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Sample records for cultured hippocampal neurons

  1. Tenuigenin protects cultured hippocampal neurons against methylglyoxal-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Jing; Huang, Xiao-Bo; Li, Zong-Xin; Yin, Lin-Lin; Chen, Wen-Qiang; Li, Lin

    2010-10-25

    Methylglyoxal is a metabolite of glucose. Since serum methylglyoxal level is increased in diabetic patients, methylglyoxal is implicated in diabetic complications such as cognitive impairment. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of tenuigenin, an active component of roots of Polygala tenuifolia Willdenow, on methylglyoxal-induced cell injury in a primary culture of rat hippocampal neurons. MTT and Hoechst 33342 staining, together with flow cytometric analysis using annexin-V and propidium (PI) label, indicated that tenuigenin pretreatment attenuated methylglyoxal -induced apoptotic cell death in primary cultured hippocampal neurons, showing a dose-dependent pattern. Furthermore, 2, 7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate was used to detect the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Tenuigenin decreased the elevated reactive oxygen species induced by methylglyoxal. In addition, tenuigenin inhibited activation of caspase-3 and reversed down-regulation of the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, both of which were induced by methylglyoxal stimulation. The results suggest that tenuigenin displays antiapoptotic and antioxidative activity in hippocampal neurons due to scavenging of intracellular reactive oxygen species, regulating Bcl-2 family and suppressing caspase-3 activity induced by methylglyoxal, which might explain at least in part the beneficial effects of tenuigenin against degenerative disorders involving diabetic cognitive impairment. PMID:20609361

  2. Endocannabinoids block status epilepticus in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; Blair, Robert E.; Ziobro, Julie M.; Sombati, Sompong; Martin, Billy R.; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Status epilepticus is a serious neurological disorder associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. Antiepileptic drugs such as diazepam, phenobarbital and phenytoin are the mainstay of status epilepticus treatment. However, over 20% of status epilepticus cases are refractory to the initial treatment with two or more antiepileptic drugs. Endocannabinoids have been implicated as playing an important role in regulating seizure activity and seizure termination. This study evaluated the effects of the major endocannabinoids methanandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) on status epilepticus in the low-Mg2+ hippocampal neuronal culture model. Status epilepticus in this model was resistant to treatment with phenobarbital and phenytoin. Methanandamide and 2-AG inhibited status epilepticus in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 145±4.15 nM and 1.68±0.19 µM, respectively. In addition, the anti-status epilepticus effects of methanandamide and 2-AG were mediated by activation of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor since they were blocked by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM251. These results provide the first evidence that the endocannabinoids, methanandamide and 2-AG, are effective inhibitors of refractory status epilepticus in the hippocampal neuronal culture model and indicate that regulating the endocannabinoid system may provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating refractory status epilepticus. PMID:17174949

  3. Age-Dependent Glutamate Induction of Synaptic Plasticity in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivenshitz, Miriam; Segal, Menahem; Sapoznik, Stav

    2006-01-01

    A common denominator for the induction of morphological and functional plasticity in cultured hippocampal neurons involves the activation of excitatory synapses. We now demonstrate massive morphological plasticity in mature cultured hippocampal neurons caused by a brief exposure to glutamate. This plasticity involves a slow, 70%-80% increase in…

  4. Perampanel Inhibition of AMPA Receptor Currents in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Matt, Lucas; Hell, Johannes Wilhelm; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Perampanel is an aryl substituted 2-pyridone AMPA receptor antagonist that was recently approved as a treatment for epilepsy. The drug potently inhibits AMPA receptor responses but the mode of block has not been characterized. Here the action of perampanel on AMPA receptors was investigated by whole-cell voltage-clamp recording in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Perampanel caused a slow (τ∼1 s at 3 µM), concentration-dependent inhibition of AMPA receptor currents evoked by AMPA and kainate. The rates of block and unblock of AMPA receptor currents were 1.5×105 M−1 s−1 and 0.58 s−1, respectively. Perampanel did not affect NMDA receptor currents. The extent of block of non-desensitizing kainate-evoked currents (IC50, 0.56 µM) was similar at all kainate concentrations (3–100 µM), demonstrating a noncompetitive blocking action. Parampanel did not alter the trajectory of AMPA evoked currents indicating that it does not influence AMPA receptor desensitization. Perampanel is a selective negative allosteric AMPA receptor antagonist of high-affinity and slow blocking kinetics. PMID:25229608

  5. Early presynaptic changes during plasticity in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ninan, Ipe; Liu, Shumin; Rabinowitz, Daniel; Arancio, Ottavio

