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Sample records for ct dose-reduction simulation

  1. Validation of CT dose-reduction simulation.

    PubMed

    Massoumzadeh, Parinaz; Don, Steven; Hildebolt, Charles F; Bae, Kyongtae T; Whiting, Bruce R

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop and validate a custom computed tomography dose-reduction simulation technique for producing images that have an appearance consistent with the same scan performed at a lower mAs (with fixed kVp, rotation time, and collimation). Synthetic noise is added to projection (sinogram) data, incorporating a stochastic noise model that includes energy-integrating detectors, tube-current modulation, bowtie beam filtering, and electronic system noise. Experimental methods were developed to determine the parameters required for each component of the noise model. As a validation, the outputs of the simulations were compared to measurements with cadavers in the image domain and with phantoms in both the sinogram and image domain, using an unbiased root-mean-square relative error metric to quantify agreement in noise processes. Four-alternative forced-choice (4AFC) observer studies were conducted to confirm the realistic appearance of simulated noise, and the effects of various system model components on visual noise were studied. The "just noticeable difference (JND)" in noise levels was analyzed to determine the sensitivity of observers to changes in noise level. Individual detector measurements were shown to be normally distributed (p > 0.54), justifying the use of a Gaussian random noise generator for simulations. Phantom tests showed the ability to match original and simulated noise variance in the sinogram domain to within 5.6% +/- 1.6% (standard deviation), which was then propagated into the image domain with errors less than 4.1% +/- 1.6%. Cadaver measurements indicated that image noise was matched to within 2.6% +/- 2.0%. More importantly, the 4AFC observer studies indicated that the simulated images were realistic, i.e., no detectable difference between simulated and original images (p = 0.86) was observed. JND studies indicated that observers' sensitivity to change in noise levels corresponded to a 25% difference in dose

  2. Validation of CT dose-reduction simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Massoumzadeh, Parinaz; Don, Steven; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Whiting, Bruce R.

    2009-01-15

    The objective of this research was to develop and validate a custom computed tomography dose-reduction simulation technique for producing images that have an appearance consistent with the same scan performed at a lower mAs (with fixed kVp, rotation time, and collimation). Synthetic noise is added to projection (sinogram) data, incorporating a stochastic noise model that includes energy-integrating detectors, tube-current modulation, bowtie beam filtering, and electronic system noise. Experimental methods were developed to determine the parameters required for each component of the noise model. As a validation, the outputs of the simulations were compared to measurements with cadavers in the image domain and with phantoms in both the sinogram and image domain, using an unbiased root-mean-square relative error metric to quantify agreement in noise processes. Four-alternative forced-choice (4AFC) observer studies were conducted to confirm the realistic appearance of simulated noise, and the effects of various system model components on visual noise were studied. The ''just noticeable difference (JND)'' in noise levels was analyzed to determine the sensitivity of observers to changes in noise level. Individual detector measurements were shown to be normally distributed (p>0.54), justifying the use of a Gaussian random noise generator for simulations. Phantom tests showed the ability to match original and simulated noise variance in the sinogram domain to within 5.6%{+-}1.6% (standard deviation), which was then propagated into the image domain with errors less than 4.1%{+-}1.6%. Cadaver measurements indicated that image noise was matched to within 2.6%{+-}2.0%. More importantly, the 4AFC observer studies indicated that the simulated images were realistic, i.e., no detectable difference between simulated and original images (p=0.86) was observed. JND studies indicated that observers' sensitivity to change in noise levels corresponded to a 25% difference in dose, which

  3. Dose reduction in CT using bismuth shielding: measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Wonho; Choo, Dong-Myung; Lee, Choon-Sik; Kim, Youhyun

    2010-01-01

    In this research, using direct measurements and Monte Carlo calculations, the potential dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding in computed tomography was evaluated. The patient dose was measured using an ionisation chamber in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom that had five measurement points at the centre and periphery. Simulations were performed using the MCNPX code. For both the bare and the bismuth-shielded phantom, the differences of dose values between experiment and simulation were within 9 %. The dose reductions due to the bismuth shielding were 1.2–55 % depending on the measurement points, X-ray tube voltage and the type of shielding. The amount of dose reduction was significant for the positions covered by the bismuth shielding (34 − 46 % for head and 41 − 55 % for body phantom on average) and negligible for other peripheral positions. The artefact on the reconstructed images were minimal when the distance between the shielding and the organs was >1 cm, and hence the shielding should be selectively located to protect critical organs such as the eye lens, thyroid and breast. The simulation results using the PMMA phantom was compared with those using a realistically voxelised phantom (KTMAN-2). For eye and breast, the simulation results using the PMMA and KTMAN-2 phantoms were similar with each other, while for thyroid the simulation results were different due to the discrepancy of locations and the sizes of the phantoms. The dose reductions achieved by bismuth and lead shielding were compared with each other and the results showed that the difference of the dose reductions achieved by the two materials was less than 2–3 %. PMID:19959602

  4. Dose reduction in CT using bismuth shielding: measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Wonho; Choo, Dong-Myung; Lee, Choon-Sik; Kim, Youhyun

    2010-03-01

    In this research, using direct measurements and Monte Carlo calculations, the potential dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding in computed tomography was evaluated. The patient dose was measured using an ionisation chamber in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom that had five measurement points at the centre and periphery. Simulations were performed using the MCNPX code. For both the bare and the bismuth-shielded phantom, the differences of dose values between experiment and simulation were within 9%. The dose reductions due to the bismuth shielding were 1.2-55% depending on the measurement points, X-ray tube voltage and the type of shielding. The amount of dose reduction was significant for the positions covered by the bismuth shielding (34 - 46% for head and 41 - 55% for body phantom on average) and negligible for other peripheral positions. The artefact on the reconstructed images were minimal when the distance between the shielding and the organs was >1 cm, and hence the shielding should be selectively located to protect critical organs such as the eye lens, thyroid and breast. The simulation results using the PMMA phantom was compared with those using a realistically voxelised phantom (KTMAN-2). For eye and breast, the simulation results using the PMMA and KTMAN-2 phantoms were similar with each other, while for thyroid the simulation results were different due to the discrepancy of locations and the sizes of the phantoms. The dose reductions achieved by bismuth and lead shielding were compared with each other and the results showed that the difference of the dose reductions achieved by the two materials was less than 2-3%. PMID:19959602

  5. Assessment of patient dose reduction by bismuth shielding in CT using measurements, GEANT4 and MCNPX simulations.

    PubMed

    Mendes, M; Costa, F; Figueira, C; Madeira, P; Teles, P; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    This work reports on the use of two different Monte Carlo codes (GEANT4 and MCNPX) for assessing the dose reduction using bismuth shields in computer tomography (CT) procedures in order to protect radiosensitive organs such as eye lens, thyroid and breast. Measurements were performed using head and body PMMA phantoms and an ionisation chamber placed in five different positions of the phantom. Simulations were performed to estimate Computed Tomography Dose Index values using GEANT4 and MCNPX. The relative differences between measurements and simulations were <10 %. The dose reduction arising from the use of bismuth shielding ranges from 2 to 45 %, depending on the position of the bismuth shield. The percentage of dose reduction was more significant for the area covered by the bismuth shielding (36 % for eye lens, 39 % for thyroid and 45 % for breast shields). PMID:25813483

  6. Simulation of dose reduction in tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Baath, Magnus

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Methods for simulating dose reduction are valuable tools in the work of optimizing radiographic examinations. Using such methods, clinical images can be simulated to have been collected at other, lower, dose levels without the need of additional patient exposure. A recent technology introduced to healthcare that needs optimization is tomosynthesis, where a number of low-dose projection images collected at different angles is used to reconstruct section images of an imaged object. The aim of the present work was to develop a method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems, suitable for tomosynthesis. Methods: The developed method uses information about the noise power spectrum (NPS) at the original dose level and the simulated dose level to create a noise image that is added to the original image to produce an image that has the same noise properties as an image actually collected at the simulated dose level. As the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of digital detectors operating at the low dose levels used for tomosynthesis may show a strong dependency on the dose level, it is important that a method for simulating dose reduction for tomosynthesis takes this dependency into account. By applying an experimentally determined relationship between pixel mean and pixel variance, variations in both dose and DQE in relevant dose ranges are taken into account. Results: The developed method was tested on a chest tomosynthesis system and was shown to produce NPS of simulated dose-reduced projection images that agreed well with the NPS of images actually collected at the simulated dose level. The simulated dose reduction method was also applied to tomosynthesis examinations of an anthropomorphic chest phantom, and the obtained noise in the reconstructed section images was very similar to that of an examination actually performed at the simulated dose level. Conclusions: In conclusion, the present article describes a method for simulating dose

  7. Patient specific tube current modulation for CT dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yannan; Yin, Zhye; Yao, Yangyang; Wang, Hui; Wu, Mingye; Kalra, Mannudeep; De Man, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Radiation exposure during CT imaging has drawn growing concern from academia, industry as well as the general public. Sinusoidal tube current modulation has been available in most commercial products and used routinely in clinical practice. To further exploit the potential of tube current modulation, Sperl et al. proposed a Computer-Assisted Scan Protocol and Reconstruction (CASPAR) scheme [6] that modulates the tube current based on the clinical applications and patient specific information. The purpose of this study is to accelerate the CASPAR scheme to make it more practical for clinical use and investigate its dose benefit for different clinical applications. The Monte Carlo simulation in the original CASPAR scheme was substituted by the dose reconstruction to accelerate the optimization process. To demonstrate the dose benefit, we used the CATSIM package generate the projection data and perform standard FDK reconstruction. The NCAT phantom at thorax position was used in the simulation. We chose three clinical cases (routine chest scan, coronary CT angiography with and without breast avoidance) and compared the dose level with different mA modulation schemes (patient specific, sinusoidal and constant mA) with matched image quality. The simulation study of three clinical cases demonstrated that the patient specific mA modulation could significantly reduce the radiation dose compared to sinusoidal modulation. The dose benefits depend on the clinical application and object shape. With matched image quality, for chest scan the patient specific mA profile reduced the dose by about 15% compared to the sinusoid mA modulation; for the organ avoidance scan the dose reduction to the breast was over 50% compared to the constant mA baseline.

  8. Radiation dose reduction for coronary artery calcium scoring at 320-detector CT with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D.

    PubMed

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Fukumoto, Wataru; Kaichi, Yoko; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kihara, Yasuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    To assess the possibility of reducing the radiation dose for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring by using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D) on a 320-detector CT scanner. Fifty-four patients underwent routine- and low-dose CT for CAC scoring. Low-dose CT was performed at one-third of the tube current used for routine-dose CT. Routine-dose CT was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and low-dose CT was reconstructed with AIDR 3D. We compared the calculated Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores of these images. The overall percentage difference in the Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores between routine- and low-dose CT studies was 15.9, 11.6, and 12.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the routine- and low-dose CT studies irrespective of the scoring algorithms applied. The CAC measurements of both imaging modalities were highly correlated with respect to the Agatston- (r = 0.996), volume- (r = 0.996), and mass score (r = 0.997; p < 0.001, all); the Bland-Altman limits of agreement scores were -37.4 to 51.4, -31.2 to 36.4 and -30.3 to 40.9%, respectively, suggesting that AIDR 3D was a good alternative for FBP. The mean effective radiation dose for routine- and low-dose CT was 2.2 and 0.7 mSv, respectively. The use of AIDR 3D made it possible to reduce the radiation dose by 67% for CAC scoring without impairing the quantification of coronary calcification. PMID:25754302

  9. Objective assessment of image quality and dose reduction in CT iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Vaishnav, J. Y. Jung, W. C.; Popescu, L. M.; Zeng, R.; Myers, K. J.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms have the potential to reduce radiation dose in CT diagnostic imaging. As these algorithms become available on the market, a standardizable method of quantifying the dose reduction that a particular IR method can achieve would be valuable. Such a method would assist manufacturers in making promotional claims about dose reduction, buyers in comparing different devices, physicists in independently validating the claims, and the United States Food and Drug Administration in regulating the labeling of CT devices. However, the nonlinear nature of commercially available IR algorithms poses challenges to objectively assessing image quality, a necessary step in establishing the amount of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve without compromising that image quality. This review paper seeks to consolidate information relevant to objectively assessing the quality of CT IR images, and thereby measuring the level of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve. Methods: The authors discuss task-based methods for assessing the quality of CT IR images and evaluating dose reduction. Results: The authors explain and review recent literature on signal detection and localization tasks in CT IR image quality assessment, the design of an appropriate phantom for these tasks, possible choices of observers (including human and model observers), and methods of evaluating observer performance. Conclusions: Standardizing the measurement of dose reduction is a problem of broad interest to the CT community and to public health. A necessary step in the process is the objective assessment of CT image quality, for which various task-based methods may be suitable. This paper attempts to consolidate recent literature that is relevant to the development and implementation of task-based methods for the assessment of CT IR image quality.

  10. Radiation dose reduction in pediatric abdominal CT scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Kamel, I.R.

    1993-01-01

    A clinical trial was designed to test whether a significantly lower radiation dose technique could be used for pediatric abdominal CT scanning without loss of diagnostic image quality. The study included pediatric patients referred to radiology from the Children's Hospital and clinics at The University of Michigan. Seventy-eight cases were included in the study, 36 cases in the experimental group and 42 in the control group. Patient characteristics in both groups were comparable in every respect except for the technical factors used to expose the pelvis. Patients in the experimental group were scanned with a technique using 80 mAs while those in the control group were scanned with the conventional technique of 240 mAs. Therefore, the radiation dose to the pelvis was three times higher in the control group than in the experimental group. Scans were evaluated by two experienced pediatric radiologists who assessed anatomical details, image resolution and the degree of confidence in reaching a diagnosis. The low-mAs technique did not result in reduction of diagnostic image quality or the confidence in reaching a diagnosis. In conclusion, the radiation dose resulting from pediatric CT of the pelvis may be reduced by a factor of three with equivalent medical benefit.

  11. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Zhao Yunzhe; Huang Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Zhu Chun; Miao Jianwei; Mao Yu; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Osher, Stanley J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Results: Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest

  12. Radiation Dose Reduction in Transmission CT Using a Novel Iterative Fourier-Based Reconstruction Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahimian, Benjamin Pooya

    while still achieving better or equivalent results relative to conventional reconstruction at full dose, as quantified across a series of image quality metrics. Finally, in the medical x-ray CT modality, the technique is demonstrated on pediatric patient data sets at various simulated dose levels. In the x-ray modalities, the results indicate that radiation dose reduction in the range of 65--80%, relative to conventional reconstruction techniques, may be possible by using the developed technique.

  13. Computed Tomography Angiography of Carotid Arteries and Vertebrobasilar System: A Simulation Study for Radiation Dose Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Manuel; Ellmann, Stephan; Allmendinger, Thomas; Eller, Achim; Kammerer, Ferdinand; May, Matthias S; Baigger, João F; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system is a standardized procedure with excellent image quality, but radiation exposure remains a matter of concern. The aim of this study is to examine to what extent radiation dose can be lowered in relation to a standard protocol by simulating examinations with lower tube currents applying a dedicated software.Lower tube current was simulated by a dedicated noise insertion and reconstruction software (ReconCT). In a phantom study, true scans were performed with different dose protocols and compared to the results of simulated dose reductions of the same degree, respectively. In a patient study, 30 CTAs of supra-aortic vessels were reconstructed at a level of 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of the initial dose. Objective and subjective image analyses were performed.No significant noise differences between true scans and simulated scans of mimicked contrasted vessels were found. In the patient study, the quality scores of the 4 dose groups differed statistically significant; this difference vanished for the comparison of the 100% and 75% datasets after dichotomization into the categories of diagnostic and nondiagnostic image quality (P = .50).This study suggests an easy-to-implement method of simulating CTAs of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system with lower tube current for dose reduction by artificially adding noise to the original raw data. Lowering the radiation dose in a moderate extent to 75% of the original dose levels does not significantly alter the diagnostic image quality. PMID:26131822

  14. Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in CT: A pediatric oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S. L.; Yee, B. S.; Kaufman, R. A.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: This study demonstrates a means of implementing an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ) technique for dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) while maintaining similar noise levels in the reconstructed image. The effects of image quality and noise texture were assessed at all implementation levels of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign . Empirically derived dose reduction limits were established for ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for imaging of the trunk for a pediatric oncology population ranging from 1 yr old through adolescence/adulthood. Methods: Image quality was assessed using metrics established by the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation program. Each image quality metric was tested using the ACR CT phantom with 0%-100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign blended with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed images. Additionally, the noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated for three common reconstruction filters of the trunk. The empirically derived limitations on ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign implementation for dose reduction were assessed using (1, 5, 10) yr old and adolescent/adult anthropomorphic phantoms. To assess dose reduction limits, the phantoms were scanned in increments of increased noise index (decrementing mA using automatic tube current modulation) balanced with ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction to maintain noise equivalence of the 0% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign image. Results: The ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign algorithm did not produce any unfavorable effects on image quality as assessed by ACR criteria. Conversely, low-contrast resolution was found to improve due to the reduction of noise in the reconstructed images. NPS calculations demonstrated that images with lower frequency noise had lower noise variance and coarser graininess at progressively higher percentages of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction; and in spite of the similar magnitudes of noise, the image reconstructed with 50% or more ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign presented a more

  15. Dose reduction for cardiac CT using a registration-based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wierzbicki, Marcin; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Peters, Terry

    2007-06-15

    Two reasons for the recent rise in radiation exposure from CT are increases in its clinical applicability and the desire to maintain high SNR while acquiring smaller voxels. To address this emerging dose problem, several strategies for reducing patient exposure have already been proposed. One method employed in cardiac imaging is ECG-driven modulation of the tube current between 100% at one time point in the cardiac cycle and a reduced fraction at the remaining phases. In this paper, we describe how images obtained during such acquisition can be used to reconstruct 4D data of consistent high quality throughout the cardiac cycle. In our approach, we assume that the mid-diastole (MD) phase is imaged with full dose. The MD image is then independently registered to lower dose images (lower SNR) at other frames, resulting in a set of transformations. Finally, the transformations are used to warp the MD frame through the cardiac cycle to generate the full 4D image. In addition, the transformations may be interpolated to increase the temporal sampling or to generate images at arbitrary time points. Our approach was validated using various data obtained with simulated and scanner-implemented dose modulation. We determined that as little as 10% of the total dose was required to reproduce full quality images with a 1 mm spatial error and an error in intensity values on the order of the image noise. Thus, our technique offers considerable dose reductions compared to standard imaging protocols, with minimal effects on the quality of the final data.

  16. Dose reduction for cardiac CT using a registration-based approach.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, Marcin; Guiraudon, Gérard M; Jones, Douglas L; Peters, Terry

    2007-06-01

    Two reasons for the recent rise in radiation exposure from CT are increases in its clinical applicability and the desire to maintain high SNR while acquiring smaller voxels. To address this emerging dose problem, several strategies for reducing patient exposure have already been proposed. One method employed in cardiac imaging is ECG-driven modulation of the tube current between 100% at one time point in the cardiac cycle and a reduced fraction at the remaining phases. In this paper, we describe how images obtained during such acquisition can be used to reconstruct 4D data of consistent high quality throughout the cardiac cycle. In our approach, we assume that the middiastole (MD) phase is imaged with full dose. The MD image is then independently registered to lower dose images (lower SNR) at other frames, resulting in a set of transformations. Finally, the transformations are used to warp the MD frame through the cardiac cycle to generate the full 4D image. In addition, the transformations may be interpolated to increase the temporal sampling or to generate images at arbitrary time points. Our approach was validated using various data obtained with simulated and scanner-implemented dose modulation. We determined that as little as 10% of the total dose was required to reproduce full quality images with a 1 mm spatial error and an error in intensity values on the order of the image noise. Thus, our technique offers considerable dose reductions compared to standard imaging protocols, with minimal effects on the quality of the final data. PMID:17654889

  17. Potential of combining iterative reconstruction with noise efficient detector design: aggressive dose reduction in head CT

    PubMed Central

    Bender, B; Schabel, C; Fenchel, M; Ernemann, U; Korn, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: With further increase of CT numbers and their dominant contribution to medical exposure, there is a recent quest for more effective dose control. While reintroduction of iterative reconstruction (IR) has proved its potential in many applications, a novel focus is placed on more noise efficient detectors. Our purpose was to assess the potential of IR in combination with an integrated circuit detector (ICD) for aggressive dose reduction in head CT. Methods: Non-contrast low-dose head CT [190 mAs; weighted volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), 33.2 mGy] was performed in 50 consecutive patients, using a new noise efficient detector and IR. Images were assessed in terms of quantitative and qualitative image quality and compared with standard dose acquisitions (320 mAs; CTDIvol, 59.7 mGy) using a conventional detector and filtered back projection. Results: By combining ICD and IR in low-dose examinations, the signal to noise was improved by about 13% above the baseline level in the standard-dose control group. Both, contrast-to-noise ratio (2.02 ± 0.6 vs 1.88 ± 0.4; p = 0.18) and objective measurements of image sharpness (695 ± 84 vs 705 ± 151 change in Hounsfield units per pixel; p = 0.79) were fully preserved in the low-dose group. Likewise, there was no significant difference in the grading of several subjective image quality parameters when both noise-reducing strategies were used in low-dose examinations. Conclusion: Combination of noise efficient detector with IR allows for meaningful dose reduction in head CT without compromise of standard image quality. Advances in knowledge: Our study demonstrates the feasibility of almost 50% dose reduction in head CT dose (1.1 mSv per scan) through combination of novel dose-reducing strategies. PMID:25827204

  18. SU-E-I-37: Eye Lens Dose Reduction From CT Scan Using Organ Based Tube Current Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H; Liu, T; Xu, X; Wu, J; Zhuo, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the eye lens dose reduction by CT scan with organ based tube current modulation (OBTCM) using GPU Monte Carlo code ARCHER-CT. Methods: 36 X-ray sources and bowtie filters were placed around the patient head with the projection angle interval of 10° for one rotation of CT scan, each projection was simulated respectively. The voxel eye models with high resolution(0.1mm*0.1mm*0.1mm) were used in the simulation and different tube voltage including 80kVp, 100kVp, 120kVp and 140kVp were taken into consideration. Results: The radiation doses to the eye lens increased with the tube voltage raised from 80kVp to 140kVp, and the dose results from 0° (AP) direction are much higher than those from 180° (PA) direction for all the 4 different tube voltage investigated. This 360° projection dose characteristic enables organ based TCM, which can reduce the eye lens dose by more than 55%. Conclusion: As the eye lens belongs to superficial tissues, its radiation dose to external exposure like CT is direction sensitive, and this characteristic feature makes organ based TCM to be an effective way to reduce the eye lens dose, so more clinical use of this technique were recommended. National Nature Science Foundation of China(No.11475047)

  19. Radiation Dose Reduction in Pediatric Body CT Using Iterative Reconstruction and a Novel Image-Based Denoising Method

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; Shiung, Maria; Thomas, Kristen B.; Matsumoto, Jane M.; Zingula, Shannon N.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction potential of a novel image-based denoising technique in pediatric abdominopelvic and chest CT examinations and compare it with a commercial iterative reconstruction method. MATERIALS AND METHODS Data were retrospectively collected from 50 (25 abdominopelvic and 25 chest) clinically indicated pediatric CT examinations. For each examination, a validated noise-insertion tool was used to simulate half-dose data, which were reconstructed using filtered back-projection (FBP) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) methods. A newly developed denoising technique, adaptive nonlocal means (aNLM), was also applied. For each of the 50 patients, three pediatric radiologists evaluated four datasets: full dose plus FBP, half dose plus FBP, half dose plus SAFIRE, and half dose plus aNLM. For each examination, the order of preference for the four datasets was ranked. The organ-specific diagnosis and diagnostic confidence for five primary organs were recorded. RESULTS The mean (± SD) volume CT dose index for the full-dose scan was 5.3 ± 2.1 mGy for abdominopelvic examinations and 2.4 ± 1.1 mGy for chest examinations. For abdominopelvic examinations, there was no statistically significant difference between the half dose plus aNLM dataset and the full dose plus FBP dataset (3.6 ± 1.0 vs 3.6 ± 0.9, respectively; p = 0.52), and aNLM performed better than SAFIRE. For chest examinations, there was no statistically significant difference between the half dose plus SAFIRE and the full dose plus FBP (4.1 ± 0.6 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, respectively; p = 0.67), and SAFIRE performed better than aNLM. For all organs, there was more than 85% agreement in organ-specific diagnosis among the three half-dose configurations and the full dose plus FBP configuration. CONCLUSION Although a novel image-based denoising technique performed better than a commercial iterative reconstruction method in pediatric

  20. Dose reduction in CT with correlated-polarity noise reduction: context-dependent spatial resolution and noise properties demonstrating two-fold dose reduction with minimal artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbins, James T.; Wells, Jered R.; Segars, W. Paul

    2014-03-01

    Correlated-polarity noise reduction (CPNR) is a novel noise reduction technique that uses a statistical approach to reducing noise while maintaining excellent spatial resolution and a traditional noise appearance. It was demonstrated in application to CT imaging for the first time at SPIE 2013 and showed qualitatively excellent image quality at half of normal CT dose. In this current work, we measure quantitatively the spatial resolution and noise properties of CPNR in CT imaging. To measure the spatial resolution, we developed a metrology approach that is suitable for nonlinear algorithms such as CPNR. We introduce the formalism of Signal Modification Factor, SMF(u,v), which is the ratio in frequency space of the CPNR-processed image divided by the noise-free image, averaged over an ensemble of ROIs in a given anatomical context. SMF is a nonlinear analog to the MTF. We used XCAT computer-generated anthropomorphic phantom images followed by projection space processing with CPNR. The SMF revealed virtually no effect from CPNR on spatial resolution of the images (<7% degradation at all frequencies). Corresponding contextdependent NPS measurements generated with CPNR at half-dose were about equal to the NPS of full-dose images without CPNR. This result demonstrates for the first time the quantitative determination of a two-fold reduction in dose with CPNR with less than 7% reduction in spatial resolution. We conclude that CPNR shows strong promise as a method for reduction of noise (and hence, dose) in CT. CPNR may also be used in combination with iterative reconstruction techniques for yet further dose reduction, pending further investigation.

  1. Performance evaluation of iterative reconstruction algorithms for achieving CT radiation dose reduction - a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Cristina T; Tamm, Eric P; Cody, Dianna D; Liu, Xinming; Jensen, Corey T; Wei, Wei; Kundra, Vikas; Rong, John

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize image quality and dose performance with GE CT iterative reconstruction techniques, adaptive statistical iterative recon-struction (ASiR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), over a range of typical to low-dose intervals using the Catphan 600 and the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantoms. The scope of the project was to quantitatively describe the advantages and limitations of these approaches. The Catphan 600 phantom, supplemented with a fat-equivalent oval ring, was scanned using a GE Discovery HD750 scanner at 120 kVp, 0.8 s rotation time, and pitch factors of 0.516, 0.984, and 1.375. The mA was selected for each pitch factor to achieve CTDIvol values of 24, 18, 12, 6, 3, 2, and 1 mGy. Images were reconstructed at 2.5 mm thickness with filtered back-projection (FBP); 20%, 40%, and 70% ASiR; and MBIR. The potential for dose reduction and low-contrast detectability were evaluated from noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements in the CTP 404 module of the Catphan. Hounsfield units (HUs) of several materials were evaluated from the cylinder inserts in the CTP 404 module, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated from the air insert. The results were con-firmed in the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantom at 6, 3, 2, and 1mGy. MBIR reduced noise levels five-fold and increased CNR by a factor of five compared to FBP below 6mGy CTDIvol, resulting in a substantial improvement in image quality. Compared to ASiR and FBP, HU in images reconstructed with MBIR were consistently lower, and this discrepancy was reversed by higher pitch factors in some materials. MBIR improved the conspicuity of the high-contrast spatial resolution bar pattern, and MTF quantification confirmed the superior spatial resolution performance of MBIR versus FBP and ASiR at higher dose levels. While ASiR and FBP were relatively insensitive to changes in dose and pitch, the spatial resolution for MBIR

  2. Reduced z-axis technique for CT Pulmonary angiography in pregnancy--validation for practical use and dose reduction.

    PubMed

    Shahir, Kaushik; McCrea, Jonathan M; Lozano, Luis Antonio Sosa; Goodman, Lawrence R

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of using reduced scan range CT pulmonary angiography technique in pregnancy for pulmonary embolism (PE) and to quantify resulting dose reduction. This was a retrospective study. Eighty-four CTPA exams performed on pregnant women during 2004-2012. The scans were modified to create reduced anatomic coverage scans extending from aortic arch to base of heart. These were separately evaluated by two radiologists for PE and non-PE abnormalities. The results were then compared by the third radiologist with original radiology report and scans. Radiation dose reduction was evaluated prospectively in 36 patients as part of a quality control project. Two patients had PE and were successfully identified on reduced z-axis scans. Thirty-two exams were normal; rest had 60 pertinent and 16 had incidental findings. There were four incidental findings which included three benign thyroid nodules and one benign small lung nodule which were missed. None of these affected clinical outcome or management. There was 71 % radiation dose reduction. No PE or any important diagnoses are missed using reduced z-axis CTPA in pregnancy. There is a substantial radiation dose reduction. Hence, this technique is highly recommended in pregnancy. PMID:26304188

  3. Method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography using the Anscombe transformation

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Lucas R.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work proposes an accurate method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography starting from a clinical image acquired with a standard dose. Methods: The method developed in this work consists of scaling a mammogram acquired at the standard radiation dose and adding signal-dependent noise. The algorithm accounts for specific issues relevant in digital mammography images, such as anisotropic noise, spatial variations in pixel gain, and the effect of dose reduction on the detective quantum efficiency. The scaling process takes into account the linearity of the system and the offset of the detector elements. The inserted noise is obtained by acquiring images of a flat-field phantom at the standard radiation dose and at the simulated dose. Using the Anscombe transformation, a relationship is created between the calculated noise mask and the scaled image, resulting in a clinical mammogram with the same noise and gray level characteristics as an image acquired at the lower-radiation dose. Results: The performance of the proposed algorithm was validated using real images acquired with an anthropomorphic breast phantom at four different doses, with five exposures for each dose and 256 nonoverlapping ROIs extracted from each image and with uniform images. The authors simulated lower-dose images and compared these with the real images. The authors evaluated the similarity between the normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and power spectrum (PS) of simulated images and real images acquired with the same dose. The maximum relative error was less than 2.5% for every ROI. The added noise was also evaluated by measuring the local variance in the real and simulated images. The relative average error for the local variance was smaller than 1%. Conclusions: A new method is proposed for simulating dose reduction in clinical mammograms. In this method, the dependency between image noise and image signal is addressed using a novel application of the Anscombe

  4. [5 years of "concerted action dose reduction in CT" -- what has been achieved and what remains to be done?].

    PubMed

    Nagel, H D; Blobel, J; Brix, G; Ewen, K; Galanski, M; Höfs, P; Loose, R; Prokop, M; Schneider, K; Stamm, G; Stender, H-S; Süss, C; Türkay, S; Vogel, H; Wucherer, M

    2004-11-01

    In May 1998, the German "Concerted Action Dose Reduction in CT" was founded by all parties involved in CT. Its intention was to achieve a significant reduction of the radiation exposure caused by CT, a matter that has increasingly been considered a major challenge since the early nineties. As a result of a number of joint efforts, the essential preconditions have been established by now. The fifth anniversary of the Concerted Action gave rise for both retrospection and outlook on the tasks that have already been accomplished and those that still need to be done. For this purpose, a one-day symposium took place in Berlin on November 4, 2003. The contents of a total of 18 contributions will be outlined here in brief. PMID:15497088

  5. Radiation Dose Reduction in Dual-Energy CT: Does It Affect the Accuracy of Urinary Stone Characterization?

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Mingliang; Yu, Lifeng; Cardona, Daniel Gomez; Liu, Yu; Duan, Xinhui; Ai, Songtao; Leng, Shuai; Shiung, Maria; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to assess the effect of radiation dose reduction in dual-energy CT (DECT) on the performance of renal stone characterization using a patient cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS CT data from 39 unenhanced DECT examinations performed for stone characterization were retrospectively analyzed in this study. Reduced-dose images were simulated at 75%, 50%, and 25% of the routine dose using a previously validated noise-insertion algorithm. Differentiation between uric acid (UA) and non-UA stones was performed using a fixed cutoff value for the dual-energy ratio. ROC analysis was performed to determine optimal cutoff values and the associated sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS Of the 206 stones found, 43 were UA and 163 were non-UA. The mean (± SD) volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) was 16.0 ± 4.0 mGy at the 100% dose level. The mean noise in 100-kV images increased from 40.9 ± 6.8 HU at 100% dose to 46.8 ± 8.8 HU, 57.7 ± 12.5 HU, and 85.4 ± 22.9 HU at 75%, 50%, and 25% dose levels, respectively. Using the default cutoff value, for stones 10 mm3 or larger, the sensitivity/specificity were 100.0%/98.8%, 82.8%/98.8%, and 89.3%/98.7%, at 75%, 50%, and 25% dose levels, respectively. ROC analysis showed varying optimal cutoff values at different dose levels. The sensitivity and specificity improved with use of these optimal cutoff values. Differentiation capability decreased for stones smaller than 10 mm3. CONCLUSION At 75% of the 16-mGy routine dose, the sensitivity and specificity for differentiating UA from non-UA stones were minimally affected for stones 10 mm3 or larger. The use of optimal cutoff values for dual-energy ratio as dose decreased (and noise increased) provided improved performance. PMID:26204304

  6. Evaluation of radiation dose reduction during CT scans by using bismuth oxide and nano-barium sulfate shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoung, Youl-Hun

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction and the image quality during CT scanning by using a new dose reduction fiber sheet (DRFS) with commercially available bismuth shields. These DRFS, were composed of nano-barium sulfate (BaSO4) filling the gaps left by the large bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) particles. The radiation dose was measured five times at a direction of 12 o'clock from the center of the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) head phantom by using a CT ionization chamber to calculate an average value. The image quality of measured CT transverse images of the PMMA head phantom depended on the X-ray tube voltage and the type of shielding. Two regions of interest in the CT transverse images were chosen, one from the right area and the other from the left area under the surface of the PMMA head phantom and at a distance of ion chamber holes located in a direction of 12 o'clock from the center of the PMMA head phantom. The results of this study showed that the new DRFS shields could reduce the dosages by 15.61%, 23.05%, and 22.71% at 90 kVp, 120 kVp, and 140 kVp, respectively, than with these of a conventional bismuth shield of the same thickness while maintaining image quality. In addition, the DRFSs produced were about 25% thinness than conventional bismuth. We conclude, therefore, that a DRFS can replace conventional bismuth as a new shield.

  7. Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D) Improves Chest CT Image Quality and Reduces Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Miyara, Tetsuhiro; Honda, Osamu; Kamiya, Hisashi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Moriya, Hiroshi; Koyama, Mitsuhiro; Noma, Satoshi; Kamiya, Ayano; Tanaka, Yuko; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the advantages of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D) for image quality improvement and dose reduction for chest computed tomography (CT). Methods Institutional Review Boards approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-eight subjects underwent chest CT at five institutions using identical scanners and protocols. During a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120, and 60 mA. Scan data were converted to images using AIDR3D and a conventional reconstruction mode (without AIDR3D). Using a 5-point scale from 1 (non-diagnostic) to 5 (excellent), three blinded observers independently evaluated image quality for three lung zones, four patterns of lung disease (nodule/mass, emphysema, bronchiolitis, and diffuse lung disease), and three mediastinal measurements (small structure visibility, streak artifacts, and shoulder artifacts). Differences in these scores were assessed by Scheffe's test. Results At each tube current, scans using AIDR3D had higher scores than those without AIDR3D, which were significant for lung zones (p<0.0001) and all mediastinal measurements (p<0.01). For lung diseases, significant improvements with AIDR3D were frequently observed at 120 and 60 mA. Scans with AIDR3D at 120 mA had significantly higher scores than those without AIDR3D at 240 mA for lung zones and mediastinal streak artifacts (p<0.0001), and slightly higher or equal scores for all other measurements. Scans with AIDR3D at 60 mA were also judged superior or equivalent to those without AIDR3D at 120 mA. Conclusion For chest CT, AIDR3D provides better image quality and can reduce radiation exposure by 50%. PMID:25153797

  8. Dose reduction assessment in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine balloon-induced-ischemia model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the use of an advanced hybrid iterative reconstruction (IR) technique (iDose4, Philips Health- care) for low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging. A porcine model was created to mimic coronary stenosis through partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a balloon catheter. The severity of LAD occlusion was adjusted with FFR measurements. Dynamic CT images were acquired at end-systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Various corrections were applied to the acquired scans to reduce motion and imaging artifacts. Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) was computed with a deconvolution-based approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). We compared a high and a low dose radiation protocol corresponding to two different tube-voltage/tube-current combinations (80kV p/100mAs and 120kV p/150mAs). The corresponding radiation doses for these protocols are 7.8mSv and 34.3mSV , respectively. The images were reconstructed using conventional FBP and three noise-reduction strengths of the IR method, iDose. Flow contrast-to-noise ratio, CNRf, as obtained from MBF maps, was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of reconstruction on contrast between normal and ischemic myocardial tissue. Preliminary results showed that the use of iDose to reconstruct low dose images provide better or comparable CNRf to that of high dose images reconstructed with FBP, suggesting significant dose savings. CNRf was improved with the three used levels of iDose compared to FBP for both protocols. When using the entire 4D dynamic sequence for MBF computation, a 77% dose reduction was achieved, while considering only half the scans (i.e., every other heart cycle) allowed even further dose reduction while maintaining relatively higher CNRf.

  9. Angular on-line tube current modulation in multidetector CT examinations of children and adults: The influence of different scanning parameters on dose reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, Antonios E.; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of angular on-line tube current modulation on dose reduction in pediatric and adult patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) examinations. Five physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate the average individual as neonate, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, 10-year-old, and adult were employed in the current study. Phantoms were scanned with the use of on-line tube current modulation (TCM). Percent dose reduction (%DR) factors achieved by applying TCM, were determined for standard protocols used for head and neck, shoulder, thorax, thorax and abdomen, abdomen, abdomen and pelvis, pelvis, and whole body examinations. A preliminary study on the application of TCM in MDCT examinations of adult patients was performed to validate the results obtained in anthropomorphic phantoms. Dose reduction was estimated as the percentage difference of the modulated milliamperes for each scan and the preset milliamperes prescribed by the scan protocol. The dose reduction in children was found to be much lower than the corresponding reduction achieved for adults. For helical scans the %DR factors, ranged between 1.6% and 7.4% for the neonate, 2.9% and 8.7% for the 1-year old, 2% and 6% for the 5-year-old, 5% and 10.9% for the 10-year-old, and 10.4% and 20.7% for the adult individual. For sequential scans the corresponding %DR factors ranged between 1.3% and 6.7%, 4.5% and 11%, 4.2% and 6.6%, 6.4% and 12.3%, and 8.9% and 23.3%, respectively. Broader beam collimations are associated with decreased %DR factors, when other scanning parameters are held constant. TCM did not impair image noise. In adult patients, the %DR values were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding results obtained in the anthropomorphic adult phantom. In conclusion, on-line TCM may be considered as a valuable tool for reducing dose in routine CT examinations of pediatric and adult patients. However, the dose reduction achieved with TCM

  10. Dose reduction of up to 89% while maintaining image quality in cardiovascular CT achieved with prospective ECG gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londt, John H.; Shreter, Uri; Vass, Melissa; Hsieh, Jiang; Ge, Zhanyu; Adda, Olivier; Dowe, David A.; Sabllayrolles, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    We present the results of dose and image quality performance evaluation of a novel, prospective ECG-gated Coronary CT Angiography acquisition mode (SnapShot Pulse, LightSpeed VCT-XT scanner, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and compare it to conventional retrospective ECG gated helical acquisition in clinical and phantom studies. Image quality phantoms were used to measure noise, slice sensitivity profile, in-plane resolution, low contrast detectability and dose, using the two acquisition modes. Clinical image quality and diagnostic confidence were evaluated in a study of 31 patients scanned with the two acquisition modes. Radiation dose reduction in clinical practice was evaluated by tracking 120 consecutive patients scanned with the prospectively gated scan mode. In the phantom measurements, the prospectively gated mode resulted in equivalent or better image quality measures at dose reductions of up to 89% compared to non-ECG modulated conventional helical scans. In the clinical study, image quality was rated excellent by expert radiologist reviewing the cases, with pathology being identical using the two acquisition modes. The average dose to patients in the clinical practice study was 5.6 mSv, representing 50% reduction compared to a similar patient population scanned with the conventional helical mode.

  11. Dose reduction of cone beam CT scanning for the entire oral and maxillofacial regions with thyroid collars

    PubMed Central

    Qu, XM; Li, G; Sanderink, GCH; Zhang, ZY; Ma, XC

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of thyroid collars on radiation dose during cone beam CT (CBCT) scanning. Methods Average tissue-absorbed dose for a NewTom 9000 CBCT scanner (Quantitative Radiology, Verona, Italy) was measured using thermoluminescent dosemeter chips in a phantom. The scans were carried out with and without thyroid collars. Effective organ dose and total effective dose were derived using International Commission on Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations. Results The effective organ doses for the thyroid gland and oesophagus were 31.0 µSv and 2.4 µSv, respectively, during CBCT scanning without a collar around the neck. When the thyroid collars were used loosely around the neck, no effective organ dose reduction was observed. When one thyroid collar was used tightly on the front of the neck, the effective organ dose for the thyroid gland and oesophagus were reduced to 15.9 µSv (48.7% reduction) and 1.4 µSv (41.7% reduction), respectively. Similar organ dose reduction (46.5% and 41.7%) was achieved when CBCT scanning was performed with two collars tightly on the front and back of the neck. However, the differences to the total effective dose were not significant among the scans with and without collars around the neck (p = 0.775). Conclusions Thyroid collars can effectively reduce the radiation dose to the thyroid and oesophagus if used appropriately. PMID:22707330

  12. Pilot Study on Image Quality and Radiation Dose of CT Colonography with Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Three-Dimensional

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hesong; Liang, Dan; Luo, Mingyue; Duan, Chaijie; Cai, Wenli; Zhu, Shanshan; Qiu, Jianping; Li, Wenru

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate image quality and radiation dose of CT colonography (CTC) with adaptive iterative dose reduction three-dimensional (AIDR3D). Methods Ten segments of porcine colon phantom were collected, and 30 pedunculate polyps with diameters ranging from 1 to 15 mm were simulated on each segment. Image data were acquired with tube voltage of 120 kVp, and current doses of 10 mAs, 20 mAs, 30 mAs, 40 mAs, 50 mAs, respectively. CTC images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and AIDR3D. Two radiologists blindly evaluated image quality. Quantitative evaluation of image quality included image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Qualitative image quality was evaluated with a five-score scale. Radiation dose was calculated based on dose-length product. Ten volunteers were examined supine 50 mAs with FBP and prone 20 mAs with AIDR3D, and image qualities were assessed. Paired t test was performed for statistical analysis. Results For 20 mAs with AIDR3D and 50 mAs with FBP, image noise, SNRs and CNRs were (16.4 ± 1.6) HU vs. (16.8 ± 2.6) HU, 1.9 ± 0.2 vs. 1.9 ± 0.4, and 62.3 ± 6.8 vs. 62.0 ± 6.2, respectively; qualitative image quality scores were 4.1 and 4.3, respectively; their differences were all not statistically significant. Compared with 50 mAs with FBP, radiation dose (1.62 mSv) of 20 mAs with AIDR3D was decreased by 60.0%. There was no statistically significant difference in image noise, SNRs, CNRs and qualitative image quality scores between prone 20 mAs with AIDR3D and supine 50 mAs with FBP in 10 volunteers, the former reduced radiation dose by 61.1%. Conclusion Image quality of CTC using 20 mAs with AIDR3D could be comparable to standard 50 mAs with FBP, radiation dose of the former reduced by about 60.0% and was only 1.62 mSv. PMID:25635839

  13. Radiation dose reduction with application of non-linear adaptive filters for abdominal CT

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Sung, Mi Kim; Back, Anni; Blake, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of non-linear adaptive filters (NLAF) on abdominal computed tomography (CT) images acquired at different radiation dose levels. METHODS: Nineteen patients (mean age 61.6 ± 7.9 years, M:F = 8:11) gave informed consent for an Institutional Review Board approved prospective study involving acquisition of 4 additional image series (200, 150, 100, 50 mAs and 120 kVp) on a 64 slice multidetector row CT scanner over an identical 10 cm length in the abdomen. The CT images acquired at 150, 100 and 50 mAs were processed with the NLAF. Two radiologists reviewed unprocessed and processed images for image quality in a blinded randomized manner. CT dose index volume, dose length product, patient weight, transverse diameters, objective noise and CT numbers were recorded. Data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance and Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Of the 31 lesions detected in abdominal CT images, 28 lesions were less than 1 cm in size. Subjective image noise was graded as unacceptable in unprocessed images at 50 and 100 mAs, and in NLAF processed images at 50 mAs only. In NLAF processed images, objective image noise was decreased by 21% (14.4 ± 4/18.2 ± 4.9) at 150 mAs, 28.3% (15.7 ± 5.6/21.9 ± 4) at 100 mAs and by 39.4% (18.8 ± 9/30.4 ± 9.2) at 50 mAs compared to unprocessed images acquired at respective radiation dose levels. At 100 mAs the visibility of smaller structures improved from suboptimal in unprocessed images to excellent in NLAF processed images, whereas diagnostic confidence was respectively improved from probably confident to fully confident. CONCLUSION: NLAF lowers image noise, improves the visibility of small structures and maintains lesion conspicuity at down to 100 mAs for abdominal CT. PMID:22328968

  14. Radiation dose reduction in thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT using tube current modulation: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Mustafa, Zakira; Nassir, Khadijah Mohd; Hamid, Hamzaini Abdul; Sun, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    This phantom study was designed to compare the radiation dose in thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT scans with and without use of tube current modulation (TCM). Effective dose (ED) and size-specific dose estimation (SSDE) were calculated with the absorbed doses measured at selective radiosensitive organs using a thermoluminescence dosimeter-100 (TLD-100). When compared to protocols without TCM, the ED and SSDE were reduced significantly with use of TCM for both the thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT. With use of TCM, the ED was 6.50 ± 0.29 mSv for thoracic and 6.01 ± 0.20 mSv for the abdomen-pelvic CT protocols. However without use of TCM, the ED was 20.07 ± 0.24 mSv and 17.30 ± 0.41 mSv for the thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT protocols, respectively. The corresponding SSDE was 10.18 ± 0.48 mGy and 11.96 ± 0.27 mGy for the thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT protocols with TCM, and 31.56 ± 0.43 mGy and 33.23 ± 0.05 mGy for thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT protocols without TCM, respectively. The highest absorbed dose was measured at the breast with 8.58 ± 0.12 mGy in the TCM protocols and 51.52 ± 14.72 mGy in the protocols without TCM during thoracic CT. In the abdomen-pelvic CT, the absorbed dose was highest at the skin with 9.30 ± 1.28mGy and 29.99 ± 2.23 mGy in protocols with and without use of TCM, respectively. In conclusion, the TCM technique results in significant dose reduction; thus it is to be highly recommended in routine thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT. PMID:25679153

  15. Dose reduction and image quality optimizations in CT of pediatric and adult patients: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, P.-H.; Lee, C.-L.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, Y.-J.; Jeon, S.-S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to easily and rapidly perform numerous acquisitions, possibly leading to a marked increase in the radiation dose to individual patients. Technical options dedicated to automatically adjusting the acquisition parameters according to the patient's size are of specific interest in pediatric radiology. A constant tube potential reduction can be achieved for adults and children, while maintaining a constant detector energy fluence. To evaluate radiation dose, the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was calculated based on the CT dose index (CTDI) measured using an ion chamber, and image noise and image contrast were measured from a scanned image to evaluate image quality. The dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) was calculated from the radiation dose, image noise, and image contrast measured from a scanned image. The noise derivative (ND) is a quality index for dose efficiency. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kVp were used to compute the average photon energy. Image contrast and the corresponding contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined for lesions of soft tissue, muscle, bone, and iodine relative to a uniform water background, as the iodine contrast increases at lower energy (i.e., k-edge of iodine is 33 keV closer to the beam energy) using mixed water-iodine contrast normalization (water 0, iodine 25, 100, 200, and 1000 HU, respectively). The proposed values correspond to high quality images and can be reduced if only high-contrast organs are assessed. The potential benefit of lowering the tube voltage is an improved CNRD, resulting in a lower radiation dose and optimization of image quality. Adjusting the tube potential in abdominal CT would be useful in current pediatric radiography, where the choice of X-ray techniques generally takes into account the size of the patient as well as the need to balance the conflicting requirements of diagnostic image quality and radiation dose

  16. Evaluation of exposure dose reduction in multislice CT coronary angiography (MS-CTA) with prospective ECG-gated helical scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Takamasa; Tsuyuki, Masaharu; Okumura, Miwa; Sano, Tomonari; Kondo, Takeshi; Takase, Shinichi

    2008-03-01

    A novel low-dose ECG-gated helical scan method to investigate coronary artery diseases was developed. This method uses a high pitch for scanning (based on the patient's heart rate) and X-rays are generated only during the optimal cardiac phases. The dose reduction was obtained using a two-level approach: 1) To use a 64-slice CT scanner (Aquilion, Toshiba, Otawara, Tochigi, Japan) with a scan speed of 0.35 s/rot. to helically scan the heart at a high pitch based on the patient's heart rate. By changing the pitch from the conventional 0.175 to 0.271 for a heart rate of 60 bpm, the exposure dose was reduced to 65%. 2) To employ tube current gating that predicts the timing of optimal cardiac phases from the previous cardiac cycle and generates X-rays only during the required cardiac phases. The combination of high speed scanning with a high pitch and appropriate X-ray generation only in the cardiac phases from 60% to 90% allows the exposure dose to be reduced to 5.6 mSv for patients with a heart rate lower than 65 bpm. This is a dose reduction of approximately 70% compared to the conventional scanning method recommended by the manufacturer when segmental reconstruction is considered. This low-dose protocol seamlessly allows for wide scan ranges (e.g., aortic dissection) with the benefits of ECG-gated helical scanning: smooth continuity for longitudinal direction and utilization of data from all cardiac cycles.

  17. Determination of the Optimal Dose Reduction Level via Iterative Reconstruction Using 640-Slice Volume Chest CT in a Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingli; Wang, Jingshi; Liu, Qin; Zhao, Pengfei; Hou, Yang; Ma, Yue; Guo, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the optimal dose reduction level of iterative reconstruction technique for paediatric chest CT in pig models. Materials and Methods 27 infant pigs underwent 640-slice volume chest CT with 80kVp and different mAs. Automatic exposure control technique was used, and the index of noise was set to SD10 (Group A, routine dose), SD12.5, SD15, SD17.5, SD20 (Groups from B to E) to reduce dose respectively. Group A was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), and Groups from B to E were reconstructed using iterative reconstruction (IR). Objective and subjective image quality (IQ) among groups were compared to determine an optimal radiation reduction level. Results The noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in Group D had no significant statistical difference from that in Group A (P = 1.0). The scores of subjective IQ in Group A were not significantly different from those in Group D (P>0.05). There were no obvious statistical differences in the objective and subjective index values among the subgroups (small, medium and large subgroups) of Group D. The effective dose (ED) of Group D was 58.9% lower than that of Group A (0.20±0.05mSv vs 0.48±0.10mSv, p <0.001). Conclusions In infant pig chest CT, using iterative reconstruction can provide diagnostic image quality; furthermore, it can reduce the dosage by 58.9%. PMID:25764485

  18. A high-resolution photon-counting breast CT system with tensor-framelet based iterative image reconstruction for radiation dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Huanjun; Gao, Hao; Zhao, Bo; Cho, Hyo-Min; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-10-01

    Both computer simulations and experimental phantom studies were carried out to investigate the radiation dose reduction with tensor framelet based iterative image reconstruction (TFIR) for a dedicated high-resolution spectral breast computed tomography (CT) based on a silicon strip photon-counting detector. The simulation was performed with a 10 cm-diameter water phantom including three contrast materials (polyethylene, 8 mg ml-1 iodine and B-100 bone-equivalent plastic). In the experimental study, the data were acquired with a 1.3 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom containing iodine in three concentrations (8, 16 and 32 mg ml-1) at various radiation doses (1.2, 2.4 and 3.6 mGy) and then CT images were reconstructed using the filtered-back-projection (FBP) technique and the TFIR technique, respectively. The image quality between these two techniques was evaluated by the quantitative analysis on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution that was evaluated using the task-based modulation transfer function (MTF). Both the simulation and experimental results indicated that the task-based MTF obtained from TFIR reconstruction with one-third of the radiation dose was comparable to that from the FBP reconstruction for low contrast target. For high contrast target, the TFIR was substantially superior to the FBP reconstruction in terms of spatial resolution. In addition, TFIR was able to achieve a factor of 1.6-1.8 increase in CNR, depending on the target contrast level. This study demonstrates that the TFIR can reduce the required radiation dose by a factor of two-thirds for a CT image reconstruction compared to the FBP technique. It achieves much better CNR and spatial resolution for high contrast target in addition to retaining similar spatial resolution for low contrast target. This TFIR technique has been implemented with a graphic processing unit system and it takes approximately 10 s to reconstruct a single-slice CT image

  19. A high-resolution photon-counting breast CT system with tensor-framelet based iterative image reconstruction for radiation dose reduction.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huanjun; Gao, Hao; Zhao, Bo; Cho, Hyo-Min; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-10-21

    Both computer simulations and experimental phantom studies were carried out to investigate the radiation dose reduction with tensor framelet based iterative image reconstruction (TFIR) for a dedicated high-resolution spectral breast computed tomography (CT) based on a silicon strip photon-counting detector. The simulation was performed with a 10 cm-diameter water phantom including three contrast materials (polyethylene, 8 mg ml(-1) iodine and B-100 bone-equivalent plastic). In the experimental study, the data were acquired with a 1.3 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom containing iodine in three concentrations (8, 16 and 32 mg ml(-1)) at various radiation doses (1.2, 2.4 and 3.6 mGy) and then CT images were reconstructed using the filtered-back-projection (FBP) technique and the TFIR technique, respectively. The image quality between these two techniques was evaluated by the quantitative analysis on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution that was evaluated using the task-based modulation transfer function (MTF). Both the simulation and experimental results indicated that the task-based MTF obtained from TFIR reconstruction with one-third of the radiation dose was comparable to that from the FBP reconstruction for low contrast target. For high contrast target, the TFIR was substantially superior to the FBP reconstruction in terms of spatial resolution. In addition, TFIR was able to achieve a factor of 1.6-1.8 increase in CNR, depending on the target contrast level. This study demonstrates that the TFIR can reduce the required radiation dose by a factor of two-thirds for a CT image reconstruction compared to the FBP technique. It achieves much better CNR and spatial resolution for high contrast target in addition to retaining similar spatial resolution for low contrast target. This TFIR technique has been implemented with a graphic processing unit system and it takes approximately 10 s to reconstruct a single-slice CT image

  20. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) using a new implementation of wavelet denoising in low tube current acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yinghua; Brunner, Stephen; Tang, Jie; Speidel, Michael; Rowley, Howard; VanLysel, Michael; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    Radiation dose reduction remains at the forefront of research in computed tomography. X-ray tube parameters such as tube current can be lowered to reduce dose; however, images become prohibitively noisy when the tube current is too low. Wavelet denoising is one of many noise reduction techniques. However, traditional wavelet techniques have the tendency to create an artificial noise texture, due to the nonuniform denoising across the image, which is undesirable from a diagnostic perspective. This work presents a new implementation of wavelet denoising that is able to achieve noise reduction, while still preserving spatial resolution. Further, the proposed method has the potential to improve those unnatural noise textures. The technique was tested on both phantom and animal datasets (Catphan phantom and timeresolved swine heart scan) acquired on a GE Discovery VCT scanner. A number of tube currents were used to investigate the potential for dose reduction.

  1. Radiation dose reduction to the breast in thoracic CT: Comparison of bismuth shielding, organ-based tube current modulation, and use of a globally decreased tube current

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jia; Duan Xinhui; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate dose performance and image quality in thoracic CT using three techniques to reduce dose to the breast: bismuth shielding, organ-based tube current modulation (TCM) and global tube current reduction. Methods: Semi-anthropomorphic thorax phantoms of four different sizes (15, 30, 35, and 40 cm lateral width) were used for dose measurement and image quality assessment. Four scans were performed on each phantom using 100 or 120 kV with a clinical CT scanner: (1) reference scan; (2) scan with bismuth breast shield of an appropriate thickness; (3) scan with organ-based TCM; and (4) scan with a global reduction in tube current chosen to match the dose reduction from bismuth shielding. Dose to the breast was measured with an ion chamber on the surface of the phantom. Image quality was evaluated by measuring the mean and standard deviation of CT numbers within the lung and heart regions. Results: Compared to the reference scan, dose to the breast region was decreased by about 21% for the 15-cm phantom with a pediatric (2-ply) shield and by about 37% for the 30, 35, and 40-cm phantoms with adult (4-ply) shields. Organ-based TCM decreased the dose by 12% for the 15-cm phantom, and 34-39% for the 30, 35, and 40-cm phantoms. Global lowering of the tube current reduced breast dose by 23% for the 15-cm phantom and 39% for the 30, 35, and 40-cm phantoms. In phantoms of all four sizes, image noise was increased in both the lung and heart regions with bismuth shielding. No significant increase in noise was observed with organ-based TCM. Decreasing tube current globally led to similar noise increases as bismuth shielding. Streak and beam hardening artifacts, and a resulting artifactual increase in CT numbers, were observed for scans with bismuth shields, but not for organ-based TCM or global tube current reduction. Conclusions: Organ-based TCM produces dose reduction to the breast similar to that achieved with bismuth shielding for

  2. Variability in CT lung-nodule quantification: Effects of dose reduction and reconstruction methods on density and texture based features

    PubMed Central

    Lo, P.; Young, S.; Kim, H. J.; Brown, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of dose level and reconstruction method on density and texture based features computed from CT lung nodules. Methods: This study had two major components. In the first component, a uniform water phantom was scanned at three dose levels and images were reconstructed using four conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and four iterative reconstruction (IR) methods for a total of 24 different combinations of acquisition and reconstruction conditions. In the second component, raw projection (sinogram) data were obtained for 33 lung nodules from patients scanned as a part of their clinical practice, where low dose acquisitions were simulated by adding noise to sinograms acquired at clinical dose levels (a total of four dose levels) and reconstructed using one FBP kernel and two IR kernels for a total of 12 conditions. For the water phantom, spherical regions of interest (ROIs) were created at multiple locations within the water phantom on one reference image obtained at a reference condition. For the lung nodule cases, the ROI of each nodule was contoured semiautomatically (with manual editing) from images obtained at a reference condition. All ROIs were applied to their corresponding images reconstructed at different conditions. For 17 of the nodule cases, repeat contours were performed to assess repeatability. Histogram (eight features) and gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) based texture features (34 features) were computed for all ROIs. For the lung nodule cases, the reference condition was selected to be 100% of clinical dose with FBP reconstruction using the B45f kernel; feature values calculated from other conditions were compared to this reference condition. A measure was introduced, which the authors refer to as Q, to assess the stability of features across different conditions, which is defined as the ratio of reproducibility (across conditions) to repeatability (across repeat contours) of each feature. Results: The

  3. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 02: A comparison of dose reduction methods on image quality for cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R; Buckley, LA

    2014-08-15

    Modern radiotherapy uses highly conformai dose distributions and therefore relies on daily image guidance for accurate patient positioning. Kilovoltage cone beam CT is one technique that is routinely used for patient set-up and results in a high dose to the patient relative to planar imaging techniques. This study uses an Elekta Synergy linac equipped with XVI cone beam CT to investigate the impact of various imaging parameters on dose and image quality. Dose and image quality are assessed as functions of x-ray tube voltage, tube current and the number of projections in the scan. In each case, the dose measurements confirm that as each parameter increases the dose increases. The assessment of high contrast resolution shows little dependence on changes to the image technique. However, low contrast visibility suggests a trade off between dose and image quality. Particularly for changes in tube potential, the dose increases much faster as a function of voltage than the corresponding increase in low contrast image quality. This suggests using moderate values of the peak tube voltage (100 – 120 kVp) since higher values result in significant dose increases with little gain in image quality. Measurements also indicate that increasing tube current achieves the greatest degree of improvement in the low contrast visibility. The results of this study highlight the need to establish careful imaging protocols to limit dose to the patient and to limit changes to the imaging parameters to those cases where there is a clear clinical requirement for improved image quality.

  4. Cone beam CT with zonal filters for simultaneous dose reduction, improved target contrast and automated set-up in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. J.; Marchant, T. E.; Amer, A. M.

    2006-05-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) using a zonal filter is introduced. The aims are reduced concomitant imaging dose to the patient, simultaneous control of body scatter for improved image quality in the tumour target zone and preserved set-up detail for radiotherapy. Aluminium transmission diaphragms added to the CBCT x-ray tube of the Elekta Synergy™ linear accelerator produced an unattenuated beam for a central 'target zone' and a partially attenuated beam for an outer 'set-up zone'. Imaging doses and contrast noise ratios (CNR) were measured in a test phantom for transmission diaphragms 12 and 24 mm thick, for 5 and 10 cm long target zones. The effect on automatic registration of zonal CBCT to conventional CT was assessed relative to full-field and lead-collimated images of an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses along the axis of rotation were reduced by up to 50% in both target and set-up zones, and weighted dose (two thirds surface dose plus one third central dose) was reduced by 10-20% for a 10 cm long target zone. CNR increased by up to 15% in zonally filtered CBCT images compared to full-field images. Automatic image registration remained as robust as that with full-field images and was superior to CBCT coned down using lead-collimation. Zonal CBCT significantly reduces imaging dose and is expected to benefit radiotherapy through improved target contrast, required to assess target coverage, and wide-field edge detail, needed for robust automatic measurement of patient set-up error.

