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Sample records for crystals cscdbr3 kpb2cl5

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of Er-doped KPb 2Cl 5 laser crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, N. W.; Bowman, S. R.; O'Connor, S.; Searles, S. K.; Ganem, Joseph

    2003-06-01

    A discussion of the spectroscopic properties of the low-phonon energy laser host material potassium lead chloride, KPb 2Cl 5, doped with trivalent erbium is presented. In this paper we present room temperature spectroscopic measurements and subsequent analysis based on the Judd-Ofelt model. Additionally, Stark level energies of the Er 3+ ions in the crystal were determined from spectroscopic measurements performed at cryogenic temperatures.

  2. Nd3+ sensitized upconversion luminescence of Nd3+/Pr3+ codoped KPb2Cl5 low phonon crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balda, R.; Al-Saleh, M.; Arriandiaga, M. A.; Garcia-Revilla, S.; Fernández, J.

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we report the upconversion emission from Pr3+ and Nd3+ ions in potassium lead chloride crystal KPb2Cl5after excitation in the 4F5/2,3/2 levels of Nd3+ ions. We have observed violet, blue, green, orange, and red emissions at room temperature. Blue emission from Pr3+ ions is induced by near infrared laser excitation of Nd3+ through energy transfer from Nd3+ to Pr3+ ions. The mechanisms leading to the visible emissions have been investigated by studying the dependence of the upconversion luminescence on the excitation wavelength and intensity of the IR pump light.

  3. Excitons and energy transport in crystals KPb 2Cl 5 and RbPb 2Br 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovarov, V. A.; Ogorodnikov, I. N.; Omelkov, S. I.; Smirnov, A. A.; Yelisseyev, A. P.

    2005-05-01

    A complex investigation of the dynamics of electronic excitations and energy transport in the KPb 2Cl 5 (KPC) and RbPb 2Br 5 (RPB) crystals was performed by means of low-temperature time-resolved vacuum ultraviolet optical luminescence spectroscopy with time resolution under selective excitation with synchrotron radiation. Data on the kinetics of the photoluminescence (PL) decay, time-resolved PL spectra (2-6.2 eV), and time-resolved PL excitation spectra (4-24 eV) at 7-300 K were obtained for the first time. The intrinsic PL bands at 2.4 (KPC) and 2.05 eV (RPB) were attributed to the radiative annihilation of the triplet excitons. This rare-earth (Pr, Er, Nd, Ho) doped crystals exhibit the characteristic luminescence of the appropriate activators. This paper discusses the electronic excitation dynamics and energy transport in these crystals.

  4. Growth and characterization of single-crystal Er 3+:KPb 2Cl 5 as a mid-infrared laser material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, N. J.; O'Connor, S.; Bowman, S. R.

    2006-06-01

    Laser-grade single crystals of Er 3+-doped potassium lead chloride (KPb 2Cl 5) have been grown by a novel modification of the Bridgman method. This new method allows for consistent seeding of a single-crystal growth from polycrystalline material while avoiding any problems with supercooling. An extended in situ annealing step allows strain to relax out of the crystal, reducing cracking problems and improving the quality of the resultant material. These crystals showed significant quantities of depolarized scattering in the visible, concentrated in stacks of parallel planes, but very little scattering in the mid-infrared. Two solid-solid phase transitions were found in this material, and passage through the higher-temperature transition was linked to the formation of the depolarization planes. Measurements were also made of the indices of refraction of all three crystal axes in the near-infrared and mid-infrared, and the orientation dependence of the 4.5 μm fluorescence of Er 3+ in this material was examined.

  5. Optical cooling in Er3+:KPb2Cl5.

    PubMed

    Condon, Nicholas J; Bowman, Steven R; O'Connor, Shawn P; Quimby, Richard S; Mungan, Carl E

    2009-03-30

    For the first time, optical cooling has been observed in the (4)I(13/2) excited state of erbium(III), using the low phonon energy host materal, potassium lead chloride (KPb(2)Cl(2)). Cooling was observed when samples were pumped at wavelengths longer than 1557 nm, 17 nm longer than the mean fluorescence wavelength of 1540 nm, which implies a nonradiative heat load of 1.1% for the (4)I(13/2)-->(4)I(15/2) transition. When pumped at 1568 nm, the total cooling efficiency was 0.38% of the absorbed power. These results highlight the potential of Er(3+):KPb(2)Cl(5) as a material for lasers operating in an eye safe spectral region. PMID:19333313

  6. Growth and optical spectroscopy of Ho-doped KPb 2Cl 5 for infrared solid-state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyebola, O.; Hömmerich, U.; Brown, E.; Trivedi, S. B.; Bluiett, A. G.; Zavada, J. M.

    2010-04-01

    Results of the growth and infrared optical properties of Ho-doped KPb 2Cl 5 for potential applications in infrared (IR) solid-state lasers are reported. The investigated crystal was synthesized from commercial starting materials of PbCl 2, KCl, and HoCl 3 followed by several purification steps including normal freezing, zone-refinement, and chlorination. The Ho:KPb 2Cl 5 crystal was subsequently grown by the Bridgman technique. Following optical excitation at ˜0.89 μm, several IR emission bands were observed at room temperature with average wavelengths at 1.07, 1.18, 1.35, 1.65, 2.00, 2.89, and 3.96 μm. The emission at 3.96 μm originated from the 5I 5→ 5I 6 transition of Ho 3+ ions and exhibited a decay time of 5.0 ms at room temperature. Based on a Judd-Ofelt analysis the mid-IR emission quantum efficiency was determined to be near unity, which results in a peak emission cross-section of 0.62×10 -20 cm 2 at 3.96 μm. The obtained spectroscopic results indicate the favorable optical properties of Ho:KPb 2Cl 5 for mid-IR laser applications.

  7. Growth of KPb2Cl5 and K2CeCl5 for gamma ray detection using vertical Bridgman method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, E.; Tupitsyn, E.; Bhattacharya, P.; Matei, L.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.; Atkinson, G.; Burger, A.

    2014-05-01

    We report the scintillation properties of both KPb2Cl5 and K2CeCl5 grown by vertical Bridgman method from synthesized and zone refined material. Both crystals exhibit minimal hygroscopic properties, which is desirable in applications where hermitization is not feasible. The KPb2Cl5 crystal, doped with 2.5 mol% of EuCl2, appeared yellow in color and did not scintillate, while the self activated transparent K2CeCl5 did. The energy resolution and decay time at 662 keV were measured to be 6.1% and 78 ns respectively, with a light yield of 31,000 photons/MeV.

  8. Optical pump-probe processes in Nd3+-doped KPb2Br5, RbPb2Br5, and KPb2Cl5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademaker, Katja; Payne, Stephen A.; Huber, Günter; Isaenko, Ludmila I.; Osiac, Eugen

    2005-12-01

    Recently, laser activity has been achieved in the low-phonon-energy, moisture-resistant bromide host crystals: neodymium-doped potassium lead bromide (Nd3+:KPb2Br5) and rubidium lead bromide (Nd3+:RbPb2Br5). Laser activity at 1.07 μm was observed for both crystalline materials. Laser operation at the new wavelengths of 1.18 and 0.97 μm resulting from the 4F5/2+2H9/2-->4IJ transitions (J=13/2 and 11/2) in Nd:RbPb2Br5 was achieved for the first time in a solid-state laser material. We present cw pump-probe spectra and discuss excited-state absorption and reabsorption processes due to the long-lived lower laser levels, as well as possible depopulation mechanisms feasible for more efficient laser operation in these crystals. The bromides are compared with potassium lead chloride (Nd3+:KPb2Cl5).

  9. Theoretical studies on the optical spectra and EPR parameters for trigonal Yb3+ center in CsCdBr3 crystal.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui-Ning; Wu, Shao-Yi; Luo, Xiao-Bing; Tang, Hong

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, the crystal-field energy levels, the EPR g factors g//, g(perpendicular) of Yb3+ and hyperfine structure constants A//, A(perpendicular) of 171Yb3+ and 173Yb3+ isotopes in CsCdBr3 crystal are calculated from the crystal-field theory. The calculated results (seven energy levels and six EPR parameters) are in reasonable agreement with the observed values. In the calculation, we find that Yb3+ ion does not occupy the exact Cd2+ site, but is shifted from the center of bromine octahedron by a distance (Delta)Z approximately 0.184 angstroms along C3 axis. The results are discussed. PMID:15649794

  10. The purification and preparation of high-purity PbCl 2 and ternary alkali lead chloride single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsch, K.; Cihlář, A.; Málková, Z.; Rodová, M.; Vaněček, M.

    1993-08-01

    Purification and crystal growth of PbCl 2 and congruently melting ternary alkali lead chlorides, KPb 2Cl 5, RbPbCl 3, RbPb 2Cl 5, and CsPbCl 3, will be described in the present paper. Source materials were purified by the chlorination of molten chlorides with gaseous mixture of chlorinating agents in combination with a subsequent zone-melting. The efficiency of this method is confirmed by chemical analysis before and after purification and by the behaviour of the melts. Large single crystals of PbCl 2, KPb 2Cl 5, RbPb 2Cl 5 and CsPbCl 3, 20 mm in diameter and 50-60 mm long, were grown by the Bridgman method. Their quality was checked by the optical absorption and elastic light scattering measurements.

  11. Crystal growth of rare-earth-doped ternary potassium lead chloride single crystals by the Bridgman method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voda, M.; Al-Saleh, M.; Lobera, G.; Balda, R.; Fernández, J.

    2004-09-01

    High optical quality pure and rare-earth-doped ternary-potassium-lead-chloride (KPb 2Cl 5) single crystals have been grown using the Bridgman technique in a two-zone transparent vertical furnace. Combining the chlorination of the melt, to eliminate oxygen impurities, with a horizontal zone-refining, followed by the Bridgman growth itself using sealed silica ampoules, we successfully grew non-moisture-sensitive crystals of a high optical quality. The moisture content in the raw materials determines the quality of the resulting crystals.

  12. Optical characterization and crystal field calculations for some erbium based solid state materials for laser refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Z.; Qiu, Z.; Johnson, Jackie; Homerick, Uwe

    2009-02-01

    The potential of three erbium based solids hosts has been investigated for laser cooling. Absorption and emission spectra have been studied for the low lying IR transitions of erbium that are relevant to recent reports of cooling using the 4I15/2-4I9/2 and4I15/2 -4I13/2 transitions. Experimental studies have been performed for erbium in three hosts; ZBLAN glass and KPb2Cl5 and Cs2NaYCl6 crystals. In order to estimate the efficiencies of cooling, theoretical calculations have been performed for the cubic Elpasolite (Cs2NaYCl6 ) crystal. These calculations also provide a first principle insight into the cooling efficiency for non-cubic and glassy hosts where such calculations are not possible.

  13. Infrared to visible and ultraviolet upconversion processes in Nd 3+-doped potassium lead chloride crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendioroz, A.; Balda, R.; Voda, M.; Al-Saleh, M.; Fernández, J.

    2004-09-01

    Infrared to visible and ultraviolet upconversion in Nd 3+ doped KPb 2Cl 5 crystal is reported. Three intense bands have been observed at 535, 595, and 668 nm coming mainly from levels 4G 7/2- 4G 9/2, together with emissions at 362, 388, 420 and 456 nm coming from level 4D 3/2, and a peak at 435 nm, corresponding to the 2P 1/2 → 4I 9/2 transition. A study of the upconversion mechanisms has been carried out that includes the upconversion emission dependence on the wavelength and intensity of the pumping light together with a comparison of the luminescence decays after infrared excitation and after direct one photon excitation of the emitting levels. The results indicate that two- and three-body energy transfer upconversion processes are responsible for emissions from levels 4G 7/2- 4G 9/2 and 4D 3/2 respectively, while level 2P 1/2 is populated by either energy transfer upconversion or excited state absorption depending on the pumping wavelength.

  14. Optical cooling of Nd-doped solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Adeva, Angel J.; Balda, Rolindes; Al Saleh, Mohammed; Garcia-Revilla, Sara; Sola, Daniel; Fernández, Joaquín

    2012-03-01

    In this work we present a comprehensive review of recent work carried out by our group in the field of optical refrigeration of Nd-doped solids. Several infrared thermography measurements in Nd-doped KPb2Cl5 crystals and micro-powders both above and below the barycentre of the 4F3/2 are presented. These include some of our most recent ones obtained by employing a novel technique that allows one to perform differential temperature measurements. The role of both the direct anti-Stokes absorption processes and those assisted by either excited state absorption or energy transfer upconversion in the cooling process is discussed.

  15. Electronic Energy-Level Structures, Optical Line Strengths, and Correlation Crystal-Field Interactions in NEODYMIUM(3+) and ERBIUM(3+) Crystalline Compounds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quagliano, John Romolo

    Energy-level state structures of Nd^ {3+} (4f^3) and Er^{3+} (4f^ {11}) electronic configurations were analyzed in a total of 13 distinct chemical systems. The 13 systems included seven crystalline hosts that contain Nd ^{3+} ions (four garnets, one nonahydrate, one hexachloride, and one hexabromide), and six that contain Er^{3+} ions (three garnets, one oxalate-bioxalate, one hexachloride, and one hexabromide). Single crystal absorption spectra (polarized and unpolarized) and optical intensity data have been acquired for neat (rm Nd(H_2O)_9) (CF _3rm SO_3)_3 at cryogenic temperatures over the UV to near-IR energy range. Single crystal polarized orthoaxial absorption, excitation, and emission experiments were performed on Er^{3+}-doped CsCdBr _3. Model Hamiltonians were developed and used to calculate lanthanide 4f^{rm N } electronic structures. These Hamiltonians were constructed and parametrized to represent both atomic and crystal-field interactions in various host materials. A Hamiltonian with atomic and first-order crystal-field operators gave a very good initial description of the energy-level structures, and a second-order correlation crystal-field (CCF) refinement produced excellent results for some multiplet manifolds that are not well characterized by the first -order (one-particle) crystal-field interactions alone. The ^2rm H(2)_{11/2} , ^2{F}(2)_ {5/2}, and ^2rm F(2) _{7/2} multiplet manifolds of Nd ^{3+} and the ^2rm H(2)_{9/2}, ^2H(2) _{11/2}, and ^4 rm G_{11/2} multiplet manifolds of Er^{3+} were markedly improved after a maximum of three CCF operators were added to the Hamiltonian. The studies showed that since the Nd^{3+} and Er ^{3+} ions share the same SLJ (Russell -Saunders) basis of atomic states, then their respective energy-level structures are sensitive to the same CCF operators. The magnitudes of the CCF interactions were found to be typically 10% of the first-order one-particle crystal-field interactions. The present work establishes a new

  16. Discovery of challacolloite, an uncommon chloride, on a fifteenth-century polychrome terracotta relief by Michele da Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezur, Anikó; Kavich, Gwénaëlle; Stenger, Jens; Torok, Elena; Snow, Carol

    2015-10-01

    The fifteenth-century gilt and polychromed terracotta relief, Virgin and Child by Michele da Firenze in the collection of the Yale University Art Gallery, was recently conserved in preparation for exhibition. The crystallization of water-soluble salts was suspected as the main reason behind its poor condition. Characterization of powdery deposits over remaining polychromy revealed the presence of KPb2Cl5 in addition to gypsum and other minor components. Detection of potassium lead chloride has not been previously reported in association with cultural heritage objects. The synthetic form of this compound has garnered attention during the past two decades due to its potential optical applications in the infrared region. In nature it occurs as challacolloite, a mineral first named only in 2005 in scientific literature and that primarily forms at high temperatures in fumaroles of volcanos, including those in Italy. The presence of this compound limits the types of materials that can be safely used in conservation treatment applications related to cleaning and consolidation, and therefore, its detection is important. This paper provides information that can serve as a reference for identifying other instances of challacolloite. The form and distribution of challacolloite on the Virgin and Child indicates that the compound is generated in situ and that crystal nucleation and growth result in loss of cohesion within paint layers, delamination of paint layers, and damage to the terracotta substrate. Possible rationales for the formation of this unusual compound are proposed.

  17. A mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganem, Joseph; Bluiett, Althea; Condon, Nicholas; O'Connor, Shawn; Bowman, Steven

    2010-03-01

    Efficient energy transfer at room temperature from Tm^3+ to Pr^3+ has been demonstrated in co-doped KPb2Cl5. The energy transfer processes result in the conversion of 805 nm laser diode pump energy to a broad band of mid-IR radiation between 3500 to 5500 nm. Spectroscopic measurements show that the material is suitable as a phosphor for the 4 to 5 micron spectral range that can be optically pumped with low-cost 0.8-micron laser diodes. The mid-IR emission is enabled by the low phonon energies in KPb2Cl5.Energy transfer pathways, rates, and quantum efficiencies are evaluated.

  18. Crystal Creations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Nona; Whitmore, Sherry

    1989-01-01

    Presents a many-faceted learning approach to the study of crystals. Provides instructions for performing activities including crystal growth and patterns, creating miniature simulations of crystal-containing rock formations, charcoal and sponge gardens, and snowflakes. (RT)

  19. Crystal Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomaker, Verner; Lingafelter, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of crystal systems, comparing (in table format) crystal systems with lattice types, number of restrictions, nature of the restrictions, and other lattices that can accidently show the same metrical symmetry. (JN)

  20. Monomial Crystals and Partition Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingley, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Recently Fayers introduced a large family of combinatorial realizations of the fundamental crystal B(Λ0) for ^sln, where the vertices are indexed by certain partitions. He showed that special cases of this construction agree with the Misra-Miwa realization and with Berg's ladder crystal. Here we show that another special case is naturally isomorphic to a realization using Nakajima's monomial crystal.

  1. Lysozyme Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    To the crystallographer, this may not be a diamond but it is just as priceless. A Lysozyme crystal grown in orbit looks great under a microscope, but the real test is X-ray crystallography. The colors are caused by polarizing filters. Proteins can form crystals generated by rows and columns of molecules that form up like soldiers on a parade ground. Shining X-rays through a crystal will produce a pattern of dots that can be decoded to reveal the arrangement of the atoms in the molecules making up the crystal. Like the troops in formation, uniformity and order are everything in X-ray crystallography. X-rays have much shorter wavelengths than visible light, so the best looking crystals under the microscope won't necessarily pass muster under the X-rays. In order to have crystals to use for X-ray diffraction studies, crystals need to be fairly large and well ordered. Scientists also need lots of crystals since exposure to air, the process of X-raying them, and other factors destroy them. Growing protein crystals in space has yielded striking results. Lysozyme's structure is well known and it has become a standard in many crystallization studies on Earth and in space.

  2. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  3. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  4. Computational crystallization.

    PubMed

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed. PMID:26792536

  5. Crystal Data

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 3 NIST Crystal Data (PC database for purchase)   NIST Crystal Data contains chemical, physical, and crystallographic information useful to characterize more than 237,671 inorganic and organic crystalline materials. The data include the standard cell parameters, cell volume, space group number and symbol, calculated density, chemical formula, chemical name, and classification by chemical type.

  6. Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John D.

    1995-02-01

    This book describes the chemical and physical structure of molecular crystals, their optical and electronic properties, and the reactions between neighboring molecules in crystals. In the second edition, the author has taken into account research that has undergone extremely rapid development since the first edition was published in 1987. For instance, he gives extensive coverage to the applications of molecular materials in high-technology devices (e.g. optical communications, laser printers, photocopiers, liquid crystal displays, solar cells, and more). There is also an entirely new chapter on the recently discovered Buckminsterfullerene carbon molecule (C60) and organic non-linear optic materials.

  7. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  8. Comparing Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Janet; Hoiberg, Karen; Chumbley, Scott

    2003-01-01

    This standard lesson on identifying salt and sugar crystals expands into an opportunity for students to develop their observation, questioning, and modeling skills. Although sugar and salt may look similar, students discovered that they looked very different under a magnifying glass and behaved differently when dissolved in water. In addition,…

  9. Therapeutic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    Some readers might not fully know what the difference is between crystallography, and the "new age" practice of dangling crystals around the body to capitalise on their healing energy. The latter is often considered to be superstition, while ironically, the former has actually resulted in real rationally-based healing of human diseases…

  10. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  11. Crystallization process

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Robert J.; Brown, William R.; Auyang, Lun; Liu, Yin-Chang; Cook, W. Jeffrey

    1986-01-01

    An improved crystallization process is disclosed for separating a crystallizable material and an excluded material which is at least partially excluded from the solid phase of the crystallizable material obtained upon freezing a liquid phase of the materials. The solid phase is more dense than the liquid phase, and it is separated therefrom by relative movement with the formation of a packed bed of solid phase. The packed bed is continuously formed adjacent its lower end and passed from the liquid phase into a countercurrent flow of backwash liquid. The packed bed extends through the level of the backwash liquid to provide a drained bed of solid phase adjacent its upper end which is melted by a condensing vapor.

