the pioneering work of W.R. Bion. He discovered two competing modalities of behavior. The first is the “task-oriented” or work group governed by shared acceptance of goals, reality-thinking in relation to time, resources and rational, and intelligent management of challenges presented. The opposing, usually unconscious, modality is what Bion called the “basic-assumption” group and alternates between three “group animal” groups: dependency/kill the leader; fight/flight and pairing. If not dealt with, these dynamics work to undermine and defeat the conscious task group’s goal achievement. The paper discusses crew training and selection, various approaches to structuring the work and hierarchy of the group, the importance of contact with a larger population through electronic communication and dealing with the “us-them” syndrome frequently observed between crew and Mission Control. The experience of the first two year closure of Biosphere 2 is drawn on in new ways to illustrate vicissitudes and management of group dynamics especially as both the inside team of biospherians and key members of Mission Control had training in working with group dynamics. Insights from that experience may help mission planning so that future groups in space cope successfully with inherent group dynamics challenges that arise.

  10. Crystallographic Data Centre Services and Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Univ. (England). Chemical Lab.

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre is concerned with the retrieval, evaluation, synthesis, and dissemination of structural data based on diffraction methods. The source of input is almost entirely primary journals. Bibliographic information and numeric data on crystal and molecular structures are on magnetic tapes. The bibliographic file…

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the CBS-domain pair of cyclin M2 (CNNM2)

    PubMed Central

    Gmez-Garca, Inmaculada; Stuiver, Marchel; Ereo, June; Oyenarte, Iker; Corral-Rodrguez, Mara Angeles; Mller, Dominik; Martnez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the CBS-domain pair of the murine CNNM2 magnesium transporter (formerly known as ancient domain protein 2; ACDP2), which consists of a pair of cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS) motifs and has 100% sequence identity to its human homologue. CNNM proteins represent the least-studied members of the eight different types of magnesium transporters identified to date in mammals. In humans, the CNNM family is encoded by four genes: CNNM14. CNNM1 acts as a cytosolic copper chaperone, whereas CNNM2 and CNNM4 have been associated with magnesium handling. Interestingly, mutations in the CNNM2 gene cause familial dominant hypomagnesaemia (MIM:607803), a rare human disorder characterized by renal and intestinal magnesium (Mg2+) wasting, which may lead to symptoms of Mg2+ depletion such as tetany, seizures and cardiac arrhythmias. This manuscript describes the preliminary crystallographic analysis of two different crystal habits of a truncated form of the protein containing its regulatory CBS-domain pair, which has been reported to host the pathological mutation T568I in humans. The crystals belonged to space groups P21212 and I222 (or I212121) and diffracted X-rays to 2.0 and 3.6? resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. PMID:23027747

  12. Clustering and group selection of multiple criteria alternatives with application to space-based networks.

    PubMed

    Malakooti, Behnam; Yang, Ziyong

    2004-02-01

    In many real-world problems, the range of consequences of different alternatives are considerably different. In addition, sometimes, selection of a group of alternatives (instead of only one best alternative) is necessary. Traditional decision making approaches treat the set of alternatives with the same method of analysis and selection. In this paper, we propose clustering alternatives into different groups so that different methods of analysis, selection, and implementation for each group can be applied. As an example, consider the selection of a group of functions (or tasks) to be processed by a group of processors. The set of tasks can be grouped according to their similar criteria, and hence, each cluster of tasks to be processed by a processor. The selection of the best alternative for each clustered group can be performed using existing methods; however, the process of selecting groups is different than the process of selecting alternatives within a group. We develop theories and procedures for clustering discrete multiple criteria alternatives. We also demonstrate how the set of alternatives is clustered into mutually exclusive groups based on 1) similar features among alternatives; 2) ideal (or most representative) alternatives given by the decision maker; and 3) other preferential information of the decision maker. The clustering of multiple criteria alternatives also has the following advantages. 1) It decreases the set of alternatives to be considered by the decision maker (for example, different decision makers are assigned to different groups of alternatives). 2) It decreases the number of criteria. 3) It may provide a different approach for analyzing multiple decision makers problems. Each decision maker may cluster alternatives differently, and hence, clustering of alternatives may provide a basis for negotiation. The developed approach is applicable for solving a class of telecommunication networks problems where a set of objects (such as routers, processors, or intelligent autonomous vehicles) are to be clustered into similar groups. Objects are clustered based on several criteria and the decision maker's preferences. PMID:15369049

  13. Space station needs attributes and architectural options study costing working group briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Individuals in the United States who understand the promise of materials processing in space and who also are senior technical personnel associated with commercial firms that process materials: (1) endorsed the concept of a space station as a desirable national asset; (2) stated that a commercial MPS research program is mandatory to extend commericalization of space for materials processing; and (3) described in general terms a national research laboratory and free flying facilities that are needed. Participants agreed that industry R&D is motivated largely by market pull rather than by technology push, that initial interest is low-g materials research; and that to farther, commercial market assurance (a salable product) is a must.

  14. Crystallographic and magnetic properties of Pb2-xBixIr2O7-? (0 ? x ? 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retuerto, M.; Sarkar, T.; Li, M.-R.; Ignatov, A.; Croft, M.; Hodges, J. P.; Thao Tran, T.; Shiv Halasyamani, P.; Greenblatt, M.

    2014-12-01

    The title series of compounds have been synthesized by solid state reaction and characterized by x-ray diffraction (PXD), neutron powder diffraction (PND), second harmonic generation (SHG), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and magnetization measurements. The crystal structures have been refined from PND data in the centrosymmetric space group Fd\\bar{3}m with pyrochlore structure. No sign of a break of the centrosymmetry has been observed by SHG and no change of the structure to a polar space group in any component of the series, as it was previously reported for Pb2Ir2O7-? with non-centrosymmetric F\\bar{4}3m space group. We have determined by PND that the oxidation state of Ir is slightly decreasing from 5+-to-4+ in the Pb-rich to almost 4+ in the Bi-rich samples. This evolution is confirmed by XAS and also it explains the progression of the crystallographic parameters. All the samples are paramagnetic in the temperature range measured and the magnitude of the effective magnetic moment is enhanced with Bi content, correlated with the enhancement of Ir4+ compared to Ir5+; suggesting Ir5+ to be present in a trigonal antiprism crystal field splitting and therefore Ir4+ as the only magnetic cation.

  15. Holographic phase space: c-functions and black holes as renormalization group flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulos, Miguel F.

    2011-05-01

    We construct a mathcal{N} -function for Lovelock theories of gravity, which yields a holographic c-function in domain-wall backgrounds, and seemingly generalizes the concept for black hole geometries. A flow equation equates the monotonicity properties of mathcal{N} with the gravitational field, which has opposite signs in the domain-wall and black hole backgrounds, due to the presence of negative/positive energy in the former/latter, and accordingly mathcal{N} monotonically decreases/increases from the UV to the IR. On AdS spaces the mathcal{N} -function is related to the Euler anomaly, and at a black hole horizon it is generically proportional to the entropy. For planar black holes, mathcal{N} diverges at the horizon, which we interpret as an order N 2 increase in the number of effective degrees of freedom. We show how mathcal{N} can be written as the ratio of the Wald entropy to an effective phase space volume, and using the flow equation relate this to Verlinde's notion of gravity as an entropic force. From the effective phase space we can obtain an expression for the dual field theory momentum cut-off, matching a previous proposal in the literature by Polchinski and Heemskerk. Finally, we propose that the area in Planck units counts states, not degrees of freedom, and identify it also as a phase space volume. Written in terms of the proper radial distance ?, it takes the suggestive form of a canonical partition function at inverse temperature ?, leading to a "mean energy" which is simply the extrinsic curvature of the surface. Using this we relate this definition of holographic phase space with the effective phase space appearing in the mathcal{N} -function.

  16. A summary of activities of the US/Soviet-Russian joint working group on space biology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doarn, Charles R.; Nicogossian, Arnauld E.; Grigoriev, Anatoly I.; Tverskaya, Galina; Orlov, Oleg I.; Ilyin, Eugene A.; Souza, Kenneth A.

    2010-10-01

    The very foundation of cooperation between the United States (US) and Russia (former Soviet Union) in space exploration is a direct result of the mutual desire for scientific understanding and the creation of a collaborative mechanism—the Joint Working Group (JWG) on Space Biology and Medicine. From the dawn of the space age, it has been the quest of humankind to understand its place in the universe. While nations can and do solve problems independently, it takes nations, working together, to accomplish great things. The formation of the JWG provided an opportunity for the opening of a series of productive relationships between the superpowers, the US and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR); and served as a justification for continued relationship for medical assistance in spaceflight, and to showcase Earth benefits from space medicine research. This relationship has been played out on an international scale with the construction and operation of the International Space Station. The fundamental reason for this successful endeavor is a direct result of the spirit and perseverance of the men and women who have worked diligently side-by-side to promote science and move our understanding of space forward. This manuscript provides a historical perspective of the JWG; how it came about; its evolution; what it accomplished; and what impact it has had and continues to have in the 21st century with regard to human spaceflight and space life sciences research. It captures the spirit of this group, which has been in continuous existence for over 40 years, and provides a never before reported summary of its activities.

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SpaA, a major pilin from Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hae Joo; Paterson, Neil G.; Baker, Edward N.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial pili are cell-surface organelles that are critically involved in adhesion to host cells, leading to the colonization of host tissues and the establishment of infections. Whereas the pili of Gram-negative bacteria have been extensively studied, those of Gram-positive bacteria came to light only recently after the discovery and characterization of Corynebacterium diphtheriae pili. These newly discovered pili are formed by the covalent polymerization of pilin subunits catalyzed by sortase enzymes, making them fundamentally different from the noncovalent pilin assemblies of Gram-negative bacteria. Here, the expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SpaA, which forms the shaft of one of the three types of pili expressed by C. diphtheriae, are reported. SpaA53486 crystals diffracted to 1.6? resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 34.9, b = 64.1, c = 198.7?, ?=?=? = 90. PMID:19652344

  18. The mimivirus R355 gene product: preliminary crystallographic analysis of a putative ubiquitin-like protein-specific protease.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Sandra; Lartigue, Audrey; Mansuelle, Pascal; Ogata, Yuki; Abergel, Chantal

    2011-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, mimivirus, reveals the presence of a gene (denoted R355) that potentially encodes a cysteine protease that is expressed late (after 6?h) in the infectious cycle of the virus. In order to verify a sequence-based functional prediction and understand its role during the infectious process, the R355 protein was produced to assay its proteolytic activity and solve its three-dimensional structure. Here, thepreliminary crystallographic analysis of the recombinant viral protein is reported. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with amonomer in the asymmetric unit. A MAD data set was used for preliminary phasing using the selenium signal from a selenomethionine-substituted protein crystal. PMID:21206054

  19. The mimivirus R355 gene product: preliminary crystallographic analysis of a putative ubiquitin-like protein-specific protease

    PubMed Central

    Jeudy, Sandra; Lartigue, Audrey; Mansuelle, Pascal; Ogata, Yuki; Abergel, Chantal

    2011-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, mimivirus, reveals the presence of a gene (denoted R355) that potentially encodes a cysteine protease that is expressed late (after 6?h) in the infectious cycle of the virus. In order to verify a sequence-based functional prediction and understand its role during the infectious process, the R355 protein was produced to assay its proteolytic activity and solve its three-dimensional structure. Here, thepreliminary crystallographic analysis of the recombinant viral protein is reported. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with amonomer in the asymmetric unit. A MAD data set was used for preliminary phasing using the selenium signal from a selenomethionine-substituted protein crystal. PMID:21206054

  20. Group dynamics in a long-term blind endeavor on Earth: An analog for space missions (Lewis & Clark Expedition group dynamic analysis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allner, M.; Rygalov, V.

    2008-12-01

    In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson set fourth a military expedition led by Captains M. Lewis and W. Clark (Lewis and Clark Expedition) on an exploration that would become an everlasting part of US national history and pride. Looking back at the events of this exploration, there are many similarities to the experiences future human space explorers will face as we look to colonize the Moon and travel to Mars and beyond (NASA Vision for Space Exploration, 2004): The Lewis and Clark Expedition lasted almost three years and involved a crew of 43 men traveling up the Missouri River to explore the unknown lands and a possible water route to the Pacific Ocean; The Expedition took place far away from customary comfortable environments known to European settlers in the early 18th century; The Expedition involved a remotely confined high-perceived risk environment with high levels of uncertainty providing stresses and every day challenges for the crew; Supplies brought on the mission were limited (mainly a mass/weight issue rather than cost), therefore the discovery and use of environmental resources (In-Situ Resource Utilization approach, including info-resources to mitigate uncertainty) was necessary for crew survival. The environments astronauts will encounter in space and on the Moon and Mars due to high risk and uncertainty will be in many aspects similar to what Lewis and Clark's crew experienced, as environments will be hostile and unforgiving if problems arise and aren't resolved quickly. The analysis provided in this research paper is relevant because the Lewis and Clark Expedition needed to move extensively and with minimal supplies. Polar remote settings, which were analyzed extensively, were different from this expedition due to the fact that these missions did not encompass extensive movement of crew facilities and supplies and were more like space missions orbiting the Earth. Using past space station results of performance on orbit in correlation with a suggested distinguishable mission phase model, the Lewis and Clark Expedition will be analyzed for similarities to these space findings. Factors of consideration in support of this analysis involve an understanding of the leadership qualities of Lewis and Clark (and relations established and maintained with one another), the selection and diversity of their crew, and the group dynamics that were developed and maintained so carefully during the expedition. With this knowledge and understanding one can gain enormous insights useful in the planning and preparation for future long-duration space exploratory missions with high level of autonomy, mobility, minimal primary life support supply and high dependence on material re-circulation and In-Situ Resource Utilization approach.

  1. Refolding, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the ?-barrel domain of BamA, a membrane protein essential for outer membrane protein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Dongchun; Yang, Kun; Huang, Yihua

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, the assembly of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) requires a five-protein ?-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) complex, of which BamA is an essential and evolutionarily conserved integral outer membrane protein. Here, the refolding, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic characterization of the ?-barrel domain of BamA from Escherichia coli (EcBamA) are reported. Native and selenomethionine-substituted EcBamA proteins were crystallized at 16C and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.6 and 3.7? resolution, respectively. The native crystals belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 118.492, b = 159.883, c = 56.000? and two molecules in one asymmetric unit; selenomethionine-substituted protein crystals belonged to space group P4322, with unit-cell parameters a=b=163.162, c = 46.388? and one molecule in one asymmetric unit. Initial phases for EcBamA ?-barrel domain were obtained from a SeMet SAD data set. These preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies paved the way for further structural determination of the ?-barrel domain of EcBamA. PMID:24598928

  2. Refolding, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the β-barrel domain of BamA, a membrane protein essential for outer membrane protein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Dongchun; Yang, Kun; Huang, Yihua

    2014-03-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, the assembly of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) requires a five-protein β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) complex, of which BamA is an essential and evolutionarily conserved integral outer membrane protein. Here, the refolding, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic characterization of the β-barrel domain of BamA from Escherichia coli (EcBamA) are reported. Native and selenomethionine-substituted EcBamA proteins were crystallized at 16°C and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.6 and 3.7 Å resolution, respectively. The native crystals belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 118.492, b = 159.883, c = 56.000 Å and two molecules in one asymmetric unit; selenomethionine-substituted protein crystals belonged to space group P4322, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 163.162, c = 46.388 Å and one molecule in one asymmetric unit. Initial phases for EcBamA β-barrel domain were obtained from a SeMet SAD data set. These preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies paved the way for further structural determination of the β-barrel domain of EcBamA. PMID:24598928

  3. Evaluating a Safe Space Training for School Counselors and Trainees Using a Randomized Control Group Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Rebekah; Hays, Danica G.

    2014-01-01

    School counselors need to advocate and act as an ally for all students. Safe Space, a training designed to facilitate competency for working with and serving LGBTQ youth (i.e., LGBTQ competency), has received increased attention in the field of school counseling. However, limited empirical support exists for training interventions such as Safe…

  4. Evaluating a Safe Space Training for School Counselors and Trainees Using a Randomized Control Group Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Rebekah; Hays, Danica G.

    2014-01-01

    School counselors need to advocate and act as an ally for all students. Safe Space, a training designed to facilitate competency for working with and serving LGBTQ youth (i.e., LGBTQ competency), has received increased attention in the field of school counseling. However, limited empirical support exists for training interventions such as Safe

  5. Working group report on advanced high-voltage high-power and energy-storage space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, H. A.; Cooke, D. L.; Evans, R. W.; Hastings, D.; Jongeward, G.; Laframboise, J. G.; Mahaffey, D.; Mcintyre, B.; Pfizer, K. A.; Purvis, C.

    1986-01-01

    Space systems in the future will probably include high-voltage, high-power energy-storage and -production systems. Two such technologies are high-voltage ac and dc systems and high-power electrodynamic tethers. The working group identified several plasma interaction phenomena that will occur in the operation of these power systems. The working group felt that building an understanding of these critical interaction issues meant that several gaps in our knowledge had to be filled, and that certain aspects of dc power systems have become fairly well understood. Examples of these current collection are in quiescent plasmas and snap over effects. However, high-voltage dc and almost all ac phenomena are, at best, inadequately understood. In addition, there is major uncertainty in the knowledge of coupling between plasmas and large scale current flows in space plasmas. These gaps in the knowledge are addressed.

  6. Two stereoisomeric 3(I),2(II)-anhydro-alpha-cyclodextrins: a molecular dynamics and crystallographic study.

    PubMed

    Immel, S; Fujita, K; Fukudome, M; Bolte, M

    2001-12-01

    Regioselective epoxide ring opening of 2(I),3(I)-(2(I)S)-anhydro-alpha-cyclodextrin (1) through intramolecular attack of hydroxyl groups of neighboring glucose rings occurs in diequatorial fashion to yield 3(I),2(II)-anhydro-alpha-cyclodextrin (3) with a rigid glucopyranose-dioxane-glucopyranose tricyclic ring system, the usual diaxial opening and the gluco/altro-configured stereoisomer 2 cannot be detected. Molecular dynamic simulations in water were used to analyze the conformations of 1-3 and the stereochemical implications of this reaction. Due to the contracted 2,3-OH side of the torus, 3 features an inverted conicity compared to the parent alpha-cyclodextrin. A crystallographic study on the bis-3.3 n-PrOH nonahydrate not only displays little variations between the solid-state and solution geometries of 3, but also provides a molecular picture of a unique inclusion complex in which three n-propanol molecules are distributed in the cavity of a dimeric unit of 3 (monoclinic, space group P2(1), a=14.257(1), b=22.623(2), c=16.644(1) A, beta=104.82(1) degrees, all 19,278 reflections with I>2 sigma(I) yield R(F)=0.1017). PMID:11728398

  7. Crystallographic texture determinations from inverse susceptibility measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L.H.; Welch, D.O.

    1996-10-01

    Determination of the quantitative relationship between crystallographic texture and magnetic properties in advanced permanent magnets may be hampered by complex microstructures, which complicate methods that rely on diffraction, or by interparticulate interactions, which adversely affect methods based on magnetic remanence measurements. To this end, new techniques in the determination of texture of bulk permanent magnets are being explored to overcome these inherent experimental difficulties. The analysis of inverse paramagnetic susceptibility measurements constitutes a new method to investigate crystallographic texture. Such measurements also provide Curie temperature data, which is sensitive to chemical changes that may have occurred in the magnetic phase during processing. The mathematical formalism underlying the analysis of inverse susceptibility measurements is outlined, and is used to evaluate magnetic measurements taken from a series of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnets that have been processed by different means, and thus contain different degrees of texture. While this method does provide qualitative information concerning the relative crystallographic alignment of magnet samples, it needs calibration to obtain an explicit value for a texture order parameter.

  8. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, Susana C. M.; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Leal, Ricardo M. F.; Mitchell, Edward P.; Forsyth, V. Trevor

    2008-05-01

    Preliminary neutron crystallographic data from the sweet protein thaumatin have been recorded using the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results illustrate the feasibility of a full neutron structural analysis aimed at further understanding the molecular basis of the perception of sweet taste. Such an analysis will exploit the use of perdeuterated thaumatin. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 Å on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin–receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste.

  9. Creating social spaces to tackle AIDS-related stigma: reviewing the role of church groups in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C; Skovdal, M; Gibbs, A

    2011-08-01

    An expanding body of literature explores the role of African church groups in facilitating or hindering the support of people living with AIDS and challenging or contributing to HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Treating church groups as social spaces in which HIV/AIDS-related stigma may potentially be challenged, we systematically review this literature, identifying five themes that highlight the complex and contradictory role of the church as a potential agent of health-enhancing social change. In many ways the church perpetuates HIV/AIDS-related stigma through (i) moralistic attitudes and (ii) its reinforcement of conservative gender ideologies. However some churches have managed move towards action that makes a more positive contribution to HIV/AIDS management through (iii) promoting various forms of social control for HIV prevention, (iv) contributing to the care and support of the AIDS-affected and (v) providing social spaces for challenging stigmatising ideas and practices. We conclude that church groups, including church leadership, can play a key role in facilitating or hindering the creation of supportive social spaces to challenge stigma. Much work remains to be done in developing deeper understandings of the multi-layered factors that enable some churches, but not others, to respond effectively to HIV/AIDS. PMID:20668927

  10. Creating Social Spaces to Tackle AIDS-Related Stigma: Reviewing the Role of Church Groups in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Skovdal, M.; Gibbs, A.

    2012-01-01

    An expanding body of literature explores the role of African church groups in facilitating or hindering the support of people living with AIDS and challenging or contributing to HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Treating church groups as social spaces in which HIV/AIDS-related stigma may potentially be challenged, we systematically review this literature, identifying five themes that highlight the complex and contradictory role of the church as a potential agent of health-enhancing social change. In many ways the church perpetuates HIV/AIDS-related stigma through (i) moralistic attitudes and (ii) its reinforcement of conservative gender ideologies. However some churches have managed move towards action that makes a more positive contribution to HIV/AIDS management through (iii) promoting various forms of social control for HIV prevention, (iv) contributing to the care and support of the AIDS-affected and (v) providing social spaces for challenging stigmatising ideas and practices. We conclude that church groups, including church leadership, can play a key role in facilitating or hindering the creation of supportive social spaces to challenge stigma. Much work remains to be done in developing deeper understandings of the multi-layered factors that enable some churches, but not others, to respond effectively to HIV/AIDS. PMID:20668927

  11. Crystallographic studies of gas sorption in metal–organic frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Elliot J.; Vitórica-Yrezábal, Iñigo J.; Brammer, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of porous crystalline materials of modular design. One of the primary applications of these materials is in the adsorption and separation of gases, with potential benefits to the energy, transport and medical sectors. In situ crystallography of MOFs under gas atmospheres has enabled the behaviour of the frameworks under gas loading to be investigated and has established the precise location of adsorbed gas molecules in a significant number of MOFs. This article reviews progress in such crystallographic studies, which has taken place over the past decade, but has its origins in earlier studies of zeolites, clathrates etc. The review considers studies by single-crystal or powder diffraction using either X-rays or neutrons. Features of MOFs that strongly affect gas sorption behaviour are discussed in the context of in situ crystallographic studies, specifically framework flexibility, and the presence of (organic) functional groups and unsaturated (open) metal sites within pores that can form specific interactions with gas molecules. PMID:24892587

  12. Preparation and Crystallographic Analysis of Gliclazide Polymorphs

    PubMed Central

    Rajamma, A. J.; Sateesha, S. B.; Narode, M. K.; Prashanth, V. R. S. S.; Karthik, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of gliclazide in the pharmaceutical industry, a large number of research groups have been engaged in various investigations aiming to enhance its biomedical application. But, very limited efforts have been made to study polymorphism of gliclazide. Therefore, this study focuses on solvent-induced polymorphism of gliclazide and its characterization by thermal methods. Three polymorphs namely, Form-I, II and III and an amorphous powder were produced from different solvents and solvent mixtures. Crystals were analyzed using infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction and single crystal x-ray diffraction. Polymorph Form-I is found to exist in centro-symmetric triclinic P-1 space group and has endothermic peak at 162.93. Form-II has endothermic peak from 171.2 to 172.35 and exists in centro-symmetric monoclinic P21/a space group while Form-III has endothermic peak from 168.93 to 169.86 and exists in centro-symmetric monoclinic P21/n space group. The equilibrium solubility values of Form-I, II, III and the amorphous form were 0.48250.025, 0.23410.042, 0.25810.038 and 0.52130.072 mg/ml, respectively. The Form-I has relatively higher solubility and similar to that of amorphous gliclazide. Form-II and Form-III are relatively most stable and least soluble. However, there was no remarkable difference in their aqueous solubility under the conditions in which study was conducted. PMID:25767316

  13. The redshift-space neighborhoods of 36 loose groups. 2: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramella, Massimo; Geller, Margaret J.; Hurchra, John P.; Thorstensen, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We explore the kinematics of 36 rich RGH89 groups identified from the first two complete slices of the CfA redshift survey. These groups have more than five members identified by a friends-of-friends algorithm at a number density contrast delta rho/rho greater than or equal to 80. To examine the stability of the determination of the velocity dispersion for these systems, we compare results for the original 232 members with results for a larger redshift sample, including 334 fainter members in the redshift neighborhoods. On average, we double the number of group members in each system. The observed distribution of velocity dispersions is stable. In fact, the velocity dispersion based on the original members identified in the CfA redshift survey is a reliable predictor of the value for the enlarged sample in an individual group. The velocity dispersion is thus a stable physical parameter for discrimination among systems galaxies. A larger sample of groups, particularly one selected from a distance limited catalog, should provide an interesting constraint on models for the formation of large-scale structure. We take H(sub 0) = km/s/Mpc.

  14. Social organization and space use of a wild mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) group.

    PubMed

    Brockmeyer, Timo; Kappeler, Peter M; Willaume, Eric; Benoit, Laure; Mboumba, Sylvre; Charpentier, Marie J E

    2015-10-01

    Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) are enigmatic Old World primates whose social organization and ecology remain poorly known. Previous studies indicated, for example, that groups are composed of only adult females and their young or that several units composed of one adult male and several females make up larger permanent social units. Here, we present the first data on group composition and male ranging patterns from the only habituated wild mandrill group and examine how home range size and daily path length varied with environmental and demographic factors over a 15-month period. Our study site is located in southern Gabon where we followed the group on a daily basis, collecting data on presence, ranging, behavior, and parasite load of its individual members. Throughout the study, the group was made up of about 120 individuals, including several non-natal and natal adult and sub-adult males. One-male units were never observed. The mandrills traveled an estimated 0.44-6.50?km/day in a home range area of 866.7?ha. Exploratory analyses revealed that precipitation, the number of adult males present, and the richness of protozoan parasites were all positively correlated with daily path length. These results clarify the social system of mandrills and provide first insights into the factors that shape their ranging patterns. PMID:26235675

  15. Creating Spaces for Critical Transformative Dialogues: Legitimising Discussion Groups as Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards-Groves, Christine J.

    2013-01-01

    Focussed dialogue (as lived and living practices) can have a powerful role in renewing professional practice, advancing its sustainability and development as administrative and political systems colonise the practices of teachers and teacher educators. However, participating in discussion groups for many teachers, including those in academia, is

  16. Finding a Space for Professional Development: Creating Thirdspace through After-School Writing Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, Robert; Coyle, Deborah; Walden, Anne; Healey, Conniem; Larson, Kim; Laughridge, Virginia; Ridder, Kim; Williams, Molly; Williams, Shawn

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a teacher study group focusing on After School Writing Circles for elementary students as a site of Thirdspace professional development. Borrowing the concept of Thirdspace from postmodern geographer Edward Soja, the authors argue that professional development works best when teachers engage in the dual work of imagining and

  17. Learning in Large Learning Spaces: The Academic Engagement of a Diverse Group of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Clive

    2012-01-01

    Teaching larger groups of students is a growing phenomenon in HE and this brings with it its own challenges, not least for the students themselves but also for their lecturers. Demographic factors as well as the experiences that characterise us as individuals will impact upon our ability to learn. The pilot study reported here considered the

  18. Integral group actions on symmetric spaces and discrete duality symmetries of supergravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Lisa; Murray, Scott H.; Sati, Hisham

    2015-10-01

    For G = G(?), a split, simply connected, semisimple Lie group of rank n and K the maximal compact subgroup of G, we give a method for computing Iwasawa coordinates of K?G using the Chevalley generators and the Steinberg presentation. When K?G is a scalar coset for a supergravity theory in dimensions ?3, we determine the action of the integral form G(?) on K?G. We give explicit results for the action of the discrete U-duality groups SL2(?) and E7(?) on the scalar cosets SO(2)?SL2(?) and [SU(8)/{ Id}]?E7(+7)(?) for type IIB supergravity in ten dimensions and 11-dimensional supergravity reduced to D = 4 dimensions, respectively. For the former, we use this to determine the discrete U-duality transformations on the scalar sector in the Borel gauge and we describe the discrete symmetries of the dyonic charge lattice. We determine the spectrum-generating symmetry group for fundamental BPS solitons of type IIB supergravity in D = 10 dimensions at the classical level and we propose an analog of this symmetry at the quantum level. We indicate how our methods can be used to study the orbits of discrete U-duality groups in general.

  19. Individual and grouping track pits etched in the exposed in a free space plastic track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashkarov, L.; Bazhutov, Yu

    2013-02-01

    New results concerned to the investigation of depth-dependent the pit-like surface-average and the grouping track-density distributions in the cosmic ray exposed column of CN-85 and CR-39 plastic solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) are presented. Two main sources: solar cosmic ray protons and recoil nuclei for very short (length <3 μm) track-pit formation are considered. Theoretical estimation of the total, uniform track-pit density indicates on failure of evidence of some additional radiation effects, partially, hypothetically conditioned with the Erzion theory. Some quantitative proofs of this hypothesis have been obtained in the measurements of the pit-groups. Totally, up to this time it was registered near of 30 pit groups with the surface pit-density in the interval of (1-15) × 106 cm2, that is two-three orders of magnitude higher than uniformly distributed track-pits on the same CR-39 plate surface. As a result of layer-by-layer investigation of the exposed CN-85 stock arrangement three pit swarms exactly correlated with the end point of high ionizing primary charge particle tracks were observed. Obtained data are considered in according to submission based on the probability of detection for the negative charged cosmic ray Erzion particles stopping events.

  20. Working Group 4 of international standardization organization Experience of developing the standards of space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, M. I.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade space environment international standards have been developed within the scope of ISO WG4 activities. This has been the first attempt to develop international standards of physical phenomena of natural environment such as galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, the Earths magnetic field, the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, etc. The main difficulty faced when developing the international standards is the lack of common methods for characterizing many natural phenomena. However, if methods have been successfully developed, such standards can play an outstanding role in the engineering requirements for spacecraft designs. This report is a survey of the current status of the international standards under development within the scope of the WG4 activity plan.

  1. Velocity space diffusion of pickup ions from the water group at Comet Halley

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, A.J.; Johnstone, A.D. ); Wilken, B.; Jockers, K. ); Glassmeier, K.H. )

    1989-08-01

    The authors have studied the diffusion in velocity space of cometary ions using the distributions of ions measured by the implanted ion spectrometer on Giotto during the inbound pass. The measurements were transformed into a frame comoving with the solar wind and oriented with the magnetic field. The observations show the evolution of the pitch angle distribution in the solar wind turbulence to form a shell from the initial ring. Diffusion in energy takes place simultaneously but on a longer time scale. Comparison with theory is inhibited by the lack of a suitable spatial model, but the simple arguments they can make indicate that pitch angle diffusion, and the process of parallel pickup, take place more slowly than theory suggests.

  2. Group dynamics during the EXEMSI isolation study. Experimental Campaign for the European Manned Space Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Cazes, C; Rosnet, E; Bachelard, C; Le Scanff, C; Rivolier, J

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the social behavior, interrelations, cohesion, efficiency and team formation of the crew during 60 days of isolation and confinement, to make a critical comparison of a variety of test methods used for this purpose and to formulate recommendations for their applications in selection, training and support for future studies of this kind. The study consisted of three phases: (1) the pre-isolation period, in which initial individual and group assessment were made to understand the motivation, characteristics, and styles of the crew members, the state of the crew, and to make a prognosis for the behavior of the group and its members, (2) the isolation period, with tests and observations to follow and analyze behavior and group dynamics of the crew, and to detect manifestations of stress, and (3) the post-isolation period with final assessment and debriefing. During these three periods individual and group tests were carried out. Direct methods, questionnaires and tests, as well as indirect methods, observations of behavior, were used. These had cognitive, affective-emotional and social components; they were quantitative, qualitative or a combination. Before isolation the crew members expressed strong confidence in the team and in their own personal capability. The leadership of the Commander seemed uncontested. Crew functioning during this period was conflict-free, but was structured in a rather rigid and defensive way (isolation of affects, denial of anxiety). Apparently, the members strongly needed to present a good image image of themselves. The relatively short period of the experiment, and the absence of real risk suggested that the crew would be able to maintain their cohesion, but in a real spaceflight situation this behavior could be inadequate and even dangerous. The pre-isolation prognosis for crew behavior during isolation was validated to a large extent. During isolation there were no clear manifestations of stress. Nevertheless, the confinement and isolation were experienced as the major stress factors. The crew members described themselves as a heterogeneous but harmonious group that was successful in their mission. In fact, the team maintained its cohesion by opposing external authority, using management as a scapegoat. Occasionally, in times of crisis, they also criticized ground crew. The Commander supported this attitude. Strongly differences in personality and behavior were noted. Analysis of the sociometric data showed that the asserted harmony was more apparent than real. It is questionable whether the group cohesion would have persisted in a life threatening crisis or even in a prolongation of the experiment. The most reliable instruments for this type of survey seem to be: group methods, non-obstructive tests, indirect instruments, and qualitative tools. The least reliable are: strictly quantitative methods, self-evaluations, standard debriefing techniques, since these reinforced in most cases subjects' defenses in an unconscious avoidance of criticism. Several recommendations were made for the organization, definition of objectives, experiment selection, crew selection, roles of external management and personnel. In particular, it is felt to be necessary to explain the aims of the mission to the subjects, to give clear and complete information, to establish confident and cooperative relations with the crew. It is essential to allow dialogue, to take opinions and suggestions of the crew seriously, and to establish clear rules of confidentiality. PMID:8814802

  3. Assessment of various natural orbitals as the basis of large active space density-matrix renormalization group calculations.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingjin; Ma, Haibo

    2013-06-14

    It is well-known that not only the orbital ordering but also the choice of the orbitals itself as the basis may significantly influence the computational efficiency of density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations. In this study, for assessing the efficiency of using various natural orbitals (NOs) as the DMRG basis, we performed benchmark DMRG calculations with different bases, which included the NOs obtained by various traditional electron correlation methods, as well as NOs acquired from preliminary moderate DMRG calculations (e.g., preserved states less than 500). The tested systems included N2, transition metal Cr2 systems, as well as 1D hydrogen polyradical chain systems under equilibrium and dissociation conditions and 2D hydrogen aggregates. The results indicate that a good compromise between the requirement for low computational costs of acquiring NOs and the demand for high efficiency of NOs as the basis of DMRG calculations may be very dependent on the studied systems' diverse electron correlation characteristics and the size of the active space. It is also shown that a DMRG-complete active space configuration interaction (DMRG-CASCI) calculation in a basis of carefully chosen NOs can provide a less expensive alternative to the standard DMRG-complete active space self-consistent field (DMRG-CASSCF) calculation and avoid the convergence difficulties of orbital optimization for large active spaces. The effect of different NO ordering schemes on DMRG-CASCI calculations is also discussed. PMID:23781781

  4. Real-space renormalization group for spectral properties of hierarchical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Li, Shanshan

    2015-10-01

    We derive the determinant of the Laplacian for the Hanoi networks and use it to determine their number of spanning trees (or graph complexity) asymptotically. While spanning trees generally proliferate with increasing average degree, the results show that modifications within the basic patterns of design of these hierarchical networks can lead to significant variations in their complexity. To this end, we develop renormalization group methods to obtain recursion equations from which many spectral properties can be obtained. This provides the basis for future applications to explore the physics of several dynamic processes.

  5. Building a research group of Space Physics at UAHuntsville -- the impact of an NSF career award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.

    2011-12-01

    G. Li (1,2) (1) Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville Huntsville, AL, 35899 (2) CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville Huntsville, AL, 35899 The author joined the faculty of the department of Physics at University of Alabama in Huntsville in August 2008. He was awarded the NSF Career award ATM-0847719 in 2009. To date, the Career award has provided partial supports to one postdoc, two graduate students and three undergraduate students for a variety of periods. Three publications came out as a result of the award (one of which is first authored by one undergraduate). Another two publications are in preparation. The award also helped the PI to be further recognized by the field of space plasma physics and cosmic ray physics. For example, in July 2009, the PI was awarded the Young Scientist Medal by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP); in April 2010, the PI won an Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) 2010 Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award. In short, the NSF CAREER has helped the PI to start his career at a level without which, will be impossible.

  6. Catalytic, Enantioselective Sulfenofunctionalisation of Alkenes: Mechanistic, Crystallographic, and Computational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Hartmann, Eduard; Kornfilt, David J. P.; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The stereocontrolled introduction of vicinal heteroatomic substituents into organic molecules is one of the most powerful ways of adding value and function. Whereas many methods exist for the introduction of oxygen- and nitrogen-containing substituents, the number stereocontrolled methods for the introduction of sulfur-containing substituents pales by comparison. Previous reports from these laboratories have described the sulfenofunctionalization of alkenes that construct vicinal carbon-sulfur and carbon-oxygen, carbon-nitrogen as well as carbon-carbon bonds with high levels of diastereospecificity and enantioselectivity. This process is enabled by the concept of Lewis base activation of Lewis acids that provides activation of Group 16 electrophiles. To provide a foundation for expansion of substrate scope and improved selectivities, we have undertaken a comprehensive study of the catalytically active species. Insights gleaned from kinetic, crystallographic and computational methods have led to the introduction of a new family of sulfenylating agents that provide significantly enhanced selectivities. PMID:25411883

  7. Crystallographic relationships between diamond and its inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimis, Paolo; Nestola, Fabrizio; Angel, Ross J.; Milani, Sula; Alvaro, Matteo; Anzolini, Chiara; Schiazza, Mariangela; Bruno, Marco; Prencipe, Mauro; Harris, Jeff W.; Hutchison, Mark T.

    2015-04-01

    The study of the crystallographic orientations of minerals included in diamonds can provide an insight into the mechanisms of their incorporation and the timing of their formation relative to the host diamond. The reported occurrence of non-trivial orientations for some minerals in some diamonds, suggesting an epitactic relationship, has long been considered to reflect contemporaneous growth of the diamond and the inclusion (= syngenesis). Correct interpretation of such orientations requires (i) a statistically significant data set, i.e. crystallographic data for single and multiple inclusions in a large number of diamonds, and (ii) a robust data-processing method, capable of removing ambiguities derived from the high symmetry of the diamond and the inclusion. We have developed software which performs such processing, starting from crystallographic orientation matrixes obtained by X-ray diffractometry. Preliminary studies indicate a wide variety of trends in the orientations of different inclusion phases in diamonds. In contrast to previous claims, olivine inclusions in lithospheric diamonds from Udachnaya do not show any preferred orientations with respect to their diamond hosts, but multiple inclusions in a single diamond often show very similar orientations within a few degrees (Nestola et al. 2014). Chromite (spinel) inclusions exhibit a strong tendency for a single (111) plane of each inclusion to be parallel to a (111) plane of their diamond host, but without any statistically significant orientation of the crystallographic axes a, b, and c. By contrast, 7 inclusions of ferropericlase studied in 2 different super deep diamonds (four inclusions in one diamond and three inclusions in the second diamond) from Brazil all exhibit the same orientation with their axes practically coincident with those of diamonds regardless of the position and the shape of the inclusions. The implications of these observations for the mechanisms of diamond growth will be explored. This work was supported by ERC starting grant 307322 to F. Nestola and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation's Deep Carbon Observatory project to P. Nimis. Nestola F., et al. (2014) Int Geol Rev, 56,1658-1667.