  5. The Impact of Different Levels of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D on Image Quality of 320-Row Coronary CT Angiography: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Sarah; Rief, Matthias; Zimmermann, Elke; Martus, Peter; Schuijf, Joanne Désirée; Blobel, Jörg; Richter, Felicitas; Dewey, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was the systematic image quality evaluation of coronary CT angiography (CTA), reconstructed with the 3 different levels of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D) and compared to filtered back projection (FBP) with quantum denoising software (QDS). Methods Standard-dose CTA raw data of 30 patients with mean radiation dose of 3.2 ± 2.6 mSv were reconstructed using AIDR 3D mild, standard, strong and compared to FBP/QDS. Objective image quality comparison (signal, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), contour sharpness) was performed using 21 measurement points per patient, including measurements in each coronary artery from proximal to distal. Results Objective image quality parameters improved with increasing levels of AIDR 3D. Noise was lowest in AIDR 3D strong (p≤0.001 at 20/21 measurement points; compared with FBP/QDS). Signal and contour sharpness analysis showed no significant difference between the reconstruction algorithms for most measurement points. Best coronary SNR and CNR were achieved with AIDR 3D strong. No loss of SNR or CNR in distal segments was seen with AIDR 3D as compared to FBP. Conclusions On standard-dose coronary CTA images, AIDR 3D strong showed higher objective image quality than FBP/QDS without reducing contour sharpness. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00967876 PMID:25945924

  6. Image Quality and Radiation Dose of CT Coronary Angiography with Automatic Tube Current Modulation and Strong Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Three-Dimensional (AIDR3D)

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hesong; Dai, Guochao; Luo, Mingyue; Duan, Chaijie; Cai, Wenli; Liang, Dan; Wang, Xinhua; Zhu, Dongyun; Li, Wenru; Qiu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate image quality and radiation dose of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) scanned using automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) and reconstructed by strong adaptive iterative dose reduction three-dimensional (AIDR3D). Methods Eighty-four consecutive CTCA patients were collected for the study. All patients were scanned using ATCM and reconstructed with strong AIDR3D, standard AIDR3D and filtered back-projection (FBP) respectively. Two radiologists who were blinded to the patients' clinical data and reconstruction methods evaluated image quality. Quantitative image quality evaluation included image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). To evaluate image quality qualitatively, coronary artery is classified into 15 segments based on the modified guidelines of the American Heart Association. Qualitative image quality was evaluated using a 4-point scale. Radiation dose was calculated based on dose-length product. Results Compared with standard AIDR3D, strong AIDR3D had lower image noise, higher SNR and CNR, their differences were all statistically significant (P<0.05); compared with FBP, strong AIDR3D decreased image noise by 46.1%, increased SNR by 84.7%, and improved CNR by 82.2%, their differences were all statistically significant (P<0.05 or 0.001). Segments with diagnostic image quality for strong AIDR3D were 336 (100.0%), 486 (96.4%), and 394 (93.8%) in proximal, middle, and distal part respectively; whereas those for standard AIDR3D were 332 (98.8%), 472 (93.7%), 378 (90.0%), respectively; those for FBP were 217 (64.6%), 173 (34.3%), 114 (27.1%), respectively; total segments with diagnostic image quality in strong AIDR3D (1216, 96.5%) were higher than those of standard AIDR3D (1182, 93.8%) and FBP (504, 40.0%); the differences between strong AIDR3D and standard AIDR3D, strong AIDR3D and FBP were all statistically significant (P<0.05 or 0.001). The mean effective radiation dose was (2.55±1.21) mSv. Conclusion

  7. Ultra-low-dose dual-source CT coronary angiography with high pitch: diagnostic yield of a volumetric planning scan and effects on dose reduction and imaging strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, B; Huppertz, A; Lembcke, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of an ultra-low-dose dual-source CT coronary angiography (CTCA) scan with high pitch for delimiting the range of the subsequent standard CTCA scan. Methods: 30 patients with an indication for CTCA were prospectively examined using a two-scan dual-source CTCA protocol (2.0 × 64.0 × 0.6 mm; pitch, 3.4; rotation time of 280 ms; 100 kV): Scan 1 was acquired with one-fifth of the tube current suggested by the automatic exposure control software [CareDose 4D™ (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) using 100 kV and 370 mAs as a reference] with the scan length from the tracheal bifurcation to the diaphragmatic border. Scan 2 was acquired with standard tube current extending with reduced scan length based on Scan 1. Nine central coronary artery segments were analysed qualitatively on both scans. Results: Scan 2 (105.1 ± 10.1 mm) was significantly shorter than Scan 1 (127.0 ± 8.7 mm). Image quality scores were significantly better for Scan 2. However, in 5 of 6 (83%) patients with stenotic coronary artery disease, a stenosis was already detected in Scan 1 and in 13 of 24 (54%) patients with non-stenotic coronary arteries, a stenosis was already excluded by Scan 1. Using Scan 2 as reference, the positive- and negative-predictive value of Scan 1 was 83% (5 of 6 patients) and 100% (13 of 13 patients), respectively. Conclusion: An ultra-low-dose CTCA planning scan enables a reliable scan length reduction of the following standard CTCA scan and allows for correct diagnosis in a substantial proportion of patients. Advances in knowledge: Further dose reductions are possible owing to a change in the individual patient's imaging strategy as a prior ultra-low-dose CTCA scan may already rule out the presence of a stenosis or may lead to a direct transferal to an invasive catheter procedure. PMID:25710210

  8. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  9. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography: techniques and future perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifeng; Liu, Xin; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan C; Qu, Mingliang; Christner, Jodie; Fletcher, Joel G; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2011-01-01

    Despite universal consensus that computed tomography (CT) overwhelmingly benefits patients when used for appropriate indications, concerns have been raised regarding the potential risk of cancer induction from CT due to the exponentially increased use of CT in medicine. Keeping radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable, consistent with the diagnostic task, remains the most important strategy for decreasing this potential risk. This article summarizes the general technical strategies that are commonly used for radiation dose management in CT. Dose-management strategies for pediatric CT, cardiac CT, dual-energy CT, CT perfusion and interventional CT are specifically discussed, and future perspectives on CT dose reduction are presented. PMID:22308169

  10. Exposure dose reduction for the high energy spectrum in the photon counting mammography: simulation study based on Japanese breast glandularity and thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Naoko; Yamazaki, Misaki; Kodera, Yoshie; Yamamuro, Mika; Yamada, Kanako; Asai, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Koji

    2015-03-01

    Recently, digital mammography with a photon counting silicon detector has been developed. With the aim of reducing the exposure dose, we have proposed a new mammography system that uses a cadmium telluride series photon counting detector. In addition, we also propose to use a high energy X-ray spectrum with a tungsten anode. The purpose of this study was assessed that the effectiveness of the high X-ray energy spectrum in terms of image quality using a Monte Carlo simulation. The proposed photon counting system with the high energy X-ray is compared to a conventional flat panel detector system with a Mo/Rh spectrum. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is calculated from simulation images with the use of breast phantoms. The breast model phantoms differed by glandularity and thickness, which were determined from Japanese clinical mammograms. We found that the CNR values were higher in the proposed system than in the conventional system. The number of photons incident on the detector was larger in the proposed system, so that the noise values was lower in comparison with the conventional system. Therefore, the high energy spectrum yielded the same CNR as using the conventional spectrum while allowing a considerable dose reduction to the breast.

  11. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and bismuth shielding for evaluation of dose reduction to the eye and image quality during head CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myeong Seong; Choi, Jiwon; Kim, Sun Young; Kweon, Dae Cheol

    2014-03-01

    There is a concern regarding the adverse effects of increasing radiation doses due to repeated computed tomography (CT) scans, especially in radiosensitive organs and portions thereof, such as the lenses of the eyes. Bismuth shielding with an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm was recently introduced in our clinic as a method to reduce the absorbed radiation dose. This technique was applied to the lens of the eye during CT scans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reduction in the absorbed radiation dose and to determine the noise level when using bismuth shielding and the ASIR algorithm with the GE DC 750 HD 64-channel CT scanner for CT of the head of a humanoid phantom. With the use of bismuth shielding, the noise level was higher in the beam-hardening artifact areas than in the revealed artifact areas. However, with the use of ASIR, the noise level was lower than that with the use of bismuth alone; it was also lower in the artifact areas. The reduction in the radiation dose with the use of bismuth was greatest at the surface of the phantom to a limited depth. In conclusion, it is possible to reduce the radiation level and slightly decrease the bismuth-induced noise level by using a combination of ASIR as an algorithm process and bismuth as an in-plane hardware-type shielding method.

  12. Feasibility Study of Radiation Dose Reduction in Adult Female Pelvic CT Scan with Low Tube-Voltage and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinlian; Chen, Jianghong; Hu, Zhihai; Zhao, Liqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate image quality of female pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans reconstructed with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) technique combined with low tube-voltage and to explore the feasibility of its clinical application. Materials and Methods Ninety-four patients were divided into two groups. The study group used 100 kVp, and images were reconstructed with 30%, 50%, 70%, and 90% ASIR. The control group used 120 kVp, and images were reconstructed with 30% ASIR. The noise index was 15 for the study group and 11 for the control group. The CT values and noise levels of different tissues were measured. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. A subjective evaluation was carried out by two experienced radiologists. The CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) was recorded. Results A 44.7% reduction in CTDIvol was observed in the study group (8.18 ± 3.58 mGy) compared with that in the control group (14.78 ± 6.15 mGy). No significant differences were observed in the tissue noise levels and CNR values between the 70% ASIR group and the control group (p = 0.068-1.000). The subjective scores indicated that visibility of small structures, diagnostic confidence, and the overall image quality score in the 70% ASIR group was the best, and were similar to those in the control group (1.87 vs. 1.79, 1.26 vs. 1.28, and 4.53 vs. 4.57; p = 0.122-0.585). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was detected between the study group and the control group (42/47 vs. 43/47, p = 1.000). Conclusion Low tube-voltage combined with automatic tube current modulation and 70% ASIR allowed the low CT radiation dose to be reduced by 44.7% without losing image quality on female pelvic scan. PMID:26357499

  13. Dose tracking and dose auditing in a comprehensive computed tomography dose-reduction program.

    PubMed

    Duong, Phuong-Anh; Little, Brent P

    2014-08-01

    Implementation of a comprehensive computed tomography (CT) radiation dose-reduction program is a complex undertaking, requiring an assessment of baseline doses, an understanding of dose-saving techniques, and an ongoing appraisal of results. We describe the role of dose tracking in planning and executing a dose-reduction program and discuss the use of the American College of Radiology CT Dose Index Registry at our institution. We review the basics of dose-related CT scan parameters, the components of the dose report, and the dose-reduction techniques, showing how an understanding of each technique is important in effective auditing of "outlier" doses identified by dose tracking. PMID:25129210

  14. Optimal dose reduction in computed tomography methodologies predicted from real-time dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Christopher Jason

    Over the past two decades, computed tomography (CT) has become an increasingly common and useful medical imaging technique. CT is a noninvasive imaging modality with three-dimensional volumetric viewing abilities, all in sub-millimeter resolution. Recent national scrutiny on radiation dose from medical exams has spearheaded an initiative to reduce dose in CT. This work concentrates on dose reduction of individual exams through two recently-innovated dose reduction techniques: organ dose modulation (ODM) and tube current modulation (TCM). ODM and TCM tailor the phase and amplitude of x-ray current, respectively, used by the CT scanner during the scan. These techniques are unique because they can be used to achieve patient dose reduction without any appreciable loss in image quality. This work details the development of the tools and methods featuring real-time dosimetry which were used to provide pioneering measurements of ODM or TCM in dose reduction for CT.

  15. SU-E-I-62: Assessing Radiation Dose Reduction and CT Image Optimization Through the Measurement and Analysis of the Detector Quantum Efficiency (DQE) of CT Images Using Different Beam Hardening Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, J; Aldoohan, S; Gill, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Reducing patient dose while maintaining (or even improving) image quality is one of the foremost goals in CT imaging. To this end, we consider the feasibility of optimizing CT scan protocols in conjunction with the application of different beam-hardening filtrations and assess this augmentation through noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detector quantum efficiency (DQE) analysis. Methods: American College of Radiology (ACR) and Catphan phantoms (The Phantom Laboratory) were scanned with a 64 slice CT scanner when additional filtration of thickness and composition (e.g., copper, nickel, tantalum, titanium, and tungsten) had been applied. A MATLAB-based code was employed to calculate the image of noise NPS. The Catphan Image Owl software suite was then used to compute the modulated transfer function (MTF) responses of the scanner. The DQE for each additional filter, including the inherent filtration, was then computed from these values. Finally, CT dose index (CTDIvol) values were obtained for each applied filtration through the use of a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber and CT dose phantom. Results: NPS, MTF, and DQE values were computed for each applied filtration and compared to the reference case of inherent beam-hardening filtration only. Results showed that the NPS values were reduced between 5 and 12% compared to inherent filtration case. Additionally, CTDIvol values were reduced between 15 and 27% depending on the composition of filtration applied. However, no noticeable changes in image contrast-to-noise ratios were noted. Conclusion: The reduction in the quanta noise section of the NPS profile found in this phantom-based study is encouraging. The reduction in both noise and dose through the application of beam-hardening filters is reflected in our phantom image quality. However, further investigation is needed to ascertain the applicability of this approach to reducing patient dose while maintaining diagnostically acceptable image qualities in a

  16. Realistic simulation of reduced-dose CT with noise modeling and sinogram synthesis using DICOM CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Won Kim, Chang; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Reducing the patient dose while maintaining the diagnostic image quality during CT exams is the subject of a growing number of studies, in which simulations of reduced-dose CT with patient data have been used as an effective technique when exploring the potential of various dose reduction techniques. Difficulties in accessing raw sinogram data, however, have restricted the use of this technique to a limited number of institutions. Here, we present a novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique which provides realistic low-dose images without the requirement of raw sinogram data. Methods: Two key characteristics of CT systems, the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and the algorithmic modulation transfer function (MTF), were measured for various combinations of object attenuation and tube currents by analyzing the noise power spectrum (NPS) of CT images obtained with a set of phantoms. Those measurements were used to develop a comprehensive CT noise model covering the reduced x-ray photon flux, object attenuation, system noise, and bow-tie filter, which was then employed to generate a simulated noise sinogram for the reduced-dose condition with the use of a synthetic sinogram generated from a reference CT image. The simulated noise sinogram was filtered with the algorithmic MTF and back-projected to create a noise CT image, which was then added to the reference CT image, finally providing a simulated reduced-dose CT image. The simulation performance was evaluated in terms of the degree of NPS similarity, the noise magnitude, the bow-tie filter effect, and the streak noise pattern at photon starvation sites with the set of phantom images. Results: The simulation results showed good agreement with actual low-dose CT images in terms of their visual appearance and in a quantitative evaluation test. The magnitude and shape of the NPS curves of the simulated low-dose images agreed well with those of real low-dose images, showing discrepancies of less than +/−3.2% in

  17. Monte Carlo simulations to assess the effects of tube current modulation on breast dose for multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Erin; Yaghmai, Nazanin; Jude, Cecilia Matilda; DeMarco, John J; Cagnon, Christopher H; Goldin, Jonathan G; Primak, Andrew N; Stevens, Donna M; Cody, Dianna D; McCollough, Cynthia H; McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2010-01-01

    Tube current modulation was designed to reduce radiation dose in CT imaging while maintaining overall image quality. This study aims to develop a method for evaluating the effects of tube current modulation (TCM) on organ dose in CT exams of actual patient anatomy. This method was validated by simulating a TCM and a fixed tube current chest CT exam on 30 voxelized patient models and estimating the radiation dose to each patient’s glandular breast tissue. This new method for estimating organ dose was compared with other conventional estimates of dose reduction. Thirty detailed voxelized models of patient anatomy were created based on image data from female patients who had previously undergone clinically indicated CT scans including the chest area. As an indicator of patient size, the perimeter of the patient was measured on the image containing at least one nipple using a semi-automated technique. The breasts were contoured on each image set by a radiologist and glandular tissue was semi-automatically segmented from this region. Previously validated Monte Carlo models of two multidetector CT scanners were used, taking into account details about the source spectra, filtration, collimation and geometry of the scanner. TCM data were obtained from each patient’s clinical scan and factored into the model to simulate the effects of TCM. For each patient model, two exams were simulated: a fixed tube current chest CT and a tube current modulated chest CT. X-ray photons were transported through the anatomy of the voxelized patient models, and radiation dose was tallied in the glandular breast tissue. The resulting doses from the tube current modulated simulations were compared to the results obtained from simulations performed using a fixed mA value. The average radiation dose to the glandular breast tissue from a fixed tube current scan across all patient models was 19 mGy. The average reduction in breast dose using the tube current modulated scan was 17%. Results were

  18. Effects of shielding the radiosensitive superficial organs of ORNL pediatric phantoms on dose reduction in computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Parisa; Miri-Hakimabad, Hashem; Rafat-Motavalli, Laleh

    2014-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT), some superficial organs which have increased sensitivity to radiation, receive doses that are significant enough to be matter of concern. Therefore, in this study, the effects of using shields on the amount of dose reduction and image quality was investigated for pediatric imaging. Absorbed doses of breasts, eyes, thyroid and testes of a series of pediatric phantoms without and with different thickness of bismuth and lead were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. Appropriate thicknesses of shields were chosen based on their weights, X-ray spectrum, and the amount of dose reduction. In addition, the effect of lead shield on image quality of a simple phantom was assessed quantitatively using region of interest (ROI) measurements. Considering the maximum reduction in absorbed doses and X-ray spectrum, using a lead shield with a maximum thickness of 0.4 mm would be appropriate for testes and thyroid and two other organs (which are exposed directly) should be protected with thinner shields. Moreover, the image quality assessment showed that lead was associated with significant increases in both noise and CT attenuation values, especially in the anterior of the phantom. Overall, the results suggested that shielding is a useful optimization tool in CT. PMID:25525312

  19. Task-based image quality evaluation of iterative reconstruction methods for low dose CT using computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingyan; Fuld, Matthew K.; Fung, George S. K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-04-01

    Iterative reconstruction (IR) methods for x-ray CT is a promising approach to improve image quality or reduce radiation dose to patients. The goal of this work was to use task based image quality measures and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) to evaluate both analytic and IR methods for clinical x-ray CT applications. We performed realistic computer simulations at five radiation dose levels, from a clinical reference low dose D0 to 25% D0. A fixed size and contrast lesion was inserted at different locations into the liver of the XCAT phantom to simulate a weak signal. The simulated data were reconstructed on a commercial CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using the vendor-provided analytic (WFBP) and IR (SAFIRE) methods. The reconstructed images were analyzed by CHOs with both rotationally symmetric (RS) and rotationally oriented (RO) channels, and with different numbers of lesion locations (5, 10, and 20) in a signal known exactly (SKE), background known exactly but variable (BKEV) detection task. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used as a summary measure to compare the IR and analytic methods; the AUC was also used as the equal performance criterion to derive the potential dose reduction factor of IR. In general, there was a good agreement in the relative AUC values of different reconstruction methods using CHOs with RS and RO channels, although the CHO with RO channels achieved higher AUCs than RS channels. The improvement of IR over analytic methods depends on the dose level. The reference dose level D0 was based on a clinical low dose protocol, lower than the standard dose due to the use of IR methods. At 75% D0, the performance improvement was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The potential dose reduction factor also depended on the detection task. For the SKE/BKEV task involving 10 lesion locations, a dose reduction of at least 25% from D0 was achieved.

  20. Imaging task-based optimal kV and mA selection for CT radiation dose reduction: from filtered backprojection (FBP) to statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Lubner, Meghan G.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-03-01

    Optimal selections of tube potential (kV) and tube current (mA) are essential in maximizing the diagnostic potential of a given CT technology while minimizing radiation dose. The use of a lower tube potential may improve image contrast, but may also require a significantly higher tube current to compensate for the rapid decrease of tube output at lower tube potentials. Therefore, the selection of kV and mA should take those kinds of constraints as well as the specific diagnostic imaging task in to consideration. For conventional quasi-linear CT systems employing linear filtered back-projection (FBP) image reconstruction algorithm, the optimization of kV-mA combinations are relatively straightforward, as neither spatial resolution nor noise texture has significant dependence on kV and mA settings. In these cases, zero-frequency analysis such as contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) or normalized CNR by dose (CNRD) can be used for optimal kV-mA selection. The recently introduced statistical model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method, however, has introduced new challenges to optimal kV and mA selection, as both spatial resolution and noise texture become closely correlated with kV and mA. In this work, a task-based approach based on modern signal detection theory and the corresponding frequency-dependent analysis has been proposed to perform the kV and mA optimization for both FBP and MBIR. By performing exhaustive measurements of task-based detectability index through the technically accessible kV-mA parameter space, iso-detectability contours were generated and overlaid on top of iso-dose contours, from which the kV-mA pair that minimize dose yet still achieving the desired detectability level can be identified.

  1. Dose reduction in molecular breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Chowdhury, Samir; Hugg, James W.; Moats, Rex A.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is the imaging of radiolabeled drugs, cells, or nanoparticles for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Screening of broad populations of women for breast cancer with mammography has been augmented by the emergence of breast MRI in screening of women at high risk for breast cancer. Screening MBI may benefit the sub-population of women with dense breast tissue that obscures small tumors in mammography. Dedicated breast imaging equipment is necessary to enable detection of early-stage tumors less than 1 cm in size. Recent progress in the development of these instruments is reviewed. Pixellated CZT for single photon MBI imaging of 99mTc-sestamibi gives high detection sensitivity for early-stage tumors. The use of registered collimators in a near-field geometry gives significantly higher detection efficiency - a factor of 3.6-, which translates into an equivalent dose reduction factor given the same acquisition time. The radiation dose in the current MBI procedure has been reduced to the level of a four-view digital mammography study. In addition to screening of selected sub-populations, reduced MBI dose allows for dual-isotope, treatment planning, and repeated therapy assessment studies in the era of molecular medicine guided by quantitative molecular imaging.

  2. [Phantom Study on Dose Reduction Using Iterative Reconstruction in Low-dose Computed Tomography for Lung Cancer Screening].

    PubMed

    Minehiro, Kaori; Takata, Tadanori; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Sakuda, Keita; Nunome, Haruka; Kawashima, Hiroko; Sanada, Shigeru

    2015-12-01

    We investigated dose reduction ability of an iterative reconstruction technology for low-dose computed tomography (CT) for lung cancer screening. The Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) provided in a multi slice CT system, Somatom Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare) was used. An anthropomorphic chest phantom (N-1, Kyoto Kagaku) was scanned at volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) of 0.50-11.86 mGy with 120 kV. For noise (standard deviation) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements, CTP486 and CTP515 modules in the Catphan (The Phantom Laboratory) were scanned. Radiological technologists were participated in the perceptual comparison. SAFIRE reduced the SD values by approximately 50% compared with filter back projection (FBP). The estimated dose reduction rates by SAFIRE determined from the perceptual comparison was approximately 23%, while 75% dose reduction rate was expected from the SD value reduction of 50%. PMID:26685831

  3. SU-C-12A-07: Effect of Vertical Position On Dose Reduction Using X-Care

    SciTech Connect

    Silosky, M; Marsh, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Reduction of absorbed dose to radiosensitive tissues is an important goal in diagnostic radiology. Siemens Medical has introduced a technique (X-CARE) to lower CT dose to anterior anatomy by reducing the tube current during 80° of rotation over radiosensitive tissues. Phantom studies have shown 30-40% dose reduction when phantoms are positioned at isocenter. However, for CT face and sinus exams, the center of the head is commonly positioned below isocenter. This work investigated the effects of vertical patient positioning on dose reduction using X-CARE. Methods: A 16cm Computed Tomography Dose Index phantom was scanned on a Siemens Definition Flash CT scanner using a routine head protocol, with the phantom positioned at scanner isocenter. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters were placed on the anterior and posterior sides of the phantom. The phantom was lowered in increments of 2cm and rescanned, up to 8cm below isocenter. The experiment was then repeated using the same scan parameters but adding the X-CARE technique. The mean dosimeter counts were determined for each phantom position, and the difference between XCARE and routine scans was plotted as a function of distance from isocenter. Results: With the phantom positioned at isocenter, using XCARE reduced dose to the anterior side of the phantom by 40%, compared to dose when X-CARE was not used. Positioned below isocenter, anterior dose was reduced by only 20-27%. Additionally, using X-CARE at isocenter reduced dose to the anterior portion of the phantom by 45.6% compared to scans performed without X-CARE 8cm below isocenter. Conclusion: While using X-CARE substantially reduced dose to the anterior side of the phantom, this effect was diminished when the phantom was positioned below isocenter, simulating common practice for face and sinus scans. This indicates that centering the head in the gantry will maximize the effect of X-CARE.

  4. Dose reduction and image quality assessment in MDCT using AEC (D-DOM & Z-DOM) and in-plane bismuth shielding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kibaek; Lee, Wonho; Lee, Junhyup; Lee, Boram; Oh, Gyubum

    2010-09-01

    Since computed tomography (CT) was introduced about 40 y ago, its use has continuously grown, resulting in the increase of the CT dose. Therefore, an awareness of the CT dose and its potential complications has led to the development of several dose-reduction strategies. One of the strategies is automatic exposure control (AEC), which modulates radiation intensity depending on the patient size, z-axis thickness (Z-DOM) or angular thickness (D-DOM). Another dose-reduction method is the in-plane bismuth shield which attenuates radiation to reduce the CT doses of the tissues underneath the shield. We evaluated and compared the dose reduction and image quality of CT for various dose-reduction techniques. The result showed that both AEC and the in-plane shield reduced the CT dose effectively and the combined method of AEC and in-plane shielding reduced the CT dose more than the single use of AEC or in-plane shields. The dose reduction using Z-DOM was normally higher than that using D-DOM. The image quality of CT dramatically degraded when the in-plane shield was directly attached to the phantom without using AEC. In order to effectively reduce CT dose without the significant degradation of the image quality, the in-plane shield should be placed 1 cm apart from the patient with applying AEC control. PMID:20511402

  5. Task-based image quality evaluation of iterative reconstruction methods for low dose CT using computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingyan; Fuld, Matthew K; Fung, George S K; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-04-01

    Iterative reconstruction (IR) methods for x-ray CT is a promising approach to improve image quality or reduce radiation dose to patients. The goal of this work was to use task based image quality measures and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) to evaluate both analytic and IR methods for clinical x-ray CT applications. We performed realistic computer simulations at five radiation dose levels, from a clinical reference low dose D0 to 25% D0. A fixed size and contrast lesion was inserted at different locations into the liver of the XCAT phantom to simulate a weak signal. The simulated data were reconstructed on a commercial CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using the vendor-provided analytic (WFBP) and IR (SAFIRE) methods. The reconstructed images were analyzed by CHOs with both rotationally symmetric (RS) and rotationally oriented (RO) channels, and with different numbers of lesion locations (5, 10, and 20) in a signal known exactly (SKE), background known exactly but variable (BKEV) detection task. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used as a summary measure to compare the IR and analytic methods; the AUC was also used as the equal performance criterion to derive the potential dose reduction factor of IR. In general, there was a good agreement in the relative AUC values of different reconstruction methods using CHOs with RS and RO channels, although the CHO with RO channels achieved higher AUCs than RS channels. The improvement of IR over analytic methods depends on the dose level. The reference dose level D0 was based on a clinical low dose protocol, lower than the standard dose due to the use of IR methods. At 75% D0, the performance improvement was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The potential dose reduction factor also depended on the detection task. For the SKE/BKEV task involving 10 lesion locations, a dose reduction of at least 25% from D0 was achieved. PMID:25776521

  6. Dose reduction using a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Fleischmann, Dominik; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors recently proposed a dynamic, prepatient x-ray attenuator capable of producing a piecewise-linear attenuation profile customized to each patient and viewing angle. This attenuator was intended to reduce scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), dynamic range, and dose by redistributing flux. In this work the authors tested the ability of the attenuator to reduce dose and SPR in simulations. Methods: The authors selected four clinical applications, including routine full field-of-view scans of the thorax and abdomen, and targeted reconstruction tasks for an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the pancreas. Raw data were estimated by forward projection of the image volume datasets. The dynamic attenuator was controlled to reduce dose while maintaining peak variance by solving a convex optimization problem, assuminga priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. In targeted reconstruction tasks, the noise in specific regions was given increased weighting. A system with a standard attenuator (or “bowtie filter”) was used as a reference, and used either convex optimized tube current modulation (TCM) or a standard TCM heuristic. The noise of the scan was determined analytically while the dose was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Scatter was also estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. The sensitivity of the dynamic attenuator to patient centering was also examined by shifting the abdomen in 2 cm intervals. Results: Compared to a reference system with optimized TCM, use of the dynamic attenuator reduced dose by about 30% in routine scans and 50% in targeted scans. Compared to the TCM heuristics which are typically used withouta priori knowledge, the dose reduction is about 50% for routine scans. The dynamic attenuator gives the ability to redistribute noise and variance and produces more uniform noise profiles than systems with a conventional bowtie filter. The SPR was also modestly reduced by 10% in the thorax and 24% in the abdomen. Imaging with the dynamic

  7. Dose reduction using a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Fleischmann, Dominik; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors recently proposed a dynamic, prepatient x-ray attenuator capable of producing a piecewise-linear attenuation profile customized to each patient and viewing angle. This attenuator was intended to reduce scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), dynamic range, and dose by redistributing flux. In this work the authors tested the ability of the attenuator to reduce dose and SPR in simulations. Methods: The authors selected four clinical applications, including routine full field-of-view scans of the thorax and abdomen, and targeted reconstruction tasks for an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the pancreas. Raw data were estimated by forward projection of the image volume datasets. The dynamic attenuator was controlled to reduce dose while maintaining peak variance by solving a convex optimization problem, assuming a priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. In targeted reconstruction tasks, the noise in specific regions was given increased weighting. A system with a standard attenuator (or “bowtie filter”) was used as a reference, and used either convex optimized tube current modulation (TCM) or a standard TCM heuristic. The noise of the scan was determined analytically while the dose was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Scatter was also estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. The sensitivity of the dynamic attenuator to patient centering was also examined by shifting the abdomen in 2 cm intervals. Results: Compared to a reference system with optimized TCM, use of the dynamic attenuator reduced dose by about 30% in routine scans and 50% in targeted scans. Compared to the TCM heuristics which are typically used without a priori knowledge, the dose reduction is about 50% for routine scans. The dynamic attenuator gives the ability to redistribute noise and variance and produces more uniform noise profiles than systems with a conventional bowtie filter. The SPR was also modestly reduced by 10% in the thorax and 24% in the abdomen. Imaging with the

  8. Dose reduction by automatic exposure control in multidetector computed tomography: comparison between measurement and calculation.

    PubMed

    Lechel, U; Becker, C; Langenfeld-Jäger, G; Brix, G

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of dose reduction in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) by current-modulated automatic exposure control (AEC) and to test the reliability of the dose estimation by the conventional CT dosimetry program CT-EXPO, when an average tube current is used. Phantom measurements were performed at a CT system with 64 detector rows for four representative examination protocols, each without and with current-modulated AEC. Organ and effective doses were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) at an anthropomorphic Alderson phantom and compared with those given by the calculation with CT-EXPO. The application of AEC yielded dose reductions between 27 and 40% (TLD measurements). While good linearity was observed between measured and computed effective dose values both without and with AEC, the organ doses showed large deviations between measurement and calculation. The dose to patients undergoing a MDCT examination can be reduced considerably by applying a current-modulated AEC. Dosimetric algorithms using a constant current-time product provide reliable estimates of the effective dose. PMID:18987864

  9. Estimating radiation dose to organs of patients undergoing conventional and novel multidetector CT exams using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Erin

    Advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology have led to an increase in the modality's diagnostic capabilities and therefore its utilization, which has in turn led to an increase in radiation exposure to the patient population. As a result, CT imaging currently constitutes approximately half of the collective exposure to ionizing radiation from medical procedures. In order to understand the radiation risk, it is necessary to estimate the radiation doses absorbed by patients undergoing CT imaging. The most widely accepted risk models are based on radiosensitive organ dose as opposed to whole body dose. In this research, radiosensitive organ dose was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations incorporating detailed multidetector CT (MDCT) scanner models, specific scan protocols, and using patient models based on accurate patient anatomy and representing a range of patient sizes. Organ dose estimates were estimated for clinical MDCT exam protocols which pose a specific concern for radiosensitive organs or regions. These dose estimates include estimation of fetal dose for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen pelvis CT exams or undergoing exams to diagnose pulmonary embolism and venous thromboembolism. Breast and lung dose were estimated for patients undergoing coronary CTA imaging, conventional fixed tube current chest CT, and conventional tube current modulated (TCM) chest CT exams. The correlation of organ dose with patient size was quantified for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen/pelvis exams and for all breast and lung dose estimates presented. Novel dose reduction techniques were developed that incorporate organ location and are specifically designed to reduce close to radiosensitive organs during CT acquisition. A generalizable model was created for simulating conventional and novel attenuation-based TCM algorithms which can be used in simulations estimating organ dose for any patient model. The generalizable model is a significant contribution of this

  10. Patient-specific CT dose determination from CT images using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qing

    Radiation dose from computed tomography (CT) has become a public concern with the increasing application of CT as a diagnostic modality, which has generated a demand for patient-specific CT dose determinations. This thesis work aims to provide a clinically applicable Monte-Carlo-based CT dose calculation tool based on patient CT images. The source spectrum was simulated based on half-value layer measurements. Analytical calculations along with the measured flux distribution were used to estimate the bowtie-filter geometry. Relative source output at different points in a cylindrical phantom was measured and compared with Monte Carlo simulations to verify the determined spectrum and bowtie-filter geometry. Sensitivity tests were designed with four spectra with the same kVp and different half-value layers, and showed that the relative output at different locations in a phantom is sensitive to different beam qualities. An mAs-to-dose conversion factor was determined with in-air measurements using an Exradin A1SL ionization chamber. Longitudinal dose profiles were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and compared with the Monte-Carlo-simulated dose profiles to verify the mAs-to-dose conversion factor. Using only the CT images to perform Monte Carlo simulations would cause dose underestimation due to the lack of a scatter region. This scenario was demonstrated with a cylindrical phantom study. Four different image extrapolation methods from the existing CT images and the Scout images were proposed. The results show that performing image extrapolation beyond the scan region improves the dose calculation accuracy under both step-shoot scan mode and helical scan mode. Two clinical studies were designed and comparisons were performed between the current CT dose metrics and the Monte-Carlo-based organ dose determination techniques proposed in this work. The results showed that the current CT dosimetry failed to show dose differences between patients with the same

  11. Automatic CT simulation optimization for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hua Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Gay, Hiram; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Yu, Lifeng; Anastasio, Mark A.; Low, Daniel A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, x-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation protocol specifications should be driven by the treatment planning requirements in lieu of duplicating diagnostic CT screening protocols. The purpose of this study was to develop a general strategy that allows for automatically, prospectively, and objectively determining the optimal patient-specific CT simulation protocols based on radiation-therapy goals, namely, maintenance of contouring quality and integrity while minimizing patient CT simulation dose. Methods: The authors proposed a general prediction strategy that provides automatic optimal CT simulation protocol selection as a function of patient size and treatment planning task. The optimal protocol is the one that delivers the minimum dose required to provide a CT simulation scan that yields accurate contours. Accurate treatment plans depend on accurate contours in order to conform the dose to actual tumor and normal organ positions. An image quality index, defined to characterize how simulation scan quality affects contour delineation, was developed and used to benchmark the contouring accuracy and treatment plan quality within the predication strategy. A clinical workflow was developed to select the optimal CT simulation protocols incorporating patient size, target delineation, and radiation dose efficiency. An experimental study using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with added-bolus layers was used to demonstrate how the proposed prediction strategy could be implemented and how the optimal CT simulation protocols could be selected for prostate cancer patients based on patient size and treatment planning task. Clinical IMRT prostate treatment plans for seven CT scans with varied image quality indices were separately optimized and compared to verify the trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage. Results: Based on the phantom study, the optimal image quality index for accurate manual prostate contouring was 4.4. The optimal tube

  12. Characterization of statistical prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS): II. Application to dose reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lauzier, Pascal Theriault; Chen Guanghong

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The ionizing radiation imparted to patients during computed tomography exams is raising concerns. This paper studies the performance of a scheme called dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS). The purpose of this study is to characterize the effects of a statistical model of x-ray detection in the DR-PICCS framework and its impact on spatial resolution. Methods: Both numerical simulations with known ground truth and in vivo animal dataset were used in this study. In numerical simulations, a phantom was simulated with Poisson noise and with varying levels of eccentricity. Both the conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and the PICCS algorithms were used to reconstruct images. In PICCS reconstructions, the prior image was generated using two different denoising methods: a simple Gaussian blur and a more advanced diffusion filter. Due to the lack of shift-invariance in nonlinear image reconstruction such as the one studied in this paper, the concept of local spatial resolution was used to study the sharpness of a reconstructed image. Specifically, a directional metric of image sharpness, the so-called pseudopoint spread function (pseudo-PSF), was employed to investigate local spatial resolution. Results: In the numerical studies, the pseudo-PSF was reduced from twice the voxel width in the prior image down to less than 1.1 times the voxel width in DR-PICCS reconstructions when the statistical model was not included. At the same noise level, when statistical weighting was used, the pseudo-PSF width in DR-PICCS reconstructed images varied between 1.5 and 0.75 times the voxel width depending on the direction along which it was measured. However, this anisotropy was largely eliminated when the prior image was generated using diffusion filtering; the pseudo-PSF width was reduced to below one voxel width in that case. In the in vivo study, a fourfold improvement in CNR was achieved while qualitatively maintaining sharpness

  13. Oxygen transport properties estimation by DSMC-CT simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Domenico; Frezzotti, Aldo; Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro

    2014-12-09

    Coupling DSMC simulations with classical trajectories calculations is emerging as a powerful tool to improve predictive capabilities of computational rarefied gas dynamics. The considerable increase of computational effort outlined in the early application of the method (Koura,1997) can be compensated by running simulations on massively parallel computers. In particular, GPU acceleration has been found quite effective in reducing computing time (Ferrigni,2012; Norman et al.,2013) of DSMC-CT simulations. The aim of the present work is to study rarefied Oxygen flows by modeling binary collisions through an accurate potential energy surface, obtained by molecular beams scattering (Aquilanti, et al.,1999). The accuracy of the method is assessed by calculating molecular Oxygen shear viscosity and heat conductivity following three different DSMC-CT simulation methods. In the first one, transport properties are obtained from DSMC-CT simulations of spontaneous fluctuation of an equilibrium state (Bruno et al, Phys. Fluids, 23, 093104, 2011). In the second method, the collision trajectory calculation is incorporated in a Monte Carlo integration procedure to evaluate the Taxman’s expressions for the transport properties of polyatomic gases (Taxman,1959). In the third, non-equilibrium zero and one-dimensional rarefied gas dynamic simulations are adopted and the transport properties are computed from the non-equilibrium fluxes of momentum and energy. The three methods provide close values of the transport properties, their estimated statistical error not exceeding 3%. The experimental values are slightly underestimated, the percentage deviation being, again, few percent.

  14. A realistic simulation framework for assessing deformable slice-to-volume (CT-fluoroscopy/CT) registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaniv, Ziv; Stenzel, Roland; Cleary, Kevin; Banovac, Filip

    2006-03-01

    Lung cancer screening for early diagnosis is a clinically important problem. One screening method is to test tissue samples obtained from CT-fluoroscopy (CTF) guided lung biopsy. CTF provides real-time imaging; however on most machines the view is limited to a single slice. Mentally reconstructing the direction of the needle when it is not in the imaging plane is a difficult task. We are currently developing 3D visualization software that will augment the physician's ability to perform this task. At the beginning of the procedure a CT scan is acquired at breath-hold. The physician then specifies an entry point and a target point on the CT. As the procedure advances the physician acquires a CTF image at breath-hold; the system then registers the current setup to the CT scan. To assess the performance of different registration algorithms for CTF/CT registration we propose to use simulated CTF images. These images are created by deforming the original CT volume and extracting a slice from it. Realistic deformation of the CT volume is achieved by using positional information from electromagnetically tracked fiducials, acquired throughout the respiratory cycle. To estimate the dense displacement field underlying the sparse displacement field provided by the fiducials we use radial basis function interpolation. Finally, we evaluated Thirion's "demons" algorithm, as implemented in ITK, for the task of slice-to-volume registration. We found it to be unsuitable for this task, as in most cases the recovered displacements were less than 50% of the original ones.

  15. Reduction of eye lens radiation dose by orbital bismuth shielding in pediatric patients undergoing CT of the head: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Damilakis, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2005-04-01

    Our aim in the study was to assess the eye lens dose reduction resulting from the use of radioprotective bismuth garments to shield the eyes of pediatric patients undergoing head CT. The Monte Carlo N-particle transport code and mathematical humanoid phantoms representing the average individual at different ages were used to determine eye lens dose reduction accomplished with bismuth shielding of the eye in the following simulated CT scans: (a) scanning of the orbits, (b) scanning of the whole head, and (c) 20 degrees angled scanning of the brain excluding the orbits. The effect of bismuth shielding on the eye lens dose was also investigated using an anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Eye lens dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding was measured in 16 patients undergoing multiphase CT scanning of the head. The patient's scans were divided in the following: CT examinations where the eye globes were entirely included (n=5), partly included (n=6) and excluded (n=5) from the scanned region. The eye lens dose reduction depended mainly on the scan boundaries set by an operator. The average eye lens dose reduction determined by Monte Carlo simulation was 38.2%, 33.0% and <1% for CT scans of the orbits, whole head, and brain with an angled gantry, respectively. The difference between the Monte Carlo derived eye lens dose reduction factor values and corresponding values determined directly by using the anthropomorphic phantom head was found less than 5%. The mean eye lens dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding in pediatric patients were 34%, 20% and <2% when eye globes were entirely included, partly included and excluded from the scanned region, respectively. A significant reduction in eye lens dose may be achieved by using superficial orbital bismuth shielding during pediatric head CT scans. However, bismuth garments should not be used in children when the eyes are excluded from the primarily exposed region. PMID:15895586

  16. Reduction of eye lens radiation dose by orbital bismuth shielding in pediatric patients undergoing CT of the head: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Tzedakis, Antonis; Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Damilakis, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2005-04-01

    Our aim in the study was to assess the eye lens dose reduction resulting from the use of radioprotective bismuth garments to shield the eyes of pediatric patients undergoing head CT. The Monte Carlo N-particle transport code and mathematical humanoid phantoms representing the average individual at different ages were used to determine eye lens dose reduction accomplished with bismuth shielding of the eye in the following simulated CT scans: (a) scanning of the orbits, (b) scanning of the whole head, and (c) 20 deg. angled scanning of the brain excluding the orbits. The effect of bismuth shielding on the eye lens dose was also investigated using an anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Eye lens dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding was measured in 16 patients undergoing multiphase CT scanning of the head. The patient's scans were divided in the following: CT examinations where the eye globes were entirely included (n=5), partly included (n=6) and excluded (n=5) from the scanned region. The eye lens dose reduction depended mainly on the scan boundaries set by an operator. The average eye lens dose reduction determined by Monte Carlo simulation was 38.2%, 33.0% and <1% for CT scans of the orbits, whole head, and brain with an angled gantry, respectively. The difference between the Monte Carlo derived eye lens dose reduction factor values and corresponding values determined directly by using the anthropomorphic phantom head was found less than 5%. The mean eye lens dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding in pediatric patients were 34%, 20% and <2% when eye globes were entirely included, partly included and excluded from the scanned region, respectively. A significant reduction in eye lens dose may be achieved by using superficial orbital bismuth shielding during pediatric head CT scans. However, bismuth garments should not be used in children when the eyes are excluded from the primarily exposed region.

  17. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Fan-Hsiung F.

    1997-08-13

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis.

  18. Are there dangers in biologic dose reduction strategies?

    PubMed

    Chan, Christopher K Y; Holroyd, Christopher R; Mason, Alice; Zarroug, Jalaa; Edwards, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Biologic dose reduction strategies, for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, have been assessed in multiple studies to assess outcomes compared to ongoing maintenance dosing. Whilst cessation in established disease usually leads to disease flare, dose tapering approaches for those achieving low disease activity often appear to be successful in the short term. However, tapering can be associated with a higher risk of losing disease control and rates of recapture of disease control using the original biologic dose vary between studies. Over relatively short periods of follow-up, a number of studies have shown no statistical difference in radiographic progression in patients tapering or discontinuing biologics. However, a Cochrane review found that radiographic and functional outcomes may be worse after TNF inhibitor discontinuation, and over long-term disease follow-up flares have been associated with radiographic progression and worse patient reported outcomes. To date, no studies of biological therapy dose reduction have specifically investigated the risk of increased immunogenicity or the effects on cardiovascular risk and other co-morbidities, although these remain important potential risks. In addition, whether there are greater dangers in certain dose reduction approaches such as a reduction in dose at the same frequency or a spacing of doses is not established. PMID:26970488

  19. Measurement of time delay for a prospectively gated CT simulator.

    PubMed

    Goharian, M; Khan, R F H

    2010-04-01

    For the management of mobile tumors, respiratory gating is the ideal option, both during imaging and during therapy. The major advantage of respiratory gating during imaging is that it is possible to create a single artifact-free CT data-set during a selected phase of the patient's breathing cycle. The purpose of the present work is to present a simple technique to measure the time delay during acquisition of a prospectively gated CT. The time delay of a Philips Brilliance BigBore (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) scanner attached to a Varian Real-Time Position Management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was measured. Two methods were used to measure the CT time delay: using a motion phantom and using a recorded data file from the RPM system. In the first technique, a rotating wheel phantom was altered by placing two plastic balls on its axis and rim, respectively. For a desired gate, the relative positions of the balls were measured from the acquired CT data and converted into corresponding phases. Phase difference was calculated between the measured phases and the desired phases. Using period of motion, the phase difference was converted into time delay. The Varian RPM system provides an external breathing signal; it also records transistor-transistor logic (TTL) 'X-Ray ON' status signal from the CT scanner in a text file. The TTL 'X-Ray ON' indicates the start of CT image acquisition. Thus, knowledge of the start time of CT acquisition, combined with the real-time phase and amplitude data from the external respiratory signal, provides time-stamping of all images in an axial CT scan. The TTL signal with time-stamp was used to calculate when (during the breathing cycle) a slice was recorded. Using the two approaches, the time delay between the prospective gating signal and CT simulator has been determined to be 367 +/- 40 ms. The delay requires corrections both at image acquisition and while setting gates for the treatment delivery

  20. Fast and Automatic Ultrasound Simulation from CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of ultrasound from a CT image. A multiscale method is developed to enhance tubular structures so as to simulate the blood flow. The acoustic response of common tissues is generated by weighted integration of adjacent regions on the ultrasound propagation path in the CT image, from which parameters, including attenuation, reflection, scattering, and noise, are estimated simultaneously. The thin-plate spline interpolation method is employed to transform the simulation image between polar and rectangular coordinate systems. The Kaiser window function is utilized to produce integration and radial blurring effects of multiple transducer elements. Experimental results show that the developed method is very fast and effective, allowing realistic ultrasound to be fast generated. Given that the developed method is fully automatic, it can be utilized for ultrasound guided navigation in clinical practice and for training purpose. PMID:24348736

  1. Dosimetry in small-animal CT using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-L.; Park, S.-J.; Jeon, P.-H.; Jo, B.-D.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Small-animal computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging devices are increasingly being used in biological research. While investigators are mainly interested in high-contrast, low-noise, and high-resolution anatomical images, relatively large radiation doses are required, and there is also growing concern over the radiological risk from preclinical experiments. This study was conducted to determine the radiation dose in a mouse model for dosimetric estimates using the GEANT4 application for tomographic emission simulations (GATE) and to extend its techniques to various small-animal CT applications. Radiation dose simulations were performed with the same parameters as those for the measured micro-CT data, using the MOBY phantom, a pencil ion chamber and an electrometer with a CT detector. For physical validation of radiation dose, absorbed dose of brain and liver in mouse were evaluated to compare simulated results with physically measured data using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The mean difference between simulated and measured data was less than 2.9% at 50 kVp X-ray source. The absorbed doses of 37 brain tissues and major organs of the mouse were evaluated according to kVp changes. The absorbed dose over all of the measurements in the brain (37 types of tissues) consistently increased and ranged from 42.4 to 104.0 mGy. Among the brain tissues, the absorbed dose of the hypothalamus (157.8-414.30 mGy) was the highest for the beams at 50-80 kVp, and that of the corpus callosum (11.2-26.6 mGy) was the lowest. These results can be used as a dosimetric database to control mouse doses and preclinical targeted radiotherapy experiments. In addition, to accurately calculate the mouse-absorbed dose, the X-ray spectrum, detector alignment, and uncertainty in the elemental composition of the simulated materials must be accurately modeled.

  2. Dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie; Thériault Lauzier, Pascal; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    A technique for dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS) in computed tomography (CT) is proposed in this work. In DR-PICCS, a standard FBP reconstructed image is forward projected to get a fully sampled projection data set. Meanwhile, it is low-pass filtered and used as the prior image in the PICCS reconstruction framework. Next, the prior image and the forward projection data are used together by the PICCS algorithm to obtain a low noise DR-PICCS reconstruction, which maintains the spatial resolution of the original FBP images. The spatial resolution of DR-PICCS was studied using a Catphan phantom by MTF measurement. The noise reduction factor, CT number change and noise texture were studied using human subject data consisting of 20 CT colonography exams performed under an IRB-approved protocol. In each human subject study, six ROIs (two soft tissue, two colonic air columns, and two subcutaneous fat) were selected for the CT number and noise measurements study. Skewness and kurtosis were used as figures of merit to indicate the noise texture. A Bland-Altman analysis was performed to study the accuracy of the CT number. The results showed that, compared with FBP reconstructions, the MTF curve shows very little change in DR-PICCS reconstructions, spatial resolution loss is less than 0.1 lp/cm, and the noise standard deviation can be reduced by a factor of 3 with DR-PICCS. The CT numbers in FBP and DR-PICCS reconstructions agree well, which indicates that DR-PICCS does not change CT numbers. The noise textures indicators measured from DR-PICCS images are in a similar range as FBP images.

  3. Development of mammography system using CdTe photon counting detector for the exposure dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Sho; Niwa, Naoko; Yamazaki, Misaki; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Nagano, Tatsuya; Kodera, Yoshie

    2014-03-01

    We propose a new mammography system using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) photon-counting detector for exposure dose reduction. In contrast to conventional mammography, this system uses high-energy X-rays. This study evaluates the usefulness of this system in terms of the absorbed dose distribution and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at acrylic step using a Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, we created a prototype system that uses a CdTe detector and automatic movement stage. For various conditions, we measured the properties and evaluated the quality of images produced by the system. The simulation result for a tube voltage of 40 kV and tungsten/barium (W/Ba) as a target/filter shows that the surface dose was reduced more than 60% compared to that under conventional conditions. The CNR of our proposal system also became higher than that under conventional conditions. The point at which the CNRs coincide for 4 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the 2-mm-thick step corresponds to a dose reduction of 30%, and these differences increased with increasing phantom thickness. To improve the image quality, we determined the problematic aspects of the scanning system. The results of this study indicate that, by using a higher X-ray energy than in conventional mammography, it is possible to obtain a significant exposure dose reduction without loss of image quality. Further, the image quality of the prototype system can be improved by optimizing the balance between the shift-and-add operation and the output of the X-ray tube. In future work, we will further examine these improvement points.

  4. Iterative methods for dose reduction and image enhancement in tomography

    DOEpatents

    Miao, Jianwei; Fahimian, Benjamin Pooya

    2012-09-18

    A system and method for creating a three dimensional cross sectional image of an object by the reconstruction of its projections that have been iteratively refined through modification in object space and Fourier space is disclosed. The invention provides systems and methods for use with any tomographic imaging system that reconstructs an object from its projections. In one embodiment, the invention presents a method to eliminate interpolations present in conventional tomography. The method has been experimentally shown to provide higher resolution and improved image quality parameters over existing approaches. A primary benefit of the method is radiation dose reduction since the invention can produce an image of a desired quality with a fewer number projections than seen with conventional methods.

  5. Simulation of trabecular mineralization measurements in micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevrhal, Sven

    2006-08-01

    Micro-CT for bone structural analysis has progressed from an in-vitro laboratory technique to devices for in-vivo assessment of small animals and the peripheral human skeleton. Currently, topological parameters of bone architecture are the primary goals of analysis. Additional measurement of the density or degree of mineralization (DMB) of trabecular and cortical bone at the microscopic level is desirable to study effects of disease and treatment progress. This information is not commonly extracted because of the challenges of accurate measurement and calibration at the tissue level. To assess the accuracy of micro-CT DMB measurements in a realistic but controlled situation, we prepared bone-mimicking watery solutions at concentrations of 100 to 600 mg/cm3 K2PO4H and scanned them with micro-CT, both in glass vials and microcapillary tubes with inner diameters of 50, 100 and 150 mm to simulate trabecular thickness. Values of the linear attenuation coefficients m in the reconstructed image are commonly affected by beam hardening effects for larger samples and by partial volume effects for small volumes. We implemented an iterative reconstruction technique to reduce beam hardening. Partial voluming was sought to be reduced by excluding voxels near the tube wall. With these two measures, improvement on the constancy of the reconstructed voxel values and linearity with solution concentration could be observed to over 90% accuracy. However, since the expected change in real bone is small more measurements are needed to confirm that micro-CT can indeed be adapted to assess bone mineralization at the tissue level.

  6. Radiation dose reduction using a CdZnTe-based computed tomography system: Comparison to flat-panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Although x-ray projection mammography has been very effective in early detection of breast cancer, its utility is reduced in the detection of small lesions that are occult or in dense breasts. One drawback is that the inherent superposition of parenchymal structures makes visualization of small lesions difficult. Breast computed tomography using flat-panel detectors has been developed to address this limitation by producing three-dimensional data while at the same time providing more comfort to the patients by eliminating breast compression. Flat panels are charge integrating detectors and therefore lack energy resolution capability. Recent advances in solid state semiconductor x-ray detector materials and associated electronics allow the investigation of x-ray imaging systems that use a photon counting and energy discriminating detector, which is the subject of this article. Methods: A small field-of-view computed tomography (CT) system that uses CdZnTe (CZT) photon counting detector was compared to one that uses a flat-panel detector for different imaging tasks in breast imaging. The benefits afforded by the CZT detector in the energy weighting modes were investigated. Two types of energy weighting methods were studied: Projection based and image based. Simulation and phantom studies were performed with a 2.5 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylinder filled with iodine and calcium contrast objects. Simulation was also performed on a 10 cm breast specimen. Results: The contrast-to-noise ratio improvements as compared to flat-panel detectors were 1.30 and 1.28 (projection based) and 1.35 and 1.25 (image based) for iodine over PMMA and hydroxylapatite over PMMA, respectively. Corresponding simulation values were 1.81 and 1.48 (projection based) and 1.85 and 1.48 (image based). Dose reductions using the CZT detector were 52.05% and 49.45% for iodine and hydroxyapatite imaging, respectively. Image-based weighting was also found to have the least beam

  7. Effects of dose reduction on the detectability of standardized radiolucent lesions in digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Dula, K; Sanderink, G; van der Stelt, P F; Mini, R; Buser, D

    1998-08-01

    Dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography was studied. Intentional underexposure was performed with the Orthophos DS while six different human mandibles were radiographed. Exposure settings were 69 kV/15 mA (standard), 64 kV/16 mA, and 60 kV/16 mA. Standardized spherical defects, each either 1 or 1.25 mm in diameter, were simulated in 288 of 432 images, and seven observers decided whether defects were present or not. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated. They showed no significant differences in the detectability of the 1-mm defect at 69, 64, or 60 kV. For the 1.25-mm defect, no difference was found between the 69 and 60 kV images, but a statistically significant different detectability was found for 64 kV images in comparison with both 69 and 60 kV images. A dose reduction of up to 43% was ascertained with a Pedo-RT-Humanoid phantom when panoramic radiography was performed at 60 kV/16 mA. The conclusion is that with the Orthophos DS, it seems possible to reduce the dose rate of x-rays without loss of diagnostic quality in the case of radiolucent changes. PMID:9720100

  8. Feasibility of normal tissue dose reduction in radiotherapy using low strength magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Youngseob; Jung, In-Hye; Kwak, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Toxicity of mucosa is one of the major concerns of radiotherapy (RT), when a target tumor is located near a mucosal lined organ. Energy of photon RT is transferred primarily by secondary electrons. If these secondary electrons could be removed in an internal cavity of mucosal lined organ, the mucosa will be spared without compromising the target tumor dose. The purpose of this study was to present a RT dose reduction in near target inner-surface (NTIS) of internal cavity, using Lorentz force of magnetic field. Materials and Methods Tissue equivalent phantoms, composed with a cylinder shaped internal cavity, and adjacent a target tumor part, were developed. The phantoms were irradiated using 6 MV photon beam, with or without 0.3 T of perpendicular magnetic field. Two experimental models were developed: single beam model (SBM) to analyze central axis dose distributions and multiple beam model (MBM) to simulate a clinical case of prostate cancer with rectum. RT dose of NTIS of internal cavity and target tumor area (TTA) were measured. Results With magnetic field applied, bending effect of dose distribution was visualized. The depth dose distribution of SBM showed 28.1% dose reduction of NTIS and little difference in dose of TTA with magnetic field. In MBM, cross-sectional dose of NTIS was reduced by 33.1% with magnetic field, while TTA dose were the same, irrespective of magnetic field. Conclusion RT dose of mucosal lined organ, located near treatment target, could be modulated by perpendicular magnetic field. PMID:26484306

  9. Cyclosporine dose reduction by ketoconazole administration in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    First, M R; Schroeder, T J; Alexander, J W; Stephens, G W; Weiskittel, P; Myre, S A; Pesce, A J

    1991-02-01

    Cyclosporine metabolism occurs in the liver via hepatic cytochrome P-450 microsomal enzymes. Ketoconazole, an imidazole derivative, has been shown to inhibit the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system. Thirty-six renal transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine as part of a triple immunosuppressive drug regimen were started on 200 mg/day of oral ketoconazole. The dose of cyclosporine was reduced by 70% at the start of ketoconazole; this dose reduction was based on our previous experience with concomitant cyclosporine-ketoconazole therapy. Ketoconazole was started in patients who had been on cyclosporine for between 10 days and 74 months. The mean cyclosporine dose was 420 mg/day (5.9 mg/kg/day) before starting ketoconazole and 66 mg/day (0.9 mg/kg/day) one year after the addition of ketoconazole; this represents a cyclosporine dose reduction of 84.7% (P less than 0.0001). The mean trough whole-blood cyclosporine concentrations measured by HPLC, were 130 ng/mL preketoconazole and 149 ng/mL after 1 year of combination therapy. Mean serum creatinine and BUN levels were unchanged before and during ketoconazole administration, and no changes in liver function tests were noted. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics were performed before and after at least three weeks of ketoconazole. Hourly whole-blood samples were measured by HPLC (parent cyclosporine only) and TDX (parent + metabolites). Combination therapy resulted in decreases in the maximum blood concentration and the steady-state volume of distribution divided by the fractional absorption, and increases in mean residence time and the parent-to-parent plus metabolite ratio (calculated by dividing the HPLC by the TDX value). The addition of ketoconazole to cyclosporine-treated patients resulted in a significant inhibition of cyclosporine metabolism and decrease in the dosage. There was minimal nephrotoxicity, and only four rejection episodes occurred on combined therapy. The concomitant administration of the two drugs was well

  10. Protecting a CT simulator room to accommodate a cyberknife facility.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, M E; Martin, M; Khalil, S; Galal, M; King, D; Rahill, C

    2015-07-01

    In 2012, a plan to develop Stereotactic treatments using a Cyberknife was unveiled at the Hermitage Medical Clinic, Dublin. Due to planning restrictions the new facility had to be contained in the existing hospital's blue print with the only available location being an unused CT simulation room. The room design would be different from conventional radiotherapy bunkers due to the fact the Cyberknife can fire an unfiltered beam in any direction bar the roof (restriction of 22° above the horizontal). Therefore all walls must be primary barriers with the roof designed to protect against the large leakage radiation resulting from the high MU's used during the treatments. Space consideration indicated that concrete alone could not be used to restrict the radiation beam to acceptable limits. To this end a combination of steel, lead, normal and heavy concrete were used to meet the dose constraints established by the Irish licensing authorities. PMID:25855074

  11. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  12. Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data

    SciTech Connect

    Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; Silva, Hamilton P. da

    2013-05-06

    Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

  13. Simulation of four-dimensional CT images from deformable registration between inhale and exhale breath-hold CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrut, David; Boldea, Vlad; Miguet, Serge; Ginestet, Chantal

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: We propose to simulate an artificial four-dimensional (4-D) CT image of the thorax during breathing. It is performed by deformable registration of two CT scans acquired at inhale and exhale breath-hold. Materials and methods: Breath-hold images were acquired with the ABC (Active Breathing Coordinator) system. Dense deformable registrations were performed. The method was a minimization of the sum of squared differences (SSD) using an approximated second-order gradient. Gaussian and linear-elastic vector field regularizations were compared. A new preprocessing step, called a priori lung density modification (APLDM), was proposed to take into account lung density changes due to inspiration. It consisted of modulating the lung densities in one image according to the densities in the other, in order to make them comparable. Simulated 4-D images were then built by vector field interpolation and image resampling of the two initial CT images. A variation in the lung density was taken into account to generate intermediate artificial CT images. The Jacobian of the deformation was used to compute voxel values in Hounsfield units. The accuracy of the deformable registration was assessed by the spatial correspondence of anatomic landmarks located by experts. Results: APLDM produced statistically significantly better results than the reference method (registration without APLDM preprocessing). The mean (and standard deviation) of distances between automatically found landmark positions and landmarks set by experts were 2.7(1.1) mm with APLDM, and 6.3(3.8) mm without. Interexpert variability was 2.3(1.2) mm. The differences between Gaussian and linear elastic regularizations were not statistically significant. In the second experiment using 4-D images, the mean difference between automatic and manual landmark positions for intermediate CT images was 2.6(2.0) mm. Conclusion: The generation of 4-D CT images by deformable registration of inhale and exhale CT images is

  14. Update on radiation safety and dose reduction in pediatric neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Mahadevappa

    2015-09-01

    The number of medical X-ray imaging procedures is growing exponentially across the globe. Even though the overall benefit from medical X-ray imaging procedures far outweighs any associated risks, it is crucial to take all necessary steps to minimize radiation risks to children without jeopardizing image quality. Among the X-ray imaging studies, except for interventional fluoroscopy procedures, CT studies constitute higher dose and therefore draw considerable scrutiny. A number of technological advances have provided ways for better and safer CT imaging. This article provides an update on the radiation safety of patients and staff and discusses dose optimization in medical X-ray imaging within pediatric neuroradiology. PMID:26346142

  15. Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; Haas-Kock, Danielle de; Visser, Peter; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. Methods: A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D{sub 90} was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Results: Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (

  16. SU-E-I-36: A KWIC and Dirty Look at Dose Savings and Perfusion Metrics in Simulated CT Neuro Perfusion Exams

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J; Martin, T; Young, S; McNitt-Gray, M; Wang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: CT neuro perfusion scans are one of the highest dose exams. Methods to reduce dose include decreasing the number of projections acquired per gantry rotation, however conventional reconstruction of such scans leads to sampling artifacts. In this study we investigated a projection view-sharing reconstruction algorithm used in dynamic MRI – “K-space Weighted Image Contrast” (KWIC) – applied to simulated perfusion exams and evaluated dose savings and impacts on perfusion metrics. Methods: A FORBILD head phantom containing simulated time-varying objects was developed and a set of parallel-beam CT projection data was created. The simulated scans were 60 seconds long, 1152 projections per turn, with a rotation time of one second. No noise was simulated. 5mm, 10mm, and 50mm objects were modeled in the brain. A baseline, “full dose” simulation used all projections and reduced dose cases were simulated by downsampling the number of projections per turn from 1152 to 576 (50% dose), 288 (25% dose), and 144 (12.5% dose). KWIC was further evaluated at 72 projections per rotation (6.25%). One image per second was reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) and KWIC. KWIC reconstructions utilized view cores of 36, 72, 144, and 288 views and 16, 8, 4, and 2 subapertures respectively. From the reconstructed images, time-to-peak (TTP), cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the FWHM of the perfusion curve were calculated and compared against reference values from the full-dose FBP data. Results: TTP, CBF, and the FWHM were unaffected by dose reduction (to 12.5%) and reconstruction method, however image quality was improved when using KWIC. Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that KWIC preserves image quality and perfusion metrics when under-sampling projections and that the unique contrast weighting of KWIC could provided substantial dose-savings for perfusion CT scans. Evaluation of KWIC in clinical CT data will be performed in the near future. R01 EB014922, NCI

  17. Pediatric CT: Strategies to Lower Radiation Dose

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, Claudia; Alessio, Adam M.; Otto, Randolph K.; Iyer, Ramesh S.; Philips, Grace S.; Swanson, Jonathan O.; Thapa, Mahesh M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The introduction of MDCT has increased the utilization of CT in pediatric radiology along with concerns for radiation sequelae. This article reviews general principles of lowering radiation dose, the basic physics that impact radiation dose, and specific CT integrated dose-reduction tools focused on the pediatric population. CONCLUSION The goal of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the recent literature regarding CT dose reduction methods, their limitations, and an outlook on future developments with a focus on the pediatric population. The discussion will initially focus on general considerations that lead to radiation dose reduction, followed by specific technical features that influence the radiation dose. PMID:23617474

  18. CFD simulations of a deforming human lung using dynamic and static CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2015-11-01

    The authors have developed a CFD model to simulate airflow in deforming lungs using dynamic (4D) CT images. After obtaining the surface mesh for one CT image, we deformed the surface mesh to match other CT images using an image registration technique. During the CFD simulations, we deformed the surface mesh by cubic interpolation as a function of lung volume, and deformed the volume mesh using a computational solid mechanics-based algorithm. To investigate the effect of CT scanning method and relative hysteresis with respect to lung volume on pressure drop along the central airways, we performed CFD simulations using different numbers of 4D and static CT images of one healthy subject. Based on the simulation with 13 4DCT images, we found that air flow fractions in airways remain nearly constant over time. By comparing the simulations with 13, 2, and 1 4DCT images, we found that the overall effect of relative hysteresis of lung structure on pressure drop along each branch at peak inspiration was 12%, and the effect of deformation was 16%. As a result of the comparison between simulations with 2 and 1 of 4D and static CT images, the effect of CT scanning method was 16-39%, depending on the deformation of the lung. NIH grants R01-HL094315, U01-HL114494, R01-HL112986, and S10-RR022421. Computer time provided by XSEDE.

