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Sample records for csitl scintillation detectors

  1. Performance of a novel 43-cm x 43-cm flat-panel detector with CsI:Tl scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Tamura, Tomoyuki; Nokita, Makoto; Okada, Satoshi; Hayashida, Shinsuke; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2004-05-01

    We have developed a novel flat-panel detector with CsI:Tl scintillator. The detector consists of a single piece 43cm x 43cm amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) array with MIS (metal-insulator-semiconductor) photoelectric converter having a pixel pitch of 160μm coated with a needle-like crystal CsI:Tl scintillator. Signal chain was totally revised from current detector utilizing an innovative sensor technology. The novel detector and current detector were equipped to a digital radiography system allowing a quantitative and comparative study. Results show that the novel detector has a linear response covering the radiographic exposure range. It has a moderate modulation transfer function (MTF) sufficient to the radiography tasks and effective to suppress the aliasing. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was almost twice than the current detector. The result of contrast-detail phantom exposed with a 1/2x dose level is equivalent to that of current detector with a 1x dose level. These results show that performance of novel detector is superior to and expected to reduce the patient dose in half than current detector due to higher DQE and innovative sensor technology.

  2. Direct and indirect signal detection of 122 keV photons with a novel detector combining a pnCCD and a CsI(Tl) scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, D. M.; Huth, M.; Hartmann, R.; Abboud, A.; Send, S.; Conka-Nurdan, T.; Shokr, M.; Pietsch, U.; Strüder, L.

    2016-01-01

    By combining a low noise fully depleted pnCCD detector with a CsI(Tl) scintillator, an energy-dispersive area detector can be realized with a high quantum efficiency (QE) in the range from below 1 keV to above 100 keV. In direct detection mode the pnCCD exhibits a relative energy resolution of 1% at 122 keV and spatial resolution of less than 75 μm, the pixel size of the pnCCD. In the indirect detection mode, i.e. conversion of the incoming X-rays in the scintillator, the measured energy resolution was about 9-13% at 122 keV, depending on the depth of interaction in the scintillator, while the position resolution, extracted with the help of simulations, was 30 μm only. We show simulated data for incident photons of 122 keV and compare the various interaction processes and relevant physical parameters to experimental results obtained with a radioactive 57Co source.

  3. Impact of precursor purity on optical properties and radiation detection of CsI:Tl scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saengkaew, Phannee; Sanorpim, Sakuntam; Jitpukdee, Manit; Cheewajaroen, Kulthawat; Yenchai, Chadet; Thong-aram, Decho; Yordsri, Visittapong; Thanachayanont, Chanchana; Nuntawong, Noppadon

    2016-08-01

    Cesium iodide doped with thallium (CsI:Tl) crystals was grown to develop the gamma-ray detectors by using low-cost raw materials. Effect of impurities on optical properties and radiation detection performance was investigated. By a modified homemade Bridgman-Stockbarger technique, CsI:Tl samples were grown in two levels of CsI and TlI reactant materials, i.e., having as a very high purity of 99.999 % and a high purity of 99.9 %. XRD measurements indicate CsI:Tl crystals having a good quality with a dominant (110) plane. Having a cubic structure, a lattice constant of CsI crystals of 0.4574 nm and a crystallite size of 43.539 nm were obtained. From the lower-purity raw materials, calcite was found in an orange crystal with a lattice constant of 0.4560 nm and a crystallite size of 43.089 nm. By PL measurements, the optical properties of the CsI:Tl crystals were analyzed. ~540-nm-wavelength PL peak was observed from the colorless high-purity crystal, and ~600-nm-wavelength PL peak was observed from the orange crystal. The brighter PL emission was obtained from the orange crystals suggesting impurities. CsI:Tl surface morphology by SEM exhibited a smooth surface with some parallel crystal facets. For electrical properties of high-quality CsI:Tl crystals, the electrical resistances were 230 ± 16 MΩ in cross-sectional direction and 714 ± 136 MΩ in vertical direction with respect to more homogeneous crystal quality in cross-sectional direction than that in vertical direction. TEM measurement was applied to evaluate the microstructure of colorless CsI:Tl crystal with different patterns of a cubic structure. Both CsI:Tl crystals show good efficiencies and good resolutions. Maintaining the same electronic conditions and amplifications, the colorless CsI:Tl scintillators represented a higher detection efficiency at 122 keV of Co-57 of 78.4 % and the energy resolution of 23.3 % compared to the detection efficiency of 75.9 % and the energy resolution of 34.6 % of the orange

  4. Segmented crystalline scintillators: Empirical and theoretical investigation of a high quantum efficiency EPID based on an initial engineering prototype CsI(Tl) detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Amit; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao Qihua; Wang Yi; Li Yixin; Du Hong; Perna, Louis

    2006-04-15

    Modern-day radiotherapy relies on highly sophisticated forms of image guidance in order to implement increasingly conformal treatment plans and achieve precise dose delivery. One of the most important goals of such image guidance is to delineate the clinical target volume from surrounding normal tissue during patient setup and dose delivery, thereby avoiding dependence on surrogates such as bony landmarks. In order to achieve this goal, it is necessary to integrate highly efficient imaging technology, capable of resolving soft-tissue contrast at very low doses, within the treatment setup. In this paper we report on the development of one such modality, which comprises a nonoptimized, prototype electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based on a 40 mm thick, segmented crystalline CsI(Tl) detector incorporated into an indirect-detection active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI). The segmented detector consists of a matrix of 160x160 optically isolated, crystalline CsI(Tl) elements spaced at 1016 {mu}m pitch. The detector was coupled to an indirect detection-based active matrix array having a pixel pitch of 508 {mu}m, with each detector element registered to 2x2 array pixels. The performance of the prototype imager was evaluated under very low-dose radiotherapy conditions and compared to that of a conventional megavoltage AMFPI based on a Lanex Fast-B phosphor screen. Detailed quantitative measurements were performed in order to determine the x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). In addition, images of a contrast-detail phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom were also acquired. The prototype imager exhibited approximately 22 times higher zero-frequency DQE ({approx}22%) compared to that of the conventional AMFPI ({approx}1%). The measured zero-frequency DQE was found to be lower than theoretical upper limits ({approx}27%) calculated from Monte Carlo simulations, which were based solely on the x

  5. Instruments and detectors on the base of scintillator crystals ZnSe(Te), CWO, CsI(Tl) for systems of security and customs inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikov, V. D.; Opolonin, A. D.; Pashko, P. V.; Svishch, V. M.; Volkov, V. G.; Lysetskaya, E. K.; Kozin, D. N.; Smith, C.

    2005-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of detector arrays scintillator-photodiode (S-PD) and scintillator-photoreceiving device (S-PRD) used for X-ray digital radiography have shown that there exist further possibilities to increase spatial resolution of this system up to 2-3 line pairs per mm. Theoretical analysis and experimental studies show that the two-energy detection method not only allows one to detect organics on the background of metal, but also substantially increases (by 3-5 times) the detection ability of the system as a whole, especially if parameters of the S-PD pair are optimized, in particular, when ZnSe(Te) is used in the low-energy circuit. A possibility to distinguish, in principle, between substances with insignificant differences in atomic number has been theoretically proven-by transition to multi-energy radiography. 3D-imaging has been realized using S-PD detector arrays. On base of theoretical and experimental search was installation of several types of inspection systems for control objects with square size 0.4×0.6-2.5×3.5 m.

  6. Temperature dependence of CsI(Tl) gamma-ray excited scintillation characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Gamma-ray excited emission spectrum, absolute scintillation yield, rise and decay time constants, and thermoluminescence emissions of CsI(Tl) were measured at {minus}100 to +50 C, for crystals from 4 different vendors. The thermoluminescence glow curves were the only property that varied significantly from crystal to crystal; room temperature operation in current mode could be susceptible to temperature fluctuations. The CsI(Tl) emission spectrum has emission bands peaking around 400 and 560 nm; the former band disappears between {minus}50 and {minus}75 C. The RT absolute scintillation yield was calculated to be 65,500{plus_minus}4,100 photons/MeV. The two primary decay time constants increases about exponentially with inverse temperature. An ultra-fast decay component was confirmed. Applications are discussed.

  7. Investigation of the screen optics of thick CsI(Tl) detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howansky, Adrian; Peng, Boyu; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Yamashita, Masanori; Lubinsky, A. R.; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Flat panel imagers (FPI) are becoming the dominant detector technology for digital x-ray imaging. In indirect FPI, the scintillator that provides the highest image quality is Thallium (Tl) doped Cesium Iodide (CsI) with columnar structure. The maximum CsI thickness used in existing FPI is ~600 microns, due to concerns of loss in spatial resolution and light output with further increase in thickness. The goal of the present work is to investigate the screen-optics for CsI with thicknesses much larger than that used in existing FPI, so that the knowledge can be used to improve imaging performance in dose sensitive and higher energy applications, such as cone-beam CT (CBCT). Columnar CsI(Tl) scintillators up to 1 mm in thickness with different screen-optical design were investigated experimentally. Pulse height spectra (PHS) were measured to determine the Swank factor at x-ray energies between 25 and 75 keV, and to derive depth-dependent light escape efficiency i.e. gain. Detector presampling MTF, NPS and DQE were measured using a high-resolution CMOS optical sensor. Optical Monte Carlo simulation was performed to estimate optical parameters for each screen design and derive depth-dependent gain and MTF, from which overall MTF and DQE were calculated and compared with measured results. The depth-dependent imaging performance parameters were then used in a cascaded linear system model (CLSM) to investigate detector performance under screen- and sensor-side irradiation conditions. The methodology developed for understanding the optics of thick CsI(Tl) will lead to detector optimization in CBCT.

  8. Extruded plastic scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau, Alan D. Bross and Kerry L. Mellott

    1999-04-16

    As a way to lower the cost of plastic scintillation detectors, commercially available polystyrene pellets have been used in the production of scintillating materials that can be extruded into different profiles. The selection of the raw materials is discussed. Two techniques to add wavelength shifting dopants to polystyrene pellets and to extrude plastic scintillating strips are described. Data on light yield and transmittance measurements are presented.

  9. SCINTILLATION EXPOSURE RATE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spears, W.G.

    1960-11-01

    A radiation detector for gamma and x rays is described. The detector comprises a scintillation crystal disposed between a tantalum shield and the input of a photomultiplier tube, the crystal and the shield cooperating so that their combined response to a given quantity of radiation at various energy levels is substantially constant.

  10. Structured CsI(Tl) scintillators for x-ray imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarkar, V.V.; Gupta, T.K.; Miller, S.R.; Klugerman, Y.; Squillante, M.R.; Entine, G.

    1998-06-01

    The authors are developing large-area, thick, structured CsI(Tl) imaging sensors for a wide variety of X-ray imaging applications. Recently they have fabricated structured CsI(Tl) scintillators ranging from 30 {micro}m (16 mg/cm{sup 2}) to 2,000 {micro}m (900 mg/cm{sup 2}) in thickness and up to 15 x 15 cm{sup 2} in area. Even 2,000-{micro}m-thick film showed well-controlled columnar growth throughout the film. Material characterization confirmed that the film is crystalline in nature and that the stoichiometry is preserved. To improve the spatial resolution of thick films, post-deposition treatments were performed. The effect of these treatments on film characteristics was quantitatively evaluated by measuring signal output, modulation transfer function [MTF(f)], noise power spectrum [NPS(f)], and detective quantum efficiency[DQE(f)]. The data show that by proper film treatments, the film DQE(f) can be improved.

  11. Effects of film thickness on scintillation characteristics of columnar CsI:Tl films exposed to high gamma radiation doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Seema; Singh, S. G.; Sen, S.; Gadkari, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    Oriented columnar films of Tl doped CsI (CsI:Tl) of varying thicknesses from 50 μm to 1000 μm have been deposited on silica glass substrates by a thermal evaporation technique. The SEM micrographs confirmed the columnar structure of the film while the powder X-ray diffraction pattern recorded for the films revealed a preferred orientation of the grown columns along the <200> direction. Effects of high energy gamma exposure up to 1000 Gy on luminescence properties of the films were investigated. Results of radio-luminescence, photo-luminescence and scintillation studies on the films are compared with those of a CsI:Tl single crystal with similar thickness. A possible correlation between the film thicknesses and radiation damage in films has been observed.

  12. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  13. A systematic study of the performance of the CsI:Tl single-crystal scintillator under X-ray excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valais, Ioannis; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Kalivas, Nektarios; Gaitanis, Anastasios; Loudos, Georgios; Sianoudis, Ioannis; Giokaris, Nikolaos; Cavouras, Dionisis; Dimitropoulos, Nikolaos; Nomicos, Constantinos D.; Kandarakis, Ioannis; Panayiotakis, Georgios S.

    2007-02-01

    The light emission performance of the X-ray excited CsI:Tl single-crystal scintillator was investigated as a function of X-ray tube voltage and crystal thickness. Four CsI:Tl single-crystal layers (CRYOS Ltd., Ukraine) with thickness from 1 to 7 mm were irradiated employing two X-ray tube voltage ranges: (i) the 22-45 kV (molybdenum anode-molybdenum filter (Mo/Mo)) range, employed in mammographic imaging and (ii) the 40-140 kV (tungsten anode-aluminum filter) tube voltage range, used in general X-ray projection and tomographic imaging. The X-ray luminescence efficiency (light emission spectrum over incident X-ray fluence) of the crystals was determined by performing light emission spectrum and X-ray exposure measurements. In addition, the intrinsic conversion efficiency (fraction of the absorbed X-ray converted into light) and the spectral compatibility to various optical detectors were estimated from these measurements. The luminescence efficiency was found to be a nonlinear function of crystal thickness and of X-ray tube voltage. Peak efficiency (29.5 μWm -2/mRs) was observed for the 5 mm thick crystal at 140 kV. A secondary efficiency peak was observed at 42 kV (Mo anode) probably due to the effect of the K-photoelectric absorption edge (at 33 and 35 keV for Cs and I, respectively). For the thicker (7 mm) crystal, the efficiency was found to decrease due to light attenuation effects within the scintillator mass.

  14. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, Stephanie A.; Chiles, Marion M.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations.

  15. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.

    1994-05-31

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 10 figs.

  16. A compact, discrete CsI(Tl) scintillator/Si photodiode gamma camera for breast cancer imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, Gregory J.

    2000-12-01

    Recent clinical evaluations of scintimammography (radionuclide breast imaging) are promising and suggest that this modality may prove a valuable complement to X-ray mammography and traditional breast cancer detection and diagnosis techniques. Scintimammography, however, typically has difficulty revealing tumors that are less than 1 cm in diameter, are located in the medial part of the breast, or are located in the axillary nodes. These shortcomings may in part be due to the use of large, conventional Anger cameras not optimized for breast imaging. In this thesis I present compact single photon camera technology designed specifically for scintimammography which strives to alleviate some of these limitations by allowing better and closer access to sites of possible breast tumors. Specific applications are outlined. The design is modular, thus a camera of the desired size and geometry can be constructed from an array (or arrays) of individual modules and a parallel hole lead collimator for directional information. Each module consists of: (1) an array of 64 discrete, optically-isolated CsI(Tl) scintillator crystals 3 x 3 x 5 mm{sup 3} in size, (2) an array of 64 low-noise Si PIN photodiodes matched 1-to-1 to the scintillator crystals, (3) an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that amplifies the 64 photodiode signals and selects the signal with the largest amplitude, and (4) connectors and hardware for interfacing the module with a motherboard, thereby allowing straightforward computer control of all individual modules within a camera.

  17. High-DQE EPIDs based on thick, segmented BGO and CsI:Tl scintillators: Performance evaluation at extremely low dose

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Perna, Louis

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) based on active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) have become the gold standard for portal imaging and are currently being investigated for megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and cone-beam digital tomosynthesis (CBDT). However, the practical realization of such volumetric imaging techniques is constrained by the relatively low detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of AMFPI-based EPIDs at radiotherapy energies, ∼1% at 6 MV. In order to significantly improve DQE, the authors are investigating thick, segmented scintillators, consisting of 2D matrices of scintillating crystals separated by septal walls. Methods: A newly constructed segmented BGO scintillator (11.3 mm thick) and three segmented CsI:Tl scintillators (11.4, 25.6, and 40.0 mm thick) were evaluated using a 6 MV photon beam. X-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, DQE, and phantom images were obtained using prototype EPIDs based on the four scintillators. Results: The BGO and CsI:Tl prototypes were found to exhibit improvement in DQE ranging from ∼12 to 25 times that of a conventional AMFPI-based EPID at zero spatial frequency. All four prototype EPIDs provide significantly improved contrast resolution at extremely low doses, extending down to a single beam pulse. In particular, the BGO prototype provides contrast resolution comparable to that of the conventional EPID, but at 20 times less dose, with spatial resolution sufficient for identifying the boundaries of low-contrast objects. For this prototype, however, the BGO scintillator exhibited an undesirable radiation-induced variation in x-ray sensitivity. Conclusions: Prototype EPIDs based on thick, segmented BGO and CsI:Tl scintillators provide significantly improved portal imaging performance at extremely low dose (i.e., down to 1 beam pulse corresponding to ∼0.022 cGy), creating the possibility of soft-tissue visualization using MV CBCT and CBDT at

  18. High-DQE EPIDs based on thick, segmented BGO and CsI:Tl scintillators: Performance evaluation at extremely low dose

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yi; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Perna, Louis

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) based on active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) have become the gold standard for portal imaging and are currently being investigated for megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and cone-beam digital tomosynthesis (CBDT). However, the practical realization of such volumetric imaging techniques is constrained by the relatively low detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of AMFPI-based EPIDs at radiotherapy energies, {approx}1% at 6 MV. In order to significantly improve DQE, the authors are investigating thick, segmented scintillators, consisting of 2D matrices of scintillating crystals separated by septal walls. Methods: A newly constructed segmented BGO scintillator (11.3 mm thick) and three segmented CsI:Tl scintillators (11.4, 25.6, and 40.0 mm thick) were evaluated using a 6 MV photon beam. X-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, DQE, and phantom images were obtained using prototype EPIDs based on the four scintillators. Results: The BGO and CsI:Tl prototypes were found to exhibit improvement in DQE ranging from {approx}12 to 25 times that of a conventional AMFPI-based EPID at zero spatial frequency. All four prototype EPIDs provide significantly improved contrast resolution at extremely low doses, extending down to a single beam pulse. In particular, the BGO prototype provides contrast resolution comparable to that of the conventional EPID, but at 20 times less dose, with spatial resolution sufficient for identifying the boundaries of low-contrast objects. For this prototype, however, the BGO scintillator exhibited an undesirable radiation-induced variation in x-ray sensitivity. Conclusions: Prototype EPIDs based on thick, segmented BGO and CsI:Tl scintillators provide significantly improved portal imaging performance at extremely low dose (i.e., down to 1 beam pulse corresponding to {approx}0.022 cGy), creating the possibility of soft-tissue visualization using MV CBCT

  19. Validation of the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform for modelling a CsI(Tl) scintillation camera dedicated to small-animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, D; Buvat, I; Loudos, G; Strul, D; Santin, G; Giokaris, N; Donnarieix, D; Maigne, L; Spanoudaki, V; Styliaris, S; Staelens, S; Breton, V

    2004-01-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are increasingly used in scintigraphic imaging to model imaging systems and to develop and assess tomographic reconstruction algorithms and correction methods for improved image quantitation. GATE (GEANT4 application for tomographic emission) is a new Monte Carlo simulation platform based on GEANT4 dedicated to nuclear imaging applications. This paper describes the GATE simulation of a prototype of scintillation camera dedicated to small-animal imaging and consisting of a CsI(Tl) crystal array coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The relevance of GATE to model the camera prototype was assessed by comparing simulated 99mTc point spread functions, energy spectra, sensitivities, scatter fractions and image of a capillary phantom with the corresponding experimental measurements. Results showed an excellent agreement between simulated and experimental data: experimental spatial resolutions were predicted with an error less than 100 microns. The difference between experimental and simulated system sensitivities for different source-to-collimator distances was within 2%. Simulated and experimental scatter fractions in a [98-182 keV] energy window differed by less than 2% for sources located in water. Simulated and experimental energy spectra agreed very well between 40 and 180 keV. These results demonstrate the ability and flexibility of GATE for simulating original detector designs. The main weakness of GATE concerns the long computation time it requires: this issue is currently under investigation by the GEANT4 and the GATE collaborations. PMID:15083671

  20. Validation of the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform for modelling a CsI(Tl) scintillation camera dedicated to small-animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaro, D.; Buvat, I.; Loudos, G.; Strul, D.; Santin, G.; Giokaris, N.; Donnarieix, D.; Maigne, L.; Spanoudaki, V.; Styliaris, S.; Staelens, S.; Breton, V.

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are increasingly used in scintigraphic imaging to model imaging systems and to develop and assess tomographic reconstruction algorithms and correction methods for improved image quantitation. GATE (GEANT4 application for tomographic emission) is a new Monte Carlo simulation platform based on GEANT4 dedicated to nuclear imaging applications. This paper describes the GATE simulation of a prototype of scintillation camera dedicated to small-animal imaging and consisting of a CsI(Tl) crystal array coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The relevance of GATE to model the camera prototype was assessed by comparing simulated 99mTc point spread functions, energy spectra, sensitivities, scatter fractions and image of a capillary phantom with the corresponding experimental measurements. Results showed an excellent agreement between simulated and experimental data: experimental spatial resolutions were predicted with an error less than 100 µm. The difference between experimental and simulated system sensitivities for different source-to-collimator distances was within 2%. Simulated and experimental scatter fractions in a [98-182 keV] energy window differed by less than 2% for sources located in water. Simulated and experimental energy spectra agreed very well between 40 and 180 keV. These results demonstrate the ability and flexibility of GATE for simulating original detector designs. The main weakness of GATE concerns the long computation time it requires: this issue is currently under investigation by the GEANT4 and the GATE collaborations.

  1. Characterization of prototype full-field breast tomosynthesis by using a CMOS array coupled with a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Gu; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-Seul; Choi, Young-Wook; Ham, Tae-Hee; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a prototype full-field digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system by using a complementary-metal-oxide semiconductive (CMOS) array coupled with a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator. The imaging system consists of a matrix with an active detector area of 3072 × 3888 pixels and a pixel pitch of 74.8 µm. For tomosynthesis imaging, the X-ray tube is automatically rotated in 3° increments in the shoot mode to acquire projection images at 15 different angles over a ±21° angular range in less than 10 s. The digital detector is stationary during image acquisition. In this research, we also carried out evaluation studies to characterize the performance of the system in different operational modes designed for the DBT system, e.g., binning mode and the range of view angles, in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectra (NNPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE): The MTF value measured at the Nyquist frequency was 18.49%, the NNPS value at zero frequency was about 1.93 × 10-5 (mm2), and the maximum value of DQE was about 47.09% for the full resolution. For the pixel binning mode, the MTF decreased more than it did for the full resolution mode due to the increased effective pixel size. However, the full resolution mode was more sensitive to noise than the pixel binning mode. For the scan angle of the DBT system, oblique incidence of X-rays on a detector caused blurring that reduced resolution. These results seem to be promising for the use of the DBT system in potential clinical applications and will provide important information when comparisons with other DBT systems are made.

  2. Large volume flow-through scintillating detector

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russ E.; Fowler, Malcolm M.

    1995-01-01

    A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

  3. PMT calibration of a scintillation detector using primary scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, E. D. C.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Yahlali, N.; Pérez, J.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Camargo, M.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopez-March, N.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Martínez Lema, G.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot Guinot, M.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R.; White, J.; Monteiro, C. M. B.

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the calibration of PMTs in scintillation detectors, inducing single electron response on the PMT from primary scintillation produced by x-ray interaction. The results agree with those obtained by the commonly used single electron response (SER) method, which uses LED light pulses to induce the PMT SER. The use of the primary scintillation for PMT calibration will be convenient in situations where the PMT is already in situ, when it becomes difficult or even impossible to apply the SER method, e.g. in commercial sealed scintillator/PMT devices. Furthermore, we have experimentally investigated the possibility of fitting the high-charge tail of the PMT SER pulse-height distribution to an exponential function, inferring the PMT gain from the inverse of the exponent. The results of the exponential fit method agree with those obtained by the SER method for pulse-height distributions resulting from an average number of around 1.0 photoelectrons reaching the first dynode per light/scintillation pulse. The SER method has higher precision and, therefore, is used in a larger number of applications. Nevertheless, the exponential fit method will be useful in situations where the single photoelectron peak is under the background or noise peak and it may present an alternative, simple way, for relative gain calibration of PMT arrays as well as for monitoring the PMT gain variations.

  4. New design of a structured CsI(Tl) screen for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Tipnis, Sameer V.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy B.; Miller, Stuart R.; Karellas, Andrew; Vedantham, Srinivasan

    2003-06-01

    Columnar CsI(Tl) screens are now routinely used for digital x-ray imaging in a wide variety of applications such as mammography, dental radiography, and non-destructive testing. While commercially available CsI(Tl) screens exhibit excellent properties, it is possible to significantly improve their performance. Here, we report on a new design of a columnar CsI(Tl) screen. Specifically, columnar CsI(Tl) screens were subjected to mechanical pixelation for minimizing the long range spread of scintillation light within the film, thus enhancing spatial and contrast resolution, and increasing the detective quantum efficiency (DQE(f)) of the digital imaging detector. To date we have fabricated up to 200 μm thick pixelated CsI(Tl) screens for mammography, and characterized their performance using a CCD camera. This paper presents a comparison of the new pixelated CsI(Tl) screens, conventional columnar CsI(Tl) screens, and Gd2O2S(Tb) screens. The data show that pixelated screens substantially improve the DQE(f) of the digital imaging system.

  5. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  6. Iterative Monte Carlo simulation with the Compton kinematics-based GEB in a plastic scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chankyu; Kim, Yewon; Moon, Myungkook; Cho, Gyuseong

    2015-09-01

    Plastic scintillators have been used for gamma ray detection in the fields of dosimetry and homeland security because of their desired characteristics such as a fast decay time, a low production cost, availability in a large-scale, and a tissue-equivalence. Gaussian energy broadening (GEB) in MCNP simulation is an effective treatment for tallies to calculate the broadened response function of a detector similarly to measured spectra. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a photopeak has been generally used to compute input parameters required for the GEB treatment. However, it is hard to find the photopeak in measured gamma spectra with plastic scintillators so that computation of the input parameters for the GEB has to be taken with another way. In this study, an iterative method for the GEB treated MCNP simulation to calculate the response function of a plastic scintillator is suggested. Instead of the photopeak, Compton maximum and Compton edge were used to estimate energy broadening in the measured spectra and to determine the GEB parameters. In a demonstration with a CsI(Tl) scintillator, the proposed iterative simulation showed the similar gamma spectra to the existing method using photopeaks. The proposed method was then applied to a polystyrene scintillator, and the simulation result were in agreement with the measured spectra with only a little iteration.

  7. Search for solar axions with CsI(Tl) crystal detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Y. S.; Park, H. K.; Bhang, H.; Choi, J. H.; Choi, S.; Hahn, I. S.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, H. W.; Kang, W. G.; Kim, B. H.; Kim, G. B.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K. W.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, J. K.; Leonard, D. S.; Li, J.; Myung, S. S.; Olsen, S. L.; So, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    The results of a search for solar axions from the Korea Invisible Mass Search (KIMS) experiment at the Yangyang Underground Laboratory are presented. Low-energy electron-recoil events would be produced by conversion of solar axions into electrons via the axio-electric effect in CsI(Tl) crystals. Using data from an exposure of 34,596 kg · days, we set a 90 % confidence level upper limit on the axion-electron coupling, g ae , of 1 .39 × 10 -11 for an axion mass less than 1 keV/c2. This limit is lower than the indirect solar neutrino bound, and fully excludes QCD axions heavier than 0.48 eV/c2 and 140.9 eV/c2 for the DFSZ and KSVZ models respectively.

  8. SENTIRAD—An innovative personal radiation detector based on a scintillation detector and a silicon photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osovizky, A.; Ginzburg, D.; Manor, A.; Seif, R.; Ghelman, M.; Cohen-Zada, I.; Ellenbogen, M.; Bronfenmakher, V.; Pushkarsky, V.; Gonen, E.; Mazor, T.; Cohen, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The alarming personal radiation detector (PRD) is a device intended for Homeland Security (HLS) applications. This portable device is designed to be worn or carried by security personnel to detect photon-emitting radioactive materials for the purpose of crime prevention. PRD is required to meet the scope of specifications defined by various HLS standards for radiation detection. It is mandatory that the device be sensitive and simultaneously small, pocket-sized, of robust mechanical design and carriable on the user's body. To serve these specialized purposes and requirements, we developed the SENTIRAD, a new radiation detector designed to meet the performance criteria established for counterterrorist applications. SENTIRAD is the first commercially available PRD based on a CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal that is optically coupled with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) serving as a light sensor. The rapidly developing technology of SiPM, a multipixel semiconductor photodiode that operates in Geiger mode, has been thoroughly investigated in previous studies. This paper presents the design considerations, constraints and radiological performance relating to the SENTIRAD radiation sensor.

  9. The design of the TASD (totally active scintillator detector) prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Mefodiev, A. V. Kudenko, Yu. G.

    2015-12-15

    Totally active and magnetic segmented scintillation neutrino detectors are developed for the nextgeneration accelerator neutrino experiments. Such detectors will incorporate scintillation modules with scintillation counters that form X and Y planes. A single counter is a 7 × 10 × 90 mm{sup 3} scintillation bar with gluedin wavelength-shifting fibers and micropixel avalanche photodiodes. The results of measurements of the parameters of these detectors are presented.