  12. Ribbon Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, Jakob; Markvorsen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    A repetitive crystal-like pattern is spontaneously formed upon the twisting of straight ribbons. The pattern is akin to a tessellation with isosceles triangles, and it can easily be demonstrated with ribbons cut from an overhead transparency. We give a general description of developable ribbons using a ruled procedure where ribbons are uniquely described by two generating functions. This construction defines a differentiable frame, the ribbon frame, which does not have singular points, whereby we avoid the shortcomings of the Frenet–Serret frame. The observed spontaneous pattern is modeled using planar triangles and cylindrical arcs, and the ribbon structure is shown to arise from a maximization of the end-to-end length of the ribbon, i.e. from an optimal use of ribbon length. The phenomenon is discussed in the perspectives of incompatible intrinsic geometries and of the emergence of long-range order. PMID:24098360

  13. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  14. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  15. Using Inorganic Crystals To Grow Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Mcpherson, Alexander A.

    1989-01-01

    Solid materials serve as nucleating agents. Protein crystals induced by heterogeneous nucleation and in some cases by epitaxy to grow at lower supersaturations than needed for spontaneous nucleation. Heterogeneous nucleation makes possible to grow large, defect-free single crystals of protein more readily. Such protein crystals benefits research in biochemistry and pharmacology.

  16. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  17. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into an adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  18. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into and adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  19. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  20. CRYSTAL COLLIMATION AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FLILLER,III, R.P.; DREES,A.; GASSNER,D.; HAMMONS,L.; MCINTYRE,G.; PEGGS,S.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; BIRYUKOV,V.; CHESNKOV,Y.; TEREKHOV,V.

    2002-06-02

    For the year 2001 run, a bent crystal was installed in the yellow ring of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The crystal forms the first stage of a two stage collimation system. By aligning the crystal to the beam, halo particles are channeled through the crystal and deflected into a copper scraper. The purpose is to reduce beam halo with greater efficiency than with a scraper alone. In this paper we present the first results from the use of the crystal collimator. We compare the crystal performance under various conditions, such as different particle species, and beta functions.

  1. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  2. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  3. Apparatus for growing crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J. (Inventor); Witt, August F. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for growing crystals from a melt employing a heat pipe, consisting of one or more sections, each section serving to control temperature and thermal gradients in the crystal as it forms inside the pipe.

  4. Crystallization from Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone

  5. Apparatus for mounting crystal

    DOEpatents

    Longeway, Paul A.

    1985-01-01

    A thickness monitor useful in deposition or etching reactor systems comprising a crystal-controlled oscillator in which the crystal is deposited or etched to change the frequency of the oscillator. The crystal rests within a thermally conductive metallic housing and arranged to be temperature controlled. Electrode contacts are made to the surface primarily by gravity force such that the crystal is substantially free of stress otherwise induced by high temperature.

  6. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  7. Artistic Crystal Creations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    In this inquiry-based, integrative art and science activity, Grade 5-8 students use multicolored Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) crystallizing solutions to reveal beautiful, cylindrical, 3-dimensional, needle-shaped structures. Through observations of the crystal art, students analyze factors that contribute to crystal size and formation, compare…

  8. Total immersion crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Crystals of wide band gap materials are produced by positioning a holder receiving a seed crystal at the interface between a body of molten wide band gap material and an overlying layer of temperature-controlled, encapsulating liquid. The temperature of the layer decreases from the crystallization temperature of the crystal at the interface with the melt to a substantially lower temperature at which formation of crystal defects does not occur, suitably a temperature of 200 to 600 C. After initiation of crystal growth, the leading edge of the crystal is pulled through the layer until the leading edge of the crystal enters the ambient gas headspace which may also be temperature controlled. The length of the column of liquid encapsulant may exceed the length of the crystal such that the leading edge and trailing edge of the crystal are both simultaneously with the column of the crystal. The crystal can be pulled vertically by means of a pulling-rotation assembly or horizontally by means of a low-angle withdrawal mechanism.

  9. Food Crystalization and Eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food Crystalization and Eggs Deana R. Jones, Ph.D. USDA Agricultural Research Service Egg Safety and Quality Research Unit Athens, Georgia, USA Deana.Jones@ars.usda.gov Sugar, salt, lactose, tartaric acid and ice are examples of constituents than can crystallize in foods. Crystallization in a foo...

  10. Protein crystallization with paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  11. Crystallography of icosahedral crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, P.

    The crystallography of icosahedral crystals is constructed. The actual three-dimensional crystal is represented by a three-dimensional cut in a regular six-dimensional periodic crystal with symmetry described by a six-dimensional space group, and the positions of atoms correspond to an arrangement of hypersurface segments. The resulting crystal cannot in general be viewed as a space-filling arrangemment of a small number of different Penrose tiles. The intensities of Bragg spots are given directly as the intensities of Bragg spots of the six-dimensional crystal.

  12. Welding Molecular Crystals.

    PubMed

    Adolf, Cyril R R; Ferlay, Sylvie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2015-12-16

    Both for fundamental and applied sciences, the design of complex molecular systems in the crystalline phase with strict control of order and periodicity at both microscopic and macroscopic levels is of prime importance for development of new solid-state materials and devices. The design and fabrication of complex crystalline systems as networks of crystals displaying task-specific properties is a step toward smart materials. Here we report on isostructural and almost isometric molecular crystals of different colors, their use for fabrication of core-shell crystals, and their welding by 3D epitaxial growth into networks of crystals as single-crystalline entities. Welding of crystals by self-assembly processes into macroscopic networks of crystals is a powerful strategy for the design of hierarchically organized periodic complex architectures composed of different subdomains displaying targeted characteristics. Crystal welding may be regarded as a first step toward the design of new hierarchically organized complex crystalline systems. PMID:26581391

  13. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  14. Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In order to rapidly and efficiently grow crystals, tools were needed to automatically identify and analyze the growing process of protein crystals. To meet this need, Diversified Scientific, Inc. (DSI), with the support of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center, developed CrystalScore(trademark), the first automated image acquisition, analysis, and archiving system designed specifically for the macromolecular crystal growing community. It offers automated hardware control, image and data archiving, image processing, a searchable database, and surface plotting of experimental data. CrystalScore is currently being used by numerous pharmaceutical companies and academic and nonprofit research centers. DSI, located in Birmingham, Alabama, was awarded the patent Method for acquiring, storing, and analyzing crystal images on March 4, 2003. Another DSI product made possible by Marshall SBIR funding is VaporPro(trademark), a unique, comprehensive system that allows for the automated control of vapor diffusion for crystallization experiments.

  15. Crystallization of PTP Domains.

    PubMed

    Levy, Colin; Adams, James; Tabernero, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Protein crystallography is the most powerful method to obtain atomic resolution information on the three-dimensional structure of proteins. An essential step towards determining the crystallographic structure of a protein is to produce good quality crystals from a concentrated sample of purified protein. These crystals are then used to obtain X-ray diffraction data necessary to determine the 3D structure by direct phasing or molecular replacement if the model of a homologous protein is available. Here, we describe the main approaches and techniques to obtain suitable crystals for X-ray diffraction. We include tools and guidance on how to evaluate and design the protein construct, how to prepare Se-methionine derivatized protein, how to assess the stability and quality of the sample, and how to crystallize and prepare crystals for diffraction experiments. While general strategies for protein crystallization are summarized, specific examples of the application of these strategies to the crystallization of PTP domains are discussed. PMID:27514806

  16. Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; Helliwell, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The key concepts that attracted crystal growers, macromolecular or solid state, to microgravity research is that density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of the growing crystals are greatly reduced. Thus, defects and flaws in the crystals can be reduced, even eliminated, and crystal volume can be increased. Macromolecular crystallography differs from the field of crystalline semiconductors. For the latter, crystals are harnessed for their electrical behaviors. A crystal of a biological macromolecule is used instead for diffraction experiments (X-ray or neutron) to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal of a biological macromolecule then the more molecular structure detail that can be extracted. This structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry, and mathematics meet to enable insight to the basic fundamentals of life. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment, and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyze the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural

  17. Crystallization and crystal properties of squid rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Midori; Kitahara, Rei; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2007-06-01

    Truncated rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was extracted and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. Rhodopsin, a photoreceptor membrane protein in the retina, is a prototypical member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. In this study, rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was treated with V8 protease to remove the C-terminal extension. Truncated rhodopsin was selectively extracted from the microvillar membranes using alkyl glucoside in the presence of zinc ions and was then crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Of the various crystals obtained, hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. The diffraction data suggested that the crystal belongs to space group P6{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.1, c = 158.6 Å. Preliminary crystallographic analysis, together with linear dichroism results, suggested that the rhodopsin dimers are packed in such a manner that their transmembrane helices are aligned nearly parallel to the c axis.

  18. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy uses laser technology to reveal a defect, a double-screw dislocation, on the surface of this crystal of canavalin, a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. When a crystal grows, attachment kinetics and transport kinetics are competing for control of the molecules. As a molecule gets close to the crystal surface, it has to attach properly for the crystal to be usable. NASA has funded investigators to look at those attachment kinetics from a theoretical standpoint and an experimental standpoint. Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine, is one of those investigators. He uses X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy in his laboratory to answer some of the many questions about how protein crystals grow. Atomic force microscopy provides a means of looking at how individual molecules are added to the surface of growing protein crystals. This helps McPherson understand the kinetics of protein crystal growth. McPherson asks, How fast do crystals grow? What are the forces involved? Investigators funded by NASA have clearly shown that such factors as the level of supersaturation and the rate of growth all affect the habit [characteristic arrangement of facets] of the crystal and the defects that occur in the crystal.

  19. Crystallization of Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, David; Messick, Troy; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has evolved into a very powerful tool to determine the three-dimensional structure of macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. The major bottleneck in structure determination by X-ray crystallography is the preparation of suitable crystalline samples. This unit outlines steps for the crystallization of a macromolecule, starting with a purified, homogeneous sample. The first protocols describe preparation of the macromolecular sample (i.e., proteins, nucleic acids, and macromolecular complexes). The preparation and assessment of crystallization trials is then described, along with a protocol for confirming whether the crystals obtained are composed of macromolecule as opposed to a crystallization reagent . Next, the optimization of crystallization conditions is presented. Finally, protocols that facilitate the growth of larger crystals through seeding are described. PMID:22045560

  20. Automated macromolecular crystallization screening

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Rupp, Bernhard; Krupka, Heike I.

    2005-03-01

    An automated macromolecular crystallization screening system wherein a multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced. A multiplicity of analysis plates is produced utilizing the reagent mixes combined with a sample. The analysis plates are incubated to promote growth of crystals. Images of the crystals are made. The images are analyzed with regard to suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A design of reagent mixes is produced based upon the expected suitability of the crystals for analysis by x-ray crystallography. A second multiplicity of mixes of the reagent components is produced utilizing the design and a second multiplicity of reagent mixes is used for a second round of automated macromolecular crystallization screening. In one embodiment the multiplicity of reagent mixes are produced by a random selection of reagent components.

  1. Single Crystal Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stormont, R. W.; Morrison, A.

    1974-01-01

    Single crystal a- and c-axis tubes and ribbons of sodium beta-alumina and sodium magnesium beta-alumina were grown from sodium oxide rich melts. Additional experiments grew ribbon crystals containing sodium magnesium beta, beta double prime, beta triple prime, and beta quadruple prime. A high pressure crystal growth chamber, sodium oxide rich melts, and iridium for all surfaces in contact with the melt were combined with the edge-defined, film-fed growth technique to grow the single crystal beta-alumina tubes and ribbons. The crystals were characterized using metallographic and X-ray diffraction techniques, and wet chemical analysis was used to determine the sodium, magnesium, and aluminum content of the grown crystals.

  2. Function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bai-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Ba, Nuo; Wu, Yi-Heng; Wang, Qing-Cai

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new kind of function photonic crystals (PCs), whose refractive index is a function of space position. Conventional PCs structure grows from two materials, A and B, with different dielectric constants εA and εB. Based on Fermat principle, we give the motion equations of light in one-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional function photonic crystals. For one-dimensional function photonic crystals, we give the dispersion relation, band gap structure and transmissivity, and compare them with conventional photonic crystals, and we find the following: (1) For the vertical and non-vertical incidence light of function photonic crystals, there are band gap structures, and for only the vertical incidence light, the conventional PCs have band gap structures. (2) By choosing various refractive index distribution functions n( z), we can obtain more wider or more narrower band gap structure than conventional photonic crystals.

  3. Antarctic stratospheric ice crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, J. ); Toon, O.B.; Pueschel, R.F.; Snetsinger, K.G. ) Verma, S. )

    1989-11-30

    Ice crystals were replicated over the Palmer Peninsula at approximately 72{degree}S on six occasions during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The sampling altitude was between 12.5 and 18.5 km (45-65 thousand ft pressure altitude) with the temperature between 190 and 201 K. The atmosphere was subsaturated with respect to ice in all cases. The collected crystals were predominantly solid and hollow columns. The largest crystals were sampled at lower altitudes where the potential temperature was below 400 K. While the crystals were larger than anticipated, their low concentration results in a total surface area that is less than one tenth of the total aerosol surface area. The large ice crystals may play an important role in the observed stratospheric dehydration processes through sedimentation. Evidence of scavenging of submicron particles further suggests that the ice crystals may be effective in the removal of stratospheric chemicals.

  4. Mercury iodide crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadoret, R.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the Mercury Iodide Crystal Growth (MICG) experiment is the growth of near-perfect single crystals of mercury Iodide (HgI2) in a microgravity environment which will decrease the convection effects on crystal growth. Evaporation and condensation are the only transformations involved in this experiment. To accomplish these objectives, a two-zone furnace will be used in which two sensors collect the temperature data (one in each zone).

  5. Crystal Formation in Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Bernardo S; Mangan, Matthew S; Latz, Eicke

    2016-05-20

    The formation and accumulation of crystalline material in tissues is a hallmark of many metabolic and inflammatory conditions. The discovery that the phase transition of physiologically soluble substances to their crystalline forms can be detected by the immune system and activate innate immune pathways has revolutionized our understanding of how crystals cause inflammation. It is now appreciated that crystals are part of the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including gout, silicosis, asbestosis, and atherosclerosis. In this review we discuss current knowledge of the complex mechanisms of crystal formation in diseased tissues and their interplay with the nutrients, metabolites, and immune cells that account for crystal-induced inflammation. PMID:26772211

  6. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  7. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  8. Phononic crystal devices

    DOEpatents

    El-Kady, Ihab F.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2012-01-10

    Phononic crystals that have the ability to modify and control the thermal black body phonon distribution and the phonon component of heat transport in a solid. In particular, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity can be modified by altering the phonon density of states in a phononic crystal. The present invention is directed to phononic crystal devices and materials such as radio frequency (RF) tags powered from ambient heat, dielectrics with extremely low thermal conductivity, thermoelectric materials with a higher ratio of electrical-to-thermal conductivity, materials with phononically engineered heat capacity, phononic crystal waveguides that enable accelerated cooling, and a variety of low temperature application devices.

  9. Heroin crystal nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Josef Edrik Keith; Merhi, Basma; Gregory, Oliver; Hu, Susie; Henriksen, Kammi; Gohh, Reginald

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an interesting case of acute kidney injury and severe metabolic alkalosis in a patient with a history of heavy heroin abuse. Urine microscopy showed numerous broomstick-like crystals. These crystals are also identified in light and electron microscopy. We hypothesize that heroin crystalizes in an alkaline pH, resulting in tubular obstruction and acute kidney injury. Management is mainly supportive as there is no known specific therapy for this condition. This paper highlights the utility of urine microscopy in diagnosing the etiology of acute kidney injury and proposes a novel disease called heroin crystal nephropathy. PMID:26034599

  10. Automation in biological crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Stewart, Patrick; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given. PMID:24915074

  11. Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility (APCF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) publication contains articles entitled: (1) Crystallization of EGFR-EGF; (2) Crystallization of Apocrustacyanin C1; (3) Crystallization and X-ray Analysis of 5S rRNA and the 5S rRNA Domain A; (4) Growth of Lysozyme Crystals at Low Nucleation Density; (5) Comparative Analysis of Aspartyl tRNA-synthetase and Thaumatin Crystals Grown on Earth and In Microgravity; (6) Lysosome Crystal Growth in the Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility Monitored via Mach-Zehnder Interferometry and CCD Video; (7) Analysis of Thaumatin Crystals Grown on Earth and in Microgravity; (8) Crystallization of the Nucleosome Core Particle; (9) Crystallization of Photosystem I; (10) Mechanism of Membrane Protein Crystal Growth: Bacteriorhodopsin-mixed Micelle Packing at the Consolution Boundary, Stabilized in Microgravity; (11) Crystallization in a Microgravity Environment of CcdB, a Protein Involved in the Control of Cell Death; and (12) Crystallization of Sulfolobus Solfataricus

  12. Channeling through Bent Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Stephanie; /Ottawa U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Bent crystals have demonstrated potential for use in beam collimation. A process called channeling is when accelerated particle beams are trapped by the nuclear potentials in the atomic planes within a crystal lattice. If the crystal is bent then the particles can follow the bending angle of the crystal. There are several different effects that are observed when particles travel through a bent crystal including dechanneling, volume capture, volume reflection and channeling. With a crystal placed at the edge of a particle beam, part of the fringe of the beam can be deflected away towards a detector or beam dump, thus helping collimate the beam. There is currently FORTRAN code by Igor Yazynin that has been used to model the passage of particles through a bent crystal. Using this code, the effects mentioned were explored for beam energy that would be seen at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at a range of crystal orientations with respect to the incoming beam. After propagating 5 meters in vacuum space past the crystal the channeled particles were observed to separate from most of the beam with some noise due to dechanneled particles. Progressively smaller bending radii, with corresponding shorter crystal lengths, were compared and it was seen that multiple scattering decreases with the length of the crystal therefore allowing for cleaner detection of the channeled particles. The input beam was then modified and only a portion of the beam sent through the crystal. With the majority of the beam not affected by the crystal, most particles were not deflected and after propagation the channeled particles were seen to be deflected approximately 5mm. After a portion of the beam travels through the crystal, the entire beam was then sent through a quadrupole magnet, which increased the separation of the channeled particles from the remainder of the beam to a distance of around 20mm. A different code, which was developed at SLAC, was used to

  13. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Proteins account for 50% or more of the dry weight of most living systems and play a crucial role in virtually all biological processes. Since the specific functions of essentially all biological molecules are determined by their three-dimensional structures, it is obvious that a detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. At the present time, protein crystallography has no substitute, it is the only technique available for elucidating the atomic arrangements within complicated biological molecules. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting and promising projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. There is a pressing need to better understand protein crystal growth, and to develop new techniques that can be used to enhance the size and quality of protein crystals. There are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor that might be expected to alter crystal growth processes in space is the elimination of density-driven convective flow. Another factor that can be readily controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystal in a gravitational field. Another potential advantage of microgravity for protein crystal growth is the option of doing containerless crystal growth. One can readily understand why the microgravity environment established by Earth-orbiting vehicles is perceived to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. The near term objectives of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  14. Fluorescent Applications to Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and tests with model proteins have shown that labeling u to 5 percent of the protein molecules does not affect the X-ray data quality obtained . The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages. Since the label is covalently attached to the protein molecules, it "tracks" the protein s response to the crystallization conditions. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a darker background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, do not show up under fluorescent illumination. Crystals have the highest protein concentration and are readily observed against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. Preliminary tests, using model proteins, indicates that we can use high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that more rapid amorphous precipitation kinetics may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Experiments are now being carried out to test this approach using a wider range, of proteins. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also

  15. Crystals for stellar spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandropoulos, N. G.; Cohen, G. G.

    1974-01-01

    Crystal evaluation as it applies to instrumentation employed in X-ray astronomy is reviewed, and some solutions are offered to problems that are commonly encountered. A general approach for selecting the most appropriate crystals for a given problem is also suggested. The energy dependence of the diffraction properties of (002) PET, (111) Ge, (101) ADP, (101) KAP, and (001) RAP are reported.