  19. Established and emerging dose reduction methods in cardiac computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Small, Gary R; Kazmi, Mustapha; Dekemp, Robert A; Chow, Benjamin J W

    2011-08-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) is a non-invasive modality that is commonly used as an alternative to invasive coronary angiography for the investigation of coronary artery disease. The enthusiasm for this technology has been tempered by a growing appreciation of the potential risks of malignancy associated with the use of ionising radiation. In the spirit of minimizing patient risk, the medical profession and industry have worked hard to developed methods and protocols to reduce patient radiation exposure while maintaining excellent diagnostic accuracy. A complete understanding of radiation reduction techniques will allow clinicians to reduce patient risk while providing an important diagnostic service. This review will consider the established and emerging techniques that may be adopted to reduce patient absorbed doses from x-ray CT. By modifying (1) x-ray tube output, (2) imaging time (scan duration), (3) imaging distance (scan length) and (4) the appropriate use of shielding, clinicians will be able to adhere to the 'as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)' principle. PMID:21630110

  20. The effects of mapping CT images to Monte Carlo materials on GEANT4 proton simulation accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Samuel; McAuley, Grant; Slater, James; Wroe, Andrew

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations of radiation therapy require conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) in CT images to an exact tissue composition and density. The number of discrete densities (or density bins) used in this mapping affects the simulation accuracy, execution time, and memory usage in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo code. The relationship between the number of density bins and CT noise was examined in general for all simulations that use HU conversion to density. Additionally, the effect of this on simulation accuracy was examined for proton radiation. Methods: Relative uncertainty from CT noise was compared with uncertainty from density binning to determine an upper limit on the number of density bins required in the presence of CT noise. Error propagation analysis was also performed on continuously slowing down approximation range calculations to determine the proton range uncertainty caused by density binning. These results were verified with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: In the presence of even modest CT noise (5 HU or 0.5%) 450 density bins were found to only cause a 5% increase in the density uncertainty (i.e., 95% of density uncertainty from CT noise, 5% from binning). Larger numbers of density bins are not required as CT noise will prevent increased density accuracy; this applies across all types of Monte Carlo simulations. Examining uncertainty in proton range, only 127 density bins are required for a proton range error of <0.1 mm in most tissue and <0.5 mm in low density tissue (e.g., lung). Conclusions: By considering CT noise and actual range uncertainty, the number of required density bins can be restricted to a very modest 127 depending on the application. Reducing the number of density bins provides large memory and execution time savings in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo packages.

  1. CT of Hepatic Sarcoidosis: Small Nodular Lesions Simulating Metastatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ufuk, Furkan; Herek, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin. The lymphoid system and the lungs are the most commonly involved organs. The frequency of signs or symptoms of hepatic involvement is very low. Case Report We present a case of symptomatic granulomatous liver disease secondary to sarcoidosis, mimicking a metastatic disease on ultrasonography and CT. Conclusions Hepatic involvement in sarcoidosis might be a perplexing diagnostic problem. The decisive CT finding with respect to the differential diagnosis was the absence of a mass effect and intact vascular architecture around the lesions. PMID:25908950

  2. XCAT/DRASIM: a realistic CT/human-model simulation package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, George S. K.; Stierstorfer, Karl; Segars, W. Paul; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Flohr, Thomas G.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this research is to develop a complete CT/human-model simulation package by integrating the 4D eXtended CArdiac-Torso (XCAT) phantom, a computer generated NURBS surface based phantom that provides a realistic model of human anatomy and respiratory and cardiac motions, and the DRASIM (Siemens Healthcare) CT-data simulation program. Unlike other CT simulation tools which are based on simple mathematical primitives or voxelized phantoms, this new simulation package has the advantages of utilizing a realistic model of human anatomy and physiological motions without voxelization and with accurate modeling of the characteristics of clinical Siemens CT systems. First, we incorporated the 4D XCAT anatomy and motion models into DRASIM by implementing a new library which consists of functions to read-in the NURBS surfaces of anatomical objects and their overlapping order and material properties in the XCAT phantom. Second, we incorporated an efficient ray-tracing algorithm for line integral calculation in DRASIM by computing the intersection points of the rays cast from the x-ray source to the detector elements through the NURBS surfaces of the multiple XCAT anatomical objects along the ray paths. Third, we evaluated the integrated simulation package by performing a number of sample simulations of multiple x-ray projections from different views followed by image reconstruction. The initial simulation results were found to be promising by qualitative evaluation. In conclusion, we have developed a unique CT/human-model simulation package which has great potential as a tool in the design and optimization of CT scanners, and the development of scanning protocols and image reconstruction methods for improving CT image quality and reducing radiation dose.

  3. Experimental validation of a rapid Monte Carlo based micro-CT simulator.

    PubMed

    Colijn, A P; Zbijewski, W; Sasov, A; Beekman, F J

    2004-09-21

    We describe a newly developed, accelerated Monte Carlo simulator of a small animal micro-CT scanner. Transmission measurements using aluminium slabs are employed to estimate the spectrum of the x-ray source. The simulator incorporating this spectrum is validated with micro-CT scans of physical water phantoms of various diameters, some containing stainless steel and Teflon rods. Good agreement is found between simulated and real data: normalized error of simulated projections, as compared to the real ones, is typically smaller than 0.05. Also the reconstructions obtained from simulated and real data are found to be similar. Thereafter, effects of scatter are studied using a voxelized software phantom representing a rat body. It is shown that the scatter fraction can reach tens of per cents in specific areas of the body and therefore scatter can significantly affect quantitative accuracy in small animal CT imaging. PMID:15509068

  4. An Educational Experiment System for Simulated CT Device with Coherent Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Izumi; Nyui, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Shinji; Negishi, Toru; Shinoda, Yukitaka; Date, Norihiko; Tsumuraya, Mitsunori; Higo, Takashi

    Today, X-ray computed tomography (CT) devices are used in a wide range of fields including medical and industrial applications. It is not easy for students in engineering fields including electrical and electronic engineering to understand the electrical and image analysis principles of X-ray CT devices. Also, in teaching facilities that educate the radiographers who actually work with this equipment in medical fields, testing and training are usually done using real X-ray CT devices. Since these devices are large and have a complex internal structure, students are currently limited with regard to the types of testing and training that they are able to perform. This makes it difficult for medical students to gain a proper understanding of the principles behind X-ray CT devices. There is consequently a need for a simple educational test system that enables engineering and medical students to understand how X-ray CT devices work. We report on the construction of an educational test system that simulates an X-ray CT device based on optical heterodyne detection using laser light for simulation experiments, and on the construction of a system that is capable of performing image reconstruction experiments using data obtained with this test system. We also report on a test system that is capable of acquiring simulated X-ray CT images.

  5. Assessing image quality and dose reduction of a new x-ray computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm using model observers

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu Kupinski, Matthew A.; Fan, Jiahua; Sainath, Paavana; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: A number of different techniques have been developed to reduce radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. In this paper, the authors will compare task-based measures of image quality of CT images reconstructed by two algorithms: conventional filtered back projection (FBP), and a new iterative reconstruction algorithm (IR). Methods: To assess image quality, the authors used the performance of a channelized Hotelling observer acting on reconstructed image slices. The selected channels are dense difference Gaussian channels (DDOG).A body phantom and a head phantom were imaged 50 times at different dose levels to obtain the data needed to assess image quality. The phantoms consisted of uniform backgrounds with low contrast signals embedded at various locations. The tasks the observer model performed included (1) detection of a signal of known location and shape, and (2) detection and localization of a signal of known shape. The employed DDOG channels are based on the response of the human visual system. Performance was assessed using the areas under ROC curves and areas under localization ROC curves. Results: For signal known exactly (SKE) and location unknown/signal shape known tasks with circular signals of different sizes and contrasts, the authors’ task-based measures showed that a FBP equivalent image quality can be achieved at lower dose levels using the IR algorithm. For the SKE case, the range of dose reduction is 50%–67% (head phantom) and 68%–82% (body phantom). For the study of location unknown/signal shape known, the dose reduction range can be reached at 67%–75% for head phantom and 67%–77% for body phantom case. These results suggest that the IR images at lower dose settings can reach the same image quality when compared to full dose conventional FBP images. Conclusions: The work presented provides an objective way to quantitatively assess the image quality of a newly introduced CT IR algorithm. The performance of the

  6. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Munley, Michael T.; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-12-15

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed 'CTDI-aperture' is introduced.

  7. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Robert L; Munley, Michael T; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-12-01

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed "CTDI-aperture" is introduced. PMID:16475771

  8. Assessment of the dose reduction potential of a model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm using a task-based performance metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Samei, Ehsan; Richard, Samuel

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Different computed tomography (CT) reconstruction techniques offer different image quality attributes of resolution and noise, challenging the ability to compare their dose reduction potential against each other. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the task-based imaging performance of CT systems to enable the assessment of the dose performance of a model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) to that of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and a filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Methods: The ACR CT phantom (model 464) was imaged across a wide range of mA setting on a 64-slice CT scanner (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Waukesha, WI). Based on previous work, the resolution was evaluated in terms of a task-based modulation transfer function (MTF) using a circular-edge technique and images from the contrast inserts located in the ACR phantom. Noise performance was assessed in terms of the noise-power spectrum (NPS) measured from the uniform section of the phantom. The task-based MTF and NPS were combined with a task function to yield a task-based estimate of imaging performance, the detectability index (d′). The detectability index was computed as a function of dose for two imaging tasks corresponding to the detection of a relatively small and a relatively large feature (1.5 and 25 mm, respectively). The performance of MBIR in terms of the d′ was compared with that of ASIR and FBP to assess its dose reduction potential. Results: Results indicated that MBIR exhibits a variability spatial resolution with respect to object contrast and noise while significantly reducing image noise. The NPS measurements for MBIR indicated a noise texture with a low-pass quality compared to the typical midpass noise found in FBP-based CT images. At comparable dose, the d′ for MBIR was higher than those of FBP and ASIR by at least 61% and 19% for the small feature and the large feature tasks, respectively. Compared to FBP and ASIR, MBIR

  9. Radiation Dose Reduction Efficiency of Buildings after the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    PubMed Central

    Monzen, Satoru; Hosoda, Masahiro; Osanai, Minoru; Tokonami, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Numerous radionuclides were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1-NPS) in Japan following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Local residents have been eager to calculate their individual radiation exposure. Thus, absorbed dose rates in the indoor and outdoor air at evacuation sites in the Fukushima Prefecture were measured using a gamma-ray measuring devices, and individual radiation exposure was calculated by assessing the radiation dose reduction efficiency (defined as the ratio of absorbed dose rate in the indoor air to the absorbed dose rate in the outdoor air) of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings. Between March 2011 and July 2011, dose reduction efficiencies of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings were 0.55±0.04, 0.15±0.02, and 0.19±0.04, respectively. The reduction efficiency of wood structures was 1.4 times higher than that reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The efficiency of reinforced concrete was similar to previously reported values, whereas that of aluminum structures has not been previously reported. Dose reduction efficiency increased in proportion to the distance from F1-NPS at 8 of the 18 evacuation sites. Time variations did not reflect dose reduction efficiencies at evacuation sites although absorbed dose rates in the outdoor air decreased. These data suggest that dose reduction efficiency depends on structure types, levels of contamination, and evacuee behaviors at evacuation sites. PMID:24999992

  10. A technique optimization protocol and the potential for dose reduction in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Ranger, Nicole T.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Samei, Ehsan

    2010-03-15

    Digital mammography requires revisiting techniques that have been optimized for prior screen/film mammography systems. The objective of the study was to determine optimized radiographic technique for a digital mammography system and demonstrate the potential for dose reduction in comparison to the clinically established techniques based on screen- film. An objective figure of merit (FOM) was employed to evaluate a direct-conversion amorphous selenium (a-Se) FFDM system (Siemens Mammomat Novation{sup DR}, Siemens AG Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) and was derived from the quotient of the squared signal-difference-to-noise ratio to mean glandular dose, for various combinations of technique factors and breast phantom configurations including kilovoltage settings (23-35 kVp), target/filter combinations (Mo-Mo and W-Rh), breast-equivalent plastic in various thicknesses (2-8 cm) and densities (100% adipose, 50% adipose/50% glandular, and 100% glandular), and simulated mass and calcification lesions. When using a W-Rh spectrum, the optimized FOM results for the simulated mass and calcification lesions showed highly consistent trends with kVp for each combination of breast density and thickness. The optimized kVp ranged from 26 kVp for 2 cm 100% adipose breasts to 30 kVp for 8 cm 100% glandular breasts. The use of the optimized W-Rh technique compared to standard Mo-Mo techniques provided dose savings ranging from 9% for 2 cm thick, 100% adipose breasts, to 63% for 6 cm thick, 100% glandular breasts, and for breasts with a 50% adipose/50% glandular composition, from 12% for 2 cm thick breasts up to 57% for 8 cm thick breasts.

  11. Three-dimensional quantitative dose reduction analysis in MammoSite balloon by Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Parsai, E Ishmael; Feldmeier, John J

    2007-01-01

    Current treatment planning systems (TPSs) for partial breast irradiation using the MammoSite brachytherapy applicator (Cytyc Corporation, Marlborough, MA) often neglect the effect of inhomogeneity, leading to potential inaccuracies in dose distributions. Previous publications either have studied only a planar dose perturbation along the bisector of the source or have paid little attention to the anisotropy effect of the system. In the present study, we investigated the attenuation-corrected radial dose and anisotropy functions in a form parallel to the updated American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-43 formalism. This work quantitatively delineates the inaccuracies in dose distributions in three-dimensional space. Monte Carlo N-particle transport code simulations in coupled photon-electron transport were used to quantify the changes in dose deposition and distribution caused by the increased attenuation coefficient of iodine-based contrast solution. The source geometry was that of the VariSource wire model VS2000 (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The concentration of the iodine-based solution was varied from 5% to 25% by volume, a range recommended by the balloon's manufacturer. Balloon diameters of 4, 5, and 6 cm were simulated. Dose rates at the typical prescription line (1 cm away from the balloon surface) were determined for various polar angles. The computations showed that the dose rate reduction throughout the entire region of interest ranged from 0.64% for the smallest balloon diameter and contrast concentration to 6.17% for the largest balloon diameter and contrast concentration. The corrected radial dose function has a predominant influence on dose reduction, but the corrected anisotropy functions explain only the effect at the MammoSite system poles. By applying the corrected radial dose and anisotropy functions to TPSs, the attenuation effect can be reduced to the minimum. PMID:18449153

  12. A technique optimization protocol and the potential for dose reduction in digital mammography

    PubMed Central

    Ranger, Nicole T.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Samei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01

    Digital mammography requires revisiting techniques that have been optimized for prior screen∕film mammography systems. The objective of the study was to determine optimized radiographic technique for a digital mammography system and demonstrate the potential for dose reduction in comparison to the clinically established techniques based on screen- film. An objective figure of merit (FOM) was employed to evaluate a direct-conversion amorphous selenium (a-Se) FFDM system (Siemens Mammomat NovationDR, Siemens AG Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) and was derived from the quotient of the squared signal-difference-to-noise ratio to mean glandular dose, for various combinations of technique factors and breast phantom configurations including kilovoltage settings (23–35 kVp), target∕filter combinations (Mo–Mo and W–Rh), breast-equivalent plastic in various thicknesses (2–8 cm) and densities (100% adipose, 50% adipose∕50% glandular, and 100% glandular), and simulated mass and calcification lesions. When using a W–Rh spectrum, the optimized FOM results for the simulated mass and calcification lesions showed highly consistent trends with kVp for each combination of breast density and thickness. The optimized kVp ranged from 26 kVp for 2 cm 100% adipose breasts to 30 kVp for 8 cm 100% glandular breasts. The use of the optimized W–Rh technique compared to standard Mo–Mo techniques provided dose savings ranging from 9% for 2 cm thick, 100% adipose breasts, to 63% for 6 cm thick, 100% glandular breasts, and for breasts with a 50% adipose∕50% glandular composition, from 12% for 2 cm thick breasts up to 57% for 8 cm thick breasts. PMID:20384232

  13. MCNPX simulation of proton dose distribution in homogeneous and CT phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. C.; Lee, Y. J.; Tung, C. J.; Cheng, H. W.; Chao, T. C.

    2014-02-01

    A dose simulation system was constructed based on the MCNPX Monte Carlo package to simulate proton dose distribution in homogeneous and CT phantoms. Conversion from Hounsfield unit of a patient CT image set to material information necessary for Monte Carlo simulation is based on Schneider's approach. In order to validate this simulation system, inter-comparison of depth dose distributions among those obtained from the MCNPX, GEANT4 and FLUKA codes for a 160 MeV monoenergetic proton beam incident normally on the surface of a homogeneous water phantom was performed. For dose validation within the CT phantom, direct comparison with measurement is infeasible. Instead, this study took the approach to indirectly compare the 50% ranges (R50%) along the central axis by our system to the NIST CSDA ranges for beams with 160 and 115 MeV energies. Comparison result within the homogeneous phantom shows good agreement. Differences of simulated R50% among the three codes are less than 1 mm. For results within the CT phantom, the MCNPX simulated water equivalent Req,50% are compatible with the CSDA water equivalent ranges from the NIST database with differences of 0.7 and 4.1 mm for 160 and 115 MeV beams, respectively.

  14. Is radiation dose reduction the right answer for HPV-positive head and neck cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Kimple, Randall J.; Harari, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNC) related to human papillomavirus (HPV) represent a growing and distinct patient cohort with unique molecular and epidemiologic characteristics. These patients have markedly improved survival outcomes compared to those with traditional HNC, leading some to advocate for treatment dose reduction. In this article, we review ongoing clinical trials investigating several ways to reduce therapeutic intensity for patients with HPV-positive HNC, discuss the risks and benefits associated with these trials, and summarize the data underlying the advancement of dose reduction trials for patients with HPV-positive HNC. PMID:24134946

  15. Is radiation dose reduction the right answer for HPV-positive head and neck cancer?

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Harari, Paul M

    2014-06-01

    Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNC) related to human papillomavirus (HPV) represent a growing and distinct patient cohort with unique molecular and epidemiologic characteristics. These patients have markedly improved survival outcomes compared to those with traditional HNC, leading some to advocate for treatment dose reduction. In this article, we review ongoing clinical trials investigating several ways to reduce therapeutic intensity for patients with HPV-positive HNC, discuss the risks and benefits associated with these trials, and summarize the data underlying the advancement of dose reduction trials for patients with HPV-positive HNC. PMID:24134946

  16. Feasibility study of dose reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis using non-local denoising algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Marcelo A. C.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Borges, Lucas R.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Barufaldi, Bruno; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2015-03-01

    The main purpose of this work is to study the ability of denoising algorithms to reduce the radiation dose in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) examinations. Clinical use of DBT is normally performed in "combo-mode", in which, in addition to DBT projections, a 2D mammogram is taken with the standard radiation dose. As a result, patients have been exposed to radiation doses higher than used in digital mammography. Thus, efforts to reduce the radiation dose in DBT examinations are of great interest. However, a decrease in dose leads to an increased quantum noise level, and related decrease in image quality. This work is aimed at addressing this problem by the use of denoising techniques, which could allow for dose reduction while keeping the image quality acceptable. We have studied two "state of the art" denoising techniques for filtering the quantum noise due to the reduced dose in DBT projections: Non-local Means (NLM) and Block-matching 3D (BM3D). We acquired DBT projections at different dose levels of an anthropomorphic physical breast phantom with inserted simulated microcalcifications. Then, we found the optimal filtering parameters where the denoising algorithms are capable of recovering the quality from the DBT images acquired with the standard radiation dose. Results using objective image quality assessment metrics showed that BM3D algorithm achieved better noise adjustment (mean difference in peak signal to noise ratio < 0.1dB) and less blurring (mean difference in image sharpness ~ 6%) than the NLM for the projections acquired with lower radiation doses.

  17. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jan T M; Shrimpton, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990's. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10's of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners. PMID:27362736

  18. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  19. SIMIND Monte Carlo simulation of a single photon emission CT

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni Toossi, M. T.; Islamian, J. Pirayesh; Momennezhad, M.; Ljungberg, M.; Naseri, S. H.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we simulated a Siemens E.CAM SPECT system using SIMIND Monte Carlo program to acquire its experimental characterization in terms of energy resolution, sensitivity, spatial resolution and imaging of phantoms using 99mTc. The experimental and simulation data for SPECT imaging was acquired from a point source and Jaszczak phantom. Verification of the simulation was done by comparing two sets of images and related data obtained from the actual and simulated systems. Image quality was assessed by comparing image contrast and resolution. Simulated and measured energy spectra (with or without a collimator) and spatial resolution from point sources in air were compared. The resulted energy spectra present similar peaks for the gamma energy of 99mTc at 140 KeV. FWHM for the simulation calculated to 14.01 KeV and 13.80 KeV for experimental data, corresponding to energy resolution of 10.01 and 9.86% compared to defined 9.9% for both systems, respectively. Sensitivities of the real and virtual gamma cameras were calculated to 85.11 and 85.39 cps/MBq, respectively. The energy spectra of both simulated and real gamma cameras were matched. Images obtained from Jaszczak phantom, experimentally and by simulation, showed similarity in contrast and resolution. SIMIND Monte Carlo could successfully simulate the Siemens E.CAM gamma camera. The results validate the use of the simulated system for further investigation, including modification, planning, and developing a SPECT system to improve the quality of images. PMID:20177569

  20. SU-E-J-187: Individually Optimized Contrast-Enhancement 4D-CT for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in Radiotherapy Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, M; Patel, K; Regine, W; Lane, B; D'Souza, W; Lu, W; Klahr, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of individually optimized contrastenhancement (CE) 4D-CT for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDA) in radiotherapy simulation. To evaluate the image quality and contrast enhancement of tumor in the CE 4D-CT, compared to the clinical standard of CE 3D-CT and 4D-CT. Methods: In this IRB-approved study, each of the 7 PDA patients enrolled underwent 3 CT scans: a free-breathing 3D-CT with contrast (CE 3D-CT) followed by a 4D-CT without contrast (4D-CT) in the first study session, and a 4D-CT with individually synchronized contrast injection (CE 4D-CT) in the second study session. In CE 4D-CT, the time of full contrast injection was determined based on the time of peak enhancement for the test injection, injection rate, table speed, and longitudinal location and span of the pancreatic region. Physicians contoured both the tumor (T) and the normal pancreatic parenchyma (P) on the three CTs (end-of-exhalation for 4D-CT). The contrast between the tumor and normal pancreatic tissue was computed as the difference of the mean enhancement level of three 1 cm3 regions of interests in T and P, respectively. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to statistically compare the scores and contrasts. Results: In qualitative evaluations, both CE 3D-CT and CE 4D-CT scored significantly better than 4D-CT (4.0 and 3.6 vs. 2.6). There was no significant difference between CE 3D-CT and CE 4D-CT. In quantitative evaluations, the contrasts between the tumor and the normal pancreatic parenchyma were 0.6±23.4, −2.1±8.0, and −19.6±28.8 HU, in CE 3D-CT, 4D-CT, and CE 4D-CT, respectively. Although not statistically significant, CE 4D-CT achieved better contrast enhancement between the tumor and the normal pancreatic parenchyma than both CE 3D-CT and 4DCT. Conclusion: CE 4D-CT achieved equivalent image quality and better contrast enhancement between tumor and normal pancreatic parenchyma than the clinical standard of CE 3D-CT and 4D-CT. This study was supported in part

  1. Pediatric personalized CT-dosimetry Monte Carlo simulations, using computational phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitroulas, P.; Kagadis, G. C.; Ploussi, A.; Kordolaimi, S.; Papamichail, D.; Karavasilis, E.; Syrgiamiotis, V.; Loudos, G.

    2015-09-01

    The last 40 years Monte Carlo (MC) simulations serve as a “gold standard” tool for a wide range of applications in the field of medical physics and tend to be essential in daily clinical practice. Regarding diagnostic imaging applications, such as computed tomography (CT), the assessment of deposited energy is of high interest, so as to better analyze the risks and the benefits of the procedure. The last few years a big effort is done towards personalized dosimetry, especially in pediatric applications. In the present study the GATE toolkit was used and computational pediatric phantoms have been modeled for the assessment of CT examinations dosimetry. The pediatric models used come from the XCAT and IT'IS series. The X-ray spectrum of a Brightspeed CT scanner was simulated and validated with experimental data. Specifically, a DCT-10 ionization chamber was irradiated twice using 120 kVp with 100 mAs and 200 mAs, for 1 sec in 1 central axial slice (thickness = 10mm). The absorbed dose was measured in air resulting in differences lower than 4% between the experimental and simulated data. The simulations were acquired using ∼1010 number of primaries in order to achieve low statistical uncertainties. Dose maps were also saved for quantification of the absorbed dose in several children critical organs during CT acquisition.

  2. Motion artifacts in CT scans: a study by computer simulation and mechanical phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Der-Chi; Lung, Jen-Kuang; Liao, Chih-Yu; Yong, Tung-Che; Hsu, Chung-Hsien; Liao, Chih-Chiang; Wu, Ren-Hong; Tseng, Kuo-Hsiung; Tsung, Tsing-Tshih

    2008-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most important tools in the diagnosis of thoracic tumors. However, during the scanning process, respiratory motion causes changes in the position and shape of the tumor, creating motion artifacts in the CT scan. This can lead to misdiagnosis of the size and position of the tumor, and can affect the effectiveness of treatment. This study develops a computer model of the movement of the thorax, and simulates the movement of a lung tumor caused by breathing during a CT scan. We show that adjusting the CT slice thickness is sufficient to determine the center of displacement and maximum displacement of a tumor during normal breathing. This model can be applied in the clinical diagnostic use of CT equipment. It will assist in finding the position of lung tumors from motion artifacts in CT scans. The target margin for treatment can thus be defined more accurately, so that appropriate doses of radiation can be applied to the target area, and irradiation of healthy tissue avoided.

  3. Patients with Fabry Disease after Enzyme Replacement Therapy Dose Reduction Versus Treatment Switch

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Johannes; Duning, Thomas; Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krebs, Alice; González, Hans Guerrero; Sommer, Claudia; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Niemann, Markus; Störk, Stefan; Schelleckes, Michael; Reiermann, Stefanie; Stypmann, Jörg; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Wanner, Christoph; Brand, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Because of the shortage of agalsidase-beta in 2009, many patients with Fabry disease were treated with lower doses or were switched to agalsidase-alfa. This observational study assessed end-organ damage and clinical symptoms during dose reduction or switch to agalsidase-alfa. A total of 105 adult patients with Fabry disease who had received agalsidase-beta (1.0 mg/kg body weight) for ≥1 year were nonrandomly assigned to continue this treatment regimen (regular-dose group, n=38), receive a reduced dose of 0.3–0.5 mg/kg (dose-reduction group, n=29), or switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-alfa (switch group) and were followed prospectively for 1 year. We assessed clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, severe arrhythmia, stroke, progression to ESRD); changes in cardiac, renal, and neurologic function; and Fabry-related symptoms (neuropathic pain, hypohidrosis, diarrhea, and disease severity scores). Organ function and Fabry-related symptoms remained stable in the regular-dose group. In contrast, estimated GFR decreased by about 3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (P=0.01) in the dose-reduction group, and the median albumin-to-creatinine ratio increased from 114 (0–606) mg/g to 216 (0–2062) mg/g (P=0.03) in the switch group. Furthermore, mean Mainz Severity Score Index scores and frequencies of pain attacks, chronic pain, gastrointestinal pain, and diarrhea increased significantly in the dose-reduction and switch groups. In conclusion, patients receiving regular agalsidase-beta dose had a stable disease course, but dose reduction led to worsening of renal function and symptoms. Switching to agalsidase-alfa is safe, but microalbuminuria may progress and Fabry-related symptoms may deteriorate. PMID:24556354

  4. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: A comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaart, René F. Paulides, Margarethus M.; Fortunati, Valerio; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Lugt, Aad van der

    2014-12-15

    ). Patient models based on CT (T{sub max}: 38.0 °C) and CT and MRI (T{sub max}: 38.1 °C) result in similar simulated temperatures, while CT and MRI{sub db} (T{sub max}: 38.5 °C) resulted in significantly higher temperatures. The SAR corresponding to these temperatures did not differ significantly. Conclusions: Although MR imaging reduces the interobserver variation in most tissues, it does not affect simulated local tissue temperatures. However, the improved soft-tissue contrast provided by MRI allows generating a detailed brain segmentation, which has a strong impact on the predicted local temperatures and hence may improve simulation guided hyperthermia.

  5. Ground truth and CT image model simulation for pathophysiological human airway system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, Margarete; Fetita, Catalin; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Pr"teux, Françoise; Grenier, Philippe

    2010-02-01

    Recurrent problem in medical image segmentation and analysis, establishing a ground truth for assessment purposes is often difficult. Facing this problem, the scientific community orients its efforts towards the development of objective methods for evaluation, namely by building up or simulating the missing ground truth for analysis. This paper focuses on the case of human pulmonary airways and develops a method 1) to simulate the ground truth for different pathophysiological configurations of the bronchial tree as a mesh model, and 2) to generate synthetic 3D CT images of airways associated with the simulated ground truth. The airway model is here built up based on the information provided by a medial axis (describing bronchus shape, subdivision geometry and local radii), which is computed from real CT data to ensure realism and matching with a patient-specific morphology. The model parameters can be further on adjusted to simulate various pathophysiological conditions of the same patient (longitudinal studies). Based on the airway mesh model, a 3D image model is synthesized by simulating the CT acquisition process. The image realism is achieved by including textural features of the surrounding pulmonary tissue which are obtained by segmentation from the same original CT data providing the airway axis. By varying the scanning simulation parameters, several 3D image models can be generated for the same airway mesh ground truth. Simulation results for physiological and pathological configurations are presented and discussed, illustrating the interest of such a modeling process for designing computer-aided diagnosis systems or for assessing their sensitivity, mainly for follow-up studies in asthma and COPD.

  6. Implication of CT Table Sag on Geometrical Accuracy During Virtual Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zullo, John R. Kudchadker, Rajat; Wu, Richard; Lee, Andrew; Prado, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanners are used in hospitals worldwide for radiation oncology treatment simulation. It is critical that the process very accurately represents the patient positioning to be used during the administration of radiation therapy to minimize the dose delivery to normal tissue. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. One problem is that some degree of vertical displacement, or sag, occurs when the table is extended from its base when under a clinical weight load, a problem resulting from mechanical limitations of the CT table. In an effort to determine the extent of the problem, we measured and compared the degree of table sag for various CT scanner tables at our institution. A clinically representative weight load was placed on each table, and the amount of table sag was measured for varying degrees of table extension from its base. Results indicated that the amount of table sag varied from approximately 0.7 to 6.6 mm and that the amount of table sag varied not only between tables from different manufacturers but also between tables of the same model from the same manufacturer. Failure to recognize and prevent this problem could lead to incorrectly derived isocenter localization and subsequent patient positioning errors. Treatment site-specific and scanner-based laser offset correction should be implemented for each patient's virtual simulation procedure. In addition, the amount of sag should be measured under a clinically representative weight load upon CT-simulator commissioning.

  7. The effects of gantry tilt on breast dose and image noise in cardiac CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Michael E.; Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat; Stevens, Grant M.; Foley, W. Dennis

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on image noise and glandular breast dose in females during cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Reducing the dose to glandular breast tissue is important due to its high radiosensitivity and limited diagnostic significance in cardiac CT scans.Methods: Tilted-gantry acquisition was investigated through computer simulations and experimental measurements. Upon IRB approval, eight voxelized phantoms were constructed from previously acquired cardiac CT datasets. Monte Carlo simulations quantified the dose deposited in glandular breast tissue over a range of tilt angles. The effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on breast dose were measured on a clinical CT scanner (CT750HD, GE Healthcare) using an anthropomorphic phantom with MOSFET dosimeters in the breast regions. In both simulations and experiments, scans were performed at gantry tilt angles of 0°–30°, in 5° increments. The percent change in breast dose was calculated relative to the nontilted scan for all tilt angles. The percent change in noise standard deviation due to gantry tilt was calculated in all reconstructed simulated and experimental images.Results: Tilting the gantry reduced the breast dose in all simulated and experimental phantoms, with generally greater dose reduction at increased gantry tilts. For example, at 30° gantry tilt, the dosimeters located in the superior, middle, and inferior breast regions measured dose reductions of 74%, 61%, and 9%, respectively. The simulations estimated 0%–30% total breast dose reduction across the eight phantoms and range of tilt angles. However, tilted-gantry acquisition also increased the noise standard deviation in the simulated phantoms by 2%–50% due to increased pathlength through the iodine-filled heart. The experimental phantom, which did not contain iodine in the blood, demonstrated decreased breast dose and decreased noise at all gantry tilt angles.Conclusions: Tilting the

  8. Validation of a Monte Carlo simulation for dose assessment in dental cone beam CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Morant, J J; Salvadó, M; Casanovas, R; Hernández-Girón, I; Velasco, E; Calzado, A

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for calculating absorbed dose has been developed and applied for dental applications with an i-CAT cone beam CT (CBCT) system. To validate the method a comparison was made between calculated and measured dose values for two different clinical protocols. Measurements with a pencil CT chamber were performed free-in-air and in a CT dose head phantom; measurements were also performed with a transmission ionization chamber. In addition for each protocol a total number of 58 thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) were packed in groups and placed at 16 representative anatomical locations of an anthropomorphic phantom (Remab system) to assess absorbed doses. To simulate X-ray exposure, a software application based on the EGS4 package was applied. Dose quantities were calculated for different voxelized models representing the CT ionization and transmission chambers, the TLDs, and the phantoms as well. The dose quantities evaluated in the comparison were the accumulated dose averaged along the rotation axis (D(i)), the volume average dose,D(vol) for the dosimetric phantom, the dose area product (DAP) and the absorbed dose for the TLDs. Absolute differences between measured and simulated outcomes were ≤ 2.1% for free-in-air doses; ≤ 6.2% in the 5 cavities of the CT dose head phantom; ≤ 13% for TLDs inside the primary beam. Such differences were considered acceptable in all cases and confirmed the validity of the MC program for different geometries. In conclusion, the devised MC simulation program can be a robust tool to optimize protocols and estimate patient doses for CBCT units in dental, oral and maxillofacial radiology. PMID:21807542

  9. Discrete Event Simulation Models for CT Examination Queuing in West China Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Li; Tang, Shijun; Shi, Yingkang; Guo, Huili

    2016-01-01

    In CT examination, the emergency patients (EPs) have highest priorities in the queuing system and thus the general patients (GPs) have to wait for a long time. This leads to a low degree of satisfaction of the whole patients. The aim of this study is to improve the patients' satisfaction by designing new queuing strategies for CT examination. We divide the EPs into urgent type and emergency type and then design two queuing strategies: one is that the urgent patients (UPs) wedge into the GPs' queue with fixed interval (fixed priority model) and the other is that the patients have dynamic priorities for queuing (dynamic priority model). Based on the data from Radiology Information Database (RID) of West China Hospital (WCH), we develop some discrete event simulation models for CT examination according to the designed strategies. We compare the performance of different strategies on the basis of the simulation results. The strategy that patients have dynamic priorities for queuing makes the waiting time of GPs decrease by 13 minutes and the degree of satisfaction increase by 40.6%. We design a more reasonable CT examination queuing strategy to decrease patients' waiting time and increase their satisfaction degrees. PMID:27547237

  10. Discrete Event Simulation Models for CT Examination Queuing in West China Hospital.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li; Liu, Hangjiang; Liao, Huchang; Tang, Shijun; Shi, Yingkang; Guo, Huili

    2016-01-01

    In CT examination, the emergency patients (EPs) have highest priorities in the queuing system and thus the general patients (GPs) have to wait for a long time. This leads to a low degree of satisfaction of the whole patients. The aim of this study is to improve the patients' satisfaction by designing new queuing strategies for CT examination. We divide the EPs into urgent type and emergency type and then design two queuing strategies: one is that the urgent patients (UPs) wedge into the GPs' queue with fixed interval (fixed priority model) and the other is that the patients have dynamic priorities for queuing (dynamic priority model). Based on the data from Radiology Information Database (RID) of West China Hospital (WCH), we develop some discrete event simulation models for CT examination according to the designed strategies. We compare the performance of different strategies on the basis of the simulation results. The strategy that patients have dynamic priorities for queuing makes the waiting time of GPs decrease by 13 minutes and the degree of satisfaction increase by 40.6%. We design a more reasonable CT examination queuing strategy to decrease patients' waiting time and increase their satisfaction degrees. PMID:27547237

  11. Surface dosimetry in a CT scanner using MOSFET detectors and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, F.; Lemire, M.; Hallil, A.; Hegyi, G.

    2008-02-01

    Diagnostic imaging with CT procedures is responsible for significant radiation doses to patients. To enable individual patient dose estimates, a combination of MOSFET detectors and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations was investigated for the determination of patient surface dose. The behaviour of MOSFETs in kV x-rays from a CT scanner was investigated with experiments and MC simulations with a CT scanner model. A dose reproducibility of 5% and a mean loss of sensitivity with accumulated dose of about 10% was noted for the MOSFETs. Beam energy increase from 80-140 kVp resulted in a response decrease of 10%. The MOSFET detectors were calibrated in terms of absolute surface dose with the aid of MC simulations. Good agreement was achieved between measured and calculated surface dose on a cylindrical Lucite phantom. Experiments with a stationary x-ray tube and contiguous axial scanning led to differences limited by 8%. Surface dose in helical scanning was investigated with measurements with radiological film and an array of five MOSFET detectors, leading to good agreement. It is concluded that an array of MOSFET detectors, calibrated in terms of surface dose, is a valuable tool to assess individual patient surface dose. In combination with MC simulations this may lead to estimations of effective dose.

  12. Simulations and experimental feasibility study of fan-beam coherent-scatter CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Adrian; Schlomka, Jens-Peter; Harding, Geoffrey L.

    2002-11-01

    Fan-beam coherent scatter computer tomography (CSCT) has been employed to obtain 2-dimensional images of spatially resolved diffraction patterns in order to supplement CT images in material discrimination. A Monte Carlo simulation tool DiPhoS (Diagnostic Photon Simulation) was used to create 2-dimensional scatter projection data sets of high-contrast water and Lucite phantom objects with plastic inserts. The results were used as input to a reconstruction routine based on a novel simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT). At the same time an experimental demonstrator was assembled to confirm the simulations by measurements and to show the feasibility of coherent scatter CT. It consisted of a 4.5kW constant power X-ray tube, a rotatable object plate and a vertical detector column that could be panned around the object. Spatial resolution was ensured by mechanical collimation. Phantoms similar to those simulated were measured and reconstructed and the contrast achieved by CSCT between the materials under examination substantially exceeded that achieved in CT. A further step was taken by examining an animal tissue sample in the same way, the results of which show remarkable contrast between muscle, cartilage and fat, suggesting that CSCT can also be used in a medical scenario.

  13. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K.

    1994-05-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

  14. Limits to dose reduction from iterative reconstruction and the effect of through-slice blurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    Iterative reconstruction methods have become very popular and show the potential to reduce dose. We present a limit to the maximum dose reduction possible with new reconstruction algorithms obtained by analyzing the information content of the raw data, assuming the reconstruction algorithm does not have a priori knowledge about the object or correlations between pixels. This limit applies to the task of estimating the density of a lesion embedded in a known background object, where the shape of the lesion is known but its density is not. Under these conditions, the density of the lesion can be estimated directly from the raw data in an optimal manner. This optimal estimate will meet or outperform the performance of any reconstruction method operating on the raw data, under the condition that the reconstruction method does not introduce a priori information. The raw data bound can be compared to the lesion density estimate from FBP in order to produce a limit on the dose reduction possible from new reconstruction algorithms. The possible dose reduction from iterative reconstruction varies with the object, but for a lesion embedded in the center of a water cylinder, it is less than 40%. Additionally, comparisons between iterative reconstruction and filtered backprojection are sometimes confounded by the effect of through-slice blurring in the iterative reconstruction. We analyzed the magnitude of the variance reduction brought about by through-slice blurring on scanners from two different vendors and found it to range between 11% and 48%.

  15. Evaluation of organ doses in adult and paediatric CT examinations based on Monte Carlo simulations and in-phantom dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Fujii, K; Nomura, K; Muramatsu, Y; Takahashi, K; Obara, S; Akahane, K; Satake, M

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and organ doses evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations through comparisons with doses evaluated by in-phantom dosimetry. Organ doses were measured with radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeter (RGD) set at various organ positions within adult and 1-y-old anthropomorphic phantoms. For the dose simulations, the X-ray spectrum and bow-tie filter shape of a CT scanner were estimated and 3D voxelised data of the CTDI and anthropomorphic phantoms from the acquired CT images were derived. Organ dose simulations and measurements were performed with chest and abdomen-pelvis CT examination scan parameters. Relative differences between the simulated and measured doses were within 5 % for the volume CTDI and 13 % for organ doses for organs within the scan range in adult and paediatric CT examinations. The simulation results were considered to be in good agreement with the measured doses. PMID:25848103

  16. A comparison of simulation tools for photon-counting spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirudin, Radin A.; Penchev, Petar; Mei, Kai; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Fiebich, Martin; Noël, Peter B.

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting detectors (PCD) not only have the advantage of providing spectral information but also offer high quantum efficiencies, producing high image quality in combination with a minimal amount of radiation dose. Due to the clinical unavailability of photon-counting CT, the need to evaluate different CT simulation tools for researching different applications for photon-counting systems is essential. In this work, we investigate two different methods to simulate PCD data: Monte-Carlo based simulation (MCS) and analytical based simulation (AS). The MCS is a general-purpose photon transport simulation based on EGSnrc C++ class library. The AS uses analytical forward-projection in combination with additional acquisition parameters. MCS takes into account all physical effects, but is computationally expensive (several days per CT acquisition). AS is fast (several minutes), but lacks the accurateness of MCS with regard to physical interactions. To evaluate both techniques an entrance spectra of 100kvp, a modified CTP515 module of the CatPhan 600 phantom, and a detector system with six thresholds was simulated. For evaluation the simulated projection data are decomposed via a maximum likelihood technique, and reconstructed via standard filtered-back projection (FBP). Image quality from both methods is subjectively and objectively assessed. Visually, the difference in the image quality was not significant. When further evaluated, the relative difference was below 4%. As a conclusion, both techniques offer different advantages, while at different stages of development the accelerated calculations via AS can make a significant difference. For the future one could foresee a combined method to join accuracy and speed.

  17. Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The {gamma} pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose

  18. Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The γ pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose

  19. Synthetic CT: Simulating low dose single and dual energy protocols from a dual energy scan

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Adam S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The choice of CT protocol can greatly impact patient dose and image quality. Since acquiring multiple scans at different techniques on a given patient is undesirable, the ability to predict image quality changes starting from a high quality exam can be quite useful. While existing methods allow one to generate simulated images of lower exposure (mAs) from an acquired CT exam, the authors present and validate a new method called synthetic CT that can generate realistic images of a patient at arbitrary low dose protocols (kVp, mAs, and filtration) for both single and dual energy scans. Methods: The synthetic CT algorithm is derived by carefully ensuring that the expected signal and noise are accurate for the simulated protocol. The method relies on the observation that the material decomposition from a dual energy CT scan allows the transmission of an arbitrary spectrum to be predicted. It requires an initial dual energy scan of the patient to either synthesize raw projections of a single energy scan or synthesize the material decompositions of a dual energy scan. The initial dual energy scan contributes inherent noise to the synthesized projections that must be accounted for before adding more noise to simulate low dose protocols. Therefore, synthetic CT is subject to the constraint that the synthesized data have noise greater than the inherent noise. The authors experimentally validated the synthetic CT algorithm across a range of protocols using a dual energy scan of an acrylic phantom with solutions of different iodine concentrations. An initial 80/140 kVp dual energy scan of the phantom provided the material decomposition necessary to synthesize images at 100 kVp and at 120 kVp, across a range of mAs values. They compared these synthesized single energy scans of the phantom to actual scans at the same protocols. Furthermore, material decompositions of a 100/120 kVp dual energy scan are synthesized by adding correlated noise to the initial material

  20. Development and evaluation of a novel designed breast CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Claudia; Schlattl, Helmut; Tischenko, Oleg; Dietrich, Olaf; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    The performance of a novel designed x-ray CT scanning geometry is investigated. Composed of a specially designed tungsten collimation mask and a high resolution flat panel detector, this scanning geometry provides high efficient data acquisition allowing dose reduction potentially up to 50%. In recent years a special type of scanning geometry has been proposed. A first prototype of this geometry called CTDOR( CT with Dual Optimal Reading) has already been built. Despite many drawbacks, resulting images have shown promising potential of dual reading. The approach of gaining two subsets of data has anew been picked up and come to terms with a novel designed CT scanner for breast imaging. The main idea consists of collimating the X-ray beam through a specially designed shielding mask thereby reducing radiation dose without compromising image quality. This is achieved by hexagonally sampled Radon transform and image reconstruction with the especially suitable OPED (orthogonal polynomial expansion on disk) algorithm. This work now presents the development and evaluation of the novel designed breast CT system. Therefore simulated phantom data were obtained to test the performance of the scanning device and compared to a standard 3rd generation scanner. Retaining advantages such as scatter-correction potential and 3D-capability, the proposed CT system yields high resolution images for breast diagnostics in low energy ranges. Assuming similar sample size, it is expected that the novel designed breast CT system in conjunction with OPED outperforms the standard 3rd generation CT system combined with FBP (filtered back projection).

  1. Evaluation of a 4D cone-beam CT reconstruction approach using a simulation framework.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Alexander; Yaniv, Ziv

    2009-01-01

    Current image-guided navigation systems for thoracic abdominal interventions utilize three dimensional (3D) images acquired at breath-hold. As a result they can only provide guidance at a specific point in the respiratory cycle. The intervention is thus performed in a gated manner, with the physician advancing only when the patient is at the same respiratory cycle in which the 3D image was acquired. To enable a more continuous workflow we propose to use 4D image data. We describe an approach to constructing a set of 4D images from a diagnostic CT acquired at breath-hold and a set of intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection images acquired while the patient is freely breathing. Our approach is based on an initial reconstruction of a gated 4D CBCT data set. The 3D CBCT images for each respiratory phase are then non-rigidly registered to the diagnostic CT data. Finally the diagnostic CT is deformed based on the registration results, providing a 4D data set with sufficient quality for navigation purposes. In this work we evaluate the proposed reconstruction approach using a simulation framework. A 3D CBCT dataset of an anthropomorphic phantom is deformed using internal motion data acquired from an animal model to create a ground truth 4D CBCT image. Simulated projection images are then created from the 4D image and the known CBCT scan parameters. Finally, the original 3D CBCT and the simulated X-ray images are used as input to our reconstruction method. The resulting 4D data set is then compared to the known ground truth by normalized cross correlation(NCC). We show that the deformed diagnostic CTs are of better quality than the gated reconstructions with a mean NCC value of 0.94 versus a mean 0.81 for the reconstructions. PMID:19964143

  2. Experimental and clinical studies on dose reduction effects of spacers in interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the mobile tongue.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Tamamoto, M; Hirokawa, Y; Kashiwado, K; Akagi, Y; Kashimoto, K; Wada, T

    1993-12-01

    The difference of radiation dose reduction effect with spacers of different materials, a heat-curing denture base resin and a silicon impression material, was examined experimentally and clinically. Radium needles and iridium hairpins were used as radioactive sources. In both studies, it was revealed that a dose reduction effect of silicon impression material was greater than that of denture base resin. Silicon impression material was thought to be a better material for spacers because of its larger radiation dose reduction effect and the time saving to produce the spacer. PMID:8284088

  3. Toward a dose reduction strategy using model-based reconstruction with limited-angle tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneda, Eri; Tkaczyk, J. E.; Palma, Giovanni; Iordache, Rǎzvan; Zelakiewicz, Scott; Muller, Serge; De Man, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) is an emerging technique for several imaging modalities and appli- cations including medical CT, security CT, PET, and microscopy. Its success derives from an ability to preserve image resolution and perceived diagnostic quality under impressively reduced signal level. MBIR typically uses a cost optimization framework that models system geometry, photon statistics, and prior knowledge of the recon- structed volume. The challenge of tomosynthetic geometries is that the inverse problem becomes more ill-posed due to the limited angles, meaning the volumetric image solution is not uniquely determined by the incom- pletely sampled projection data. Furthermore, low signal level conditions introduce additional challenges due to noise. A fundamental strength of MBIR for limited-views and limited-angle is that it provides a framework for constraining the solution consistent with prior knowledge of expected image characteristics. In this study, we analyze through simulation the capability of MBIR with respect to prior modeling components for limited-views, limited-angle digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) under low dose conditions. A comparison to ground truth phantoms shows that MBIR with regularization achieves a higher level of fidelity and lower level of blurring and streaking artifacts compared to other state of the art iterative reconstructions, especially for high contrast objects. The benefit of contrast preservation along with less artifacts may lead to detectability improvement of microcalcification for more accurate cancer diagnosis.

  4. Reducing CT dose in myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Emma; Dixon, Kat L

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the radiation dose arising from computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction to single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging studies without adversely affecting its accuracy. Using the Perspex CTDI phantom with the Xi detector to measure dose, CT scans were acquired using the Siemens Symbia T over the full range of CT settings available. Using the default setting 'AECmean', the measured dose at the centre of the phantom was 1.68 mGy and the breast dose from the scout view was 0.30 mGy. The lowest dose was achieved using the dose modulation setting in which the doses were reduced to 1.21 mGy and undetectable (<0.01 mGy), respectively. To observe the effect of changing these settings, 30 patients received a stress scan with default CT settings and a rest scan utilizing single photon emission computed tomography-guided CT and the dose modulation CT settings. Results showed a mean effective dose reduction of 23.6%. The dose reduction was greatest for larger patients, with the largest dose reduction for one patient being 72%. There was no apparent difference in attenuation correction between the two sets of resultant images. These new lower-dose settings are now applied to all clinical myocardial perfusion imaging studies. PMID:26302461

  5. Evaluation of the potential in radiation dose reduction for full-field digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasch, Kay-Uwe; Moftah, Belal A.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluates the image quality for different radiation doses in full-field digital mammography (FFDM). The potential of dose reductions is evaluated for both, the transition from screen-film mammography (SFM) to FFDM as well as within FFDM due to the optimization of exposure parameters. Exposures of a 4.5 cm breast phantom rendering different contrasts as well as bar patterns were made using a FFDM system (GE Senographe 2000D). For different kVp and mAs settings as well as different target/filter combinations chosen for the above exposures, average glandular dose (AGD), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and modulation transfer function (MTF) were determined. To benchmark the results, relative change of AGD was evaluated against SNR, CNR and MTF. Eventually, the results were normalized to AGD's rendered by settings typically used in today's clinical routine. For standard settings (automatic mode), both FFDM and SFM deliver approximately the same AGD of about 2.2 mGy. From that, AGD reduction can be substantial in FFDM if only SNR and high contrast CNR are considered. In this case, reduction of up to 40% can be achieved in a wide kVp range if switching from the standard target/filter combination Mo/Rh to Rh/Rh. However, if low contrast CNR is to remain unchanged, dose reduction is practically impossible. The change of peak voltage and target/filter material had no influence on MTF. Assuming current CNR requirements as standards, significant dose reduction in FFDM cannot be achieved. Only by compromising low contrast CNR levels AGD of up to 40% can be saved at current standards of SNR and high contrast CNR.

  6. Acceptance test procedure for K basins dose reduction project clean and coat equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Creed, R.F.

    1996-03-11

    This document is the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the clean and coat equipment designed by Oceaneering Hanford, Inc. under purchase order MDK-XVC-406988 for use in the 105 K East Basin. The ATP provides the guidelines and criteria to test the equipment`s ability to clean and coat the concrete perimeter, divider walls, and dummy elevator pit above the existing water level. This equipment was designed and built in support of the Spent Nuclear Fuel, Dose Reduction Project. The ATP will be performed at the 305 test facility in the 300 Area at Hanford. The test results will be documented in WHC-SD-SNF-ATR-020.

  7. Lipowitz metal shielding thickness for dose reduction of 6-20 MeV electrons.

    PubMed

    Purdy, J A; Choi, M C; Feldman, A

    1980-01-01

    The relative dose reduction by Lipowitz metal of 6 to 20 MeV electrons from a Varian Associates Clinac-20 linear accelerator has been measured using a parallel plate thin wall ionization chamber. Metal thickness required for a 5% attenuation level for a 10 X 10 cm2 field are as follows: 6 MeV-2.3 mm, 9 MeV-4.4 mm, 12 MeV-8.5 mm, 16 MeV--18.0 mm, 20 MeV-25.0 mm. PMID:7393151

  8. A low dose simulation tool for CT systems with energy integrating detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zabic, Stanislav; Morton, Thomas; Brown, Kevin M.; Wang Qiu

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new strategy for simulating low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans using real scans of a higher dose as an input. The tool is verified against simulations and real scans and compared to other approaches found in the literature. Methods: The conditional variance identity is used to properly account for the variance of the input high-dose data, and a formula is derived for generating a new Poisson noise realization which has the same mean and variance as the true low-dose data. The authors also derive a formula for the inclusion of real samples of detector noise, properly scaled according to the level of the simulated x-ray signals. Results: The proposed method is shown to match real scans in number of experiments. Noise standard deviation measurements in simulated low-dose reconstructions of a 35 cm water phantom match real scans in a range from 500 to 10 mA with less than 5% error. Mean and variance of individual detector channels are shown to match closely across the detector array. Finally, the visual appearance of noise and streak artifacts is shown to match in real scans even under conditions of photon-starvation (with tube currents as low as 10 and 80 mA). Additionally, the proposed method is shown to be more accurate than previous approaches (1) in achieving the correct mean and variance in reconstructed images from pure-Poisson noise simulations (with no detector noise) under photon-starvation conditions, and (2) in simulating the correct noise level and detector noise artifacts in real low-dose scans. Conclusions: The proposed method can accurately simulate low-dose CT data starting from high-dose data, including effects from photon starvation and detector noise. This is potentially a very useful tool in helping to determine minimum dose requirements for a wide range of clinical protocols and advanced reconstruction algorithms.

  9. Simulated scatter performance of an inverse-geometry dedicated breast CT system

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagtani, Reema; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this work was to quantify the effects of scatter for inverse-geometry dedicated breast CT compared to cone-beam breast CT through simulations. The inverse geometry was previously proposed as an alternative to cone-beam acquisition for volumetric CT. The inverse geometry consists of a large-area scanned-source opposite a detector array that is smaller in the transverse direction. While the gantry rotates, the x-ray beam is rapidly sequenced through an array of positions, acquiring a truncated projection image at each position. Inverse-geometry CT (IGCT) is expected to detect less scatter than cone-beam methods because only a fraction of the object is irradiated at any time and the fast detector isolates the measurements from sequential x-ray beams. An additional scatter benefit is the increased air gap due to the inverted geometry. In this study, we modeled inverse-geometry and cone-beam dedicated breast CT systems of equivalent resolution, field of view, and photon fluence. Monte Carlo simulations generated scatter and primary projections of three cylindrical phantoms of diameters 10, 14, and 18 cm composed of 50% adipose/50% glandular tissue. The scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) was calculated for each breast diameter. Monte Carlo simulations were combined with analytical simulations to generate inverse-geometry and cone-beam images of breast phantoms embedded with tumors. Noise representing the photon fluence of a realistic breast CT scan was added to the simulated projections. Cone-beam data were reconstructed with and without an ideal scatter correction. The CNR between breast tumor and background was compared for the inverse and cone-beam geometries for the three phantom diameters. Results demonstrated an order of magnitude reduction in SPR for the IGCT system compared to the cone-beam system. For example, the peak IGCT SPRs were 0.05 and 0.09 for the 14 and 18 cm phantoms, respectively, compared to 0.42 and 1 for the cone-beam system. For both

  10. Respiratory regularity gated 4D CT acquisition: concepts and proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Keall, P J; Vedam, S S; George, R; Williamson, J F

    2007-09-01

    Four-dimensional CT images are generally sorted through a post-acquisition procedure correlating images with a time-synchronized external respiration signal. The patient's ability to maintain reproducible respiration is the limiting factor during 4D CT, where artifacts occur in approximately 85% of scans with current technology. To reduce these artifacts and their subsequent effects during radiotherapy planning, a method for improved 4D CT image acquisition that relies on gating 4D CT acquisition based on the real time monitoring of the respiration signal has been proposed. The respiration signal and CT data acquisition are linked, such that data from irregular breathing cycles, which cause artifacts, are not acquired by gating CT acquisition by the respiratory signal. A proof-of-principle application of the respiratory regularity gated 4D CT method using patient respiratory signals demonstrates the potential of this method to reduce artifacts currently found in 4D CT scans. Numerical simulations indicate a potential reduction in motion within a respiratory phase bin by 20-40% depending on tolerances chosen. Additional advantages of the proposed method are dose reduction by eliminating unnecessary oversampling and obviating the need for post-processing to create the 4D CT data set. PMID:18044305

  11. Watertight modeling and segmentation of bifurcated Coronary arteries for blood flow simulation using CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haoyin; Sun, Peng; Ha, Seongmin; Lundine, Devon; Xiong, Guanglei

    2016-10-01

    Image-based simulation of blood flow using computational fluid dynamics has been shown to play an important role in the diagnosis of ischemic coronary artery disease. Accurate extraction of complex coronary artery structures in a watertight geometry is a prerequisite, but manual segmentation is both tedious and subjective. Several semi- and fully automated coronary artery extraction approaches have been developed but have faced several challenges. Conventional voxel-based methods allow for watertight segmentation but are slow and difficult to incorporate expert knowledge. Machine learning based methods are relatively fast and capture rich information embedded in manual annotations. Although sufficient for visualization and analysis of coronary anatomy, these methods cannot be used directly for blood flow simulation if the coronary vasculature is represented as a loose combination of tubular structures and the bifurcation geometry is improperly modeled. In this paper, we propose a novel method to extract branching coronary arteries from CT imaging with a focus on explicit bifurcation modeling and application of machine learning. A bifurcation lumen is firstly modeled by generating the convex hull to join tubular vessel branches. Guided by the pre-determined centerline, machine learning based segmentation is performed to adapt the bifurcation lumen model to target vessel boundaries and smoothed by subdivision surfaces. Our experiments show the constructed coronary artery geometry from CT imaging is accurate by comparing results against the manually annotated ground-truths, and can be directly applied to coronary blood flow simulation. PMID:27490317

  12. Dose Reduction Study in Vaginal Balloon Packing Filled With Contrast for HDR Brachytherapy Treatment;HDR; Uterine cervix cancer; Vaginal balloon packing; Contrast; Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Amarjit S.; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Biagioli, Matthew C.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Vaginal balloon packing is a means to displace organs at risk during high dose rate brachytherapy of the uterine cervix. We tested the hypothesis that contrast-filled vaginal balloon packing reduces radiation dose to organs at risk, such as the bladder and rectum, in comparison to water- or air-filled balloons. Methods and Materials: In a phantom study, semispherical vaginal packing balloons were filled with air, saline solution, and contrast agents. A high dose rate iridium-192 source was placed on the anterior surface of the balloon, and the diode detector was placed on the posterior surface. Dose ratios were taken with each material in the balloon. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, by use of the MC computer program DOSXYZnrc, were performed to study dose reduction vs. balloon size and contrast material, including commercially available iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents. Results: Measured dose ratios on the phantom with the balloon radius of 3.4 cm were 0.922 {+-} 0.002 for contrast/saline solution and 0.808 {+-} 0.001 for contrast/air. The corresponding ratios by MC simulations were 0.895 {+-} 0.010 and 0.781 {+-} 0.010. The iodine concentration in the contrast was 23.3% by weight. The dose reduction of contrast-filled balloon ranges from 6% to 15% compared with water-filled balloon and 11% to 26% compared with air-filled balloon, with a balloon size range between 1.4 and 3.8 cm, and iodine concentration in contrast of 24.9%. The dose reduction was proportional to the contrast agent concentration. The gadolinium-based contrast agents showed less dose reduction because of much lower concentrations in their solutions. Conclusions: The dose to the posterior wall of the bladder and the anterior wall of the rectum can be reduced if the vaginal balloon is filled with contrast agent in comparison to vaginal balloons filled with saline solution or air.

  13. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  14. Simulating nodules in chest radiographs with real nodules from multi-slice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilham, Arnold; van Ginneken, Bram

    2006-03-01

    To improve the detection of nodules in chest radiographs, large databases of chest radiographs with annotated, proven nodules are needed for training of both radiologists and computer-aided detection systems. The construction of such databases is a laborious and time-consuming task. This study presents a novel technique to produce large amounts of chest x-rays with annotated, simulated nodules. Realistic nodules in radiographs are generated using real nodules segmented from CT images. Results from an observer study indicate that the simulated nodules can not be distinguished from real nodules. This method has great potential to aid the development of automated detection systems and to generate teaching files for human observers.

  15. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy during Methadone Dose Reduction: Rationale, Treatment Description, and a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Stotts, Angela L.; Masuda, Akihiko; Wilson, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Many clients who undergo methadone maintenance (MM) treatment for heroin and other opiate dependence prefer abstinence from methadone. Attempts at methadone detoxification are often unsuccessful, however, due to distressing physical as well as psychological symptoms. Outcomes from a MM client who voluntarily participated in an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) – based methadone detoxification program are presented. The program consisted of a 1-month stabilization and 5-month gradual methadone dose reduction period, combined with weekly individual ACT sessions. Urine samples were collected twice weekly to assess for use of illicit drugs. The participant successfully completed the program and had favorable drug use outcomes during the course of treatment, and at the one-month and one-year follow-ups. Innovative behavior therapies, such as ACT, that focus on acceptance of the inevitable distress associated with opiate withdrawal may improve methadone detoxification outcomes. PMID:20628479

  16. Analysis of uncertainties in Monte Carlo simulated organ dose for chest CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muryn, John S.; Morgan, Ashraf G.; Segars, W. P.; Liptak, Chris L.; Dong, Frank F.; Primak, Andrew N.; Li, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    In Monte Carlo simulation of organ dose for a chest CT scan, many input parameters are required (e.g., half-value layer of the x-ray energy spectrum, effective beam width, and anatomical coverage of the scan). The input parameter values are provided by the manufacturer, measured experimentally, or determined based on typical clinical practices. The goal of this study was to assess the uncertainties in Monte Carlo simulated organ dose as a result of using input parameter values that deviate from the truth (clinical reality). Organ dose from a chest CT scan was simulated for a standard-size female phantom using a set of reference input parameter values (treated as the truth). To emulate the situation in which the input parameter values used by the researcher may deviate from the truth, additional simulations were performed in which errors were purposefully introduced into the input parameter values, the effects of which on organ dose per CTDIvol were analyzed. Our study showed that when errors in half value layer were within ± 0.5 mm Al, the errors in organ dose per CTDIvol were less than 6%. Errors in effective beam width of up to 3 mm had negligible effect (< 2.5%) on organ dose. In contrast, when the assumed anatomical center of the patient deviated from the true anatomical center by 5 cm, organ dose errors of up to 20% were introduced. Lastly, when the assumed extra scan length was longer by 4 cm than the true value, dose errors of up to 160% were found. The results answer the important question: to what level of accuracy each input parameter needs to be determined in order to obtain accurate organ dose results.

  17. Development of radiation dose reduction techniques for cadmium zinc telluride detectors in molecular breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Michael K.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Weinmann, Amanda; Manduca, Armando; Rhodes, Deborah J.

    2010-08-01

    Background: Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a novel breast imaging technique that uses Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) gamma cameras to detect the uptake of Tc-99m sestamibi in breast tumors. Current techniques employ an administered dose of 20-30 mCi Tc-99m, delivering an effective dose of 6.5-10 mSv to the body. This is ~ 5-10 times that of mammography. The goal of this study was to reduce the radiation dose by a factor of 5-10, while maintaining image quality. Methods: A total of 4 dose reduction schemes were evaluated - a) optimized collimation, b) improved utilization of the energy spectrum below the photopeak, c) adaptive geometric mean algorithm developed for combination of images from opposing detectors, and d) non local means filtering (NLMF) for noise reduction and image enhancement. Validation of the various schemes was performed using a breast phantom containing a variety of tumors and containing activity matched to that observed in clinical studies. Results: Development of tungsten collimators with holes matched to the CZT pixels yielded a 2.1-2.9 gain in system sensitivity. Improved utilization of the energy spectra yielded a 1.5-2.0 gain in sensitivity. Development of a modified geometric mean algorithm yielded a 1.4 reduction in image noise, while retaining contrast. Images of the breast phantom demonstrated that a factor of 5 reduction in dose was achieved. Additional refinements to the NLMF should enable an additional factor of 2 reduction in dose. Conclusion: Significant dose reduction in MBI to levels comparable to mammography can be achieved while maintaining image quality.

  18. Forming Simulation of Thick AFP Laminates and Comparison with Live CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutz, Daniel; Vermilyea, Mark; Bel, Sylvain; Hinterhölzl, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Automated fiber placement (AFP) process can be used to manufacture laminates by laying up unidirectional slit tapes along a desired path and placing multiple layers on top of each other. Usually, the slit tapes are placed direct onto the tooling to attain the final part geometry. Alternatively, the laminate can be built up on a planar substrate and can be subsequently formed into the final shape. This kind of processing allows manufacturing highly curved parts, which may not be possible with the direct placement. In the present work a forming simulation of thick AFP laminates is developed to predict the tapes' orientations and delamination as well as transverse tape spread-ups and separations during the forming process. The simulation model is built up through the material characterization experiments. Validation is performed comparing the results of the simulation vs. the experimental forming on two generic geometries. An optical inspection is made on the external layers of the laminates. In a second step, live computer tomography (CT) scans are used to inspect the tapes within an AFP laminate during forming of an L- and a Z-flange. Tapes re-orientation, gaps and tapes widening are observed experimentally and compared to the simulation results. The simulation is capable to predict the tows orientation and provides indicators concerning the tows spread-up and separation.