  10. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and

  11. Time resolution of a scintillating fiber detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, S.; Toeda, T.; Daito, I.; Doushita, N.; Hasegawa, T.; Horikawa, N.; Iwata, T.; Kibe, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Miyachi, Y.; Noboriguchi, K.; Takabayashi, N.; Tohyama, T.; Wakai, A.

    1999-07-01

    The performance of scintillating fiber detectors with 2 m long light guides was investigated for COMPASS experiment, using a 450 MeV/ c electron beam.Prototypes consisting of 0.5 mm diameter fibers (Kuraray SCSF-38 single-cladding) with the position-sensitive photomultipliers H6568 (Hamamatsu) were constructed for the test. The time resolution of σ˜430 ps was obtained with about 10 photoelectrons for the prototype of 10-layers structure.

  12. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  13. Nanocomposite scintillator, detector, and method

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; McKigney, Edward A.; Muenchausen, Ross E.; Bennett, Bryan L.

    2009-04-28

    A compact includes a mixture of a solid binder and at least one nanopowder phosphor chosen from yttrium oxide, yttrium tantalate, barium fluoride, cesium fluoride, bismuth germanate, zinc gallate, calcium magnesium pyrosilicate, calcium molybdate, calcium chlorovanadate, barium titanium pyrophosphate, a metal tungstate, a cerium doped nanophosphor, a bismuth doped nanophosphor, a lead doped nanophosphor, a thallium doped sodium iodide, a doped cesium iodide, a rare earth doped pyrosilicate, or a lanthanide halide. The compact can be used in a radiation detector for detecting ionizing radiation.

  14. Liquid Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stefanie N.; Learned, John G.

    2010-03-30

    Large open volume (not segmented) liquid scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measurements, in the MeV energy region. We describe the potential employment of large detectors (>1 kiloton) for studies of higher energy neutrino interactions, such as cosmic rays and long-baseline experiments. When considering the physics potential of new large instruments the possibility of doing useful measurements with higher energy neutrino interactions has been overlooked. Here we take into account Fermat's principle, which states that the first light to reach each PMT will follow the shortest path between that PMT and the point of origin. We describe the geometry of this process, and the resulting wavefront, which we are calling the 'Fermat surface', and discuss methods of using this surface to extract directional track information and particle identification. This capability may be demonstrated in the new long-baseline neutrino beam from Jaeri accelerator to the KamLAND detector in Japan. Other exciting applications include the use of Hanohano as a movable long-baseline detector in this same beam, and LENA in Europe for future long-baseline neutrino beams from CERN. Also, this methodology opens up the question as to whether a large liquid scintillator detector should be given consideration for use in a future long-baseline experiment from Fermilab to the DUSEL underground laboratory at Homestake.

  15. Neutron spectroscopy with scintillation detectors using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica

    The purpose of this research was to study neutron spectroscopy using the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. This scintillator material provided a novel means of detection for fast neutrons, without the disadvantages of traditional liquid scintillation materials. EJ-299-33A provided a more durable option to these materials, making it less likely to be damaged during handling. Unlike liquid scintillators, this plastic scintillator was manufactured from a non-toxic material, making it safer to use, as well as easier to design detectors. The material was also manufactured with inherent pulse shape discrimination abilities, making it suitable for use in neutron detection. The neutron spectral unfolding technique was developed in two stages. Initial detector response function modeling was carried out through the use of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The response functions were developed for a monoenergetic neutron flux. Wavelets were then applied to smooth the response function. The spectral unfolding technique was applied through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB. Verification of the unfolding technique was carried out through the use of experimentally determined response functions. These were measured on the neutron source based on the Van de Graff accelerator at the University of Kentucky. This machine provided a range of monoenergetic neutron beams between 0.1 MeV and 24 MeV, making it possible to measure the set of response functions of the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detector to neutrons of specific energies. The response of a plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) source was measured using the source available at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The neutron spectrum reconstruction was carried out using the experimentally measured response functions. Experimental data was collected in the list mode of the waveform digitizer. Post processing of this data focused on the pulse shape discrimination analysis of the recorded response functions to remove the

  16. Temperature dependence of BCF plastic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, Landon; Beddar, Sam

    2013-05-01

    We examined temperature dependence in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) made of BCF-60 or BCF-12 scintillating fiber coupled to optical fiber with cyanoacrylate. PSDs were subjected to a range of temperatures using a temperature-controlled water bath and irradiated at each temperature while either the dose was measured using a CCD camera or the spectral output was measured using a spectrometer. The spectrometer was used to examine the intensity and spectral distribution of scintillation light emitted by the PSDs, Cerenkov light generated within the PSD, and light transmitted through an isolated optical coupling. BCF-60 PSDs exhibited a 0.50% decrease and BCF-12 PSDs a 0.09% decrease in measured dose per °C increase, relative to dose measured at 22 °C. Spectrometry revealed that the total intensity of the light generated by BCF-60 and BCF-12 PSDs decreased by 0.32% and 0.13%, respectively, per °C increase. The spectral distribution of the light changed slightly with temperature for both PSDs, accounting for the disparity between the change in measured dose and total light output. The generation of Cerenkov light was temperature independent. However, light transmitted through optical coupling between the scintillator and the optical fiber also exhibited temperature dependence.

  17. Particle gamma correlations in 12C measured with the CsI(Tl) based detector array CHIMERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardella, G.; Acosta, L.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Berceanu, I.; Castoldi, A.; De Filippo, E.; Dell`Aquila, D.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Guazzoni, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Minniti, T.; Morgana, E.; Norella, S.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Pop, A.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2015-11-01

    The gamma decay of the first excited 4.44 MeV 2+level of 12C, populated by inelastic scattering of proton and 16O beams at various energies was studied in order to test γ-ray detection efficiency and the quality of angular distribution information given by the CsI(Tl) detectors of the 4π CHIMERA array. The γ-decay was measured in coincidence with ejectile scattered particles in an approximately 4π geometry allowing to extract the angular distribution in the reference frame of recoiling 12C target. The typical sin2 (2θ) behavior of angular distribution was observed in the case of 16O beam. Besides that, for the proton beam, in order to explain the observed distribution, the addition of an incoherent flat contribution was required. This latter is the effect of proton spin flip events allowing the population of M=±1 magnetic substates, that is not possible in reactions induced by 16O beam. A comparison with previously collected data, obtained measuring only in and out of plane proton-γ-ray coincidences, confirms the good quality of the angular distribution information given by the apparatus. Possible applications with radioactive beams are outlined.

  18. Energy resolution of small scintillation detectors with SiPM light readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzicka, M.; Moszyński, M.; Szczęśniak, T.; Kapusta, M.; Szawłowski, M.; Wolski, D.

    2013-02-01

    The development of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) with a large number of APD cells and improved linearity of the pulse height response prompted interest in their application to gamma spectrometry with scintillators. Hamamatsu MPPC sensors equipped with 3600 and 14400 APD cells were chosen in our study because of their well pronounced single photoelectron spectra, which allowed us to precisely measure the photoelectron numbers (PHE) or fired APD cells and then to discuss, in a quantitative manner, the obtainable energy resolution. The studied detectors were first characterized in direct detection of laser light pulses and then in gamma spectroscopy with LFS and CsI:Tl crystals. In the study with the laser light pulses the linearity of the MPPC response versus a light pulse intensity monitored with PMT was measured. Two different methods were used for an evaluation of the MPPC response expressed in the number of photoelectrons (PHE) generated by light illumination. The direct method (PHEdir), based on the comparison of the light peak position to that of the single photoelectron peak, determined the upper limit of the PHE. The lower limit of the PHE was derived from an analysis of the measured pulse height resolution under the assumption of Poisson statistics and MPPC excess noise factor (ENF) of 1. Furthermore, the ENF of the MPPC is discussed with respect to the contributions of device dead time, optical cross-talk and after-pulses to the results obtained. In the scintillation tests, measurements of energy resolution and non-proportionality of the light yield were performed with LFS and CsI:Tl crystals, and both types of 3 × 3 mm MPPC detectors were used for light readout. The results are discussed in a quantitative manner based on the measured PHE.

  19. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of excitation density dependent scintillation in CsI and CsI(Tl)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Williams, Richard; Grim, Joel; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2013-08-15

    Nonlinear quenching of electron-hole pairs in the denser regions of ionization tracks created by γ-ray and high-energy electrons is a likely cause of the light yield nonproportionality of many inorganic scintillators. Therefore, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations were carried out to investigate the scintillation properties of pure and thallium-doped CsI as a function of electron-hole pair density. The availability of recent experimental data on the excitation density dependence of the light yield of CsI following ultraviolet excitation allowed for an improved parameterization of the interactions between self-trapped excitons (STE) in the KMC model via dipole-dipole Förster transfer. The KMC simulations reveal that nonlinear quenching occurs very rapidly (within a few picoseconds) in the early stages of the scintillation process. In addition, the simulations predict that the concentration of thallium activators can affect the extent of nonlinear quenching as it has a direct influence on the STE density through STE dissociation and electron scavenging. This improved model will enable more realistic simulations of the nonproportional γ-ray and electron response of inorganic scintillators.

  20. High spatial resolution radiation detectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, T

    1995-05-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) as a large-area thin film semiconductor with ease of doping and low-cost fabrication capability has given a new impetus to the field of imaging sensors; its high radiation resistance also makes it a good material for radiation detectors. In addition, large-area microelectronics based on a-Si:H or polysilicon can be made with full integration of peripheral circuits, including readout switches and shift registers on the same substrate. Thin a-Si:H p-i-n photodiodes coupled to suitable scintillators are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. The response speed of CsI/a-Si:H diode combinations to individual particulate radiation is limited by the scintillation light decay since the charge collection time of the diode is very short (< 10ns). The reverse current of the detector is analyzed in term of contact injection, thermal generation, field enhanced emission (Poole-Frenkel effect), and edge leakage. A good collection efficiency for a diode is obtained by optimizing the p layer of the diode thickness and composition. The CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to an a-Si:H photodiode detector shows a capability for detecting minimum ionizing particles with S/N {approximately}20. In such an arrangement a p-i-n diode is operated in a photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). In addition, a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3--8 for shaping times of 1 {micro}s. The mechanism of the formation of structured CsI scintillator layers is analyzed. Initial nucleation in the deposited layer is sensitive to the type of substrate medium, with imperfections generally catalyzing nucleation. Therefore, the microgeometry of a patterned substrate has a significant effect on the structure of the CsI growth.

  1. High spatial resolution radiation detectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, T.

    1995-05-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) as a large-area thin film semiconductor with ease of doping and low-cost fabrication capability has given a new impetus to the field of imaging sensors; its high radiation resistance also makes it a good material for radiation detectors. In addition, large-area microelectronics based on a-Si:H or polysilicon can be made with full integration of peripheral circuits, including readout switches and shift registers on the same substrate. Thin a-Si:H p-i-n photodiodes coupled to suitable scintillators are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. The response speed of CsI/a-Si:H diode combinations to individual particulate radiation is limited by the scintillation light decay since the charge collection time of the diode is very short (less than 10 ns). The reverse current of the detector is analyzed in term of contact injection, thermal generation, field enhanced emission (Poole-Frenkel effect), and edge leakage. A good collection efficiency for a diode is obtained by optimizing the p layer of the diode thickness and composition. The CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to an a-Si:H photodiode detector shows a capability for detecting minimum ionizing particles with S/N approx. 20. In such an arrangement a p-i-n diode is operated in a photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). In addition, a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3--8 for shaping times of 1 micro s. The mechanism of the formation of structured CsI scintillator layers is analyzed. Initial nucleation in the deposited layer is sensitive to the type of substrate medium, with imperfections generally catalyzing nucleation. Therefore, the microgeometry of a patterned substrate has a significant effect on the structure of the CsI growth.

  2. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers, and

  3. Characteristics of a CsI(Tl) Compton-suppressed clover detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N. T.; Lei, X. G.; Guo, Y. X.; Zhou, X. H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ma, F.; Li, S. C.; Liu, M. L.; Zheng, Y.; Fang, Y. D.; Hua, W.; Guo, S.; Qiang, Y. H.; Wang, J. G.; Gao, B. S.; Xu, S. W.; Chen, S. Z.

    2013-03-01

    The performance of a four fold segmented clover detector coupled to a CsI-suppressed shield has been tested using several standard radioactive sources. The summing characteristics, hit patterns and absolute efficiency were measured in both crystal and clover modes. Peak-to-total ratios of 57.3% and 45.6% in suppressed clover mode have been determined for 137Cs and 60Co sources, respectively. A Geant4 simulation of the suppressed clover detector, including the segmentation of the germanium crystals, has been created, and the simulation results agreed very well with the experimental data.

  4. Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benziger, Jay B.; Calaprice, Frank P.

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors are capable of providing spectral yields of the low energy solar neutrinos. These detectors require > 100 tons of liquid scintillator with high optical and radiopurity. In this paper requirements for low-energy neutrino detection by liquid scintillation are specified and the procedures to achieve low backgrounds in large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos are reviewed. The designs, operations and achievements of Borexino, KamLAND and SNO+ in measuring the low-energy solar neutrino fluxes are reviewed.

  5. Fundamental limits of scintillation detector timing precision.

    PubMed

    Derenzo, Stephen E; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A(-1/2) more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA(-1/2). An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons ns(-1). A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons ns(-1). PMID:24874216

  6. Fundamental Limits of Scintillation Detector Timing Precision

    PubMed Central

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A−1/2 more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA−1/2. An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. PMID:24874216

  7. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Future role of scintillation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurfess, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The future role of conventional scintillation detector telescopes for line gamma-ray astronomy is discussed. Although the energy resolution of the germanium detectors now being used by several groups is clearly desirable, the larger effective areas and higher efficiencies available with scintillation detectors is advantageous for many observations. This is particularly true for those observations of astrophysical phenomena where significant line broadening is expected.

  8. Segmented crystalline scintillators: An initial investigation of high quantum efficiency detectors for megavoltage x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Amit; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao Qihua; Li Yixin; Su Zhong; Wang Yi; Yamamoto, Jin; Du Hong; Cunningham, Ian; Klugerman, Misha; Shah, Kanai

    2005-10-15

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) based on indirect detection, active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPIs) have become the technology of choice for geometric verification of patient localization and dose delivery in external beam radiotherapy. However, current AMFPI EPIDs, which are based on powdered-phosphor screens, make use of only {approx}2% of the incident radiation, thus severely limiting their imaging performance as quantified by the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) ({approx}1%, compared to {approx}75% for kilovoltage AMFPIs). With the rapidly increasing adoption of image-guided techniques in virtually every aspect of radiotherapy, there exist strong incentives to develop high-DQE megavoltage x-ray imagers, capable of providing soft-tissue contrast at very low doses in megavoltage tomographic and, potentially, projection imaging. In this work we present a systematic theoretical and preliminary empirical evaluation of a promising, high-quantum-efficiency, megavoltage x-ray detector design based on a two-dimensional matrix of thick, optically isolated, crystalline scintillator elements. The detector is coupled with an indirect detection-based active matrix array, with the center-to-center spacing of the crystalline elements chosen to match the pitch of the underlying array pixels. Such a design enables the utilization of a significantly larger fraction of the incident radiation (up to 80% for a 6 MV beam), through increases in the thickness of the crystalline elements, without loss of spatial resolution due to the spread of optical photons. Radiation damage studies were performed on test samples of two candidate scintillator materials, CsI(Tl) and BGO, under conditions relevant to radiotherapy imaging. A detailed Monte Carlo-based study was performed in order to examine the signal, spatial spreading, and noise properties of the absorbed energy for several segmented detector configurations. Parameters studied included scintillator material, septal wall

  9. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  10. Neutron detector using lithiated glass-scintillating particle composite

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Steven; Stephan, Andrew C.; Dai, Sheng; Im, Hee-Jung

    2009-09-01

    A neutron detector composed of a matrix of scintillating particles imbedded in a lithiated glass is disclosed. The neutron detector detects the neutrons by absorbing the neutron in the lithium-6 isotope which has been enriched from the natural isotopic ratio to a commercial ninety five percent. The utility of the detector is optimized by suitably selecting scintillating particle sizes in the range of the alpha and the triton. Nominal particle sizes are in the range of five to twenty five microns depending upon the specific scintillating particle selected.

  11. Spatial response characterization of He-4 scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Ryan P.; Steinberg, Noah; Murer, David; Ray, Heather; Jordan, Kelly A.

    2015-09-01

    The spatial response of pressurized helium-4 fast neutron scintillation detectors is characterized using collimated neutron source measurements and MCNPX-PoliMi simulations. A method for localizing the position of each detected event is also demonstrated using the two-sided photomultiplier readout. Results show that the position of particle interaction along the axis of the active volume has a measurable effect on the scintillation light response of the detector. An algorithm is presented that uses the probability distribution of relative interaction positions to perform source localization, further demonstrating the applicability of these detectors as tools for the detector of hidden shielded nuclear material.

  12. Rayleigh scattering of linear alkylbenzene in large liquid scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiang Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yangheng; Wurm, Michael; Zhang, Qingmin; Ding, Yayun; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang

    2015-07-15

    Rayleigh scattering poses an intrinsic limit for the transparency of organic liquid scintillators. This work focuses on the Rayleigh scattering length of linear alkylbenzene (LAB), which will be used as the solvent of the liquid scintillator in the central detector of the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory. We investigate the anisotropy of the Rayleigh scattering in LAB, showing that the resulting Rayleigh scattering length will be significantly shorter than reported before. Given the same overall light attenuation, this will result in a more efficient transmission of photons through the scintillator, increasing the amount of light collected by the photosensors and thereby the energy resolution of the detector.

  13. Characterizing and validating the PROSPECT segmented scintillator detector design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcini, Danielle; Prospect Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PROSPECT experiment will use two segmented liquid scintillator detectors positioned 7-20m from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to perform a search for eV-scale sterile neutrinos and measure the antineutrino spectrum of uranium-235. A multi-year R&D program focused on background studies at the HFIR reactor, lithium-loaded liquid scintillator development, and characterization of multiple prototype detectors has culminated in the design of a segmented, 3-ton liquid scintillator detector for PROSPECT Phase I. This detector design is being validated with a 50 liter, 2-segment prototype detector, PROSPECT-50. We will report results of on-going performance and calibration studies and discuss implications for the PROSPECT physics program.

  14. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  15. Characterization and testing of EJ-309 and Stilbene scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baramsai, B.; Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Rusev, G.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-09-01

    A new neutron detector array (NEUANCE) is under development at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). After completion, NEUANCE will be installed in the central cavity of the 3.6π Υ-ray detector array DANCE located at the Lujan Center of LANSCE. The detector system, with simultaneous neutron and -ray detection capability, will be used to study neutron-induced capture and session reactions. The response of a EJ-309 scintillation detector to Υ-ray and neutron radiation was measured using the standard Υ-ray and 252Cf sources. The light from the detector was collected using a Hamamatsu photomultiplier tube or a Silicon photomultiplier GEANT4 was used to understand the light output and the optical photon transport in the scintillation. The detector geometry and optimum parameters for the data acquisition system were determined based on the test results and the simulations.

  16. Radiation sensitivity of GSO and LSO scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Peter; Kozma, Petr

    2005-02-01

    Radiation resistance of 4×4×30 mm 3 GSO and LSO imaging scintillation detectors has been studied for low-energy gamma-ray doses of 10 4 Gy (10 6 rad) and 10 5 Gy (10 7 rad). Radiation hardness was determined by the measurement of optical transmission through GSO and LSO scintillation crystals before and after irradiations with 60Co gamma-rays. The results have been analysed in terms of the radiation-induced absorption coefficients and compared with radiation sensitivity measurements of small BGO scintillation crystals. The recovery time of irradiated small GSO and LSO crystals has also been determined.

  17. Smaller, Lower-Power Fast-Neutron Scintillation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Jagdish; Blaes, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors that are smaller and less power-hungry than mainstream scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors are undergoing development. There are numerous applications for such detectors in monitoring fast-neutron fluxes from nuclear reactors, nuclear materials, and natural sources, both on Earth and in outer space. A particularly important terrestrial application for small, low-power, portable fast-neutron detectors lies in the requirement to scan for nuclear materials in cargo and baggage arriving at international transportation facilities. The present development of miniature, low-power scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors exploits recent advances in the fabrication of avalanche photodiodes (APDs). Basically, such a detector includes a plastic scintillator, typically between 300 and 400 m thick with very thin silver mirror coating on all its faces except the one bonded to an APD. All photons generated from scintillation are thus internally reflected and eventually directed to the APD. This design affords not only compactness but also tight optical coupling for utilization of a relatively large proportion of the scintillation light. The combination of this tight coupling and the avalanche-multiplication gain (typically between 750 and 1,000) of the APD is expected to have enough sensitivity to enable monitoring of a fast-neutron flux as small as 1,000 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). Moreover, pulse-height analysis can be expected to provide information on the kinetic energies of incident neutrons. It has been estimated that a complete, fully developed fast-neutron detector of this type, would be characterized by linear dimensions of the order of 10 cm or less, a mass of no more than about 0.5 kg, and a power demand of no more than a few watts.

  18. Performance of photomultiplier tubes and sodium iodide scintillation detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) and scintillation detector systems incorporating 50.8 by 1.27 cm NaI (T l) crystals was investigated to determine the characteristics of the photomultiplier tubes and optimize the detector geometry for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory. Background information on performance characteristics of PMT's and NaI (T l) detectors is provided, procedures for measurement of relevant parameters are specified, and results of these measurements are presented.

  19. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  20. Position Sensitive Detectors Mounted with Scintillators and Silicon Photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalhaes, Roberto P. M.; Bonifácio, Daniel A. B.; Moralles, Maurício

    2011-08-01

    This work presents the first results obtained in the "Assembly and characterization of position sensitive detectors composed of scintillators coupled to silicon photomultipliers" project. The development of new x and γ radiation detectors have found several technological applications, especially in medical physics, where γ detectors that can be used in high intensity magnetic field are of particular importance. The experimental setup consisted of coupling of two silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) to the small sides of a 3×3×100 mm3 scintillator and the coupling of one SiPM to one of the small sides of a 3×3×10 mm3 scintillator. We found that the detectors used in this study presented an energy resolution that is in agreement with those observed in scintillators of the same family coupled to conventional photomultipliers. Besides that, there is a strong correlation between the difference of the light intensity in both SiPMs of the long detector and the position of the γ source. The results confirm the great potential of application of such detectors.

  1. Multilayer Scintillation Detector for Nuclear Physics Monitoring of Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batischev, A. G.; Aleksandrin, S. Yu.; Gurov, Yu. B.; Koldashov, S. V.; Lapushkin, S. V.; Mayorov, A. G.

    The physical characteristics of the multilayer scintillation spectrometer (MSS) for identification and energy measurement of cosmic electrons, positrons and nuclei are considered in this paper. This spectrometer is made on the basis of several plastic scintillator plates with various thick viewed by photomultipliers. Two upper layers are strips of orthogonal scintillators. The nuclei energy measurement range is 3 - 100 MeV/nucleon. Spectrometer is planning for space weather monitoring and investigation of solar-magnetospheric and geophysics effects on satellite. MSS time resolution is about 1 microsecond and it can measure the time profiles of fast processes in the Earth's magnetosphere. Spectrometer experimental characteristics were estimated by means of computer simulation. The ionization loss fluctuations, ion charge exchange during pass through detector and, especially, scintillation quenching effect (Bircs effect) were taken into account in calculations.

  2. A scintillator purification system for the Borexino solar neutrino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benziger, J.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Chen, M.; Corsi, A.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Fernholz, R.; Ford, R.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Harding, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kidner, S.; Leung, M.; Loeser, F.; McCarty, K.; McKinsey, D.; Nelson, A.; Pocar, A.; Salvo, C.; Schimizzi, D.; Shutt, T.; Sonnenschein, A.

    2008-03-01

    Purification of the 278 tons of liquid scintillator and 889 tons of buffer shielding for the Borexino solar neutrino detector is performed with a system that combines distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and filtration. This paper describes the principles of operation, design, and construction of that purification system, and reviews the requirements and methods to achieve system cleanliness and leak-tightness.

  3. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Burgett, Eric A; May, Iain; Muenchausen, Ross E; Taw, Felicia; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  4. Neutrino Flavor Sensitivity of Large Liquid Scintillator Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, K. K.; Bick, D.; Enqvist, T.; Hellgartner, D.; Kaiser, M.; Lorenz, S.; Meloni, M.; Meyer, M.; Möllenberg, R.; Oberauer, L.; Soiron, M.; Smirnov, M.; Stahl, A.; Trzaska, W. H.; Wonsak, B.; Wurm, M.

    Scintillator detectors are known for their good light yield, energy resolution, timing characteristics and pulse shape discrimination capabilities. These features make the next-generation liquid scintillation detector LENA[1] (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) the optimal choice for a wide range of astro-particle topics including supernova-, solar-, and geo neutrinos. In addition to the excellent calorimetric and timing properties, scintillartor detectors (LSDs) are also capable of topology reconstruction sufficient to discriminate with adequate efficiency between electron and muon neutrino induced charge current events and neutral current events in the GeV energy range. This feature makes LENA a competitive tool for the determination of the mass hierarchy (MH) with long baseline neutrino beams such as the proposed CN2PY beam (2288 km). This work summarizes the status of the current work on track reconstruction schemes and discusses the sensitivity limit for the neutrino mass hierarchy measurement with LENA.

  5. Organic scintillator detector response simulations with DRiFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, M. T.; Bates, C. R.; McKigney, E. A.; Solomon, C. J.; Sood, A.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the organic scintillation simulation capabilities of DRiFT, a post-processing Detector Response Function Toolkit for MCNP® output. DRiFT is used to create realistic scintillation detector response functions to incident neutron and gamma mixed-field radiation. As a post-processing tool, DRiFT leverages the extensively validated radiation transport capabilities of MCNP® 6 , which also provides the ability to simulate complex sources and geometries. DRiFT is designed to be flexible, it allows the user to specify scintillator material, PMT type, applied PMT voltage, and quenching data used in simulations. The toolkit's capabilities, which include the generation of pulse shape discrimination plots and full-energy detector spectra, are demonstrated in a comparison of measured and simulated neutron contributions from 252Cf and PuBe, and photon spectra from 22Na and 228Th sources. DRiFT reproduced energy resolution effects observed in EJ-301 measurements through the inclusion of scintillation yield variances, photon transport noise, and PMT photocathode and multiplication noise.

  6. Single-photoelectron noise reduction in scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin, T.P.; The SLAC mQ Collaboration

    1995-10-01

    The 1994--95 search at SLAC for mulicharged particles used four 21 {times} 21 {times} 130-cm{sup 3} Bicron 408 scintillation counters to detect a signal at the single-photoelectron level. The competing noise requiring minimization was due to a combination of PM tube (8-inch Thorne EMI 9353KA) afterpulsing and ambient radiation-induced scintillator luminescence. A very slow decay (> 30 {mu}s) component was observed and received particular attention. Efforts to reduce the SPE noise included photomultiplier tube base modifications, detector shielding and cooling, signal amplification, and veto procedures.

  7. The Plastic Scintillator Detector of the DAMPE space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    The DArk Matter Explorer (DAMPE) is a satellite based experiment aiming for dark matter search and many other topics astronomy interested. The Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) gives DAMPE the ability to measure charge of the crossing particles and separate gamma from electrons, which are necessary for achieving the goals of the experiment. The PSD is composed by 82 scintillator counters and read at both ends by a total of 162 photomultiplier tubes. In this paper, we describe the final design of DAMPE-PSD, the expected performances, and shows some results of the beam test carried on at CERN.

  8. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2006-11-28

    A detector system that combines a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillation thermal neutron detector with a fast scintillation detector in a single layered structure. Detection of thermal and fast neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation is achieved in the unified detector structure. The fast scintillator replaces the polyethelene moderator layer adjacent the .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber panel of the neutron detector and acts as the moderator for the glass fibers. Fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the fast scintillator. Thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the glass fiber scintillator.

  9. Photoelectron anticorrelations and sub-Poisson statistics in scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Bousselham, Abdelkader; Barrett, Harrison H.; Bora, Vaibhav; Shah, Kanai

    2010-01-01

    The performance of scintillation detectors for x rays and gamma rays is limited fundamentally by the statistics of the scintillation light and the resulting photoelectrons. This paper presents a new experimental approach to studying these statistics by observing correlations in the signals from two photodetectors. It is shown that the Fano factors (ratios of variance to mean), both for the number the photoelectrons produced on the photocathode of the photomultiplier and for the underlying number of scintillation photons, can be deduced from these correlations. For LaBr3(Ce) and 662 keV gamma rays, the photopeak signals obtained by photomultipliers on opposite faces of a thin sample are negatively correlated, and the Fano factor for the photoelectrons is significantly less than one. The inferred Fano factor for the optical photons is very small, indistinguishable from zero within experimental error. PMID:20725609

  10. Pulse-shape discrimination in NE213 liquid scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, M.; Tropea, S.; Agodi, C.; Assié, M.; Azaiez, F.; Boiano, C.; Bondì, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; De Napoli, M.; de Séréville, N.; Foti, A.; Linares, R.; Nicolosi, D.; Scarpaci, J. A.