    2006-01-01

    Long-lasting increase in synaptic strength is thought to underlie learning. An explosion of data has characterized changes in postsynaptic (pstS) AMPA receptor cycling during potentiation. However, changes occurring within the presynaptic (prS) terminal remain largely unknown. We show that appearance of new release sites during potentiation between cultured hippocampal neurons is due to (a) conversion of nonrecycling sites to recycling sites, (b) formation of new releasing sites from areas containing diffuse staining for the prS marker Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein-2 and (c) budding of new recycling sites from previously existing recycling sites. In addition, potentiation is accompanied by a release probability increase in pre-existing boutons depending upon their individual probability. These prS changes precede and regulate fluorescence increase for pstS GFP-tagged-AMPA-receptor subunit GluR1. These results suggest that potentiation involves early changes in the prS terminal including remodeling and release probability increase of pre-existing synapses. PMID:16957772

  6. Morphological assessment of neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neuron-astrocyte co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Gennaro; Costa, Lucio G

    2012-05-01

    Neurite outgrowth is a fundamental event in brain development, as well as in regeneration of damaged neurons. Astrocytes play a major role in neuritogenesis, by expressing and releasing factors that facilitate neurite outgrowth, such as extracellular matrix proteins, and factors that can inhibit neuritogenesis, such as the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan neurocan. In this unit we describe a noncontact co-culture system of hippocampal neurons and cortical (or hippocampal) astrocytes for measurement of neurite outgrowth. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are plated on glass coverslips, which are inverted onto an astrocyte feeder layer, allowing exposure of neurons to astrocyte-derived factors without direct contact between these two cell types. After co-culture, neurons are stained and photographed, and processes are assessed morphologically using Metamorph software. This method allows exposing astrocytes to various agents before co-culture in order to assess how these exposures may influence the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth. PMID:22549268

  7. Membrane potential dynamics of axons in cultured hippocampal neurons probed by second-harmonic-generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuriya, Mutsuo; Yasui, Masato

    2010-03-01

    The electrical properties of axons critically influence the nature of communication between neurons. However, due to their small size, direct measurement of membrane potential dynamics in intact and complex mammalian axons has been a challenge. Furthermore, quantitative optical measurements of axonal membrane potential dynamics have not been available. To characterize the basic principles of somatic voltage signal propagation in intact axonal arbors, second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging is applied to cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. When FM4-64 is applied extracellularly to dissociated neurons, whole axonal arbors are visualized by SHG imaging. Upon action potential generation by somatic current injection, nonattenuating action potentials are recorded in intact axonal arbors. Interestingly, however, both current- and voltage-clamp recordings suggest that nonregenerative subthreshold somatic voltage changes at the soma are poorly conveyed to these axonal sites. These results reveal the nature of membrane potential dynamics of cultured hippocampal neurons, and further show the possibility of SHG imaging in physiological investigations of axons.

  8. Neuroprotective Effects of Agmatine Against Cell Damage Caused by Glucocorticoids in Cultured Rat Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, M.-Y.; Wang, W.-P.; Bissette, G.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study the neuroprotective effects of agmatine against neuronal damage caused by glucocorticoids were examined in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Spectrophotometric measurements of lactate dehydrogenase activities, β-tubulin III immunocytochemical staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end-labeling assay (TUNEL) labeling and caspase-3 assays were carried out to detect cell damage or possible involved mechanisms. Our results show that dexamethasone and corticosterone produced a concentration-dependent increase of lactate dehydrogenase release in 12-day hippocampal cultures. Addition of 100 μM agmatine into media prevented the glucocorticoid-induced increase of lactate dehydrogenase release, an effect also shared with the specific N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist MK801 and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists mifepristone and spironolactone. Arcaine, an analog of agmatine with similar structure as agmatine, also blocked glucocorticoid-induced increase of lactate dehydrogenase release. Spermine and putrescine, the endogenous polyamine and metabolic products of agmatine without the guanidino moiety of agmatine, have no appreciable effect on glucocorticoid-induced injuries, indicating a structural relevance for this neuroprotection. Immunocytochemical staining with β-tubulin III confirmed the substantial neuronal injuries caused by glucocorticoids and the neuroprotective effects of agmatine against these neuronal injuries. TUNEL labeling demonstrated that agmatine significantly reduced TUNEL-positive cell numbers induced by exposure of cultured neurons to dexamethasone. Moreover, exposure of hippocampal neurons to dexamethasone significantly increased caspase-3 activity, which was inhibited by co-treatment with agmatine. Taken together, these results demonstrate that agmatine can protect cultured hippocampal neurons from glucocorticoid-induced neurotoxicity, through a possible blockade of