  19. Forming Simulation of Thick AFP Laminates and Comparison with Live CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutz, Daniel; Vermilyea, Mark; Bel, Sylvain; Hinterhölzl, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Automated fiber placement (AFP) process can be used to manufacture laminates by laying up unidirectional slit tapes along a desired path and placing multiple layers on top of each other. Usually, the slit tapes are placed direct onto the tooling to attain the final part geometry. Alternatively, the laminate can be built up on a planar substrate and can be subsequently formed into the final shape. This kind of processing allows manufacturing highly curved parts, which may not be possible with the direct placement. In the present work a forming simulation of thick AFP laminates is developed to predict the tapes' orientations and delamination as well as transverse tape spread-ups and separations during the forming process. The simulation model is built up through the material characterization experiments. Validation is performed comparing the results of the simulation vs. the experimental forming on two generic geometries. An optical inspection is made on the external layers of the laminates. In a second step, live computer tomography (CT) scans are used to inspect the tapes within an AFP laminate during forming of an L- and a Z-flange. Tapes re-orientation, gaps and tapes widening are observed experimentally and compared to the simulation results. The simulation is capable to predict the tows orientation and provides indicators concerning the tows spread-up and separation.

  20. MO-E-17A-03: Monte Carlo CT Dose Calculation: A Comparison Between Experiment and Simulation Using ARCHER-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Du, X; Su, L; Gao, Y; Ji, W; Xu, X; Zhang, D; Shi, J; Liu, B; Kalra, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the CT doses derived from the experiments and GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, using a human cadaver and ATOM phantom. Methods: The cadaver of an 88-year old male and the ATOM phantom were scanned by a GE LightSpeed Pro 16 MDCT. For the cadaver study, the Thimble chambers (Model 10×5−0.6CT and 10×6−0.6CT) were used to measure the absorbed dose in different deep and superficial organs. Whole-body scans were first performed to construct a complete image database for MC simulations. Abdomen/pelvis helical scans were then conducted using 120/100 kVps, 300 mAs and a pitch factor of 1.375:1. For the ATOM phantom study, the OSL dosimeters were used and helical scans were performed using 120 kVp and x, y, z tube current modulation (TCM). For the MC simulations, sufficient particles were run in both cases such that the statistical errors of the results by ARCHER-CT were limited to 1%. Results: For the human cadaver scan, the doses to the stomach, liver, colon, left kidney, pancreas and urinary bladder were compared. The difference between experiments and simulations was within 19% for the 120 kVp and 25% for the 100 kVp. For the ATOM phantom scan, the doses to the lung, thyroid, esophagus, heart, stomach, liver, spleen, kidneys and thymus were compared. The difference was 39.2% for the esophagus, and within 16% for all other organs. Conclusion: In this study the experimental and simulated CT doses were compared. Their difference is primarily attributed to the systematic errors of the MC simulations, including the accuracy of the bowtie filter modeling, and the algorithm to generate voxelized phantom from DICOM images. The experimental error is considered small and may arise from the dosimeters. R01 grant (R01EB015478) from National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

  1. Experimental validation of a single shaped filter approach for CT using variable source-to-filter distance for examination of arbitrary object diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lück, Ferdinand; Kolditz, Daniel; Hupfer, Martin; Steiding, Christian; Kalender, Willi A.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the use of a single shaped filter (SF) for computed tomography (CT) using variable source-to-filter distance (SFD) for the examination of different object diameters. A SF was designed by performing simulations with the purpose of achieving noise homogeneity in the reconstructed volume and dose reduction for arbitrary phantom diameters. This was accomplished by using a filter design method thats target is to achieve a homogeneous detector noise, but also uses a correction factor for the filtered back projection process. According to simulation results, a single SF designed for one of the largest phantom diameters meets the requirements for all diameters when SFD can be adjusted. To validate these results, a SF made of aluminium alloy was manufactured. Measurements were performed on a CT scanner with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms of diameters from 40-100 mm. The filter was positioned at SFDs ranging from 97-168 mm depending on the phantom diameter. Image quality was evaluated for the reconstructed volume by assessing CT value accuracy, noise homogeneity, contrast-to-noise ratio weighted by dose (CNRD) and spatial resolution. Furthermore, scatter distribution was determined with the use of a beam-stop phantom. Dose was measured for a PMMA phantom with a diameter of 100 mm using a calibrated ionization chamber. The application of a single SF at variable SFD led to improved noise uniformity and dose reduction: noise homogeneity was improved from 15% down to about 0%, and dose was reduced by about 37%. Furthermore, scatter dropped by about 32%, which led to reduced cupping artifacts and improved CT value accuracy. Spatial resolution and CNRD was not affected by the SF. By means of a single SF with variable SFD designed for CT, significant dose reduction can be achieved and image quality can be improved by reducing noise inhomogeneity as well as scatter-induced artifacts.

  2. Quantifying the image quality and dose reduction of respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography with patient-measured breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Benjamin J.; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Kipritidis, John; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory triggered four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is a novel technique that uses a patient’s respiratory signal to drive the image acquisition with the goal of imaging dose reduction without degrading image quality. This work investigates image quality and dose using patient-measured respiratory signals for RT 4D CBCT simulations. Studies were performed that simulate a 4D CBCT image acquisition using both the novel RT 4D CBCT technique and a conventional 4D CBCT technique. A set containing 111 free breathing lung cancer patient respiratory signal files was used to create 111 pairs of RT 4D CBCT and conventional 4D CBCT image sets from realistic simulations of a 4D CBCT system using a Rando phantom and the digital phantom, XCAT. Each of these image sets were compared to a ground truth dataset from which a mean absolute pixel difference (MAPD) metric was calculated to quantify the degradation of image quality. The number of projections used in each simulation was counted and was assumed as a surrogate for imaging dose. Based on 111 breathing traces, when comparing RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, the average image quality was reduced by 7.6% (Rando study) and 11.1% (XCAT study). However, the average imaging dose reduction was 53% based on needing fewer projections (617 on average) than conventional 4D CBCT (1320 projections). The simulation studies have demonstrated that the RT 4D CBCT method can potentially offer a 53% saving in imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT in simulation studies using a wide range of patient-measured breathing traces with a minimal impact on image quality.

  3. SU-E-J-183: Quantifying the Image Quality and Dose Reduction of Respiratory Triggered 4D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography with Patient- Measured Breathing

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B; OBrien, R; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory triggered four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is a novel technique that uses a patient's respiratory signal to drive the image acquisition with the goal of imaging dose reduction without degrading image quality. This work investigates image quality and dose using patient-measured respiratory signals for RT 4D CBCT simulations instead of synthetic sinusoidal signals used in previous work. Methods: Studies were performed that simulate a 4D CBCT image acquisition using both the novel RT 4D CBCT technique and a conventional 4D CBCT technique from a database of oversampled Rando phantom CBCT projections. A database containing 111 free breathing lung cancer patient respiratory signal files was used to create 111 RT 4D CBCT and 111 conventional 4D CBCT image datasets from realistic simulations of a 4D RT CBCT system. Each of these image datasets were compared to a ground truth dataset from which a root mean square error (RMSE) metric was calculated to quantify the degradation of image quality. The number of projections used in each simulation is counted and was assumed as a surrogate for imaging dose. Results: Based on 111 breathing traces, when comparing RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT the average image quality was reduced by 7.6%. However, the average imaging dose reduction was 53% based on needing fewer projections (617 on average) than conventional 4D CBCT (1320 projections). Conclusion: The simulation studies using a wide range of patient breathing traces have demonstrated that the RT 4D CBCT method can potentially offer a substantial saving of imaging dose of 53% on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT in simulation studies with a minimal impact on image quality. A patent application (PCT/US2012/048693) has been filed which is related to this work.

  4. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinato, W.; Santos, W. S.; Paschoal, C. M. M.; Souza, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current-time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  5. Simulator/planner for CT-directed needle biopsy of the spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kevin R.; Lathan, Corinna E.; Carignan, Craig R.

    1998-06-01

    Minimally invasive spine procedures can spare the patient the trauma associated with open surgery. However, these procedures can be difficult to learn and require extensive training for proficiency. At Georgetown University Medical Center, spine biopsies are often done under computed tomography (CT) guidance. While this technique is effective, it is time consuming since the biopsy needle must be advanced slowly and its position checked several times to ensure vital organs are not damaged. A research project is being conducted to develop a computer-guided, image-based minimally invasive system for therapy and surgical techniques. As an initial step, a needle biopsy simulator for training is being developed. In the next phase, this simulator could also be used for preoperative planning. The simulator consists of two major modules: a visual module to display the medical images and biopsy tools and a haptic module to provide force feedback based on the needle position. The haptic module incorporates a robotic device that provides force feedback in three translational directions. In the future, it is anticipated that semi- autonomous robotic systems, in which the human controls some degrees of freedom and the robot the other degrees of freedom, will be developed for interventional tasks such as needle spine biopsy. The simulator described here can then be used as a 'master arm' to control the robotic system that actually performs the intervention.

  6. On the need to compensate edema-induced dose reductions in pre-planned 131Cs prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z. Jay; Deng, Jun; Roberts, Kenneth; Nath, Ravinder

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Surgical-trauma-induced edema and its protracted resolution can lead to significant dose reduction in pre-planned 131Cs prostate brachytherapy. The purpose of this work was to examine whether these dose reductions should be actively compensated and to estimate the magnitude of additional irradiations needed for dose compensation. Methods and Materials Quantitative edema resolution characteristics observed by Waterman et. el. were used to examine the physical and radiobiological effects of prostate edema in pre-planned 131Cs implants. The need for dose compensation was assessed based on the dose-responses observed in 125I and 103Pd prostate implants. Biologically effective dose calculated with full consideration of edema evolution was used to estimate the additional irradiations needed for dose compensation. Results Edema-induced dose reduction in pre-planned 131Cs implants could easily exceed 10% prescription dose for implants with moderate or large edemas. These dose reductions could lead to more than 10% reduction in biochemical recurrence-free survival for individual patients if the effect of edema was ignored. For a prescribed dose of 120 Gy, the number of 2-Gy external-beam fractions needed to compensate a 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, or 25% edema-induced dose reduction could be 1, 4, 6, 7, or 9, respectively, for prostate cancers with a median potential doubling time of 42 days. The required additional irradiation increases for tumors that are fast growing and/or are less efficient in sub-lethal damage repair. Conclusions Compensation of edema-induced dose reductions in pre-planned 131Cs prostate brachytherapy should be actively considered for those implants with moderate or large edemas. PMID:17980500

  7. On the Need to Compensate for Edema-Induced Dose Reductions in Preplanned {sup 131}Cs Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z. Jay Deng Jun; Roberts, Kenneth; Nath, Ravinder

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical trauma-induced edema and its protracted resolution can lead to significant dose reductions in preplanned {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy. The purpose of this work was to examine whether these dose reductions should be actively compensated for and to estimate the magnitude of the additional irradiation needed for dose compensation. Methods and Materials: The quantitative edema resolution characteristics observed by Waterman et al. were used to examine the physical and radiobiologic effects of prostate edema in preplanned {sup 131}Cs implants. The need for dose compensation was assessed using the dose responses observed in {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd prostate implants. The biologically effective dose, calculated with full consideration of edema evolution, was used to estimate the additional irradiation needed for dose compensation. Results: We found that the edema-induced dose reduction in preplanned {sup 131}Cs implants could easily exceed 10% of the prescription dose for implants with moderate or large edema. These dose reductions could lead to a >10% reduction in the biochemical recurrence-free survival for individual patients if the effect of edema was ignored. For a prescribed dose of 120 Gy, the number of 2-Gy external beam fractions needed to compensate for a 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% edema-induced dose reduction would be one, four, six, seven, and nine, respectively, for prostate cancer with a median potential doubling time of 42 days. The required additional irradiation increased for fast-growing tumors and/or those less efficient in sublethal damage repair. Conclusion: Compensation of edema-induced dose reductions in preplanned {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy should be actively considered for those implants with moderate or large edema.

  8. Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT.

    PubMed

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R; La Riviere, Patrick J; Alessio, Adam M

    2014-04-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml (min g)(-1), cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min(-1)). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3 s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11 000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This

  9. Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-04-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml (min g)-1, cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min-1). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3 s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11 000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This suggests that

  10. A TR-induced algorithm for hot spots elimination through CT-scan HIFU simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Nicolas; Okita, Kohei; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2011-09-01

    Although nowadays widely spread for imaging and treatments uses, HIFU techniques are still limited by the distortion of the wavefront due to refraction and reflection on the inhomogeneous media inside the human body. CT-scan Time Reversal (TR) procedure has risen as a promising candidate for focus control. A finite difference time domain parallelized code is used to provide simulations of TR-enhanced propagation through elements of the human body and implement a simple algorithm to address the issue of grating lobes, i.e secondary peaks of pressure due to natural diffraction by phased arrays and enhanced by medium heterogeneity. Using an iterative, progressive process combining secondary sound sources and independent signal summation, the primary peak is strengthened while secondary peaks are increasingly obliterated. This method supports the feasibility of precise modification and enhancement of the pressure profile in the targeted area through Time Reversal based solutions.

  11. Three dimensional simulation of fluid flow in X-ray CT images of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Omari, A.; Masad, E.

    2004-11-01

    A numerical scheme is developed in order to simulate fluid flow in three dimensional (3-D) microstructures. The governing equations for steady incompressible flow are solved using the semi-implicit method for pressure-linked equations (SIMPLE) finite difference scheme within a non-staggered grid system that represents the 3-D microstructure. This system allows solving the governing equations using only one computational cell. The numerical scheme is verified through simulating fluid flow in idealized 3-D microstructures with known closed form solutions for permeability. The numerical factors affecting the solution in terms of convergence and accuracy are also discussed. These factors include the resolution of the analysed microstructure and the truncation criterion. Fluid flow in 2-D X-ray computed tomography (CT) images of real porous media microstructure is also simulated using this numerical model. These real microstructures include field cores of asphalt mixes, laboratory linear kneading compactor (LKC) specimens, and laboratory Superpave gyratory compactor (SGC) specimens. The numerical results for the permeability of the real microstructures are compared with the results from closed form solutions. Copyright

  12. Cone-beam CT breast imaging with a flat panel detector: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingyun; Shaw, Chris C.; Tu, Shu-Ju; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Liu, Xinming; Kappadath, S. C.

    2005-04-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of using a flat panel based cone-beam computer tomography (CT) system for 3-D breast imaging with computer simulation and imaging experiments. In our simulation study, 3-D phantoms were analytically modeled to simulate a breast loosely compressed into cylindrical shape with embedded soft tissue masses and calcifications. Attenuation coefficients were estimated to represent various types of breast tissue, soft tissue masses and calcifications to generate realistic image signal and contrast. Projection images were computed to incorporate x-ray attenuation, geometric magnification, x-ray detection, detector blurring, image pixelization and digitization. Based on the two-views mammography comparable dose level on the central axis of the phantom (also the rotation axis), x-ray kVp/filtration, transmittance through the phantom, detected quantum efficiency (DQE), exposure level, and imaging geometry, the photon fluence was estimated and used to estimate the phantom noise level on a pixel-by-pixel basis. This estimated noise level was then used with the random number generator to produce and add a fluctuation component to the noiseless transmitted image signal. The noise carrying projection images were then convolved with a Gaussian-like kernel, computed from measured 1-D line spread function (LSF) to simulated detector blurring. Additional 2-D Gaussian-like kernel is designed to suppress the noise fluctuation that inherently originates from projection images so that the reconstructed image detectability of low contrast masses phantom can be improved. Image reconstruction was performed using the Feldkamp algorithm. All simulations were performed on a 24 PC (2.4 GHz Dual-Xeon CPU) cluster with MPI parallel programming. With 600 mrads mean glandular dose (MGD) at the phantom center, soft tissue masses as small as 1 mm in diameter can be detected in a 10 cm diameter 50% glandular 50% adipose or fatter breast tissue, and 2 mm or larger

  13. Estimation of absorbed doses from paediatric cone-beam CT scans: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Toncheva, Greta; Frush, Donald P; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a dose estimation tool with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A 5-y-old paediatric anthropomorphic phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned to create a voxelised phantom and used as an input for the abdominal cone-beam CT in a BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system. An X-ray tube model of the Varian On-Board Imager((R)) was built in the MC system. To validate the model, the absorbed doses at each organ location for standard-dose and low-dose modes were measured in the physical phantom with MOSFET detectors; effective doses were also calculated. In the results, the MC simulations were comparable to the MOSFET measurements. This voxelised phantom approach could produce a more accurate dose estimation than the stylised phantom method. This model can be easily applied to multi-detector CT dosimetry. PMID:19889800

  14. Cone Beam Breast CT with a Flat Panel Detector- Simulation, Implementation and Demonstration.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Chris; Chen, Lingyun; Altunbas, Mastafa; Tu, Shuju; Wang, Tian-Peng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Cheenu Kappadath, S; Meng, Yang; Liu, Xinming

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes our experiences in the simulation, implementation and application of a flat panel detector based cone beam computed tomography (CT) imaging system for dedicated 3-D breast imaging. In our simulation study, the breast was analytically modeled as a cylinder of breast tissue loosely molded into cylindrical shape with embedded soft tissue masses and calcifications. Attenuation coefficients for various types of breast tissue, soft tissue masses and calcifications were estimated for various kVp's to generate simulated image signals. Projection images were computed to incorporate x-ray attenuation, geometric magnification, x-ray detection, detector blurring, image pixelization and digitization. Based on the x-ray kVp/filtration used, transmittance through the phantom, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), exposure level, and imaging geometry, the photon fluence was estimated and used to compute the quantum noise level on a pixel-by-pixel basis for various dose levels at the isocenter. This estimated noise level was then used with a random number generator to generate and add a fluctuation component to the noiseless transmitted image signal. The noise carrying projection images were then convolved with a Gaussian-like kernel, computed from measured 1-D line spread function (LSF) to simulate detector blurring. Additional 2-D Gaussian filtering was applied to the projection images and tested for improving the detection of soft tissue masses and calcifications in the reconstructed images. Reconstruction was performed using the Feldkamp filtered backprojection algorithm. All simulations were performed on a 24 PC (2.4 GHz Dual-Xeon CPU) cluster with MPI parallel programming. PMID:17281227

  15. An adaptive gating approach for x-ray dose reduction during cardiac interventional procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Malek, A.; Yassa, F.; Bloomer, J. )

    1994-03-01

    The increasing number of cardiac interventional procedures has resulted in a tremendous increase in the absorbed x-ray dose by radiologists as well as patients. A new method is presented for x-ray dose reduction which utilizes adaptive tube pulse-rate scheduling in pulsed fluoroscopic systems. In the proposed system, pulse-rate scheduling depends on the heart muscle activity phase determined through continuous guided segmentation of the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG). Displaying images generated at the proposed adaptive nonuniform rate is visually unacceptable; therefore, a frame-filling approach is devised to ensure a 30 frame/sec display rate. The authors adopted two approaches for the frame-filling portion of the system depending on the imaging mode used in the procedure. During cine-mode imaging (high x-ray dose), collected image frame-to-frame pixel motion is estimated using a pel-recursive algorithm followed by motion-based pixel interpolation to estimate the frames necessary to increase the rate to 30 frames/sec. The other frame-filling approach is adopted during fluoro-mode imaging (low x-ray dose), characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio images. This approach consists of simply holding the last collected frame for as many frames as necessary to maintain the real-time display rate.

  16. Radiation dose reduction in digital radiography using wavelet-based image processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruyuki; Tsai, Du-Yih; Lee, Yongbum; Matsuyama, Eri; Kojima, Katsuyuki

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of the use of wavelet transform for image processing on radiation dose reduction in computed radiography (CR), by measuring various physical characteristics of the wavelet-transformed images. Moreover, we propose a wavelet-based method for offering a possibility to reduce radiation dose while maintaining a clinically acceptable image quality. The proposed method integrates the advantages of a previously proposed technique, i.e., sigmoid-type transfer curve for wavelet coefficient weighting adjustment technique, as well as a wavelet soft-thresholding technique. The former can improve contrast and spatial resolution of CR images, the latter is able to improve the performance of image noise. In the investigation of physical characteristics, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and contrast-to-noise ratio of CR images processed by the proposed method and other different methods were measured and compared. Furthermore, visual evaluation was performed using Scheffe's pair comparison method. Experimental results showed that the proposed method could improve overall image quality as compared to other methods. Our visual evaluation showed that an approximately 40% reduction in exposure dose might be achieved in hip joint radiography by using the proposed method.

  17. Modeling and testing of a non-standard scanning device with dose reduction potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de las Heras, Hugo; Tischenko, Oleg; Panzer, Werner; Xu, Yuan; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2007-03-01

    A non-standard scanning device with dose-reduction potential was proposed at the SPIE Medical Imaging conference 2006. The new device obtains the Radon data after the X-ray beam is collimated through a special mask. This mask is combined with a new geometry that permits an efficient data collection, thus the device has the potential of reducing the dose by a factor of two. In this work, we report a prototype of the new device and experimental data acquisition using only the mask of the new scanning geometry. In order to obtain the optimal parameters for the scanning device, several factors have been considered, including detector elements and shielding shape, fan beam angle, speed of the source rotation and materials employed. The calibration of the detector elements needs especial attention, due to the dependence of the detector response on the energy of the X-rays. A simplfied version of the device was designed and mounted. Phantom data were acquired using this prototype and were used to test the performance of the new design. The results obtained are highly promising, even though the prototype developed does not make use yet of all the potential features proposed in the theory.

  18. A computer simulation method for low-dose CT images by use of real high-dose images: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Takenaga, Tomomi; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Goto, Makoto; Hatemura, Masahiro; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Practical simulations of low-dose CT images have a possibility of being helpful means for optimization of the CT exposure dose. Because current methods reported by several researchers are limited to specific vendor platforms and generally rely on raw sinogram data that are difficult to access, we have developed a new computerized scheme for producing simulated low-dose CT images from real high-dose images without use of raw sinogram data or of a particular phantom. Our computerized scheme for low-dose CT simulation was based on the addition of a simulated noise image to a real high-dose CT image reconstructed by the filtered back-projection algorithm. First, a sinogram was generated from the forward projection of a high-dose CT image. Then, an additional noise sinogram resulting from use of a reduced exposure dose was estimated from a predetermined noise model. Finally, a noise CT image was reconstructed with a predetermined filter and was added to the real high-dose CT image to create a simulated low-dose CT image. The noise power spectrum and modulation transfer function of the simulated low-dose images were very close to those of the real low-dose images. In order to confirm the feasibility of our method, we applied this method to clinical cases which were examined with the high dose initially and then followed with a low-dose CT. In conclusion, our proposed method could simulate the low-dose CT images from their real high-dose images with sufficient accuracy and could be used for determining the optimal dose setting for various clinical CT examinations. PMID:26290269

  19. Region-oriented CT image representation for reducing computing time of Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrut, David; Guigues, Laurent

    2008-04-15

    Purpose. We propose a new method for efficient particle transportation in voxelized geometry for Monte Carlo simulations. We describe its use for calculating dose distribution in CT images for radiation therapy. Material and methods. The proposed approach, based on an implicit volume representation named segmented volume, coupled with an adapted segmentation procedure and a distance map, allows us to minimize the number of boundary crossings, which slows down simulation. The method was implemented with the GEANT4 toolkit and compared to four other methods: One box per voxel, parameterized volumes, octree-based volumes, and nested parameterized volumes. For each representation, we compared dose distribution, time, and memory consumption. Results. The proposed method allows us to decrease computational time by up to a factor of 15, while keeping memory consumption low, and without any modification of the transportation engine. Speeding up is related to the geometry complexity and the number of different materials used. We obtained an optimal number of steps with removal of all unnecessary steps between adjacent voxels sharing a similar material. However, the cost of each step is increased. When the number of steps cannot be decreased enough, due for example, to the large number of material boundaries, such a method is not considered suitable. Conclusion. This feasibility study shows that optimizing the representation of an image in memory potentially increases computing efficiency. We used the GEANT4 toolkit, but we could potentially use other Monte Carlo simulation codes. The method introduces a tradeoff between speed and geometry accuracy, allowing computational time gain. However, simulations with GEANT4 remain slow and further work is needed to speed up the procedure while preserving the desired accuracy.

  20. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Boone, JM; Abbey, CK; Hargreaves, J; Bateni, C; Lindfors, KK; Yang, K; Nosratieh, A; Hernandez, A; Gazi, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Methods Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33 mm, 0.71 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast. Results The percent correct of the human observer’s responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p<0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist’s performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92 % correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67 % for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the

  1. Dosimetric investigation of proton therapy on CT-based patient data using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongsan, T.; Liamsuwan, T.; Tangboonduangjit, P.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of radiotherapy is to deliver high radiation dose to the tumor with low radiation dose to healthy tissues. Protons have Bragg peaks that give high radiation dose to the tumor but low exit dose or dose tail. Therefore, proton therapy is promising for treating deep- seated tumors and tumors locating close to organs at risk. Moreover, the physical characteristic of protons is suitable for treating cancer in pediatric patients. This work developed a computational platform for calculating proton dose distribution using the Monte Carlo (MC) technique and patient's anatomical data. The studied case is a pediatric patient with a primary brain tumor. PHITS will be used for MC simulation. Therefore, patient-specific CT-DICOM files were converted to the PHITS input. A MATLAB optimization program was developed to create a beam delivery control file for this study. The optimization program requires the proton beam data. All these data were calculated in this work using analytical formulas and the calculation accuracy was tested, before the beam delivery control file is used for MC simulation. This study will be useful for researchers aiming to investigate proton dose distribution in patients but do not have access to proton therapy machines.

  2. Patient radiation dose reduction using an X-ray imaging noise reduction technology for cardiac angiography and intervention.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Funatsu, Atsushi; Okada, Tadahisa; Mauti, Maria; Waizumi, Yuki; Yamada, Shinichi

    2016-05-01

    Coronary angiography and intervention can expose patients to high radiation dose. This retrospective study quantifies the patient dose reduction due to the introduction of a novel X-ray imaging noise reduction technology using advanced real-time image noise reduction algorithms and optimized acquisition chain for fluoroscopy and exposure in interventional cardiology. Patient, procedure and radiation dose data were retrospectively collected in the period August 2012-August 2013 for 883 patients treated with the image noise reduction technology (referred as "new system"). The same data were collected for 1083 patients in the period April 2011-July 2012 with a system using state-of-the-art image processing and reference acquisition chain (referred as "reference system"). Procedures were divided into diagnostic (CAG) and intervention (PCI). Acquisition parameters such as fluoroscopy time, volume of contrast medium, number of exposure images and number of stored fluoroscopy images were collected to classify procedure complexity. The procedural dose reduction was investigated separately for three main cardiologists. The new system provides significant dose reduction compared to the reference system. Median DAP values decreased for all procedures (p < 0.0001) from 172.7 to 59.4 Gy cm(2), for CAG from 155.1 to 52.0 Gy cm(2) and for PCI from 229.0 to 85.8 Gy cm(2) with reduction quantified at 66, 66 and 63 %, respectively. Based on median values, the dose reduction for all procedures was 68, 60 and 67 % for cardiologists 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The X-ray imaging technology combining advanced real-time image noise reduction algorithms and anatomy-specific optimized fluoroscopy and cine acquisition chain provides 66 % patient dose reduction in interventional cardiology. PMID:25840815

  3. SU-E-J-113: The Influence of Optimizing Pediatric CT Simulator Protocols On the Treatment Dose Calculation in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Hu, Q; Tie, J; Wu, H; Deng, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of applying optimized scanning protocols for pediatric CT simulation by quantifying the dosimetric inaccuracy introduced by using a fixed HU to density conversion. Methods: The images of a CIRS electron density reference phantom (Model 062) were acquired by a Siemens CT simulator (Sensation Open) using the following settings of tube voltage and beam current: 120 kV/190mA (the reference protocol used to calibrate CT for our treatment planning system (TPS)); Fixed 190mA combined with all available kV: 80, 100, and 140; fixed 120 kV and various current from 37 to 444 mA (scanner extremes) with interval of 30 mA. To avoid the HU uncertainty of point sampling in the various inserts of known electron densities, the mean CT numbers of the central cylindrical volume were calculated using DICOMan software. The doses per 100 MU to the reference point (SAD=100cm, Depth=10cm, Field=10X10cm, 6MV photon beam) in a virtual cubic phantom (30X30X30cm) were calculated using Eclipse TPS (calculation model: AcurosXB-11031) by assigning the CT numbers to HU of typical materials acquired by various protocols. Results: For the inserts of densities less than muscle, CT number fluctuations of all protocols were within the tolerance of 10 HU as accepted by AAPM-TG66. For more condensed materials, fixed kV yielded stable HU with any mA combination where largest disparities were found in 1750mg/cc insert: HU{sub reference}=1801(106.6cGy), HU{sub minimum}=1799 (106.6cGy, error{sub dose}=0.00%), HU{sub maximum}=1815 (106.8cGy, error{sub dose}=0.19%). Yet greater disagreements were observed with increasing density when kV was modified: HU{sub minimum}=1646 (104.5cGy, error{sub dose}=- 1.97%), HU{sub maximum}=2487 (116.4cGy, error{sub dose}=9.19%) in 1750mg/cc insert. Conclusion: Without affecting treatment dose calculation, personalized mA optimization of CT simulator can be conducted by fixing kV for a better cost-effectiveness of imaging dose and quality

  4. Direct detector radiography versus dual reading computed radiography: feasibility of dose reduction in chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Michael; Uffmann, Martin; Weber, Michael; Prokop, Mathias; Balassy, Csilla; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2006-07-01

    The image quality of dual-reading computed radiography and dose-reduced direct radiography of the chest was compared in a clinical setting. The study group consisted of 50 patients that underwent three posteroanterior chest radiographs within minutes, one image obtained with a dual read-out computed radiography system (CR; Fuji 5501) at regular dose and two images with a flat panel direct detector unit (DR; Diagnost, Philips). The DR images were obtained with the same and with 50% of the dose used for the CR images. Images were evaluated in a blinded side-by-side comparison. Eight radiologists ranked the visually perceivable difference in image quality using a three-point scale. Then, three radiologists scored the visibility of anatomic landmarks in low and high attenuation areas and image noise. Statistical analysis was based on Friedman tests and Wilcoxon rank sum tests at a significance level of P<0.05. DR was judged superior to CR for the delineation of structures in high attenuation areas of the mediastinum even when obtained with 50% less dose (P<0.001). The visibility of most pulmonary structures was judged equivalent with both techniques, regardless of acquisition dose and speed level. Scores for image noise were lower for DR compared with CR, with the exception of DR obtained at a reduced dose. Thus, in this clinical preference study, DR was equivalent or even superior to the most modern dual read-out CR, even when obtained with 50% dose. A further dose reduction does not appear to be feasible for DR without significant loss of image quality. PMID:16404566

  5. Estimation of breast dose saving potential using a breast positioning technique for organ-based tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wanyi; Tian, Xiaoyu; Sturgeon, Gregory; Agasthya, Greeshma; Segars, William Paul; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    In thoracic CT, organ-based tube current modulation (OTCM) reduces breast dose by lowering the tube current in the 120° anterior dose reduction zone of patients. However, in practice the breasts usually expand to an angle larger than the dose reduction zone. This work aims to simulate a breast positioning technique (BPT) to constrain the breast tissue to within the dose reduction zone for OTCM and to evaluate the corresponding potential reduction in breast dose. Thirteen female anthropomorphic computational phantoms were studied (age range: 27-65 y.o., weight range: 52-105.8 kg). Each phantom was modeled in the supine position with and without application of the BPT. Attenuation-based tube current (ATCM, reference mA) was generated by a ray-tracing program, taking into account the patient attenuation change in the longitudinal and angular plane (CAREDose4D, Siemens Healthcare). OTCM was generated by reducing the mA to 20% between +/- 60° anterior of the patient and increasing the mA in the remaining projections correspondingly (X-CARE, Siemens Healthcare) to maintain the mean tube current. Breast tissue dose was estimated using a validated Monte Carlo program for a commercial scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). Compared to standard tube current modulation, breast dose was significantly reduced using OTCM by 19.8+/-4.7%. With the BPT, breast dose was reduced by an additional 20.4+/-6.5% to 37.1+/-6.9%, using the same CTDIvol. BPT was more effective for phantoms simulating women with larger breasts with the average breast dose reduction of 30.2%, 39.2%, and 49.2% from OTCMBP to ATCM, using the same CTDIvol for phantoms with 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5 kg breasts, respectively. This study shows that a specially designed BPT improves the effectiveness of OTCM.

  6. Pore-scale simulation of carbonate dissolution in micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira Nunes, J. P.; Blunt, M. J.; Bijeljic, B.

    2016-02-01

    We present a particle-based method to simulate carbonate dissolution at the pore scale directly on the voxels of three-dimensional micro-CT images. The flow field is computed on the images by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Rock-fluid interaction is modeled using a three-step approach: solute advection, diffusion, and reaction. Advection is simulated with a semianalytical pore-scale streamline tracing algorithm, diffusion by random walk is superimposed, while the reaction rate is defined by the flux of particles through the pore-solid interface. We derive a relationship between the local particle flux and the independently measured batch calcite dissolution rate. We validate our method against a dynamic imaging experiment where a Ketton oolite is imaged during CO2-saturated brine injection at reservoir conditions. The image-calculated increases in porosity and permeability are predicted accurately, and the spatial distribution of the dissolution front is correctly replicated. The experiments and simulations are performed at a high flow rate, in the uniform dissolution regime - Pe ≫ 1 and PeDa ≪ 1—thus extending the reaction throughout the sample. Transport is advection dominated, and dissolution is limited to regions with significant inflow of solute. We show that the sample-averaged reaction rate is 1 order of magnitude lower than that measured in batch reactors. This decrease is the result of restrictions imposed on the flux of solute to the solid surface by the heterogeneous flow field, at the millimeter scale.

  7. X-Ray Dose Reduction in Abdominal Computed Tomography Using Advanced Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Peigang; Zhu, Shaocheng; Shi, Dapeng; Guo, Ying; Sun, Minghua

    2014-01-01

    Objective This work aims to explore the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms in reducing computed tomography (CT) radiation dosages in abdominal imaging. Methods CT scans on a standard male phantom were performed at different tube currents. Images at the different tube currents were reconstructed with the filtered back-projection (FBP), 50% ASiR and MBIR algorithms and compared. The CT value, image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of the reconstructed abdominal images were measured. Volumetric CT dose indexes (CTDIvol) were recorded. Results At different tube currents, 50% ASiR and MBIR significantly reduced image noise and increased the CNR when compared with FBP. The minimal tube current values required by FBP, 50% ASiR, and MBIR to achieve acceptable image quality using this phantom were 200, 140, and 80 mA, respectively. At the identical image quality, 50% ASiR and MBIR reduced the radiation dose by 35.9% and 59.9% respectively when compared with FBP. Conclusions Advanced iterative reconstruction techniques are able to reduce image noise and increase image CNRs. Compared with FBP, 50% ASiR and MBIR reduced radiation doses by 35.9% and 59.9%, respectively. PMID:24664174

  8. [State of the art and future trends in technology for computed tomography dose reduction].

    PubMed

    Calzado Cantera, A; Hernández-Girón, I; Salvadó Artells, M; Rodríguez González, R

    2013-12-01

    The introduction of helical and multislice acquisitions in CT scanners together with decreased image reconstruction times has had a tremendous impact on radiological practice. Technological developments in the last 10 to 12 years have enabled very high quality images to be obtained in a very short time. Improved image quality has led to an increase in the number of indications for CT. In parallel to this development, radiation exposure in patients has increased considerably. Concern about the potential health risks posed by CT imaging, reflected in diverse initiatives and actions by official organs and scientific societies, has prompted the search for ways to reduce radiation exposure in patients without compromising diagnostic efficacy. To this end, good practice guidelines have been established, special applications have been developed for scanners, and research has been undertaken to optimize the clinical use of CT. Noteworthy technical developments incorporated in scanners include the different modes of X-ray tube current modulation, automatic selection of voltage settings, selective organ protection, adaptive collimation, and iterative reconstruction. The appropriate use of these tools to reduce radiation doses requires thorough knowledge of how they work. PMID:24211196

  9. Modeling of body tissues for Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy treatments planned with conventional x-ray CT systems.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Nakao, Minoru

    2016-07-01

    In the conventional procedure for accurate Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy, a CT number given to each pixel of a patient image is directly converted to mass density and elemental composition using their respective functions that have been calibrated specifically for the relevant x-ray CT system. We propose an alternative approach that is a conversion in two steps: the first from CT number to density and the second from density to composition. Based on the latest compilation of standard tissues for reference adult male and female phantoms, we sorted the standard tissues into groups by mass density and defined the representative tissues by averaging the material properties per group. With these representative tissues, we formulated polyline relations between mass density and each of the following; electron density, stopping-power ratio and elemental densities. We also revised a procedure of stoichiometric calibration for CT-number conversion and demonstrated the two-step conversion method for a theoretically emulated CT system with hypothetical 80 keV photons. For the standard tissues, high correlation was generally observed between mass density and the other densities excluding those of C and O for the light spongiosa tissues between 1.0 g cm(-3) and 1.1 g cm(-3) occupying 1% of the human body mass. The polylines fitted to the dominant tissues were generally consistent with similar formulations in the literature. The two-step conversion procedure was demonstrated to be practical and will potentially facilitate Monte Carlo simulation for treatment planning and for retrospective analysis of treatment plans with little impact on the management of planning CT systems. PMID:27300449

  10. Variations in tumor size and position due to irregular breathing in 4D-CT: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Sarker, Joyatee; Chu, Alan; Mui, Kit; Wolfgang, John A.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Chen, George T. Y.; Sharp, Gregory C.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the position and volume errors in 4D-CT caused by irregular breathing. Methods: A virtual 4D-CT scanner was designed to reproduce axial mode scans with retrospective resorting. This virtual scanner creates an artificial spherical tumor based on the specifications of the user, and recreates images that might be produced by a 4D-CT scanner using a patient breathing waveform. 155 respiratory waveforms of patients were used to test the variability of 4D-CT scans. Each breathing waveform was normalized and scaled to 1, 2, and 3 cm peak-to-peak motion, and artificial tumors with 2 and 4 cm radius were simulated for each scaled waveform. The center of mass and volume of resorted 4D-CT images were calculated and compared to the expected values of center of mass and volume for the artificial tumor. Intrasubject variability was investigated by running the virtual scanner over different subintervals of each patient's breathing waveform. Results: The average error in the center of mass location of an artificial tumor was less than 2 mm standard deviation for 2 cm motion. The corresponding average error in volume was less than 4%. In the worst-case scenarios, a center of mass error of 1.0 cm standard deviation and volume errors of 30%-60% at inhale were found. Systematic errors were observed in a subset of patients due to irregular breathing, and these errors were more pronounced when the tumor volume is smaller. Conclusions: Irregular breathing during 4D-CT simulation causes systematic errors in volume and center of mass measurements. These errors are small but depend on the tumor size, motion amplitude, and degree of breathing irregularity.

  11. Modeling of body tissues for Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy treatments planned with conventional x-ray CT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Nakao, Minoru

    2016-07-01

    In the conventional procedure for accurate Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy, a CT number given to each pixel of a patient image is directly converted to mass density and elemental composition using their respective functions that have been calibrated specifically for the relevant x-ray CT system. We propose an alternative approach that is a conversion in two steps: the first from CT number to density and the second from density to composition. Based on the latest compilation of standard tissues for reference adult male and female phantoms, we sorted the standard tissues into groups by mass density and defined the representative tissues by averaging the material properties per group. With these representative tissues, we formulated polyline relations between mass density and each of the following; electron density, stopping-power ratio and elemental densities. We also revised a procedure of stoichiometric calibration for CT-number conversion and demonstrated the two-step conversion method for a theoretically emulated CT system with hypothetical 80 keV photons. For the standard tissues, high correlation was generally observed between mass density and the other densities excluding those of C and O for the light spongiosa tissues between 1.0 g cm‑3 and 1.1 g cm‑3 occupying 1% of the human body mass. The polylines fitted to the dominant tissues were generally consistent with similar formulations in the literature. The two-step conversion procedure was demonstrated to be practical and will potentially facilitate Monte Carlo simulation for treatment planning and for retrospective analysis of treatment plans with little impact on the management of planning CT systems.

  12. Optimizing spectral CT parameters for material classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigie, D. S.; La Rivière, P. J.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we propose a framework for optimizing spectral CT imaging parameters and hardware design with regard to material classification tasks. Compared with conventional CT, many more parameters must be considered when designing spectral CT systems and protocols. These choices will impact material classification performance in a non-obvious, task-dependent way with direct implications for radiation dose reduction. In light of this, we adapt Hotelling Observer formalisms typically applied to signal detection tasks to the spectral CT, material-classification problem. The result is a rapidly computable metric that makes it possible to sweep out many system configurations, generating parameter optimization curves (POC’s) that can be used to select optimal settings. The proposed model avoids restrictive assumptions about the basis-material decomposition (e.g. linearity) and incorporates signal uncertainty with a stochastic object model. This technique is demonstrated on dual-kVp and photon-counting systems for two different, clinically motivated material classification tasks (kidney stone classification and plaque removal). We show that the POC’s predicted with the proposed analytic model agree well with those derived from computationally intensive numerical simulation studies.

  13. Optimizing spectral CT parameters for material classification tasks.

    PubMed

    Rigie, D S; La Rivière, P J

    2016-06-21

    In this work, we propose a framework for optimizing spectral CT imaging parameters and hardware design with regard to material classification tasks. Compared with conventional CT, many more parameters must be considered when designing spectral CT systems and protocols. These choices will impact material classification performance in a non-obvious, task-dependent way with direct implications for radiation dose reduction. In light of this, we adapt Hotelling Observer formalisms typically applied to signal detection tasks to the spectral CT, material-classification problem. The result is a rapidly computable metric that makes it possible to sweep out many system configurations, generating parameter optimization curves (POC's) that can be used to select optimal settings. The proposed model avoids restrictive assumptions about the basis-material decomposition (e.g. linearity) and incorporates signal uncertainty with a stochastic object model. This technique is demonstrated on dual-kVp and photon-counting systems for two different, clinically motivated material classification tasks (kidney stone classification and plaque removal). We show that the POC's predicted with the proposed analytic model agree well with those derived from computationally intensive numerical simulation studies. PMID:27227430

  14. SU-E-T-99: Design and Development of Isocenter Parameter System for CT Simulation Laser Based On DICOM RT

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In order to receive DICOM files from treatment planning system and generate patient isocenter positioning parameter file for CT laser system automatically, this paper presents a method for communication with treatment planning system and calculation of isocenter parameter for each radiation field. Methods: Coordinate transformation and laser positioning file formats were analyzed, isocenter parameter was calculated via data from DICOM CT Data and DICOM RTPLAN file. An in-house software-DicomGenie was developed based on the object-oriented program platform-Qt with DCMTK SDK (Germany OFFIS company DICOM SDK) . DicomGenie was tested for accuracy using Philips CT simulation plan system (Tumor LOC, Philips) and A2J CT positioning laser system (Thorigny Sur Marne, France). Results: DicomGenie successfully established DICOM communication between treatment planning system, DICOM files were received by DicomGenie and patient laser isocenter information was generated accurately. Patient laser parameter data files can be used for for CT laser system directly. Conclusion: In-house software DicomGenie received and extracted DICOM data, isocenter laser positioning data files were created by DicomGenie and can be use for A2J laser positioning system.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann method for fast patient-specific simulation of liver tumor ablation from CT images.

    PubMed

    Audigier, Chloé; Mansi, Tommaso; Delingette, Hervé; Rapaka, Saikiran; Mihalef, Viorel; Sharma, Puneet; Carnegie, Daniel; Boctor, Emad; Choti, Michael; Kamen, Ali; Comaniciu, Dorin; Ayache, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Radio-frequency ablation (RFA), the most widely used minimally invasive ablative therapy of liver cancer, is challenged by a lack of patient-specific planning. In particular, the presence of blood vessels and time-varying thermal diffusivity makes the prediction of the extent of the ablated tissue difficult. This may result in incomplete treatments and increased risk of recurrence. We propose a new model of the physical mechanisms involved in RFA of abdominal tumors based on Lattice Boltzmann Method to predict the extent of ablation given the probe location and the biological parameters. Our method relies on patient images, from which level set representations of liver geometry, tumor shape and vessels are extracted. Then a computational model of heat diffusion, cellular necrosis and blood flow through vessels and liver is solved to estimate the extent of ablated tissue. After quantitative verifications against an analytical solution, we apply our framework to 5 patients datasets which include pre- and post-operative CT images, yielding promising correlation between predicted and actual ablation extent (mean point to mesh errors of 8.7 mm). Implemented on graphics processing units, our method may enable RFA planning in clinical settings as it leads to near real-time computation: 1 minute of ablation is simulated in 1.14 minutes, which is almost 60x faster than standard finite element method. PMID:24505777

  16. Development of image reconstruction for Gamma-ray CT of large-dimension industrial plants using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorsandi, M.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2015-08-01

    In industrial Gamma-ray CT, specifically for large-dimension plants or processes, the simplicity and portability of CT system necessitate to use individual gamma-ray detectors for imaging purposes. Considering properties of the gamma-ray source as well as characteristics of the detectors, including penetration depth, energy resolution, size, etc., the quality of reconstructed images is limited. Therefore, implementation of an appropriate reconstruction procedure is important to improve the image quality. In this paper, an accurate and applicable procedure has been proposed for image reconstruction of Gamma-ray CT of large-dimension industrial plants. Additionally, a portable configuration of tomographic system was introduced and simulated in MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The simulation results were validated through comparison with the experimental results reported in the literature. Evaluations showed that maximum difference between reconstruction error in this work and the benchmark was less than 1.3%. Additional investigation has been carried out on a typical standard phantom introduced by IAEA using the validated procedure. Image quality assessment showed that the reconstruction error was less than 1.7% using different algorithms and a good contrast higher than 76% was obtained. Our overall results are indicative of the fact that the procedures and methods introduced in this work are quite efficient for improving the image quality of gamma CT of industrial plants.

  17. Region-of-interest reconstruction for a cone-beam dental CT with a circular trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhanli; Zou, Jing; Gui, Jianbao; Zheng, Hairong; Xia, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Dental CT is the most appropriate and accurate device for preoperative evaluation of dental implantation. It can demonstrate the quantity of bone in three dimensions (3D), the location of important adjacent anatomic structures and the quality of available bone with minimal geometric distortion. Nevertheless, with the rapid increase of dental CT examinations, we are facing the problem of dose reduction without loss of image quality. In this work, backprojection-filtration (BPF) and Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct the 3D full image and region-of-interest (ROI) image from complete and truncated circular cone-beam data respectively by computer-simulation. In addition, the BPF algorithm was evaluated based on the 3D ROI-image reconstruction from real data, which was acquired from our developed circular cone-beam prototype dental CT system. The results demonstrated that the ROI-image quality reconstructed from truncated data using the BPF algorithm was comparable to that reconstructed from complete data. The FDK algorithm, however, created artifacts while reconstructing ROI-image. Thus it can be seen, for circular cone-beam dental CT, reducing scanning angular range of the BPF algorithm used for ROI-image reconstruction are helpful for reducing the radiation dose and scanning time. Finally, an analytical method was developed for estimation of the ROI projection area on the detector before CT scanning, which would help doctors to roughly estimate the total radiation dose before the CT examination.

  18. Dose reduction and its influence on diagnostic accuracy and radiation risk in digital mammography: an observer performance study using an anthropomorphic breast phantom

    PubMed Central

    Svahn, Tony; Hemdal, Bengt; Ruschin, Mark; Chakraborty, Dev P; Andersson, Ingvar; Tingberg, Anders; Mattsson, Sören

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of dose reduction on diagnostic accuracy and radiation risk in digital mammography. Simulated masses and microcalcifications were positioned in an anthropomorphic breast phantom. Thirty digital images, 14 with lesions, 16 without, were acquired of the phantom using a Mammomat Novation (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) at each of three dose levels. These corresponded to 100%, 50% and 30% of the normally used average glandular dose (AGD; 1.3 mGy for a standard breast). Eight observers interpreted the 90 unprocessed images in a free-response study and the data was analyzed with the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) method. Observer performance was assessed using the JAFROC figure of merit (FOM). The benefit of radiation risk reduction was estimated based on several risk models. There was no statistically significant difference in performance, as described by the FOM, between the 100% and the 50% dose levels. However, the FOMs for both the 100% and the 50% dose were significantly different from the corresponding quantity for the 30% dose level (F-statistic = 4.95, p-value = 0.01). A dose reduction of 50% would result in 3-9 fewer breast cancer fatalities per 100,000 women undergoing annual screening from the age of 40 to 49 years. The results of the study indicate a possibility of reducing the dose to the breast to half of the dose level currently used. This has to be confirmed in clinical studies and possible differences depending on lesion type should be further examined. PMID:17704316

  19. Patients with Fabry Disease after Enzyme Replacement Therapy Dose Reduction and Switch-2-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krämer, Johannes; Duning, Thomas; Reiermann, Stefanie; Sommer, Claudia; Stypmann, Jörg; Blaschke, Daniela; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Hense, Hans-Werner; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Brand, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Because of the shortage of agalsidase-β supply between 2009 and 2012, patients with Fabry disease either were treated with reduced doses or were switched to agalsidase-α. In this observational study, we assessed end organ damage and clinical symptoms with special focus on renal outcome after 2 years of dose-reduction and/or switch to agalsidase-α. A total of 89 adult patients with Fabry disease who had received agalsidase-β (1.0 mg/kg body wt) for >1 year were nonrandomly assigned to continue this treatment regimen (regular-dose group, n=24), to receive a reduced dose of 0.3-0.5 mg/kg and a subsequent switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-α (dose-reduction-switch group, n=28), or to directly switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-α (switch group, n=37) and were followed-up for 2 years. We assessed clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, severe arrhythmia, stroke, progression to ESRD), changes in cardiac and renal function, Fabry-related symptoms (pain, hypohidrosis, diarrhea), and disease severity scores. Determination of renal function by creatinine and cystatin C-based eGFR revealed decreasing eGFRs in the dose-reduction-switch group and the switch group. The Mainz Severity Score Index increased significantly in these two groups (P=0.02 and P<0.001, respectively), and higher frequencies of gastrointestinal pain occurred during follow-up. In conclusion, after 2 years of observation, all groups showed a stable clinical disease course with respect to serious clinical events. However, patients under agalsidase-β dose-reduction and switch or a direct switch to agalsidase-α showed a decline of renal function independent of the eGFR formula used. PMID:26185201

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of the dose from imaging with GE eXplore 120 micro-CT using GATE

    SciTech Connect

    Bretin, Florian; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Plenevaux, Alain; Seret, Alain

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Small animals are increasingly used as translational models in preclinical imaging studies involving microCT, during which the subjects can be exposed to large amounts of radiation. While the radiation levels are generally sublethal, studies have shown that low-level radiation can change physiological parameters in mice. In order to rule out any influence of radiation on the outcome of such experiments, or resulting deterministic effects in the subjects, the levels of radiation involved need to be addressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the radiation dose delivered by the GE eXplore 120 microCT non-invasively using Monte Carlo simulations in GATE and to compare results to previously obtained experimental values. Methods: Tungsten X-ray spectra were simulated at 70, 80, and 97 kVp using an analytical tool and their half-value layers were simulated for spectra validation against experimentally measured values of the physical X-ray tube. A Monte Carlo model of the microCT system was set up and four protocols that are regularly applied to live animal scanning were implemented. The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) inside a PMMA phantom was derived and multiple field of view acquisitions were simulated using the PMMA phantom, a representative mouse and rat. Results: Simulated half-value layers agreed with experimentally obtained results within a 7% error window. The CTDI ranged from 20 to 56 mGy and closely matched experimental values. Derived organ doses in mice reached 459 mGy in bones and up to 200 mGy in soft tissue organs using the highest energy protocol. Dose levels in rats were lower due to the increased mass of the animal compared to mice. The uncertainty of all dose simulations was below 14%. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations proved a valuable tool to investigate the 3D dose distribution in animals from microCT. Small animals, especially mice (due to their small volume), receive large amounts of radiation from the GE eXplore 120

  1. Fetal doses to pregnant patients from CT with tube current modulation calculated using Monte Carlo simulations and realistic phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jianwei; Xu, X. George; Caracappa, Peter F.; Liu, Bob

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the radiation dose to the fetus using retrospective tube current modulation (TCM) data selected from archived clinical records. This paper describes the calculation of fetal doses using retrospective TCM data and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Three TCM schemes were adopted for use with three pregnant patient phantoms. MC simulations were used to model CT scanners, TCM schemes and pregnant patients. Comparisons between organ doses from TCM schemes and those from non-TCM schemes show that these three TCM schemes reduced fetal doses by 14, 18 and 25 %, respectively. These organ doses were also compared with those from ImPACT calculation. It is found that the difference between the calculated fetal dose and the ImPACT reported dose is as high as 46 %. This work demonstrates methods to study organ doses from various TCM protocols and potential ways to improve the accuracy of CT dose calculation for pregnant patients. PMID:23222824

  2. Monte Carlo simulation for dose distribution calculations in a CT-based phantom at the Portuguese gamma irradiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Carlos; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Oliveira, M. Carmo; Ferreira, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    In preview works the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility, UTR, has been simulated using the MCNP code and the product to be irradiated has been drawn using the boolean operators with the MCNP surfaces. However, sometimes the product to be irradiated could have an irregular shape. The paper describes an alternative way for drawing the corresponding volume based on CT image data in a format of a 3D matrix of voxels. This data are read by a specific code called SCMS which transforms it into a MCNP input file. The dimensions of each MCNP voxel depend on the number of elements in the CT-based matrix. Additionally, the new approach allows one to know dose distributions anywhere without extra definitions of surfaces or volumes. Experimental dose measurements were carried out using Amber Perspex dosimeters. This work presents the results of MCNP simulations using both modeling modes - the standard mode and the voxel mode.

  3. Unraveling the hydrodynamics of split root water uptake experiments using CT scanned root architectures and three dimensional flow simulations

    PubMed Central

    Koebernick, Nicolai; Huber, Katrin; Kerkhofs, Elien; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry; Vetterlein, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Split root experiments have the potential to disentangle water transport in roots and soil, enabling the investigation of the water uptake pattern of a root system. Interpretation of the experimental data assumes that water flow between the split soil compartments does not occur. Another approach to investigate root water uptake is by numerical simulations combining soil and root water flow depending on the parameterization and description of the root system. Our aim is to demonstrate the synergisms that emerge from combining split root experiments with simulations. We show how growing root architectures derived from temporally repeated X-ray CT scanning can be implemented in numerical soil-plant models. Faba beans were grown with and without split layers and exposed to a single drought period during which plant and soil water status were measured. Root architectures were reconstructed from CT scans and used in the model R-SWMS (root-soil water movement and solute transport) to simulate water potentials in soil and roots in 3D as well as water uptake by growing roots in different depths. CT scans revealed that root development was considerably lower with split layers compared to without. This coincided with a reduction of transpiration, stomatal conductance and shoot growth. Simulated predawn water potentials were lower in the presence of split layers. Simulations showed that this was related to an increased resistance to vertical water flow in the soil by the split layers. Comparison between measured and simulated soil water potentials proved that the split layers were not perfectly isolating and that redistribution of water from the lower, wetter compartments to the drier upper compartments took place, thus water losses were not equal to the root water uptake from those compartments. Still, the layers increased the resistance to vertical flow which resulted in lower simulated collar water potentials that led to reduced stomatal conductance and growth. PMID

  4. Unraveling the hydrodynamics of split root water uptake experiments using CT scanned root architectures and three dimensional flow simulations.

    PubMed

    Koebernick, Nicolai; Huber, Katrin; Kerkhofs, Elien; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry; Vetterlein, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Split root experiments have the potential to disentangle water transport in roots and soil, enabling the investigation of the water uptake pattern of a root system. Interpretation of the experimental data assumes that water flow between the split soil compartments does not occur. Another approach to investigate root water uptake is by numerical simulations combining soil and root water flow depending on the parameterization and description of the root system. Our aim is to demonstrate the synergisms that emerge from combining split root experiments with simulations. We show how growing root architectures derived from temporally repeated X-ray CT scanning can be implemented in numerical soil-plant models. Faba beans were grown with and without split layers and exposed to a single drought period during which plant and soil water status were measured. Root architectures were reconstructed from CT scans and used in the model R-SWMS (root-soil water movement and solute transport) to simulate water potentials in soil and roots in 3D as well as water uptake by growing roots in different depths. CT scans revealed that root development was considerably lower with split layers compared to without. This coincided with a reduction of transpiration, stomatal conductance and shoot growth. Simulated predawn water potentials were lower in the presence of split layers. Simulations showed that this was related to an increased resistance to vertical water flow in the soil by the split layers. Comparison between measured and simulated soil water potentials proved that the split layers were not perfectly isolating and that redistribution of water from the lower, wetter compartments to the drier upper compartments took place, thus water losses were not equal to the root water uptake from those compartments. Still, the layers increased the resistance to vertical flow which resulted in lower simulated collar water potentials that led to reduced stomatal conductance and growth. PMID

  5. Radiation dose reduction and new image modalities development for interventional C-arm imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Kai

    Cardiovascular disease and stroke are the leading health problems and causes of death in the US. Due to the minimally invasive nature of the evolution of image guided techniques, interventional radiological procedures are becoming more common and are preferred in treating many cardiovascular diseases and strokes. In addition, with the recent advances in hardware and device technology, the speed and efficacy of interventional treatment has significantly improved. This implies that more image modalities can be developed based on the current C-arm system and patients treated in interventional suites can potentially experience better health outcomes. However, during the treatment patients are irradiated with substantial amounts of ionizing radiation with a high dose rate (digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with 3muGy/frame and 3D cone beam CT image with 0.36muGy/frame for a Siemens Artis Zee biplane system) and/or a long irradiation time (a roadmapping image sequence can be as long as one hour during aneurysm embolization). As a result, the patient entrance dose is extremely high. Despite the fact that the radiation dose is already substantial, image quality is not always satisfactory. By default a temporal average is used in roadmapping images to overcome poor image quality, but this technique can result in motion blurred images. Therefore, reducing radiation dose while maintaining or even improving the image quality is an important area for continued research. This thesis is focused on improving the clinical applications of C-arm cone beam CT systems in two ways: (1) Improve the performance of current image modalities on the C-arm system. (2) Develop new image modalities based on the current system. To be more specific, the objectives are to reduce radiation dose for current modalities (e.g., DSA, fluoroscopy, roadmapping, and cone beam CT) and enable cone beam CT perfusion and time resolved cone beam CT angiography that can be used to diagnose and triage acute

  6. Assessment of phase based dose modulation for improved dose efficiency in cardiac CT on an anthropomorphic motion phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budde, Adam; Nilsen, Roy; Nett, Brian

    2014-03-01

    State of the art automatic exposure control modulates the tube current across view angle and Z based on patient anatomy for use in axial full scan reconstructions. Cardiac CT, however, uses a fundamentally different image reconstruction that applies a temporal weighting to reduce motion artifacts. This paper describes a phase based mA modulation that goes beyond axial and ECG modulation; it uses knowledge of the temporal view weighting applied within the reconstruction algorithm to improve dose efficiency in cardiac CT scanning. Using physical phantoms and synthetic noise emulation, we measure how knowledge of sinogram temporal weighting and the prescribed cardiac phase can be used to improve dose efficiency. First, we validated that a synthetic CT noise emulation method produced realistic image noise. Next, we used the CT noise emulation method to simulate mA modulation on scans of a physical anthropomorphic phantom where a motion profile corresponding to a heart rate of 60 beats per minute was used. The CT noise emulation method matched noise to lower dose scans across the image within 1.5% relative error. Using this noise emulation method to simulate modulating the mA while keeping the total dose constant, the image variance was reduced by an average of 11.9% on a scan with 50 msec padding, demonstrating improved dose efficiency. Radiation dose reduction in cardiac CT can be achieved while maintaining the same level of image noise through phase based dose modulation that incorporates knowledge of the cardiac reconstruction algorithm.

  7. Simulation-aided investigation of beam hardening induced errors in CT dimensional metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ye; Kiekens, Kim; Welkenhuyzen, Frank; Angel, J.; De Chiffre, L.; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Dewulf, Wim

    2014-06-01

    Industrial x-ray computed tomography (CT) systems are being increasingly used as dimensional measuring machines. However, micron level accuracy is not always achievable, as of yet. The measurement accuracy is influenced by many factors, such as the workpiece properties, x-ray voltage, filter, beam hardening, scattering and calibration methods (Kruth et al 2011 CIRP Ann. Manuf. Technol. 60 821-42, Bartscher et al 2007 CIRP Ann. Manuf. Technol. 56 495-8, De Chiffre et al 2005 CIRP Ann. Manuf. Technol. 54 479-82, Schmitt and Niggemann 2010 Meas. Sci. Technol. 21 054008). Since most of these factors are mutually correlated, it remains challenging to interpret measurement results and to identify the distinct error sources. Since simulations allow isolating the different affecting factors, they form a useful complement to experimental investigations. Dewulf et al (2012 CIRP Ann. Manuf. Technol. 61 495-8) investigated the influence of beam hardening correction parameters on the diameter of a calibrated steel pin in different experimental set-ups. It was clearly shown that an inappropriate beam hardening correction can result in significant dimensional errors. This paper confirms these results using simulations of a pin surrounded by a stepped cylinder: a clear discontinuity in the measured diameter of the inner pin is observed where it enters the surrounding material. The results are expanded with an investigation of the beam hardening effect on the measurement results for both inner and outer diameters of the surrounding stepped cylinder. Accuracy as well as the effect on the uncertainty determination is discussed. The results are compared with simulations using monochromatic beams in order to have a benchmark which excludes beam hardening effects and x-ray scattering. Furthermore, based on the above results, the authors propose a case-dependent calibration artefact for beam hardening correction and edge offset determination. In the final part of the paper, the

  8. TH-A-18C-04: Ultrafast Cone-Beam CT Scatter Correction with GPU-Based Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y; Bai, T; Yan, H; Ouyang, L; Wang, J; Pompos, A; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Zhou, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Scatter artifacts severely degrade image quality of cone-beam CT (CBCT). We present an ultrafast scatter correction framework by using GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and prior patient CT image, aiming at automatically finish the whole process including both scatter correction and reconstructions within 30 seconds. Methods: The method consists of six steps: 1) FDK reconstruction using raw projection data; 2) Rigid Registration of planning CT to the FDK results; 3) MC scatter calculation at sparse view angles using the planning CT; 4) Interpolation of the calculated scatter signals to other angles; 5) Removal of scatter from the raw projections; 6) FDK reconstruction using the scatter-corrected projections. In addition to using GPU to accelerate MC photon simulations, we also use a small number of photons and a down-sampled CT image in simulation to further reduce computation time. A novel denoising algorithm is used to eliminate MC scatter noise caused by low photon numbers. The method is validated on head-and-neck cases with simulated and clinical data. Results: We have studied impacts of photo histories, volume down sampling factors on the accuracy of scatter estimation. The Fourier analysis was conducted to show that scatter images calculated at 31 angles are sufficient to restore those at all angles with <0.1% error. For the simulated case with a resolution of 512×512×100, we simulated 10M photons per angle. The total computation time is 23.77 seconds on a Nvidia GTX Titan GPU. The scatter-induced shading/cupping artifacts are substantially reduced, and the average HU error of a region-of-interest is reduced from 75.9 to 19.0 HU. Similar results were found for a real patient case. Conclusion: A practical ultrafast MC-based CBCT scatter correction scheme is developed. The whole process of scatter correction and reconstruction is accomplished within 30 seconds. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01), The Core Technology Research

  9. Comparison of different dose reduction system in computed tomography for orthodontic applications

    PubMed Central

    FANUCCI, E.; FIASCHETTI, V.; OTTRIA, L.; MATALONI, M; ACAMPORA, V.; LIONE, R.; BARLATTANI, A.; SIMONETTI, G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY To correlate different CT system: MSCT (multislice computed tomography) with different acquisition parameters (100KV, 80KV), different reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) and CBCT (cone beam computed tomography) examination in terms of absorbed X-ray dose and diagnostic accuracy. 80 KV protocols compared with 100 KV protocols resulted in reduced total radiation dose without relevant loss of diagnostic image information and quality. CBCT protocols compared with 80 KV MSCT protocols resulted in reduced total radiation dose but loss of diagnostic image information and quality although no so relevant. In addition the new system applies to equipment ASIR applicable on MSCT allows 50% of the dose without compromising image quality. PMID:23285397

  10. Modelling capillary trapping using finite-volume simulation of two-phase flow directly on micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeini, Ali Q.; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2015-09-01

    We study capillary trapping in porous media using direct pore-scale simulation of two-phase flow on micro-CT images of a Berea sandstone and a sandpack. The trapped non-wetting phase saturations are predicted by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using a volume-of-fluid based finite-volume framework to simulate primary drainage followed by water injection. Using these simulations, we analyse the effects of initial non-wetting-phase saturation, capillary number and flow direction on the residual saturation. The predictions from our numerical method are in agreement with published experimental measurements of capillary trapping curves. This shows that our direct simulation method can be used to elucidate the effect of pore structure and flow pattern of capillary trapping and provides a platform to study the physics of multiphase flow at the pore scale.