  16. Demonstration of Crystal Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neville, Joseph P.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment where equal parts of copper and aluminum are heated then cooled to show extremely large crystals. Suggestions are given for changing the orientation of crystals by varying cooling rates. Students are more receptive to concepts of microstructure after seeing this experiment. (DH)

  17. Crystal growth and crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Selected topics that may be of interest for both crystal-structure and crystal-growth communities are overviewed. The growth of protein crystals, along with that of some other compounds, is one of the topics, and recent insights into related phenomena are considered as examples of applications of general principles. The relationship between crystal growth shape and structure is reviewed and an attempt to introduce semiquantitative characterization of binding for proteins is made. The concept of kinks for complex structures is briefly discussed. Even at sufficiently low supersaturations, the fluctuation of steps may not be sufficient to implement the Gibbs-Thomson law if the kink density is low enough. Subsurface ordering of liquids and growth of rough interfaces from melts is discussed. Crystals growing in microgravity from solution should be more perfect if they preferentially trap stress-inducing impurities, thus creating an impurity-depleted zone around themselves. Evidently, such a zone is developed only around the crystals growing in the absence of convection. Under terrestrial conditions, the self-purified depleted zone is destroyed by convection, the crystal traps more impurity and grows stressed. The stress relief causes mosaicity. In systems containing stress-inducing but poorly trapped impurities, the crystals grown in the absence of convection should be worse than those of their terrestrial counterparts.

  18. Walkout in Crystal City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrios, Greg

    2009-01-01

    When students take action, they create change that extends far beyond the classroom. In this article, the author, who was a former teacher from Crystal City, Texas, remembers the student walkout that helped launch the Latino civil rights movement 40 years ago. The Crystal City student walkout remains a high point in the history of student activism…

  19. Crystal Shape Bingo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.

    This document describes a game that provides students with practice in recognizing three dimensional crystal shapes and planar geometric shapes of crystal faces. It contains information on the objective of the game, game preparation, and rules for playing. Play cards are included (four to a page). (ASK)

  20. Tunable liquid crystal lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woltman, Scott J.

    Liquid crystal lasers are dye-doped distributed feedback lasing systems. Fabricated by coupling the periodic structure of a liquid crystal medium with a fluorescent dye, the emission from these systems is tunable by controlling the liquid crystal system---be it through electric or thermal field effects, photochemical reactions, mechanical deformations, etc. The laser action arises from an extended interaction time between the radiation field, the laser emission, and the matter field, the periodic liquid crystal medium, at the edge of the photonic band gap. In this thesis, several tunable liquid crystal laser systems are investigated: cholesteric liquid crystals, holographic-polymer dispersed liquid crystals and liquid crystal polarization gratings. The primary focus has been to fabricate systems that are tunable through electrical means, as applications requiring mechanical or thermal changes are often difficult to control. Cholesteric liquid crystal lasers are helical Bragg reflectors, with a band gap for circularly polarized light of equivalent handedness to their helix. These materials were doped with a laser dye and laser emission was observed. The use of an in-plane electric field tends to unwind the helical pitch of the film and in doing so tunable emission was demonstrated for ˜15 nm. Holographic-polymer dispersed liquid crystals (H-PDLCs) are grating structures consisting of alternating layers of polymer and liquid crystal, with different indices of refraction. The application of an electric field index matches these layers and switches off the grating. Thus, laser emission can be switched on and off through the use of an electric field. Spatially tunable H-PDLC lasers were fabricated by creating chirped gratings, formed by divergent beams. The emission was shown to tune ˜5 nm as the pump beam was translated across a 1 inch film. Liquid crystal polarization gratings use photo-patterned alignment layers, through a polarization holography exposure, to

  1. Polymer Crystallization under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floudas, George

    Recent efforts indicated that polymer crystallization under confinement can be substantially different from the bulk. This can have important technological applications for the design of polymeric nanofibers with tunable mechanical strength, processability and optical clarity. However, the question of how, why and when polymers crystallize under confinement is not fully answered. Important studies of polymer crystallization confined to droplets and within the spherical nanodomains of block copolymers emphasized the interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Herein we report on recent studies1-5 of polymer crystallization under hard confinement provided by model self-ordered AAO nanopores. Important open questions here are on the type of nucleation (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous), the size of critical nucleus, the crystal orientation and the possibility to control the overall crystallinity. Providing answers to these questions is of technological relevance for the understanding of nanocomposites containing semicrystalline polymers. In collaboration with Y. Suzuki, H. Duran, M. Steinhart, H.-J. Butt.

  2. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  3. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Smith, Craig D.; Smith, H. Wilson; Vijay-Kumar, Senadhi; Senadhi, Shobha E.; Ealick, Steven E.; Carter, Daniel C.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    The crystals of most proteins or other biological macromolecules are poorly ordered and diffract to lower resolutions than those observed for most crystals of simple organic and inorganic compounds. Crystallization in the microgravity environment of space may improve crystal quality by eliminating convection effects near growing crystal surfaces. A series of 11 different protein crystal growth experiments was performed on U.S. Space Shuttle flight STS-26 in September 1988. The microgravity-grown crystals of gamma-interferon D1, porcine elastase, and isocitrate lyase are larger, display more uniform morphologies, and yield diffraction data to significantly higher resolutions than the best crystals of these proteins grown on earth.

  4. Quartz crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Baughman, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    A process for growing single crystals from an amorphous substance that can undergo phase transformation to the crystalline state in an appropriate solvent. The process is carried out in an autoclave having a lower dissolution zone and an upper crystallization zone between which a temperature differential (.DELTA.T) is maintained at all times. The apparatus loaded with the substance, solvent, and seed crystals is heated slowly maintaining a very low .DELTA.T between the warmer lower zone and cooler upper zone until the amorphous substance is transformed to the crystalline state in the lower zone. The heating rate is then increased to maintain a large .DELTA.T sufficient to increase material transport between the zones and rapid crystallization. .alpha.-Quartz single crystal can thus be made from fused quartz in caustic solvent by heating to 350.degree. C. stepwise with a .DELTA.T of 0.25.degree.-3.degree. C., increasing the .DELTA.T to about 50.degree. C. after the fused quartz has crystallized, and maintaining these conditions until crystal growth in the upper zone is completed.

  5. Biomolecular membrane protein crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Bolla, Jani; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2012-07-01

    Integral membrane proteins comprise approximately 30% of the sequenced genomes, and there is an immediate need for their high-resolution structural information. Currently, the most reliable approach to obtain these structures is X-ray crystallography. However, obtaining crystals of membrane proteins that diffract to high resolution appears to be quite challenging, and remains a major obstacle in structural determination. This brief review summarizes a variety of methodologies for use in crystallizing these membrane proteins. Hopefully, by introducing the available methods, techniques, and providing a general understanding of membrane proteins, a rational decision can be made about now to crystallize these complex materials.

  6. DD fusion in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2010-12-15

    The article discusses the mechanism of DD {sup {yields} 4}He fusion and so-called nonradiative thermalization of the reaction in crystals. The dynamics of this process is considered. The assumption that the decay time of the compound nucleus depends on its excitation energy makes experiments in crystals compatible with the acceleration data.We consider the processes in the crystals that increase the intensity ofDD fusion in comparison to the amorphous media, and the yield of the reaction is estimated.

  7. Raman scattering in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.F.

    1988-09-30

    A tutorial presentation is given of Raman scattering in crystals. The physical concepts are emphasized rather than the detailed mathematical formalism. Starting with an introduction to the concepts of phonons and conservation laws, the effects of photon-phonon interactions are presented. This interaction concept is shown for a simple cubic crystal and is extended to a uniaxial crystal. The correlation table method is used for determining the number and symmetry of the Raman active modes. Finally, examples are given to illustrate the relative ease of using this group theoretical method and the predictions are compared with measured Raman spectra. 37 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Superelastic organic crystals.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Yasuhiro

    2014-07-01

    Superelastic materials (crystal-to-crystal transformation pseudo elasticity) that consist of organic components have not been observed since superelasticity was discovered in a Au-Cd alloy in 1932. Superelastic materials have been exclusively developed in metallic or inorganic covalent solids, as represented by Ti-Ni alloys. Organosuperelasticity is now revealed in a pure organic crystal of terephthalamide, which precisely produces a large motion with high repetition and high energy storage efficiency. This process is driven by a small shear stress owing to the low density of strain energy related to the low lattice energy. PMID:24800764

  9. Analysis of Crystallization Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, Kenneth F.

    1997-01-01

    A realistic computer model for polymorphic crystallization (i.e., initial and final phases with identical compositions), which includes time-dependent nucleation and cluster-size-dependent growth rates, is developed and tested by fits to experimental data. Model calculations are used to assess the validity of two of the more common approaches for the analysis of crystallization data. The effects of particle size on transformation kinetics, important for the crystallization of many systems of limited dimension including thin films, fine powders, and nanoparticles, are examined.

  10. The Crystal Hotel: A Microfluidic Approach to Biomimetic Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiuqing; Wang, Yun-Wei; Ihli, Johannes; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Li, Shunbo; Walshaw, Richard; Chen, Li; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2015-12-01

    A "crystal hotel" microfluidic device that allows crystal growth in confined volumes to be studied in situ is used to produce large calcite single crystals with predefined crystallographic orientation, microstructure, and shape by control of the detailed physical environment, flow, and surface chemistry. This general approach can be extended to form technologically important, nanopatterned single crystals. PMID:26479157

  11. Shaping Crystal-Crystal Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiyu; van Anders, Greg; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon

    Previous computational and experimental studies have shown self-assembled structure depends strongly on building block shape. New synthesis techniques have led to building blocks with reconfigurable shape and it has been demonstrated that building block reconfiguration can induce bulk structural reconfiguration. However, we do not understand systematically how this transition happens as a function of building block shape. Using a recently developed ``digital alchemy'' framework, we study the thermodynamics of shape-driven crystal-crystal transitions. We find examples of shape-driven bulk reconfiguration that are accompanied by first-order phase transitions, and bulk reconfiguration that occurs without any thermodynamic phase transition. Our results suggest that for well-chosen shapes and structures, there exist facile means of bulk reconfiguration, and that shape-driven bulk reconfiguration provides a viable mechanism for developing functional materials.

  12. Crystallization of Silicon Ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Purity constraints for reasonable solar-cell efficiency require that silicon-ribbon growth for photovoltaics occur in a regime in which constitutional supercooling or other compositional effects on the crystallization front are not important. A major consideration in the fundamentals of crystallization is the removal of the latent heat of fusion. The direction of removal, compared with the growth direction, has a major influence on the crystallization rate and the development of localized stresses. The detailed shape of the crystallization front appears to have two forms: that required for dendritic-web growth, and that occurring in all others. After the removal of the latent heat of fusion, the thermal-mechanical behavior of all ribbons appears similar within the constraints of the exothermal gradient. The technological constraints in achieving the required thermal and mechanical conditions vary widely among the growth processes.

  13. Crystal Field Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, D. J.; Ng, Betty

    2007-09-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Introduction; 1. Crystal field splitting mechanisms D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 2. Empirical crystal fields D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 3. Fitting crystal field parameters D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 4. Lanthanide and actinide optical spectra G. K. Liu; 5. Superposition model D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 6. Effects of electron correlation on crystal field splitting M. F. Reid and D. J. Newman; 7. Ground state splittings in S-state ions D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 8. Invariants and moments Y. Y. Yeung; 9. Semiclassical model K. S. Chan; 10. Transition intensities M. F. Reid; Appendix 1. Point symmetry D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; Appendix 2. QBASIC programs D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; Appendix 3. Accessible program packages Y. Y. Yeung, M. F. Reid and D. J. Newman; Appendix 4. Computer package CST Cz. Rudowicz; Bibliography; Index.

  14. Crystal-Clear Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondris-Crawford, Renate J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Provides diagrams to aid in discussing polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) technology. Equipped with a knowledge of PDLC, teachers can provide students with insight on how the gap between basic science and technology is bridged. (ZWH)

  15. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous. PMID:21867316

  16. Ice crystal terminal velocities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1972-01-01

    Terminal velocities of different ice crystal forms were calculated, using the most recent ice crystal drag coefficients, aspect ratios, and densities. The equations derived were primarily for use in calculating precipitation rates by sampling particles with an aircraft in cirrus clouds, and determining particle size in cirrus clouds by Doppler radar. However, the equations are sufficiently general for determining particle terminal velocity at any altitude, and almost any crystal type. Two sets of equations were derived. The 'general' equations provide a good estimate of terminal velocities at any altitude. The 'specific' equations are a set of equations for ice crystal terminal velocities at 1000 mb. The calculations are in good agreement with terminal velocity measurements. The results from the present study were also compared to prior calculations by others and seem to give more reasonable results, particularly at higher altitudes.

  17. Macromolecular Crystal Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Bellamy, Henry D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There are many ways of judging a good crystal. Which we use depends on the qualities we seek. For gemstones size, clarity and impurity levels (color) are paramount. For the semiconductor industry purity is probably the most important quality. For the structural crystallographer the primary desideratum is the somewhat more subtle concept of internal order. In this chapter we discuss the effect of internal order (or the lack of it) on the crystal's diffraction properties.

  18. Characterizing protein crystal nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akella, Sathish V.

    We developed an experimental microfluidic based technique to measure the nucleation rates and successfully applied the technique to measure nucleation rates of lysozyme crystals. The technique involves counting the number of samples which do not have crystals as a function of time. Under the assumption that nucleation is a Poisson process, the fraction of samples with no crystals decays exponentially with the decay constant proportional to nucleation rate and volume of the sample. Since nucleation is a random and rare event, one needs to perform measurements on large number of samples to obtain good statistics. Microfluidics offers the solution of producing large number of samples at minimal material consumption. Hence, we developed a microfluidic method and measured nucleation rates of lysozyme crystals in supersaturated protein drops, each with volume of ˜ 1 nL. Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) describes the kinetics of nucleation and predicts the functional form of nucleation rate in terms of the thermodynamic quantities involved, such as supersaturation, temperature, etc. We analyzed the measured nucleation rates in the context of CNT and obtained the activation energy and the kinetic pre-factor characterizing the nucleation process. One conclusion is that heterogeneous nucleation dominates crystallization. We report preliminary studies on selective enhancement of nucleation in one of the crystal polymorprhs of lysozyme (spherulite) using amorphous mesoporous bioactive gel-glass te{naomi06, naomi08}, CaO.P 2O5.SiO2 (known as bio-glass) with 2-10 nm pore-size diameter distribution. The pores act as heterogeneous nucleation centers and claimed to enhance the nucleation rates by molecular confinement. The measured kinetic profiles of crystal fraction of spherulites indicate that the crystallization of spherulites may be proceeding via secondary nucleation pathways.

  19. Excitability in liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Coullet, P.; Frisch, T.; Gilli, J. M.; Rica, S.

    1994-09-01

    The spiral waves observed in a liquid crystal submitted to a vertical electric field and a horizontal rotating magnetic field are explained in the framework of a purely mechanical description of the liquid crystal. The originality of the experiment described in this paper is the presence of the vertical electric field which allows us to analyze the spiral waves in the framework of a weakly nonlinear theory. PMID:12780124

  20. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell, Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC) uses a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for macromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of macromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystallized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  1. Engineering Crystal Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, Preshit; Kuvadia, Zubin B.; Doherty, Michael F.

    2013-07-01

    Crystallization is an important separation and particle formation technique in the manufacture of high-value-added products. During crystallization, many physicochemical characteristics of the substance are established. Such characteristics include crystal polymorph, shape and size, chemical purity and stability, reactivity, and electrical and magnetic properties. However, control over the physical form of crystalline materials has remained poor, due mainly to an inadequate understanding of the basic growth and dissolution mechanisms, as well as of the influence of impurities, additives, and solvents on the growth rate of individual crystal faces. Crystal growth is a surface-controlled phenomenon in which solute molecules are incorporated into surface lattice sites to yield the bulk long-range order that characterizes crystalline materials. In this article, we describe some recent advances in crystal morphology engineering, with a special focus on a new mechanistic model for spiral growth. These mechanistic ideas are simple enough that they can be made to work and accurate enough that they are useful.

  2. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  3. Crystal growth of artificial snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, S.; Oka, A.; Taki, M.; Kuwano, R.; Ono, H.; Nagura, R.; Narimatsu, Y.; Tanii, J.; Kamimiytat, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Snow crystals were grown onboard the space shuttle during STS-7 and STS-8 to facilitate the investigation of crystal growth under conditions of weightlessness. The experimental design and hardware are described. Space-grown snow crystals were polyhedrons looking like spheres, which were unlike snow crystals produced in experiments on Earth.

  4. The Crystallization of Monosodium Urate

    PubMed Central

    Martillo, Miguel A.; Nazzal, Lama; Crittenden, Daria B.

    2014-01-01

    Gout is a common crystal-induced arthritis, in which monosodium urate (MSU) crystals precipitate within joints and soft tissues and elicit an inflammatory response. The causes of elevated serum urate and the inflammatory pathways activated by MSU crystals have been well studied, but less is known about the processes leading to crystal formation and growth. Uric acid, the final product of purine metabolism, is a weak acid that circulates as the deprotonated urate anion under physiologic conditions, and combines with sodium ions to form MSU. MSU crystals are known to have a triclinic structure, in which stacked sheets of purine rings form the needle-shaped crystals that are observed microscopically. Exposed, charged crystal surfaces are thought to allow for interaction with phospholipid membranes and serum factors, playing a role in the crystal-mediated inflammatory response. While hyperuricemia is a clear risk factor for gout, local factors have been hypothesized to play a role in crystal formation, such as temperature, pH, mechanical stress, cartilage components, and other synovial and serum factors. Interestingly, several studies suggest that MSU crystals may drive the generation of crystal-specific antibodies that facilitate future MSU crystallization. Here, we review MSU crystal biology, including a discussion of crystal structure, effector function, and factors thought to play a role in crystal formation. We also briefly compare MSU biology to that of uric acid stones causing nephrolithasis, and consider the potential treatment implications of MSU crystal biology. PMID:24357445

  5. Crystallization phenomena in slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrling, Carl Folke

    2000-09-01

    The crystallization of the mold slag affects both the heat transfer and the lubrication between the mold and the strand in continuous casting of steel. In order for mold slag design to become an engineering science rather than an empirical exercise, a fundamental understanding of the melting and solidification behavior of a slag must be developed. Thus it is necessary to be able to quantify the phenomena that occur under the thermal conditions that are found in the mold of a continuous caster. The double hot thermocouple technique (DHTT) and the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope used in this study are two novel techniques for investigating melting and solidification phenomena of transparent slags. Results from these techniques are useful in defining the phenomena that occur when the slag film infiltrates between the mold and the shell of the casting. TTT diagrams were obtained for various slags and indicated that the onset of crystallization is a function of cooling rate and slag chemistry. Crystal morphology was found to be dependent upon the experimental temperature and four different morphologies were classified based upon the degree of melt undercooling. Continuous cooling experiments were carried out to develop CCT diagrams and it was found that the amount and appearance of the crystalline fraction greatly depends on the cooling conditions. The DHTT can also be used to mimic the cooling profile encountered by the slag in the mold of a continuous caster. In this differential cooling mode (DCT), it was found that the details of the cooling rate determine the actual response of the slag to a thermal gradient and small changes can lead to significantly different results. Crystal growth rates were measured and found to be in the range between 0.11 mum/s to 11.73 mum/s depending on temperature and slag chemistry. Alumina particles were found to be effective innoculants in oxide melts reducing the incubation time for the onset of crystallization and also extending

  6. Introduction to protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Alexander; Gavira, Jose A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystallization was discovered by chance about 150 years ago and was developed in the late 19th century as a powerful purification tool and as a demonstration of chemical purity. The crystallization of proteins, nucleic acids and large biological complexes, such as viruses, depends on the creation of a solution that is supersaturated in the macromolecule but exhibits conditions that do not significantly perturb its natural state. Supersaturation is produced through the addition of mild precipitating agents such as neutral salts or polymers, and by the manipulation of various parameters that include temperature, ionic strength and pH. Also important in the crystallization process are factors that can affect the structural state of the macromolecule, such as metal ions, inhibitors, cofactors or other conventional small molecules. A variety of approaches have been developed that combine the spectrum of factors that effect and promote crystallization, and among the most widely used are vapor diffusion, dialysis, batch and liquid–liquid diffusion. Successes in macromolecular crystallization have multiplied rapidly in recent years owing to the advent of practical, easy-to-use screening kits and the application of laboratory robotics. A brief review will be given here of the most popular methods, some guiding principles and an overview of current technologies. PMID:24419610

  7. Crystal Growth Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Batur, Celal; Bennett, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    We present an innovative design of a vertical transparent multizone furnace which can operate in the temperature range of 25 C to 750 C and deliver thermal gradients of 2 C/cm to 45 C/cm for the commercial applications to crystal growth. The operation of the eight zone furnace is based on a self-tuning temperature control system with a DC power supply for optimal thermal stability. We show that the desired thermal profile over the entire length of the furnace consists of a functional combination of the fundamental thermal profiles for each individual zone obtained by setting the set-point temperature for that zone. The self-tuning system accounts for the zone to zone thermal interactions. The control system operates such that the thermal profile is maintained under thermal load, thus boundary conditions on crystal growth ampoules can be predetermined prior to crystal growth. Temperature profiles for the growth of crystals via directional solidification, vapor transport techniques, and multiple gradient applications are shown to be easily implemented. The unique feature of its transparency and ease of programming thermal profiles make the furnace useful for scientific and commercial applications for the determination of process parameters to optimize crystal growth conditions.