  8. A CPU benchmark for protein crystallographic refinement.

    PubMed

    Bourne, P E; Hendrickson, W A

    1990-01-01

    The CPU time required to complete a cycle of restrained least-squares refinement of a protein structure from X-ray crystallographic data using the FORTRAN codes PROTIN and PROLSQ are reported for 48 different processors, ranging from single-user workstations to supercomputers. Sequential, vector, VLIW, multiprocessor, and RISC hardware architectures are compared using both a small and a large protein structure. Representative compile times for each hardware type are also given, and the improvement in run-time when coding for a specific hardware architecture considered. The benchmarks involve scalar integer and vector floating point arithmetic and are representative of the calculations performed in many scientific disciplines. PMID:2225778

  9. Localization properties of random-mass Dirac fermions from real-space renormalization group.

    PubMed

    Mkhitaryan, V V; Raikh, M E

    2011-06-24

    Localization properties of random-mass Dirac fermions for a realization of mass disorder, commonly referred to as the Cho-Fisher model, are studied on the D-class chiral network. We show that a simple renormalization group (RG) description captures accurately a rich phase diagram: thermal metal and two insulators with quantized ?(xy), as well as transitions (including critical exponents) between them. Our main finding is that, even with small transmission of nodes, the RG block exhibits a sizable portion of perfect resonances. Delocalization occurs by proliferation of these resonances to larger scales. Evolution of the thermal conductance distribution towards a metallic fixed point is synchronized with evolution of signs of transmission coefficients, so that delocalization is accompanied with sign percolation. PMID:21770661

  10. The Exploration Atmospheres Working Group's Report on Space Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Thibeault, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    This part of Exploration Atmospheres Working Group analyses focuses on the potential use of nonmetallic composites as the interior walls and structural elements exposed to the atmosphere of the spacecraft or habitat. The primary drive to consider nonmetallic, polymer-based composites as an alternative to aluminum structure is due to their superior radiation shielding properties. But as is shown in this analysis, these composites can also be made to combine superior mechanical properties with superior shielding properties. In addition, these composites can be made safe; i.e., with regard to flammability and toxicity, as well as "smart"; i.e., embedded with sensors for the continuous monitoring of material health and conditions. The analysis main conclusions are that (1) smart polymer-based composites are an enabling technology for safe and reliable exploration missions, and (2) an adaptive, synergetic systems approach is required to meet the missions requirements from structure, properties, and processes to crew health and protection for exploration missions.

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic core of cystathionine ?-synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ereo-Orbea, June; Majtan, Tomas; Oyenarte, Iker; Kraus, Jan P.; Martnez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS; EC 4.2.1.22) catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine and serine to form cystathionine, with the release of water. In humans, deficiency in CBS activity is the most common cause of hyperhomocysteinaemia and homocystinuria. More than 160 pathogenic mutations in the human CBS gene have been described to date. Here, the purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic core of CBS from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScCBS) is described which, in contrast to other eukaryotic CBSs, lacks the N-terminal haem-binding domain and is considered to be a useful model for investigation of the pyridoxal-5?-phosphate-mediated reactions of human CBS (hCBS). The purified protein yielded two different crystal forms belonging to space groups P41212 and P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 72.390, c = 386.794? and a = 58.156, b = 89.988, c = 121.687?, respectively. Diffraction data were collected to 2.7 and 3.1? resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. Preliminary analysis of the X-ray data suggests the presence of ScCBS homodimers in both types of crystals. PMID:24598918

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the full-length cystathionine ?-synthase from Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Oyenarte, Iker; Majtan, Tomas; Ereo, June; Corral-Rodrguez, Mara Angeles; Klaudiny, Jaroslav; Majtan, Juraj; Kraus, Jan P.; Martnez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS) is a pyridoxal-5?-phosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the first step of the transsulfuration pathway, namely the condensation of serine with homocysteine to form cystathionine. Mutations in the CBS gene are the single most common cause of hereditary homocystinuria, a multisystemic disease affecting to various extents the vasculature, connective tissues and central nervous system. At present, the crystal structure of CBS from Drosophila melanogaster is the only available structure of the full-length enzyme. Here we describe a cloning, overexpression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a full-length CBS from Apis mellifera (AmCBS) which maintains 51 and 46% sequence identity with its Drosophila and human homologs, respectively. The AmCBS yielded crystals belonging to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 85.90, b = 95.87, c = 180.33?. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 3.0?. The crystal structure contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit which presumably correspond to the dimeric species observed in solution. PMID:23143241

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic core of cystathionine ?-synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ereo-Orbea, June; Majtan, Tomas; Oyenarte, Iker; Kraus, Jan P; Martnez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2014-03-01

    Cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS; EC 4.2.1.22) catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine and serine to form cystathionine, with the release of water. In humans, deficiency in CBS activity is the most common cause of hyperhomocysteinaemia and homocystinuria. More than 160 pathogenic mutations in the human CBS gene have been described to date. Here, the purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic core of CBS from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScCBS) is described which, in contrast to other eukaryotic CBSs, lacks the N-terminal haem-binding domain and is considered to be a useful model for investigation of the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-mediated reactions of human CBS (hCBS). The purified protein yielded two different crystal forms belonging to space groups P41212 and P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 72.390, c = 386.794? and a = 58.156, b = 89.988, c = 121.687?, respectively. Diffraction data were collected to 2.7 and 3.1? resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. Preliminary analysis of the X-ray data suggests the presence of ScCBS homodimers in both types of crystals. PMID:24598918

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of carnosinase CN2 from mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Tetsuo; Unno, Hideaki; Ujita, Sayuri; Otani, Hiroto; Okumura, Nobuaki; Hashida-Okumura, Akiko; Nagai, Katsuya; Kusunoki, Masami

    2006-10-01

    Mouse carnosinase was crystallized in complex with Zn{sup 2+} or Mn{sup 2+} and the complexes are undergoing structure determination by the MAD method. Mammalian tissues contain several histidine-containing dipeptides, of which l-carnosine is the best characterized and is found in various tissues including the brain and skeletal muscles. However, the mechanism for its biosynthesis and degradation have not yet been fully elucidated. Crystallographic study of carnosinase CN2 from mouse has been undertaken in order to understand its enzymatic mechanism from a structural viewpoint. CN2 was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique using PEG 3350 as a precipitant. Crystals were obtained in complex with either Mn{sup 2+} or Zn{sup 2+}. Both crystals of CN2 belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} and have almost identical unit-cell parameters (a = 54.41, b = 199.77, c = 55.49 Å, β = 118.52° for the Zn{sup 2+} complex crystals). Diffraction data were collected to 1.7 and 2.3 Å for Zn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} complex crystals, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. Structure determination is ongoing using the multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method.

  15. Purification and crystallographic analysis of a FAD-dependent halogenase from Streptomyces sp. JCM9888.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanqun; Yan, Baohua; Yang, Ting; Jiang, Jian; Wei, Heng; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2015-08-01

    A new FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide)-dependent halogenase HalY from Streptomyces sp. JCM9888 was reported to be involved in the regioselective halogenation of adenine. HalY is a variant B FAD-dependent halogenase that is most similar to the halogenase PltA involved in pyoluteorin biosynthesis. This study reports the overexpression and purification of HalY with an N-terminal hexahistidine tag, followed by crystallization experiments and X-ray crystallographic analysis. HalY was purified as a monomer in solution and crystallized to give X-ray diffraction to a resolution of 1.7?. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.4, b = 113.4, c = 47.6?, ? = ? = 90, ? = 107.4, and contained one monomer of HalY in the asymmetric unit, with a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.3?(3)?Da(-1) and a solvent content of 46%. The structure of the halogenase CndH was used as a search model in molecular replacement to obtain the initial model of HalY. Manual model building and structure refinement of HalY are in progress. PMID:26249684

  16. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalinski, Eva; Bange, Gert; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2007-09-01

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1 from Homo sapiens is provided. ErbB-3-binding protein 1 (Ebp1) is a member of the family of proliferation-associated 2G4 proteins (PA2G4s) and plays a role in cellular growth and differentiation. Ligand-induced activation of the transmembrane receptor ErbB3 leads to dissociation of Ebp1 from the receptor in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The non-associated protein is involved in transcriptional and translational regulation in the cell. Here, the overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Ebp1 from Homo sapiens are reported. Initially observed crystals were improved by serial seeding to single crystals suitable for data collection. The optimized crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 .

  17. Crystallization, diffraction data collection and preliminary crystallographic analysis of DING protein from Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Moniot, Sebastien; Elias, Mikael; Kim, Donghyo; Scott, Ken; Chabriere, Eric

    2007-07-01

    Crystallization of DING protein from P. fluorescens is reported. A complete data set was collected to 1.43 Å resolution. PfluDING is a phosphate-binding protein expressed in Pseudomonas fluorescens. This protein is clearly distinct from the bacterial ABC transporter soluble phosphate-binding protein PstS and is more homologous to eukaryotic DING proteins. Interestingly, bacterial DING proteins have only been detected in certain Pseudomonas species. Although DING proteins seem to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes, they are systematically absent from eukaryotic genomic databases and thus are still quite mysterious and poorly characterized. PfluDING displays mitogenic activity towards human cells and binds various ligands such as inorganic phosphate, pyrophosphate, nucleotide triphosphates and cotinine. Here, the crystallization of PfluDING is reported in a monoclinic space group (P2{sub 1}), with typical unit-cell parameters a = 36.7, b = 123.7, c = 40.8 Å, α = 90, β = 116.7, γ = 90°. Preliminary crystallographic analysis reveals good diffraction quality for these crystals and a 1.43 Å resolution data set has been collected.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the ADP-ribosyltransferase HopU1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan; Wang, Ping; Yang, Huirong; Xu, Yanhui

    2010-01-01

    Several Gram-negative pathogens of plants and animals and some eukaryotic associated bacteria use type III protein-secretion systems (T3SSs) to deliver bacterial virulence-associated ‘effector’ proteins directly into host cells. HopU1 is a type III effector protein from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, which causes plant bacterial speck disease. HopU1 quells host immunity through ADP-ribosylation of GRP7 as a substrate. HopU1 has been reported as the first ADP-ribosyltransferase virulence protein to be identified in a plant pathogen. Although several structures of ADP-ribosyltransferases have been determined to date, no structure of an ADP-ribosyltransferase from a plant pathogen has been determined. Here, the protein expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of HopU1 are reported. Diffracting crystals were grown by hanging-drop vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol 10 000 as a precipitant. Native and SAD data sets were collected using native and selenomethionine-derivative HopU1 crystals. The diffraction pattern of the crystal extended to 2.7 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belonged to space group P43, with unit-cell parameters a = 92.6, b = 92.6, c = 101.6 Å. PMID:20693672

  19. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of GluB from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingbo; Li, Defeng; Hu, Yonglin; Wang, Da Cheng

    2013-06-01

    GluB is a substrate-binding protein (SBP) which participates in the uptake of glutamic acid in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a Gram-positive bacterium. It is part of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter system. Together with the transmembrane proteins GluC and GluD and the cytoplasmic protein GluA, which couples the hydrolysis of ATP to the translocation of glutamate, they form a highly active glutamate-uptake system. As part of efforts to study the amino-acid metabolism, especially the metabolism of glutamic acid by C. glutamicum, a bacterium that is widely used in the industrial production of glutamic acid, the GluB protein was expressed, purified and crystallized, an X-ray diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 1.9 Å and preliminary crystallographic analysis was performed. The crystal belonged to space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 82.50, c = 72.69 Å. PMID:23722846

  20. Crystallization, diffraction data collection and preliminary crystallographic analysis of DING protein from Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Moniot, Sebastien; Elias, Mikael; Kim, Donghyo; Scott, Ken; Chabriere, Eric

    2007-07-01

    PfluDING is a phosphate-binding protein expressed in Pseudomonas fluorescens. This protein is clearly distinct from the bacterial ABC transporter soluble phosphate-binding protein PstS and is more homologous to eukaryotic DING proteins. Interestingly, bacterial DING proteins have only been detected in certain Pseudomonas species. Although DING proteins seem to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes, they are systematically absent from eukaryotic genomic databases and thus are still quite mysterious and poorly characterized. PfluDING displays mitogenic activity towards human cells and binds various ligands such as inorganic phosphate, pyrophosphate, nucleotide triphosphates and cotinine. Here, the crystallization of PfluDING is reported in a monoclinic space group (P2(1)), with typical unit-cell parameters a = 36.7, b = 123.7, c = 40.8 A, alpha = 90, beta = 116.7, gamma = 90 degrees. Preliminary crystallographic analysis reveals good diffraction quality for these crystals and a 1.43 A resolution data set has been collected. PMID:17620718

  1. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of a possible transcription factor encoded by the mimivirus L544 gene

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccafava, Alexandre; Lartigue, Audrey; Mansuelle, Pascal; Jeudy, Sandra; Abergel, Chantal

    2011-01-01

    Mimivirus is the prototype of a new family (the Mimiviridae) of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs), which already include the Poxviridae, Iridoviridae, Phycodnaviridae and Asfarviridae. Mimivirus specifically replicates in cells from the genus Acanthamoeba. Proteomic analysis of purified mimivirus particles revealed the presence of many subunits of the DNA-directed RNA polymerase II complex. A fully functional pre-transcriptional complex appears to be loaded in the virions, allowing mimivirus to initiate transcription within the host cytoplasm immediately upon infection independently of the host nuclear apparatus. To fully understand this process, a systematic study of mimivirus proteins that are predicted (by bioinformatics) or suspected (by proteomic analysis) to be involved in transcription was initiated by cloning and expressing them in Escherichia coli in order to determine their three-dimensional structures. Here, preliminary crystallographic analysis of the recombinant L544 protein is reported. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C2221 with one monomer per asymmetric unit. A MAD data set was used for preliminary phasing using the selenium signal present in a selenomethionine-substituted protein crystal. PMID:21821896

  2. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of a possible transcription factor encoded by the mimivirus L544 gene.

    PubMed

    Ciaccafava, Alexandre; Lartigue, Audrey; Mansuelle, Pascal; Jeudy, Sandra; Abergel, Chantal

    2011-08-01

    Mimivirus is the prototype of a new family (the Mimiviridae) of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs), which already include the Poxviridae, Iridoviridae, Phycodnaviridae and Asfarviridae. Mimivirus specifically replicates in cells from the genus Acanthamoeba. Proteomic analysis of purified mimivirus particles revealed the presence of many subunits of the DNA-directed RNA polymerase II complex. A fully functional pre-transcriptional complex appears to be loaded in the virions, allowing mimivirus to initiate transcription within the host cytoplasm immediately upon infection independently of the host nuclear apparatus. To fully understand this process, a systematic study of mimivirus proteins that are predicted (by bioinformatics) or suspected (by proteomic analysis) to be involved in transcription was initiated by cloning and expressing them in Escherichia coli in order to determine their three-dimensional structures. Here, preliminary crystallographic analysis of the recombinant L544 protein is reported. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222(1) with one monomer per asymmetric unit. A MAD data set was used for preliminary phasing using the selenium signal present in a selenomethionine-substituted protein crystal. PMID:21821896

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic investigation of FrnE, a disulfide oxidoreductase from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Lata; Misra, Hari Sharan; Bihani, Subhash Chandra

    2014-11-01

    In prokaryotes, Dsb proteins catalyze the formation of native disulfide bonds through an oxidative folding pathway and are part of the cell machinery that protects proteins from oxidative stress. Deinococcus radiodurans is an extremophile which shows unparalleled resistance to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress. It has a strong mechanism to protect its proteome from oxidative damage. The genome of Deinococcus shows the presence of FrnE, a Dsb protein homologue that potentially provides the bacterium with oxidative stress tolerance. Here, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of FrnE from D. radiodurans are reported. Diffraction-quality single crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with reservoir solution consisting of 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.0, 10% PEG 8000, 15-20% glycerol. Diffraction data were collected on an Agilent SuperNova system using a microfocus sealed-tube X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution at 100 K. The space group of the crystal was found to be P2₁22₁, with unit-cell parameters a=47.91, b=62.94, c=86.75 Å, α=β=γ=90°. Based on Matthews coefficient analysis, one monomer per asymmetric unit is present in the crystal, with a solvent content of approximately 45%. PMID:25372826

  4. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human myotubularin-related protein 3.

    PubMed

    Son, Ji Young; Lee, Jee Un; Yoo, Ki-Young; Shin, Woori; Im, Dong-Won; Kim, Seung Jun; Ryu, Seong Eon; Heo, Yong-Seok

    2014-09-01

    Myotubularin-related proteins are a large family of phosphatases that have the catalytic activity of dephosphorylating the phospholipid molecules phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate. Each of the 14 family members contains a phosphatase catalytic domain, which is inactive in six family members owing to amino-acid changes in a key motif for the activity. All of the members also bear PH-GRAM domains, which have low homologies between them and have roles that are not yet clear. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of human myotubularin-related protein 3 encompassing the PH-GRAM and the phosphatase catalytic domain are reported. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis shows that the crystals diffracted to 3.30? resolution at a synchrotron X-ray source. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 323.3, b = 263.3, c = 149.4?, ? = 109.7. PMID:25195900

  5. Between-group behaviour in health care: gaps, edges, boundaries, disconnections, weak ties, spaces and holes. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gaps are typically regarded as a problem to be solved. People are stimulated to close or plug them. Researchers are moved to fill deficits in the literature in order to realise a more complete knowledge base, health authorities want to bridge policy-practice disconnections, managers to secure resources to remedy shortfalls between poor and idealised care, and clinicians to provide services to patients across the divides of organisational silos. Despite practical and policy work in many health systems to bridge gaps, it is valuable to study research examining them for the insights provided. Structural holes, spaces between social clusters and weak or absent ties represent fissures in networks, located in less densely populated parts of otherwise closely connected social structures. Such gaps are useful as they illustrate how communication potentially breaks down or interactivity fails. This paper discusses empirical and theoretical work on this phenomenon with the aim of analysing a specific exemplar, the structures of silos within health care organisations. Methods The research literature on social spaces, holes, gaps, boundaries and edges was searched systematically, and separated into health [n = 13] and non-health [n = 55] samples. The health literature was reviewed and synthesised in order to understand the circumstances between stakeholders and stakeholder groups that both provide threats to networked interactions and opportunities to strengthen the fabric of organisational and institutional inter-relationships. Results The research examples illuminate various network structure characteristics and group interactions. They explicate a range of opportunities for improved social and professional relations that understanding structural holes, social spaces and absent ties affords. A principal finding is that these kinds of gaps illustrate the conditions under which connections are strained or have been severed, where the limits of integration between groups occurs, the circumstances in which social spaces are or need to be negotiated and the way divides are bridged. The study's limitations are that it is bounded by the focus of attention and the search terms used and there is yet to be developed a probabilistic, predictive model for gaps and how to connect them. Conclusions Gaps offer insights into social structures, and how real world behaviours of participants in workplaces, organisations and institutions are fragile. The paper highlights the circumstances in which network disjunctures and group divides manifest. Knowledge of these phenomenon provides opportunities for working out ways to improve health sector organisational communications, knowledge transmission and relationships. PMID:21134295

  6. Inter-Agency Consultative Group for Space Science (IACG): Handbook of Missions and Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The ACE spacecraft design is based on the Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) built by Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and the Applied Physics Lab (APL) for the AMPTE program. ACE is designed as a spinning spacecraft with its spin axis aligned to the Earth-Sun axis. The ACE launch weight will be approx. 633 kg, including 105 kg of scientific instruments and 184 kg of propellant. Using a Delta-class expendable launch vehicle, ACE will be launched into an L1 libration point (240 R(sub e)) orbit. Telemetry will be 6.7 kbps average, using tape recorder storage with daily readout to DSN. The experiment power requirement is approximately 76 W nominal and 96 W peak. The prime objective of the ACE mission is: (1) to determine accurate elemental and isotropic abundances including solar matter, local interstellar matter and local galactic matter; (2) to study the origin of elements and evolutionary processing in galactic nucleosynthesis, galactic evolution, origin and evolution of the solar system; (3) to study coronal formation and solar-wind acceleration processes; and (4) to study particle acceleration and transport, including coronal shock acceleration, stochastic flare acceleration, interplanetary shock acceleration, and interstellar acceleration and propagation. To accomplish this objective, ACE will perform comprehensive and coordinated determinations of the elemental and isotopic composition of energetic nuclei accelerated on the Sun, in interplanetary space, and from galactic sources. These observations will span five decades in energy, from solar wind to galactic cosmic ray energies, and will cover the element range from H-1 to Zr-40. Comparison of these samples of matter will be used to study the origin and subsequent evolution of both solar system and galactic material by isolating the effects of fundamental processes that include nucleosynthesis, charged and neutral particle separation, bulk plasma acceleration, and the acceleration of suprathermal and high-energy particles.

  7. Behavioral and biological effects of autonomous versus scheduled mission management in simulated space-dwelling groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roma, Peter G.; Hursh, Steven R.; Hienz, Robert D.; Emurian, Henry H.; Gasior, Eric D.; Brinson, Zabecca S.; Brady, Joseph V.

    2011-05-01

    Logistical constraints during long-duration space expeditions will limit the ability of Earth-based mission control personnel to manage their astronaut crews and will thus increase the prevalence of autonomous operations. Despite this inevitability, little research exists regarding crew performance and psychosocial adaptation under such autonomous conditions. To this end, a newly-initiated study on crew management systems was conducted to assess crew performance effectiveness under rigid schedule-based management of crew activities by Mission Control versus more flexible, autonomous management of activities by the crews themselves. Nine volunteers formed three long-term crews and were extensively trained in a simulated planetary geological exploration task over the course of several months. Each crew then embarked on two separate 3-4 h missions in a counterbalanced sequence: Scheduled, in which the crews were directed by Mission Control according to a strict topographic and temporal region-searching sequence, and Autonomous, in which the well-trained crews received equivalent baseline support from Mission Control but were free to explore the planetary surface as they saw fit. Under the autonomous missions, performance in all three crews improved (more high-valued geologic samples were retrieved), subjective self-reports of negative emotional states decreased, unstructured debriefing logs contained fewer references to negative emotions and greater use of socially-referent language, and salivary cortisol output across the missions was attenuated. The present study provides evidence that crew autonomy may improve performance and help sustain if not enhance psychosocial adaptation and biobehavioral health. These controlled experimental data contribute to an emerging empirical database on crew autonomy which the international astronautics community may build upon for future research and ultimately draw upon when designing and managing missions.

  8. The effect of spacing transverse to the wave direction on the Morison force coefficients in two cylinder groups

    SciTech Connect

    Haritos, N.; Smith, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides some results from an experimental study currently being carried out in the Michell laboratory at the University of Melbourne. The principal purpose of the study is to investigate the Morison in-line hydrodynamic force characteristics of slender surface-piercing multi-cylinder structures. The test program has been tailored to provide more detailed observations within the close-spaced region (Separation/Diameter ratio, s/D < 2) of the group interference effect in such multi-cylinder structures over the Keulegan Carpenter range 0 < KC < 20 which encompasses the inertia force dominant Morison regime (KC < 5), as well as the so-called troublesome region (5 < KC < 15) where both drag and inertia force components are significant. Results currently in hand for the side-by-side two-cylinder group configuration are presented which clearly depict the characteristics of this interference effect.

  9. Peculiarities of a Group Response of Cardiovascular System of Volunteers at Different Latitudes to Changes of Space Weather Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshina, S. S.; Samsonov, S. N.; Manykina, V. I.; Afanasyeva, T. N.; Vishnevsky, V. V.; Petrova, P. G.; Petrova, V. D.; Strekalovskaya, A. A.; Tokayeva, L. K.; Kaplanova, T. I.; Potapova, M. V.

    A simultaneous monitoring in evaluating of the response of a cardiovascular system of healthy volunteers was performed. The research was oriented to changes of a space weather parameters in aurural (Tixie), subauroral (Yakutsk) and medium (Saratov) areas. In each of the experimental groups there was revealed an effect of synchronization between repolarization processes of ventrical myocard responding (according to a T-wave symmetry coefficient of a cardiogram) and geomagnetic activity (according Kp-index). At rest the group effect of synchronization (GES) of myocard in geomagnetic activity change was noticed in 33,3%-61,3% of the respondents. The origin of GES has features depending on the area of habitation and an age of the volunteers. The study is performed with the partial financial support in partnership with Russian-Ukrainian grant RFFI ?14-02-90424 ukr_a.

  10. Collaborative annotation of 3D crystallographic models.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J; Henderson, M; Khan, I

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the AnnoCryst system-a tool that was designed to enable authenticated collaborators to share online discussions about 3D crystallographic structures through the asynchronous attachment, storage, and retrieval of annotations. Annotations are personal comments, interpretations, questions, assessments, or references that can be attached to files, data, digital objects, or Web pages. The AnnoCryst system enables annotations to be attached to 3D crystallographic models retrieved from either private local repositories (e.g., Fedora) or public online databases (e.g., Protein Data Bank or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database) via a Web browser. The system uses the Jmol plugin for viewing and manipulating the 3D crystal structures but extends Jmol by providing an additional interface through which annotations can be created, attached, stored, searched, browsed, and retrieved. The annotations are stored on a standardized Web annotation server (Annotea), which has been extended to support 3D macromolecular structures. Finally, the system is embedded within a security framework that is capable of authenticating users and restricting access only to trusted colleagues. PMID:17900174

  11. Space-group symmetry fractionalization in a family of exactly solvable models with Z2 topological order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hao; Hermele, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We study square lattice space-group symmetry fractionalization in a family of exactly solvable models with Z2 topological order in two dimensions. In particular, we have obtained a complete understanding of which distinct types of symmetry fractionalization (symmetry classes) can be realized within this class of models, which are generalizations of Kitaev's Z2 toric code to arbitrary lattices. This question is motivated by earlier work of Essin and one of us (M. H.) [Phys. Rev. B 87, 104406 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.104406], where the idea of symmetry classification was laid out, and which, for square lattice symmetry, produces 2080 symmetry classes consistent with the fusion rules of Z2 topological order. This approach does not produce a physical model for each symmetry class, and indeed there are reasons to believe that some symmetry classes may not be realizable in strictly two-dimensional systems, thus raising the question of which classes are in fact possible. While our understanding is limited to a restricted class of models, it is complete in the sense that for each of the 2080 possible symmetry classes, we either prove rigorously that the class cannot be realized in our family of models, or we give an explicit model realizing the class. We thus find that exactly 487 symmetry classes are realized in the family of models considered. With a more restrictive type of symmetry action, where space-group operations act trivially in the internal Hilbert space of each spin degree of freedom, we find that exactly 82 symmetry classes are realized. In addition, we present a single model that realizes all 26=64 types of symmetry fractionalization allowed for a single anyon species (Z2 charge excitation), as the parameters in the Hamiltonian are varied. The paper concludes with a summary and a discussion of two results pertaining to more general bosonic models.

  12. Structure of delta-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} from density functional theory: A systematic crystallographic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Wachsman, Eric D.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Nino, Juan C.

    2009-05-15

    A systematic crystallographic analysis of the <110> and <111> vacancy-ordered structure of cubic delta-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} obtained from electronic-structure calculations is presented. The ordering of vacancies leads to a doubling of the unit-cell that results in a 2x2x2 fluorite super-structure, with an associated reduction in its space group symmetry from Fm3-barm to Fm3-bar. The Bi atoms present inside the <111> vacancy-ordered oxygen sublattice have equal Bi-O bond lengths, whereas, those present inside the <110> vacancy-ordered oxygen sublattice have three different pairs of Bi-O bond lengths. The specific ionic displacements and electronic charge configurations also depend on the nature of vacancy ordering in the oxygen sub-lattice. - Graphical abstract: 1/8 of a 2x2x2 delta-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} superstructure having Fm3-bar space group. Every oxygen (black) has three possible positions, only one of which is filled either by O1 (red) or O{sub 2} (blue).

  13. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a penicillin-binding protein homologue from Pyrococcus abyssi

    SciTech Connect

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Mayer, Claudine

    2005-11-01

    The crystallization of a hypothetical penicillin-binding protein from the archaeon P. abyssi in space group C2 by hanging-drop vapour diffusion is reported. The genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi contains a gene (pab0087) encoding a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) homologue. This sequence consists of 447 residues and shows significant sequence similarity to low-molecular-weight PBPs and class C β-lactamases. The Pab0087 protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data from two different crystal forms were collected to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution. Both crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 160.59, b = 135.74, c = 113.02 Å, β = 117.36° and a = 166.97, b = 131.25, c = 189.39 Å, β = 113.81°, respectively. The asymmetric unit contains four and eight molecules, respectively, with fourfold non-crystallographic symmetry.

  14. Incorporating Space Science Content Into the Undergraduate Curriculum by the NASA Education Forums' Higher Education Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.; Buxner, S.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Fraknoi, A.; Moldwin, M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Low, R.; Schultz, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    As part of the NASA Education Forums, the Higher Education Working Group (HEWG) strives to support undergraduate science education through a variety of activities. These activities include: providing resource that incorporate space science topics into the existing undergraduate curriculum, understanding the role that community colleges play in STEM education and preparing STEM teachers, and identifying issues in diversity related to STEM education. To assess the best way of including space science into the undergraduate curriculum, the HEWG held a series of workshops and conducted surveys of undergraduate faculty who are conducting research in space science. During this engagement, the faculty expressed a need for a centralized repository of materials that can be used as part of already existing undergraduate courses in astronomy, physics, and earth science. Such a repository has since been developed, the 'EarthSpace Higher Education Clearing House (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace/) and it is still growing. Additional community tools, such as a newsletter, are provided through this website. To better understand the role and needs of community colleges, the HEWG undertook and extensive survey of community college STEM faculty. 187 faculty responded to the survey and the results show the extensive teaching load these faculty have, as well as the diverse demographics and the extent to which STEM teachers begin their preparation at 2 year institutions. Finally, the HEWG has begun to work on understanding the issues faced in increasing the diversity of the STEM work force. Progress and results of all this work will be summarized in this presentation.

  15. Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and additional resources focuses on space and astronomy. Specifies age levels for resources that include Web sites, CD-ROMS and software, videos, books, audios, and magazines; offers professional resources; and presents a relevant class activity. (LRW)

  16. Crystallization and crystallographic studies of kallistatin

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fang; Zhou, Aiwu; Wei, Zhenquan

    2015-01-01

    Kallistatin is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) which specifically inhibits human tissue kallikrein; however, its inhibitory activity is inhibited by heparin. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism, recombinant human kallistatin was prepared in Escherichia coli and the protein was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9? resolution. The crystals were found to belong to space group P61, with unit-cell parameters a = 113.51, b = 113.51, c = 76.17?. Initial analysis indicated that the crystallized kallistatin was in a relaxed conformation, with its reactive-centre loop inserted in the central ?-sheet. PMID:26323298

  17. Crystallization and crystallographic studies of kallistatin

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Fang; Zhou, Aiwu; Wei, Zhenquan

    2015-08-25

    The crystallization of human kallistatin in the relaxed conformation is reported. Kallistatin is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) which specifically inhibits human tissue kallikrein; however, its inhibitory activity is inhibited by heparin. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism, recombinant human kallistatin was prepared in Escherichia coli and the protein was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The crystals were found to belong to space group P6{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 113.51, b = 113.51, c = 76.17 Å. Initial analysis indicated that the crystallized kallistatin was in a relaxed conformation, with its reactive-centre loop inserted in the central β-sheet.

  18. Teaching Biochemists and Pharmacologists How to Use Crystallographic Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duax, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a one-semester course designed to teach first year graduate students how to extract, interpret, evaluate, and use the information provided by an X-ray crystallographic crystal structure determination. Presents a course outline and discusses the treatment of crystal composition, crystallographic parameters, molecular geometry and

  19. XTAL system of crystallographic programs: programmer's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.R.; Stewart, J.M.; Norden, A.P.; Munn, R.J.; Freer, S.T.

    1980-02-01

    This document establishes the basis for collaborative writing of transportable computer programs for x-ray crystallography. The concepts and general-purpose utility subroutines described here can be readily adapted to other scientific calculations. The complete system of crystallographic programs and subroutines is called XTAL and replaces the XRAY (6,7,8) system of programs. The coding language for the XTAL system is RATMAC (5). The XTAL system of programs contains routines for controlling execution of application programs. In this sense it forms a suboperating system that presents the same computational environment to the user and programmer irrespective of the operating system in use at a particular installation. These control routines replace all FORTRAN I/O code, supply character reading and writing, supply binary file reading and writing, serve as a support library for applications programs, and provide for interprogram communication.

  20. Crystallographic structure of ternary semiconducting alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgrny, M.; Czy?yk, M. T.; Balzarotti, A.; Letardi, P.; Motta, N.; Kisiel, A.; Zimnal-Starnawska, M.

    1985-08-01

    Recent EXAFS experiments have revealed that the crystallographic structure of semiconducting ternary alloys is considerably distorted in comparison with the zinc-blende structure. We have used the Valence-Force-Field model and the Monte-Carlo simulation technique to calculate from the macroscopic elastic properties of constituents the lattice distortion of these alloys at any arbitrary concentration. These results form the basis of the detailed interpretation of the EXAFS data. All the experimental features, including the radial distribution function broadening and the multi-modal behaviour, can be reproduced with high accuracy. We show that the distortion of the mixed sublattice is, contrary to expectations, quite large. The estimate of the elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing is given for both InGaAs and CdZnTe systems.

  1. Crystallographic education in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Gražulis, Saulius; Sarjeant, Amy Alexis; Moeck, Peter; Stone-Sundberg, Jennifer; Snyder, Trevor J.; Kaminsky, Werner; Oliver, Allen G.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Dawe, Louise N.; Rychkov, Denis A.; Losev, Evgeniy A.; Boldyreva, Elena V.; Tanski, Joseph M.; Bernstein, Joel; Rabeh, Wael M.; Kantardjieff, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    There are many methods that can be used to incorporate concepts of crystallography into the learning experiences of students, whether they are in elementary school, at university or part of the public at large. It is not always critical that those who teach crystallography have immediate access to diffraction equipment to be able to introduce the concepts of symmetry, packing or molecular structure in an age- and audience-appropriate manner. Crystallography can be used as a tool for teaching general chemistry concepts as well as general research techniques without ever having a student determine a crystal structure. Thus, methods for younger students to perform crystal growth experiments of simple inorganic salts, organic compounds and even metals are presented. For settings where crystallographic instrumentation is accessible (proximally or remotely), students can be involved in all steps of the process, from crystal growth, to data collection, through structure solution and refinement, to final publication. Several approaches based on the presentations in the MS92 Microsymposium at the IUCr 23rd Congress and General Assembly are reported. The topics cover methods for introducing crystallography to undergraduate students as part of a core chemistry curriculum; a successful short-course workshop intended to bootstrap researchers who rely on crystallography for their work; and efforts to bring crystallography to secondary school children and non-science majors. In addition to these workshops, demonstrations and long-format courses, open-format crystallographic databases and three-dimensional printed models as tools that can be used to excite target audiences and inspire them to pursue a deeper understanding of crystallography are described. PMID:26664347

  2. Inorganic structures in space group P3m1; coordinate analysis and systematic prediction of new ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, S C

    2008-08-01

    ICSD Release 2007/1 contains 47 families of inorganic crystal structures, some single-member only, within the 311 entries listed under the polar space group P3m1. Coordinate analysis reveals 12 such families to be candidate ferroelectrics, over a range of confidence levels. Selection is based on the detection of an approach to nonpolar supergroup symmetry, within specified limits, by the atomic arrangement as reported in a confirmed polar space group. The primary source of uncertainty in such predictions is the reliability of the underlying structural determination. The candidates include In(2)ZnS(4), TlSn(2)F(5), Cu(7)Te(4), NaMnSe(2), Na(2)In(2)(Mo(3)O(8))(MoO(4))(2), Nb(3)Br(7)S, Nb(3)TeI(7), fencooperite, Bi(HCOO)(3), Li(NpO(2))(CO(3))(H(2)O)(2), LiPtD(0.66) and Ag(3)(MoO(3)F(3))(Ag(3)(MoO(4))Cl). A total of 20 structures examined are likely to be nonpolar, a further 20 have reduced predictive properties and three others are more likely to retain P3m1 symmetry over a wide thermal range. Substantial uncertainties associated with many of the listed 163 CdI(2), 69 ZnS and 10 SiC polytype structures, together with their low potential for use as possible ferroelectrics, led to their exclusion from fuller analysis. PMID:18641444

  3. Crystallographic Tool Box (CrysTBox): automated tools for transmission electron microscopists and crystallographers

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Miloslav; Jger, Ale

    2015-01-01

    Three tools for an automated analysis of electron diffraction pattern and crystallographic visualization are presented. Firstly, diffractGUI determines the zone axis from selected area diffraction, convergent beam diffraction or nanodiffraction patterns and allows for indexing of individual reflections. Secondly, ringGUI identifies crystallographic planes corresponding to the depicted rings in the ring diffraction pattern and can select the sample material from a list of candidates. Both diffractGUI and ringGUI employ methods of computer vision for a fast, robust and accurate analysis. Thirdly, cellViewer is an intuitive visualization tool which is also helpful for crystallographic calculations or educational purposes. diffractGUI and cellViewer can be used together during a transmission electron microscopy session to determine the sample holder tilts required to reach a desired zone axis. All the tools offer a graphical user interface. The toolbox is distributed as a standalone application, so it can be installed on the microscope computer and launched directly from DigitalMicrograph (Gatan Inc.). PMID:26664349

  4. Synthesis, capillary crystallization and preliminary joint X-ray and neutron crystallographic study of Z-DNA without polyamine at low pH

    SciTech Connect

    Langan, Paul Li, Xinmin; Hanson, B. Leif; Coates, Leighton; Mustyakimov, Marat

    2006-05-01

    Joint X-ray and neutron crystallographic data have been collected from the oligonucleotide d(CGCGCG) crystallized without polyamine and at low pH in order to study hydration in the protein-binding major groove of Z-DNA. In order to crystallographically study the hydration of the major groove (convex surface) of Z-DNA, the oligonucleotide d(CGCGCG) has been synthesized. Single crystals were grown by vapor diffusion using the hanging-drop and sitting-drop methods for X-ray studies and by batch crystallization and evaporation within silicon tubes for neutron studies. Hexagonal crystals were obtained without the use of duplex-stabilizing polyamines and at an acid pH. X-ray data collected at room temperature (1.5 resolution; unit-cell parameters a = 17.90, b = 30.59, c = 44.61 ) and at 100 K (1 resolution; a = 17.99, b = 30.98, c = 44.07 ) and neutron data collected at room temperature (1.6 resolution; a = 18.00, b = 31.16, c = 44.88 ) indicate that the DNA is in the Z-form packing in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}.

  5. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of BceC, aUDP-glucose dehydrogenase from Burkholderia cepacia IST408

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Joana; Popescu, Alma O.; S-Correia, Isabel; Fialho, Arsnio M.; Frazo, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) have emerged as important opportunistic pathogens, establishing lung infections in immunocompromised or cystic fibrosis patients. Bcc uses polysaccharide-biofilm production in order to evade the host immune response. The biofilm precursor UDP-glucuronic acid isproduced by a twofold NAD+-dependent oxidation of UDP-glucose. In B.cepacia IST408 this enzymatic reaction is performed by the UDP-glucose dehydrogenase BceC, a 470-residue enzyme, the production and crystallization of which are described here. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121 and contained four molecules in the asymmetric unit. Their crystallographic analysis at 2.09? resolution and a molecular-replacement study are reported. PMID:20208157

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the transport unit of the monomeric autotransporter AIDA-I from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gawarzewski, Iris; Tschapek, Britta; Hoeppner, Astrid; Jose, Joachim; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-10-01

    The adhesin involved in diffuse adherence (AIDA-I) from Escherichia coli belongs to the group of autotransporters, specifically the type Va secretion system (T5aSS). All autotransporter systems contain a C-terminal ?-domain, which forms a barrel-like structure in the outer membrane with a hydrophilic pore allowing passenger translocation across the outer membrane. The passenger domain harbours the biological activity in the extracellular space and functions, for example, as an adhesin, an enzyme and a toxin. The exact transport mechanism of passenger translocation across the outer membrane is not clear at present. Thus, structure determination of the transport unit of AIDA-I could provide new insights into the transport mechanism. Here, the purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the transport unit of AIDA-I are reported. PMID:24100572

  7. High-level Expression Purification Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Crystallographic Studies of the Receptor Binding Domain of botulinum neurotoxin Serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhang; X Gao; G Buchko; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly toxic proteins for humans and animals that are responsible for the deadly neuroparalytic disease botulism. Here, details of the expression and purification of the receptor-binding domain (HCR) of BoNT/D in Escherichia coli are presented. Using a codon-optimized cDNA, BoNT/D{_}HCR was expressed at a high level (150-200 mg per litre of culture) in the soluble fraction. Following a three-step purification protocol, very pure (>98%) BoNT/D{_}HCR was obtained. The recombinant BoNT/D{_}HCR was crystallized and the crystals diffracted to 1.65 {angstrom} resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.8, b = 89.7, c = 93.9 {angstrom}. Preliminary crystallographic data analysis revealed the presence of one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  8. High-level expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the receptor-binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Robinson, H.; Gao, X.; Qin, L.; Buchko, G. W.; Varnum, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly toxic proteins for humans and animals that are responsible for the deadly neuroparalytic disease botulism. Here, details of the expression and purification of the receptor-binding domain (HCR) of BoNT/D in Escherichia coli are presented. Using a codon-optimized cDNA, BoNT/D{_}HCR was expressed at a high level (150-200 mg per litre of culture) in the soluble fraction. Following a three-step purification protocol, very pure (>98%) BoNT/D{_}HCR was obtained. The recombinant BoNT/D{_}HCR was crystallized and the crystals diffracted to 1.65 {angstrom} resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.8, b = 89.7, c = 93.9 {angstrom}. Preliminary crystallographic data analysis revealed the presence of one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  9. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the ankyrin-repeat domain of Arabidopsis thaliana AKT1: identification of the domain boundaries for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Chaves-Sanjuán, Antonio; Sánchez-Barrena, María José; González-Rubio, Juana María; Albert, Armando

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana K+ transporter 1 (AKT1) participates in the maintenance of an adequate cell potassium (K+) concentration. The CBL-interacting protein kinase 23 (CIPK23) activates AKT1 for K+ uptake under low-K+ conditions. This process is mediated by the interaction between the cytosolic ankyrin-repeat (AR) domain of AKT1 and the kinase domain of CIPK23. However, the precise boundaries of the AR domain and the residues responsible for the interaction are still unknown. Here, the optimization procedure to obtain an AR domain construct suitable for crystallization and the preliminary crystallographic analysis of the obtained crystals are reported. The crystals belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 34.83, b = 65.89, c = 85.44 Å, and diffracted to 1.98 Å resolution. PMID:24699751

  10. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of cis-biphenyl-2,3-dihydrodiol-2,3-dehydrogenase from Pandoraea pnomenusa B-356.