  11. Noise performance studies of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) as a function of kV, mA and exposure level: Impact on radiation dose reduction and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Li, Ke; Lubner, Meghan G.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-03-01

    The significance of understanding the noise properties of clinical CT systems is twofold: First, as the diagnostic performance (particularly for the detection of low contrast lesions) is strongly limited by noise, a thorough study of the dependence of image noise on scanning and reconstruction parameters would enable the desired image quality to be achieved with the least amount of radiation dose; Second, a clear understanding of the noise properties of CT systems would allow the limitations in existing CT systems to be identified and improved. The recent introduction of the model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has introduced strong nonlinearity to clinical CT systems and violated the classical relationship between CT noise properties and CT system parameters, therefore it is necessary to perform a comprehensive study on the noise properties of MBIR. The purpose of this study was to systematically study the dependence of the noise magnitude and noise texture of MBIR on x-ray tube potential (kV), tube current (mA), and radiation dose level. It has been found that the noise variance σ2 of MBIR has relaxed dependence on kV and mA, which can be described as power-law relationships as σ2 ~kV-1 and σ2 ~ mA-0.4, respectively. The shape of the noise power spectrum (NPS) demonstrated a strong dependence on kV and mA, but it remained constant as long as the radiation dose level was the same. These semi-empirical relationships can be potentially used to guide the optimal selection of kV and mA when prescribing CT scans with the maximal dose reduction.

  12. Development and validation of MCNP4C-based Monte Carlo simulator for fan- and cone-beam x-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Ay, Mohammad Reza; Zaidi, Habib

    2005-10-21

    An x-ray computed tomography (CT) simulator based on the Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP4C) was developed for simulation of both fan- and cone-beam CT scanners. A user-friendly interface running under Matlab 6.5.1 creates the scanner geometry at different views as MCNP4C's input file. The full simulation of x-ray tube, phantom and detectors with single-slice, multi-slice and flat detector configurations was considered. The simulator was validated through comparison with experimental measurements of different nonuniform phantoms with varying sizes on both a clinical and a small-animal CT scanner. There is good agreement between the simulated and measured projections and reconstructed images. Thereafter, the effects of bow-tie filter, phantom size and septa length on scatter distribution in fan-beam CT were studied in detail. The relative difference between detected total, primary and scatter photons for septa length varying between 0 and 95 mm is 11.2%, 1.9% and 84.1%, respectively, whereas the scatter-to-primary ratio decreases by 83.8%. The developed simulator is a powerful tool for evaluating the effect of physical, geometrical and other design parameters on scanner performance and image quality in addition to offering a versatile tool for investigating potential artefacts and correction schemes when using CT-based attenuation correction on dual-modality PET/CT units. PMID:16204878

  13. Simulating stress-dependent fluid flow in a fractured core sample using real-time X-ray CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Tobias; Huo, Da; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Enzmann, Frieder; Benson, Sally; Blum, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    Various geoscientific applications require a fast prediction of fracture permeability for an optimal workflow. Hence, the objective of the current study is to introduce and validate a practical method to characterize and approximate single flow in fractures under different stress conditions by using a core-flooding apparatus, in situ X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans and a finite-volume method solving the Navier-Stokes-Brinkman equations. The permeability of the fractured sandstone sample was measured stepwise during a loading-unloading cycle (0.7 to 22.1 MPa and back) to validate the numerical results. Simultaneously, the pressurized core sample was imaged with a medical X-ray CT scanner with a voxel dimension of 0.5 × 0.5 × 1.0 mm3. Fracture geometries were obtained by CT images based on a modification of the simplified missing attenuation (MSMA) approach. Simulation results revealed both qualitative plausibility and a quantitative approximation of the experimentally derived permeabilities. The qualitative results indicate flow channeling along several preferential flow paths with less pronounced tortuosity. Significant changes in permeability can be assigned to temporal and permanent changes within the fracture due to applied stresses. The deviations of the quantitative results appear to be mainly caused by both local underestimation of hydraulic properties due to compositional matrix heterogeneities and the low CT resolution affecting the accurate capturing of sub-grid-scale features. Both affect the proper reproduction of the actual connectivity and therefore also the depiction of the expected permeability hysteresis. Furthermore, the threshold value CTmat (1862.6 HU) depicting the matrix material represents the most sensitive input parameter of the simulations. Small variations of CTmat can cause enormous changes in simulated permeability by up to a factor of 2.6 ± 0.1 and, thus, have to be defined with caution. Nevertheless, comparison with further CT

  14. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Jim Q.; Zhang, Da; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the GEANT4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization.

  15. CT dose minimization using personalized protocol optimization and aggressive bowtie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yin, Zhye; Jin, Yannan; Wu, Mingye; Yao, Yangyang; Tao, Kun; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; De Man, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we propose to use patient-specific x-ray fluence control to reduce the radiation dose to sensitive organs while still achieving the desired image quality (IQ) in the region of interest (ROI). The mA modulation profile is optimized view by view, based on the sensitive organs and the ROI, which are obtained from an ultra-low-dose volumetric CT scout scan [1]. We use a clinical chest CT scan to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed concept: the breast region is selected as the sensitive organ region while the cardiac region is selected as IQ ROI. Two groups of simulations are performed based on the clinical CT dataset: (1) a constant mA scan adjusted based on the patient attenuation (120 kVp, 300 mA), which serves as baseline; (2) an optimized scan with aggressive bowtie and ROI centering combined with patient-specific mA modulation. The results shows that the combination of the aggressive bowtie and the optimized mA modulation can result in 40% dose reduction in the breast region, while the IQ in the cardiac region is maintained. More generally, this paper demonstrates the general concept of using a 3D scout scan for optimal scan planning.

  16. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE`s Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts.

  17. Immunosuppressant dose reduction and long-term rejection risk in renal transplant recipients with severe bacterial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chia-Jen; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Yang, Wu-Chang; Yang, Chih-Yu

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Due to lifelong immunosuppression, renal transplant recipients (RTRs) are at risk of infectious complications such as pneumonia. Severe pneumonia results in respiratory failure and is life-threatening. We aimed to examine the influence of immunosuppressant dose reduction on RTRs with bacterial pneumonia and respiratory failure. METHODS From January 2001 to January 2011, 33 of 1,146 RTRs at a single centre developed bacterial pneumonia with respiratory failure. All patients were treated using mechanical ventilation and aggressive therapies in the intensive care unit. RESULTS Average time from kidney transplantation to pneumonia with respiratory failure was 6.8 years. In-hospital mortality rate was 45.5% despite intensive care and aggressive therapies. Logistic regression analysis indicated that a high serum creatinine level at the time of admission to the intensive care unit (odds ratio 1.77 per mg/dL, 95% confidence interval 1.01–3.09; p = 0.045) was a mortality determinant. Out of the 33 patients, immunosuppressive agents were reduced in 17 (51.5%). We found that although immunosuppressant dose reduction tended to improve in-hospital mortality, this was not statistically significant. Nevertheless, during a mean follow-up period of two years, none of the survivors (n = 18) developed acute rejection or allograft necrosis. CONCLUSION In RTRs with bacterial pneumonia and respiratory failure, higher serum creatinine levels were a mortality determinant. Although temporary immunosuppressant dose reduction might not reduce mortality, it was associated with a minimal risk of acute rejection during the two-year follow-up. Our results suggest that early immunosuppressant reduction in RTRs with severe pneumonia of indeterminate microbiology may be safe even when pathogens are bacterial in nature. PMID:25091886

  18. SU-E-J-154: Image Quality Assessment of Contrast-Enhanced 4D-CT for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in Radiotherapy Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, W; Xue, M; Patel, K; Regine, W; Wang, J; D’Souza, W; Lu, W; Kang, M; Klahr, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study presents quantitative and qualitative assessment of the image qualities in contrast-enhanced (CE) 3D-CT, 4D-CT and CE 4D-CT to identify feasibility for replacing the clinical standard simulation with a single CE 4D-CT for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDA) in radiotherapy simulation. Methods: Ten PDA patients were enrolled and underwent three CT scans: a clinical standard pair of CE 3D-CT immediately followed by a 4D-CT, and a CE 4D-CT one week later. Physicians qualitatively evaluated the general image quality and regional vessel definitions and gave a score from 1 to 5. Next, physicians delineated the contours of the tumor (T) and the normal pancreatic parenchyma (P) on the three CTs (CE 3D-CT, 50% phase for 4D-CT and CE 4D-CT), then high density areas were automatically removed by thresholding at 500 HU and morphological operations. The pancreatic tumor contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) and conspicuity (C, absolute difference of mean enhancement levels in P and T) were computed to quantitatively assess image quality. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare these quantities. Results: In qualitative evaluations, CE 3D-CT and CE 4D-CT scored equivalently (4.4±0.4 and 4.3±0.4) and both were significantly better than 4D-CT (3.1±0.6). In quantitative evaluations, the C values were higher in CE 4D-CT (28±19 HU, p=0.19 and 0.17) than the clinical standard pair of CE 3D-CT and 4D-CT (17±12 and 16±17 HU, p=0.65). In CE 3D-CT and CE 4D-CT, mean CNR (1.8±1.4 and 1.8±1.7, p=0.94) and mean SNR (5.8±2.6 and 5.5±3.2, p=0.71) both were higher than 4D-CT (CNR: 1.1±1.3, p<0.3; SNR: 3.3±2.1, p<0.1). The absolute enhancement levels for T and P were higher in CE 4D-CT (87, 82 HU) than in CE 3D-CT (60, 56) and 4DCT (53, 70). Conclusions: The individually optimized CE 4D-CT is feasible and achieved comparable image qualities to the clinical standard simulation. This study was supported in part by Philips Healthcare.

  19. Characterization of scatter in cone-beam CT breast imaging: Comparison of experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Liu, Bob; O’Connor, J. Michael; Didier, Clay S.; Glick, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    It is commonly understood that scattered radiation in x-ray computed tomography (CT) degrades the reconstructed image. As a precursor to developing scatter compensation methods, it is important to characterize this scatter using both empirical measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Previous studies characterizing scatter using both experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations have been reported in diagnostic radiology and conventional mammography. The emerging technology of cone-beam CT breast imaging (CTBI) differs significantly from conventional mammography in the breast shape and imaging geometry, aspects that are important factors impacting the measured scatter. This study used a bench-top cone-beam CTBI system with an indirect flat-panel detector. A cylindrical phantom with equivalent composition of 50% fibroglandular and 50% adipose tissues was used, and scatter distributions were measured by beam stop and aperture methods. The GEANT4-based simulation package GATE was used to model x-ray photon interactions in the phantom and detector. Scatter to primary ratio (SPR) measurements using both the beam stop and aperture methods were consistent within 5% after subtraction of nonbreast scatter contributions and agree with the low energy electromagnetic model simulation in GATE. The validated simulation model was used to characterize the SPR in different CTBI conditions. In addition, a realistic, digital breast phantom was simulated to determine the characteristics of various scatter components that cannot be separated in measurements. The simulation showed that the scatter distribution from multiple Compton and Rayleigh scatterings, as well as from the single Compton scattering, has predominantly low-frequency characteristics. The single Rayleigh scatter was observed to be the primary contribution to the spatially variant scatter component. PMID:19378746

  20. A practical cone-beam CT scatter correction method with optimized Monte Carlo simulations for image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Bai, Ti; Yan, Hao; Ouyang, Luo; Pompos, Arnold; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-05-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) has become the standard image guidance tool for patient setup in image-guided radiation therapy. However, due to its large illumination field, scattered photons severely degrade its image quality. While kernel-based scatter correction methods have been used routinely in the clinic, it is still desirable to develop Monte Carlo (MC) simulation-based methods due to their accuracy. However, the high computational burden of the MC method has prevented routine clinical application. This paper reports our recent development of a practical method of MC-based scatter estimation and removal for CBCT. In contrast with conventional MC approaches that estimate scatter signals using a scatter-contaminated CBCT image, our method used a planning CT image for MC simulation, which has the advantages of accurate image intensity and absence of image truncation. In our method, the planning CT was first rigidly registered with the CBCT. Scatter signals were then estimated via MC simulation. After scatter signals were removed from the raw CBCT projections, a corrected CBCT image was reconstructed. The entire workflow was implemented on a GPU platform for high computational efficiency. Strategies such as projection denoising, CT image downsampling, and interpolation along the angular direction were employed to further enhance the calculation speed. We studied the impact of key parameters in the workflow on the resulting accuracy and efficiency, based on which the optimal parameter values were determined. Our method was evaluated in numerical simulation, phantom, and real patient cases. In the simulation cases, our method reduced mean HU errors from 44 to 3 HU and from 78 to 9 HU in the full-fan and the half-fan cases, respectively. In both the phantom and the patient cases, image artifacts caused by scatter, such as ring artifacts around the bowtie area, were reduced. With all the techniques employed, we achieved computation time of less than 30 s including the

  1. A practical cone-beam CT scatter correction method with optimized Monte Carlo simulations for image-guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuan; Bai, Ti; Yan, Hao; Ouyang, Luo; Pompos, Arnold; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2015-05-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) has become the standard image guidance tool for patient setup in image-guided radiation therapy. However, due to its large illumination field, scattered photons severely degrade its image quality. While kernel-based scatter correction methods have been used routinely in the clinic, it is still desirable to develop Monte Carlo (MC) simulation-based methods due to their accuracy. However, the high computational burden of the MC method has prevented routine clinical application. This paper reports our recent development of a practical method of MC-based scatter estimation and removal for CBCT. In contrast with conventional MC approaches that estimate scatter signals using a scatter-contaminated CBCT image, our method used a planning CT image for MC simulation, which has the advantages of accurate image intensity and absence of image truncation. In our method, the planning CT was first rigidly registered with the CBCT. Scatter signals were then estimated via MC simulation. After scatter signals were removed from the raw CBCT projections, a corrected CBCT image was reconstructed. The entire workflow was implemented on a GPU platform for high computational efficiency. Strategies such as projection denoising, CT image downsampling, and interpolation along the angular direction were employed to further enhance the calculation speed. We studied the impact of key parameters in the workflow on the resulting accuracy and efficiency, based on which the optimal parameter values were determined. Our method was evaluated in numerical simulation, phantom, and real patient cases. In the simulation cases, our method reduced mean HU errors from 44 to 3 HU and from 78 to 9 HU in the full-fan and the half-fan cases, respectively. In both the phantom and the patient cases, image artifacts caused by scatter, such as ring artifacts around the bowtie area, were reduced. With all the techniques employed, we achieved computation time of less than 30 s including the

  2. A Practical Cone-beam CT Scatter Correction Method with Optimized Monte Carlo Simulations for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuan; Bai, Ti; Yan, Hao; Ouyang, Luo; Pompos, Arnold; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) has become the standard image guidance tool for patient setup in image-guided radiation therapy. However, due to its large illumination field, scattered photons severely degrade its image quality. While kernel-based scatter correction methods have been used routinely in the clinic, it is still desirable to develop Monte Carlo (MC) simulation-based methods due to their accuracy. However, the high computational burden of the MC method has prevented routine clinical application. This paper reports our recent development of a practical method of MC-based scatter estimation and removal for CBCT. In contrast with conventional MC approaches that estimate scatter signals using a scatter-contaminated CBCT image, our method used a planning CT image for MC simulation, which has the advantages of accurate image intensity and absence of image truncation. In our method, the planning CT was first rigidly registered with the CBCT. Scatter signals were then estimated via MC simulation. After scatter signals were removed from the raw CBCT projections, a corrected CBCT image was reconstructed. The entire workflow was implemented on a GPU platform for high computational efficiency. Strategies such as projection denoising, CT image downsampling, and interpolation along the angular direction were employed to further enhance the calculation speed. We studied the impact of key parameters in the workflow on the resulting accuracy and efficiency, based on which the optimal parameter values were determined. Our method was evaluated in numerical simulation, phantom, and real patient cases. In the simulation cases, our method reduced mean HU errors from 44 HU to 3 HU and from 78 HU to 9 HU in the full-fan and the half-fan cases, respectively. In both the phantom and the patient cases, image artifacts caused by scatter, such as ring artifacts around the bowtie area, were reduced. With all the techniques employed, we achieved computation time of less than 30 sec including the

  3. CT angiography in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease: a transformation in cardiovascular CT practice

    PubMed Central

    Al Moudi, Mansour; Cao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) angiography represents the most important technical development in CT imaging and it has challenged invasive angiography in the diagnostic evaluation of cardiovascular abnormalities. Over the last decades, technological evolution in CT imaging has enabled CT angiography to become a first-line imaging modality in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. This review provides an overview of the diagnostic applications of CT angiography (CTA) in cardiovascular disease, with a focus on selected clinical challenges in some common cardiovascular abnormalities, which include abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism (PE) and coronary artery disease. An evidence-based review is conducted to demonstrate how CT angiography has changed our approach in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular disease. Radiation dose reduction strategies are also discussed to show how CT angiography can be performed in a low-dose protocol in the current clinical practice. PMID:25392823

  4. CT angiography in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease: a transformation in cardiovascular CT practice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua; Al Moudi, Mansour; Cao, Yan

    2014-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) angiography represents the most important technical development in CT imaging and it has challenged invasive angiography in the diagnostic evaluation of cardiovascular abnormalities. Over the last decades, technological evolution in CT imaging has enabled CT angiography to become a first-line imaging modality in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. This review provides an overview of the diagnostic applications of CT angiography (CTA) in cardiovascular disease, with a focus on selected clinical challenges in some common cardiovascular abnormalities, which include abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism (PE) and coronary artery disease. An evidence-based review is conducted to demonstrate how CT angiography has changed our approach in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular disease. Radiation dose reduction strategies are also discussed to show how CT angiography can be performed in a low-dose protocol in the current clinical practice. PMID:25392823

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of simultaneous radiation detection in the hybrid tomography system ClearPET-XPAD3/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávila, H. Olaya; Sevilla, A. C.; Castro, H. F.; Martínez, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Geant4 based simulation framework SciFW1, a detailed simulation was performed for a detector array in the hybrid tomography prototype for small animals called ClearPET / XPAD, which was built in the Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille. The detector system consists of an array of phoswich scintillation detectors: LSO (Lutetium Oxy-ortosilicate doped with cerium Lu2SiO5:Ce) and LuYAP (Lutetium Ortoaluminate of Yttrium doped with cerium Lu0.7Y0.3AlO3:Ce) for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and hybrid pixel detector XPAD for Computed Tomography (CT). Simultaneous acquisition of deposited energy and the corresponding time - position for each recorded event were analyzed, independently, for both detectors. interference between detection modules for PET and CT. Information about amount of radiation reaching each phoswich crystal and XPAD detector using a phantom in order to study the effectiveness by radiation attenuation and influence the positioning of the radioactive source 22Na was obtained. The simulation proposed will improve distribution of detectors rings and interference values will be taken into account in the new versions of detectors.

  6. CFD simulation of hemodynamics in sequential and individual coronary bypass grafts based on multislice CT scan datasets.

    PubMed

    Hajati, Omid; Zarrabi, Khalil; Karimi, Reza; Hajati, Azadeh

    2012-01-01

    There is still controversy over the differences in the patency rates of the sequential and individual coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) techniques. The purpose of this paper was to non-invasively evaluate hemodynamic parameters using complete 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the sequential and the individual methods based on the patient-specific data extracted from computed tomography (CT) angiography. For CFD analysis, the geometric model of coronary arteries was reconstructed using an ECG-gated 64-detector row CT. Modeling the sequential and individual bypass grafting, this study simulates the flow from the aorta to the occluded posterior descending artery (PDA) and the posterior left ventricle (PLV) vessel with six coronary branches based on the physiologically measured inlet flow as the boundary condition. The maximum calculated wall shear stress (WSS) in the sequential and the individual models were estimated to be 35.1 N/m(2) and 36.5 N/m(2), respectively. Compared to the individual bypass method, the sequential graft has shown a higher velocity at the proximal segment and lower spatial wall shear stress gradient (SWSSG) due to the flow splitting caused by the side-to-side anastomosis. Simulated results combined with its surgical benefits including the requirement of shorter vein length and fewer anastomoses advocate the sequential method as a more favorable CABG method. PMID:23365974

  7. Feasibility of patient dose reduction based on various noise suppression filters for cone-beam computed tomography in an image-guided patient positioning system.

    PubMed

    Kamezawa, Hidemi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shirieda, Katsutoshi; Kameda, Noboru; Ohki, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of patient dose reduction based on six noise suppression filters for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image-guided patient positioning (IGPP) system. A midpoint dose was employed as a patient dose index. First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT images were acquired with a reference dose and various low doses. Second, an automated rigid registration was performed for three axis translations to estimate patient setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images processed by six noise suppression filters (averaging filter, median filter, Gaussian filter, edge-preserving smoothing filter, bilateral filter, and adaptive partial median filter (AMF)). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as Euclidean distances between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT and RD-CBCT images. Finally, the residual errors as a function of the patient dose index were estimated for LD-CBCT images processed by six noise suppression filters, and then the patient dose indices for the filtered LD-CBCT images were obtained at the same residual error as the RD-CBCT image. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic phantom and four cancer patients. The patient dose for the LD-CBCT images was reduced to 19% of that for the RD-CBCT image for the phantom by using AMF, while keeping a same residual error of 0.47 mm as the RD-CBCT image by applying the noise suppression filters to the LD-CBCT images. The average patient dose was reduced to 31.1% for prostate cancer patients, and it was reduced to 82.5% for a lung cancer patient by applying the AMF. These preliminary results suggested that the proposed approach based on noise suppression filters could decrease the patient dose in IGPP systems. PMID:27065312

  8. Feasibility of patient dose reduction based on various noise suppression filters for cone-beam computed tomography in an image-guided patient positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezawa, Hidemi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shirieda, Katsutoshi; Kameda, Noboru; Ohki, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of patient dose reduction based on six noise suppression filters for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image-guided patient positioning (IGPP) system. A midpoint dose was employed as a patient dose index. First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT images were acquired with a reference dose and various low doses. Second, an automated rigid registration was performed for three axis translations to estimate patient setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images processed by six noise suppression filters (averaging filter, median filter, Gaussian filter, edge-preserving smoothing filter, bilateral filter, and adaptive partial median filter (AMF)). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as Euclidean distances between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT and RD-CBCT images. Finally, the residual errors as a function of the patient dose index were estimated for LD-CBCT images processed by six noise suppression filters, and then the patient dose indices for the filtered LD-CBCT images were obtained at the same residual error as the RD-CBCT image. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic phantom and four cancer patients. The patient dose for the LD-CBCT images was reduced to 19% of that for the RD-CBCT image for the phantom by using AMF, while keeping a same residual error of 0.47 mm as the RD-CBCT image by applying the noise suppression filters to the LD-CBCT images. The average patient dose was reduced to 31.1% for prostate cancer patients, and it was reduced to 82.5% for a lung cancer patient by applying the AMF. These preliminary results suggested that the proposed approach based on noise suppression filters could decrease the patient dose in IGPP systems.

  9. Feasible Dose Reduction in Routine Chest Computed Tomography Maintaining Constant Image Quality Using the Last Three Scanner Generations: From Filtered Back Projection to Sinogram-affirmed Iterative Reconstruction and Impact of the Novel Fully Integrated Detector Design Minimizing Electronic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Ebner, Lukas; Knobloch, Felix; Huber, Adrian; Landau, Julia; Ott, Daniel; Heverhagen, Johannes T; Christe, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate a dose reduction in contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) by comparing the three latest generations of Siemens CT scanners used in clinical practice. We analyzed the amount of radiation used with filtered back projection (FBP) and an iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm to yield the same image quality. Furthermore, the influence on the radiation dose of the most recent integrated circuit detector (ICD; Stellar detector, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) was investigated. Materials and Methods: 136 Patients were included. Scan parameters were set to a thorax routine: SOMATOM Sensation 64 (FBP), SOMATOM Definition Flash (IR), and SOMATOM Definition Edge (ICD and IR). Tube current was set constantly to the reference level of 100 mA automated tube current modulation using reference milliamperes. Care kV was used on the Flash and Edge scanner, while tube potential was individually selected between 100 and 140 kVp by the medical technologists at the SOMATOM Sensation. Quality assessment was performed on soft-tissue kernel reconstruction. Dose was represented by the dose length product. Results: Dose-length product (DLP) with FBP for the average chest CT was 308 mGy*cm ± 99.6. In contrast, the DLP for the chest CT with IR algorithm was 196.8 mGy*cm ± 68.8 (P = 0.0001). Further decline in dose can be noted with IR and the ICD: DLP: 166.4 mGy*cm ± 54.5 (P = 0.033). The dose reduction compared to FBP was 36.1% with IR and 45.6% with IR/ICD. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was favorable in the aorta, bone, and soft tissue for IR/ICD in combination compared to FBP (the P values ranged from 0.003 to 0.048). Overall contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) improved with declining DLP. Conclusion: The most recent technical developments, namely IR in combination with integrated circuit detectors, can significantly lower radiation dose in chest CT examinations. PMID:25161807

  10. Clinical evaluation of the iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm for CT simulation in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Axente, Marian; Von Eyben, Rie; Hristov, Dimitre; Paidi, Ajay; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Zeng, Chuan; Krauss, Andreas

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate an iterative metal artifact reduction (IMAR) algorithm prototype in the radiation oncology clinic setting by testing for accuracy in CT number retrieval, relative dosimetric changes in regions affected by artifacts, and improvements in anatomical and shape conspicuity of corrected images. Methods: A phantom with known material inserts was scanned in the presence/absence of metal with different configurations of placement and sizes. The relative change in CT numbers from the reference data (CT with no metal) was analyzed. The CT studies were also used for dosimetric tests where dose distributions from both photon and proton beams were calculated. Dose differences and gamma analysis were calculated to quantify the relative changes between doses calculated on the different CT studies. Data from eight patients (all different treatment sites) were also used to quantify the differences between dose distributions before and after correction with IMAR, with no reference standard. A ranking experiment was also conducted to analyze the relative confidence of physicians delineating anatomy in the near vicinity of the metal implants. Results: IMAR corrected images proved to accurately retrieve CT numbers in the phantom study, independent of metal insert configuration, size of the metal, and acquisition energy. For plastic water, the mean difference between corrected images and reference images was −1.3 HU across all scenarios (N = 37) with a 90% confidence interval of [−2.4, −0.2] HU. While deviations were relatively higher in images with more metal content, IMAR was able to effectively correct the CT numbers independent of the quantity of metal. Residual errors in the CT numbers as well as some induced by the correction algorithm were found in the IMAR corrected images. However, the dose distributions calculated on IMAR corrected images were closer to the reference data in phantom studies. Relative spatial difference in the dose

  11. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  12. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  13. Dose Reduction versus Dose-interval Prolongation in Eribulin Mesilate Monotherapy in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Retrospective Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Toshinori; Oshima, Yumiko; Mishima, Etsuko; Ban, Akiko; Katsuragawa, Kenji; Nagamatsu, Hidetsugu; Yoshioka, Yuki; Tsukiyama, Ikuto; Hisada, Tatsuya; Itakura, Yukari; Mizutani, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    It is often necessary to modify the dose or schedule of eribulin mesilate (Eri) because of adverse events. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated the optimal approach for Eri dose adjustment and/or dosage interval adjustment. Patients who received Eri at the institutions affiliated with the Division of Oncology of the Aichi Prefectural Society of Hospital Pharmacists between July 2011 and November 2013 were enrolled in this study. We compared the group that underwent dose reduction without changes to their dosage interval (dose reduction group) with the group that had a change in their dosage interval (dose-interval prolongation group). The primary end-point was time to treatment failure (TTF), and the secondary end-points were overall survival (OS), overall response rate (ORR), clinical benefit rate (CBR), and adverse events. The TTF and OS of the dose reduction group were approximately two times longer than those of the dose-interval prolongation group. In addition, the dose reduction group had significantly improved ORR and CBR, which together indicate an antitumor effect (p=0.013 and 0.002, respectively). Although peripheral neuropathy occurred significantly more frequently in the patients in the dose reduction group (p=0.026), it was grade 1 and controllable in most of the cases. There were no differences in the occurrence of other adverse effects between the two groups. Therefore, we suggest that dose reduction with maintenance of the dosage interval is the preferred treatment approach in cases where Eri dose or schedule modification is necessary. PMID:27040459

  14. Effects of sparse sampling schemes on image quality in low-dose CT

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Sajid; Lee, Taewon; Cho, Seungryong; Shin, Sukyoung; Lee, Rena

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Various scanning methods and image reconstruction algorithms are actively investigated for low-dose computed tomography (CT) that can potentially reduce a health-risk related to radiation dose. Particularly, compressive-sensing (CS) based algorithms have been successfully developed for reconstructing images from sparsely sampled data. Although these algorithms have shown promises in low-dose CT, it has not been studied how sparse sampling schemes affect image quality in CS-based image reconstruction. In this work, the authors present several sparse-sampling schemes for low-dose CT, quantitatively analyze their data property, and compare effects of the sampling schemes on the image quality.Methods: Data properties of several sampling schemes are analyzed with respect to the CS-based image reconstruction using two measures: sampling density and data incoherence. The authors present five different sparse sampling schemes, and simulated those schemes to achieve a targeted dose reduction. Dose reduction factors of about 75% and 87.5%, compared to a conventional scan, were tested. A fully sampled circular cone-beam CT data set was used as a reference, and sparse sampling has been realized numerically based on the CBCT data.Results: It is found that both sampling density and data incoherence affect the image quality in the CS-based reconstruction. Among the sampling schemes the authors investigated, the sparse-view, many-view undersampling (MVUS)-fine, and MVUS-moving cases have shown promising results. These sampling schemes produced images with similar image quality compared to the reference image and their structure similarity index values were higher than 0.92 in the mouse head scan with 75% dose reduction.Conclusions: The authors found that in CS-based image reconstructions both sampling density and data incoherence affect the image quality, and suggest that a sampling scheme should be devised and optimized by use of these indicators. With this strategic

  15. Computational and human observer image quality evaluation of low dose, knowledge-based CT iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Miao, Jun; Brown, Kevin M.; Zabic, Stanislav; Raihani, Nilgoun; Wilson, David L.

    2015-10-15

    and model complexity according to AIC{sub c}. With parameters fixed, the model reasonably predicted detectability of human observers in blended FBP-IMR images. Semianalytic internal noise computation gave results equivalent to Monte Carlo, greatly speeding parameter estimation. Using Model-k4, the authors found an average detectability improvement of 2.7 ± 0.4 times that of FBP. IMR showed greater improvements in detectability with larger signals and relatively consistent improvements across signal contrast and x-ray dose. In the phantom tested, Model-k4 predicted an 82% dose reduction compared to FBP, verified with physical CT scans at 80% reduced dose. Conclusions: IMR improves detectability over FBP and may enable significant dose reductions. A channelized Hotelling observer with internal noise proportional to channel output standard deviation agreed well with human observers across a wide range of variables, even across reconstructions with drastically different image characteristics. Utility of the model observer was demonstrated by predicting the effect of image processing (blending), analyzing detectability improvements with IMR across dose, size, and contrast, and in guiding real CT scan dose reduction experiments. Such a model observer can be applied in optimizing parameters in advanced iterative reconstruction algorithms as well as guiding dose reduction protocols in physical CT experiments.

  16. Aneurysm of the proximal thoracic aorta simulating neoplasm: the role of CT and angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.R.; Khoury, P.T.

    1985-05-01

    Ascending aortic and proximal transverse arch aneurysms may sometimes project to the left of midline and be difficult to distinguish from neoplasm. The authors have recently encountered three such cases that presented as possible neoplastic soft-tissue masses overlying the left upper lobe. They did not enhance on intravenous-contrast-enhanced CT scans, and in two cases the diagnosis of aneurysm was not confirmed until angiography was performed.

  17. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ryan M.; O'Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-07-01

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337-43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source’s emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system’s resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring techniques currently exist.

  18. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan M.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337–43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source’s emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system’s resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring technique currently exists. PMID:23807573

  19. Cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity is ameliorated by dose reduction and conversion to sirolimus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sereno, J; Vala, H; Nunes, S; Rocha-Pereira, P; Carvalho, E; Alves, R; Teixeira, F; Reis, F

    2015-04-01

    Side-effect minimization strategies to avoid serious side-effects of cyclosporine A (CsA), such as nephrotoxicity, have been mainly based on dose reduction and conversion to other putatively less nephrotoxic drugs, such as sirolimus (SRL), an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin. This study intended to evaluate the impact of protocols based on CsA dose reduction and further conversion to SRL on kidney function and lesions, based on serum, urine and renal tissue markers. The following 3 groups (n=6) were tested during a 9-week protocol: control (vehicle); CsA (5 mg/kg/day) and Red + Conv (CsA 30 mg/kg/day during 3 weeks + 3 weeks with CsA 5 mg/kg/day + SRL 1 mg/kg/day during the last 3 weeks). The following parameters were analysed: blood pressure, heart rate and biochemical data; serum and urine contents and clearances of creatinine, urea and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), as well as, glomerular filtration rate; kidney lipid peroxidation and clearance; kidney lesions were evaluated and protein expression was performed by immunohistochemistry. After the first 3 weeks of CsA (30 mg/kg/day) treatment animals showed body weight loss, hypertension, tachycardia, as well as, increased serum levels of non-HDL cholesterol, glucose, triglycerides, creatinine and urea, accompanied by decreased GFR and insulin levels. In addition, a significant increase in the expression of connective tissue growth factor, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), mammalian target of rapamycin, nuclear factor-κβ1 and transforming growth factor-β was found in the kidney, accompanied by extensive renal damage. The following 3 weeks with CsA dose reduction revealed amelioration of vascular and glomerular lesions, but without significant tubular improvement. The last 3 weeks with the conversion to sirolimus revealed high serum and urine NGAL contents but the CsA-evoked renal damage was substantially ameliorated, by reduced of connective tissue growth factor, mammalian

  20. Development and validation of a measurement-based source model for kilovoltage cone-beam CT Monte Carlo dosimetry simulations

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Kyle; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Ruan, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to adapt an equivalent source model originally developed for conventional CT Monte Carlo dose quantification to the radiation oncology context and validate its application for evaluating concomitant dose incurred by a kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) system integrated into a linear accelerator. Methods: In order to properly characterize beams from the integrated kV CBCT system, the authors have adapted a previously developed equivalent source model consisting of an equivalent spectrum module that takes into account intrinsic filtration and an equivalent filter module characterizing the added bowtie filtration. An equivalent spectrum was generated for an 80, 100, and 125 kVp beam with beam energy characterized by half-value layer measurements. An equivalent filter description was generated from bowtie profile measurements for both the full- and half-bowtie. Equivalent source models for each combination of equivalent spectrum and filter were incorporated into the Monte Carlo software package MCNPX. Monte Carlo simulations were then validated against in-phantom measurements for both the radiographic and CBCT mode of operation of the kV CBCT system. Radiographic and CBCT imaging dose was measured for a variety of protocols at various locations within a body (32 cm in diameter) and head (16 cm in diameter) CTDI phantom. The in-phantom radiographic and CBCT dose was simulated at all measurement locations and converted to absolute dose using normalization factors calculated from air scan measurements and corresponding simulations. The simulated results were compared with the physical measurements and their discrepancies were assessed quantitatively. Results: Strong agreement was observed between in-phantom simulations and measurements. For the radiographic protocols, simulations uniformly underestimated measurements by 0.54%–5.14% (mean difference = −3.07%, SD = 1.60%). For the CBCT protocols, simulations uniformly

  1. Development and validation of a measurement-based source model for kilovoltage cone-beam CT Monte Carlo dosimetry simulations

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Kyle; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Ruan, Dan

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to adapt an equivalent source model originally developed for conventional CT Monte Carlo dose quantification to the radiation oncology context and validate its application for evaluating concomitant dose incurred by a kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) system integrated into a linear accelerator.Methods: In order to properly characterize beams from the integrated kV CBCT system, the authors have adapted a previously developed equivalent source model consisting of an equivalent spectrum module that takes into account intrinsic filtration and an equivalent filter module characterizing the added bowtie filtration. An equivalent spectrum was generated for an 80, 100, and 125 kVp beam with beam energy characterized by half-value layer measurements. An equivalent filter description was generated from bowtie profile measurements for both the full- and half-bowtie. Equivalent source models for each combination of equivalent spectrum and filter were incorporated into the Monte Carlo software package MCNPX. Monte Carlo simulations were then validated against in-phantom measurements for both the radiographic and CBCT mode of operation of the kV CBCT system. Radiographic and CBCT imaging dose was measured for a variety of protocols at various locations within a body (32 cm in diameter) and head (16 cm in diameter) CTDI phantom. The in-phantom radiographic and CBCT dose was simulated at all measurement locations and converted to absolute dose using normalization factors calculated from air scan measurements and corresponding simulations. The simulated results were compared with the physical measurements and their discrepancies were assessed quantitatively.Results: Strong agreement was observed between in-phantom simulations and measurements. For the radiographic protocols, simulations uniformly underestimated measurements by 0.54%–5.14% (mean difference =−3.07%, SD = 1.60%). For the CBCT protocols, simulations uniformly underestimated

  2. Effect of rare earth filtration on patient exposure, dose reduction, and image quality in oral panoramic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, D.A.; Washburn, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Rare earth intensifying screen material (Gd2O2S:Tb) was added to the standard Al filtration of an oral panoramic x-ray unit, resulting in a beam capable of achieving reductions in patient dose without a loss of image quality. The added rare earth filtration technique resulted in patient dose reductions of 21-56%, depending on anatomic sites, when compared to the conventional Al filtration technique. Films generated from both techniques were measured densitometrically and evaluated by a panel of practicing clinicians. Diagnostically significant differences were minimal. The results indicate that use of rare earth filters in oral panoramic radiography is an effective means of reducing exposures of dental patients to ionizing radiation.

  3. Persistent hiccups due to aripiprazole in an adolescent with obsessive compulsive disorder responding to dose reduction and rechallenge

    PubMed Central

    Kutuk, Meryem Ozlem; Tufan, Ali Evren; Guler, Gulen; Yildirim, Veli; Toros, Fevziye

    2016-01-01

    Our case involves persistent hiccup arising in an adolescent with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) who was using aripiprazole as an augmentation to fluoxetine and whose hiccups remitted with dose reduction and rechallenge. Treatment suggested that aripiprazole might lead to hiccups. Antipsychotics are also used for the treatment of hiccups, but recent case reports suggest that they cause hiccups as well. Within 12 h of taking 5 mg aripiprazole, the 13-year-old girl began having continuous hiccups, which lasted for 3–4 h. The hiccups resolved when the dose of aripiprazole was reduced to 2.5 mg. To achieve augmentation, aripiprazole was replaced with risperidone 0.5 mg/day for 1 month, but excess sedation was observed. As a result, aripiprazole was restarted at a dose of 2.5 mg/day, and 1 week later, it was increased to 5 mg/every other day. No hiccups were observed. PMID:27099770

  4. Persistent hiccups due to aripiprazole in an adolescent with obsessive compulsive disorder responding to dose reduction and rechallenge.

    PubMed

    Kutuk, Meryem Ozlem; Tufan, Ali Evren; Guler, Gulen; Yildirim, Veli; Toros, Fevziye

    2016-04-01

    Our case involves persistent hiccup arising in an adolescent with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) who was using aripiprazole as an augmentation to fluoxetine and whose hiccups remitted with dose reduction and rechallenge. Treatment suggested that aripiprazole might lead to hiccups. Antipsychotics are also used for the treatment of hiccups, but recent case reports suggest that they cause hiccups as well. Within 12 h of taking 5 mg aripiprazole, the 13-year-old girl began having continuous hiccups, which lasted for 3-4 h. The hiccups resolved when the dose of aripiprazole was reduced to 2.5 mg. To achieve augmentation, aripiprazole was replaced with risperidone 0.5 mg/day for 1 month, but excess sedation was observed. As a result, aripiprazole was restarted at a dose of 2.5 mg/day, and 1 week later, it was increased to 5 mg/every other day. No hiccups were observed. PMID:27099770

  5. Poster — Thur Eve — 11: Validation of the orthopedic metallic artifact reduction tool for CT simulations at the Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J; Foottit, C

    2014-08-15

    Metallic implants in patients can produce image artifacts in kilovoltage CT simulation images which can introduce noise and inaccuracies in CT number, affecting anatomical segmentation and dose distributions. The commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm (O-MAR) (Philips Healthcare System) was recently made available on CT simulation scanners at our institution. This study validated the clinical use of O-MAR by investigating its effects on CT number and dose distributions. O-MAR corrected and uncorrected images were acquired with a Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT simulator of a cylindrical solid water phantom that contained various plugs (including metal) of known density. CT number accuracy was investigated by determining the mean and standard deviation in regions of interest (ROI) within each plug for uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images and comparing with no-metal image values. Dose distributions were calculated using the Monaco treatment planning system. Seven open fields were equally spaced about the phantom around a ROI near the center of the phantom. These were compared to a “correct” dose distribution calculated by overriding electron densities a no-metal phantom image to produce an image containing metal but no artifacts. An overall improvement in CT number and dose distribution accuracy was achieved by applying the O-MAR correction. Mean CT numbers and standard deviations were found to be generally improved. Exceptions included lung equivalent media, which is consistent with vendor specified contraindications. Dose profiles were found to vary by ±4% between uncorrected or O-MAR corrected images with O-MAR producing doses closer to ground truth.

  6. Sex differences in nicotine self-administration in rats during progressive unit dose reduction: Implications for nicotine regulation policy

    PubMed Central

    Grebenstein, Patricia; Burroughs, Danielle; Zhang, Yan; LeSage, Mark G.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the nicotine content in tobacco products is being considered by the FDA as a policy to reduce the addictiveness of tobacco products. Understanding individual differences in response to nicotine reduction will be critical to developing safe and effective policy. Animal and human research demonstrating sex differences in the reinforcing effects of nicotine suggests that males and females may respond differently to nicotine-reduction policies. However, no studies have directly examined sex differences in the effects of nicotine unit-dose reduction on nicotine self-administration (NSA) in animals. The purpose of the present study was to examine this issue in a rodent self-administration model. Male and female rats were trained to self-administer nicotine (0.06 mg/kg) under an FR 3 schedule during daily 23 h sessions. Rats were then exposed to saline extinction and reacquisition of NSA, followed by weekly reductions in the unit dose (0.03 to 0.00025 mg/kg) until extinction levels of responding were achieved. Males and females were compared with respect to baseline levels of intake, resistance to extinction, degree of compensatory increases in responding during dose reduction, and the threshold reinforcing unit dose of nicotine. Exponential demand-curve analysis was also conducted to compare the sensitivity of males and females to increases in the unit price (FR/unit dose) of nicotine (i.e., elasticity of demand or reinforcing efficacy). Females exhibited significantly higher baseline intake and less compensation than males. However, there were no sex differences in the reinforcement threshold or elasticity of demand. Dose–response relationships were very well described by the exponential demand function (r2 values > 0.96 for individual subjects). These findings suggest that females may exhibit less compensatory smoking in response to nicotine reduction policies, even though their nicotine reinforcement threshold and elasticity of demand may not differ from

  7. Sex differences in nicotine self-administration in rats during progressive unit dose reduction: implications for nicotine regulation policy.

    PubMed

    Grebenstein, Patricia; Burroughs, Danielle; Zhang, Yan; LeSage, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Reducing the nicotine content in tobacco products is being considered by the FDA as a policy to reduce the addictiveness of tobacco products. Understanding individual differences in response to nicotine reduction will be critical to developing safe and effective policy. Animal and human research demonstrating sex differences in the reinforcing effects of nicotine suggests that males and females may respond differently to nicotine-reduction policies. However, no studies have directly examined sex differences in the effects of nicotine unit-dose reduction on nicotine self-administration (NSA) in animals. The purpose of the present study was to examine this issue in a rodent self-administration model. Male and female rats were trained to self-administer nicotine (0.06mg/kg) under an FR 3 schedule during daily 23h sessions. Rats were then exposed to saline extinction and reacquisition of NSA, followed by weekly reductions in the unit dose (0.03 to 0.00025mg/kg) until extinction levels of responding were achieved. Males and females were compared with respect to baseline levels of intake, resistance to extinction, degree of compensatory increases in responding during dose reduction, and the threshold reinforcing unit dose of nicotine. Exponential demand-curve analysis was also conducted to compare the sensitivity of males and females to increases in the unit price (FR/unit dose) of nicotine (i.e., elasticity of demand or reinforcing efficacy). Females exhibited significantly higher baseline intake and less compensation than males. However, there were no sex differences in the reinforcement threshold or elasticity of demand. Dose-response relationships were very well described by the exponential demand function (r(2) values>0.96 for individual subjects). These findings suggest that females may exhibit less compensatory smoking in response to nicotine reduction policies, even though their nicotine reinforcement threshold and elasticity of demand may not differ from males

  8. A computer simulation study comparing lesion detection accuracy with digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Xing; Glick, Stephen J.; Liu, Bob; Vedula, Aruna A.; Thacker, Samta

    2006-04-15

    Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a three-dimensional (3D) object onto a 2D plane. Recently, two promising approaches for 3D volumetric breast imaging have been proposed, breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT breast imaging (CTBI). To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy with either breast tomosynthesis or CT breast imaging as compared to digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through a CsI based flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of Mo/Mo 28 kVp for digital mammography, Mo/Rh 28 kVp for BT, and W/Ce 50 kVp for CTBI were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total average glandular dose of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in conventional two-view screening mammography. The same total dose was modeled for both the DM and BT simulations. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochastic growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum, with the composition of 50% fibroglandular and 50% adipose tissue. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with five observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (A{sub z}) was 0.76 for DM, 0.93 for BT, and 0.94 for CTBI. Results indicated that for the same dose, a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom was detected by the two volumetric breast imaging systems, BT and CTBI, with statistically

  9. CT Angiography after 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5–15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  10. Evaluation of patient dose using a virtual CT scanner: Applications to 4DCT simulation and Kilovoltage cone-beam imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMarco, J. J.; McNitt-Gray, M. F.; Cagnon, C. H.; Angel, E.; Agazaryan, N.; Zankl, M.

    2008-02-01

    This work evaluates the effects of patient size on radiation dose from simulation imaging studies such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT). 4DCT studies are scans that include temporal information, frequently incorporating highly over-sampled imaging series necessary for retrospective sorting as a function of respiratory phase. This type of imaging study can result in a significant dose increase to the patient due to the slower table speed as compared with a conventional axial or helical scan protocol. Kilovoltage cone-beam imaging is a relatively new imaging technique that requires an on-board kilovoltage x-ray tube and a flat-panel detector. Instead of porting individual reference fields, the kV tube and flat-panel detector are rotated about the patient producing a cone-beam CT data set (kV-CBCT). To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of adult patients and virtual source models of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. The GSF family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models, were implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The adult patient models represent a range of patient sizes and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented. Simulated 4DCT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a multi-detector CT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, bow-tie filtration, and helical source path. Standard MCNPX tally functions were applied to each model to estimate absolute organ dose based upon an air-kerma normalization measurement for nominal scanner operating parameters.

  11. Radiation dose reduction in cone-beam computed tomography of extremities: evaluation of a novel radiation shield.

    PubMed

    Matikka, H; Virén, T

    2014-06-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new technique for imaging of extremities. It provides high-resolution images with lower effective dose compared to conventional CT. However following the ALARA principle, CBCT-imaging protocols and practices must also be optimised to minimize the dose absorbed by the patient as well as personnel. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a novel scanner-attached radiation shield on the dose absorbed by the patient and on the amount of scattered radiation around the scanner.An orthopedic CBCT scanner was applied for comparing the doses with and without the shield during an elbow and a knee scan. A homogeneous 8 cm PMMA phantom with either an anthropomorphic Alderson phantom or a 16 cm PMMA phantom simulated the tissues of a patient. Measurements were made for several scan parameters using calibrated dose meters.The results show that the radiation shield significantly decreased the doses measured on the patient during CBCT scans of the elbow and the knee. The usage of the shield decreased the absorbed doses by up to 95.5%. Also scattered radiation around the gantry decreased notably. The use of the shield is highly recommended, especially for pediatric patients. PMID:24894593

  12. Scatter in an uncollimated x-ray CT machine based on a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadeson, Nicola; Morton, Edward; Lionheart, William

    2010-04-01

    A high-speed motionless-gantry x-ray CT machine has been designed to allow for 3D images to be collected in real time. By using multiple, switched x-ray sources and fixed detector rings, the time consuming mechanical rotation of conventional CT machines can be removed. However, the nature of this design limits the possibility of detector collimation since each detector must now be able to record the energy of x-ray beams from a number of different directions. The lack of collimation has implications in the reconstructed image due to an increase in the number of scattered photons recorded. A Monte Carlo computer simulation of the x-ray machine has been developed, using the Geant4 software toolkit, to analyse the behaviour of both Rayleigh and Compton scattered photons when considering airport baggage and medical applications. Four different scattering objects were analysed based on 50kVp, 100kVp and 150kVp spectra for a tungsten target. Two suitcase objects, a body and a brain phantom were chosen as objects typical of airport baggage and medical CT. The results indicate that the level of scatter is negligible for a typical airport baggage application, since the majority of space in a suitcase consists of clothing, which has a low density. Scatter contributes to less than 1% of the image in all instances. However, due to the large amounts of water found in the human body, the level of scatter in the medical instances are significantly higher, reaching 37% when the body phantom is analysed at 50kVp.

  13. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  14. Effects of registration error on parametric response map analysis: a simulation study using liver CT-perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lausch, A.; Jensen, N. K. G.; Chen, J.; Lee, T. Y.; Lock, M.; Wong, E.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of registration error (RE) on parametric response map (PRM) analysis of pre and post-radiotherapy (RT) functional images. Methods: Arterial blood flow maps (ABF) were generated from the CT-perfusion scans of 5 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. ABF values within each patient map were modified to produce seven new ABF maps simulating 7 distinct post-RT functional change scenarios. Ground truth PRMs were generated for each patient by comparing the simulated and original ABF maps. Each simulated ABF map was then deformed by different magnitudes of realistic respiratory motion in order to simulate RE. PRMs were generated for each of the deformed maps and then compared to the ground truth PRMs to produce estimates of RE-induced misclassification. Main findings: The percentage of voxels misclassified as decreasing, no change, and increasing, increased with RE For all patients, increasing RE was observed to increase the number of high post-RT ABF voxels associated with low pre-RT ABF voxels and vice versa. 3 mm of average tumour RE resulted in 18-45% tumour voxel misclassification rates. Conclusions: RE induced misclassification posed challenges for PRM analysis in the liver where registration accuracy tends to be lower. Quantitative understanding of the sensitivity of the PRM method to registration error is required if PRMs are to be used to guide radiation therapy dose painting techniques.

  15. CoNNeCT Antenna Positioning System Dynamic Simulator Modal Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Tevor M.; McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Suarez, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed an on-orbit, adaptable, Software Defined Radios (SDR)/Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS)-based testbed facility to conduct a suite of experiments to advance technologies, reduce risk, and enable future mission capabilities on the International Space Station (ISS). The Communications, Navigation, and Networking reConfigurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) Project will provide NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop and field communications, navigation, and networking technologies in both the laboratory and space environment based on reconfigurable, software-defined radio platforms and the STRS Architecture. The CoNNeCT Payload Operations Nomenclature is "SCAN Testbed," and this nomenclature will be used in all ISS integration, safety, verification, and operations documentation. The SCAN Testbed (payload) is a Flight Releasable Attachment Mechanism (FRAM) based payload that will launch aboard the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Multipurpose Exposed Pallet (EP-MP) to the International Space Station (ISS), and will be transferred to the Express Logistics Carrier 3 (ELC3) via Extravehicular Robotics (EVR). The SCAN Testbed will operate on-orbit for a minimum of two years.

  16. CoNNeCT Antenna Positioning System Dynamic Simulator Modal Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Trevor M.; McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Suarez, Vicente J.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed an on-orbit, adaptable, Software Defined Radios (SDR)/Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS)-based testbed facility to conduct a suite of experiments to advance technologies, reduce risk, and enable future mission capabilities on the International Space Station (ISS). The Communications, Navigation, and Networking reConfigurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) Project will provide NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop and field communications, navigation, and networking technologies in both the laboratory and space environment based on reconfigurable, software-defined radio platforms and the STRS Architecture. The CoNNeCT Payload Operations Nomenclature is SCAN Testbed, and this nomenclature will be used in all ISS integration, safety, verification, and operations documentation. The SCAN Testbed (payload) is a Flight Releasable Attachment Mechanism (FRAM) based payload that will launch aboard the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Multipurpose Exposed Pallet (EP-MP) to the International Space Station (ISS), and will be transferred to the Express Logistics Carrier 3 (ELC3) via Extravehicular Robotics (EVR). The SCAN Testbed will operate on-orbit for a minimum of two years.

  17. Calibration and GEANT4 Simulations of the Phase II Proton Compute Tomography (pCT) Range Stack Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Uzunyan, S. A.; Blazey, G.; Boi, S.; Coutrakon, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Hedin, D.; Johnson, E.; Kalnins, J.; Zutshi, V.; Ford, R.; Rauch, J. E.; Rubinov, P.; Sellberg, G.; Wilson, P.; Naimuddin, M.

    2015-12-29

    Northern Illinois University in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and Delhi University has been designing and building a proton CT scanner for applications in proton treatment planning. The Phase II proton CT scanner consists of eight planes of tracking detectors with two X and two Y coordinate measurements both before and after the patient. In addition, a range stack detector consisting of a stack of thin scintillator tiles, arranged in twelve eight-tile frames, is used to determine the water equivalent path length (WEPL) of each track through the patient. The X-Y coordinates and WEPL are required input for image reconstruction software to find the relative (proton) stopping powers (RSP) value of each voxel in the patient and generate a corresponding 3D image. In this Note we describe tests conducted in 2015 at the proton beam at the Central DuPage Hospital in Warrenville, IL, focusing on the range stack calibration procedure and comparisons with the GEANT~4 range stack simulation.

  18. Low-dose preview for patient-specific, task-specific technique selection in cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Adam S.; Stayman, J. Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Khanna, A. Jay; Gallia, Gary L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : A method is presented for generating simulated low-dose cone-beam CT (CBCT) preview images from which patient- and task-specific minimum-dose protocols can be confidently selected prospectively in clinical scenarios involving repeat scans. Methods : In clinical scenarios involving a series of CBCT images, the low-dose preview (LDP) method operates upon the first scan to create a projection dataset that accurately simulates the effects of dose reduction in subsequent scans by injecting noise of proper magnitude and correlation, including both quantum and electronic readout noise as important components of image noise in flat-panel detector CBCT. Experiments were conducted to validate the LDP method in both a head phantom and a cadaveric torso by performing CBCT acquisitions spanning a wide dose range (head: 0.8–13.2 mGy, body: 0.8–12.4 mGy) with a prototype mobile C-arm system. After injecting correlated noise to simulate dose reduction, the projections were reconstructed using both conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and an iterative, model-based image reconstruction method (MBIR). The LDP images were then compared to real CBCT images in terms of noise magnitude, noise-power spectrum (NPS), spatial resolution, contrast, and artifacts. Results : For both FBP and MBIR, the LDP images exhibited accurate levels of spatial resolution and contrast that were unaffected by the correlated noise injection, as expected. Furthermore, the LDP image noise magnitude and NPS were in strong agreement with real CBCT images acquired at the corresponding, reduced dose level across the entire dose range considered. The noise magnitude agreed within 7% for both the head phantom and cadaveric torso, and the NPS showed a similar level of agreement up to the Nyquist frequency. Therefore, the LDP images were highly representative of real image quality across a broad range of dose and reconstruction methods. On the other hand, naïve injection ofuncorrelated noise

  19. Low-dose preview for patient-specific, task-specific technique selection in cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Adam S.; Stayman, J. Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Khanna, A. Jay; Gallia, Gary L.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose : A method is presented for generating simulated low-dose cone-beam CT (CBCT) preview images from which patient- and task-specific minimum-dose protocols can be confidently selected prospectively in clinical scenarios involving repeat scans. Methods : In clinical scenarios involving a series of CBCT images, the low-dose preview (LDP) method operates upon the first scan to create a projection dataset that accurately simulates the effects of dose reduction in subsequent scans by injecting noise of proper magnitude and correlation, including both quantum and electronic readout noise as important components of image noise in flat-panel detector CBCT. Experiments were conducted to validate the LDP method in both a head phantom and a cadaveric torso by performing CBCT acquisitions spanning a wide dose range (head: 0.8–13.2 mGy, body: 0.8–12.4 mGy) with a prototype mobile C-arm system. After injecting correlated noise to simulate dose reduction, the projections were reconstructed using both conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and an iterative, model-based image reconstruction method (MBIR). The LDP images were then compared to real CBCT images in terms of noise magnitude, noise-power spectrum (NPS), spatial resolution, contrast, and artifacts. Results : For both FBP and MBIR, the LDP images exhibited accurate levels of spatial resolution and contrast that were unaffected by the correlated noise injection, as expected. Furthermore, the LDP image noise magnitude and NPS were in strong agreement with real CBCT images acquired at the corresponding, reduced dose level across the entire dose range considered. The noise magnitude agreed within 7% for both the head phantom and cadaveric torso, and the NPS showed a similar level of agreement up to the Nyquist frequency. Therefore, the LDP images were highly representative of real image quality across a broad range of dose and reconstruction methods. On the other hand, naïve injection ofuncorrelated noise

  20. SU-E-I-20: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Test of Second Generation Toshiba Aquilion Large Bore CT Simulator Based On AAPM TG-66 Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM radiation therapy committee task group No. 66 (TG-66) published a report which described a general approach to CT simulator QA. The report outlines the testing procedures and specifications for the evaluation of patient dose, radiation safety, electromechanical components, and image quality for a CT simulator. The purpose of this study is to thoroughly evaluate the performance of a second generation Toshiba Aquilion Large Bore CT simulator with 90 cm bore size (Toshiba, Nasu, JP) based on the TG-66 criteria. The testing procedures and results from this study provide baselines for a routine QA program. Methods: Different measurements and analysis were performed including CTDIvol measurements, alignment and orientation of gantry lasers, orientation of the tabletop with respect to the imaging plane, table movement and indexing accuracy, Scanogram location accuracy, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, field uniformity, CT number accuracy, mA linearity and mA reproducibility using a number of different phantoms and measuring devices, such as CTDI phantom, ACR image quality phantom, TG-66 laser QA phantom, pencil ion chamber (Fluke Victoreen) and electrometer (RTI Solidose 400). Results: The CTDI measurements were within 20% of the console displayed values. The alignment and orientation for both gantry laser and tabletop, as well as the table movement and indexing and scanogram location accuracy were within 2mm as specified in TG66. The spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, field uniformity and CT number accuracy were all within ACR’s recommended limits. The mA linearity and reproducibility were both well below the TG66 threshold. Conclusion: The 90 cm bore size second generation Toshiba Aquilion Large Bore CT simulator that comes with 70 cm true FOV can consistently meet various clinical needs. The results demonstrated that this simulator complies with the TG-66 protocol in all aspects including electromechanical component

  1. Spectral optimization for micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Brauweiler, Robert; Eisa, Fabian; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize micro-CT protocols with respect to x-ray spectra and thereby reduce radiation dose at unimpaired image quality. Methods: Simulations were performed to assess image contrast, noise, and radiation dose for different imaging tasks. The figure of merit used to determine the optimal spectrum was the dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD). Both optimal photon energy and tube voltage were considered. Three different types of filtration were investigated for polychromatic x-ray spectra: 0.5 mm Al, 3.0 mm Al, and 0.2 mm Cu. Phantoms consisted of water cylinders of 20, 32, and 50 mm in diameter with a central insert of 9 mm which was filled with different contrast materials: an iodine-based contrast medium (CM) to mimic contrast-enhanced (CE) imaging, hydroxyapatite to mimic bone structures, and water with reduced density to mimic soft tissue contrast. Validation measurements were conducted on a commercially available micro-CT scanner using phantoms consisting of water-equivalent plastics. Measurements on a mouse cadaver were performed to assess potential artifacts like beam hardening and to further validate simulation results. Results: The optimal photon energy for CE imaging was found at 34 keV. For bone imaging, optimal energies were 17, 20, and 23 keV for the 20, 32, and 50 mm phantom, respectively. For density differences, optimal energies varied between 18 and 50 keV for the 20 and 50 mm phantom, respectively. For the 32 mm phantom and density differences, CNRD was found to be constant within 2.5% for the energy range of 21-60 keV. For polychromatic spectra and CMs, optimal settings were 50 kV with 0.2 mm Cu filtration, allowing for a dose reduction of 58% compared to the optimal setting for 0.5 mm Al filtration. For bone imaging, optimal tube voltages were below 35 kV. For soft tissue imaging, optimal tube settings strongly depended on phantom size. For 20 mm, low voltages were preferred. For 32 mm, CNRD was found to be almost independent of

  2. Very low-dose adult whole-body tumor imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Naveed, Muhammad; McGrath, Mary; Lisi, Michele; Lavalley, Cathy; Feiglin, David

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if effective radiation dose due to PET component in adult whole-body tumor imaging with time-of-flight F-18 FDG PET/CT could be significantly reduced. We retrospectively analyzed data for 10 patients with the body mass index ranging from 25 to 50. We simulated F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose via reconstruction of simulated shorter acquisition time per bed position scans from the acquired list data. F-18 FDG whole-body scans were reconstructed using time-of-flight OSEM algorithm and advanced system modeling. Two groups of images were obtained: group A with a standard dose of F-18 FDG and standard reconstruction parameters and group B with simulated 25% dose and modified reconstruction parameters, respectively. Three nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the simulated activity independently reviewed the images and compared diagnostic quality of images. Based on the input from the physicians, we selected optimal modified reconstruction parameters for group B. In so obtained images, all the lesions observed in the group A were visible in the group B. The tumor SUV values were different in the group A, as compared to group B, respectively. However, no significant differences were reported in the final interpretation of the images from A and B groups. In conclusion, for a small number of patients, we have demonstrated that F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose, accompanied by appropriate modification of the reconstruction parameters provided adequate diagnostic quality of PET images acquired on time-of-flight PET/CT.