    2013-02-01

    The 16-channel fast stretcher BaFPro module, originally developed for processing signals of Barium Fluoride scintillators, has been modified to make a high performing analog pulse-shape analysis of signals from the NE213 liquid scintillators of the EDEN neutron detector array. The module produces two Gaussian signals, whose amplitudes are proportional to the height of the fast component of the output light and to the total energy deposited into the scintillator, respectively. An in-beam test has been performed at INFN-LNS (Italy) demonstrating a low detection threshold, a good pulse-shape discrimination even at low energies and a wide dynamic range for the measurement of the neutrons energy.

  11. Photoelectron anticorrelations and sub-Poisson statistics in scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Bousselham, Abdelkader; Barrett, Harrison H; Bora, Vaibhav; Shah, Kanai

    2010-08-01

    The performance of scintillation detectors for x rays and gamma rays is limited fundamentally by the statistics of the scintillation light and the resulting photoelectrons. This paper presents a new experimental approach to studying these statistics by observing correlations in the signals from two photodetectors. It is shown that the Fano factors (ratios of variance to mean), both for the number the photoelectrons produced on the photocathode of the photomultiplier and for the underlying number of scintillation photons, can be deduced from these correlations. For LaBr(3)(Ce) and 662 keV gamma rays, the photopeak signals obtained by photomultipliers on opposite faces of a thin sample are negatively correlated, and the Fano factor for the photoelectrons is significantly less than one. The inferred Fano factor for the optical photons is very small, indistinguishable from zero within experimental error. PMID:20725609

  12. Timing Measurements of Scintillator Bars with Silicon Phtotomultiplier Light Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelor, Mark; Elizondo, Leonardo; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To track and analyze cosmic rays via precise measurements of muon and similarly penetrating particle's airshower axes directions, we constructed a prototype consisting of two 1-meter long scintillator bars. Each bar is embedded with green wavelength shifting fibers to increase detection rate of two silicon photomultiplier, SiPM, light detectors to record light produced by cosmic rays via scintillation. The focus of the experiment was to determine the performance of these devices. Evaluation was performed for two makes of SiPM models - from AdvanSiD and Hamamatsu. Timing measurements of the apparatus were performed under several trigger conditions to filter out noise such as coincidence trigger with 2 photomultiplier detectors, as well as SiPM detectors in self-triggered mode. The SiPM detector waveforms were digitized using a 4-channel fast waveform sampler, the DRS4 digitizer. Signals were analyzed with the CERN PAW package. From our results, we deduced the speed of light in the scintillator using the SiPM modules to be about 66% of the speed of light in a vacuum which is in accordance with the specifications of the index of refraction for the fibers given by the manufacturer's specifications. The results of our timing measurements would be presented. Dept. of Ed. Title V Grant PO31S090007.

  13. Maximum likelihood positioning and energy correction for scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Lerche, Christoph W; Salomon, André; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Lodomez, Sarah; Weissler, Björn; Solf, Torsten

    2016-02-21

    An algorithm for determining the crystal pixel and the gamma ray energy with scintillation detectors for PET is presented. The algorithm uses Likelihood Maximisation (ML) and therefore is inherently robust to missing data caused by defect or paralysed photo detector pixels. We tested the algorithm on a highly integrated MRI compatible small animal PET insert. The scintillation detector blocks of the PET gantry were built with the newly developed digital Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) technology from Philips Digital Photon Counting and LYSO pixel arrays with a pitch of 1 mm and length of 12 mm. Light sharing was used to readout the scintillation light from the [Formula: see text] scintillator pixel array with an [Formula: see text] SiPM array. For the performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm, we measured the scanner's spatial resolution, energy resolution, singles and prompt count rate performance, and image noise. These values were compared to corresponding values obtained with Center of Gravity (CoG) based positioning methods for different scintillation light trigger thresholds and also for different energy windows. While all positioning algorithms showed similar spatial resolution, a clear advantage for the ML method was observed when comparing the PET scanner's overall single and prompt detection efficiency, image noise, and energy resolution to the CoG based methods. Further, ML positioning reduces the dependence of image quality on scanner configuration parameters and was the only method that allowed achieving highest energy resolution, count rate performance and spatial resolution at the same time. PMID:26836394

  14. Maximum likelihood positioning and energy correction for scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Christoph W.; Salomon, André; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Lodomez, Sarah; Weissler, Björn; Solf, Torsten

    2016-02-01

    An algorithm for determining the crystal pixel and the gamma ray energy with scintillation detectors for PET is presented. The algorithm uses Likelihood Maximisation (ML) and therefore is inherently robust to missing data caused by defect or paralysed photo detector pixels. We tested the algorithm on a highly integrated MRI compatible small animal PET insert. The scintillation detector blocks of the PET gantry were built with the newly developed digital Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) technology from Philips Digital Photon Counting and LYSO pixel arrays with a pitch of 1 mm and length of 12 mm. Light sharing was used to readout the scintillation light from the 30× 30 scintillator pixel array with an 8× 8 SiPM array. For the performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm, we measured the scanner’s spatial resolution, energy resolution, singles and prompt count rate performance, and image noise. These values were compared to corresponding values obtained with Center of Gravity (CoG) based positioning methods for different scintillation light trigger thresholds and also for different energy windows. While all positioning algorithms showed similar spatial resolution, a clear advantage for the ML method was observed when comparing the PET scanner’s overall single and prompt detection efficiency, image noise, and energy resolution to the CoG based methods. Further, ML positioning reduces the dependence of image quality on scanner configuration parameters and was the only method that allowed achieving highest energy resolution, count rate performance and spatial resolution at the same time.

  15. The readout electronics for Plastic Scintillator Detector of DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jie; Yang, Haibo; Zhao, Hongyun; Su, Hong; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; JingZhe, Zhang; Wang, XiaoHui; Liu, Jie; Xiao, Guoqing; Ma, Xinwen

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite, which launched in December 2015, is designed to find the evidence of the existence of dark matter particles in the universe via the detection of the high-energy electrons and gamma-ray particles produced possibly by the annihilation of dark matter particles. Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) is one of major part of the satellite payload, which is comprised of a crossed pair of layers with 41 plastic scintillator-strips, each read out from both ends by the same Hamamatsu R4443MOD2 photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs). In order to extend linear dynamic range of detector, PMTs read out each plastic scintillator-strip separately with two dynode pickoffs. Therefore, the readout electronics system comprises of four Front-end boards to receive the pulses from 328 PMTs and implement charge measurement, which is based on the Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) chip VA160, 16 bits ADC and FPGA. The electronics of the detector has been designed following stringent requirements on mechanical and thermal stability, power consumption, radiation hardness and double redundancy. Various experiments are designed and implemented to check the performance of the electronics, some excellent results has been achieved.According to experimental results analysis, it is proved that the readout electronics works well.

  16. Optical scattering lengths in large liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wurm, M.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Goeger-Neff, M.; Hofmann, M.; Lewke, T.; Meindl, Q.; Moellenberg, R.; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Tippmann, M.; Todor, S.; Winter, J.; Lachenmaier, T.; Traunsteiner, C.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodan

    2010-05-15

    For liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors of kiloton scale, the transparency of the organic solvent is of central importance. The present paper reports on laboratory measurements of the optical scattering lengths of the organic solvents phenylxylylethane, linear alkylbenzene (LAB), and dodecane, which are under discussion for next-generation experiments such as SNO+ (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory), HanoHano, or LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy). Results comprise the wavelength range of 415-440 nm. The contributions from Rayleigh and Mie scattering as well as from absorption/re-emission processes are discussed. Based on the present results, LAB seems to be the preferred solvent for a large-volume detector.

  17. Position reconstruction in large-area scintillating fibre detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahata, K.; Johansson, H. T.; Paschalis, S.; Simon, H.; Aumann, T.

    2009-09-01

    A new analysis procedure has been developed for the large-area scintillating fibre detectors with position-sensitive photomultiplier (PSPM) readout used for heavy ions in the LAND set-up at GSI. It includes gain matching of the PSPM, calibration of the PSPM fibre mask and hit reconstruction. This procedure allows for a quasi-online calibration of this tracking device. It also allows for a precise determination of the position close to the intrinsic detector resolution of 1 mm pitch together with careful treatment of individual event accuracies.

  18. X-ray and charged particle detection with CsI(Tl) layer coupled to a-Si:H photodiode layers

    SciTech Connect

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.; Gee, T.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Wildermuth, D. ); Street, R.A. )

    1990-10-01

    A compact real-time X-ray and charged particle imager with digitized position output can built either by coupling a fast scintillator to a photodiode array or by forming one on a photodiode array directly. CsI(Tl) layers 100--1000{mu}m thick were evaporated on glass substrates from a crystal CsI(Tl). When coupled to a crystalline Si or amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photodiode and exposed to calibrated X-ray pulses, their light yields and speed were found to be comparable to those of a crystal CsI(Tl). Single {beta} particle detection was demonstrated with this combination. The light spread inside evaporated CsI(Tl) was suppressed by its columnar structure. Scintillation detection gives much larger signals than direct X-ray detection due to the increased energy deposition in the detector material. Fabrication of monolithic type X-ray sensors consisting of CsI + a-Si:H photodiodes is discussed. 20 refs., 16 figs.

  19. Scintillator and solid-state neutron detectors and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carturan, Sara Maria; Marchi, Tommaso; Fanchini, Erica; De Vita, Raffaella; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio

    2014-10-01

    The application range of neutron detectors covers many topics, not only involving experimental research, but spanning tens of industrial, health, transport, cultural heritage fields of interest. Several studies focus on new scintillating materials where the light response, under fast and slow neutrons exposure, is triggered by proton recoil or by the presence of neutron capture materials as 10B, 6Li or 157Gd. Neutron monitors, where the robustness of silicon-based detectors can be fully exploited by coupling with suitable neutron absorber/converter materials, have recently proved their outstanding performances. Discrimination between neutron signals from other radiations, such as - or cosmic rays, is achieved through timing techniques or with pulse shape analysis. Furthermore, the choice of the detection/discrimination techniques depends on the type of application the detector will be used for. An example is Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM) for cargo inspection or luggage control that are required to satisfy specific international standards for and neutron detection efficiencies. This paper is an overview of some of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) activities in the field of neutron detection, involving novel technologies. We will describe the most recent advances related to scintillators and silicon-based detectors coupled with thin films of suitable converters for neutron detection and we will discuss applications in the field of nuclear security.

  20. Time-based position estimation in monolithic scintillator detectors.

    PubMed

    Tabacchini, Valerio; Borghi, Giacomo; Schaart, Dennis R

    2015-07-21

    Gamma-ray detectors based on bright monolithic scintillation crystals coupled to pixelated photodetectors are currently being considered for several applications in the medical imaging field. In a typical monolithic detector, both the light intensity and the time of arrival of the earliest scintillation photons can be recorded by each of the photosensor pixels every time a gamma interaction occurs. Generally, the time stamps are used to determine the gamma interaction time while the light intensities are used to estimate the 3D position of the interaction point. In this work we show that the spatio-temporal distribution of the time stamps also carries information on the location of the gamma interaction point and thus the time stamps can be used as explanatory variables for position estimation. We present a model for the spatial resolution obtainable when the interaction position is estimated using exclusively the time stamp of the first photon detected on each of the photosensor pixels. The model is shown to be in agreement with experimental measurements on a 16 mm  ×  16 mm  ×  10 mm LSO : Ce,0.2%Ca crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array where a spatial resolution of 3 mm (root mean squared error) is obtained. Finally we discuss the effects of the main parameters such as scintillator rise and decay time, light output and photosensor single photon time resolution and pixel size. PMID:26133784

  1. Time-based position estimation in monolithic scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabacchini, Valerio; Borghi, Giacomo; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2015-07-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on bright monolithic scintillation crystals coupled to pixelated photodetectors are currently being considered for several applications in the medical imaging field. In a typical monolithic detector, both the light intensity and the time of arrival of the earliest scintillation photons can be recorded by each of the photosensor pixels every time a gamma interaction occurs. Generally, the time stamps are used to determine the gamma interaction time while the light intensities are used to estimate the 3D position of the interaction point. In this work we show that the spatio-temporal distribution of the time stamps also carries information on the location of the gamma interaction point and thus the time stamps can be used as explanatory variables for position estimation. We present a model for the spatial resolution obtainable when the interaction position is estimated using exclusively the time stamp of the first photon detected on each of the photosensor pixels. The model is shown to be in agreement with experimental measurements on a 16 mm  ×  16 mm  ×  10 mm LSO : Ce,0.2%Ca crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array where a spatial resolution of 3 mm (root mean squared error) is obtained. Finally we discuss the effects of the main parameters such as scintillator rise and decay time, light output and photosensor single photon time resolution and pixel size.

  2. Scifi97: Conference on Scintillating Fiber Detectors. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.; Ruchti, R.C.; Wayne, M.R.

    1998-11-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Conference on Scintillating and Fiber Detectors SCIFI97 held at Notre Dame, Indiana in November 1997. The topics discussed included the developments in photosensor technology, calorimetry, including upgrading of hadron calorimeters and EM calorimeters. Medical imaging instrumentation and techniques were also discussed, particularly the PET scanners. Astrophysical applications in detection and composition determination of galactic cosmic rays and solar neutrons were discussed. General developments in scintillation fiber trackers including new materials were a popular topic at the Conference. The Conference reviewed the state{minus}of{minus}the{minus}art of the field of scintillation fiber detectors and their applications in nuclear medicine, astrophysics, and particle physics. The Conference was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory, as well as other sponsors. There were 66 papers presented at the Conference,out of which 23 have been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  3. Organic liquid scintillation detector shape and volume impact on radiation portal monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paff, Marc G.; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed and tested a radiation portal monitor using organic liquid scintillation detectors. In order to optimize our system designs, neutron measurements were carried out with three organic liquid scintillation detectors of different shapes and sizes, along with a 3He radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a reference. The three liquids tested were a 7.62 cm diameter by 7.62 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, a 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, and a 25 cm by 25 cm by 10 cm "paddle" shaped organic liquid scintillation detector. Background and Cf-252 neutron measurements were recorded to allow for a comparison of neutron intrinsic efficiencies as well as receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves between detectors. The 12.7 cm diameter cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector exhibited the highest intrinsic neutron efficiency (54%) of all three liquid scintillators. An ROC curve analysis for a heavily moderated Cf-252 measurement showed that using the 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume Eljen EJ309 organic liquid scintillation detector would result in the fewest needed detector units in order to achieve a near 100% positive neutron alarm rate while maintaining a better than 1 in 10,000 false alarm rate on natural neutron background. A small number of organic liquid scintillation detectors could therefore be a valid alternative to 3He in some RPM applications.

  4. Emulation workbench for position sensitive gaseous scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, L.; Margato, L. M. S.; Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Fraga, F. A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Position sensitive detectors based on gaseous scintillation proportional counters with Anger-type readout are being used in several research areas such as neutron detection, search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Design and optimization of such detectors are complex and time consuming tasks. Simulations, while being a powerful tool, strongly depend on the light transfer models and demand accurate knowledge of many parameters, which are often not available. Here we describe an alternative approach based on the experimental evaluation of a detector using an isotropic point-like light source with precisely controllable light emission properties, installed on a 3D positioning system. The results obtained with the developed setup at validation conditions, when the scattered light is strongly suppressed show good agreement with simulations.

  5. A scintillating fiber detector for π0 identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hassani, A. J. Rusi; Beer, W.; Gilot, J.-F.; Goudsmit, P. F. A.; Leisi, H. J.; Thomann, S.; Volken, W.

    1990-05-01

    It has been known for several years that electromagnetic calorimetry with scintillating plastic fibers gives good results at high energy (ref. [1] H. Blumenfeld et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 225 (1984) 518; ref. [2] H. Burmeister et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 225 (1984) 530). A measurement done with 40 MeV electrons [2] convinced us that this technique can be applied for the identification of π0 particles produced in the capture of negative pions by protons. A prototype detector has been built, calibrated and used in coincidence with a NaI detector to identify the decay of neutral pions produced by stopping a 200 MeV/ cπ- beam in a CH 2 target. Results are discussed and compared with a Monte Carlo simulation. Finally, a full-scale detector has been built and successfully used in a measurement of the X-ray yield in pionic hydrogen.

  6. A scintillating fibres tracker detector for archaeological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichelli, M.; Ansoldi, S.; Bari, M.; Basset, M.; Battiston, R.; Blasko, S.; Coren, F.; Fiori, E.; Giannini, G.; Iugovaz, D.; Papi, A.; Reia, S.; Scian, G.

    2007-03-01

    We designed, constructed and operated a cylindrical, scintillating fibres, tracker detector in order to measure the directional flux of cosmic ray muons underground. This instrument named Muon Ground Radiograph (MGR) was developed to study the fluctuation of the density in the soil that causes detection anisotropies in the arrival direction of cosmic ray muons observed in a tracker detector located underground. Density fluctuations may reveal hidden cavities or buried structures and can contribute to archaeological findings. The shape of the detector we used, for this purpose, is cylindrical, 14 cm diameter and 224 cm height, and it can be inserted into a 20 cm diameter hole in the ground at a maximum depth of 30 m. This paper will describe the instrument design and construction and also report some results of two observational campaigns in the town of Aquileia the Claudio and Traiano port.

  7. Apparatus and method for temperature correction and expanded count rate of inorganic scintillation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Hsue, Sin Tao; Browne, Michael C.; Audia, Jeffrey M.

    2006-07-25

    The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for temperature correction and count rate expansion of inorganic scintillation detectors. A temperature sensor is attached to an inorganic scintillation detector. The inorganic scintillation detector, due to interaction with incident radiation, creates light pulse signals. A photoreceiver processes the light pulse signals to current signals. Temperature correction circuitry that uses a fast light component signal, a slow light component signal, and the temperature signal from the temperature sensor to corrected an inorganic scintillation detector signal output and expanded the count rate.

  8. Atmospheric Neutron Measurements using a Small Scintillator Based Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kole, Merlin; Pearce, Mark; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mozsi; Moretti, Elena; Yanagida, Takayuki; Chauvin, Maxime; Mikhalev, Victor; Rydstrom, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu

    PoGOLino is a standalone scintillator-based neutron detector designed for balloon-borne missions. Its main purpose is to provide data of the neutron flux in 2 different energy ranges in the high altitude / high latitude region where the highest neutron flux in the atmosphere is found. Furthermore the influence of the Solar activity upon the neutron environment in this region is relatively strong. As a result both short and long term time fluctuations are strongest in this region. At high altitudes neutrons can form a source of background for balloon-borne scientific measurements. They can furthermore form a major source for single event upsets in electronics. A good understanding of the high altitude / high latitude neutron environment is therefore important. Measurements of the neutron environment in this region are however lacking. PoGOLino contains two 5 mm thick Lithium Calcium Aluminium Fluoride (LiCAF) scintillators used for neutron detection. The LiCAF crystals are sandwiched between 2 Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) scintillating crystals, which serve to veto signals produced by gamma-rays and charged particles. The veto system makes measurements of the neutron flux possible even in high radiation environments. One LiCAF detector is shielded with polyethylene while the second remains unshielded, making the detectors sensitive in different energy ranges. The choice of a scintillator crystals as the detection material ensures a high detection efficiency while keeping the instrument small, robust and light weight. The full standalone cylindrical instrument has a radius of 120 mm, a height of 670 mm and a total mass of 13 kg, making it suitable as a piggy back mission. PoGOLino was successfully launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Center in Northern Sweden to an altitude of 30.9 km. A detailed description of the detector design is presented, along with results of of the flight. The neutron flux measured during flight is compared to predictions based

  9. Simulation results of liquid and plastic scintillator detectors for reactor antineutrino detection - A comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, V. K. S.; Pant, L. M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Datar, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    A simulation study of two kinds of scintillation detectors has been done using GEANT4. We compare plastic scintillator and liquid scintillator based designs for detecting electron antineutrinos emitted from the core of reactors. The motivation for this study is to set up an experiment at the research reactor facility at BARC for very short baseline neutrino oscillation study and remote reactor monitoring.

  10. Modular design of long narrow scintillating cells for ILC detector

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Maloney, J.; Rykalin, V.; Schellpfeffer, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    The experimental results for the narrow scintillating elements with effective area about 20 cm{sup 2} are reported. The elements were formed from the single piece of scintillator and were read out via wavelength shifting fibers with the MRS (Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor) photodiodes on both ends of each fiber. The formation of the cells from the piece of scintillator by using grooves is discussed. The cell performance was tested using the radioactive source by measuring the PMT current and a single rate after amplifier and discrimination with threshold at about three photo electrons in each channel and quad coincidences (double coincidences between sensors on each fiber and double coincidences between two neighboring fibers). This result is of high importance for large multi-channel systems, i.e. module may be used as an active element for calorimeter or muon system for the design of the future electron-positron linear collider detector because cell effective area can be smoothly enlarged or reduced (to 4 cm{sup 2} definitely).

  11. Measurement of intrinsic radioactive backgrounds from the 137Cs and U/Th chains in CsI(Tl) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shu-Kui; Yue, Qian; Lin, Shin-Ted; Li, Yuan-Jing; Tang, Chang-Jian; Wong Tsz-King, Henry; Xing, Hao-Yang; Yang, Chao-Wen; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Jing-Jun

    2015-04-01

    The inorganic CsI(Tl) crystal scintillator is a candidate anti-compton detector for the China Dark matter Experiment. Studying the intrinsic radiopurity of the CsI(Tl) crystal is an issue of major importance. The timing, energy and spatial correlations, as well as the capability of pulse shape discrimination provide powerful methods for the measurement of intrinsic radiopurities. The experimental design, detector performance and event-selection algorithms are described. A total of 359×3 kg-days data from three prototypes of CsI(Tl) crystals were taken at China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL), which offers a good shielding environment. The contamination levels of internal isotopes from 137Cs, 232Th and 238U series, as well as the upper bounds of 235U series are reported. Identification of the whole α peaks from U/Th decay chains and derivation of those corresponding quenching factors are achieved. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275107, 11175099)

  12. Performance characterization of a new high resolution PET scintillation detector

    PubMed Central

    Foudray, A M K; Olcott, P D

    2013-01-01

    Performance of a new high resolution PET detection concept is presented. In this new concept, annihilation radiation enters the scintillator detectors edge-on. Each detector module comprises two 8 × 8 LYSO scintillator arrays of 0.91 × 0.91 × 1 mm3 crystals coupled to two position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) mounted on a flex circuit. Appropriate crystal segmentation allows the recording of all three spatial coordinates of the interaction(s) simultaneously with submillimeter resolution. We report an average energy resolution of 14.6 ± 1.7% for 511 keV photons at FWHM. Coincident time resolution was determined to be 2.98 ± 0.13 ns FWHM on average. The coincidence point spread function (PSF) has an average FWHM of 0.837 ± 0.049 mm (using a 500 μm spherical source) and is uniform across the arrays. Both PSF and coincident time resolution degrade when Compton interactions are included in the data. Different blurring factors were evaluated theoretically, resulting in a calculated PSF of 0.793 mm, in good agreement with the measured value. PMID:20844332

  13. Fission-fragment detector for DANCE based on thin scintillating films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Roman, A. R.; Daum, J. K.; Springs, R. K.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing 4 π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillation photons were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U (n , f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described.

  14. (Effects of ionizing radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors)

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is my task to summarise the great variety of topics (covering a refreshing mix of physics, chemistry and technology) presented at this conference, which has focused on the effects of ionising radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors. One of the reasons and the central interest of many of the participants was the use of such detectors in experiments at two future large hadron colliders: the Superconducting Super Collider to be operating outside of Dallas in the United States by the turn of the decade and its European counterpart the Large Hadron Collider to be operating outside of Geneva in Switzerland on a similar time scale. These accelerators are the apple of the high energy physicist's eye.'' Their goal is to uncover the elusive Higgs particle and thereby set the cornerstone in our current knowledge of elementary particle interactions. This is the Quest, and from this lofty height the presentations rapidly moved on to the specific questions of experimental science: how such an experiment is carried out; why radiation damage is an issue; how radiation damage affects detectors; which factors affect radiation damage characteristics; which factors are not affected by radiation damage; and how better detectors may be constructed. These were the substance of this conference.

  15. Measuring fast neutrons with large liquid scintillation detector for ultra-low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Mei, D.-M.; Davis, P.; Woltman, B.; Gray, F.

    2013-11-01

    We developed a 12-liter volume neutron detector filled with the liquid scintillator EJ301 that measures neutrons in an underground laboratory where dark matter and neutrino experiments are located. The detector target is a cylindrical volume coated on the inside with reflective paint (95% reflectivity) that significantly increases the detector's light collection. We demonstrate several calibration techniques using point sources and cosmic-ray muons for energies up to 20 MeV for this large liquid scintillation detector. Neutron-gamma separation using pulse shape discrimination with a few MeV neutrons to hundreds of MeV neutrons is shown for the first time using a large liquid scintillator.

  16. Development of Readout System for the CALET Scintillating Fiber Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, T.; Torii, S.; Yoshida, K.; Hibino, K.; Yamagami, T.; Murakami, H.; Kasahara, K.

    2001-08-01

    We have a plan to make observations of high energy electrons and gamma rays with the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). We are carrying out a R&D for the detector, CALET (CALorimetric Electron Telescope). It consists of an imaging calorimeter (IC) and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC). We will utilize a few hundred-thousands scintillating fibers (SCIFI) for the IC part to visualize cascade showers. We have two options for readout of such amount of SCIFI. First, we have developed a new image intensifier coupled to CCD camera (II-CCD), which is based on the technology utilized and established in the balloon observations with BETS (Balloonborne Electron Telescope with Scintillating fibers). Although the data acquisition rate will be limited to a few 10 Hz, a lot of SCIFI can be read relatively easily with the readout system of the II-CCD. Second, we are developing a readout system with multi-anode photo multipliers (MA-PMT) and front-end chips (VA32 hdr32; one of the Viking family). The readout system with the MA-PMT will enable us to make data acquisition at high frequency of over one thousand Hz.

  17. The neutron detectors based on oxide scintillators for control of fissionable radioactive substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikov, V. D.; Grinyov, B. V.; Onyshchenko, G. M.; Piven, L. A.; Lysetska, O. K.; Opolonin, O. D.; Kostioukevitch, S. A.; Smith, C. F.

    2014-09-01

    A large-area X-ray CMOS image sensor (LXCIS) is widely used in mammography, non-destructive inspection, and animal CT. For LXCIS, in spite of weakness such as low spatial and energy resolution, a Indirect method using scintillator like CsI(Tl) or Gd2O2S is still well-used because of low cost and easy manufacture. A photo-diode for X-ray imaging has large area about 50 ~ 200 um as compared with vision image sensors. That is because X-ray has feature of straight and very small light emission of a scintillator. Moreover, notwithstanding several structure like columnar, the scintillator still emit a diffusible light. This diffusible light from scintillator can make spatial crosstalk in X-ray photodiode array because of a large incidence angle. Moreover, comparing with vision image sensors, X-ray sensor doesn't have micro lens for gathering the photons to photo-diode. In this study, we simulated the affection of spatial crosstalk in X-ray sensor by comparing optical sensor. Additionally, the chip, which was fabricated in 0.18 um 1P5M process by Hynix in Korea, was tested to know the effect of spatial crosstalk by changing design parameters. From these works, we found out that spatial crosstalk is affected by pixel pitch, incident angle of photons, and micro lens on each pixels.

  18. Characteristics of scintillation detectors based on inorganic scintillators and SiPM light readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szcze&şacute; niak, T.; Grodzicka, M.; Moszyński, M.; Szawłowski, M.; Wolski, D.; Baszak, J.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) became one of the strongest candidates for application in PET-MR or SPECT-MR dual-modality scanners. However, optimization of the scintillation detectors with SiPM light readout requires different approach than in the case of classic photomultipliers. The finite number of micro-cells in a SiPM creates nonlinear response for high number of incident photons. Moreover, the size and total number of micro-cells defines fill factor, which in turn affects the photon detection efficiency (PDE). Response of SiPMs is also highly sensitive to bias voltage causing changes in PDE and excess noise factor (ENF). Finally, each cell posses an effective dead time needed to fully recharge that cell after the photon detection. In this work the listed above unique features of SiPMs are overviewed. The reported data also contain measurements of energy resolution and 22Na time resolution.

  19. Structural design of a high energy particle detector using liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Timothy John; /Minnesota U.

    1997-02-01

    This thesis presents a design for a 10,000 ton liquid scintillator neutrino detector being considered for the MINOS project at Fermilab. Details of designing, manufacturing, and assembling the active detector components are presented. The detector consists of 1080 magnetized steel absorber planes alternating with 1080 active detector planes. Each active plane is made up of plastic extrusions divided into nearly 400 cells for positional resolution. Life tests on the plastic extrusions determine their feasibility for containing the scintillator. The extrusions are sealed at the bottom, filled with liquid scintillator, and have an optical fiber running the entire length of each cell. The fibers terminate at the top of each extrusion in a manifold. An optical-fiber-light-guide connects the fibers in each manifold to a photo-detector. The photo-detector converts the light signals from the scintillator and optical fibers into electrical impulses for computer analysis.