    PubMed

    Patil, Dipak N; Tomar, Shailly; Sylvestre, Michel; Kumar, Pravindra

    2010-11-01

    cis-Biphenyl-2,3-dihydrodiol-2,3-dehydrogenase (BphB) is involved in the aerobic biodegradation of biphenyl and polychlorinated biphenyls. BphB from Pandoraea pnomenusa strain B-356 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and crystallized. Crystals were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol 3350 and 0.2?M sodium malonate. A BphB crystal diffracted to 2.8? resolution and belonged to space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 75.2, c = 180.4?. Preliminary crystallographic analysis indicated the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, giving a Matthews coefficient of 2.2?(3)?Da(-1) and a solvent content of 44%. PMID:21045310

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, S. J.; Johs, Alexander; Sawhney, M. S.; Shi, Liang; Liang, L.

    2012-01-01

    The outer membrane cytochrome OmcA functions as a terminal metal reductase in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The ten-heme centers shuttle electrons from the transmembrane donor complex to extracellular electron acceptors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of OmcA are reported. Crystals of OmcA were grown by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant. The OmcA crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 246.0, c = 136.6 A , * = 90, * = 97.8, * = 90*. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 A .

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, S.J.; Johs, A.; Sawhney, M.S.; Shi, L.; Liang, L.

    2012-05-24

    The outer membrane cytochrome OmcA functions as a terminal metal reductase in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The ten-heme centers shuttle electrons from the transmembrane donor complex to extracellular electron acceptors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of OmcA are reported. Crystals of OmcA were grown by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant. The OmcA crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 246.0, c = 136.6 {angstrom}, = 90, {beta} = 97.8, {gamma} = 90{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 {angstrom}.

  13. Crystallographic identification of an unexpected by-product in an Ullman's reaction toward biphenyls: 1-(4-hexyloxy-3-hydroxyphenyl)ethanone.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Veronica E; Baggio, Ricardo; Cukiernik, Fabio D

    2015-11-01

    The synthesis of 3,3'-diacetoxy-4,4'-bis(hexyloxy)biphenyl following the nickel-modified Ullmann reaction yielded a by-product which was identified successfully by crystallographic analysis as 1-(4-hexyloxy-3-hydroxyphenyl)ethanone, C14H20O3. This unexpected nonbiphenyl by-product exhibited IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and COSY (correlation spectroscopy) spectra fully consistent with the proposed structure. The compound crystallized in the orthorombic Pbca space group, with two independent formula units in the asymmetric unit (one of which was slightly disordered), and showed a supramolecular architecture in which molecules linked by hydroxy-ethanone O-HO interactions are organized in columns separated by the aliphatic tails. PMID:26524178

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of PotA, a membrane-associated ATPase of the spermidine-preferential uptake system in Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Kanai, Ken; Murata, Michio; Adachi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2014-06-01

    A membrane-associated ATPase, PotA, is a component of the spermidine-preferential uptake system in prokaryotes that plays an important role in normal cell growth by regulating the cellular polyamine concentration. No three-dimensional structures of membrane-associated ATPases in polyamine-uptake systems have been determined to date. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PotA from Thermotoga maritima are reported. Diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.7 Å resolution from both native and selenomethionine-labelled crystals. Preliminary crystallographic analysis revealed that the crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P3₁12 (or P3₂12), with unit-cell parameters a=b=88.9, c=221.2 Å, α=90, β=90, γ=120°, indicating that a dimer was present in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24915082

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a non-specific lipid-transfer protein with antipathogenic activity from Phaseolus mungo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao Yun; Zhou, Kang Jing; Ye, Xiu Yun; Xu, Zhi Bin; Wu, Jin Hong; Rao, Ping Fan

    2004-12-01

    A 9 kDa non-specific lipid-transfer protein (nsLTP) from mung bean (Phaseolus mungo) seeds, displaying antifungal activity, antibacterial activity and lipid-transfer activity, was crystallized at 297 K using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant by means of the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Native X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 A. The crystals are rhombohedral, belonging to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 38.671, b = 51.785, c = 55.925 A. Assuming the presence of one molecule in the crystallographic asymmetric unit results in a Matthews coefficient (V(M)) of approximately 3.0 A(3) Da(-1), corresponding to a solvent content of about 58%. PMID:15583398

  16. Complete active space second-order perturbation theory with cumulant approximation for extended active-space wavefunction from density matrix renormalization group.

    PubMed

    Kurashige, Yuki; Chalupský, Jakub; Lan, Tran Nguyen; Yanai, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    We report an extension of our previous development that incorporated quantum-chemical density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) into the complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) [Y. Kurashige and T. Yanai, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 094104 (2011)]. In the previous study, the combined theory, referred to as DMRG-CASPT2, was built upon the use of pseudo-canonical molecular orbitals (PCMOs) for one-electron basis. Within the PCMO basis, the construction of the four-particle reduced density matrix (4-RDM) using DMRG can be greatly facilitated because of simplicity in the multiplication of 4-RDM and diagonal Fock matrix in the CASPT2 equation. In this work, we develop an approach to use more suited orbital basis in DMRG-CASPT2 calculations, e.g., localized molecular orbitals, in order to extend the domain of applicability. Because the multiplication of 4-RDM and generalized Fock matrix is no longer simple in general orbitals, an approximation is made to it using the cumulant reconstruction neglecting higher-particle cumulants. Also, we present the details of the algorithm to compute 3-RDM of the DMRG wavefunction as an extension of the 2-RDM algorithm of Zgid et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 128, 144115 (2008)] and Chan et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 128, 144117 (2008)]. The performance of the extended DMRG-CASPT2 approach was examined for large-scale multireference systems, such as low-lying excited states of long-chain polyenes and isomerization potential of {[Cu(NH3)3]2O2}(2+). PMID:25381506

  17. Coordination of Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) Science Working Group (SWG) for the study of instrument accommodation and operational requirements on space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives are to coordinate the activities of the Science Working Group (SWG) of the Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) for the study of instruments accommodation and operation requirements on board space station. In order to facilitate the progress of the objective, two conferences were organized, together with two small group discussions.

  18. Group theory for structural analysis and lattice vibrations in phosphorene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro-Soares, J.; Almeida, R. M.; Canado, L. G.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Jorio, A.

    2015-05-01

    Group theory analysis for two-dimensional elemental systems related to phosphorene is presented, including (i) graphene, silicene, germanene, and stanene; (ii) their dependence on the number of layers; and (iii) their two possible stacking arrangements. Departing from the most symmetric D6h 1 graphene space group, the structures are found to have a group-subgroup relation, and analysis of the irreducible representations of their lattice vibrations makes it possible to distinguish between the different allotropes. The analysis can be used to study the effect of strain, to understand structural phase transitions, to characterize the number of layers, crystallographic orientation, and nonlinear phenomena.

  19. Expression, limited proteolysis and preliminary crystallographic analysis of IpaD, a component of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Steven; Roversi, Pietro; Espina, Marianela; Deane, Janet E.; Birket, Susan; Picking, William D.; Blocker, Ariel; Picking, Wendy L.; Lea, Susan M.

    2006-09-01

    IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the S. flexneri type III secretion system, has been crystallized in a variety of crystal forms using in-drop proteolysis. Native and selenomethionine-labelled data collection and preliminary analyses are reported. IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system, has been overexpressed and purified. Crystals were grown of the native protein in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.9, b = 100.7, c = 112.0 Å, and data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Analysis of the native Patterson map revealed a peak at 50% of the origin on the Harker section v = 0.5, suggesting twofold non-crystallographic symmetry parallel to the b crystallographic axis. As attempts to derivatize or grow selenomethionine-labelled protein crystals failed, in-drop proteolysis was used to produce new crystal forms. A trace amount of subtilisin Carlsberg was added to IpaD before sparse-matrix screening, resulting in the production of several new crystal forms. This approach produced SeMet-labelled crystals and diffraction data were collected to 3.2 Å resolution. The SeMet crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 139.4, b = 45.0, c = 99.5 Å, β = 107.9°. An anomalous difference Patterson map revealed peaks on the Harker section v = 0, while the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a twofold noncrystallographic symmetry axis, which is consistent with two molecules per asymmetric unit.

  20. CRYSTMET -- The NRCC Metals Crystallographic Data File

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.H.; Rodgers, J.R.; Gough, S.R.; Villars, P.

    1996-05-01

    CRYSTMET is a computer-readable database of critically evaluated crystallographic data for metals accompanied by pertinent chemical, physical and bibliographic information. It currently contains about 60,000 entries and covers the literature exhaustively from 1913. Scientific editing of the abstracted entries, consisting of numerous automated and manual checks, is done to ensure consistency with related, previously published studies, to assign structure types where necessary and to help guarantee the accuracy of the data and related information. Analyses of the entries and their distribution across key journals as a function of time show interesting trends in the complexity of the compounds studied as well as in the elements they contain. Two applications of CRYSTMET are the identification of unknowns and the prediction of properties of materials. CRYSTMET is available either online or via license of a private copy from the Canadian Scientific Numeric Database Service (CAN/SND). The indexed online search and analysis system is easy and economical to use yet fast and powerful. Development of a new system is under way combining the capabilities of ORACLE with the flexibility of a modern interface based on the Netscape browsing tool.

  1. Determination of crystallographic intensities from sparse data

    PubMed Central

    Ayyer, Kartik; Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Wierman, Jennifer L.; Elser, Veit; Gruner, Sol M.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray serial microcrystallography involves the collection and merging of frames of diffraction data from randomly oriented protein microcrystals. The number of diffracted X-rays in each frame is limited by radiation damage, and this number decreases with crystal size. The data in the frame are said to be sparse if too few X-rays are collected to determine the orientation of the microcrystal. It is commonly assumed that sparse crystal diffraction frames cannot be merged, thereby setting a lower limit to the size of microcrystals that may be merged with a given source fluence. The EMC algorithm [Loh & Elser (2009 ?), Phys. Rev. E, 80, 026705] has previously been applied to reconstruct structures from sparse noncrystalline data of objects with unknown orientations [Philipp et al. (2012 ?), Opt. Express, 20, 1312913137; Ayyer et al. (2014 ?), Opt. Express, 22, 24032413]. Here, it is shown that sparse data which cannot be oriented on a per-frame basis can be used effectively as crystallographic data. As a proof-of-principle, reconstruction of the three-dimensional diffraction intensity using sparse data frames from a 1.35?kDa molecule crystal is demonstrated. The results suggest that serial microcrystallography is, in principle, not limited by the fluence of the X-ray source, and collection of complete data sets should be feasible at, for instance, storage-ring X-ray sources. PMID:25610625

  2. "I am a waste of breath, of space, of time": metaphors of self in a pro-anorexia group.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carolina Figueras

    2015-02-01

    According to recent research on eating disorders, heavy users of pro-anorexia (pro-ana) sites show higher levels of disordered eating and more severe impairment of quality of life than non-heavy users. A better understanding of how pro-ana members self-present in the virtual world could shed some light on these offline behaviors. Through discourse analysis, I examined the metaphors the members of a pro-ana group invoked in their personal profiles on a popular social networking site, to talk about the self. I applied the Metaphor Identification Procedure to 757 text profiles. I identified four key metaphorical constructions in pro-ana members' self-descriptions: self as space, self as weight, perfecting the self, and the social self. These four main metaphors represented discourse strategies, both to create a collective pro-ana identity and to enact an individual identity as pro-ana. In this article, I discuss the implications of these findings for the treatment of eating disorders. PMID:25225049

  3. Overexpression, purification and crystallographic analysis of a unique adenosine kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yimin; Long, Mary C.; Ranganathan, Senthil; Escuyer, Vincent; Parker, William B.; Li, Rongbao

    2005-06-01

    Adenosine kinase from M. tuberculosis has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in the presence of adenosine. Structure determination using molecular replacement with diffraction data collected at 2.2 Å reveals a dimeric structure. Adenosine kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the only prokaryotic adenosine kinase that has been isolated and characterized. The enzyme catalyzes the phosphorylation of adenosine to adenosine monophosphate and is involved in the activation of 2-methyladenosine, a compound that has demonstrated selective activity against M. tuberculosis. The mechanism of action of 2-methyladenosine is likely to be different from those of current tuberculosis treatments and this compound (or other adenosine analogs) may prove to be a novel therapeutic intervention for this disease. The M. tuberculosis adenosine kinase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the enzyme was purified with activity comparable to that reported previously. The protein was crystallized in the presence of adenosine using the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted X-rays to high resolution and a complete data set was collected to 2.2 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to space group P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.2, c = 111.6 Å, and contained a single protein molecule in the asymmetric unit. An initial structural model of the protein was obtained by the molecular-replacement method, which revealed a dimeric structure. The monomers of the dimer were related by twofold crystallographic symmetry. An understanding of how the M. tuberculosis adenosine kinase differs from the human homolog should aid in the design of more potent and selective antimycobacterial agents that are selectively activated by this enzyme.

  4. Identification of succinic semialdehyde reductases from Geobacter: expression, purification, crystallization, preliminary functional, and crystallographic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Zheng, Yi; Garavito, R. Michael

    2012-04-30

    Succinic semialdehyde reductase (SSAR) is an important enzyme involved in {gamma}-aminobutyrate (GABA) metabolism. By converting succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to {gamma}-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), the SSAR facilitates an alternative pathway for GABA degradation. In this study, we identified SSARs from Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens (GsSSAR and GmSSAR, respectively). The enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity. Both GsSSAR and GmSSAR showed the activity of reducing SSA using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as a co-factor. The oligomeric sizes of GsSSAR and GmSSAR, as determined by analytical size exclusion chromatography, suggest that the enzymes presumably exist as tetramers in solution. The recombinant GsSSAR and GmSSAR crystallized in the presence of NADP{sup +}, and the resulting crystals diffracted to 1.89 {angstrom} (GsSSAR) and 2.25 {angstrom} (GmSSAR) resolution. The GsSSAR and GmSSAR crystals belong to the space groups P2{sub 1}22{sub 1} (a = 99.61 {angstrom}, b = 147.49 {angstrom}, c = 182.47 {angstrom}) and P1 (a = 75.97 {angstrom}, b = 79.14 {angstrom}, c = 95.47 {angstrom}, {alpha} = 82.15{sup o}, {beta} = 88.80{sup o}, {gamma} = 87.66{sup o}), respectively. Preliminary crystallographic data analysis suggests the presence of eight protein monomers in the asymmetric units for both GsSSAR and GmSSAR.

  5. D-Side: A Facility and Workforce Planning Group Multi-criteria Decision Support System for Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavana, Madjid

    2005-01-01

    "To understand and protect our home planet, to explore the universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers" is NASA's mission. The Systems Management Office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is searching for methods to effectively manage the Center's resources to meet NASA's mission. D-Side is a group multi-criteria decision support system (GMDSS) developed to support facility decisions at JSC. D-Side uses a series of sequential and structured processes to plot facilities in a three-dimensional (3-D) graph on the basis of each facility alignment with NASA's mission and goals, the extent to which other facilities are dependent on the facility, and the dollar value of capital investments that have been postponed at the facility relative to the facility replacement value. A similarity factor rank orders facilities based on their Euclidean distance from Ideal and Nadir points. These similarity factors are then used to allocate capital improvement resources across facilities. We also present a parallel model that can be used to support decisions concerning allocation of human resources investments across workforce units. Finally, we present results from a pilot study where 12 experienced facility managers from NASA used D-Side and the organization's current approach to rank order and allocate funds for capital improvement across 20 facilities. Users evaluated D-Side favorably in terms of ease of use, the quality of the decision-making process, decision quality, and overall value-added. Their evaluations of D-Side were significantly more favorable than their evaluations of the current approach. Keywords: NASA, Multi-Criteria Decision Making, Decision Support System, AHP, Euclidean Distance, 3-D Modeling, Facility Planning, Workforce Planning.

  6. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. I. Hubble space telescope/wide field planetary camera 2 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-07-10

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with τ ∼ 5 Gyr; (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs, and dwarf ellipticals can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH (τ ∼ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages >10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z = 2 ranges considerably (80% for galaxies with M < 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉} to 30% for galaxies with M > 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}) and is largely explained by environment; (5) the distinction between 'ultra-faint' and 'classical' dSphs is arbitrary; (6) LG dIrrs formed a significantly higher fraction of stellar mass prior to z = 2 than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies from Leitner and the SFHs from the abundance matching models of Behroozi et al. This may indicate higher than expected star formation efficiencies at early times in low mass galaxies. Finally, we provide all the SFHs in tabulated electronic format for use by the community.

  7. High-resolution neutron crystallographic studies of the hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin

    SciTech Connect

    Jogl, Gerwald; Wang, Xiaoping; Mason, Sax A.; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zöe; Hoffman, Christina; Kratky, Christoph; Langan, Paul

    2011-06-01

    High-resolution crystallographic studies of the hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin have provided hydrogen-bond parameters of unprecedented accuracy for a biomacromolecule. The hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin has been studied using high-resolution monochromatic neutron crystallographic data collected at room temperature to a resolution of 0.92 Å on the original D19 diffractometer with a prototype 4° × 64° detector at the high-flux reactor neutron source run by the Institute Laue–Langevin. The resulting structure provides hydrogen-bonding parameters for the hydration of biomacromolecules to unprecedented accuracy. These experimental parameters will be used to define more accurate force fields for biomacromolecular structure refinement. The presence of a hydrophobic bowl motif surrounded by flexible side chains with terminal functional groups may be significant for the efficient scavenging of ligands. The feasibility of extending the resolution of this structure to ultrahigh resolution was investigated by collecting time-of-flight neutron crystallographic data during commissioning of the TOPAZ diffractometer with a prototype array of 14 modular 2° × 21° detectors at the Spallation Neutron Source run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  8. Variations in Reactivity on Different Crystallographic Orientations of Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; Albrecht, Peter M; Calaza, Florencia C

    2013-01-01

    Cerium oxide is a principal component in many heterogeneous catalytic processes. One of its key characteristics is the ability to provide or remove oxygen in chemical reactions. The different crystallographic faces of ceria present significantly different surface structures and compositions that may alter the catalytic reactivity. The structure and composition determine the number of coordination vacancies surrounding surface atoms, the availability of adsorption sites, the spacing between adsorption sites and the ability to remove O from the surface. To investigate the role of surface orientation on reactivity, CeO2 films were grown with two different orientations. CeO2(100) films were grown ex situ by pulsed laser deposition on Nb-doped SrTiO3(100). CeO2(111) films were grown in situ by thermal deposition of Ce metal onto Ru(0001) in an oxygen atmosphere. The chemical reactivity was characterized by the adsorption and decomposition of various molecules such as alcohols, aldehydes and organic acids. In general the CeO2(100) surface was found to be more active, i.e. molecules adsorbed more readily and reacted to form new products, especially on a fully oxidized substrate. However the CeO2(100) surface was less selective with a greater propensity to produce CO, CO2 and water as products. The differences in chemical reactivity are discussed in light of possible structural terminations of the two surfaces. Recently nanocubes and nano-octahedra have been synthesized that display CeO2(100) and CeO2(111) faces, respectively. These nanoparticles enable us to correlate reactions on high surface area model catalysts at atmospheric pressure with model single crystal films in a UHV environment.

  9. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 subtype C protease

    SciTech Connect

    Coman, Roxana M.; Robbins, Arthur; Goodenow, Maureen M.; McKenna, Robert; Dunn, Ben M.

    2007-04-01

    Crystals of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 subtype C protease complexed with indinavir and nelfinavir have been grown in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} and shown to diffract X-rays to 2.3 Å resolution. Crystals of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) subtype C protease (PR) complexed with the clinically used inhibitors indinavir (IDV) and nelfinavir (NFV) have been grown in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with mean unit-cell parameters a = 46.7 (±0.1), b = 59.8 (±0.3), c = 87.0 (±0.4) Å, β = 95.2 (±0.5)°. The crystals of both complexes have been shown to diffract X-rays to 2.3 Å resolution. The diffraction data for the subtype C PR complexes with IDV and NFV were subsequently processed and reduced, with overall R{sub sym} values of 8.4 and 11.4%, respectively. Based on the unit-cell volumes, molecular-replacement results and packing considerations, there are two protease homodimers per crystallographic asymmetric unit in each of the complexes. The data were initially phased using a model based on the crystal structure of HIV-1 subtype B PR; the structures have been determined and further refinement and analysis are in progress. These structures and subsequent studies with other inhibitors will greatly aid in correlating the amino-acid variation between the different HIV PRs and understanding their differential sensitivity and resistance to current drug therapy.

  10. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a hyperthermophilic adenylosuccinate synthetase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoying; Akasaka, Ryogo; Takemoto, Chie; Morita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Machiko; Terada, Takaho; Shirozu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Chen, Shilin; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Adenylosuccinate synthetase (AdSS) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step in the conversion of inosine monophosphate (IMP) to adenosine monophosphate (AMP) in the purine-biosynthetic pathway. Although AdSS from the vast majority of organisms is 430–457 amino acids in length, AdSS sequences isolated from thermophilic archaea are 90–120 amino acids shorter. In this study, crystallographic studies of a short AdSS sequence from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 (PhAdSS) were performed in order to reveal the unusual structure of AdSS from thermophilic archaea. Crystals of PhAdSS were obtained by the microbatch-under-oil method and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.50 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the trigonal space group P3212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.2, c = 107.9 Å. There was one molecule per asymmetric unit, giving a Matthews coefficient of 2.17 Å3 Da−1 and an approximate solvent content of 43%. In contrast, the results of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analytical ultracentrifugation showed that the recombinant PhAdSS formed a dimer in solution. PMID:22139164

  11. Crystallographic characterization of the radixin FERM domain bound to the cytoplasmic tail of adhesion molecule CD44

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Tomoyuki; Kitano, Ken; Terawaki, Shin-ichi; Maesaki, Ryoko; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2007-10-01

    The radixin FERM domain complexed with the CD44 cytoplasmic tail peptide has been crystallized. A diffraction data set from the complex was collected to 2.1 Å. CD44 is an important adhesion molecule that specifically binds hyaluronic acid and regulates cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions. Increasing evidence has indicated that CD44 is assembled in a regulated manner into the membrane–cytoskeletal junction, a process that is mediated by ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) proteins. Crystals of a complex between the radixin FERM domain and the C-terminal cytoplasmic region of CD44 have been obtained. The crystal of the radixin FERM domain bound to the CD44 cytoplasmic tail peptide belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.70, b = 66.18, c = 86.22 Å, and contain one complex in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. An intensity data set was collected to a resolution of 2.1 Å.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of polyphenol oxidase from Juglans regia (jrPPO1)

    SciTech Connect

    Zekiri, Florime; Bijelic, Aleksandar; Molitor, Christian; Rompel, Annette

    2014-05-28

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a plant PPO exhibiting monophenolase activity from J. regia (jrPPO1) in its active form (Asp{sup 101}–Arg{sup 445}) are reported. Tyrosinase is a type 3 copper enzyme that catalyzes the ortho-hydroxylation of monophenols to diphenols as well as their subsequent oxidation to quinones, which are precursors for the biosynthesis of melanins. The first plant tyrosinase from walnut leaves (Juglans regia) was purified to homogeneity and crystallized. During the purification, two forms of the enzyme differing only in their C-termini [jrPPO1(Asp{sup 101}–Pro{sup 444}) and jrPPO1(Asp{sup 101}–Arg{sup 445})] were obtained. The most abundant form jrPPO1(Asp{sup 101}–Arg{sup 445}), as described in Zekiri et al. [Phytochemistry (2014 ▶), 101, 5–15], was crystallized, resulting in crystals that belonged to space group C121, with unit-cell parameters a = 115.56, b = 91.90, c = 86.87 Å, α = 90, β = 130.186, γ = 90°, and diffracted to 2.39 Å resolution. Crystals were only obtained from solutions containing at least 30% polyethylene glycol 5000 monomethyl ether in a close-to-neutral pH range.

  13. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the mannose 6-phosphate isomerase from Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Gowda, Giri; Sagurthi, Someswar Rao; Savithri, H. S.; Murthy, M. R. N.

    2008-02-01

    The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of mannose 6-phosphate isomerase from S. typhimurium are reported. Mannose 6-phosphate isomerase (MPI; EC 5.3.1.8) catalyzes the reversible isomerization of d-mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) and d-fructose 6-phosphate (F6P). In the eukaryotes and prokaryotes investigated to date, the enzyme has been reported to play a crucial role in d-mannose metabolism and supply of the activated mannose donor guanosine diphosphate d-mannose (GDP-d-mannose). In the present study, MPI was cloned from Salmonella typhimurium, overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni–NTA affinity column chromatography. Purified MPI crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 36.03, b = 92.2, c = 111.01 Å. A data set extending to 1.66 Å resolution was collected with 98.8% completeness using an image-plate detector system mounted on a rotating-anode X-ray generator. The asymmetric unit of the crystal cell was compatible with the presence of a monomer of MPI. A preliminary structure solution of the enzyme has been obtained by molecular replacement using Candida albicans MPI as the phasing model and the program Phaser. Further refinement and model building are in progress.

  14. Protein expression, characterization, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a Fic protein from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Welner, Ditte; Dedic, Emil; van Leeuwen, Hans C; Kuijper, Ed; Bjerrum, Morten Jannik; stergaard, Ole; Jrgensen, Ren

    2014-06-01

    Fic domains in proteins are found in abundance in nature from the simplest prokaryotes to animals. Interestingly, Fic domains found in two virulence factors of Gram-negative bacteria have recently been demonstrated to catalyse the transfer of the AMP moiety from ATP to small host GTPases. This post-translational modification has attracted considerable interest and a role for adenylylation in pathology and physiology is emerging. This work was aimed at the structural characterization of a newly identified Fic protein of the Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile. A constitutively active inhibitory helix mutant of C. difficile Fic was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized by the vapour-diffusion technique. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis shows that the crystals diffract to at least 1.68? resolution at a synchrotron X-ray source. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2?2?2?, with unit-cell parameters a=45.6, b=80.8, c=144.7?, ?=?=?=90. Two molecules per asymmetric unit corresponds to a Matthews coefficient of 2.37?3?Da(-1) and a solvent content of 48%. PMID:24915103

  15. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of LipA, a secretory lipase/esterase from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    SciTech Connect

    Aparna, Gudlur; Chatterjee, Avradip; Jha, Gopaljee; Sonti, Ramesh V.; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan

    2007-08-01

    The crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of LipA, a lipase/esterase secreted by X. oryzae pv. oryzae during its infection of rice plants, are reported. Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is the causal agent of bacterial leaf blight, a serious disease of rice. Several enzymes that are secreted through the type II secretion system of this bacterium play an important role in the plant–microbe interaction, being important for virulence and also being able to induce potent host defence responses. One of these enzymes is a secretory lipase/esterase, LipA, which shows a very weak homology to other bacterial lipases and gives a positive tributyrin plate assay. In this study, LipA was purified from the culture supernatant of an overexpressing clone of X. oryzae pv. oryzae and two types of crystals belonging to space group C2 but with two different unit-cell parameters were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Type I crystals diffract to a maximum resolution of 1.89 Å and have unit-cell parameters a = 93.1, b = 62.3, c = 66.1 Å, β = 90.8°. Type II crystals have unit-cell parameters a = 103.6, b = 54.6, c = 66.3 Å, β = 92.6° and diffract to 1.86 Å. Solvent-content analysis shows one monomer in the asymmetric unit in both the crystal forms.

  16. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the major capsid protein P2 of the lipid-containing bacteriophage PM2

    SciTech Connect

    Abrescia, Nicola G. A.; Kivel, Hanna M.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Bamford, Jaana K. H.; Bamford, Dennis H.; Stuart, David I.

    2005-08-01

    The viral capsid protein P2 of bacteriophage PM2 has been crystallized. Preliminary X-ray analysis demonstrates the position and orientation of the two trimers in the asymmetric unit. PM2 (Corticoviridae) is a dsDNA bacteriophage which contains a lipid membrane beneath its icosahedral capsid. In this respect it resembles bacteriophage PRD1 (Tectiviridae), although it is not known whether the similarity extends to the detailed molecular architecture of the virus, for instance the fold of the major coat protein P2. Structural analysis of PM2 has been initiated and virus-derived P2 has been crystallized by sitting-nanodrop vapour diffusion. Crystals of P2 have been obtained in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with two trimers in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 171.1, b = 78.7, c = 130.1 . The crystals diffract to 4 resolution at the ESRF BM14 beamline (Grenoble, France) and the orientation of the non-crystallographic threefold axes, the spatial relationship between the two trimers and the packing of the trimers within the unit cell have been determined. The trimers form tightly packed layers consistent with the crystal morphology, possibly recapitulating aspects of the arrangement of subunits in the virus.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of a recombinant predicted acetamidase/formamidase from the thermophile Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Guangteng; Huang, Qichen Tang, Youqi; Unno, Hideaki; Kusunoki, Masami

    2005-01-01

    A predicated acetamidase/formanidase from the archaeon T. tengcongensis and its SeMet substitute have been crystallized and undergone preliminarily crystallographic studies including MAD data collection. No crystal structures are yet available for homologues of a predicted acetamidase/formamidase (Amds/Fmds) from the archaeon Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis. The Amds/Fmds gene was cloned and expressed as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli. Native Amds/Fmds and its SeMet-substituted form were purified and crystallized by vapour diffusion in hanging drops at 296 K. The native crystals, which were grown in PEG 8000, belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.23 (3), b = 152.88 (6), c = 100.26 (7) Å, β = 99.49 (3)°. The diffraction data were collected to 2.00 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Based on a predicted solvent content of 50%, a Matthews coefficient of 2.44 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and two main peaks in the self-rotation function, the asymmetric unit is predicted to contain two dimers of the 32 kDa native protein. MAD data were collected for the SeMet protein, but the corresponding crystals display different unit-cell parameters and appear to contain four dimers in the asymmetric unit.

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of KatB, a manganese catalase from Anabaena PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Bihani, Subhash Chandra; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2013-11-01

    Catalases are enzymes that play an important role in the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in aerobic organisms. Among catalases, haem-containing catalases are ubiquitously distributed and their enzymatic mechanism is very well understood. On the other hand, manganese catalases that contain a bimanganese core in the active site have been less well characterized and their mode of action is not fully understood. The genome of Anabaena PCC 7120 does not show the presence of a haem catalase-like gene; instead, two ORFs encoding manganese catalases (Mn-catalases) are present. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of KatB, one of the two Mn-catalases from Anabaena, are reported. KatB was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 400 as a precipitant and calcium acetate as an additive. Diffraction data were collected in-house on an Agilent SuperNova system using a microfocus sealed-tube X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution at 100 K. The tetragonal crystal belonged to space group P4(1)2(1)2 (or enantiomer), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.87, c = 138.86 Å. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis using the Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function suggests the presence of a trimer in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24192374

  19. 36 CFR 1280.85 - What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Archives at College Park is available for use by non-NARA groups and organizations? 1280.85 Section 1280.85 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES USE OF... Archives at College Park, Md 1280.85 What space in the National Archives at College Park is available...

  20. 36 CFR 1280.85 - What space in the National Archives at College Park is available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Archives at College Park is available for use by non-NARA groups and organizations? 1280.85 Section 1280.85 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES USE OF... Archives at College Park, Md 1280.85 What space in the National Archives at College Park is available...

  1. Crystallographic effects during micromachining — A finite-element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shin-Hyung; Choi, Woo Chun

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical micromachining is a powerful and effective way for manufacturing small sized machine parts. Even though the micromachining process is similar to the traditional machining, the material behavior during the process is much different. In particular, many researchers report that the basic mechanics of the work material is affected by microstructures and their crystallographic orientations. For example, crystallographic orientations of the work material have significant influence on force response, chip formation and surface finish. In order to thoroughly understand the effect of crystallographic orientations on the micromachining process, finite-element model (FEM) simulating orthogonal cutting process of single crystallographic material was presented. For modeling the work material, rate sensitive single crystal plasticity of face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal was implemented. For the chip formation during the simulation, element deletion technique was used. The simulation model is developed using ABAQUS/explicit with user material subroutine via user material subroutine (VUMAT). Simulations showed that variation of the specific cutting energy at different crystallographic orientations of work material shows significant anisotropy. The developed FEM model can be a useful prediction tool of micromachining of crystalline materials.

  2. Antibacterial activity of ZnO powder with crystallographic orientation.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Osamu; Iida, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Zenbe-E

    2008-03-01

    ZnO powder with crystallographic orientation was prepared from the mixed aqueous solution of zinc chloride, tri-ethanol amine and thio-urea. From X-ray diffraction measurement, as-prepared powder was found to have the orientation along a-b axes of hexagonal structure, and a needle-like shape with the aspect ratio of 5 was observed by scanning electron microscope, indicating that as-prepared powder had crystallographic orientation. In the tests of antibacterial activity by colony count method, ZnO powders with and without crystallographic orientation were used in present work. Survival ratio of bacteria decreased with increasing powder concentration, i.e., increase in antibacterial activity. The antibacterial activity in ZnO powder with crystallographic orientation was weaker than that in commercial ZnO powder without orientation at same powder concentration. Regarding specific surface area of the powders used in antibacterial tests, however, antibacterial activity in powder with orientation was found to be similar to that without orientation; that is, the crystallographic orientation of ZnO did not affect antibacterial activity. The activity toward Staphylococcus aureus was stronger than that toward Escherichia coli, irrespective of the kind of powders. PMID:17914627

  3. Activity budget, diet, and use of space by two groups of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) in eastern Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Tatyana; Ferrari, Stephen F; Lopes, Maria Aparecida

    2013-07-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.) are widely distributed in the Amazon basin. This study describes the ecological and behavioral patterns of two social groups of S. sciureus in forests adjacent to the Tucuruí hydroelectric reservoir in eastern Amazonia, including range size, activity budgets, and composition of the diet. The groups were monitored at Base 4 (group B4) and Germoplasma Island (group GI). Quantitative behavioral data were collected using instantaneous scan sampling to record behavior, substrate use, and height. Home ranges were delimited using a GPS to determine group position after each 50 m of movement. Home ranges were 75.0 ha for group B4 (39 members) and 77.5 ha for group GI (32 members). The use of vertical strata was well defined, with a marked preference for the middle and lower levels of the canopy. The activity budgets of both groups were typical of those of other squirrel monkeys and were dominated by foraging (B4 = 48.7 %; GI = 49.6 %), moving (both groups 28.9 %), and feeding (B4 = 14.6 %; GI = 12.4 %). Resting was rare (B4 = 3.5 %; GI = 2.6 %) and less common than social behavior (B4 = 4.3 %; GI = 6.4 %). The diet of both groups was dominated by plant material (B4 = 70.7 % of feeding records; GI = 71.4 %), which is in contrast with the more insectivorous diets recorded for Saimiri at other sites. Group GI spent more time foraging during the dry season, whereas group B4 spent more time in the rainy season when the consumption of fruit increased (significantly, in the case of group GI). The less insectivorous diet of these groups may be due to a number of factors, including the unique habitat configuration at the site and reduced hydrological stress due to the proximity of the reservoir. PMID:23546826

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the [NiFe] hydrogenase maturation proteins HypC and HypD

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Matsumi, Rie; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Miki, Kunio

    2007-06-01

    The [NiFe] hydrogenase maturation proteins HypC and HypD were purified and crystallized. Crystals of HypC and HypD suitable for data collection diffracted to 1.80 and 2.07 resolution, respectively. HypC and HypD proteins are required for the insertion of the Fe atom with diatomic ligands into the large subunit of [NiFe] hydrogenases, an important step in the maturation process of this type of hydrogenase. The crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of HypC and HypD from Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 are reported. Crystals of HypC grew in two different forms. Monoclinic crystals of HypC in space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a = 78.2, b = 59.1, c = 54.0 , ? = 109.0 were obtained using PEG 4000 and ammonium sulfate or sodium bromide as precipitants. They diffracted X-rays to 1.8 resolution and were suitable for structure determination. Crystals of HypD were also obtained in two different forms. The monoclinic crystals obtained using PEG 4000 and magnesium chloride diffracted X-rays to beyond 2.1 resolution, despite growing as clusters. They belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.3, b = 118.4, c = 81.2 , ? = 100.9, and are suitable for data collection.

  5. Bifurcation Diagrams and Quotient Topological Spaces Under the Action of the Affine Group of a Family of Planar Quadratic Vector Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerba Diaconescu, Oxana; Schlomiuk, Dana; Vulpe, Nicolae

    In this article, we consider the class QSL4{u +vc+w^c, &boldsymbol; ? } of all real quadratic differential systems (dx)/(dt) = p(x, y), (dy)/(dt) = q(x, y) with gcd(p, q) = 1, having invariant lines of total multiplicity four and two complex and one real infinite singularities. We first construct compactified canonical forms for the class QSL4{u +vc+w^c, &boldsymbol; ? } so as to include limit points in the 12-dimensional parameter space of this class. We next construct the bifurcation diagrams for these compactified canonical forms. These diagrams contain many repetitions of phase portraits and we show that these are due to many symmetries under the group action. To retain the essence of the dynamics we finally construct the quotient spaces under the action of the group G = Aff(2, ?) ?* of affine transformations and time homotheties and we place the phase portraits in these quotient spaces. The final diagrams retain only the necessary information to capture the dynamics under the motion in the parameter space as well as under this group action. We also present here necessary and sufficient conditions for an affine line to be invariant of multiplicity k for a quadratic system.

  6. Talk in Blended-Space Speech Communities: An Exploration of Discursive Practices of a Professional Development Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvin, Tabitha Ann

    2011-01-01

    This study is an exploration of alternative teacher professional development. While using symbolic interactionism for a research lens, it characterizes the discursive practices commonly found in formal, informal, and blended-space speech communities based on the talk within a leadership-development program comprised of five female, church-based

  7. A study of space station needs, attributes and architectural options. Final briefing: Cost working group discussion session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The economic factors involved in the design and utilization of the space station are investigated. Topics include the economic benefits associated with research and production, the orbit transfer vehicle, and satellite servicing. Program costs and design options are examined. The possibilities of financing from the private sector are discussed.

  8. Talk in Blended-Space Speech Communities: An Exploration of Discursive Practices of a Professional Development Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvin, Tabitha Ann

    2011-01-01

    This study is an exploration of alternative teacher professional development. While using symbolic interactionism for a research lens, it characterizes the discursive practices commonly found in formal, informal, and blended-space speech communities based on the talk within a leadership-development program comprised of five female, church-based…

  9. Using Innovative Outliers to Detect Discrete Shifts in Dynamics in Group-Based State-Space Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Hamaker, Ellen L.; Allaire, Jason C.