  3. The Influences of Withdrawal and Daily Dose Reduction of Pioglitazone on Metabolic Parameters in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Retrospective Longitudinal Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Fukunaga, Takayuki; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Adachi, Hiroki; Moriyama, Sumie; Kawaguchi, Akiko; Mishima, Shuichi; Sako, Akahito; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to understand the influences of withdrawal or dose reduction of pioglitazone in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We retrospectively picked up patients who had undergone withdrawal or daily dose reduction of pioglitazone after a continuous prescription for 3 months or longer between January 2010 and March 2014. We compared the data before the withdrawal or dose reduction of pioglitazone with the data at 3 or 6 months after those by a chart-based analysis. Results Among 713 patients taking pioglitazone at least once during the studied period, 20 patients had undergone withdrawal of pioglitazone (group A) and 51 patients had undergone daily dose reduction (group B). The mean pioglitazone dose at baseline was 23 mg in subjects of group A, and 30 mg in group B. The number of subjects who had taken high-dose metformin (≥ 1,000 mg) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors increased after the withdrawal or dose reduction of pioglitazone in both groups. Although no significant change was observed in plasma glucose and HbA1c levels, body weight significantly decreased at 3 and 6 months after the dose reduction in group B. The same tendency was observed in group A. Serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels significantly decreased at 3 and 6 months after the withdrawal in group A. The serum alanine aminotransferase levels significantly increased 3 months after the withdrawal in group A. Conclusions Present study demonstrated that the withdrawal of pioglitazone exacerbated serum HDL-C and liver function in patients with type 2 diabetes, although glycemic control could be maintained by using high-dose metformin or DPP-4 inhibitors. PMID:27429679

  4. X-ray CT analyses, models and numerical simulations: a comparison with petrophysical analyses in an experimental CO2 study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Steven; Pudlo, Dieter; Enzmann, Frieder; Reitenbach, Viktor; Albrecht, Daniel; Ganzer, Leonhard; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    An essential part of the collaborative research project H2STORE (hydrogen to store), which is funded by the German government, was a comparison of various analytical methods for characterizing reservoir sandstones from different stratigraphic units. In this context Permian, Triassic and Tertiary reservoir sandstones were analysed. Rock core materials, provided by RWE Gasspeicher GmbH (Dortmund, Germany), GDF Suez E&P Deutschland GmbH (Lingen, Germany), E.ON Gas Storage GmbH (Essen, Germany) and RAG Rohöl-Aufsuchungs Aktiengesellschaft (Vienna, Austria), were processed by different laboratory techniques; thin sections were prepared, rock fragments were crushed and cubes of 1 cm edge length and plugs 3 to 5 cm in length with a diameter of about 2.5 cm were sawn from macroscopic homogeneous cores. With this prepared sample material, polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, coupled with image analyses, specific surface area measurements (after Brunauer, Emmet and Teller, 1938; BET), He-porosity and N2-permeability measurements and high-resolution microcomputer tomography (μ-CT), which were used for numerical simulations, were applied. All these methods were practised on most of the same sample material, before and on selected Permian sandstones also after static CO2 experiments under reservoir conditions. A major concern in comparing the results of these methods is an appraisal of the reliability of the given porosity, permeability and mineral-specific reactive (inner) surface area data. The CO2 experiments modified the petrophysical as well as the mineralogical/geochemical rock properties. These changes are detectable by all applied analytical methods. Nevertheless, a major outcome of the high-resolution μ-CT analyses and following numerical data simulations was that quite similar data sets and data interpretations were maintained by the different petrophysical standard methods. Moreover, the μ-CT analyses are not only time saving, but also

  5. Comparison of organ-specific-radiation dose levels between 70 kVp perfusion CT and standard tri-phasic liver CT in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma using a Monte-Carlo-Simulation-based analysis platform

    PubMed Central

    Gawlitza, J.; Haubenreisser, H.; Meyer, M.; Hagelstein, C.; Sudarski, S.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Henzler, T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to systematically compare organ-specific-radiation dose levels between a radiation dose optimized perfusion CT (dVPCT) protocol of the liver and a tri-phasic standard CT protocol of the liver using a Monte-Carlo-Simulation-based analysis platform. Methods and materials The complete CT data of 52 patients (41 males; mean age 65 ± 12) with suspected HCC that underwent dVPCT examinations on a 3rd generation dual-source CT (Somatom Force, Siemens) with a dose optimized tube voltage of 70 kVp or 80 kVp were exported to an analysis platform (Radimetrics, Bayer). The dVPCT studies were matched with a reference group of 50 patients (35 males; mean age 65 ± 14) that underwent standard tri-phasic CT (sCT) examinations of the liver with 130 kVp using the calculated water-equivalent-diameter of the patients. The analysis platform was used for the calculation of the organ-specific effective dose (ED) as well as global radiation-dose parameters (ICRP103). Results The organ-specific ED of the dVPCT protocol was statistically significantly lower when compared to the sCT in 14 of 21, and noninferior in a total of 18 of 21 examined items (all p < 0.05). The EDs of the dVPCT examinations were especially in the dose sensitive organs such as the red marrow (17.3 mSv vs 24.6 mSv, p = < 0.0001) and the liver (33.3 mSv vs 46.9 mSv, p = 0.0003) lower when compared to the sCT. Conclusion Our results suggest that dVPCT performed at 70 or 80 kVp compares favorably to sCT performed with 130 kVp with regard to effective organ dose levels, especially in dose sensitive organs, while providing additional functional information which is of paramount importance in patients undergoing novel targeted therapies. PMID:27200404

  6. Computational simulations of the influence of noise in optical CT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Yves

    2015-01-01

    In 3D radiation dosimetry with optical CT scanning readout, projections of transmitted light are recorded in either lines or planar. The projections are then transferred to optical density maps by use of filtered back-projection. Absolute dose maps can be derived from the optical density maps by calibration of the optical absorption coefficient to dose values. The transmission profiles will be subject to a certain level of detector noise and noise arriving from fluctuations in the light source. Different reconstruction filters in the frequency domain can be applied in the image reconstruction procedure. The noise level in the final reconstructed images is determined by the noise in the projections, the spatial resolution and the reconstruction algorithm. The reconstruction filters may also have an effect on the geometrical precision as a spatial frequency filter may also affect the spatial resolution. We here propose an easy method to assess both the noise sensitivity and the performance in terms of mapping dose distributions with various theoretical dose gradients.

  7. EVALUATION OF DOSE REDUCTION POTENTIALS OF A NOVEL SCATTER CORRECTION SOFTWARE FOR BEDSIDE CHEST X-RAY IMAGING.

    PubMed

    Renger, Bernhard; Brieskorn, Carina; Toth, Vivien; Mentrup, Detlef; Jockel, Sascha; Lohöfer, Fabian; Schwarz, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J; Noël, Peter B

    2016-06-01

    Bedside chest X-rays (CXR) for catheter position control may add up to a considerable radiation dose for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). In this study, image quality and dose reduction potentials of a novel X-ray scatter correction software (SkyFlow, Philips Healthcare, Hamburg, Germany) were evaluated. CXRs of a 'LUNGMAN' (Kyoto Kagaku Co., LTD, Kyoto, Japan) thoracic phantom with a portacath system, a central venous line and a dialysis catheter were performed in an experimental set-up with multiple tube voltage and tube current settings without and with an antiscatter grid. Images with diagnostic exposure index (EI) 250-500 were evaluated for the difference in applied mAs with and without antiscatter grid. Three radiologists subjectively assessed the diagnostic image quality of grid and non-grid images. Compared with a non-grid image, usage of an antiscatter grid implied twice as high mAs in order to reach diagnostic EI. SkyFlow significantly improved the image quality of images acquired without grid. CXR with grid provided better image contrast than grid-less imaging with scatter correction. PMID:26977074

  8. Two brothers with skewed thiopurine metabolism in ulcerative colitis treated successfully with allopurinol and mercaptopurine dose reduction.

    PubMed

    Hoentjen, Frank; Hanauer, Stephen B; de Boer, Nanne K; Rubin, David T

    2012-01-01

    Thiopurine therapy effectively maintains remission in inflammatory bowel disease. However, many patients are unable to achieve optimum benefits from azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine because of undesirable metabolism related to high thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) activity characterized by hepatic transaminitis secondary to increased 6-methylmercaptopurine (6-MMP) production and reduced levels of therapeutic 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN). Allopurinol can optimize this skewed metabolism. We discuss two brothers who were both diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC). Their disease remained active despite oral and topical mesalamines. Steroids followed by 6-mercaptopurine (MP) were unsuccessfully introduced for both patients and both were found to have high 6-MMP and low 6-TGN levels, despite normal TMPT enzyme activity, accompanied by transaminitis. Allopurinol was introduced in combination with MP dose reduction. For both brothers addition of allopurinol was associated with successful remission and optimized MP metabolites. These siblings with active UC illustrate that skewed thiopurine metabolism may occur despite normal TPMT enzyme activity and can lead to adverse events in the absence of disease control. We confirm previous data showing that addition of allopurinol can reverse this skewed metabolism, and reduce both hepatotoxicity and disease activity, but we now also introduce the concept of a family history of preferential MP metabolism as a clue to effective management for other family members. PMID:22147254

  9. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and aocelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts. An author index and a subject index are provided to facilitate use. Both indices contain the abstract numbers from previous volumes, as well as the current volume. Information that the reader feels might be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center.

  10. Reducing radiation dose to the female breast during CT coronary angiography: A simulation study comparing breast shielding, angular tube current modulation, reduced kV, and partial angle protocols using an unknown-location signal-detectability metric

    SciTech Connect

    Rupcich, Franco; Gilat Schmidt, Taly; Badal, Andreu; Popescu, Lucretiu M.; Kyprianou, Iacovos

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The authors compared the performance of five protocols intended to reduce dose to the breast during computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography scans using a model observer unknown-location signal-detectability metric.Methods: The authors simulated CT images of an anthropomorphic female thorax phantom for a 120 kV reference protocol and five “dose reduction” protocols intended to reduce dose to the breast: 120 kV partial angle (posteriorly centered), 120 kV tube-current modulated (TCM), 120 kV with shielded breasts, 80 kV, and 80 kV partial angle (posteriorly centered). Two image quality tasks were investigated: the detection and localization of 4-mm, 3.25 mg/ml and 1-mm, 6.0 mg/ml iodine contrast signals randomly located in the heart region. For each protocol, the authors plotted the signal detectability, as quantified by the area under the exponentially transformed free response characteristic curve estimator (A-caret{sub FE}), as well as noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) versus breast and lung dose. In addition, the authors quantified each protocol's dose performance as the percent difference in dose relative to the reference protocol achieved while maintaining equivalent A-caret{sub FE}.Results: For the 4-mm signal-size task, the 80 kV full scan and 80 kV partial angle protocols decreased dose to the breast (80.5% and 85.3%, respectively) and lung (80.5% and 76.7%, respectively) with A-caret{sub FE} = 0.96, but also resulted in an approximate three-fold increase in image noise. The 120 kV partial protocol reduced dose to the breast (17.6%) at the expense of increased lung dose (25.3%). The TCM algorithm decreased dose to the breast (6.0%) and lung (10.4%). Breast shielding increased breast dose (67.8%) and lung dose (103.4%). The 80 kV and 80 kV partial protocols demonstrated greater dose reductions for the 4-mm task than for the 1-mm task, and the shielded protocol showed a larger increase in dose for the 4-mm task than for the 1-mm task

  11. Estimation of the delivered patient dose in lung IMRT treatment based on deformable registration of 4D-CT data and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flampouri, Stella; Jiang, Steve B.; Sharp, Greg C.; Wolfgang, John; Patel, Abhijit A.; Choi, Noah C.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to accurately estimate the difference between the planned and the delivered dose due to respiratory motion and free breathing helical CT artefacts for lung IMRT treatments, and to estimate the impact of this difference on clinical outcome. Six patients with representative tumour motion, size and position were selected for this retrospective study. For each patient, we had acquired both a free breathing helical CT and a ten-phase 4D-CT scan. A commercial treatment planning system was used to create four IMRT plans for each patient. The first two plans were based on the GTV as contoured on the free breathing helical CT set, with a GTV to PTV expansion of 1.5 cm and 2.0 cm, respectively. The third plan was based on the ITV, a composite volume formed by the union of the CTV volumes contoured on free breathing helical CT, end-of-inhale (EOI) and end-of-exhale (EOE) 4D-CT. The fourth plan was based on GTV contoured on the EOE 4D-CT. The prescribed dose was 60 Gy for all four plans. Fluence maps and beam setup parameters of the IMRT plans were used by the Monte Carlo dose calculation engine MCSIM for absolute dose calculation on both the free breathing CT and 4D-CT data. CT deformable registration between the breathing phases was performed to estimate the motion trajectory for both the tumour and healthy tissue. Then, a composite dose distribution over the whole breathing cycle was calculated as a final estimate of the delivered dose. EUD values were computed on the basis of the composite dose for all four plans. For the patient with the largest motion effect, the difference in the EUD of CTV between the planed and the delivered doses was 33, 11, 1 and 0 Gy for the first, second, third and fourth plan, respectively. The number of breathing phases required for accurate dose prediction was also investigated. With the advent of 4D-CT, deformable registration and Monte Carlo simulations, it is feasible to perform an accurate calculation of the

  12. Estimation of the delivered patient dose in lung IMRT treatment based on deformable registration of 4D-CT data and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Flampouri, Stella; Jiang, Steve B; Sharp, Greg C; Wolfgang, John; Patel, Abhijit A; Choi, Noah C

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to accurately estimate the difference between the planned and the delivered dose due to respiratory motion and free breathing helical CT artefacts for lung IMRT treatments, and to estimate the impact of this difference on clinical outcome. Six patients with representative tumour motion, size and position were selected for this retrospective study. For each patient, we had acquired both a free breathing helical CT and a ten-phase 4D-CT scan. A commercial treatment planning system was used to create four IMRT plans for each patient. The first two plans were based on the GTV as contoured on the free breathing helical CT set, with a GTV to PTV expansion of 1.5 cm and 2.0 cm, respectively. The third plan was based on the ITV, a composite volume formed by the union of the CTV volumes contoured on free breathing helical CT, end-of-inhale (EOI) and end-of-exhale (EOE) 4D-CT. The fourth plan was based on GTV contoured on the EOE 4D-CT. The prescribed dose was 60 Gy for all four plans. Fluence maps and beam setup parameters of the IMRT plans were used by the Monte Carlo dose calculation engine MCSIM for absolute dose calculation on both the free breathing CT and 4D-CT data. CT deformable registration between the breathing phases was performed to estimate the motion trajectory for both the tumour and healthy tissue. Then, a composite dose distribution over the whole breathing cycle was calculated as a final estimate of the delivered dose. EUD values were computed on the basis of the composite dose for all four plans. For the patient with the largest motion effect, the difference in the EUD of CTV between the planed and the delivered doses was 33, 11, 1 and 0 Gy for the first, second, third and fourth plan, respectively. The number of breathing phases required for accurate dose prediction was also investigated. With the advent of 4D-CT, deformable registration and Monte Carlo simulations, it is feasible to perform an accurate calculation of the

  13. Ultra low-dose CT attenuation correction in PET SPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shyh-Jen; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tsai, Chia-Jung; Yang, Ching-Ching; Lee, Jason J. S.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2010-07-01

    The use of CT images for attenuation correction (CTAC) allows significantly shorter scanning time and a high quality noise-free attenuation map compared with conventional germanium-68 transmission scan because at least 10 4 times greater of photon flux would be generated from a CT scan under standard operating condition. However, this CTAC technique would potentially introduce more radiation risk to the patients owing to the higher radiation exposure from CT scan. Statistic parameters mapping (SPM) is a prominent technique in nuclear medicine community for the analysis of brain imaging data. The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of low-dose CT (LDCT) and ultra low-dose CT (UDCT) in PET SPM applications. The study was divided into two parts. The first part was to evaluate of tracer uptake distribution pattern and quantity analysis by using the striatal phantom to initially assess the feasibility of AC for clinical purpose. The second part was to examine the group SPM analysis using the Hoffman brain phantom. The phantom study is to simulate the human brain and to reduce the experimental uncertainty of real subjects. The initial studies show that the results of PET SPM analysis have no significant differences between LDCT and UDCT comparing to the current used default CTAC. Moreover, the dose of the LDCT is lower than that of the default CT by a factor of 9, and UDCT can even yield a 42 times dose reduction. We have demonstrated the SPM results while using LDCT and UDCT for PET AC is comparable to those using default CT setting, suggesting their feasibility in PET SPM applications. In addition, the necessity of UDCT in PET SPM studies to avoid excess radiation dose is also evident since most of the subjects involved are non-cancer patients or children and some normal subjects are even served as a comparison group in the experiment. It is our belief that additional attempts to decrease the radiation dose would be valuable, especially for children and

  14. New horizons in cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    den Harder, A M; Willemink, M J; de Jong, P A; Schilham, A M R; Rajiah, P; Takx, R A P; Leiner, T

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, cardiovascular computed tomography angiography (CCTA) was associated with considerable radiation doses. The introduction of tube current modulation and automatic tube potential selection as well as high-pitch prospective ECG-triggering and iterative reconstruction offer the ability to decrease dose with approximately one order of magnitude, often to sub-millisievert dose levels. In parallel, advancements in computational technology have enabled the measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR) from CCTA data (FFRCT). This technique shows potential to replace invasively measured FFR to select patients in need of coronary intervention. Furthermore, developments in scanner hardware have led to the introduction of dual-energy and photon-counting CT, which offer the possibility of material decomposition imaging. Dual-energy CT reduces beam hardening, which enables CCTA in patients with a high calcium burden and more robust myocardial CT perfusion imaging. Future-generation CT systems will be capable of counting individual X-ray photons. Photon-counting CT is promising and may result in a substantial further radiation dose reduction, vastly increased spatial resolution, and the introduction of a whole new class of contrast agents. PMID:26932775

  15. Effects of Arbutin on Radiation-Induced Micronuclei in Mice Bone Marrow Cells and Its Definite Dose Reduction Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nadi, Saba; Monfared, Ali Shabestani; Mozdarani, Hossein; Mahmodzade, Aziz; Pouramir, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interactions of free radicals from ionizing radiation with DNA can induce DNA damage and lead to mutagenesis and carsinogenesis. With respect to radiation damage to human, it is important to protect humans from side effects induced by ionizing radiation. In the present study, the effects of arbutin were investigated by using the micronucleus test for anti-clastogenic activity, to calculate the ratio of polychromatic erythrocyte to polychromatic erythrocyte plus normochromatic erythrocyte (PCE/PCE+NCE) in order to show cell proliferation activity. Methods: Arbutin (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally (ip)administered to NMRI mice two hours before gamma radiation at 2 and 4 gray (Gy). The frequency of micronuclei in 1000 PCEs (MnPCEs) and the ratio of PCE/PCE+NCE were calculated for each sample. Data were statistically evaluated using one-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test, and t-test. Results: The findings indicated that gamma radiation at 2 and 4 Gy extremely increased the frequencies of MnPCE (P<0.001) while reducing PCE/PCE+NCE (P<0.001) compared to the control group. All three doses of arbutin before irradiation significantly reduced the frequencies of MnPCEs and increased the ratio of PCE/PCE+NCE in mice bone marrow compared to the non-drug-treated irradiated control (P<0.001). All three doses of arbutin had no toxicity effect on bone marrow cells. The calculated dose reduction factor (DRF) showed DRF=1.93 for 2Gy and DRF=2.22 for 4 Gy. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that arbutin gives significant protection to rat bone against the clastogenic and cytotoxic effects of gamma irradiation. PMID:27217601

  16. Dose reduction by moving a region of interest (ROI) beam attenuator to follow a moving object of interest

    PubMed Central

    Panse, Ashish S.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Region-of-interest (ROI) fluoroscopy takes advantage of the fact that most neurovascular interventional activity is performed in only a small portion of an x-ray imaging field of view (FOV). The ROI beam filter is an attenuating material that reduces patient dose in the area peripheral to the object of interest. This project explores a method of moving the beam-attenuator aperture with the object of interest such that it always remains in the ROI. In this study, the ROI attenuator, which reduces the dose by 80% in the peripheral region, is mounted on a linear stage placed near the x-ray tube. Fluoroscopy is performed using the Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which is a high-resolution, CCD-based x-ray detector. A stainless-steel stent is selected as the object of interest, and is moved across the FOV and localized using an object-detection algorithm available in the IMAQ Vision package of LabVIEW. The ROI is moved to follow the stent motion. The pixel intensities are equalized in both FOV regions and an adaptive temporal filter dependent on the motion of the object of interest is implemented inside the ROI. With a temporal filter weight of 5% for the current image in the peripheral region, the SNR measured is 47.8. The weights inside the ROI vary between 10% and 33% with a measured SNR of 57.9 and 35.3 when the object is stationary and moving, respectively. This method allows patient dose reduction as well as maintenance of superior image quality in the ROI while tracking the object. PMID:22866212

  17. Dose reduction by moving a region of interest (ROI) beam attenuator to follow a moving object of interest.

    PubMed

    Panse, Ashish S; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Jain, A; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    Region-of-interest (ROI) fluoroscopy takes advantage of the fact that most neurovascular interventional activity is performed in only a small portion of an x-ray imaging field of view (FOV). The ROI beam filter is an attenuating material that reduces patient dose in the area peripheral to the object of interest. This project explores a method of moving the beam-attenuator aperture with the object of interest such that it always remains in the ROI. In this study, the ROI attenuator, which reduces the dose by 80% in the peripheral region, is mounted on a linear stage placed near the x-ray tube. Fluoroscopy is performed using the Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which is a high-resolution, CCD-based x-ray detector. A stainless-steel stent is selected as the object of interest, and is moved across the FOV and localized using an object-detection algorithm available in the IMAQ Vision package of LabVIEW. The ROI is moved to follow the stent motion. The pixel intensities are equalized in both FOV regions and an adaptive temporal filter dependent on the motion of the object of interest is implemented inside the ROI. With a temporal filter weight of 5% for the current image in the peripheral region, the SNR measured is 47.8. The weights inside the ROI vary between 10% and 33% with a measured SNR of 57.9 and 35.3 when the object is stationary and moving, respectively. This method allows patient dose reduction as well as maintenance of superior image quality in the ROI while tracking the object. PMID:22866212

  18. Dose reduction by moving a region of interest (ROI) beam attenuator to follow a moving object of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panse, Ashish S.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    Region-of-interest (ROI) fluoroscopy takes advantage of the fact that most neurovascular interventional activity is performed in only a small portion of an x-ray imaging field of view (FOV). The ROI beam filter is an attenuating material that reduces patient dose in the area peripheral to the object of interest. This project explores a method of moving the beam-attenuator aperture with the object of interest such that it always remains in the ROI. In this study, the ROI attenuator, which reduces the dose by 80% in the peripheral region, is mounted on a linear stage placed near the xray tube. Fluoroscopy is performed using the Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which is a high-resolution, CCD-based x-ray detector. A stainless-steel stent is selected as the object of interest, and is moved across the FOV and localized using an object-detection algorithm available in the IMAQ Vision package of LabVIEW. The ROI is moved to follow the stent motion. The pixel intensities are equalized in both FOV regions and an adaptive temporal filter dependent on the motion of the object of interest is implemented inside the ROI. With a temporal filter weight of 5% for the current image in the peripheral region, the SNR measured is 47.8. The weights inside the ROI vary between 10% and 33% with a measured SNR of 57.9 and 35.3 when the object is stationary and moving, respectively. This method allows patient dose reduction as well as maintenance of superior image quality in the ROI while tracking the object.

  19. Coupling micro-CT with computer simulations to analyze dispersion in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, Sadaf; Dunnmon, Jared; Werer, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, table-top X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) systems have been utilized to analyze various samples with a resolution on the order of 1 μm -100 μm . In this study, we explore the use of these systems both in extracting high-resolution topologies of porous structures for use as inputs into computational simulations and in directly characterizing gas dispersion within such structures using fluoroscopic imaging of dense gaseous tracers. The opaque-solid environment and small pore-scale effects in porous media restrict the use of conventional imaging techniques, thereby making XCT a potentially useful diagnostic technique for understanding internal flows in porous and optically inaccessible structures. In the present work, we extract the topology of various reticulated porous foams from 3D XCT data and perform numerical simulations of the flow inside these structures. Permeability and tortuosity, which are key parameters in volume-averaged models are evaluated from the resulting flow fields and knowledge of the solid structure.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of an x-ray volume imaging cone beam CT unit

    SciTech Connect

    Spezi, Emiliano; Downes, Patrick; Radu, Emil; Jarvis, Richard

    2009-01-15

    In this work the authors characterized the radiation field produced by a kilovolt cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit integrated in the Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. The x-ray volume imaging (XVI) radiation unit was modeled in detail using the BEAMNRC Monte Carlo (MC) code system. The simulations of eight collimator cassettes and the neutral filter F0 were successfully carried out. MC calculations from the EGSNRC code DOSXYZNRC were benchmarked against measurements in water. A large set of depth dose and lateral profiles was acquired with the ionization chamber in water, with the x-ray tube in a stationary position, and with the beam energy set to 120 kV. Measurements for all the available collimator cassettes were compared with calculations, showing very good agreement (<2% in most cases). Furthermore, half value layer measurements were carried out and used to validate the MC model of the XVI unit. In this case dose calculations were performed with the EGSNRC code cavity and these showed excellent agreement. In this manuscript the authors also report on the optimization work of the relevant parameters that influenced the development of the MC model. The dosimetric part of this work was very useful in characterizing the XVI radiation output for the energy of interest. The detailed simulation part of the work is the first step toward an accurate MC based assessment of the dose delivered to patients during routine CBCT scans for image and dose guided radiotherapy.

  1. NASA/ESA CT-990 Spacelab simulation. Appendix A: The experiment operator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    A joint NASA/ESA endeavor was established to conduct an extensive spacelab simulation using the NASA CV-990 airborne laboratory. The scientific payload was selected to perform studies in upper atmospheric physics and infrared astronomy with principal investigators from France, the Netherlands, England, and several groups from the United States. Two experiment operators from Europe and two from the U.S. were selected to live aboard the aircraft along with a mission manager for a six-day period and operate the experiments in behalf of the principal scientists. This appendix discusses the experiment operators and their relationship to the joint mission under the following general headings: selection criteria, training programs, and performance. The performance of the proxy operators was assessed in terms of adequacy of training, amount of scientific data obtained, quality of data obtained, and reactions to problems that arose in experiment operation.

  2. Fluence field optimization for noise and dose objectives in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolac, Steven; Graham, Sean; Siewerdsen, Jeff; Jaffray, David

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Selecting the appropriate imaging technique in computed tomography (CT) inherently involves balancing the tradeoff between image quality and imaging dose. Modulation of the x-ray fluence field, laterally across the beam, and independently for each projection, may potentially meet user-prescribed, regional image quality objectives, while reducing radiation to the patient. The proposed approach, called fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT), parallels the approach commonly used in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), except ''image quality plans'' replace the ''dose plans'' of IMRT. This work studies the potential noise and dose benefits of FFMCT via objective driven optimization of fluence fields. Methods: Experiments were carried out in simulation. Image quality plans were defined by specifying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) criteria for regions of interest (ROIs) in simulated cylindrical and oblong water phantoms, and an anthropomorphic phantom with bone, air, and water equivalent regions. X-ray fluence field patterns were generated using a simulated annealing optimization method that attempts to achieve the spatially-dependent prescribed SNR criteria in the phantoms while limiting dose (to the volume or subvolumes). The resulting SNR and dose distributions were analyzed and compared to results using a bowtie filtered fluence field. Results: Compared to using a fixed bowtie filtered fluence, FFMCT achieved superior agreement with the target image quality objectives, and resulted in integral dose reductions ranging from 39 to 52%. Prioritizing dose constraints for specific regions of interest resulted in a preferential reduction of dose to those regions with some tradeoff in SNR, particularly where the target low dose regions overlapped with regions where high SNR was prescribed. The method appeared fairly robust under increased complexity and heterogeneity of the object structure. Conclusions: These results support that FFMCT has the potential to meet

  3. Large-eddy Simulation of Heat and Water Vapor Transfer in CT-Based Human Airway Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Tawhai, Merryn; Hoffman, Eric; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-11-01

    We propose a novel imaging-based thermodynamic model to study local heat and mass transfers in the human airways. Both 3D and 1D CFD models are developed and validated. Large-eddy simulation (LES) is adopted to solve 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Boussinesq approximation along with temperature and water vapor transport equations and energy-flux based wall boundary condition. The 1D model provides initial and boundary conditions to the 3D model. The computed tomography (CT) lung images of three healthy subjects with sinusoidal waveforms and minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min are considered. Between 1D and 3D models and between subjects, the average temperature and water vapor distributions are similar, but their regional distributions are significantly different. In particular, unlike the 1D model, the heat and water vapor transfers in the 3D model are elevated at the bifurcations during inspiration. Moreover, the correlations of Nusselt number (Nu) and Sherwood number (Sh) with local Reynolds number and airway diameter are proposed. In conclusion, use of the subject-specific lung model is essential for accurate prediction of local thermal impacts on airway epithelium. Supported in part by NIH grants R01-HL094315, U01-HL114494 and S10-RR022421.

  4. Direct reconstruction in CT-analogous pharmacokinetic diffuse fluorescence tomography: two-dimensional simulative and experimental validations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-04-01

    We present a generalized strategy for direct reconstruction in pharmacokinetic diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) with CT-analogous scanning mode, which can accomplish one-step reconstruction of the indocyanine-green pharmacokinetic-rate images within in vivo small animals by incorporating the compartmental kinetic model into an adaptive extended Kalman filtering scheme and using an instantaneous sampling dataset. This scheme, compared with the established indirect and direct methods, eliminates the interim error of the DFT inversion and relaxes the expensive requirement of the instrument for obtaining highly time-resolved date-sets of complete 360 deg projections. The scheme is validated by two-dimensional simulations for the two-compartment model and pilot phantom experiments for the one-compartment model, suggesting that the proposed method can estimate the compartmental concentrations and the pharmacokinetic-rates simultaneously with a fair quantitative and localization accuracy, and is well suitable for cost-effective and dense-sampling instrumentation based on the highly-sensitive photon counting technique.

  5. Direct reconstruction in CT-analogous pharmacokinetic diffuse fluorescence tomography: two-dimensional simulative and experimental validations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-04-30

    We present a generalized strategy for direct reconstruction in pharmacokinetic diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) with CT-analogous scanning mode, which can accomplish one-step reconstruction of the indocyanine-green pharmacokinetic-rate images within in vivo small animals by incorporating the compartmental kinetic model into an adaptive extended Kalman filtering scheme and using an instantaneous sampling dataset. This scheme, compared with the established indirect and direct methods, eliminates the interim error of the DFT inversion and relaxes the expensive requirement of the instrument for obtaining highly time-resolved date-sets of complete 360 deg projections. The scheme is validated by two-dimensional simulations for the two-compartment model and pilot phantom experiments for the one-compartment model, suggesting that the proposed method can estimate the compartmental concentrations and the pharmacokinetic-rates simultaneously with a fair quantitative and localization accuracy, and is well suitable for cost-effective and dense-sampling instrumentation based on the highly-sensitive photon counting technique. PMID:27093958

  6. TH-A-18C-09: Ultra-Fast Monte Carlo Simulation for Cone Beam CT Imaging of Brain Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J; Yorkston, J; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V; Siewerdsen, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Application of cone-beam CT (CBCT) to low-contrast soft tissue imaging, such as in detection of traumatic brain injury, is challenged by high levels of scatter. A fast, accurate scatter correction method based on Monte Carlo (MC) estimation is developed for application in high-quality CBCT imaging of acute brain injury. Methods: The correction involves MC scatter estimation executed on an NVIDIA GTX 780 GPU (MC-GPU), with baseline simulation speed of ~1e7 photons/sec. MC-GPU is accelerated by a novel, GPU-optimized implementation of variance reduction (VR) techniques (forced detection and photon splitting). The number of simulated tracks and projections is reduced for additional speed-up. Residual noise is removed and the missing scatter projections are estimated via kernel smoothing (KS) in projection plane and across gantry angles. The method is assessed using CBCT images of a head phantom presenting a realistic simulation of fresh intracranial hemorrhage (100 kVp, 180 mAs, 720 projections, source-detector distance 700 mm, source-axis distance 480 mm). Results: For a fixed run-time of ~1 sec/projection, GPU-optimized VR reduces the noise in MC-GPU scatter estimates by a factor of 4. For scatter correction, MC-GPU with VR is executed with 4-fold angular downsampling and 1e5 photons/projection, yielding 3.5 minute run-time per scan, and de-noised with optimized KS. Corrected CBCT images demonstrate uniformity improvement of 18 HU and contrast improvement of 26 HU compared to no correction, and a 52% increase in contrast-tonoise ratio in simulated hemorrhage compared to “oracle” constant fraction correction. Conclusion: Acceleration of MC-GPU achieved through GPU-optimized variance reduction and kernel smoothing yields an efficient (<5 min/scan) and accurate scatter correction that does not rely on additional hardware or simplifying assumptions about the scatter distribution. The method is undergoing implementation in a novel CBCT dedicated to brain

  7. Rapid Automated Treatment Planning Process to Select Breast Cancer Patients for Active Breathing Control to Achieve Cardiac Dose Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Wei; Purdie, Thomas G.; Rahman, Mohammad; Marshall, Andrea; Liu Feifei; Fyles, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a rapid automated treatment planning process for the selection of patients with left-sided breast cancer for a moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) technique using active breathing control (ABC); and to determine the dose reduction to the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and the heart using mDIBH. Method and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using an automated method for patients undergoing left-sided breast radiotherapy (n = 53) with two-field tangential intensity-modulated radiotherapy. All patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, defined as having >10 cm{sup 3} of the heart receiving 50% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 50}) on the free-breathing automated treatment plan, underwent repeat scanning on a protocol using a mDIBH technique and ABC. The doses to the LAD and heart were compared between the free-breathing and mDIBH plans. Results: The automated planning process required approximately 9 min to generate a breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan. Using the dose-volume criteria, 20 of the 53 patients were selected for ABC. Significant differences were found between the free-breathing and mDIBH plans for the heart V{sub 50} (29.9 vs. 3.7 cm{sup 3}), mean heart dose (317 vs. 132 cGy), mean LAD dose (2,047 vs. 594 cGy), and maximal dose to 0.2 cm{sup 3} of the LAD (4,155 vs. 1,507 cGy, all p <.001). Of the 17 patients who had a breath-hold threshold of {>=}0.8 L, 14 achieved a {>=}90% reduction in the heart V{sub 50} using the mDIBH technique. The 3 patients who had had a breath-hold threshold <0.8 L achieved a lower, but still significant, reduction in the heart V{sub 50}. Conclusions: A rapid automated treatment planning process can be used to select patients who will benefit most from mDIBH. For selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, the mDIBH technique using ABC can significantly reduce the dose to the LAD and heart, potentially reducing the cardiac risks.

  8. Randomised, double-blind controlled trial by dose reduction of implanted intrathecal morphine delivery in chronic non-cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Jon H; Duarte, Rui V; Southall, Jane L; Nightingale, Peter; Kitas, George D

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of intrathecal morphine in the long term by hypothesising that a reduction of the intrathecal opioid dose following long-term administration would increase the level of pain intensity. Design Randomised, double-blind, controlled, parallel group trial. Setting Department of Pain Management, Russells Hall Hospital, Dudley, UK. Participants 24 patients with non-cancer pain implanted with morphine reservoirs were assessed for eligibility. Interventions Participants were randomly allocated to one of two parallel groups in which one of the groups had no change in morphine dose and the other group had a small reduction (20%) in dosage every week during a 10-week follow-up. Outcome Primary outcomes were visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score change and withdrawal from the study due to lack of efficacy. Results 9 of the patients assessed for eligibility declined to participate in the study. 15 patients were randomised to control (n=5) or intervention (n=10) and included in an intention-to-treat analysis. Owing to worsening of pain, seven patients withdrew from the study prematurely. None knew prior to withdrawal which arm of the study they were in, but all turned out to be in the dose-reduction arm. The calculation of dropout rates between groups indicated a significant statistical difference (p=0.026) and recruitment was ceased. The VAS change between baseline and the last observation was smaller in the control group (median, Mdn=11) than in the intervention group (Mdn=30.5), although not statistically significant, Z=−1.839, p=0.070; r=−0.47. Within groups, VAS was significantly lower at baseline (Mdn=49.5) than at the last observation (Mdn=77.5) for the reduction group, Z=−2.805, p=0.002; r=−0.627 but not for the control group (p=0.188). Conclusions This double-blind randomised controlled trial of chronic intrathecal morphine administration suggests the effectiveness of this therapy for the management of

  9. Simulation of turbulent airflow using a CT based upper airway model of a racehorse.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, Vineet; Datta, Ashim K; Ducharme, Normand G; Pease, Anthony P

    2008-06-01

    Computational model for airflow through the upper airway of a horse was developed. Previous flow models for human airway do not hold true for horses due to significant differences in anatomy and the high Reynolds number of flow in the equine airway. Moreover, models that simulate the entire respiratory cycle and emphasize on pressures inside the airway in relation to various anatomical diseases are lacking. The geometry of the airway was created by reconstructing images obtained from computed tomography scans of a thoroughbred racehorse. Different geometries for inhalation and exhalation were used for the model based on the difference in the nasopharynx size during the two phases of respiration. The Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations were solved for the isothermal flow with the standard k-epsilon model for turbulence. Transient pressure boundary conditions for the entire breathing cycle were obtained from past experimental studies on live horses. The flow equations were solved in a commercial finite volume solver. The flow rates, computed based on the applied pressure conditions, were compared to experimentally measured flow rates for model validation. Detailed analysis of velocity, pressure, and turbulence characteristics of the flow was done. Velocity magnitudes at various slices during inhalation were found to be higher than corresponding velocity magnitudes during exhalation. The front and middle parts of the nasopharynx were found to have minimum intraluminal pressure in the airway during inhalation. During exhalation, the pressures in the soft palate were higher compared to those in the larynx, epiglottis, and nasopharynx. Turbulent kinetic energy was found to be maximum at the entry to the airway and gradually decreased as the flow moved inside the airway. However, turbulent kinetic energy increased in regions of the airway with abrupt change in area. Based on the analysis of pressure distribution at different sections of the airway, it was concluded

  10. TH-A-18C-11: An Investigation of KV CBCT Image Quality and Dose Reduction for Volume-Of-Interest Imaging Using Dynamic Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, D; Robar, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The focus of this work was to investigate the improvements in image quality and dose reduction for volume-of-interest (VOI) kV-CBCT using dynamic collimation. Methods: A prototype iris aperture was used to track a VOI during a CBCT acquisition. The current aperture design is capable of one-dimensional translation as a function of gantry angle and dynamic adjustment of the iris radius. The aperture occupies the location of the bow-tie filter on a Varian OBI system. CBCT and planar image quality was investigated as a function of aperture radius, while maintaining the same dose to the VOI, for a 20 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom with a 9 mm diameter bone insert centered on isocenter. Corresponding scatter-to-primary ratios (SPR) were determined at the detector plane with Monte Carlo simulation using EGSnrc. Dose distributions for various anatomical sites were modeled using a dynamic BEAMnrc library and DOSXYZnrc. The resulting VOI dose distributions were compared to full-field distributions. Results: SPR was reduced by a factor of 8.4 when decreasing iris diameter from 21.2 cm to 2.4 cm (at isocenter). Similarly, this change in iris diameter corresponds to a factor increase of approximately 1.4 and 1.5 in image contrast for CBCT and planar images, respectively, and similarly a factor decrease in image noise of approximately 1.7 and 1.5. This results in a measured gain in contrast-to-noise ratio of a factor of approximately 2.3 for both CBCT and planar images. Depending upon the anatomical site, dose was reduced to 10%–70% of the full field value along the central axis plane and down to 2% along the axial planes, while maintaining the same dose to the VOI compared to full-field techniques. Conclusion: The presented VOI technique offers improved image quality for image-guided radiotherapy while sparing the surrounding volume of unnecessary dose compared to full-field techniques.

  11. Low Dose MDCT with Tube Current Modulation: Role in Detection of Urolithiasis and Patient Effective Dose Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Chandan; Sripathi, Smiti; Parakh, Anushri; Shrivastav, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urolithiasis is one of the major, recurring problem in young individuals and CT being the commonest diagnostic modality used. In order to reduce the radiation dose to the patient who are young and as stone formation is a recurring process; one of the simplest way would be, low dose CT along with tube current modulation. Aim Aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of low dose (70mAs) with standard dose (250mAs) protocol in detecting urolithiasis and to define the tube current and mean effective patient dose by these protocols. Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted in 200 patients over a period of 2 years with acute flank pain presentation. CT was performed in 100 cases with standard dose and another 100 with low dose protocol using tube current modulation. Sensitivity and specificity for calculus detection, percentage reduction of dose and tube current with low dose protocol was calculated. Results Urolithiasis was detected in 138 patients, 67 were examined by high dose and 71 were by low dose protocol. Sensitivity and Specificity of low dose protocol was 97.1% and 96.4% with similar results found in high BMI patients. Tube current modulation resulted in reduction of effective tube current by 12.17%. The mean effective patient dose for standard dose was 10.33 mSv whereas 2.92 mSv for low dose with 51.13–53.8% reduction in low dose protocol. Conclusion The study has reinforced that low-dose CT with tube current modulation is appropriate for diagnosis of urolithiasis with significant reduction in tube current and patient effective dose. PMID:27437322

  12. Infliximab Dose Reduction Sustains the Clinical Treatment Effect in Active HLAB27 Positive Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Two-Year Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mörck, Boel; Bremell, Tomas; Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The rationale of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of infliximab (IFX) treatment in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to determine whether IFX dose reduction and interval extension sustains the treatment effect. Nineteen patients were included and treated with IFX 5 mg/kg every 6 weeks for 56 weeks. All patients concomitantly received MTX with median dose 7.5 mg/weekly. During the second year, the IFX dose was reduced to 3 mg/kg every 8 weeks. Eighteen patients completed the 1-year and 15 patients the 2-year trial. The ≥50% improvement at week 16 from baseline of BASDAI was achieved in 16/19 (84%) patients. Significant reductions in BASDAI, BASFI, and BASMI scores, decrease in ESR and CRP, and improvement in SF-36 were observed at weeks 16 and 56. The MRI-defined inflammatory changes in the sacroiliac joints disappeared in 10/15 patients (67%) already at 16 weeks. IFX treatment effect was sustained throughout the second year after IFX dose reduction and interval extension. We conclude that IFX treatment is effective in well-established active AS and a dose reduction sustains the treatment effect. These observations are of clinical importance and open the opportunity to reduce the drug costs. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01850121. PMID:24089587

  13. SU-E-J-243: Possibility of Exposure Dose Reduction of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in An Image Guided Patient Positioning System by Using Various Noise Suppression Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Kamezawa, H; Arimura, H; Ohki, M; Shirieda, K; Kameda, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of exposure dose reduction of the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image guided patient positioning system by using 6 noise suppression filters. Methods: First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT (X-ray volume imaging system, Elekta Co.) images were acquired with a reference dose of 86.2 mGy (weighted CT dose index: CTDIw) and various low doses of 1.4 to 43.1 mGy, respectively. Second, an automated rigid registration for three axes was performed for estimating setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images, which were processed by 6 noise suppression filters, i.e., averaging filter (AF), median filter (MF), Gaussian filter (GF), bilateral filter (BF), edge preserving smoothing filter (EPF) and adaptive partial median filter (AMF). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as an Euclidean distance between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT image and RD-CBCT image. Finally, the relationships between the residual error and CTDIw were obtained for 6 noise suppression filters, and then the CTDIw for LD-CBCT images processed by the noise suppression filters were measured at the same residual error, which was obtained with the RD-CBCT. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom and two cancer patients. Results: For the phantom, the exposure dose could be reduced from 61% (GF) to 78% (AMF) by applying the noise suppression filters to the CBCT images. The exposure dose in a prostate cancer case could be reduced from 8% (AF) to 61% (AMF), and the exposure dose in a lung cancer case could be reduced from 9% (AF) to 37% (AMF). Conclusion: Using noise suppression filters, particularly an adaptive partial median filter, could be feasible to decrease the additional exposure dose to patients in image guided patient positioning systems.

  14. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Bernatowicz, K. Knopf, A.; Lomax, A.; Keall, P.; Kipritidis, J.; Mishra, P.

    2015-01-15

    : Averaged across all simulations and phase bins, respiratory-gating reduced overall thoracic MSE by 46% compared to conventional 4D CT (p ∼ 10{sup −19}). Gating leads to small but significant (p < 0.02) reductions in lung volume errors (1.8%–1.4%), false positives (4.0%–2.6%), and false negatives (2.7%–1.3%). These percentage reductions correspond to gating reducing image artifacts by 24–90 cm{sup 3} of lung tissue. Similar to earlier studies, gating reduced patient image dose by up to 22%, but with scan time increased by up to 135%. Beam paused 4D CT did not significantly impact normal lung tissue image quality, but did yield similar dose reductions as for respiratory-gating, without the added cost in scanning time. Conclusions: For a typical 6 L lung, respiratory-gated 4D CT can reduce image artifacts affecting up to 90 cm{sup 3} of normal lung tissue compared to conventional acquisition. This image improvement could have important implications for dose calculations based on 4D CT. Where image quality is less critical, beam paused 4D CT is a simple strategy to reduce imaging dose without sacrificing acquisition time.

  15. Coronary CT angiography: current status and continuing challenges.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Choo, G H; Ng, K H

    2012-05-01

    Coronary CT angiography has been increasingly used in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease owing to rapid technological developments, which are reflected in the improved spatial and temporal resolution of the images. High diagnostic accuracy has been achieved with multislice CT scanners (64 slice and higher), and in selected patients coronary CT angiography is regarded as a reliable alternative to invasive coronary angiography. With high-quality coronary CT imaging increasingly being performed, patients can benefit from an imaging modality that provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis while avoiding an invasive procedure. Despite the tremendous contributions of coronary CT angiography to cardiac imaging, study results reported in the literature should be interpreted with caution as there are some limitations existing within the study design or related to patient risk factors. In addition, some attention must be given to the potential health risks associated with the ionising radiation received during cardiac CT examinations. Radiation dose associated with coronary CT angiography has raised serious concerns in the literature, as the risk of developing malignancy is not negligible. Various dose-saving strategies have been implemented, with some of the strategies resulting in significant dose reduction. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the role of coronary CT angiography on cardiac imaging, with focus on coronary artery disease in terms of the diagnostic and prognostic value of coronary CT angiography. Various approaches for dose reduction commonly recommended in the literature are discussed. Limitations of coronary CT angiography are identified. Finally, future directions and challenges with the use of coronary CT angiography are highlighted. PMID:22253353

  16. Coronary CT angiography: current status and continuing challenges

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Z; Choo, G H; Ng, K H

    2012-01-01

    Coronary CT angiography has been increasingly used in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease owing to rapid technological developments, which are reflected in the improved spatial and temporal resolution of the images. High diagnostic accuracy has been achieved with multislice CT scanners (64 slice and higher), and in selected patients coronary CT angiography is regarded as a reliable alternative to invasive coronary angiography. With high-quality coronary CT imaging increasingly being performed, patients can benefit from an imaging modality that provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis while avoiding an invasive procedure. Despite the tremendous contributions of coronary CT angiography to cardiac imaging, study results reported in the literature should be interpreted with caution as there are some limitations existing within the study design or related to patient risk factors. In addition, some attention must be given to the potential health risks associated with the ionising radiation received during cardiac CT examinations. Radiation dose associated with coronary CT angiography has raised serious concerns in the literature, as the risk of developing malignancy is not negligible. Various dose-saving strategies have been implemented, with some of the strategies resulting in significant dose reduction. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the role of coronary CT angiography on cardiac imaging, with focus on coronary artery disease in terms of the diagnostic and prognostic value of coronary CT angiography. Various approaches for dose reduction commonly recommended in the literature are discussed. Limitations of coronary CT angiography are identified. Finally, future directions and challenges with the use of coronary CT angiography are highlighted. PMID:22253353

  17. Numerical simulation of airflow and microparticle deposition in a synchrotron micro-CT-based pulmonary acinus model.

    PubMed

    Sera, Toshihiro; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto; Yokota, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The acinus consists of complex, branched alveolar ducts and numerous surrounding alveoli, and so in this study, we hypothesized that the particle deposition can be much influenced by the complex acinar geometry, and simulated the airflow and particle deposition (density = 1.0 g/cm(3), diameter = 1 and 3 μm) numerically in a pulmonary acinar model based on synchrotron micro-CT of the mammalian lung. We assumed that the fluid-structure interaction was neglected and that alveolar flow was induced by the expansion and contraction of the acinar model with the volume changing sinusoidally with time as the moving boundary conditions. The alveolar flow was dominated by radial flows, and a weak recirculating flow was observed at the proximal side of alveoli during the entire respiratory cycle, despite the maximum Reynolds number at the inlet being 0.029. Under zero gravity, the particle deposition rate after single breathing was less than 0.01, although the particles were transported deeply into the acinus after inspiration. Under a gravitational field, the deposition rate and map were influenced strongly by gravity orientation. In the case of a particle diameter of 1 μm, the rate increased dramatically and mostly non-deposited particles remained in the model, indicating that the rate would increase further after repeated breathing. At a particle diameter of 3 μm, the rate was 1.0 and all particles were deposited during single breathing. Our results show that the particle deposition rate in realistic pulmonary acinar model is higher than in an idealized model. PMID:24821393

  18. Determination of prospective displacement-based gate threshold for respiratory-gated radiation delivery from retrospective phase-based gate threshold selected at 4D CT simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Vedam, S.; Archambault, L.; Starkschall, G.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2007-11-15

    Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) imaging has found increasing importance in the localization of tumor and surrounding normal structures throughout the respiratory cycle. Based on such tumor motion information, it is possible to identify the appropriate phase interval for respiratory gated treatment planning and delivery. Such a gating phase interval is determined retrospectively based on tumor motion from internal tumor displacement. However, respiratory-gated treatment is delivered prospectively based on motion determined predominantly from an external monitor. Therefore, the simulation gate threshold determined from the retrospective phase interval selected for gating at 4D CT simulation may not correspond to the delivery gate threshold that is determined from the prospective external monitor displacement at treatment delivery. The purpose of the present work is to establish a relationship between the thresholds for respiratory gating determined at CT simulation and treatment delivery, respectively. One hundred fifty external respiratory motion traces, from 90 patients, with and without audio-visual biofeedback, are analyzed. Two respiratory phase intervals, 40%-60% and 30%-70%, are chosen for respiratory gating from the 4D CT-derived tumor motion trajectory. From residual tumor displacements within each such gating phase interval, a simulation gate threshold is defined based on (a) the average and (b) the maximum respiratory displacement within the phase interval. The duty cycle for prospective gated delivery is estimated from the proportion of external monitor displacement data points within both the selected phase interval and the simulation gate threshold. The delivery gate threshold is then determined iteratively to match the above determined duty cycle. The magnitude of the difference between such gate thresholds determined at simulation and treatment delivery is quantified in each case. Phantom motion tests yielded coincidence of simulation

  19. Acceleration of fluoro-CT reconstruction for a mobile C-Arm on GPU and FPGA hardware: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xinwei; Cheryauka, Arvi; Tubbs, David

    2006-03-01

    CT imaging in interventional and minimally-invasive surgery requires high-performance computing solutions that meet operational room demands, healthcare business requirements, and the constraints of a mobile C-arm system. The computational requirements of clinical procedures using CT-like data are increasing rapidly, mainly due to the need for rapid access to medical imagery during critical surgical procedures. The highly parallel nature of Radon transform and CT algorithms enables embedded computing solutions utilizing a parallel processing architecture to realize a significant gain of computational intensity with comparable hardware and program coding/testing expenses. In this paper, using a sample 2D and 3D CT problem, we explore the programming challenges and the potential benefits of embedded computing using commodity hardware components. The accuracy and performance results obtained on three computational platforms: a single CPU, a single GPU, and a solution based on FPGA technology have been analyzed. We have shown that hardware-accelerated CT image reconstruction can be achieved with similar levels of noise and clarity of feature when compared to program execution on a CPU, but gaining a performance increase at one or more orders of magnitude faster. 3D cone-beam or helical CT reconstruction and a variety of volumetric image processing applications will benefit from similar accelerations.

  20. Partial Arc Beam Filtration: A Novel Approach to Reducing CT Breast Dose

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to assess the effectiveness of a novel computed tomography (CT) radiation dose-reduction strategy in which filtration was added at the x-ray tube output port between the x-ray beam and the breast area of three sizes of anthropomorphic phantoms. METHODS To evaluate the dose-reduction potential of partial arc x-ray beam filtration, copper foil filtration or lead foil filtration was placed over CT scanners’ covers when scanning anthropomorphic phantoms representative of a 5-year-old, 10-year-old, and an adult female. Dose reduction was calculated as the percent difference between the mean entrance radiation dose (detected on the phantoms’ surfaces at locations representing the sternum and left breast) in unshielded scans compared to the mean dose in scans shielded by copper foil or lead foil. Additionally, we compared the CT numbers and noise sampled in regions representing the lung and the soft tissues near the sternum, left breast, and spine in CT images of the phantoms during unshielded scans relative to acquisitions shielded copper foil or lead foil. RESULTS Entrance dose at the sternum and left breast in the three anthropomorphic phantoms was reduced by 28% to 66% and 54% to 79% when using copper foil or lead foil filtration, respectively. However, copper foil filtration affected the CT numbers and noise in the CT images less than the lead foil filtration (8.2% versus 32% mean increase in noise, respectively). CONCLUSION By incorporating partial arc beam filtration into CT scanners, substantial dose reductions may be achieved with a minimal increase in image noise. PMID:23436850

  1. SU-E-I-63: Quantitative Evaluation of the Effects of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR) Software On CT Images for Radiotherapy Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jani, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: CT simulation for patients with metal implants can often be challenging due to artifacts that obscure tumor/target delineation and normal organ definition. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR), a commercially available software, in reducing metal-induced artifacts and its effect on computed dose during treatment planning. Methods: CT images of water surrounding metallic cylindrical rods made of aluminum, copper and iron were studied in terms of Hounsfield Units (HU) spread. Metal-induced artifacts were characterized in terms of HU/Volume Histogram (HVH) using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Effects of OMAR on enhancing our ability to delineate organs on CT and subsequent dose computation were examined in nine (9) patients with hip implants and two (2) patients with breast tissue expanders. Results: Our study characterized water at 1000 HU with a standard deviation (SD) of about 20 HU. The HVHs allowed us to evaluate how the presence of metal changed the HU spread. For example, introducing a 2.54 cm diameter copper rod in water increased the SD in HU of the surrounding water from 20 to 209, representing an increase in artifacts. Subsequent use of OMAR brought the SD down to 78. Aluminum produced least artifacts whereas Iron showed largest amount of artifacts. In general, an increase in kVp and mA during CT scanning showed better effectiveness of OMAR in reducing artifacts. Our dose analysis showed that some isodose contours shifted by several mm with OMAR but infrequently and were nonsignificant in planning process. Computed volumes of various dose levels showed <2% change. Conclusions: In our experience, OMAR software greatly reduced the metal-induced CT artifacts for the majority of patients with implants, thereby improving our ability to delineate tumor and surrounding organs. OMAR had a clinically negligible effect on computed dose within tissues. Partially funded by unrestricted

  2. PET/CT-guided treatment planning for paediatric cancer patients: a simulation study of proton and conventional photon therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, N P; Björk-Eriksson, T; Birk Christensen, C; Kiil-Berthelsen, A; Aznar, M C; Hollensen, C; Markova, E; Munck af Rosenschöld, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of including fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scanning in the planning of paediatric radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Target volumes were first delineated without and subsequently re-delineated with access to 18F-FDG PET scan information, on duplicate CT sets. RT plans were generated for three-dimensional conformal photon RT (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The results were evaluated by comparison of target volumes, target dose coverage parameters, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and estimated risk of secondary cancer (SC). Results: Considerable deviations between CT- and PET/CT-guided target volumes were seen in 3 out of the 11 patients studied. However, averaging over the whole cohort, CT or PET/CT guidance introduced no significant difference in the shape or size of the target volumes, target dose coverage, irradiated volumes, estimated NTCP or SC risk, neither for IMPT nor 3DCRT. Conclusion: Our results imply that the inclusion of PET/CT scans in the RT planning process could have considerable impact for individual patients. There were no general trends of increasing or decreasing irradiated volumes, suggesting that the long-term morbidity of RT in childhood would on average remain largely unaffected. Advances in knowledge: 18F-FDG PET-based RT planning does not systematically change NTCP or SC risk for paediatric cancer patients compared with CT only. 3 out of 11 patients had a distinct change of target volumes when PET-guided planning was introduced. Dice and mismatch metrics are not sufficient to assess the consequences of target volume differences in the context of RT. PMID:25494657

  3. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  4. Techniques and tactics for optimizing CT dose in adults and children: state of the art and future advances.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jack; MacKenzie, John D; Cody, Dianna D; Gould, Robert

    2014-03-01

    With growing concern over radiation exposure from CT, dose reduction and optimization have become important considerations. Many protocol factors and CT technologies influence this dose reduction effort, and as such, users should maintain a working knowledge of developments in the field. Individual patient factors and scanner-specific details also require care and expertise, which are vital to the success of any dose reduction effort. The authors review the content of the Virtual Symposium on Radiation Safety in Computed Tomography (University of California Dose Optimization and Standardization Endeavor), specifically that pertaining to the more practical aspects of dose optimization. These range from prescan tips to postscan factors, as well as protocol definition itself. Topics discussed include localizer radiograph acquisition, tube current modulation, reconstruction methods, and pediatric considerations, with the content biased toward a CT technologist or protocol manager. Near-term innovations, including new iterative reconstruction methods, tube potential modulation, and dual-energy CT, are presented, and their capability for dose reduction is briefly discussed. PMID:24589401

  5. Individually optimized uniform contrast enhancement in CT angiography for the diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolic disease—A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Ming; Zhang, Hao; D’Souza, Warren; Lu, Wei; Kligerman, Seth; Klahr, Paul

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To improve the diagnostic quality of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) by individually optimizing a biphasic contrast injection function to achieve targeted uniform contrast enhancement. To compare the results against a previously reported discrete Fourier transform (DFT) approach. Methods: This simulation study used the CTPA datasets of 27 consecutive patients with pulmonary thromboembolic disease (PE). An optimization approach was developed consisting of (1) computation of the impulse enhancement function (IEF) based on a test bolus scan, and (2) optimization of a biphasic contrast injection function using the IEF in order to achieve targeted uniform enhancement. The injection rates and durations of a biphasic contrast injection function are optimized by minimizing the difference between the resulting contrast enhancement curve and the targeted uniform enhancement curve, while conforming to the clinical constraints of injection rate and total contrast volume. The total contrast volume was limited first to the clinical standard of 65 ml, and then to the same amount used in the DFT approach for comparison. The optimization approach and the DFT approach were compared in terms of the root mean square error (RMSE) and total contrast volume used. Results: When the total contrast volume was limited to 65 ml, the optimization approach produced significantly better contrast enhancement (closer to the targeted uniform contrast enhancement) than the DFT approach (RMSE 17 HU vs 56 HU,p < 0.00001). On average, the optimization approach used 63 ml contrast, while the DFT approach used 50 ml with four patients exceeding 65 ml. When equivalent total contrast volume was used for individual patient, the optimization approach still generated significantly better contrast enhancement (RMSE 44 HU vs 56 HU, p < 0.01). Constraints for the injection function could be easily accommodated into the optimization process when searching for the optimal biphasic injection function

  6. SU-E-I-73: Clinical Evaluation of CT Image Reconstructed Using Interior Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Ge, G; Winkler, M; Cong, W; Wang, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose reduction has been a long standing challenge in CT imaging of obese patients. Recent advances in interior tomography (reconstruction of an interior region of interest (ROI) from line integrals associated with only paths through the ROI) promise to achieve significant radiation dose reduction without compromising image quality. This study is to investigate the application of this technique in CT imaging through evaluating imaging quality reconstructed from patient data. Methods: Projection data were directly obtained from patients who had CT examinations in a Dual Source CT scanner (DSCT). Two detectors in a DSCT acquired projection data simultaneously. One detector provided projection data for full field of view (FOV, 50 cm) while another detectors provided truncated projection data for a FOV of 26 cm. Full FOV CT images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection and iterative algorithm; while interior tomography algorithm was implemented to reconstruct ROI images. For comparison reason, FBP was also used to reconstruct ROI images. Reconstructed CT images were evaluated by radiologists and compared with images from CT scanner. Results: The results show that the reconstructed ROI image was in excellent agreement with the truth inside the ROI, obtained from images from CT scanner, and the detailed features in the ROI were quantitatively accurate. Radiologists evaluation shows that CT images reconstructed with interior tomography met diagnosis requirements. Radiation dose may be reduced up to 50% using interior tomography, depending on patient size. Conclusion: This study shows that interior tomography can be readily employed in CT imaging for radiation dose reduction. It may be especially useful in imaging obese patients, whose subcutaneous tissue is less clinically relevant but may significantly increase radiation dose.

  7. In vivo dosimetry for estimation of effective doses in multislice CT coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    De Denaro, M.; Bregant, P.; Severgnini, M.; De Guarrini, F.

    2007-10-15

    In vivo dosimetry represents a technique that has been widely employed to evaluate the dose to the patient mainly in radiotherapy. Considering the increment in dose to the population due to new high-dose multislice CT examinations, such as coronary angiography, it is becoming important to more accurately know the dose to the patient. The desire to know patient dose extends even to radiological examinations. Thermoluminescent dosimeters are considered the gold standard for in vivo dosimetry, but their use is time consuming. A rapid, less labor-intensive method has been developed to perform in vivo dosimetry using radiochromic film positioned next to the patient's skin. Multislice CT scanners allow the estimation of the effective dose to the patient from the dose length product (DLP) parameter, the value of which is displayed on the acquisition console, simply multiplying the DLP by published conversion factors. The method represents only an approximation based on standard size circular phantoms and neglects the actual size of the patient. More accurate evaluations can be carried out using software-based Monte Carlo simulations. However, these methods do not consider possible dose reduction techniques, such as automatic tube-current modulation. For 22 patients effective doses measured by in vivo dosimetry and calculated by software were compared. The technique of using in vivo dosimetry measured with radiochromic film appears a promising procedure for improving the assessment of the effective dose to the patient.

  8. Progressive cone beam CT dose control in image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hao; Cervino, Laura; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia Xun; Zhen Xin

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) offers a tremendous advantage for treatment guidance. The associated imaging dose is a clinical concern. One unique feature of CBCT-based IGRT is that the same patient is repeatedly scanned during a treatment course, and the contents of CBCT images at different fractions are similar. The authors propose a progressive dose control (PDC) scheme to utilize this temporal correlation for imaging dose reduction. Methods: A dynamic CBCT scan protocol, as opposed to the static one in the current clinical practice, is proposed to gradually reduce the imaging dose in each treatment fraction. The CBCT image from each fraction is processed by a prior-image based nonlocal means (PINLM) module to enhance its quality. The increasing amount of prior information from previous CBCT images prevents degradation of image quality due to the reduced imaging dose. Two proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted using measured phantom data and Monte Carlo simulated patient data with deformation. Results: In the measured phantom case, utilizing a prior image acquired at 0.4 mAs, PINLM is able to improve the image quality of a CBCT acquired at 0.2 mAs by reducing the noise level from 34.95 to 12.45 HU. In the synthetic patient case, acceptable image quality is maintained at four consecutive fractions with gradually decreasing exposure levels of 0.4, 0.1, 0.07, and 0.05 mAs. When compared with the standard low-dose protocol of 0.4 mAs for each fraction, an overall imaging dose reduction of more than 60% is achieved. Conclusions: PINLM-PDC is able to reduce CBCT imaging dose in IGRT utilizing the temporal correlations among the sequence of CBCT images while maintaining the quality.

  9. Dose reconstruction for real-time patient-specific dose estimation in CT

    SciTech Connect

    De Man, Bruno Yin, Zhye; Wu, Mingye; FitzGerald, Paul; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Many recent computed tomography (CT) dose reduction approaches belong to one of three categories: statistical reconstruction algorithms, efficient x-ray detectors, and optimized CT acquisition schemes with precise control over the x-ray distribution. The latter category could greatly benefit from fast and accurate methods for dose estimation, which would enable real-time patient-specific protocol optimization. Methods: The authors present a new method for volumetrically reconstructing absorbed dose on a per-voxel basis, directly from the actual CT images. The authors’ specific implementation combines a distance-driven pencil-beam approach to model the first-order x-ray interactions with a set of Gaussian convolution kernels to model the higher-order x-ray interactions. The authors performed a number of 3D simulation experiments comparing the proposed method to a Monte Carlo based ground truth. Results: The authors’ results indicate that the proposed approach offers a good trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency. The images show a good qualitative correspondence to Monte Carlo estimates. Preliminary quantitative results show errors below 10%, except in bone regions, where the authors see a bigger model mismatch. The computational complexity is similar to that of a low-resolution filtered-backprojection algorithm. Conclusions: The authors present a method for analytic dose reconstruction in CT, similar to the techniques used in radiation therapy planning with megavoltage energies. Future work will include refinements of the proposed method to improve the accuracy as well as a more extensive validation study. The proposed method is not intended to replace methods that track individual x-ray photons, but the authors expect that it may prove useful in applications where real-time patient-specific dose estimation is required.

