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Sample records for crystallographic space groups

  1. Bilbao Crystallographic Server. II. Representations of crystallographic point groups and space groups.

    PubMed

    Aroyo, Mois I; Kirov, Asen; Capillas, Cesar; Perez-Mato, J M; Wondratschek, Hans

    2006-03-01

    The Bilbao Crystallographic Server is a web site with crystallographic programs and databases freely available on-line (http://www.cryst.ehu.es). The server gives access to general information related to crystallographic symmetry groups (generators, general and special positions, maximal subgroups, Brillouin zones etc.). Apart from the simple tools for retrieving the stored data, there are programs for the analysis of group-subgroup relations between space groups (subgroups and supergroups, Wyckoff-position splitting schemes etc.). There are also software packages studying specific problems of solid-state physics, structural chemistry and crystallography. This article reports on the programs treating representations of point and space groups. There are tools for the construction of irreducible representations, for the study of the correlations between representations of group-subgroup pairs of space groups and for the decompositions of Kronecker products of representations. PMID:16489249

  2. The crystallographic chameleon: when space groups change skin.

    PubMed

    Nespolo, Massimo; Aroyo, Mois I

    2016-09-01

    Volume A of International Tables for Crystallography is the reference for space-group information. However, the content is not exhaustive because for many space groups a variety of settings may be chosen but not all of them are described in detail or even fully listed. The use of alternative settings may seem an unnecessary complication when the purpose is just to describe a crystal structure; however, these are of the utmost importance for a number of tasks, such as the investigation of structure relations between polymorphs or derivative structures, the study of pseudo-symmetry and its potential consequences, and the analysis of the common substructure of twins. The aim of the article is twofold: (i) to present a guide to expressing the symmetry operations, the Hermann-Mauguin symbols and the Wyckoff positions of a space group in an alternative setting, and (ii) to point to alternative settings of space groups of possible practical applications and not listed in Volume A of International Tables for Crystallography. PMID:27580201

  3. Prediction of molecular crystal structures by a crystallographic QM/MM model with full space-group symmetry.

    PubMed

    Mörschel, Philipp; Schmidt, Martin U

    2015-01-01

    A crystallographic quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical model (c-QM/MM model) with full space-group symmetry has been developed for molecular crystals. The lattice energy was calculated by quantum-mechanical methods for short-range interactions and force-field methods for long-range interactions. The quantum-mechanical calculations covered the interactions within the molecule and the interactions of a reference molecule with each of the surrounding 12-15 molecules. The interactions with all other molecules were treated by force-field methods. In each optimization step the energies in the QM and MM shells were calculated separately as single-point energies; after adding both energy contributions, the crystal structure (including the lattice parameters) was optimized accordingly. The space-group symmetry was maintained throughout. Crystal structures with more than one molecule per asymmetric unit, e.g. structures with Z' = 2, hydrates and solvates, have been optimized as well. Test calculations with different quantum-mechanical methods on nine small organic molecules revealed that the density functional theory methods with dispersion correction using the B97-D functional with 6-31G* basis set in combination with the DREIDING force field reproduced the experimental crystal structures with good accuracy. Subsequently the c-QM/MM method was applied to nine compounds from the CCDC blind tests resulting in good energy rankings and excellent geometric accuracies. PMID:25537386

  4. Orbits of crystallographic embedding of non-crystallographic groups and applications to virology.

    PubMed

    Twarock, Reidun; Valiunas, Motiejus; Zappa, Emilio

    2015-11-01

    The architecture of infinite structures with non-crystallographic symmetries can be modelled via aperiodic tilings, but a systematic construction method for finite structures with non-crystallographic symmetry at different radial levels is still lacking. This paper presents a group theoretical method for the construction of finite nested point sets with non-crystallographic symmetry. Akin to the construction of quasicrystals, a non-crystallographic group G is embedded into the point group P of a higher-dimensional lattice and the chains of all G-containing subgroups are constructed. The orbits of lattice points under such subgroups are determined, and it is shown that their projection into a lower-dimensional G-invariant subspace consists of nested point sets with G-symmetry at each radial level. The number of different radial levels is bounded by the index of G in the subgroup of P. In the case of icosahedral symmetry, all subgroup chains are determined explicitly and it is illustrated that these point sets in projection provide blueprints that approximate the organization of simple viral capsids, encoding information on the structural organization of capsid proteins and the genomic material collectively, based on two case studies. Contrary to the affine extensions previously introduced, these orbits endow virus architecture with an underlying finite group structure, which lends itself better to the modelling of dynamic properties than its infinite-dimensional counterpart. PMID:26522406

  5. Polyhedra with noncrystallographic symmetry as the orbits of crystallographic point symmetry groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsetsina, T. I.; Chuprunov, E. V.

    2015-11-01

    Polyhedra with noncrystallographic symmetry are analyzed as the orbits of crystallographic point symmetry groups on a set of smooth or structured ("hatched") planes. Polyhedra with symmetrically equivalent faces, obtained using crystallographic point groups but having noncrystallographic symmetry, and polyhedra, the symmetry group T of which is crystallographic but can be implemented only on the assumption of a noncrystallographic character of the internal structure of polyhedron, are studied. The results of the analysis for all 32 point symmetry groups are listed in table.

  6. The analysis of crystallographic symmetry types in finite groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, Atikah Mohd; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Adam, Nooraishikin; Zamri, Siti Norziahidayu Amzee

    2014-06-01

    Undeniably, it is human nature to prefer objects which are considered beautiful. Most consider beautiful as perfection, hence they try to create objects which are perfectly balance in shape and patterns. This creates a whole different kind of art, the kind that requires an object to be symmetrical. This leads to the study of symmetrical objects and pattern. Even mathematicians and ethnomathematicians are very interested with the essence of symmetry. One of these studies were conducted on the Malay traditional triaxial weaving culture. The patterns derived from this technique are symmetrical and this allows for further research. In this paper, the 17 symmetry types in a plane, known as the wallpaper groups, are studied and discussed. The wallpaper groups will then be applied to the triaxial patterns of food cover in Malaysia.

  7. Novel Kac-Moody-type affine extensions of non-crystallographic Coxeter groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechant, Pierre-Philippe; Bœhm, Céline; Twarock, Reidun

    2012-07-01

    Motivated by recent results in mathematical virology, we present novel asymmetric {Z}[\\tau ]-integer-valued affine extensions of the non-crystallographic Coxeter groups H2, H3 and H4 derived in a Kac-Moody-type formalism. In particular, we show that the affine reflection planes which extend the Coxeter group H3 generate (twist) translations along two-, three- and five-fold axes of icosahedral symmetry, and we classify these translations in terms of the Fibonacci recursion relation applied to different start values. We thus provide an explanation of previous results concerning affine extensions of icosahedral symmetry in a Coxeter group context, and extend this analysis to the case of the non-crystallographic Coxeter groups H2 and H4. These results will enable new applications of group theory in physics (quasicrystals), biology (viruses) and chemistry (fullerenes).

  8. Crystallographic Information Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasser, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Crystallographic information provides the fundamental basis for understanding the properties and behavior of materials. This data, such as chemical composition, unit cell dimensions, space group, and atomic positions, derives from the primary literature--that is, from published experimental measurement or theoretical calculation. Although the…

  9. Crystallographic topology and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.K.; Burnett, M.N.; Dunbar, W.D.

    1996-10-01

    Geometric topology and structural crystallography concepts are combined to define a new area we call Structural Crystallographic Topology, which may be of interest to both crystallographers and mathematicians. In this paper, we represent crystallographic symmetry groups by orbifolds and crystal structures by Morse - functions. The Morse function uses mildly overlapping Gaussian thermal-motion probability density functions centered on atomic sites to form a critical net with peak, pass, pale, and pit critical points joined into a graph by density gradient-flow separatrices. Critical net crystal structure drawings can be made with the ORTEP-III graphics pro- An orbifold consists of an underlying topological space with an embedded singular set that represents the Wyckoff sites of the crystallographic group. An orbifold for a point group, plane group, or space group is derived by gluing together equivalent edges or faces of a crystallographic asymmetric unit. The critical-net-on-orbifold model incorporates the classical invariant lattice complexes of crystallography and allows concise quotient-space topological illustrations to be drawn without the repetition that is characteristic of normal crystal structure drawings.

  10. Symmetric spaces of exceptional groups

    SciTech Connect

    Boya, L. J.

    2010-02-15

    We address the problem of the reasons for the existence of 12 symmetric spaces with the exceptional Lie groups. The 1 + 2 cases for G{sub 2} and F{sub 4}, respectively, are easily explained from the octonionic nature of these groups. The 4 + 3 + 2 cases on the E{sub 6,7,8} series require the magic square of Freudenthal and, for the split case, an appeal to the supergravity chain in 5, 4, and 3 space-time dimensions.

  11. Renormalization group in internal space

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, J.; Sailer, K.

    2005-01-15

    Renormalization group in the internal space consists of the gradual change of the coupling constants. Functional evolution equations corresponding to the change of the mass or the coupling constant are presented in the framework of a scalar model. The evolution in the mass which yields the functional generalization of the Callan-Symanzik equation for the one-particle irreducible effective action is given in its renormalized, cutoff-independent form. The evolution of the coupling constant generates an evolution equation for the two-particle irreducible effective action.

  12. Platinum Group Thiophenoxyimine Complexes: Syntheses,Crystallographic and Computational Studies of Structural Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Krinsky, Jamin L.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2006-10-03

    Monomeric thiosalicylaldiminate complexes of rhodium(I) and iridium(I) were prepared by ligand transfer from the homoleptic zinc(II) species. In the presence of strongly donating ligands, the iridium complexes undergo insertion of the metal into the imine carbon-hydrogen bond. Thiophenoxyketimines were prepared by non-templated reaction of o-mercaptoacetophenone with anilines, and were complexed with rhodium(I), iridium(I), nickel(II) and platinum(II). X-ray crystallographic studies showed that while the thiosalicylaldiminate complexes display planar ligand conformations, those of the thiophenoxyketiminates are strongly distorted. Results of a computational study were consistent with a steric-strain interpretation of the difference in preferred ligand geometries.

  13. Interactive PDF files with embedded 3D designs as support material to study the 32 crystallographic point groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arribas, Victor; Casas, Lluís; Estop, Eugènia; Labrador, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Crystallography and X-ray diffraction techniques are essential topics in geosciences and other solid-state sciences. Their fundamentals, which include point symmetry groups, are taught in the corresponding university courses. In-depth meaningful learning of symmetry concepts is difficult and requires capacity for abstraction and spatial vision. Traditionally, wooden crystallographic models are used as support material. In this paper, we describe a new interactive tool, freely available, inspired in such models. Thirty-two PDF files containing embedded 3D models have been created. Each file illustrates a point symmetry group and can be used to teach/learn essential symmetry concepts and the International Hermann-Mauguin notation of point symmetry groups. Most interactive computer-aided tools devoted to symmetry deal with molecular symmetry and disregard crystal symmetry so we have developed a tool that fills the existing gap.

  14. Aeritalia Space Systems Group, Turin, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlan, Vincent

    1989-01-01

    Aeritalia has been involved in European space programs since the early 1960's. Space activities grew to the point that in 1984 Aeritalia established a separate Space Systems Group (SSG), located in Turin. Today, SSG is involved in dozens of projects, some of them jointly with NASA and U.S. aerospace companies. Here, several of the major projects, such as the Tethered Satellite system, HIPPARCOS, Columbus Pressurized Module, Italian Research Interim Stage, and others are briefly described.

  15. Distribution of mica polytypes among space groups.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, H.

    1971-01-01

    All the possible space groups for mica polytypes are deduced by making use of the characteristics of the mica unit layer and stacking mode. The algebraic properties of the vector-stacking symbol of Ross et al. (1966) are examined, and a simple algorithm for deducing the space group from this symbol is presented. A method considered for enumerating all possible stacking sequences of mica polytypes makes use of a computer.

  16. Crystallographic analysis of the NNA7 Fab and proposal for the mode of human blood-group recognition.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kefang; Song, Shuh Chyung; Spitalnik, Steven L; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2005-10-01

    The NNA7 Fab antibody fragment recognizes the human N-type blood-group antigen comprised of the N-terminal glycopeptide of glycophorin A (GPA). A mutant form of this Fab fragment, NNA7-G91S, exhibits markedly reduced antigen binding. To provide insight into how these Fab fragments recognize this glycopeptide antigen, the crystal structures of NNA7 and NNA7-G91S were solved and refined to 1.83 and 1.97 A resolution, respectively. Both molecules are composed of the same heavy (H) chain Fd fragment, but each contains a slightly different light (L) chain owing to the G91S substitution. Specifically, the G91S mutation pushes the backbone of the neighboring H chain away from complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) of the L-chain variable region, allowing an additional glycerol cryoprotectant molecule to enter the antigen-combining site near the putative location of O-linked glycosylation. Each Fab fragment also possesses a well defined 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) molecule trapped in its antigen-combining site, as well as a crystallographic symmetry-related molecule comprising an amino-acid sequence that is virtually identical to the N-terminus of GPA. The MES molecule interacts with the H-chain CDR in a manner reminiscent of antibody-carbohydrate complexes. These results suggest a model for recognition of the glycopeptide antigen that accounts for the deleterious effect of the G91S substitution. PMID:16204891

  17. Crystallographic Study of Hydration of an Internal Cavity in Engineered Proteins with Buried Polar or Ionizable Groups

    PubMed Central

    Schlessman, Jamie L.; Abe, Colby; Gittis, Apostolos; Karp, Daniel A.; Dolan, Michael A.; García-Moreno E., Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    Although internal water molecules are essential for the structure and function of many proteins, the structural and physical factors that govern internal hydration are poorly understood. We have examined the molecular determinants of internal hydration systematically, by solving the crystal structures of variants of staphylococcal nuclease with Gln-66, Asn-66, and Tyr-66 at cryo (100 K) and room (298 K) temperatures, and comparing them with existing cryo and room temperature structures of variants with Glu-66, Asp-66, Lys-66, Glu-92 or Lys-92 obtained under conditions of pH where the internal ionizable groups are in the neutral state. At cryogenic temperatures the polar moieties of all these internal side chains are hydrated except in the cases of Lys-66 and Lys-92. At room temperature the internal water molecules were observed only in variants with Glu-66 and Tyr-66; water molecules in the other variants are probably present but they are disordered and therefore undetectable crystallographically. Each internal water molecule establishes between 3 and 5 hydrogen bonds with the protein or with other internal water molecules. The strength of interactions between internal polar side chains and water molecules seems to decrease from carboxylic acids to amides to amines. Low temperature, low cavity volume, and the presence of oxygen atoms in the cavity increase the positional stability of internal water molecules. This set of structures and the physical insight they contribute into internal hydration will be useful for the development and benchmarking of computational methods for artificial hydration of pockets, cavities, and active sites in proteins. PMID:18178652

  18. Crystallographic oxide phase identification of char deposits obtained from space shuttle Columbia window debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivas, J. D.; Wright, M. C.; Christoffersen, R.; Cone, D. M.; McDanels, S. J.

    2010-09-01

    Char deposits on recovered fragments of space shuttle Columbia windowpanes were analyzed to further understand the events that occurred during orbiter reentry and breakup. The TEM analysis demonstrated that oxides of aluminum and titanium mixed with silicon oxides to preserve a history of thermal conditions to which portions of the vehicle were exposed. The presence of Ti during the beginning of the deposition process, along with the thermodynamic phase precipitation upon cool down, indicated that temperatures well above the Ti melt point were experienced. The stratified observations implied that additional exothermic reactions, expectedly metal combustion of a Ti-6Al-4V structure, had to occur for oxide formation. Results are significant for aerospace vehicles, where thermal protection system (TPS) breaches could cause material originally designed for substructural applications to be in direct path with reentry plasma.

  19. Crystallographic Oxide Phase Identification of Char Deposits Obtained from Space Shuttle Columbia Window Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivas, J. D.; Wright, M. C.; Christoffersen, R.; Cone, D. M.; McDanels, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Analyzing the remains of Space Shuttle Columbia has proven technically beneficial years after the vehicle breakup. This investigation focused on charred deposits on fragments of Columbia overhead windowpanes. Results were unexpected relative to the engineering understanding of material performance in a reentry environment. The TEM analysis demonstrated that the oxides of aluminum and titanium mixed with silicon oxides to preserve a history of thermal conditions to which portions of the vehicle were exposed. The presence of Ti during the beginning of the deposition process, along with the thermodynamic phase precipitation upon cool down, indicate that temperatures well above the Ti melt point were experienced. The stratified observations implied that additional exothermic reaction, expectedly metal combustion of a Ti structure, had to be present for oxide formation. Results are significant for aerospace vehicles where thermal protection system (TPS) breaches cause substructures to be in direct path with the reentry plasma. 1

  20. Space Station concept development group studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, L. E.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA study activities in preparation for a Space Station began in the early 1970's. The early studies included many in-house NASA and contracted studies. A group of representatives from all the NASA Centers, titled the Space Station Concept Development Group (CDG) was involved in the studies which led to the initiation of the Space Station Program. The CDG studies were performed over a period of approximately one year and consisted of four phases. The initial phase had the objective to determine the functions required of the station as opposed to a configuration. The activities of the second phase were primarily concerned with a sizing of the facilities required for payloads and the resources necessary to support these mission payloads. The third phase of studies was designed to develop a philosophical approach to a number of areas related to autonomy, maintainability, operations and logistics, and verification. The fourth phase of the study was to be concerned with configuration assessment activities.

  1. Four-dimensional space groups for pedestrians: composite structures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junliang; Lee, Stephen; Lin, Jianhua

    2007-10-01

    Higher-dimensional crystals have been studied for the last thirty years. However, most practicing chemists, materials scientists, and crystallographers continue to eschew the use of higher-dimensional crystallography in their work. Yet it has become increasingly clear in recent years that the number of higher-dimensional systems continues to grow from hundreds to as many as a thousand different compounds. Part of the problem has to do with the somewhat opaque language that has developed over the past decades to describe higher-dimensional systems. This language, while well-suited to the specialist, is too sophisticated for the neophyte wishing to enter the field, and as such can be an impediment. This Focus Review hopes to address this issue. The goal of this article is to show the regular chemist or materials scientist that knowledge of regular 3D crystallography is all that is really necessary to understand 4D crystal systems. To this end, we have couched higher-dimensional composite structures in the language of ordinary 3D crystals. In particular, we developed the principle of complementarity, which allows one to identify correctly 4D space groups solely from examination of the two 3D components that make up a typical 4D composite structure. PMID:17886829

  2. Scientific investigations of the Space Research Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbay, J. S.; Lynn, K. J. W.

    The origin and charter of the Space Research Group of the American Projects Division is presented. Some of the achievements of the Very Long Base Interferometer (VLBI) team is traced through the deployment of outstanding personnel and facilities to which it had access. The pioneering work in charting the higher regions of the ionosphere to define features and trace progress over time are examined. The potential of the resources within the American Projects Division to determine VLF propagation characteristics are discussed.

  3. NASA's Internal Space Weather Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Guhathakurta, M.; Bell, H.; Niemeyer, L.; Allen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements from many of NASA's scientific spacecraft are used routinely by space weather forecasters, both in the U.S. and internationally. ACE, SOHO (an ESA/NASA collaboration), STEREO, and SDO provide images and in situ measurements that are assimilated into models and cited in alerts and warnings. A number of years ago, the Space Weather laboratory was established at NASA-Goddard, along with the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. Within that organization, a space weather service center has begun issuing alerts for NASA's operational users. NASA's operational user community includes flight operations for human and robotic explorers; atmospheric drag concerns for low-Earth orbit; interplanetary navigation and communication; and the fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles, high altitude aircraft, and launch vehicles. Over the past three years we have identified internal stakeholders within NASA and formed a Working Group to better coordinate their expertise and their needs. In this presentation we will describe this activity and some of the challenges in forming a diverse working group.

  4. Space Propulsion Synergy Group ETO technology assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, James

    There exists within the aerospace community a widely recognized need to improve future space launch systems. While these needs have been expressed by many national committees, potential solutions have not achieved consensus nor have they endured. Facing the challenge to remain competitive with limited national resources, the U.S. must improve its strategic planning efforts. A nationally accepted strategic plan for space would enable a focused research & development program. The Space Propulsion Synergy Group (SPSG), chartered to support long range strategic planning, has achieved several breakthroughs. First, using a broad industry/government team, the SPSG evaluated and achieved consensus on the vehicles, propulsion systems, and propulsion technologies that have the best long term potential for achieving desired system attributes. The breakthrough that enabled broad consensus was developing criteria that are measurable a-priori. Second, realizing that systems having the best long term payoffs can loose support when constraints are tight, the SPSG invented a dual prioritization approach that balances long term strategic thrusts with current programmatic constraints. This breakthrough enables individual program managers to make decisions based on both individual project needs and long term strategic needs. Results indicate that a SSTO using an integrated modular engine has the best long term potential for a 20 Klb class vehicle and that health monitoring and control technologies rank among the highest dual priority liquid rocket technologies.

  5. Crystallographic analysis of ground and space thermostable T1 lipase crystal obtained via counter diffusion method approach.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Aris, Sayangku Nor Ariati; Thean Chor, Adam Leow; Mohamad Ali, Mohd Shukuri; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Raja Abd Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional structure of thermostable lipase is much sought after nowadays as it is important for industrial application mainly found in the food, detergent, and pharmaceutical sectors. Crystallization utilizing the counter diffusion method in space was performed with the aim to obtain high resolution diffracting crystals with better internal order to improve the accuracy of the structure. Thermostable T1 lipase enzyme has been crystallized in laboratory on earth and also under microgravity condition aboard Progress spacecraft to the ISS in collaboration with JAXA (Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency). This study is conducted with the aims of improving crystal packing and structure resolution. The diffraction data set for ground grown crystal was collected to 1.3 Å resolution and belonged to monoclinic C2 space group with unit cell parameters a = 117.40 Å, b = 80.95 Å, and c = 99.81 Å, whereas the diffraction data set for space grown crystal was collected to 1.1 Å resolution and belonged to monoclinic C2 space group with unit cell parameters a = 117.31 Å, b = 80.85 Å, and c = 99.81 Å. The major difference between the two crystal growth systems is the lack of convection and sedimentation in microgravity environment resulted in the growth of much higher quality crystals of T1 lipase. PMID:24516857

  6. Crystallographic Analysis of Ground and Space Thermostable T1 Lipase Crystal Obtained via Counter Diffusion Method Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad Aris, Sayangku Nor Ariati; Thean Chor, Adam Leow; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Raja Abd. Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional structure of thermostable lipase is much sought after nowadays as it is important for industrial application mainly found in the food, detergent, and pharmaceutical sectors. Crystallization utilizing the counter diffusion method in space was performed with the aim to obtain high resolution diffracting crystals with better internal order to improve the accuracy of the structure. Thermostable T1 lipase enzyme has been crystallized in laboratory on earth and also under microgravity condition aboard Progress spacecraft to the ISS in collaboration with JAXA (Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency). This study is conducted with the aims of improving crystal packing and structure resolution. The diffraction data set for ground grown crystal was collected to 1.3 Å resolution and belonged to monoclinic C2 space group with unit cell parameters a = 117.40 Å, b = 80.95 Å, and c = 99.81 Å, whereas the diffraction data set for space grown crystal was collected to 1.1 Å resolution and belonged to monoclinic C2 space group with unit cell parameters a = 117.31 Å, b = 80.85 Å, and c = 99.81 Å. The major difference between the two crystal growth systems is the lack of convection and sedimentation in microgravity environment resulted in the growth of much higher quality crystals of T1 lipase. PMID:24516857

  7. Space Propulsion Synergy Group ETO technology assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, James

    The Space Propulsion Synergy Group (SPSG), which was chartered to support long-range strategic planning, has, using a broad industry/government team, evaluated and achieved consensus on the vehicles, propulsion systems, and propulsion technologies that have the best long-term potential for achieving desired system attributes. The breakthrough that enabled broad consensus was developing criteria that are measurable a priori. The SPSG invented a dual prioritization approach that balances long-term strategic thrusts with current programmatic constraints. This enables individual program managers to make decisions based on both individual project needs and long-term strategic needs. Results indicate that an SSTO using an integrated modular engine has the best long-term potential for a 20 Klb class vehicle, and that health monitoring and control technologies are among the highest dual priority liquid rocket technologies.

  8. UCLA IGPP Space Plasma Simulation Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the past 10 years the UCLA IGPP Space Plasma Simulation Group has pursued its theoretical effort to develop a Mission Oriented Theory (MOT) for the International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program. This effort has been based on a combination of approaches: analytical theory, large scale kinetic (LSK) calculations, global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and self-consistent plasma kinetic (SCK) simulations. These models have been used to formulate a global interpretation of local measurements made by the ISTP spacecraft. The regions of applications of the MOT cover most of the magnetosphere: the solar wind, the low- and high-latitude magnetospheric boundary, the near-Earth and distant magnetotail, and the auroral region. Most recent investigations include: plasma processes in the electron foreshock, response of the magnetospheric cusp, particle entry in the magnetosphere, sources of observed distribution functions in the magnetotail, transport of oxygen ions, self-consistent evolution of the magnetotail, substorm studies, effects of explosive reconnection, and auroral acceleration simulations.

  9. International Space Station Earth Observations Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.; Oikawa, Koki

    2015-01-01

    The multilateral Earth Observations Working Group (EOWG) was chartered in May 2012 in order to improve coordination and collaboration of Earth observing payloads, research, and applications on the International Space Station (ISS). The EOWG derives its authority from the ISS Program Science Forum, and a NASA representative serves as a permanent co-chair. A rotating co-chair position can be occupied by any of the international partners, following concurrence by the other partners; a JAXA representative is the current co-chair. Primary functions of the EOWG include, 1) the exchange of information on plans for payloads, from science and application objectives to instrument development, data collection, distribution and research; 2) recognition and facilitation of opportunities for international collaboration in order to optimize benefits from different instruments; and 3) provide a formal ISS Program interface for collection and application of remotely sensed data collected in response to natural disasters through the International Charter, Space and Major Disasters. Recent examples of EOWG activities include coordination of bilateral data sharing protocols between NASA and TsNIIMash for use of crew time and instruments in support of ATV5 reentry imaging activities; discussion of continued use and support of the Nightpod camera mount system by NASA and ESA; and review and revision of international partner contributions on Earth observations to the ISS Program Benefits to Humanity publication.

  10. Crystallographic Topology 2: Overview and Work in Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.K.

    1999-08-01

    This overview describes an application of contemporary geometric topology and stochastic process concepts to structural crystallography. In this application, crystallographic groups become orbifolds, crystal structures become Morse functions on orbifolds, and vibrating atoms in a crystal become vector valued Gaussian measures with the Radon-Nikodym property. Intended crystallographic benefits include new methods for visualization of space groups and crystal structures, analysis of the thermal motion patterns seen in ORTEP drawings, and a classification scheme for crystal structures based on their Heegaard splitting properties.

  11. Operator Algebra Quantum Homogeneous Spaces of Universal Gauge Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanta, Snigdhayan; Mathai, Varghese

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we quantize universal gauge groups such as SU(∞), as well as their homogeneous spaces, in the σ- C*-algebra setting. More precisely, we propose concise definitions of σ- C*-quantum groups and σ- C*-quantum homogeneous spaces and explain these concepts here. At the same time, we put these definitions in the mathematical context of countably compactly generated spaces as well as C*-compact quantum groups and homogeneous spaces. We also study the representable K-theory of these spaces and compute these groups for the quantum homogeneous spaces associated to the quantum version of the universal gauge group SU(∞).

  12. The space shuttle payload planning working groups: Executive summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of a space shuttle payload planning group session are presented. The purpose of the workshop is: (1) to provide guidance for the design and development of the space shuttle and the spacelab and (2) to plan a space science and applications program for the 1980 time period. Individual groups were organized to cover the various space sciences, applications, technologies, and life sciences. Summaries of the reports submitted by the working groups are provided.

  13. Space station group activities habitability module study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, David

    1986-01-01

    This study explores and analyzes architectural design approaches for the interior of the Space Station Habitability Module (originally defined as Habitability Module 1 in Space Station Reference Configuration Decription, JSC-19989, August 1984). In the Research Phase, architectural program and habitability design guidelines are specified. In the Schematic Design Phase, a range of alternative concepts is described and illustrated with drawings, scale-model photographs and design analysis evaluations. Recommendations are presented on the internal architectural, configuration of the Space Station Habitability Module for such functions as the wardroom, galley, exercise facility, library and station control work station. The models show full design configurations for on-orbit performance.

  14. Exceptional groups, symmetric spaces and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cerchiai, Bianca L.; Cacciatori, Sergio L.