    2009-01-01

    Outliers are typically regarded as data anomalies that should be discarded. However, dynamic or "innovative" outliers can be appropriately utilized to capture unusual but substantively meaningful shifts in a system's dynamics. We extend De Jong and Penzer's 1998 approach for representing outliers in single-subject state-space models to a

  10. Group-theoretical approach to the construction of bases in 2{sup n}-dimensional Hilbert space

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Romero, J. L.; Klimov, A. B.

    2011-06-15

    We propose a systematic procedure to construct all the possible bases with definite factorization structure in 2{sup n}-dimensional Hilbert space and discuss an algorithm for the determination of basis separability. The results are applied for classification of bases for an n-qubit system.

  11. Structural studies in columnar basalts from crystallographic and magnetic fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiphaine, Boiron; Jrme, Bascou; Pierre, Camps; Eric, Ferre; Claire, Maurice; Bernard, Guy; Marie-Christine, Gerbe

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to better characterize the columnar and the associated microstructure development in basalt flows. The thermal contraction (O'Reilly, 1879) is the main hypothesis to explain the columnar formation. However, neither the structures which appear in basalt flow constituted of three levels (Tomkeieff, 1940) nor circular and radial structures within the prisms (for which weathering nor fracturing can account for) can be explained by the thermal contraction theory alone. An early structuring process during solidification (Guy and Le Coze, 1990) could play for a part that must be discussed (Guy, 2010). We studied two recent basalt flows (75 000 years) from the French Massif Central, in which the three flow levels are clearly observed. In the first basalt flow (La Palisse, Ardche), the emission centre and the flow direction are known. In the second one (Saint Arcons d'Allier, Haute Loire), the prismatic columns are particularly well developed. In order to characterize the flow structure at different scales, from the flow to the grain scale, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements were performed. The AMS data were coupled with crystallographic preferred orientation measurements of magnetite, plagioclase and clinopyroxene using Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and image analyses from perpendicular thin sections. Magnetic mineralogy studies of the La Palisse basalts, in particular the thermomagnetic curves, indicate that the main carrier of AMS is high-Ti titanomagnetite (Tc?130C). AMS measurements of about a hundred samples show a higher degree of AMS (P parameter) in the middle level in comparison to the base. Inversely, the bulk magnetic susceptibility (Km) is higher at the flow base. Distinctive parameters for the different levels of the basaltic flows could be then provided by AMS measurements.. Moreover, the comparison between AMS and EBSD data indicate that the magnetic susceptibility carried by the magnetic grains is controlled by the crystallographic orientation of plagioclase and then related to the direction lava flow. In addition, an AMS study carried out on a prism section shows that Km and P magnetic parameters increase from the core to the rim of the prism. The analysis of hysteresis parameters on the same samples indicates that the magnetic grains are larger in size in the core than on the rim. This suggests processes inducing a magnetic grain size arrangement before the prism formation. References O'Reilly J.P (1879)Explanatory notes and discussion on the nature of the prismatic forms of a group of columnar basalts, Giant's Causeway. Trans. Roy. Irish Acad. Tomkeieff S.I, (1940)The basalt lavas of the Giant's Causeway district of the Northern Ireland. Bull. Volc vol 2, pp 89-146. Guy B. and Le Coze J. (1990) Reflections about columnar jointing in basalts: the instability of the planar solidification front, C.R.Acad.Sc. Paris, 311, II, 943-949. Guy B (2010) Basalt columns: Large scale constitutional supercooling? Comments on the paper by John Gilman (JVGR, 2009) and presentation of some new data, JVG to appear.

  12. A new systematic framework for crystallographic analysis of atom probe data.

    PubMed

    Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Breen, Andrew; Ceguerra, Anna V; Gault, Baptiste; Ringer, Simon P; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, after a brief introduction to the principles behind atom probe crystallography, we introduce methods for unambiguously determining the presence of crystal planes within atom probe datasets, as well as their characteristics: location; orientation and interplanar spacing. These methods, which we refer to as plane orientation extraction (POE) and local crystallography mapping (LCM) make use of real-space data and allow for systematic analyses. We present here application of POE and LCM to datasets of pure Al, industrial aluminium alloys and doped-silicon. Data was collected both in DC voltage mode and laser-assisted mode (in the latter of which extracting crystallographic information is known to be more difficult due to distortions). The nature of the atomic planes in both datasets was extracted and analysed. PMID:25747179

  13. Atomic structure of defects in anion-deficient perovskite-based ferrites with a crystallographic shear structure.

    PubMed

    Batuk, Maria; Turner, Stuart; Abakumov, Artem M; Batuk, Dmitry; Hadermann, Joke; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2014-02-17

    Crystallographic shear (CS) planes provide a new structure-generation mechanism in the anion-deficient perovskites containing lone-pair cations. Pb2Sr2Bi2Fe6O16, a new n = 6 representative of the A(n)B(n)O(3n-2) homologous series of the perovskite-based ferrites with the CS structure, has been synthesized using the solid-state technique. The structure is built of perovskite blocks with a thickness of four FeO6 octahedra spaced by double columns of FeO5 edge-sharing distorted tetragonal pyramids, forming 1/2[110](101)p CS planes (space group Pnma, a = 5.6690(2) , b = 3.9108(1) , c = 32.643(1) ). Pb2Sr2Bi2Fe6O16 features a wealth of microstructural phenomena caused by the flexibility of the CS planes due to the variable ratio and length of the constituting fragments with {101}p and {001}p orientation. This leads to the formation of "waves", "hairpins", "?-shaped" defects, and inclusions of the hitherto unknown layered anion-deficient perovskites Bi2(Sr,Pb)Fe3O8.5 and Bi3(Sr,Pb)Fe4O11.5. Using a combination of diffraction, imaging, and spectroscopic transmission electron microscopy techniques this complex microstructure was fully characterized, including direct determination of positions, chemical composition, and coordination number of individual atomic species. The complex defect structure makes these perovskites particularly similar to the CS structures in ReO3-type oxides. The flexibility of the CS planes appears to be a specific feature of the Sr-based system, related to the geometric match between the SrO perovskite layers and the {100}p segments of the CS planes. PMID:24479580

  14. A 2.2? resolution structure of the USP7 catalytic domain in a new space group elaborates upon structural rearrangements resulting from ubiquitin binding

    PubMed Central

    Molland, Katrina; Zhou, Qing; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    A sparse-matrix screen for new crystallization conditions for the USP7 catalytic domain (USP7CD) led to the identification of a condition in which crystals grow reproducibly in 2448?h. Variation of the halide metal, growth temperature and seed-stock concentration resulted in a shift in space group from P21 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit to C2 with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Representative structures from each space group were determined to 2.2? resolution and these structures support previous findings that the catalytic triad and switching loop are likely to be in unproductive conformations in the absence of ubiquitin (Ub). Importantly, the new structures reveal previously unobserved electron density for blocking loop 1 (BL1) residues 410419. The new structures indicate a distinct rearrangement of the USP7 BL1 compared with its position in the presence of bound Ub. PMID:24598911

  15. A 2.2 Å resolution structure of the USP7 catalytic domain in a new space group elaborates upon structural rearrangements resulting from ubiquitin binding.

    PubMed

    Molland, Katrina; Zhou, Qing; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2014-03-01

    A sparse-matrix screen for new crystallization conditions for the USP7 catalytic domain (USP7CD) led to the identification of a condition in which crystals grow reproducibly in 24-48 h. Variation of the halide metal, growth temperature and seed-stock concentration resulted in a shift in space group from P21 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit to C2 with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Representative structures from each space group were determined to 2.2 Å resolution and these structures support previous findings that the catalytic triad and switching loop are likely to be in unproductive conformations in the absence of ubiquitin (Ub). Importantly, the new structures reveal previously unobserved electron density for blocking loop 1 (BL1) residues 410-419. The new structures indicate a distinct rearrangement of the USP7 BL1 compared with its position in the presence of bound Ub. PMID:24598911

  16. X-ray Crystallographic Computations Using a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attard, Alfred E.; Lee, Henry C.

    1979-01-01

    Describes six crystallographic programs which have been developed to illustrate the range of usefulness of programmable calculators in providing computational assistance in chemical analysis. These programs are suitable for the analysis of x-ray diffraction data in the laboratory by students. (HM)

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic studies of different redox states of the active site of thioredoxin 1 from the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Acevedo, Adam A.; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Rudio-Piera, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a 12?kDa cellular redox protein that belongs to a family of small redox proteins which undergo reversible oxidation to produce a cystine disulfide bond through the transfer of reducing equivalents from the catalytic site cysteine residues (Cys32 and Cys35) to a disulfide substrate. In this study, crystals of thioredoxin 1 from the Pacific whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvTrx) were successfully obtained. One data set was collected from each of four crystals at 100?K and the three-dimensional structures of the catalytic cysteines in different redox states were determined: reduced and oxidized forms at 2.00? resolution using data collected at a synchrotron-radiation source and two partially reduced structures at 1.54 and 1.88? resolution using data collected using an in-house source. All of the crystals belonged to space group P3212, with unit-cell parameters a = 57.5?(4), b = 57.5?(4), c = 118.1?(8)?. The asymmetric unit contains two subunits of LvTrx, with a Matthews coefficient (V M) of 2.31?3?Da?1 and a solvent content of 46%. Initial phases were determined by molecular replacement using the crystallographic model of Trx from Drosophila melanogaster as a template. In the present work, LvTrx was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Structural analysis of the different redox states at the Trx active site highlights its reactivity and corroborates the existence of a dimer in the crystal. In the crystallographic structures the dimer is stabilized by several interactions, including a disulfide bridge between Cys73 of each LvTrx monomer, a hydrogen bond between the side chain of Asp60 of each monomer and several hydrophobic interactions, with a noncrystallographic twofold axis. PMID:23695560

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the ATPase domain of human TAP in nucleotide-free and ADP-, vanadate- and azide-complexed forms.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sita R; Gangwar, Shanti P; Saxena, Ajay K

    2012-06-01

    The human transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) protein belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily and is formed by the heterodimerization of TAP1 and TAP2 subunits. TAP selectively pumps cytosolic peptides into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum in an ATP-dependent manner. The catalytic cycle of the ATPase domain of TAP is not understood at the molecular level. The structures of catalytic intermediates of the ATPase domain of TAP will contribute to the understanding of the chemical mechanism of ATP hydrolysis. In order to understand this mechanism, the ATPase domain of human TAP1 (NBD1) was expressed and purified, crystallized in nucleotide-free and transition-state complex forms and X-ray crystallographic studies were performed. The NBD1 protein was crystallized (i) in the nucleotide-free apo form; (ii) in complex with ADP-Mg(2+), mimicking the product-bound state; (iii) in complex with vanadate-ADP-Mg(2+), mimicking the ATP-bound state; and (iv) in complex with azide-ADP-Mg(2+), also mimicking the ATP-bound state. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected for apo and complexed NBD1 using an in-house X-ray diffraction facility at a wavelength of 1.5418 Å. The apo and complexed NBD1 crystals belonged to the primitive hexagonal space group P6(2), with one monomer in the asymmetric unit. Here, the crystallization, data collection and preliminary crystallographic analysis of apo and complexed NBD1 are reported. PMID:22684063

  19. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working Group Summary. 5: Propulsion (P-1). A. Summary Statement. B. Technology Needs (Form 1). C. Priority Assessments (Form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    All themes require some form of advanced propulsion capabilities to achieve their stated objectives. Requirements cover a broad spectrum ranging from a new generation of heavy lift launch vehicles to low thrust, long lift system for on-orbit operations. The commonality extant between propulsive technologies was established and group technologies were grouped into vehicle classes by functional capability. The five classes of launch vehicles identified by the space transportation theme were augmented with a sixth class, encompassing planetary and on-orbit operations. Propulsion technologies in each class were then ranked, and assigned priority numbers. Prioritized technologies were matched to theme requirements.

  20. A scientific program for infrared, submillimeter and radio astronomy from space: A report by the Management Operations Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Important and fundamental scientific progress can be attained through space observations in the wavelengths longward of 1 micron. The formation of galaxies, stars, and planets, the origin of quasars and the nature of active galactic nuclei, the large scale structure of the Universe, and the problem of the missing mass, are among the major scientific issues that can be addressed by these observations. Significant advances in many areas of astrophysics can be made over the next 20 years by implementing the outlined program. This program combines large observatories with smaller projects to create an overall scheme that emphasized complementarity and synergy, advanced technology, community support and development, and the training of the next generation of scientists. Key aspects of the program include: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility; the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy; a robust program of small missions; and the creation of the technology base for future major observatories.

  1. Investigation of Some Potent Medicinal Plants of N.E.INDIA with Respect to Thermophysical, Chromatographic and Crystallographic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, M. N.; Kalita, Mahendra

    2010-06-01

    North East India is readily available of various kinds of medicinal plants. A lot of studies on thermophysical properties of plant leaves, fluids, stems and roots had already been made[3,4,8]. In the present studies of thermophysical properties, chromatographic and crystallographic properties of specific medicinal plant leaves (Azadirechta indica)A, (Vinca rosea)B, (Clerodrendrum colebrookianum)C, (Osimum sanctum)D and fruits (Chisocheton paniculatus) E, and (Cudrania javanensis) F have been made plant based drugs for curing for different chronic diseases. The thermophysical properties of these leaves and fruits have been studies with XRD, XRF, TG, DTG, DTA, and DSC thermograms. From weight loss(%), time and temperature variations, the Activation Energies of these medicinal plant samples have been computed. The thermal stability is found more for the fruits samples than that of the leave samples. Thermal behaviours of all six samples have shown hygroscopic behaviour. The results TG, DTG and DTA thermograms confirmed that all samples show similar dehydration and decomposition reactions and hydrophilic nature. Both chromatographic techniques thin layer (TLC) and Column chromatography have been used for separation of components of the mixtures of samples. From these methods of the fruit sample E a pure crystalline white solids have been identified and confirm them as (MK 01) ?-isomer. Our interest to study the molecular and crystal structure of the sample E. The single crystal of (MK 01) is found to be orthorhombic cell with lattice parameters a = 10?699(3) b = 15?5100(4) c = 16?626(4) ? = 90 ? = 90 ? = 90 with space group P212121 Again from fruit sample F a light yellow solid is isolated and on crystallization give crystalline solid MN-01 and MN-02 and it is confirmed that these two compounds are unsaturated isoflavonoids. The single crystal of MN-01 has been found monoclinic with lattice parameters a = 6.2374(11), b = 8.4243(11), c = 21.181(4), ? = 96.083(13), ? = 95.602(10) and ? = 107.419(7) with Space group P-1. Again single crystal MN-02 has been found monoclinic with lattice parameters being a = 25.2732 , b = 7.4414 , c = 22.3113 , ? = 90, ? = 93.063, ? = 90, with space group C2/c.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic characterization of TrmFO, a folate-dependent tRNA methyltransferase from Thermotoga maritima

    SciTech Connect

    Cicmil, Nenad

    2008-03-01

    T. maritima TrmFO was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. A diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 2.6 Å. TrmFO, previously classified as GID, is a methyltransferase that catalyzes the formation of 5-methyluridine or ribothymidine (T) at position 54 in tRNA in some Gram-positive bacteria. To date, TrmFO is the only characterized tRNA methyltransferase that does not use S-adenosylmethionine as the methyl-group donor. Instead, the donor of the methyl group is N{sup 5},N{sup 10}-methylenetetrahydrofolate. The crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of TrmFO are reported here. The recombinant protein, cloned from Thermotoga maritima genomic DNA, was overproduced in Esherichia coli and crystallized in 25%(v/v) PEG 4000, 100 mM NaCl and sodium citrate buffer pH 5.0 at 291 K using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. The plate-shaped crystals diffracted to 2.6 Å and belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.94, b = 92.46, c = 127.20 Å.

  3. Crystals of the Arp2/3 complex in two new space groups with structural information about actin-related protein 2 and potential WASP binding sites.

    PubMed

    Jurgenson, Christopher T; Pollard, Thomas D

    2015-09-01

    Co-crystals of the bovine Arp2/3 complex with the CA motif from N-WASP in two new space groups were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The crystals in the orthorhombic space group P212121 contained one complex per asymmetric unit, with unit-cell parameters a = 105.48, b = 156.71, c = 177.84?, and diffracted to 3.9? resolution. The crystals in the tetragonal space group P41 contained two complexes per asymmetric unit, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 149.93, c=265.91?, and diffracted to 5.0? resolution. The electron-density maps of both new crystal forms had densities for small segments of subdomains 1 and 2 of Arp2. Both maps had density at the binding site on Arp3 for the C-terminal EWE tripeptide from N-WASP and a binding site proposed for the C motif of N-WASP in the barbed-end groove of Arp2. The map from the tetragonal crystal form had density near the barbed end of Arp3 that may correspond to the C helix of N-WASP. The noise levels and the low resolution of the maps made the assignment of specific molecular structures for any of these CA peptides impossible. PMID:26323303

  4. Recovery of Crystallographic Texture in Remineralized Dental Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Samera; Anderson, Paul; Al-Jawad, Maisoon

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent disease encountered by people of all ages around the world. Chemical changes occurring in the oral environment during the caries process alter the crystallography and microstructure of dental enamel resulting in loss of mechanical function. Little is known about the crystallographic effects of demineralization and remineralization. The motivation for this study was to develop understanding of the caries process at the crystallographic level in order to contribute towards a long term solution. In this study synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning electron microscopy and scanning microradiography have been used to correlate enamel crystallography, microstructure and mineral concentration respectively in enamel affected by natural caries and following artificial demineralization and remineralization regimes. In particular, the extent of destruction and re-formation of this complex structure has been measured. 2D diffraction patterns collected at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility were used to quantify changes in the preferred orientation (crystallographic texture) and position of the (002) Bragg reflection within selected regions of interest in each tooth slice, and then correlated with the microstructure and local mineral mass. The results revealed that caries and artificial demineralization cause a large reduction in crystallographic texture which is coupled with the loss of mineral mass. Remineralization restores the texture to the original level seen in healthy enamel and restores mineral density. The results also showed that remineralization promotes ordered formation of new crystallites and growth of pre-existing crystallites which match the preferred orientation of healthy enamel. Combining microstructural and crystallographic characterization aids the understanding of caries and erosion processes and assists in the progress towards developing therapeutic treatments to allow affected enamel to regain structural integrity. PMID:25360532

  5. Summary Report of the NASA Management Study Group: Recommendations to the Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Samuel C.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Management Study Group (NMSG) was established under the auspices of the National Acedamy of Public Administration at the request of the Administrator of NASA to assess NASA's management practices and to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA organization. This report summarizes the conclusions and recommendations of the NMSG on the overall management and organization of NASA.

  6. Themed Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Christopher O.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a classroom activity that introduces students to the concept of themed space. Students learn to think critically about the spaces they encounter on a regular basis by analyzing existing spaces and by working in groups to create their own themed space. This exercise gives students the chance to see the relevance of critical…

  7. Themed Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Christopher O.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a classroom activity that introduces students to the concept of themed space. Students learn to think critically about the spaces they encounter on a regular basis by analyzing existing spaces and by working in groups to create their own themed space. This exercise gives students the chance to see the relevance of critical

  8. H-bonded supramolecular assembly via proton transfer: Isolation, X-ray crystallographic characterization and SOD mimic activity of [Cu(dipic)2]2[PA-H]45H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Zafar A.; Khalid, Mohd; Shahid, M.; Kumar, Sarvendra; Sharma, Prashant K.; Siddique, Armeen; Anjuli

    2013-02-01

    The title proton transfer complex was isolated from the reaction of CuCl22H2O with pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (dipic-H2) in presence of 3-amino-1-propanol (PA) under reflux condition. It was thoroughly characterized by FAB-mass, FT-IR, electronic (ligand field), EPR spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic techniques. The complex crystallizes in the space group C1c1 of the monoclinic system. The unit cell parameters are, a = 17.247(5), b = 20.058(5) , c = 15.320(4) and ? = 109.235(5). Extensive H-bonding between the complex anion [Cu(dipic)2]2- and the surrounding cations [PA-H]+ results in a 3D network, supported with additional ?-? interactions of the ligand (dipic)2- neighboring units. The SOD mimic activity of the present complex was also examined using NBT assay.

  9. Working group 4 of the International Standardization Organization - experience of developing standards in the space environment field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, M.

    Over the past few years, space environment standards have been under development in the scope of ISO WG4 activities. This is the first attempt to develop standards of physical phenomena of the natural environment such as galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar energetic particles (SEP), the Earth's magnetic field, the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, etc. The major difficulties associated with the development of such standards is the absence of widely recognized models for many natural phenomena. However, in the case of successful development, such standards can play an important role in engineering estimates, required for spacecraft design. This report will contain an overview of the current status of the standards being developed in scope of the WG4 activity plan.

  10. Theory of electronic and structural properties of materials: Novel group-IV materials and real space methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peihong

    This dissertation consists of two parts. The first part employs existing computational techniques to study the electronic, and structural properties of novel group-IV and related materials, namely, carbon nanotubes, boron nitride nanotubes, and crystalline group-IV alloys. In the second part, we develop a new electronic structure calculation technique based on finite element methods with multigrid acceleration. The computation time of our new technique scales quadratically with the number of atoms in the system i.e., O( N2), as opposed to the unfavorable cubic scaling ( O(N3)) for most existing ab initio methods. Chapter 1 gives an overview of theoretical methods involved in this dissertation. Chapter 2 focuses on the structural properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. First, a new nucleation model for carbon nanotubes is proposed. Second, plastic deformation of carbon nanotube under high tensile stress is studied using a tight-binding total energy model. The elastic limits of carbon nanotubes are found to be higher than any other known materials and very sensitive to the so-called wrapping angle of nanotubes. Chapter 3 is devoted to the electronic and structural properties of novel group-IV alloys formed from CVD precursor. Group-IV alloys have attracted considerable research interest recently. Using the newly developed UltraHigh Vacuum Chemical Vapor Deposition (UHV CVD) technique, group-IV alloys such as Si4C and Ge4C, which contain 20 atomic % carbon, have been realized. The computational time of traditional ab initio techniques such as pseudopotential planewave methods scales at least as O( N3), where N is the number of atoms in the system. This unfavorable scaling limits the number of atoms one can study using these methods to several hundreds, even with the most powerful supercomputers available today. In chapter 4, we develop an O( N2) ab initio electronic structure calculation technique based on the finite element methods with multigrid acceleration. O(N2) scaling is achieved by avoiding explicit re-orthogonalization between eigenvectors, which is made possible by a multigrid algorithm. With these new techniques, we can perform ab initio calculations for systems containing more than 32 atoms on a single workstation (Compaq alpha DS10). (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  11. An alternative to the crystallographic reconstruction of austenite in steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-03-01

    An alternative crystallographic austenite reconstruction programme written in Matlab is developed by combining the best features of the existing models: the orientation relationship refinement, the local pixel-by-pixel analysis and the nuclei identification and spreading strategy. This programme can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. Its applicability is demonstrated on both quenching and partitioning and as-quenched lath-martensite steels. - Highlights: • An alternative crystallographic austenite reconstruction program is developed. • The method combines a local analysis and a nuclei identification/spreading strategy. • The validity of the calculated orientation relationship is verified on a Q and P steel. • The accuracy of the reconstructed microtexture is investigated on a martensite steel.

  12. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Henriques, Alexandra; Graham, Joseph T.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Brown, Donald W.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-11-17

    Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method) is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure maymore » be investigated.« less

  13. Automated identification of crystallographic ligands using sparse-density representations

    SciTech Connect

    Carolan, C. G.; Lamzin, V. S.

    2014-07-01

    A novel procedure for identifying ligands in macromolecular crystallographic electron-density maps is introduced. Density clusters in such maps can be rapidly attributed to one of 82 different ligands in an automated manner. A novel procedure for the automatic identification of ligands in macromolecular crystallographic electron-density maps is introduced. It is based on the sparse parameterization of density clusters and the matching of the pseudo-atomic grids thus created to conformationally variant ligands using mathematical descriptors of molecular shape, size and topology. In large-scale tests on experimental data derived from the Protein Data Bank, the procedure could quickly identify the deposited ligand within the top-ranked compounds from a database of candidates. This indicates the suitability of the method for the identification of binding entities in fragment-based drug screening and in model completion in macromolecular structure determination.

  14. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    SciTech Connect

    White, Thomas A. Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M.; Kirian, Richard A.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  15. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, Alexandra; Graham, Joseph T.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Brown, Donald W.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-11-15

    Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method) is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 10{sup 15} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.

  16. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, Alexandra; Graham, Joseph T.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Brown, Donald W.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-11-17

    Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method) is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of BipD, a component of the Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system

    SciTech Connect

    Roversi, Pietro; Johnson, Steven; Field, Terry; Deane, Janet E.; Galyov, Edouard E.; Lea, Susan M.

    2006-09-01

    A construct consisting of residues 10310 of mature BipD, a component of the B. pseudomallei type III secretion system, has been crystallized. Native BipD crystals and SeMet and K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} derivative crystals have undergone preliminary crystallographic analysis. A construct consisting of residues 10310 of BipD, a component of the Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system (T3SS), has been overexpressed as a GST fusion, cleaved from the GST tag and purified. Crystals were grown of native and selenomethionine-labelled BipD. The crystals grow in two different polymorphs from the same condition. The first polymorph belongs to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.98, b = 122.79, c = 49.17 , a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.4 {sup 3} Da{sup ?1} (47% solvent content) and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The second polymorph belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 136.47, b = 89.84, c = 50.15 , and a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.3 {sup 3} Da{sup ?1} (45% solvent content) for two molecules per asymmetric unit (analysis of the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a weak twofold non-crystallographic symmetry axis in this P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 form). The native crystals of both forms give diffraction data to 2.7 resolution, while the SeMet-labelled P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 crystals diffract to 3.3 resolution. A K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} derivative of the P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 form was also obtained and data were collected to 2.7 with radiation of wavelength ? = 0.933 . The Pt-derivative anomalous difference Patterson map revealed two self-peaks on the Harker sections.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of α-glucosidase HaG from Halomonas sp. strain H11

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xing; Saburi, Wataru; Gai, Zuo-Qi; Komoda, Keisuke; Yu, Jian; Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Kido, Yusuke; Matsui, Hirokazu; Mori, Haruhide; Yao, Min

    2014-01-01

    The α-glucosidase HaG from the halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. strain H11 catalyzes the hydrolysis of the glucosidic linkage at the nonreducing end of α-­glucosides, such as maltose and sucrose, to release α-glucose. Based on its amino-acid sequence, this enzyme is classified as a member of glycoside hydrolase family 13. HaG has three unique characteristics: (i) a very narrow substrate specificity, almost exclusively hydrolyzing disaccharides; (ii) activation by monovalent cations, such as K+, Rb+, Cs+ and NH4 +; and (iii) high transfer activity of the glucose moiety to the OH group of low-molecular-weight compounds, including glycerol and 6-gingerol. Crystallographic studies have been performed in order to understand these special features. An expression vector was constructed and recombinant HaG protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. A data set to 2.15 Å resolution was collected and processed. The crystal belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.2, b = 119.2, c = 177.2 Å. The structure has been determined by molecular replacement using the isomaltulose synthase PalI as the search model (PDB entry 1m53). PMID:24699739

  19. Crystallographic features of magnetostatic waves spectra in ferrite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagaev, V. V.; Tun Lin, Tun

    2015-04-01

    Influence of crystallographic magnetic anisotropy on dispersion laws of magnetostatic spin waves is discussed. Classification of waves spectra in single crystal films of ferrites is given. The scale of magnetic anisotropy influence on spectra of volume and surface types of waves is investigated. The film model with cubic magnetic anisotropy is constructed and expressions for components of a tensor of the effective demagnetization anisotropy factors are deduced. Results of spectra calculation of magnetostatic waves in a film of yttrium iron garnet are given.

  20. Crystallographic texture of light tinplate coatings made in various electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gburík, R.; Černík, M.; Leggat, R.; Vranec, P.

    2015-04-01

    Two electrolytic tinplating processes are currently used in Europe: PSA (based on phenolsulfonic acid) and MSA (based on methanesulfonic acid). The Halogen Process is used in other parts of the world. The electrolyte composition and process parameters affect the electrodeposit and ultimately the tinplate appearance and performance. In order to better understand the impact of electrolyte composition on the crystallographic texture of tin coating tinplate, light tin coatings on single reduced, continuously annealed (CA) tinplate produced in three electrolytes: Halogen, PSA and MSA were analyzed. The crystallographic texture of thin tin coating (<2.8gm-2) was analyzed by X-ray Diffraction and Electron Backscatter Diffraction. The effect of reflow (melting of the tin followed by rapid solidification) and ironing during drawn and wall ironed (DWI) can forming on the tin crystallography were evaluated. Both texture analysis by XRD and EBSD confirmed that all un-melted tin coatings, made in three different electrolytes, contain texture fibers. The effect of steel sheet crystallographic texture was investigated by comparing the tin crystallographic orientation on continuously annealed steel substrate (with α and γ fiber texture) versus batch annealed (BA) steel with a strong γ fiber texture. The main electrolytic parameters, current density and line speed, did not affect the texture formation of tin coating produced in MSA-based electrolyte within the commercial ranges. Un-melted tin coatings produced in the MSA-based electrolyte showed sharper texture than those produced in PSA and Halogen electrolytes. The FeSn2 alloy structure was not observed in un-melted tin coatings; however, it was detected after ironing in the DWI process.

  1. Human 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-ligand complexes: crystals of different space groups with various cations and combined seeding and co-crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.-W.; Han, Q.; Qiu, W.; Campbell, R. L.; Xie, B.-X.; Azzi, A.; Lin, S.-X.

    1999-01-01

    Human estrogenic 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD1) is responsible for the synthesis of active estrogens that stimulate the proliferation of breast cancer cells. The enzyme has been crystallized using a Mg 2+/PEG (3500)/β-octyl glucoside system [Zhu et al., J. Mol. Biol. 234 (1993) 242]. The space group of these crystals is C2. Here we report that cations can affect 17β-HSD1 crystallization significantly. In the presence of Mn 2+ instead of Mg 2+, crystals have been obtained in the same space group with similar unit cell dimensions. In the presence of Li + and Na + instead of Mg 2+, the space group has been changed to P2 12 12 1. A whole data set for a crystal of 17ß-HSD1 complex with progesterone grown in the presence of Li + has been collected to 1.95 Å resolution with a synchrotron source. The cell dimensions are a=41.91 Å, b=108.21 Å, c=117.00 Å. The structure has been preliminarily determined by molecular replacement, yielding important information on crystal packing in the presence of different cations. In order to further understand the structure-function relationship of 17β-HSD1, enzyme complexes with several ligands have been crystallized. As the steroids have very low aqueous solubility, we used a combined method of seeding and co-crystallization to obtain crystals of 17β-HSD1 complexed with various ligands. This method provides ideal conditions for growing complex crystals, with ligands such as 20α-hydroxysteroid progesterone, testosterone and 17β-methyl-estradiol-NADP +. Several complex structures have been determined with reliable electronic density of the bound ligands.

  2. Atoms.inp Archive: Crystallographic Data from GSECARS

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newville, Matthew

    The Atoms.inp Archive is a collection of crystallographic data for use in XAFS analysis. The crystallographic data is stored as atoms.inp files, which contain all the information necessary to describe the crystal, and can be used by the program ATOMS to generate feff.inp files. These files can then be used by the FEFF program [See http://leonardo.phys.washington.edu/feff/] to calculate a theoretical XAFS spectrum for the crystal. This archive exists because it can take a considerable amount of time to locate a suitable reference for a model structure to use for making theoretical XAFS standards. Even then, references sometimes give non-standard or incomplete crystallographic notation that ATOMS has difficulty interpreting. All of this means that getting a reliable atoms.inp file can take quite a bit of effort. It is hoped that this collection of well-documented and well-tested atoms.inp files will eliminate much of the work in creating theoretical XAFS standards from FEFF. [Taken from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/]. The collection currently has more than 200 crystal structures, 2748 data files, and it continues to expand. The collection is related to the UWXAFS Project [http://depts.washington.edu/uwxafs/] and to the work of the Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources (CARS). After searching the Archive, a user may also choose to run the web version of ATOMS software.

  3. Asymmetrical quartz crystallographic fabrics formed during constrictional deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, W. A.; Beane, R. J.

    2010-10-01

    Numerical simulations predict unique quartz crystallographic fabric patterns for plane strain, flattening, and constriction. Multiple studies support the predictions for plane strain and flattening. To test predictions for constriction, this paper analyzes five examples of quartz crystallographic fabrics from a 1-km-wide domain of L tectonites in the Pigeon Point high-strain zone, Klamath Mountains, California, U.S.A. These samples were deformed under greenschist- to amphibolite-facies conditions. Quartz c-axis fabrics are similar to the predicted double-girdle fabrics except that amphibolite-facies samples exhibit c-axis maxima and are distinctly asymmetrical about the elongation lineations. Activation of different slip systems combined with small deviations from pure constriction account for the c-axis maxima, and noncoaxial flow accounts for the fabric asymmetry. The simple-shear component is randomly oriented in geographic coordinates throughout the domain of L tectonites. These data confirm that numerical simulations predict the quartz c-axis fabric geometry developed during constriction for some deformation conditions, and they confirm the quartz a-axis patterns predicted for constriction for the first time. These data also demonstrate that the relationship between quartz crystallographic fabrics and strain geometry is not straightforward, and they indicate that a-axis fabrics may be more useful indicators of strain geometry variations.

  4. Crystallographically uniform arrays of ordered (In)GaN nanocolumns

    SciTech Connect

    Ga?evi?, . Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Albert, S.; Calleja, E.

    2015-01-21

    In this work, through a comparative study of self-assembled (SA) and selective area grown (SAG) (In)GaN nanocolumn (NC) ensembles, we first give a detailed insight into improved crystallographic uniformity (homogeneity of crystallographic tilts and twists) of the latter ones. The study, performed making use of: reflective high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, reveals that unlike their SA counterparts, the ensembles of SAG NCs show single epitaxial relationship to both sapphire(0001) and Si(111) underlying substrates. In the second part of the article, making use of X-ray diffraction, we directly show that the selective area growth leads to improved compositional uniformity of InGaN NC ensembles. This further leads to improved spectral purity of their luminescence, as confirmed by comparative macro-photoluminescence measurements performed on SA and SAG InGaN NC ensembles. An improved crystallographic uniformity of NC ensembles facilitates their integration into optoelectronic devices, whereas their improved compositional uniformity allows for their employment in single-color optoelectronic applications.

  5. Exact hairy black brane solutions in 5D anti-de Sitter space and holographic renormalization group flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acea, Andrs; Anabaln, Andrs; Astefanesei, Dumitru

    2013-06-01

    We construct a general class of exact regular black hole solutions with toroidal horizon topology in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter gravity with a self-interacting scalar field. With these boundary conditions and due to the nontrivial backreaction of the scalar field, the no-hair theorems can be evaded so that an event horizon can be formed. The scalar field is regular everywhere outside the curvature singularity and it vanishes at the boundary where the potential is finite. We study the properties of these black holes in the context of AdS/CFT duality and comment on the dual operators, which saturate the unitarity bound. We present exact expressions for the beta function and construct a c-function that characterizes the renormalization-group flow.

  6. Ongoing Analyses of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes (FDNS) code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco analysis was a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  7. Ongoing Analysis of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco engine analysis is a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  8. High-resolution neutron crystallographic studies of the hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin

    PubMed Central

    Jogl, Gerwald; Wang, Xiaoping; Mason, Sax A.; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Ze; Hoffman, Christina; Kratky, Christoph; Langan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin has been studied using high-resolution monochromatic neutron crystallographic data collected at room temperature to a resolution of 0.92? on the original D19 diffractometer with a prototype 4 64 detector at the high-flux reactor neutron source run by the Institute LaueLangevin. The resulting structure provides hydrogen-bonding parameters for the hydration of biomacromolecules to unprecedented accuracy. These experimental parameters will be used to define more accurate force fields for biomacromolecular structure refinement. The presence of a hydrophobic bowl motif surrounded by flexible side chains with terminal functional groups may be significant for the efficient scavenging of ligands. The feasibility of extending theresolution of this structure to ultrahigh resolution was investigated by collecting time-of-flight neutron crystallographic data during commissioning of the TOPAZ diffractometer with a prototype array of 14 modular 2 21 detectors at the Spallation Neutron Source run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. PMID:21636899

  9. High resolution neutron crystallographic studies of the hydration of coenzyme cob(II)alamin

    SciTech Connect

    Jogl, Gerwald; Wang, Xiaoping; Mason, Sax; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zoe; Hoffmann, Christina; Kratky, Christoph; Langan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The hydration of coenzyme cob(II)alamin has been studied using high resolution monochromatic neutron crystallographic data collected at room temperature to a resolution of surrounded by flexible side chains with terminal functional groups may be significant for 0.92 on the original diffractometer D19 with a prototype 4o x 64o detector at the high-flux reactor neutron source run by the Institute Laue Langevin. The resulting structure provides H bonding parameters for the hydration of biomacromolecules to unprecedented accuracy. These experimental parameters will be used to define more accurate force-fields for biomacromolecular structure refinement. The presence of a hydrophobic bowl motif efficient scavenging of ligands. The feasibility of extending the resolution of this structure to ultra high resolution was investigated by collecting time-of-flight neutron crystallographic data on diffractometer TOPAZ with a prototype array of 14 modular 21o x 21o detectors at the Spallation Neutron Source run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  10. Observation of phycoerythrin-containing cyanobacteria and other phytoplankton groups from space using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy on SCIAMACHY data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracher, Astrid; Dinter, Tilman; Burrows, John P.; Vountas, Marco; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Peeken, Ilka

    In order to understand the marine phytoplankton's role in the global marine ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles it is necessary to derive global information on the distribution of major functional phytoplankton types (PFT) in the world oceans. In our study we use instead of the common ocean color sensors such as CZCS, SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS, with rather low spectral resolution, the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to study the retrieval of phytoplankton distribution and absorption with the satellite sensor Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). SCIAMACHY measures back scattered solar radiation in the UV-Vis-NIR spectral region with a high spectral resolution (0.2 to 1.5 nm). We used in-situ measured phytoplankton absorption spectra from two different RV Polarstern expeditions where different phytoplankton groups were representing or dominating the phytoplankton composition in order to identify these characteristic absorption spectra in SCIAMACHY data in the range of 430 to 500 nm and also to identify absorption from cyanobacterial photosynthetic pigment phycoerythrin. Our results show clearly these absorptions in the SCIAMACHY data. The conversion of these differential absorptions by including the information of the light penetration depth (according to Vountas et al., Ocean Science, 2007) globally distributed pigment concentrations for these characteristic phytoplankton groups for two monthly periods (Feb-March 2004, Oct-Nov 2005 and Oct-Nov 2007) are derived. The satellite retrieved information on cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp. and Prochlorococcus sp.) and diatoms distribution matches well with the concentration measured from collocated water samples with HPLC technique and also to global model analysis with the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM from http://reason.gsfc.nasa.gov/OPS/Giovanni/) according to Gregg and Casey 2006 and Gregg 2006. Results are of great importance for global modelling of marine ecosystem and climate change studies regarding changes in the ocean.