  8. Introduction to protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Alexander; Gavira, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystallization was discovered by chance about 150 years ago and was developed in the late 19th century as a powerful purification tool and as a demonstration of chemical purity. The crystallization of proteins, nucleic acids and large biological complexes, such as viruses, depends on the creation of a solution that is supersaturated in the macromolecule but exhibits conditions that do not significantly perturb its natural state. Supersaturation is produced through the addition of mild precipitating agents such as neutral salts or polymers, and by the manipulation of various parameters that include temperature, ionic strength and pH. Also important in the crystallization process are factors that can affect the structural state of the macromolecule, such as metal ions, inhibitors, cofactors or other conventional small molecules. A variety of approaches have been developed that combine the spectrum of factors that effect and promote crystallization, and among the most widely used are vapor diffusion, dialysis, batch and liquid-liquid diffusion. Successes in macromolecular crystallization have multiplied rapidly in recent years owing to the advent of practical, easy-to-use screening kits and the application of laboratory robotics. A brief review will be given here of the most popular methods, some guiding principles and an overview of current technologies. PMID:24419610

  9. Protein Crystals and their Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent results on binding between protein molecules in crystal lattice, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties and strength and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed in the first half of this paper (Sea 2-4). In the second par&, some basic approaches to solubility of proteins are followed by overview on crystal nucleation and growth (Sec 5). It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source for scattering of crystal number ultimately appearing in the batch. Frequency at which new molecules join crystal lattice is measured by kinetic coefficient and related to the observable crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria to discriminate diffusion and kinetic limited growth are discussed on this basis in Sec 7. In Sec 8, creation of defects is discussed with the emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal I;erfection.

  10. Protein crystals and their growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    Recent results on the associations between protein molecules in crystal lattices, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties, strength, and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed. In addition, some basic approaches to understanding the solubility of proteins are followed by an overview of crystal nucleation and growth. It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source of the variation in the number of crystals ultimately appearing in the sample. The frequency at which new molecules join a crystal lattice is measured by the kinetic coefficient and is related to the observed crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria used to discriminate diffusion- and kinetic-limited growth are discussed on this basis. Finally, the creation of defects is discussed with an emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal perfection.

  11. Crystallization of atactic polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yu; Forrest, James

    Atactic polystyrene is often used as an archetypical example of a material that has no crystalline ground state due to the lack of order in the arrangement of phenyl groups along the backbone. However, even in polymers with perfect Bernoullian (random) statistics, there is a probability that a given molecule will have larger blocks of a given stereoregularity. These blocks, in turn, could allow the formation of nanocrysalline domains. As a model system to investigate whether such blocks could lead to nanoscale crystallinity, we consider PS with Mw less than 1000 where there is a reasonable probability of a molecule having all meso or racemo diads . For the case of Mw 600, there are clear indications of crystal growth with two characteristic temperatures below which two different crystal species can nucleate and grow. Similar crystal growth and melting behavior is observed for Mw 1000.

  12. Tunable electrochromic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, Su-Lan; Bader, Georges; Ashrit, P. V.

    2005-05-01

    Photonic crystals based on the electrochromic phenomenon have been fabricated and proposed for band gap tuning. Electrochromic tungsten trioxide (WO3) inverse opals have been fabricated by polystyrene colloidal crystal templating. The WO3 matrix was obtained through a dip-infiltrating sol-gel process, with subsequent removal of the polymer microspheres by calcination. Scanning electron micrographs confirm the ordering of the hexagonal macroporous structure. The reflection spectra show two pronounced Bragg diffraction peaks. By inserting lithium into the crystals, the first reflection peak shifts gradually toward shorter wavelength for 36 nm, while the second reflection peak shifts toward longer wavelength for about 28 nm. This should be of great interest for photonic device applications.

  13. Frequency doubling crystals

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Francis; Velsko, Stephan P.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a "harmonic generating unit" which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L-arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyl hydroxyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  14. Ion Coulomb crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewsen, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The following text will give a brief introduction to the physics of the spatially ordered structures, so-called Coulomb crystals, that appear when confined ions are cooled to sufficiently low temperatures. It will as well briefly comment on the very diverse scientific applications of such crystals, which have emerged the past two decades. While this document lacks figures, it includes a substantial number of references in which more detailed information can be found. It is the hope that the text will stimulate the reader to dig deeper into one or more of the discussed subjects and inspire her/him to think about new potential applications.

  15. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Hoyt, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of curable liquid crystal polyester monomers and to thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions prepared therefrom. It is an object of this invention to provide curable liquid crystalline polyester materials. Another object of this invention is to provide a process of preparing curable liquid crystal polyester monomers. Yet another object of this invention is to provide liquid crystalline blends of polyester materials. It is a further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions. It is a still further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions having a high heat resistance. 1 fig.

  16. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Hoyt, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    The present invention relates to the field of curable liquid crystal polyester monomers and to thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions prepared therefrom. It is an object of this invention to provide curable liquid crystalline polyester materials. Another object of this invention is to provide a process of preparing curable liquid crystal polyester monomers. Yet another object of this invention is to provide liquid crystalline blends of polyester materials. It is a further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions. It is a still further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions having a high heat resistance. 1 fig.

  17. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell (standing), Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC),and Marc Pusey of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) use a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for marcromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of marcromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystalized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  18. Semiconductor nanorod liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang-shi; Walda, Joost; Manna, Liberato; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2002-01-28

    Rodlike molecules form liquid crystalline phases with orientational order and positional disorder. The great majority of materials in which liquid crystalline phases have been observed are comprised of organic molecules or polymers, even though there has been continuing and growing interest in inorganic liquid crystals. Recent advances in the control of the sizes and shapes of inorganic nanocrystals allow for the formation of a broad class of new inorganic liquid crystals. Here we show the formation of liquid crystalline phases of CdSe semiconductor nanorods. These new liquid crystalline phases may have great importance for both application and fundamental study.

  19. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  20. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  1. Crystallization kinetics of ammonium perchlorate in MSMPR crystallizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanrıkulu, S. Ü.; Eroğlu, İ.; Bulutcu, A. N.; Özkar, S.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of supersaturation level, sodium chloride (NaCl) as impurity, and the suspension density of the crystallizer content on the crystallization kinetics of ammonium perchlorate (AP) were studied in a mixed-suspension mixed-product removal crystallizer. The product crystals have a plate-like morphology. The crystal size distribution is not affected by the supersaturation level. There was a deviation from the ideal population density where the growth rate of pure AP crystallization was size dependent with the order of 0.4 according to Abegg, Stevens and Larson (ASL) model. However, the ASL model was not found to be suitable to express the growth rate of the crystals in NaCl containing AP solution. Also when suspension density of the crystallizer increased, secondary nucleation was observed.

  2. Dynamically controlled crystallization method and apparatus and crystals obtained thereby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnowitz, Leonard (Inventor); Steinberg, Emanuel (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for dynamically controlling the crystallization of proteins including a crystallization chamber or chambers for holding a protein in a salt solution, one or more salt solution chambers, two communication passages respectively coupling the crystallization chamber with each of the salt solution chambers, and transfer mechanisms configured to respectively transfer salt solution between each of the salt solution chambers and the crystallization chamber. The transfer mechanisms are interlocked to maintain the volume of salt solution in the crystallization chamber substantially constant. Salt solution of different concentrations is transferred into and out of the crystallization chamber to adjust the salt concentration in the crystallization chamber to achieve precise control of the crystallization process.

  3. Nucleation-trap crystallizer for growth of crystals from solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnal, A. K.; Saxena, A.; Ganesamoorthy, S.; Bhaumik, Indranil; Wadhawan, V. K.; Bhat, H. L.; Gupta, P. K.

    2006-12-01

    Stability of the solution against spurious nucleation plays a dominant role in the growth of crystals at high growth rates requiring high levels of supersaturation. If any spurious nucleation does occur during a growth run, it becomes practically impossible to grow a very large crystal. A novel nucleation-trap crystallizer has been developed and used for the growth of crystals from aqueous solution so as to trap any unwanted nuclei and the particles that appear and settle at the bottom of the crystallizer during the growth process. In this crystallizer, any particles and nuclei nucleating during the growth are forced into the nucleation trap (or well) and subsequently by manipulating the temperature of the well; the growth of the nuclei is arrested. DKDP and ammonium acid phthalate crystals were grown in the developed system. X-ray rocking curve measurements on DKDP and ammonium acid phthalate crystals yielded FWHM of 89.1 and 29.71 arcsec, respectively.

  4. Functionalizing Designer DNA Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    Three-dimensional crystals have been self-assembled from a DNA tensegrity triangle via sticky end interaction. The tensegrity triangle is a rigid DNA motif containing three double helical edges connected pair-wise by three four-arm junctions. The symmetric triangle contains 3 unique strands combined in a 3:3:1 ratio: 3 crossover, 3 helical and 1 central. The length of the sticky end reported previously was two nucleotides (nt) (GA:TC) and the motif with 2-helical turns of DNA per edge diffracted to 4.9 A at beam line NSLS-X25 and to 4 A at beam line ID19 at APS. The purpose of these self-assembled DNA crystals is that they can be used as a framework for hosting external guests for use in crystallographic structure solving or the periodic positioning of molecules for nanoelectronics. This thesis describes strategies to improve the resolution and to incorporate guests into the 3D lattice. The first chapter describes the effect of varying sticky end lengths and the influence of 5'-phosphate addition on crystal formation and resolution. X-ray diffraction data from beam line NSLS-X25 revealed that the crystal resolution for 1-nt (G:C) sticky end was 3.4 A. Motifs with every possible combination of 1-nt and 2-nt sticky-ended phosphorylated strands were crystallized and X-ray data were collected. The position of the 5'-phosphate on either the crossover (strand 1), helical (strand 2), or central strand (3) had an impact on the resolution of the self-assembled crystals with the 1-nt 1P-2-3 system diffracting to 2.62 A at APS and 3.1 A at NSLS-X25. The second chapter describes the sequence-specific recognition of DNA motifs with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). This study examined the feasibility of using TFOs to bind to specific locations within a 3-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif. The TFO 5'-TTCTTTCTTCTCT was used to target the tensegrity motif containing an appropriately embedded oligopurine.oligopyrimidine binding site. As triplex formation involving cytidine

  5. Thermoelectricity in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Said, Suhana; Nordin, Abdul Rahman; Abdullah, Norbani; Balamurugan, S.

    2015-09-01

    The thermoelectric effect, also known as the Seebeck effect, describes the conversion of a temperature gradient into electricity. A Figure of Merit (ZT) is used to describe the thermoelectric ability of a material. It is directly dependent on its Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity, and inversely dependent on its thermal conductivity. There is usually a compromise between these parameters, which limit the performance of thermoelectric materials. The current achievement for ZT~2.2 falls short of the expected threshold of ZT=3 to allow its viability in commercial applications. In recent times, advances in organic thermoelectrics been significant, improving by over 3 orders of magnitude over a period of about 10 years. Liquid crystals are newly investigated as candidate thermoelectric materials, given their low thermal conductivity, inherent ordering, and in some cases, reasonable electrical conductivity. In this work the thermoelectric behaviour of a discotic liquid crystal, is discussed. The DLC was filled into cells coated with a charge injector, and an alignment of the columnar axis perpendicular to the substrate was allowed to form. This thermoelectric behavior can be correlated to the order-disorder transition. A reasonable thermoelectric power in the liquid crystal temperature regime was noted. In summary, thermoelectric liquid crystals may have the potential to be utilised in flexible devices, as a standalone power source.

  6. The Crystal Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    In past issues of this journal, the late H. R. Crane wrote a long series of articles under the running title of "How Things Work." In them, Dick dealt with many questions that physics teachers asked themselves, but did not have the time to answer. This article is my attempt to work through the physics of the crystal set, which I thought…

  7. DIFFRACTION FROM MODEL CRYSTALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although calculating X-ray diffraction patterns from atomic coordinates of a crystal structure is a widely available capability, calculation from non-periodic arrays of atoms has not been widely applied to cellulose. Non-periodic arrays result from modeling studies that, even though started with at...

  8. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  9. Bridgman crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this theoretical research effort was to improve the understanding of the growth of Pb(x)Sn(1-x)Te and especially how crystal quality could be improved utilizing the microgravity environment of space. All theoretical growths are done using the vertical Bridgman method. It is believed that improved single crystal yields can be achieved by systematically identifying and studying system parameters both theoretically and experimentally. A computational model was developed to study and eventually optimize the growth process. The model is primarily concerned with the prediction of the thermal field, although mass transfer in the melt and the state of stress in the crystal were of considerable interest. The evolution is presented of the computer simulation and some of the important results obtained. Diffusion controlled growth was first studied since it represented a relatively simple, but nontheless realistic situation. In fact, results from this analysis prompted a study of the triple junction region where the melt, crystal, and ampoule wall meet. Since microgravity applications were sought because of the low level of fluid movement, the effect of gravitational field strength on the thermal and concentration field was also of interest. A study of the strength of coriolis acceleration on the growth process during space flight was deemed necessary since it would surely produce asymmetries in the flow field if strong enough. Finally, thermosolutal convection in a steady microgravity field for thermally stable conditions and both stable and unstable solutal conditions was simulated.

  10. Rate of Lysozyme Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, J. K.; Clunie, J. C.

    1997-03-01

    We have observed the following: Free solution measurements of the electrophoretic mobility of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals grown in aqueous NaCl at 10 deg C at pH values between 3.6 and 5.7 demonstrate that the crystals are positively charged.(J.K. Baird, A.M. Holmes, and J.C. Clunie, Bull.Am.Phys.Soc. 41, 620 (1996)) (2) When the decaying concentration of uncrystallized lysozyme in the growth solution is monitored as a function of time, the log of the half-life decreases linearly with the square-root of the ionic strength. (3) Acid-base titration shows that lysozyme molecules in solution exist as highly charged cations.(R. Roxby and C. Tanford, Biochemistry 10, 3348 (1971)) These three observations combine to suggest that lysozyme crystallizes by addition of lysozyme cations to positively charged crystal nuclei and that the rate is accelerated by the presence of strong electrolytes.

  11. Laser schlieren crystal monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Robert B. (Inventor); Johnston, Mary H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring the state of a crystal which is suspended in a solution is described which includes providing a light source for emitting a beam of light along an optical axis. A collimating lens is arranged along the optical axis for collimating the emitted beam to provide a first collimated light beam consisting of parallel light rays. By passing the first collimated light beam through a transparent container, a number of the parallel light rays are deflected off the surfaces of said crystal being monitored according to the refractive index gradient to provide a deflected beam of deflected light rays. A focusing lens is arranged along optical axis for focusing the deflected rays towards a desired focal point. A knife edge is arranged in a predetermined orientation at the focal point; and a screen is provided. A portion of the deflected beam is blocked with the knife edge to project only a portion of the deflected beam. A band is created at one edge of the image of the crystal which indicates the state of change of the surface of the crystal being monitored.

  12. Controlling Chirality of Entropic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasceno, Pablo F.; Karas, Andrew S.; Schultz, Benjamin A.; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal crystal structures with complexity and diversity rivaling atomic and molecular crystals have been predicted and obtained for hard particles by entropy maximization. However, thus far homochiral colloidal crystals, which are candidates for photonic metamaterials, are absent. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that chiral polyhedra exhibiting weak directional entropic forces self-assemble either an achiral crystal or a chiral crystal with limited control over the crystal handedness. Building blocks with stronger faceting exhibit higher selectivity and assemble a chiral crystal with handedness uniquely determined by the particle chirality. Tuning the strength of directional entropic forces by means of particle rounding or the use of depletants allows for reconfiguration between achiral and homochiral crystals. We rationalize our findings by quantifying the chirality strength of each particle, both from particle geometry and potential of mean force and torque diagrams.

  13. FTIR spectroscopy of borate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Laszlo; Beregi, E.; Polgar, K.; Peter, A.

    1999-03-01

    Infrared absorption spectroscopy has been used to study the vibrational modes in various borate crystals, the electronic transitions of Nd3+ ions in NYAB, and the stretching vibration of hydroxyl ions in CLBO crystals.

  14. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Bugg, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment in space are described with special attention given to the crystal growth facilities and the techniques used in Space Shuttle experiments. The properties of large space-grown crystals of gamma interferon, elastase, lathyros ochrus lectin I, and few other proteins grown on various STS flights are described. A comparison of the microgravity-grown crystals with the bast earth-grown crystals demonstrated that the space-grown crystals are more highly ordered at the molecular level than their earth-grown counterparts. When crystallization conditions were optimized, the microgravity-grown protein crystals were larger, displayed more uniform morphologies, and yielded diffraction data to significantly higher resolution than their earth-grown counterparts.

  15. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblum, William M.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances have been made in several of the experimental aspects of protein crystallography, leaving protein crystallization as one of the few remaining bottlenecks. As a result, it has become important that the science of protein crystal growth is better understood and that improved methods for protein crystallization are developed. Preliminary experiments with both small molecules and proteins indicate that microgravity may beneficially affect crystal growth. For this reason, a series of protein crystal growth experiments using the Space Shuttle was initiated. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth. Various optical techniques are being utilized to monitor the crystal growth process from the incipient or nucleation stage and throughout the growth phase. The eventual goal of these studies is to develop a system which utilizes optical monitoring for dynamic control of the crystallization process.

  16. Protein Crystals of Raf Kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image shows crystals of the protein raf kinase grown on Earth (photo a) and on USML-2 (photo b). The space-grown crystals are an order of magnitude larger. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals

  17. Controlling Chirality of Entropic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Pablo F; Karas, Andrew S; Schultz, Benjamin A; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal crystal structures with complexity and diversity rivaling atomic and molecular crystals have been predicted and obtained for hard particles by entropy maximization. However, thus far homochiral colloidal crystals, which are candidates for photonic metamaterials, are absent. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that chiral polyhedra exhibiting weak directional entropic forces self-assemble either an achiral crystal or a chiral crystal with limited control over the crystal handedness. Building blocks with stronger faceting exhibit higher selectivity and assemble a chiral crystal with handedness uniquely determined by the particle chirality. Tuning the strength of directional entropic forces by means of particle rounding or the use of depletants allows for reconfiguration between achiral and homochiral crystals. We rationalize our findings by quantifying the chirality strength of each particle, both from particle geometry and potential of mean force and torque diagrams. PMID:26550757

  18. Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy for applications in chemical sensing and optical refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumi Barimah, Eric

    limit of detection for ClO4, was determined to be 14.7 +/- 0.5 wt%/wt for the given experimental conditions. In the second part of this research, the temperature-dependent absorption and emission properties of Tm doped KPb2Cl5 (KPC) and KPb2Br5 (KPB) were evaluated for applications in laser cooling. A Tm doped Y3Al5O12 (YAG) crystal was also included for comparative studies. Under laser pumping, all crystals exhibited broad IR fluorescence at room temperature with a mean fluorescence wavelength of ˜1.82 mum and bandwidth of 0.14 mum (FWHM) for Tm:KPC/KPB and ˜1.79 mum for Tm:YAG. Initial experiments on laser-induced heating/cooling were performed using a combined IR imaging and fluorescence thermometry setup. Employing a continuous-wave laser operating at 1.907 mum, Tm: KPC and Tm: KPB crystals revealed a very small heat load resulting in temperature increase of ˜ 0.3 ( +/- 0.1)°C. The heat loading in Tm:YAG was signicantly larger and resulted in a temperature increase of ˜0.9 (+/-0.1)°C. The results derived from IR imaging were also conrmed by the fluorescence thermometry experiments, which showed only minimal changes in the FIR intensity ratio of the green Er3+ fluorescence lines from Er:KPC.