    2009-03-31

    In this article we provide a detailed description of a technique to obtain a simple parameterization for different exceptional Lie groups, such as G{sub 2}, F{sub 4} and E{sub 6}, based on their fibration structure. For the compact case, we construct a realization which is a generalization of the Euler angles for SU(2), while for the non compact version of G{sub 2(2)}/SO(4) we compute the Iwasawa decomposition. This allows us to obtain not only an explicit expression for the Haar measure on the group manifold, but also for the cosets G{sub 2}/SO(4), G{sub 2}/SU(3), F{sub 4}/Spin(9), E{sub 6}/F{sub 4} and G{sub 2(2)}/SO(4) that we used to find the concrete realization of the general element of the group. Moreover, as a by-product, in the simplest case of G{sub 2}/SO(4), we have been able to compute an Einstein metric and the vielbein. The relevance of these results in physics is discussed.

  15. Meeting of intercosmos space physics group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolova, N. A.

    1989-06-01

    The 22nd meeting of scientists and specialists of Socialist countries in the Intercosmos program was held in April 1988, in Tbilisi. Taking part in the meeting were well-known Soviet scientists and major foreign specialists from Bulgaria, Hungary, GDR, Cuba, Mongolia, Poland, Rumania, and Czechoslovakia. The meeting focused on a plan for collaboration in space physics for the 1991 to 1995 period and up to the year 2000. The Mars-94 project, which is a component part of the program, Mars-2000, proposed by Soviet scientists, is discussed along with other proposed planetary projects. In the area of high energy astrophysics, a project involving a large orbital observatory (Spektr-Rentgen-Gamma) is being prepared for solving problems associated with cosmology, extragalactic astronomy, and stellar astronomy. It will be carried out through international cooperation with significant developments effected by socialist countries. Two other projects discussed include Radioastron which involves radiointerferometry, and Relikt-2 which will continue research that was begun aboard the unmanned Prognoz-9 station. In the area of solar terrestrial physics, instruments are being designed for the study of X-ray active formations in the solar atmosphere and processes that take place in solar plasma (the Koronas-1, F project, and the Neytron project). The study of cosmic plasma is called for in the Interbol project. Also, the Czech furnace Kristallizator-ChSk-1 is in operation aboard the Mir orbital station and the launch of another unit is expected. All 10 Intercosmos countries are taking part in the preparation of experiments involving space-based materials science.

  16. Professional Discussion Groups: Informal Learning in a Third Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    In this ethnographic study, I explored two discussion groups and discovered Third Space elements such as cultural hybridity, counterscript, and sharing of experiences and resources contributed to a safe learning environment existing at the boundaries between participant personal and professional spaces. The groups operated under the auspices of a…

  17. The International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Ronald J.; Rabin, Robert; Lujan, Barbara F.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout the 1980s, ESA and the space agencies of Canada, Germany, France, Japan, and the U.S. have pursued cooperative projects bilaterally and multilaterally to prepare for, and to respond to, opportunities in space life sciences research previously unapproachable in scale and sophistication. To cope effectively with likely future space research opportunities, broad, multilateral, coordinated strategic planning is required. Thus, life scientists from these agencies have allied to form the International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group. This Group is formally organized under a charter that specifies the purpose of the Working Group as the development of an international strategic plan for the space life sciences, with periodic revisions as needed to keep the plan current. The plan will be policy-, not operations-oriented. The Working Group also may establish specific implementation teams to coordinate multilateral science policy in specific areas; such teams have been established for space station utilization, and for sharing of flight equipment.

  18. Actuator Grouping Optimization on Flexible Space Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required surface accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. For this study, an analytical model is shown which combines a flexible Kapton reflector with Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) actuators for surface control. Surface errors are introduced that are similar to real world scenarios, and a least squares control algorithm is developed for surface control. Experimental results on a 2.4 meter reflector show that while the analytical reflector model is generally correct, due to idiosyncrasies in the reflector it cannot be used for online control. A new method called the En Mass Elimination algorithm is used to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the number of actuators in the system exceeds the number of power supplies available.

  19. Mathematical aspects of molecular replacement. III. Properties of space groups preferred by proteins in the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Chirikjian, G; Sajjadi, S; Toptygin, D; Yan, Y

    2015-03-01

    The main goal of molecular replacement in macromolecular crystallography is to find the appropriate rigid-body transformations that situate identical copies of model proteins in the crystallographic unit cell. The search for such transformations can be thought of as taking place in the coset space Γ\\G where Γ is the Sohncke group of the macromolecular crystal and G is the continuous group of rigid-body motions in Euclidean space. This paper, the third in a series, is concerned with viewing nonsymmorphic Γ in a new way. These space groups, rather than symmorphic ones, are the most common ones for protein crystals. Moreover, their properties impact the structure of the space Γ\\G. In particular, nonsymmorphic space groups contain both Bieberbach subgroups and symmorphic subgroups. A number of new theorems focusing on these subgroups are proven, and it is shown that these concepts are related to the preferences that proteins have for crystallizing in different space groups, as observed in the Protein Data Bank. PMID:25727867

  20. Space group constraints on weak indices in topological crystalline insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varjas, Daniel; de Juan, Fernando; Lu, Yuan-Ming

    In this work we derive constraints on weak indices of topological insulators and superconductors coming from space group symmetry. Weak indices are topological invariants of lower dimensional slices of the Brillouin zone, notable examples are the Chern numbers in class A and weak ℤ2 indices in class AII in 3D. The components of the weak indices form a momentum space vector that transforms in a simple fashion under space group symmetries, using results of momentum space crystallography we find the allowed values for each Bravais lattice. Nonsymmorphic symmetries, such as screw axes and glide planes pose additional constraints. Accounting for both of these we find that most space groups experience some restriction, to the extent that some cannot support nontrivial weak topological insulators and superconductors at all. This result puts a strong constraint on candidates in the experimental and numerical search for topological materials based on the lattice structure alone.

  1. Group structure and group process for effective space station astronaut teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholas, J. M.; Kagan, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Space Station crews will encounter new problems, many derived from the social interaction of groups working in space for extended durations. Solutions to these problems must focus on the structure of groups and the interaction of individuals. A model of intervention is proposed to address problems of interpersonal relationships and emotional stress, and improve the morale, cohesiveness, and productivity of astronaut teams.

  2. Group theoretical construction of planar noncommutative phase spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ngendakumana, Ancille Todjihoundé, Leonard; Nzotungicimpaye, Joachim

    2014-01-15

    Noncommutative phase spaces are generated and classified in the framework of centrally extended anisotropic planar kinematical Lie groups as well as in the framework of noncentrally abelian extended planar absolute time Lie groups. Through these constructions the coordinates of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of naturally introduced fields giving rise to minimal couplings. By symplectic realizations methods, physical interpretations of generators coming from the obtained structures are given.

  3. The New NRL Crystallographic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, Michael; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hicks, David; Toher, Cormac; Levy, Ohad; Hart, Gus

    For many years the Naval Research Laboratory maintained an online graphical database of crystal structures for a wide variety of materials. This database has now been redesigned, updated and integrated with the AFLOW framework for high throughput computational materials discovery (http://materials.duke.edu/aflow.html). For each structure we provide an image showing the atomic positions; the primitive vectors of the lattice and the basis vectors of every atom in the unit cell; the space group and Wyckoff positions; Pearson symbols; common names; and Strukturbericht designations, where available. References for each structure are provided, as well as a Crystallographic Information File (CIF). The database currently includes almost 300 entries and will be continuously updated and expanded. It enables easy search of the various structures based on their underlying symmetries, either by Bravais lattice, Pearson symbol, Strukturbericht designation or commonly used prototypes. The talk will describe the features of the database, and highlight its utility for high throughput computational materials design. Work at NRL is funded by a Contract with the Duke University Department of Mechanical Engineering.

  4. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 2: Atmospheric and space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Atmospheric and Space Physics working group of the space shuttle mission planning activity are presented. The principal objectives defined by the group are: (1) to investigate the detailed mechanisms which control the near-space environment of the earth, (2) to perform plasma physics investigations not feasible in ground-based laboratories, and (3) to conduct investigations which are important in understanding planetary and cometary phenomena. The core instrumentation and laboratory configurations for conducting the investigations are defined.

  5. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 10: Space technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Space Technology group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The elements of the space technology program are: (1) long duration exposure facility, (2) advanced technology laboratory, (3) physics and chemistry laboratory, (4) contamination experiments, and (5) laser information/data transmission technology. The space technology mission model is presented in tabular form. The proposed experiments to be conducted by each test facility are described. Recommended approaches for user community interfacing are included.

  6. Environmental interactions in space exploration: Environmental interactions working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph C.; Hillard, G. Barry

    1992-01-01

    With the advent of the Space Exploration Initiative, the possibility of designing and using systems on scales heretofore unattempted presents exciting new challenges in systems design and space science. The environments addressed by the Space Exploration Initiative include the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, as well as the varied plasma and field environments which will be encountered by humans and cargo enroute to these destinations. Systems designers will need to understand environmental interactions and be able to model these mechanisms from the earliest conceptual design stages through design completion. To the end of understanding environmental interactions and establishing robotic precursor mission requirements, an Environmental Interactions Working Group was established as part of the Robotic Missions Working Group. The working group is described, and its current activities are updated.

  7. Space Group Symmetry Fractionalization in a Chiral Kagome Heisenberg Antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaletel, Michael P.; Zhu, Zhenyue; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Vishwanath, Ashvin; White, Steven R.

    2016-05-01

    The anyonic excitations of a spin liquid can feature fractional quantum numbers under space group symmetries. Detecting these fractional quantum numbers, which are analogs of the fractional charge of Laughlin quasiparticles, may prove easier than the direct observation of anyonic braiding and statistics. Motivated by the recent numerical discovery of spin-liquid phases in the kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet, we theoretically predict the pattern of space group symmetry fractionalization in the kagome lattice SO(3)-symmetric chiral spin liquid. We provide a method to detect these fractional quantum numbers in finite-size numerics which is simple to implement in the density matrix renormalization group. Applying these developments to the chiral spin liquid phase of a kagome Heisenberg model, we find perfect agreement between our theoretical prediction and numerical observations.

  8. Trimesic acid dimethyl sulfoxide solvate: space group revision

    PubMed Central

    Bernès, Sylvain; Hernández, Guadalupe; Portillo, Roberto; Gutiérrez, René

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the title solvate, C9H6O6·C2H6OS, was determined 30 years ago [Herbstein, Kapon & Wasserman (1978 ▶). Acta Cryst. B34, 1613–1617], with data collected at room temperature, and refined in the space group P21. The present redetermination, based on high-resolution diffraction data, shows that the actual space group is more likely to be P21/m. The crystal structure contains layers of trimesic acid molecules lying on mirror planes. A mirror plane also passes through the S and O atoms of the solvent molecule. The molecules in each layer are inter­connected through strong O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a two-dimensional supra­molecular network within each layer. The donor groups are the hydroxyls of the trimesic acid mol­ecules, while the acceptors are the carbonyl or the sulfoxide O atoms. PMID:21202984

  9. Space Group Symmetry Fractionalization in a Chiral Kagome Heisenberg Antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Zaletel, Michael P; Zhu, Zhenyue; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Vishwanath, Ashvin; White, Steven R

    2016-05-13

    The anyonic excitations of a spin liquid can feature fractional quantum numbers under space group symmetries. Detecting these fractional quantum numbers, which are analogs of the fractional charge of Laughlin quasiparticles, may prove easier than the direct observation of anyonic braiding and statistics. Motivated by the recent numerical discovery of spin-liquid phases in the kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet, we theoretically predict the pattern of space group symmetry fractionalization in the kagome lattice SO(3)-symmetric chiral spin liquid. We provide a method to detect these fractional quantum numbers in finite-size numerics which is simple to implement in the density matrix renormalization group. Applying these developments to the chiral spin liquid phase of a kagome Heisenberg model, we find perfect agreement between our theoretical prediction and numerical observations. PMID:27232041

  10. Gaussian distributions, Jacobi group, and Siegel-Jacobi space

    SciTech Connect

    Molitor, Mathieu

    2014-12-15

    Let N be the space of Gaussian distribution functions over ℝ, regarded as a 2-dimensional statistical manifold parameterized by the mean μ and the deviation σ. In this paper, we show that the tangent bundle of N, endowed with its natural Kähler structure, is the Siegel-Jacobi space appearing in the context of Number Theory and Jacobi forms. Geometrical aspects of the Siegel-Jacobi space are discussed in detail (completeness, curvature, group of holomorphic isometries, space of Kähler functions, and relationship to the Jacobi group), and are related to the quantum formalism in its geometrical form, i.e., based on the Kähler structure of the complex projective space. This paper is a continuation of our previous work [M. Molitor, “Remarks on the statistical origin of the geometrical formulation of quantum mechanics,” Int. J. Geom. Methods Mod. Phys. 9(3), 1220001, 9 (2012); M. Molitor, “Information geometry and the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics,” e-print arXiv (2012); M. Molitor, “Exponential families, Kähler geometry and quantum mechanics,” J. Geom. Phys. 70, 54–80 (2013)], where we studied the quantum formalism from a geometric and information-theoretical point of view.

  11. Gaussian distributions, Jacobi group, and Siegel-Jacobi space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molitor, Mathieu

    2014-12-01

    Let N be the space of Gaussian distribution functions over ℝ, regarded as a 2-dimensional statistical manifold parameterized by the mean μ and the deviation σ. In this paper, we show that the tangent bundle of N , endowed with its natural Kähler structure, is the Siegel-Jacobi space appearing in the context of Number Theory and Jacobi forms. Geometrical aspects of the Siegel-Jacobi space are discussed in detail (completeness, curvature, group of holomorphic isometries, space of Kähler functions, and relationship to the Jacobi group), and are related to the quantum formalism in its geometrical form, i.e., based on the Kähler structure of the complex projective space. This paper is a continuation of our previous work [M. Molitor, "Remarks on the statistical origin of the geometrical formulation of quantum mechanics," Int. J. Geom. Methods Mod. Phys. 9(3), 1220001, 9 (2012); M. Molitor, "Information geometry and the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics," e-print arXiv (2012); M. Molitor, "Exponential families, Kähler geometry and quantum mechanics," J. Geom. Phys. 70, 54-80 (2013)], where we studied the quantum formalism from a geometric and information-theoretical point of view.

  12. The space shuttle payload planning working groups: Volume 9: Materials processing and space manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Materials Processing and Space Manufacturing group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The effects of weightlessness on the levitation processes, mixture stability, and control over heat and mass transport in fluids are considered for investigation. The research and development projects include: (1) metallurgical processes, (2) electronic materials, (3) biological applications, and (4)nonmetallic materials and processes. Additional recommendations are provided concerning the allocation of payload space, acceptance of experiments for flight, flight qualification, and private use of the space shuttle.

  13. Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

    1991-02-01

    This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

  14. Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

    1991-02-01

    This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA`s fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

  15. Topological classification of crystalline insulators with space group symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jadaun, Priyamvada; Xiao, Di; Niu, Q.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2013-01-01

    We show that in crystalline insulators, space group symmetry alone gives rise to a topological classification based on the discretization of electric polarization. Using C3 rotational symmetry as an example, we first prove that the polarization is discretized into three distinct classes, i.e., it can only take three inequivalent values. We then prove that these classes are topologically distinct. Therefore, a Z3 topological classification exists, with polarization as a topological class index. A concrete tight-binding model is derived to demonstrate the Z3 topological phase transition. Using first-principles calculations, we identify graphene on a BN substrate as a possible candidate to realize these Z3 topological states. To complete our analysis, we extend the classification of band structures to all 17 two-dimensional space groups. This work will contribute to a complete theory of symmetry-conserved topological phases and also elucidate topological properties of graphenelike systems.

  16. Differential calculus on quantum spaces and quantum groups

    SciTech Connect

    Zumino, B

    1992-12-10

    A review of recent developments in the quantum differential calculus. The quantum group GLq(n) is treated by considering it as a particular quantum space. Functions on SLq(n) are defined as a subclass of functions on GLq(n). The case of SOq(n) is also briefly considered. These notes cover part of a lecture given at the XIX International Conference on Group Theoretic Methods in Physics, Salamanca, Spain 1992.

  17. National facilities study. Volume 4: Space operations facilities task group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The principal objectives of the National Facilities Study (NFS) were to: (1) determine where U.S. facilities do not meet national aerospace needs; (2) define new facilities required to make U.S. capabilities 'world class' where such improvements are in the national interest; (3) define where consolidation and phase-out of existing facilities is appropriate; and (4) develop a long-term national plan for world-class facility acquisition and shared usage. The Space Operations Facilities Task Group defined discrete tasks to accomplish the above objectives within the scope of the study. An assessment of national space operations facilities was conducted to determine the nation's capability to meet the requirements of space operations during the next 30 years. The mission model used in the study to define facility requirements is described in Volume 3. Based on this model, the major focus of the Task Group was to identify any substantive overlap or underutilization of space operations facilities and to identify any facility shortfalls that would necessitate facility upgrades or new facilities. The focus of this initial study was directed toward facility recommendations related to consolidations, closures, enhancements, and upgrades considered necessary to efficiently and effectively support the baseline requirements model. Activities related to identifying facility needs or recommendations for enhancing U.S. international competitiveness and achieving world-class capability, where appropriate, were deferred to a subsequent study phase.

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of DehI, a group I α-haloacid dehalogenase from Pseudomonas putida strain PP3

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidberger, Jason W.; Wilce, Jackie A.; Weightman, Andrew J.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.

    2008-07-01

    The α-haloacid dehalogenase DehI from P. putida strain PP3 was cloned into a vector with an N-terminal His tag and expressed in E. coli Nova Blue strain. Purified protein was crystallized in a primitive monoclinic form and a complete native data set was collected and analysed. Pseudomonas putida strain PP3 produces two dehalogenases, DehI and DehII, which belong to the group I and II α-haloacid dehalogenases, respectively. Group I dehalogenases catalyse the removal of halides from d-haloalkanoic acids and in some cases also the l-enantiomers, both substituted at their chiral centres. Studies of members of this group have resulted in the proposal of general catalytic mechanisms, although no structural information is available in order to better characterize their function. This work presents the initial stages of the structural investigation of the group I α-haloacid dehalogenase DehI. The DehI gene was cloned into a pET15b vector with an N-terminal His tag and expressed in Escherichia coli Nova Blue strain. Purified protein was crystallized in 25% PEG 3350, 0.4 M lithium sulfate and 0.1 M bis-tris buffer pH 6.0. The crystals were primitive monoclinic (space group P2{sub 1}), with unit-cell parameters a = 68.32, b = 111.86, c = 75.13 Å, α = 90, β = 93.7, γ = 90°, and a complete native data set was collected. Molecular replacement is not an option for structure determination, so further experimental phasing methods will be necessary.

  19. Space station group activities habitability module study: A synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, David; Glassman, Terry

    1987-01-01

    Space station habitability was studied by investigating crew activity routines, proximities, ergonomic envelopes, and group volumes. Ten alternative schematic interior designs were proposed. Preliminary conclusions include: (1) in-service interior modifications may be necessary and should be planned for; (2) design complexity will be increased if the module cluster is reduced from five to three; (3) the increased crew circulation attendant upon enhancement of space station activity may produce human traffic bottlenecks and should be planned for; (4) a single- or two-person quiet area may be desirable to provide crew members with needed solitude during waking hours; and (5) the decision to choose a two-shift or three-shift daily cycle will have a significant impact on the design configuration and operational efficiency of the human habitat.

  20. Expression, purification and X-ray crystallographic analysis of the Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen-binding adhesin BabA.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Suresh; Moonens, Kristof; Romão, Ema; Lo, Alvin; Vandenbussche, Guy; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Muyldermans, Serge; Borén, Thomas; Remaut, Han

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human pathogen that colonizes about 50% of the world's population, causing chronic gastritis, duodenal ulcers and even gastric cancer. A steady emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains poses an important public health threat and there is an urgent requirement for alternative therapeutics. The blood group antigen-binding adhesin BabA mediates the intimate attachment to the host mucosa and forms a major candidate for novel vaccine and drug development. Here, the recombinant expression and crystallization of a soluble BabA truncation (BabA(25-460)) corresponding to the predicted extracellular adhesin domain of the protein are reported. X-ray diffraction data for nanobody-stabilized BabA(25-460) were collected to 2.25 Å resolution from a crystal that belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 50.96, b = 131.41, c = 123.40 Å, α = 90.0, β = 94.8, γ = 90.0°, and which was predicted to contain two BabA(25-460)-nanobody complexes per asymmetric unit. PMID:25484214

  1. Quiver theories for moduli spaces of classical group nilpotent orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Amihay; Kalveks, Rudolph

    2016-06-01

    We approach the topic of Classical group nilpotent orbits from the perspective of the moduli spaces of quivers, described in terms of Hilbert series and generating functions. We review the established Higgs and Coulomb branch quiver theory constructions for A series nilpotent orbits. We present systematic constructions for BCD series nilpotent orbits on the Higgs branches of quiver theories defined by canonical partitions; this paper collects earlier work into a systematic framework, filling in gaps and providing a complete treatment. We find new Coulomb branch constructions for above minimal nilpotent orbits, including some based upon twisted affine Dynkin diagrams. We also discuss aspects of 3 d mirror symmetry between these Higgs and Coulomb branch constructions and explore dualities and other relationships, such as HyperKähler quotients, between quivers. We analyse all Classical group nilpotent orbit moduli spaces up to rank 4 by giving their unrefined Hilbert series and the Highest Weight Generating functions for their decompositions into characters of irreducible representations and/or Hall Littlewood polynomials.

  2. Metrics for comparison of crystallographic maps

    SciTech Connect

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-10-01

    Numerical comparison of crystallographic contour maps is used extensively in structure solution and model refinement, analysis and validation. However, traditional metrics such as the map correlation coefficient (map CC, real-space CC or RSCC) sometimes contradict the results of visual assessment of the corresponding maps. This article explains such apparent contradictions and suggests new metrics and tools to compare crystallographic contour maps. The key to the new methods is rank scaling of the Fourier syntheses. The new metrics are complementary to the usual map CC and can be more helpful in map comparison, in particular when only some of their aspects, such as regions of high density, are of interest.

  3. Grouping Miller-Nicely by linear vector space rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budhlakoti, Suvrat; Allen, Jont B.; Larsen, Erik

    2001-05-01

    Human speech recognition has been studied using response to CV speech stimuli. Miller and Nicely (1955) studied such data in the form of confusion matrices to obtain insight into the psychological structure of the phone in noise. Here, the confusion matrices are modeled as phone coordinates in a high dimensional perceptual vector space. The model generalizes to an eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) [Allen (2004)]. This is followed by agglomerative hierarchical clustering of the transformed data, and an automated process is used to identify the main clusters. The resulting EVD clustering is very similar to other Miller-Nicely groupings, based on both production and MDS derived features, but is more model based. It was found that there is a gradual and highly consistent change in the clustering of sounds, independent of cluster size and configuration. By examining the change in similarity between various speech sounds, it is hoped that perceptual features may be uniquely identified.

  4. Revised Space Groups for Three Molybdenum(V) Phosphate Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclaire, A.; Borel, M. M.; Guesdon, A.; Marsh, Richard E.

    2001-06-01

    The space groups of three previously described Mo(V) phosphate structures are revised. (1) δ-KMo2P3O13, originally reported as triclinic, Poverline1, is revised to monoclinic, C2/c; it is identical to the compound previously identified as K4Mo8P12O52. (2) The compound formulated as [Mo12CdP8O50(OH)12]Cd [N(CH3)4]2(H3O)6·5H2O, originally described as monoclinic, Pn, is revised to P21/n (also monoclinic). (3) Rb3O2(MoO)4(PO4)4, originally reported as orthorhombic, C2221, is revised to tetragonal, P43212. The general descriptions of the structures are unchanged; however, for compound 2 the revision involves the addition of a center of symmetry and, as a result, there are significant changes in the interatomic distances and angles.

  5. A structural group-connectome in standard stereotactic (MNI) space

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A group connectome of 20 subjects has been normalized into standard stereotactic (MNI) space. Data has been processed using the Gibbs' Tracking approach (Reisert et al., 2011) [11] and normalized into standard space using DARTEL (Ashburner, 2007) [1]. All data has been acquired within the scope of the study A. Horn, D. Ostwald, M. Reisert, F. Blankenburg, The structural–functional connectome and the default mode network of the human brain, NeuroImage 102 (2013) 142–151. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.09.069. The utility of this dataset can be described by the following points: In medical studies in which subject-specific dMRI is not available, a standardized connectome may help to gain some canonical insight into white-matter connectivity. The dataset enables scientists who use different modalities (like EEG, MEG etc.) without access to MRI, to combine studies obtained using other methodology with insights from the brain's inner structural formation. The dataset could also extend possible claims made by meta-analyzes/literature-based studies. PMID:26543893

  6. Report of the Working Group on Space/Lunar Tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The group discussed the advantages and disadvantages of five locations for an optical/infrared array: low-Earth orbit (LEO), Sun-synchronous Earth-orbit, geosynchronous orbit (GEO), Lagrangian points (L4 and L5), and the lunar surface. The factors affecting an array and our assessments of them are given and briefly discussed. In the discussions, two axioms are assumed: (1) Human expansion into space and to the Moon will occur; and (2) The Space Station will be constructed and operational. The major conclusion reached is that baselines of moderate size (greater than 300 m) are best done on the Moon and that large baselines (greater than 10 km) can be done only on the Moon. Three areas needing additional research were identified as follows. (1) Studies are needed on methods to steer long-baseline systems in orbit. This involves learning how to control free-flyers. It is not clear how the difficulty of control varies with orbital elevation. (2) More work is needed on the internal metrology of array systems, both orbital and lunar-surface systems.(3) We need to understand the radiation effects on detectors and electronics and learn how to mitigate them.

  7. Crystallographic CourseWare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Margaret E.; Vasbinder, Eric; Kowalcyzk, Deborah; Jackson, Sean; Giammalvo, Joseph; Braun, James; Dimarco, Keith

    2000-09-01

    Literature Cited

    1. International Tables for Crystallography: Volume A: Space Group Symmetry; Hanh, T., Ed.; D. Reidel: Boston, 1983.
    2. International Tables for Crystallography, Brief Teaching Edition of Volume A, Space-Group Symmetry, 3rd ed.; Hanh, T., Ed.; Dordrecht: Boston, 1993.
    3. Kastner, M. E. J. Appl. Crystallogr. 1999, 32, 327-331.
    4. Macromedia Director, version 6.5; Macromedia, Inc., San Francisco, CA; 1998.
    5. QuickTime, version 3.0; Apple Computer: Cupertino, CA, 1998.
    6. ToolBook II, Instructor, version 6.0; Asymetrix: Bellevue, WA, 1998.
    7. HyperCard 2.3.5; Apple Computer: Cupertino, CA, 1998.

  8. Distributed interactive communication in simulated space-dwelling groups.

    PubMed

    Brady, Joseph V; Hienz, Robert D; Hursh, Steven R; Ragusa, Leonard C; Rouse, Charles O; Gasior, Eric D

    2004-03-01

    This report describes the development and preliminary application of an experimental test bed for modeling human behavior in the context of a computer generated environment to analyze the effects of variations in communication modalities, incentives and stressful conditions. In addition to detailing the methodological development of a simulated task environment that provides for electronic monitoring and recording of individual and group behavior, the initial substantive findings from an experimental analysis of distributed interactive communication in simulated space dwelling groups are described. Crews of three members each (male and female) participated in simulated "planetary missions" based upon a synthetic scenario task that required identification, collection, and analysis of geologic specimens with a range of grade values. The results of these preliminary studies showed clearly that cooperative and productive interactions were maintained between individually isolated and distributed individuals communicating and problem-solving effectively in a computer-generated "planetary" environment over extended time intervals without benefit of one another's physical presence. Studies on communication channel constraints confirmed the functional interchangeability between available modalities with the highest degree of interchangeability occurring between Audio and Text modes of communication. The effects of task-related incentives were determined by the conditions under which they were available with Positive Incentives effectively attenuating decrements in performance under stressful time pressure. PMID:14983895

  9. Spectroscopic and structural assignment of the absolute stereochemistry in a series of 1,2-difluorovinyl organometalloids. The first crystallographic characterization and structural series of group 14 fluorovinyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Brisdon, Alan K; Crossley, Ian R; Pritchard, Robin G; Warren, John E

    2002-09-01

    The group 14 trifluorovinyl compounds Ph(3)ECF=CF(2) (E = Ge, Sn, Pb) have been prepared in high yield by the low-temperature reaction of the triphenylelement halide with trifluorovinyllithium, generated from tetrafluoroethane (CF(3)CH(2)F, HFC-134a) and 2 equiv of n-butyllithium. The X-ray crystal structures of these materials have been obtained, so affording the first structural series for such species. Subsequent reaction of Ph(3)GeCF=CF(2) with LiAlH(4) and a range of organolithium reagents has led to preparation of the 1,2-difluorovinylgermanes Ph(3)GeCF=CFR (R = H, Me, n-Bu, t-Bu, Ph). Multinuclear NMR spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic studies of these compounds have been undertaken and have shown unequivocally the exclusive trans-geometry of the 1,2-difluorovinyl moiety. PMID:12206700

  10. Space Weather Activities of IONOLAB Group: IONOLAB-TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, F.; Sezen, U.; Arikan, O.; Ugurlu, O.; Nayir, H.