  11. Models for Copper Dynamic Behavior in Doped Cadmium dl-Histidine Crystals: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Crystallographic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Colaneri, Michael J; Teat, Simon J; Vitali, Jacqueline

    2015-11-12

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and crystallographic studies of copper-doped cadmium dl-histidine, abbreviated as CdDLHis, were undertaken to gain further understanding on the relationship between site structure and dynamic behavior in biological model complexes. X-ray diffraction measurements determined the crystal structure of CdDLHis at 100 and 298 K. CdDLHis crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c with two cadmium complexes per asymmetric unit. In each complex, the Cd is hexacoordinated to two histidine molecules. Both histidines are l in one complex and d in the other. Additionally, each complex contains multiple waters of varying disorder. Single crystal EPR spectroscopic splitting (g) and copper hyperfine (A(Cu)) tensors at room temperature (principal values: g = 2.249, 2.089, 2.050; A(Cu) = -453, -30.5, -0.08 MHz) were determined from rotational experiments. Alignments of the tensor directions with the host structure were used to position the copper unpaired dx(2)-y(2) orbital in an approximate plane made by four proposed ligand atoms: the N-imidazole and N-amino of one histidine, and the N-amino and O-carboxyl of the other. Each complex has two such planes related by noncrystallographic symmetry, which make an angle of 65 and have a 1.56 distance between their midpoints. These findings are consistent with three interpretations that can adequately explain previous temperature-dependent EPR powder spectra of this system: (1) a local structural distortion (static strain) at the copper site has a temperature dependence significant enough to affect the EPR pattern, (2) the copper can hop between the two sites in each complex at high temperature, and (3) there exists a dynamic Jahn-Teller effect involving the copper ligands. PMID:26501364

  12. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of GanB, a GH42 intracellular β-galactosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Hodaya V.; Tabachnikov, Orly; Feinberg, Hadar; Govada, Lata; Chayen, Naomi E.; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 is a Gram-positive thermophilic soil bacterium that contains a multi-enzyme system for the utilization of plant cell-wall polysaccharides, including xylan, arabinan and galactan. The bacterium uses a number of endo-acting extracellular enzymes that break down the high-molecular-weight polysaccharides into decorated oligosaccharides. These oligosaccharides enter the cell and are further hydrolyzed into sugar monomers by a set of intracellular glycoside hydrolases. One of these intracellular degrading enzymes is GanB, a glycoside hydrolase family 42 β-galactosidase capable of hydrolyzing short β-1,4-galactosaccharides to galactose. GanB and related enzymes therefore play an important part in the hemicellulolytic utilization system of many microorganisms which use plant biomass for growth. The interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of these enzymes stems from their potential biotechnological applications. GanB from G. stearothermophilus T-6 has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified, biochemically characterized and crystallized in our laboratory as part of its complete structure–function study. The best crystals obtained for this enzyme belong to the primitive orthorhombic space group P212121, with average crystallographic unit-cell parameters of a = 71.84, b = 181.35, c = 196.57 Å. Full diffraction data sets to 2.45 and 2.50 Å resolution have been collected for both the wild-type enzyme and its E323A nucleophile catalytic mutant, respectively, as measured from flash-cooled crystals at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. These data are currently being used for the full three-dimensional crystal structure determination of GanB. PMID:24100561

  13. Crystallographic Structure of the Human Leukocyte Antigen DRA, DRB3*0101: Models of a Directional Alloimmune Respone and Autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Parry,C.; Gorski, J.; Stern, L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe structural studies of the human leukocyte antigen DR52a, HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101, in complex with an N-terminal human platelet integrin {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III glycoprotein peptide which contains a Leu/Pro dimorphism. The 33:Leu dimorphism is the epitope for the T cell directed response in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura in individuals with the {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III 33:Pro allele, and defines the unidirectional alloimmune response. This condition is always associated with DR52a. The crystallographic structure has been refined to 2.25 {angstrom}. There are two {alpha}{beta} heterodimers to the asymmetric unit in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The molecule is characterized by two prominent hydrophobic pockets at either end of the peptide binding cleft and a deep, narrower and highly charged P4 opening underneath the beta 1 chain. Further, the peptide in the second molecule displays a sharp upward turn after pocket P9. The structure reveals the role of pockets and the distinctive basic P4 pocket, shared by DR52a and DR3, in selecting their respective binding peptide repertoire. We observe an interesting switch in a residue from the canonically assigned pocket 6 seen in prior class II structures to pocket 4. This occludes the P6 pocket helping to explain the distinctive '1-4-9' peptide binding motif. A {beta}57 Asp {yields} Val substitution abrogates the salt-bridge to {alpha}76 Arg and along with a hydrophobic {beta}37 is important in shaping the P9 pocket. DRB3*0101 and DRB1*0301 belong to an ancestral haplotype and are associated with many autoimmune diseases linked to antigen presentation, but whereas DR3 is susceptible to type 1 diabetes DR52a is not. This dichotomy is explored for clues to the disease.

  14. Structural features of the void space of hydrocarbon reservoirs of the Middle Ob group of fields (Western Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitdikova, E.; Bruzhes, L.; Izotov, P.

    2009-04-01

    The Middle Ob group of fields is a promising one in the West Siberian petroleum province. Structurally, these fields are located on the western slope of the Vartovsk Arch and are multi-level ones. The young Sortym formation and the Jurassic (J1, J2, etc) offer the best prospects. Their reservoir rocks are represented by polymictic and medium-grained sandstones with argillaceous-carbonate-iron cement. The cement either forms a continuous medium or fills the pores. Optical and scanning electron microscopic studies indicate that these pores are small and are classified as nano- and mesopores. The pore formation is governed by randomly oriented lamellae of clay minerals of various microstructures. The total porosity of such cement zones can be as high as 50%. These pores are well connected. With regard to the clastic component of matrix minerals, the porosity of reservoirs of this type is 8-12%. The presence of such fine-pored cement indicates that these reservoirs can be considered a mesoporous medium. The pore size is comparable to the size of heavy hydrocarbon molecules. Therefore, these reservoirs can be molecular sieves that filter light hydrocarbon fractions.

  15. Space group analysis of Sr1-xCaxTiO3 ceramics with x = 0.20, 0.27 and 0.30 through electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Shahid; Lalla, N. P.

    2007-10-01

    The space groups of Sr1-xCaxTiO3 in the composition range 0.20<=x<=0.30 have been investigated using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron diffraction techniques. Electron diffraction has been used in selected area diffraction (SAD), convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) and micro-diffraction modes to record zero-order Laue zone (ZOLZ) and higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) patterns. For the 0.20<=x<=0.30 composition range there is still controversy regarding the correct space group: P 21/m, Pnma, Imma or I4/mcm. By invoking Rietveld refinement, detailed analysis of CBED patterns containing A2-type GM-lines and comparison between simulated ZOLZ/FOLZ and experimentally observed SAD patterns, we have established that for Sr1-xCaxTiO3 (0.20<=x<=0.30) two types of phase coexist at room temperature. These are the Pnma and P 21212 orthorhombic phases, coexisting with volume fractions of about 40% and 60% respectively.

  16. Bis(4-picoline-κN)gold(I) dibromidoaurate(I) and bis(4-picoline-κN)gold(I) dichloridoaurate(I): space-group ambiguity?

    PubMed

    Döring, Cindy; Jones, Peter G

    2013-07-01

    Bis(4-picoline-κN)gold(I) dibromidoaurate(I), [Au(C6H7N)2][AuBr2], (I), crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/n, with two half cations and one general anion in the asymmetric unit. The cations, located on centres of inversion, assemble to form chains parallel to the a axis, but there are no significant contacts between the cations. Cohesion is provided by flanking anions, which are connected to the cations by short Au···Au contacts and C-H···Br hydrogen bonds, and to each other by Br···Br contacts. The corresponding chloride derivative, [Au(C6H7N)2][AuCl2], (II), is isotypic. A previous structure determination of (II), reported in the space group P1 with very similar axis lengths to those of (I) [Lin et al. (2008). Inorg. Chem. 47, 2543-2551], might be identical to the structure presented here, except that its γ angle of 88.79 (7)° seems to rule out a monoclinic cell. No phase transformation of (II) could be detected on the basis of data sets recorded at 100, 200 and 295 K. PMID:23832026

  17. The redshift-space cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function - I. Modelling galaxy infall on to Millennium simulation clusters and SDSS groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Ying; Weinberg, David H.

    2013-06-01

    The large-scale infall of galaxies around massive clusters provides a potentially powerful diagnostic of structure growth, dark energy and cosmological deviations from General Relativity. We develop and test a method to recover galaxy infall kinematics (GIK) from measurements of the redshift-space cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function ? s_cg(r_p,r_? ). Using galaxy and halo samples from the Millennium simulation, we calibrate an analytic model of the galaxy kinematic profiles comprising a virialized component with an isotropic Gaussian velocity distribution and an infall component described by a skewed 2D t-distribution with a characteristic infall velocity vr, c and separate radial and tangential dispersions. We show that convolving the real-space cross-correlation function with this velocity distribution accurately predicts the redshift-space ? s_cg, and we show that measurements of ? s_cg can be inverted to recover the four distinct elements of the GIK profiles. These in turn provide diagnostics of cluster mass profiles, and we expect the characteristic infall velocity vr, c(r) in particular to be insensitive to galaxy formation physics that can affect velocity dispersions within haloes. As a proof of concept we measure ? s_cg for rich galaxy groups in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and recover GIK profiles for groups in two bins of central galaxy stellar mass. The higher mass bin has a vr, c(r) curve very similar to that of 1014 h-1 M? haloes in the Millennium simulation, and the recovered kinematics follow the expected trends with mass. GIK modelling of cluster-galaxy cross-correlations can be a valuable complement to stacked weak lensing analyses, allowing novel tests of modified gravity theories that seek to explain cosmic acceleration.

  18. Effect of increase in orientational order of lipid chains and head group spacing on non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sutapa Mondal; Bansode, Amol S; Sarkar, Munna

    2010-12-21

    Membrane fusion is a key event in many biological processes. The fusion process, both in vivo and in vitro, is induced by different agents which include mainly proteins and peptides. For protein- and peptide-mediated membrane fusion, conformational reorganization serves as a driving force. Small drug molecules do not share this advantage; hence, drug induced membrane fusion occurring in absence of any other fusogenic agent and at physiologically relevant concentration of the drugs is a very rare event. To date, only three drugs, namely, meloxicam (Mx), piroxicam (Px), and tenoxicam (Tx), belonging to the oxicam group of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), have been shown by us to induce fusion at very low drug to lipid ratio without the aid of any other fusogenic agent. In our continued effort to understand the interplay of different physical and chemical parameters of both the participating drugs and the membrane on the mechanism of this drug induced membrane fusion, we present here the effect of increase in orientational order of the lipid chains and increase in head group spacing. This is achieved by studying the effect of low concentration cholesterol (<10 mol %) at temperatures above the chain-melting transition. Low concentration cholesterol (<10 mol %), above the gel to fluid transition temperature, is mainly known to increase orientational order of the lipid chains and increase head group spacing. To isolate the effect of these parameters, small unilameller vesicles (SUVs) formed by dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) with an average diameter of 50-60 nm were used as simple model membranes. Fluorescence assays were used to probe the time dependence of lipid mixing, content mixing, and leakage and also used to determine the partitioning of the drugs in the membrane bilayer. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the effect of drugs in the presence of cholesterol on the chain-melting temperature which reflects the fluidization effect of the hydrophobic tail region of the bilayer. Our results show contradictory effect of low concentration cholesterol on the fusion induced by the three drugs, which has been explained by parsing the effect of orientational order and increase in head group spacing on the fusion process. PMID:21114267

  19. The use of Fourier reverse transforms in crystallographic phase refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Ringrose, S.

    1997-10-08

    Often a crystallographer obtains an electron density map which shows only part of the structure. In such cases, the phasing of the trial model is poor enough that the electron density map may show peaks in some of the atomic positions, but other atomic positions are not visible. There may also be extraneous peaks present which are not due to atomic positions. A method for determination of crystal structures that have resisted solution through normal crystallographic methods has been developed. PHASER is a series of FORTRAN programs which aids in the structure solution of poorly phased electron density maps by refining the crystallographic phases. It facilitates the refinement of such poorly phased electron density maps for difficult structures which might otherwise not be solvable. The trial model, which serves as the starting point for the phase refinement, may be acquired by several routes such as direct methods or Patterson methods. Modifications are made to the reverse transform process based on several assumptions. First, the starting electron density map is modified based on the fact that physically the electron density map must be non-negative at all points. In practice a small positive cutoff is used. A reverse Fourier transform is computed based on the modified electron density map. Secondly, the authors assume that a better electron density map will result by using the observed magnitudes of the structure factors combined with the phases calculated in the reverse transform. After convergence has been reached, more atomic positions and less extraneous peaks are observed in the refined electron density map. The starting model need not be very large to achieve success with PHASER; successful phase refinement has been achieved with a starting model that consists of only 5% of the total scattering power of the full molecule. The second part of the thesis discusses three crystal structure determinations.

  20. In Vitro Inhibition of Glyoxalase ? by Flavonoids: New Insights from Crystallographic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zhai, Jing; Zhang, Liping; Li, Cuiyun; Zhao, Yining; Chen, Yunyun; Li, Qing; Hu, Xiao Peng

    2016-01-01

    The antitumor pharmacological property of flavonoids is correlated with inhibition towards glyoxalase I (GLOI), a critical zinc-enzyme in the methylglyoxal detoxification pathway. In this study, 16 flavonoids were examined, and only baicalein (Ki of 0.183 M) is identified as a potent in vitro GLOI inhibitor. X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that baicalein chelates with the catalytic Zn(2+) via its characteristic C6/C7 hydroxyl groups. The coordination ability of flavonoids, and therefore their ability to inhibit GLOI, is determined by the Zn(2+) coordination geometry, the rigid skeleton of flavonoids and the geometry of the hydrophobic cavity of the GLOI active site. This structural basis could be useful in predicting GLOI inhibition of other natural polyphenols. PMID:26268338

  1. XAFS and crystallographic studies of Ni(II) porphyrins in single crystals and in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, M.W.; Furenlid, L.R.; Barkigia, K.M.; Fajer, J.

    1996-09-01

    Abstract. Nickel porphyrins serve as models for the active sites of several biological processes. Crystallographic and EXAFS results for a Ni meso-tetrapropyl porphyrin (NiTPrP) yield different Ni-N distances in solution and in the solid state. The Ni-N distances determined by single crystal polarized XAS and X-ray diffraction agree well. Polarized XANES experiments further establish that the pre-edge feature observed in square planar Ni(II) complexes is a ls-4pz transition. The single crystal and solution EXAFS results demonstrate that conformational variations of the porphyrin macrocycle can readily be imposed by environmental and/or packing forces and can thereby modulate the chemical and physical properties of porphyrinic chromophores and prosthetic groups.

  2. Crystallographic phase retrieval through image processing under constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kam Y.

    1993-11-01

    The crystallographic image processing techniques of Sayre's equation, molecular averaging, solvent flattening and histogram matching are combined in an integrated procedure for macromolecular phase retrieval. It employs the constraints of the local shape of electron density, equal molecules, solvent flatness and correct electron density distribution. These constraints on electron density image are satisfied simultaneously by solving a system of non- linear equations using fast Fourier transform. The electron density image is further filtered under the constraint of observed diffraction amplitudes. The effect of each constraint on phase retrieval is examined. The constraints are found to work synergistically in phase retrieval. Test results on 2Zn insulin are presented.

  3. Modeling the evolution of crystallographic dislocation density in crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenlis, Athanasios; Parks, David M.

    2002-09-01

    Dislocations are the most important material defects in crystal plasticity, and although dislocation mechanics has long been understood as the underlying physical basis for continuum crystal plasticity formulations, explicit consideration of crystallographic dislocation mechanics has been largely absent in working constitutive models. Here, dislocation density state variables evolve from initial conditions according to equations based on fundamental concepts in dislocation mechanics such as the conservation of Burgers vector in multiplication and annihilation processes. The model is implemented to investigate the polyslip behavior of single-crystal aluminum. The results not only capture the mechanical stress/strain response, but also detail the development of underlying dislocation structure responsible for the plastic behavior.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of winged bean acidic lectin.

    PubMed

    Manoj, N; Srinivas, V R; Satish, B; Singha, N C; Suguna, K

    1999-02-01

    The acidic lectin (WBAII) from the winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) binds to the H-antigenic determinant on human erythrocytes and to the T-antigenic disaccharide Gal-beta1,3-GalNAc. Two crystal forms of WBAII were obtained in the presence of methyl-alpha-D-galactose. Form I belongs to space group R3 with unit-cell dimensions a = b = 182.11, c = 44.99 A and has one dimer in the asymmetric unit. Form II belongs to space group C2 with unit-cell dimensions a = 135.36, b = 127.25, c = 139.98 A, beta = 95. 9 degrees and has four dimers in the asymmetric unit. Intensity data were collected to 3.0 A and to 3.5 A from crystals of form I and II, respectively. The structures were solved by the molecular-replacement method using the coordinates of the basic form of winged bean lectin. PMID:10089380

  5. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of XometC, a cystathionine γ-lyase-like protein from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, Phuong-Thuy Ho; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Kim, Hyesoon; Jung, Junho; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Gu; Lee, Byoung-Moo; Kang, Hee-Wan; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2008-08-01

    XometC, a cystathionine γ-lyase-like protein from X. oryzae pv. oryzae and an antibacterial drug-target protein against bacterial blight, was cloned, purified and crystallized. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of XometC crystals was carried out. Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight of rice (Oryza sativa L.), one of the most devastating diseases of rice in most rice-growing countries. XometC, a cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL) like protein that is an antibacterial drug-target protein against Xoo, was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. CGL catalyzes the second step in the reverse-transsulfuration pathway, which is essential for the metabolic interconversion of the sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine and methionine. Crystals of two different shapes, plate-shaped and pyramid-shaped, diffracted to 2.9 and 3.2 Å resolution and belonged to the primitive orthogonal space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = 73.0, b = 144.9, c = 152.3 Å and a = b = 78.2, c = 300.7 Å, respectively. For the P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} crystals, three or four monomers exist in the asymmetric unit with a corresponding V{sub M} of 3.02 or 2.26 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 59.3 or 45.7%. For the P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}) crystals, four or five monomers exist in the asymmetric unit with a corresponding V{sub M} of 2.59 or 2.09 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 52.5 or 40.6%.

  6. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the trehalulose synthase MutB from Pseudomonas mesoacidophila MX-45

    SciTech Connect

    Ravaud, Stéphanie; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2005-01-01

    The trehalulose synthase MutB from P. mesoacidophila MX-45 has been crystallized in two different crystal forms and diffraction data have been collected to 1.6 and 1.8 Å, respectively. The trehalulose synthase (MutB) from Pseudomonas mesoacidophila MX-45, belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 13, catalyses the isomerization of sucrose to trehalulose (α-d-glucosylpyranosyl-1,1-d-fructofuranose) and isomaltulose (α-d-glucosylpyranosyl-1,6-d-fructofuranose) as main products and glucose and fructose in residual amounts from the hydrolytic reaction. To date, a three-dimensional structure of a sucrose isomerase that produces mainly trehalulose, as is the case for MutB, has been lacking. Crystallographic studies of this 64 kDa enzyme have therefore been initiated in order to contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis of sucrose decomposition, isomerization and of the selectivity of this enzyme that leads to the formation of different products. The MutB protein has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Two different crystal forms have been obtained: one diffracts X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and belongs to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 63.8, b = 72.0, c = 82.2 Å, α = 67.5, β = 73.1, γ = 70.8°, while the other form diffracts to 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 63.7, b = 85.9, c = 119.7 Å, β = 97.7°. A molecular-replacement solution has been found using the structure of the isomaltulose synthase (PalI) from Klebsiella sp. LX3 as a search model.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of [NiFe]-hydrogenase maturation factor HypE from Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Takayuki; Watanabe, Satoshi; Matsumi, Rie; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Miki, Kunio

    2007-09-01

    The [NiFe]-hydrogenase maturation protein HypE was purified and crystallized. Crystals of HypE suitable for data collection diffracted to 1.55 resolution. The hydrogenase maturation protein HypE is involved in the biosynthesis of the CN ligands of the active-site iron of [NiFe] hydrogenases using carbamoylphosphate as a substrate. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of HypE from Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 are reported. Crystals of HypE (338 amino acids, 35.9 kDa) have been obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.3, b = 45.8, c = 75.1 . There is one HypE molecule in the asymmetric unit. A complete native X-ray diffraction data set was collected to a maximum resolution of 1.55 at 100 K.

  8. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of selenomethionine-labelled KaiC-like protein PH0186 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, Hua; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Tanokura, Masaru

    2007-04-01

    Preliminary crystallographic analysis of KaiC-like protein PH0186 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 is reported. KaiC is the central protein in the circadian-clock system of cyanobacteria. A selenomethionine-labelled KaiC-homologous protein from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 (PH0186; 28 kDa) was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using ethanol as a precipitant. The crystals diffracted X-rays to beyond 2.0 resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The space group of the crystals was determined to be C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 173.7, b = 51.8, c = 97.5 , ? = 122.8. The crystal contains three molecules in the asymmetric unit (V{sub M} = 2.2 {sup 3} Da{sup ?1}) and has a solvent content of 43.5%. Sixfold noncrystallographic symmetry was identified from self-rotation calculations, assuming the presence of a hexamer in the crystal.

  9. Synthesis, capillary crystallization and preliminary joint X-ray and neutron crystallographic study of Z-DNA without polyamine at low pH.

    PubMed

    Langan, Paul; Li, Xinmin; Hanson, B Leif; Coates, Leighton; Mustyakimov, Marat

    2006-05-01

    In order to crystallographically study the hydration of the major groove (convex surface) of Z-DNA, the oligonucleotide d(CGCGCG) has been synthesized. Single crystals were grown by vapor diffusion using the hanging-drop and sitting-drop methods for X-ray studies and by batch crystallization and evaporation within silicon tubes for neutron studies. Hexagonal crystals were obtained without the use of duplex-stabilizing polyamines and at an acid pH. X-ray data collected at room temperature (1.5 angstroms resolution; unit-cell parameters a = 17.90, b = 30.59, c = 44.61 angstroms) and at 100 K (1 angstroms resolution; a = 17.99, b = 30.98, c = 44.07 angstroms) and neutron data collected at room temperature (1.6 angstroms resolution; a = 18.00, b = 31.16, c = 44.88 angstroms) indicate that the DNA is in the Z-form packing in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). PMID:16682774

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Gan1D, a GH1 6-phospho-?-galactosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T1

    PubMed Central

    Lansky, Shifra; Zehavi, Arie; Dann, Roie; Dvir, Hay; Belrhali, Hassan; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T1 is a Gram-positive thermophilic soil bacterium that contains an extensive system for the utilization of plant cell-wall polysaccharides, including xylan, arabinan and galactan. The bacterium uses a number of extracellular enzymes that break down the high-molecular-weight polysaccharides into short oligosaccharides, which enter the cell and are further hydrolyzed into sugar monomers by dedicated intracellular glycoside hydrolases. The interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of these proteins originates mainly from the wide range of their potential biotechnological applications. Studying the different hemicellulolytic utilization systems in G. stearothermophilus T1, a new galactan-utilization gene cluster was recently identified, which encodes a number of proteins, one of which is a GH1 putative 6-phospho-?-galactosidase (Gan1D). Gan1D has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized as part of its comprehensive structurefunction study. The best crystals obtained for this enzyme belonged to the triclinic space group P1, with average crystallographic unit-cell parameters of a=67.0, b = 78.1, c = 92.1?, ? = 102.4, ? = 93.5, ? = 91.7. A full diffraction data set to 1.33? resolution has been collected for the wild-type enzyme, as measured from flash-cooled crystals at 100?K, using synchrotron radiation. These data are currently being used for the detailed three-dimensional crystal structure analysis of Gan1D. PMID:24637762

  11. High-level expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Qin, Lin; Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2010-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly toxic proteins for humans and can cause neuroparalytic disease botulism. Due to the limitations of production and manipulation of holoenzymes, expressing non-toxic heavy chain receptor binding domains (HCR) has become a common strategy for vaccine and antibody development. Meanwhile, large quantities and highly purified soluble proteins are required for research areas such as antibody maturation and structural biology. We present high level expression and purification of the BoNT serotype D HCR in E. coli using a codon-optimized cDNA. By varying expression conditions, especially at low temperature, the protein was expressed at a high level with high solubility. About 150-200 mg protein was purified to >90% purity from 1 L cell culture. The recombinant D_HCR was crystallized and the crystals diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P212121 with unit cell dimensions a = 60.8 Å, b = 89.7 Å, c = 93.9 Å. Preliminary crystallographic data analysis revealed one molecule in asymmetric unit.

  12. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies of NahF, a salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida G7 involved in naphthalene degradation

    PubMed Central

    Coitinho, Juliana Barbosa; Costa, Débora Maria Abrantes; Guimarães, Samuel Leite; de Góes, Alfredo Miranda; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida G7 is one of the most studied naphthalene-degrading species. The nah operon in P. putida, which is present on the 83 kb metabolic plasmid NAH7, codes for enzymes involved in the conversion of naphthalene to salicylate. The enzyme NahF (salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase) catalyzes the last reaction in this pathway. The nahF gene was subcloned into the pET28a(TEV) vector and the recombinant protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli Arctic Express at 285 K. The soluble protein was purified by affinity chromatography followed by gel filtration. Crystals of recombinant NahF (6×His-NahF) were obtained at 291 K and diffracted to 2.42 Å resolution. They belonged to the hexagonal space group P6422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 169.47, c = 157.94 Å. The asymmetric unit contained a monomer and a crystallographic twofold axis generated the dimeric biological unit. PMID:22232182

  13. Arginine kinase: joint crystallographic and NMR RDC analyses link substrate-associated motions to intrinsic flexibility.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaogang; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Davulcu, Omar; Skalicky, Jack J; Brschweiler, Rafael; Chapman, Michael S

    2011-01-14

    The phosphagen kinase family, including creatine and arginine kinases (AKs), catalyzes the reversible transfer of a "high-energy" phosphate between ATP and a phosphoguanidino substrate. They have become a model for the study of both substrate-induced conformational change and intrinsic protein dynamics. Prior crystallographic studies indicated large substrate-induced domain rotations, but differences among a recent set of AK structures were interpreted as a plastic deformation. Here, the structure of Limulus substrate-free AK is refined against high-resolution crystallographic data and compared quantitatively with NMR chemical shifts and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs). This demonstrates the feasibility of this type of RDC analysis of proteins that are large by NMR standards (42kDa) and illuminates the solution structure, free from crystal-packing constraints. Detailed comparison of the 1.7 resolution substrate-free crystal structure against the 1.7 transition-state analog complex shows large substrate-induced domain motions that can be broken down into movements of smaller quasi-rigid bodies. The solution-state structure of substrate-free AK is most consistent with an equilibrium of substrate-free and substrate-bound structures, with the substrate-free form dominating, but with varying displacements of the quasi-rigid groups. Rigid-group rotations evident from the crystal structures are about axes previously associated with intrinsic millisecond dynamics using NMR relaxation dispersion. Thus, "substrate-induced" motions are along modes that are intrinsically flexible in the substrate-free enzyme and likely involve some degree of conformational selection. PMID:21075117

  14. Arginine Kinase. Joint Crystallographic & NMR RDC Analyses link Substrate-Associated Motions to Intrinsic Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaogang; Brschweiler-Li, Lei; Davulcu, Omar; Skalicky, Jack J.; Brschweiler, Rafael; Chapman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The phosphagen kinase family, including creatine and arginine kinases, catalyze the reversible transfer of a high energy phosphate between ATP and a phospho-guanidino substrate. They have become a model for the study of both substrate-induced conformational change and intrinsic protein dynamics. Prior crystallographic studies indicated large substrate-induced domain rotations, but differences among a recent set of arginine kinase structures was interpreted as a plastic deformation. Here, the structure of Limulus substrate-free arginine kinase is refined against high resolution crystallographic data and compared quantitatively with NMR chemical shifts and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs). This demonstrates the feasibility of this type of RDC analysis of proteins that are large by NMR standards (42 kDa), and illuminates the solution structure, free from crystal-packing constraints. Detailed comparison of the 1.7 resolution substrate-free crystal structure against the 1.2 transition state analog complex shows large substrate-induced domain motions which can be broken down into movements of smaller quasi-rigid bodies. The solution state structure of substrate-free arginine kinase is most consistent with an equilibrium of substrate-free and bound structures, with the substrate-free form dominating, but with varying displacements of the quasi-rigid groups. Rigid-group rotations evident from the crystal structures are about axes previously associated with intrinsic millisecond dynamics using NMR relaxation dispersion. Thus, substrate-induced motions are along modes that are intrinsically flexible in the substrate-free enzyme, and likely involve some degree of conformational selection. PMID:21075117

  15. X-ray crystallographic and tungsten-183 nuclear magnetic resonance structural studies of the [M4(H2O)2(XW9O34) 2]10- heteropolyanions (M = COII or Zn, X = P or As)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T.; Tourne, C.M.; Tourne, G.F.; Weakley, T.J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The crystal structures of K10[Co4(H2O)2(PW9O 34)2]??22H2O (1) and isomorphous K10[Zn4(H2O)2(AsW9O 34)2]??23H2O (2) have been determined {Mo-K?? radiation, space group P21/n, Z = 2; (1) a = 15.794(2), b = 21.360(2), c = 12.312(1) A??, ?? = 91.96??, R = 0.084 for 3 242 observed reflections [I ??? 3??(I)]; (2) a = 15.842(4), b = 21.327(5), c = 12.308(4) A??, ?? = 92.42(4)??, R = 0.066 for 4 675 observed reflections [F ??? 3??(F)]}. The anions have crystallographic symmetry 1 and non-crystallographic symmetry very close to 2/m (C2h). Each consists of two [XW9O34]9- moieties [??-B isomers; X = P (1) or As (2)] linked via four CoIIO6 or ZnO6 groups. Two Co or Zn atoms each carry a water ligand. The 183W n.m.r. spectra of the anions [Zn4(H2O)2(XW9O34) 2]10- (X = P or As) confirm that the anions retain 2/m symmetry in aqueous solution. Homonuclear coupling constants between 183W atoms are 5.8-9.0 Hz for adjacent WO6 octahedra sharing edges, and 19.6-25.0 Hz for octahedra sharing corners.

  16. A visual data flow environment for macromolecular crystallographic computing.

    PubMed

    Wild, D L; Tucker, P A; Choe, S

    1995-10-01

    This article describes the integration of programs from the widely used CCP4 macromolecular crystallography package into a modern data flow visualization environment (application visualization system [AVS]), which provides a simple graphical user interface, a visual programming paradigm, and a variety of 1-, 2-, and 3-D data visualization tools for the display of graphical information and the results of crystallographic calculations, such as electron density and Patterson maps. The CCP4 suite comprises a number of separate Fortran 77 programs, which communicate via common file formats. Each program is encapsulated into an AVS macro module, and may be linked to others in a data flow network, reflecting the nature of many crystallographic calculations. Named pipes are used to pass input parameters from a graphical user interface to the program module, and also to intercept line printer output, which can be filtered to extract graphical information and significant numerical parameters. These may be passed to downstream modules, permitting calculations to be automated if no user interaction is required, or giving the user the opportunity to make selections in an interactive manner. PMID:8603058

  17. International summer school on macromolecular crystallographic computing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The School was the seventh in a series of International Union of Crystallography (IUCr) Crystallographic Symposia. The format of the School was formal lectures in the morning, tutorials in the afternoon, and software demonstrations and more lectures in the evening. The full program which left both the organizers and attendees exhausted, reflects the current state of excitement in the field of macromolecular structure determination using the technique of X-ray crystallography. The new and improved technologies and techniques described in these Proceedings are contributing to that growth and at the same time, as pointed out in the paper given by Sussman, creating challenges for the Protein Data Bank (PDB). As the School progressed, the authors were struck by the similarities to events which took place in small molecule crystallography beginning some 20 to 25 years ago. Growth then was fueled by the advent of new algorithms, affordable computer hardware, and good software. So it is today for macromolecular crystallography, but with the added bonus of the Internet which is changing how scientist conduct their research. Flack presented this view as part of his on-going contribution to how crystallographers use the Internet. After presentations discussing structures en masse they returned to the more traditional mode of presentation which parallels the determination of a single macromolecular structure: data collection -- phasing -- model building and visualization -- refinement.

  18. Crystallographic Study of the LUMI Intermediate of Squid Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Midori; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Upon absorption of light, the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin isomerizes from the 11-cis to the trans configuration, initiating a photoreaction cycle. The primary photoreaction state, bathorhodopsin (BATHO), relaxes thermally through lumirhodopsin (LUMI) into a photoactive state, metarhodopsin (META), which stimulates the conjugated G-protein. Previous crystallographic studies of squid and bovine rhodopsins have shown that the structural change in the primary photoreaction of squid rhodopsin is considerably different from that observed in bovine rhodopsin. It would be expected that there is a fundamental difference in the subsequent thermal relaxation process between vertebrate and invertebrate rhodopsins. In this work, we performed crystallographic analyses of the LUMI state of squid rhodopsin using the P62 crystal. When the crystal was illuminated at 100 K with blue light, a half fraction of the protein was converted into BATHO. This reaction state relaxed into LUMI when the illuminated crystal was warmed in the dark to 170 K. It was found that, whereas trans retinal is largely twisted in BATHO, it takes on a more planar configuration in LUMI. This relaxation of retinal is accompanied by reorientation of the Schiff base NH bond, the hydrogen-bonding partner of which is switched to Asn185 in LUMI. Unlike bovine rhodopsin, the BATHO-to-LUMI transition in squid rhodopsin was accompanied by no significant change in the position/orientation of the beta-ionone ring of retinal. PMID:26024518

  19. Crystallographic texture effects in hydroforming of aluminum sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, P.R.; Beaudoin, A.J. . Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering); Mathur, K.K. ); Kocks, U.F.; Korzekwa, D.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The success of hydroforming operations, as well as many other sheet forming processes, depends strongly on the initial condition of the stock material. The stock material may be in a variety of states as a consequence of its processing history. The crystallographic texture may range from a pronounced deformation texture imparted by rolling operations to a cube texture that could arise from recrystallization. Such variations in the texture impose significant differences on the plastic response of the material. To accurately predict the deformations during hydroforming, the effects of the crystallographic texture on the anisotropy of the plasticity must be included in the forming model. In this paper polycrystalline plasticity is used in conjunction with a three dimensional, transient, finite element formulation to simulate hydroforming. The procedure to initialize the starting state of the material in terms of aggregates of crystals is emphasized as it is an essential element in treating work hardened materials. Massively parallel algorithms are employed to interrogate aggregates for the purpose of evaluating mechanical properties and to update their states. Application to drawing of aluminum sheet using the hydroform process demonstrates the ability of the formulation to capture effects such as earing.

  20. Crystallographic texture effects in hydroforming of aluminum sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, P.R.; Beaudoin, A.J.; Mathur, K.K.; Kocks, U.F.; Korzekwa, D.A.

    1992-09-01

    The success of hydroforming operations, as well as many other sheet forming processes, depends strongly on the initial condition of the stock material. The stock material may be in a variety of states as a consequence of its processing history. The crystallographic texture may range from a pronounced deformation texture imparted by rolling operations to a cube texture that could arise from recrystallization. Such variations in the texture impose significant differences on the plastic response of the material. To accurately predict the deformations during hydroforming, the effects of the crystallographic texture on the anisotropy of the plasticity must be included in the forming model. In this paper polycrystalline plasticity is used in conjunction with a three dimensional, transient, finite element formulation to simulate hydroforming. The procedure to initialize the starting state of the material in terms of aggregates of crystals is emphasized as it is an essential element in treating work hardened materials. Massively parallel algorithms are employed to interrogate aggregates for the purpose of evaluating mechanical properties and to update their states. Application to drawing of aluminum sheet using the hydroform process demonstrates the ability of the formulation to capture effects such as earing.

  1. An International Strategy for Human Exploration of the Moon: The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurini, Kathleen C.; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Junichiro, Kawaguchi; Piedboeuf, Jean-Claude; Schade, Britta; Lorenzoni, Andrea; Curtis, Jeremy; Hae-Dong, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) was established in response to The Global Exploration Strategy: The Framework for Coordination developed by fourteen space agencies and released in May 2007. Several ISECG participating space agencies have been studying concepts for human exploration of the moon that allow individual and collective goals and objectives to be met. This 18 month study activity culminated with the development of the ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration. The reference architecture is a series of elements delivered over time in a flexible and evolvable campaign. This paper will describe the reference architecture and how it will inform near-term and long-term programmatic planning within interested agencies. The reference architecture is intended to serve as a global point of departure conceptual architecture that enables individual agency investments in technology development and demonstration, International Space Station research and technology demonstration, terrestrial analog studies, and robotic precursor missions to contribute towards the eventual implementation of a human lunar exploration scenario which reflects the concepts and priorities established to date. It also serves to create opportunities for partnerships that will support evolution of this concept and its eventual realization. The ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration (commonly referred to as the lunar gPoD) reflects the agency commitments to finding an effective balance between conducting important scientific investigations of and from the moon, as well as demonstrating and mastering the technologies and capabilities to send humans farther into the Solar System. The lunar gPoD begins with a robust robotic precursor phase that demonstrates technologies and capabilities considered important for the success of the campaign. Robotic missions will inform the human missions and buy down risks. Human exploration will start with a thorough scientific investigation of the polar region while allowing the ability to demonstrate and validate the systems needed to take humans on more ambitious lunar exploration excursions. The ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration serves as a model for future cooperation and is documented in a summary report and a comprehensive document that also describes the collaborative international process that led to its development. ISECG plans to continue with architecture studies such as this to examine an open transportation architecture and other destinations, with expanded participation from ISECG agencies, as it works to inform international partnerships and advance the Global Exploration Strategy.

  2. Differences in the chemical and catalytic characteristics of two crystallographically 'identical' enzyme catalytic sites. Characterization of actinidin and papain by a combination of pH-dependent substrate catalysis kinetics and reactivity probe studies targeted on the catalytic-site thiol group and its immediate microenvironment.

    PubMed Central

    Salih, E; Malthouse, J P; Kowlessur, D; Jarvis, M; O'Driscoll, M; Brocklehurst, K

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of actinidin (EC 3.4.22.14) and papain (EC 3.4.22.2), two cysteine proteinases whose catalytic-site regions appear to superimpose to a degree that approaches atomic co-ordinate accuracy of both crystal structures, were evaluated by determining (a) the pH-dependence in acid media of the acylation process of the catalytic act (k+2/Ks) using N alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine p-nitroanilide (L-Bz-Arg-Nan) as substrate and (b) the sensitivity of the reactivity of the catalytic-site thiol group and its pH-dependence to structural change in small, thiol-specific, two-protonic-state reactivity probes (2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide and methyl 2-pyridyl disulphide) where enzyme-probe contacts should be restricted to areas close to the catalytic site. Distortion of the catalytic sites of the two enzymes at pH less than 4 was evaluated over time-scales appropriate for both stopped-flow reactivity probe kinetics (less than or equal to 1-2 s) and steady-state substrate catalysis kinetics (3-5 min) by using the 2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide monocation as a titrant for non-distorted catalytic sites. This permitted a lower pH limit to be defined for valid kinetic analysis of both types. The behaviour of the enzymes at pH less than 4 requires a kinetic model in which the apparently biomolecular reaction of enzyme with probe reagent is separated from the process leading to loss of conformational integrity by a potentially reversible step. The acylation of actinidin with L-Bz-Arg-Nan in acidic media occurs in two protonic states, one produced by raising the pH across pKa less than 4 which probably characterizes the formation of -S-/-ImH+ ion pair (pKa approx. 3) and the other, of higher reactivity, produced by raising the pH across pKa 5.5, which may characterize rearrangement of catalytic-site geometry. The pH-dependence of the acylation of papain by L-Bz-Arg-Nan is quite different and is not influenced by protonic dissociation with pKa values in the range 5-6. The earlier conclusion that the acylation of papain depends on two protonic dissociations each with pKa approx. 4 was confirmed. This argument is now more firmly based because titration with 2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide permits the loss of conformational integrity to be taken into account in the analysis of the kinetic data at very low pH. Methyl 2-pyridyl disulphide was synthesized by reaction of pyridine-2-thione with methyl methanethiolsulphonate and its pKa at I = 0.1 was determined by spectral analysis at 307 nm to be 2.8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2825655

  3. Differences in the chemical and catalytic characteristics of two crystallographically 'identical' enzyme catalytic sites. Characterization of actinidin and papain by a combination of pH-dependent substrate catalysis kinetics and reactivity probe studies targeted on the catalytic-site thiol group and its immediate microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Salih, E; Malthouse, J P; Kowlessur, D; Jarvis, M; O'Driscoll, M; Brocklehurst, K

    1987-10-01

    The characteristics of actinidin (EC 3.4.22.14) and papain (EC 3.4.22.2), two cysteine proteinases whose catalytic-site regions appear to superimpose to a degree that approaches atomic co-ordinate accuracy of both crystal structures, were evaluated by determining (a) the pH-dependence in acid media of the acylation process of the catalytic act (k+2/Ks) using N alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine p-nitroanilide (L-Bz-Arg-Nan) as substrate and (b) the sensitivity of the reactivity of the catalytic-site thiol group and its pH-dependence to structural change in small, thiol-specific, two-protonic-state reactivity probes (2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide and methyl 2-pyridyl disulphide) where enzyme-probe contacts should be restricted to areas close to the catalytic site. Distortion of the catalytic sites of the two enzymes at pH less than 4 was evaluated over time-scales appropriate for both stopped-flow reactivity probe kinetics (less than or equal to 1-2 s) and steady-state substrate catalysis kinetics (3-5 min) by using the 2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide monocation as a titrant for non-distorted catalytic sites. This permitted a lower pH limit to be defined for valid kinetic analysis of both types. The behaviour of the enzymes at pH less than 4 requires a kinetic model in which the apparently biomolecular reaction of enzyme with probe reagent is separated from the process leading to loss of conformational integrity by a potentially reversible step. The acylation of actinidin with L-Bz-Arg-Nan in acidic media occurs in two protonic states, one produced by raising the pH across pKa less than 4 which probably characterizes the formation of -S-/-ImH+ ion pair (pKa approx. 3) and the other, of higher reactivity, produced by raising the pH across pKa 5.5, which may characterize rearrangement of catalytic-site geometry. The pH-dependence of the acylation of papain by L-Bz-Arg-Nan is quite different and is not influenced by protonic dissociation with pKa values in the range 5-6. The earlier conclusion that the acylation of papain depends on two protonic dissociations each with pKa approx. 4 was confirmed. This argument is now more firmly based because titration with 2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide permits the loss of conformational integrity to be taken into account in the analysis of the kinetic data at very low pH. Methyl 2-pyridyl disulphide was synthesized by reaction of pyridine-2-thione with methyl methanethiolsulphonate and its pKa at I = 0.1 was determined by spectral analysis at 307 nm to be 2.8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2825655

  4. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of a plant pathogenic factor: pectate lyase.