  20. Influence of Depth of Interaction upon the Performance of Scintillator Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mark S.; Gundacker, Stefan; Taylor, Alaric; Tummeltshammer, Clemens; Auffray, Etiennette; Lecoq, Paul; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    The uncertainty in time of particle detection within a scintillator detector, characterised by the coinci- dence time resolution (CTR), is explored with respect to the interaction position within the scintillator crystal itself. Electronic collimation between two scintillator detectors is utilised to determine the CTR with depth of interaction (DOI) for different materials, geometries and wrappings. Significantly, no rela- tionship between the CTR and DOI is observed within experimental error. Confinement of the interaction position is seen to degrade the CTR in long scintillator crystals by 10%. PMID:24875832

  1. Use of internal scintillator radioactivity to calibrate DOI function of a PET detector with a dual-ended-scintillator readout

    SciTech Connect

    Bircher, Chad; Shao Yiping

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors that use a dual-ended-scintillator readout to measure depth-of-interaction (DOI) must have an accurate DOI function to provide the relationship between DOI and signal ratios to be used for detector calibration and recalibration. In a previous study, the authors used a novel and simple method to accurately and quickly measure DOI function by irradiating the detector with an external uniform flood source; however, as a practical concern, implementing external uniform flood sources in an assembled PET system is technically challenging and expensive. In the current study, therefore, the authors investigated whether the same method could be used to acquire DOI function from scintillator-generated (i.e., internal) radiation. The authors also developed a method for calibrating the energy scale necessary to select the events within the desired energy window. Methods: The authors measured the DOI function of a PET detector with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) scintillators. Radiation events originating from the scintillators' internal Lu-176 beta decay were used to measure DOI functions which were then compared with those measured from both an external uniform flood source and an electronically collimated external point source. The authors conducted these studies with several scintillators of differing geometries (1.5 x 1.5 and 2.0 x 2.0 mm{sup 2} cross-section area and 20, 30, and 40 mm length) and various surface finishes (mirror-finishing, saw-cut rough, and other finishes in between), and in a prototype array. Results: All measured results using internal and external radiation sources showed excellent agreement in DOI function measurement. The mean difference among DOI values for all scintillators measured from internal and external radiation sources was less than 1.0 mm for different scintillator geometries and various surface finishes. Conclusions: The internal radioactivity of LYSO scintillators can be used

  2. The plastic scintillator detector calibration circuit for DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haibo; Kong, Jie; Zhao, Hongyun; Su, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is being constructed as a scientific satellite to observe high energy cosmic rays in space. Plastic scintillator detector array (PSD), developed by Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMPCAS), is one of the most important parts in the payload of DAMPE which is mainly used for the study of dark matter. As an anti-coincidence detector, and a charged-particle identification detector, the PSD has a total of 360 electronic readout channels, which are distributed at four sides of PSD using four identical front end electronics (FEE). Each FEE reads out 90 charge signals output by the detector. A special calibration circuit is designed in FEE. FPGA is used for on-line control, enabling the calibration circuit to generate the pulse signal with known charge. The generated signal is then sent to the FEE for calibration and self-test. This circuit mainly consists of DAC, operation amplifier, analog switch, capacitance and resistance. By using controllable step pulse, the charge can be coupled to the charge measuring chip using the small capacitance. In order to fulfill the system's objective of large dynamic range, the FEE is required to have good linearity. Thus, the charge-controllable signal is needed to do sweep test on all channels in order to obtain the non-linear parameters for off-line correction. On the other hand, the FEE will run on the satellite for three years. The changes of the operational environment and the aging of devices will lead to parameter variation of the FEE, highlighting the need for regular calibration. The calibration signal generation circuit also has a compact structure and the ability to work normally, with the PSD system's voltage resolution being higher than 0.6%.

  3. Two dimensional and linear scintillation detectors for fast neutron imaging — comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikerov, V. I.; Koshelev, A. P.; Ozerov, O. V.; Sviridov, A. S.; Yurkov, D. I.

    2014-05-01

    The paper was aimed to compare performance capabilities of two types of scintillation detectors commonly used for fast neutron imaging: two dimensional and linear ones. Best-case values of quantum efficiency, spatial resolution and capacity were estimated for detectors with plastic converter-screen in case of 14 MeV neutrons. For that there were examined nuclear reactions produced in converter-screen by fast neutrons, spatial distributions of energy release of emerged charged particles and amplitude distributions of scintillations generated by these particles. The paper shows that the efficiency of the linear detector is essentially higher and this detector provides potentially better spatial resolution in comparison with the two dimensional detector. But, the two dimensional detector surpasses the linear one in capacity. The presented results can be used for designing radiographic fast neutron detectors with organic scintillators.

  4. Development of a cylindrical tracking detector with multichannel scintillation fibers and pixelated photon detector readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akazawa, Y.; Miwa, K.; Honda, R.; Shiozaki, T.; Chiga, N.

    2015-07-01

    We are developing a cylindrical tracking detector for a Σp scattering experiment in J-PARC with scintillation fibers and the Pixelated Photon Detector (PPD) readout, which is called as cylindrical fiber tracker (CFT), in order to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles emitted inside CFT. CFT works not only as a tracking detector but also a particle identification detector from energy deposits. A prototype CFT consisting of two straight layers and one spiral layer was constructed. About 1100 scintillation fibers with a diameter of 0.75 mm (Kuraray SCSF-78 M) were used. Each fiber signal was read by Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC, HPK S10362-11-050P, 1×1 mm2, 400 pixels) fiber by fiber. MPPCs were handled with Extended Analogue Silicon Photomultipliers Integrated ReadOut Chip (EASIROC) boards, which were developed for the readout of a large number of MPPCs. The energy resolution of one layer was 28% for a 70 MeV proton where the energy deposit in fibers was 0.7 MeV.

  5. Optimizing timing performance of silicon photomultiplier-based scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jung Yeol; Vinke, Ruud

    2013-01-01

    Precise timing resolution is crucial for applications requiring photon time-of-flight (ToF) information such as ToF positron emission tomography (PET). Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for PET, with their high output capacitance, are known to require custom preamplifiers to optimize timing performance. In this paper, we describe simple alternative front-end electronics based on a commercial low-noise RF preamplifier and methods that have been implemented to achieve excellent timing resolution. Two radiation detectors with L(Y)SO scintillators coupled to Hamamatsu SiPMs (MPPC S10362–33-050C) and front-end electronics based on an RF amplifier (MAR-3SM+), typically used for wireless applications that require minimal additional circuitry, have been fabricated. These detectors were used to detect annihilation photons from a Ge-68 source and the output signals were subsequently digitized by a high speed oscilloscope for offline processing. A coincident resolving time (CRT) of 147 ± 3 ps FWHM and 186 ± 3 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 and with 3 × 3 × 20 mm3 LYSO crystal elements were measured, respectively. With smaller 2 × 2 × 3 mm3 LSO crystals, a CRT of 125 ± 2 ps FWHM was achieved with slight improvement to 121 ± 3 ps at a lower temperature (15°C). Finally, with the 20 mm length crystals, a degradation of timing resolution was observed for annihilation photon interactions that occur close to the photosensor compared to shallow depth-of-interaction (DOI). We conclude that commercial RF amplifiers optimized for noise, besides their ease of use, can produce excellent timing resolution comparable to best reported values acquired with custom readout electronics. On the other hand, as timing performance degrades with increasing photon DOI, a head-on detector configuration will produce better CRT than a side-irradiated setup for longer crystals. PMID:23369872

  6. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Clancy, T. J.; Hatarik, R.; McNaney, J.; Zaitseva, N. P.

    2012-10-15

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  7. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGAa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Clancy, T. J.; Hatarik, R.; McNaney, J.; Zaitseva, N. P.

    2012-10-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  8. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Caggiano, J A; Carman, M L; Clancy, T J; Hatarik, R; McNaney, J; Zaitseva, N P

    2012-10-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented. PMID:23126836

  9. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-02-07

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  10. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-01-01

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  11. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined detection of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, M.M.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1987-02-27

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation event count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  12. Detection of Extensive Cosmic Air Showers by Small Scintillation Detectors with Wavelength-Shifting Fibres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiola, Salvatore; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Riggi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    A set of three small scintillation detectors was employed to measure correlated events due to the passage of cosmic muons originating from extensive air showers. The coincidence rate between (any) two detectors was extracted as a function of their relative distance. The difference between the arrival times in three non-aligned detectors was used…

  13. Proton-induced radioactivity in NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Radioactivity induced by protons in sodium iodide scintillation crystals were calculated and directly measured. These data are useful in determining trapped radiation and cosmic-ray induced, background-counting rates in spaceborne detectors.

  14. Scintillation Detector for the Measurement of Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Rays on the Super-TIGER Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, Jason

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the design and construction of the scintillation detectors for the Super-TIGER experiment. Super-TIGER is a large-area (5.4sq m) balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the abundances of cosmic-ray nuclei between Z= 10 and Z=56. It is based on the successful TIGER experiment that flew in Antarctica in 2001 and 2003. Super-TIGER has three layers of scintillation detectors, two Cherenkov detectors and a scintillating fiber hodoscope. The scintillation detector employs four wavelength shifter bars surrounding the edges of the scintillator to collect the light from particles traversing the detector. PMTs are optically coupled at both ends of the bars for light collection. We report on laboratory performance of the scintillation counters using muons. In addition we discuss the design challenges and detector response over this broad charge range including the effect of scintilator saturation.

  15. Performance evaluation of new large-area avalanche photodiodes for scintillation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, K. M.; Masterson, M. J.; Farrell, R.

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD's) appear promising for certain applications as a solid state replacement for the photomultiplier tube. The increase in leakage current and capacitance noise with device active area has in the past kept the size of commercially available devices to less than 1 mm (exp 2). Recent advances in fabrication technology have, however, resulted in relatively low noise devices of up to 1 inch in diameter. We have recently evaluated the performance as scintillation spectroscopy detectors of two commercial large area avalanche photodiodes. These APD's exhibit exceptional performance: at 662 KeV a 1 inch diameter device coupled to a CsI(Tl) scintillator and operating at room temperature yielded 6.9 pct. resolution and a 1 cm device coupled to CsI(Tl) and cooled to 260 K gave 4.4 pct. resolution, which is believed to be the best resolution ever recorded for a scintillation spectrometer.

  16. Optimum design calculations for detectors based on ZnSe(Те,О) scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrunov, K.; Ryzhikov, V.; Gavrilyuk, V.; Naydenov, S.; Lysetska, O.; Litichevskyi, V.

    2013-06-01

    Light collection in scintillators ZnSe(X), where X is an isovalent dopant, was studied using Monte Carlo calculations. Optimum design was determined for detectors of "scintillator—Si-photodiode" type, which can involve either one scintillation element or scintillation layers of large area made of small-crystalline grains. The calculations were carried out both for determination of the optimum scintillator shape and for design optimization of light guides, on the surface of which the layer of small-crystalline grains is formed.

  17. Beam tests of a 3-D position sensitive scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Labanti, C.; Hall, C.J.; Agrinier, B.; Byard, K.; Dean, A.J.; Goldwurm, A.; Harding, J.S.

    1989-02-01

    An array of 30 position sensitive scintillator bars has been tested in a gamma-ray beam from I.N.S.T.N. Van de Graff facility at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires, Saclay, France. The gamma-ray energies ranged from 6 MeV to 17 MeV. The bars are similar to those proposed for use in the GRASP gamma-ray telescope satellite imaging plane. They are manufactured from CsI(T1) covered with a highly reflective diffusive wrapping, and are read out using large area PIN photodiodes. Each bar measures 15.0 cm by 1.3 cm by 1.3 cm. The beam test unit was comprised of 30 bars stacked in a 5 by 6 array. The photodiodes were optically coupled to the end face of each bar and were connected to a processing chain comprised of a low noise preamplifier, a high gain shaping amplifier, and a digitisation and data collection system. Several experiments were performed with the unit to assess the spectral response, position resolution, and background rejection capabilities of the complete detector. The test procedure is explained and some results are presented.

  18. Lithium glass scintillator neutron detector as an improved alternative to the standard 3 he proportional counter

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Popov, Pavel Degtiarenko

    2011-06-01

    Lithium glass scintillator made from 6Li-enriched substrate is a well known for its neutron detection capability. In spite of neutron interaction, cross section of 6Li happens to be lower than that of 3He. However, the neutron detection efficiency could be higher due to higher volume content of 6Li nuclear in the solid scintillator vs. gas filled proportional counter. At the same time, as lithium glass is sensitive to gamma and charge particle radiation, non-neutron radiation discrimination is required. Our detector is composed of two equal-size cylindrical Li(Ce) glass scintillators. The first one is high-sensitive to thermal neutrons GS-20 (6Li doped), the second one is GS-30 (7Li doped) type Scint-Gobain made lithium glass scintillator. Each of scintillators is coupled with R7400U Hamamatsu subminiature photomultiplier tube, and all assembly is fitted into NP100H 3He tube size. 6Li absorbs thermal neutrons releasing alpha particles and triton with 4.8 MeV total energy deposit inside the scintillator (equivalent to about ~1.3 MeV gamma energy depositions). Because 7Li isotope does not absorb thermal neutrons, and the physical properties of the two scintillators are virtually identical, the difference between these two scintillators could be used to provide neutron dose rate information. Results of study of neutron detector assembled of two Li(Ce) scintillators and NP100H moderator are presented

  19. Semiconductor radiation detector with internal gain

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan; Patt, Bradley E.; Vilkelis, Gintas

    2003-04-01

    An avalanche drift photodetector (ADP) incorporates extremely low capacitance of a silicon drift photodetector (SDP) and internal gain that mitigates the surface leakage current noise of an avalanche photodetector (APD). The ADP can be coupled with scintillators such as CsI(Tl), NaI(Tl), LSO or others to form large volume scintillation type gamma ray detectors for gamma ray spectroscopy, photon counting, gamma ray counting, etc. Arrays of the ADPs can be used to replace the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) used in conjunction with scintillation crystals in conventional gamma cameras for nuclear medical imaging.

  20. Conceptual design of stacked-layer detectors to increase the sensitivity of Fast Neutron Gamma-ray Radiography (FNGR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jea Hyung; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Chung, Young Hyun

    2012-04-01

    This study is focused on the structure and other possible factors related to scintillators used in the Fast Neutron and Gamma-ray Radiography (FNGR) system to increase its sensitivity. The CsI(Tl) crystal scintillator (Co-60 gamma-ray detection) and the BC430 plastic scintillator (14 MeV fast neutron detection) were analyzed with the Monte Carlo simulation (MCNPX and DETEC97 codes). Each scintillator was investigated with regard to the optimum thickness (1 cm × 1 cm), reconfiguration of detector modules (a stacked-layer structure), the optimum surface treatment, and the spectral matching with customized PIN-type photodiodes. As a result, the optimum thickness of the CsI(Tl) was found to be 4.5 cm; the optimum value was 5.5 cm for the BC430. When the detector modules were stacked in a sandwich structure rather than the existing single detector structure, the light photon transmission to the surface of the photodiode was enhanced by 40% and 58% for CsI(Tl) and BC430, respectively. In the matter of scintillator surface treatment, both scintillators were simulated with unpolished and polished condition before coating. The polished condition of the scintillator surfaces showed a higher performance, more than doubling that of the unpolished condition surfaces. Then, the performance improvement of the scintillator with the paint coating was compared to the scintillator with the metal coating conditions. For CsI(Tl), the metal coating showed a 10 % higher performance than that of the paint coating, and the metal coating of BC430 showed a 6% higher performance than that of the paint coating. As a result of spectral matching between the scintillators and the customized PIN-photodiodes, PS100-6b of Silicon AG, SD445-14-21-305 of API, and FSD1010-CAL of THOLABS were compared. The spectral matching factor of PS100-6b was 0.39 with CsI(Tl) and was 0.42 with BC430; the spectral matching factors of the other samples were relatively lower (SD445-14-21-305 with CsI(Tl): 0.29; SD445

  1. Optimizing timing performance of silicon photomultiplier-based scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Jung Yeol; Vinke, Ruud; Levin, Craig S

    2013-02-21

    Precise timing resolution is crucial for applications requiring photon time-of-flight (ToF) information such as ToF positron emission tomography (PET). Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for PET, with their high output capacitance, are known to require custom preamplifiers to optimize timing performance. In this paper, we describe simple alternative front-end electronics based on a commercial low-noise RF preamplifier and methods that have been implemented to achieve excellent timing resolution. Two radiation detectors with L(Y)SO scintillators coupled to Hamamatsu SiPMs (MPPC S10362-33-050C) and front-end electronics based on an RF amplifier (MAR-3SM+), typically used for wireless applications that require minimal additional circuitry, have been fabricated. These detectors were used to detect annihilation photons from a Ge-68 source and the output signals were subsequently digitized by a high speed oscilloscope for offline processing. A coincident resolving time (CRT) of 147 ± 3 ps FWHM and 186 ± 3 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm(3) and with 3 × 3 × 20 mm(3) LYSO crystal elements were measured, respectively. With smaller 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) LSO crystals, a CRT of 125 ± 2 ps FWHM was achieved with slight improvement to 121 ± 3 ps at a lower temperature (15° C). Finally, with the 20 mm length crystals, a degradation of timing resolution was observed for annihilation photon interactions that occur close to the photosensor compared to shallow depth-of-interaction (DOI). We conclude that commercial RF amplifiers optimized for noise, besides their ease of use, can produce excellent timing resolution comparable to best reported values acquired with custom readout electronics. On the other hand, as timing performance degrades with increasing photon DOI, a head-on detector configuration will produce better CRT than a side-irradiated setup for longer crystals. PMID:23369872

  2. Rejection of Alpha Surface Background in Non-scintillating Bolometric Detectors: The ABSuRD Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; di Vacri, M. L.; Gorla, P.; Pavan, M.; Yeh, M.

    2016-08-01

    Due to their excellent energy resolution values and the vast choice of possible materials, bolometric detectors are currently widely used in the physics of rare events. A limiting aspect for bolometers rises from their inability to discriminate among radiation types or surface from bulk events. It has been demonstrated that the main limitation to sensitivity for purely bolometric detectors is represented by surface alpha contaminations, causing a continuous background that cannot be discriminated. A new scintillation-based technique for the rejection of surface alpha background in non-scintillating bolometric experiments is proposed in this work. The idea is to combine a scintillating and a high sensitivity photon detector with a non-scintillating absorber. We present results showing the possibility to reject events due to alpha decay at or nearby the surface of the crystal.

  3. Tracking performance of the scintillating fiber detector in the K2K experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. J.; Iwashita, T.; Ishida, T.; Jeon, E. J.; Yokoyama, H.; Aoki, S.; Berns, H. G.; Bhang, H. C.; Boyd, S.; Fujii, K.; Hara, T.; Hayato, Y.; Hill, J.; Ishii, T.; Ishino, H.; Jung, C. K.; Kearns, E.; Kim, H. I.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, S. B.; Kobayashi, T.; Kume, G.; Matsuno, S.; Mine, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Onchi, M.; Otaki, T.; Oyama, Y.; Park, H.; Sakuda, M.; Sato, K.; Scholberg, K.; Sharkey, E.; Stone, J. L.; Suzuki, A.; Takenaka, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, Y.; Takatsuki, M.; Walter, C. W.; Wilkes, J.; Yoo, J.; Yoshida, M.

    2003-02-01

    The K2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment uses a Scintillating Fiber Detector (SciFi) to reconstruct charged particles produced in neutrino interactions in the near detector. We describe the track reconstruction algorithm and the performance of the SciFi after 3 years of operation.

  4. Development of a thin scintillation films fission-fragment detector and a novel neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Daum, J. K.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Roman, A. R.; Springs, R. K.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    Investigation of prompt fission and neutron-capture Υ rays from fissile actinide samples at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) requires use of a fission-fragment detector to provide a trigger or a veto signal. A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillations were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U(n,f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described. A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the same type of scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements with it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  5. Optical simulation of monolithic scintillator detectors using GATE/GEANT4.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, D J Jan; Schaart, Dennis R; Maas, Marnix C; Beekman, Freek J; Bruyndonckx, Peter; van Eijk, Carel W E

    2010-03-21

    Much research is being conducted on position-sensitive scintillation detectors for medical imaging, particularly for emission tomography. Monte Carlo simulations play an essential role in many of these research activities. As the scintillation process, the transport of scintillation photons through the crystal(s), and the conversion of these photons into electronic signals each have a major influence on the detector performance; all of these processes may need to be incorporated in the model to obtain accurate results. In this work the optical and scintillation models of the GEANT4 simulation toolkit are validated by comparing simulations and measurements on monolithic scintillator detectors for high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET). We have furthermore made the GEANT4 optical models available within the user-friendly GATE simulation platform (as of version 3.0). It is shown how the necessary optical input parameters can be determined with sufficient accuracy. The results show that the optical physics models of GATE/GEANT4 enable accurate prediction of the spatial and energy resolution of monolithic scintillator PET detectors. PMID:20182005

  6. Sensitivity of sodium iodide cryogenic scintillation-phonon detectors to WIMP signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M.; Nadeau, P.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Roth, S.; von Sivers, M.; Yavin, I.

    2016-05-01

    There is great interest in performing dark matter direct detection experiments using alkali halides such as NaI to test the DAMA/LIBRA claim. Cryogenic scintillation-phonon detectors measure both scintillation light and phonons to provide event-by-event discrimination between particles interacting with nuclei and particles interacting with electrons. An alkali halide scintillation-phonon detector could test the DAMA/LIBRA claim in a model-independent way using a similar material with added background discrimination. We present simulations of such detectors to determine their possible sensitivity to both annual modulation and particle interaction signals. We find that a 5 kg detector array could test the modulation reported by DAMA/LIBRA within 2 years using a likelihood-ratio test.

  7. Scintillator efficiency study with MeV x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Stuart; Brown, Kristina; Curtis, Alden; Lutz, Stephen S.; Howe, Russell; Malone, Robert; Mitchell, Stephen; Danielson, Jeremy; Haines, Todd; Kwiatkowski, Kris

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated scintillator efficiency for MeV radiographic imaging. This paper discusses the modeled detection efficiency and measured brightness of a number of scintillator materials. An optical imaging camera records images of scintillator emission excited by a pulsed x-ray machine. The efficiency of various thicknesses of monolithic LYSO:Ce (cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate) are being studied to understand brightness and resolution trade-offs compared with a range of micro-columnar CsI:Tl (thallium-doped cesium iodide) scintillator screens. The micro-columnar scintillator structure apparently provides an optical gain mechanism that results in brighter signals from thinner samples. The trade-offs for brightness versus resolution in monolithic scintillators is straightforward. For higher-energy x-rays, thicker materials generally produce brighter signal due to x-ray absorption and the optical emission properties of the material. However, as scintillator thickness is increased, detector blur begins to dominate imaging system resolution due to the volume image generated in the scintillator thickness and the depth of field of the imaging system. We employ a telecentric optical relay lens to image the scintillator onto a recording CCD camera. The telecentric lens helps provide sharp focus through thicker-volume emitting scintillators. Stray light from scintillator emission can also affect the image scene contrast. We have applied an optical light scatter model to the imaging system to minimize scatter sources and maximize scene contrasts.

  8. Data analysis in solar neutrinos liquid-scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testera, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the description of some of the methods developed to extract the solar neutrino signal from the background by the two running experiments (Borexino and Kamland) based on the use of a large volume of liquid scintillator.

  9. Cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors with PMT readout for rare event search experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Lin, J.; Mikhailik, V. B.; Kraus, H.

    2016-06-01

    Cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors (CPSD) for rare event search experiments require reliable, efficient and robust photon detectors that can resolve individual photons in a scintillation event. We report on a cryogenic detector containing a scintillating crystal, equipped with an NTD-Ge phonon sensor and a photon detector based on a low-temperature photomultiplier tube (PMT) that is powered by a Cockcroft-Walton generator. Here we present results from the characterisation of two detector modules, one with CaWO4, the other with CaMoO4 as scintillator. The energy resolutions (FWHM) at 122.1 keV for the scintillation/PMT channel are 19.9% and 29.7% respectively for CaWO4 and CaMoO4 while the energy resolutions (FWHM) for the phonon channels are 2.17 keV (1.8%) and 0.97 keV (0.79%). These characteristics compare favourably with other CPSDs currently used in cryogenic rare-event search experiments. The detection module with PMT readout benefits from the implementation of a well-understood, reliable, and commercially available component and improved time resolution, while retaining the major advantages of conventional CPSD, such as high sensitivity, resolving power and discrimination ability.

  10. Simulating response functions and pulse shape discrimination for organic scintillation detectors with Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Gumplinger, Peter

    2014-02-01

    We present new capabilities of the Geant4 toolkit that enable the precision simulation of organic scintillation detectors within a comprehensive Monte Carlo code for the first time. As of version 10.0-beta, the Geant4 toolkit models the data-driven photon production from any user-defined scintillator, photon transportation through arbitrarily complex detector geometries, and time-resolved photon detection at the light readout device. By fully specifying the optical properties and geometrical configuration of the detector, the user can simulate response functions, photon transit times, and pulse shape discrimination. These capabilities enable detector simulation within a larger experimental environment as well as computationally evaluating novel scintillators, detector geometry, and light readout configurations. We demonstrate agreement of Geant4 with the NRESP7 code and with experiments for the spectroscopy of neutrons and gammas in the ranges 0-20 MeV and 0.511-1.274 MeV, respectively, using EJ301-based organic scintillation detectors. We also show agreement between Geant4 and experimental modeling of the particle-dependent detector pulses that enable simulated pulse shape discrimination.

  11. Development of a small scintillation detector with an optical fiber for fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Yagi, T; Unesaki, H; Misawa, T; Pyeon, C H; Shiroya, S; Matsumoto, T; Harano, H

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the characteristics of a reactor and a neutron generator, a small scintillation detector with an optical fiber with ThO(2) has been developed to measure fast neutrons. However, experimental facilities where (232)Th can be used are limited by regulations, and S/N ratio is low because the background counts of this detector are increase by alpha decay of (232)Th. The purpose of this study is to develop a new optical fiber detector for measuring fast neutrons that does not use nuclear material such as (232)Th. From the measured and calculated results, the new optical fiber detector which uses ZnS(Ag) as a converter material together with a scintillator have the highest detection efficiency among several developed detectors. It is applied for the measurement of reaction rates generated from fast neutrons; furthermore, the absolute detection efficiency of this detector was obtained experimentally. PMID:21129989

  12. Improving detector spatial resolution using pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Langechuan; Lu, Minghui; Cao, Wanqing; Peng, Luke; Chen, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    Indirect conversion flat panel detectors (FPDs) based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) technology are widely used in digital X-ray imaging. In such FPDs a scintillator layer is used for converting X-rays into visible light photons. However, the lateral spread of these photons inside the scintillator layer reduces spatial resolution of the FPD. In this study, FPDs incorporating pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure were developed to limit lateral spread of light photons thereby improving spatial resolution. For the pixelated scintillator, a two-dimensional barrier rib structure was first manufactured on a substrate layer, coated with reflective materials, and filled to the rim with the scintillating material of gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS). Several scintillator samples were fabricated, with pitch size varying from 160 to 280 μm and rib height from 200 to 280 μm. The samples were directly coupled to an a-Si flat panel photodiode array with a pitch of 200 μm to convert optical photons to electronic signals. With the pixelated scintillator, the detector modulation transfer function was shown to improve significantly (by 94% at 2 cycle/mm) compared to a detector using an unstructured GOS layer. However, the prototype does show lower sensitivity due to the decrease in scintillator fill factor. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of using the barrier-rib structure to improve the spatial resolution of FPDs. Such an improvement would greatly benefit nondestructive testing applications where the spatial resolution is the most important parameter. Further investigation will focus on improving the detector sensitivity and exploring its medical applications.

  13. CsI(Tl) with photodiodes for identifying subsurface radionuclide contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Stromswold, D.C.; Meisner, J.E.; Nicaise, W.F.

    1994-10-01

    At the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, underground radioactive contamination exists as the result of leaks, spills, and intentional disposal of waste products from plutonium-production operations. Characterizing these contaminants in preparation for environmental remediation is a major effort now in progress. In this paper, a cylindrical (15 {times} 61 mm) CsI(Tl) scintillation detector with two side-mounted photodiodes has been developed to collect spectral gamma-ray data in subsurface contaminated formations at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. It operates inside small-diameter, thick-wall steel pipes pushed into the ground to depths up to 20 m by a cone penetrometer. The detector provides a rugged, efficient, magnetic-field-insensitive means for identifying gamma-ray-emitting contaminants (mainly {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co). Mounting two 3 x 30-mm photodiodes end-to-end on a flat area along the detector`s side provides efficient light collection over the length of the detector.

  14. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  15. Time and Amplitude Characteristics of Large Scintillation Detectors with SiPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplin, V. A.; Makliaev, E. F.; Melikyan, Yu. A.; Naumov, P. P.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Runtso, M. F.

    A large plastic scintillation detector system with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout has been developed as a prototype for future astroparticle experiments' detectors. A set of SiPM connected in parallel was used in order to enlarge the light collection effective area and thus enhance the detector's amplitude and timing performance. Here we report on the values of time resolution and scintillation detection efficiency of such a system for different types of SiPM as a function of the distance between the scintillation strip edge with photomultipliers attached to it, and the penetrating particle. Results of a special simulation study of the system's amplitude and timing performance as a function of the SiPM radiation aging are also presented.

  16. Compensational scintillation detector with a flat energy response for flash X-ray measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Liang; Quan Lin; Zhang Zhongbing; Ouyang Xiaoping; Liu Bin; Liu Jinliang

    2013-01-15

    To measure the intensity of flash X-ray sources directly, a novel scintillation detector with a fast time response and flat energy response is developed by combining film scintillators of doped ZnO crystal and fast organic scintillator together. Through compensation design, the dual-scintillator detector (DSD) achieved a flat energy response to X-rays from tens of keV to several MeV, and sub-nanosecond time response by coupling to ultrafast photo-electronic devices. A prototype detector was fabricated according to the theoretical design; it employed ZnO:In and EJ228 with thicknesses of 0.3 mm and 0.1 mm, respectively. The energy response of this detector was tested on monoenergetic X-ray and {gamma}-ray sources. The detector performs very well with a sensitivity fluctuation below 5% for 8 discrete energy points within the 40-250 keV energy region and for other energies of 662 keV and 1.25 MeV as well, showing good accordance with the theoretical design. Additionally, the detector works properly for the application to the flash X-ray radiation field absolute intensity measurement. This DSD may be very useful for the diagnosis of time-resolved dynamic physical processes of flash X-ray sources without knowing the exact energy spectrum.