    2009-04-01

    Space Weather (SW) is the concept of changing environmental conditions in outer space and affect Earth and its technological systems. SW is a consequence of the solar activities and the coupling of solar energy on Earth's atmosphere due to the Earth's magnetic field. The monitoring and prediction of SW has utmost importance for HF communication, Satellite communication, navigation and guidance systems, Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite systems, Space Craft exit and entry into the atmosphere. Ionosphere is the plasma layer of the atmosphere that is ionized by solar radiation and it is a key player of SW. Ionosphere is a temporally and spatially varying, dispersive, anisotropic and inhomogeneous medium that is characterized primarily by its electron density distribution. IONOLAB is a group of researchers of various disciplines, getting together to handle challenges of the Earth's ionosphere. The team has researchers from Hacettepe University and Bilkent University, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering and General Command of Mapping of Turkish Army. One of the most important contributions of IONOLAB group is the automated web-based computation service for Total Electron Content (TEC). TEC corresponds to the line integral of electron density distribution on a given path. TEC can also be expressed as the amount of free electrons within 1 m2 cross-sectional area of the cylinder on the ray path. Global Position System (GPS) provides a cost-effective medium for monitoring of ionosphere using the signals recorded by stationary GPS receivers in estimating TEC. IONOLAB group has developed IONOLAB-TEC for reliable and robust estimates for all latitudes and both calm and disturbed days by using RINEX, IONEX and satellite ephemeris data provided from the IGS centers. IONOLAB-TEC consists of a regularized signal estimation algorithm which combines signals from all GPS satellites for a given instant and a given receiver, for a desired time period or for 24 hours

  11. The space group classification of topological band insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juricic, Vladimir; Slager, Robert-Jan; Mesaros, Andrej; Zaanen, Jan

    2013-03-01

    The existing classification of topological band insulators(TBIs) departs from time-reversal symmetry, but the role of the crystal symmetries in the physics of these topological states remained elusive. I will discuss the classification of TBIs protected not only by time-reversal, but also by space group symmetries. I find three broad classes of topological states: (a) Γ-states robust against general time-reversal invariant perturbations; (b) Translationally-active states protected from elastic scattering, but susceptible to topological crystalline disorder; (c) Valley topological insulators sensitive to the effects of non-topological and crystalline disorder. These three classes give rise to 18 different two-dimensional, and, at least 70 three-dimensional TBIs. I will show how some of these topological states can be realized in two dimensions when tight-binding M-B model, originally introduced for HgTe quantum wells, is generalized to include longer-range hoppings. Finally, experimental implications of our classification scheme with an emphasis on topological states in Sn-based materials will be discussed. V. J. acknowledges the support of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  12. Sensor space group analysis for fNIRS data

    PubMed Central

    Tak, S.; Uga, M.; Flandin, G.; Dan, I.; Penny, W.D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a method for monitoring hemoglobin responses using optical probes placed on the scalp. fNIRS spatial resolution is limited by the distance between channels defined as a pair of source and detector, and channel positions are often inconsistent across subjects. These challenges can lead to less accurate estimate of group level effects from channel-specific measurements. New method This paper addresses this shortcoming by applying random-effects analysis using summary statistics to interpolated fNIRS topographic images. Specifically, we generate individual contrast images containing the experimental effects of interest in a canonical scalp surface. Random-effects analysis then allows for making inference about the regionally specific effects induced by (potentially) multiple experimental factors in a population. Results We illustrate the approach using experimental data acquired during a colour-word matching Stroop task, and show that left frontopolar regions are significantly activated in a population during Stroop effects. This result agrees with previous neuroimaging findings. Compared with existing methods The proposed methods (i) address potential misalignment of sensor locations between subjects using spatial interpolation; (ii) produce experimental effects of interest either on a 2D regular grid or on a 3D triangular mesh, both representations of a canonical scalp surface; and (iii) enables one to infer population effects from fNIRS data using a computationally efficient summary statistic approach (random-effects analysis). Significance of regional effects is assessed using random field theory. Conclusions In this paper, we have shown how fNIRS data from multiple subjects can be analysed in sensor space using random-effects analysis. PMID:26952847

  13. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 1: Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The space astronomy missions to be accomplished by the space shuttle are discussed. The principal instrument is the Large Space Telescope optimized for the ultraviolet and visible regions of the spectrum, but usable also in the infrared. Two infrared telescopes are also proposed and their characteristics are described. Other instruments considered for the astronomical observations are: (1) a very wide angle ultraviolet camera, (2) a grazing incidence telescope, (3) Explorer-class free flyers to measure the cosmic microwave background, and (4) rocket-class instruments which can fly frequently on a variety of missions. The stability requirements of the space shuttle for accomplishing the astronomy mission are defined.

  14. Mineralogical, chemical, and crystallographic properties of supergene jarosite-group minerals from the Xitieshan Pb-Zn sulfide deposit, northern Tibetan Plateau, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Lei; Li, Jian-Wei; Rye, Robert O.; Benzel, William H.; Lowers, H.A.; He, Ming-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Supergene jarosite-group minerals are widespread in weathering profiles overlying Pb-Zn sulfide ores at Xitieshan, northern Tibetan Plateau, China. They consist predominantly of K-deficient natrojarosite, with lesser amounts of K-rich natrojarosite and plumbojarosite. Electron microprobe (EMP) analyses, scanning electron microcopy (SEM) investigation, and X-ray mapping reveal that the jarosite-group minerals are characterized by spectacular oscillatory zoning composed of alternating growth bands of K-deficient and K-bearing natrojarosite (K2O >1 wt.%). Plumbojarosite, whenever present, occurs as an overgrowth in the outermost bands, and its composition can be best represented by K0.29Na0.19Pb0.31Fe2.66Al0.22(SO4)1.65(PO4)0.31(AsO4)0.04(OH)7.37. The substitution of monovalent for divalent cations at the A site of plumbojarosite is charge balanced by the substitution of five-valent for six-valent anions in XO,4/sub> at the X site. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of representative samples reveal mass losses of 11.46 wt.% at 446.6 °C and 21.42 wt.% at 683.4 °C due to dehydroxylation and desulfidation, respectively. TGA data also indicate that the natrojarosite structure collapses at 446.6 °C, resulting in the formation of NaFe(SO4)2 and minor hematite. The decomposition products of NaFe(SO4) are hematite and Na,2SO4. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses show that the jarosite-group minerals have mean unit-cell parameters of a=7.315 ä and c=016.598 ä. XRD and EMP data support the view that substitutions of Na for K in the A site and full Fe occupancy in the B site can considerably decrease the unit-cell parameter c, but only slightly increase a. The results from this study suggest that the observed oscillatory zoning of jarosite-group minerals at Xitieshan resulted mainly from substitutions of K for Na at the A site and P for S at the X site.

  15. Bi-Exact Groups, Strongly Ergodic Actions and Group Measure Space Type III Factors with No Central Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdayer, Cyril; Isono, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the asymptotic structure of (possibly type III) crossed product von Neumann algebras {M = B rtimes Γ} arising from arbitrary actions {Γ &ucedil;rvearrowright B} of bi-exact discrete groups (e.g. free groups) on amenable von Neumann algebras. We prove a spectral gap rigidity result for the central sequence algebra {N' \\cap M^ω} of any nonamenable von Neumann subalgebra with normal expectation {N subset M} . We use this result to show that for any strongly ergodic essentially free nonsingular action {Γ &ucedil;rvearrowright (X, μ)} of any bi-exact countable discrete group on a standard probability space, the corresponding group measure space factor {L^∞(X) rtimes Γ} has no nontrivial central sequence. Using recent results of Boutonnet et al. (Local spectral gap in simple Lie groups and applications, 2015), we construct, for every {0 < λ ≤ 1} , a type {III_λ} strongly ergodic essentially free nonsingular action F_∞ &ucedil;rvearrowright (X_λ, μ_λ) of the free group F_∞ on a standard probability space so that the corresponding group measure space type {III_λ} factor {L^∞(X_λ, μ_λ) rtimes F_∞ has no nontrivial central sequence by our main result. In particular, we obtain the first examples of group measure space type {III} factors with no nontrivial central sequence.

  16. Student "Facebook" Groups as a Third Space: Between Social Life and Schoolwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaen, Janus; Dalsgaard, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines educational potentials of "Facebook" groups that are created and managed by students without any involvement from teachers. The objective is to study student-managed "Facebook" groups as a "third space" between the institutional space of teacher-managed "Facebook" groups and the…

  17. Metrics for comparison of crystallographic maps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-10-01

    Numerical comparison of crystallographic contour maps is used extensively in structure solution and model refinement, analysis and validation. However, traditional metrics such as the map correlation coefficient (map CC, real-space CC or RSCC) sometimes contradict the results of visual assessment of the corresponding maps. This article explains such apparent contradictions and suggests new metrics and tools to compare crystallographic contour maps. The key to the new methods is rank scaling of the Fourier syntheses. The new metrics are complementary to the usual map CC and can be more helpful in map comparison, in particular when only some of their aspects,more » such as regions of high density, are of interest.« less

  18. Controlled crystal dehydration triggers a space-group switch and shapes the tertiary structure of cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein.

    PubMed

    Klingl, Stefan; Scherer, Myriam; Stamminger, Thomas; Muller, Yves A

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein is a key viral effector protein that reprograms host cells. Controlled dehydration experiments with IE1 crystals not only extended their diffraction limit from 2.85 to 2.3 Å resolution but also triggered a monoclinic to tetragonal space-group transition with only minor alterations in the unit-cell parameters. An analysis of the pre-dehydration and post-dehydration crystal structures shows how dehydration rearranges the packing of IE1 molecules to meet the unit-cell constraints of the higher lattice symmetry. The transition from P21 to P43 reduces the number of copies in the asymmetric unit from four to two, and molecules previously related by noncrystallographic symmetry merge into identical crystallographic copies in the tetragonal space group. At the same time, dehydration considerably alters the tertiary structure of one of the two remaining IE1 chains in the asymmetric unit. It appears that this conformational switch is required to compensate for a transition that is assumed to be unfavourable, namely from a highly preferred to a rarely observed space group. At the same time, the dehydration-triggered molecular reshaping could reveal an inherent molecular flexibility that possibly informs on the biological function of IE1, namely on its binding to target proteins from the host cell. PMID:26143921

  19. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus NDK: preliminary crystallographic analysis of the first viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jeudy, Sandra; Coutard, Bruno; Lebrun, Régine; Abergel, Chantal

    2005-01-01

    The complete sequence of the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, has recently been determined [Raoult et al. (2004 ▶), Science, 306, 1344–1350] and revealed numerous genes not expected to be found in a virus. A comprehensive structural and functional study of these gene products was initiated [Abergel et al. (2005 ▶), Acta Cryst. F61, 212–215] both to better understand their role in the virus physiology and to obtain some clues to the origin of DNA viruses. Here, the preliminary crystallographic analysis of the viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase protein is reported. The crystal belongs to the cubic space group P213, with unit-cell parameter 99.425 Å. The self-rotation function confirms that there are two monomers per asymmetric unit related by a twofold non-crystallographic axis and that the unit cell thus contains four biological entities. PMID:16511098

  20. Polyimides Containing Pendent Phosphine Oxide Groups for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Watson, K. A.; Connell, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    As part of an ongoing materials development activity to produce high performance polymers that are durable to the space environment, phosphine oxide containing polyimides have been under investigation. A novel dianhydride was prepared from 2,5-dihydroxyphenyldiphenylphosphine oxide in good yield. The dianhydride was reacted with commercially available diamines, and a previously reported diamine was reacted with commercially available dianhydrides to prepare isomeric polyimides. The physical and mechanical properties, particularly thermal and optical properties, of the polymers were determined. One material exhibited a high glass transition temperature, high tensile properties, and low solar absorptivity. The chemistry, physical, and mechanical properties of these resins will be discussed.

  1. Space Weather Activities of IONOLAB Group: TEC Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, F.; Yilmaz, A.; Arikan, O.; Sayin, I.; Gurun, M.; Akdogan, K. E.; Yildirim, S. A.

    2009-04-01

    Being a key player in Space Weather, ionospheric variability affects the performance of both communication and navigation systems. To improve the performance of these systems, ionosphere has to be monitored. Total Electron Content (TEC), line integral of the electron density along a ray path, is an important parameter to investigate the ionospheric variability. A cost-effective way of obtaining TEC is by using dual-frequency GPS receivers. Since these measurements are sparse in space, accurate and robust interpolation techniques are needed to interpolate (or map) the TEC distribution for a given region in space. However, the TEC data derived from GPS measurements contain measurement noise, model and computational errors. Thus, it is necessary to analyze the interpolation performance of the techniques on synthetic data sets that can represent various ionospheric states. By this way, interpolation performance of the techniques can be compared over many parameters that can be controlled to represent the desired ionospheric states. In this study, Multiquadrics, Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Cubic Splines, Ordinary and Universal Kriging, Random Field Priors (RFP), Multi-Layer Perceptron Neural Network (MLP-NN), and Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBF-NN) are employed as the spatial interpolation algorithms. These mapping techniques are initially tried on synthetic TEC surfaces for parameter and coefficient optimization and determination of error bounds. Interpolation performance of these methods are compared on synthetic TEC surfaces over the parameters of sampling pattern, number of samples, the variability of the surface and the trend type in the TEC surfaces. By examining the performance of the interpolation methods, it is observed that both Kriging, RFP and NN have important advantages and possible disadvantages depending on the given constraints. It is also observed that the determining parameter in the error performance is the trend in the Ionosphere

  2. Marathons versus Spaced Groups: Skin Conductance and the Effects of Time Distribution on Encounter Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loomis, Thomas P.

    1988-01-01

    Randomly assigned 41 students to 2 twice-weekly groups, which met for 3 hours eight times; 2 marathons, which met continuously for 24 hours; and nontreatment control group. Treatment groups had significant positive changes on 14 of 15 measured personality variables between pre- and post-test, and positive change on all dependent measures between…

  3. The birth of an infant decreases group spacing in a zoo-housed lowland gorilla group (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Kurtycz, Laura M; Shender, Marisa A; Ross, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Changes in group composition can alter the behavior of social animals such as gorillas. Although gorilla births are presumed to affect group spacing patterns, there is relatively little data about how these events affect gorilla group cohesion. We investigated how members of a western lowland gorilla group (n = 6) at Lincoln Park Zoo (Chicago, IL, USA) spaced themselves prior to and after the birth of an infant, to investigate changes in group cohesion. Gorillas were housed in an indoor-outdoor enclosure in which access to the outdoors was permitted when temperatures exceeded 5°C. We recorded spatial locations of each group member using 30-min group scans on tablet computers with an electronic map interface, as well as noting their access to outdoor areas. Data from the 4 months following the birth was compared to a control period corresponding to early pregnancy. We measured distances between all possible group dyads for each scan and subsequently calculated a mean distance between all group members. An ANOVA revealed that access to the outdoors had no effect on group spacing (F(1,56) = 0.066, P = 0.799). However, the presence of an infant resulted in a significant reduction in inter-individual distance (F(1,56) = 23.988, P = 0.000), decreasing inter-individual spacing by 12.5%. This information helps characterize the behavioral impact of a new birth on captive gorilla social structure and could potentially inform future management of breeding gorilla groups. PMID:25130595

  4. Invariant-theoretic method for calculating Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for space groups

    SciTech Connect

    Aizenberg, A.Ya.; Gufan, Yu.M.

    1995-03-01

    A new invariant-theoretic method to directly calculate Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for space and point groups representations is proposed. The method is exemplified with the space groups O{sub h}{sup 5} and D{sub 6h}{sup 1}. 34 refs.

  5. Exploration of the Chemical Space of Group 4 Polymer Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenchen; Pilania, Ghanshyam; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2013-03-01

    The current standards for capacitive energy storage applications are polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) which have large band gap and high breakdown strength, but a small dielectric constant. The envisaged next generation dielectric should provide high dielectric constant, while still preserving the insulating characteristics of PP and PE. To meet these growing needs, we use high throughput density functional theory (DFT) calculations in combination with machine learning (ML) methods to identify classes of polymers with large dielectric constant and band gap. In our work, we consider various possible local chemical modifications to polyethylene (PE). To be specific, we allow the -CH2- unit in the PE backbone segment to be replaced by -SiF2-, -SiCl2-, -GeF2-, -GeCl2-, -SnF2-, or -SnCl2- units in a systematic manner. High throughput methods were used first to accurately determine the dielectric constant and band gap of the chemically modified PE chains for a set of limited compositions and configurations. ML methods were then used to predict the properties of systems spanning a much larger part of the configurational and compositional space. A set of most promising PE modifications (with simultaneously large dielectric constant and band gap) is identified using this strategy.

  6. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 6: Communications and navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Communications and Navigation working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The basic goals to be accomplished are to increase the use of space systems and to develop new space capabilities for providing communication and navigation services to the user community in the 1980 time period. Specific experiments to be conducted for improving space communication and navigation capabilities are defined. The characteristics of the experimental equipment required to accomplish the mission are discussed.

  7. On the generation of point groups in spaces of various dimensions.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, A; Herzig, P; Altmann, S L

    2001-09-01

    In this paper the use of Clifford algebra in the parametrization of point groups in spaces of various dimensions is shown. Higher-dimensional spaces are of great interest especially when modulated crystals or quasicrystals are studied. While the quaternion units, which are useful to parametrize rotations in 3 dimensions, can be identified with rotations, the basic Clifford units may be regarded as mirrors from which all proper and improper symmetry operations can be generated. The practical implementation of this method of parametrization is demonstrated for the group of the hypercube in the 4-dimensional space, and generalisations to spaces of dimensions higher than 4 are suggested. PMID:11666073

  8. Unusual space-group pseudo symmetry in crystals of human phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Manoj, N.; Ealick, S.E.

    2010-12-01

    Phosphopantothenoylcysteine (PPC) decarboxylase is an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of coenzyme A and catalyzes the decarboxylation of PPC to phosphopantetheine. Human PPC decarboxylase has been expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The Laue class of the diffraction data appears to be {bar 3}m, suggesting space group R32 with two monomers per asymmetric unit. However, the crystals belong to the space group R3 and the asymmetric unit contains four monomers. The structure has been solved using molecular replacement and refined to a current R factor of 29%. The crystal packing can be considered as two interlaced lattices, each consistent with space group R32 and with the corresponding twofold axes parallel to each other but separated along the threefold axis. Thus, the true space group is R3 with four monomers per asymmetric unit.

  9. Managing space for managed care: the challenge for a multispecialty group practice.

    PubMed

    Berkoff, M J; Burns, L A

    1996-07-01

    A project that began as an architectural study to determine space requirements and remedy space deficiencies for an academic medical center's faculty multispecialty group practice led to development of an analytical methodology for assessing real space needs and viable options for solutions in the context of the group's operational policies, physician practice patterns, and business goals. Major facility investments for new or renovated construction demand significant capital expenditure, which can severely affect a group's ability to complete as a financially viable player in a marketplace environment of increasingly competitive managed care delivery systems. The methodology created during this project helped the group practice to understand how they could optimize the use of existing space, minimize capital costs, and provide flexibility for future developments. PMID:10158956

  10. On the Group of Translations and Inversions of Phase Space and the Wigner Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Jens Peder

    1982-04-01

    Grossmann and Royer have recently shown that the Wigner functions are closely related to the set of all translations and inversions of phase space. This allows the phase space representation of quantum mechanics to be constructed directly on the group of phase space translations and inversions. Starting from this observation, we have derived analytical expressions for the matrix elements of the translation and inversion operators, in the harmonic oscillator representation, without introducing coordinate or momentum wavefunctions.

  11. SHELXT – Integrated space-group and crystal-structure determination

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    SHELXT automates routine small-molecule structure determination starting from single-crystal reflection data, the Laue group and a reasonable guess as to which elements might be present. The new computer program SHELXT employs a novel dual-space algorithm to solve the phase problem for single-crystal reflection data expanded to the space group P1. Missing data are taken into account and the resolution extended if necessary. All space groups in the specified Laue group are tested to find which are consistent with the P1 phases. After applying the resulting origin shifts and space-group symmetry, the solutions are subject to further dual-space recycling followed by a peak search and summation of the electron density around each peak. Elements are assigned to give the best fit to the integrated peak densities and if necessary additional elements are considered. An isotropic refinement is followed for non-centrosymmetric space groups by the calculation of a Flack parameter and, if appropriate, inversion of the structure. The structure is assembled to maximize its connectivity and centred optimally in the unit cell. SHELXT has already solved many thousand structures with a high success rate, and is optimized for multiprocessor computers. It is, however, unsuitable for severely disordered and twinned structures because it is based on the assumption that the structure consists of atoms.

  12. Criteria for weak and strong continuity of representations of topological groups in Banach spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtern, A. I.

    2002-10-01

    Several necessary and sufficient conditions for weak and strong continuity of representations of topological groups in Banach spaces are obtained. In particular, it is shown that a representation S of a locally compact group G in a Banach space is continuous in the strong (or, equivalently, in the weak) operator topology if and only if for some real number q, 0\\leqslant q<1, and each unit vector \\xi in the representation space of S there exists a neighbourhood U=U(\\xi)\\subset G of the identity element e\\in G such that \\Vert S(g)\\xi-\\xi\\Vert\\leqslant q for all g\\in U. Versions of this criterion for other classes of groups (including not necessarily locally compact groups) and refinements for finite-dimensional representations are obtained; examples are discussed. Applications to the theory of quasirepresentations of topological groups are presented.

  13. The effect of in-line spacing of two cylinder groups on the Morison force coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.; Haritos, N.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes some results from an experimental study undertaken in the University of Melbourne`s Michell Laboratory which has investigated the interference effect associated with closely spaced cylinder groups on the in-line Morison force coefficients. Previous experimental studies undertaken at the University of Melbourne identified that the closely spaced cylinder range, (spacing to diameter ratio less than 3), is critical to the determination of the Morison force coefficients for tandem cylinders. The current research extends the previous work conducted in the department by investigating in more detail the closely spaced cylinder regime whilst extending results into the drag dominant regime (Keulegan-Carpenter number > 20). Results presented herein are limited to the exploration of the effect of varying the spacing of two cylinder groups oriented in-line to the direction of the uni-directional waves.

  14. The Approximation of a Group Stimulus Space by Averaging Responses to Selected Subsets of the Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Earl J.; Lissitz, Robert W.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a simple random procedure for selecting subsets of stimulus pairs for presentation to subjects. The resulting set of ratings from the group of subjects allows the construction of a group space through the use of an existing computer program. (Author/JKS)

  15. Expanding Trauma through Space and Time: Mapping the Rhetorical Strategies of Trauma Carrier Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degloma, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I detail two rhetorical strategies that trauma carrier groups--including social movement organizations, professional mental health associations, and patient advocacy groups--use to expand the relevance of trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) through space and time: the social transmission of trauma and the social…

  16. Challenges in Teaching Space Physics to Different Target Groups From Space Weather Forecasters to Heavy-weight Theorists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, H. E.

    2008-12-01

    Plasma physics as the backbone of space physics is difficult and thus the space physics students need to have strong foundations in general physics, in particular in classical electrodynamics and thermodynamics, and master the basic mathematical tools for physicists. In many universities the number of students specializing in space physics at Master's and Doctoral levels is rather small and the students may have quite different preferences ranging from experimental approach to hard-core space plasma theory. This poses challenges in building up a study program that has both the variety and depth needed to motivate the best students to choose this field. At the University of Helsinki we require all beginning space physics students, regardless whether they enter the field as Master's or Doctoral degree students, to take a one-semester package consisting of plasma physics and its space applications. However, some compromises are necessary. For example, it is not at all clear, how thoroughly Landau damping should be taught at the first run or how deeply should the intricacies of collisionless reconnection be discussed. In both cases we have left the details to an optional course in advanced space physics, even with the risk that the student's appreciation of, e.g., reconnection may remain at the level of a magic wand. For learning experimental work, data analysis or computer simulations we have actively pursued arrangements for the Master's degree students to get a summer employments in active research groups, which usually lead to the Master's theses. All doctoral students are members of research groups and participate in experimental work, data analysis, simulation studies or theory development, or any combination of these. We emphasize strongly "learning by doing" all the way from the weekly home exercises during the lecture courses to the PhD theses which in Finland consist typically of 4-6 peer-reviewed articles with a comprehensive introductory part.

  17. Crystallographic and Spectroscopic Symmetry Notations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Compares Schoenflies and Hermann-Mauguin notations of symmetry. Although the former (used by spectroscopists) and latter (used by crystallographers) both describe the same symmetry, there are distinct differences in the manner of description which may lead to confusion in correlating the two notations. (Author/JN)

  18. Current Activities and Capabilities of the Terrestrial Environment Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Batts, Wade

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) designated Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) the center of excellence for space transportation. The Aerospace Environments and Effects (AEE) team of the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch (EL23) in the Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory at MSFC, supports the center of excellence designation by providing near-Earth space, deep space, planetary, and terrestrial environments expertise to projects as required. The Terrestrial Environment (TE) group within the AEE team maintains an extensive TE data base. Statistics and models derived from this data are applied to the design and development of new aerospace vehicles, as well as performance enhancement of operational vehicles such as the Space Shuttle. The TE is defined as the Earth's atmospheric environment extending from the surface to orbital insertion altitudes (approximately 90 km).

  19. National facilities study. Volume 5: Space research and development facilities task group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    With the beginnings of the U.S. space program, there was a pressing need to develop facilities that could support the technology research and development, testing, and operations of evolving space systems. Redundancy in facilities that was once and advantage in providing flexibility and schedule accommodation is instead fast becoming a burden on scarce resources. As a result, there is a clear perception in many sectors that the U.S. has many space R&D facilities that are under-utilized and which are no longer cost-effective to maintain. At the same time, it is clear that the U.S. continues to possess many space R&D facilities which are the best -- or among the best -- in the world. In order to remain world class in key areas, careful assessment of current capabilities and planning for new facilities is needed. The National Facility Study (NFS) was initiated in 1992 to develop a comprehensive and integrated long-term plan for future aerospace facilities that meets current and projected government and commercial needs. In order to assess the nation's capability to support space research and development (R&D), a Space R&D Task Group was formed. The Task Group was co-chaired by NASA and DOD. The Task Group formed four major, technologically- and functionally- oriented working groups: Human and Machine Operations; Information and Communications; Propulsion and Power; and Materials, Structures, and Flight Dynamics. In addition to these groups, three supporting working groups were formed: Systems Engineering and Requirements; Strategy and Policy; and Costing Analysis. The Space R&D Task Group examined several hundred facilities against the template of a baseline mission and requirements model (developed in common with the Space Operations Task Group) and a set of excursions from the baseline. The model and excursions are described in Volume 3 of the NFS final report. In addition, as a part of the effort, the group examined key strategic issues associated with space R

  20. The knowledge-based system GRAPE and its application to Landau theory analysis for magnetic space groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Junming; Cui, Zhan; Hao, Bailin

    1990-08-01

    A knowldge-based project, the GRAPE system(Group Representation and Application in Physics Environment), is described in this paper. The GRAPE system is designed to provide physicists with a group theoretical environment to help them solve problems in group theory and representation. The user can communicate with GRAPE in plain English. At the present stage, it contains the knowledge of crystallography point groups, space groups as well as magnetic space groups both in group structure and group representations. The GRAPE system consists of five modules besides the knowledge base and the data base: a natural language interface, a computation module, a tutprial module, a bibliography module, and a program library. Group theoretical analysis for the Landau theory of continuous phase transitions has been the first application of the GRAPE system. The calculation for determining directions of phase transition at the Γ point for 230 space groups, 230 grey space groups and 674 black and white magnetic space groups has been performed.

  1. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method.

    PubMed

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  2. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    PubMed Central

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  3. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-06-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows.

  4. Identifying the multiplicity of crystallographically equivalent variants generated by iterative phase transformations in Ti.