    PubMed

    Kim, C Y; Mosser, V; Keen, N; Jurnak, F

    1989-07-20

    Pectate lyase is a saccharide-binding enzyme that lyitically depolymerizes polypectate in higher plant cell walls, thus causing soft-rot diseases in food crops. A pectate lyase from Erwinia chrysanthemi, EC16 (PLe), crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with unit cell dimension of a = 39.0 A, b = 91.0 A and c = 103.4 A. The asymmetric unit consists of one molecule with a molecular mass of 38,118 daltons and the X-ray diffraction extends to a resolution of 1.8 A. The crystals reproducibly grow to large dimensions and are suitable for a high-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis. PMID:2769765

  5. Preliminary crystallographic examination of a novel fungal lysozyme from Chalaropsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; He, Xiao-Min; Lyne, James E.; Stubbs, Gerald; Hash, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The lysozyme from the fungus of the Chalaropsis species has been crystallized. This lysozyme displays no sequence homology with avian, phage, or mammalian lysozymes, however, preliminary studies indicate significant sequence homology with the bacterial lysozyme from Streptomyces. Both enzymes are unusual in possessing beta-1,4-N-acetylmuramidase and beta-1,4-N,6-O-diacetylmuramidase activity. The crystals grow from solutions of ammonium sulfate during growth periods from several months to a year. The space group is P2(1)2(1)2(1) with a = 34.0 A, b = 42.6 A, c = 122.1 A. Preliminary data indicate that there is 1 molecule/asymmetric unit.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of manganese lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Wennman, Anneli; Oliw, Ernst H.; Karkehabadi, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Lipoxygenases constitute a family of nonhaem metal enzymes with catalytic iron or, occasionally, catalytic manganese. Lipoxygenases oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids with position specificity and stereospecificity to hydroperoxides, which contribute to inflammation and the development of cancer. Little is known about the structural differences between lipoxygenases with Fe or Mn and the metal-selection mechanism. A Pichia pastoris expression system was used for the production of the manganese lipoxygenase of the take-all fungus of wheat, Gaeumannomyces graminis. The active enzyme was treated with α-mannosidase, purified to apparent homogeneity and subjected to crystal screening and X-ray diffraction. The crystals diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 226.6, b = 50.6, c = 177.92 Å, β = 91.70°. PMID:24699754

  7. Crystallographic studies of aspartate racemase from Lactobacillus sakei NBRC 15893.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tomomi; Yamauchi, Takae; Ishiyama, Makoto; Gogami, Yoshitaka; Oikawa, Tadao; Hata, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    Aspartate racemase catalyzes the interconversion between L-aspartate and D-aspartate and belongs to the PLP-independent racemases. The enzyme from the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus sakei NBRC 15893, isolated from kimoto, is considered to be involved in D-aspartate synthesis during the brewing process of Japanese sake at low temperatures. The enzyme was crystallized at 293?K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using 25%(v/v) PEG MME 550, 5%(v/v) 2-propanol. The crystal belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 104.68, c = 97.29?, and diffracted to 2.6? resolution. Structure determination is under way. PMID:26249691

  8. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of sugar cane phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, H. B.; Sculaccio, S. A.; Thiemann, O. H.; Oliva, G.

    2005-01-01

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthases (PRS; EC 2.7.6.1) are enzymes that are of central importance in several metabolic pathways in all cells. The sugar cane PRS enzyme contains 328 amino acids with a molecular weight of 36.6?kDa and represents the first plant PRS to be crystallized, as well as the first phosphate-independent PRS to be studied in molecular detail. Sugar cane PRS was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Using X-ray diffraction experiments it was determined that the crystals belong to the orthorhombic system, with space group P21212 and unit-cell parameters a = 213.2, b = 152.6, c = 149.3?. The crystals diffract to a maximum resolution of 3.3? and a complete data set to 3.5? resolution was collected and analysed. PMID:16508088

  9. Crystallographic and CD probing of ligand-induced conformational changes in a plant PR-10 protein.

    PubMed

    ?liwiak, Joanna; Dolot, Rafa?; Michalska, Karolina; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Bujacz, Grzegorz; Sikorski, Micha?; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10) proteins are a family of abundant proteins initially identified as elements of the plant defense system. The key structural feature suggesting PR-10 functionality is a huge hydrophobic cavity created in the protein interior by a scaffold composed of an extended ?-sheet wrapped around a long and flexible C-terminal ?-helix. Several crystallographic and NMR studies have shown that the cavity can accommodate a variety of small molecule ligands, including phytohormones. The article describes ?1.3 resolution crystal structures of a Lupinus luteus PR-10 isoform LlPR-10.1A, in its free form and in complex with trans-zeatin, a naturally occurring plant hormone belonging to the cytokinin group. Moreover we present the structure of the same protein where the saturation with zeatin is not complete. This set of three crystal structures allows us to track the structural adaptation of the protein upon trans-zeatin docking, as well as the sequence of the ligand-binding events, step-by-step. In addition, titration of LlPR-10.1A with trans-zeatin monitored in solution by CD spectra, confirmed the pattern of structural adaptations deduced from the crystallographic studies. The ligand-biding mode shows no similarity to other zeatin complexes of PR-10 proteins. The present work, which describes the first atomic models of the same PR-10 protein with and without a physiological ligand, reveals that the conformation of LlPR-10.1A undergoes a significant structural rearrangement upon trans-zeatin binding. PMID:26644353

  10. Automated crystallographic system for high-throughput protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Brunzelle, Joseph S; Shafaee, Padram; Yang, Xiaojing; Weigand, Steve; Ren, Zhong; Anderson, Wayne F

    2003-07-01

    High-throughput structural genomic efforts require software that is highly automated, distributive and requires minimal user intervention to determine protein structures. Preliminary experiments were set up to test whether automated scripts could utilize a minimum set of input parameters and produce a set of initial protein coordinates. From this starting point, a highly distributive system was developed that could determine macromolecular structures at a high throughput rate, warehouse and harvest the associated data. The system uses a web interface to obtain input data and display results. It utilizes a relational database to store the initial data needed to start the structure-determination process as well as generated data. A distributive program interface administers the crystallographic programs which determine protein structures. Using a test set of 19 protein targets, 79% were determined automatically. PMID:12832756

  11. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    PubMed Central

    White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M.; Kirian, Richard A.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-01-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the serial crystallography methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam. PMID:23793149

  12. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources.

    PubMed

    White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M; Kirian, Richard A; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Chapman, Henry N

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the `serial crystallography' methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam. PMID:23793149

  13. Sharing electronic structure and crystallographic data with ETSF_IO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliste, D.; Pouillon, Y.; Verstraete, M. J.; Olevano, V.; Gonze, X.

    2008-11-01

    We present a library of routines whose main goal is to read and write exchangeable files (NetCDF file format) storing electronic structure and crystallographic information. It is based on the specification agreed inside the European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF). Accordingly, this library is nicknamed ETSF_IO. The purpose of this article is to give both an overview of the ETSF_IO library and a closer look at its usage. ETSF_IO is designed to be robust and easy to use, close to Fortran read and write routines. To facilitate its adoption, a complete documentation of the input and output arguments of the routines is available in the package, as well as six tutorials explaining in detail various possible uses of the library routines. Catalogue identifier: AEBG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBG_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Gnu Lesser General Public License No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 63 156 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 363 390 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 Computer: All systems with a Fortran95 compiler Operating system: All systems with a Fortran95 compiler Classification: 7.3, 8 External routines: NetCDF, http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/software/netcdf Nature of problem: Store and exchange electronic structure data and crystallographic data independently of the computational platform, language and generating software Solution method: Implement a library based both on NetCDF file format and an open specification (http://etsf.eu/index.php?page=standardization)

  14. Ocean acidification reduces the crystallographic control in juvenile mussel shells.

    PubMed

    Fitzer, Susan C; Cusack, Maggie; Phoenix, Vernon R; Kamenos, Nicholas A

    2014-10-01

    Global climate change threatens the oceans as anthropogenic carbon dioxide causes ocean acidification and reduced carbonate saturation. Future projections indicate under saturation of aragonite, and potentially calcite, in the oceans by 2100. Calcifying organisms are those most at risk from such ocean acidification, as carbonate is vital in the biomineralisation of their calcium carbonate protective shells. This study highlights the importance of multi-generational studies to investigate how marine organisms can potentially adapt to future projected global climate change. Mytilus edulis is an economically important marine calcifier vulnerable to decreasing carbonate saturation as their shells comprise two calcium carbonate polymorphs: aragonite and calcite. M. edulis specimens were cultured under current and projected pCO2 (380, 550, 750 and 1000μatm), following 6months of experimental culture, adults produced second generation juvenile mussels. Juvenile mussel shells were examined for structural and crystallographic orientation of aragonite and calcite. At 1000μatm pCO2, juvenile mussels spawned and grown under this high pCO2 do not produce aragonite which is more vulnerable to carbonate under-saturation than calcite. Calcite and aragonite were produced at 380, 550 and 750μatm pCO2. Electron back scatter diffraction analyses reveal less constraint in crystallographic orientation with increased pCO2. Shell formation is maintained, although the nacre crystals appear corroded and crystals are not so closely layered together. The differences in ultrastructure and crystallography in shells formed by juveniles spawned from adults in high pCO2 conditions may prove instrumental in their ability to survive ocean acidification. PMID:25180664

  15. A Practical Method of Solving Cutoff Coulomb Problems in Momentum Space --- Application to the Lippmann-Schwinger Resonating-Group Method and the pd Elastic Scattering ---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Fukukawa, K.

    2012-08-01

    A practical method of solving cutoff Coulomb problems of two-cluster systems in momentum space is given. When a sharply cut-off Coulomb force with a cutoff radius ? is introduced at the level of constituent particles, the two-cluster direct potential of the Coulomb force becomes in general a local screened Coulomb potential. The asymptotic Hamiltonian yields two types of asymptotic waves; one is an approximate Coulomb wave with ? in the middle-range region, and the other a free (no-Coulomb) wave in the longest-range region. The constant Wronskians of this Hamiltonian can be calculated in either region. We can evaluate the Coulomb-modified nuclear phase shifts for the screened Coulomb problem using the matching condition proposed by Vincent and Phatak for the sharply cut-off Coulomb problem. We apply this method first to an exactly solvable model of the ? ? scattering with the Ali-Bodmer potential and confirm that a complete solution is obtained with a finite ?. The stability of nuclear phase shifts with respect to the change in ? within some appropriate range is demonstrated in the ? ? resonating-group method (RGM) calculation using the Minnesota three-range force. An application to the pd elastic scattering is also discussed.

  16. Similar quartz crystallographic textures in rocks of continental earth's crust (by neutron diffraction data): III. Relation of quartz texture types with means and conditions of texture formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, A. N. Ivankina, T. I.; Ullemeyer, K.; Vasin, R. N.

    2008-09-15

    Examples of different rocks collected in different regions of the continental earth's crust are presented. Groups of quartz crystallographic textures of the same type are selected for these rocks. The relationship between the types of textures and the physical means and conditions of their formation is analyzed. The effect of the {alpha}-{beta} phase transition in quartz on the texture transformations in rocks is considered.

  17. X-ray crystallographic analysis of inhibition of endothiapepsin by cyclohexyl renin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J; Quail, W; Frazao, C; Foundling, S I; Blundell, T L; Humblet, C; Lunney, E A; Lowther, W T; Dunn, B M

    1992-09-01

    The crystal structures of endothiapepsin, a fungal aspartic proteinase (EC 3.4.23.6), cocrystallized with two oligopeptide renin inhibitors, PD125967 and PD125754, have been determined at 2.0-A resolution and refined to R-factors of 0.143 and 0.153, respectively. These inhibitors, which are of the hydroxyethylene and statine types, respectively, possess a cyclohexylalanine side chain at P1 and have interesting functionalities at the P3 position which, until now, have not been subjected to crystallographic analysis. PD125967 has a bis(1-naphthylmethyl)acetyl residue at P3, and PD125754 possesses a hydroxyethylene analogue of the P3-P2 peptide bond for proteolytic stability. The structures reveal that the S3 pocket accommodates one naphthyl ring with conformational changes of the Asp 77 and Asp 114 side chains, the other naphthyl group residing in the S4 region. The P3-P2 hydroxyethylene analogue of PD125754 forms a hydrogen bond with the NH of Thr 219, thereby making the same interaction with the enzyme as the equivalent peptide groups of all inhibitors studied so far. The absence of side chains at the P2 and P1' positions of this inhibitor allows water molecules to occupy the respective pockets in the complex. The relative potencies of PD125967 and PD125754 for endothiapepsin are consistent with the changes in solvent-accessible area which take place on inhibitor binding. PMID:1525155

  18. A Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Study of Star-forming Regions in the Local Group. II. Young Stellar Populations in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana; Efremova, Boryana; Hodge, Paul; Kang, Yongbeom

    2012-11-01

    We studied the young stellar populations of 22 star-forming regions in the Andromeda galaxy (M31), with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multi-band imaging from far-UV to I. The regions were selected from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) wide-field far-UV imaging; they sample different environments and galactocentric distances from 6 to 22 kpc. They were imaged with 30 HST fields (360 distinct images, in six bandpasses), with a pixel scale of 0.38 pc projected on the sky, at the distance of M31. This study is part of HST treasury survey program HST-GO-11079, which includes star-forming regions in eight Local Group galaxies. We provide a merged catalog of six-band stellar photometry in the 30 M31 fields, containing 118,036 sources brighter than V and B ~ 23 mag. Each HST field covers about 0.3 kpc2 in M31, and contains up to ~7000 stars, of which the number varies by a factor of >7 among the target regions; a large fraction of the sample are hot massive stars, due to our choice of filters and exposures. We derived stellar physical parameters and interstellar extinction for individual sources by spectral energy distribution analysis with model-atmosphere colors, and used the results to infer ages, massive stars content, and extinction of the star-forming regions. Reddening is up to E(B - V) <~ 0.6 mag in some OB associations, and lowest in the outermost regions (average of lsim0.12 mag in OB184 at 21.9 kpc). We examined the spatial distribution (clustering) of the hot massive stars, and defined OB associations on various spatial scales from compact to wider, more spread out ones. A hierarchical structuring is observed, with small compact groups arranged within large complexes. Their areas vary from less than 10 to 105 pc2, and masses are up to ?105 M ?, in the scales sampled by our analysis. Their cumulative mass distribution follows a power law, at least in part of the sampled regime. Hot-star counts in the young regions compare very well with integrated measurements of UV flux from GALEX.

  19. Microfocus/Polycapillary-Optic Crystallographic X-Ray System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, Marshall; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ciszak, Ewa

    2005-01-01

    A system that generates an intense, nearly collimated, nearly monochromatic, small-diameter x-ray beam has been developed for use in macromolecular crystallography. A conventional x-ray system for macromolecular crystallography includes a rotating-anode x-ray source, which is massive (.500 kg), large (approximately 2 by 2 by 1 m), and power-hungry (between 2 and 18 kW). In contrast, the present system generates a beam of the required brightness from a microfocus source, which is small and light enough to be mounted on a laboratory bench, and operates at a power level of only tens of watts. The figure schematically depicts the system as configured for observing x-ray diffraction from a macromolecular crystal. In addition to the microfocus x-ray source, the system includes a polycapillary optic . a monolithic block (typically a bundle of fused glass tubes) that contains thousands of straight or gently curved capillary channels, along which x-rays propagate with multiple reflections. This particular polycapillary optic is configured to act as a collimator; the x-ray beam that emerges from its output face consists of quasi-parallel subbeams with a small angular divergence and a diameter comparable to the size of a crystal to be studied. The gap between the microfocus x-ray source and the input face of the polycapillary optic is chosen consistently with the focal length of the polycapillary optic and the need to maximize the solid angle subtended by the optic in order to maximize the collimated x-ray flux. The spectrum from the source contains a significant component of Cu K (photon energy is 8.08 keV) radiation. The beam is monochromatized (for Cu K ) by a nickel filter 10 m thick. In a test, this system was operated at a power of 40 W (current of 897 A at an accelerating potential of 45 kV), with an anode x-ray spot size of 41+/-2 microns. Also tested, in order to provide a standard for comparison, was a commercial rotating-anode x-ray crystallographic system with a pyrolytic graphite monochromator and a 250-micron pinhole collimator, operating at a power of 3.15 kW (current of 70 mA at an accelerating potential of 45 kV). The flux of collimated Cu K radiation in this system was found to be approximately 16 times that in the rotatinganode system. Data on x-ray diffraction from crystals of tetragonal form of lysozyme (protein) in this system were found to be of high quality and to be reducible by use of standard crystallographic software.

  20. Crystallographic preferred orientations may develop in nanocrystalline materials on fault planes due to surface energy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toy, Virginia G.; Mitchell, Thomas M.; Druiventak, Anthony; Wirth, Richard

    2015-09-01

    A layer of substantially noncrystalline material, composed of partially annealed nanopowder with local melt, was experimentally generated by comminution during ˜1.5 mm total slip at ˜2.5 × 10-6 m s-1, Pconf ˜ 0.5 GPa, and 450°C or 600°C, on saw cut surfaces in novaculite. The partially annealed nanopowder comprises angular grains mostly 5-200 nm diameter in a variably dense packing arrangement. A sharp transition from wall rock to partially annealed nanopowder illustrates that the nanopowder effectively localizes shear, consistent with generation of nanoparticles during initial fragmentation, not by progressive grain size reduction. Dislocation densities in nanopowder grains or immediate wall rock are not significantly high, but there are planar plastic defects spaced at 5-200 nm parallel to the host quartz grain's basal plane. We propose these plastic defects developed into through-going fractures to generate nanocrystals. The partially annealed nanopowder has a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) that we hypothesize developed due to surface energy interactions to maximize coincident site lattices (CSL) during annealing. This mechanism may also have generated CPOs recently described in micro/nanocrystalline calcite fault gouges.

  1. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of sugar cane phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, H. B.; Sculaccio, S. A.; Thiemann, O. H.; Oliva, G.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data have been collected from crystals of recombinant sugar cane phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (PRS) and analysis has revealed its quaternary structure, localizing this PRS into the class of enzymes forming an hexameric oligomer of 223 kDa. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthases (PRS; EC 2.7.6.1) are enzymes that are of central importance in several metabolic pathways in all cells. The sugar cane PRS enzyme contains 328 amino acids with a molecular weight of 36.6 kDa and represents the first plant PRS to be crystallized, as well as the first phosphate-independent PRS to be studied in molecular detail. Sugar cane PRS was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Using X-ray diffraction experiments it was determined that the crystals belong to the orthorhombic system, with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 and unit-cell parameters a = 213.2, b = 152.6, c = 149.3 . The crystals diffract to a maximum resolution of 3.3 and a complete data set to 3.5 resolution was collected and analysed.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human glycosylated haemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Syakhovich, Vitaly E.; Saraswathi, N. T.; Ruff, Marc; Bokut, Sergey B.; Moras, Dino

    2006-02-01

    Non enzymatic modification of haemoglobin by glucose plays an important role in diabetes pathogenesis. Here the purification, characterization and crystallization of human glycosylated haemoglobin are reported. Human glycosylated haemoglobin A{sub 1C} is a stable minor variant formed in vivo by post-translational modification of the main form of haemoglobin by glucose. Crystals of oxyHbA{sub 1C} were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and PEG as precipitant. The diffraction pattern of the crystal extends to a resolution of 2.3 Å at 120 K. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 237.98, b = 59.27, c = 137.02 Å, α = 90.00, β = 125.40, γ = 90.00°. The presence of two and a half molecules per asymmetric unit gives a crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 9.70 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 49%.

  3. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of avian infectious bronchitis virus main protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Shen, Wei; Liao, Ming; Bartlam, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The avian infectious bronchitis virus main protease has been crystallized; crystals diffract to 2.7 Å resolution. Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is the prototype of the genus Coronavirus. It causes a highly contagious disease which affects the respiratory, reproductive, neurological and renal systems of chickens, resulting great economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. The coronavirus (CoV) main protease (M{sup pro}), which plays a pivotal role in viral gene expression and replication through a highly complex cascade involving the proteolytic processing of replicase polyproteins, is an attractive target for antiviral drug design. In this study, IBV M{sup pro} was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Crystals suitable for X-ray crystallography have been obtained using microseeding techniques and belong to space group P6{sub 1}22. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.7 Å resolution from a single crystal. The unit-cell parameters were a = b = 119.1, c = 270.7 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Three molecules were predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit from a calculated self-rotation function.

  4. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 6: Power (P-2). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Power requirements for the multipurpose space power platform, for space industrialization, SETI, the solar system exploration facility, and for global services are assessed for various launch dates. Priorities and initiatives for the development of elements of space power systems are described for systems using light power input (solar energy source) or thermal power input, (solar, chemical, nuclear, radioisotopes, reactors). Systems for power conversion, power processing, distribution and control are likewise examined.

  5. Crystallographic Snapshot of Glycosylasparaginase Precursor Poised for Autoprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Guo, H

    2010-01-01

    Glycosylasparaginase belongs to a family of N-terminal nucleophile hydrolases that autoproteolytically generate their mature enzymes from single-chain protein precursors. Previously, based on a precursor structure paused at pre-autoproteolysis stage by a reversible inhibitor (glycine), we proposed a mechanism of intramolecular autoproteolysis. A key structural feature, a highly strained conformation at the scissile peptide bond, had been identified and was hypothesized to be critical for driving autoproteolysis through an N-O acyl shift. To examine this 'twist-and-break' hypothesis, we report here a 1.9-{angstrom}-resolution structure of an autoproteolysis-active precursor (a T152C mutant) that is free of inhibitor or ligand and is poised to undergo autoproteolysis. The current crystallographic study has provided direct evidence for the natural conformation of the glycosylasparaginase autocatalytic site without influence from any inhibitor or ligand. This finding has confirmed our previous proposal that conformational strain is an intrinsic feature of an active precursor.

  6. Integration of Nanotubes, Etch Tracks, and Nanoribbons in Crystallographic Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, Mathias J.; Hunley, D. Patrick; Sundrarajan, Abhishek; Nasseri, Mohsen; Strachan, Douglas R.

    2015-03-01

    Three nanomaterial components, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), few-layer graphene (FLG), and etch tracks exposing insulating SiO2 regions, are integrated to form crystallographically-aligned nanoscale systems. These integrated systems consist of CNTs grown across nanogap etch tracks and nanoribbons formed within the FLG films as a result of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processing. Each nanoscale component is aligned along the underlying graphene lattice, resulting in their orientations being locked into precise values, with CNTs maintaining alignment even after crossing etch tracks. The growth of aligned CNTs across nanogap etch tracks and nanoribbons suggests that integrated formations can be achieved by growing CNTs directly over nanogap etch tracks and nanoribbons. This is supported by calculations of the vibrational energy of CNTs indicating that they should be capable of maintaining atomic registry with an underlying graphene lattice as they grow across a typical etch track, in agreement with our experimental results. Thus, this work is relevant to the integration of semiconducting, conducting, and insulating nano-materials all together into precise nano-electronic systems.

  7. A crystallographic model for nickel base single crystal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Stouffer, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a tool for the mechanical analysis of nickel-base single-crystal superalloys, specifically Rene N4, used in gas turbine engine components. This objective is achieved by developing a rate-dependent anisotropic constitutive model and implementing it in a nonlinear three-dimensional finite-element code. The constitutive model is developed from metallurgical concepts utilizing a crystallographic approach. An extension of Schmid's law is combined with the Bodner-Partom equations to model the inelastic tension/compression asymmetry and orientation-dependence in octahedral slip. Schmid's law is used to approximate the inelastic response of the material in cube slip. The constitutive equations model the tensile behavior, creep response and strain-rate sensitivity of the single-crystal superalloys. Methods for deriving the material constants from standard tests are also discussed. The model is implemented in a finite-element code, and the computed and experimental results are compared for several orientations and loading conditions.

  8. Preliminary crystallographic characterization of an RNA helicase from Kunjin virus

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrangelo, Eloise; Bollati, Michela; Milani, Mario; Brisbarre, Nadge; Lamballerie, Xavier de; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Khromykh, Alexander; Bolognesi, Martino

    2006-09-01

    The C-terminal 440 amino acids of the NS3 protein from Kunjin virus (Flaviviridae) code for a helicase. The protein has been overexpressed and crystallized. Characterization of the isolated monoclinic crystal form and diffraction data (at 3.0 resolution) are presented, together with a preliminary molecular-replacement solution. Kunjin virus is a member of the Flavivirus genus and is an Australian variant of West Nile virus. The C-terminal domain of the Kunjin virus NS3 protein displays helicase activity. The protein is thought to separate daughter and template RNA strands, assisting the initiation of replication by unwinding RNA secondary structure in the 3? nontranslated region. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the NS3 helicase domain are reported. It is shown that Kunjin virus helicase may adopt a dimeric assembly in absence of nucleic acids, oligomerization being a means to provide the helicases with multiple nucleic acid-binding capability, facilitating translocation along the RNA strands. Kunjin virus NS3 helicase domain is an attractive model for studying the molecular mechanisms of flavivirus replication, while simultaneously providing a new basis for the rational development of anti-flaviviral compounds.

  9. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask how are nanoshapes created?, how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?, how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed. PMID:25485133

  10. Crystallographic Investigation of Imidazolium Ionic Liquid Effects on Enzyme Structure.

    PubMed

    Nordwald, Erik M; Plaks, Joseph G; Snell, Jared R; Sousa, Marcelo C; Kaar, Joel L

    2015-11-01

    We present the first crystallographic insight into the interactions of an ionic liquid (IL) with an enzyme, which has widespread implications for stabilizing enzymes in IL media for biocatalysis. Structures of Bacillus subtilis lipase?A (lipA) and an IL-stable variant (QM-lipA) were obtained in the presence of increasing concentrations of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM][Cl]). These studies revealed that the [BMIM] cation interacts with surface residues through hydrophobic and cation-? interactions. Of specific interest was the disruption of internal stacking interactions of aromatic side chains by [BMIM], which provides structural evidence for the mechanism of enzyme denaturation by ILs. The interaction of [BMIM] and Cl ions with lipA was reduced by the stabilizing mutations Y49E and G158E in QM-lipA. Ultimately, these findings present the molecular basis for stabilizing enzymes from IL-induced inactivation, as well as the selection of ILs that are less denaturing. PMID:26388426

  11. Crystallographic orientation inhomogeneity and crystal splitting in biogenic calcite

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio G.; Bonarski, Jan T.; Willinger, Marc G.; Faryna, Marek; Berent, Katarzyna; Kania, Bogusz; González-Segura, Alicia; Pina, Carlos M.; Pospiech, Jan; Morawiec, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The calcitic prismatic units forming the outer shell of the bivalve Pinctada margaritifera have been analysed using scanning electron microscopy–electron back-scatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In the initial stages of growth, the individual prismatic units are single crystals. Their crystalline orientation is not consistent but rather changes gradually during growth. The gradients in crystallographic orientation occur mainly in a direction parallel to the long axis of the prism, i.e. perpendicular to the shell surface and do not show preferential tilting along any of the calcite lattice axes. At a certain growth stage, gradients begin to spread and diverge, implying that the prismatic units split into several crystalline domains. In this way, a branched crystal, in which the ends of the branches are independent crystalline domains, is formed. At the nanometre scale, the material is composed of slightly misoriented domains, which are separated by planes approximately perpendicular to the c-axis. Orientational gradients and splitting processes are described in biocrystals for the first time and are undoubtedly related to the high content of intracrystalline organic molecules, although the way in which these act to induce the observed crystalline patterns is a matter of future research. PMID:23804442

  12. Crystallographic Orientation of Cuttlebone Shield Determined by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, Maggie; Chung, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In common with many cephalopod mollusks, cuttlefish produce an internal biomineral buoyancy device. This cuttlebone is analogous to a surf board in shape and structure, providing rigidity and a means of controlling buoyancy. The cuttlebone is composed of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite and comprises an upper dorsal shield and a lower lamellar matrix. The lamellar matrix comprises layers of chambers with highly corrugated walls. The dorsal shield comprises bundles of aragonite needles stacked on top of each other. Electron backscatter diffraction analyses of the dorsal shield reveal that the c-axis of aragonite is parallel with the long axis of the needles in the bundles such that any spread in crystallographic orientation is consistent with the spread in orientation of the fibers as they radiate to form the overall structure of the dorsal shield. This arrangement of c-axis coincident with the long axis of the biomineral structure is similar to the arrangement in corals and in contrast to the situation in the molluskan aragonite nacre of brachiopod calcite where the c-axis is perpendicular to the aragonite tablet or calcite fiber, respectively.

  13. Cobalt-mediated crystallographic etching of graphite from defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Jiayi; Gong, Hao; Luo, Zhiqiang; Zhan, Da; Shen, Zexiang; Thong, John T L

    2012-08-20

    Herein is reported a study of Co-assisted crystallographic etching of graphite in hydrogen environment at temperatures above 750 C. Unlike nanoparticle etching of graphite surface that leaves trenches, the Co could fill the hexagonal or triangular etch-pits that progressively enlarge, before finally balling-up, leaving well-defined etched pits enclosed by edges oriented at 60 or 120 relative to each other. The morphology and chirality of the etched edges have been carefully studied by transmission electron microscopy and Raman analysis, the latter indicating zigzag edges. By introducing defects to the graphite using an oxygen plasma or by utilizing the edges of graphene/graphite flakes (which are considered as defects), an ability to define the position of the etched edges is demonstrated. Based on these results, graphite strips are successfully etched from the edges and graphitic ribbons are fabricated which are enclosed by purely zigzag edges. These fabricated graphitic ribbons could potentially be isolated layer-by-layer and transferred to a device substrate for further processing into graphene nanoribbon transistors. PMID:22539414

  14. Crystallographic studies of the Anthrax lethal toxin. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, C.A.

    1996-07-01

    The lethal form of Anthrax results from the inhalation of anthrax spores. Death is primarily due to the effects of the lethal toxin (Protective Antigen (PA) + Lethal Factor) from the causative agent, Bacillus anthracis. All the Anthrax vaccines currently in use or under development contain or produce PA, the major antigenic component of anthrax toxin, and there is a clear need for an improved vaccine for human use. In the previous report we described the first atomic resolution structure of PA, revealing that the molecule is composed largely of beta-sheets organized into four domains. This information can be used in the design. of recombinant PA vaccines. In this report we describe additional features of the full-length PA molecule derived from further crystallographic refinement and careful examination of the structure. We compare two crystal forms of PA grown at different pH values and discuss the functional implications. A complete definition of the function of each domain must await the crystal structure of the PA63 heptamer. We have grown crystals of the heptamer under both detergent and detergent-free conditions, and made substantial progress towards the crystal structure. The mechanism of anthrax intoxication in the light of our results is reviewed.

  15. X-ray crystallographic and kinetic investigations of 6-sulfamoyl-saccharin as a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Alterio, V; Tanc, M; Ivanova, J; Zalubovskis, R; Vozny, I; Monti, S M; Di Fiore, A; De Simone, G; Supuran, C T

    2015-04-01

    6-Sulfamoyl-saccharin was investigated as an inhibitor of 11 ?-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms of human (h) origin, hCA I-XIV, and X-ray crystallographic data were obtained for its adduct with hCA II, the physiologically dominant isoform. This compound possesses two potential zinc-binding groups, the primary sulfamoyl one and the secondary, acylatedsulfonamide. Saccharin itself binds to the Zn(II) ion from the CA active site coordinating with this last group, in deprotonated (SO2N(-)CO) form. Here we explain why 6-sulfamoyl-saccharin, unlike saccharin, binds to the metal ion from the hCA II active site by its primary sulfonamide moiety and not the secondary one as saccharin itself. Our study is useful for shedding new light to the structure-based drug design of isoform-selective CA inhibitors of the sulfonamide type. PMID:25733161

  16. Crystallographic flat origami with three flat foldability types of the generating unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taganap, Eduard C.; De Las Peas, Ma. Louise Antonette N.; Rapanut, Teofina A.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we determine crystallographic flat origami from a crease pattern having three flat foldability types of its generating unit. In particular, we consider crease patterns arising from Archimedean tilings via the hinged tiling method.

  17. Synthesis and study of the crystallographic and magnetic structure of DyFeMnO{sub 5}: A new ferrimagnetic oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Lope, M.J.; Retuerto, M.; Alonso, J.A. Pomjakushin, V.

    2008-09-15

    The title oxide has been obtained by replacing Mn{sup 3+} by Fe{sup 3+} in the parent oxide DyMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The crystallographic and magnetic structures have been analysed from neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data, in complement with susceptibility and magnetic measurements. DyFeMnO{sub 5} is orthorhombic, belonging to the Pbam space group as the parent compound. The crystal structure contains infinite chains of edge-sharing Mn{sup 4+}O{sub 6} octahedra, interconnected by dimer units of Fe{sup 3+}O{sub 5} square pyramids. There is a certain antisite disorder in the crystal structure, with 8.0% of the Mn{sup 4+} sites occupied by Fe cations, and 8.2% of the Fe{sup 3+} positions occupied by Mn{sup 3+} cations. The magnetization measurements show that DyFeMnO{sub 5} presents magnetic order below T{sub C}{approx}178 K; a study of the magnetic structure from the low-temperature NPD patterns indicates an antiferromagnetic coupling of the Mn{sup 4+} and Fe{sup 3+} spins, with the polarization of the Dy{sup 3+} magnetic moments parallel to the those of the Fe sublattice. - Graphical abstract: DyFeMnO{sub 5} is orthorhombic (Pbam) as the parent DyMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} oxide. The crystal structure contains infinite chains of edge-sharing Mn{sup 4+}O{sub 6} octahedra, interconnected by dimer units of Fe{sup 3+}O{sub 5} square pyramids. It is ferrimagnetic below T{sub C}{approx}178 K; a NPD study indicated an antiferromagnetic coupling of the Mn{sup 4+} and Fe{sup 3+} spins, with Dy{sup 3+} magnetic moments parallel to those of Fe.

  18. Crystallographic and magnetic properties of the spinel-type ferrites ZnxCo1-xFe2O4 (0.0 ? x ? 0.75)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, A. K.; Zakaria, A. K. M.; Jewel, Md. Yusuf; Khan, Abu Saeed; Yunus, S. M.; Kamal, I.; Datta, T. K.; Eriksson, S.-G.

    2015-05-01

    Ultrahigh frequencies (UHF) have applications in signal and power electronics to minimize product sizes, increase production quantity and lower manufacturing cost. In the UHF range of 300 MHz to 3 GHz, ferrimagnetic iron oxides (ferrites) are especially useful because they combine the properties of a magnetic material with that of an electrical insulator. Ferrites have much higher electrical resistivity than metallic ferromagnetic materials, resulting in minimization of the eddy current losses, and total penetration of the electromagnetic (EM) field. Hence ferrites are frequently applied as circuit elements, magnetic storage media like read/write heads, phase shifters and Faraday rotators. The electromagnetic properties of ferrites are affected by operating conditions such as field strength, temperature and frequency. The spinel system ZnxCo1-xFe2O4 (x=0.0, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75) has been prepared by the standard solid state sintering method. X-ray and neutron powder diffraction measurements were performed at room temperature. Neutron diffraction data analysis confirms the cubic symmetry corresponding to the space group Fd3m. The distribution of three cations Zn2+, Co2+ and Fe3+ over the spinel lattice and other crystallographic parameters like lattice constant, oxygen position parameter, overall temperature factor and occupancies of different ions in different lattice sites for the samples have been determined from the analysis of neutron diffraction data. The lattice constant increases with increasing Zn content in the system. The magnetic structure was found to be ferrimagnetic for the samples with x?0.50. Magnetization measurements show that with the increase of Zn content in the system the value of saturation magnetization first increases and then decreases. The variation of the magnetic moment with Zn substitution has been discussed in terms of the distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic ions over the A and B sub-lattices and their exchange coupling.

  19. Energetic, crystallographic and diffusion characteristics of hydrogen isotopes in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivak, A. B.; Sivak, P. A.; Romanov, V. A.; Chernov, V. M.

    2015-06-01

    Energetic, crystallographic and diffusion characteristics of various interstitial configurations of H atoms and their complexes with self-point defects (SIA - self-interstitial atom, V - vacancy) in bcc iron have been calculated by molecular statics and molecular dynamics using Fe-H interatomic interaction potential developed by Ramasubramaniam et al. (2009) and modified by the authors of the present work and Fe-Fe matrix potential M07 developed by Malerba et al. (2010). The most energetically favorable configuration of an interstitial H atom is tetrahedral configuration. The energy barrier for H atom migration is 0.04 eV. The highest binding energy of all the considered complexes "vacancy - H atom" and "SIA - H atom" is 0.54 and 0.15 eV, respectively. The binding energy of H atom with edge dislocations in slip systems <1 1 1>{1 1 0}, <1 1 1>{1 1 2}, <1 0 0>{1 0 0}, <1 0 0>{1 1 0} is 0.32, 0.30, 0.45, 0.54 eV, respectively. The binding energy of H atom in VHn complexes (n = 1 … 15) decreases from 0.54 to 0.35 eV with increasing of n from 1 to 6. At n > 6, it decreases to ∼0.1 eV. The temperature dependences of hydrogen isotopes (P, D, T) diffusivities have been calculated for the temperature range 70-1800 K. Arrhenius-type dependencies describe the calculated data at temperatures T < 100 K. At T > 250 K, the temperature dependencies of the diffusivities DP, DD, DT have a parabolic form. The diffusivities of H isotopes are within 10% at room temperature. The isotope effect becomes stronger at higher temperatures, e.g., ratios DP/DD and DP/DT at 1800 K equal 1.23 and 1.40, respectively.

  20. Classical group theory adapted to the mechanism of Pt3Ni nanoparticle growth: the role of W(CO)6 as the "shape-controlling" agent.

    PubMed

    Radtke, M; Ignaszak, A

    2016-01-01

    Classical group theory was applied to prove the Pt3Ni crystallographic transformation from Platonic cubic to Archimedean cuboctahedral structures and the formation of Pt3Ni polypods. The role of W(CO)6 as a shape-controlling agent is discussed with respect to the crystallographic features of the clusters and superstructures generated as control samples. PMID:26608555

  1. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 1: Navigation, guidance, control (E-1) A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The six themes identified by the Workshop have many common navigation guidance and control needs. All the earth orbit themes have a strong requirement for attitude, figure and stabilization control of large space structures, a requirement not currently being supported. All but the space transportation theme have need for precision pointing of spacecraft and instruments. In addition all the themes have requirements for increasing autonomous operations for such activities as spacecraft and experiment operations, onboard mission modification, rendezvous and docking, spacecraft assembly and maintenance, navigation and guidance, and self-checkout, test and repair. Major new efforts are required to conceptualize new approaches to large space antennas and arrays that are lightweight, readily deployable, and capable of precise attitude and figure control. Conventional approaches offer little hope of meeting these requirements. Functions that can benefit from increasing automation or autonomous operations are listed.