  19. Colouring crystals with inorganic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kulak, Alexander N; Yang, Pengcheng; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Armes, Steven P; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2014-01-01

    A simple, one-pot method is presented whereby gold nanoparticles coated with a zwitterionic diblock copolymer are incorporated within single crystals of calcite. This may provide a versatile alternative to dyeing crystal with organic molecules and could be extended to create a series of new nanocomposite crystals with novel properties. PMID:24202647

  20. Food Crystallization and Egg Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar, salt, lactose, tartaric acid and ice are examples of constituents than can crystallize in foods. Crystallization in a food product can be either beneficial or detrimental and is of particular importance in candy and frozen desserts. The most common crystal in foods is sugar which affects th...

  1. Chiral Crystallization of Ethylenediamine Sulfate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koby, Lawrence; Ningappa, Jyothi B.; Dakesssian, Maria; Cuccia, Louis A.

    2005-01-01

    The optimal conditions for the crystallization of achiral ethylenediamine sulfate into large chiral crystals that are ideal for polarimetry studies and observation using Polaroid sheets are presented. This experiment is an ideal undergraduate experiment, which clearly demonstrates the chiral crystallization of an achiral molecule.

  2. Small Business Innovations (Crystal Components)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Scientific Materials Corporation, Bozeman, MT developed the SciMax line of improved Nd:Yag crystals under an Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center. They reduced the amount of water trapped in the crystals during growth to improve the optical quality and efficiency. Applications of the crystals include fiber optics, telecommunications, welding, drilling, eye surgery and medical instrumentation.

  3. Direct flow crystal growth system

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    1992-01-01

    A crystal is grown in a constantly filtered solution which is flowed directly into the growing face of a crystal. In a continuous flow system, solution at its saturation temperature is removed from a crystal growth tank, heated above its saturation temperature, filtered, cooled back to its saturation temperature, and returned to the tank.

  4. Physical vapor transport crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoel, Dave W.; Anderson, Elmer; Wu, Maw-Kuen; Cheng, H. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of this research are two-fold: to study effective means of growing ZnSe crystals of good optical quality and to determine the advantages of growing such crystals in microgravity. As of this date the optimal conditions for crystal growth have not been determined. However, successful growth runs were made in two furnances and the results are given.

  5. Liquid crystal orientation control in photonic liquid crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychlowski, M. S.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Woliński, T. R.

    2011-05-01

    Similarly to liquid crystal displays technology in photonic liquid crystal fibers (PLCFs) a molecular orientation control is a crucial issue that influences proper operation of PLCF-based devices. The paper presents two distinct configurations: planar and radial escaped orientation of the LC molecules inside capillaries as well as methods of their application to photonic liquid crystal fibers. Possibilities of LC orientation control influence both: attenuation and transmitting spectra of the PLCF The orienting method is based on creation of an additional orienting layer on the inner surface of the capillary or air hole of the photonic liquid crystal fiber. Aligning materials used in the experiment are commercially available polyimides SE1211 and SE130 which induce liquid crystal homeotropic and planar anchoring conditions. The orienting layer increase an order parameter of the liquid crystal improving propagation properties and stability of photonic liquid crystal fiber-based devices.

  6. Laser alexandrite crystals grown by horizontal oriented crystallization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurov, V. V.; Tsvetkov, E. G.; Yurkin, A. M.

    2008-05-01

    Comparative studies were performed for alexandrite crystals, Al 2BeO 4:Cr 3+, employed in solid state lasers and grown by the horizontal oriented crystallization (HOC) technique and alexandrite crystals grown by the Czochralski (Cz) method. It was shown that the structural quality and possibilities of generation of stimulated emission HOC-crystals are similar to Cz-crystals, whereas their damage threshold is about three times higher. The obtained results and considerably lower cost price of HOC-alexandrite crystals prove their advantageous application in powerful laser systems, which require large laser rods with a higher resistance to laser beam. It is emphasized that application of HOC technique is promising for growth of laser crystals of other high-temperature oxide compounds.

  7. Protein Crystals Grown in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A collage of protein and virus crystals, many of which were grown on the U.S. Space Shuttle or Russian Space Station, Mir. The crystals include the proteins canavalin; mouse monoclonal antibody; a sweet protein, thaumatin; and a fungal protease. Viruses are represented here by crystals of turnip yellow mosaic virus and satellite tobacco mosaic virus. The crystals are photographed under polarized light (thus causing the colors) and range in size from a few hundred microns in edge length up to more than a millimeter. All the crystals are grown from aqueous solutions and are useful for X-ray diffraction analysis. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  8. Plenum type crystal growth process

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.

    1992-01-01

    Crystals are grown in a tank which is divided by a baffle into a crystal growth region above the baffle and a plenum region below the baffle. A turbine blade or stirring wheel is positioned in a turbine tube which extends through the baffle to generate a flow of solution from the crystal growing region to the plenum region. The solution is pressurized as it flows into the plenum region. The pressurized solution flows back to the crystal growing region through return flow tubes extending through the baffle. Growing crystals are positioned near the ends of the return flow tubes to receive a direct flow of solution.

  9. Twisted aspirin crystals.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Rohl, Andrew L; Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2013-03-01

    Banded spherulites of aspirin have been crystallized from the melt in the presence of salicylic acid either generated from aspirin decomposition or added deliberately (2.6-35.9 mol %). Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and optical polarimetry show that the spherulites are composed of helicoidal crystallites twisted along the <010> growth directions. Mueller matrix imaging reveals radial oscillations in not only linear birefringence, but also circular birefringence, whose origin is explained through slight (∼1.3°) but systematic splaying of individual lamellae in the film. Strain associated with the replacement of aspirin molecules by salicylic acid molecules in the crystal structure is computed to be large enough to work as the driving force for the twisting of crystallites. PMID:23425247

  10. CRYSTAL/FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Anderson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT), under funding from NASA, participated in the CRYSTAL/FACE field campaign in July, 2002 with measurements of cirrus cloud hydrometeors in the size range from 0.5 to 1600 microns. The measurements were made with the DMT Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS) that was flown on NASA's WB57F. With the exception of the first research flight when the data system failed two hours into the mission, the measurement system performed almost flawlessly during the thirteen flights. The measurements from the CAPS have been essential for interpretation of cirrus cloud properties and their impact on climate. The CAPS data set has been used extensively by the CRYSTAL/FACE investigators and as of the date of this report, have been included in five published research articles, 10 conference presentations and six other journal articles currently in preparation.

  11. Graphite Polyhedral Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogotsi, Yury; Libera, Joseph A.; Kalashnikov, Nikolay; Yoshimura, Masahiro

    2000-10-01

    Polyhedral nano- and microstructures with shapes of faceted needles, rods, rings, barrels, and double-tipped pyramids, which we call graphite polyhedral crystals (GPCs), have been discovered. They were found in pores of glassy carbon. They have nanotube cores and graphite faces, and they can exhibit unusual sevenfold, ninefold, or more complex axial symmetry. Although some are giant radially extended nanotubes, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy suggest GPCs have a degree of perfection higher than in multiwall nanotubes of similar size. The crystals are up to 1 micrometer in cross section and 5 micrometers in length, and they can probably be grown in much larger sizes. Preliminary results suggest a high electrical conductivity, strength, and chemical stability of GPC.

  12. Macromolecular crystal growing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Herren, Blair J. (Inventor); Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Yost, Vaughn H. (Inventor); Bugg, Charles E. (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor); Suddath, Fred L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A macromolecular crystal growing system especially designed for growing crystals in the low gravity of space as well as the gravity of earth includes at least one tray assembly, a carrier assembly which receives the tray, and a refrigeration-incubation module in which the carrier assembly is received. The tray assembly includes a plurality of sealed chambers with a plastic syringe and a plug means for the double tip of the syringe provided therein. Ganging mechanisms operate the syringes and plugs simultaneously in a precise and smooth operation. Preferably, the tray assemblies are mounted on ball bearing slides for smooth operation in inserting and removing the tray assemblies into the carrier assembly. The plugging mechanism also includes a loading control mechanism. A mechanism for leaving a syringe unplugged is also provided.

  13. Surrogate Seeds For Growth Of Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Larger crystals of higher quality grown. Alternative method for starting growth of crystal involves use of seed crystal of different material instead of same material as solution. Intended for growing single-crystal proteins for experiments but applicable in general to growth of crystals from solutions and to growth of semiconductor or other crystals from melts.

  14. The Crystal Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2014-04-01

    In past issues of this journal, the late H. R. Crane wrote a long series of articles under the running title of "How Things Work." In them, Dick dealt with many questions that physics teachers asked themselves, but did not have the time to answer. This article is my attempt to work through the physics of the crystal set, which I thought I knew, but actually did not.

  15. Nematic liquid crystal bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Susannah; Ellis, Perry; Vallamkondu, Jayalakshmi; Danemiller, Edward; Vernon, Mark; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    We study the effects of confining a nematic liquid crystal between two parallel glass plates with homeotropic boundary conditions for the director at all bounding surfaces. We find that the free surface of the nematic bridge is a surface of constant mean curvature. In addition, by changing the distance between the plates and the contact angle with the glass plates, we transition between loops and hedgehogs that can be either radial or hyperbolic.

  16. Slotted photonic crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, Mark Gerard

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them result in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This thesis presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which engender higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the peak of optical mode within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. High sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than most competing devices in the literature. Initial tests with cellular material for real applications was also performed, and shown to be of promise. In addition, groundwork to make an integrated device that includes the spectrometer function was also carried out showing that slotted photonic crystals themselves can be used for on-chip wavelength specific filtering and spectroscopy, whilst gas-free microvalves for automation were also developed. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  17. Path to protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Growth of two-dimensional S-layer crystals on supported lipid bilayers observed in solution using in situ atomic force microscopy. This movie shows proteins sticking onto the supported lipid bilayer, forming a mobile phase that condenses into amorphous clusters, and undergoing a phase transition to crystalline clusters composed of 2 to 15 tetramers. These initial clusters then enter a growth phase in which new tetramers form exclusively at unoccupied lattice sites along the cluster edges.

  18. Hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Limin; Birks, T A; Loh, W H

    2011-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). A chemical surface treatment for making PCFs hydrophobic is introduced. This repels water from the holes of PCFs, so that their optical properties remain unchanged even when they are immersed in water. The combination of a hollow core and a water-repellent inner surface of the hydrophobic PCF provides an ultracompact dissolved-gas sensor element, which is demonstrated for the sensing of dissolved ammonia gas. PMID:22139276

  19. Protein Crystal Isocitrate Lyase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Isocitrate Lyase earth-grown (left) and space-grown (right). This is a target enzyme for fungicides. A better understanding of this enzyme should lead to the discovery of more potent fungicides to treat serious crop diseases such as rice blast; it regulates the flow of metabolic intermediates required for cell growth. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  20. High density protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouleau, Robyn (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence (Inventor); Hedden, Douglas Keith (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A protein crystal growth assembly including a crystal growth cell and further including a cell body having a top side and a bottom side and a first aperture defined therethrough, the cell body having opposing first and second sides and a second aperture defined therethrough. A cell barrel is disposed within the cell body, the cell barrel defining a cavity alignable with the first aperture of the cell body, the cell barrel being rotatable within the second aperture. A reservoir is coupled to the bottom side of the cell body and a cap having a top side is disposed on the top side of the cell body. The protein crystal growth assembly may be employed in methods including vapor diffusion crystallization, liquid to liquid crystallization, batch crystallization, and temperature induction batch mode crystallization.

  1. Manipulating crystallization with molecular additives.

    PubMed

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Lee, Stephanie S; Kahr, Bart; Ward, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of organic crystals in a wide range of industrial applications, the chemistry, biology, materials science, and chemical engineering communities have focused considerable attention on developing methods to control crystal structure, size, shape, and orientation. Tailored additives have been used to control crystallization to great effect, presumably by selectively binding to particular crystallographic surfaces and sites. However, substantial knowledge gaps still exist in the fundamental mechanisms that govern the formation and growth of organic crystals in both the absence and presence of additives. In this review, we highlight research discoveries that reveal the role of additives, either introduced by design or present adventitiously, on various stages of formation and growth of organic crystals, including nucleation, dislocation spiral growth mechanisms, growth inhibition, and nonclassical crystal morphologies. The insights from these investigations and others of their kind are likely to guide the development of innovative methods to manipulate crystallization for a wide range of materials and applications. PMID:24579880

  2. Living liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuang; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-01-01

    Collective motion of self-propelled organisms or synthetic particles, often termed “active fluid,” has attracted enormous attention in the broad scientific community because of its fundamentally nonequilibrium nature. Energy input and interactions among the moving units and the medium lead to complex dynamics. Here, we introduce a class of active matter––living liquid crystals (LLCs)––that combines living swimming bacteria with a lyotropic liquid crystal. The physical properties of LLCs can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to bacteria, by concentration of ingredients, or by temperature. Our studies reveal a wealth of intriguing dynamic phenomena, caused by the coupling between the activity-triggered flow and long-range orientational order of the medium. Among these are (i) nonlinear trajectories of bacterial motion guided by nonuniform director, (ii) local melting of the liquid crystal caused by the bacteria-produced shear flows, (iii) activity-triggered transition from a nonflowing uniform state into a flowing one-dimensional periodic pattern and its evolution into a turbulent array of topological defects, and (iv) birefringence-enabled visualization of microflow generated by the nanometers-thick bacterial flagella. Unlike their isotropic counterpart, the LLCs show collective dynamic effects at very low volume fraction of bacteria, on the order of 0.2%. Our work suggests an unorthodox design concept to control and manipulate the dynamic behavior of soft active matter and opens the door for potential biosensing and biomedical applications. PMID:24474746

  3. Living liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Aranson, Igor S

    2014-01-28

    Collective motion of self-propelled organisms or synthetic particles, often termed "active fluid," has attracted enormous attention in the broad scientific community because of its fundamentally nonequilibrium nature. Energy input and interactions among the moving units and the medium lead to complex dynamics. Here, we introduce a class of active matter--living liquid crystals (LLCs)--that combines living swimming bacteria with a lyotropic liquid crystal. The physical properties of LLCs can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to bacteria, by concentration of ingredients, or by temperature. Our studies reveal a wealth of intriguing dynamic phenomena, caused by the coupling between the activity-triggered flow and long-range orientational order of the medium. Among these are (i) nonlinear trajectories of bacterial motion guided by nonuniform director, (ii) local melting of the liquid crystal caused by the bacteria-produced shear flows, (iii) activity-triggered transition from a nonflowing uniform state into a flowing one-dimensional periodic pattern and its evolution into a turbulent array of topological defects, and (iv) birefringence-enabled visualization of microflow generated by the nanometers-thick bacterial flagella. Unlike their isotropic counterpart, the LLCs show collective dynamic effects at very low volume fraction of bacteria, on the order of 0.2%. Our work suggests an unorthodox design concept to control and manipulate the dynamic behavior of soft active matter and opens the door for potential biosensing and biomedical applications. PMID:24474746

  4. Slotted photonic crystal sensors.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Mark G; Krauss, Thomas F; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  5. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Axel

    2001-03-01

    Two- and three-dimensional microfabricated mirrors are generally referred to as photonic bandgap (PBG) crystals, and can be lithographically constructed to match a given frequency to confine light to very small volumes.1 For mirrors matching light emission at 1550nm, the lattice parameter a should correspond to 500nm, and the radius of the holes should be 180nm. By combining the slab waveguide design from microdisk lasers with the concept of microfabricating Bragg reflectors around a 2-D Fabry-Perot structure, we arrive at the design for ultra-small sub-3 optical nanocavity photonic crystal lasers. The mode volume in these laser cavities can be as small as 2.5 cubic half wavelengths or 0.03m3, and spontaneous emission in the cavity can be very efficiently coupled into the lasing mode. This efficient coupling in turn results in significant advantages of these nanocavity lasers over devices with larger mode volumes, as high modulation speed and very low threshold power light emission are expected. If the photonic crystal is designed appropriately and is not too porous, it is also possible to efficiently guide light within the perforated slab and to minimize diffraction losses. This waveguiding within a photonic crystal provides us with an opportunity to couple light from one cavity to another, or into connecting waveguides. By creating two-dimensional photonic crystals, which are microfabricated into InGaAsP slabs, we have recently defined the smallest lasers to date. When combined with high index contrast slabs in which light can be efficiently guided, microfabricated two-dimensional photonic bandgap mirrors provide the geometries needed to confine light into extremely small volumes with high Q.1,2,3,4 Two-dimensional Fabry-Perot resonators with microfabricated mirrors are formed when defects are introduced into the periodic photonic bandgap structure. It is then possible to tune these cavities lithographically by changing the precise geometry of the microstructures

  6. Quartz crystal fabrication facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, R. J.

    1980-05-01

    The report describes the design and operation of a five chamber, interconnected vacuum system, which is capable of cleaning, plating, and sealing precision quartz crystal units in ceramic flatpack enclosures continuously in a high vacuum environment. The production rate design goal was 200 units per eight hour day. A unique nozzle beam gold deposition source was developed to operate for extended periods of time without reloading. The source puts out a narrow beam of gold typically in the order of 2 1/2 deg included cone angle. Maximum deposition rates are in the order of 400 a/min at 5.5 in. 'throw' distance used. Entrance and exit air lock chambers expedite the material throughput, so that the processing chambers are at high vacuum for extended periods of time. A stainless steel conveyor belt, in conjunction with three vacuum manipulators, transport the resonator components to the various work stations. Individual chambers are normally separated from each other by gate valves. The crystal resonators, mounted in flatpack frames but unplated, are loaded into transport trays in a lid-frame-lid sequency for insertion into the system and exit as completed crystal units. The system utilizes molybdenum coated ball bearings at essentially all friction surfaces. The gold sources and plating mask heads are equipped with elevators and gate valves, so that they can be removed from the system for maintenance without exposing the chambers to atmosphere.

  7. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  8. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, C.Y.; Chen, P.C.

    1995-04-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes are most commonly utilized to remove sulfur dioxide from stack gases of coal- or oil-fired plants. In the simple slurry technology, SO{sub 2} is absorbed by a slurry of lime/limestone to form calcium sulfite crystals of acicular habit and its strong agglomeration, requiring large clarifiers and filters to dewater the sludge to make an acceptable landfill. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals from solution were studied by reacting Ca(OH){sub 2} with NaHSO{sub 3} in a pH-stat semibatch crystallizer. Single platelet crystals and agglomerates of platelet crystals were produced in the pH range from 5.80 to 6.80. The crystallization mechanism changed from primary nucleation to crystal growth in the progressive precipitation. Using the titration curves, the growth rate was calculated from the titration rate at the final stage of operation. The crystal growth rates of calcium sulfate hemihydrate crystals were found to obey the parabolic rate law in the low supersaturation range. Another point to be noted is that the precipitates of calcium sulfite hemihydrate in agitated suspensions have a tendency to form agglomerates. It was found that the degree of agglomeration is a weak function of relative supersaturation and magma density, while the pH value is a key factor that affects the degree of agglomeration. Addition of EDTA also has an effect on the agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrates.

  9. On dewetting of thin films due to crystallization (crystallization dewetting).

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mehran; Rahimzadeh, Amin; Eslamian, Morteza

    2016-03-01

    Drying and crystallization of a thin liquid film of an ionic or a similar solution can cause dewetting in the resulting thin solid film. This paper aims at investigating this type of dewetting, herein termed "crystallization dewetting", using PbI2 dissolved in organic solvents as the model solution. PbI2 solid films are usually used in X-ray detection and lead halide perovskite solar cells. In this work, PbI2 films are fabricated using spin coating and the effect of major parameters influencing the crystallization dewetting, including the type of the solvent, solution concentration, drying temperature, spin speed, as well as imposed vibration on the substrate are studied on dewetting, surface profile and coverage, using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Simplified hydrodynamic governing equations of crystallization in thin films are presented and using a mathematical representation of the process, it is phenomenologically demonstrated that crystallization dewetting occurs due to the absorption and consumption of the solution surrounding a growing crystal. Among the results, it is found that a low spin speed (high thickness), a high solution concentration and a low drying temperature promote crystal growth, and therefore crystallization dewetting. It is also shown that imposed vibration on the substrate can affect the crystal size and crystallization dewetting. PMID:26993991

  10. Discrete breathers in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. V.; Korznikova, E. A.; Baimova, Yu A.; Velarde, M. G.