  10. Dose reduction of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (etanercept) can be effective in ankylosing spondylitis patients with synovitis of the hip in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Li, Jitian; Wang, Xiaoqing; Han, Zongchang; Zhang, Yonghong; Wang, Yuli; Zhang, Yishan; Li, Wuyin

    2016-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an immune-mediated inflammatory arthritis and enthesitis involving the spine and peripheral joints. In recent years, specific antagonist of tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNFα, etanercept) 50 mg weekly therapy has rapidly gained popularity for the treatment of AS. However, the dose of etanercept has not been determined in Asian, particularly Chinese populations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of dose reduction of etanercept (50 mg/week in 4 weeks followed by 25 mg/week in 8 weeks) in the treatment of AS with synovitis of the hip, as against the conventional dose (50 mg/week in 12 weeks) in a Chinese population. Forty-three Chinese AS patients with synovitis of the hip were involved in this study. Seventeen of them were randomized to receive conventional dose of etanercept treatment and 26 were given a dose reduction regimen for 12 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was disease activity of response for AS at week 12, including Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the serum erythrocyte sediment rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and assessment of synovitis of the hip by ultrasonography. At 12 weeks, all of the patients had responses to some extent and the efficacy variables improved significantly over time, but not between treatment groups. Nine patients experienced at least one adverse event (generally, infections and injection site reactions), most of them mild or moderate. In sum, the dose reduction of etanercept regimen in the 12-week AS treatment was confirmed as a safe and effective therapy as the conventional dose was given. PMID:27381286

  11. Direct simulations of two-phase flow on micro-CT images of porous media and upscaling of pore-scale forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeini, Ali Q.; Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko

    2014-12-01

    Pore-scale forces have a significant effect on the macroscopic behaviour of multiphase flow through porous media. This paper studies the effect of these forces using a new volume-of-fluid based finite volume method developed for simulating two-phase flow directly on micro-CT images of porous media. An analytical analysis of the relationship between the pore-scale forces and the Darcy-scale pressure drops is presented. We use this analysis to propose unambiguous definitions of Darcy-scale viscous pressure drops as the rate of energy dissipation per unit flow rate of each phase, and then use them to obtain the relative permeability curves. We show that this definition is consistent with conventional laboratory/field measurements by comparing our predictions with experimental relative permeability. We present single and two-phase flow simulations for primary oil injection followed by water injection on a sandpack and a Berea sandstone. The two-phase flow simulations are presented at different capillary numbers which cover the transition from capillary fingering at low capillary numbers to a more viscous fingering displacement pattern at higher capillary numbers, and the effect of capillary number on the relative permeability curves is investigated. Overall, this paper presents a new finite volume-based methodology for the detailed analysis of two-phase flow directly on micro-CT images of porous media and upscaling of the results to the Darcy scale.

  12. 99mTc-MDP uptake in SPECT/CT by a bladder hernia simulating inguinal metastasis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    JI, TIEFENG; GAO, DAPENG; CHEN, BIN; WANG, RENJIE; GAO, SHI

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old male with a history of prostate cancer and high prostate specific antigen levels underwent 99mtechnetium-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT), to identify bone metastasis. The patient possessed no previous history of serious illnesses or surgical procedures and no family history of malignancies. A whole-body CT scan revealed an intense MDP uptake in the right inguinal region on the anterior view, but not in the posterior view, which was suspected to be a metastatic lesion. However, there was no evidence of bone metastasis on the CT scan. In addition, an increased 99mTc-MDP uptake was indicated on the SPECT images in the right inguinal region, which appeared to be separate from the main bladder activity. CT images of the pelvis revealed an inferior tongue-like extension of the bladder into the right inguinal region. Fused SPECT/CT axial images indicated the circular accumulation of the 99mTc-MDP in the medial right groin, with well-defined walls that connected the accumulation to the bladder. The final diagnosis was a bladder hernia (T2N0M0), which may have been responsible for the misdiagnosis of bone metastasis due to the use of radiopharmaceuticals (99mTc-MDP) that were mainly excreted through urination. Considering the comprehensive situation of the patient, radical prostatectomy was performed. The bladder hernia was subsequently monitored by follow-up examination every 3 months, and remains alive and under follow-up to date. PMID:26893749

  13. The development of a population of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms for CT imaging research and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Hannah; Zhang, Yakun; Frush, Jack; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Minhas, Anum; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. Tilak; Miller, M. I.; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul

    2014-03-01

    With the increased use of CT examinations, the associated radiation dose has become a large concern, especially for pediatrics. Much research has focused on reducing radiation dose through new scanning and reconstruction methods. Computational phantoms provide an effective and efficient means for evaluating image quality, patient-specific dose, and organ-specific dose in CT. We previously developed a set of highly-detailed 4D reference pediatric XCAT phantoms at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years with organ and tissues masses matched to ICRP Publication 89 values. We now extend this reference set to a series of 64 pediatric phantoms of a variety of ages and height and weight percentiles, representative of the public at large. High resolution PET-CT data was reviewed by a practicing experienced radiologist for anatomic regularity and was then segmented with manual and semi-automatic methods to form a target model. A Multi-Channel Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (MC-LDDMM) algorithm was used to calculate the transform from the best age matching pediatric reference phantom to the patient target. The transform was used to complete the target, filling in the non-segmented structures and defining models for the cardiac and respiratory motions. The complete phantoms, consisting of thousands of structures, were then manually inspected for anatomical accuracy. 3D CT data was simulated from the phantoms to demonstrate their ability to generate realistic, patient quality imaging data. The population of pediatric phantoms developed in this work provides a vital tool to investigate dose reduction techniques in 3D and 4D pediatric CT.

  14. Implementation of interior micro-CT on a carbon nanotube dynamic micro-CT scanner for lower radiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hao; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Cao, Guohua

    2015-03-01

    Micro-CT is a high-resolution volumetric imaging tool that provides imaging evaluations for many preclinical applications. However, the relatively high cumulative radiation dose from micro-CT scans could lead to detrimental influence on the experimental outcomes or even the damages of specimens. Interior micro-computed tomography (micro- CT) produces exact tomographic images of an interior region-of-interest (ROI) embedded within an object from truncated projection data. It holds promises for many biomedical applications with significantly reduced radiation doses. Here, we present our first implementation of an interior micro-CT system using a carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission microfocus x-ray source. The system has two modes - interior micro-CT mode and global micro-CT mode, which is realized with a detachable x-ray beam collimator at the source side. The interior mode has an effective field-of-view (FOV) of about 10mm in diameter, while for the global mode the FOV is about 40mm in diameter. We acquired CT data in these two modes from a mouse-sized phantom, and compared the reconstructed image qualities and the associated radiation exposures. Interior ROI reconstruction was achieved by using our in-house developed reconstruction algorithm. Overall, interior micro-CT demonstrated comparable image quality to the conventional global micro-CT. Radiation doses measured by an ion chamber show that interior micro-CT yielded significant dose reduction (up to 83%).

  15. Dose reduction in fluoroscopic interventions using a combination of a region of interest (ROI) x-ray attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable temporal filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, Liza; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2013-03-01

    A novel dose reduction technique for fluoroscopic interventions involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable ROI temporal recursive filter, was used to guide the catheter to the ROI in three live animal studies, two involving rabbits and one involving a sheep. In the two rabbit studies presented , a catheter was guided to the entrance of the carotid artery. With the added ROI attenuator the image under the high attenuation region is very noisy. By using temporal filtering with a filter weight of 0.6 on previous frames, the noise is reduced. In the sheep study the catheter was guided to the descending aorta of the animal. The sheep offered a relatively higher attenuation to the incident x-rays and thus a higher temporal filter weight of 0.8 on previous frames was used during the procedure to reduce the noise to levels acceptable by the interventionalist. The image sequences from both studies show that significant dose reduction of 5-6 times can be achieved with acceptable image quality outside the ROI by using the above mentioned technique. Even though the temporal filter weighting outside the ROI is higher, the consequent lag does not prevent perception of catheter movement.

  16. Dose Reduction in Fluoroscopic Interventions Using a Combination of a Region of Interest (ROI) X-Ray Attenuator and Spatially-Different, Temporally-Variable Temporal Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, S.N Swetadri; Pope, Liza; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A.H.; Bednarek, D.R; Rudin, S.

    2013-01-01

    A novel dose reduction technique for fluoroscopic interventions involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable ROI temporal recursive filter, was used to guide the catheter to the ROI in three live animal studies, two involving rabbits and one involving a sheep. In the two rabbit studies presented, a catheter was guided to the entrance of the carotid artery. With the added ROI attenuator the image under the high attenuation region is very noisy. By using temporal filtering with a filter weight of 0.6 on previous frames, the noise is reduced. In the sheep study the catheter was guided to the descending aorta of the animal. The sheep offered a relatively higher attenuation to the incident x-rays and thus a higher temporal filter weight of 0.8 on previous frames was used during the procedure to reduce the noise to levels acceptable by the interventionalist. The image sequences from both studies show that significant dose reduction of 5–6 times can be achieved with acceptable image quality outside the ROI by using the above mentioned technique. Even though the temporal filter weighting outside the ROI is higher, the consequent lag does not prevent perception of catheter movement. PMID:24817800

  17. The influence of novel CT reconstruction technique and ECG-gated technique on image quality and patient dose of cardiac computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Dyakov, I; Stoinova, V; Groudeva, V; Vassileva, J

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare image quality and patient dose in cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) in terms of volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI vol), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose, when changing from filtered back projection (FBP) to adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) reconstruction techniques. Further aim was to implement prospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gating for patient dose reduction. The study was performed with Aquilion ONE 320-row CT of Toshiba Medical Systems. Analysis of cardiac CT protocols was performed before and after integration of the new software. The AIDR technique showed more than 50 % reduction in CTDIvol values and 57 % in effective dose. The subjective evaluation of clinical images confirmed the adequate image quality acquired by the AIDR technique. The preliminary results indicated significant dose reduction when using prospective ECG gating by keeping the adequate diagnostic quality of clinical images. PMID:25836680

  18. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  19. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2008-12-15

    any other patient in the same size/protocol group who undergoes the chest scan. In summary, this work reported the first assessment of dose variations across pediatric CT patients in the same size/protocol group due to the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus and provided a previously unavailable method for patient-specific organ dose estimation, which will help in assessing patient risk and optimizing dose reduction strategies, including the development of scan protocols.

  20. CT Image Reconstruction from Sparse Projections Using Adaptive TpV Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zijia; Zhou, Linghong

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dose reduction without losing CT image quality has been an increasing concern. Reducing the number of X-ray projections to reconstruct CT images, which is also called sparse-projection reconstruction, can potentially avoid excessive dose delivered to patients in CT examination. To overcome the disadvantages of total variation (TV) minimization method, in this work we introduce a novel adaptive TpV regularization into sparse-projection image reconstruction and use FISTA technique to accelerate iterative convergence. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the proposed method suppresses noise and artifacts more efficiently, and preserves structure information better than other existing reconstruction methods. PMID:26089962

  1. Novel iterative reconstruction method with optimal dose usage for partially redundant CT-acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, H.; Raupach, R.; Sunnegardh, J.; Allmendinger, T.; Klotz, E.; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2015-11-01

    In CT imaging, a variety of applications exist which are strongly SNR limited. However, in some cases redundant data of the same body region provide additional quanta. Examples: in dual energy CT, the spatial resolution has to be compromised to provide good SNR for material decomposition. However, the respective spectral dataset of the same body region provides additional quanta which might be utilized to improve SNR of each spectral component. Perfusion CT is a high dose application, and dose reduction is highly desirable. However, a meaningful evaluation of perfusion parameters might be impaired by noisy time frames. On the other hand, the SNR of the average of all time frames is extremely high. In redundant CT acquisitions, multiple image datasets can be reconstructed and averaged to composite image data. These composite image data, however, might be compromised with respect to contrast resolution and/or spatial resolution and/or temporal resolution. These observations bring us to the idea of transferring high SNR of composite image data to low SNR ‘source’ image data, while maintaining their resolution. It has been shown that the noise characteristics of CT image data can be improved by iterative reconstruction (Popescu et al 2012 Book of Abstracts, 2nd CT Meeting (Salt Lake City, UT) p 148). In case of data dependent Gaussian noise it can be modelled with image-based iterative reconstruction at least in an approximate manner (Bruder et al 2011 Proc. SPIE 7961 79610J). We present a generalized update equation in image space, consisting of a linear combination of the previous update, a correction term which is constrained by the source image data, and a regularization prior, which is initialized by the composite image data. This iterative reconstruction approach we call bimodal reconstruction (BMR). Based on simulation data it is shown that BMR can improve low contrast detectability, substantially reduces the noise power and has the potential to recover

  2. Novel iterative reconstruction method with optimal dose usage for partially redundant CT-acquisition.

    PubMed

    Bruder, H; Raupach, R; Sunnegardh, J; Allmendinger, T; Klotz, E; Stierstorfer, K; Flohr, T

    2015-11-01

    In CT imaging, a variety of applications exist which are strongly SNR limited. However, in some cases redundant data of the same body region provide additional quanta. Examples in dual energy CT, the spatial resolution has to be compromised to provide good SNR for material decomposition. However, the respective spectral dataset of the same body region provides additional quanta which might be utilized to improve SNR of each spectral component. Perfusion CT is a high dose application, and dose reduction is highly desirable. However, a meaningful evaluation of perfusion parameters might be impaired by noisy time frames. On the other hand, the SNR of the average of all time frames is extremely high.In redundant CT acquisitions, multiple image datasets can be reconstructed and averaged to composite image data. These composite image data, however, might be compromised with respect to contrast resolution and/or spatial resolution and/or temporal resolution. These observations bring us to the idea of transferring high SNR of composite image data to low SNR 'source' image data, while maintaining their resolution.It has been shown that the noise characteristics of CT image data can be improved by iterative reconstruction (Popescu et al 2012 Book of Abstracts, 2nd CT Meeting (Salt Lake City, UT) p 148). In case of data dependent Gaussian noise it can be modelled with image-based iterative reconstruction at least in an approximate manner (Bruder et al 2011 Proc. SPIE 7961 79610J). We present a generalized update equation in image space, consisting of a linear combination of the previous update, a correction term which is constrained by the source image data, and a regularization prior, which is initialized by the composite image data. This iterative reconstruction approach we call bimodal reconstruction (BMR). Based on simulation data it is shown that BMR can improve low contrast detectability, substantially reduces the noise power and has the potential to recover spatial

  3. SU-E-T-294: Simulations to Investigate the Feasibility of ‘dry’ Optical-CT Imaging for 3D Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, K; Rankine, L; Oldham, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform simulations investigating the feasibility of “dry” optical-CT, and determine optimal design and scanning parameters for a novel dry tank telecentric optical-CT 3D dosimetry system. Such a system would have important advantages in terms of practical convenience and reduced cost. Methods: A Matlab based ray-tracing simulation platform, ScanSim, was used to model a telecentric system with a polyurethane dry tank, cylindrical dosimeter, and surrounding fluid. This program's capabilities were expanded for the geometry and physics of dry scanning. To categorize the effects of refractive index (RI) mismatches, simulations were run for several dosimeter (RI = 1.5−1.48) and fluid (RI = 1.55−1.33) combinations. Additional simulations examined the effect of increasing gap size (1–5mm) between the dosimeter and tank wall, and of changing the telecentric lens tolerance (0.5°−5°). The evaluation metric is the usable radius; the distance from the dosimeter center where the measured and true doses differ by less than 2%. Results: As the tank/dosimeter RI mismatch increases from 0–0.02, the usable radius decreases from 97.6% to 50.2%. The fluid RI for matching is lower than either the tank or dosimeter RI. Changing gap sizes has drastic effects on the usable radius, requiring more closely matched fluid at large gap sizes. Increasing the telecentric tolerance through a range from 0.5°–5.0° improved the usable radius for every combination of media. Conclusion: Dry optical-CT with telecentric lenses is feasible when the dosimeter and tank RIs are closely matched (<0.01 difference), or when data in the periphery is not required. The ScanSim tool proved very useful in situations when the tank and dosimeter have slight differences in RI by enabling estimation of the optimal choice of RI of the small amount of fluid still required. Some spoiling of the telecentric beam and increasing the tolerance helps recover the usable radius.

  4. SU-C-18C-06: Radiation Dose Reduction in Body Interventional Radiology: Clinical Results Utilizing a New Imaging Acquisition and Processing Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlbrenner, R; Kolli, KP; Taylor, A; Kohi, M; Fidelman, N; LaBerge, J; Kerlan, R; Gould, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the patient radiation dose reduction achieved during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) procedures performed in a body interventional radiology suite equipped with the Philips Allura Clarity imaging acquisition and processing platform, compared to TACE procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Methods: Total fluoroscopy time, cumulative dose area product, and cumulative air kerma were recorded for the first 25 TACE procedures performed to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Philips body interventional radiology suite equipped with Philips Allura Clarity. The same data were collected for the prior 85 TACE procedures performed to treat HCC in the same suite equipped with Philips Allura Xper. Mean values from these cohorts were compared using two-tailed t tests. Results: Following installation of the Philips Allura Clarity platform, a 42.8% reduction in mean cumulative dose area product (3033.2 versus 1733.6 mGycm∧2, p < 0.0001) and a 31.2% reduction in mean cumulative air kerma (1445.4 versus 994.2 mGy, p < 0.001) was achieved compared to similar procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Mean total fluoroscopy time was not significantly different between the two cohorts (1679.3 versus 1791.3 seconds, p = 0.41). Conclusion: This study demonstrates a significant patient radiation dose reduction during TACE procedures performed to treat HCC after a body interventional radiology suite was converted to the Philips Allura Clarity platform from the Philips Allura Xper platform. Future work will focus on evaluation of patient dose reduction in a larger cohort of patients across a broader range of procedures and in specific populations, including obese patients and pediatric patients, and comparison of image quality between the two platforms. Funding for this study was provided by Philips Healthcare, with 5% salary support provided to authors K. Pallav

  5. The impact of various protective tools on the dose reduction in the eye lens in an interventional cardiology-clinical study.

    PubMed

    Domienik, J; Bissinger, A; Grabowicz, W; Jankowski, Ł; Kręcki, R; Makowski, M; Masiarek, K; Plewka, M; Lubiński, A; Peruga, J Z

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to check, in clinical practice, the potential for the dose reduction of lead eyewear and a ceiling-suspended shield used to protect the eye lens of physicians working in interventional cardiology. To this end, for the lead eyewear, the dose reduction factors were derived to correct the readings from a dosimeter used routinely outside the glasses. Four types of lead eyewear with attached loose thermoluminescent dosimeters and EYE-D dosimeters were worn by physicians in two clinical centres, for two-month periods, during coronary angiography (CA), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and pacemaker procedures. In order to analyse, separately, how a ceiling-suspended lead screen absorbs the scattered radiation, a series of measurements was carried out during single CA/PCI procedures performed with and without the protection. The lead eyewear may reduce the doses to the eye closest to the x-ray tube by a factor between 1.1 and 3.4, depending on its model and the physician's position. The effectiveness of the eyewear may, however, vary-even for the same model and physician-almost twofold between different working periods. The ceiling-suspended shield decreases the doses in clinical practice by a factor of 2.3. The annual eye lens doses without the eyewear estimated from routine measurements are high-above or close to the new eye lens dose limit established by the recent EU Basic Safety Standards, even though the ceiling-suspended shield was used. Therefore, to comply with the new dose limit that is set in the Directive, protection of the eyes of physicians with high workloads might require the use of both the eyewear and the ceiling-suspended shield. PMID:27183002

  6. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial ... or other growth (mass) Cerebral atrophy (loss of brain tissue) ... with the hearing nerve Stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)

  7. Effective Dose Reduction to Cardiac Structures Using Protons Compared With 3DCRT and IMRT in Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella; Su Zhong; Latif, Naeem; Dang, Nam H.; Lynch, James; Joyce, Michael; Sandler, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric impact of proton therapy (PT) on various cardiac subunits in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Methods and Materials: From June 2009 through December 2010, 13 patients were enrolled on an institutional review board-approved protocol for consolidative involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) for HL. Three separate treatment plans were developed prospectively by using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and PT. Cardiac subunits were retrospectively contoured on the 11 patients with intravenous-contrast simulation scans, and the doses were calculated for all treatment plans. A Wilcoxon paired test was performed to evaluate the statistical significance (p < 0.05) of 3DCRT and IMRT compared with PT. Results: The mean heart doses were 21 Gy, 12 Gy, and 8 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE]) with 3DCRT, IMRT, and PT, respectively. Compared with 3DCRT and IMRT, PT reduced the mean doses to the left and right atria; the left and right ventricles; the aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves; and the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right circumflex coronary arteries. Conclusions: Compared with 3DCRT and IMRT, PT reduced the radiation doses to all major cardiac subunits. Limiting the doses to these structures should translate into lower rates of cardiac toxicities.

  8. Method for measuring the intensity profile of a CT fan-beam filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Dohatcu, Andreea

    2014-03-01

    Research on CT systems often requires knowledge of intensity as a function of angle in the fan-beam, due to the presence of bowtie filters, for studies such as dose reduction simulation, Monte Carlo dose calculations, or statistical reconstruction algorithms. Since manufacturers consider the x-ray bowtie filter design to be proprietary information, several methods have been proposed to measure the beam intensity profile independently: 1) calculate statistical properties of noise in acquired sinograms (requires access to raw data files, which is also vendor proprietary); 2) measure the waveform of a dosimeter located away from the isocenter (requires dosimeter equipment costing > 10K). We present a novel method that is inexpensive (parts costing 100 from any hardware store, using Gafchromic film at $3 per measurement), requires no proprietary information, and can be performed in a few minutes. A fixture is built from perforated steel tubing, which forms an aperture that selectively samples the intensity at a particular fan-beam angle in a rotating gantry. Two exposures (1× and 2×) are made and self-developing radiochromic film (Gafchromic XR- Ashland Inc.) is then scanned on an inexpensive PC document scanner. An analysis method is described that linearizes the measurements for relative exposure. The resultant profile is corrected for geometric effects (1/LΛ2 fall-off, gantry dwell time) and background exposure, providing a noninvasive estimate of the CT fan-beam intensity present in an operational CT system. This method will allow researchers to conveniently measure parameters required for modeling the effects of bowtie filters in clinical scanners.

  9. Radiation dose in breast CT imaging with monochromatic x-rays: simulation study of the influence of energy, composition and thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittone, A.; Bravin, A.; Coan, P.

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments have shown that high resolution phase contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) of the breast can be performed at clinically compatible doses. Results have yet been obtained in vitro on full breasts, and the clinical translation of the technique seems more and more possible. This work presents a method to quickly estimate the average dose in the organ using the software GATE. The influence of different parameters on the dose distribution, like breast composition and thickness, and for preclinical test, the presence of a skin/PMMA external layer, has been investigated. Several correction factors, to be applied to the given dose database, are also introduced to allow the use of these results in geometries different from those studied here. An energy optimization study is presented that considers also the influence on the energy choice of x-ray detector. A simple analytical method to estimate the best energy that minimizes the dose-transmittance ratio in CT imaging is presented and compared with the results of simulations.

  10. Size-dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for photon-counting spectral CT system in pediatric imaging: simulation study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han; Danielsson, Mats; Xu, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    We are developing a photon-counting spectral CT detector with a small pixel size of [Formula: see text] mm(2), offering a potential advantage for better visualization of small structures in pediatric patients. The purpose of this study is to determine the patient size dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for pediatric CT in two imaging cases: adipose imaging and iodinated blood imaging. Cylindrical soft-tissue phantoms of diameters between 10-25 cm were used to mimic patients of different ages from 0 to 15 y. For adipose imaging, a 5 mm diameter adipose sphere was assumed as an imaging target, while in the case of iodinated imaging, an iodinated blood sphere of 1 mm in diameter was assumed. By applying the geometry of a commercial CT scanner (GE Lightspeed VCT), simulations were carried out to calculate the detectability index, [Formula: see text], with tube potentials varying from 40 to 140 kVp. The optimal kVp for each phantom in each imaging case was determined such that the dose-normalized detectability index, [Formula: see text]dose, is maximized. With the assumption that the detectability index in pediatric imaging is required the same as in typical adult imaging, the value of mAs at optimal kVp for each phantom was selected to achieve a reference detectability index that was obtained by scanning an adult phantom (30 cm in diameter) in a typical adult CT procedure (120 kVp and 200 mAs) using a modeled energy-integrating system. For adipose imaging, the optimal kVps are 50, 60, 80, and 120 kVp, respectively, for phantoms of 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm in diameter. The corresponding mAs values required to achieve the reference detectability index are only 9%, 23%, 24%, and 54% of the mAs that is used for adult patients at 120 kVp, for 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm diameter phantoms, respectively. In the case of iodinated imaging, a tube potential of 60 kVp was found optimal for all phantoms investigated, and the mAs values required to achieve the reference

  11. Size-dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for photon-counting spectral CT system in pediatric imaging: simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han; Danielsson, Mats; Xu, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    We are developing a photon-counting spectral CT detector with a small pixel size of 0.4× 0.5 mm2, offering a potential advantage for better visualization of small structures in pediatric patients. The purpose of this study is to determine the patient size dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for pediatric CT in two imaging cases: adipose imaging and iodinated blood imaging. Cylindrical soft-tissue phantoms of diameters between 10–25 cm were used to mimic patients of different ages from 0 to 15 y. For adipose imaging, a 5 mm diameter adipose sphere was assumed as an imaging target, while in the case of iodinated imaging, an iodinated blood sphere of 1 mm in diameter was assumed. By applying the geometry of a commercial CT scanner (GE Lightspeed VCT), simulations were carried out to calculate the detectability index, {{d}\\prime 2} , with tube potentials varying from 40 to 140 kVp. The optimal kVp for each phantom in each imaging case was determined such that the dose-normalized detectability index, {{d}\\prime 2}/ dose, is maximized. With the assumption that the detectability index in pediatric imaging is required the same as in typical adult imaging, the value of mAs at optimal kVp for each phantom was selected to achieve a reference detectability index that was obtained by scanning an adult phantom (30 cm in diameter) in a typical adult CT procedure (120 kVp and 200 mAs) using a modeled energy-integrating system. For adipose imaging, the optimal kVps are 50, 60, 80, and 120 kVp, respectively, for phantoms of 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm in diameter. The corresponding mAs values required to achieve the reference detectability index are only 9%, 23%, 24%, and 54% of the mAs that is used for adult patients at 120 kVp, for 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm diameter phantoms, respectively. In the case of iodinated imaging, a tube potential of 60 kVp was found optimal for all phantoms investigated, and the mAs values required to achieve the reference detectability

  12. SU-E-I-25: Quantification of Coronary Artery Cross-Sectional Area in CT Angiography Using Integrated Density: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T; Ding, H; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a physics-based model for accurate quantification of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of coronary arteries in CT angiography by measuring the integrated density to account for the partial volume effect. Methods: In this technique the integrated density of the object as compared with its local background is measured to account for the partial volume effect. Normal vessels were simulated as circles with diameters in the range of 0.1–3mm. Diseased vessels were simulated as 2, 3, and 4mm diameter vessels with 10–90% area stenosis, created by inserting circular plaques. A simplified two material model was used with the lumen as 8mg/ml Iodine and background as lipid. The contrast-to-noise ratio between lumen and background was approximately 26. Linear fits to the known CSA were calculated. The precision and accuracy of the measurement were quantified using the root-mean-square fit deviations (RMSD) and errors to the known CSA (RMSE). Results compared to manual segmentation of the vessel lumen. To assess the impact of random variations, coefficients of variation (CV) from 10 simulations for each vessel were computed to determine reliability. Measurements with CVs less than 10% were considered reliable. Results: For normal vessels, the precision and accuracy of the integrated density technique were 0.12mm{sup 2} and 0.28mm{sup 2}, respectively. The corresponding results for manual segmentation were 0.27mm{sup 2} and 0.43mm{sup 2}. For diseased vessels, the precision and accuracy of the integrated density technique were 0.14mm{sup 2} and 0.19mm{sup 2}. Corresponding results for manual segmentation were 0.42mm{sup 2} and 0.71mm{sup 2}. Reliable CSAs were obtained for normal vessels with diameters larger than 1 mm and for diseased vessels with area as low as 1.26mm2. Conclusion: The CSA based on integrated density showed improved precision and accuracy as compared with manual segmentation in simulation. These results indicate the potential of using

  13. The influence of bowtie filtration on x-ray photons distribution in cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shanghai; Feng, Peng; Wei, Biao; He, Peng; Deng, Luzhen; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Bowtie filters are used to modulate an incoming x-ray beam as a function of the angle of the x-ray to balance the photon flux on a detector array. Because of their key roles in radiation dose reduction and multi-energy imaging, bowtie filters have attracted a major attention in modern X-ray computed tomography (CT). However, few researches are concerned on the effects of the structure and materials for the bowtie filter in the Cone Beam CT (CBCT). In this study, the influence of bowtie filters' structure and materials on X-ray photons distribution are analyzed using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations by MCNP5 code. In the current model, the phantom was radiated by virtual X-ray source (its' energy spectrum calculated by SpekCalc program) filtered using bowtie, then all photons were collected through array photoncounting detectors. In the process above, two bowtie filters' parameters which include center thickness (B), edge thickness (controlled by A), changed respectively. Two kinds of situation are simulated: 1) A=0.036, B=1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6mm and the material is aluminum; 2) A=0.016, 0.036, 0.056, 0.076, 0.096, B=2mm and the material is aluminum. All the X-ray photons' distribution are measured through MCNP. The results show that reduction in center thickness and edge thickness can reduce the number of background photons in CBCT. Our preliminary research shows that structure parameters of bowtie filter can influence X-ray photons, furthermore, radiation dose distribution, which provide some evidences in design of bowtie filter for reducing radiation dose in CBCT.

  14. Inosine Triphosphatase Genetic Variants are Protective Against Anemia During Antiviral Therapy for HCV2/3 But Do Not Decrease Dose Reductions of RBV Or Increase SVR

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alexander J.; Santoro, Rosanna; Piazzolla, Valeria; Clark, Paul J.; Naggie, Susanna; Tillmann, Hans L.; Patel, Keyur; Muir, Andrew J.; Shianna, Kevin V.; Mottola, Leonardo; Petruzzellis, Daniela; Romano, Mario; Sogari, Fernando; Facciorusso, Domenico; Goldstein, David B.; McHutchison, John G.; Mangia, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Two functional variants in the inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) gene causing inosine triphos-phatase (ITPase) deficiency protect against ribavirin (RBV)-induced hemolytic anemia and the need for RBV dose reduction in patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV). No data are available for genotype 2/3 HCV. We evaluated the association between the casual ITPA variants and on-treatment anemia in a well-characterized cohort of genotype 2/3 patients treated with variable-duration pegylated interferon alfa-2b (PEG-IFN-α2b) and RBV. Two hundred thirty-eight Caucasian patients were included in this retrospective study [185 (78%) with genotype 2 and 53 (22%) with genotype 3]. Patients were treated with PEG-IFN-α2b plus weight-based RBV (1000/1200 mg) for 12 (n = 109) or 24 weeks (n = 129). The ITPA polymorphisms rs1127354 and rs7270101 were genotyped, and an ITPase deficiency variable was defined that combined both ITPA variants according to their effect on ITPase activity. The primary endpoint was hemoglobin (Hb) reduction in week 4. We also considered Hb reduction over the course of therapy, the need for RBV dose modification, and the rate of sustained virological response (SVR). The ITPA variants were strongly and independently associated with protection from week 4 anemia (P = 10−6 for rs1127354 and P = 10−7 for rs7270101). Combining the variants into the ITPase deficiency variable increased the strength of association (P = 10−11). ITPase deficiency protected against anemia throughout treatment. ITPase deficiency was associated with a delayed time to an Hb level < 10 g/dL (hazard ratio = 0.25, 95% confidence interval = 0.08–0.84, P = 0.025) but not with the rate of RBV dose modification (required per protocol at Hb < 9.5 g/dL). There was no association between the ITPA variants and SVR. Conclusion Two ITPA variants were strongly associated with protection against treatment-related anemia in patients with genotype 2/3 HCV, but they did not decrease the need

  15. A Multi-institutional Clinical Trial of Rectal Dose Reduction via Injected Polyethylene-Glycol Hydrogel During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Analysis of Dosimetric Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Danny Y.; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Uhl, Matthias; Eble, Michael J.; Pinkawa, Michael; Triest, Baukelien van; Kalisvaart, Robin; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Ford, Eric C.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of a prostate-rectum spacer on dose to rectum during external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer and to assess for factors correlated with rectal dose reduction. Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients at 4 institutions were enrolled into a prospective pilot clinical trial. Patients underwent baseline scans and then were injected with perirectal spacing hydrogel and rescanned. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created on both scans for comparison. The objectives were to establish rates of creation of ≥7.5 mm of prostate-rectal separation, and decrease in rectal V70 of ≥25%. Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate the associations between preinjection and postinjection changes in rectal V70 and changes in plan conformity, rectal volume, bladder volume, bladder V70, planning target volume (PTV), and postinjection midgland separation, gel volume, gel thickness, length of PTV/gel contact, and gel left-to-right symmetry. Results: Hydrogel resulted in ≥7.5-mm prostate-rectal separation in 95.8% of patients; 95.7% had decreased rectal V70 of ≥25%, with a mean reduction of 8.0 Gy. There were no significant differences in preinjection and postinjection prostate, PTV, rectal, and bladder volumes. Plan conformities were significantly different before versus after injection (P=.02); plans with worse conformity indexes after injection compared with before injection (n=13) still had improvements in rectal V70. In multiple regression analysis, greater postinjection reduction in V70 was associated with decreased relative postinjection plan conformity (P=.01). Reductions in V70 did not significantly vary by institution, despite significant interinstitutional variations in plan conformity. There were no significant relationships between reduction in V70 and the other characteristics analyzed. Conclusions: Injection of hydrogel into the prostate-rectal interface resulted in dose reductions to rectum

  16. The profound effects of patient arm positioning on organ doses from CT procedures calculated using Monte Carlo simulations and deformable phantoms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haikuan; Gao, Yiming; Ding, Aiping; Caracappa, Peter F; Xu, X George

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the organ dose differences caused by the arms-raised and arms-lowered postures for multidetector computed tomography procedures. Organ doses were calculated using computational phantoms and Monte Carlo simulations. The arm position in two previously developed adult male and female human phantoms was adjusted to represent 'raised' and 'lowered' postures using advanced BREP-based mesh surface geometries. Organ doses from routine computed tomography (CT) scan protocols, including the chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis scans, were simulated at various tube voltages and reported in the unit of mGy per 100 mAs. The CT scanner model was based on previously tested work. The differences in organ dose per unit tube current between raised and lowered arm postures were studied. Furthermore, the differences due to the tube current modulation (TCM) for these two different postures and their impact on organ doses were also investigated. For a given scan parameter, a patient having lowered arms received smaller doses to organs located within the chest, abdomen or pelvis when compared with the patient having raised arms. As expected, this is caused by the attenuation of the primary X rays by the arms. However, the skin doses and bone surface doses in the patient having lowered arms were found to be 3.97-32.12% larger than those in a patient having raised arms due to the fact that more skin and spongiosa were covered in the scan range when the arms are lowered. This study also found that dose differences become smaller with the increase in tube voltage for most of organs or tissues except the skin. For example, the liver dose differences decreased from -15.01 to -11.33% whereas the skin dose differences increased from 21.53 to 25.24% with tube voltage increased from 80 to 140 kVp. With TCM applied, the organ doses of all the listed organs in patient having lowered arms are larger due to the additional tube current necessary to

  17. The profound effects of patient arm positioning on organ doses from CT procedures calculated using Monte Carlo simulations and deformable phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haikuan; Gao, Yiming; Ding, Aiping; Caracappa, Peter F.; Xu, X. George

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the organ dose differences caused by the arms-raised and arms-lowered postures for multidetector computed tomography procedures. Organ doses were calculated using computational phantoms and Monte Carlo simulations. The arm position in two previously developed adult male and female human phantoms was adjusted to represent ‘raised’ and ‘lowered’ postures using advanced BREP-based mesh surface geometries. Organ doses from routine computed tomography (CT) scan protocols, including the chest, abdomen–pelvis, and chest–abdomen–pelvis scans, were simulated at various tube voltages and reported in the unit of mGy per 100 mAs. The CT scanner model was based on previously tested work. The differences in organ dose per unit tube current between raised and lowered arm postures were studied. Furthermore, the differences due to the tube current modulation (TCM) for these two different postures and their impact on organ doses were also investigated. For a given scan parameter, a patient having lowered arms received smaller doses to organs located within the chest, abdomen or pelvis when compared with the patient having raised arms. As expected, this is caused by the attenuation of the primary X rays by the arms. However, the skin doses and bone surface doses in the patient having lowered arms were found to be 3.97–32.12 % larger than those in a patient having raised arms due to the fact that more skin and spongiosa were covered in the scan range when the arms are lowered. This study also found that dose differences become smaller with the increase in tube voltage for most of organs or tissues except the skin. For example, the liver dose differences decreased from −15.01 to −11.33 % whereas the skin dose differences increased from 21.53 to 25.24 % with tube voltage increased from 80 to 140 kVp. With TCM applied, the organ doses of all the listed organs in patient having lowered arms are larger due to the additional tube

  18. Simulation study on potential accuracy gains from dual energy CT tissue segmentation for low-energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; Granton, Patrick V.; Reniers, Brigitte; Öllers, Michel C.; Beaulieu, Luc; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-10-01

    This work compares Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for 125I and 103Pd low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources performed in virtual phantoms containing a series of human soft tissues of interest for brachytherapy. The geometries are segmented (tissue type and density assignment) based on simulated single energy computed tomography (SECT) and dual energy (DECT) images, as well as the all-water TG-43 approach. Accuracy is evaluated by comparison to a reference MC dose calculation performed in the same phantoms, where each voxel's material properties are assigned with exactly known values. The objective is to assess potential dose calculation accuracy gains from DECT. A CT imaging simulation package, ImaSim, is used to generate CT images of calibration and dose calculation phantoms at 80, 120, and 140 kVp. From the high and low energy images electron density ρe and atomic number Z are obtained using a DECT algorithm. Following a correction derived from scans of the calibration phantom, accuracy on Z and ρe of ±1% is obtained for all soft tissues with atomic number Z in [6,8] except lung. GEANT4 MC dose calculations based on DECT segmentation agreed with the reference within ±4% for 103Pd, the most sensitive source to tissue misassignments. SECT segmentation with three tissue bins as well as the TG-43 approach showed inferior accuracy with errors of up to 20%. Using seven tissue bins in our SECT segmentation brought errors within ±10% for 103Pd. In general 125I dose calculations showed higher accuracy than 103Pd. Simulated image noise was found to decrease DECT accuracy by 3-4%. Our findings suggest that DECT-based segmentation yields improved accuracy when compared to SECT segmentation with seven tissue bins in LDR brachytherapy dose calculation for the specific case of our non-anthropomorphic phantom. The validity of our conclusions for clinical geometry as well as the importance of image noise in the tissue segmentation procedure deserves further

  19. Simulation study on potential accuracy gains from dual energy CT tissue segmentation for low-energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Landry, Guillaume; Granton, Patrick V; Reniers, Brigitte; Ollers, Michel C; Beaulieu, Luc; Wildberger, Joachim E; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-10-01

    This work compares Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for (125)I and (103)Pd low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources performed in virtual phantoms containing a series of human soft tissues of interest for brachytherapy. The geometries are segmented (tissue type and density assignment) based on simulated single energy computed tomography (SECT) and dual energy (DECT) images, as well as the all-water TG-43 approach. Accuracy is evaluated by comparison to a reference MC dose calculation performed in the same phantoms, where each voxel's material properties are assigned with exactly known values. The objective is to assess potential dose calculation accuracy gains from DECT. A CT imaging simulation package, ImaSim, is used to generate CT images of calibration and dose calculation phantoms at 80, 120, and 140 kVp. From the high and low energy images electron density ρ(e) and atomic number Z are obtained using a DECT algorithm. Following a correction derived from scans of the calibration phantom, accuracy on Z and ρ(e) of ±1% is obtained for all soft tissues with atomic number Z ∊ [6,8] except lung. GEANT4 MC dose calculations based on DECT segmentation agreed with the reference within ±4% for (103)Pd, the most sensitive source to tissue misassignments. SECT segmentation with three tissue bins as well as the TG-43 approach showed inferior accuracy with errors of up to 20%. Using seven tissue bins in our SECT segmentation brought errors within ±10% for (103)Pd. In general (125)I dose calculations showed higher accuracy than (103)Pd. Simulated image noise was found to decrease DECT accuracy by 3-4%. Our findings suggest that DECT-based segmentation yields improved accuracy when compared to SECT segmentation with seven tissue bins in LDR brachytherapy dose calculation for the specific case of our non-anthropomorphic phantom. The validity of our conclusions for clinical geometry as well as the importance of image noise in the tissue segmentation procedure deserves

  20. Methods for clinical evaluation of noise reduction techniques in abdominopelvic CT.

    PubMed

    Ehman, Eric C; Yu, Lifeng; Manduca, Armando; Hara, Amy K; Shiung, Maria M; Jondal, Dayna; Lake, David S; Paden, Robert G; Blezek, Daniel J; Bruesewitz, Michael R; McCollough, Cynthia H; Hough, David M; Fletcher, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    Most noise reduction methods involve nonlinear processes, and objective evaluation of image quality can be challenging, since image noise cannot be fully characterized on the sole basis of the noise level at computed tomography (CT). Noise spatial correlation (or noise texture) is closely related to the detection and characterization of low-contrast objects and may be quantified by analyzing the noise power spectrum. High-contrast spatial resolution can be measured using the modulation transfer function and section sensitivity profile and is generally unaffected by noise reduction. Detectability of low-contrast lesions can be evaluated subjectively at varying dose levels using phantoms containing low-contrast objects. Clinical applications with inherent high-contrast abnormalities (eg, CT for renal calculi, CT enterography) permit larger dose reductions with denoising techniques. In low-contrast tasks such as detection of metastases in solid organs, dose reduction is substantially more limited by loss of lesion conspicuity due to loss of low-contrast spatial resolution and coarsening of noise texture. Existing noise reduction strategies for dose reduction have a substantial impact on lowering the radiation dose at CT. To preserve the diagnostic benefit of CT examination, thoughtful utilization of these strategies must be based on the inherent lesion-to-background contrast and the anatomy of interest. The authors provide an overview of existing noise reduction strategies for low-dose abdominopelvic CT, including analytic reconstruction, image and projection space denoising, and iterative reconstruction; review qualitative and quantitative tools for evaluating these strategies; and discuss the strengths and limitations of individual noise reduction methods. PMID:25019428

  1. Region of interest (ROI) computed tomography (CT): Comparison with full field of view (FFOV) and truncated CT for a human head phantom

    PubMed Central

    Chityala, R.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Rudin, S.; Bednarek, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    Cone-beam CT reconstruction can be performed at lower integral dose, by using a non-uniform beam filter between the x-ray source and the patient to obtain good image quality within an ROI with minimal artifacts. To evaluate the method, a human head phantom was placed on a rotary stage. Cone-beam projection images of the phantom were obtained with and without an ROI filter (dose reduction factor ~7). A mapping function was established to equalize the intensity outside the ROI (to compensate for the attenuation by the filter) to the intensity inside by assuming that those features lying both inside and outside very close to the edge of the ROI are the same. Reconstructed images were obtained using equalized projection images for 2 cases: one in which the outside region was smoothed using an averaging filter and the other with no smoothing outside. In addition, a third case was simulated by calculating the average pixel value inside the ROI for each image and assigning this value to all pixels outside the ROI for that image. The images were then back projected using a Feldkamp algorithm. We found that the three cases yield results inside the ROI comparable to those obtained using FFOV projections. In addition, the ROI filter reconstruction with smoothing provides image information outside the ROI comparable to the FFOV reconstruction. CT using an ROI filter provides a means to reconstruct reliable 3D for a volume of interest with greatly reduced integral dose compared to FFOV projections and with minimal artifacts. PMID:21311728

  2. Simulation-based validation and arrival-time correction for Patlak analyses of Perfusion-CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredno, Jörg; Hom, Jason; Schneider, Thomas; Wintermark, Max

    2009-02-01

    Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) breakdown is a hypothesized mechanism for hemorrhagic transformation in acute stroke. The Patlak analysis of a Perfusion Computed Tomography (PCT) scan measures the BBB permeability, but the method yields higher estimates when applied to the first pass of the contrast bolus compared to a delayed phase. We present a numerical phantom that simulates vascular and parenchymal time-attenuation curves to determine the validity of permeability measurements obtained with different acquisition protocols. A network of tubes represents the major cerebral arteries ipsi- and contralateral to an ischemic event. These tubes branch off into smaller segments that represent capillary beds. Blood flow in the phantom is freely defined and simulated as non-Newtonian tubular flow. Diffusion of contrast in the vessels and permeation through vessel walls is part of the simulation. The phantom allows us to compare the results of a permeability measurement to the simulated vessel wall status. A Patlak analysis reliably detects areas with BBB breakdown for acquisitions of 240s duration, whereas results obtained from the first pass are biased in areas of reduced blood flow. Compensating for differences in contrast arrival times reduces this bias and gives good estimates of BBB permeability for PCT acquisitions of 90-150s duration.

  3. Development and validation of a hybrid simulation technique for cone beam CT: application to an oral imaging system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Pauwels, R; Marshall, N; Shaheen, E; Nuyts, J; Jacobs, R; Bosmans, H

    2011-09-21

    This paper proposes a hybrid technique to simulate the complete chain of an oral cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system for the study of both radiation dose and image quality. The model was developed around a 3D Accuitomo 170 unit (J Morita, Japan) with a tube potential range of 60-90 kV. The Monte Carlo technique was adopted to simulate the x-ray generation, filtration and collimation. Exact dimensions of the bow-tie filter were estimated iteratively using experimentally acquired flood images. Non-flat radiation fields for different exposure settings were mediated via 'phase spaces'. Primary projection images were obtained by ray tracing at discrete energies and were fused according to the two-dimensional energy modulation templates derived from the phase space. Coarse Monte Carlo simulations were performed for scatter projections and the resulting noisy images were smoothed by Richardson-Lucy fitting. Resolution and noise characteristics of the flat panel detector were included using the measured modulation transfer function (MTF) and the noise power spectrum (NPS), respectively. The Monte Carlo dose calculation was calibrated in terms of kerma free-in-air about the isocenter, using an ionization chamber, and was subsequently validated by comparison against the measured air kerma in water at various positions of a cylindrical water phantom. The resulting dose discrepancies were found <10% for most cases. Intensity profiles of the experimentally acquired and simulated projection images of the water phantom showed comparable fractional increase over the common area as changing from a small to a large field of view, suggesting that the scatter was accurately accounted. Image validation was conducted using two small phantoms and the built-in quality assurance protocol of the system. The reconstructed simulated images showed high resemblance on contrast resolution, noise appearance and artifact pattern in comparison to experimentally acquired images, with <5

  4. Development and validation of a hybrid simulation technique for cone beam CT: application to an oral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Pauwels, R.; Marshall, N.; Shaheen, E.; Nuyts, J.; Jacobs, R.; Bosmans, H.

    2011-09-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid technique to simulate the complete chain of an oral cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system for the study of both radiation dose and image quality. The model was developed around a 3D Accuitomo 170 unit (J Morita, Japan) with a tube potential range of 60-90 kV. The Monte Carlo technique was adopted to simulate the x-ray generation, filtration and collimation. Exact dimensions of the bow-tie filter were estimated iteratively using experimentally acquired flood images. Non-flat radiation fields for different exposure settings were mediated via 'phase spaces'. Primary projection images were obtained by ray tracing at discrete energies and were fused according to the two-dimensional energy modulation templates derived from the phase space. Coarse Monte Carlo simulations were performed for scatter projections and the resulting noisy images were smoothed by Richardson-Lucy fitting. Resolution and noise characteristics of the flat panel detector were included using the measured modulation transfer function (MTF) and the noise power spectrum (NPS), respectively. The Monte Carlo dose calculation was calibrated in terms of kerma free-in-air about the isocenter, using an ionization chamber, and was subsequently validated by comparison against the measured air kerma in water at various positions of a cylindrical water phantom. The resulting dose discrepancies were found <10% for most cases. Intensity profiles of the experimentally acquired and simulated projection images of the water phantom showed comparable fractional increase over the common area as changing from a small to a large field of view, suggesting that the scatter was accurately accounted. Image validation was conducted using two small phantoms and the built-in quality assurance protocol of the system. The reconstructed simulated images showed high resemblance on contrast resolution, noise appearance and artifact pattern in comparison to experimentally acquired images, with <5

  5. Investigations of different kilovoltage x-ray energy for three-dimensional converging stereotactic radiotherapy system: Monte Carlo simulations with CT data

    SciTech Connect

    Deloar, Hossain M.; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kawase, Takatsugu; Tsunoo, Takanori; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Ozaki, Masahiro; Saito, Kimiaki; Takagi, Shunji; Sato, Osamu; Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Myojoyama, Atsushi; Sorell, Graham

    2006-12-15

    We are investigating three-dimensional converging stereotactic radiotherapy (3DCSRT) with suitable medium-energy x rays as treatment for small lung tumors with better dose homogeneity at the target. A computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for non-coplanar converging radiotherapy was simulated with BEAMnrc (EGS4) Monte-Carlo code for x-ray energy of 147.5, 200, 300, and 500 kilovoltage (kVp). The system was validated by comparing calculated and measured percentage of depth dose in a water phantom for the energy of 120 and 147.5 kVp. A thorax phantom and CT data from lung tumors (<20 cm{sup 3}) were used to compare dose homogeneities of kVp energies with MV energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV. Three non-coplanar arcs (0 deg. and {+-}25 deg. ) around the center of the target were employed. The Monte Carlo dose data format was converted to the XiO RTP format to compare dose homogeneity, differential, and integral dose volume histograms of kVp and MV energies. In terms of dose homogeneity and DVHs, dose distributions at the target of all kVp energies with the thorax phantom were better than MV energies, with mean dose absorption at the ribs (human data) of 100%, 85%, 50%, 30% for 147.5, 200, 300, and 500 kVp, respectively. Considering dose distributions and reduction of the enhanced dose absorption at the ribs, a minimum of 500 kVp is suitable for the lung kVp 3DCSRT system.

  6. Role of cardiac ultrafast cameras with CZT solid-state detectors and software developments on radiation absorbed dose reduction to the patients.

    PubMed

    Gunalp, Bengul

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is one the most contributing nuclear medicine technique to the annual population dose. The purpose of this study is to compare radiation-absorbed doses to the patients examined by conventional cardiac SPECT (CSPECT) camera and ultrafast cardiac (UFC) camera with cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) solid-state detectors. Total injected activity was reduced by 50 % when both stress and rest images were acquired and by 75 % when only stress images were taken with UFC camera. As a result of this, the mean total effective dose was found significantly lower with UFC camera (2.2 ± 1.2 mSv) than CSPECT (7.7 ± 3.8 mSv) (p < 0.001). Further dose reduction was obtained by reducing equivocal test results and unnecessary additional examinations with UFC camera. Using UFC camera, MPI can be conveniently used for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) much less increasing annual population radiation dose as it had been before. PMID:25848109

  7. Reducing absorbed dose to eye lenses in head CT examinations: the effect of bismuth shielding.

    PubMed

    Ciarmatori, Alberto; Nocetti, L; Mistretta, G; Zambelli, G; Costi, T

    2016-06-01

    The eye lens is considered to be among the most radiosensitive human tissues. Brain CT scans may unnecessarily expose it to radiation even if the area of clinical interest is far from the eyes. The aim of this study is to implement a bismuth eye lens shielding system for Head-CT acquisitions in these cases. The study is focused on the assessment of the dosimetric characteristics of the shielding system as well as on its effect on image quality. The shielding system was tested in two set-ups which differ for distance ("contact" and "4 cm" Set up respectively). Scans were performed on a CTDI phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom. A reference set up without shielding system was acquired to establish a baseline. Image quality was assessed by signal (not HU converted), noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) evaluation. The overall dose reduction was evaluated by measuring the CTDIvol while the eye lens dose reduction was assessed by placing thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) on an anthropomorphic phantom. The image quality analysis exhibits the presence of an artefact that mildly increases the CT number up to 3 cm below the shielding system. Below the artefact, the difference of the Signal and the CNR are negligible between the three different set-ups. Regarding the CTDI, the analysis demonstrates a decrease by almost 12 % (in the "contact" set-up) and 9 % (in the "4 cm" set-up). TLD measurements exhibit an eye lens dose reduction by 28.5 ± 5 and 21.1 ± 5 % respectively at the "contact" and the "4 cm" distance. No relevant artefact was found and image quality was not affected by the shielding system. Significant dose reductions were measured. These features make the shielding set-up useful for clinical implementation in both studied positions. PMID:27098155

  8. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. Modern spiral scanners can perform the exam without stopping. A computer ...

  9. CT dose and image quality in the last three scanner generations

    PubMed Central

    Christe, Andreas; Heverhagen, Johannes; Ozdoba, Christoph; Weisstanner, Christian; Ulzheimer, Stefan; Ebner, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare the computed tomography (CT) dose and image quality with the filtered back projection against the iterative reconstruction and CT with a minimal electronic noise detector. METHODS: A lung phantom (Chest Phantom N1 by Kyoto Kagaku) was scanned with 3 different CT scanners: the Somatom Sensation, the Definition Flash and the Definition Edge (all from Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The scan parameters were identical to the Siemens presetting for THORAX ROUTINE (scan length 35 cm and FOV 33 cm). Nine different exposition levels were examined (reference mAs/peek voltage): 100/120, 100/100, 100/80, 50/120, 50/100, 50/80, 25/120, 25/100 and 25 mAs/80 kVp. Images from the SOMATOM Sensation were reconstructed using classic filtered back projection. Iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE, level 3) was performed for the two other scanners. A Stellar detector was used with the Somatom Definition Edge. The CT doses were represented by the dose length products (DLPs) (mGycm) provided by the scanners. Signal, contrast, noise and subjective image quality were recorded by two different radiologists with 10 and 3 years of experience in chest CT radiology. To determine the average dose reduction between two scanners, the integral of the dose difference was calculated from the lowest to the highest noise level. RESULTS: When using iterative reconstruction (IR) instead of filtered back projection (FBP), the average dose reduction was 30%, 52% and 80% for bone, soft tissue and air, respectively, for the same image quality (P < 0.0001). The recently introduced Stellar detector (Sd) lowered the radiation dose by an additional 27%, 54% and 70% for bone, soft tissue and air, respectively (P < 0.0001). The benefit of dose reduction was larger at lower dose levels. With the same radiation dose, an average of 34% (22%-37%) and 25% (13%-46%) more contrast to noise was achieved by changing from FBP to IR and from IR to Sd, respectively. For the same contrast to noise level, an average of

  10. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 06: Canada's National Computed Tomography (CT) Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Wardlaw, GM; Martel, N; Blackler, W; Asselin, J-F

    2014-08-15

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in medical imaging is reflected in its' increased use and availability since the early 1990's; however, given CT's relatively larger exposures (vs. planar x-ray) greater care must be taken to ensure that CT procedures are optimised in terms of providing the smallest dose possible while maintaining sufficient diagnostic image quality. The development of CT Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) supports this process. DRLs have been suggested/supported by international/national bodies since the early 1990's and widely adopted elsewhere, but not on a national basis in Canada. Essentially, CT DRLs provide guidance on what is considered good practice for common CT exams, but require a representative sample of CT examination data to make any recommendations. Canada's National CT Survey project, in collaboration with provincial/territorial authorities, has collected a large national sample of CT practice data for 7 common examinations (with associated clinical indications) of both adult and pediatric patients. Following completion of data entry into a common database, a survey summary report and recommendations will be made on CT DRLs from this data. It is hoped that these can then be used by local regions to promote CT practice optimisation and support any dose reduction initiatives.

  11. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  12. Application- and patient size-dependent optimization of x-ray spectra for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kalender, Willi A.; Deak, Paul; Kellermeier, Markus; Straten, Marcel van; Vollmar, Sabrina V.

    2009-03-15

    settings of 120-140 kV were found as adequate choices with optimal values increasing for larger cross sections, e.g., for large abdomens voltages higher than 140 kV may be indicated. For bone and iodine imaging the optimum values were generally found at significantly lower voltages of typically below 80 kV. This offers a potential for dose reduction of up to 50%, but demands significantly higher power values in most cases. The authors concluded that voltage settings in CT should be varied more often than is common in practice today and should be chosen not only according to patient size but also according to the substance imaged in order to minimize dose while not compromising image quality. A reduction from 120 to 80 kV, for example, would yield a reduction in patient dose by more than half for coronary CT angiography. The use of lower voltages has to be recommended for contrast medium studies in cardiac and pediatric CT.

  13. Hierarchical pictorial structures for simultaneously localizing multiple organs in volumetric pre-scan CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montillo, Albert; Song, Qi; Das, Bipul; Yin, Zhye

    2015-03-01

    Parsing volumetric computed tomography (CT) into 10 or more salient organs simultaneously is a challenging task with many applications such as personalized scan planning and dose reporting. In the clinic, pre-scan data can come in the form of very low dose volumes acquired just prior to the primary scan or from an existing primary scan. To localize organs in such diverse data, we propose a new learning based framework that we call hierarchical pictorial structures (HPS) which builds multiple levels of models in a tree-like hierarchy that mirrors the natural decomposition of human anatomy from gross structures to finer structures. Each node of our hierarchical model learns (1) the local appearance and shape of structures, and (2) a generative global model that learns probabilistic, structural arrangement. Our main contribution is twofold. First we embed the pictorial structures approach in a hierarchical framework which reduces test time image interpretation and allows for the incorporation of additional geometric constraints that robustly guide model fitting in the presence of noise. Second we guide our HPS framework with the probabilistic cost maps extracted using random decision forests using volumetric 3D HOG features which makes our model fast to train and fast to apply to novel test data and posses a high degree of invariance to shape distortion and imaging artifacts. All steps require approximate 3 mins to compute and all organs are located with suitably high accuracy for our clinical applications such as personalized scan planning for radiation dose reduction. We assess our method using a database of volumetric CT scans from 81 subjects with widely varying age and pathology and with simulated ultra-low dose cadaver pre-scan data.

  14. Maintenance of remission following 2 years of standard treatment then dose reduction with abatacept in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Westhovens, Rene; Robles, Manuel; Ximenes, Antonio Carlos; Wollenhaupt, Jurgen; Durez, Patrick; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Grassi, Walter; Haraoui, Boulos; Shergy, William; Park, Sung-Hwan; Genant, Harry; Peterfy, Charles; Becker, Jean-Claude; Murthy, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate maintenance of response while reducing intravenous abatacept dose from ∼10 mg/kg to ∼5 mg/kg in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who achieved disease activity score (DAS)28 (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, ESR) <2.6. Methods This 1-year, multinational, randomised, double-blind substudy evaluated the efficacy and safety of ∼10 mg/kg and ∼5 mg/kg abatacept in patients with early RA with poor prognosis who had reached DAS28 (ESR) <2.6 at year 2 of the AGREE study. The primary outcome was time to disease relapse (defined as additional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, ≥2 courses high-dose steroids, return to open-label abatacept ∼10 mg/kg, or DAS28 (C reactive protein) ≥3.2 at two consecutive visits). Results 108 patients were randomised (∼10 mg/kg, n=58; ∼5 mg/kg, n=50). Three and five patients, respectively, discontinued, and four per group returned to open-label abatacept. Relapse over time and the proportion of patients relapsing were similar in both groups (31% (∼10 mg/kg) vs 34% (∼5 mg/kg); HR: 0.87 (95% CI 0.45 to 1.69)). Mean steady-state trough serum concentration for the ∼10 mg/kg group was 20.3–24.1 µg/mL, compared with 8.8–12.0 µg/mL for the ∼5 mg/kg group. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that abatacept dose reduction may be an option in patients with poor prognosis early RA who achieve DAS28 (ESR) <2.6 after ≥1 year on abatacept (∼10 mg/kg). Trial registration number NCT00989235. PMID:25550337

  15. ProTaper and WaveOne systems three-dimensional comparison of device parameters after the shaping technique. A micro-CT study on simulated root canals

    PubMed Central

    Dioguardi, Mario; Troiano, Giuseppe; Laino, Luigi; Russo, Lucio Lo; Giannatempo, Giovanni; Lauritano, Floriana; Cicciù, Marco; Muzio, Lorenzo Lo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to highlights possible differences in the volume of shaping and canal surface area after the using of common endodontic devices ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems. Methods: Forty ISO 15, 0.02 taper, S-shaped endo-training Blocks (Dentsply, Maillefer) were assigned in two groups (n = 20 for each group). For each block the initial working length (WL) was evaluated with a 10 K-files (Dentsply Maillefer), so the glide path was created with PathFile 1, 2 and 3 (Dentsply Maillefer) at the WL. After that, simulated canals in the group 1 were shaped with S1, S2, F1 and F2 at WL; while in group 2 it was used single-file WaveOne primary in reciprocating motion. After shaping, the resin blocks were analysed with Skyscan 1172 scanner (Skyscan, Kontich, Belgium) and then volumetrically at a source voltage of 65 kV and a source current of 153 uA. Results: No statistically differences (P > 0.05) have been found in terms of volume and surface area after the use of ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems. Conclusions: Although, results from micro-CT analysis revealed that Wave One result in a decrease of volume and surface area of shaping than ProTaper Universal, differences are not statistically significant. PMID:26770376

  16. Model-based CT performance assessment and optimization for iodinated and noniodinated imaging tasks as a function of kVp and body size

    PubMed Central

    Samei, Ehsan; Richard, Samuel; Lurwitz, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to assess the comparative performance of iterative reconstruction in space (IRIS) and filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithms in terms of image quality and dose across kVps and phantom sizes. Methods: The ACR CT phantom (model 464) was supplemented with the addition of an iodinated spherical capsule (1.5 mm diameter, 3.4 mg iodine per ml) to simulate the contrast filled structures and with an additional circular attachment consisting of an array of 500 um brass beads for spatial resolution measurements. A larger sized phantom was also created by wrapping the original phantom with additional tissue equivalent material of 4 cm thickness. The phantoms were imaged on a 64 detector array multidetector computed tomography scanner (Somatom Definition, Siemens, Germany) using clinically applicable protocols (0.5 s rotation time; 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp; 64 to 640 mA; 220 to 250 mm field of view). Images were reconstructed using the FBP and the IRIS algorithms. Combining measurements of image noise and spatial resolution with a task function, a figure of merit (FOM) for image quality was generated taking into account the type of visualization required from the image for the detection of either large or small image features with and without iodine content. The FOM was further reported in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AZ) to predict the comparative diagnostic performance of the two algorithms at different dose levels. Results: For a given dose level, the predicted AZ for IRIS consistently outperformed that of FBP. At comparative AZ, depending on protocol and task, the dose requirement for the optimal technique (optimized kVp with IRIS) was 2-3 times lower than that for standard technique (120 kVp with FBP). The potential for dose reduction was found to be higher when performing small feature detection tasks in comparison to larger feature detection tasks. The optimal kVp was from

  17. Model-based CT performance assessment and optimization for iodinated and noniodinated imaging tasks as a function of kVp and body size

    SciTech Connect

    Samei, Ehsan Richard, Samuel; Lurwitz, Lynne

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to assess the comparative performance of iterative reconstruction in space (IRIS) and filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithms in terms of image quality and dose across kVps and phantom sizes. Methods: The ACR CT phantom (model 464) was supplemented with the addition of an iodinated spherical capsule (1.5 mm diameter, 3.4 mg iodine per ml) to simulate the contrast filled structures and with an additional circular attachment consisting of an array of 500 um brass beads for spatial resolution measurements. A larger sized phantom was also created by wrapping the original phantom with additional tissue equivalent material of 4 cm thickness. The phantoms were imaged on a 64 detector array multidetector computed tomography scanner (Somatom Definition, Siemens, Germany) using clinically applicable protocols (0.5 s rotation time; 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp; 64 to 640 mA; 220 to 250 mm field of view). Images were reconstructed using the FBP and the IRIS algorithms. Combining measurements of image noise and spatial resolution with a task function, a figure of merit (FOM) for image quality was generated taking into account the type of visualization required from the image for the detection of either large or small image features with and without iodine content. The FOM was further reported in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (A{sub Z}) to predict the comparative diagnostic performance of the two algorithms at different dose levels. Results: For a given dose level, the predicted A{sub Z} for IRIS consistently outperformed that of FBP. At comparative A{sub Z}, depending on protocol and task, the dose requirement for the optimal technique (optimized kVp with IRIS) was 2-3 times lower than that for standard technique (120 kVp with FBP). The potential for dose reduction was found to be higher when performing small feature detection tasks in comparison to larger feature detection tasks. The

  18. Wobbled splatting--a fast perspective volume rendering method for simulation of x-ray images from CT.

    PubMed

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Seemann, Rudolf; Figl, Michael; Hummel, Johann; Ede, Christopher; Homolka, Peter; Yang, Xinhui; Niederer, Peter; Bergmann, Helmar

    2005-05-01

    3D/2D registration, the automatic assignment of a global rigid-body transformation matching the coordinate systems of patient and preoperative volume scan using projection images, is an important topic in image-guided therapy and radiation oncology. A crucial part of most 3D/2D registration algorithms is the fast computation of digitally rendered radiographs (DRRs) to be compared iteratively to radiographs or portal images. Since registration is an iterative process, fast generation of DRRs-which are perspective summed voxel renderings-is desired. In this note, we present a simple and rapid method for generation of DRRs based on splat rendering. As opposed to conventional splatting, antialiasing of the resulting images is not achieved by means of computing a discrete point spread function (a so-called footprint), but by stochastic distortion of either the voxel positions in the volume scan or by the simulation of a focal spot of the x-ray tube with non-zero diameter. Our method generates slightly blurred DRRs suitable for registration purposes at framerates of approximately 10 Hz when rendering volume images with a size of 30 MB. PMID:15843725

  19. Comparison of cone beam CT device and field of view for the detection of simulated periapical bone lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hedeşiu, M; Băciuţ, M; Băciuţ, G; Nackaerts, O; Jacobs, R

    2012-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of different cone beam CTs (CBCTs) and the influence of field of view (FOV) in diagnosing simulated periapical lesions. Methods 6 formalin-fixed lateral mandibular specimens from pigs were used for creating 20 standardized periapical bone defects. 18 roots were selected for the control group. Three CBCT devices [Accuitomo 3D® (Morita, Kyoto, Japan), NewTom 3G (Quantitative Radiology, Verona, Italy) and Scanora® (Soredex, Tuusula, Finland)] and three FOVs (NewTom 3G® FOV 6, 9 and 12 inches) were used to scan the mandible. Five observers assessed the images, using a five-point probability scale for the presence of lesions. Specificity, sensitivity and areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated. Results Sensitivity ranged from 72% to 80%. Specificity ranged from 60% to 77%. A difference in scoring between Scanora and the other two devices existed only in the control group. ROC analysis for different FOVs showed a decreased sensitivity with an increasing FOV, but this difference was not significant. Conclusion In the control group, there was a difference between the CBCT devices regarding their specificity. FOV size did not show any difference in diagnostic performance. In cases in which conventional radiographic methods in combination with clinical evaluation are not sufficient, CBCT may be the method of choice to assess periapical pathology. CBCT examinations should be complementary to a clinical examination and FOV adaptation can be utilized to keep the dose to the patient as low as possible. PMID:22554990

  20. Reducing Radiation Dose in Emergency CT Scans While Maintaining Equal Image Quality: Just a Promise or Reality for Severely Injured Patients?