    PubMed

    Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Pond, Robert Charles

    2016-02-01

    This work describes phase transformations in Ti from a purely crystallographic perspective. Iterative heating and cooling above and below 1155 K induce phase transitions between a low-temperature h.c.p. (hexagonal close packed) (6/m mm) and a high-temperature b.c.c. (body centred cubic) (m3m) structure. The crystallography of the two phases has been found to be related by the Burgers Orientation Relationship (Burgers OR). The transitions are accompanied by changes in texture, as an ever-increasing number of crystallographically equivalent variants occur with every cycle. Identifying their multiplicity is important to relate the textures before and after the transformation, in order to predict the resultant one and refine its microstructure. The four-dimensional Frank space was utilized to describe both h.c.p. and b.c.c. structures within the same orthogonal framework, and thus allow for their easy numerical manipulation through matrix algebra. Crystallographic group decomposition showed that the common symmetry maintained in both groups was that of group 2/m; therefore, the symmetry operations that generated the variants were of groups 3m and 23 for cubic and hexagonal generations, respectively. The number of all potential variants was determined for the first three variant generations, and degeneracy was indeed detected, reducing the number of variants from 72 to 57 and from 432 to 180 for the second and third generations, respectively. Degeneracy was attributed on some special alignments of symmetry operators, as a result of the Burgers OR connecting the relative orientation of the two structures. PMID:26830797

  5. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 3: High energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the High Energy Astrophysics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The objectives to be accomplished during space shuttle missions are defined as: (1) X-ray astronomy, (2) hard X-ray and gamma ray astronomy, and (3) cosmic ray astronomy. The instruments and test equipment required to accomplish the mission are identified. Recommendations for managing the installation of the equipment and conducting the missions are included.

  6. Hybrid-Space Density Matrix Renormalization Group Study of the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Georg; Noack, Reinhard M.

    We investigate the ground state of the two-dimensional Hubbard model on a cylinder geometry at intermediate coupling and weak doping. We study properties such as the behavior of the ground-state energy, pair-field correlations, and the appearance of stripes. We find striped ground states generically, with the width of the stripes depending on the filling, the boundary conditions, and the circumference of the cylinder. Furthermore, we analyse the interplay between the different stripe configurations and the decay of the pairing correlations. Our analysis is based on a hybrid-space density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) approach, which uses a momentum-space representation in the transverse and a real-space representation in the longitudinal direction. Exploiting the transverse momentum quantum number makes significant speedup and memory savings compared to the real-space DMRG possible. In particular, we obtain computational costs that are independent of the cylinder width for fixed size of the truncated Hilbert space.

  7. Group theoretical interpretation of the modified gravity in de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, M.

    2016-03-01

    A framework has been presented for theoretical interpretation of various modified gravitational models which is based on the group theoretical approach and unitary irreducible representations (UIR's) of de Sitter (dS) group. In order to illustrate the application of the proposed method, a model of modified gravity has been investigated. The background field method has been utilized and the linearized modified gravitational field equation has been obtained in the 4-dimensional dS space-time as the background. The field equation has been written as the eigne-value equation of the Casimir operators of dS space using the flat 5-dimensional ambient space notations. The Minkowskian correspondence of the theory has been obtained by taking the zero curvature limit. It has been shown that under some simple conditions, the linearized modified field equation transforms according to two of the UIR's of dS group labeled by Π 2,1 ± and Π 2,2 ± in the discrete series. It means that the proposed modified gravitational theory can be a suitable one to describe the quantum gravitational effects in its linear approximation on dS space. The field equation has been solved and the solution has been written as the multiplication of a symmetric rank-2 polarization tensor and a massless scalar field using the ambient space notations. Also the two-point function has been calculated in the ambient space formalism. It is dS invariant and free of any theoretical problems.

  8. Triboluminescence dominated by crystallographic orientation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kuifang; Ma, Liran; Xu, Xuefeng; Wen, Shizhu; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    Triboluminescence (TL) is an optical phenomenon that has a long and varied history with broad applications, such as damage detection, X-ray source, and mass health monitoring sensor. So far, the properties and mechanisms of TL remain not completely understood. The TL properties emitted during the sliding contact between Al2O3 and SiO2 surfaces were studied along different crystallographic orientations. In this study, the TL intensity of Al2O3 was significantly enhanced as Al2O3 surface was along a particular crystallographic orientation, which is an unconventional phenomenon. TL enhancement of Al2O3 was not affected by air atmosphere and atomic stocking mode of Al2O3. The enhancement mechanism of Al2O3 may be influenced by the surface state of Al2O3. This work provides a new method to control the intensity of TL and novel ideas to elucidate the TL mechanism. PMID:27193511

  9. Triboluminescence dominated by crystallographic orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuifang; Ma, Liran; Xu, Xuefeng; Wen, Shizhu; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-05-01

    Triboluminescence (TL) is an optical phenomenon that has a long and varied history with broad applications, such as damage detection, X-ray source, and mass health monitoring sensor. So far, the properties and mechanisms of TL remain not completely understood. The TL properties emitted during the sliding contact between Al2O3 and SiO2 surfaces were studied along different crystallographic orientations. In this study, the TL intensity of Al2O3 was significantly enhanced as Al2O3 surface was along a particular crystallographic orientation, which is an unconventional phenomenon. TL enhancement of Al2O3 was not affected by air atmosphere and atomic stocking mode of Al2O3. The enhancement mechanism of Al2O3 may be influenced by the surface state of Al2O3. This work provides a new method to control the intensity of TL and novel ideas to elucidate the TL mechanism.

  10. Triboluminescence dominated by crystallographic orientation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuifang; Ma, Liran; Xu, Xuefeng; Wen, Shizhu; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    Triboluminescence (TL) is an optical phenomenon that has a long and varied history with broad applications, such as damage detection, X-ray source, and mass health monitoring sensor. So far, the properties and mechanisms of TL remain not completely understood. The TL properties emitted during the sliding contact between Al2O3 and SiO2 surfaces were studied along different crystallographic orientations. In this study, the TL intensity of Al2O3 was significantly enhanced as Al2O3 surface was along a particular crystallographic orientation, which is an unconventional phenomenon. TL enhancement of Al2O3 was not affected by air atmosphere and atomic stocking mode of Al2O3. The enhancement mechanism of Al2O3 may be influenced by the surface state of Al2O3. This work provides a new method to control the intensity of TL and novel ideas to elucidate the TL mechanism. PMID:27193511

  11. Johnson Space Center's Risk and Reliability Analysis Group 2008 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, Mark; Boyer, Roger; Cross, Bob; Hamlin, Teri; Roelant, Henk; Stewart, Mike; Bigler, Mark; Winter, Scott; Reistle, Bruce; Heydorn,Dick

    2009-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) Directorate s Risk and Reliability Analysis Group provides both mathematical and engineering analysis expertise in the areas of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) analysis, and data collection and analysis. The fundamental goal of this group is to provide National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) decisionmakers with the necessary information to make informed decisions when evaluating personnel, flight hardware, and public safety concerns associated with current operating systems as well as with any future systems. The Analysis Group includes a staff of statistical and reliability experts with valuable backgrounds in the statistical, reliability, and engineering fields. This group includes JSC S&MA Analysis Branch personnel as well as S&MA support services contractors, such as Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) and SoHaR. The Analysis Group s experience base includes nuclear power (both commercial and navy), manufacturing, Department of Defense, chemical, and shipping industries, as well as significant aerospace experience specifically in the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and Constellation Programs. The Analysis Group partners with project and program offices, other NASA centers, NASA contractors, and universities to provide additional resources or information to the group when performing various analysis tasks. The JSC S&MA Analysis Group is recognized as a leader in risk and reliability analysis within the NASA community. Therefore, the Analysis Group is in high demand to help the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) continue to fly safely, assist in designing the next generation spacecraft for the Constellation Program (CxP), and promote advanced analytical techniques. The Analysis Section s tasks include teaching classes and instituting personnel qualification processes to enhance the professional abilities of our analysts

  12. Status of the IAA study group on traffic management rules for space operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contant, Corinne; Lala, Petr; Schrogl, Kai-Uwe

    2007-10-01

    The investigation of space traffic and its management has only recently become a point of wider discussion. In particular, the series of workshops organized by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and other international organizations on international cooperation highlighted the issue. It was discussed thoroughly at the workshops, which took place in 1999 and 2001, respectively. It was at the 2001 workshop, when the suggestion was made that an International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) Study on the subject of space traffic management should be prepared. This suggestion was taken up and a proposal was presented to the Board of Trustees of IAA, which, in late 2001, accepted this proposal. Following this, an interdisciplinary study group of around 20 persons was composed. One early milestone in the process of work was the conduct of an International Institute of Space Law (IISL)/European Center of Space Law (ECSL) Symposium alongside the 2002 session of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS) Legal Subcommittee. This symposium consisted of presentations of members of the IAA study group. Also, close coordination with other study projects of IAA, in particular with the one on space debris, is sought. This paper presents the status of work of the study group, in particular, the approach and the scope of the study as well as its preliminary findings. The study group intends to finalize its work in early 2004, in order to be able to put the study before IAA and launch its review process before the 2004 International Astronautical Congress. Following this review, the study will be published and may be expected to make an impact in fora like the UNCOPUOS. The authors of this paper act as the coordinators/the rapporteur to this study. The paper will be presented in the IAA—as well as the IISL—session dealing with space traffic, by that bridging the two areas and seeking input from various sources.

  13. INFLUENCE OF SPAWNING GROUP SIZE AND SPACE ON REPRODUCTION BY SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS, CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cripe, G.M., R.L. Hemmer and L.R. Goodman. In press. Influence of Spawning Group Size and Space on Reproduction Variability of Sheepshead Minnows, Cyprinodon variegatus (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB...

  14. Definition of spacecraft standard interfaces by the NASA Space Assembly and Servicing Working Group (SASWG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radtke, Robert; Woolley, Charles; Arnold, Lana

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Space Assembly and Servicing Working Group (SASWG) is to study enabling technologies for on-orbit spacecraft maintenance and servicing. One key technology required for effective space logistics activity is the development of standard spacecraft interfaces, including the 'Basic Set' defined by NASA, the U.S. Space Command, and industry panelists to be the following: (1) navigation aids; (2) grasping, berthing, and docking; and (3) utility connections for power, data, and fluids. Draft standards have been prepared and referred to professional standards organizations, including the AIAA, EIA, and SAE space standards committee. The objective of the SASWG is to support these committees with the technical expertise required to prepare standards, guidelines, and recommended practices which will be accepted by the ANSI and international standards organizations, including the ISO, IEC, and PASC.

  15. Future In-Space Operations (FISO): A Working Group and Community Engagement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Lester, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Long-duration human capabilities beyond low Earth orbit (LEO), either in support of or as an alternative to lunar surface operations, have been assessed at least since the late 1960s. Over the next few months, we will present short histories of concepts for long-duration, free-space human habitation beyond LEO from the end of the Apollo program to the Decadal Planning Team (DPT)/NASA Exploration Team (NExT), which was active in 1999 2000 (see Forging a vision: NASA s Decadal Planning Team and the origins of the Vision for Space Exploration , The Space Review, December 19, 2005). Here we summarize the brief existence of the Future In-Space Operations (FISO) working group in 2005 2006 and its successor, a telecon-based colloquium series, which we co-moderate.

  16. Environmental interactions in Space Exploration: Announcement of the formation of an Environmental Interactions Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph C.; Hillard, G. Barry

    1991-01-01

    With the advent of the Space Exploration Initiative, the possibility of designing and using systems on scales not heretofore attempted presents exciting new challenges in systems design and space science. The environments addressed by the Space Exploration Initiative include the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, as well as the varied plasma and field environments which will be encountered by humans and cargo enroute to these destinations. Systems designers will need to understand environmental interactions and be able to model these mechanisms from the earliest conceptual design stages through design completion. To the end of understanding environmental interactions and establishing robotic precursor mission requirements, an Environmental Interactions Working Group has been established as part of the Robotic Missions Working Group. The current paper describes the working group and gives an update of its current activities. Working group charter and operation are reviewed, background information on the environmental interactions and their characteristics is offered, and the current status of the group's activities is presented along with anticipations for the future.

  17. Group and individual sow behavior is altered in early gestation by space allowance in the days immediately following grouping.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, E C; Plush, K J; van Wettere, W H E J; Hughes, P E

    2016-01-01

    Aggression between domestic sows is greatest when sows are first introduced to each other and hierarchies form. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a spacious "mixing pen" on sow aggression and stress. Sows were mixed into groups of 6 and allowed 2 (LOW; 8 groups and 48 sows), 4 (MED; 7 groups and 42 sows), or 6 m/sow (HIGH; 7 groups and 42 sows) for 4 d after mixing, at which point all pens were equalized to 2 m/sow. Salivary cortisol concentration and injury counts were measured on d -1, 0, 1, 3, and 4 relative to mixing, and behavior was also recorded on each of these days following mixing. Reproductive performance was assessed at farrowing. A linear mixed model was applied to the data. Data are presented as least squares means and standard error of the mean. Where transformations occurred, nontransformed adjusted means are presented in parentheses following the presentation of transformed data. In the primary analyses where measures were considered at the pen level, there were no effect of space allowance on fight number per sow, duration of fights, percentage of total time spent fighting, displacements, bites, knocks, and lunges ( > 0.05). These measures were higher on d 0 (i.e., fight number 1.0 ± 0.1 [13.8]) compared with d 1 (0.4 ± 0.1 [4.2]), 3 (0.7 ± 0.1 [5.3]), and 4 (0.7 ± 0.1 [5.5]; < 0.05), with no increase in aggression on d 4 when pen sizes were standardized ( > 0.05). There was increased percentage of time spent active (1.5 ± 0.02 [33.7] for LOW, 1.5 ± 0.02 [36.5] for MED, and 1.6 ± 0.02 [43.4] for HIGH) and time spent exploring (1.8 ± 0.1 [3.5] for LOW, 2.0 ± 0.1 [4.0] for MED, and 2.3 ± 0.1 [5.7] for HIGH) and number of nonaggressive sow-sow contacts (0.3 ± 0.09 [2.2] for LOW, 0.4 ± 0.07 [3.2] for MED, and 0.5 ± 0.07 [4.5] for HIGH) in HIGH compared with LOW ( < 0.05). Farrowing rate and total piglets born were not affected by treatment ( > 0.05). A secondary analysis was conducted that examined individual sow

  18. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 8: Earth and ocean physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Earth and Ocean Physics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The requirements for the space shuttle mission are defined as: (1) precision measurement for earth and ocean physics experiments, (2) development and demonstration of new and improved sensors and analytical techniques, (3) acquisition of surface truth data for evaluation of new measurement techniques, (4) conduct of critical experiments to validate geophysical phenomena and instrumental results, and (5) development and validation of analytical/experimental models for global ocean dynamics and solid earth dynamics/earthquake prediction. Tables of data are presented to show the flight schedule estimated costs, and the mission model.

  19. Communication: Active space decomposition with multiple sites: Density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Shane M.; Shiozaki, Toru

    2014-12-07

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few μE{sub h} or less) with M = 128 in both cases. This rapid convergence is because the renormalization steps are used only for the interfragment electron correlation.

  20. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 7: Earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Earth Observations working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The objectives of the Earth Observation experiments are: (1) establishment of quantitative relationships between observable parameters and geophysical variables, (2) development, test, calibration, and evaluation of eventual flight instruments in experimental space flight missions, (3) demonstration of the operational utility of specific observation concepts or techniques as information inputs needed for taking actions, and (4) deployment of prototype and follow-on operational Earth Observation systems. The basic payload capability, mission duration, launch sites, inclinations, and payload limitations are defined.

  1. Space allowance and high fiber diet impact performance and behavior of group-kept gestating sows.

    PubMed

    DeDecker, A E; Hanson, A R; Walker, P M; Salak-Johnson, J L

    2014-04-01

    Identifying and optimizing housing and management systems that improve the well-being of the gestating sow is essential to sustaining animal agriculture. Therefore, the impact of 2 floor-space allowances and a high-fiber gestation diet on dry group-housed sows were evaluated using multiple measures of well-being. Groups of 10 multiparous sows/pen (n = 221) were assigned randomly to treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement to either a corn-soybean meal diet (CTL) or corn-soybean meal diet supplemented with soybean hulls and wheat middlings (FBR), and floor-space allowance of either 1.7 or 2.3 m(2)/sow. Sow BW, backfat (BF), and body condition score (BCS) were all recorded on d 34, 65, 90, and 110 of gestation, whereas skin lesions were scored on d 34, every 2 d for the first 2-wk postmixing, and then biweekly throughout gestation. Blood sample was collected only on d 34 for cortisol (baseline), and samples were collected on d 90 of gestation for other measures including cortisol. Behavior was registered on multiple days throughout gestation. Sows fed FBR and kept at 1.7 m(2) produced heavier litter and weaning weights and greater number of piglets born alive, compared to sows fed FBR but kept at 2.3 m(2) of floor space (diet × floor space, P ≤ 0.04). Sows fed FBR and kept at 1.7 m(2) performed fewer oral-nasal-facial and sham-chew behaviors than sows fed CTL and kept at the same floor space (diet × floor space, P ≤ 0.044). Sows kept at 1.7 m(2) of floor space had a greater (P < 0.05) total lesion severity score than sows kept at 2.3 m(2)/sow, and vulva lesion scores were more (P < 0.02) severe among CTL-fed sows than FBR-fed sows. Parities 2 and 3 sows fed FBR and kept at 1.7 m(2) of floor space were heavier (P < 0.001) than sows fed the same diet but kept at 2.3 m(2). These results indicate that keeping small groups of pregnant sows at a minimum floor-space allowance of 1.7 m(2)/sow and floor feeding these sows a high-fiber diet can improve short-term sow

  2. Phormidium phycoerythrin forms hexamers in crystals: a crystallographic study.

    PubMed

    Sonani, Ravi Raghav; Sharma, Mahima; Gupta, Gagan Deep; Kumar, Vinay; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-08-01

    The crystallographic analysis of a marine cyanobacterium (Phormidium sp. A09DM) phycoerythrin (PE) that shows distinct sequence features compared with known PE structures from cyanobacteria and red algae is reported. Phormidium PE was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Diffraction data were collected on the protein crystallography beamline at the Indus-2 synchrotron. The crystals diffracted to about 2.1 Å resolution at 100 K. The crystals, with an apparent hexagonal morphology, belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 108.3, b = 108.4 Å, c = 116.6 Å, α = 78.94, β = 82.50, γ = 60.34°. The molecular-replacement solution confirmed the presence of 12 αβ monomers in the P1 cell. The Phormidium PE elutes as an (αβ)3 trimer of αβ monomers from a molecular-sieve column and exists as [(αβ)3]2 hexamers in the crystal lattice. Unlike red algal PE proteins, the hexamers of Phormidium PE do not form higher-order structures in the crystals. The existence of only one characteristic visual absorption band at 564 nm suggests the presence of phycoerythrobilin chromophores, and the absence of any other types of bilins, in the Phormidium PE assembly. PMID:26249689

  3. Neutron Laue and X-ray diffraction study of a new crystallographic superspace phase in n-nonadecane-urea.

    PubMed

    Zerdane, S; Mariette, C; McIntyre, G J; Lemée-Cailleau, M-H; Rabiller, P; Guérin, L; Ameline, J C; Toudic, B

    2015-06-01

    Aperiodic composite crystals present long-range order without translational symmetry. These materials may be described as the intersection in three dimensions of a crystal which is periodic in a higher-dimensional space. In such materials, symmetry breaking must be described as structural changes within these crystallographic superspaces. The increase in the number of superspace groups with the increase in the dimension of the superspace allows many more structural solutions. This is illustrated in n-nonadecane-urea, revealing a fifth higher-dimensional phase at low temperature. PMID:26027005

  4. Range Commanders Council Meteorology Group 88th Meeting: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Task Report, 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2004-01-01

    Supported Return-to-Flight activities by providing surface climate data from Kennedy Space Center used primarily for ice and dew formation studies, and upper air wind analysis primarily used for ascent loads analyses. The MSFC Environments Group's Terrestrial and Planetary Environments Team documented Space Shuttle day-of-launch support activities by publishing a document in support of SSP Return-to-Flight activities entitled "Space Shuttle Program Flight Operations Support". The team also formalized the Shuttle Natural Environments Technical Panel and chaired the first special session of the SSP Natural Environments Panel meeting at KSC, November 4-7,2003.58 participants from NASA, DOD and other government agencies from across the country attended the meeting.

  5. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  6. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Tokuoka, Keiji; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Okamoto, Naoki; Okano, Yousuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Inaka, Koji; Urade, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2007-10-01

    Old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Old yellow enzyme (OYE) is an NADPH oxidoreductase that contains a flavin mononucleotide as a prosthetic group. The OYE from Trypanosoma cruzi, which produces prostaglandin F{sub 2α}, a potent mediator of various physiological and pathological processes, from prostaglandin H2. The protein was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.3, b = 78.8, c = 78.8 Å, β = 93.4° and two molecules per asymmetric unit. The crystals were suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies and diffracted to 1.70 Å resolution. A Patterson search method is in progress using the structure of OYE from Pseudomonas putida as a starting model.

  7. Cohomologies of Configuration Spaces and Higher-Dimensional Polylogarithms in Renormalization Group Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolov, Nikolay M.

    2010-06-17

    The deviation from commutativity of the renormalization and the action of all linear partial differential operators is the main source of the anomalies in quantum field theory, including the renormalization group action. This deviation is characterized by certain 'renormalization cocycles' that are related to cohomologies of the so called (ordered) configuration spaces. Cohomological differential equations that determine the renormalization cocycles up to the renormalization freedom are obtained. The solution of these equations requires introducing transcendental extensions related to higher-dimensional polylogarithms.

  8. Report from the MPP Working Group to the NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James R.; Grosch, Chester; Mcanulty, Michael; Odonnell, John; Storey, Owen

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) gave a select group of scientists the opportunity to test and implement their computational algorithms on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) located at Goddard Space Flight Center, beginning in late 1985. One year later, the Working Group presented its report, which addressed the following: algorithms, programming languages, architecture, programming environments, the way theory relates, and performance measured. The findings point to a number of demonstrated computational techniques for which the MPP architecture is ideally suited. For example, besides executing much faster on the MPP than on conventional computers, systolic VLSI simulation (where distances are short), lattice simulation, neural network simulation, and image problems were found to be easier to program on the MPP's architecture than on a CYBER 205 or even a VAX. The report also makes technical recommendations covering all aspects of MPP use, and recommendations concerning the future of the MPP and machines based on similar architectures, expansion of the Working Group, and study of the role of future parallel processors for space station, EOS, and the Great Observatories era.

  9. Recombinant production, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic structure determination of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Ronny C.; McFeeters, Hana; Coates, Leighton; McFeeters, Robert L.

    2014-10-15

    The peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase enzyme from the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pth; EC 3.1.1.29) has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized for X-ray structural analysis. Suitable crystals were grown using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method after one week of incubation against a reservoir solution consisting of 20% polyethylene glycol 4000, 100 mM Tris pH 7.5, 10%(v/v) isopropyl alcohol. The crystals were used to obtain the three-dimensional structure of the native protein at 1.77 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement of the crystallographic data processed in space group P6122 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 63.62,c = 155.20 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. The asymmetric unit of the crystallographic lattice was composed of a single copy of the enzyme molecule with a 43% solvent fraction, corresponding to a Matthews coefficient of 2.43 Å3 Da-1. The crystallographic structure reported here will serve as the foundation for future structure-guided efforts towards the development of novel small-molecule inhibitors specific to bacterial Pths.

  10. Space group symmetry applied to SCF calculations with periodic boundary conditions and Gaussian orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakov, Alexander A.

    We report theoretical, algorithmic, and computational aspects of exploiting space-group symmetry in self-consistent field (SCF) calculations, primarily Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT), with periodic boundary conditions (PBC) and Gaussian-type orbitals. Incorporating exact exchange leads to generally better performance for a broad class of systems, but leads to a significant increase of computation time, especially for 3D solids, due to a large number of explicitly evaluated two-electron integrals. We exploit reduction of the list thereof based on the space-group symmetry of a crystal. As distinct from previous achievements, based on the use of symmorphic groups only, we extend our technique to non-symmorphic groups, thus enabling application of any of 230 3D space groups. Algorithms facilitating efficient reduction of the list of two-electron integrals and restoring the full Fock-type matrix have been proposed and implemented in the development version of Gaussian program. These schemes are applied not only to the HFx, but also to explicit evaluation of the near-field Coulomb contribution. In 3D solids with smallest unit cells speedup factors range from 2X to 9X for the near field Coulomb part and from 3X to 8X for the exact exchange, thus leading to a substantial reduction of the overall computational cost. Factors noticeably lower than the number of the operations are due to the highly symmetric atomic positions in crystals, as well as to the choice of primitive cells. In systems with atoms on general positions or in special positions of low multiplicity, the speedup factors readily exceed one order of magnitude being almost 70X (near-field Coulomb) and 57X (HFx) for the largest tested (16,7) single-walled nanotube with 278 symmetry operations.

  11. 'Seeing' atoms: the crystallographic revolution.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbach, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Laue's experiment in 1912 of the diffraction of X-rays by crystals led to one of the most influential discoveries in the history of science: the first determinations of crystal structures, NaCl and diamond in particular, by W. L. Bragg in 1913. For the first time, the visualisation of the structure of matter at the atomic level became possible. X-ray diffraction provided a sort of microscope with atomic resolution, atoms became observable physical objects and their relative positions in space could be seen. All branches of science concerned with matter, solid-state physics, chemistry, materials science, mineralogy and biology, could now be firmly anchored on the spatial arrangement of atoms. During the ensuing 100 years, structure determination by diffraction methods has matured into an indispensable method of chemical analysis. We trace the history of the development of 'small-structure' crystallography (excepting macromolecular structures) in Switzerland. Among the pioneers figure Peter Debye and Paul Scherrer with powder diffraction, and Paul Niggli and his Zurich School with space group symmetry and geometrical crystallography. Diffraction methods were applied early on by chemists at the Universities of Bern and Geneva. By the 1970s, X-ray crystallography was firmly established at most Swiss Universities, directed by full professors. Today, chemical analysis by structure determination is the task of service laboratories. However, the demand of diffraction methods to solve problems in all disciplines of science is still increasing and powerful radiation sources and detectors are being developed in Switzerland and worldwide. PMID:24801690

  12. The redshift-space neighborhoods of 36 loose groups of galaxies. 1: The data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramella, Massimo; Geller, Margaret J.; Hurchra, John P.; Thorstensen, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We have selected 36 loose groups of galaxies (RGH89) with at least five members, and with mean redshift average value of CZ is greater than 3200 km/s. These groups all lie within the first two slices of the CfA redshift survey 8(sup h) less than or equal to alpha less than or equal to 17(sup h) and 26.5 deg less than or equal to delta less than or equal to 38.5 deg). For each of these groups, we define the redshift-space neighborhood as a region centered on the group coordinates and delimited by a circle of projected radius R(sub cir) = 1.5/h Mpc on the sky, and by a velocity interval delta (sub cz) = 3000 km/s. Here we give the redshifts of 334 galaxies in these redshift-space neighborhoods. For completeness, we also give the redshifts of the 232 original members. These data include 199 new redshifts. We demonstrate that these samples of fainter galaxies significantly increase the number of members.

  13. Endomorphisms of spaces of virtual vectors fixed by a discrete group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rădulescu, F.

    2016-04-01

    A study is made of unitary representations π of a discrete group G that are of type II when restricted to an almost-normal subgroup Γ\\subseteq G. The associated unitary representation \\overlineπ {p} of G on the Hilbert space of `virtual' Γ_0-invariant vectors is investigated, where Γ_0 runs over a suitable class of finite-index subgroups of Γ. The unitary representation \\overlineπ {p} of G is uniquely determined by the requirement that the Hecke operators for all Γ_0 are the `block-matrix coefficients' of \\overlineπ {p}. If π\\vert_Γ is an integer multiple of the regular representation, then there is a subspace L of the Hilbert space of π that acts as a fundamental domain for Γ. In this case the space of Γ-invariant vectors is identified with L. When π\\vert_Γ is not an integer multiple of the regular representation (for example, if G=\\operatorname{PGL}(2, Z \\lbrack 1/p \\rbrack ), Γ is the modular group, π belongs to the discrete series of representations of \\operatorname{PSL}(2, R), and the Γ-invariant vectors are cusp forms), π is assumed to be the restriction to a subspace H_0 of a larger unitary representation having a subspace L as above. The operator angle between the projection P_L onto L (typically, the characteristic function of the fundamental domain) and the projection P_0 onto the subspace H_0 (typically, a Bergman projection onto a space of analytic functions) is the analogue of the space of Γ-invariant vectors. It is proved that the character of the unitary representation \\overlineπ {p} is uniquely determined by the character of the representation π. Bibliography: 53 titles.

  14. Processor-Group Aware Runtime Support for Shared-and Global-Address Space Models

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Tipparaju, Vinod; Palmer, Bruce; Nieplocha, Jarek

    2004-12-07

    Exploiting multilevel parallelism using processor groups is becoming increasingly important for programming on high-end systems. This paper describes a group-aware run-time support for shared-/global- address space programming models. The current effort has been undertaken in the context of the Aggregate Remote Memory Copy Interface (ARMCI) [5], a portable runtime system used as a communication layer for Global Arrays [6], Co-Array Fortran (CAF) [9], GPSHMEM [10], Co-Array Python [11], and also end-user applications. The paper describes the management of shared memory, integration of shared memory communication and RDMA on clusters with SMP nodes, and registration. These are all required for efficient multi- method and multi-protocol communication on modern systems. Focus is placed on techniques for supporting process groups while maximizing communication performance and efficiently managing global memory system-wide.