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that periodic discrete defect-containing systems, in addition to traveling waves, support vibrational defect-localized modes. It turned out that if a periodic discrete system is nonlinear, it can support spatially localized vibrational modes as exact solutions even in the absence of defects. Since the nodes of the system are all on equal footing, it is only through the special choice of initial conditions that a group of nodes can be found on which such a mode, called a discrete breather (DB), will be excited. The DB frequency must be outside the frequency range of the small-amplitude traveling waves. Not resonating with and expending no energy on the excitation of traveling waves, a DB can theoretically conserve its vibrational energy forever provided no thermal vibrations or other perturbations are present. Crystals are nonlinear discrete systems, and the discovery in them of DBs was only a matter of time. It is well known that periodic discrete defect-containing systems support both traveling waves and vibrational defect-localized modes. It turns out that if a periodic discrete system is nonlinear, it can support spatially localized vibrational modes as exact solutions even in the absence of defects. Because the nodes of the system are all on equal footing, only a special choice of the initial conditions allows selecting a group of nodes on which such a mode, called a discrete breather (DB), can be excited. The DB frequency must be outside the frequency range of small-amplitude traveling waves. Not resonating with and expending no energy on the excitation of traveling waves, a DB can theoretically preserve its vibrational energy forever if no thermal vibrations or other perturbations are present. Crystals are nonlinear discrete systems, and the discovery of DBs in them was only a matter of time. Experimental studies of DBs encounter major technical difficulties, leaving atomistic computer simulations as the primary investigation tool. Despite

  11. Functionalizing Designer DNA Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    Three-dimensional crystals have been self-assembled from a DNA tensegrity triangle via sticky end interaction. The tensegrity triangle is a rigid DNA motif containing three double helical edges connected pair-wise by three four-arm junctions. The symmetric triangle contains 3 unique strands combined in a 3:3:1 ratio: 3 crossover, 3 helical and 1 central. The length of the sticky end reported previously was two nucleotides (nt) (GA:TC) and the motif with 2-helical turns of DNA per edge diffracted to 4.9 A at beam line NSLS-X25 and to 4 A at beam line ID19 at APS. The purpose of these self-assembled DNA crystals is that they can be used as a framework for hosting external guests for use in crystallographic structure solving or the periodic positioning of molecules for nanoelectronics. This thesis describes strategies to improve the resolution and to incorporate guests into the 3D lattice. The first chapter describes the effect of varying sticky end lengths and the influence of 5'-phosphate addition on crystal formation and resolution. X-ray diffraction data from beam line NSLS-X25 revealed that the crystal resolution for 1-nt (G:C) sticky end was 3.4 A. Motifs with every possible combination of 1-nt and 2-nt sticky-ended phosphorylated strands were crystallized and X-ray data were collected. The position of the 5'-phosphate on either the crossover (strand 1), helical (strand 2), or central strand (3) had an impact on the resolution of the self-assembled crystals with the 1-nt 1P-2-3 system diffracting to 2.62 A at APS and 3.1 A at NSLS-X25. The second chapter describes the sequence-specific recognition of DNA motifs with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). This study examined the feasibility of using TFOs to bind to specific locations within a 3-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif. The TFO 5'-TTCTTTCTTCTCT was used to target the tensegrity motif containing an appropriately embedded oligopurine.oligopyrimidine binding site. As triplex formation involving cytidine

  12. Unifying the crystallization behavior of hexagonal and square crystals with the phase-field-crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yang; Zheng, Chen; Jing, Zhang; Yongxin, Wang; Yanli, Lu

    2016-03-01

    By employing the phase-field-crystal models, the atomic crystallization process of hexagonal and square crystals is investigated with the emphasis on the growth mechanism and morphological change. A unified regime describing the crystallization behavior of both crystals is obtained with the thermodynamic driving force varying. By increasing the driving force, both crystals (in the steady-state) transform from a faceted polygon to an apex-bulged polygon, and then into a symmetric dendrite. For the faceted polygon, the interface advances by a layer-by-layer (LL) mode while for the apex-bulged polygonal and the dendritic crystals, it first adopts the LL mode and then transits into the multi-layer (ML) mode in the later stage. In particular, a shift of the nucleation sites from the face center to the area around the crystal tips is detected in the early growth stage of both crystals and is rationalized in terms of the relation between the crystal size and the driving force distribution. Finally, a parameter characterizing the complex shape change of square crystal is introduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 54175378, 51474176, and 51274167), the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM7261), and the Doctoral Foundation Program of Ministry of China (Grant No. 20136102120021).

  13. Crystallization Optimum Solubility Screening: using crystallization results to identify the optimal buffer for protein crystal formation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Bernard; Stevens, Raymond C.; Page, Rebecca

    2005-12-01

    It is shown how protein crystallization results can be used to identify buffers that improve protein solubility and, in turn, crystallization success. An optimal solubility screen is described that uses the results of crystallization trials to identify buffers that improve protein solubility and, in turn, crystallization success. This screen is useful not only for standard crystallization experiments, but also can easily be implemented into any high-throughput structure-determination pipeline. As a proof of principle, the predicted novel-fold protein AF2059 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, which was known to precipitate in most buffers and particularly during concentration experiments, was selected. Using the crystallization results of 192 independent crystallization trials, it was possible to identify a buffer containing 100 mM CHES pH 9.25 that significantly improves its solubility. After transferring AF2059 into this ‘optimum-solubility’ buffer, the protein was rescreened for crystal formation against these same 192 conditions. Instead of extensive precipitation, as observed initially, it was found that 24 separate conditions produced crystals and the exchange of AF2059 into CHES buffer significantly improved crystallization success. Fine-screen optimization of these conditions led to the production of a crystal suitable for high-resolution (2.2 Å) structure determination.

  14. Crystallization with oils: a new dimension in macromolecular crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayen, Naomi E.

    1999-01-01

    The crystal growth of biological macromolecules is a complicated process involving numerous parameters. This paper presents an approach which employs the use of oil as a major aid to crystal growth, and which has opened up a new dimension in the field of macromolecular crystallization. The presence of oil is a parameter which can contribute to the accuracy, the cleanliness and to the increase in the reproducibility of the experiments. Furthermore, the oil has a role in the protection of the trials during the course of their duration and in maintaining the stability of the resulting crystals. The use of oil also applies to the crystallization of membrane proteins. The results of a wide range of experiments which exploit the presence of oil to abet macromolecular crystal growth using both vapour diffusion and microbatch are presented.

  15. DDA Computations of Porous Aggregates with Forsterite Crystals: Effects of Crystal Shape and Crystal Mass Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lindsay, Sean S.; Harker, David; Woodward, Charles; Kelley, Michael S.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla

    2015-01-01

    Porous aggregate grains are commonly found in cometary dust samples and are needed to model cometary IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Models for thermal emissions from comets require two forms of silicates: amorphous and crystalline. The dominant crystal resonances observed in comet SEDs are from Forsterite (Mg2SiO4). The mass fractions that are crystalline span a large range from 0.0 < or = fcrystal < or = 0.74. Radial transport models that predict the enrichment of the outer disk (>25 AU at 1E6 yr) by inner disk materials (crystals) are challenged to yield the highend-range of cometary crystal mass fractions. However, in current thermal models, Forsterite crystals are not incorporated into larger aggregate grains but instead only are considered as discrete crystals. A complicating factor is that Forsterite crystals with rectangular shapes better fit the observed spectral resonances in wavelength (11.0-11.15 microns, 16, 19, 23.5, 27, and 33 microns), feature asymmetry and relative height (Lindley et al. 2013) than spherically or elliptically shaped crystals. We present DDA-DDSCAT computations of IR absorptivities (Qabs) of 3 micron-radii porous aggregates with 0.13 < or = fcrystal < or = 0.35 and with polyhedral-shaped Forsterite crystals. We can produce crystal resonances with similar appearance to the observed resonances of comet Hale- Bopp. Also, a lower mass fraction of crystals in aggregates can produce the same spectral contrast as a higher mass fraction of discrete crystals; the 11micron and 23 micron crystalline resonances appear amplified when crystals are incorporated into aggregates composed otherwise of spherically shaped amorphous Fe-Mg olivines and pyroxenes. We show that the optical properties of a porous aggregate is not linear combination of its monomers, so aggregates need to be computed. We discuss the consequence of lowering comet crystal mass fractions by modeling IR SEDs with aggregates with crystals, and the implications for radial

  16. Dynamically controlled crystallization method and apparatus and crystals obtained thereby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnowitz, Leonard (Inventor); Steinberg, Emanuel (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus for dynamically controlling the crystallization of molecules including a crystallization chamber (14) or chambers for holding molecules in a precipitant solution, one or more precipitant solution reservoirs (16, 18), communication passages (17, 19) respectively coupling the crystallization chamber(s) with each of the precipitant solution reservoirs, and transfer mechanisms (20, 21, 22, 24, 26, 28) configured to respectively transfer precipitant solution between each of the precipitant solution reservoirs and the crystallization chamber(s). The transfer mechanisms are interlocked to maintain a constant volume of precipitant solution in the crystallization chamber(s). Precipitant solutions of different concentrations are transferred into and out of the crystallization chamber(s) to adjust the concentration of precipitant in the crystallization chamber(s) to achieve precise control of the crystallization process. The method and apparatus can be used effectively to grow crystals under reduced gravity conditions such as microgravity conditions of space, and under conditions of reduced or enhanced effective gravity as induced by a powerful magnetic field.

  17. Adhesion of single crystals on modified surfaces in crystallization fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Moriz; Augustin, Wolfgang; Scholl, Stephan

    2012-12-01

    In crystallization fouling it has been observed that during a certain initial phase the fouling is formed by a non-uniform layer consisting of a population of single crystals. These single crystals are frequently formed by inverse soluble salts such as CaCO3. During heterogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous growth an interfacial area between the crystal and the heat transfer surface occurs. The development of this interfacial area is the reason for the adhesion of each single crystal and of all individual crystals, once a uniform layer has been built up. The emerging interfacial area is intrinsic to the heterogeneous nucleation of crystals and can be explained by the thermodynamic principle of the minimum of the Gibbs free energy. In this study CaCO3 crystals were grown heterogeneously on untreated and on modified surfaces inside a flow channel. An untreated stainless steel (AISI 304) surface was used as a reference. Following surface modifications were investigated: enameled and electropolished stainless steel as well as diamond-like-carbon based coatings on stainless steel substrate. The adhesion was measured through a novel measurement technique using a micromanipulator to shear off single crystals from the substrate which was fixed to a spring table inside a SEM.

  18. Electrohydrodynamically patterned colloidal crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, Ryan C. (Inventor); Poon, Hak F. (Inventor); Xiao, Yi (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for assembling patterned crystalline arrays of colloidal particles using ultraviolet illumination of an optically-sensitive semiconducting anode while using the anode to apply an electronic field to the colloidal particles. The ultraviolet illumination increases current density, and consequently, the flow of the colloidal particles. As a result, colloidal particles can be caused to migrate from non-illuminated areas of the anode to illuminated areas of the anode. Selective illumination of the anode can also be used to permanently affix colloidal crystals to illuminated areas of the anode while not affixing them to non-illuminated areas of the anode.

  19. Antiferromagnetic magnonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncoso, Roberto E.; Ulloa, Camilo; Pesce, Felipe; Nunez, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    We describe the features of magnonic crystals based upon antiferromagnetic elements. Our main results are that with a periodic modulation of either magnetic fields or system characteristics, such as the anisotropy, it is possible to tailor the spin-wave spectra of antiferromagnetic systems into a band-like organization that displays a segregation of allowed and forbidden bands. The main features of the band structure, such as bandwidths and band gaps, can be readily manipulated. Our results provide a natural link between two steadily growing fields of spintronics: antiferromagnetic spintronics and magnonics.

  20. Photonic crystal microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, A. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Sukhinina, N. S.; Matveev, D. V.; Dolganov, P. V.; Dolganov, V. K.; Emelchenko, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spherical samples of photonic crystals formed by colloidal SiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized. Synthesis of microspheres from 160 nm, 200 nm and 430 nm diameter colloidal nanoparticles was performed over a wide size range, from 5 μm to 50 μm. The mechanism of formation of void microparticles exceeding 50 μm is discussed. The spectral measurements verified the association of the spectra with the peaks of selective reflection from the cubic lattice planes. The microparticle morphology is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  1. Crystallization of fluorozirconate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Doremus, Robert H.; Bruce, A. J.; Moynihan, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The crystallization of a number of glasses of the fluorozirconate family has been studied (using powder X-ray diffraction and DSC) as a function of time and temperature of heating. The main crystalline phases were beta BaZrF6 and beta BaZr2F10. Stable and metastble transformations to the low-temperature alpha phases were also investigated. The size of crystallites in fully devitrified glasses was calculated (from line broadening of the X-ray diffraction peaks) to be about 60 nm.

  2. Crystallization in detergent performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoes, D.; Van Landschoot, R. C.; Van Rosmalen, G. M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various polymeric additives on the crystallization of CaCO 3 in simple soda-based detergent formulations were investigated. The adherence of CaCO 3 on cotton, a great disadvantage of soda-based detergents, was significantly diminished by copolymers of polystyrene sulfonates. A mechanism in which these additives promote the nucleation of CaCO 3 is proposed. Polyacrylates cause an increasing adherence of CaCO 3 on cotton, because the chains adsorb on cotton and CaCO 3

  3. Lasing from fluorescent protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Heon Jeong; Gather, Malte C; Song, Ji-Joon; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-15

    We investigated fluorescent protein crystals for potential photonic applications, for the first time to our knowledge. Rod-shaped crystals of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were synthesized, with diameters of 0.5-2 μm and lengths of 100-200 μm. The crystals exhibit minimal light scattering due to their ordered structure and generate substantially higher fluorescence intensity than EGFP or dye molecules in solutions. The magnitude of concentration quenching in EGFP crystals was measured to be about 7-10 dB. Upon optical pumping at 485 nm, individual EGFP crystals located between dichroic mirrors generated laser emission with a single-mode spectral line at 513 nm. Our results demonstrate the potential of protein crystals as novel optical elements for self-assembled, micro- or nano-lasers and amplifiers in aqueous environment. PMID:25607090

  4. Crystallization modifiers in lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula Badan; Masuchi, Monise Helen; Miyasaki, Eriksen Koji; Domingues, Maria Aliciane Fontenele; Stroppa, Valter Luís Zuliani; de Oliveira, Glazieli Marangoni; Kieckbusch, Theo Guenter

    2015-07-01

    Crystallization of fats is a determinant physical event affecting the structure and properties of fat-based products. The stability of these processed foods is regulated by changes in the physical state of fats and alterations in their crystallization behavior. Problems like polymorphic transitions, oil migration, fat bloom development, slow crystallization and formation of crystalline aggregates stand out. The change of the crystallization behavior of lipid systems has been a strategic issue for the processing of foods, aiming at taylor made products, reducing costs, improving quality, and increasing the applicability and stability of different industrial fats. In this connection, advances in understanding the complex mechanisms that govern fat crystallization led to the development of strategies in order to modulate the conventional processes of fat structuration, based on the use of crystallization modifiers. Different components have been evaluated, such as specific triacyglycerols, partial glycerides (monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols), free fatty acids, phospholipids and emulsifiers. The knowledge and expertise on the influence of these specific additives or minor lipids on the crystallization behavior of fat systems represents a focus of current interest for the industrial processing of oils and fats. This article presents a comprehensive review on the use of crystallization modifiers in lipid systems, especially for palm oil, cocoa butter and general purpose fats, highlighting: i) the removal, addition or fractionation of minor lipids in fat bases; ii) the use of nucleating agents to modify the crystallization process; iii) control of crystallization in lipid bases by using emulsifiers. The addition of these components into lipid systems is discussed in relation to the phenomena of nucleation, crystal growth, morphology, thermal behavior and polymorphism, with the intention of providing the reader with a complete panorama of the associated mechanisms

  5. Protein crystal growth tray assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Miller, Teresa Y. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A protein crystal growth tray assembly includes a tray that has a plurality of individual crystal growth chambers. Each chamber has a movable pedestal which carries a protein crystal growth compartment at an upper end. The several pedestals for each tray assembly are ganged together for concurrent movement so that the solutions in the various pedestal growth compartments can be separated from the solutions in the tray's growth chambers until the experiment is to be activated.

  6. Crystals Out of "Thin Air"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, John J.

    2000-04-01

    Sublimation is an excellent method to introduce crystals and crystal formation. In this experiment crystals of para-dichlorobenzene form readily and efficiently from mothballs in a safe setting, using canning jars with ice cubes. The experiment can serve as an introduction to the concept of molecules, especially when combined with the condensation of liquids and the perception of odors. This sublimation is presented for elementary school teachers, but can be an effective demonstration in other settings.

  7. Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) (PC database for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.

  8. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  9. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, C. E.; Clifford, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    The advantages of protein crystallization in space, and the applications of protein crystallography to drug design, protein engineering, and the design of synthetic vaccines are examined. The steps involved in using protein crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein are discussed. The growth chamber design and the hand-held apparatus developed for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques (hanging-drop method) are described; the experimental data from the four Shuttle missions are utilized to develop hardware for protein crystal growth in space and to evaluate the effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  10. Quartz-crystal-oscillator hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measuring device, which eliminates complex and expensive optical components by electronically sensing dewpoint of water vapor in gas, employs piezoelectric crystal oscillator, supportive circuitry, temperature regulators, and readout.

  11. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOEpatents

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  12. Active and driven hydrodynamic crystals.

    PubMed

    Desreumaux, N; Florent, N; Lauga, E; Bartolo, D

    2012-08-01

    Motivated by the experimental ability to produce monodisperse particles in microfluidic devices, we study theoretically the hydrodynamic stability of driven and active crystals. We first recall the theoretical tools allowing to quantify the dynamics of elongated particles in a confined fluid. In this regime hydrodynamic interactions between particles arise from a superposition of potential dipolar singularities. We exploit this feature to derive the equations of motion for the particle positions and orientations. After showing that all five planar Bravais lattices are stationary solutions of the equations of motion, we consider separately the case where the particles are passively driven by an external force, and the situation where they are self-propelling. We first demonstrate that phonon modes propagate in driven crystals, which are always marginally stable. The spatial structures of the eigenmodes depend solely on the symmetries of the lattices, and on the orientation of the driving force. For active crystals, the stability of the particle positions and orientations depends not only on the symmetry of the crystals but also on the perturbation wavelengths and on the crystal density. Unlike unconfined fluids, the stability of active crystals is independent of the nature of the propulsion mechanism at the single-particle level. The square and rectangular lattices are found to be linearly unstable at short wavelengths provided the volume fraction of the crystals is high enough. Differently, hexagonal, oblique, and face-centered crystals are always unstable. Our work provides a theoretical basis for future experimental work on flowing microfluidic crystals. PMID:22864543

  13. Crystal Chemistry of Melanite Garnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Dawn Marie

    1999-01-01

    This original project resulted in a detailed crystal chemical data map of a titanium rich garnet (melanite) suite that originates from the Crowsnest Volcanics of Alberta Canada. Garnet is typically present during the partial melting of the earth's mantle to produce basalt. Prior studies conducted at Youngstown State University have yielded questions as to the crystal structure of the melanite. In the Studies conducted at Youngstown State University, through the use of single crystal x-ray diffraction, the c-axis appears to be distorted creating a tetragonal crystal instead of the typical cubic crystal of garnets. The micro probe was used on the same suite of titanium rich garnets as used in the single crystal x-ray diffraction. The combination of the single crystal x-ray research and the detailed microprobe research will allow us to determine the exact crystal chemical structure of the melanite garnet. The crystal chemical data was gathered through the utilization of the SX100 Electron Probe Micro Analyzer. Determination of the exact chemical nature may prove useful in modeling the ultramafic source rock responsible for the formation of the titanium rich lunar basalts.