    PubMed

    Grupp, Ulrich; Schäfer, Max-Ludwig; Meyer, Henning; Lembcke, Alexander; Pöllinger, Alexander; Wieners, Gero; Renz, Diane; Schwabe, Philipp; Streitparth, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to assess the impact of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on CT imaging quality, diagnostic interpretability, and radiation dose reduction for a proven CT acquisition protocol for total body trauma. Methods. 18 patients with multiple trauma (ISS ≥ 16) were examined either with a routine protocol (n = 6), 30% (n = 6), or 40% (n = 6) of iterative reconstruction (IR) modification in the raw data domain of the routine protocol (140 kV, collimation: 40, noise index: 15). Study groups were matched by scan range and maximal abdominal diameter. Image noise was quantitatively measured. Image contrast, image noise, and overall interpretability were evaluated by two experienced and blinded readers. The amount of radiation dose reductions was evaluated. Results. No statistically significant differences between routine and IR protocols regarding image noise, contrast, and interpretability were present. Mean effective dose for the routine protocol was 25.3 ± 2.9 mSv, 19.7 ± 5.8 mSv for the IR 30, and 17.5 ± 4.2 mSv for the IR 40 protocol, that is, 22.1% effective dose reduction for IR 30 (P = 0.093) and 30.8% effective dose reduction for IR 40 (P = 0.0203). Conclusions. IR does not reduce study interpretability in total body trauma protocols while providing a significant reduction in effective radiation dose. PMID:24381762

  1. Principles of CT and CT technology.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Lee W

    2007-09-01

    This article provides a review of the basic principles of CT within the context of the evolution of CT. Modern CT technology can be understood as a natural progression of improvements and innovations in response to both engineering problems and clinical requirements. Detailed discussions of multislice CT, CT image quality evaluation, and radiation doses in CT will be presented in upcoming articles in this series. PMID:17823453

  2. Lumbosacral spine CT

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal CT; CT - lumbosacral spine ... In other cases, a CT of the lumbosacral spine may be done after injecting contrast dye into ... of the body. A CT of the lumbosacral spine can evaluate fractures and changes of the spine, ...

  3. Thoracic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... table that slides into the center of the scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. ... than 300 pounds, have your doctor contact the scanner operator before the exam. CT scanners have a ...

  4. Impact of Safety-Related Dose Reductions or Discontinuations on Sustained Virologic Response in HCV-Infected Patients: Results from the GUARD-C Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Graham R.; Coppola, Carmine; Derbala, Moutaz; Ferenci, Peter; Orlandini, Alessandra; Reddy, K. Rajender; Tallarico, Ludovico; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Ahlers, Silke; Bakalos, Georgios; Hassanein, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, peginterferon alfa/ribavirin remains relevant in many resource-constrained settings. The non-randomized GUARD-C cohort investigated baseline predictors of safety-related dose reductions or discontinuations (sr-RD) and their impact on sustained virologic response (SVR) in patients receiving peginterferon alfa/ribavirin in routine practice. Methods A total of 3181 HCV-mono-infected treatment-naive patients were assigned to 24 or 48 weeks of peginterferon alfa/ribavirin by their physician. Patients were categorized by time-to-first sr-RD (Week 4/12). Detailed analyses of the impact of sr-RD on SVR24 (HCV RNA <50 IU/mL) were conducted in 951 Caucasian, noncirrhotic genotype (G)1 patients assigned to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin for 48 weeks. The probability of SVR24 was identified by a baseline scoring system (range: 0–9 points) on which scores of 5 to 9 and <5 represent high and low probability of SVR24, respectively. Results SVR24 rates were 46.1% (754/1634), 77.1% (279/362), 68.0% (514/756), and 51.3% (203/396), respectively, in G1, 2, 3, and 4 patients. Overall, 16.9% and 21.8% patients experienced ≥1 sr-RD for peginterferon alfa and ribavirin, respectively. Among Caucasian noncirrhotic G1 patients: female sex, lower body mass index, pre-existing cardiovascular/pulmonary disease, and low hematological indices were prognostic factors of sr-RD; SVR24 was lower in patients with ≥1 vs. no sr-RD by Week 4 (37.9% vs. 54.4%; P = 0.0046) and Week 12 (41.7% vs. 55.3%; P = 0.0016); sr-RD by Week 4/12 significantly reduced SVR24 in patients with scores <5 but not ≥5. Conclusions In conclusion, sr-RD to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin significantly impacts on SVR24 rates in treatment-naive G1 noncirrhotic Caucasian patients. Baseline characteristics can help select patients with a high probability of SVR24 and a low probability of sr-RD with

  5. SU-E-J-72: Geant4 Simulations of Spot-Scanned Proton Beam Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kanehira, T; Sutherland, K; Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K; Shirato, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate density inhomogeneities which can effect dose distributions for real-time image gated spot-scanning proton therapy (RGPT), a dose calculation system, using treatment planning system VQA (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo) spot position data, was developed based on Geant4. Methods: A Geant4 application was developed to simulate spot-scanned proton beams at Hokkaido University Hospital. A CT scan (0.98 × 0.98 × 1.25 mm) was performed for prostate cancer treatment with three or four inserted gold markers (diameter 1.5 mm, volume 1.77 mm3) in or near the target tumor. The CT data was read into VQA. A spot scanning plan was generated and exported to text files, specifying the beam energy and position of each spot. The text files were converted and read into our Geant4-based software. The spot position was converted into steering magnet field strength (in Tesla) for our beam nozzle. Individual protons were tracked from the vacuum chamber, through the helium chamber, steering magnets, dose monitors, etc., in a straight, horizontal line. The patient CT data was converted into materials with variable density and placed in a parametrized volume at the isocenter. Gold fiducial markers were represented in the CT data by two adjacent voxels (volume 2.38 mm3). 600,000 proton histories were tracked for each target spot. As one beam contained about 1,000 spots, approximately 600 million histories were recorded for each beam on a blade server. Two plans were considered: two beam horizontal opposed (90 and 270 degree) and three beam (0, 90 and 270 degree). Results: We are able to convert spot scanning plans from VQA and simulate them with our Geant4-based code. Our system can be used to evaluate the effect of dose reduction caused by gold markers used for RGPT. Conclusion: Our Geant4 application is able to calculate dose distributions for spot scanned proton therapy.

  6. Paediatric CT optimisation utilising Catphan® 600 and age-specific anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joana; Batista, Maria do Carmo; Foley, Shane; Paulo, Graciano; McEntee, Mark F; Rainford, Louise

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to perform phantom-based optimisation of paediatric computed tomography (CT) protocols and quantify the impact upon radiation dose and image noise levels. The study involved three Portuguese paediatric centres. Currently employed scanning protocols for head and chest examinations and combinations of exposure parameters were applied to a Catphan(®)600 phantom to review the CT dose impact. Contrast-noise ratio (CNR) was quantified using Radia Diagnostic(®) tool. Imaging parameters, returning similar CNRs (<1) and dose savings were applied to three paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms. OsiriX software based on standard deviation pixel values facilitated image noise analysis. Currently employed protocols and age categorisation varied between centres. Manipulation of exposure parameters facilitated mean dose reductions of 33 and 28 % for paediatric head and chest CT examinations, respectively. The majority of the optimised CT examinations resulted in image noise similar to currently employed protocols. Dose reductions of up to 33 % were achieved with image quality maintained. PMID:24567497

  7. Medical image analysis methods in MR/CT-imaged acute-subacute ischemic stroke lesion: Segmentation, prediction and insights into dynamic evolution simulation models. A critical appraisal☆

    PubMed Central

    Rekik, Islem; Allassonnière, Stéphanie; Carpenter, Trevor K.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, basic thresholding techniques in combination with standard statistical correlation-based data analysis tools have been widely used to investigate different aspects of evolution of acute or subacute to late stage ischemic stroke in both human and animal data. Yet, a wave of biology-dependent and imaging-dependent issues is still untackled pointing towards the key question: “how does an ischemic stroke evolve?” Paving the way for potential answers to this question, both magnetic resonance (MRI) and CT (computed tomography) images have been used to visualize the lesion extent, either with or without spatial distinction between dead and salvageable tissue. Combining diffusion and perfusion imaging modalities may provide the possibility of predicting further tissue recovery or eventual necrosis. Going beyond these basic thresholding techniques, in this critical appraisal, we explore different semi-automatic or fully automatic 2D/3D medical image analysis methods and mathematical models applied to human, animal (rats/rodents) and/or synthetic ischemic stroke to tackle one of the following three problems: (1) segmentation of infarcted and/or salvageable (also called penumbral) tissue, (2) prediction of final ischemic tissue fate (death or recovery) and (3) dynamic simulation of the lesion core and/or penumbra evolution. To highlight the key features in the reviewed segmentation and prediction methods, we propose a common categorization pattern. We also emphasize some key aspects of the methods such as the imaging modalities required to build and test the presented approach, the number of patients/animals or synthetic samples, the use of external user interaction and the methods of assessment (clinical or imaging-based). Furthermore, we investigate how any key difficulties, posed by the evolution of stroke such as swelling or reperfusion, were detected (or not) by each method. In the absence of any imaging-based macroscopic dynamic model

  8. SU-E-I-86: Ultra-Low Dose Computed Tomography Attenuation Correction for Pediatric PET CT Using Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™)

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S; Shulkin, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop ultra-low dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultra-low doses (10–35 mAs). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for eleven tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% CTDIvol (0.39/3.64; mGy) radiation dose from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUVbw) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation organ dose, as derived from patient exam size specific dose estimate (SSDE), was converted to effective dose using the standard ICRP report 103 method. Effective dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative patient population dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the non-dose reduced CTAC image down to 90% dose reduction. No change in SUVbw, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols reconstructed with ASiR and down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62%–86% (3.2/8.3−0.9/6.2; mSv). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from pre dose-reduced patient images. Conclusion: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CTAC dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for co

  9. [CT fluoroscopy].

    PubMed

    Rogalla, P; Juran, R

    2004-07-01

    Percutaneous biopsy of pulmonary nodules requires precise needle placement, with the goal of attaining a secure position of the needle for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes as quickly as possible and with minimal tissue damage along the access route. The requirements from the image guidance system during the intervention are, in addition to universal applicability, a quick reaction time and a user-friendly interface. CT fluoroscopy fulfils these requirements, although radiation protection for the patient and radiologist becomes an important issue. PMID:15232690

  10. Optical-CT scanning of polymer gels

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, M

    2006-01-01

    The application of optical-CT scanning to achieve accurate high-resolution 3D dosimetry is a subject of current interest. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of past research and achievements in optical-CT polymer gel dosimetry, and to review current issues and challenges. The origins of optical-CT imaging of light-scattering polymer gels are reviewed. Techniques to characterize and optimize optical-CT performance are presented. Particular attention is given to studies of artifacts in optical-CT imaging, an important area that has not been well studied to date. The technique of optical-CT simulation by Monte-Carlo modeling is introduced as a tool to explore such artifacts. New simulation studies are presented and compared with experimental data. PMID:17082823

  11. Estimating lesion volume in low-dose chest CT: How low can we go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stefano; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the potential for dose reduction in chest CT studies where lesion volume is the primary output (e.g. in therapy-monitoring applications). Methods: We added noise to the raw sinogram data from 15 chest exams with lung lesions to simulate a series of reduced-dose scans for each patient. We reconstructed the reduced-dose data on the clinical workstation and imported the resulting image series into our quantitative imaging database for lesion contouring. One reader contoured the lesions (one per patient) at the clinical reference dose (100%) and 8 simulated fractions of the clinical dose (50, 25, 15, 10, 7, 5, 4, and 3%). Dose fractions were hidden from the reader to reduce bias. We compared clinical and reduced-dose volumes in terms of bias error and variability (4x the standard deviation of the percent differences). Results: Averaging over all lesions, the bias error ranged from -0.6% to 10.6%. Variability ranged from 92% at 3% of clinical dose to 54% at 50% of clinical dose. Averaging over only the smaller lesions (<1cm equivalent diameter), bias error ranged from -9.2% to 14.1% and variability ranged from 125% at 3% dose to 33.9% at 50% dose. Conclusions: The reader's variability decreased with dose, especially for smaller lesions. However, these preliminary results are limited by potential recall bias, a small patient cohort, and an overly-simplified task. Therapy monitoring often involves checking for new lesions, which may influence the reader's clinical dose threshold for acceptable performance.

  12. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer). Methods: Aluminum wires and calcium carbonate grains of various sizes were embedded in a paraffin cylinder to simulate imaging of calcifications in a breast. Phantoms were imaged with a benchtop experimental cone beam CT system at various exposure levels. In addition to the Dexela detector, a high pitch (50 μm), thin (150 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (C7921CA-09, Hamamatsu Corporation, Hamamatsu City, Japan) and a widely used low pitch (194 μm), thick (600 μm) scintillator aSi/CsI flat panel detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems) were also used in scanning for comparison. The images were independently reviewed by six readers (imaging physicists). The MC visibility was quantified as the fraction of visible MCs and measured as a function of the estimated mean glandular dose (MGD) level for various MC sizes and detectors. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) were also measured and compared for the three detectors used. Results: The authors have demonstrated that the use of a high pitch (75 μm) CMOS detector coupled with a thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator helped make the smaller 150–160, 160–180, and 180–200 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 10.8, 9, and 10.8 mGy, respectively. It also made the larger 200–212 and 212–224 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 7.2 mGy. No performance improvement was observed for 224–250 μm or larger size groups. With the higher spatial resolution of the Dexela detector based system, the apparent dimensions and shapes of MCs were more accurately rendered. The results show that with the aforementioned detector, a 73% visibility could be achieved in imaging 160–180 μm MCs as compared to 28% visibility achieved by

  13. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer).Methods: Aluminum wires and calcium carbonate grains of various sizes were embedded in a paraffin cylinder to simulate imaging of calcifications in a breast. Phantoms were imaged with a benchtop experimental cone beam CT system at various exposure levels. In addition to the Dexela detector, a high pitch (50 μm), thin (150 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (C7921CA-09, Hamamatsu Corporation, Hamamatsu City, Japan) and a widely used low pitch (194 μm), thick (600 μm) scintillator aSi/CsI flat panel detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems) were also used in scanning for comparison. The images were independently reviewed by six readers (imaging physicists). The MC visibility was quantified as the fraction of visible MCs and measured as a function of the estimated mean glandular dose (MGD) level for various MC sizes and detectors. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) were also measured and compared for the three detectors used.Results: The authors have demonstrated that the use of a high pitch (75 μm) CMOS detector coupled with a thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator helped make the smaller 150–160, 160–180, and 180–200 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 10.8, 9, and 10.8 mGy, respectively. It also made the larger 200–212 and 212–224 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 7.2 mGy. No performance improvement was observed for 224–250 μm or larger size groups. With the higher spatial resolution of the Dexela detector based system, the apparent dimensions and shapes of MCs were more accurately rendered. The results show that with the aforementioned detector, a 73% visibility could be achieved in imaging 160–180 μm MCs as compared to 28% visibility achieved by

  14. Performance simulation of an x-ray detector for spectral CT with combined Si and Cd[Zn]Te detection layers.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Christoph; Engel, Klaus-Jürgen; Wiegert, Jens

    2010-12-21

    The most obvious problem in obtaining spectral information with energy-resolving photon counting detectors in clinical computed tomography (CT) is the huge x-ray flux present in conventional CT systems. At high tube voltages (e.g. 140 kVp), despite the beam shaper, this flux can be close to 10⁹ Mcps mm⁻² in the direct beam or in regions behind the object, which are close to the direct beam. Without accepting the drawbacks of truncated reconstruction, i.e. estimating missing direct-beam projection data, a photon-counting energy-resolving detector has to be able to deal with such high count rates. Sub-structuring pixels into sub-pixels is not enough to reduce the count rate per pixel to values that today's direct converting Cd[Zn]Te material can cope with (≤ 10 Mcps in an optimistic view). Below 300 µm pixel pitch, x-ray cross-talk (Compton scatter and K-escape) and the effect of charge diffusion between pixels are problematic. By organising the detector in several different layers, the count rate can be further reduced. However this alone does not limit the count rates to the required level, since the high stopping power of the material becomes a disadvantage in the layered approach: a simple absorption calculation for 300 µm pixel pitch shows that the required layer thickness of below 10 Mcps/pixel for the top layers in the direct beam is significantly below 100 µm. In a horizontal multi-layer detector, such thin layers are very difficult to manufacture due to the brittleness of Cd[Zn]Te. In a vertical configuration (also called edge-on illumination (Ludqvist et al 2001 IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 48 1530-6, Roessl et al 2008 IEEE NSS-MIC-RTSD 2008, Conf. Rec. Talk NM2-3)), bonding of the readout electronics (with pixel pitches below 100 µm) is not straightforward although it has already been done successfully (Pellegrini et al 2004 IEEE NSS MIC 2004 pp 2104-9). Obviously, for the top detector layers, materials with lower stopping power would be advantageous

  15. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-11-15

    that were not adjusted by patient size. Additionally, considerable differences were noted in ED{sub adj} distributions between scanners, with scanners employing iterative reconstruction exhibiting significantly lower ED{sub adj} (range: 9%-64%). Finally, a significant difference (up to 59%) in ED{sub adj} distributions was observed between institutions, indicating the potential for dose reduction. Conclusions: The authors developed a robust automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT. Using this program, significant differences in ED{sub adj} were observed between scanner models and across institutions. This new dose monitoring program offers a unique tool for improving quality assurance and standardization both within and across institutions.

  16. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  17. Computer simulations to estimate organ doses from clinically validated cardiac, neuro, and pediatric protocols for multiple detector computed tomography scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghita, Monica

    Recent advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology, particularly that of multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanning, have provided increased utilization and more diverse clinical applications including more advanced vascular and cardiac exams, perfusion imaging, and screening exams. Notwithstanding the benefits to the patient undergoing a CT study, the fundamental concern in radiation protection is the minimization of the radiation exposure delivered as well as the implementation of structures to prevent inappropriate ordering and clinical use of these advanced studies. This research work developed a computational methodology for routine clinical use to assess patient organ doses from MDCT scanners. To support the methodology, a computer code (DXS-Diagnostic X-ray Spectra) was developed to accurately and conveniently generate x-ray spectra in the diagnostic energy range (45-140 keV). The two accepted standard radiation transport calculation methods namely, deterministic and Monte Carlo, have been preliminarily investigated for their capability and readiness to support the proposed goal of the work. Thorough tests demonstrated that the lack of appropriate discrete photon interaction coefficients in the aforementioned diagnostic energy range impedes the applicability of the deterministic approach to routine clinical use; improvements in the multigroup treatment may make it more viable. Thus, the open source Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, was adapted to appropriately model an MDCT scan. For this, a new method, entirely based on routine clinical CT measurements, was developed and validated to generate an "equivalent source and filtration" model that obviates the need of proprietary information for a given CT scanner. Computer simulations employing the Monte Carlo methodology and UF's tomographic human phantoms were performed to assess, compare, and optimize pediatric, cardiac and neuro-imaging protocols for the new 320-slice scanner at Shands/UF based on dose considerations

  18. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  19. Design of anthropomorphic textured phantoms for CT performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Justin; Bochud, François; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    Commercially available computed tomography (CT) technologies such as iterative reconstruction (IR) have the potential to enable reduced patient doses while maintaining diagnostic image quality. However, systematically determining safe dose reduction levels for IR algorithms is a challenging task due to their nonlinear nature. Most attempts to evaluate IR algorithms rely on measurements made in uniform phantoms. Such measurements may overstate the dose reduction potential of IR because they don't account for the complex relationship between anatomical variability and image quality. The purpose of this study was to design anatomically informed textured phantoms for CT performance evaluation. Two phantoms were designed to represent lung and soft-tissue textures. The lung phantom includes intricate vessel-like structures along with embedded nodules (spherical, lobulated, and spiculated). The soft tissue phantom was designed based on a three-dimensional clustered lumpy background with included low-contrast lesions (spherical and anthropomorphic). The phantoms were built using rapid prototyping (3D printing) technology and imaged on a modern multi-slice clinical CT scanner to assess the noise performance of a commercial IR algorithm in the context of uniform and textured backgrounds. Fifty repeated acquisitions were acquired for each background type and noise was assessed by measuring pixel standard deviation, across the ensemble of repeated acquisitions. For pixels in uniform areas, the IR algorithm reduced noise magnitude (STD) by 60% (compared to FBP). However, for edge pixels, the noise magnitude in the IR images ranged from 20% higher to 40% lower compared to FBP. In all FBP images and in IR images of the uniform phantom, noise appeared to be globally non-stationary (i.e., spatially dependent) but locally stationary (within a reasonably small region of interest). In the IR images of the textured phantoms, the noise was globally and locally non-stationary.

  20. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  1. SCCT guidelines on radiation dose and dose-optimization strategies in cardiovascular CT

    PubMed Central

    Halliburton, Sandra S.; Abbara, Suhny; Chen, Marcus Y.; Gentry, Ralph; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Raff, Gilbert L.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Hausleiter, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, computed tomography (CT) has developed into a standard clinical test for a variety of cardiovascular conditions. The emergence of cardiovascular CT during a period of dramatic increase in radiation exposure to the population from medical procedures and heightened concern about the subsequent potential cancer risk has led to intense scrutiny of the radiation burden of this new technique. This has hastened the development and implementation of dose reduction tools and prompted closer monitoring of patient dose. In an effort to aid the cardiovascular CT community in incorporating patient-centered radiation dose optimization and monitoring strategies into standard practice, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography has produced a guideline document to review available data and provide recommendations regarding interpretation of radiation dose indices and predictors of risk, appropriate use of scanner acquisition modes and settings, development of algorithms for dose optimization, and establishment of procedures for dose monitoring. PMID:21723512

  2. SU-D-18A-06: Variation of Controlled Breath Hold From CT Simulation to Treatment and Its Dosimetric Impact for Left-Sided Breast Radiotherapy with a Real-Time Optical Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Mittauer, K; Deraniyagala, R; Li, J; Lu, B; Liu, C; Lightsey, J; Yan, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Different breath-hold (BH) maneuvers (abdominal breathing vs. chest breathing) during CT simulation and treatment can lead to chest wall positional variation. The purpose of this study is to quantify the variation of active breathing control (ABC)-assisted BH and estimate its dosimetric impact for left-sided whole-breast radiotherapy with a real-time optical tracking system (OTS). Methods: Seven breast cancer patients were included. An in-house OTS tracked an infrared (IR) marker affixed over the xiphoid process of the patient at CT simulation and throughout the treatment course to measure BH variations. Correlation between the IR marker and the breast was studied for dosimetric purposes. The positional variations of 860 BHs were retrospectively incorporated into treatment plans to assess their dosimetric impact on breast and cardiac organs (heart and left anterior descending artery [LAD]). Results: The mean intrafraction variations were 2.8 mm, 2.7 mm, and 1.6 mm in the anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and mediolateral (ML) directions, respectively. Mean stability in any direction was within 1.5 mm. A general trend of BH undershoot at treatment relative to CT simulation was observed with an average of 4.4 mm, 3.6 mm, and 0.1 mm in the AP, CC, and ML directions, respectively. Undershoot up to 12.6 mm was observed for individual patients. The difference between the planned and delivered dose to breast targets was negligible. The average planned/delivered mean heart doses, mean LAD doses, and max LAD doses were 1.4/2.1, 7.4/15.7, and 18.6/31.0 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: Systematic undershoot was observed in ABC-assisted BHs from CT simulation to treatment. Its dosimetric impact on breast coverage was minimized with image guidance, but the benefits of cardiac organ sparing were degraded. A real-time tracking system can be used in junction with the ABC device to improve BH reproducibility.

  3. Quantitative micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevrhal, Sven

    2005-09-01

    Micro-CT for bone structural analysis has progressed from an in-vitro laboratory technique to devices for in-vivo assessment of small animals and the peripheral human skeleton. Currently, topological parameters of bone architecture are the primary goals of analysis. Additional measurement of the density or degree of mineralization (DMB) of trabecular and cortical bone at the microscopic level is desirable to study effects of disease and treatment progress. This information is not commonly extracted because of the challenges of accurate measurement and calibration at the tissue level. To assess the accuracy of micro-CT DMB measurements in a realistic but controlled situation, we prepared bone-mimicking watery solutions at concentrations of 100 to 600 mg/cm3 K2PO4H and scanned them with micro-CT, both in glass vials and microcapillary tubes with inner diameters of 50, 100 and 150 μm to simulate trabecular thickness. Values of the linear attenuation coefficients μ in the reconstructed image are commonly affected by beam hardening effects for larger samples and by partial volume effects for small volumes. We implemented an iterative reconstruction technique to reduce beam hardening. Partial voluming was sought to be reduced by excluding voxels near the tube wall. With these two measures, improvement on the constancy of the reconstructed voxel values and linearity with solution concentration could be observed to over 90% accuracy. However, since the expected change in real bone is small more measurements are needed to confirm that micro-CT can indeed be adapted to assess bone mineralization at the tissue level.

  4. Low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion using advanced iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Fuqua, Christopher; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) can provide quantitative functional information for the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, x-ray dose in dynamic CTP is high, typically from 10mSv to >20mSv. We compared the dose reduction potential of advanced iterative reconstruction, Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio) to hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4) and filtered back projection (FBP). Dynamic CTP scans were obtained using a porcine model with balloon-induced ischemia in the left anterior descending coronary artery to prescribed fractional flow reserve values. High dose dynamic CTP scans were acquired at 100kVp/100mAs with effective dose of 23mSv. Low dose scans at 75mAs, 50mAs, and 25mAs were simulated by adding x-ray quantum noise and detector electronic noise to the projection space data. Images were reconstructed with FBP, iDose4, and IMR at each dose level. Image quality in static CTP images was assessed by SNR and CNR. Blood flow was obtained using a dynamic CTP analysis pipeline and blood flow image quality was assessed using flow-SNR and flow-CNR. IMR showed highest static image quality according to SNR and CNR. Blood flow in FBP was increasingly over-estimated at reduced dose. Flow was more consistent for iDose4 from 100mAs to 50mAs, but was over-estimated at 25mAs. IMR was most consistent from 100mAs to 25mAs. Static images and flow maps for 100mAs FBP, 50mAs iDose4, and 25mAs IMR showed comparable, clear ischemia, CNR, and flow-CNR values. These results suggest that IMR can enable dynamic CTP at significantly reduced dose, at 5.8mSv or 25% of the comparable 23mSv FBP protocol.

  5. CT angiography after 20 years: a transformation in cardiovascular disease characterization continues to advance.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Geoffrey D; Leipsic, Jonathon; Joseph Schoepf, U; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2014-06-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5-15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  6. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy by delineations on CT-based simulation in different respiratory phases for the treatment of senile patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weifeng; Yuan, Feng; Wang, Guoping; Lin, Zhiren; Pan, Yanling; Chen, Longhua

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to evaluate the application of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) based on computed tomography (CT) simulations in different respiratory phases. Methods A total of 64 patients aged >70 years old with NSCLC were treated by 3D-CRT using CT images in different respiratory phases. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) at the end of inspiration and end of expiration were combined to obtain the total GTV, which was close to the motional range of tumors during respiration, and no additional expansion of the clinical target volume (CTAV) to planning target volume (PTV) (CTAV:PTV) was included during the recording of respiratory movements. Patients were also planned according to the classic 3D-CRT approach. Efficacy, prognostic factors, and side effects were evaluated. Results Compared with the classic approach, the average PTV was 18.9% lower (median: 17.3%), and the average lung volume receiving a prescribed dose for a tumor was 22.4% lower (median: 20.9%). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 70.6%, 54.9%, and 29.4%, respectively, with an overall tumor response rate of 79.7%. The Karnofsky performance status and N stage were independent prognostic factors, whereas age was not. Conclusion Without affecting therapeutic effects, CT simulations in different respiratory phases were well-tolerated in elderly patients with NSCLC, could effectively reduce PTV, and could improve the quality of life. PMID:26392773

  7. WE-D-18A-01: Evaluation of Three Commercial Metal Artifact Reduction Methods for CT Simulations in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J; Kerns, J; Nute, J; Liu, X; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Mirkovic, D; Howell, R; Kry, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate three commercial metal artifact reduction methods (MAR) in the context of radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods: Three MAR strategies were evaluated: Philips O-MAR, monochromatic imaging using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) dual energy CT, and monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software (GSIMARs). The Gammex RMI 467 tissue characterization phantom with several metal rods and two anthropomorphic phantoms (pelvic phantom with hip prosthesis and head phantom with dental fillings), were scanned with and without (baseline) metals. Each MAR method was evaluated based on CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and reduction in the severity of streak artifacts. CT number difference maps between the baseline and metal scan images were calculated, and the severity of streak artifacts was quantified using the percentage of pixels with >40 HU error (“bad pixels”). Results: Philips O-MAR generally reduced HU errors in the RMI phantom. However, increased errors and induced artifacts were observed for lung materials. GSI monochromatic 70keV images generally showed similar HU errors as 120kVp imaging, while 140keV images reduced errors. GSI-MARs systematically reduced errors compared to GSI monochromatic imaging. All imaging techniques preserved the diameter of a stainless steel rod to within ±1.6mm (2 pixels). For the hip prosthesis, O-MAR reduced the average % bad pixels from 47% to 32%. For GSI 140keV imaging, the percent of bad pixels was reduced from 37% to 29% compared to 120kVp imaging, while GSI-MARs further reduced it to 12%. For the head phantom, none of the MAR methods were particularly successful. Conclusion: The three MAR methods all improve CT images for treatment planning to some degree, but none of them are globally effective for all conditions. The MAR methods were successful for large metal implants in a homogeneous environment (hip prosthesis) but were not successful for the more complicated case of dental

  8. Simulation and experimental studies of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data based on compressed-sensing theory for potential applications to dental cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, U. K.; Lee, M. S.; Cho, H. S.; Hong, D. K.; Park, Y. O.; Park, C. K.; Cho, H. M.; Choi, S. I.; Woo, T. H.

    2015-06-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data. In computed tomography (CT), for example, image reconstruction from sparse views and/or limited-angle (<360°) views would enable fast scanning with reduced imaging doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented a reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed-sensing (CS) theory, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for potential applications to low-dose, high-accurate dental cone-beam CT (CBCT). We performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics and also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images of superior accuracy from insufficient sampling data and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from insufficient data indicate that the CS-based algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  9. Quality assurance in cardiovascular CT: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    White, S K; Castellano, E; Gartland, N; Patel, T; Padley, S P G; Rubens, M B; Nicol, E D

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular computed tomography (CCT) is a cutting-edge imaging technique providing important, non-invasive, diagnostic information. Concerns exist regarding radiation exposure to patient populations, but achieving optimal image quality at the lowest doses can be challenging. This guide provides practical advice about how quality can be assured in any CCT unit or radiology department. Illustrated by real-world vignettes and data analysis from our own experience, we highlight a multidisciplinary team approach to each stage of the patient journey, the effectiveness of regular dose audit overseen by a CT optimisation group, and the importance of underused systolic scanning techniques, in order to drive significant dose reduction without loss of image quality or clinical confidence. PMID:26945872

  10. Emerging Techniques for Dose Optimization in Abdominal CT

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Joel F.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M.; Maturen, Katherine E.; Wasnik, Ashish P.; Pandya, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in computed tomographic (CT) scanning technique such as automated tube current modulation (ATCM), optimized x-ray tube voltage, and better use of iterative image reconstruction have allowed maintenance of good CT image quality with reduced radiation dose. ATCM varies the tube current during scanning to account for differences in patient attenuation, ensuring a more homogeneous image quality, although selection of the appropriate image quality parameter is essential for achieving optimal dose reduction. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage is best suited for evaluating iodinated structures, since the effective energy of the x-ray beam will be closer to the k-edge of iodine, resulting in a higher attenuation for the iodine. The optimal kilovoltage for a CT study should be chosen on the basis of imaging task and patient habitus. The aim of iterative image reconstruction is to identify factors that contribute to noise on CT images with use of statistical models of noise (statistical iterative reconstruction) and selective removal of noise to improve image quality. The degree of noise suppression achieved with statistical iterative reconstruction can be customized to minimize the effect of altered image quality on CT images. Unlike with statistical iterative reconstruction, model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms model both the statistical noise and the physical acquisition process, allowing CT to be performed with further reduction in radiation dose without an increase in image noise or loss of spatial resolution. Understanding these recently developed scanning techniques is essential for optimization of imaging protocols designed to achieve the desired image quality with a reduced dose. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:24428277

  11. Degradation of cT low-contrast spatial resolution Due to the Use of iterative reconstruction and reduced Dose levels1

    PubMed Central

    McCollough, Cynthia H.; Yu, Lifeng; Kofler, James M.; Leng, Shuai; Zhang, Yi; Li, Zhoubo; Carter, Rickey E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the dose reduction that could be achieved without degrading low-contrast spatial resolution (LCR) performance for two commercial iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques, each evaluated at two strengths with many repeated scans. Materials and Methods Two scanner models were used to image the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT Accreditation Phantom LCR section at volume CT dose indexes of 8, 12, and 16 mGy. Images were reconstructed by using filtered-back projection (FBP) and two manufacturers’ IR techniques, each at two strengths (moderate and strong). Data acquisition and reconstruction were repeated 100 times for each, yielding 1800 images. Three diagnostic medical physicists reviewed the LCR images in a blinded fashion and graded the visibility of four 6-mm rods with a six-point scale. Noninferiority and inferiority-superiority analyses were used to interpret the differences in LCR relative to FBP images acquired at 16 mGy. Results LCR decreased with decreasing dose for all reconstructions. Relative to FBP and full dose, 25%–50% dose reductions resulted in inferior LCR for vendors 1 and 2 for FBP and 25% dose reductions resulted in inferior and equivalent performance for vendor 1 and equivalent and superior performance for vendor 2 at moderate and strong IR settings, respectively. When dose was reduced by 50%, both IR techniques resulted in inferior LCR at both strength settings. Conclusion For radiation dose reductions of 25% or more, the ability to resolve the four 6-mm rods in the ACR CT Accreditation Phantom can be lost. PMID:25811326

  12. Simulation of dosimetric consequences of 4D-CT-based motion margin estimation for proton radiotherapy using patient tumor motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koybasi, Ozhan; Mishra, Pankaj; St. James, Sara; Lewis, John H.; Seco, Joao

    2014-02-01

    For the radiation treatment of lung cancer patients, four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) is a common practice used clinically to image tumor motion and subsequently determine the internal target volume (ITV) from the maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. ITV, which is derived from short pre-treatment 4D-CT scan (<6 s per couch position), may not adequately cover the extent of tumor motion during the treatment, particularly for patients that exhibit a large respiratory variability. Inaccurate tumor localization may result in under-dosage of the tumor or over-dosage of the surrounding tissues. The purpose of this study is therefore to assess the degree of tumor under-dosage in case of regular and irregular breathing for proton radiotherapy using ITV-based treatment planning. We place a spherical lesion into a modified XCAT phantom that is also capable of producing 4D images based on irregular breathing, and move the tumor according to real tumor motion data, which is acquired over multiple days by tracking gold fiducial markers implanted into the lung tumors of patients. We derive ITVs by taking the union of all tumor positions during 6 s of tumor motion in the phantom using the first day patient tumor tracking data. This is equivalent to ITVs generated clinically from cine-mode 4D-CT MIP images. The treatment plans created for different ITVs are then implemented on dynamic phantoms with tumor motion governed by real tumor tracking data from consecutive days. By comparing gross tumor volume dose distribution on days of ‘treatment’ with the ITV dose distribution, we evaluate the deviation of the actually delivered dose from the predicted dose. Our results have shown that the proton treatment planning on ITV derived from pre-treatment cine-mode 4D-CT can result in under-dosage (dose covering 95% of volume) of the tumor by up to 25.7% over 3 min of treatment for the patient with irregular respiratory motion. Tumor under-dosage is less significant for

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  14. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  15. Dose reduction of scattered photons from concrete walls lined with lead: Implications for improvement in design of megavoltage radiation therapy facility mazes

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Affan, I. A. M. Hugtenburg, R. P.; Piliero, M.; Bari, D. S.; Al-Saleh, W. M.; Evans, S.; Al-Hasan, M.; Al-Zughul, B.; Al-Kharouf, S.; Ghaith, A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: This study explores the possibility of using lead to cover part of the radiation therapy facility maze walls in order to absorb low energy photons and reduce the total dose at the maze entrance of radiation therapy rooms. Methods: Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to establish the possibility of using high-Z materials to cover the concrete walls of the maze in order to reduce the dose of the scattered photons at the maze entrance. The dose of the backscattered photons from a concrete wall was measured for various scattering angles. The dose was also calculated by the FLUKA and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. The FLUKA code was also used to simulate an existing radiotherapy room to study the effect of multiple scattering when adding lead to cover the concrete walls of the maze. Monoenergetic photons were used to represent the main components of the x ray spectrum up to 10 MV. Results: It was observed that when the concrete wall was covered with just 2 mm of lead, the measured dose rate at all backscattering angles was reduced by 20% for photons of energy comparable to Co-60 emissions and 70% for Cs-137 emissions. The simulations with FLUKA and EGS showed that the reduction in the dose was potentially even higher when lead was added. One explanation for the reduction is the increased absorption of backscattered photons due to the photoelectric interaction in lead. The results also showed that adding 2 mm lead to the concrete walls and floor of the maze reduced the dose at the maze entrance by up to 90%. Conclusions: This novel proposal of covering part or the entire maze walls with a few millimeters of lead would have a direct implication for the design of radiation therapy facilities and would assist in upgrading the design of some mazes, especially those in facilities with limited space where the maze length cannot be extended to sufficiently reduce the dose.

  16. Assessment of organ dose reduction and secondary cancer risk associated with the use of proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treatment of neuroblastomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To compare proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with conformal radiation therapy (CRT) in terms of their organ doses and ability to cause secondary cancer in normal organs. Methods Five patients (median age, 4 years; range, 2–11 years) who underwent PBT for retroperitoneal neuroblastoma were selected for treatment planning simulation. Four patients had stage 4 tumors and one had stage 2A tumor, according to the International Neuroblastoma Staging System. Two patients received 36 Gy, two received 21.6 Gy, and one received 41.4 Gy of radiation. The volume structures of these patients were used for simulations of CRT and IMRT treatment. Dose–volume analyses of liver, stomach, colon, small intestine, pancreas, and bone were performed for the simulations. Secondary cancer risks in these organs were calculated using the organ equivalent dose (OED) model, which took into account the rates of cell killing, repopulation, and the neutron dose from the treatment machine. Results In all evaluated organs, the mean dose in PBT was 20–80% of that in CRT. IMRT also showed lower mean doses than CRT for two organs (20% and 65%), but higher mean doses for the other four organs (110–120%). The risk of secondary cancer in PBT was 24–83% of that in CRT for five organs, but 121% of that in CRT for pancreas. The risk of secondary cancer in IMRT was equal to or higher than CRT for four organs (range 100–124%). Conclusion Low radiation doses in normal organs are more frequently observed in PBT than in IMRT. Assessments of secondary cancer risk showed that PBT reduces the risk of secondary cancer in most organs, whereas IMRT is associated with a higher risk than CRT. PMID:24180282

  17. Adaptive non-local means filtering based on local noise level for CT denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhoubo; Yu, Lifeng; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Manduca, Armando

    2012-03-01

    Radiation dose from CT scans is an increasing health concern in the practice of radiology. Higher dose scans can produce clearer images with high diagnostic quality, but may increase the potential risk of radiation-induced cancer or other side effects. Lowering radiation dose alone generally produces a noisier image and may degrade diagnostic performance. Recently, CT dose reduction based on non-local means (NLM) filtering for noise reduction has yielded promising results. However, traditional NLM denoising operates under the assumption that image noise is spatially uniform noise, while in CT images the noise level varies significantly within and across slices. Therefore, applying NLM filtering to CT data using a global filtering strength cannot achieve optimal denoising performance. In this work, we have developed a technique for efficiently estimating the local noise level for CT images, and have modified the NLM algorithm to adapt to local variations in noise level. The local noise level estimation technique matches the true noise distribution determined from multiple repetitive scans of a phantom object very well. The modified NLM algorithm provides more effective denoising of CT data throughout a volume, and may allow significant lowering of radiation dose. Both the noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering can be performed in times that allow integration with the clinical workflow.

  18. Radiation Exposure of Ovarian Cancer Patients: Contribution of CT Examinations Performed on Different MDCT (16 and 64 Slices) Scanners and Image Quality Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Stefania; Origgi, Daniela; Brambilla, Sarah; De Maria, Federica; Foà, Riccardo; Raimondi, Sara; Colombo, Nicoletta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to compare radiation doses given to ovarian cancer patients by different computed tomographies (CTs) and to evaluate association between doses and subjective and objective image quality. CT examinations included were performed either on a 16-slice CT, equipped with automatic z-axis tube current modulation, or on a 64-slice CT, equipped with z-axis, xy-axis modulation, and adaptive statistical iterative algorithm (ASIR). Evaluation of dose included the following dose descriptors: volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). Objective image noise was evaluated in abdominal aorta and liver. Subjective image quality was evaluated by assessment of image noise, spatial resolution and diagnostic acceptability. Mean and median CTDIvol, DLP, and E; correlation between CTDIvol and DLP and patients’ weight; comparison of objective noise for the 2 scanners; association between dose descriptors and subjective image quality. The 64-slice CT delivered to patients 24.5% lower dose (P < 0.0001) than 16-slice CT. There was a significant correlation between all dose descriptors (CTDIvol, DLP, E) and weight (P < 0.0001). Objective noise was comparable for the 2 CT scanners. There was a significant correlation between dose descriptors and image noise for the 64-slice CT, and between dose descriptors and spatial resolution for the 16-slice CT. Current dose reduction systems may reduce radiation dose without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic acceptability of CT exams. PMID:25929914

  19. Radiation exposure of ovarian cancer patients: contribution of CT examinations performed on different MDCT (16 and 64 slices) scanners and image quality evaluation: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Stefania; Origgi, Daniela; Brambilla, Sarah; De Maria, Federica; Foà, Riccardo; Raimondi, Sara; Colombo, Nicoletta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to compare radiation doses given to ovarian cancer patients by different computed tomographies (CTs) and to evaluate association between doses and subjective and objective image quality.CT examinations included were performed either on a 16-slice CT, equipped with automatic z-axis tube current modulation, or on a 64-slice CT, equipped with z-axis, xy-axis modulation, and adaptive statistical iterative algorithm (ASIR). Evaluation of dose included the following dose descriptors: volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). Objective image noise was evaluated in abdominal aorta and liver. Subjective image quality was evaluated by assessment of image noise, spatial resolution and diagnostic acceptability.Mean and median CTDIvol, DLP, and E; correlation between CTDIvol and DLP and patients' weight; comparison of objective noise for the 2 scanners; association between dose descriptors and subjective image quality.The 64-slice CT delivered to patients 24.5% lower dose (P < 0.0001) than 16-slice CT. There was a significant correlation between all dose descriptors (CTDIvol, DLP, E) and weight (P < 0.0001). Objective noise was comparable for the 2 CT scanners. There was a significant correlation between dose descriptors and image noise for the 64-slice CT, and between dose descriptors and spatial resolution for the 16-slice CT.Current dose reduction systems may reduce radiation dose without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic acceptability of CT exams. PMID:25929914

  20. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques. PMID:26156231

  1. 13th TC1/TC7 Symposium Fundamental and Applied Metrology September 01-03, 2010, London, UK: Effects of radiation dose reduction in digital radiography using wavelet-based image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, H.; Tsai, D. Y.; Lee, Y.; Matsuyama, E.; Kojima, K.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effect of the use of wavelet transform on dose reduction in computed radiography (CR). The physical properties of the processed CR images were measured using the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), contrast-to-noise ratio, and peak signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, visual evaluation was performed by Scheffe's pair comparison method. Experimental results showed that sigmoid-type transfer curves for wavelet coefficient weighting adjustment could improve the MTF, and three soft-threshold methods could improve the NPS at all spatial frequency ranges. Moreover, our visual evaluation showed that an approximately 40% reduction in exposure dose might be achieved with the sigmoid-type transfer curve in hip joint radiography.

  2. Dose reduction technique using a combination of a region of interest (ROI) material x-ray attenuator and spatially different temporal filtering for fluoroscopic interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Panse, A.; Jain, A.; Sharma, P.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique.

  3. Dose Reduction Technique Using a Combination of a Region of Interest (ROI) Material X-Ray Attenuator and Spatially Different Temporal Filtering for Fluoroscopic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, S.N Swetadri; Panse, A.; Jain, A.; Sharma, P.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A.H.; Cartwright, A.N.; Bednarek, D.R; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique. PMID:24027617

  4. Ion Stopping Powers and CT Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, Michael F.; Sardesai, Milind; Sun, Sean; Miller, Daniel W.

    2010-10-01

    One of the advantages of ion beam therapy is the steep dose gradient produced near the ion's range. Use of this advantage makes knowledge of the stopping powers for all materials through which the beam passes critical. Most treatment planning systems calculate dose distributions using depth dose data measured in water and an algorithm that converts the kilovoltage X-ray computed tomography (CT) number of a given material to its linear stopping power relative to water. Some materials present in kilovoltage scans of patients and simulation phantoms do not lie on the standard tissue conversion curve. The relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs) of 21 different tissue substitutes and positioning, registration, immobilization, and beamline materials were measured in beams of protons accelerated to energies of 155, 200, and 250 MeV; carbon ions accelerated to 290 MeV/n; and iron ions accelerated to 970 MeV/n. These same materials were scanned with both kilovoltage and megavoltage CT scanners to obtain their CT numbers. Measured RLSPs and CT numbers were compared with calculated and/or literature values. Relationships of RLSPs to physical densities, electronic densities, kilovoltage CT numbers, megavoltage CT numbers, and water equivalence values converted by a treatment planning system are given. Usage of CT numbers and substitution of measured values into treatment plans to provide accurate patient and phantom simulations are discussed.

  5. Head CT (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  6. CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  7. CT appearance of splenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  8. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-21

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  9. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  10. Orbit CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may mean: Bleeding Broken eye socket bone Graves disease Infection Tumor Risks CT scans and other x- ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 66. Read More CT scan Graves disease Tumor Update Date 1/18/2015 Updated by: ...

  11. Infant Cardiac CT Angiography with 64-Slice and 256-Slice CT: Comparison of Radiation Dose and Image Quality Using a Pediatric Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to investigate the image quality and radiation exposure of pediatric protocols for cardiac CT angiography (CTA) in infants under one year of age. Methodology/Principal Findings Cardiac CTA examinations were performed using an anthropomorphic phantom representing a 1-year-old child scanned with non-electrocardiogram-gated (NG), retrospectively electrocardiogram-gated helical (RGH) and prospectively electrocardiogram-gated axial (PGA) techniques in 64-slice and 256-slice CT scanners. The thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used for direct organ dose measurement, while dose-length product and effective mAs were also used to estimate the patient dose. For image quality, noise and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) were assessed based on regions-of-interest drawn on the reconstructed CT images, and were compared with the proposed cardiac image quantum index (CIQI). Estimated dose results were in accordant to the measured doses. The NG scan showed the best image quality in terms of noise and SNR. The PGA scan had better image quality than the RGH scan with 83.70% dose reduction. Noise and SNR were also corresponded to the proposed CIQI. Conclusions/Significance The PGA scan protocol was a good choice in balancing radiation exposure and image quality for infant cardiac CTA. We also suggested that the effective mAs and the CIQI were suitable in assessing the tradeoffs between radiation dose and image quality for cardiac CTA in infants. These results are useful for future implementation of dose reduction strategies in pediatric cardiac CTA protocols. PMID:23185380

  12. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing. PMID:22276376

  13. Analytic image reconstruction from partial data for a single-scan cone-beam CT with scatter correction

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Jonghwan; Pua, Rizza; Cho, Seungryong; Kim, Insoo; Han, Bumsoo

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: A beam-blocker composed of multiple strips is a useful gadget for scatter correction and/or for dose reduction in cone-beam CT (CBCT). However, the use of such a beam-blocker would yield cone-beam data that can be challenging for accurate image reconstruction from a single scan in the filtered-backprojection framework. The focus of the work was to develop an analytic image reconstruction method for CBCT that can be directly applied to partially blocked cone-beam data in conjunction with the scatter correction. Methods: The authors developed a rebinned backprojection-filteration (BPF) algorithm for reconstructing images from the partially blocked cone-beam data in a circular scan. The authors also proposed a beam-blocking geometry considering data redundancy such that an efficient scatter estimate can be acquired and sufficient data for BPF image reconstruction can be secured at the same time from a single scan without using any blocker motion. Additionally, scatter correction method and noise reduction scheme have been developed. The authors have performed both simulation and experimental studies to validate the rebinned BPF algorithm for image reconstruction from partially blocked cone-beam data. Quantitative evaluations of the reconstructed image quality were performed in the experimental studies. Results: The simulation study revealed that the developed reconstruction algorithm successfully reconstructs the images from the partial cone-beam data. In the experimental study, the proposed method effectively corrected for the scatter in each projection and reconstructed scatter-corrected images from a single scan. Reduction of cupping artifacts and an enhancement of the image contrast have been demonstrated. The image contrast has increased by a factor of about 2, and the image accuracy in terms of root-mean-square-error with respect to the fan-beam CT image has increased by more than 30%. Conclusions: The authors have successfully demonstrated that the

  14. Second Generation Gold Nanobeacons for Robust K-Edge Imaging with Multi-Energy CT

    PubMed Central

    Schirra, Carsten O.; Senpan, Angana; Roessl, Ewald; Thran, Axel; Stacy, Allen J.; Wu, Lina; Proska, Roland; Pan, Dipanjan

    2012-01-01

    Spectral CT is the newest advancement in CT imaging technology, which enhances traditional CT images with the capability to image and quantify certain elements based on their distinctive K-edge energies. K-edge imaging feature recognizes high accumulations of targeted elements and presents them as colorized voxels against the normal grayscale X-ray background offering promise to overcome the relatively low inherent contrast within soft tissue and distinguish the high attenuation of calcium from contrast enhanced targets. Towards this aim, second generation gold nanobeacons (GNB2), which incorporate at least five times more metal than the previous generation was developed. The particles were synthesized as lipid-encapsulated, vascularly constrained (>120 nm) nanoparticle incorporating tiny gold nanoparticles (2–4 nm) within a polysorbate core. The choice of core material dictated to achieve a higher metal loading. The particles were thoroughly characterized by physicochemical techniques. This study reports one of the earlier examples of spectral CT imaging with gold nanoparticles demonstrating the potential for targeted in vitro and in vivo imaging and eliminates calcium interference with CT. The use of statistical image reconstruction shows high SNR may allow dose reduction and/or faster scan times. PMID:23185109

  15. Assessment of patient dose and image quality for cardiac CT with breast shields.

    PubMed

    Midgley, S M; Einsiedel, P F; Langenberg, F; Lui, E H; Heinze, S B

    2012-09-01

    Breast shielding can reduce dose to the female breast, a radiosensitive organ receiving significant radiation during computed tomography (CT) chest examinations, particularly in cardiac CT, where Electrocardiogram dose modulation currently precludes the use of radial dose modulation to reduce breast dose. However, breast shields may produce artefacts affecting interpretation of coronary arteries. This study explores the dose savings and the effect of breast shields on image quality with torso and CT dose index body phantoms and an organ dose calculator. Change in dose calculated: 53-63 % (female breast), 82-85 % (lung), 79-84 % (oesophagus) and 76-80 % (effective dose) with larger dose reductions at lower kVp. Image quality is preserved when breast shields are placed after the scout no closer than 10 mm from the skin. Therefore, breast shields can be used in cardiac CT to reduce breast dose without compromising image quality. Revised conversion factors for dose length product to effective dose are suggested for cardiac CT without and with breast shields. PMID:22492837

  16. Dosimetry of permanent interstitial prostate brachytherapy for an interoperative procedure, using O-arm based CT and TRUS

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Akane; Satoh, Takefumi; Tsumura, Hideyasu; Takenaka, Kouji; Kawakami, Shogo; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this report is dosimetric evaluation for an intraoperative fusion computed tomography (CT) as a superior predictor of 1-month CT based dosimetry in comparison to transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) in permanent interstitial prostate brachytherapy. Material and methods Data of 65 patients treated with seed implantation were analyzed. All procedures has been performed with patients in the lithotomy position inside the O-arm system. An end-fine probe is used as a landmark to fuse TRUS and O-arm-based CT images. There was no difference in the patient's position, probe position, and timing of image acquisition between the two imaging modalities. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters such as the dose to 90% of prostate volume (D90) has been analyzed. Results The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic tended to be larger on fusion CT than on TRUS for most DVH parameters (71.85% vs. 59.59% for D90; p = 0.07). Significant relationships between fusion CT and 1-month CT were confirmed using Pearson's correlation coefficients for most DVH parameters (R = 0.48, p < 0.01 for D90), although the relationship between TRUS and 1-month CT was poor. Large dose reduction (35 Gy for D90) was seen from TRUS to fusion CT, especially in patients with high body weight and small prostate volume. Conclusions Intraoperative fusion CT appears to have higher predictive power for 1-month CT-based dosimetry than TRUS. A prospective trial using fusion CT-based planning is warranted. PMID:26985192

  17. Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo Deloar, Hossain M.; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  18. Sub-milliSievert (sub-mSv) CT Colonography

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Pooler, B. Dustin; Kitchin, Douglas R.; Tang, Jie; Li, Ke; Kim, David H.; del Rio, Alejandro Munoz; Chen, Guang-Hong; Pickhardt, Perry J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To prospectively compare reduced-dose (RD) CT colonography (CTC) with standard-dose (SD) imaging using several reconstruction algorithms. Methods Following SD supine CTC, 40 patients (mean age, 57.3 years; 17 M/23 F, mean BMI, 27.2) underwent an additional RD supine examination (targeted dose reduction, 70–90%). DLP, CTDIvol, effective dose, and SSDE were compared. Several reconstruction algorithms were applied to RD series. SD-FBP served as reference standard. Objective image noise, subjective image quality and polyp conspicuity were assessed. Results Mean CTDIvol and effective dose for RD series was 0.89 mGy (median 0.65) and 0.6 mSv (median 0.44), compared with 3.8 mGy (median 3.1) and 2.8 mSv (median 2.3) for SD series, respectively. Mean dose reduction was 78%. Mean image noise was significantly reduced on RD-PICCS (24.3±19HU) and RD-MBIR (19±18HU) compared with RD-FBP (90±33), RD-ASIR (72±27) and SD-FBP (47±14 HU). 2D image quality score was higher with RD-PICCS, RD-MBIR, and SD-FBP (2.7±0.4/2.8±0.4/2.9±0.6) compared with RD-FBP (1.5±0.4) and RD-ASIR (1.8±0.44). A similar trend was seen with 3D image quality scores. Polyp conspicuity scores were similar between SD-FBP/RD-PICCS/RD-MBIR (3.5±0.6/3.2±0.8/3.3±0.6). Conclusion Sub-milliSievert CTC performed with iterative reconstruction techniques demonstrate decreased image quality compared to SD, but improved image quality compared to RD images reconstructed with FBP. PMID:25903700

  19. Comprehensive evaluations of cone-beam CT dose in image-guided radiation therapy via GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, Davide; Scolari, Enrica; Silvestri, Chiara; Jiang Graves, Yan; Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Rice, Roger; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2014-03-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used for patient setup in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Radiation dose from CBCT scans has become a clinical concern. The purposes of this study are (1) to commission a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation package gCTD for Varian On-Board Imaging (OBI) system and test the calculation accuracy, and (2) to quantitatively evaluate CBCT dose from the OBI system in typical IGRT scan protocols. We first conducted dose measurements in a water phantom. X-ray source model parameters used in gCTD are obtained through a commissioning process. gCTD accuracy is demonstrated by comparing calculations with measurements in water and in CTDI phantoms. Twenty-five brain cancer patients are used to study dose in a standard-dose head protocol, and 25 prostate cancer patients are used to study dose in pelvis protocol and pelvis spotlight protocol. Mean dose to each organ is calculated. Mean dose to 2% voxels that have the highest dose is also computed to quantify the maximum dose. It is found that the mean dose value to an organ varies largely among patients. Moreover, dose distribution is highly non-homogeneous inside an organ. The maximum dose is found to be 1-3 times higher than the mean dose depending on the organ, and is up to eight times higher for the entire body due to the very high dose region in bony structures. High computational efficiency has also been observed in our studies, such that MC dose calculation time is less than 5 min for a typical case.

  20. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimetre spectrally resolved CT system on high- and low-frequency imaging tasks: a simulation.

    PubMed

    Yveborg, Moa; Danielsson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans

    2012-04-21

    We are developing a photon-counting silicon strip detector with 0.4 × 0.5 mm² detector elements for clinical CT applications. Except for the limited detection efficiency of approximately 0.8 for a spectrum of 80 kVp, the largest discrepancies from ideal spectral behaviour have been shown to be Compton interactions in the detector and electronic noise. Using the framework of cascaded system analysis, we reconstruct the 3D MTF and NPS of a silicon strip detector including the influence of scatter and charge sharing inside the detector. We compare the reconstructed noise and signal characteristics with a reconstructed 3D MTF and NPS of an ideal energy-integrating detector system with unity detection efficiency, no scatter or charge sharing inside the detector, unity presampling MTF and 1 × 1 mm² detector elements. The comparison is done by calculating the dose-normalized detectability index for some clinically relevant imaging tasks and spectra. This work demonstrates that although the detection efficiency of the silicon detector rapidly drops for the acceleration voltages encountered in clinical computed tomography practice, and despite the high fraction of Compton interactions due to the low atomic number, silicon detectors can perform on a par with ideal energy-integrating detectors for routine imaging tasks containing low-frequency components. For imaging tasks containing high-frequency components, the proposed silicon detector system can perform approximately 1.1-1.3 times better than a fully ideal energy-integrating system. PMID:22469924

  1. Experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT using digital beam attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Szczykutowicz, TP; Mistretta, CA

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tailoring CT scan acquisition parameters to individual patients is a topic of much research in the CT imaging community. It is now common place to find automatically adjusted tube current options for modern CT scanners. In addition, the use of beam shaping filters, commonly called bowtie filters, is available on most CT systems and allows for different body regions to receive different incident x-ray fluence distributions. However, no method currently exists which allows for the form of the incident x-ray fluence distribution to change as a function of view angle. This study represents the first experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) for a c-arm geometry CT scan. Methods: X-ray fluence modulation is accomplished using a digital beam attenuator (DBA). The device is composed of 10 iron wedge pairs that modulate the thickness of iron x-rays must traverse before reaching a patient. Using this device, experimental data was taken using a Siemens Zeego c-arm scanner. Scans were performed on a cylindrical polyethylene phantom and on two different sections of an anthropomorphic phantom. The DBA was used to equalize the x-ray fluence striking the detector for each scan. Non DBA, or “flat field” scans were also acquired of the same phantom objects for comparison. In addition, a scan was performed in which the DBA was used to enable volume of interest (VOI) imaging. In VOI, only a small sub-volume within a patient receives full dose and the rest of the patient receives a much lower dose. Data corrections unique to using a piece-wise constant modulator were also developed. Results The feasibility of FFMCT implemented using a DBA device has been demonstrated. Initial results suggest dose reductions of up to 3.6 times relative to “flat field” CT. In addition to dose reduction, the DBA enables a large improvement in image noise uniformity and the ability to provide regionally enhanced signal to noise using VOI imaging techniques. Conclusions

  2. Overbeaming and overlapping of volume-scan CT with tube current modulation in a 320-detector row CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yan-Shi; Lai, Nan-Ku; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of volume scan tube current modulation (VS-ATCM) with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) technique in abdomen CT examinations. We scanned an elliptical cone-shaped phantom utilizing AIDR3D technique combined with VS-ATCM mode in a 320-detector row CT scanner. The image noise distributions with conventional filtered back-projction (FBP) technique and those with AIDR3D technique were compared. The radiation dose profile and tube current time product (mAs) in three noise levels of VS-ATCM modes were compared. The radiation beam profiles of five preset scan lengths were measured using Gafchromic film strips to assess the effects of overbeaming and everlapping. The results indicated that the image noises with AIDR3D technique was 13-74% lower than those in FBP technique. The mAs distributions can be a prediction for various abdominal sizes when undergoing a VS-ATCM mode scan. Patients can receive the radiation dose of overbeaming and overlapping during the VS-ATCM mode scans.

  3. Potential benefit of the CT adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction method for pediatric cardiac diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miéville, Frédéric A.; Ayestaran, Paul; Argaud, Christophe; Rizzo, Elena; Ou, Phalla; Brunelle, Francis; Gudinchet, François; Bochud, François; Verdun, Francis R.

    2010-04-01

    Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) is a new imaging reconstruction technique recently introduced by General Electric (GE). This technique, when combined with a conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) approach, is able to improve the image noise reduction. To quantify the benefits provided on the image quality and the dose reduction by the ASIR method with respect to the pure FBP one, the standard deviation (SD), the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS), the image uniformity and the noise homogeneity were examined. Measurements were performed on a control quality phantom when varying the CT dose index (CTDIvol) and the reconstruction kernels. A 64-MDCT was employed and raw data were reconstructed with different percentages of ASIR on a CT console dedicated for ASIR reconstruction. Three radiologists also assessed a cardiac pediatric exam reconstructed with different ASIR percentages using the visual grading analysis (VGA) method. For the standard, soft and bone reconstruction kernels, the SD is reduced when the ASIR percentage increases up to 100% with a higher benefit for low CTDIvol. MTF medium frequencies were slightly enhanced and modifications of the NPS shape curve were observed. However for the pediatric cardiac CT exam, VGA scores indicate an upper limit of the ASIR benefit. 40% of ASIR was observed as the best trade-off between noise reduction and clinical realism of organ images. Using phantom results, 40% of ASIR corresponded to an estimated dose reduction of 30% under pediatric cardiac protocol conditions. In spite of this discrepancy between phantom and clinical results, the ASIR method is as an important option when considering the reduction of radiation dose, especially for pediatric patients.

  4. Practical CT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizumi, T.T.; Suneja, S.K.; Teal, J.S. )

    1989-07-01

    The dose from computed tomography (CT) examinations is not negligible from a radiation safety standpoint. Occasionally, one encounters a case in which an unsuspected pregnant woman undergoes a CT pelvic scan, and the radiologist is required to estimate the dose to the fetus. This article addresses practical methods of CT dosimetry with a specific discussion on fetal dose estimate. Three methods are described: (1) the use of a dose chart, (2) the pencil ionization chamber method, and (3) the thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) method.

  5. CT findings in leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1984-12-01

    Review of 84 computed tomographic (CT) scans in leukemic patients demonstrate a wide spectrum of abnormalities. Findings caused by leukemia were lymphadenopathy, visceral enlargement, focal defects, and tissue infiltration. Hemorrhage was by far the most common complication and could usually be characterized on the noncontrast CT scan. The distinction between old hematomas, foci of infection, and leukemia infiltration could not be made with certainty without CT-guided aspiration. Unusual instances of sepsis, such as microabscesses of the liver and typhlitis, were seen.

  6. PET/CT Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Todd M.; Mehta, Ajeet S.; Mehta, Amar S.; Laymon, Charles M.; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W.

    2014-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in PET/CT imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for attenuation correction. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT. PMID:21237418

  7. Effect of contrast ma