  15. A Perceptual Phonetic Similarity Space for Languages: Evidence from Five Native Language Listener Groups1

    PubMed Central

    Bradlow, Ann; Clopper, Cynthia; Smiljanic, Rajka; Walter, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to devise a means of representing languages in a perceptual similarity space based on their overall phonetic similarity. In Experiment 1, native English listeners performed a free classification task in which they grouped 17 diverse languages based on their perceived phonetic similarity. A similarity matrix of the grouping patterns was then submitted to clustering and multidimensional scaling analyses. In Experiment 2, an independent group of native English listeners sorted the group of 17 languages in terms of their distance from English. Experiment 3 repeated Experiment 2 with four groups of non-native English listeners: Dutch, Mandarin, Turkish and Korean listeners. Taken together, the results of these three experiments represent a step towards establishing an approach to assessing the overall phonetic similarity of languages. This approach could potentially provide the basis for developing predictions regarding foreign-accented speech intelligibility for various listener groups, and regarding speech perception accuracy in the context of background noise in various languages. PMID:21179563

  16. Encoding Curved Tetrahedra in Face Holonomies: Phase Space of Shapes from Group-Valued Moment Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggard, Hal M.; Han, Muxin; Riello, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    We present a generalization of Minkowski's classic theorem on the reconstruction of tetrahedra from algebraic data to homogeneously curved spaces. Euclidean notions such as the normal vector to a face are replaced by Levi-Civita holonomies around each of the tetrahedron's faces. This allows the reconstruction of both spherical and hyperbolic tetrahedra within a unified framework. A new type of hyperbolic simplex is introduced in order for all the sectors encoded in the algebraic data to be covered. Generalizing the phase space of shapes associated to flat tetrahedra leads to group valued moment maps and quasi-Poisson spaces. These discrete geometries provide a natural arena for considering the quantization of gravity including a cosmological constant. A concrete realization of this is provided by the relation with the spin-network states of loop quantum gravity. This work therefore provides a bottom-up justification for the emergence of deformed gauge symmetries and quantum groups in 3+1 dimensional covariant loop quantum gravity in the presence of a cosmological constant.

  17. Subluminal group velocity and dispersion of Laguerre Gauss beams in free space

    PubMed Central

    Bareza, Nestor D.; Hermosa, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    That the speed of light in free space c is constant has been a pillar of modern physics since the derivation of Maxwell and in Einstein’s postulate in special relativity. This has been a basic assumption in light’s various applications. However, a physical beam of light has a finite extent such that even in free space it is by nature dispersive. The field confinement changes its wavevector, hence, altering the light’s group velocity vg. Here, we report the subluminal vg and consequently the dispersion in free space of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam, a beam known to carry orbital angular momentum. The vg of LG beam, calculated in the paraxial regime, is observed to be inversely proportional to the beam’s divergence θ0, the orbital order ℓ and the radial order p. LG beams of higher orders travel relatively slower than that of lower orders. As a consequence, LG beams of different orders separate in the temporal domain along propagation. This is an added effect to the dispersion due to field confinement. Our results are useful for treating information embedded in LG beams from astronomical sources and/or data transmission in free space. PMID:27231195

  18. Operator evolution in the three-body space via the similarity renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Micah; Quaglioni, Sofia; Johnson, Calvin; Jurgenson, Eric; Navratil, Petr

    2014-03-01

    Performing quantitative calculations of nuclear observables in terms of nucleons interacting through two- and three-nucleon forces is a guiding principle of ab initio nuclear theory. Computationally, this is complicated by the large model spaces needed to reach convergence in many-body approaches, such as the no-core shell model (NCSM). In recent years, the similarity renormalization group (SRG) has provided a powerful tool to soften interactions for ab initio structure calculations, thus leading to convergence within smaller model spaces. SRG has been very successful when applied to the Hamiltonian of the nuclear system. However, when computing observables other than spectra, one must evolve the relevant operators using the same transformation that was applied to the Hamiltonian. Here we compute the root mean square (RMS) radius of 3H to show that evolving the \\rcirc2 operator in the three-body space, thus including two- and three-body SRG induced terms, will yield an exactly unitary transformation. We then extend our calculations to 4He and compute the RMS radius and total strength of the dipole transition using operators evolved in the three-body space. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Support came from U.S. DOE/SC/NP (work proposal SCW1158), IMRR: LLNL-ABS-647982.

  19. Subluminal group velocity and dispersion of Laguerre Gauss beams in free space.

    PubMed

    Bareza, Nestor D; Hermosa, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    That the speed of light in free space c is constant has been a pillar of modern physics since the derivation of Maxwell and in Einstein's postulate in special relativity. This has been a basic assumption in light's various applications. However, a physical beam of light has a finite extent such that even in free space it is by nature dispersive. The field confinement changes its wavevector, hence, altering the light's group velocity vg. Here, we report the subluminal vg and consequently the dispersion in free space of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam, a beam known to carry orbital angular momentum. The vg of LG beam, calculated in the paraxial regime, is observed to be inversely proportional to the beam's divergence θ0, the orbital order ℓ and the radial order p. LG beams of higher orders travel relatively slower than that of lower orders. As a consequence, LG beams of different orders separate in the temporal domain along propagation. This is an added effect to the dispersion due to field confinement. Our results are useful for treating information embedded in LG beams from astronomical sources and/or data transmission in free space. PMID:27231195

  20. Subluminal group velocity and dispersion of Laguerre Gauss beams in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareza, Nestor D.; Hermosa, Nathaniel

    2016-05-01

    That the speed of light in free space c is constant has been a pillar of modern physics since the derivation of Maxwell and in Einstein’s postulate in special relativity. This has been a basic assumption in light’s various applications. However, a physical beam of light has a finite extent such that even in free space it is by nature dispersive. The field confinement changes its wavevector, hence, altering the light’s group velocity vg. Here, we report the subluminal vg and consequently the dispersion in free space of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam, a beam known to carry orbital angular momentum. The vg of LG beam, calculated in the paraxial regime, is observed to be inversely proportional to the beam’s divergence θ0, the orbital order ℓ and the radial order p. LG beams of higher orders travel relatively slower than that of lower orders. As a consequence, LG beams of different orders separate in the temporal domain along propagation. This is an added effect to the dispersion due to field confinement. Our results are useful for treating information embedded in LG beams from astronomical sources and/or data transmission in free space.

  1. Group-galaxy correlations in redshift space as a probe of the growth of structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, F. G.; de la Torre, S.; Bianchi, D.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the use of the cross-correlation between galaxies and galaxy groups to measure redshift-space distortions (RSD) and thus probe the growth rate of cosmological structure. This is compared to the classical approach based on using galaxy auto-correlation. We make use of realistic simulated galaxy catalogues that have been constructed by populating simulated dark matter haloes with galaxies through halo occupation prescriptions. We adapt the classical RSD dispersion model to the case of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function and estimate the RSD parameter β by fitting both the full anisotropic correlation function ξs(rp, π) and its multipole moments. In addition, we define a modified version of the latter statistics by truncating the multipole moments to exclude strongly non-linear distortions at small transverse scales. We fit these three observable quantities in our set of simulated galaxy catalogues and estimate statistical and systematic errors on β for the case of galaxy-galaxy, group-group, and group-galaxy correlation functions. When ignoring off-diagonal elements of the covariance matrix in the fitting, the truncated multipole moments of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function provide the most accurate estimate, with systematic errors below 3 per cent when fitting transverse scales larger than 10 h-1 Mpc. Including the full data covariance enlarges statistical errors but keep unchanged the level of systematic error. Although statistical errors are generally larger for groups, the use of group-galaxy cross-correlation can potentially allow the reduction of systematics while using simple linear or dispersion models.

  2. Magnetic and crystallographic structures in UTX intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.A.; Lawson, A.C.; Sechovsky, V.; Havela, L.; Kergadallan, Y.; Nakotte, H.; de Boer, F.R.

    1993-08-01

    Uranium, along with other actinides and lanthanides, forms a large group of ternary intermetallic compounds of stoichiometry UTX (T = transition metal, X = p-electron metal). These compounds are formed in several structure types and the occurrence and stability of particular structures with respect to the transition metal content suggests reasonable systematics. The authors have also investigated the magnetic structures of selected UTX compounds and it is revealing to relate the crystallographic and magnetic structures, because of the relationship between the magnetic symmetry and that of the U-atom environment produced by the 5f-ligand hybridization, and the consequent anisotropic exchange. Those of ZrNiAl structure type are collinear, with moments along the hexagonal c-axis. In the orthorhombic NiSiTi structure type, the moments are confined to the b- c plane (perpendicular to the uranium chains) and the structures are often incommensurate. In the hexagonal CaIn{sub 2} (or GaGeLi) structure type, the magnetic structures form in an orthorhombic cell, and at least in the disordered centric group, again the moments lie perpendicular to the nearest-neighbor uranium spacing. This work presents a phenomenology of trends in UTX ternary compounds. It is shown that there is an apparent strong hybridization parallel to nearest neighbor U-U directions, with ferromagnetic coupling in the same directions. There may be a systematic relationship between the hybridization anisotropy and the magnetic anisotropy, in which the quantization axes are the same and the moments point along directions of relatively weak hybridization.

  3. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 5: Solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Solar Physics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The areas to be investigated by the solar physics experiments are: (1) the production of mechanical energy in the subphotospheric layers and its transport and dissipation in the upper layers of the atmosphere, (2) the mass flux from the subphotospheric layers into the chromosphere and corona and beyond the solar wind, (3) solar activity and its relationship to magnetic fields, and (4) the production of solar flares. The approach to be followed in conducting the experiments and the equipment required are defined.

  4. Crystallization of the Focal Adhesion Kinase Targeting (FAT) Domain in a Primitive Orthorhombic Space Group

    SciTech Connect

    Magis,A.; Bailey, K.; Kurenova, E.; Hernandez Prada, J.; Cance, W.; Ostrov, D.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data from the targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were collected from a single crystal that diffracted to 1.99 Angstroms resolution and reduced to the primitive orthorhombic lattice. A single molecule was predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit based on the Matthews coefficient. The data were phased using molecular-replacement methods using an existing model of the FAK FAT domain. All structures of human focal adhesion kinase FAT domains solved to date have been solved in a C-centered orthorhombic space group.

  5. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 4: Life sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Life Sciences working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The objectives of the Life Sciences investigations are: (1) to continue the research directed at understanding the origin of life and the search for extraterrestrial evidence of life, (2) biomedical research to understand mechanisms and provide criteria for support of manned flight, (3) technology development for life support, protective systems, and work aids for providing environmental control, and (4) to study basic biological functions at all levels or organization influenced by gravity, radiation, and circadian rhythms. Examples of candidate experimental schedules and the experimental package functional requirements are included.

  6. Real space renormalization group and totalitarian paradox of majority rule voting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galam, Serge

    2000-09-01

    The effect of majority rule voting in hierarchical structures is studied using the basic concepts from real space renormalization group. It shows in particular that a huge majority can be self-eliminated while climbing up the hierarchy levels. This majority democratic self-elimination articulates around the existence of fixed points in the voting flow. An unstable fixed point determines the critical threshold to full and total power. It can be varied from 50% up to 77% of initial support. Our model could shed new light on the last century eastern European communist collapse.

  7. Pressure and equilibrium measures for actions of amenable groups on the space of configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufetov, Aleksei I.

    2011-03-01

    The model of statistical physics on a countable amenable group G is considered. For the natural action of G on the space of configurations S^G, \\vert S\\vert<\\infty, and for any closed invariant set X\\subset S^G we prove that there exists pressure which corresponds to a potential with finite norm on X (in the sense of the limit with respect to any Følner sequence of sets in G). The existence of an equilibrium measure is established. Bibliography: 8 titles.

  8. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a 2S albumin seed protein from Lens culinaris

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Pankaj; Gaur, Vineet; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2008-08-01

    A 2S albumin from L. culinaris was purified and crystallized and preliminary crystallographic studies were carried out. Lens culinaris (lentil) is a widely consumed high-protein-content leguminous crop. A 2S albumin protein (26.5 kDa) has been identified using NH{sub 2}-terminal sequencing from a 90% ammonium sulfate saturation fraction of total L. culinaris seed protein extract. The NH{sub 2}-terminal sequence shows very high homology to PA2, an allergy-related protein from Pisum sativum. The 2S albumin protein was purified using a combination of size-exclusion and ion-exchange chromatography. Crystals of the 2S seed albumin obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and were indexed in space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 78.6, c = 135.2 Å.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase

    SciTech Connect

    Qamra, Rohini; Prakash, Prachee; Aruna, Bandi; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Mande, Shekhar C.

    2005-05-01

    Chorismate mutase from M. tuberculosis has been crystallized. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies reveal the occurrence of a dimeric molecule in the crystal asymmetric unit. Chorismate mutase catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine in bacteria, fungi and higher plants. The recent re-annotation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome has revealed the presence of a duplicate set of genes coding for chorismate mutase. The mycobacterial gene Rv1885c bears <20% sequence homology to other bacterial chorismate mutases, thus serving as a potential target for the development of inhibitors specific to the pathogen. The M. tuberculosis chorismate mutase was crystallized in space group C2 and the crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function calculations revealed the presence of two monomers in the asymmetric unit.

  10. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic data analysis of filamin A repeats 14–16

    SciTech Connect

    Aguda, Adeleke Halilu; Sakwe, Amos Malle; Rask, Lars; Robinson, Robert Charles

    2007-04-01

    The crystallization and crystallographic data analysis of filamin repeats 14–16 are reported. Human filamin A is a 280 kDa protein involved in actin-filament cross-linking. It is structurally divided into an actin-binding headpiece (ABD) and a rod domain containing 24 immunoglobulin-like (Ig) repeats. A fragment of human filamin A (Ig repeats 14–16) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified protein was crystallized in 1.6 M ammonium sulfate, 2% PEG 1000 and 100 mM HEPES pH 7.5. The crystals diffracted to 1.95 Å and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 50.63, b = 52.10, c = 98.46 Å, α = β = γ = 90°.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of rabbit l-gulonate 3-dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Asada, Yukuhiko; Kuroishi, Chizu; Ukita, Yoko; Sumii, Rie; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hara, Akira; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-03-01

    The preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of rabbit l-gulonate 3-dehydrogenase is described. Rabbit l-gulonate 3-dehydrogenase was crystallized using the oil-microbatch method at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.70 Å resolution from a crystal at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the C-centred monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.81, b = 69.08, c = 65.64 Å, β = 102.7°. Assuming the presence of a monomeric protomer in the asymmetric unit gives a V{sub M} value of 2.21 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 44.4%. A cocrystal with NADH, which was isomorphous to the apo form, was also prepared and diffraction data were collected to 1.85 Å resolution using Cu Kα radiation at 100 K.

  12. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of Pru du amandin, an allergenic protein from Prunus dulcis

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Vineet; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2008-01-01

    The purification, identification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an allergy-related protein, Pru du amandin, from P. dulcis nuts are reported. Food allergies appear to be one of the foremost causes of hypersensitivity reactions. Nut allergies account for most food allergies and are often permanent. The 360 kDa hexameric protein Pru du amandin, a known allergen, was purified from almonds (Prunus dulcis) by ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion-exchange chromatography. The protein was identified by a BLAST homology search against the nonredundant sequence database. Pru du amandin belongs to the 11S legumin family of seed storage proteins characterized by the presence of a cupin motif. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 150.7, c = 164.9 Å.

  13. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human Rad GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Yanuar, Arry; Sakurai, Shigeru; Kitano, Ken; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2005-11-01

    Human Rad has been crystallized. A diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 1.8 Å. Human Rad is a new member of the Ras GTPase superfamily and is overexpressed in human skeletal muscle of individuals with type II diabetes. The GTPase core domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified for crystallization. Crystals were obtained at 293 K by vapour diffusion using a crystallization robot. The crystals were found to belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.2, b = 58.6, c = 53.4 Å, β = 97.9°, and contained two Rad molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. A diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 1.8 Å using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8.

  14. Intraspecific variation in space use, group size, and mating systems of caviomorph rodents

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Christine R.; Burger, Joseph Robert

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in social systems is widely recognized across many taxa, and specific models, including polygamy potential, resource defense, and resource dispersion, have been developed to explain the relationship between ecological variation and social organization. Although mammals from temperate North America and Eurasia have provided many insights into this relationship, rodents from the Neotropics and temperate South America have largely been ignored. In this review we focus on reports documenting intraspecific variation in spacing systems, group size, and mating systems of caviomorphs. This large group of New World hystricognath rodents occupies a diverse array of habitats; thus, members of the same species potentially exhibit different social systems in response to different ecological conditions. Spatial patterns vary in response to a diverse array of factors, including predation, food availability, population density, and soil characteristics. Changes in group size typically correlate with changes in resource availability, particularly food. Mating systems generally reflect the ability of males to control access to females, which may depend on population density or food distribution. In general, social organization in caviomorphs fits predictions of resource-based models; however, most studies have been purely observational, involving small numbers of animals over short time periods and reporting qualitative rather than quantitative levels of ecological correlates. In future studies the use of molecular techniques and controlled, experimental manipulations can increase our understanding of intraspecific variation in caviomorph social systems. This understudied group of rodents offers excellent opportunities to provide insights into the influence of ecological conditions on behavior such as social systems. PMID:22328790

  15. Space group symmetry applied to SCF calculations with periodic boundary conditions and Gaussian orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakov, Alexander A.; Frisch, Michael J.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2013-09-01

    Space group symmetry is exploited and implemented in density functional calculations of extended systems with periodic boundary conditions. Our scheme for reducing the number of two-electron integrals employs the entire set of operations of the space group, including glide plains and screw axes. Speedups observed for the Fock matrix formation in simple 3D systems range from 2X to 9X for the near field Coulomb part and from 3X to 8X for the Hartree-Fock-type exchange, the slowest steps of the procedure, thus leading to a substantial reduction of the computational time. The relatively small speedup factors in special cases are attributed to the highly symmetric positions atoms occupy in crystals, including the ones tested here, as well as to the choice of the smallest possible unit cells. For quasi-1D systems with most atoms staying invariant only under identity, the speedup factors often exceed one order of magnitude reaching almost 70X (near-field Coulomb) and 57X (HFx) for the largest tested (16,7) single-walled nanotube with 278 symmetry operations.

  16. Crystallographic Control in Ilmenite Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, M. L.; Grey, I. E.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.

    2007-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques were used to characterize the products from hydrogen reduction of polygranular synthetic ilmenite discs at temperatures in the range 823 to 1173 K and pressures in the range 1 to 13 atm. Reduction commences at grain boundaries and cracks and advances progressively to grain interiors. Within individual grains, the morphology of the reduction products was found to be crystallographically controlled. Near parallel bands of metallic iron (Fe m ) form within each grain, aligned with the basal plane of ilmenite (il) (0001) il . The separation between bands is of the order of 1 μm and is relatively constant with change of pressure and temperature. In the interband region, conversion of ilmenite to rutile occurs preferentially parallel to \\{ 11ifmmodeexpandafterbarelseexpandafter\\=fi{2}0\\} _{{il}} ilmenite planes, generating platelets of rutile that grow normal to the Fe m bands. The intergrain duplex morphology of the reduction products closely resembles cellular precipitation in alloys. At reduction temperatures above ˜1000 K, the interband region comprises dense, nonporous oriented intergrowths of rutile platelets and residual ilmenite, whereas below ˜900 K, the interband region contains a fine, filamentary network of pores. In the intermediate temperature regime, a change from dense to porous interband region occurs with increasing pressure. The observations have been interpreted in terms of the relative rates of interfacial chemical reaction and solid-state diffusion, with the latter having a controlling influence at lower temperatures or higher pressures.

  17. Some algebraic properties of crystallographic sublattices.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, John S

    2006-03-01

    In this article, a number of the results relevant to the concept of sublattices of a basic crystallographic lattice are reviewed, emphasizing particularly previously unpublished work on the algebraic aspects. A three-dimensional geometric lattice L can be considered as an infinite Abelian group under addition. A sublattice S of L, which is also three-dimensional, is a subgroup of L such that the finite quotient group, G approximately equals L/S, is an Abelian group of order the index of S in L. The sublattice itself in its standard form is represented by an upper triangular matrix. The index of the sublattice is given by the determinant of this matrix. It is first noted that a sublattice described by an arbitrary basis set in L may be converted to this standard form. Next the sublattice is expressed as the intersection of a set of sublattices of individual index a power of a distinct prime, i.e. S(n = p(a)(1)p(b)(2)...) = S(1)(p(a)(1)[cap]S(2)(p(b)(2)...[cap]... = [bigcap](i)S(i)(p(alpha(i)), where p(1), p(2) etc. are prime numbers and n = Pi(i)p(alpha)(i) is the Euclidean factorization of n. This decomposition is important because it corresponds to the Sylow decomposition of the corresponding quotient group G approximately equals (i)[sign: see text] A(p)(i). It is also useful to be able to carry out two commutative binary operations on sublattices of L; these are to find their common sublattice of lowest index in L, which is their intersection S(cap) = S(a)(m)[cap]S(b)(n) and their common superlattice of highest index in L, given by S(< >) = , where < > indicates the span of the sublattices. PMID:16489245

  18. Nuclear safety policy working group recommendations on nuclear propulsion safety for the space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Albert C.; Lee, James H.; Mcculloch, William H.; Sawyer, J. Charles, Jr.; Bari, Robert A.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Hardy, Alva C.; Niederauer, George F.; Remp, Kerry; Rice, John W.

    1993-01-01

    An interagency Nuclear Safety Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program. These recommendations, which are contained in this report, should facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG has recommended a top-level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the SEI nuclear propulsion safety program. In addition, the NSPWG has reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. These recommendations should be useful for the development of the program's top-level requirements for safety functions (referred to as Safety Functional Requirements). The safety requirements and guidelines address the following topics: reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, safeguards, risk/reliability, operational safety, ground testing, and other considerations.

  19. Filling-Enforced Gaplessness in Band Structures of the 230 Space Groups.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Haruki; Po, Hoi Chun; Zaletel, Michael P; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2016-08-26

    Nonsymmorphic symmetries like screws and glides produce electron band touchings, obstructing the formation of a band insulator and leading, instead, to metals or nodal semimetals even when the number of electrons in the unit cell is an even integer. Here, we calculate the electron fillings compatible with being a band insulator for all 230 space groups, for noninteracting electrons with time-reversal symmetry. Our bounds are tight-that is, we can rigorously eliminate band insulators at any forbidden filling and produce explicit models for all allowed fillings-and stronger than those recently established for interacting systems. These results provide simple criteria that should help guide the search for topological semimetals and, also, have implications for both the nature and stability of the resulting nodal Fermi surfaces. PMID:27610868

  20. Application of the renormalization group to the calculation of the vacuum decay rate in flat and curved space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Dimitrios

    2007-02-01

    I show that an application of renormalization group arguments may lead to significant corrections to the vacuum decay rate for phase transitions in flat and curved space-time. It can also give some information regarding its dependence on the parameters of the theory, including the cosmological constant in the case of decay in curved space-time.

  1. International Space Station Air Quality Assessed According to Toxicologically-Grouped Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Limero, Tom; DeVera, Vanessa; Cheng, Patti; Hand, Jennifer; Macatangay, Ariel; Beck, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Scores of compounds are found in the International Space Station (ISS) atmospheric samples that are returned to the Johnson Space Center Toxicology Laboratory for analysis. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) are set with the view that each compound is present as if there were no other compounds present. In order to apply SMACs to the interpretation of the analytical data, the toxicologist must employ some method of combining the potential effects of the aggregate of compounds found in the atmospheric samples. The simplest approach is to assume that each quantifiable compound has the potential for some effect in proportion to the applicable SMAC, and then add all the proportions. This simple paradigm disregards the fact that most compounds have potential to adversely affect only a few physiological systems, and their effects would be independent rather than additive. An improved approach to dealing with exposure to mixtures is to add the proportions only for compounds that adversely affect the same physiological system. For example, toxicants that cause respiratory irritation are separated from those that cause neurotoxicity or cardio-toxicity. Herein we analyze ISS air quality data according to toxicological groups with a view that this could be used for understanding any crew symptoms occurring at the time of the sample. In addition, this approach could be useful in post-flight longitudinal surveys where the flight surgeon may need to identify post-flight, follow-up medical studies because of on-orbit exposures that target specific physiological systems.

  2. International Space Station Air Quality Assessed According to Toxicologically-Grouped Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Beck, Steve; Cheng, Patti F.; deVera, Vanessa J.; Hand, Jennifer; Macatangay, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    Scores of compounds are found in the International Space Station (ISS) atmospheric samples that are returned to the Johnson Space Center Toxicology Laboratory for analysis. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) are set with the view that each compound is present as if there were no other compounds present. In order to apply SMACs to the interpretation of the analytical data, the toxicologist must employ some method of combining the potential effects of the aggregate of compounds found in the atmospheric samples. The simplest approach is to assume that each quantifiable compound has the potential for some effect in proportion to the applicable SMAC, and then add all the proportions. This simple paradigm disregards the fact that most compounds have potential to adversely affect only a few physiological systems, and their effects would be independent rather than additive. An improved approach to dealing with exposure to mixtures is to add the proportions only for compounds that adversely affect the same physiological system. For example, toxicants that cause respiratory irritation are separated from those that cause neurotoxicity or cardio-toxicity. Herein we analyze ISS air quality data according to toxicological groups with a view that this could be used for understanding any crew symptoms occurring at the time of the sample acquisition. In addition, this approach could be useful in post-flight longitudinal surveys where the flight surgeon may need to identify post-flight, follow-up medical studies because of on-orbit exposures that target specific physiological systems.

  3. Quantum groups, roots of unity and particles on quantized Anti-de Sitter space

    SciTech Connect

    Steinacker, H

    1997-05-23

    Quantum groups in general and the quantum Anti-de Sitter group U{sub q}(so(2,3)) in particular are studied from the point of view of quantum field theory. The author shows that if q is a suitable root of unity, there exist finite-dimensional, unitary representations corresponding to essentially all the classical one-particle representations with (half) integer spin, with the same structure at low energies as in the classical case. In the massless case for spin {ge} 1, {open_quotes}naive{close_quotes} representations are unitarizable only after factoring out a subspace of {open_quotes}pure gauges{close_quotes}, as classically. Unitary many-particle representations are defined, with the correct classical limit. Furthermore, the author identifies a remarkable element Q in the center of U{sub q}(g), which plays the role of a BRST operator in the case of U{sub q}(so(2,3)) at roots of unity, for any spin {ge} 1. The associated ghosts are an intrinsic part of the indecomposable representations. The author shows how to define an involution on algebras of creation and anihilation operators at roots of unity, in an example corresponding to non-identical particles. It is shown how nonabelian gauge fields appear naturally in this framework, without having to define connections on fiber bundles. Integration on Quantum Euclidean space and sphere and on Anti-de Sitter space is studied as well. The author gives a conjecture how Q can be used in general to analyze the structure of indecomposable representations, and to define a new, completely reducible associative (tensor) product of representations at roots of unity, which generalizes the standard {open_quotes}truncated{close_quotes} tensor product as well as many-particle representations.

  4. Group space allowance has little effect on sow health, productivity, or welfare in a free-access stall system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Free-access stalls allow sows to choose the protection of a stall or use of a shared group space. This study investigated the effect of group space width: 0.91 (SS), 2.13 (IS), and 3.05 (LS) m on the health, production, behavior, and welfare of gestating sows. At gestational day (GD) 35.4 ± 2.3, 21 ...