  9. Prolactin mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons via its receptor.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Castañeda, E; Grattan, D R; Pasantes-Morales, H; Pérez-Domínguez, M; Cabrera-Reyes, E A; Morales, T; Cerbón, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been reported that prolactin (PRL) exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in hippocampus in the rat in vivo models. However, the exact mechanism by which PRL mediates this effect is not completely understood. The aim of our study was to assess whether prolactin exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in an in vitro model using primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons, and to determine whether this effect is mediated via the prolactin receptor (PRLR). Primary cell cultures of rat hippocampal neurons were used in all experiments, gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. The results demonstrated that PRL treatment of neurons from primary cultures did not modify cell viability, but that it exerted a neuroprotective effect, with cells treated with PRL showing a significant increase of viability after glutamate (Glu)--induced excitotoxicity as compared with neurons treated with Glu alone. Cultured neurons expressed mRNA for both PRL and its receptor (PRLR), and both PRL and PRLR expression levels changed after the excitotoxic insult. Interestingly, the PRLR protein was detected as two main isoforms of 100 and 40 kDa as compared with that expressed in hypothalamic cells, which was present only as a 30 kDa variant. On the other hand, PRL was not detected in neuron cultures, either by western blot or by immunohistochemistry. Neuroprotection induced by PRL was significantly blocked by specific oligonucleotides against PRLR, thus suggesting that the PRL role is mediated by its receptor expressed in these neurons. The overall results indicated that PRL induces neuroprotection in neurons from primary cell cultures. PMID:26874070

  10. Vasopressin protects hippocampal neurones in culture against nutrient deprivation or glutamate-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Aguilera, Greti

    2010-01-01

    Vasopressin (VP) secreted within the brain modulates neuronal function by acting as a neurotransmitter. Recent reports show that VP prevents serum deprivation-induced apoptosis in the neuronal cell line, H32. To determine whether VP is antiapoptotic in hippocampal neurones, primary cultures of these neurones were used to examine the effect of VP on neuronal culture supplement (B27) deprivation-, or glutamate-induced apoptosis, and the signaling pathways mediating the effects. Removal of B27 supplement from the culture medium for 24 hours or addition of glutamate (3 to 10 uM) decreased neuronal viability (P<0.05) and increased Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining and caspase-3 activity (P<0.05), which is consistent with apoptotic cell death. VP (10nM) reduced B27 deprivation- or glutamate-induced cell death (P<0.05). These antiapoptotic effects of VP were completely blocked by a V1 but not a V2 receptor antagonist, indicating that they are mediated via V1 VP receptors. The antiapoptotic effect of VP in neurones involves activation of MAPK/ERK and IP3/Akt signaling pathways. This was shown by the transient increases in phospho-ERK and phospho-Akt after incubation with VP revealed by western blot analyses, and the ability of specific inhibitors to reduce the inhibitory effect of VP on caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining by 70% and 35%, respectively (p<0.05). These studies demonstrate that VP has antiapoptotic actions in hippocampal neurones, an effect which is mediated by the MAPK/ERK and PI3/Akt signaling pathways. The ability of VP to reduce nutrient deprivation or glutamate overstimulation-induced neuronal death suggests that VP acts as a neuroprotective agent within the brain. PMID:20673301

  11. Analyzing kinesin motor domain translocation in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chung-Fang; Banker, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal microtubules are subject to extensive posttranslational modifications and are bound by MAPs, tip-binding proteins, and other accessory proteins. All of these features, which are difficult to replicate in vitro, are likely to influence the translocation of kinesin motors. Here we describe assays for evaluating the translocation of a population of fluorescently labeled kinesin motor domains, based on their accumulation in regions of the cell enriched in microtubule plus ends. Neurons lend themselves to these experiments because of their microtubule organization. In axons, microtubules are oriented with their plus ends out; dendrites contain a mixed population of microtubules, but those near the tips are also plus end out. The assays involve the expression of constitutively active kinesins that can walk processively, but that lack the autoinhibitory domain in the tail that normally prevents their binding to microtubules until they attach to vesicles. The degree to which such motor domains accumulate at neurite tips serves as a measure of the efficiency of their translocation. Although these assays cannot provide the kind of quantitative kinetic information obtained from in vitro assays, they offer a simple way to examine kinesin translocation in living neurons. They can be used to compare the translocation efficiency of different kinesin motors and to evaluate how mutations or posttranslational modifications within the motor domain influence kinesin translocation. Changes to motor domain accumulation in these assays can also serve as readout for changes in the microtubule cytoskeleton that affect kinesin translocation. PMID:26794516

  12. NRSF causes cAMP-sensitive suppression of sodium current in cultured hippocampal neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadeau, H.; Lester, H. A.