  17. Characterizing the response of miniature scintillation detectors when irradiated with proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, Louis; Polf, Jerimy C.; Beaulieu, Luc; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Designing a plastic scintillation detector for proton radiation therapy requires careful consideration. Most plastic scintillators should not perturb a proton beam if they are sufficiently small but may exhibit some energy dependence due to quenching effect. In this work, we studied the factors that would affect the performance of such scintillation detectors. We performed Monte Carlo simulations of proton beams with energies between 50 and 250 MeV to study signal amplitude, water equivalence, spatial resolution, and quenching of light output. Implementation of the quenching effect in the Monte Carlo simulations was then compared with prior experimental data for validation. The signal amplitude of a plastic scintillating fiber detector was on the order of 300 photons per MeV of energy deposited in the detector, corresponding to a power of about 30 pW at a proton dose rate of 100 cGy/min. The signal amplitude could be increased by up to a factor of 2 with reflective coating. We also found that Cerenkov light was not a significant source of noise. Dose deposited in the plastic scintillator was within 2% of the dose deposited in a similar volume of water throughout the whole depth-dose curve for protons with energies higher than 50 MeV. A scintillation detector with a radius of 0.5 mm offers a sufficient spatial resolution for use with a proton beam of 100 MeV or more. The main disadvantage of plastic scintillators when irradiated by protons was the quenching effect, which reduced the amount of scintillation and resulted in dose underestimation by close to 30% at the Bragg peak for beams of 150 MeV or more. However, the level of quenching was nearly constant throughout the proximal half of the depth-dose curve for all proton energies considered. We therefore conclude that it is possible to construct an effective detector to overcome the problems traditionally encountered in proton dosimetry. Scintillation detectors could be used for surface or shallow measurements

  18. Neutron response characterization for an EJ299-33 plastic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Massey, Thomas N.; Flaska, Marek; Becchetti, F. D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-05-10

    Organic scintillation detectors have shown promise as neutron detectors for characterizing special nuclear materials in various arms-control and homeland security applications. Recent advances have yielded a new plastic scintillator - EJ299-33 - with pulse-shape-discrimination (PSD) capability. Plastic scintillators would have a much expanded range of deployment relative to liquids and crystals. Here, we present a full characterization of pulse height response to fission-energy neutrons for an EJ299-33 detector with 7.62-by-7.62-cm cylindrical active volume, and compare with an EJ309 liquid scintillator in the same assembly. Scintillation light output relations, energy resolutions, and response matrices are presented for both detectors. A Continuous spectrum neutron source, obtained via the bombardment of Al-27 with 7.44-MeV deuterons at the Edwards Accelerator Facility at Ohio University, was used for the measurement. A new procedure for evaluating and comparing PSD performance is presented which accounts for the effect of the light output relation on the ability to detect low energy neutrons. The EJ299-33 is shown to have considerable deficit in matrix condition, and in PSD figure of merit when compared to EJ309, especially when neutron energy is taken into account. Furthermore the EJ299 is likely to bring a modest PSD capability into a array of held applications that are not accessible to liquids or crystals. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords

  19. Neutron response characterization for an EJ299-33 plastic scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Massey, Thomas N.; Flaska, Marek; Becchetti, F. D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-09-01

    Organic scintillation detectors have shown promise as neutron detectors for characterizing special nuclear materials in various arms-control and homeland-security applications. Recent advances have yielded a new plastic scintillator - EJ299-33 - with pulse-shape-discrimination (PSD) capability. Plastic scintillators would have a much-expanded range of deployment relative to liquids and crystals. Here, we present a full characterization of pulse-height response to fission-energy neutrons for an EJ299-33 detector with 7.62-by-7.62-cm cylindrical active volume, and compare with an EJ309 liquid scintillator in the same assembly. Scintillation light-output relations, energy resolutions, and response matrices are presented for both detectors. A continuous-spectrum neutron source, obtained via the bombardment of 27Al with 7.44-MeV deuterons at the Edwards Accelerator Facility at Ohio University, was used for the measurement. A new procedure for evaluating and comparing PSD performance is presented which accounts for the effect of the light-output relation on the ability to detect low-energy neutrons. The EJ299-33 is shown to have considerable deficit in matrix condition, and in PSD figure of merit when compared to EJ309, especially when neutron energy is taken into account. Nevertheless the EJ299 is likely to bring a modest PSD capability into a array of field applications that are not accessible to liquids or crystals.

  20. Neutron response characterization for an EJ299-33 plastic scintillation detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Massey, Thomas N.; Flaska, Marek; Becchetti, F. D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-05-10

    Organic scintillation detectors have shown promise as neutron detectors for characterizing special nuclear materials in various arms-control and homeland security applications. Recent advances have yielded a new plastic scintillator - EJ299-33 - with pulse-shape-discrimination (PSD) capability. Plastic scintillators would have a much expanded range of deployment relative to liquids and crystals. Here, we present a full characterization of pulse height response to fission-energy neutrons for an EJ299-33 detector with 7.62-by-7.62-cm cylindrical active volume, and compare with an EJ309 liquid scintillator in the same assembly. Scintillation light output relations, energy resolutions, and response matrices are presented for both detectors. A Continuousmore » spectrum neutron source, obtained via the bombardment of Al-27 with 7.44-MeV deuterons at the Edwards Accelerator Facility at Ohio University, was used for the measurement. A new procedure for evaluating and comparing PSD performance is presented which accounts for the effect of the light output relation on the ability to detect low energy neutrons. The EJ299-33 is shown to have considerable deficit in matrix condition, and in PSD figure of merit when compared to EJ309, especially when neutron energy is taken into account. Furthermore the EJ299 is likely to bring a modest PSD capability into a array of held applications that are not accessible to liquids or crystals. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords« less

  1. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams.

    PubMed

    Seravalli, E; de Boer, M; Geurink, F; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schippers, J M; van Eijk, C W E; Voss, B

    2008-09-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies. PMID:18695295

  2. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seravalli, E.; de Boer, M.; Geurink, F.; Huizenga, J.; Kreuger, R.; Schippers, J. M.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Voss, B.

    2008-09-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies.

  3. Beta ray spectroscopy based on a plastic scintillation detector/silicon surface barrier detector coincidence telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Y. S.; Hirning, C. R.; Yuen, P.; Aikens, M.

    1994-01-01

    Beta radiation is now recognized as a significant radiation safety problem and several international conferences have recently been devoted to the problems of mixed field beta/photon dosimetry. Conventional dosimetry applies algorithms to thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) multi-element badges which attempt to extract dose information based on the comparison of TL signals from ``thick/thin'' and/or ``bare/filtered'' elements. These may be grossly innacurate due to inadequate or non-existant knowledge of the energy spectrum of both the beta radiation and the accompanying photon field, as well as other factors. In this paper, we discuss the operation of a beta-ray energy spectrometer based on a two element, E × dE detector telescope intended to support dose algorithms with beta spectral information. Beta energies are measured via a 5 cm diameter × 2 cm thick BC-404 plastic scintillator preceded by a single, 100 μm thick, totally depleted, silicon dE detector. Photon events in the E detector are rejected by requiring a coincidence between the E and dE detectors. Photon rejection ratios vary from 225:1 at 1.25 MeV (60Co) to 360:1 at 0.36 MeV (133Ba). The spectrometer is capable of measuring electron energies from a lower energy coincidence threshold of approximately 125 keV to an upper limit of 3.5 MeV. This energy range spans the great majority of beta-emitting radionuclides in nuclear facilities.

  4. Investigation of the PGNAA using the LaBr3 scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Favalli, A; Mehner, H-C; Ciriello, V; Pedersen, B

    2010-01-01

    The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission develops instrumentation for detection of hazardous materials. In relation to this a new experimental facility was constructed for research into methods applying the detection of characteristic gamma rays subsequent to neutron irradiation. This includes the detection of prompt gamma rays from neutron inelastic scattering and neutron capture. For this purpose the device employs LaBr(3) scintillation detectors. The paper investigates the applicability of the LaBr(3) scintillation detector to PGNAA. PMID:19884018

  5. Observation of EAS Core with the Small Scintillation Detector at Taro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuyama, H.; Kuramochi, Hiroshi; Obara, Hitoshi; Ono, Shunichi; Origasa, Satoru; Mochida, Akinori; Sakayama, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Noboru

    2003-07-01

    We have observed the core structure of extensive air showers(EAS) that primary energy above 1016 eV. To measure the more detail and the correct density of the incident particles near EAS core, we installed 100 small scintillation detectors (using plastic scintillator : 15cm × 15cm × 2.5cm) that are placed on a lattice 10 × 10, and 40cm separation, at Taro Cosmic Ray Lab oratory, at autumn 2002. We report the detail of the small detector, and preliminary results.

  6. The Time Of Flight Scintillators For The Blast Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindile, A. T.

    2001-10-01

    The testing procedures for the time-of-flight scintillators of the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid are presented. The manufacturing process is described and the results for the time resolution and efficiency tests are shown, with details of the hardware and sofware used.

  7. A Measurement of the Scintillation Light Yield in CD4 Using a Photosensitive GEM Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Azmoun, B.; Azmoun, B.; Caccavano, A.; Rumore, M.; Sinsheimer, J.; Smirnov, N.; Stoll, S.; Woody, C.

    2010-08-01

    The absolute photon yield of scintillation light produced by highly ionizing particles in pure CF{sub 4} has been measured using a photosensitive Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector. The detector consists of two standard GEMs and a CsI coated GEM which acts as a photocathode that is sensitive to the 160 nm scintillation light produced in CF{sub 4}. The light yield was determined in terms of the number of scintillation photons emitted into a 4{pi} solid angle produced per MeV of energy deposited in the gas by a 5.5 MeV alpha particle and found to be 314 {+-} 15 photons per MeV. The quantum yield was determined using a fitting method to determine the number of photoelectrons from the measured pulse height distribution, and by an independent method using the measured gain of the GEM detector. The effect of scintillation light in CF{sub 4} on the performance of Cherenkov detectors, such as the PHENIX Hadron Blind Detector (HBD) at RHIC, is also discussed.

  8. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: fundamental feasibility investigation for SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, B J M; Hunt, D C; Rowlands, J A; Ohkawa, Yuji; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2005-09-01

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The final electronic image is read out using an active matrix array of thin film transistors (TFT). We call the proposed detector SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager). The advantage of the SHARP-AMFPI is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the important design considerations for SHARP-AMFPI such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness d(Se) and the applied electric field E(Se) of the HARP layer. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the E(Se) dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 microm HARP layer. The results were used in a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and nonavalanche modes as a function of E(Se): (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; (4) gain nonuniformity resulting from thickness nonuniformity; and (5) effects of direct x-ray interaction in HARP. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 microm can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy. PMID:16266110

  9. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: Fundamental feasibility investigation for SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Wei; Li Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, B.J.M.; Hunt, D.C.; Rowlands, J.A.; Ohkawa, Yuji; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2005-09-15

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The final electronic image is read out using an active matrix array of thin film transistors (TFT). We call the proposed detector SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager). The advantage of the SHARP-AMFPI is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the important design considerations for SHARP-AMFPI such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness d{sub Se} and the applied electric field E{sub Se} of the HARP layer. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the E{sub Se} dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 {mu}m HARP layer. The results were used in a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and nonavalanche modes as a function of E{sub Se}: (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; (4) gain nonuniformity resulting from thickness nonuniformity; and (5) effects of direct x-ray interaction in HARP. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 {mu}m can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy.

  10. SABRE: A search for dark matter and a test of the DAMA/LIBRA annual-modulation result using thallium-doped sodium-iodide scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Emily Kathryn

    Ample evidence has been gathered demonstrating that the majority of the mass in the universe is composed of non-luminous, non-baryonic matter. Though the evidence for dark matter is unassailable, its nature and properties remain unknown. A broad effort has been undertaken by the physics community to detect dark-matter particles through direct-detection techniques. For over a decade, the DAMA/LIBRA experiment has observed a highly significant (9.3sigma) modulation in the scintillation event rate in their highly pure NaI(Tl) detectors, which they use as the basis of a claim for the discovery of dark-matter particles. However, the dark-matter interpretation of the DAMA/LIBRA modulation remains unverified. While there have been some recent hints of dark matter in the form of a light Weakly-Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) from the CoGeNT and CDMS-Si experiments, when assuming a WIMP dark-matter model, several other experiments, including the LUX and XENON noble-liquid experiments, the KIMS CsI(Tl) experiment, and several bubble chamber experiments, conflict with DAMA/LIBRA. However, these experiments use different dark-matter targets and cannot be compared with DAMA/LIBRA in a model-independent way. The uncertainty surrounding the dark-matter model, astrophysical model, and nuclear-physics effects makes it necessary for a new NaI(Tl) experiment to directly test the DAMA/LIBRA result. The Sodium-iodide with Active Background REjection (SABRE) experiment seeks to provide a much-needed model-independent test of the DAMA/LIBRA modulation by developing highly pure crystal detectors with very low radioactivity and deploying them in an active veto detector that can reject key backgrounds in a dark-matter measurement. This work focuses on the efforts put forward by the SABRE collaboration in developing low-background, low-threshold crystal detectors, designing and fabricating a liquid-scintillator veto detector, and simulating the predicted background spectrum for a dark

  11. Study of Scintillator thickness optimization of lens-coupled X-ray imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, H.; Du, G.; Deng, B.; Chen, R.; Xiao, T.

    2016-03-01

    Lens-coupled X-ray in-direct imaging detectors are very popular for high-resolution X-ray imaging at the third generation synchrotron radiation facilities. This imaging system consists of a scintilator producing a visible-light image of X-ray beam, a microscope objective, a mirror reflecting at 90° and a CCD camera. When the thickness of the scintillator is matched with the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, the image quality of experimental results will be improved obviously. This paper used an imaging system at BL13W beamline of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) to study the matching relation between the scintillator thickness and the NA of the microscope objective with a real sample. By use of the matching relation between the scintillator thickness and the NA of the microscope objective, the optimal imaging results have been obtained.

  12. A fast microchannel plate-scintillator detector for velocity map imaging and imaging mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, B.; King, S. J.; Vallance, C.; Brouard, M.

    2014-02-15

    The time resolution achievable using standard position-sensitive ion detectors, consisting of a chevron pair of microchannel plates coupled to a phosphor screen, is primarily limited by the emission lifetime of the phosphor, around 70 ns for the most commonly used P47 phosphor. We demonstrate that poly-para-phenylene laser dyes may be employed extremely effectively as scintillators, exhibiting higher brightness and much shorter decay lifetimes than P47. We provide an extensive characterisation of the properties of such scintillators, with a particular emphasis on applications in velocity-map imaging and microscope-mode imaging mass spectrometry. The most promising of the new scintillators exhibits an electron-to-photon conversion efficiency double that of P47, with an emission lifetime an order of magnitude shorter. The new scintillator screens are vacuum stable and show no signs of signal degradation even over longer periods of operation.

  13. Expected performance of an ideal liquid argon neutrino detector with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorel, M.

    2014-10-01

    Scintillation light is used in liquid argon (LAr) neutrino detectors to provide a trigger signal, veto information against cosmic rays, and absolute event timing. In this work, we discuss additional opportunities offered by detectors with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light, that is with light collection efficiencies of about 10-3. We focus on two key detector performance indicators for neutrino oscillation physics: calorimetric neutrino energy reconstruction and neutrino/antineutrino separation in a non-magnetized detector. Our results are based on detailed simulations, with neutrino interactions modelled according to the GENIE event generator, while the charge and light responses of a large LAr ideal detector are described by the Geant4 and NEST simulation tools. A neutrino energy resolution as good as 3.3% RMS for 4 GeV electron neutrino charged-current interactions can in principle be obtained in a large detector of this type, by using both charge and light information. By exploiting muon capture in argon and scintillation light information to veto muon decay electrons, we also obtain muon neutrino identification efficiencies of about 50%, and muon antineutrino misidentification rates at the few percent level, for few-GeV neutrino interactions that are fully contained. We argue that the construction of large LAr detectors with sufficiently high light collection efficiencies is in principle possible.

  14. A large area plastic scintillation detector with 4-corner-readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shu-Wen; Yu, Yu-Hong; Zhou, Yong; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Zhang, Xue-Heng; Wang, Shi-Tao; Yue, Ke; Liu, Long-Xiang; Fang, Fang; Yan, Duo; Sun, Yu; Wang, Zhao-Min

    2016-05-01

    A 760 mm × 760 mm × 30 mm plastic scintillation detector viewed by photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) from four corners has been developed, and the detector has been tested with cosmic rays and γ rays. A position-independent effective time T eff has been found, indicating this detector can be used as a TOF detector. The hit position can also be reconstructed by the time from the four corners. A TOF resolution of 236 ps and a position resolution of 48 mm have been achieved, and the detection efficiency has also been investigated. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1332207, 11405242)

  15. Development of a scintillation light detector for a cryogenic rare-event-search experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; So, J. H.; Kang, C. S.; Kim, G. B.; Kim, S. R.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, M. K.; Yoon, W. S.; Kim, Y. H.

    2015-06-01

    We developed a light detector to measure scintillation light from a crystal utilized in heat and light measurements at low temperatures for a rare-event-search experiment. A 2-in. Ge wafer was used as the light absorber, while a metallic magnetic calorimeter was employed to read out the temperature increase of the absorber. The light detector was tested at 25-100 mK using a cryogen-free adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The performance in terms of energy resolution, rise time and signal amplitude was measured using radioactive sources with a consideration of the absorption position on the wafer. The light detector was used to measure the scintillation light of a CaMoO4 crystal at mK temperatures. We also discuss for the potential application of this detector in a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment.

  16. Improvement of the energy resolution of the scintillating detectors for the low background measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodák, R.; Bukový, M.; Burešová, H.; Cerna, C.; Fajt, L.; Jouve, J.; Kouba, P.; Marquet, Ch.; Piquemal, F.; Přidal, P.; Smolek, K.; Špavorová, M.; Štekl, I.

    2015-08-01

    The main goal of this project was the improvement of the energy resolution of the scintillating detectors. In order to obtain the required energy resolution at the level of ˜ 8 %, which corresponds to the half-life sensitivity of about 1.2 × 1026 years for the SuperNEMO experiment [1], an optimal ratio of concentrations of the activator (pTP) and the wavelength shifter (POPOP) in the purified polystyrene (PS) base had to be found. Furthermore, good optical properties and mainly the energy resolution for such improved detectors are comparable with properties for higher price plastic scintillators based on the polyvinyltoluene (PVT). In this contribution, the results of the measurement with the organic plastic scintillators with various composition are presented.

  17. Gamma-ray detector employing scintillators coupled to semiconductor drift photodetectors

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation detectors according to one embodiment of the invention are implemented using scintillators combined with a semiconductor drift photodetectors wherein the components are specifically constructed in terms of their geometry, dimensions, and arrangement so that the scintillator decay time and drift time in the photodetector pairs are matched in order to achieve a greater signal-to-noise ratio. The detectors may include electronics for amplification of electrical signals produced by the silicon drift photodetector, the amplification having a shaping time optimized with respect to the decay time of the scintillator and time spread of the signal in the silicon drift photodetector to substantially maximize the ratio of the signal to the electronic noise.

  18. Suppression of Afterglow in Microcolumnar CsI:Tl by Codoping With Sm2+: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Thacker, Samta C.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Ovechkina, Lena E.; Miller, Stuart R.; Cool, Steven; Brecher, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Microcolumnar CsI:Tl remains a highly desirable sensor for digital X-ray imaging due to its superior spatial resolution, bright emission, high absorption efficiency, and ready availability. Despite such obvious advantages, two characteristic properties of CsI:Tl undermine their use in clinical and high speed imaging: a persistent afterglow in its scintillation decay, and a hysteresis effect that distorts the scintillation yield after exposure to high radiation doses. In our earlier work we have discovered that the addition of 0.05 to 0.5 mol percent of Sm2+ to crystals of CsI:Tl suppresses their afterglow by a factor of up to 50, even when subjected to a very high exposure of 120 R. This additive also diminishes hysteresis by an order of magnitude, which is a major accomplishment. Consequent- ly, our work is now focused on developing codoped microcolumnar CsI:Tl, Sm films that can potentially combine excellent properties of the current state-of-the-art CsI:Tl films with the reduced afterglow and hysteresis observed in codoped crystals. While our earlier attempts in CsI:Tl, Sm film fabrication, reported at the previous IEEE meeting, demonstrated obvious advantages of the approach, the recent work has succeeded in producing films that show improvement by at least a factor of 7 in afterglow and 150% in brightness compared to the standard CsI:Tl films. We report these important results in this paper, along with other recent advances in film growth and new imaging results. PMID:20617107

  19. A simple method for the stabilization of scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, M.; Brewer, W. D.; Klein, E.

    1983-02-01

    We report on the design and operation of a gain-stabilized Nal(Tl) scintillation spectrometer for use in stray magnetic fields utilizing a blue light-emitting diode as reference source. The spectrometer is simple, compact, and robust and the stabilization can be constructed at modest additional cost. It is easy to operate, and yields long-term gain stability of better than ±0.2% as well as greatly improved operation in stray magnetic fields.

  20. The research program of the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) in the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadykin, V. L.; Yakushev, V. F.; Korchagin, P. V.; Korchagin, V. B.; Malgin, A. S.; Ryassny, F. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Talochkin, V. P.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Badino, G.

    1985-01-01

    A massive (90 tons) liquid scintillation detector (LSD) has been running since October 1984 in the Mont Blanc Laboratory at a depth of 5,200 hg/sq cm of standard rock. The research program of the experiment covers a variety of topics in particle physics and astrophysics. The performance of the detector, the main fields of research are presented and the preliminary results are discussed.

  1. A time-gating scintillation detector for the measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Yea, Kwon-hae; Cha, Hyungki

    2009-06-15

    A time-gating scintillation detector, in which a fast high voltage switch is used for gating a channel photomultiplier, was developed for a measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons. The x rays generated from the intense femtosecond laser and the solid target interactions were suppressed selectively and a time-of-flight signal of a laser-generated fast neutron was measured effectively. The detector was used successfully to measure the neutron yield of a femtosecond, deuterated, polystyrene plasma.

  2. A time-gating scintillation detector for the measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Yea, Kwon-hae; Cha, Hyungki

    2009-06-01

    A time-gating scintillation detector, in which a fast high voltage switch is used for gating a channel photomultiplier, was developed for a measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons. The x rays generated from the intense femtosecond laser and the solid target interactions were suppressed selectively and a time-of-flight signal of a laser-generated fast neutron was measured effectively. The detector was used successfully to measure the neutron yield of a femtosecond, deuterated, polystyrene plasma. PMID:19566199

  3. A Scintillator tile-fiber preshower detector for the CDF Central Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lami

    2004-08-12

    The front face of the CDF central calorimeter is being equipped with a new Preshower detector, based on scintillator tiles read out by WLS fibers. A light yield of about 40 pe/MIP at the tile exit was obtained, exceeding the design requirements.

  4. Development of a thermal neutron detector based on scintillating fibers and silicon photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Barbagallo, Massimo; Greco, Giuseppe; Scire, Carlotta; Scire, Sergio; Cosentino, Luigi; Pappalardo, Alfio; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Montereali, Rosa Maria; Vincenti, Maria Aurora

    2010-09-15

    We propose a technique for thermal neutron detection, based on a {sup 6}Li converter placed in front of scintillating fibers readout by means of silicon photomultipliers. Such a technique allows building cheap and compact detectors and dosimeters, thus possibly opening new perspectives in terms of granular monitoring of neutron fluxes as well as space-resolved neutron detection.

  5. A study of the characteristics of scintillation detectors with a diffuse reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. A.; Filchenkov, V. V.; Konin, A. D.; Zhuk, V. V.

    1996-02-01

    The process of light collection in a scintillation counter with a diffuse reflector is studied using the Monte-Carlo codes "PHOTON" and "LIGHT". The results obtained are compared with the simple model estimations and employed to describe the time shape of the signal for several different detectors including the full absorption neutron spectrometer, and reanalyze the previous NE-213 transparency measurements.

  6. Wavelength-Shifting-Fiber Scintillation Detectors for Thermal Neutron Imaging at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Lowell; Diawara, Yacouba; Ellis, E Darren; Funk, Loren L; Hannan, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2012-01-01

    We have developed wavelength-Shifting-fiber Scintillator Detector (SSD) with 0.3 m2 area per module. Each module has 154 x 7 pixels and a 5 mm x 50 mm pixel size. Our goal is to design a large area neutron detector offering higher detection efficiency and higher count-rate capability for Time-Of-Flight (TOF) neutron diffraction in Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A ZnS/6LiF scintillator combined with a novel fiber encoding scheme was used to record the neutron events. A channel read-out-card (CROC) based digital-signal processing electronics and position-determination algorithm was applied for neutron imaging. Neutron-gamma discrimination was carried out using pulse-shape discrimination (PSD). A sandwich flat-scintillator detector can have detection efficiency close to He-3 tubes (about 10 atm). A single layer flat-scintillator detector has count rate capability of 6,500 cps/cm2, which is acceptable for powder diffractometers at SNS.

  7. Probing the Earth’s interior with a large-volume liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Feilitzsch, Franz V.; Fields, Brian D.; Undagoitia, Teresa Marrodán; Oberauer, Lothar; Potzel, Walter; Raffelt, Georg G.; Wurm, Michael

    2007-02-01

    A future large-volume liquid scintillator detector would provide a high-statistics measurement of terrestrial antineutrinos originating from β-decays of the uranium and thorium chains. In addition, the forward displacement of the neutron in the detection reaction ν+p→n+e provides directional information. We investigate the requirements on such detectors to distinguish between certain geophysical models on the basis of the angular dependence of the geoneutrino flux. Our analysis is based on a Monte-Carlo simulation with different levels of light yield, considering both unloaded and gadolinium-loaded scintillators. We find that a 50 kt detector such as the proposed LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) will detect deviations from isotropy of the geoneutrino flux significantly. However, with an unloaded scintillator the time needed for a useful discrimination between different geophysical models is too large if one uses the directional information alone. A Gd-loaded scintillator improves the situation considerably, although a 50 kt detector would still need several decades to distinguish between a geophysical reference model and one with a large neutrino source in the Earth’s core. However, a high-statistics measurement of the total geoneutrino flux and its spectrum still provides an extremely useful glance at the Earth’s interior.

  8. Study of the penetrating component of cosmic rays underground using large scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazhskaya, O. G.

    2016-05-01

    The study of penetrating component of cosmic ray underground using large scintillation detectors situated in Russia and Italy is carried out during more than 40 years. The main results obtained at the different depths from 25 m w.e. to 5200 m w.e. are presented in this report.

  9. Neutron emission measurement at the HL-2A tokamak device with a liquid scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xufei; Chen, Zhongjing; Peng, Xingyu; Yuan, Xi; Zhang, Xing; Cui, Zhiqiang; Du, Tengfei; Hu, Zhimeng; Li, Tao; Fan, Tieshuan Chen, Jinxiang; Li, Xiangqing; Zhang, Guohui; Gorini, Giuseppe; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Jinwei; Yang, Qingwei

    2014-10-15

    Neutron emission measurement at the HL-2A tokamak device with a liquid scintillation detector is described. The detector was placed at a location with little structure material in the field of view, and equipped with a gain monitoring system which could provide the possibility to evaluate the gain variation as well as to correct for the detector response. Time trace of the neutron emissivity was obtained and it was consistent with the result of a standard {sup 235}U fission chamber. During the plasma discharge the neutron yield could vary by about four orders of magnitude and the fluctuation of the detector gain was up to about 6%. Pulse height spectrum of the liquid scintillation detector was constructed and corrected with the aid of the gain monitoring system, and the correction was found to be essential for the assessment of the neutron energy spectrum. This successful measurement offered experience and confidence for the application of liquid scintillation detectors in the upcoming neutron camera system.

  10. Fast response amplitude scintillation detector for X-ray synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dementyev, E. N.; Sheromov, M. A.; Sokolov, A. S.

    1986-05-01

    The present paper describes a scintillation detector for X-ray synchrotron radiation. This detector has been created on the basis of a scintillator and a photoelectron multiplier (FEU-130) and its construction allows one to use the specific features of the time characteristics of synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring. In a given range of amplitudes, the detector electronics makes a 64-channel amplitude analysis of the FEU-130 signal strobed by the revolution frequency of an electron bunch in the storage ring ( f0 = 818 kHz). There is the possibility of operating the detector at high intensities of the monochromatic radiation incident on the scintillator. Such a possibility is directly provided by the time structure of SR and is not realizable with the use of other X-ray sources. The detector will find wide application in studies on X-ray structural analysis, transmission and fluorescent EXAFS- and XANES-spectroscopy, transmission scanning microscopy and microtomography, calibration of X-ray detectors and as a monitor on SR beams from the storage ring VEPP-4.

  11. Active Inspection of Nuclear Materials Using {sup 4}He Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Davatz, G.; Howard, A.; Chandra, R.; Gendotti, U.