  5. Public opinion and interest group positions on open-space issues in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA: Implications for resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannery, Thomas Allan

    1987-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to elicit and compare the open-space preferences of citizens and openspace experts in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. A randomly selected sample of 492 citizens and 35 open-space experts participated in a telephone survey during May 5 18, 1986. The following hypothesis was tested and used as a guideline for the study: HO1: There is no significant difference between respondents' status and preference for open space in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The hypothesis was rejected. Findings confirmed respondents' status affected preference for open space. Of the eight issues on which the citizen and expert groups were compared, five recorded significant differences in response profiles. The open-space expert group was significantly more supportive of using open space to accommodate offroad vehicle facilities, wildlife preserves, a citywide recreational trail, and a trail system along the arroyos and city ditches. The citizen sample was significantly more supportive of using open space to accommodate overnight camping facilities. Both groups equally supported using open space to accommodate an outdoor amphitheater, outdoor education facilities, and rafting, kayaking, and canoeing facilities. The finding indicated that expert preferences did not represent an aggregate of citizen preferences for managing open-space resources. Understanding both expert and citizen positions will facilitate decision-making processes and help resolve environmental disputes.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope Snapshot Search for Planetary Nebulae in Globular Clusters of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    2015-04-01

    Single stars in ancient globular clusters (GCs) are believed incapable of producing planetary nebulae (PNs), because their post-asymptotic-giant-branch evolutionary timescales are slower than the dissipation timescales for PNs. Nevertheless, four PNs are known in Galactic GCs. Their existence likely requires more exotic evolutionary channels, including stellar mergers and common-envelope binary interactions. I carried out a snapshot imaging search with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for PNs in bright Local Group GCs outside the Milky Way. I used a filter covering the 5007 Å nebular emission line of [O iii], and another one in the nearby continuum, to image 66 GCs. Inclusion of archival HST frames brought the total number of extragalactic GCs imaged at 5007 Å to 75, whose total luminosity slightly exceeds that of the entire Galactic GC system. I found no convincing PNs in these clusters, aside from one PN in a young M31 cluster misclassified as a GC, and two PNs at such large angular separations from an M31 GC that membership is doubtful. In a ground-based spectroscopic survey of 274 old GCs in M31, Jacoby et al. found three candidate PNs. My HST images of one of them suggest that the [O iii] emission actually arises from ambient interstellar medium rather than a PN; for the other two candidates, there are broadband archival UV HST images that show bright, blue point sources that are probably the PNs. In a literature search, I also identified five further PN candidates lying near old GCs in M31, for which follow-up observations are necessary to confirm their membership. The rates of incidence of PNs are similar, and small but nonzero, throughout the GCs of the Local Group. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, and from the data archive at STScI, which are operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  7. Sex of preceding child and birth spacing among Nigerian ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Fayehun, O A; Omololu, O O; Isiugo-Abanihe, U C

    2011-06-01

    In seeking for more effective ways of fertility control and improvement of maternal and child health through birth spacing in a predominantly patrilineal society like Nigeria, this study explores how the sex of a previous child affects birth interval among ethnic groups, controlling for demographic and socioeconomic variables. The study utilized birth history data from the 2008 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey. The findings showed that the effect of sex of prior births on the birth interval is slightly significant among the Igbo and the Southern minorities, who tend to desire to have a male child sooner if preceding births were female. Among all the ethnic groups, women who are yet to meet their ideal sex preference have a shorter birth interval than those who have. Apart from the evident sex preferences, these results suggest that Nigerian parents also undertake sex balancing among their children. There is a consistent and strong relationship between the survival of a child and subsequent birth interval, which suggest that women have a short birth interval, and hence a large family size, because they are not certain that their children would survive. PMID:22590895

  8. Precise estimate of correlation length exponents from simple real-space renormalization group analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubica, Aleksander; Yoshida, Beni

    2014-03-01

    We invent a novel real-space renormalization group (RG) scheme which accurately estimates correlation length exponents ν near criticality of quantum Ising and clock models in higher dimensions. The method, based on a recent proposal by Miyazaki et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 051103 (2011), is remarkably simple (often analytical), grouping only a few spins into a block spin so that renormalized Hamiltonian has a closed form. A previous difficulty of spatial anisotropy and unwanted terms arising in higher-dimensional RG schemes is avoided by incorporating rotational invariance and internal Zq symmetries of the Hamiltonian. By applying this scheme to (2+1)-dim Ising model on a triangular lattice, we obtained ν = 0 . 6300 which is within statistical error of the current best Monte-Carlo result and ϕ4 theory estimation with seven-loop corrections. We also apply the scheme to higher-dimensional clock (Potts) models for which ordinary Monte-Carlo methods are not efficient due to suppression of quantum fluctuation in first-order phase transition.

  9. Space station needs, attributes and architectural options study commercialization working group briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The benefits for each of the following commercial areas was investigated: communications, remote sensing, materials processing in space, low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite assembly, testing, and servicing, and space tourism. In each case, where economic benefits are derived, the costs for accomplishing tasks with the Space Station are compared with the cost with the Space Transportation System only.

  10. Target selection and comparison of mission design for space debris removal by DLR's advanced study group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pas, Niels; Lousada, Joao; Terhes, Claudia; Bernabeu, Marc; Bauer, Waldemar

    2014-09-01

    Space debris is a growing problem. Models show that the Kessler syndrome, the exponential growth of debris due to collisions, has become unavoidable unless an active debris removal program is initiated. The debris population in LEO with inclination between 60° and 95° is considered as the most critical zone. In order to stabilize the debris population in orbit, especially in LEO, 5 to 10 objects will need to be removed every year. The unique circumstances of such a mission could require that several objects are removed with a single launch. This will require a mission to rendezvous with a multitude of objects orbiting on different altitudes, inclinations and planes. Removal models have assumed that the top priority targets will be removed first. However this will lead to a suboptimal mission design and increase the ΔV-budget. Since there is a multitude of targets to choose from, the targets can be selected for an optimal mission design. In order to select a group of targets for a removal mission the orbital parameters and political constraints should also be taken into account. Within this paper a number of the target selection criteria are presented. The possible mission targets and their order of retrieval is dependent on the mission architecture. A comparison between several global mission architectures is given. Under consideration are 3 global missions of which a number of parameters are varied. The first mission launches multiple separate deorbit kits. The second launches a mother craft with deorbit kits. The third launches an orbital tug which pulls the debris in a lower orbit, after which a deorbit kit performs the final deorbit burn. A RoM mass and cost comparison is presented. The research described in this paper has been conducted as part of an active debris removal study by the Advanced Study Group (ASG). The ASG is an interdisciplinary student group working at the DLR, analyzing existing technologies and developing new ideas into preliminary

  11. Transformation of Air Quality Monitor Data from the International Space Station into Toxicological Effect Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Zalesak, Selina M.

    2011-01-01

    The primary reason for monitoring air quality aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is to determine whether air pollutants have collectively reached a concentration where the crew could experience adverse health effects. These effects could be near-real-time (e.g. headache, respiratory irritation) or occur late in the mission or even years later (e.g. cancer, liver toxicity). Secondary purposes for monitoring include discovery that a potentially harmful compound has leaked into the atmosphere or that air revitalization system performance has diminished. Typical ISS atmospheric trace pollutants consist of alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic compounds, halo-carbons, siloxanes, and silanols. Rarely, sulfur-containing compounds and alkanes are found at trace levels. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) have been set in cooperation with a subcommittee of the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology. For each compound and time of exposure, the limiting adverse effect(s) has been identified. By factoring the analytical data from the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), which is in use as a prototype instrument aboard the ISS, through the array of compounds and SMACs, the risk of 16 specific adverse effects can be estimated. Within each adverse-effect group, we have used an additive model proportioned to each applicable 180-day SMAC to estimate risk. In the recent past this conversion has been performed using archival data, which can be delayed for months after an air sample is taken because it must be returned to earth for analysis. But with the AQM gathering in situ data each week, NASA is in a position to follow toxic-effect groups and correlate these with any reported crew symptoms. The AQM data are supplemented with data from real-time CO2 instruments aboard the ISS and from archival measurements of formaldehyde, which the AQM cannot detect.

  12. Surface structure, crystallographic and ice-nucleating properties of cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Möhler, Ottmar; Kiselev, Alexei; Saathoff, Harald; Weidler, Peter; Shutthanandan, Shuttha; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Jantsch, Evelyn; Koop, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence of the high diversity and efficient freezing ability of biological ice-nucleating particles is driving a reevaluation of their impact upon climate. Despite their potential importance, little is known about their atmospheric abundance and ice nucleation efficiency, especially non-proteinaceous ones, in comparison to non-biological materials (e.g., mineral dust). Recently, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC; non-proteinaceous plant structural polymer) has been identified as a potential biological ice-nucleating particle. However, it is still uncertain if the ice-nucleating activity is specific to the MCC structure or generally relevant to all cellulose materials, such that the results of MCC can be representatively scaled up to the total cellulose content in the atmosphere to address its role in clouds and the climate system. Here we use the helium ion microscopy (HIM) imaging and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique to characterize the nanoscale surface structure and crystalline properties of the two different types of cellulose (MCC and fibrous cellulose extracted from natural wood pulp) as model proxies for atmospheric cellulose particles and to assess their potential accessibility for water molecules. To complement these structural characterizations, we also present the results of immersion freezing experiments using the cold stage-based droplet freezing BINARY (Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARaY) technique. The HIM results suggest that both cellulose types have a complex porous morphology with capillary spaces between the nanoscale fibrils over the microfiber surface. These surface structures may make cellulose accessible to water. The XRD results suggest that the structural properties of both cellulose materials are in agreement (i.e., P21 space group; a=7.96 Å, b=8.35 Å, c=10.28 Å) and comparable to the crystallographic properties of general monoclinic cellulose (i.e., Cellulose Iβ). The results obtained from the BINARY measurements suggest

  13. LDEF meteoroid and debris special investigation group investigations and activities at the Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    See, Thomas H.; Warren, Jack L.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Sapp, Clyde A.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Dardano, Claire B.

    1995-01-01

    Since the return of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) in January, 1990, members of the Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas have been examining LDEF hardware in an effort to expand the knowledge base regarding the low-Earth orbit (LEO) particulate environment. In addition to the various investigative activities, JSC is also the location of the general Meteoroid & Debris database. This publicly accessible database contains information obtained from the various M&D SIG investigations, as well as limited data obtained by individual LDEF Principal Investigators. LDEF exposed approximately 130 m(exp 2) of surface area to the LEO particulate environment, approximately 15.4 m(exp 2) of which was occupied by structural frame components (i.e., longerons and intercoastals) of the spacecraft. The data reported here was obtained as a result of detailed scans of LDEF intercoastals, 68 of which reside at JSC. The limited amount of data presently available on the A0178 thermal control blankets was reported last year and will not be reiterated here. The data presented here are limited to measurements of crater diameters and their frequency of occurrence (i.e., flux).

  14. LDEF meteoroid and debris special investigation group investigations and activities at the Johnson Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Thomas H.; Warren, Jack L.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Sapp, Clyde A.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Dardano, Claire B.

    1995-02-01

    Since the return of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) in January, 1990, members of the Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas have been examining LDEF hardware in an effort to expand the knowledge base regarding the low-Earth orbit (LEO) particulate environment. In addition to the various investigative activities, JSC is also the location of the general Meteoroid & Debris database. This publicly accessible database contains information obtained from the various M&D SIG investigations, as well as limited data obtained by individual LDEF Principal Investigators. LDEF exposed approximately 130 m(exp 2) of surface area to the LEO particulate environment, approximately 15.4 m(exp 2) of which was occupied by structural frame components (i.e., longerons and intercoastals) of the spacecraft. The data reported here was obtained as a result of detailed scans of LDEF intercoastals, 68 of which reside at JSC. The limited amount of data presently available on the A0178 thermal control blankets was reported last year and will not be reiterated here. The data presented here are limited to measurements of crater diameters and their frequency of occurrence (i.e., flux).

  15. Confessions of an icosahedral virus crystallographer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, John E.

    2013-01-01

    This is a personal history of my structural studies of icosahedral viruses that evolved from crystallographic studies, to hybrid methods with electron cryo-microscopy and image reconstruction (cryoEM) and then developed further by incorporating a variety of physical methods to augment the high resolution crystallographic studies. It is not meant to be comprehensive, even for my own work, but hopefully provides some perspective on the growth of our understanding of these remarkable biologic assemblies. The goal is to provide a historical perspective for those new to the field and to emphasize the limitations of any one method, even those that provide atomic resolution information about viruses. PMID:23291268

  16. Overview of the Space Propulsion Synergy Group (SPSG) strategic planning support efforts for earth to orbit transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dankhoff, Walter F.; Hope, William P., Jr.

    1993-06-01

    An essential requirement of a successful space program is the assurance of a safe affordable routine access to space. In view of this, a national organization known as the Space Propulsion Synergy Group (SPSG) has been directed for the past two years toward supporting strategic planning for earth-to-orbit space transportation and propulsion systems. This paper presents a short description of the approach the SPSG followed in their space transportation and propulsion systems strategic planning support activities. The SPSG study emphasized the identification of the transportation systems users/customers and the characteristics of attributes most valued by them in earth-to-LEO payload transportation services. The study initiated the process known as Quality Function Deployment to ensure that the customer/user real requirements and needs are properly addressed and that the transportation system concepts advocated had the greatest probability of satisfying the custosmer's requirements and desired attributes.

  17. Proceedings of the Space Shuttle Sortie Workshop. Volume 2: Working group reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Details are presented on the mission planning progress in each of the working paper reports. The general topics covered are the following: space technology; materials processing and space manufacturing; communications and navigation; earth and ocean physics; oceanography; earth resources and surface environmental quality; meteorology and atmospheric environmental quality; life sciences; atmospheric and space physics; solar physics; high energy cosmic rays; X-ray and gamma ray astronomy; ultraviolet-optical astronomy; planetary astronomy; and infrared astronomy.

  18. Crystallographic Data Centre Services and Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Univ. (England). Chemical Lab.

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre is concerned with the retrieval, evaluation, synthesis, and dissemination of structural data based on diffraction methods. The source of input is almost entirely primary journals. Bibliographic information and numeric data on crystal and molecular structures are on magnetic tapes. The bibliographic file…

  19. Three sets of crystallographic sub-planar structures in quartz formed by tectonic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derez, Tine; Pennock, Gill; Drury, Martyn; Sintubin, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    In quartz, multiple sets of fine planar deformation microstructures that have specific crystallographic orientations parallel to planes with low Miller-Bravais indices are commonly considered as shock-induced planar deformation features (PDFs) diagnostic of shock metamorphism. Using polarized light microscopy, we demonstrate that up to three sets of tectonically induced sub-planar fine extinction bands (FEBs), sub-parallel to the basal, γ, ω, and π crystallographic planes, are common in vein quartz in low-grade tectonometamorphic settings. We conclude that the observation of multiple (2-3) sets of fine scale, closely spaced, crystallographically controlled, sub-planar microstructures is not sufficient to unambiguously distinguish PDFs from tectonic FEBs.

  20. Canonical Groups for Quantization on the Two-Dimensional Sphere and One-Dimensional Complex Projective Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Sumadi A. H.; H, Zainuddin

    2014-11-01

    Using Isham's group-theoretic quantization scheme, we construct the canonical groups of the systems on the two-dimensional sphere and one-dimensional complex projective space, which are homeomorphic. In the first case, we take SO(3) as the natural canonical Lie group of rotations of the two-sphere and find all the possible Hamiltonian vector fields, and followed by verifying the commutator and Poisson bracket algebra correspondences with the Lie algebra of the group. In the second case, the same technique is resumed to define the Lie group, in this case SU (2), of CP'.We show that one can simply use a coordinate transformation from S2 to CP1 to obtain all the Hamiltonian vector fields of CP1. We explicitly show that the Lie algebra structures of both canonical groups are locally homomorphic. On the other hand, globally their corresponding canonical groups are acting on different geometries, the latter of which is almost complex. Thus the canonical group for CP1 is the double-covering group of SO(3), namely SU(2). The relevance of the proposed formalism is to understand the idea of CP1 as a space of where the qubit lives which is known as a Bloch sphere.

  1. Responding to the Concerns of Student Cultural Groups: Redesigning Spaces for Cultural Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Anise Mazone; Higbee, Jeanne L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the engagement of a student committee in redesigning an entire floor of a university union to accommodate student cultural centers and provide space in a fair and equitable manner. The reorganization focused on the process as well as the task of allocating space, with an emphasis on the opportunity to foster the development of…

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the CBS-domain pair of cyclin M2 (CNNM2)

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-García, Inmaculada; Stuiver, Marchel; Ereño, June; Oyenarte, Iker; Corral-Rodríguez, María Angeles; Müller, Dominik; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the CBS-domain pair of the murine CNNM2 magnesium transporter (formerly known as ancient domain protein 2; ACDP2), which consists of a pair of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) motifs and has 100% sequence identity to its human homologue. CNNM proteins represent the least-studied members of the eight different types of magnesium transporters identified to date in mammals. In humans, the CNNM family is encoded by four genes: CNNM1–4. CNNM1 acts as a cytosolic copper chaperone, whereas CNNM2 and CNNM4 have been associated with magnesium handling. Interestingly, mutations in the CNNM2 gene cause familial dominant hypomagnesaemia (MIM:607803), a rare human disorder characterized by renal and intestinal magnesium (Mg2+) wasting, which may lead to symptoms of Mg2+ depletion such as tetany, seizures and cardiac arrhythmias. This manuscript describes the preliminary crystallographic analysis of two different crystal habits of a truncated form of the protein containing its regulatory CBS-domain pair, which has been reported to host the pathological mutation T568I in humans. The crystals belonged to space groups P21212 and I222 (or I212121) and diffracted X-­rays to 2.0 and 3.6 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. PMID:23027747

  3. Recombinant production, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic structure determination of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Vandavasi, Venugopal; Taylor-Creel, Kasey; McFeeters, Robert L.; Coates, Leighton; McFeeters, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (Pth; EC 3.1.1.29) from the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized for X-ray analysis. Crystals were grown using hanging-drop vapor diffusion against a reservoir solution consisting of 0.03 M citric acid, 0.05 M bis-tris propane, 1% glycerol, 3% sucrose, 25% PEG 6000 pH 7.6. Crystals were used to obtain the three-dimensional structure of the native protein at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement of the crystallographic data processed in space group P212121 with unit-cell parameters a = 62.1, b = 64.9, c = 110.5 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The asymmetric unit of the crystallographic lattice was composed of two copies of the enzyme molecule with a 51% solvent fraction, corresponding to a Matthews coefficient of 2.02 Å3 Da−1. The structural coordinates reported serve as a foundation for computational and structure-guided efforts towards novel small-molecule Pth1 inhibitors and potential antibacterial development. PMID:25005080

  4. Group space allowance has little effect on sow health, productivity, or welfare in a free-access stall system.

    PubMed

    Mack, L A; Lay, D C; Eicher, S D; Johnson, A K; Richert, B T; Pajor, E A

    2014-06-01

    Free-access stalls allow sows to choose the protection of a stall or use of a shared group space. This study investigated the effect of group space width, 0.91 (SS), 2.13 (IS), and 3.05 (LS) m, on the health, production, behavior, and welfare of gestating sows. Nine replications of 21 (N = 189) gestating sows were used. At gestational d 35.4 ± 2.3, the pregnant sows were distributed into 3 pens of 7 sows, where they remained until 104.6 ± 3.5 d. Each treatment pen had 7 free-access stalls and a group space that together provided 1.93 (SS), 2.68 (IS), or 3.24 (LS) m(2)/sow. Baseline measurements were obtained before mixing. Back fat depth, BW, BCS, and lameness were measured monthly, and skin lesions were scored weekly. Blood was collected monthly for hematological, immunological, and cortisol analyses. Sow behavior was video recorded continuously during the initial 4 d of treatment and 24 h every other week thereafter. Behavior was analyzed for location, posture, pen investigation, social contact, and aggression. Skin response to the mitogen concanavalin A (Con A) was tested at mean gestational d 106. Litter characteristics including size and weight were collected at birth and weaning. The data were analyzed using a mixed model. Multiple comparisons were adjusted with the Tukey-Kramer and Bejamini-Hochberg methods. Group space allowance had no effect on any measure of sow health, physiology, or production (P ≥ 0.10). Sows in the SS, IS, and LS pens spent 77.88% ± 3.88%, 66.02% ± 3.87%, and 63.64% ± 3.91%, respectively, of their time in the free-access stalls (P = 0.12). However, SS sows used the group space less than IS and LS sows (P = 0.01). Overall, pen investigatory behavior was not affected by group space allowance (P = 0.91). Sows in the LS pens spent more time in a social group than SS sows (P = 0.02), whereas sows in IS pens were intermediate to, but not different from, the other treatments (P ≥ 0.10). The size of the social groups was also

  5. Ultraviolet-Optical Space Astronomy Beyond HST Conference (Origins Conference and UV-Optical Working Group Support)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Morse, Jon

    2001-01-01

    This grant supported three major activities, from 1997-2001. (1) Origins Conference. The funds from this grant were used, initially, to support a Conference on "Origins", held May 19-23, 1997 at Estes Park, CO and attended by a wide range of astronomers, planetary scientists, and astrobiologists. The scientific proceedings of this meeting were published in 1998 by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific: "Origins" (1998) "Proceedings of the International Origins Conference". (2) UV-Optical Space Astronomy. Conference Additional funds provided by the NASA Office of Space Science were used to support a meeting held August 5-7, 1998 at Boulder, CO and attended by ultraviolet and optical astronomers and instrumentalists interested in a UV-O successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. The scientific proceedings of this meeting were published in 1999: "Ultraviolet-Optical Space Astronomy Beyond the Hubble Space Telescope" (1999), NASA provided funds and commissioned the UVOWG (Ultraviolet-Optical Working Group), charged with recommending a set of fundamental scientific problems and new space missions in the UV/Optical wavelength bands. The working group was chaired by J. M. Shull, and included ten other astrophysicists. Their report was published as a "White Paper" (Nov. 1999) entitled "The Emergence of the Modern Universe: Tracing the Cosmic Web" available. The results of this report were used in the NASA Strategic Planning ("Roadmap") exercise and by the NRC Astronomy/Astrophysics Decade Committee.

  6. Group Dynamics as a Critical Component of Successful Space Exploration: Conceptual Theory and Insights from the Biosphere 2 Closure Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark; Allen, John P.

    As space exploration and eventually habitation achieves longer durations, successfully managing group dynamics of small, physically isolated groups will become vital. The paper summarizes important underlying research and conceptual theory and how these manifested in a well-documented example: the closure experiments of Biosphere 2. Key research breakthroughs in discerning the operation of small human groups comes from the pioneering work of W.R. Bion. He discovered two competing modalities of behavior. The first is the “task-oriented” or work group governed by shared acceptance of goals, reality-thinking in relation to time, resources and rational, and intelligent management of challenges presented. The opposing, usually unconscious, modality is what Bion called the “basic-assumption” group and alternates between three “group animal” groups: dependency/kill the leader; fight/flight and pairing. If not dealt with, these dynamics work to undermine and defeat the conscious task group’s goal achievement. The paper discusses crew training and selection, various approaches to structuring the work and hierarchy of the group, the importance of contact with a larger population through electronic communication and dealing with the “us-them” syndrome frequently observed between crew and Mission Control. The experience of the first two year closure of Biosphere 2 is drawn on in new ways to illustrate vicissitudes and management of group dynamics especially as both the inside team of biospherians and key members of Mission Control had training in working with group dynamics. Insights from that experience may help mission planning so that future groups in space cope successfully with inherent group dynamics challenges that arise.

  7. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the oxidized form of a two mono-nuclear iron centres protein from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    PubMed

    Coelho, A V; Matias, P M; Carrondo, M A; Tavares, P; Moura, J J; Moura, I; Fülop, V; Hajdu, J; Le Gall, J

    1996-06-01

    Crystals of the fully oxidized form of desulfoferrodoxin were obtained by vapor diffusion from a solution containing 20% PEG 4000, 0.1 M HEPES buffer, pH 7.5, and 0.2 M CaCl2. Trigonal and/or rectangular prisms could be obtained, depending on the temperature used for the crystal growth. Trigonal prisms belong to the rhombohedral space group R32, with a = 112.5 A and c = 63.2 A; rectangular prisms belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with a = 77.7 A, b = 80.9 A, c = 53.9 A, and beta = 98.1 degrees. The crystallographic asymmetric unit of the rhombohedral crystal form contains one molecule. There are two molecules in the asymmetric unit of the monoclinic form, in agreement with the self-rotation function. PMID:8762151

  8. Analysis of the structural continuity in twinned crystals in terms of pseudo-eigensymmetry of crystallographic orbits.

    PubMed

    Marzouki, Mohamed Amine; Souvignier, Bernd; Nespolo, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The reticular theory of twinning gives the necessary conditions on the lattice level for the formation of twins. The latter are based on the continuation, more or less approximate, of a substructure through the composition surface. The analysis of this structural continuity can be performed in terms of the eigensymmetry of the crystallographic orbits corresponding to occupied Wyckoff positions in the structure. If [Formula: see text] is the space group of the individual and [Formula: see text] a space group which fixes the twin lattice obtained as an intersection of the space groups of the individuals in their respective orientations, then a structural continuity is obtained if (1) the eigensymmetry of an orbit under [Formula: see text] contains the twin operation; (2) the eigensymmetry of a union of orbits under [Formula: see text] contains the twin operation; (3) the eigensymmetry of a split orbit under [Formula: see text] contains the twin operation; or (4) the eigensymmetry of a union of split orbits under [Formula: see text] contains the twin operation. The case of the twins in melilite is analysed: the (approximate) restoration of some of the orbits explains the formation of these twins. PMID:25075318

  9. Analysis of the structural continuity in twinned crystals in terms of pseudo-eigensymmetry of crystallographic orbits

    PubMed Central

    Marzouki, Mohamed Amine; Souvignier, Bernd; Nespolo, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The reticular theory of twinning gives the necessary conditions on the lattice level for the formation of twins. The latter are based on the continuation, more or less approximate, of a substructure through the composition surface. The analysis of this structural continuity can be performed in terms of the eigensymmetry of the crystallographic orbits corresponding to occupied Wyckoff positions in the structure. If is the space group of the individual and a space group which fixes the twin lattice obtained as an intersection of the space groups of the individuals in their respective orientations, then a structural continuity is obtained if (1) the eigensymmetry of an orbit under contains the twin operation; (2) the eigensymmetry of a union of orbits under contains the twin operation; (3) the eigensymmetry of a split orbit under contains the twin operation; or (4) the eigensymmetry of a union of split orbits under contains the twin operation. The case of the twins in melilite is analysed: the (approximate) restoration of some of the orbits explains the formation of these twins. PMID:25075318

  10. Crystallographic and magnetic properties of Pb2-xBixIr2O7-δ (0 ≤ x ≤ 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retuerto, M.; Sarkar, T.; Li, M.-R.; Ignatov, A.; Croft, M.; Hodges, J. P.; Thao Tran, T.; Shiv Halasyamani, P.; Greenblatt, M.

    2014-12-01

    The title series of compounds have been synthesized by solid state reaction and characterized by x-ray diffraction (PXD), neutron powder diffraction (PND), second harmonic generation (SHG), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and magnetization measurements. The crystal structures have been refined from PND data in the centrosymmetric space group Fd\\bar{3}m with pyrochlore structure. No sign of a break of the centrosymmetry has been observed by SHG and no change of the structure to a polar space group in any component of the series, as it was previously reported for Pb2Ir2O7-δ with non-centrosymmetric F\\bar{4}3m space group. We have determined by PND that the oxidation state of Ir is slightly decreasing from 5+-to-4+ in the Pb-rich to almost 4+ in the Bi-rich samples. This evolution is confirmed by XAS and also it explains the progression of the crystallographic parameters. All the samples are paramagnetic in the temperature range measured and the magnitude of the effective magnetic moment is enhanced with Bi content, correlated with the enhancement of Ir4+ compared to Ir5+; suggesting Ir5+ to be present in a trigonal antiprism crystal field splitting and therefore Ir4+ as the only magnetic cation.

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds.