  14. Aluminum-air battery crystallizer

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1987-01-23

    A prototype crystallizer system for the aluminum-air battery operated reliably through simulated startup and shutdown cycles and met its design objectives. The crystallizer system allows for crystallization and removal of the aluminium hydroxide reaction product; it is required to allow steady-state and long-term operation of the aluminum-air battery. The system has to minimize volume and maintain low turbulence and shear to minimize secondary nucleation and energy consumption while enhancing agglomeration. A lamella crystallizer satisfies system constraints.

  15. Surface Relaxation in Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boutet, S.; Robinson, I. K.; Hu, Z. W.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    Surface X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on (111) growth faces of crystals of the Cellular iron-storage protein horse spleen ferritin. Crystal Trunkation Rods (CTR) were measured. A fit of the measured profile of the CTR revealed a surface roughness of 48 +/- 4.5 A and a top layer spacing contraction of 3.9 +/- 1.5%. In addition to the peak from the CTR, the rocking curves of the crystals displayed unexpected extra peaks. Multiple-scattering is demonstrated to account for them. Future applications of the method could allow the exploration of hydration effects on the growth of protein crystals.

  16. Wetting of cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Nuno M; Figueirinhas Pereira, Maria Carolina; Bernardino, Nelson R; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2016-02-01

    We investigate theoretically the wetting properties of cholesteric liquid crystals at a planar substrate. If the properties of substrate and of the interface are such that the cholesteric layers are not distorted, the wetting properties are similar to those of a nematic liquid crystal. If, on the other hand, the anchoring conditions force the distortion of the liquid crystal layers the wetting properties are altered, the free cholesteric-isotropic interface is non-planar and there is a layer of topological defects close to the substrate. These deformations can either promote or hinder the wetting of the substrate by a cholesteric, depending on the properties of the cholesteric liquid crystal. PMID:26920516

  17. Tunable Topological Phononic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ze-Guo; Wu, Ying

    2016-05-01

    Topological insulators first observed in electronic systems have inspired many analogues in photonic and phononic crystals in which remarkable one-way propagation edge states are supported by topologically nontrivial band gaps. Such band gaps can be achieved by breaking the time-reversal symmetry to lift the degeneracy associated with Dirac cones at the corners of the Brillouin zone. Here, we report on our construction of a phononic crystal exhibiting a Dirac-like cone in the Brillouin zone center. We demonstrate that simultaneously breaking the time-reversal symmetry and altering the geometric size of the unit cell result in a topological transition that we verify by the Chern number calculation and edge-mode analysis. We develop a complete model based on the tight binding to uncover the physical mechanisms of the topological transition. Both the model and numerical simulations show that the topology of the band gap is tunable by varying both the velocity field and the geometric size; such tunability may dramatically enrich the design and use of acoustic topological insulators.

  18. Liquid Crystals in Tribology

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Francisco-José; Martínez-Nicolás, Ginés; Iglesias, Patricia; Sanes, José; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Two decades ago, the literature dealing with the possible applications of low molar mass liquid crystals, also called monomer liquid crystals (MLCs), only included about 50 references. Today, thousands of papers, conference reports, books or book chapters and patents refer to the study and applications of MLCs as lubricants and lubricant additives and efforts are made to develop new commercial applications. The development of more efficient lubricants is of paramount technological and economic relevance as it is estimated that half the energy consumption is dissipated as friction. MLCs have shown their ability to form ordered boundary layers with good load-carrying capacity and to lower the friction coefficients, wear rates and contact temperature of sliding surfaces, thus contributing to increase the components service life and to save energy. This review includes the use of MLCs in lubrication, and dispersions of MLCs in conventional polymers (PDMLCs). Finally, new lubricating system composed of MLC blends with surfactants, ionic liquids or nanophases are considered. PMID:19865534

  19. Crystal structure of triclopyr

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seonghwa; Kim, Jineun; Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound {systematic name: 2-[(3,5,6-tri­chloro­pyridin-2-yl)­oxy]acetic acid}, the herbicide triclopyr, C7H4Cl3NO3, the asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol­ecules in which the dihedral angles between the mean plane of the carb­oxy­lic acid group and the pyridyl ring plane are 79.3 (6) and 83.8 (5)°. In the crystal, pairs of inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds form dimers through an R 2 2(8) ring motif and are extended into chains along [100] by weak π–π inter­actions [ring centroid separations = 3.799 (4) and 3.810 (4) Å]. In addition, short inter­molecular Cl⋯Cl contacts [3.458 (2) Å] connect the chains, yielding a two-dimensional architecture extending parallel to (020). The crystal studied was found to be non-merohedrally twinned with the minor component being 0.175 (4). PMID:25309266

  20. Crystal structure of triclopyr.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seonghwa; Kim, Jineun; Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-09-01

    In the title compound {systematic name: 2-[(3,5,6-tri-chloro-pyridin-2-yl)-oxy]acetic acid}, the herbicide triclopyr, C7H4Cl3NO3, the asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol-ecules in which the dihedral angles between the mean plane of the carb-oxy-lic acid group and the pyridyl ring plane are 79.3 (6) and 83.8 (5)°. In the crystal, pairs of inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds form dimers through an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif and are extended into chains along [100] by weak π-π inter-actions [ring centroid separations = 3.799 (4) and 3.810 (4) Å]. In addition, short inter-molecular Cl⋯Cl contacts [3.458 (2) Å] connect the chains, yielding a two-dimensional architecture extending parallel to (020). The crystal studied was found to be non-merohedrally twinned with the minor component being 0.175 (4). PMID:25309266

  1. Glasses crystallize rapidly at free surfaces by growing crystals upward

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Zhu, Lei; Kearns, Kenneth L.; Ediger, Mark D.; Yu, Lian

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization of glasses and amorphous solids is studied in many fields to understand the stability of amorphous materials, the fabrication of glass ceramics, and the mechanism of biomineralization. Recent studies have found that crystal growth in organic glasses can be orders of magnitude faster at the free surface than in the interior, a phenomenon potentially important for understanding glass crystallization in general. Current explanations differ for surface-enhanced crystal growth, including released tension and enhanced mobility at glass surfaces. We report here a feature of the phenomenon relevant for elucidating its mechanism: Despite their higher densities, surface crystals rise substantially above the glass surface as they grow laterally, without penetrating deep into the bulk. For indomethacin (IMC), an organic glass able to grow surface crystals in two polymorphs (α and γ), the growth front can be hundreds of nanometers above the glass surface. The process of surface crystal growth, meanwhile, is unperturbed by eliminating bulk material deeper than some threshold depth (ca. 300 nm for α IMC and less than 180 nm for γ IMC). As a growth strategy, the upward-lateral growth of surface crystals increases the system’s surface energy, but can effectively take advantage of surface mobility and circumvent slow growth in the bulk. PMID:21444775

  2. Crystallization and crystal manipulation of the Pterocarpus angolensis seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Loris, Remy; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Buts, Lieven; Bouckaert, Julie; Beeckmans, Sonia; De Greve, Henri; Wyns, Lode

    2005-06-01

    The Man/Glc-specific legume lectin from the seeds of the African bloodwood tree (Pterocarpus angolensis) was crystallized in the presence of the disaccharide ligand Man(alpha1-3)ManMe. Small crystals initially appeared from a preliminary screen, but proved difficult to reproduce. The initial crystals were used to prepare microseeds, leading to a reproducible crystallization protocol. All attempts to obtain crystals directly of the ligand-free protein or of other carbohydrate complexes failed. However, the Man(alpha1-3)ManMe co-crystals withstand soaking with ten other carbohydrates known to bind to the lectin. Soaking for 15 min in 100 mM carbohydrate typically resulted in complete replacement of Man(alpha1-3)ManMe by the desired carbohydrate despite the involvement of lattice contacts at the binding site. Transferring the crystals for two weeks in carbohydrate-free artificial mother liquor resulted in the complete removal of the sugar from one of the two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Additional treatment of these crystals with 100 mM EDTA for two weeks resulted in removal of the structural calcium and manganese ions, which is accompanied by significant structural rearrangements of the loops that constitute the carbohydrate-binding site. PMID:15930620

  3. Scintillating crystals for precision crystal calorimetry in high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, R.

    1998-11-01

    Scintillating crystals in future high energy physics experiments face a new challenge to maintain its performance in a hostile radiation environment. This paper discusses the effects of radiation damage in scintillating crystals. The importance of maintaining crystal{close_quote}s light response uniformity and the feasibility to build a precision crystal calorimeter under radiation are elaborated. The mechanism of radiation damage in scintillating crystals is also discussed. While the damage in alkali halides is found to be caused by the oxygen/hydroxyl contamination, it is the structure defects, such as oxygen vacancies, cause damage in oxides. Material analysis used to reach these conclusions are presented in details. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  5. Variable focus crystal diffraction lens

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.

    1988-11-01

    A new method has been developed to control the shape of the surface of a diffracting crystal that will allow it to function as a variable focus crystal diffraction lens, for focusing photon beams from a synchrotron source. The new method uses thermal gradients in the crystal to control the shape of the surface of the crystal in two dimensions and allows one to generate both spherical and ellipsoidal surface shapes. In this work the thermal gradient was generated by core drilling two sets of cooling channels in a silicon crystal so that cooling or heating fluids could be circulated through the crystal at two different levels. The first set of channels is close to the surface of the crystal where the photon beam strikes it. The second set of channels is equal distant from the back surface. If a concave surface is desired, the fluid in the channels just below the surface exposed to the beam is cooler than the fluid circulating through the channels near the back surface. If a convex surface is desired, then the cooling fluid in the upper channels near the surface exposed to the incident photon beam, is warmer than the fluid in the lower channels. The focal length of the crystal lens is varied by varying the thermal gradient in the crystal. This approach can also be applied to the first crystal in a high power synchrotron beam line to eliminate the bowing and other thermal distortions of the crystal caused by the high heat load. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  7. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The overall scientific goals and rationale for growing protein crystals in microgravity are discussed. Data on the growth of human serum albumin crystals which were produced during the First International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) are presented. Potential scientific advantages of the utilization of Space Station Freedom are discussed.

  8. Positioning Vise for Crystal Cleavage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallberg, F. C.; Morgan, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Vise manipulates brittle crystals, such as lithium fluoride, so they are in proper position for cleaving. Vise allows crystals as thin as 2 millimeters or less positioned so that cleaved without breakage. Vise holds workpiece firmly but gently. Bushings, shafts and adjusting screw designed to move jaws smoothly and uniformly with great tactile sensitivity.

  9. Controlling Chirality of Entropic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasceno, Pablo; Karas, Andrew; Schultz, Benjamin; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon

    Colloidal crystal structures with complexity and diversity rivaling atomic and molecular crystals have been predicted and obtained for hard particles by entropy maximization. However, thus far homochiral colloidal crystals, which are candidates for photonic metamaterials, are absent. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that chiral polyhedra exhibiting weak directional entropic forces self-assemble either an achiral crystal or a chiral crystal with limited control over the crystal handedness. Building blocks with stronger faceting exhibit higher selectivity and assemble a chiral crystal with handedness uniquely determined by the particle chirality. Tuning the strength of directional entropic forces by means of particle rounding or the use of depletants allows for reconfiguration between achiral and homochiral crystals. We rationalize our findings by quantifying the chirality strength of each particle, both from particle geometry and potential of mean force and torque diagrams. Work supported by the National Science Foundation, Division of Materials Research Award No. DMR 1120923, U.S. Army Research Office under Grant Award No. W911NF-10-1-0518, and also by the DOD/ASD (R&E) under Award No. N00244-09-1-0062.

  10. Novel inclusion in laser crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiaoshan; Wang Siting; Jin Zhongru; Shen Yafang; Chen Jiaguang

    1986-12-01

    In growing alexandrite crystals, a novel inclusion has been found. The inclusions are quantitatively analyzed by an electronic probe and the mechanism for forming inclusions is suggested. In our Bridgman MgF/sub 2/ crystals, the inclusions in <001> direction have also been observed.

  11. Pharmaceutical crystallization with nanocellulose organogels.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Palomero, Celia; Kennedy, Stuart R; Soriano, M Laura; Jones, Christopher D; Valcárcel, Miguel; Steed, Jonathan W

    2016-06-14

    Carboxylated nanocellulose forms organogels at 0.3 wt% in the presence of a cationic surfactant. The resulting gels can be used as novel crystallization media for pharmaceutical solid form control, resulting in isolation a new sulfapyridine solvate, morphology modification and crystallization of an octadecylammonium salt of sulfamethoxazole. PMID:27168091

  12. Dynamically controlled crystal growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Terry L. (Inventor); Kim, Larry J. (Inventor); Harrington, Michael (Inventor); DeLucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Crystal growth can be initiated and controlled by dynamically controlled vapor diffusion or temperature change. In one aspect, the present invention uses a precisely controlled vapor diffusion approach to monitor and control protein crystal growth. The system utilizes a humidity sensor and various interfaces under computer control to effect virtually any evaporation rate from a number of different growth solutions simultaneously by means of an evaporative gas flow. A static laser light scattering sensor can be used to detect aggregation events and trigger a change in the evaporation rate for a growth solution. A control/follower configuration can be used to actively monitor one chamber and accurately control replicate chambers relative to the control chamber. In a second aspect, the invention exploits the varying solubility of proteins versus temperature to control the growth of protein crystals. This system contains miniature thermoelectric devices under microcomputer control that change temperature as needed to grow crystals of a given protein. Complex temperature ramps are possible using this approach. A static laser light scattering probe also can be used in this system as a non-invasive probe for detection of aggregation events. The automated dynamic control system provides systematic and predictable responses with regard to crystal size. These systems can be used for microgravity crystallization projects, for example in a space shuttle, and for crystallization work under terrestial conditions. The present invention is particularly useful for macromolecular crystallization, e.g. for proteins, polypeptides, nucleic acids, viruses and virus particles.

  13. Photoelastic sphenoscopic analysis of crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, L.; Rinaldi, D.; Scalise, L.; Paone, N.; Davı, F.

    2016-01-01

    Birefringent crystals are at the basis of various devices used in many fields, from high energy physics to biomedical imaging for cancer detection. Since crystals are the main elements of those devices, a great attention is paid on their quality and properties. Here, we present a methodology for the photoelastic analysis of birefringent crystals, based on a modified polariscope. Polariscopes using conoscopic observation are used to evaluate crystals residual stresses in a precise but time consuming way; in our methodology, the light beam shape, which impinges on the crystal surface, has been changed from a solid cone (conoscopy) to a wedge (sphenoscopy). Since the polarized and coherent light is focused on a line rather than on a spot, this allows a faster analysis which leads to the observation, at a glance, of a spatial distribution of stress along a line. Three samples of lead tungstate crystals have been observed using this technique, and the obtained results are compared with the conoscopic observation. The samples have been tested both in unloaded condition and in a loaded configuration induced by means of a four points bending device, which allows to induce a known stress distribution in the crystal. The obtained results confirm, in a reliable manner, the sensitivity of the methodology to the crystal structure and stress.

  14. Czochralski crystal growth: Modeling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudukovic, M. P.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Srivastava, R. K.; Dorsey, D.

    1986-01-01

    The modeling study of Czochralski (Cz) crystal growth is reported. The approach was to relate in a quantitative manner, using models based on first priniciples, crystal quality to operating conditions and geometric variables. The finite element method is used for all calculations.

  15. Growing Crystals on the Ceiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method of studying growing crystals in a classroom utilizing a carrousel projector standing vertically. A saturated salt solution is placed on a slide on the lens of the projector and the heat from the projector causes the water to evaporate and salt to crystalize. (Author/DS)

  16. Crystallization of steroids in gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkura, S. Narayana; Devanarayanan, S.

    1991-03-01

    The crystal growth and characterization of certain steriods, viz., cholesterol, cholesteryl acetate, β-sitosterol, progesterone and testosterone, in a silica gel medium is discussed. The present study shows that the single test tube diffusion method can be used to grow crystals of steroids in a silica gel medium by the reduction of steroid solubility.

  17. Crystals Out of "Thin Air".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, John J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes how to grow crystals of para-dichlorobenzene beginning with household mothballs. The crystals form through sublimation (solid to gas) and deposition (gas to solid). Also discusses demonstrations of evaporation and condensation and odor perception, which can support a study of the kinetic theory and phases of matter. (WRM)

  18. Cessation of growth in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcón Rodríguez, C.; Aguilera Morales, S.; Falcón Rodríguez, F.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model that explains the cessation of growth of protein crystals as a consequence of the increment of bond weakness between adjacent protein molecules is presented. It is assumed that the main factor increasing the bond weakness is the concentration of precipitating salts generally used in protein crystal growth practice.

  19. Natural photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-10-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  20. Bioengineering single crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Hsuan; Park, Alexander; Joester, Derk

    2011-02-16

    Biomineralization is a "bottom-up" synthesis process that results in the formation of inorganic/organic nanocomposites with unrivaled control over structure, superior mechanical properties, adaptive response, and the capability of self-repair. While de novo design of such highly optimized materials may still be out of reach, engineering of the biosynthetic machinery may offer an alternative route to design advanced materials. Herein, we present an approach using micro-contact-printed lectins for patterning sea urchin embryo primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) in vitro. We demonstrate not only that PMCs cultured on these substrates show attachment to wheat germ agglutinin and concanavalin A patterns but, more importantly, that the deposition and elongation of calcite spicules occurs cooperatively by multiple cells and in alignment with the printed pattern. This allows us to control the placement and orientation of smooth, cylindrical calcite single crystals where the crystallographic c-direction is parallel to the cylinder axis and the underlying line pattern. PMID:21265521

  1. Lamella settler crystallizer

    DOEpatents

    Maimoni, Arturo

    1990-01-01

    A crystallizer which incorporates a lamella settler and which is particularly applicable for use in batteries and power cells for electric vehicles or stationary applications. The lamella settler can be utilized for coarse particle separation or for agglomeration, and is particularly applicable to aluminum-air batteries or power cells for solving the hydrargillite (aluminum-hydroxide) removal problems from such batteries. This invention provides the advantages of very low energy consumption, turbulence, shear, cost and maintenance. Thus, due to the low shear and low turbulence of this invention, it is particularly effective in the control of aluminum hydroxide particle size distribution in the various sections of an aluminum-air system, as well as in other electrochemical systems requiring separation for phases of different densities.

  2. Lamella settler crystallizer

    DOEpatents

    Maimoni, A.

    1990-12-18

    A crystallizer is described which incorporates a lamella settler and which is particularly applicable for use in batteries and power cells for electric vehicles or stationary applications. The lamella settler can be utilized for coarse particle separation or for agglomeration, and is particularly applicable to aluminum-air batteries or power cells for solving the hydrargillite (aluminum-hydroxide) removal problems from such batteries. This invention provides the advantages of very low energy consumption, turbulence, shear, cost and maintenance. Thus, due to the low shear and low turbulence of this invention, it is particularly effective in the control of aluminum hydroxide particle size distribution in the various sections of an aluminum-air system, as well as in other electrochemical systems requiring separation for phases of different densities. 3 figs.

  3. Voxelated liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Taylor H.; McConney, Michael E.; Wie, Jeong Jae; Tondiglia, Vincent P.; White, Timothy J.

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic control of shape can bring multifunctionality to devices. Soft materials capable of programmable shape change require localized control of the magnitude and directionality of a mechanical response. We report the preparation of soft, ordered materials referred to as liquid crystal elastomers. The direction of molecular order, known as the director, is written within local volume elements (voxels) as small as 0.0005 cubic millimeters. Locally, the director controls the inherent mechanical response (55% strain) within the material. In monoliths with spatially patterned director, thermal or chemical stimuli transform flat sheets into three-dimensional objects through controlled bending and stretching. The programmable mechanical response of these materials could yield monolithic multifunctional devices or serve as reconfigurable substrates for flexible devices in aerospace, medicine, or consumer goods.

  4. Photonic Crystal Nanolaser Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shota; Otsuka, Shota; Hachuda, Shoji; Endo, Tatsuro; Imai, Yasunori; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Misawa, Hiroaki; Baba, Toshihiko

    High-performance and low-cost sensors are critical devices for high-throughput analyses of bio-samples in medical diagnoses and life sciences. In this paper, we demonstrate photonic crystal nanolaser sensor, which detects the adsorption of biomolecules from the lasing wavelength shift. It is a promising device, which balances a high sensitivity, high resolution, small size, easy integration, simple setup and low cost. In particular with a nanoslot structure, it achieves a super-sensitivity in protein sensing whose detection limit is three orders of magnitude lower than that of standard surface-plasmon-resonance sensors. Our investigations indicate that the nanoslot acts as a protein condenser powered by the optical gradient force, which arises from the strong localization of laser mode in the nanoslot.