    2011-12-13

    The detection of fissionable materials by neutron and high-energy photon active interrogation methods is explored using {sup 4}He scintillation detectors to search for prompt and delayed neutron signature. The low electron density of {sup 4}He in addition to its pulse shape discrimination capability allows strong rejection of gamma radiation. For the detection of the prompt neutron signatures, this capability is important as the signal produced by induced fission is accompanied by intense gamma radiation. The nanosecond time resolution of {sup 4}He scintillation detectors can be used for time-of-flight measurements aimed at determining the energy of the emitted neutrons. For delayed neutron detection, the insensitivity to the low energy neutrons present from non-signal reactions is inherent. Unlike detectors requiring a moderator, this technology can easily be collimated to reduce sensitivity to neutrons from outside the field of interest. The performance of the detectors for these applications is studied using GEANT4 computer modeling, based on measured detector parameters. A comparison is made with technologies typically used for these applications, i.e. heavily shielded organic scintillators for prompt neutron detection and Cd-lined {sup 3}He neutron detectors for the detection of delayed neutrons.

  12. A Monte Carlo investigation of Swank noise for thick, segmented, crystalline scintillators for radiotherapy imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2009-01-01

    Thick, segmented scintillating detectors, consisting of 2D matrices of scintillator crystals separated by optically opaque septal walls, hold considerable potential for significantly improving the performance of megavoltage (MV) active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs). Initial simulation studies of the radiation transport properties of segmented detectors have indicated the possibility of significant improvement in DQE compared to conventional MV AMFPIs based on phosphor screen detectors. It is therefore interesting to investigate how the generation and transport of secondary optical photons affect the DQE performance of such segmented detectors. One effect that can degrade DQE performance is optical Swank noise (quantified by the optical Swank factor Iopt), which is induced by depth-dependent variations in optical gain. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation and optical transport have been used to examine Iopt and zero-frequency DQE for segmented CsI:Tl and BGO detectors at different thicknesses and element-to-element pitches. For these detectors, Iopt and DQE were studied as a function of various optical parameters, including absorption and scattering in the scintillator, absorption at the top reflector and septal walls, as well as scattering at the side surfaces of the scintillator crystals. The results indicate that Iopt and DQE are only weakly affected by absorption and scattering in the scintillator, as well as by absorption at the top reflector. However, in some cases, these metrics were found to be significantly degraded by absorption at the septal walls and scattering at the scintillator side surfaces. Moreover, such degradations are more significant for detectors with greater thickness or smaller element pitch. At 1.016 mm pitch and with optimized optical properties, 40 mm thick segmented CsI:Tl and BGO detectors are predicted to provide DQE values of ∼29% and 42%, corresponding to improvement by factors of ∼29 and 42, respectively

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yushou; Conner, Joseph; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1 μm, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optical boundary behaviors are simulated. This simulation was first validated through measurements of neutron response from lithium glass cylinders. With good expected light collection, an algorithm based upon the features inherent to alpha and triton particle tracks is proposed to reconstruct the neutron reaction position in the glass fiber array. Given a 1 μm fiber diameter and 0.1mm detector thickness, the neutron spatial resolution is expected to reach σ∼1 μm with a Gaussian fit in each lateral dimension. The detection efficiency was estimated to be 3.7% for a glass fiber assembly with thickness of 0.1mm. When the detector thickness increases from 0.1mm to 1mm, the position resolution is not expected to vary much, while the detection efficiency is expected to increase by about a factor of ten. PMID:26708515

  14. Study of light transport inside scintillation crystals for PET detectors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Downie, Evan; Farrell, Thomas; Peng, Hao

    2013-04-01

    Scintillation crystal design is a critical component in positron emission tomography system development, which impacts a number of performance parameters including energy resolution, time resolution and spatial resolution. Our work aims to develop a generalized simulation tool to model the light transport inside scintillation crystals with good accuracy, taking into account surface treatments, reflectors, temporal dependence of scintillation decay, and comprehensive experimental validations. The simulation has been validated against both direct analytical calculation and experimental measurements. In this work, the studies were performed for a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal of 3×3×20 mm(3) dimension coupled to a Hamamatsu silicon photomultiplier, with respect to light output, rise-time slope, energy resolution and time resolution. Four crystal surface treatment and reflector configurations were investigated: GroundMetal, GroundPaint, PolishMetal and PolishPaint. The experiments were performed to validate the Monte Carlo simulation results. The results indicate that the best time resolution (0.96±0.05 ns) and good energy resolution (10.6±0.4%) could be produced by using a polished surface with specular reflector, while the configuration of a polished surface with diffusive reflector produces the best energy resolution (10.2±0.9%). The results indicate that a polished surface with diffusive reflector achieves the best energy resolution (10.2±0.9%) for 511 keV high energy photons, and a polished surface with specular reflector achieves the best time resolution (0.96±0.05 ns) measured against a Hamamatsu fast photomultiplier tube. The ground surface treatment is not recommended for its inferior performance in terms of energy and time resolution. Possible explanations and future improvements to be made to the developed simulation tool are discussed. PMID:23470488

  15. Study of light transport inside scintillation crystals for PET detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Downie, Evan; Farrell, Thomas; Peng, Hao

    2013-04-01

    Scintillation crystal design is a critical component in positron emission tomography system development, which impacts a number of performance parameters including energy resolution, time resolution and spatial resolution. Our work aims to develop a generalized simulation tool to model the light transport inside scintillation crystals with good accuracy, taking into account surface treatments, reflectors, temporal dependence of scintillation decay, and comprehensive experimental validations. The simulation has been validated against both direct analytical calculation and experimental measurements. In this work, the studies were performed for a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal of 3×3×20 mm3 dimension coupled to a Hamamatsu silicon photomultiplier, with respect to light output, rise-time slope, energy resolution and time resolution. Four crystal surface treatment and reflector configurations were investigated: GroundMetal, GroundPaint, PolishMetal and PolishPaint. The experiments were performed to validate the Monte Carlo simulation results. The results indicate that the best time resolution (0.96±0.05 ns) and good energy resolution (10.6±0.4%) could be produced by using a polished surface with specular reflector, while the configuration of a polished surface with diffusive reflector produces the best energy resolution (10.2±0.9%). The results indicate that a polished surface with diffusive reflector achieves the best energy resolution (10.2±0.9%) for 511 keV high energy photons, and a polished surface with specular reflector achieves the best time resolution (0.96±0.05 ns) measured against a Hamamatsu fast photomultiplier tube. The ground surface treatment is not recommended for its inferior performance in terms of energy and time resolution. Possible explanations and future improvements to be made to the developed simulation tool are discussed.

  16. Development and Operation of a Liquid Scintillator Purification System for a Solar Neutrino Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Benziger, J. B.; Calaprice, F. P.; Darnton, N.; Johnson, M.; Loeser, F.; Vogelaar, R. B.

    1996-10-01

    An on-line purification system for a large-scale, liquid scintillator detector has been developed for the Counting Test Facility (CTF), a five-ton prototype of the Borexino solar neutrino detector at Gran Sasso. This purification system was operated to remove radioactive impurities from the pseudocumene-based scintillator in the CTF. Counter-current water extraction was performed to remove ionic impurities from the scintillator. Notably, the radon daughters ^210Bi and ^210Po were identified prior to purification and were successfully removed by water extraction. Vacuum distillation of the entire scintillator mixture allowed high radiopurity and chemical purity to be maintained; in addtion, it enabled a test of the origin of ^14C in the scintillator mixture to be performed. Finally, nitrogen stripping was utilized to remove noble gas radioactive isotopes, such as ^85Kr and ^222Rn. The results of the CTF purification activities and an overview of the purification scheme for the Borexino solar neutrino experiment will be presented.

  17. Integrated semiconductor quantum dot scintillation detector: Ultimate limit for speed and light yield

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oktyabrsky, Serge; Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; Murat, Pavel

    2016-03-30

    Here, a picosecond-range timing of charged particles and photons is a long-standing challenge for many high-energy physics, biophysics, medical and security applications. We present a design, technological pathway and challenges, and some properties important for realization of an ultrafast high-efficient room-temperature semiconductor scintillator based on self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in a GaAs matrix. Low QD density (<; 1015 cm-3), fast (~5 ps) electron capture, luminescence peak redshifted by 0.2-0.3 eV from GaAs absorption edge with fast decay time (0.5-1 ns) along with the efficient energy transfer in the GaAs matrix (4.2 eV/pair) allows for fabrication of a semiconductormore » scintillator with the unsurpassed performance parameters. The major technological challenge is fabrication of a large volume (> 1 cm3 ) of epitaxial QD medium. This requires multiple film separation and bonding, likely using separate epitaxial films as waveguides for improved light coupling. Compared to traditional inorganic scintillators, the semiconductor-QD based scintillators could have about 5x higher light yield and 20x faster decay time, opening a way to gamma detectors with the energy resolution better than 1% and sustaining counting rates MHz. Picosecond-scale timing requires segmented low-capacitance photodiodes integrated with the scintillator. For photons, the proposed detector inherently provides the depth-of-interaction information.« less

  18. Scintillator gamma-ray detectors with silicon photomultiplier readouts for high-energy astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Legere, Jason; Bancroft, Christopher; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.; Schwadron, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    Space-based gamma-ray detectors for high-energy astronomy face strict constraints of mass, volume, and power, and must endure harsh operating environments. Scintillator materials have a long history of successful operation under these conditions, and new materials offer greatly improved performance in terms of efficiency, time response, and energy resolution. The use of scintillators in space remains constrained, however, by the mass, volume, and fragility of the associated light readout device, typically a vacuum photomultiplier tube (PMT). Recently developed silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) offer gains and efficiencies similar to those of PMTs, but with greatly reduced mass and volume, high ruggedness, and no high-voltage requirements. We have therefore been investigating the use of SiPM readouts for scintillator gamma-ray detectors, with an emphasis on their suitability for space- and balloonbased instruments for high-energy astronomy. We present our most recent results, including spectroscopy measurements for lanthanum bromide scintillators with SiPM readouts, and pulse-shape discrimination using organic scintillators with SiPM readouts. We also describe potential applications of SiPM readouts to specific highenergy astronomy instrument concepts.

  19. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations.

    PubMed

    Sótér, A; Todoroki, K; Kobayashi, T; Barna, D; Horváth, D; Hori, M

    2014-02-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 × 1 mm(2). The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ≈ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen at high annihilation rates of the antiprotons. PMID:24593349

  20. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Sótér, A.; Todoroki, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Barna, D.; Wigner Research Center of Physics, H-1525 Budapest ; Horváth, D.; Hori, M.; Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033

    2014-02-15

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 × 1 mm{sup 2}. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ≈ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen at high annihilation rates of the antiprotons.

  1. TH-C-19A-11: Toward An Optimized Multi-Point Scintillation Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Duguay-Drouin, P; Delage, ME; Therriault-Proulx, F; Beddar, S; Beaulieu, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to characterize a 2-points mPSDs' optical chain using a spectral analysis to help selecting the optimal components for the detector. Methods: Twenty different 2-points mPSD combinations were built using 4 plastic scintillators (BCF10, BCF12, BCF60, BC430; St-Gobain) and quantum dots (QDs). The scintillator is said to be proximal when near the photodetector, and distal otherwise. A 15m optical fiber (ESKA GH-4001) was coupled to the scintillating component and connected to a spectrometer (Shamrock, Andor and QEPro, OceanOptics). These scintillation components were irradiated at 125kVp; a spectrum for each scintillator was obtained by irradiation of individual scintillator and shielding the second component, thus talking into account light propagation in all components and interfaces. The combined total spectrum was also acquired and involved simultaneous irradiation of the two scintillators for each possible combination. The shape and intensity were characterized. Results: QDs in proximal position absorb almost all the light signal from distal plastic scintillators and emit in its own emission wavelength, with 100% of the signal in the QD range (625–700nm) for the combination BCF12/QD. However, discrimination is possible when QD is in distal position in combination with blue scintillators, total signal being 73% in the blue range (400-550nm) and 27% in QD range. Similar results are obtained with the orange scintillator (BC430). For optimal signal intensity, BCF12 should always be in proximal position, e.g. having 50% more intensity when coupled with BCF60 in distal position (BCF12/BCF60) compared to the BCF60/BCF12 combination. Conclusion: Different combinations of plastic scintillators and QD were built and their emission spectra were studied. We established a preferential order for the scintillating components in the context of an optimized 2-points mPSD. In short, the components with higher wavelength emission spectrum

  2. A newly developed wrapping method for scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhl, L.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Csatlós, M.; Algora, A.; Gulyás, J.; Kalinka, G.; Kertész, Zs I.; Timár, J.

    2016-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer, the European Low-Energy Neutron Spectrometer (ELENS), has been constructed to study exotic nuclei in inverse kinematics experiments. The spectrometer consisting of scintillator bars can be used in the neutron energy range of 100 keV to 10 MeV. To increase the light collection efficiency a special wrapping method was developed for each bars of ELENS. By using the specially heat treated reflector foil 15-20% better light collection is available. The development of wrapping process, the results of the test experiments are also presented.

  3. Radioactive threat detection using scintillant-based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, Alex

    2004-09-01

    An update to the performance of AS&E's Radioactive Threat Detection sensor technology. A model is presented detailing the components of the scintillant-based RTD system employed in AS&E products aimed at detecting radiological WMD. An overview of recent improvements in the sensors, electrical subsystems and software algorithms are presented. The resulting improvements in performance are described and sample results shown from existing systems. Advanced and future capabilities are described with an assessment of their feasibility and their application to Homeland Defense.

  4. Hybrid metal organic scintillator materials system and particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Christina A.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Doty, F. Patrick; Simmons, Blake A.

    2011-07-26

    We describe the preparation and characterization of two zinc hybrid luminescent structures based on the flexible and emissive linker molecule, trans-(4-R,4'-R') stilbene, where R and R' are mono- or poly-coordinating groups, which retain their luminescence within these solid materials. For example, reaction of trans-4,4'-stilbenedicarboxylic acid and zinc nitrate in the solvent dimethylformamide (DMF) yielded a dense 2-D network featuring zinc in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination environments connected by trans-stilbene links. Similar reaction in diethylformamide (DEF) at higher temperatures resulted in a porous, 3-D framework structure consisting of two interpenetrating cubic lattices, each featuring basic to zinc carboxylate vertices joined by trans-stilbene, analogous to the isoreticular MOF (IRMOF) series. We demonstrate that the optical properties of both embodiments correlate directly with the local ligand environments observed in the crystal structures. We further demonstrate that these materials produce high luminescent response to proton radiation and high radiation tolerance relative to prior scintillators. These features can be used to create sophisticated scintillating detection sensors.

  5. Evaluation of Large Volume SrI2(Eu) Scintillator Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, B W; Cherepy, N J; Drury, O B; Thelin, P A; Fisher, S E; Magyar, A F; Payne, S A; Burger, A; Boatner, L A; Ramey, J O; Shah, K S; Hawrami, R

    2010-11-18

    There is an ever increasing demand for gamma-ray detectors which can achieve good energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and room-temperature operation. We are working to address each of these requirements through the development of large volume SrI{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator detectors. In this work, we have evaluated a variety of SrI{sub 2} crystals with volumes >10 cm{sup 3}. The goal of this research was to examine the causes of energy resolution degradation for larger detectors and to determine what can be done to mitigate these effects. Testing both packaged and unpackaged detectors, we have consistently achieved better resolution with the packaged detectors. Using a collimated gamma-ray source, it was determined that better energy resolution for the packaged detectors is correlated with better light collection uniformity. A number of packaged detectors were fabricated and tested and the best spectroscopic performance was achieved for a 3% Eu doped crystal with an energy resolution of 2.93% FWHM at 662keV. Simulations of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) crystals were also performed to better understand the light transport physics in scintillators and are reported. This study has important implications for the development of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) detectors for national security purposes.

  6. Development of an encapsulated scintillating fiber detector as a 14-MeV neutron sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singkarat, S.; Boonyawan, D.; Hoyes, G. G.; Tippawan, U.; Vilaithong, T.; Garis, N. S.; Kobus, H.

    1997-02-01

    A scintillating fiber detector has been developed and tested for use as a 14-MeV neutron sensor. The detector, designated an "Encapsulated Scintillating Fiber Detector (EFD)", is composed of a parallel array of 0.5 × 0.5 × 15 mm BCF-12 plastic scintillating fibers encapsulated in clear BC-600 optical cement. The 85 fibers from a 12 × 12 mm square array, with a separation gap of 0.8-1 mm, in the center of the 40 mm diameter × 15 mm thick hardened optical cement. It can be directly coupled to an ordinary 2 in. diameter photomultiplier tube and its simple electronics. The response of the detector to gamma-rays from isotopic sources, as well as to 2.6- and 14-MeV monoenergetic neutrons from a neutron generator has been evaluated. The detector shows 3 distinct properties simultaneously, i.e. (1) good gamma-ray pulse height reduction, (2) discrimination against 14-MeV neutrons entering at angles non-parallel to the fiber axis, and (3) production of a full energy peak of 14-MeV recoil protons in the direction of the fiber axes. Investigations by Monte Carlo simulation are also included.

  7. A systematic characterization of the low-energy photon response of plastic scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Jonathan; Beddar, Sam; Bonde, Chris; Schmidt, Daniel; Culberson, Wesley; Guillemette, Maxime; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-08-01

    To characterize the low energy behavior of scintillating materials used in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs), 3 PSDs were developed using polystyrene-based scintillating materials emitting in different wavelengths. These detectors were exposed to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-matched low-energy beams ranging from 20 kVp to 250 kVp, and to (137)Cs and (60)Co beams. The dose in polystyrene was compared to the dose in air measured by NIST-calibrated ionization chambers at the same location. Analysis of every beam quality spectrum was used to extract the beam parameters and the effective mass energy-absorption coefficient. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to calculate the energy absorbed in the scintillators' volume. The scintillators' expected response was then compared to the experimental measurements and an energy-dependent correction factor was identified to account for low-energy quenching in the scintillators. The empirical Birks model was then compared to these values to verify its validity for low-energy electrons. The clear optical fiber response was below 0.2% of the scintillator's light for x-ray beams, indicating that a negligible amount of fluorescence contamination was produced. However, for higher-energy beams ((137)Cs and (60)Co), the scintillators' response was corrected for the Cerenkov stem effect. The scintillators' response increased by a factor of approximately 4 from a 20 kVp to a (60)Co beam. The decrease in sensitivity from ionization quenching reached a local minimum of about [Formula: see text] between 40 keV and 60 keV x-ray beam mean energy, but dropped by 20% for very low-energy (13 keV) beams. The Birks model may be used to fit the experimental data, but it must take into account the energy dependence of the kB quenching parameter. A detailed comprehension of intrinsic scintillator response is essential for proper calibration of PSD dosimeters for radiology. PMID:27384872

  8. Searching for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos with liquid scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, J.; Sandick, P.

    2015-06-22

    We consider searches for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos in the core of the Sun. We find that liquid scintillation neutrino detectors have enhanced sensitivity to this class of dark matter models, due to the energy and angular resolution possible for electron neutrinos and antineutrinos that scatter via charged-current interactions. In particular we find that KamLAND, utilizing existing data, could provide better sensitivity to such models than any current direct detection experiment for m{sub X}≲15 Gev. KamLAND’s sensitivity is signal-limited, and future liquid scintillation or liquid argon detectors with similar energy and angular resolution, but with larger exposure, will provide significantly better sensitivity. These detectors may be particularly powerful probes of dark matter with mass O(10) GeV.

  9. Simulation tool for optical design of PET detector modules including scintillator material and sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Jatekos, B.; Erdei, G.; Lorincz, E.

    2011-07-01

    The appearance of single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) in the field of PET detector modules made it necessary to apply more complex optical design methods to refine the performance of such assemblies. We developed a combined simulation tool that is capable to model complex detector structures including scintillation material, light guide, light collection optics and sensor, correctly taking into account the statistical behavior of emission of scintillation light and its absorbance in SPADs. As a validation we compared simulation results obtained by our software and another optical design program. Calculations were performed for a simple PET detector arrangement used for testing purposes. According to the results, deviation of center of gravity coordinates between the two simulations is 0.0195 mm, the average ratio of total counts 1.0052. We investigated the error resulting from finite sampling in wavelength space and we found that 20 nm pitch is sufficient for the simulation in case of the given spectral dependencies. (authors)

  10. A region segmentation based algorithm for building a crystal position lookup table in a scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai-Peng; Yun, Ming-Kai; Liu, Shuang-Quan; Fan, Xin; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chai, Pei; Shan, Bao-Ci

    2015-03-01

    In a scintillation detector, scintillation crystals are typically made into a 2-dimensional modular array. The location of incident gamma-ray needs be calibrated due to spatial response nonlinearity. Generally, position histograms-the characteristic flood response of scintillation detectors-are used for position calibration. In this paper, a position calibration method based on a crystal position lookup table which maps the inaccurate location calculated by Anger logic to the exact hitting crystal position has been proposed. Firstly, the position histogram is preprocessed, such as noise reduction and image enhancement. Then the processed position histogram is segmented into disconnected regions, and crystal marking points are labeled by finding the centroids of regions. Finally, crystal boundaries are determined and the crystal position lookup table is generated. The scheme is evaluated by the whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) scanner and breast dedicated single photon emission computed tomography scanner developed by the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The results demonstrate that the algorithm is accurate, efficient, robust and applicable to any configurations of scintillation detector. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (81101175) and XIE Jia-Lin Foundation of Institute of High Energy Physics (Y3546360U2)

  11. Gamma ray measurement of earth formation properties using a position sensitive scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sonne, D.S.; Beard, W.J.

    1987-01-20

    This patent describes a system for measuring properties of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole at different radial distances from the borehole, comprising: a fluid tight hollow body member sized and adapted for passage through a well borehole and housing therein; a source of gamma rays and means for directing gamma rays from the source outwardly from the body member into earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole; and a position sensitive scintillation detector for detecting gamma rays scattered back into the body member from the earth formation in the vicinity of the borehole, means for collimating the scattered gamma rays onto the detector. The detector comprises scintillation crystal means having discrete longitudinally spaced active regions or bins and is longitudinally spaced from the gamma ray source. It has a longitudinal length L and two opposite ends and photomultiplier tubes optically coupled to the opposite ends for providing output voltage signals having voltage amplitudes A and B representative of the intensity of scintillation events occurring in the crystal and impinging at the opposite ends thereof. A means separates the bins for selectively attenuating light passing therebetween, and a means combines the output voltage signals A and B according to a predetermined relationship to derive the discrete bin along the length L of each of the scintillation events in the crystal, thereby providing measurements of the gamma ray scattering properties of the earth formations at different radial distances from the borehole.

  12. The timing resolution of scintillation-detector systems: Monte Carlo analysis.

    PubMed

    Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-11-01

    Recent advancements in fast scintillating materials and fast photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) have stimulated renewed interest in time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET). It is well known that the improvement in the timing resolution in PET can significantly reduce the noise variance in the reconstructed image resulting in improved image quality. In order to evaluate the timing performance of scintillation detectors used in TOF PET, we use Monte Carlo analysis to model the physical processes (crystal geometry, crystal surface finish, scintillator rise time, scintillator decay time, photoelectron yield, PMT transit time spread, PMT single-electron response, amplifier response and time pick-off method) that can contribute to the timing resolution of scintillation-detector systems. In the Monte Carlo analysis, the photoelectron emissions are modeled by a rate function, which is used to generate the photoelectron time points. The rate function, which is simulated using Geant4, represents the combined intrinsic light emissions of the scintillator and the subsequent light transport through the crystal. The PMT output signal is determined by the superposition of the PMT single-electron response resulting from the photoelectron emissions. The transit time spread and the single-electron gain variation of the PMT are modeled in the analysis. Three practical time pick-off methods are considered in the analysis. Statistically, the best timing resolution is achieved with the first photoelectron timing. The calculated timing resolution suggests that a leading edge discriminator gives better timing performance than a constant fraction discriminator and produces comparable results when a two-threshold or three-threshold discriminator is used. For a typical PMT, the effect of detector noise on the timing resolution is negligible. The calculated timing resolution is found to improve with increasing mean photoelectron yield, decreasing scintillator decay time and

  13. Improved Growth Methods for LaBr3 Scintillation Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Douglas S

    2011-05-01

    The objective is to develop advanced materials for deployment as high-resolution gamma ray detectors. Both LaBr3 and CeBr3 are advanced scintillation materials, and will be studied in this research. Prototype devices, in collaboration Sandia National Laboratories, will be demonstrated along with recommendations for mass production and deployment. It is anticipated that improved methods of crystal growth will yield larger single crystals of LaBr3 for deployable room-temperature operated gamma radiation spectrometers. The growth methods will be characterized. The LaBr3 and CeBr3 scintillation crystals will be characterized for light yield, spectral resolution, and for hardness.

  14. A Neutron Detector Constructed Using Shards of ^6Li-loaded Glass Scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Steven; Czirr, Bart; Rees, Lawrence

    2012-10-01

    Because of a global shortage of ^3He, an essential component of many neutron detectors, much work is currently being done to develop new neutron detectors based on alternative materials for homeland security applications. One of the possible replacements for ^3He is Ce^3+-activated, ^6Li-loaded glass scintillator. Although this material has been widely used in neutron detectors for over half a century, its relatively high gamma sensitivity has made it unattractive for use in radiation portal monitors. We have tested a new technique for reducing the gamma sensitivity of a neutron detector based on ^6Li glass. Our prototype neutron detector consists of small (about 1 mm^3) shards of ^6Li-loaded glass scintillator embedded in optical epoxy. Mineral oil is placed behind the glass and epoxy for moderation. Our tests indicate that this detector can achieve a gamma sensitivity that is at least 100 times lower than a comparable neutron detector constructed using a thin sheet of ^6Li glass. Modeling performed using the particle transport codes MCNP and PENELOPE suggests that the gamma sensitivity of the glass shards is lower because more high-energy Compton electrons escape them before depositing their full energy.

  15. Double β experiments with the help of scintillation and HPGe detectors at Gran Sasso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, A.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Boiko, R. S.; Brudanin, V. B.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Chernyak, D. M.; Danevich, F. A.; d'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Dossovitskiyj, A. E.; Galashov, E. N.; Grinyov, B. V.; Incicchitti, A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kovtun, G. P.; Kropivyansky, B. N.; Kudovbenko, V. M.; Laubenstein, M.; Mikhlin, A. L.; Nagornaya, L. L.; Nagorny, S. S.; Nagornyi, P. G.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Podviyanuk, R. B.; Prosperi, D.; Polischuk, O. G.; Shcherban, A. P.; Shlegel, V. N.; Solopikhin, D. A.; Stenin, Y. G.; Suhonen, J.; Tolmachev, A. V.; Tretyak, V. I.; Umatov, V. I.; Vasiliev, Y. V.; Virich, V. D.; Vyshnevskyi, I. M.; Yavetskiy, R. P.; Yurchenko, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    A search for double beta decay of 64,70Zn, 180,186W was carried out by using low background ZnWO4 crystal scintillators, while a CeCl3 scintillation detector was applied to investigate 2β processes in 136,138,142Ce. A search for 2β decay of 96,104Ru, 156,158Dy, 190,198Pt and study of 2ν2β decay of 100Mo to the first excited 0+ level of 100Ru were realized by ultra-low background HPGe γ spectrometry. Moreover, CdWO4 crystal scintillators from enriched 106Cd and 116Cd isotopes were developed to search for 2β decay of 106Cd and 116Cd. Finally, experiments aimed to investigate 96,104Ru and 116Cd are in progress and a new phase of the experiment to search for 2β processes in 106Cd is in preparation.

  16. Prompt directional detection of galactic supernova by combining large liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, V.; Chirac, T.; Lasserre, T.; Volpe, C.; Cribier, M.; Durero, M.; Gaffiot, J.; Houdy, T.; Letourneau, A.; Mention, G.; Pequignot, M.; Sibille, V.; Vivier, M.

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse supernovae produce an intense burst of electron antineutrinos in the few-tens-of-MeV range. Several Large Liquid Scintillator-based Detectors (LLSD) are currently operated worldwide, being very effective for low energy antineutrino detection through the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) process. In this article, we develop a procedure for the prompt extraction of the supernova location by revisiting the details of IBD kinematics over the broad energy range of supernova neutrinos. Combining all current scintillator-based detector, we show that one can locate a canonical supernova at 10 kpc with an accuracy of 45 degrees (68% C.L.). After the addition of the next generation of scintillator-based detectors, the accuracy could reach 12 degrees (68% C.L.), therefore reaching the performances of the large water Čerenkov neutrino detectors. We also discuss a possible improvement of the SuperNova Early Warning System (SNEWS) inter-experiment network with the implementation of a directionality information in each experiment. Finally, we discuss the possibility to constrain the neutrino energy spectrum as well as the mass of the newly born neutron star with the LLSD data.

  17. Potential for SPECT cameras utilizing photodiode readout of scintillator crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Gruber, G.J.; Huesman, R.H.