    PubMed

    Patil, Dipak N; Chaudhry, Anshul; Sharma, Ashwani K; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-07-01

    A Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor has been purified from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds. SDS-PAGE analysis of a purified sample showed a homogeneous band corresponding to a molecular weight of 21 kDa. The protein was identified as a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor based on N-terminal amino-acid sequence analysis. It was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 6000. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 37.2, b = 77.1, c = 129.1 A. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 A. Preliminary crystallographic analysis indicated the presence of one proteinase inhibitor molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 44%. PMID:19574654

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the CBS-domain protein MJ1004 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    PubMed Central

    Oyenarte, Iker; Lucas, María; Gómez García, Inmaculada; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    The purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the archaeal CBS-domain protein MJ1004 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii are described. The native protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized in the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.4, b = 53.8, c = 82.6 Å, β = 106.1°. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Matthews-volume calculations suggested the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit that are likely to correspond to a dimeric species, which is also observed in solution. PMID:21393835

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the TLDc domain of oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Alsarraf, Husam M. A. B.; Laroche, Fabrice; Spaink, Herman; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickael

    2011-01-01

    Cell metabolic processes are constantly producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), which have deleterious effects by triggering, for example, DNA damage. Numerous enzymes such as catalase, and small compounds such as vitamin C, provide protection against ROS. The TLDc domain of the human oxidation resistance protein has been shown to be able to protect DNA from oxidative stress; however, its mechanism of action is still not understood and no structural information is available on this domain. Structural information on the TLDc domain may therefore help in understanding exactly how it works. Here, the purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the TLDc domain from zebrafish are reported. Crystals belonging to the orthorhombic space group P21212 were obtained and diffracted to 0.97 Å resolution. Selenomethionine-substituted protein could also be crystallized; these crystals diffracted to 1.1 Å resolution and the structure could be solved by SAD/MAD methods. PMID:22102041

  14. Expression, limited proteolysis and preliminary crystallographic analysis of IpaD, a component of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Steven; Roversi, Pietro; Espina, Marianela; Deane, Janet E.; Birket, Susan; Picking, William D.; Blocker, Ariel; Picking, Wendy L.; Lea, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    IpaD, the putative needle-tip protein of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system, has been overexpressed and purified. Crystals were grown of the native protein in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.9, b = 100.7, c = 112.0 Å, and data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Analysis of the native Patterson map revealed a peak at 50% of the origin on the Harker section v = 0.5, suggesting twofold non-crystallographic symmetry parallel to the b crystallographic axis. As attempts to derivatize or grow selenomethionine-labelled protein crystals failed, in-drop proteolysis was used to produce new crystal forms. A trace amount of subtilisin Carlsberg was added to IpaD before sparse-matrix screening, resulting in the production of several new crystal forms. This approach produced SeMet-labelled crystals and diffraction data were collected to 3.2 Å resolution. The SeMet crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 139.4, b = 45.0, c = 99.5 Å, β = 107.9°. An anomalous difference Patterson map revealed peaks on the Harker section v = 0, while the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a twofold noncrystallographic symmetry axis, which is consistent with two molecules per asymmetric unit. PMID:16946465

  15. Clustering and group selection of multiple criteria alternatives with application to space-based networks.

    PubMed

    Malakooti, Behnam; Yang, Ziyong

    2004-02-01

    In many real-world problems, the range of consequences of different alternatives are considerably different. In addition, sometimes, selection of a group of alternatives (instead of only one best alternative) is necessary. Traditional decision making approaches treat the set of alternatives with the same method of analysis and selection. In this paper, we propose clustering alternatives into different groups so that different methods of analysis, selection, and implementation for each group can be applied. As an example, consider the selection of a group of functions (or tasks) to be processed by a group of processors. The set of tasks can be grouped according to their similar criteria, and hence, each cluster of tasks to be processed by a processor. The selection of the best alternative for each clustered group can be performed using existing methods; however, the process of selecting groups is different than the process of selecting alternatives within a group. We develop theories and procedures for clustering discrete multiple criteria alternatives. We also demonstrate how the set of alternatives is clustered into mutually exclusive groups based on 1) similar features among alternatives; 2) ideal (or most representative) alternatives given by the decision maker; and 3) other preferential information of the decision maker. The clustering of multiple criteria alternatives also has the following advantages. 1) It decreases the set of alternatives to be considered by the decision maker (for example, different decision makers are assigned to different groups of alternatives). 2) It decreases the number of criteria. 3) It may provide a different approach for analyzing multiple decision makers problems. Each decision maker may cluster alternatives differently, and hence, clustering of alternatives may provide a basis for negotiation. The developed approach is applicable for solving a class of telecommunication networks problems where a set of objects (such as routers

  16. Space station needs attributes and architectural options study costing working group briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Individuals in the United States who understand the promise of materials processing in space and who also are senior technical personnel associated with commercial firms that process materials: (1) endorsed the concept of a space station as a desirable national asset; (2) stated that a commercial MPS research program is mandatory to extend commericalization of space for materials processing; and (3) described in general terms a national research laboratory and free flying facilities that are needed. Participants agreed that industry R&D is motivated largely by market pull rather than by technology push, that initial interest is low-g materials research; and that to farther, commercial market assurance (a salable product) is a must.

  17. A summary of activities of the US/Soviet-Russian joint working group on space biology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doarn, Charles R.; Nicogossian, Arnauld E.; Grigoriev, Anatoly I.; Tverskaya, Galina; Orlov, Oleg I.; Ilyin, Eugene A.; Souza, Kenneth A.

    2010-10-01

    The very foundation of cooperation between the United States (US) and Russia (former Soviet Union) in space exploration is a direct result of the mutual desire for scientific understanding and the creation of a collaborative mechanism—the Joint Working Group (JWG) on Space Biology and Medicine. From the dawn of the space age, it has been the quest of humankind to understand its place in the universe. While nations can and do solve problems independently, it takes nations, working together, to accomplish great things. The formation of the JWG provided an opportunity for the opening of a series of productive relationships between the superpowers, the US and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR); and served as a justification for continued relationship for medical assistance in spaceflight, and to showcase Earth benefits from space medicine research. This relationship has been played out on an international scale with the construction and operation of the International Space Station. The fundamental reason for this successful endeavor is a direct result of the spirit and perseverance of the men and women who have worked diligently side-by-side to promote science and move our understanding of space forward. This manuscript provides a historical perspective of the JWG; how it came about; its evolution; what it accomplished; and what impact it has had and continues to have in the 21st century with regard to human spaceflight and space life sciences research. It captures the spirit of this group, which has been in continuous existence for over 40 years, and provides a never before reported summary of its activities.

  18. Holographic phase space: c-functions and black holes as renormalization group flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulos, Miguel F.

    2011-05-01

    We construct a mathcal{N} -function for Lovelock theories of gravity, which yields a holographic c-function in domain-wall backgrounds, and seemingly generalizes the concept for black hole geometries. A flow equation equates the monotonicity properties of mathcal{N} with the gravitational field, which has opposite signs in the domain-wall and black hole backgrounds, due to the presence of negative/positive energy in the former/latter, and accordingly mathcal{N} monotonically decreases/increases from the UV to the IR. On AdS spaces the mathcal{N} -function is related to the Euler anomaly, and at a black hole horizon it is generically proportional to the entropy. For planar black holes, mathcal{N} diverges at the horizon, which we interpret as an order N 2 increase in the number of effective degrees of freedom. We show how mathcal{N} can be written as the ratio of the Wald entropy to an effective phase space volume, and using the flow equation relate this to Verlinde's notion of gravity as an entropic force. From the effective phase space we can obtain an expression for the dual field theory momentum cut-off, matching a previous proposal in the literature by Polchinski and Heemskerk. Finally, we propose that the area in Planck units counts states, not degrees of freedom, and identify it also as a phase space volume. Written in terms of the proper radial distance β, it takes the suggestive form of a canonical partition function at inverse temperature β, leading to a "mean energy" which is simply the extrinsic curvature of the surface. Using this we relate this definition of holographic phase space with the effective phase space appearing in the mathcal{N} -function.

  19. Crystal growth and first crystallographic characterization of mixed uranium(IV)-plutonium(III) oxalates.

    PubMed

    Tamain, Christelle; Arab Chapelet, Bénédicte; Rivenet, Murielle; Abraham, Francis; Caraballo, Richard; Grandjean, Stéphane

    2013-05-01

    The mixed-actinide uranium(IV)-plutonium(III) oxalate single crystals (NH4)0.5[Pu(III)0.5U(IV)0.5(C2O4)2·H2O]·nH2O (1) and (NH4)2.7Pu(III)0.7U(IV)1.3(C2O4)5·nH2O (2) have been prepared by the diffusion of different ions through membranes separating compartments of a triple cell. UV-vis, Raman, and thermal ionization mass spectrometry analyses demonstrate the presence of both uranium and plutonium metal cations with conservation of the initial oxidation state, U(IV) and Pu(III), and the formation of mixed-valence, mixed-actinide oxalate compounds. The structure of 1 and an average structure of 2 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and were solved by direct methods and Fourier difference techniques. Compounds 1 and 2 are the first mixed uranium(IV)-plutonium(III) compounds to be structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure of 1, space group P4/n, a = 8.8558(3) Å, b = 7.8963(2) Å, Z = 2, consists of layers formed by four-membered rings of the two actinide metals occupying the same crystallographic site connected through oxalate ions. The actinide atoms are nine-coordinated by oxygen atoms from four bidentate oxalate ligands and one water molecule, which alternates up and down the layer. The single-charged cations and nonbonded water molecules are disordered in the same crystallographic site. For compound 2, an average structure has been determined in space group P6/mmm with a = 11.158(2) Å and c = 6.400(1) Å. The honeycomb-like framework [Pu(III)0.7U(IV)1.3(C2O4)5](2.7-) results from a three-dimensional arrangement of mixed (U0.65Pu0.35)O10 polyhedra connected by five bis-bidentate μ(2)-oxalate ions in a trigonal-bipyramidal configuration. PMID:23577593

  20. Group dynamics in a long-term blind endeavor on Earth: An analog for space missions (Lewis & Clark Expedition group dynamic analysis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allner, M.; Rygalov, V.

    2008-12-01

    suggested distinguishable mission phase model, the Lewis and Clark Expedition will be analyzed for similarities to these space findings. Factors of consideration in support of this analysis involve an understanding of the leadership qualities of Lewis and Clark (and relations established and maintained with one another), the selection and diversity of their crew, and the group dynamics that were developed and maintained so carefully during the expedition. With this knowledge and understanding one can gain enormous insights useful in the planning and preparation for future long-duration space exploratory missions with high level of autonomy, mobility, minimal primary life support supply and high dependence on material re-circulation and In-Situ Resource Utilization approach.

  1. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea.

    PubMed

    Wall, Michael E

    2016-07-01

    Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement. PMID:27437111

  2. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wall, Michael E.

    2016-07-01

    Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the datamore » is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. Lastly, the results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement.« less

  3. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement. PMID:27437111

  4. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, Susana C. M.; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Leal, Ricardo M. F.; Mitchell, Edward P.; Forsyth, V. Trevor

    2008-05-01

    Preliminary neutron crystallographic data from the sweet protein thaumatin have been recorded using the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results illustrate the feasibility of a full neutron structural analysis aimed at further understanding the molecular basis of the perception of sweet taste. Such an analysis will exploit the use of perdeuterated thaumatin. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 Å on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin–receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste.

  5. The Effects of Status Space and Status Struggle on Group Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Joan R.

    Using Status Characteristic Theory as a theoretical framework, increasing status distinctions between professional group members were predicted to decrease the quantity of task related information and quality of decisions made in small problem-solving groups. Three experimental conditions were created: (1) occupational prestige manipulated, (2)…

  6. Evaluating a Safe Space Training for School Counselors and Trainees Using a Randomized Control Group Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Rebekah; Hays, Danica G.

    2014-01-01

    School counselors need to advocate and act as an ally for all students. Safe Space, a training designed to facilitate competency for working with and serving LGBTQ youth (i.e., LGBTQ competency), has received increased attention in the field of school counseling. However, limited empirical support exists for training interventions such as Safe…

  7. Crystallographic studies of gas sorption in metal–organic frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Elliot J.; Vitórica-Yrezábal, Iñigo J.; Brammer, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of porous crystalline materials of modular design. One of the primary applications of these materials is in the adsorption and separation of gases, with potential benefits to the energy, transport and medical sectors. In situ crystallography of MOFs under gas atmospheres has enabled the behaviour of the frameworks under gas loading to be investigated and has established the precise location of adsorbed gas molecules in a significant number of MOFs. This article reviews progress in such crystallographic studies, which has taken place over the past decade, but has its origins in earlier studies of zeolites, clathrates etc. The review considers studies by single-crystal or powder diffraction using either X-rays or neutrons. Features of MOFs that strongly affect gas sorption behaviour are discussed in the context of in situ crystallographic studies, specifically framework flexibility, and the presence of (organic) functional groups and unsaturated (open) metal sites within pores that can form specific interactions with gas molecules. PMID:24892587

  8. Preparation and Crystallographic Analysis of Gliclazide Polymorphs

    PubMed Central

    Rajamma, A. J.; Sateesha, S. B.; Narode, M. K.; Prashanth, V. R. S. S.; Karthik, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of gliclazide in the pharmaceutical industry, a large number of research groups have been engaged in various investigations aiming to enhance its biomedical application. But, very limited efforts have been made to study polymorphism of gliclazide. Therefore, this study focuses on solvent-induced polymorphism of gliclazide and its characterization by thermal methods. Three polymorphs namely, Form-I, II and III and an amorphous powder were produced from different solvents and solvent mixtures. Crystals were analyzed using infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction and single crystal x-ray diffraction. Polymorph Form-I is found to exist in centro-symmetric triclinic P-1 space group and has endothermic peak at 162.93°. Form-II has endothermic peak from 171.2° to 172.35° and exists in centro-symmetric monoclinic P21/a space group while Form-III has endothermic peak from 168.93° to 169.86° and exists in centro-symmetric monoclinic P21/n space group. The equilibrium solubility values of Form-I, II, III and the amorphous form were 0.4825±0.025, 0.2341±0.042, 0.2581±0.038 and 0.5213±0.072 mg/ml, respectively. The Form-I has relatively higher solubility and similar to that of amorphous gliclazide. Form-II and Form-III are relatively most stable and least soluble. However, there was no remarkable difference in their aqueous solubility under the conditions in which study was conducted. PMID:25767316

  9. Preparation and crystallographic analysis of gliclazide polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Rajamma, A J; Sateesha, S B; Narode, M K; Prashanth, V R S S; Karthik, A M

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of gliclazide in the pharmaceutical industry, a large number of research groups have been engaged in various investigations aiming to enhance its biomedical application. But, very limited efforts have been made to study polymorphism of gliclazide. Therefore, this study focuses on solvent-induced polymorphism of gliclazide and its characterization by thermal methods. Three polymorphs namely, Form-I, II and III and an amorphous powder were produced from different solvents and solvent mixtures. Crystals were analyzed using infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction and single crystal x-ray diffraction. Polymorph Form-I is found to exist in centro-symmetric triclinic P-1 space group and has endothermic peak at 162.93°. Form-II has endothermic peak from 171.2° to 172.35° and exists in centro-symmetric monoclinic P21/a space group while Form-III has endothermic peak from 168.93° to 169.86° and exists in centro-symmetric monoclinic P21/n space group. The equilibrium solubility values of Form-I, II, III and the amorphous form were 0.4825±0.025, 0.2341±0.042, 0.2581±0.038 and 0.5213±0.072 mg/ml, respectively. The Form-I has relatively higher solubility and similar to that of amorphous gliclazide. Form-II and Form-III are relatively most stable and least soluble. However, there was no remarkable difference in their aqueous solubility under the conditions in which study was conducted. PMID:25767316

  10. Magneto-transport study in single crystals of Cd3 As2 with different space group symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shih-Ting; Sankar, Raman; Chien, Yung-Yu; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Guo, G. Y.; Chou, F. C.; Lee, Wei-Li; Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan Collaboration; Center of condensed matter sciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan Collaboration; Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taiwan Collaboration; Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The 3-D Dirac semi-metal Cd3As2 is known as a potential parent compound for several unique topological phases such as Weyl semi-metal, topological superconductor, and axion insulator. Its 3D Dirac band has recently been demonstrated by ARPES experiments. In this report, we conduct magneto-transport measurements on single crystals of Cd3As2 with three different space group symmetries of I41cd, I41/acd, and P42/nmc, which was characterized by X-ray diffraction. Large anisotropy magnetoresistance and splitting of SdH frequency were observed in all Cd3As2crystals under investigation regardless of the type of space group symmetry suggesting that defects may play an important role. Detailed magneto-transport data at various field orientations will be presented and discussed..

  11. Working group report on advanced high-voltage high-power and energy-storage space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, H. A.; Cooke, D. L.; Evans, R. W.; Hastings, D.; Jongeward, G.; Laframboise, J. G.; Mahaffey, D.; Mcintyre, B.; Pfizer, K. A.; Purvis, C.

    1986-01-01

    Space systems in the future will probably include high-voltage, high-power energy-storage and -production systems. Two such technologies are high-voltage ac and dc systems and high-power electrodynamic tethers. The working group identified several plasma interaction phenomena that will occur in the operation of these power systems. The working group felt that building an understanding of these critical interaction issues meant that several gaps in our knowledge had to be filled, and that certain aspects of dc power systems have become fairly well understood. Examples of these current collection are in quiescent plasmas and snap over effects. However, high-voltage dc and almost all ac phenomena are, at best, inadequately understood. In addition, there is major uncertainty in the knowledge of coupling between plasmas and large scale current flows in space plasmas. These gaps in the knowledge are addressed.

  12. Innovation in the teaching of astrophysics and space science - spacecraft design group study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, C.

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes how the design of a scientific satellite can be used to provide both a stimulating and effective subject for a physics based group study. The group study divides the satellite into distinct subsystems and small teams of two or three students carry out the detailed design of each subsystem. The aim is to produce a complete satellite system design along with the choice of launch vehicle, orbit and communications system so that all the mission requirements can be met. An important feature of the group study is that it is a student led activity with staff acting as mentors. The development of key skills and important learning outcomes from the group study is discussed along with the method for assessment, structuring and resourcing the study.

  13. Creating a Space for Acknowledgment and Generativity in Reflective Group Supervision.

    PubMed

    Paré, David

    2016-06-01

    Small group supervision is a powerful venue for generative conversations because of the multiplicity of perspectives available and the potential for an appreciative audience to a practitioner's work. At the same time, the well-intentioned reflections by a few practitioners in a room can inadvertently duplicate normative discourses that circulate in the wider culture and the profession. This article explores the use of narrative practices for benefiting from the advantages of group supervision while mindful of the vulnerability that comes with sharing one's work among colleagues. The reflective group supervision processes described were modified from the work of Tom Andersen and Michael White to provide a venue that encourages the creative multiplicity of group conversation while discouraging unhelpful discourses which constrain generative conversation. PMID:27087249

  14. Creating Social Spaces to Tackle AIDS-Related Stigma: Reviewing the Role of Church Groups in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Skovdal, M.; Gibbs, A.

    2012-01-01

    An expanding body of literature explores the role of African church groups in facilitating or hindering the support of people living with AIDS and challenging or contributing to HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Treating church groups as social spaces in which HIV/AIDS-related stigma may potentially be challenged, we systematically review this literature, identifying five themes that highlight the complex and contradictory role of the church as a potential agent of health-enhancing social change. In many ways the church perpetuates HIV/AIDS-related stigma through (i) moralistic attitudes and (ii) its reinforcement of conservative gender ideologies. However some churches have managed move towards action that makes a more positive contribution to HIV/AIDS management through (iii) promoting various forms of social control for HIV prevention, (iv) contributing to the care and support of the AIDS-affected and (v) providing social spaces for challenging stigmatising ideas and practices. We conclude that church groups, including church leadership, can play a key role in facilitating or hindering the creation of supportive social spaces to challenge stigma. Much work remains to be done in developing deeper understandings of the multi-layered factors that enable some churches, but not others, to respond effectively to HIV/AIDS. PMID:20668927

  15. Creating social spaces to tackle AIDS-related stigma: reviewing the role of church groups in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C; Skovdal, M; Gibbs, A

    2011-08-01

    An expanding body of literature explores the role of African church groups in facilitating or hindering the support of people living with AIDS and challenging or contributing to HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Treating church groups as social spaces in which HIV/AIDS-related stigma may potentially be challenged, we systematically review this literature, identifying five themes that highlight the complex and contradictory role of the church as a potential agent of health-enhancing social change. In many ways the church perpetuates HIV/AIDS-related stigma through (i) moralistic attitudes and (ii) its reinforcement of conservative gender ideologies. However some churches have managed move towards action that makes a more positive contribution to HIV/AIDS management through (iii) promoting various forms of social control for HIV prevention, (iv) contributing to the care and support of the AIDS-affected and (v) providing social spaces for challenging stigmatising ideas and practices. We conclude that church groups, including church leadership, can play a key role in facilitating or hindering the creation of supportive social spaces to challenge stigma. Much work remains to be done in developing deeper understandings of the multi-layered factors that enable some churches, but not others, to respond effectively to HIV/AIDS. PMID:20668927

  16. Cryoannealing-induced space-group transition of crystals of the carbonic anhydrase psCA3.

    PubMed

    Pinard, Melissa A; Kurian, Justin J; Aggarwal, Mayank; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McKenna, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Cryoannealing has been demonstrated to improve the diffraction quality and resolution of crystals of the β-carbonic anhydrase psCA3 concomitant with a change in space group. After initial flash-cooling in a liquid-nitrogen cryostream an X-ray diffraction data set from a psCA3 crystal was indexed in space group P21212 and was scaled to 2.6 Å resolution, but subsequent cryoannealing studies revealed induced protein rearrangements in the crystal contacts, which transformed the space group to I222, with a corresponding improvement of 0.7 Å in resolution. Although the change in diffraction resolution was significant, only minor changes in the psCA3 structure, which retained its catalytic `open' conformation, were observed. These findings demonstrate that cryoannealing can be successfully utilized to induce higher diffraction-quality crystals while maintaining enzymatically relevant conformations and may be useful as an experimental tool for structural studies of other enzymes where the initial diffraction quality is poor. PMID:27380376

  17. The redshift-space neighborhoods of 36 loose groups. 2: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramella, Massimo; Geller, Margaret J.; Hurchra, John P.; Thorstensen, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We explore the kinematics of 36 rich RGH89 groups identified from the first two complete slices of the CfA redshift survey. These groups have more than five members identified by a friends-of-friends algorithm at a number density contrast delta rho/rho greater than or equal to 80. To examine the stability of the determination of the velocity dispersion for these systems, we compare results for the original 232 members with results for a larger redshift sample, including 334 fainter members in the redshift neighborhoods. On average, we double the number of group members in each system. The observed distribution of velocity dispersions is stable. In fact, the velocity dispersion based on the original members identified in the CfA redshift survey is a reliable predictor of the value for the enlarged sample in an individual group. The velocity dispersion is thus a stable physical parameter for discrimination among systems galaxies. A larger sample of groups, particularly one selected from a distance limited catalog, should provide an interesting constraint on models for the formation of large-scale structure. We take H(sub 0) = km/s/Mpc.

  18. Social organization and space use of a wild mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) group.

    PubMed

    Brockmeyer, Timo; Kappeler, Peter M; Willaume, Eric; Benoit, Laure; Mboumba, Sylvère; Charpentier, Marie J E

    2015-10-01

    Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) are enigmatic Old World primates whose social organization and ecology remain poorly known. Previous studies indicated, for example, that groups are composed of only adult females and their young or that several units composed of one adult male and several females make up larger permanent social units. Here, we present the first data on group composition and male ranging patterns from the only habituated wild mandrill group and examine how home range size and daily path length varied with environmental and demographic factors over a 15-month period. Our study site is located in southern Gabon where we followed the group on a daily basis, collecting data on presence, ranging, behavior, and parasite load of its individual members. Throughout the study, the group was made up of about 120 individuals, including several non-natal and natal adult and sub-adult males. One-male units were never observed. The mandrills traveled an estimated 0.44-6.50 km/day in a home range area of 866.7 ha. Exploratory analyses revealed that precipitation, the number of adult males present, and the richness of protozoan parasites were all positively correlated with daily path length. These results clarify the social system of mandrills and provide first insights into the factors that shape their ranging patterns. PMID:26235675

  19. Creating Spaces for Critical Transformative Dialogues: Legitimising Discussion Groups as Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards-Groves, Christine J.

    2013-01-01

    Focussed dialogue (as lived and living practices) can have a powerful role in renewing professional practice, advancing its sustainability and development as administrative and political systems colonise the practices of teachers and teacher educators. However, participating in discussion groups for many teachers, including those in academia, is…

  20. Learning in Large Learning Spaces: The Academic Engagement of a Diverse Group of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Clive

    2012-01-01

    Teaching larger groups of students is a growing phenomenon in HE and this brings with it its own challenges, not least for the students themselves but also for their lecturers. Demographic factors as well as the experiences that characterise us as individuals will impact upon our ability to learn. The pilot study reported here considered the…

  1. Finding a Space for Professional Development: Creating Thirdspace through After-School Writing Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, Robert; Coyle, Deborah; Walden, Anne; Healey, Conniem; Larson, Kim; Laughridge, Virginia; Ridder, Kim; Williams, Molly; Williams, Shawn

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a teacher study group focusing on After School Writing Circles for elementary students as a site of Thirdspace professional development. Borrowing the concept of Thirdspace from postmodern geographer Edward Soja, the authors argue that professional development works best when teachers engage in the dual work of imagining and…

  2. Integral group actions on symmetric spaces and discrete duality symmetries of supergravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Lisa; Murray, Scott H.; Sati, Hisham

    2015-10-01

    For G = G(ℝ), a split, simply connected, semisimple Lie group of rank n and K the maximal compact subgroup of G, we give a method for computing Iwasawa coordinates of K∖G using the Chevalley generators and the Steinberg presentation. When K∖G is a scalar coset for a supergravity theory in dimensions ≥3, we determine the action of the integral form G(ℤ) on K∖G. We give explicit results for the action of the discrete U-duality groups SL2(ℤ) and E7(ℤ) on the scalar cosets SO(2)∖SL2(ℝ) and [SU(8)/{ ± Id}]∖E7(+7)(ℝ) for type IIB supergravity in ten dimensions and 11-dimensional supergravity reduced to D = 4 dimensions, respectively. For the former, we use this to determine the discrete U-duality transformations on the scalar sector in the Borel gauge and we describe the discrete symmetries of the dyonic charge lattice. We determine the spectrum-generating symmetry group for fundamental BPS solitons of type IIB supergravity in D = 10 dimensions at the classical level and we propose an analog of this symmetry at the quantum level. We indicate how our methods can be used to study the orbits of discrete U-duality groups in general.

  3. Integral group actions on symmetric spaces and discrete duality symmetries of supergravity theories

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Lisa; Murray, Scott H.; Sati, Hisham

    2015-10-15

    For G = G(ℝ), a split, simply connected, semisimple Lie group of rank n and K the maximal compact subgroup of G, we give a method for computing Iwasawa coordinates of K∖G using the Chevalley generators and the Steinberg presentation. When K∖G is a scalar coset for a supergravity theory in dimensions ≥3, we determine the action of the integral form G(ℤ) on K∖G. We give explicit results for the action of the discrete U-duality groups SL{sub 2}(ℤ) and E{sub 7}(ℤ) on the scalar cosets SO(2)∖SL{sub 2}(ℝ) and [SU(8)/( ± Id)]∖E{sub 7(+7)}(ℝ) for type IIB supergravity in ten dimensions and 11-dimensional supergravity reduced to D = 4 dimensions, respectively. For the former, we use this to determine the discrete U-duality transformations on the scalar sector in the Borel gauge and we describe the discrete symmetries of the dyonic charge lattice. We determine the spectrum-generating symmetry group for fundamental BPS solitons of type IIB supergravity in D = 10 dimensions at the classical level and we propose an analog of this symmetry at the quantum level. We indicate how our methods can be used to study the orbits of discrete U-duality groups in general.

  4. Plant population and row spacing effects on maturity group III soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maturity group IV and V soybean produced in the upper mid-southern states of Kentucky, Tennessee, eastern Mississippi, and northern Alabama are primarily nonirrigated due to rolling uplands, highly erodible soils, and small fields common to the region. Sole reliance on rainfall and the coinciding o...

  5. Unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes simulation of the post-critical flow around a closely spaced group of silos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillewaere, J.; Dooms, D.; Van Quekelberghe, B.; Degroote, J.; Vierendeels, J.; De Roeck, G.; Lombaert, G.; Degrande, G.

    2012-04-01

    During a storm in October 2002, wind induced ovalling vibrations were observed on several empty silos of a closely spaced group (pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.05) consisting of 8 by 5 silos in the port of Antwerp (Belgium). Numerical simulations of the turbulent wind flow are performed to clarify the occurrence of the observed ovalling vibrations near the lee side corner of the group by studying the dynamic wind pressures on the silo surfaces and linking to the dynamic properties of the silo structures. As the orientation of the group largely affects the pressure distribution around the cylinders of the group, the influence of the angle of incidence of the wind flow on these ovalling vibrations is examined while other parameters, such as spacing ratio and Reynolds number are unchanged. To achieve results within a reasonable computation time, 2D unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations using Menter's shear stress transport turbulence model were performed. In order to elucidate the influence of the applied turbulence model and to qualitatively validate the spatial and temporal discretization of the 2D highly turbulent post-critical (Re=1.24×107) flow simulations for the silo group, single cylinder simulations were used. The geometric resemblance of the group arrangement with rectangular cylinders on the one hand and of the interstitial spaces with tube arrays (e.g. heat exchangers) on the other hand is used to qualitatively compare the observed flow phenomena. The simulations show that the silo group can be treated neither as a tube array nor as a solid bluff body. Subsequent linking of dynamic wind pressures to dynamic properties of the silo structures reveals strong narrow band frequency peaks in the turbulent pressure coefficient spectra of the silos near the lee side corners of the group that match the structural natural frequencies of the third and fourth ovalling mode shape of the silos. This match indicates a forced, resonant response which

  6. Crystallographic Texture in Ceramics and Metals.

    PubMed

    Vaudin, M D

    2001-01-01

    Preferred crystallographic orientation, or texture, occurs almost universally, both in natural and man-made systems. Many components and devices in electronic and magnetic systems are fabricated from materials that have crystallographic texture. With the rapidly increasing use of thin film technology, where sharp axisymmetric crystallographic texture normal to the film plane is frequently observed, the occurrence and impact of texture are rising. Thin film applications in which the texture of the material plays a key role in determining properties and performance are broad: complex oxides in random access memory devices, ZnO thin film resonators for cell phone applications, metallic alloys in magnetic recording media, and Al and Cu interconnects in integrated circuits are but a few examples. Texture is established during the synthesis or post-synthesis heat treatment of a material and thus has a strong dependence upon processing history. Accurate measurement of texture is not simple and a variety of tools and approaches are being actively employed in texture studies. X-ray, neutron and electron diffraction based techniques are practiced around the world at varying levels of complexity with regard to equipment and analysis methods. Despite the well-documented existence of these varied approaches, many reported texture measurements on electronic materials are based solely on the relative intensities of conventional θ-2θ x-ray diffraction peaks, which typically yield inaccurate results. NIST has developed quantitative texture measurement techniques that employ equipment commonly available in most industrial and academic settings. A number of examples of texture measurement in ceramic and metal systems will be presented, taken from the historical development and application of these techniques at NIST over the past 7 years. PMID:27500066

  7. Crystallographic Texture in Ceramics and Metals

    PubMed Central

    Vaudin, Mark D.