  5. Frequency mixing crystal

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, Christopher A.; Davis, Laura E.; Webb, Mark

    1992-01-01

    In a laser system for converting infrared laser light waves to visible light comprising a source of infrared laser light waves and means of harmoic generation associated therewith for production of light waves at integral multiples of the frequency of the original wave, the improvement of said means of harmonic generation comprising a crystal having the chemical formula X.sub.2 Y(NO.sub.3).sub.5 .multidot.2 nZ.sub.2 o wherein X is selected from the group consisting of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Tl; Y is selected from the group consisting of Sc, Y, La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Al, Ga, and In; Z is selected from the group consisting of H and D; and n ranges from 0 to 4.

  6. MCT crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.

    1988-01-01

    Convection and segregation in directional solidification and crystal growth by the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique are traditionally treated by assuming axisymmetric thermal condition on the ampoule wall. It is, however, difficult to achieve such a condition in an experimental setup. Any deviation from an axisymmetric temperature field on the wall of a vertical ampoule represents a horizontal temperature gradient. The horizontal density gradient that results from thermal expansion in the melt under this condition must lead on earth to some buoyance-driven convection, no matter what the axial (vertical) temperature distribution that is imposed on the melt. The magnitude of such convective flows for conditions representative of the MSFC mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) Bridgman setup is studied.

  7. Dual quartz crystal microbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, G.C.; Benson, N.H.; Petelenz, D.; Janata, J. )

    1995-01-15

    Construction and performance of a dual quartz crystal microbalance is described. The final probe has a dipstick configuration that is particularly suitable for sensing and monitoring applications in viscous and/or conducting liquids. The differential (heterodyned) frequency measurement substantially eliminates the deleterious effects of viscosity, temperature, and conductivity. The corresponding performance coefficients are temperature df/dT = 1.5 Hz/[degree]C, viscosity df/d[eta][sub L] = 103 Hz/cP, and conductivity df/dM = 108 Hz/M, where conductivity is expressed in terms of molarity of sodium chloride. As an example, the etching of a 2000-A-thick layer of aluminum has been monitored as a function of time. 13 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Modeling liquid crystal polymeric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez Pinto, Vianney Karina

    The main focus of this work is the theoretical and numerical study of materials that combine liquid crystal and polymer. Liquid crystal elastomers are polymeric materials that exhibit both the ordered properties of the liquid crystals and the elastic properties of rubbers. Changing the order of the liquid crystal molecules within the polymer network can induce shape change. These materials are very valuable for applications such as actuators, sensors, artificial muscles, haptic displays, etc. In this work we apply finite element elastodynamics simulations to study the temperature induced shape deformation in nematic elastomers with complex director microstructure. In another topic, we propose a novel numerical method to model the director dynamics and microstructural evolution of three dimensional nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals. Numerical studies presented in this work are in agreement with experimental observations and provide insight into the design of application devices.

  9. Computational strain gradient crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niordson, Christian F.; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical method for viscous strain gradient crystal plasticity theory is presented, which incorporates both energetic and dissipative gradient effects. The underlying minimum principles are discussed as well as convergence properties of the proposed finite element procedure. Three problems of plane crystal plasticity are studied: pure shear of a single crystal between rigid platens as well as plastic deformation around cylindrical voids in hexagonal close packed and face centered cubic crystals. Effective in-plane constitutive slip parameters for plane strain deformation of specifically oriented face centered cubic crystals are developed in terms of the crystallographic slip parameters. The effect on geometrically necessary dislocation structures introduced by plastic deformation is investigated as a function of the ratio of void radius to plasticity length scale.

  10. Texturing studies on ? bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran, D.; Subramanian, C.

    1998-08-01

    Textured crystals of 0953-2048/11/8/013/img2 have been grown by the platinum strip heater-floating zone technique. Texturing ratio and phase purity (Bi-2212) of the grown crystals were calculated from the x-ray diffraction data. Chemical compositions of the grown crystals were quantified from the inductively coupled plasma analysis. 0953-2048/11/8/013/img3 was found to be increased by 2 K for a lower level of substitution and a superconductor to semiconductor transition was observed for the higher order Y substitution. Oxygen stoichiometries of the Y substituted crystals were quantified from the iodometry titration method. Micro-twinning along the growth axis was revealed during etching studies for the cleaved crystals.

  11. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  12. Development of single crystal membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stormont, R. W.; Cocks, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The design and construction of a high pressure crystal growth chamber was accomplished which would allow the growth of crystals under inert gas pressures of 2 MN/sq m (300 psi). A novel crystal growth technique called EFG was used to grow tubes and rods of the hollandite compounds, BaMgTi7O16, K2MgTi7O16, and tubes of sodium beta-alumina, sodium magnesium-alumina, and potassium beta-alumina. Rods and tubes grown are characterized using metallographic and X-ray diffraction techniques. The hollandite compounds are found to be two or three-phase, composed of coarse grained orientated crystallites. Single crystal c-axis tubes of sodium beta-alumina were grown from melts containing excess sodium oxide. Additional experiments demonstrated that crystals of magnesia doped beta-alumina and potassium beta-alumina also can be achieved by this EFG technique.

  13. Growing single crystals in silica gel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, B.

    1970-01-01

    Two types of chemical reactions for crystal growing are discussed. The first is a metathetical reaction to produce calcium tartrate tetrahydrate crystals, the second is a decomplexation reaction to produce cuprous chloride crystals.

  14. Crystallization of Biological Macromolecules in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; Chayen, N. E.; Helliwell, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of microgravity crystallization explaining why microgravity is used, factors which affect crystallization, the method of crystallization and the environment itself. Also covered is how best to make use of microgravity and what the future might hold.

  15. Effects of impurities on crystal growth in fructose crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Y. D.; Shiau, L. D.; Berglund, K. A.

    1989-10-01

    The influence of impurities on the crystallization of anhydrous fructose from aqueous solution was studied. The growth kinetics of fructose crystals in the fructose-water-glucose and fructose-water-difructose dianhydrides systems were investigated using photomicroscopic contact nucleation techniques. Glucose is the major impurity likely to be present in fructose syrup formed during corn wet milling, while several difructose dianhydrides are formed in situ under crystallization conditions and have been proposed as a cause in the decrease of overall yields. Both sets of impurities were found to cause inhibition of crystal growth, but the mechanisms responsible in each case are different. It was found that the presence of glucose increases the solubility of fructose in water and thus lowers the supersaturation of the solution. This is probably the main effect responsible for the decrease of crystal growth. Since the molecular structures of difructose dianhydrides are similar to that of fructose, they are probably "tailor-made" impurities. The decrease of crystal growth is probably caused by the incorporation of these impurities into or adsorption to the crystal surface which would accept fructose molecules in the orientation that existed in the difructose dianhydride.

  16. Crystallization and crystal packing analysis of DNA oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Teng, M.-K.

    1988-07-01

    There are now over 30 DNA oligonucleotides that have been crystallized and their structure determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. From these studies there is a new wealth of information available to us concerning the fine details of the conformation of DNA molecules and their interactions with other ligands such as antitumor drugs and ions. In addition, the intensive efforts in attempting to crystallize many DNA fragments from several laboratories have resulted in a considerable amount of data related to the crystallization conditions for DNA molecules. Various factors such as the types of metal ion, precipitant, buffer and pH all play important roles in obtaining suitable crystals. We have also analyzed the packings of DNA molecules in the crystal lattice and found that they can be arranged into four different general categories. Those four types of packing interactions are: (1) base-base stacking plus intermolecular hydrogen bonds such as in the crystals of Z-DNA, daunomycin/DNA complex, triostin A/DNA complex, etc.; (2) base pair/A-DNA minor groove stacking, as in several DNA oligomer crystals in the A-DNA conformation; (3) guanine-guanine pairing in the minor groove of B-DNA dodecamers; (4) miscellaneous hydrogen bonding and stacking interactions. Many of those intermolecular interactions are examined in details and their possible biological relevance is discussed.

  17. DDA Computations of Porous Aggregates with Forsterite Crystals: Effects of Crystal Shape and Crystal Mass Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lindsay, Sean S.; Harker, David; Woodward, Charles; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla

    2015-08-01

    Porous aggregate grains are commonly found in cometary dust samples and are needed to model cometary IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Models for thermal emissions from comets require two forms of silicates: amorphous and crystalline. The dominant crystal resonances observed in comet SEDs are from Forsterite (Mg2SiO4). The mass fractions that are crystalline span a large range from 0.0 ≤ fcrystal ≤ 0.74. Radial transport models that predict the enrichment of the outer disk (>25 AU at 1E6 yr) by inner disk materials (crystals) are challenged to yield the highend-range of cometary crystal mass fractions. However, in current thermal models, Forsterite crystals are not incorporated into larger aggregate grains but instead only are considered as discrete crystals. A complicating factor is that Forsterite crystals with rectangular shapes better fit the observed spectral resonances in wavelength (11.0-11.15 μm, 16, 19, 23.5, 27, and 33 μm), feature asymmetry and relative height (Lindley et al. 2013) than spherically or elliptically shaped crystals. We present DDA-DDSCAT computations of IR absorptivities (Qabs) of 3 μm-radii porous aggregates with 0.13 ≤ fcrystal ≤ 0.35 and with polyhedral-shaped Forsterite crystals. We can produce crystal resonances with similar appearance to the observed resonances of comet Hale-Bopp. Also, a lower mass fraction of crystals in aggregates can produce the same spectral contrast as a higher mass fraction of discrete crystals; the 11µm and 23 µm crystalline resonances appear amplified when crystals are incorporated into aggregates composed otherwise of spherically shaped amorphous Fe-Mg olivines and pyroxenes. We show that the optical properties of a porous aggregate is not linear combination of its monomers, so aggregates need to be computed. We discuss the consequence of lowering comet crystal mass fractions by modeling IR SEDs with aggregates with crystals, and the implications for radial transport models of our

  18. Crystal-field effects in fluoride crystals for optical refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hehlen, Markus P

    2010-01-01

    The field of optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids has recently seen an important breakthrough. The cooling of a YLiF{sub 4} (YLF) crystal doped with 5 mol% Yb3+ to 155 K by Seletskiy et al [NPhot] has surpassed the lowest temperatures ({approx}170 K for {approx}100 mW cooling capacity) that are practical with commercial multi-stage thermoelectric coolers (TEC) [Glaister]. This record performance has advanced laser cooling into an application relevant regime and has put first practical optical cryocoolers within reach. The result is also relevant from a material perspective since for the first time, an Yb3+-doped crystal has outperformed an Yb3+-doped glass. The record temperature of 208 K was held by the Yb3+-doped fluorozirconate glass ZBLAN. Advanced purification and glass fabrication methods currently under development are expected to also advance ZBLAN:Yb3+ to sub-TEC temperatures. However, recent achievements with YLF:Yb3+ illustrate that crystalline materials may have two potentially game-changing advantajes over glassy materials. First, the crystalline environment reduces the inhomogeneous broadening of the Yb3+ electronic transitions as compared to a glassy matrix. The respective sharpening of the crystal-field transitions increases the peak absorption cross section at the laser excitation wavelength and allows for more efficient pumping of the Yb3+ ions, particularly at low temperatures. Second, many detrimental impurities present in the starting materials tend to be excluded from the crystal during its slow growth process, in contrast to a glass where all impurities present in the starting materials are included in the glass when it is formed by temperature quenching a melt. The ultra high purity required for laser cooling materials [PRB] therefore may be easier to realize in crystals than in glasses. Laser cooling occurs by laser excitation of a rare-earth ion followed by anti-Stokes luminescence. Each such laser-cooling cycle extracts

  19. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  20. Liquid crystal filled diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Mary Lou

    1997-12-01

    Liquid crystal technology is becoming increasingly important for flat displays in electronics, computers and TV. Most liquid crystal displays currently made have as their basic unit, two flat surfaces each coated with a transparent, conductive layer, between which a thin layer of liquid crystals is sandwiched. The work detailed in this dissertation is based on a modification of the basic liquid crystal unit and studies the properties of structures which consist of certain anisotropic liquid crystals confined between a flat substrate and a corrugated one, each substrate being transparent and having a thin trans-parent conductive coating. Without an applied electric field, the refractive indices of the liquid crystal and corrugated substrate do not match, and thus strong diffraction occurs. When an electric field is applied to the device, the liquid crystals are re-oriented so that the refractive indices now match, and the device behaves as a uniform slab of homogeneous material producing no diffraction. Rigorous coupled wave analysis was developed to design the ideal devices and analyze the performance of our experimental ones. 99% diffraction efficiencies in single wavelength polarized illumination are shown to be possible with this class of devices. The best device we fabricated showed a 62% distraction efficiency, as our fabrication process roughened the top surface of the device so that (≃30%) of the incident light was lost to scatter. Several new fabrication processes are proposed to eliminate this scatter problem, and that details of fabrication processes thus far attempted are outlined.

  1. Spatial filtering with photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maigyte, Lina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-03-15

    Photonic crystals are well known for their celebrated photonic band-gaps—the forbidden frequency ranges, for which the light waves cannot propagate through the structure. The frequency (or chromatic) band-gaps of photonic crystals can be utilized for frequency filtering. In analogy to the chromatic band-gaps and the frequency filtering, the angular band-gaps and the angular (spatial) filtering are also possible in photonic crystals. In this article, we review the recent advances of the spatial filtering using the photonic crystals in different propagation regimes and for different geometries. We review the most evident configuration of filtering in Bragg regime (with the back-reflection—i.e., in the configuration with band-gaps) as well as in Laue regime (with forward deflection—i.e., in the configuration without band-gaps). We explore the spatial filtering in crystals with different symmetries, including axisymmetric crystals; we discuss the role of chirping, i.e., the dependence of the longitudinal period along the structure. We also review the experimental techniques to fabricate the photonic crystals and numerical techniques to explore the spatial filtering. Finally, we discuss several implementations of such filters for intracavity spatial filtering.

  2. Pressure sensor using liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S. (Inventor); Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A pressure sensor includes a liquid crystal positioned between transparent, electrically conductive films (18 and 20), that are biased by a voltage (V) which induces an electric field (E) that causes the liquid crystal to assume a first state of orientation. Application of pressure (P) to a flexible, transparent film (24) causes the conductive film (20) to move closer to or farther from the conductive film (18), thereby causing a change in the electric field (E'(P)) which causes the liquid crystal to assume a second state of orientation. Polarized light (P.sub.1) is directed into the liquid crystal and transmitted or reflected to an analyzer (A or 30). Changes in the state of orientation of the liquid crystal induced by applied pressure (P) result in a different light intensity being detected at the analyzer (A or 30) as a function of the applied pressure (P). In particular embodiments, the liquid crystal is present as droplets (10) in a polymer matrix (12) or in cells (14) in a polymeric or dielectric grid (16) material in the form of a layer (13) between the electrically conductive films (18 and 20). The liquid crystal fills the open wells in the polymer matrix (12) or grid (16) only partially.

  3. Crystallization of copper metaphosphate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the valence state of copper in copper metaphosphate glass on the crystallization behavior and glass transition temperature has been investigated. The crystallization of copper metaphosphate is initiated from the surface and its main crystalline phase is copper metaphosphate (Cu(PO)3),independent of the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)). However, the crystal morphology, the relative crystallization rates, and their temperature dependences are affected by the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu (total)) ratio in the glass. On the other hand, the totally oxidized glass crystallizes from all over the surface. The relative crystallization rate of the reduced glass to the totally oxidized glass is large at low temperature, but small at high temperature. The glass transition temperature of the glass increases as the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)) ratio is raised. It is also found that the atmosphere used during heat treatment does not influence the crystallization of the reduced glass, except for the formation of a very thin CuO surface layer when heated in air.

  4. Towards improved CZT crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Ward, Donald K.; Doty, F. Patrick; Wong, Bryan Matthew; Zhou, Xiao Wang

    2010-03-01

    Past experimental efforts to improve CZT crystals for gamma spectrometer applications have been focused on reducing micron-scale defects such as tellurium inclusions and precipitates. While these micron-scale defects are important, experiments have shown that the micron-scale variations in transport can be caused by the formation and aggregation of atomic-scale defects such as dislocations and point defect clusters. Moreover, dislocation cells have been found to act as nucleation sites that cause the formation of large precipitates. To better solve the uniformity problem of CZT, atomic-scale defects must be understood and controlled. To this end, we have begun to develop an atomistic model that can be used to reveal the effects of small-scale defects and to guide experiments for reducing both atomic- and micron-scale (tellurium inclusions and precipitates) defects. Our model will be based upon a bond order potential (BOP) to enable large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of material structures at a high-fidelity level that was not possible with alternative methods. To establish how BOP improves over existing approaches, we report here our recent work on the assessment of two representative literature CdTe interatomic potentials that are currently widely used: the Stillinger-Weber (SW) potential and the Tersoff-Rockett (TR) potential. Careful examinations of phases, defects, and surfaces of the CdTe system were performed. We began our study by using both potentials to evaluate the lattice constants and cohesive energies of various Cd, Te, and CdTe phases including dimer, trimer, chain, square, rhomboid, tetrahedron, diamond-cubic (dc), simple-cubic (sc), body-centered-cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), graphite-sheet, A8, zinc-blende (zb), wurtzite (wz), NaCl, CsCl, etc. We then compared the results with our calculations using the density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical method. We also evaluated the suitability of the

  5. Changes in copper sulfate crystal habit during cooling crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulietti, M.; Seckler, M. M.; Derenzo, S.; Valarelli, J. V.

    1996-09-01

    The morphology of technical grade copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate crystals produced from batch cooling experiments in the temperature range of 70 to 30°C is described and correlated with the process conditions. A slow linear cooling rate (batch time of 90 min) predominantly caused the appearance of well-formed crystals. Exponential cooling (120 min) resulted in the additional formation of agglomerates and twins. The presence of seeds for both cooling modes led to round crystals, agglomerates and twins. Fast linear cooling (15 min) gave rise to a mixture of the former types. Broken crystals and adhering fragments were often found. Growth zoning was pronounced in seeded and linear cooling experiments. Fluid inclusions were always found and were more pronounced for larger particles. The occurrence of twinning, zoning and fluid inclusions was qualitatively explained in terms of fundamental principles.

  6. Automated protein crystal growth facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donald, Stacey

    1994-01-01

    A customer for the protein crystal growth facility fills the specially designed chamber with the correct solutions, fills the syringes with their quenching solutions, and submits the data needed for the proper growth of their crystal. To make sure that the chambers and syringes are filled correctly, a NASA representative may assist the customer. The data needed is the approximate growth time, the growth temperature, and the desired crystal size, but this data can be changed anytime from the ground, if needed. The chambers are gathered and placed into numbered slots in special drawers. Then, data is entered into a computer for each of the chambers. Technicians map out when each chamber's growth should be activated so that all of the chambers have enough time to grow. All of this data is up-linked to the space station when the previous growth session is over. Anti-vibrational containers need to be constructed for the high forces encountered during the lift off and the landing of the space shuttle, and though our team has not designed these containers, we do not feel that there is any reason why a suitable one could not be made. When the shuttle reaches the space station, an astronaut removes a drawer of quenched chambers from the growth facility and inserts a drawer of new chambers. All twelve of the drawers can be replaced in this fashion. The optical disks can also be removed this way. The old drawers are stored for the trip back to earth. Once inside the growth facility, a chamber is removed by the robot and placed in one of 144 active sites at a time previously picked by a technician. Growth begins when the chamber is inserted into an active site. Then, the sensing system starts to determine the size of the protein crystal. All during the crystal's growth, the customer can view the crystal and read all of the crystal's data, such as growth rate and crystal size. When the sensing system determines that the crystal has reached the predetermined size, the robot is

  7. Aperiodic crystals and superspace concepts.

    PubMed

    Janssen, T; Janner, A

    2014-08-01

    For several decades the lattice periodicity of crystals, as shown by Laue, was considered to be their essential property. In the early sixties of the last century compounds were found which for many reasons should be called crystals, but were not lattice periodic. This opened the field of aperiodic crystals. An overview of this development is given. Many materials of this kind were found, sometimes with very interesting properties. In the beginning the development was slow, but the number of structures of this type increased enormously. In the meantime hundreds of scientists have contributed to this field using a multi-disciplinary approach. PMID:25080242

  8. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  9. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.

  10. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.