    1997-05-01

    We present a conceptual design for a SPECT detector consisting of an array of 3x3x5 mm CsI(Tl) scintillator crystals individually read out by an array of 3 mm square silicon photodiodes. The interaction position is not determined by Anger logic, but by the location of the individual crystal/photodiode element in which the gamma ray is observed. Since the design is modular (each module typically having 64 crystals, photodiodes, and charge amplifiers, and one multiplexer circuit to reduce the number of readout channels), a large variety of camera geometries can be realized. Advantages of this design over conventional cameras (NaI(Tl) scintillator/photomultiplier tube) are lower gain drift (i.e. higher stability), smaller size, significantly higher count rate capability, and potentially lower cost. For the 141 keV emissions of Tc-99m, both CsI(Tl) and NaI(Tl) have 85-90% photoelectric fraction, but CsI(TI) has an attenuation length of 3.0 mm as compared to 4.5 mm for NaI(Tl). Thus, a 5 mm thick CsI(Tl) camera has singular efficiency to a Nal(Tl) camera with a 7.5 mm thickness (between 1/4 and 3/8 inch). The light output of CsI(Tl) is 25% higher than that of Nal(Tl), and while its 565 nm emissions are not efficiently detected with photomultiplier tubes, they are well matched to photodiode detection.

  18. Characterization of liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system

    SciTech Connect

    Lombigit, L. Yussup, N. Ibrahim, Maslina Mohd; Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Rawi, M. Z. M.

    2015-04-29

    A digital n/γ pulse shape discrimination (PSD) system is currently under development at Instrumentation and Automation Centre, Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This system aims at simultaneous detection of fast neutron and gamma ray in mixed radiations environment. This work reports the system characterization performed on the liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system. The characterization involves measurement of electron light output from the BC-501A detector and energy channels calibration of the pulse height spectra acquired with DPSD system using set of photon reference sources. The main goal of this experiment is to calibrate the ADC channel of our DPSD system, characterized the BC-501 detector and find the position of Compton edge which later could be used as threshold for the n/γ PSD experiment. The detector resolution however is worse as compared to other published data but it is expected as our detector has a smaller active volume.

  19. Measurement of some EAS properties using new scintillator detectors developed for the GRAPES-3 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grapes-3 Collaboration; Mohanty, P. K.; Dugad, S. R.; Goswami, U. D.; Gupta, S. K.; Hayashi, Y.; Iyer, A.; Ito, N.; Jagadeesan, P.; Jain, A.; Karthikeyan, S.; Kawakami, S.; Minamino, M.; Morris, S. D.; Nayak, P. K.; Nonaka, T.; Oshima, A.; Rao, B. S.; Ravindran, K. C.; Tanaka, H.; Tonwar, S. C.; GRAPES-3 Collaboration

    2009-02-01

    The GRAPES-3 extensive air shower (EAS) array started operation with 256 scintillator detectors at Ooty in India. Each detector is viewed by a fast photomultiplier tube (PMT) mounted at a height of 60 cm above the scintillator. However, for further expansion of the array, an alternative readout of the scintillator using wave-length shifting (WLS) fibers is employed. This resulted in improved performance with a larger photon signal and a more uniform response. With the inclusion of a second PMT, the dynamic range for particle detection has been increased to ˜5 × 103 particles m-2. We now use plastic scintillators, developed in-house to cut costs. The measurement of the density spectrum, shows a power law dependence with an index γ = 1.57 ± 0.04. Using the zenith angle dependence of the density spectrum, an attenuation length Λa = 98 106 g cm-2 for the EAS is obtained. These measurements are found to be consistent with the results reported earlier by other groups.

  20. Realization of a small-size high resolution linear neutron scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, R.; Reinartz, R.; Reinhart, P.; Schelten, J.; Jansen, E.; Schaefer, W.

    1998-06-01

    The spectrum of position sensitive neutron scintillation detectors, which have been developed and designed in the institute during the last decade, comprises several high resolution linear detectors. The design of the small size high resolution detector is based on a modified Anger technology using a linear array of 24 HAMAMATSU type R1770 rectangular photomultipliers and a 1 mm {sup 6}Li glass scintillator. The sensitive detector area is 200 x 20 mm{sup 2} and the spatial resolution is 1.2 mm. The neutron sensitivity at 1{angstrom} is about 65% and the residual gamma sensitivity is less than 10{sup {minus}4} and the maximum count rate is about 100 kHz. The detector is linked to a highly flexible PC-based data acquisition system with 12 bit position and 16 bit time resolution. The stand alone detector and data acquisition system is aimed preferably at pulsed sources performing high resolution angle-dispersive time-of-flight experiments.

  1. Scintillating-fiber imaging detector for 14-MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ress, D.; Lerche, R.A.; Ellis, R.J.; Heaton, G.W.; Nelson, M.B.; Mant, G.; Lehr, D.E.

    1994-07-25

    The authors have created a detector to image the neutrons emitted by imploded inertial-confinement fusion targets. The 14-MeV neutrons, which are produced by deuterium-tritium fusion events in the target, pass through an aperture to create an image on the detector. The neutron radiation is converted to blue light (430 nm) with a 20-cm-square array of plastic scintillating fibers. Each fiber is 10-cm long with a 1-mm-square cross section; approximately 35-thousand fibers make up the array. The resulting blue-light image is reduced and amplified by a sequence of fiber-optic tapers and image intensifiers, then acquired by a CCD camera. The fiber-optic readout system was tested optically for overall throughput the resolution. The authors plan to characterize the scintillator array reusing an ion-beam neutron source as well as DT-fusion neutrons emitted by inertial confinement targets. Characterization experiments will measure the light-production efficiency, spatial resolution, and neutron scattering within the detector. Several neutron images of laser-fusion targets have been obtained with the detector. Several neutron images of laser-fusion targets have been obtained with the detector. They describe the detector and their characterization methods, present characterization results, and give examples of the neutron images.

  2. A large-scale low-background liquid scintillation detector: the counting test facility at Gran Sasso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, G.; Arpesella, C.; Bacchiocchi, G.; Balata, M.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bonetti, S.; Brigatti, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F. P.; Cavaletti, R.; Cecchet, G.; Chen, M.; Darnton, N.; Debari, A.; Deutsch, M.; Elisei, F.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Galbiati, C.; Garagiola, A.; Gatti, F.; Giammarchi, M. G.; Giugni, D.; Goldbrunner, T.; Golubchikov, A.; Goretti, A.; Grabar, S.; Hagner, T.; Hartmann, F.; von Hentig, R.; Heusser, G.; Ianni, A.; Jochum, J.; Johnson, M.; Laubenstein, M.; Loeser, F.; Lombardi, P.; Magni, S.; Malvezzi, S.; Manno, I.; Manuzio, G.; Masetti, F.; Mazzucato, U.; Meroni, E.; Neff, M.; Nisi, S.; Nostro, A.; Oberauer, L.; Perotti, A.; Preda, A.; Raghavan, P.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Resconi, E.; Ruscitti, P.; Scardaoni, R.; Schoenert, S.; Smirnov, O.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Ullucci, P.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Vitale, S.; Zaimidoroga, O.

    1998-02-01

    A 4.8 m3 unsegmented liquid scintillation detector at the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso has shown the feasibility of multi-ton low-background detectors operating to energies as low as 250 keV. Detector construction and the handling of large volumes of liquid scintillator to minimize the background are described. The scintillator, 1.5 g PPO/L-pseudocumene, is held in a flexible nylon vessel shielded by 1000 t of purified water. The active detector volume is viewed by 100 photomultipliers, which measure time and charge for each event, from which energy, position and pulse shape are deduced. On-line purification of the scintillator by water extraction, vacuum distillation and nitrogen stripping removed radioactive impurities. Upper limits were established of < 10-7 Bq/kg-scintillator for events with energies 250 keV < E < 800 keV, and < 10-9 Bq/kg-scintillator due to the decay products of uranium and thorium. The isotopic abundance of 14C/12C in the scintillator was shown to be approximately 10-18 by extending the energy window of the detector to 25-250 keV. The 14C abundance and uranium and thorium levels in the CTF are compatible with the Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment.

  3. Pulse shape discrimination in helium-4 scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Ryan P.; Enqvist, Andreas; Jordan, Kelly A.

    2016-09-01

    Three algorithms were investigated for discriminating between neutrons and gamma rays in a pressurized 4He gas fast neutron detector: charge comparison, weighted integration, and neutron-gamma model analysis (NGMA). For each algorithm, a comprehensive pulse shape discrimination study was conducted using time-of-flight measurements, receiver operator characteristic curves, figure of merit performance measures, and a comparison of performance between 252Cf and PuBe mixed neutron/gamma sources. The NGMA method was found to have the best overall performance by both the figure of merit and the receiver operator characteristic curve. The results also illustrated the high gamma rejection efficiency of these detectors, which is desirable in a variety of neutron monitoring applications.

  4. Neutron-sensing scintillating glass optical fiber detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, M.; Reeder, P.L.; Craig, R.A.

    1994-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed and tested the highest-transmission neutron-sensing glass fibers reported in the open literature to date. By developing glass compositions specifically for fiber drawing and by using superior oxidationstate controls and rapid quenching, PNL produces, fiber with useful lengths in excess of 200 cm. These long fibers can be used in detectors. Test results on the fibers used as a form-fitting detector around a small storage container containing neutron and gamma ray sources are reported. Excellent neutron-gamma ray discrimination has been achieved. These neutron-sensing glass optical fibers provide for new methods for monitoring the inventory of, preventing the diversion of, and detecting the unauthorized transport of sensitive nuclear materials. As such, it represents a significant potential element in countering the threat of nuclear terrorism.

  5. Development of the Fast Scintillation Detector with Programmable High Voltage Adjustment Suitable for Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Prochazka, R.; Frydrych, J.; Pechousek, J.

    2010-07-13

    This work is focused on a development of a compact fast scintillation detector suitable for Moessbauer spectroscopy (low energy X-ray/{gamma}-ray detection) where high counting rates are inevitable. Optimization of this part was necessary for a reliable function, better time resolution and to avoid a detector pulses pile-up effect. The pile-up effect decreases the measurement performance, significantly depends on the source activity and also on the pulse duration. Our new detection unit includes a fast scintillation crystal YAP:Ce, an R6095 photomultiplier tube, a high voltage power supply socket C9028-01 assembly, an AD5252 digital potentiometer with an I2C interface and an AD8000 ultra fast operation preamplifier. The main advantages of this solution lie in a short pulse duration (less than 200 ns), stable operation for high activities, programmable gain of the high voltage supply and compact design in the aluminum housing.

  6. Development of the Plastic Scintillator Detector Array for the Prototype of the Dark Matter Particle Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongjie; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; Zhou, Yong; Fang, Fang; Chen, Junling

    2016-07-01

    The scientific object of Dark Matter Particles Explorer(DAMPE) is the measurement of electrons and photons in the range of 5GeV~10TeV and the flux of nuclei up to 500TeV with excellent resolution , and the realization of measurements will identify possible Dark Matter(DM) signature and help deepen our understanding of the origin and propagation of high energy cosmic ray respectively. Plastic Scintillator Detector Array (PSD), which adopts perpendicular structure with two layers and each layer consists of 15 scintillator strips, is one sub-detector of DAMPE for detecting heavy ions and distinguishing photons and electrons. In this paper, the design and some test results of PSD are to be described.

  7. MCNPX--PoliMi Variance Reduction Techniques for Simulating Neutron Scintillation Detector Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Shikha

    Scintillation detectors have emerged as a viable He-3 replacement technology in the field of nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards. The scintillation light produced in the detectors is dependent on the energy deposited and the nucleus with which the interaction occurs. For neutrons interacting with hydrogen in organic liquid scintillation detectors, the energy-to-light conversion process is nonlinear. MCNPX-PoliMi is a Monte Carlo Code that has been used for simulating this detailed scintillation physics; however, until now, simulations have only been done in analog mode. Analog Monte Carlo simulations can take long times to run, especially in the presence of shielding and large source-detector distances, as in the case of typical nonproliferation problems. In this thesis, two nonanalog approaches to speed up MCNPX-PoliMi simulations of neutron scintillation detector response have been studied. In the first approach, a response matrix method (RMM) is used to efficiently calculate neutron pulse height distributions (PHDs). This method combines the neutron current incident on the detector face with an MCNPX-PoliMi-calculated response matrix to generate PHDs. The PHD calculations and their associated uncertainty are compared for a polyethylene-shielded and lead-shielded Cf-252 source for three different techniques: fully analog MCNPX-PoliMi, the RMM, and the RMM with source biasing. The RMM with source biasing reduces computation time or increases the figure-of-merit on an average by a factor of 600 for polyethylene and 300 for lead shielding (when compared to the fully analog calculation). The simulated neutron PHDs show good agreement with the laboratory measurements, thereby validating the RMM. In the second approach, MCNPX-PoliMi simulations are performed with the aid of variance reduction techniques. This is done by separating the analog and nonanalog components of the simulations. Inside the detector region, where scintillation light is produced, no variance

  8. Performance of a position-sensitive scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Karp, J S; Muehllehner, G

    1985-07-01

    The spatial resolution of a NaI(T1), 25 mm thick bar detector designed for use in positron emission tomography has been studied. The position along the 500 mm long detector is determined from the centroid of the light distribution in the crystal as measured by a linear array of photomultiplier tubes. A Monte Carlo computer simulation was performed to investigate the factors limiting the spatial resolution. The program allowed us to study the effect of various phototube configurations and crystal surfaces. Since the resolution is affected by the width of the light distribution, we studied the effect of sharpening the distribution by modifying the front crystal surface with grooves cut perpendicular to the long axis of the crystal and by using non-linear preamplifiers. The simulation predicts a spatial resolution (FWHM) of 3 mm with this crystal. Experimental measurements of spatial resolution were performed concurrently with the simulations. In particular, a modified grooved crystal was measured to have 4.0 mm spatial resolution, an improvement over the original crystal without grooves. With delay line pulse shortening, which increases the count rate capability of the detector, the grooved crystal was measured to have 5.5 mm spatial resolution. PMID:3895256

  9. Performance assessment of CsI(Tl) screens on various substrates for X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Dong; Jiang, Peng; Zhang, Hong-Kai; Zhao, Bo-Zhen; Qin, Xiu-Bo; Wei, Cun-Feng; Liu, Yu; Wei, Long

    2015-07-01

    Thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI(Tl)) screens are widely used in X-ray imaging devices because of the columnar structure of the CsI(Tl) layer, but few reports focus on the optical role of the substrate in the screen system. In this paper, four substrates including fused silica (SiO2), silver-film coated SiO2, graphite (C) and fiber optic plate (FOP) are used to fabricate CsI(Tl) screens by thermal evaporation. Their imaging performance is evaluated by relative light output (RLO), modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ). The results reveal that although CsI(Tl) film on graphite plate yields images with the lowest light output, it presents relatively higher spatial resolution and better signal-to-noise characteristics. However, films on SiO2 plate obtain low MTF but high NNPS curves, whether they are coated with silver film or not. Furthermore, scintillation screens on FOP have bright images with low NNPS and high NEQ, but have the lowest MTF. By controlling the substrate optical features, CsI(Tl) films can be tailored to suit a given application. Supported by National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project (2011YQ03011205, 2013YQ03062902) and Key Program of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1332202)

  10. The 90 ton liquid scintillation detector in the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badino, G.; Bologna, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Saavedra, O.; Dadykin, V. L.; Korchagin, V. B.; Korchagin, P. V.; Malgin, A. S.

    1984-12-01

    The authors discuss the results from calibrating liquid scintillation counters (1.5 m3 each) used in the large-volume neutrino experiment in the Mont Blanc Laboratory. The electronic and recording systems from the 72 counters of the detector are described, and the method to detect low-energy γ pulses from (n,p) reaction by using 252Cf as a neutron source is discussed.

  11. Characterization of a scintillating GEM detector with low energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Seravalli, E; de Boer, M R; Geurink, F; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schippers, J M; van Eijk, C W E

    2008-11-01

    A two-dimensional position-sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector is being developed with the aim of using it for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in charged particle therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF(4) scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. In such a system, light quanta are emitted by the scintillating gas mixture during the electron avalanches in the GEM holes when radiation traverses the detector. The light intensity distribution is proportional to the energy deposited in the detector's sensitive volume by the beam. In the present work, we investigated the optimization of the scintillating GEM detector light yield. The light quanta are detected by means of a CCD camera or a photomultiplier tube coupled to a monochromator. The GEM charge signal is measured simultaneously. We have found that with 60 microm diameter double conical GEM holes, a brighter light signal and a higher electric signal are obtained than with 80 microm diameter holes. With an Ar + 8% CF(4) volume concentration, the highest voltage across the GEMs and the largest light and electric signals were reached. Moreover, we have found that the emission spectrum of Ar/CF(4) is independent of (1) the voltages applied across the GEMs, (2) the x-ray beam intensity and (3) the GEM hole diameter. On the other hand, the ratio of Ar to CF(4) peaks in the spectrum changes when the concentration of the latter gas is varied. PMID:18854612

  12. Performance comparison of four compact room-temperature detectors – two cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors, a LaCl3(Ce) scintillator, and an NaI(Tl) scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Hartwell

    2004-10-01

    The performance characteristics of four compact, room-temperature detectors – two scintillators and two semiconductor detectors – have been studied. All are commercially-available detectors. The two scintillators were a Æ13mmX13mm lanthanum chloride [LaCl3(Ce)] detector and a Æ25mmX25mm sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] detector. The two semiconductor detectors were a 10X10X3 mm3 cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector with a coplanar gridded anode and a 5X5X5 mm3 CZT detector with an extended cathode. The efficiency, resolution, and peak shape performance of these devices are compared in this work. Since LaCl3(Ce) is a relatively new commercial scintillator material, additional information on the performance of this detector is presented. Specifically, we discuss the impact of naturally-occurring radioactive 138La on the background spectra measured with this scintillator. Additionally, two of the three LaCl3(Ce) crystals that we obtained commercially were internally contaminated with an alpha particle-emitting radionuclide which we have identified as 227Ac+daughters. This contamination had a profound impact on the usefulness of these two detectors.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of the data acquisition chain of scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binda, F.; Ericsson, G.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Eriksson, J.; Skiba, M.; Conroy, S.; Weiszflog, M.

    2014-08-01

    The good performance of a detector can be strongly affected by the instrumentation used to acquire the data. The possibility of anticipating how the acquisition chain will affect the signal can help in finding the best solution among different set-ups. In this work we developed a Monte Carlo code that aims to simulate the effect of the various components of a digital Data Acquisition system (DAQ) applied to scintillation detectors. The components included in the model are: the scintillator, the photomultiplier tube (PMT), the signal cable and the digitizer. We benchmarked the code against real data acquired with a NE213 scintillator, comparing simulated and real signal pulses induced by gamma-ray interaction. Then we studied the dependence of the energy resolution of a pulse height spectrum (PHS) on the sampling frequency and the bit resolution of the digitizer. We found that exceeding some values of the sampling frequency and the bit resolution improves only marginally the performance of the system. The method can be applied for the study of various detector systems relevant for nuclear techniques, such as in fusion diagnostics.

  14. Polyethylene Naphthalate Scintillator: A Novel Detector for the Dosimetry of Radioactive Ophthalmic Applicators

    PubMed Central

    Flühs, Dirk; Flühs, Andrea; Ebenau, Melanie; Eichmann, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Background Dosimetric measurements in small radiation fields with large gradients, such as eye plaque dosimetry with β or low-energy photon emitters, require dosimetrically almost water-equivalent detectors with volumes of <1 mm3 and linear responses over several orders of magnitude. Polyvinyltoluene-based scintillators fulfil these conditions. Hence, they are a standard for such applications. However, they show disadvantages with regard to certain material properties and their dosimetric behaviour towards low-energy photons. Purpose, Materials and Methods Polyethylene naphthalate, recently recognized as a scintillator, offers chemical, physical and basic dosimetric properties superior to polyvinyltoluene. Its general applicability as a clinical dosimeter, however, has not been shown yet. To prove this applicability, extensive measurements at several clinical photon and electron radiation sources, ranging from ophthalmic plaques to a linear accelerator, were performed. Results For all radiation qualities under investigation, covering a wide range of dose rates, a linearity of the detector response to the dose was shown. Conclusion Polyethylene naphthalate proved to be a suitable detector material for the dosimetry of ophthalmic plaques, including low-energy photon emitters and other small radiation fields. Due to superior properties, it has the potential to replace polyvinyltoluene as the standard scintillator for such applications. PMID:27171681

  15. Advances in CMOS Solid-state Photomultipliers for Scintillation Detector Applications

    PubMed Central

    Christian, James F.; Stapels, Christopher J.; Johnson, Erik B.; McClish, Mickel; Dokhale, Purushotthom; Shah, Kanai S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmistha; Chapman, Eric; Augustine, Frank L.

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state photomultipliers (SSPMs) are a compact, lightweight, potentially low-cost alternative to a photomultiplier tube for a variety of scintillation detector applications, including digital-dosimeter and medical-imaging applications. Manufacturing SSPMs with a commercial CMOS process provides the ability for rapid prototyping, and facilitates production to reduce the cost. RMD designs CMOS SSPM devices that are fabricated by commercial foundries. This work describes the characterization and performance of these devices for scintillation detector applications. This work also describes the terms contributing to device noise in terms of the excess noise of the SSPM, the binomial statistics governing the number of pixels triggered by a scintillation event, and the background, or thermal, count rate. The fluctuations associated with these terms limit the resolution of the signal pulse amplitude. We explore the use of pixel-level signal conditioning, and characterize the performance of a prototype SSPM device that preserves the digital nature of the signal. In addition, we explore designs of position-sensitive SSPM detectors for medical imaging applications, and characterize their performance. PMID:25540471

  16. Characterization of a scintillating fibers read by MPPC detectors trigger prototype for the AMADEUS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzi, M.; Berucci, C.; Curceanu, C.; D'Uffizi, A.; Piscicchia, K.; Poli Lener, M.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Vazquez Doce, O.

    2013-05-01

    Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPC) consist of hundreds of micro silicon Avalanche PhotoDiodes (APD) working in Geiger mode. The high gain and the low noise, typical of these devices, together with their good performance in magnetic field, make them ideal readout detectors for scintillating fibers as trigger detectors in particle and nuclear physics experiments like AMADEUS, where such detectors are planned to be used to trigger on charged kaon pairs. In order to investigate the detection efficiency of such a system, a prototype setup consisting of 32, 1 mm diameter scintillating fibers, arranged in two double layers of 16 fibers each, and read out at both sides by 64 MPPCs with an ad-hoc built readout electronics, was tested at the πM-1 line of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Villigen, Switzerland. The detection efficiency and the trigger capability were measured on a beam containing protons, electrons, muons and pions with a momentum of 440 MeV/c. The measured average efficiency for protons for a double layer of scintillating fibers (96.2±1.0%) represents a guarantee of the good performance of this system as a trigger for the AMADEUS experiment.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of the data acquisition chain of scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Binda, F.; Ericsson, G.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Eriksson, J.; Skiba, M.; Conroy, S.; Weiszflog, M.

    2014-08-21

    The good performance of a detector can be strongly affected by the instrumentation used to acquire the data. The possibility of anticipating how the acquisition chain will affect the signal can help in finding the best solution among different set-ups. In this work we developed a Monte Carlo code that aims to simulate the effect of the various components of a digital Data Acquisition system (DAQ) applied to scintillation detectors. The components included in the model are: the scintillator, the photomultiplier tube (PMT), the signal cable and the digitizer. We benchmarked the code against real data acquired with a NE213 scintillator, comparing simulated and real signal pulses induced by gamma-ray interaction. Then we studied the dependence of the energy resolution of a pulse height spectrum (PHS) on the sampling frequency and the bit resolution of the digitizer. We found that exceeding some values of the sampling frequency and the bit resolution improves only marginally the performance of the system. The method can be applied for the study of various detector systems relevant for nuclear techniques, such as in fusion diagnostics.

  18. Scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Muñoz, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Zohm, H.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2009-05-01

    A scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses has been designed and installed on the ASDEX upgrade (AUG) tokamak [A. Herrmann and O. Gruber, Fusion Sci. Technol. 44, 569 (2003)]. The detector resolves in time the energy and pitch angle of fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluctuations. The use of a novel scintillator material with a very short decay time and high quantum efficiency allows to identify the MHD fluctuations responsible for the ion losses through Fourier analysis. A Faraday cup (secondary scintillator plate) has been embedded behind the scintillator plate for an absolute calibration of the detector. The detector is mounted on a manipulator to vary its radial position with respect to the plasma. A thermocouple on the inner side of the graphite protection enables the safety search for the most adequate radial position. To align the scintillator light pattern with the light detectors a system composed by a lens and a vacuum-compatible halogen lamp has been allocated within the detector head. In this paper, the design of the scintillator probe, as well as the new technique used to analyze the data through spectrograms will be described. A last section is devoted to discuss the diagnosis prospects of this method for ITER [M. Shimada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S1 (2007)].

  19. Scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Zohm, H.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2009-05-15

    A scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses has been designed and installed on the ASDEX upgrade (AUG) tokamak [A. Herrmann and O. Gruber, Fusion Sci. Technol. 44, 569 (2003)]. The detector resolves in time the energy and pitch angle of fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluctuations. The use of a novel scintillator material with a very short decay time and high quantum efficiency allows to identify the MHD fluctuations responsible for the ion losses through Fourier analysis. A Faraday cup (secondary scintillator plate) has been embedded behind the scintillator plate for an absolute calibration of the detector. The detector is mounted on a manipulator to vary its radial position with respect to the plasma. A thermocouple on the inner side of the graphite protection enables the safety search for the most adequate radial position. To align the scintillator light pattern with the light detectors a system composed by a lens and a vacuum-compatible halogen lamp has been allocated within the detector head. In this paper, the design of the scintillator probe, as well as the new technique used to analyze the data through spectrograms will be described. A last section is devoted to discuss the diagnosis prospects of this method for ITER [M. Shimada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S1 (2007)].

  20. Scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak.

    PubMed

    García-Muñoz, M; Fahrbach, H-U; Zohm, H

    2009-05-01

    A scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses has been designed and installed on the ASDEX upgrade (AUG) tokamak [A. Herrmann and O. Gruber, Fusion Sci. Technol. 44, 569 (2003)]. The detector resolves in time the energy and pitch angle of fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluctuations. The use of a novel scintillator material with a very short decay time and high quantum efficiency allows to identify the MHD fluctuations responsible for the ion losses through Fourier analysis. A Faraday cup (secondary scintillator plate) has been embedded behind the scintillator plate for an absolute calibration of the detector. The detector is mounted on a manipulator to vary its radial position with respect to the plasma. A thermocouple on the inner side of the graphite protection enables the safety search for the most adequate radial position. To align the scintillator light pattern with the light detectors a system composed by a lens and a vacuum-compatible halogen lamp has been allocated within the detector head. In this paper, the design of the scintillator probe, as well as the new technique used to analyze the data through spectrograms will be described. A last section is devoted to discuss the diagnosis prospects of this method for ITER [M. Shimada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S1 (2007)]. PMID:19499603

  1. Performance characteristics of a silicon photomultiplier based compact radiation detector for Homeland Security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye Min; Joo, Koan Sik

    2015-05-01

    A next-generation compact radiation detector was studied for more accurate measurement of radiation and for improvement of detector reliability for the purpose of developing radiation protection technology and military applications. The previously used radiation detector had some limitations due to its bulky size, limited range and its environment for radiation measurement. On the other hand, the compact radiation detector examined in this study utilizes a silicon photomultiplier which appears to be more suitable for this application because of its physical superiority characterized by its small size, high sensitivity, and durability. Accordingly, a SiPM based scintillation detector has been developed as part of this basic study of military radiation detectors. The detector has been tested for its ability to obtain the operating characteristics of a sensor and analyzed with variations of parameter values and for efficiency of detection in accordance with its ability to measure radiation in the environment. Two SiPM based Scintillation detectors with LYSO, BGO and CsI:Tl scintillators were developed and the detectors were analyzed by a number of operating characteristics such as reverse bias, operating temperature and high magnetic field, that depend on environmental changes in radiation measurement. The Photon count rate and spectra were compared for these three scintillators. We found that there were variations in the radiation detection which were characterized by reverse bias, temperature and high magnetic field. It was also found that there was an 11.9% energy resolution for the LYSO, 15.5% for BGO and 13.5% for CsI:Tl using Array SiPM, and 18% for CsI:Tl energy resolution using single SiPM when we measured energy resolution of 511 keV for 22Na. These results demonstrate the potential widespread use of SiPM based compact radiation detectors for Homeland Security applications.

  2. A large dynamic range readout design for the plastic scintillator detector of DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; Zhang, Yongjie; Fang, Fang; Chen, Junling; Hu, Bitao

    2016-08-01

    A large dynamic range is required by the Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) of DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) to detect particles from electron to heavy ions with Z ≤ 20. To expand the dynamic range, the readout design based on the double-dynodes signal extraction from the photomultiplier tube has been proposed and adopted by PSD. To verify this design, a prototype detector module has been constructed and tested with cosmic ray and relativistic ion beam. The results match with the estimation and the readout unit could easily cover the required dynamic range of about 4 orders of magnitude.

  3. Gamma ray measurement of earth formation properties using a position sensitive scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sonne, D.S.

    1986-10-21

    This patent describes a system for measuring properties of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole at different radial distances from the borehole, comprising: a fluid tight hollow body member sized and adapted for passage through a well borehole and housing therein; a source of gamma rays and means for directing gamma rays from the source outwardly from the body member into earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole; and a position sensitive scintillation detector for detecting gamma rays scattered back into the body member from the earth formation in the vicinity of the borehole and means for collimating the scattered gamma rays onto the detector.

  4. Development and characterization of scintillation based detectors for the use in radiological early warning networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, P.; Dombrowski, H.; Neumaier, S.