  2. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 2: Data handling, communications (E-2). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Technologies required to support the stated OAST thrust to increase information return by X1000, while reducing costs by a factor of 10 are identified. The most significant driver is the need for an overall end-to-end data system management technology. Maximum use of LSI component technology and trade-offs between hardware and software are manifest in most all considerations of technology needs. By far, the greatest need for data handling technology was identified for the space Exploration and Global Services themes. Major advances are needed in NASA's ability to provide cost effective mass reduction of space data, and automated assessment of earth looking imagery, with a concomitant reduction in cost per useful bit. A combined approach embodying end-to-end system analysis, with onboard data set selection, onboard data processing, highly parallel image processing (both ground and space), low cost, high capacity memories, and low cost user data distribution systems would be necessary.

  3. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 9: Aerothermodynamics (M-3). A: Statement. B: Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2). D. Additional assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Twelve aerothermodynamic space technology needs were identified to reduce the design uncertainties in aerodynamic heating and forces experienced by heavy lift launch vehicles, orbit transfer vehicles, and advanced single stage to orbit vehicles for the space transportation system, and for probes, planetary surface landers, and sample return vehicles for solar system exploration vehicles. Research and technology needs identified include: (1) increasing the fluid dynamics capability by at least two orders of magnitude by developing an advanced computer processor for the solution of fluid dynamic problems with improved software; (2) predicting multi-engine base flow fields for launch vehicles; and (3) developing methods to conserve energy in aerothermodynamic ground test facilities.

  4. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 7: Material (M-1). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The approach of matching technology areas with various themes needs was not effective for the materials and thermal control discipline because of the diversity of requirements for each. Top priorities were evolved from the advanced space transportation system and the space power platform because these are essential building blocks in fulfilling some of the other themes. Important needs identified include life long-life cryogenic cooling systems for sensors, masers, and other devices and the needs for lightweight nuclear shielding materials for nuclear electric propulsion.

  5. Space Resources and Space Settlements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingham, J. (Editor); Gilbreath, W. P. (Editor); Oleary, B. (Editor); Gosset, B. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The technical papers from the five tasks groups that took part in the 1977 Ames Summer Study on Space Settlements and Industrialization Using Nonterrestrial Materials are presented. The papers are presented under the following general topics: (1) research needs for regenerative life-support systems; (2) habitat design; (3) dynamics and design of electromagnetic mass drivers; (4) asteroids as resources for space manufacturing; and (5) processing of nonterrestrial materials.

  6. Significance of Dauphin twins in crystallographic fabrics of quartz tectonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eske Srensen, Bjrn

    2014-05-01

    Dauphine twins are commonly found in quartz tectonites, however their role in deformation processes are not completely understood. This study represents a new attempt to understand the interaction between slip systems and Dauphine twins in deforming quartz-rich rocks at different temperatures. There is no doubt that Dauphine twins are mobilized under stress as this has been shown by experiments for single crystals and in polycrystalline aggregates where distinct crystallographic fabrics develop in previously randomly oriented aggregates related to minimization of elastic energy (Tullis 1972). However in quartz tectonites the Dauphine twin process is a part of interplay between plastic deformation and recovery processes which depends on PT, strain-rate and fluid composition and availability. In quartz tectonites with Y-girdle C-axis (GBM-regime) fabrics Dauphin twins are abundant, relating different parts of r- and z rhomb "comet" distributions. This is interpreted as completion between prism slip and Dauphin twinning. Slip rotates grains such that CRSS is low on the prism planes, but then Dauphin twin boundaries sweeps through the grain back to the orientation giving lower stored elastic energy. The faster recovery at higher temperatures gives subgrain walls slowing down twin movement across the mm-sized grain of the GBM regime. At lower temperatures in the SGR-regime grain-size is reduced and different rotations of the grains are happening due to the domination of rhomb and basal slip. Because recrystallization is effective relative to grain-size the grains are commonly free of internal strain and subgrain walls, allowing the favorably oriented Dauphin twin member to sweep across the whole grain overwhelming the unfavorably oriented Dauphin twin member. As a consequence high strain reduces the number of Dauphin twins and quartz rhomb fabrics appear trigonal, missing the "comet" shape of the GBM regime rhomb fabrics. Since Dauphin twinning is also efficient at low temperatures rocks deformed in the brittle regime may also display stress-induced movement of Dauphin twins. Though still highly debated Dauphin twins and quartz rhombs fabrics may evolve as critical tools for determining paleostress orientation. Tullis, J. and Tullis, T. E., 1972, Preferred orientation of quartz produced by mechanical Dauphine twinning: thermodynamics and axial experiments in H. Heard et al., eds., Flow and Fracture of Rocks, Am. Geophys. Union Monograph 16, 67-82.

  7. Crystallographic transformation of limestone during calcination under CO2.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Medina, Santiago

    2015-09-14

    The calcination reaction of limestone (CaCO3) to yield lime (CaO) is at the heart of many industrial applications as well as natural processes. In the recently emerged calcium-looping technology, CO2 capture is accomplished by the carbonation of CaO in a gas-solid reactor (carbonator). CaO is derived by the calcination of limestone in a calciner reactor under necessarily high CO2 partial pressure and high temperature. In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been employed in this work to gain further insight into the crystallographic transformation that takes place during the calcination of limestone under CO2, at partial pressures (P) close to the equilibrium pressure (Peq) and at high temperature. Calcination under these conditions becomes extremely slow. The in situ XRD analysis presented here suggests the presence of an intermediate metastable CaO* phase stemming from the parent CaCO3 structure. According to the reaction mechanism proposed elsewhere, the exothermicity of the CaO* → CaO transformation and high values of P/Peq inhibit the nucleation of CaO at high temperatures. The wt% of CaO* remains at a relatively high level during slow calcination. Two diverse stages have been identified in the evolution of CaO crystallite size, L. Initially, L increases with CaCO3 conversion, following a logarithmic law. Slow calcination allows the crystallite size to grow up from a few nanometers at nucleation up to around 100 nm near the end of conversion. Otherwise, quick calcination at relatively lower CO2 concentrations limits CaO crystallite growth. Once calcination reaches an advanced state, the presence of CaO* drops to zero and the rate of increase of the CaO crystallite size is significantly hindered. Arguably, the first stage in CaO crystallite growth is driven by aggregation of the metastable CaO* nanocrystals, due to surface attractive forces, whereas the second one is consistent with sintering of the aggregated CaO crystals, and persists with time after full calcination is attained. Our analysis shows that the main mechanism responsible for the increase of CaO crystallite size (and thus for undermining the reactivity of the CaO) under high CO2 partial pressure is enhanced aggregation, whereas CaO sintering is relatively less relevant, as would be expected for calcination temperatures well below the Tamman temperature. PMID:26235797

  8. Green apatites: hydride ions, electrons and their interconversion in the crystallographic channel.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Katsuro; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-03-01

    Hydride (H(-)) ions and electrons in channel sites of the lattice of calcium phosphate apatites are characterized. Solid-state chemical reduction using TiH2 is effective for doping of H(-) ions into apatites. Irradiation of the H(-) ion-doped apatite with ultraviolet (UV) light induces green coloration. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) reveals that this colour centre is attributed to electrons captured at a vacant anion site in the crystallographic channel, forming F(+) centres. Transient H(0) atoms are detected at low temperatures by EPR. The concentration of UV-induced electrons in the apatite at room temperature decays according to second-order kinetics because of the chemical reactions involving two electrons; overall, electron generation and thermal decay can be described as: H(-) + O(2-) ↔ 2e(-) + OH(-). (1)H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to identify H(-) ions in the apatite, which are characterized by a chemical shift of +3.4 ppm. Various types of O-H groups including OH(-) ions in the channel and protons bound to phosphate groups are concurrently formed, and are identified by considering the relationship between the O-H stretching frequency and the (1)H chemical shift. The complementary results obtained by EPR and NMR reveal that the H(-) ions and transient H(0) atoms are located at the centre of Ca3 triangles in the apatite, while the electrons are located in the centre of Ca6 octahedra. These findings provide an effective approach for identifying new classes of mixed-oxide-hydride or -electride crystals. PMID:26928237

  9. 36 CFR 1280.74 - What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FACILITIES What Rules Apply to Use NARA Public Areas in the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives Building, Washington, Dc § 1280.74 What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA..., Washington, DC: Area Capacity Rotunda Galleries 250 persons. William G. McGowan Theater 290...

  10. 36 CFR 1280.74 - What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FACILITIES What Rules Apply to Use NARA Public Areas in the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives Building, Washington, Dc § 1280.74 What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA..., Washington, DC: Area Capacity Rotunda Galleries 250 persons. William G. McGowan Theater 290...

  11. 36 CFR 1280.74 - What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FACILITIES What Rules Apply to Use NARA Public Areas in the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives Building, Washington, Dc § 1280.74 What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA..., Washington, DC: Area Capacity Rotunda Galleries 250 persons. William G. McGowan Theater 290...

  12. 36 CFR 1280.74 - What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FACILITIES What Rules Apply to Use NARA Public Areas in the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives Building, Washington, Dc § 1280.74 What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA..., Washington, DC: Area Capacity Rotunda Galleries 250 persons. William G. McGowan Theater 290...

  13. 36 CFR 1280.74 - What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA groups and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FACILITIES What Rules Apply to Use NARA Public Areas in the Washington, DC, Area? National Archives Building, Washington, Dc § 1280.74 What spaces in the National Archives Building are available for use by non-NARA..., Washington, DC: Area Capacity Rotunda Galleries 250 persons. William G. McGowan Theater 290...

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the cysteine protease inhibitor clitocypin

    SciTech Connect

    Galea, Katja; Brzin, Joe; Saboti?, Jerica; Turk, Duan

    2006-01-01

    Clitocypin is a cysteine protease inhibitor from the mushroom Clitocybe nebularis. The protein has been purified from natural sources and crystallized in a variety of non-isomorphous forms belonging to monoclinic and triclinic space groups. Clitocypin is a cysteine protease inhibitor from the mushroom Clitocybe nebularis. The protein has been purified from natural sources and crystallized in a variety of non-isomorphous forms belonging to monoclinic and triclinic space groups. A diffraction data set to 1.55 resolution was obtained from a crystal belonging to space group P2, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.326, b = 33.597, c = 55.568 , ? = 104. An inability to achieve isomorphism forced the use of MAD and SAD phasing methods. Phasing is in progress.

  15. A log-likelihood-gain intensity target for crystallographic phasing that accounts for experimental error.

    PubMed

    Read, Randy J; McCoy, Airlie J

    2016-03-01

    The crystallographic diffraction experiment measures Bragg intensities; crystallographic electron-density maps and other crystallographic calculations in phasing require structure-factor amplitudes. If data were measured with no errors, the structure-factor amplitudes would be trivially proportional to the square roots of the intensities. When the experimental errors are large, and especially when random errors yield negative net intensities, the conversion of intensities and their error estimates into amplitudes and associated error estimates becomes nontrivial. Although this problem has been addressed intermittently in the history of crystallographic phasing, current approaches to accounting for experimental errors in macromolecular crystallography have numerous significant defects. These have been addressed with the formulation of LLGI, a log-likelihood-gain function in terms of the Bragg intensities and their associated experimental error estimates. LLGI has the correct asymptotic behaviour for data with large experimental error, appropriately downweighting these reflections without introducing bias. LLGI abrogates the need for the conversion of intensity data to amplitudes, which is usually performed with the French and Wilson method [French & Wilson (1978), Acta Cryst. A35, 517-525], wherever likelihood target functions are required. It has general applicability for a wide variety of algorithms in macromolecular crystallography, including scaling, characterizing anisotropy and translational noncrystallographic symmetry, detecting outliers, experimental phasing, molecular replacement and refinement. Because it is impossible to reliably recover the original intensity data from amplitudes, it is suggested that crystallographers should always deposit the intensity data in the Protein Data Bank. PMID:26960124

  16. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 3: Sensors (E-3). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2). D. Additional assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Developments required to support the space power, SETI, solar system exploration and global services programs are identified. Instrumentation and calibration sensors (rather than scientific) are needed for the space power system. Highly sophisticated receivers for narrowband detection of microwave sensors and sensors for automated stellar cataloging to provide a mapping data base for SETI are needed. Various phases of solar system exploration require large area solid state imaging arrays from UV to IR; a long focal plane telescope; high energy particle detectors; advanced spectrometers; a gravitometer; and atmospheric distanalyzer; sensors for penetrometers; in-situ sensors for surface chemical analysis, life detection, spectroscopic and microscopic analyses of surface soils, and for meteorological measurements. Active and passive multiapplication sensors, advanced multispectral scanners with improved resolution in the UV and IR ranges, and laser techniques for advanced probing and oceanographic characterization will enhance for global services.

  17. Group Dynamics in Long -term blind endeavors on Earth as an analog for Remote Space Missions (Lewis & Clark Expedition, 1803 - 1806, Dynamic Analysis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allner, M.; Rygalov, V.; Reilly, J.

    In 1803 President Thomas Jefferson set fourth a military expedition led by Captains newline M Lewis and W Clark L C Expedition on an exploration to learn more about the large territory of land the U S had just purchased from France Cavan 1991 Their mission was to find a direct water route to the Pacific Ocean for the purpose of commerce and further industrial development Edwards 1999 Looking back at the events of this exploration there are many similarities to the experiences future human space explorers will face as we look to colonize the Moon and travel to Mars and beyond NASA Vision for Space Exploration 2004 - The L C Expedition lasted almost three years and involved a crew of 43 men traveling up the Missouri River to explore the unknown lands and a possible water route to the Pacific Ocean newline - The expedition took place far away from customary comfortable environments known to European settlers in early 18th century newline - The expedition involved a remotely confined high-perceived risk environment with high levels of uncertainty providing stresses and every day challenges for the crew newline - Supplies brought on the mission were limited mainly a mass weight issue rather than cost therefore the discovery and use of environmental resources In-Situ Resource Utilization approach including info-resources to mitigate uncertainty was necessary for crew survival The environments astronauts will encounter in space and on the Moon and Mars due to high risk and uncertainty will be in many aspects similar

  18. An electron diffraction and bond valence sum study of the space group symmetries and structures of the photocatalytic 1:1 ordered A2InNbO 6 double perovskites ( A=Ca 2+, Sr 2+, Ba 2+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, V.; Liu, Y.; Withers, R. L.; Krausz, E.

    2004-03-01

    A careful investigation has been carried out into the space group symmetries, structures and crystal chemistries of the 1:1 B-site ordered double perovskites A2InNbO 6 ( A=Ca 2+, Sr 2+, Ba 2+) using a combination of bond valence sum calculations, powder XRD and electron diffraction. A recent investigation of these compounds by Yin et al. reported a random distribution of In 3+ and Nb 5+ ions onto the perovskite B-site positions of these compounds and hence Pm 3m ( a= ap, subscript p for parent perovskite sub-structure) space group symmetry for the A=Ba and Sr compounds and Pnma( a= ap+ bp, b=- ap+ bp, c=2 cp) space group symmetry for the A=Ca compound. A careful electron diffraction study, however, shows that both the A=Ca and Sr compounds occur at room temperature in P12 1/ n1 ( a= ap+ bp, b=- ap+ bp, c=2 cp) perovskite-related superstructure phases while the A=Ba compound occurs in the Fm 3m , a=2 ap, elpasolite structure type. Bond valence sum calculations are used to explain why this should be so as well as to provide a useful first-order approximation to the structures of each of the compounds.

  19. On the abelianization of all Bieberbach groups of dimension four with symmetric point group of order six

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Tan Yee; Idrus, Nor'ashiqin Mohd; Masri, Rohaidah; Fauzi, Wan Nor Farhana Wan Mohd; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Hassim, Hazzirah Izzati Mat

    2014-12-01

    A torsion free crystallographic group, which is known as a Bieberbach group, has many interesting properties. The properties of the groups can be explored by computing the homological functors of the groups. In the computation of the homological functors, the abelianization of groups plays an important role. The abelianization of a group can be constructed by computing its derived subgroup. In this paper, the construction of the abelianization of all Bieberbach groups of dimension four with symmetric point group of order six are shown. Groups, Algorithms and Programming (GAP) software is used to assist the construction.

  20. Space languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Dan

    1987-01-01

    Applications of linguistic principles to potential problems of human and machine communication in space settings are discussed. Variations in language among speakers of different backgrounds and change in language forms resulting from new experiences or reduced contact with other groups need to be considered in the design of intelligent machine systems.

  1. Crystallographic texture engineering through novel melt strategies via electron beam melting: Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Kirka, Michael M.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sames, William J.

    2015-06-01

    Preliminary research has demonstrated the ability to utilise novel scan strategies in the electron beam melting (EBM) process to establish control of crystallographic texture within Inconel 718 deposits. Conventional EBM scan strategies and process parameters yield coarse columnar grains aligned parallel to the build direction. Through varying process parameters such as beam power, beam velocity, beam focus and scan strategy, the behaviour of the electron beam can be manipulated from a line source to a point source. The net effect of these variations is that the resulting crystallographic texture is controlled in a manner to produce either epitaxial deposits or fully equiaxed deposits. Furthermore, this research demonstrates the ability to change the crystallographic texture on the macroscale indicating that EBM technology can be used to create complex geometric components with both site-specific microstructures and material properties.

  2. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Crystallographic Orientation Dependence of Nanoscratching of Single Crystalline Copper.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanquan; Zhang, Junjie; Yan, Yongda; Yu, Bowen; Geng, Lin; Sun, Tao

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we perform experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single crystalline copper under the load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching using a triangular pyramidal probe. The correlation of microscopic deformation behavior of the material with macroscopically-observed machining results is revealed. Moreover, the influence of crystallographic orientation on the nanoscratching of single crystalline copper is examined. Our simulation results indicate that the plastic deformation of single crystalline Cu under the nanoscratching is exclusively governed by dislocation mechanisms. However, there is no glissile dislocation structure formed due to the probe oscillation under the load-controlled mode. Both experiments and MD simulations demonstrate that the machined surface morphologies in terms of groove depth and surface pile-up exhibit strong crystallographic orientation dependence, because of different geometries of activated slip planes cutting with free surfaces and strain hardening abilities associated with different crystallographic orientations. PMID:26147506

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Crystallographic Orientation Dependence of Nanoscratching of Single Crystalline Copper

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yanquan; Zhang, Junjie; Yan, Yongda; Yu, Bowen; Geng, Lin; Sun, Tao

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we perform experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single crystalline copper under the load-controlled multi-passes nanoscratching using a triangular pyramidal probe. The correlation of microscopic deformation behavior of the material with macroscopically-observed machining results is revealed. Moreover, the influence of crystallographic orientation on the nanoscratching of single crystalline copper is examined. Our simulation results indicate that the plastic deformation of single crystalline Cu under the nanoscratching is exclusively governed by dislocation mechanisms. However, there is no glissile dislocation structure formed due to the probe oscillation under the load-controlled mode. Both experiments and MD simulations demonstrate that the machined surface morphologies in terms of groove depth and surface pile-up exhibit strong crystallographic orientation dependence, because of different geometries of activated slip planes cutting with free surfaces and strain hardening abilities associated with different crystallographic orientations. PMID:26147506

  4. Crystallographic texture engineering through novel melt strategies via electron beam melting: Inconel 718

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Kirka, Michael M.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sames, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary research has demonstrated the ability to utilise novel scan strategies in the electron beam melting (EBM) process to establish control of crystallographic texture within Inconel 718 deposits. Conventional EBM scan strategies and process parameters yield coarse columnar grains aligned parallel to the build direction. Through varying process parameters such as beam power, beam velocity, beam focus and scan strategy, the behaviour of the electron beam can be manipulated from a line source to a point source. The net effect of these variations is that the resulting crystallographic texture is controlled in a manner to produce either epitaxial deposits ormore » fully equiaxed deposits. Furthermore, this research demonstrates the ability to change the crystallographic texture on the macroscale indicating that EBM technology can be used to create complex geometric components with both site-specific microstructures and material properties.« less

  5. Space group and hydrogen positions of single crystal delta-AlOOH, (Al0.84Mg0.07Si0.09)H0.98O2 and its relation to stishovite and brucite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, Y.; Kuribayashi, T.; Suzuki, A.; Ohtani, E.; Kamada, T.

    2003-04-01

    A single crystal of δ-AlOOH synthesized by Suzuki et al. (2000) at conditions of 1000^oC and 21 GPa was used in this study. A set of X-ray diffraction intensities up to sinθ/λ=0.80 Å-1 were measured with a single crystal of 83×35×24 μm using MoKα radiation (50 kV, 40 mA). Al:Mg:Si ratio 0.84:0.07:0.09 measured by EDS with the same crystal used in the X-ray diffraction intensity measurement yielded the chemical formula (Al0.84Mg0.07Si0.09)H0.98O_2. Suzuki et al. (2000) reported the space group P2_1nm from powder X-ray data but the systematic absence of reflections observed in this study indicated another space group Pnn2. The systematic absence of reflections observed in the present work were h+l odd for h0l and k+l odd for 0kl, indicating possible space group Pnn2 or Pnnm. The N(Z) test for a center of symmetry indicated an acentric space group. The non-centrosymmetric space group Pnn2 was therefore employed and was confirmed by the structural refinement. The agreement factors for 109 independent reflections (Io>= 3.0σ Io) were R=3.6% with anisotropic temperature factors. The difference Fourier synthesis was calculated and two significant Fourier peaks H1 and H2 for the possible hydrogen sites were found. The H1 site locates around two-fold rotation axis with H1-H1 distance of 0.55 Å. The H1 site is considered to be for symmetrical statistical distribution of hydrogen atoms. The H2-H2 are separated with H2-H2 distance 2.12 Å which is larger than the sum of van der Waals radii of hydrogen atoms. The partial occupancy of Mg and Si atoms at Al site suggests the possibility of limited solid solution among δ-AlOOH, stishovite SiO_2 and hypothetical rutile-structured Mg(OH)_2. The H1 site is considered to be for AlOOH and the H_2 site for Mg(OH)_2.

  6. Studies of social group dynamics under isolated conditions. Objective summary of the literature as it relates to potential problems of long duration space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinograd, S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Scientific literature which deals with the study of human behavior and crew interaction in situations simulating long term space flight is summarized and organized. A bibliography of all the pertinent U.S. literature available is included, along with definitions of the behavioral characteristics terms employed. The summarized studies are analyzed according to behavioral factors and environmental conditions. The analysis consist of two matrices. (1) The matrix of factors studied correlates each research study area and individual study with the behavioral factors that were investigated in the study. (2) The matrix of conclusions identifies those studies whose investigators appeared to draw specific conclusions concerning questions of importance to NASA.

  7. Phosphate tungsten bronze series: crystallographic and structural properties of low-dimensional conductors.

    PubMed

    Roussel, P; Pérez, O; Labbé, P

    2001-10-01

    Phosphate tungsten bronzes have been shown to be conductors of low dimensionality. A review of the crystallographic and structural properties of this huge series of compounds is given here, corresponding to the present knowledge of the different X-ray studies and electron microscopy investigations. Three main families are described, monophosphate tungsten bronzes, Ax(PO2)4(WO3)2m, either with pentagonal tunnels (MPTBp) or with hexagonal tunnels (MPTBh), and diphosphate tungsten bronzes, Ax(P2O4)2(WO3)2m, mainly with hexagonal tunnels (DPTBh). The general aspect of these crystal structures may be described as a building of polyhedra sharing oxygen corners made of regular stacking of WO3-type slabs with a thickness function of m, joined by slices of tetrahedral PO4 phosphate or P2O7 diphosphate groups. The relations of the different slabs with respect to the basic perovskite structure are mentioned. The structural description is focused on the tilt phenomenon of the WO6 octahedra inside a slab of WO3-type. In this respect, a comparison with the different phases of the WO3 crystal structures is established. The various modes of tilting and the different possible connections between two adjacent WO3-type slabs involve a great variety of structures with different symmetries, as well as the existence of numerous twins in MPTBp's. Several phase transitions, with the appearance of diffuse scattering and modulation phenomena, were analysed by X-ray scattering measurements and through the temperature dependence of various physical properties for the MPTBp's. The role of the W displacements within the WO3-type slabs, in two modulated structures (m = 4 and m = 10), already solved, is discussed. Finally, the complexity of the structural aspects of DPTBh's is explained on the basis of the average structures which are the only ones solved. PMID:11574717

  8. Correlation between Crystallographic and Magnetic Domains at Co/NiO(001) Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ohldag, H.; van der Laan, G.; Arenholz, E.

    2008-12-18

    Using soft x-ray spectromicroscopy we show that NiO(001) exhibits a crystallographic and magnetic domain structure near the surface identical to that of the bulk. Upon Co deposition a perpendicular coupling between the Ni and Co moments is observed that persists even after formation of uncompensated Ni spins at the interface through annealing. The chemical composition at the interface alters its crystallographic structure and leads to a reorientation of the Ni moments from the <112> to the <110> direction. We show that this reorientation is driven by changes in the magnetocrystalline anisotropy rather than exchange coupling mediated by residual uncompensated spins.

  9. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of glutathione transferase zeta 1 (GSTZ1a-1a)

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Christopher D.; Zhong, Guo; Smeltz, Marci; James, Margaret O. McKenna, Robert

    2014-01-21

    Crystals of glutathione transferase zeta 1 were grown and shown to diffract X-rays to 3.1 resolution. They belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.0, b = 49.6, c = 54.6 , ? = 82.9, ? = 69.9, ? = 73.4.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C from Thermus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad; Ranjani, Chellamuthu Vasuki; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Baba, Seiki; Chen, Lirong; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Nishida, Masami; Ebihara, Akio; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2010-12-03

    The Gram-negative aerobic eubacterium Thermus thermophilus is an extremely important thermophilic microorganism that was originally isolated from a thermal vent environment in Japan. The molybdenum cofactor in this organism is considered to be an essential component required by enzymes that catalyze diverse key reactions in the global metabolism of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. The molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C derived from T. thermophilus was crystallized in two different space groups. Crystals obtained using the first crystallization condition belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 64.81, b = 109.84, c = 115.19 {angstrom}, {beta} = 104.9{sup o}; the crystal diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 {angstrom}. The other crystal form belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.57, c = 59.25 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. Preliminary calculations reveal that the asymmetric unit contains 12 monomers and one monomer for the crystals belonging to space group P2{sub 1} and R32, respectively.

  11. Introduction to Quantum Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podle?, P.; Mller, E.

    We give an elementary introduction to the theory of algebraic and topological quantum groups (in the spirit of S. L. Woronowicz). In particular, we recall the basic facts from Hopf (*-) algebra theory, theory of compact (matrix) quantum groups and the theory of their actions on compact quantum spaces. We also provide the most important examples, including the classification of quantum SL(2)-groups, their real forms and quantum spheres. We also consider quantum SLq(N)-groups and quantum Lorentz groups.

  12. Abundance of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) affects group characteristics and use of space by golden-headed lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysomelas) in Cabruca agroforest.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Leonardo C; Neves, Leonardo G; Raboy, Becky E; Dietz, James M

    2011-08-01

    Cabruca is an agroforest of cacao trees shaded by native forest trees. It is the predominant vegetation type throughout eastern part of the range of the golden-headed lion tamarins, Leontopithecus chrysomelas, an endangered primate endemic to Atlantic Forest. Understanding how lion tamarins use this agroforest is a conservation priority. To address this question, we documented the diet, home range size, group sizes and composition, density, number of litters and body condition of lion tamarins living in cabruca, and other habitats. Jackfruit, Artocarpus heterophyllus, was the most used species used by lion tamarins in cabruca and was widely available and used throughout the year. In cabruca, home range size was the smallest (22-28ha) and density of lion tamarins was the highest (1.7ind/ha) reported for the species. Group size averaged 7.4 individuals and was not significantly different among the vegetation types. In cabruca, groups produced one or two litters a year, and all litters were twins. Adult males in cabruca were significantly heavier than males in primary forest. Our study is the first to demonstrate that breeding groups of golden-headed lion tamarins can survive and reproduce entirely within cabruca agroforest. Jackfruit proved to be a keystone resource for lion tamarins in cabruca, and bromeliads were important as an animal prey foraging microhabitat. In cases where cabruca contains concentrated resources, such as jackfruit and bromeliads, lion tamarins may not only survive and reproduce but may fare better than in other forest types, at least for body condition and reproduction. PMID:21079956

  13. Abundance of Jackfruit ( Artocarpus heterophyllus) Affects Group Characteristics and Use of Space by Golden-Headed Lion Tamarins ( Leontopithecus chrysomelas) in Cabruca Agroforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    C. Oliveira, Leonardo; G. Neves, Leonardo; E. Raboy, Becky; M. Dietz, James

    2011-08-01

    Cabruca is an agroforest of cacao trees shaded by native forest trees. It is the predominant vegetation type throughout eastern part of the range of the golden-headed lion tamarins, Leontopithecus chrysomelas, an endangered primate endemic to Atlantic Forest. Understanding how lion tamarins use this agroforest is a conservation priority. To address this question, we documented the diet, home range size, group sizes and composition, density, number of litters and body condition of lion tamarins living in cabruca, and other habitats. Jackfruit, Artocarpus heterophyllus, was the most used species used by lion tamarins in cabruca and was widely available and used throughout the year. In cabruca, home range size was the smallest (22-28 ha) and density of lion tamarins was the highest (1.7 ind/ha) reported for the species. Group size averaged 7.4 individuals and was not significantly different among the vegetation types. In cabruca, groups produced one or two litters a year, and all litters were twins. Adult males in cabruca were significantly heavier than males in primary forest. Our study is the first to demonstrate that breeding groups of golden-headed lion tamarins can survive and reproduce entirely within cabruca agroforest. Jackfruit proved to be a keystone resource for lion tamarins in cabruca, and bromeliads were important as an animal prey foraging microhabitat. In cases where cabruca contains concentrated resources, such as jackfruit and bromeliads, lion tamarins may not only survive and reproduce but may fare better than in other forest types, at least for body condition and reproduction.

  14. Distinct Spacing Between Anionic Groups: An Essential Chemical Determinant for Achieving Thiophene-Based Ligands to Distinguish ?-Amyloid or Tau Polymorphic Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Klingstedt, Therse; Shirani, Hamid; Mahler, Jasmin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Nystrm, Sofie; Goedert, Michel; Jucker, Mathias; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2015-06-15

    The accumulation of protein aggregates is associated with many devastating neurodegenerative diseases and the existence of distinct aggregated morphotypes has been suggested to explain the heterogeneous phenotype reported for these diseases. Thus, the development of molecular probes able to distinguish such morphotypes is essential. We report an anionic tetrameric oligothiophene compound that can be utilized for spectral assignment of different morphotypes of ?-amyloid or tau aggregates present in transgenic mice at distinct ages. The ability of the ligand to spectrally distinguish between the aggregated morphotypes was reduced when the spacing between the anionic substituents along the conjugated thiophene backbone was altered, which verified that specific molecular interactions between the ligand and the protein aggregate are necessary to detect aggregate polymorphism. Our findings provide the structural and functional basis for the development of new fluorescent ligands that can distinguish between different morphotypes of protein aggregates. PMID:26013403

  15. Working group 4 of International Standardization Organization -experience of developing the standards of space environment: status of 2010 and roadmap for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, Mikhail; Tobiska, W. Kent

    Since the beginning of 90's space environment international standards have been developed within the scope of ISO WG4 activities. This has been the first attempt to develop interna-tional standards of physical phenomena of natural environment such as galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar energetic particles (SEP), the Earth's magnetic field, the ionosphere, the plasma-sphere, etc. The main difficulty faced when developing the international standards is the lack of common methods for characterizing many natural phenomena. However, if methods have been successfully developed, such standards can play an outstanding role in the engineering requirements for spacecraft designs. This report is a survey of the current status of the inter-national standards under development within the scope of the WG4 activity plan and roadmap for the future.

  16. Distinct Spacing Between Anionic Groups: An Essential Chemical Determinant for Achieving Thiophene-Based Ligands to Distinguish β-Amyloid or Tau Polymorphic Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Klingstedt, Therése; Shirani, Hamid; Mahler, Jasmin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Nyström, Sofie; Goedert, Michel; Jucker, Mathias; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of protein aggregates is associated with many devastating neurodegenerative diseases and the existence of distinct aggregated morphotypes has been suggested to explain the heterogeneous phenotype reported for these diseases. Thus, the development of molecular probes able to distinguish such morphotypes is essential. We report an anionic tetrameric oligothiophene compound that can be utilized for spectral assignment of different morphotypes of β-amyloid or tau aggregates present in transgenic mice at distinct ages. The ability of the ligand to spectrally distinguish between the aggregated morphotypes was reduced when the spacing between the anionic substituents along the conjugated thiophene backbone was altered, which verified that specific molecular interactions between the ligand and the protein aggregate are necessary to detect aggregate polymorphism. Our findings provide the structural and functional basis for the development of new fluorescent ligands that can distinguish between different morphotypes of protein aggregates. PMID:26013403

  17. Crystallographic preferred orientation and deformation of deep Earth minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Pamela Michelle

    This thesis aims to provide further insight into crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) and deformation mechanisms active at high pressure. Preferred orientation of iron-rich magnesiowustite (Mg,Fe)O, a major mantle mineral phase, stishovite (SiO2), the high pressure polymorph of quartz that is likely present in the lower crust and mantle, and in NaMgF3 + NaCl, an analog system to lower mantle minerals MgSiO3 + MgO, have been examined with synchrotron X-ray diffraction while at high pressure in either a diamond anvil cell or a multianvil press. Magnesiowustite, (Mg0.08Fe0.88)O, and wustite, Fe0.94O, were compressed up to 37 GPa at ambient temperature in diamond anvil cells (DAC) at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray diffraction patterns were taken in situ in radial geometry in order to study the evolution of CPO through the cubic-to-rhombohedral phase transition. Under uniaxial stress in the DAC, cubic texture developed (i.e. {100} c planes aligned perpendicular to the compression direction). Variant selection of preferred orientation was observed immediately following the transition to the rhombohedral phase. Upon decompression in the DAC, FeO reverted back to cubic symmetry and the cubic texture reappeared, demonstrating that the transition is reversible and has texture memory. The crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, but little is known about texture development during deformation, which provides information for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. Radial DAC experiments were done at the ALS and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) while collecting X-ray diffraction patterns in radial geometry to examine in situ development of CPO. Starting pressure in the sample chamber was still in the quartz stability field, and compression of quartz produced a weak texture, likely due to Dauphine twinning. Following compression of quartz into the stishovite stability field, near 13-16 GPa, the sample was laser heated to activate kinetics and transition to stishovite. Stishovite nucleated with (001) planes preferentially aligned perpendicular to compression. Increased preferred orientation during further compression up to 38 GPa is attributed to slip. Slip systems responsible were inferred from visco-plastic self-consistent modeling and are most likely basal and pyramidal slip at experimental conditions. Geodynamic models predict large strains due to convection in the mantle, and polycrystal plasticity simulations suggest strong preferred orientation. However, these models ignore interaction among phases, which is important for the lower mantle, estimated to be composed of ˜25% soft magnesiowustite (Mg,Fe)O and ˜70% harder Mg-perovskite (MgSiO3). How much preferred orientation develops as a result of large strains in the lower mantle depends on the volume percent ratios and arrangement of the two phases. If grains of the softer phase, MgO, become interconnected, they may act as a lubricant between grains of the harder phase, thereby absorbing most of the deformation. Alternatively, the soft phase may sit in pockets in between harder MgSiO 3 grains, and thus not be interconnected, leaving MgSiO3 to bear the load. In the former case, MgO will control the deformation, and in the later, MgSiO3, and the development of CPO in these two cases may greatly differ. To study CPO development in a two-phase system, deformation experiments were performed in the deformation-DIA (D-DIA, DIA being shortening of "diamond") at the APS while collecting X-ray diffraction patterns in situ. While the D-DIA offers more control over deformation conditions and temperature and can deform larger samples, resulting in better counting statistics than for DAC samples, it cannot reach pressures beyond 12 GPa or temperatures higher than 2000 K. Thus neighborite (NaMgF3) and halite (NaCl), which have the same structures and relative strengths as mantle minerals silicate-magnesium pervoskite (MgSiO3) and periclase (MgO) but deform more easily, were chosen as analogs. Information on grain structure and distribution before and after deformation was collected using X-ray microtomography, both at the APS and the ALS. Results from D-DIA experiments show that when present in as little as 15%, the soft phase absorbs much of the deformation, greatly reducing CPO of the harder phase. Conversely, CPO in NaCl is highest for the sample with highest NaCl content. In addition, microtomography data shows that soft NaCl is largely connected and surrounds the harder grains of NaMgF3. Deformation of NaMgF3 and NaCl was simulated with both a self-consistent polycrystal plasticity model and with another polycrystal plasticity model which uses fast Fourier transform that takes into account interactions among grains and is better suited to study deformation in two-phase materials. Implications for the lower mantle are discussed. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  18. Discovery of novel inhibitors for DHODH via virtual screening and X-ray crystallographic structures

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Larry R.; Zhang, Ying; Degnen, William; Peppard, Jane; Cabel, Dasha; Zou, Chao; Tsay, Joseph T.; Subramaniam, Arun; Vaz, Roy J.; Li, Yi

    2010-10-28

    Amino-benzoic acid derivatives 1-4 were found to be inhibitors for DHODH by virtual screening, biochemical, and X-ray crystallographic studies. X-ray structures showed that 1 and 2 bind to DHODH as predicted by virtual screening, but 3 and 4 were found to be structurally different from the corresponding compounds initially identified by virtual screening.

  19. Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. IV. Preparation of "Interatomic Distances 1960-65"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, F. H.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre is concerned with the retrieval, evaluation, synthesis, and dissemination of structural data obtained by diffraction methods. This paper describes the use of a computer-based file system of both bibliographic information and numeric data to produce a compendium of interatomic distances. (10 references)…

  20. Crystallographic Texture and Magnetic Anisotropy and Their Influence Upon Microwave Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, V. G.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.

    2013-07-01

    The role of magnetic and structural anisotropies in determining the radio-frequency properties of ferrites and their performance characteristics when integrated within high-frequency devices are explored. Both thin-film epitaxy and bulk polycrystalline texture are discussed, defining viable paths to realizing the crystallographic texture required for device integration.

  1. Control of crystallographic orientation in diamond synthesis through laser resonant vibrational excitation of precursor molecules

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhi Qiang; Bai, Jaeil; Zhou, Yun Shen; Gao, Yi; Park, Jongbok; Guillemet, Thomas; Jiang, Lan; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Lu, Yong Feng

    2014-01-01

    Crystallographic orientations determine the optical, electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of crystals. Control of crystallographic orientations has been studied by changing the growth parameters, including temperature, pressure, proportion of precursors, and surface conditions. However, molecular dynamic mechanisms underlying these controls remain largely unknown. Here we achieved control of crystallographic orientations in diamond growth through a joint experimental and theoretical study of laser resonant vibrational excitation of precursor molecules (ethylene). Resonant vibrational excitation of the ethylene molecules using a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser steers the chemical reactions and promotes proportion of intermediate oxide species, which results in preferential growth of {100}-oriented diamond films and diamond single crystals in open air. Quantum molecular dynamic simulations and calculations of chemisorption energies of radicals detected from our mass-spectroscopy experiment provide an in-depth understanding of molecular reaction mechanisms in the steering of chemical reactions and control of crystallographic orientations. This finding opens up a new avenue for controlled chemical vapor deposition of crystals through resonant vibrational excitations to steer surface chemistry. PMID:24694918

  2. A log-likelihood-gain intensity target for crystallographic phasing that accounts for experimental error

    PubMed Central

    Read, Randy J.; McCoy, Airlie J.

    2016-01-01

    The crystallographic diffraction experiment measures Bragg intensities; crystallo­graphic electron-density maps and other crystallographic calculations in phasing require structure-factor amplitudes. If data were measured with no errors, the structure-factor amplitudes would be trivially proportional to the square roots of the intensities. When the experimental errors are large, and especially when random errors yield negative net intensities, the conversion of intensities and their error estimates into amplitudes and associated error estimates becomes nontrivial. Although this problem has been addressed intermittently in the history of crystallographic phasing, current approaches to accounting for experimental errors in macromolecular crystallography have numerous significant defects. These have been addressed with the formulation of LLGI, a log-likelihood-gain function in terms of the Bragg intensities and their associated experimental error estimates. LLGI has the correct asymptotic behaviour for data with large experimental error, appropriately downweighting these reflections without introducing bias. LLGI abrogates the need for the conversion of intensity data to amplitudes, which is usually performed with the French and Wilson method [French & Wilson (1978 ▸), Acta Cryst. A35, 517–525], wherever likelihood target functions are required. It has general applicability for a wide variety of algorithms in macromolecular crystallography, including scaling, characterizing anisotropy and translational noncrystallographic symmetry, detecting outliers, experimental phasing, molecular replacement and refinement. Because it is impossible to reliably recover the original intensity data from amplitudes, it is suggested that crystallographers should always deposit the intensity data in the Protein Data Bank. PMID:26960124

  3. Contribution to crystallographic slip assessment by means of topographic measurements achieved with atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kahloun, C.; Badji, R.; Bacroix, B.; Bouabdallah, M.