    2001-01-01

    Preferred crystallographic orientation, or texture, occurs almost universally, both in natural and man-made systems. Many components and devices in electronic and magnetic systems are fabricated from materials that have crystallographic texture. With the rapidly increasing use of thin film technology, where sharp axisymmetric crystallographic texture normal to the film plane is frequently observed, the occurrence and impact of texture are rising. Thin film applications in which the texture of the material plays a key role in determining properties and performance are broad: complex oxides in random access memory devices, ZnO thin film resonators for cell phone applications, metallic alloys in magnetic recording media, and Al and Cu interconnects in integrated circuits are but a few examples. Texture is established during the synthesis or post-synthesis heat treatment of a material and thus has a strong dependence upon processing history. Accurate measurement of texture is not simple and a variety of tools and approaches are being actively employed in texture studies. X-ray, neutron and electron diffraction based techniques are practiced around the world at varying levels of complexity with regard to equipment and analysis methods. Despite the well-documented existence of these varied approaches, many reported texture measurements on electronic materials are based solely on the relative intensities of conventional θ-2θ x-ray diffraction peaks, which typically yield inaccurate results. NIST has developed quantitative texture measurement techniques that employ equipment commonly available in most industrial and academic settings. A number of examples of texture measurement in ceramic and metal systems will be presented, taken from the historical development and application of these techniques at NIST over the past 7 years.

  8. Synthesis and Crystallographic Analysis of 5-Se-Thymidine DNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, A.; Sheng, J; Jiang, J; Zhanbg, W; Huang, Z

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of the interaction of 5-CH3 of thymidine and its 5?-phosphate backbone (C-H O-PO3 interaction) in DNA via the insertion of the atomic probe (a selenium atom) into the exo-5-position of thymidine (5-Se-T). 5-Se-T was synthesized for the first time, via Mn(OAc)3 assisted electrophilic addition of CH3SeSeCH3 to 3?,5?-di-O-benzoyl-2?-deoxyuridine. The 5-Se-T phosphoramidite was subsequently synthesized and incorporated into DNA in over 99% coupling yield. Biophysical and structural investigations of the 5-Se-T DNAs revealed that the Se-modified and nonmodified DNAs are virtually identical. In addition, the crystallographic analysis of a 5-Se-T DNA strongly suggests a hydrogen-bond formation between the 5-CH3 and 5?-phosphate groups (CH3 PO4- interaction).

  9. Catalytic, Enantioselective Sulfenofunctionalisation of Alkenes: Mechanistic, Crystallographic, and Computational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Hartmann, Eduard; Kornfilt, David J. P.; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The stereocontrolled introduction of vicinal heteroatomic substituents into organic molecules is one of the most powerful ways of adding value and function. Whereas many methods exist for the introduction of oxygen- and nitrogen-containing substituents, the number stereocontrolled methods for the introduction of sulfur-containing substituents pales by comparison. Previous reports from these laboratories have described the sulfenofunctionalization of alkenes that construct vicinal carbon-sulfur and carbon-oxygen, carbon-nitrogen as well as carbon-carbon bonds with high levels of diastereospecificity and enantioselectivity. This process is enabled by the concept of Lewis base activation of Lewis acids that provides activation of Group 16 electrophiles. To provide a foundation for expansion of substrate scope and improved selectivities, we have undertaken a comprehensive study of the catalytically active species. Insights gleaned from kinetic, crystallographic and computational methods have led to the introduction of a new family of sulfenylating agents that provide significantly enhanced selectivities. PMID:25411883

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human cystathionine β-synthase

    PubMed Central

    Oyenarte, Iker; Majtan, Tomas; Ereño, June; Corral-Rodríguez, María Angeles; Kraus, Jan P.; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Human cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is a pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-dependent hemeprotein, whose catalytic activity is regulated by S-adenosylmethionine. CBS catalyzes the β-replacement reaction of homocysteine (Hcy) with serine to yield cystathionine. CBS is a key regulator of plasma levels of the thrombogenic Hcy and deficiency in CBS is the single most common cause of homocystinuria, an inherited metabolic disorder of sulfur amino acids. The properties of CBS enzymes, such as domain organization, oligomerization degree or regulatory mechanisms, are not conserved across the eukaryotes. The current body of knowledge is insufficient to understand these differences and their impact on CBS function and physiology. To overcome this deficiency, we have addressed the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a protein construct (hCBS516–525) that contains the full-length CBS from Homo sapiens (hCBS) and just lacks amino-acid residues 516–525, which are located in a disordered loop. The human enzyme yielded crystals belonging to space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.98, b = 136.33, c = 169.83 Å and diffracting X-rays to a resolution of 3.0 Å. The crystal structure appears to contain two molecules in the asymmetric unit which presumably correspond to a dimeric form of the enzyme. PMID:23143240

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of TssL from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae-Hee; Chang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Yeon-Gil

    2014-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a macromolecular complex that is conserved in Gram-negative bacteria. The T6SS secretes effector proteins into recipient cells in a contact-dependent manner in order to accomplish cooperative and competitive interactions with the cells. Although the composition and mechanism of the T6SS have been intensively investigated across many Gram-negative bacteria, to date structural information on T6SS components from the important pathogen Vibrio cholerae has been rare. Here, the cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the cytoplasmic domain of TssL, an inner membrane protein of the T6SS, from V. cholerae are reported. Diffraction data were collected to 1.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to the hexagonal space group P61, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.4, b = 78.4, c = 49.5 Å. The successful structural characterization of TssL from V. cholerae will contribute to understanding the role of the membrane-associated subunits of the T6SS in more detail. PMID:25195905

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic investigation of FrnE, a disulfide oxidoreductase from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Lata; Misra, Hari Sharan; Bihani, Subhash Chandra

    2014-11-01

    In prokaryotes, Dsb proteins catalyze the formation of native disulfide bonds through an oxidative folding pathway and are part of the cell machinery that protects proteins from oxidative stress. Deinococcus radiodurans is an extremophile which shows unparalleled resistance to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress. It has a strong mechanism to protect its proteome from oxidative damage. The genome of Deinococcus shows the presence of FrnE, a Dsb protein homologue that potentially provides the bacterium with oxidative stress tolerance. Here, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of FrnE from D. radiodurans are reported. Diffraction-quality single crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with reservoir solution consisting of 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.0, 10% PEG 8000, 15-20% glycerol. Diffraction data were collected on an Agilent SuperNova system using a microfocus sealed-tube X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution at 100 K. The space group of the crystal was found to be P2₁22₁, with unit-cell parameters a=47.91, b=62.94, c=86.75 Å, α=β=γ=90°. Based on Matthews coefficient analysis, one monomer per asymmetric unit is present in the crystal, with a solvent content of approximately 45%. PMID:25372826

  13. On the validation of crystallographic symmetry and the quality of structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jimin

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, Zwart and colleagues observed that the fraction of the structures deposited in the PDB alleged to have “pseudosymmetry” or “special noncrystallographic symmetry” (NCS) was about 6%, and that this percentage was rising annually. A few years later, Poon and colleagues found that 2% of all the crystal structures in the PDB belonged to higher symmetry space groups than those assigned to them. Here, I report an analysis of the X-ray diffraction data deposited for this class of structures, which shows that most of the “pseudosymmetry” and “special NCS” that has been reported is in fact true crystallographic symmetry (CS). This distinction is important because the credibility of crystal structures depends heavily on quality control statistics such as Rfree that are unreliable when they are computed incorrectly, which they often are when CS is misidentified as “special NCS” or “pseudosymmetry”. When mistakes of this kind are made, artificially low values of Rfree can give unjustified confidence in the accuracy of the reported structures. PMID:25352397

  14. Structure of the SARS coronavirus main proteinase as an active C{sub 2} crystallographic dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ting; Ooi, Amy; Lee, Hooi Chen; Wilmouth, Rupert; Liu, Ding Xiang; Lescar, Julien

    2005-11-01

    An orthorhombic crystal form of the SARS CoV main proteinase diffracting to a resolution of 1.9 Å is reported. The conformation of residues in the catalytic site indicates an active enzyme. The 34 kDa main proteinase (M{sup pro}) from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) plays an important role in the virus life cycle through the specific processing of viral polyproteins. As such, SARS-CoV M{sup pro} is a key target for the identification of specific inhibitors directed against the SARS virus. With a view to facilitating the development of such compounds, crystals were obtained of the enzyme at pH 6.5 in the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 that diffract to a resolution of 1.9 Å. These crystals contain one monomer per asymmetric unit and the biologically active dimer is generated via the crystallographic twofold axis. The conformation of the catalytic site indicates that the enzyme is active in the crystalline form and thus suitable for structure-based inhibition studies.

  15. Crystallization, diffraction data collection and preliminary crystallographic analysis of DING protein from Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Moniot, Sebastien; Elias, Mikael; Kim, Donghyo; Scott, Ken; Chabriere, Eric

    2007-07-01

    Crystallization of DING protein from P. fluorescens is reported. A complete data set was collected to 1.43 Å resolution. PfluDING is a phosphate-binding protein expressed in Pseudomonas fluorescens. This protein is clearly distinct from the bacterial ABC transporter soluble phosphate-binding protein PstS and is more homologous to eukaryotic DING proteins. Interestingly, bacterial DING proteins have only been detected in certain Pseudomonas species. Although DING proteins seem to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes, they are systematically absent from eukaryotic genomic databases and thus are still quite mysterious and poorly characterized. PfluDING displays mitogenic activity towards human cells and binds various ligands such as inorganic phosphate, pyrophosphate, nucleotide triphosphates and cotinine. Here, the crystallization of PfluDING is reported in a monoclinic space group (P2{sub 1}), with typical unit-cell parameters a = 36.7, b = 123.7, c = 40.8 Å, α = 90, β = 116.7, γ = 90°. Preliminary crystallographic analysis reveals good diffraction quality for these crystals and a 1.43 Å resolution data set has been collected.

  16. Crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of the Corynebacterium glutamicum nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase component A

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Sujin; Lee, Sujin; Kang, Beom Sik; Lee, Heung-Soo; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Kim, Myung Hee

    2006-11-01

    The Corynebacterium glutamicum NTA monooxygenase component A protein, which plays the central role in NTA biodegradation, was crystallized. The initial X-ray crystallographic characterization is reported. Safety and environmental concerns have recently dictated the proper disposal of nitrilotriacetate (NTA). Biodegradation of NTA is initiated by NTA monooxygenase, which is composed of two proteins: component A and component B. The NTA monooxygenase component A protein from Corynebacterium glutamicum was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.5 Å on a synchrotron beamline. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.04, b = 98.51, c = 171.61 Å, β = 101.94°. The asymmetric unit consists of four molecules, corresponding to a packing density of 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. The structure was solved by molecular replacement. Structure refinement is in progress.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a bacterial Asn-transamidosome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tateki; Yamashita, Keitaro; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2014-01-01

    Most canonical aminoacyl-tRNAs are synthesized directly by their cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), but glutaminyl-tRNAGln and asparaginyl-tRNAAsn are synthesized indirectly by two-step processes. These processes are catalyzed by the transamidosome, a large ribonucleoprotein particle composed of GatA, GatB, GatC, aaRS and tRNA. In this study, the Asn-transamidosome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was reconstructed and crystallized by mixing purified GatCAB complex, AspRS and tRNAAsn. The crystal of the Asn-transamidosome belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.3, b = 186.0, c = 287.8 Å, β = 93.3°, and diffracted to 3.73 Å resolution. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis showed that the asymmetric unit contained two Asn-transamidosomes, each composed of two GatCABs, one AspRS dimer and two tRNAAsns, indicating that the construction of the current Asn-transamidosome differs from that of Thermus thermophilus. PMID:24915095

  18. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human myotubularin-related protein 3

    PubMed Central

    Son, Ji Young; Lee, Jee Un; Yoo, Ki-Young; Shin, Woori; Im, Dong-Won; Kim, Seung Jun; Ryu, Seong Eon; Heo, Yong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Myotubularin-related proteins are a large family of phosphatases that have the catalytic activity of dephosphorylating the phospholipid molecules phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate. Each of the 14 family members contains a phosphatase catalytic domain, which is inactive in six family members owing to amino-acid changes in a key motif for the activity. All of the members also bear PH-GRAM domains, which have low homologies between them and have roles that are not yet clear. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of human myotubularin-related protein 3 encompassing the PH-GRAM and the phosphatase catalytic domain are reported. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis shows that the crystals diffracted to 3.30 Å resolution at a synchrotron X-ray source. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 323.3, b = 263.3, c = 149.4 Å, β = 109.7°. PMID:25195900

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies on 2-dehydro-3-deoxygalactarate aldolase from Leptospira interrogans

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xu; Huang, Hua; Song, Xiaomin; Wang, Yanli; Xu, Hang; Teng, Maikun; Gong, Weimin

    2006-12-01

    Preliminary crystallographic studies on 2-dehydro-3-deoxygalactarate aldolase from L. interrogans. 2-Dehydro-3-deoxygalactarate (DDG) aldolase is a member of the class II aldolase family and plays an important role in the pyruvate-metabolism pathway, catalyzing the reversible aldol cleavage of DDG to pyruvate and tartronic semialdehyde. As it is a potential novel antibiotic target, it is necessary to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of DDG aldolase. To determine the crystal structure, crystals of DDG aldolase from Leptospira interrogans were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution using a Cu Kα rotating-anode X-ray source. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 293.5, b = 125.6, c = 87.6 Å, β = 100.9°. The V{sub M} is calculated to be 2.4 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, assuming there to be 12 protein molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  20. Group dynamics during the EXEMSI isolation study. Experimental Campaign for the European Manned Space Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Cazes, C; Rosnet, E; Bachelard, C; Le Scanff, C; Rivolier, J

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the social behavior, interrelations, cohesion, efficiency and team formation of the crew during 60 days of isolation and confinement, to make a critical comparison of a variety of test methods used for this purpose and to formulate recommendations for their applications in selection, training and support for future studies of this kind. The study consisted of three phases: (1) the pre-isolation period, in which initial individual and group assessment were made to understand the motivation, characteristics, and styles of the crew members, the state of the crew, and to make a prognosis for the behavior of the group and its members, (2) the isolation period, with tests and observations to follow and analyze behavior and group dynamics of the crew, and to detect manifestations of stress, and (3) the post-isolation period with final assessment and debriefing. During these three periods individual and group tests were carried out. Direct methods, questionnaires and tests, as well as indirect methods, observations of behavior, were used. These had cognitive, affective-emotional and social components; they were quantitative, qualitative or a combination. Before isolation the crew members expressed strong confidence in the team and in their own personal capability. The leadership of the Commander seemed uncontested. Crew functioning during this period was conflict-free, but was structured in a rather rigid and defensive way (isolation of affects, denial of anxiety). Apparently, the members strongly needed to present a good image image of themselves. The relatively short period of the experiment, and the absence of real risk suggested that the crew would be able to maintain their cohesion, but in a real spaceflight situation this behavior could be inadequate and even dangerous. The pre-isolation prognosis for crew behavior during isolation was validated to a large extent. During isolation there were no clear manifestations of

  1. Determination of phytoplankton groups from space: application to senegalo-mauritanean upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Yala; Brajard, Julien; Crépon, Michel; Machu, Eric; Niang, Ndeye

    2016-04-01

    Phytoplankton groups can be estimated from ocean color spectral satellite observations using a clustering algorithm combined with in-situ measurements of pigment concentration such as PHYSAT. This algorithm (http://log.univ-littoral.fr/Physat) gives global maps of dominant groups for the last ocean color satellite sensor observing periods (MODIS, SeaWiFS). For specific regional studies, especially in very productive regions such as the Senegalo-Mauritanian upwelling, it has been shown that the standard algorithm can present some limitations. First, PHYSAT in its published version uses thresholds on the chlorophyll-a concentration and aerosol optical thickness values to guaranty a "high-quality" estimation of the water-leaving reflectance and of the related chlorophyll-a. Second, since PHYSAT is based on mean water-leaving reflectance spectra (Ra) normalized by classes of chlorophyll-a concentration (Ra*spectra), the algorithm must be insensitive to some small regional variation of this parameter. A regional PHYSAT-like algorithm was applied to the Senegal coast to overcome these difficulties. First, a specific atmospheric correction algorithm was applied to the satellite measurements to produce accurate water-leaving reflectances under Saharan dusts. Artificial neural network (Multilayer perceptrons) was used to estimate the chlorophyll-a concentration from the water-leaving reflectance. Then a clustering algorithm based on Self-organizing map was used to classify the spectral information (Ra,Ra*) spectra measured by the satellite. It has been shown that this new regional PHYSAT algorithm gives coherent spatial patches of Ra*. Based on expertise acquired in others ocean area, these patches could be associated with phytoplankton groups such as diatoms. In situ measurements of secondary pigments were conducted in the framework of the UPSEN campaigns (2012 and 2013) and were used to validate this approach. We show that these in-situ measurement are coherent with the

  2. A walk through energy, discrepancy, numerical integration and group invariant measures on measurable subsets of euclidean space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damelin, S.

    2008-07-01

    (A) The celebrated Gaussian quadrature formula on finite intervals tells us that the Gauss nodes are the zeros of the unique solution of an extremal problem. We announce recent results of Damelin, Grabner, Levesley, Ragozin and Sun which derive quadrature estimates on compact, homogenous manifolds embedded in Euclidean spaces, via energy functionals associated with a class of group-invariant kernels which are generalizations of zonal kernels on the spheres or radial kernels in euclidean spaces. Our results apply, in particular, to weighted Riesz kernels defined on spheres and certain projective spaces. Our energy functionals describe both uniform and perturbed uniform distribution of quadrature point sets. (B) Given , some measurable subset of Euclidean space, one sometimes wants to construct, a design, a finite set of points, , with a small energy or discrepancy. We announce recent results of Damelin, Hickernell, Ragozin and Zeng which show that these two measures of quality are equivalent when they are defined via positive definite kernels . The error of approximating the integral by the sample average of f over has a tight upper bound in terms the energy or discrepancy of . The tightness of this error bound follows by requiring f to lie in the Hilbert space with reproducing kernel K. The theory presented here provides an interpretation of the best design for numerical integration as one with minimum energy, provided that the μ defining the integration problem is the equilibrium measure or charge distribution corresponding to the energy kernel, K. (C) Let be the orbit of a compact, possibly non Abelian group, , acting as measurable transformations of and the kernel K is invariant under the group action. We announce recent results of Damelin, Hickernell, Ragozin and Zeng which show that the equilibrium measure is the normalized measure on induced by Haar measure on . This allows us to calculate explicit representations of equilibrium measures. There is an

  3. The Exploration Atmospheres Working Group's Report on Space Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Thibeault, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    This part of Exploration Atmospheres Working Group analyses focuses on the potential use of nonmetallic composites as the interior walls and structural elements exposed to the atmosphere of the spacecraft or habitat. The primary drive to consider nonmetallic, polymer-based composites as an alternative to aluminum structure is due to their superior radiation shielding properties. But as is shown in this analysis, these composites can also be made to combine superior mechanical properties with superior shielding properties. In addition, these composites can be made safe; i.e., with regard to flammability and toxicity, as well as "smart"; i.e., embedded with sensors for the continuous monitoring of material health and conditions. The analysis main conclusions are that (1) smart polymer-based composites are an enabling technology for safe and reliable exploration missions, and (2) an adaptive, synergetic systems approach is required to meet the missions requirements from structure, properties, and processes to crew health and protection for exploration missions.

  4. Between-group behaviour in health care: gaps, edges, boundaries, disconnections, weak ties, spaces and holes. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gaps are typically regarded as a problem to be solved. People are stimulated to close or plug them. Researchers are moved to fill deficits in the literature in order to realise a more complete knowledge base, health authorities want to bridge policy-practice disconnections, managers to secure resources to remedy shortfalls between poor and idealised care, and clinicians to provide services to patients across the divides of organisational silos. Despite practical and policy work in many health systems to bridge gaps, it is valuable to study research examining them for the insights provided. Structural holes, spaces between social clusters and weak or absent ties represent fissures in networks, located in less densely populated parts of otherwise closely connected social structures. Such gaps are useful as they illustrate how communication potentially breaks down or interactivity fails. This paper discusses empirical and theoretical work on this phenomenon with the aim of analysing a specific exemplar, the structures of silos within health care organisations. Methods The research literature on social spaces, holes, gaps, boundaries and edges was searched systematically, and separated into health [n = 13] and non-health [n = 55] samples. The health literature was reviewed and synthesised in order to understand the circumstances between stakeholders and stakeholder groups that both provide threats to networked interactions and opportunities to strengthen the fabric of organisational and institutional inter-relationships. Results The research examples illuminate various network structure characteristics and group interactions. They explicate a range of opportunities for improved social and professional relations that understanding structural holes, social spaces and absent ties affords. A principal finding is that these kinds of gaps illustrate the conditions under which connections are strained or have been severed, where the limits of integration between

  5. Inter-Agency Consultative Group for Space Science (IACG): Handbook of Missions and Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The ACE spacecraft design is based on the Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) built by Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and the Applied Physics Lab (APL) for the AMPTE program. ACE is designed as a spinning spacecraft with its spin axis aligned to the Earth-Sun axis. The ACE launch weight will be approx. 633 kg, including 105 kg of scientific instruments and 184 kg of propellant. Using a Delta-class expendable launch vehicle, ACE will be launched into an L1 libration point (240 R(sub e)) orbit. Telemetry will be 6.7 kbps average, using tape recorder storage with daily readout to DSN. The experiment power requirement is approximately 76 W nominal and 96 W peak. The prime objective of the ACE mission is: (1) to determine accurate elemental and isotropic abundances including solar matter, local interstellar matter and local galactic matter; (2) to study the origin of elements and evolutionary processing in galactic nucleosynthesis, galactic evolution, origin and evolution of the solar system; (3) to study coronal formation and solar-wind acceleration processes; and (4) to study particle acceleration and transport, including coronal shock acceleration, stochastic flare acceleration, interplanetary shock acceleration, and interstellar acceleration and propagation. To accomplish this objective, ACE will perform comprehensive and coordinated determinations of the elemental and isotopic composition of energetic nuclei accelerated on the Sun, in interplanetary space, and from galactic sources. These observations will span five decades in energy, from solar wind to galactic cosmic ray energies, and will cover the element range from H-1 to Zr-40. Comparison of these samples of matter will be used to study the origin and subsequent evolution of both solar system and galactic material by isolating the effects of fundamental processes that include nucleosynthesis, charged and neutral particle separation, bulk plasma acceleration, and the acceleration of suprathermal and high

  6. Behavioral and biological effects of autonomous versus scheduled mission management in simulated space-dwelling groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roma, Peter G.; Hursh, Steven R.; Hienz, Robert D.; Emurian, Henry H.; Gasior, Eric D.; Brinson, Zabecca S.; Brady, Joseph V.

    2011-05-01

    Logistical constraints during long-duration space expeditions will limit the ability of Earth-based mission control personnel to manage their astronaut crews and will thus increase the prevalence of autonomous operations. Despite this inevitability, little research exists regarding crew performance and psychosocial adaptation under such autonomous conditions. To this end, a newly-initiated study on crew management systems was conducted to assess crew performance effectiveness under rigid schedule-based management of crew activities by Mission Control versus more flexible, autonomous management of activities by the crews themselves. Nine volunteers formed three long-term crews and were extensively trained in a simulated planetary geological exploration task over the course of several months. Each crew then embarked on two separate 3-4 h missions in a counterbalanced sequence: Scheduled, in which the crews were directed by Mission Control according to a strict topographic and temporal region-searching sequence, and Autonomous, in which the well-trained crews received equivalent baseline support from Mission Control but were free to explore the planetary surface as they saw fit. Under the autonomous missions, performance in all three crews improved (more high-valued geologic samples were retrieved), subjective self-reports of negative emotional states decreased, unstructured debriefing logs contained fewer references to negative emotions and greater use of socially-referent language, and salivary cortisol output across the missions was attenuated. The present study provides evidence that crew autonomy may improve performance and help sustain if not enhance psychosocial adaptation and biobehavioral health. These controlled experimental data contribute to an emerging empirical database on crew autonomy which the international astronautics community may build upon for future research and ultimately draw upon when designing and managing missions.

  7. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of GpgS, a key glucosyltransferase involved in methylglucose lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gest, Petra; Kaur, Devinder; Pham, Ha T; van der Woerd, Mark; Hansen, Emily; Brennan, Patrick J; Jackson, Mary; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2008-12-01

    Glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (GpgS) is a key enzyme that catalyses the first glucosylation step in methylglucose lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in mycobacteria. These important molecules are believed to be involved in the regulation of fatty-acid and mycolic acid synthesis. The enzyme belongs to the recently defined GT81 family of retaining glycosyltransferases (CAZy, Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes Database; see http://www.cazy.org). Here, the purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis are reported of GpgS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and of its complex with UDP. GpgS crystals belonged to space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.85, b = 98.85, c = 127.64 A, and diffracted to 2.6 A resolution. GpgS-UDP complex crystals belonged to space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.32, b = 98.32, c = 127.96 A, and diffracted to 3.0 A resolution. PMID:19052364

  8. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a penicillin-binding protein homologue from Pyrococcus abyssi

    SciTech Connect

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Mayer, Claudine

    2005-11-01

    The crystallization of a hypothetical penicillin-binding protein from the archaeon P. abyssi in space group C2 by hanging-drop vapour diffusion is reported. The genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi contains a gene (pab0087) encoding a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) homologue. This sequence consists of 447 residues and shows significant sequence similarity to low-molecular-weight PBPs and class C β-lactamases. The Pab0087 protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data from two different crystal forms were collected to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution. Both crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 160.59, b = 135.74, c = 113.02 Å, β = 117.36° and a = 166.97, b = 131.25, c = 189.39 Å, β = 113.81°, respectively. The asymmetric unit contains four and eight molecules, respectively, with fourfold non-crystallographic symmetry.

  9. Structure of delta-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} from density functional theory: A systematic crystallographic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Wachsman, Eric D.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Nino, Juan C.

    2009-05-15

    A systematic crystallographic analysis of the <110> and <111> vacancy-ordered structure of cubic delta-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} obtained from electronic-structure calculations is presented. The ordering of vacancies leads to a doubling of the unit-cell that results in a 2x2x2 fluorite super-structure, with an associated reduction in its space group symmetry from Fm3-barm to Fm3-bar. The Bi atoms present inside the <111> vacancy-ordered oxygen sublattice have equal Bi-O bond lengths, whereas, those present inside the <110> vacancy-ordered oxygen sublattice have three different pairs of Bi-O bond lengths. The specific ionic displacements and electronic charge configurations also depend on the nature of vacancy ordering in the oxygen sub-lattice. - Graphical abstract: 1/8 of a 2x2x2 delta-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} superstructure having Fm3-bar space group. Every oxygen (black) has three possible positions, only one of which is filled either by O1 (red) or O{sub 2} (blue).

  10. The effect of spacing transverse to the wave direction on the Morison force coefficients in two cylinder groups

    SciTech Connect

    Haritos, N.; Smith, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides some results from an experimental study currently being carried out in the Michell laboratory at the University of Melbourne. The principal purpose of the study is to investigate the Morison in-line hydrodynamic force characteristics of slender surface-piercing multi-cylinder structures. The test program has been tailored to provide more detailed observations within the close-spaced region (Separation/Diameter ratio, s/D < 2) of the group interference effect in such multi-cylinder structures over the Keulegan Carpenter range 0 < KC < 20 which encompasses the inertia force dominant Morison regime (KC < 5), as well as the so-called troublesome region (5 < KC < 15) where both drag and inertia force components are significant. Results currently in hand for the side-by-side two-cylinder group configuration are presented which clearly depict the characteristics of this interference effect.