    2016-02-01

    To detect radiological incidents, all members of the European Union have installed nationwide radiological early warning networks. Most of the installed detector systems supply only dosimetric information. Novel spectrometry systems are considered to be good candidates for a new detector generation for environmental radiation monitoring because they will supply both nuclide-specific information and ambient dose equivalent rate values. Four different detector types were chosen and compared with each other (LaBr3, CeBr3, SrI2 scintillation detectors, and CdZnTe, a semiconductor detector). As a first step, the inherent background of these detectors was measured in the low background underground laboratory UDO II of PTB. As a second step, the relative detection sensitivity between the various detectors was determined at different energies. Finally, the detectors were exposed to a 4π-radiation field of radon progeny in PTB's radon chamber. The obtained results show that the investigated detectors are well suited for environmental radiation monitoring.

  5. A New scintillator tile / fiber preshower detector for the CDF central calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; Artikov, A.; Bromberg, C.; Budagov, J.; Byrum, K.; Chang, S.; Chlachidze, G.; Goulianos, K.; Huston, J.; Iori, M.; Kim, M.; Kuhlmann, S.; Lami, S.; Lindgren, M.; Lytken, E.; Miller, R.; Nodulman, L.; Pauletta, G.; Penzo, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Roser, R.; /Argonne /Dubna, JINR /Fermilab /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Michigan State U. /INFN, Siena /Rockefeller U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Udine /Tsukuba U.

    2004-11-01

    A detector designed to measure early particle showers has been installed in front of the central CDF calorimeter at the Tevatron. This new preshower detector is based on scintillator tiles coupled to wavelength-shifting fibers read out by multianode photomultipliers and has a total of 3,072 readout channels. The replacement of the old gas detector was required due to an expected increase in instantaneous luminosity of the Tevatron collider in the next few years. Calorimeter coverage, jet energy resolution, and electron and photon identification are among the expected improvements. The final detector design, together with the R&D studies that led to the choice of scintillator and fiber, mechanical assembly, and quality control are presented. The detector was installed in the fall 2004 Tevatron shutdown and is expected to start collecting colliding beam data by the end of 2004. First measurements indicate a light yield of 12 photoelectrons/MIP, a more than two-fold increase over the design goals.

  6. Mass composition sensitivity of combined arrays of water cherenkov and scintillation detectors in the EeV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Javier G.; Engel, Ralph; Roth, Markus

    2016-02-01

    We consider an array of scintillation detectors combined with an array of water Cherenkov detectors designed to simultaneously measure the cosmic-ray primary mass composition and energy spectrum at energies around 1EeV. In this work we investigate the sensitivity to primary mass composition of such combined arrays. The water Cherenkov detectors are arranged in a triangular grid with fixed 750m spacing and the configuration of the scintillation detectors is changed to study the impact of different configurations on the sensitivity to mass composition. We show that the performance for composition determination can be compared favorably to that of fluorescence measurements after the difference in duty cycles is considered.

  7. Near midplane scintillator-based fast ion loss detector on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Fisher, R. K.; Pace, D. C.; Chavez, J. A.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garcia-Munoz, M.

    2012-10-15

    A new scintillator-based fast-ion loss detector (FILD) installed near the outer midplane of the plasma has been commissioned on DIII-D. This detector successfully measures coherent fast ion losses produced by fast-ion driven instabilities ({<=}500 kHz). Combined with the first FILD at {approx}45 Degree-Sign below the outer midplane [R. K. Fisher, et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10D307 (2010)], the two-detector system measures poloidal variation of losses. The phase space sensitivity of the new detector (gyroradius r{sub L}{approx}[1.5-8] cm and pitch angle {alpha}{approx}[35 Degree-Sign -85 Degree-Sign ]) is calibrated using neutral beam first orbit loss measurements. Since fast ion losses are localized poloidally, having two FILDs at different poloidal locations allows for the study of losses over a wider range of plasma shapes and types of loss orbits.

  8. Measurement of {nu}-bar{sub e}-e scattering cross section with CsI(Tl) detector array and the Beyond Standard Model constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, V.; Singh, L.; Singh, M. K.; Soma, A. K.; Wong, H. T.

    2011-11-23

    A search of {nu}-bar{sub e}-e scattering cross section was carried out at the Kuo-Sheng nuclear power station. Based on 29882 and 7369 kg-days of reactor ON/OFF data, respectively, at an average reactor ON {nu}-bar{sub e} flux of 6.4x10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, the standard model (SM) electroweak interaction was probed at the squared 4-momentum transfer range of Q{sup 2}{approx}3x10{sup -6} GeV{sup 2}. The ratio of experimental to SM cross section was measured [1.08{+-}0.21(stat){+-}0.16(sys)]. We placed the constraints on the electroweak parameters (g{sub V},g{sub A}), corresponding to a weak mixing angle measurement of sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 0.251{+-}0.031(stat){+-}0.024(sys). A Point Contact Germanium Detector (PCGe) of mass 1 kg has been installed at a new underground laboratory 'China Jin-Ping Laboratory (CJPL)' in China.

  9. Photon-counting gamma camera based on columnar CsI(Tl) optically coupled to a back-illuminated CCD

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.; Chen, Liying; Taylor, Sean J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances have been made in a new class of CCD-based, single-photon-counting gamma-ray detectors which offer sub-100 μm intrinsic resolutions.1–7 These detectors show great promise in small-animal SPECT and molecular imaging and exist in a variety of configurations. Typically, a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator or a radiography screen (Gd2O2S:Tb) is imaged onto the CCD. Gamma-ray interactions are seen as clusters of signal spread over multiple pixels. When the detector is operated in a charge-integration mode, signal spread across pixels results in spatial-resolution degradation. However, if the detector is operated in photon-counting mode, the gamma-ray interaction position can be estimated using either Anger (centroid) estimation or maximum-likelihood position estimation resulting in a substantial improvement in spatial resolution.2 Due to the low-light-level nature of the scintillation process, CCD-based gamma cameras implement an amplification stage in the CCD via electron multiplying (EMCCDs)8–10 or via an image intensifier prior to the optical path.1 We have applied ideas and techniques from previous systems to our high-resolution LumiSPECT detector.11, 12 LumiSPECT is a dual-modality optical/SPECT small-animal imaging system which was originally designed to operate in charge-integration mode. It employs a cryogenically cooled, high-quantum-efficiency, back-illuminated large-format CCD and operates in single-photon-counting mode without any intermediate amplification process. Operating in photon-counting mode, the detector has an intrinsic spatial resolution of 64 μm compared to 134 μm in integrating mode. PMID:20890397

  10. Water-equivalent plastic scintillation detectors for high-energy beam dosimetry: I. Physical characteristics and theoretical consideration.

    PubMed

    Beddar, A S; Mackie, T R; Attix, F H

    1992-10-01

    A minimally perturbing plastic scintillation detector has been developed for the dosimetry of high-energy beams in radiotherapy. The detector system consists of two identical parallel sets of radiation-resistant optical fibre bundles, each connected to independent photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). One fibre bundle is connected to a miniature water equivalent plastic scintillator and so scintillation as well as Cerenkov light generated in the fibres is detected at its PMT. The other 'background' bundle is not connected to the scintillator and so only Cerenkov light is detected by its PMT. The background signal is subtracted to yield only the signal from the scintillator. The water-equivalence of plastic scintillation detectors is studied for photon and electron beams in the radiotherapy range. Application of Burlin cavity theory shows that the energy dependence of such detectors is expected to be better than the commonly used systems (ionization chambers, LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters, film and Si diodes). It is also shown that they are not affected by temperature variations and exhibit much less radiation damage than either photon or electron diode detectors. PMID:1438554

  11. Passively scattered proton beam entrance dosimetry with a plastic scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Landon; Holmes, Charles; Sahoo, Narayan; Beddar, Sam

    2015-02-01

    We tested the feasibility of using plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) for proton entrance dosimetry. A PSD built with BCF-12 scintillating fiber was used to measure the absolute entrance dose of a passively scattered proton beam for energies ranging from 140 to 250 MeV, and for a range of spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) widths at two energies, to quantify the effect of ionization quenching on the response of the detector and to determine the necessity of Cerenkov radiation correction in proton beams. The overall accuracy and precision of the PSD was evaluated by measuring lateral beam profiles and comparing the results with profiles measured using film. The PSD under-responded owing to ionization quenching, exhibiting approximately a 7% loss of signal at the highest energy studied (250 MeV) and a 10% loss of signal at the lowest energy studied (140 MeV). For a given nominal energy, varying the SOBP width did not significantly alter the response of the PSD. Cerenkov radiation contributed negligibly to the PSD signal and can be safely ignored without introducing more than 1% error in the measured dose. Profiles measured with the PSD and film agreed to within the uncertainty of the detector, demonstrating good relative accuracy. Although correction factors were necessary to account for ionization quenching, the magnitude of the correction varied minimally over a broad range of energies; PSDs therefore represent a practical detector for proton entrance dosimetry. PMID:25591037

  12. An experimental study of antireflective coatings in Ge light detectors for scintillating bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, M.; Beeman, J. W.; Giuliani, A.; Dumoulin, L.; Olivieri, E.; Pessina, G.; Plantevin, O.; Rusconi, C.; Tenconi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Luminescent bolometers are double-readout devices able to measure simultaneously the phonon and the light yields after a particle interaction in the detector. This operation allows in some cases to tag the type of the interacting quantum, crucial issue for background control in rare event experiments such as the search for neutrinoless double beta decay and for interactions of particle dark matter candidates. The light detectors used in the LUCIFER and LUMINEU searches (projects aiming at the study of the double beta interesting candidates 82Se and 100Mo using ZnSe and ZnMoO4 scintillating bolometers) consist of hyper-pure Ge thin slabs equipped with NTD thermistors. A substantial sensitivity improvement of the Ge light detectors can be obtained applying a proper anti-reflective coatings on the Ge side exposed to the luminescent bolometer. The present paper deals with the investigation of this aspect, proving and quantifying the positive effect of a SiO2 and a SiO coating and setting the experimental bases for future tests of other coating materials. The results confirm that an appropriate coating procedure helps in improving the sensitivity of bolometric light detectors by an important factor (in the range 20% - 35%) and needs to be included in the recipe for the development of an optimized radio-pure scintillating bolometer.

  13. Arrays of Segmented, Tapered Light Guides for Use with Large, Planar Scintillation Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Vaigneur, Keith; Stolin, Alexander V.; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic imaging techniques can potentially improve detection and diagnosis of cancer in women with radiodense and/or fibrocystic breasts. Our group has previously developed a high-resolution positron emission tomography imaging and biopsy device (PEM-PET) to detect and guide the biopsy of suspicious breast lesions. Initial testing revealed that the imaging field-of-view (FOV) of the scanner was smaller than the physical size of the detector’s active area, which could hinder sampling of breast areas close to the chest wall. The purpose of this work was to utilize segmented, tapered light guides for optically coupling the scintillator arrays to arrays of position-sensitive photomultipliers to increase both the active FOV and identification of individual scintillator elements. Testing of the new system revealed that the optics of these structures made it possible to discern detector elements from the complete active area of the detector face. In the previous system the top and bottom rows and left and right columns were not identifiable. Additionally, use of the new light guides increased the contrast of individual detector elements by up to 129%. Improved element identification led to a spatial resolution increase by approximately 12%. Due to attenuation of light in the light guides the detector energy resolution decreased from 18.5% to 19.1%. Overall, these improvements should increase the field-of-view and spatial resolution of the dedicated breast-PET system. PMID:26538685

  14. Investigation of three-dimensional localisation of radioactive sources using a fast organic liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, K. A. A.; Joyce, M. J.; Taylor, G. C.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of locating radioactive sources in space using a scanning-based method, relative to the three-dimensional location of the detector. The scanning system comprises an organic liquid scintillator detector, a tungsten collimator and an adjustable equatorial mount. The detector output is connected to a bespoke fast digitiser (Hybrid Instruments Ltd., UK) which streams digital samples to a personal computer. A radioactive source has been attached to a vertical wall and the data have been collected in two stages. In the first case, the scanning system was placed a couple of metres away from the wall and in the second case it moved few centimetres from the previous location, parallel to the wall. In each case data were collected from a grid of measurement points (set of azimuth angles for set of elevation angles) which covered the source on the wall. The discrimination of fast neutrons and gamma rays, detected by the organic liquid scintillator detector, is carried out on the basis of pulse gradient analysis. Images are then produced in terms of the angular distribution of events for total counts, gamma rays and neutrons for both cases. The three-dimensional location of the neutron source can be obtained by considering the relative separation of the centres of the corresponding images of angular distribution of events. The measurements have been made at the National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex, UK.

  15. Development of deep-UV sensitive MPPC for liquid xenon scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootani, W.; Ieki, K.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Mori, T.; Nakaura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Sawada, R.; Shibata, N.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Sato, K.; Yamada, R.

    2015-07-01

    The liquid xenon (LXe) γ-ray detector for the MEG II experiment is based on a highly granular scintillation readout with Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs). Here we report on the development of a large-area MPPC sensitive to LXe scintillation light in deep-UV range for the MEG II LXe detector. A prototype model of the deep-UV MPPC with an active area of 12 × 12mm2 was successfully tested in LXe, showing an excellent performance such as a high photon detection efficiency for the LXe scintillation light (about 20% at ΔV = 2.5 V), a high internal gain (about 106 at ΔV = 2.5 V) and an excellent single photoelectron resolution. The sensor chip of the MPPC is segmented into four sectors, which are then connected in series in order to reduce the overall sensor capacitance. The signal fall time of about 135 ns for the non-segmented sensor was significantly reduced down to 25 ns with the series-connected sensor segments. The preliminary results on the performance of the deep-UV MPPC are presented.

  16. Simple algorithms for digital pulse-shape discrimination with liquid scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, T.

    2015-01-01

    The development of compact, battery-powered digital liquid scintillation neutron detection systems for field applications requires digital pulse processing (DPP) algorithms with minimum computational overhead. To meet this demand, two DPP algorithms for the discrimination of neutron and γ-rays with liquid scintillation detectors were developed and examined by using a NE213 liquid scintillation detector in a mixed radiation field. The first algorithm is based on the relation between the amplitude of a current pulse at the output of a photomultiplier tube and the amount of charge contained in the pulse. A figure-of-merit (FOM) value of 0.98 with 450 keVee (electron equivalent energy) energy threshold was achieved with this method when pulses were sampled at 250 MSample/s and with 8-bit resolution. Compared to the similar method of charge-comparison this method requires only a single integration window, thereby reducing the amount of computations by approximately 40%. The second approach is a digital version of the trailing-edge constant-fraction discrimination method. A FOM value of 0.84 with an energy threshold of 450 keVee was achieved with this method. In comparison with the similar method of rise-time discrimination this method requires a single time pick-off, thereby reducing the amount of computations by approximately 50%. The algorithms described in this work are useful for developing portable detection systems for applications such as homeland security, radiation dosimetry and environmental monitoring.

  17. First performance tests of a digital photon counter (DPC) array coupled to a CsI(Tl) crystal matrix for potential use in SPECT.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Maria; Borghi, Giacomo; Spirou, Spiridon V; Loudos, George; Schaart, Dennis R

    2014-05-21

    The digital photon counter (DPC) is a recently developed type of digital silicon photomultiplier that combines low dark count rates, low readout noise, and fully digital, integrated readout circuitry with neighbor logic capability, system scalability, and MR compatibility. These are desirable properties for application in scintillation detectors for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this work, the feasibility of using a DPC array in combination with a CsI(Tl) crystal matrix as a potential detector for SPECT is investigated for the first time. Given the relatively long decay time of CsI(Tl), an important consideration is the influence on the detector performance of the DPC dark count rate as a function of temperature. We present a preliminary characterization of a detector assembled with an array of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) CsI(Tl) crystals. Preparatory measurements were acquired with a (57)Co source in order to optimize the light-guide thickness and the sensor settings. The spatial resolution of the detector was tested by acquiring flood maps with (57)Co as well as (99m)Tc sources. Three crystal identification algorithms were compared for the reconstruction of the flood maps. All crystal elements could be visualized clearly and high values of peak-to-valley ratios were achieved. Energy resolutions of ∼18.5% FWHM and ∼15% FWHM were measured at 122 keV and 140 keV, respectively. Temperature-dependent measurements indicate that the detector can work satisfactorily up to about 15 °C. PMID:24743522

  18. 2D dosimetry in a proton beam with a scintillating GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seravalli, E.; de Boer, M. R.; Geurink, F.; Huizenga, J.; Kreuger, R.; Schippers, J. M.; van Eijk, C. W. E.

    2009-06-01

    A two-dimensional position-sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector is being developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in particle therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two gas electron multiplier (GEM) structures are mounted (Seravalli et al 2008b Med. Phys. Biol. 53 4651-65). Photons emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules during the gas multiplication in the GEM holes are detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. The intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D dose distribution. In this work, we report on the characterization of the scintillating GEM detector in terms of those properties that are of particular importance in relative dose measurements, e.g. response reproducibility, dose dependence, dose rate dependence, spatial and time response, field size dependence, response uniformity. The experiments were performed in a 150 MeV proton beam. We found that the detector response is very stable for measurements performed in succession (σ = 0.6%) and its response reproducibility over 2 days is about 5%. The detector response was found to be linear with the dose in the range 0.05-19 Gy. No dose rate effects were observed between 1 and 16 Gy min-1 at the shallow depth of a water phantom and 2 and 38 Gy min-1 at the Bragg peak depth. No field size effects were observed in the range 120-3850 mm2. A signal rise and fall time of 2 µs was recorded and a spatial response of <=1 mm was measured.

  19. Spectroscopic study of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene for liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Qian; Han, Junbo; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Xuan; Ding, Yayun; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang

    2015-11-01

    We have set up a light scattering spectrometer to study the depolarization of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene. The scattering spectra show that the depolarized part of light scattering is due to Rayleigh scattering. The additional depolarized Rayleigh scattering can make the effective transparency of linear alkylbenzene much better than expected. Therefore, sufficient scintillation photons can transmit through large liquid scintillator detector, such as that of the JUNO experiment. Our study is crucial to achieving an unprecedented energy resolution of 3 %/√{E{(MeV)}} required for the JUNO experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The spectroscopic method can also be used to examine the depolarization of other organic solvents used in neutrino experiments.

  20. Reaching time resolution of less than 10 ps with plastic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Sun, B. H.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Zhu, L. H.; Enomoto, A.; Nagae, D.; Nishimura, T.; Omika, S.; Ozawa, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    Timing-pick up detectors with excellent timing resolutions are essential in many modern nuclear physics experiments. Aiming to develop a Time-Of-Flight system with precision down to about 10 ps, we have made a systematic study of the timing characteristic of TOF detectors, which consist of several combinations of plastic scintillators and photomultiplier tubes. With the conventional electronics, the best timing resolution of about 5.1 ps (σ) has been achieved for detectors with an area size of 3 × 1cm2 . It is found that for data digitalization a combination of TAC and ADC can achieve a better time resolution than the currently available TDC. Simultaneous measurements of both time and pulse height are very valuable for the correction of time-walk effect.

  1. Development of a scintillating fiber tracking detector for the K2K neutrino oscillation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Atsumu

    1998-11-09

    We are preparing a scintillating fiber tracking detector as a part of the near fine-grained detector in the K2K long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment between KEK and Super-Kamiokande. We use Kuraray SCSF-78, 0.7 mm diameter fiber with Hamamatsu IIT-CCD camera read out system. The choice of the fiber is based on a series of measurements of the light yield and aging of the candidate fibers under various conditions. It was found that SCSF-78 has enough light yield and lifetime for our purposes. We have also checked the performance of the SCIFI sheet-IIT-CCD system by source ({sup 90}Sr) and cosmic rays. The detection efficiency was found to be more than 99%. The full SCIFI detector construction is current under way.

  2. Development of a scintillating fiber tracking detector for the K2K neutrino oscillation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsumu

    1998-11-01

    We are preparing a scintillating fiber tracking detector as a part of the near fine-grained detector in the K2K long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment between KEK and Super-Kamiokande. We use Kuraray SCSF-78, 0.7 mm diameter fiber with Hamamatsu IIT-CCD camera read out system. The choice of the fiber is based on a series of measurements of the light yield and aging of the candidate fibers under various conditions. It was found that SCSF-78 has enough light yield and lifetime for our purposes. We have also checked the performance of the SCIFI sheet-IIT-CCD system by source (90Sr) and cosmic rays. The detection efficiency was found to be more than 99%. The full SCIFI detector construction is current under way.

  3. Advances in the growth of alkaline-Earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, J. S.; Cherepy, N. J.; Beck, P. R.; Payne, S. A.; Burger, A.; Rowe, E.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-09-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystalgrowth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  4. Scintillator Pad Detector: Very Front End Electronics. Design and Pre-Series

    SciTech Connect

    Luengo, S.; Riera, J.; Tortella, S.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Gascon, D.; Comerma, A.; Garrido, L.

    2006-10-27

    The SPD (Scintillator Pad Detector) is a part of LHCb calorimeter which is designed to distinguish electrons and photons for this first level trigger. This detector is a plastic scintillator layer, divided in about 6000 cells of different size to obtain better granularity near the beam. Charged particles will produce, and photons will not, ionisation on the scintillator. This ionisation generates a light pulse that is collected by a Wavelength Shifting (WLS) fibre that is twisted inside the scintillator cell. The light is transmitted through a clear fibre to the readout system. For cost reduction, these 6000 cells are divided in groups using a MAPMT of 64 channels for receiving information in the readout system. The signal outing the SPD PMTs is rather unpredictable as a result of the low photostatistics, 20-30 photoelectrons per MIP, and the response of the WLS fibre, which has low decay time. Then, the signal processing must be performed by first integrating the total charge and later subtracting to avoid pile-up. The SPD Readout system is performed by an ASIC which integrates the signal, makes the pile-up compensation, and compares the level obtained to a programmable threshold (distinguishing electrons and photons), an FPGA which programmes the ASIC thresholds and pile-up subtraction and finally LVDS serializers, in order to send information to the first level trigger system. The design of the VFE unit takes into account not only mechanical constraints, as a result of the little space for the readout electronics but also the radiation quote expected in the environment and the distance between the VFE electronics and the racks were information is sent.

  5. Advances in the growth of alkaline-earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Beck, P; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystal-growth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  6. Towards monolithic scintillator based TOF-PET systems: practical methods for detector calibration and operation.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Giacomo; Tabacchini, Valerio; Schaart, Dennis R

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on thick monolithic scintillator crystals can achieve spatial resolutions  <2 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and coincidence resolving times (CRTs) better than 200 ps FWHM. Moreover, they provide high sensitivity and depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. While these are excellent characteristics for clinical time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET), the application of monolithic scintillators has so far been hampered by the lengthy and complex procedures needed for position- and time-of-interaction estimation. Here, the algorithms previously developed in our group are revised to make the calibration and operation of a large number of monolithic scintillator detectors in a TOF-PET system practical. In particular, the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification method for x,y-position estimation is accelerated with an algorithm that quickly preselects only the most useful reference events, reducing the computation time for position estimation by a factor of ~200 compared to the previously published k-NN 1D method. Also, the procedures for estimating the DOI and time of interaction are revised to enable full detector calibration by means of fan-beam or flood irradiations only. Moreover, a new technique is presented to allow the use of events in which some of the photosensor pixel values and/or timestamps are missing (e.g. due to dead time), so as to further increase system sensitivity. The accelerated methods were tested on a monolithic scintillator detector specifically developed for clinical PET applications, consisting of a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO : Ce crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array. This resulted in a spatial resolution of 1.7 mm FWHM, an average DOI resolution of 3.7 mm FWHM, and a CRT of 214 ps. Moreover, the possibility of using events missing the information of up to 16 out of 64 photosensor pixels is shown. This results in only a small

  7. Towards monolithic scintillator based TOF-PET systems: practical methods for detector calibration and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Giacomo; Tabacchini, Valerio; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on thick monolithic scintillator crystals can achieve spatial resolutions  <2 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and coincidence resolving times (CRTs) better than 200 ps FWHM. Moreover, they provide high sensitivity and depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. While these are excellent characteristics for clinical time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET), the application of monolithic scintillators has so far been hampered by the lengthy and complex procedures needed for position- and time-of-interaction estimation. Here, the algorithms previously developed in our group are revised to make the calibration and operation of a large number of monolithic scintillator detectors in a TOF-PET system practical. In particular, the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification method for x,y-position estimation is accelerated with an algorithm that quickly preselects only the most useful reference events, reducing the computation time for position estimation by a factor of ~200 compared to the previously published k-NN 1D method. Also, the procedures for estimating the DOI and time of interaction are revised to enable full detector calibration by means of fan-beam or flood irradiations only. Moreover, a new technique is presented to allow the use of events in which some of the photosensor pixel values and/or timestamps are missing (e.g. due to dead time), so as to further increase system sensitivity. The accelerated methods were tested on a monolithic scintillator detector specifically developed for clinical PET applications, consisting of a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO : Ce crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array. This resulted in a spatial resolution of 1.7 mm FWHM, an average DOI resolution of 3.7 mm FWHM, and a CRT of 214 ps. Moreover, the possibility of using events missing the information of up to 16 out of 64 photosensor pixels is shown. This results in only a small

  8. Characterizing energy dependence and count rate performance of a dual scintillator fiber-optic detector for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerner, Matthew R. Stepusin, Elliott J.; Hyer, Daniel E.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Kilovoltage (kV) x-rays pose a significant challenge for radiation dosimetry. In the kV energy range, even small differences in material composition can result in significant variations in the absorbed energy between soft tissue and the detector. In addition, the use of electronic systems in light detection has demonstrated measurement losses at high photon fluence rates incident to the detector. This study investigated the feasibility of using a novel dual scintillator detector and whether its response to changes in beam energy from scatter and hardening is readily quantified. The detector incorporates a tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator and a gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator, which has a higher sensitivity to scatter x-rays. Methods: The detector was constructed by coupling two scintillators: (1) small cylindrical plastic scintillator, 500 μm in diameter and 2 mm in length, and (2) 100 micron sheet of gadolinium oxysulfide 500 μm in diameter, each to a 2 m long optical fiber, which acts as a light guide to transmit scintillation photons from the sensitive element to a photomultiplier tube. Count rate linearity data were obtained from a wide range of exposure rates delivered from a radiological x-ray tube by adjusting the tube current. The data were fitted to a nonparalyzable dead time model to characterize the time response. The true counting rate was related to the reference free air dose air rate measured with a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Radcal{sup ®} thimble chamber as described in AAPM Report No. 111. Secondary electron and photon spectra were evaluated using Monte Carlo techniques to analyze ionization quenching and photon energy-absorption characteristics from free-in-air and in phantom measurements. The depth/energy dependence of the detector was characterized using a computed tomography dose index QA phantom consisting of nested adult head and body segments. The phantom provided up to 32 cm of acrylic with a compatible 0.6 cm{sup 3} calibrated

  9. A Minor Modification of Leading Edge Discriminator Circuitry with a Delay Line for Baseline Restoration of Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N

    2003-05-27

    Multi-channel neutron time-of-flight detector arrays LaNSA, T-ion, Medusa, and Mandala, have been used for neutron spectroscopy in inertial confinement fusion experiments. These multi-channel neutron detector arrays consist of many identical scintillation detectors (842 {approx} 1024 channel), data acquisition electronics (discriminators, time-to digital converters, and controller). Each detector element is operated in neutron counting mode. Time-of-flight of individual detected neutrons are recorded by time to digital converters. The energy of each detected neutrons is determined from its time-of-flight. The accurate time measurement ({Delta}t {approx} 0.5 ns) and straightforward statistical features of the data obtained with these systems provides good integrity and reliability. The elements detector used in these systems are organic scintillators coupled with photo multiplier tubes. A scintillation detector operated in particle-counting mode requires finite recovery time after each detection event. The recovery time is determined by the time responses of scintillators, photo multiplier tubes, and the dead times of following discriminators and time-to digital converters. The harsh gamma ray background environment of fast ignitor experiments requires detectors that have fast recovery times. In high intensity laser experiments (I > 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}), strong gamma ray bursts are produced by relativistic laser plasma interactions. Prior to the neutron signal, these strong gamma ray bursts hit the detectors and interfere with the detection of following neutron signals. In these situations, the recovery time of the system after preceding gamma ray bursts is determined mainly by the base line shift of the PMT signal (due to slower decay components of scintillators ''after glow''). Discriminators cannot detect following signal pulses until the proceeding burst decays below its threshold voltage. The base line shift caused by the after glow prolongs the recovery

  10. Can scintillation detectors with low spectral resolution accurately determine radionuclides content of building materials?

    PubMed

    Kovler, K; Prilutskiy, Z; Antropov, S; Antropova, N; Bozhko, V; Alfassi, Z B; Lavi, N

    2013-07-01

    The current paper makes an attempt to check whether the scintillation NaI(Tl) detectors, in spite of their poor energy resolution, can determine accurately the content of NORM in building materials. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides were measured using two types of detectors: (a) NaI(Tl) spectrometer equipped with the special software based on the matrix method of least squares, and (b) high-purity germanium spectrometer. Synthetic compositions with activity concentrations varying in a wide range, from 1/5 to 5 times median activity concentrations of the natural radionuclides available in the earth crust and the samples of popular building materials, such as concrete, pumice and gypsum, were tested, while the density of the tested samples changed in a wide range (from 860 up to 2,410 kg/m(3)). The results obtained in the NaI(Tl) system were similar to those obtained with the HPGe spectrometer, mostly within the uncertainty range. This comparison shows that scintillation spectrometers equipped with a special software aimed to compensate for the lower spectral resolution of NaI(Tl) detectors can be successfully used for the radiation control of mass construction products. PMID:23542118