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to quantitatively characterize the plastic glide occurring during tensile deformation of a duplex 2205 stainless steel sample. We demonstrate that an appropriate treatment of the topographic image issued from AFM measurements allows precise and quantitative information about the characteristics of plastic deformation and especially the amount of crystallographic slip.

  4. Ecosystem Analysis from Space: Diagnosis of Phytoplankton Functional Groups from Satellite Data and Skill Assessment for Coupled Hydrodynamic-Ecosystem Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliff, J. K.; Penta, B.; Kindle, J.

    2006-12-01

    A suite of empirical and semi-analytic ocean color algorithms were applied to three years of Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) data from the Gulf of Mexico. Examination of the interdependencies between various ocean color products and their relationships to satellite-retrieved physical variables (sea surface temperature, sea surface height) provided a means to diagnose potential changes in the taxonomic composition and size-structure of the surface phytoplankton community and attendant changes in the upper- ocean thermal structure. The principal method used to discern dominant phytoplankton functional groups was via examination of the satellite-estimated phytoplankton absorption efficiency: the ratio of phytoplankton absorption (443 nm) product to the surface pigment concentration product. The results were used to analyze a model of phytoplankton functional group dynamics for the surface mixed layer. Statistical plots summarizing the root-mean-square-errors and correlation coefficients between the model's results and the satellite-estimated chlorophyll fractionation were used to implement a model skill assessment for a range of potential model parameter settings.

  5. Far-ir Spectroscopy Of Various Mineral Groups: Providing Laboratory Data For Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusentsova, Tatyana; Peale, R.; Maukonen, D.; Figueiredo, P.; Harlow, G.; Ebel, D.; Lisse, C.

    2011-01-01

    To aid in interpreting data from Herschel Space Observatory Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS), we have collected mass absorption coefficient spectra in the wavelength range 15 to 250 micron of micron-sized powders for more than 140 mineral species representing various mineral groups. Mineral groups investigated included nesosilicates (olivines, garnets, phenakite), inosilicates (pyroxenes, pyroxenoids, amphiboles), sorosilicates, cyclosilicates, tectosilicates (silicas, feldspars), phyllosilicates, carbonates, sulfides, and oxides. The mineral samples were selected from AMNH mineral collection, chemical and crystallographic identity of all minerals was confirmed by means of electron microprobe and grain and powder XRD. Samples were ground to micron dimensions and the micron size distribution was ensured by Stokes settling, verified by scanning electron microscopy. Milligram quantities of mineral sample were dispersed in polyethylene powder and melted into pellets. Spectra were collected using a Fourier spectrometer with globar source, mylar beamsplitter, and a 4 K bolometer. Temperature dependence of the spectra down to 15 K revealed sharpening and blue-shifts of the characteristic absorption lines, and in some cases, resolution of additional features not seen at room temperature. Mineral spectra in the far-IR region are highly characteristic of mineral group, crystal structure and chemical composition. The spectral data obtained in this study, together with the accompanying mineral characterization data, will be added to Planetary Data System database to be used for mineral identification in cosmic dust populations, based on far-IR emission spectra of collected by Herschel and similar space IR missions.

  6. Strategies, Programs and Projects 2008 of the Astrophysical Group "SPACE-Universidad Nacional Mayor De San Marcos, Peru" - Preparing for the IYA2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, Victor; Aguilar, M.; Huisacayna, J.

    2008-05-01

    We present a review of our efforts to introduce astronomy as scientific career in Peru, showing how our astronomy outreach programs have been one of the most important keys to reach our national astronomical scientific goals, remarking the crucial role that the celebration of the IYA2009 must play, in order to promote PhD programmes in astronomy in developing countries. We show the importance of the creation of the Seminario Permanente de Astronomía y Ciencias Espaciales (SPACE) in the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, as an academic scientific and cultural center in Peru, to support our 26 years-old "Astronomical Fridays which are addressed to wide range of public, from schoolchildren to scientists. We also show how important was to rediscover our ancient astronomical cultural past of Incas in order to promote the construction of a Astronomical Center located near Cusco city over 4000 meters above sea level, which includes a tourist-educational observatory, a scientific optical observatory and a solar radio observatory.

  7. Space Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Mary Fae (Editor); McKay, David S. (Editor); Duke, Michael S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Space resources must be used to support life on the Moon and exploration of Mars. Just as the pioneers applied the tools they brought with them to resources they found along the way rather than trying to haul all their needs over a long supply line, so too must space travelers apply their high technology tools to local resources. The pioneers refilled their water barrels at each river they forded; moonbase inhabitants may use chemical reactors to combine hydrogen brought from Earth with oxygen found in lunar soil to make their water. The pioneers sought temporary shelter under trees or in the lee of a cliff and built sod houses as their first homes on the new land; settlers of the Moon may seek out lava tubes for their shelter or cover space station modules with lunar regolith for radiation protection. The pioneers moved further west from their first settlements, using wagons they had built from local wood and pack animals they had raised; space explorers may use propellant made at a lunar base to take them on to Mars. The concept for this report was developed at a NASA-sponsored summer study in 1984. The program was held on the Scripps campus of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). It was jointly managed under the California Space Inst. and the NASA Johnson Space Center, under the direction of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) at NASA Headquarters. The study participants (listed in the addendum) included a group of 18 university teachers and researchers (faculty fellows) who were present for the entire 10-week period and a larger group of attendees from universities, Government, and industry who came for a series of four 1-week workshops. The organization of this report follows that of the summer study. Space Resources consists of a brief overview and four detailed technical volumes: (1) Scenarios; (2) Energy, Power, and Transport; (3) Materials; (4) Social Concerns. Although many of the included papers got their impetus from workshop discussions, most have been written since then, thus allowing the authors to base new applications on established information and tested technology. All these papers have been updated to include the authors' current work. This overview, drafted by faculty fellow Jim Burke, describes the findings of the summer study, as participants explored the use of space resources in the development of future space activities and defined the necessary research and development that must precede the practical utilization of these resources. Space resources considered included lunar soil, oxygen derived from lunar soil, material retrieved from near-Earth asteroids, abundant sunlight, low gravity, and high vacuum. The study participants analyzed the direct use of these resources, the potential demand for products from them, the techniques for retrieving and processing space resources, the necessary infrastructure, and the economic tradeoffs. This is certainly not the first report to urge the utilization of space resources in the development of space activities. In fact, Space Resources may be seen as the third of a trilogy of NASA Special Publications reporting such ideas arising from similar studies. It has been preceded by Space Settlements: A Design Study (NASA SP-413) and Space Resources and Space Settlements (NASA SP-428). And other, contemporaneous reports have responded to the same themes. The National Commission on Space, led by Thomas Paine, in Pioneering the Space Frontier, and the NASA task force led by astronaut Sally Ride, in Leadership and America's Future in Space, also emphasize expansion of the space Infrastructure; more detailed exploration of the Moon, Mars, and asteroids; an early start on the development of the technology necessary for using space resources; and systematic development of the skills necessary for long-term human presence in space. Our report does not represent any Government-authorized view or official NASA policy. NASA's official response to these challenging opportunities must be found in the reports of its Office of Exploration, which was established in 1987. That office's report, released in November 1989, of a 90-day study of possible plans for human exploration of the Moon and Mars is NASA's response to the new initiative proposed by President Bush on July 20, 1989, the 20th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing on the Moon: "First, for the coming decade, for the 1990s, Space Station Freedom, our critical next step in all our space endeavors. And next, for the new century, back to the Moon, back to the future, and this time, back to stay. And then a journey into tomorrow, a journey to another planet, a manned mission to Mars." This report, Space Resources, offers substantiation for NASA's bid to carry out that new initiative.

  8. Local dynamics of proteins and DNA evaluated from crystallographic B factors

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Bohdan; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Brevern, Alexandre G. de; Černý, Jiří

    2014-09-01

    Distributions of scaled B factors from 704 protein–DNA complexes reflect primarily the neighbourhood of amino-acid and nucleotide residues: their flexibility grows from the protein core to protein–protein and protein–DNA interfaces, to solvent-exposed residues. Some of the findings clearly observed at higher resolution structures can no longer be observed for structures at low resolution indicating problems in refinement protocols. The dynamics of protein and nucleic acid structures is as important as their average static picture. The local molecular dynamics concealed in diffraction images is expressed as so-called B factors. To find out how the crystal-derived B factors represent the dynamic behaviour of atoms and residues of proteins and DNA in their complexes, the distributions of scaled B factors from a carefully curated data set of over 700 protein–DNA crystal structures were analyzed [Schneider et al. (2014 ▶), Nucleic Acids Res.42, 3381–3394]. Amino acids and nucleotides were categorized based on their molecular neighbourhood as solvent-accessible, solvent-inaccessible (i.e. forming the protein core) or lying at protein–protein or protein–DNA interfaces; the backbone and side-chain atoms were analyzed separately. The B factors of two types of crystal-ordered water molecules were also analyzed. The analysis confirmed several expected features of protein and DNA dynamics, but also revealed surprising facts. Solvent-accessible amino acids have B factors that are larger than those of residues at the biomolecular interfaces, and core-forming amino acids are the most restricted in their movement. A unique feature of the latter group is that their side-chain and backbone atoms are restricted in their movement to the same extent; in all other amino-acid groups the side chains are more floppy than the backbone. The low values of the B factors of water molecules bridging proteins with DNA and the very large fluctuations of DNA phosphates are surprising. The features discriminating different types of residues are less pronounced in structures with lower crystallographic resolution. Some of the observed trends are likely to be the consequence of improper refinement protocols that may need to be rectified.

  9. Petrographic and crystallographic study of silicate minerals in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, I. S. E.; Turner, F. J.; Wenk, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    Optical U-stage measurements, chemical microprobe data, and X-ray procession photographs of a bytownite twin group from rock 12032,44 are compared. Sharp but weak b and no c-reflections were observed for this An89 bytownite indicating a partly disordered structure. Euler angles, used to characterize the orientation of the optical indicatrix, compare better with values for plutonic than for volcanic plagioclase. This indicates that structural and optical properties cannot be directly correlated.

  10. Crystallographic parameters in geometrically and topologically close-packed superstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Knestaypin, Evgeny A. E-mail: 7mmm81@gmal.com; Morozov, Maksim M. E-mail: 7mmm81@gmal.com; Potekaev, Alexandr I.; Klopotov, Anatoly A.; Markova, Tatyana N.; Klopotov, Vladimir D.

    2014-11-14

    The structures of stoichiometric compositions AB, A{sub 2}B, and A{sub 3}B for structures, B19, L1{sub 0}, L1{sub 2}, D0{sub 19}, D0{sub 22}, D0{sub 23}, D0{sub 24}, A15, C14, C15 and C36 have been investigated based on the analysis of diagrams in coordinates of space-filling coefficients Ψ on superstructural compression ΔΩ/Ω. On the basis of the analysis of the abovementioned diagrams, the equation Ψ = f{sub 0}+f{sub 1}(ΔΩ/Ω) has been obtained, and coefficients f{sub 0} and f{sub 1} of the equation for the investigated structures have been determined. It has been established that values of coefficients f{sub 0} and f{sub 1} for Laves phases have higher values than for all other compounds.

  11. Space Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Mary Fae (Editor); McKay, David S. (Editor); Duke, Michael S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Space resources must be used to support life on the Moon and exploration of Mars. Just as the pioneers applied the tools they brought with them to resources they found along the way rather than trying to haul all their needs over a long supply line, so too must space travelers apply their high technology tools to local resources. The pioneers refilled their water barrels at each river they forded; moonbase inhabitants may use chemical reactors to combine hydrogen brought from Earth with oxygen found in lunar soil to make their water. The pioneers sought temporary shelter under trees or in the lee of a cliff and built sod houses as their first homes on the new land; settlers of the Moon may seek out lava tubes for their shelter or cover space station modules with lunar regolith for radiation protection. The pioneers moved further west from their first settlements, using wagons they had built from local wood and pack animals they had raised; space explorers may use propellant made at a lunar base to take them on to Mars. The concept for this report was developed at a NASA-sponsored summer study in 1984. The program was held on the Scripps campus of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). It was jointly managed under the California Space Inst. and the NASA Johnson Space Center, under the direction of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) at NASA Headquarters. The study participants (listed in the addendum) included a group of 18 university teachers and researchers (faculty fellows) who were present for the entire 10-week period and a larger group of attendees from universities, Government, and industry who came for a series of four 1-week workshops. The organization of this report follows that of the summer study. Space Resources consists of a brief overview and four detailed technical volumes: (1) Scenarios; (2) Energy, Power, and Transport; (3) Materials; (4) Social Concerns. Although many of the included papers got their impetus from workshop discussions, most have been written since then, thus allowing the authors to base new applications on established information and tested technology. All these papers have been updated to include the authors' current work. This overview, drafted by faculty fellow Jim Burke, describes the findings of the summer study, as participants explored the use of space resources in the development of future space activities and defined the necessary research and development that must precede the practical utilization of these resources. Space resources considered included lunar soil, oxygen derived from lunar soil, material retrieved from near-Earth asteroids, abundant sunlight, low gravity, and high vacuum. The study participants analyzed the direct use of these resources, the potential demand for products from them, the techniques for retrieving and processing space resources, the necessary infrastructure, and the economic tradeoffs. This is certainly not the first report to urge the utilization of space resources in the development of space activities. In fact, Space Resources may be seen as the third of a trilogy of NASA Special Publications reporting such ideas arising from similar studies. It has been preceded by Space Settlements: A Design Study (NASA SP-413) and Space Resources and Space Settlements (NASA SP-428). And other, contemporaneous reports have responded to the same themes. The National Commission on Space, led by Thomas Paine, in Pioneering the Space Frontier, and the NASA task force led by astronaut Sally Ride, in Leadership and America's Future in Space, also emphasize expansion of the space Infrastructure; more detailed exploration of the Moon, Mars, and asteroids; an early start on the development of the technology necessary for using space resources; and systematic development of the skills necessary for long-term human presence in space. Our report does not represent any Government-authorized view or official NASA policy. NASA's official response to these challenging op

  12. Lie Groups, Physics, and Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Robert

    2008-01-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Lie groups; 2. Matrix groups; 4. Lie algebras; 5. Matrix algebras; 6. Operator algebras; 7. Exponentiation; 8. Structure theory for Lie algebras; 9. Structure theory for simple Lie algebras; 10. Root spaces and Dykin diagrams; 11. Real forms; 12. Riemannian symmetric spaces; 13. Contraction; 14. Hydrogenic atoms; 15. Maxwell's equations; 16. Lie groups and differential equations; References; Index.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of recombinant immunoglobulin G-binding protein from Streptococcus suis

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Abdul Hamid; Chu, Fuliang; Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Qinagmin; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George Fu

    2008-08-01

    Crystallization of recombinant IgG-binding protein expressed in Escherichia coli using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method is described. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.98, b = 43.94, c = 78.17 Å. Streptococcus suis, an important zoonotic pathogen, expresses immunoglobulin G-binding protein, which is thought to be helpful to the organism in eluding the host defence system. Recombinant IgG-binding protein expressed in Escherichia coli has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.98, b = 43.94, c = 78.17 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to 2.60 Å resolution.

  14. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.573, a putative sugar kinase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yan-Feng; Li, Lan-Fen; Yang, Cheng; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2008-01-01

    SMU.573 from S. mutans was expressed in E. coli and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group I4 and 2.5 Å resolution diffraction data were collected at an in-house chromium radiation source. SMU.573 from Streptococcus mutans is a structurally and functionally uncharacterized protein that was selected for structural biology studies. Native and SeMet-labelled proteins were expressed with an N-His tag in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified by Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals of the SeMet-labelled protein were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and a 2.5 Å resolution diffraction data set was collected using an in-house chromium radiation source. The crystals belong to space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.53, c = 56.26 Å, α = β = γ = 90°.

  15. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SecA from Enterococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Meining, Winfried; Scheuring, Johannes; Fischer, Markus; Weinkauf, Sevil

    2006-06-01

    SecA ATPase from E. faecalis has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals belong to space group C2 and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution. The gene coding for SecA from Enterococcus faecalis was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In this protein, the lysine at position 6 was replaced by an asparagine in order to reduce sensitivity towards proteases. The modified protein was purified and crystallized. Crystals diffracting to 2.4 Å resolution were obtained using the vapour-diffusion technique. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 203.4, b = 49.8, c = 100.8 Å, α = γ = 90.0, β = 119.1°. A selenomethionine derivative was prepared and is currently being tested in crystallization trials.

  16. Cloning, preparation and preliminary crystallographic studies of penicillin V acylase autoproteolytic processing mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, P. Manish; Brannigan, James A.; Prabhune, Asmita; Pundle, Archana; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Dodson, G. Guy; Suresh, C. G.

    2005-01-01

    The production, crystallization and characterization of three inactive mutants of penicillin V acylase from B. sphaericus in their respective precursor and processed forms are reported. The space groups are different for the native enzyme and the mutants. The crystallization of three catalytically inactive mutants of penicillin V acylase (PVA) from Bacillus sphaericus in precursor and processed forms is reported. The mutant proteins crystallize in different primitive monoclinic space groups that are distinct from the crystal forms for the native enzyme. Directed mutants and clone constructs were designed to study the post-translational autoproteolytic processing of PVA. The catalytically inactive mutants will provide three-dimensional structures of precursor PVA forms, plus open a route to the study of enzyme–substrate complexes for this industrially important enzyme.

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of laminin-binding protein (Lmb) from Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Ragunathan, Preethi; Spellerberg, Barbara; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2009-01-01

    Laminin-binding protein (Lmb), a surface-exposed lipoprotein from Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus), mediates attachment to human laminin and plays a crucial role in the adhesion/invasion of eukaryotic host cells. However, the structural basis of laminin binding still remains unclear. In the context of detailed structural analysis, the lmb gene has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.5? and belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.63, b = 70.60, c = 75.37?, ? = 96.77. PMID:19407385

  18. STM and LEED observations of the surface structure of TiO2(110) following crystallographic shear plane formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. A.; Poulston, S.; Stone, P.; Bowker, M.

    1999-04-01

    Extended vacuum annealing of rutile TiO2(110) produces macroscopic and nanoscopic changes in the surface morphology. These result from the ordering of oxygen vacancies/Tin+ interstitials in bulk TiO2 into crystallographic shear (CS) planes. We have employed low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) to identify the surface termination of CS planes produced in the bulk. The directions of the planar defects along the surface indicate the \\{132\\} series of shear planes dominate the STM images, which is also supported by the LEED results. The spacing between planes gradually varies across the surface suggesting that a series of Magnéli phases are formed. LEED patterns confirm the coexistence of both relatively large areas of a single phase and a continuum of separations between planes. Formation of CS planes also leads to extensive facetting of the crystal, which is visible to the naked eye as a rippled surface finish. Some Ca segregation is observed during CS plane formation; however, when removed the CS planes remain, indicating they are not significantly stabilized by the Ca.

  19. Sporulation Phosporelay Proteins And Their Complexes: Crystallographic Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Varughese, K.I.; Zhao, H.; Veldore, V.H.; Zapf, J.

    2009-06-04

    Bacteria use two-component systems to adapt to changes in environmental conditions. In response to deteriorating conditions of growth, certain types of bacteria form spores instead of proceeding with cell division. The formation of spores is controlled by an expanded version of two-component systems called the phosphorelay. The phosphorelay comprises a primary kinase that receives the signal/stimulus and undergoes autophosphorylation, followed by two intermediate messengers that regulate the flow of the phosphoryl group to the ultimate response regulator/transcription factor. Sporulation is initiated when the level of phosphorylation of the transcription factor reaches a critical point. This chapter describes efforts to understand the mechanism of initiation of sporulation at the molecular level using X-ray crystallography as a tool. Structural analyses of individual members, as well as their complexes, provide insight into the mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and the origin of specificity in signal transduction.

  20. An evaluation of adhesive sample holders for advanced crystallographic experiments.

    PubMed

    Mazzorana, Marco; Sanchez-Weatherby, Juan; Sandy, James; Lobley, Carina M C; Sorensen, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The hydration state of macromolecular crystals often affects their overall order and, ultimately, the quality of the X-ray diffraction pattern that they produce. Post-crystallization techniques that alter the solvent content of a crystal may induce rearrangement within the three-dimensional array making up the crystal, possibly resulting in more ordered packing. The hydration state of a crystal can be manipulated by exposing it to a stream of air at controlled relative humidity in which the crystal can equilibrate. This approach provides a way of exploring crystal hydration space to assess the diffraction capabilities of existing crystals. A key requirement of these experiments is to expose the crystal directly to the dehydrating environment by having the minimum amount of residual mother liquor around it. This is usually achieved by placing the crystal on a flat porous support (Kapton mesh) and removing excess liquid by wicking. Here, an alternative approach is considered whereby crystals are harvested using adhesives that capture naked crystals directly from their crystallization drop, reducing the process to a one-step procedure. The impact of using adhesives to ease the harvesting of different types of crystals is presented together with their contribution to background scattering and their usefulness in dehydration experiments. It is concluded that adhesive supports represent a valuable tool for mounting macromolecular crystals to be used in humidity-controlled experiments and to improve signal-to-noise ratios in diffraction experiments, and how they can protect crystals from modifications in the sample environment is discussed. PMID:25195752

  1. An evaluation of adhesive sample holders for advanced crystallographic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzorana, Marco; Sanchez-Weatherby, Juan Sandy, James; Lobley, Carina M. C.; Sorensen, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Commercially available adhesives have been evaluated for crystal mounting when undertaking complex macromolecular crystallography experiments. Here, their use as tools for advanced sample mounting and cryoprotection is assessed and their suitability for room-temperature data-collection and humidity-controlled studies is investigated. The hydration state of macromolecular crystals often affects their overall order and, ultimately, the quality of the X-ray diffraction pattern that they produce. Post-crystallization techniques that alter the solvent content of a crystal may induce rearrangement within the three-dimensional array making up the crystal, possibly resulting in more ordered packing. The hydration state of a crystal can be manipulated by exposing it to a stream of air at controlled relative humidity in which the crystal can equilibrate. This approach provides a way of exploring crystal hydration space to assess the diffraction capabilities of existing crystals. A key requirement of these experiments is to expose the crystal directly to the dehydrating environment by having the minimum amount of residual mother liquor around it. This is usually achieved by placing the crystal on a flat porous support (Kapton mesh) and removing excess liquid by wicking. Here, an alternative approach is considered whereby crystals are harvested using adhesives that capture naked crystals directly from their crystallization drop, reducing the process to a one-step procedure. The impact of using adhesives to ease the harvesting of different types of crystals is presented together with their contribution to background scattering and their usefulness in dehydration experiments. It is concluded that adhesive supports represent a valuable tool for mounting macromolecular crystals to be used in humidity-controlled experiments and to improve signal-to-noise ratios in diffraction experiments, and how they can protect crystals from modifications in the sample environment is discussed.

  2. Crystallographic Texture and Orientation Variants in Al2O3-Y3Al5O12 Directionally Solidified Eutectic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, Colleen S.; Dickey, Elizabeth C.; Sayir, Ali; Farmer, Serene (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Eutectic rods of Al2O3 and Y3Al5O12 were grown by a laser-heated float zone method, and their microstructure and crystallographic texture were studied by scanning electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction and x-ray diffraction. The composites were found to be highly textured with two twin-related crystallographic orientation relationships between the phases. Electron backscattered diffraction was employed to determine the spatial distribution of the orientational variants within the samples and to define the crystallographic orientation of various microstructural features.

  3. Microscopic, crystallographic and adherence properties of plasma-sprayed calcium phosphate coatings on Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufekci, Eser

    Recently, plasma-spayed titanium implants have become very popular in the dentistry because of their biocompatibility and ability of providing osseointegration with the surrounding bone. Although there are numerous published studies on these materials, information and standards are still lacking. This study investigated the miscrostructural, crystallographic and adherence properties of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-6Al-4V substrates. The microstructures of the coatings and the elemental interdiffusion near the coating/substrate interface were investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with x-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). X-ray diffraction analyses performed on Ti-6Al-4V coupons prepared with different percent crystallinities have provided structural information such as degree of crystallinity, phases present, average crystallite size, as well as the residual stresses within the coating. For evaluation of the adherence of the coatings to the substrates, experimental rods were subjected to torsion. The fracture surfaces were analyzed using SEM/EDS to develop a new methodology to determine the percent adherence of the coatings. SEM studies indicated that the surface microstructures of commercial dental implants were consistent with the plasma-spraying. In cross-section, coatings exhibited minimal porosity and limited interdiffusion of titanium and calcium at the coating/substrate interface. X-ray diffraction analyses indicated that the highest crystallinity coatings consisted of almost entirely HA and an amorphous calcium phosphate phase. As the coating crystallinity decreased, increasing amounts of alpha- and beta-tricalcium phosphate and tetracalcium phosphate were detected. The mean percent crystallinity for the three sets of coatings ranged from 50-60%. The mean HA crystallite size for the three sets of coatings ranged from about 0.02-0.04 mum. Differences in mean interplanar spacings for three selected crystallographic planes of HA, compared with the pure ICDD (International Center for Diffraction Data) powder standards, implied that coatings had a nonuniform state of tensile stresses (0-130 MPa). The EDS analyses of the fractured coating surfaces indicated that the percent coating adherence was approximately 20%, which appeared to be comparable to that observed in SEM photomicrographs.

  4. Crystallographic texture in mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion-strengthened MA956 and MA957 steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, T. S.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    1993-04-01

    The crystallographic textures of two mechanically alloyed, oxide dispersion-strengthened steels have been studied in the as-deformed and recrystallized conditions. The MA956 steel, which has relatively large chromium and aluminum concentrations, is found to exhibit a strong <110> fiber texture in the extruded condition. Despite the larger degree of deformation imparted to MA957 during extrusion, its crystallographic texture is found to be rather weak. Significant differences have also been found in the texture after recrystallization heat treatments. These differences could not be explained on the basis of deformation or recrystallization theory. However, the discovery that under certain specific conditions MA957 partially transforms to austenite has helped rationalize the texture results. In particular, the austenite is found to form at the temperature where the extrusion process is usually carried out. The observation of austenite is found to be consistent with thermodynamic phase stability calculations and metallographic experiments.

  5. Crystallographic dependence of CO activation on cobalt catalysts: HCP versus FCC.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Xun; Su, Hai-Yan; Sun, Da-Peng; Zhang, Bing-Yan; Li, Wei-Xue

    2013-11-01

    Identifying the structure sensitivity of catalysts in reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis from CO and H2 over cobalt catalysts, is an important yet challenging issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Based on a first-principles kinetic study, we find for the first time that CO activation on hexagonal close-packed (HCP) Co not only has much higher intrinsic activity than that of face centered-cubic (FCC) Co but also prefers a different reaction route, i.e., direct dissociation with HCP Co but H-assisted dissociation on the FCC Co. The origin is identified from the formation of various denser yet favorable active sites on HCP Co not available for FCC Co, due to their distinct crystallographic structure and morphology. The great dependence of the activity on the crystallographic structure and morphology of the catalysts revealed here may open a new avenue for better, stable catalysts with maximum mass-specific reactivity. PMID:24147726

  6. Hydrogen bond dynamics in crystalline ?-9-anthracene carboxylic acid--a combined crystallographic and spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Mor, Ren; Scholz, Mirko; Busse, Gehard; Busse, Lennart; Paulmann, Carsten; Tolkiehn, Martin; Techert, Simone

    2012-08-01

    We compare results from single crystal X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy to elucidate the nature of hydrogen bonding in ?-9-anthracene carboxylic acid (?-9AC, C(15)H(10)O(2)). The crystallographic studies indicate a disorder for the protons in the cyclic hydrogen bond. This disorder allows the determination of the energy difference between two proton sites along the hydrogen bond. The temperature dependent Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) underpins the crystallographic results. The combination of both methods allows the estimation of a one-dimensional potential curve describing the OH-stretching motion. The dynamical properties of the proton transfer along the hydrogen bond are extracted from this potential. The work presented here has profound implication on future studies of photochemical dynamics of crystalline ?-9AC, which can deliver a deeper understanding of the mechanism of photochemical driven molecular machines and the optical and electronic properties of molecular organic semiconductors. PMID:22735829

  7. Growth and crystallographic feature-dependent characterization of spinel zinc ferrite thin films by RF sputtering

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    ZnFe2O4 (ZFO) thin films exhibiting varying crystallographic features ((222)-epitaxially, (400)-epitaxially, and randomly oriented films) were grown on various substrates by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The type of substrate used profoundly affected the surface topography of the resulting ZFO films. The surface of the ZFO (222) epilayer was dense and exhibited small rectangular surface grains; however, the ZFO (400) epilayer exhibited small grooves. The surface of the randomly oriented ZFO thin film exhibited distinct three-dimensional island-like grains that demonstrated considerable surface roughness. Magnetization-temperature curves revealed that the ZFO thin films exhibited a spin-glass transition temperature of approximately 40K. The crystallographic orientation of the ZFO thin films strongly affected magnetic anisotropy. The ZFO (222) epitaxy exhibited the strongest magnetic anisotropy, whereas the randomly oriented ZFO thin film exhibited no clear magnetic anisotropy. PMID:24354428

  8. The X-ray system of crystallographic programs for any computer having a PIDGIN FORTRAN compiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. M.; Kruger, G. J.; Ammon, H. L.; Dickinson, C.; Hall, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    A manual is presented for the use of a library of crystallographic programs. This library, called the X-ray system, is designed to carry out the calculations required to solve the structure of crystals by diffraction techniques. It has been implemented at the University of Maryland on the Univac 1108. It has, however, been developed and run on a variety of machines under various operating systems. It is considered to be an essentially machine independent library of applications programs. The report includes definition of crystallographic computing terms, program descriptions, with some text to show their application to specific crystal problems, detailed card input descriptions, mass storage file structure and some example run streams.

  9. Crystallographic anisotropy of the resistivity size effect in single crystal tungsten nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dooho; Moneck, Matthew; Liu, Xuan; Oh, Soong Ju; Kagan, Cherie R.; Coffey, Kevin R.; Barmak, Katayun

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates an anisotropic increase in resistivity with decreasing width in single crystal tungsten (W) nanowires having a height of 21?nm. Nanowire-widths were in the range of 15451?nm, with the anisotropy observed for widths below 50?nm. The longitudinal directions of the nanowires coincided with the <100>, <110> and <111> orientations of the body centered cubic phase of W. The resistivity increase was observed to be minimized for the <111>-oriented single crystal nanowires, exhibiting a factor of two lower increase in resistivity at a width of ~15?nm, relative to the thin film resistivity (i.e., an infinitely wide wire). The observed anisotropy is attributed to crystallographic anisotropy of the Fermi velocity and the resultant anisotropy of the electron mean free path in W, and underscores the critical role of crystallographic orientation in nanoscale metallic conduction. PMID:24005230

  10. Preferred crystallographic orientation in the ice I ? II transformation and the flow of ice II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, K.; Wenk, H.-R.; Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    The preferred crystallographic orientation developed during the ice I ? II transformation and during the plastic flow of ice II was measured in polycrystalline deuterium oxide (D2O) specimens using low-temperature neutron diffraction. Samples partially transformed from ice I to II under a non-hydrostatic stress developed a preferred crystallographic orientation in the ice II. Samples of pure ice II transformed from ice I under a hydrostatic stress and then when compressed axially, developed a strong preferred orientation of compression axes parallel to (1010). A match to the observed preferred orientation using the viscoplastic self-consistent theory was obtained only when (1010) [0001] was taken as the predominant slip system in ice II.

  11. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic characterization of FlhF from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Bange, Gert; Petzold, Georg; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2007-05-01

    Preliminary crystallographic data are reported for the third SRP GTPase FlhF from Bacillus subtilis. The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis contains three proteins belonging to the signal recognition particle (SRP) type GTPase family. The well characterized signal sequence-binding protein SRP54 and the SRP receptor protein FtsY are universally conserved components of the SRP system of protein transport. The third member, FlhF, has been implicated in the placement and assembly of polar flagella. This article describes the overexpression and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of an FlhF fragment that corresponds to the well characterized GTPase domains in SRP54 and FtsY. Three crystal forms are reported with either GDP or GMPPNP and diffract to a resolution of about 3 .

  12. Asymmetric Rolling Process Simulations by Dynamic Explicit Crystallographic Homogenized Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoc Tam, Nguyen; Nakamura, Yasunori; Terao, Toshihiro; Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Nakamachi, Eiji; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Morimoto, Hideo

    2007-05-17

    Recently, the asymmetric rolling (ASR) has been applied to the material processing of aluminum alloy sheet to control micro-crystal structure and texture in order to improve the mechanical properties. Previously, several studies aimed at high formability sheet generation have been carried out experimentally, but finite element simulations to predict the deformation induced texture evolution of the asymmetrically rolled sheet metals have not been investigated rigorously. In this study, crystallographic homogenized finite element (FE) codes are developed and applied to analyze the asymmetrical rolling processes. The textures of sheet metals were measured by electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD), and compared with FE simulations. The results from the dynamic explicit type Crystallographic homogenization FEM code shows that this type of simulation is a comprehensive tool to predict the plastic induced texture evolution.

  13. Growth and crystallographic feature-dependent characterization of spinel zinc ferrite thin films by RF sputtering.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuan-Chang; Hsia, Hao-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    ZnFe2O4 (ZFO) thin films exhibiting varying crystallographic features ((222)-epitaxially, (400)-epitaxially, and randomly oriented films) were grown on various substrates by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The type of substrate used profoundly affected the surface topography of the resulting ZFO films. The surface of the ZFO (222) epilayer was dense and exhibited small rectangular surface grains; however, the ZFO (400) epilayer exhibited small grooves. The surface of the randomly oriented ZFO thin film exhibited distinct three-dimensional island-like grains that demonstrated considerable surface roughness. Magnetization-temperature curves revealed that the ZFO thin films exhibited a spin-glass transition temperature of approximately 40 K. The crystallographic orientation of the ZFO thin films strongly affected magnetic anisotropy. The ZFO (222) epitaxy exhibited the strongest magnetic anisotropy, whereas the randomly oriented ZFO thin film exhibited no clear magnetic anisotropy. PMID:24354428

  14. Mineralogical, crystallographic and morphological characteristics of natural kaolins from the Ivory Coast (West Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sei, J.; Morato, F.; Kra, G.; Staunton, S.; Quiquampoix, H.; Jumas, J. C.; Olivier-Fourcade, J.

    2006-10-01

    Thirteen clay samples from four deposits in the Ivory Coast (West Africa) were studied using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and chemical analysis. Mineralogical, crystallographic and morphological characteristics of these samples are given. Kaolinite is the principal mineral but other minerals are present in small quantities: illite, quartz, anatase and iron oxides (oxides and oxyhydroxides). The crystallographic, morphological and surface characteristics are influenced by the presence of these impurities. In particular, the presence of iron oxides was associated with reduced structural ordering and thermal stability of kaolinite and increased specific surface area. These clays could be used in the ceramics industry to make tiles and bricks, and also in agronomy as supports for chemical fertilizers or for environmental protection by immobilising potentially toxic waste products.

  15. Bacillus anthracis-Like Bacteria and Other B. cereus Group Members in a Microbial Community Within the International Space Station: A Challenge for Rapid and Easy Molecular Detection of Virulent B. anthracis

    PubMed Central

    van Tongeren, Sandra P.; Roest, Hendrik I. J.; Degener, John E.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2014-01-01

    For some microbial species, such as Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of the disease anthrax, correct detection and identification by molecular methods can be problematic. The detection of virulent B. anthracis is challenging due to multiple virulence markers that need to be present in order for B. anthracis to be virulent and its close relationship to Bacillus cereus and other members of the B. cereus group. This is especially the case in environments where build-up of Bacillus spores can occur and several representatives of the B. cereus group may be present, which increases the chance for false-positives. In this study we show the presence of B. anthracis-like bacteria and other members of the B. cereus group in a microbial community within the human environment of the International Space Station and their preliminary identification by using conventional culturing as well as molecular techniques including 16S rDNA sequencing, PCR and real-time PCR. Our study shows that when monitoring the microbial hygiene in a given human environment, health risk assessment is troublesome in the case of virulent B. anthracis, especially if this should be done with rapid, easy to apply and on-site molecular methods. PMID:24945323

  16. Microstructure, crystallographic texture and mechanical properties of friction stir welded AA2017A

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.M.Z.; Wynne, B.P.; Rainforth, W.M.; Threadgill, P.L.

    2012-02-15

    In this study a thick section (20 mm) friction stir welded AA2017A-T451 has been characterized in terms of microstructure, crystallographic texture and mechanical properties. For microstructural analysis both optical and scanning electron microscopes have been used. A detailed crystallographic texture analysis has been carried out using the electron back scattering diffraction technique. Crystallographic texture has been examined in both shoulder and probe affected regions of the weld NG. An entirely weak texture is observed at the shoulder affected region which is mainly explained by the effect of the sequential multi pass deformation experienced by both tool probe and tool shoulder. The texture in the probe dominated region at the AS side of the weld is relatively weak but still assembles the simple shear texture of FCC metals with B/B{sup Macron} and C components existing across the whole map. However, the texture is stronger at the RS than at the AS of the weld, mainly dominated byB/B{sup Macron} components and with C component almost absent across the map. An alternating bands between (B) components and (B{sup Macron }) component are observed only at the AS side of the weld. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed investigation of microstructure and crystallographic texture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grain size is varied from the top to the bottom of the NG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An entirely weak texture is observed at the shoulder affected region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The texture in the probe affected region is dominated by simple shear texture.

  17. Morphological and crystallographic evolution of bainite transformation in Fe-0.15C binary alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Terasaki, Hidenori; Komizo, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an in situ observation method, combining laser scanning confocal microscopy and electron backscattering diffraction, was used to investigate the morphological and crystallographic evolution of bainite transformation in a Fe-0.15C binary alloy. The nucleation at a grain boundary and inclusions, sympathetic nucleation, and impingement event of bainitic ferrite were directly shown in real time. The variant evolution during bainite transformation and misorientation between bainitic ferrites were clarified. Strong variant selection was observed during sympathetic nucleation. PMID:19588518

  18. Crystallographic and metallurgical characterization of radiation detector grade cadmium telluride materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.J.; Eissler, E.E.; Cameron, S.E. . eV Products Div.); Kong, Y.; Fan, S.; Jovanovic, S.; Lynn, K.G. )

    1993-01-01

    Radiation detector grade CdTe crystals are characterized by several crystallographic and metallurgical techniques including infrared microscopy, dislocation etch pitting and X-ray diffraction. Results are presented for a set of 50 detectors fabricated from an ingot produced by the High Pressure Bridgman method. Data on the temperature dependence of leakage current and pulse height analysis are presented, along with measurements of room temperature charge transport properties. Attempts to relate crystal structure to detector performance discussed.

  19. Crystallographic and metallurgical characterization of radiation detector grade cadmium telluride materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.J.; Eissler, E.E.; Cameron, S.E.; Kong, Y.; Fan, S.; Jovanovic, S.; Lynn, K.G.

    1993-06-01

    Radiation detector grade CdTe crystals are characterized by several crystallographic and metallurgical techniques including infrared microscopy, dislocation etch pitting and X-ray diffraction. Results are presented for a set of 50 detectors fabricated from an ingot produced by the High Pressure Bridgman method. Data on the temperature dependence of leakage current and pulse height analysis are presented, along with measurements of room temperature charge transport properties. Attempts to relate crystal structure to detector performance discussed.

  20. 3D mapping of crystallographic phase distribution using energy-selective neutron tomography.

    PubMed

    Woracek, Robin; Penumadu, Dayakar; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, Andre; Boin, Mirko; Banhart, John; Manke, Ingo

    2014-06-25

    Nondestructive 3D mapping of crystallographic phases is introduced providing distribution of phase fractions within the bulk (centimeter range) of samples with micrometer-scale resolution. The novel neutron tomography based technique overcomes critical limitations of existing techniques and offers a wide range of potential applications. It is demonstrated for steel samples exhibiting phase transformation after being subjected to tensile and torsional deformation. PMID:24692200