    2002-01-01

    The neuron restrictive silencer factor (NRSF/REST) has been shown to bind to the promoters of many neuron-specific genes and is able to suppress transcription of Na(+) channels in PC12 cells, although its functional effect in terminally differentiated neurons is unknown. We constructed lentiviral vectors to express NRSF as a bicistronic message with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and followed infected hippocampal neurons in culture over a period of 1-2 wk. NRSF-expressing neurons showed a time-dependent suppression of Na(+) channel function as measured by whole cell electrophysiology. Suppression was reversed or prevented by the addition of membrane-permeable cAMP analogues and enhanced by cAMP antagonists but not affected by increasing protein expression with a viral enhancer. Secondary effects, including altered sensitivity to glutamate and GABA and reduced outward K(+) currents, were duplicated by culturing GFP-infected control neurons in TTX. The striking similarity of the phenotypes makes NRSF potentially useful as a genetic "silencer" and also suggests avenues of further exploration that may elucidate the transcription factor's in vivo role in neuronal plasticity.

  13. The structural development of primary cultured hippocampal neurons on a graphene substrate.

    PubMed

    He, Zuhong; Zhang, Shasha; Song, Qin; Li, Wenyan; Liu, Dong; Li, Huawei; Tang, Mingliang; Chai, Renjie

    2016-10-01

    The potential of graphene-based nanomaterials as a neural interfacing material for neural repair and regeneration remains poorly understood. In the present study, the response to the graphene substrate by neurons was determined in a hippocampal culture model. The results revealed the growth and maturation of hippocampal cultures on graphene substrates were significantly improved compared to the commercial control. In details, graphene promoted growth cone growth and microtubule formation inside filopodia 24h after seeding as evidenced by a higher average number of filopodia emerging from growth cones, a longer average length of filopodia, and a larger growth cone area. Graphene also significantly boosted neurite sprouting and outgrowth. The dendritic length, the number of branch points, and the dendritic complex index were significantly improved on the graphene substrate during culture. Moreover, the spine density was enhanced and the maturation of dendritic spines from thin to stubby spines was significantly promoted on graphene at 21 days after seeding. Lastly, graphene significantly elevated the synapse density and synaptic activity in the hippocampal cultures. The present study highlights graphene's potential as a neural interfacing material for neural repair and regeneration and sheds light on the future biomedical applications of graphene-based nanomaterials. PMID:27395037

  14. Quantification of bursting and synchrony in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Eisenman, Lawrence N; Emnett, Christine M; Mohan, Jayaram; Zorumski, Charles F; Mennerick, Steven

    2015-08-01

    It is widely appreciated that neuronal networks exhibit patterns of bursting and synchrony that are not captured by simple measures such as average spike rate. These patterns can encode information or represent pathological behavior such as seizures. However, methods for quantifying bursting and synchrony are not agreed upon and can be confounded with spike rate measures. Previous validation has largely relied on in silico networks and single experimental conditions. How published measures of bursting and synchrony perform when applied to biological networks of varied average spike rate and subjected to varied experimental challenges is unclear. In multielectrode array recordings of network activity, we found that two mechanistically distinct drugs, cyclothiazide and bicuculline, produced equivalent increases in average spike rate but differed in bursting and synchrony. We applied several measures of bursting to the recordings (2 threshold interval methods and a surprise-based method) and found that a measure based on an average critical interval, adjusted for the array-wide spike rate, performed best in quantifying differential drug effects. To quantify synchrony, we compared a coefficient of variation-based measure, the recently proposed spike time tiling coefficient, the SPIKE-distance measure, and a global synchrony index. The spike time tiling coefficient, the SPIKE-distance measure, and the global synchrony index all captured a difference between drugs with the best performance exhibited by the global synchrony index. In summary, our exploration should aid other investigators by highlighting strengths and limitations of current methods. PMID:26041823

  15. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  16. Developmental Expression of Kv Potassium Channels at the Axon Initial Segment of Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ponce, Diana; DeFelipe, Javier; Garrido, Juan José; Muñoz, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Axonal outgrowth and the formation of the axon initial segment (AIS) are early events in the acquisition of neuronal polarity. The AIS is characterized by a high concentration of voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels. However, the specific ion channel subunits present and their precise localization in this axonal subdomain vary both during development and among the types of neurons, probably determining their firing characteristics in response to stimulation. Here, we characterize the developmental expression of different subfamilies of voltage-gated potassium channels in the AISs of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, including subunits Kv1.2, Kv2.2 and Kv7.2. In contrast to the early appearance of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Kv7.2 subunit at the AIS, Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunits were tethered at the AIS only after 10 days in vitro. Interestingly, we observed different patterns of Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunit expression, with each confined to distinct neuronal populations. The accumulation of Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunits at the AIS was dependent on ankyrin G tethering, it was not affected by disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and it was resistant to detergent extraction, as described previously for other AIS proteins. This distribution of potassium channels in the AIS further emphasizes the heterogeneity of this structure in different neuronal populations, as proposed previously, and suggests corresponding differences in action potential regulation. PMID:23119056

  17. Evaluation of neurotoxic and neuroprotective pathways affected by antiepileptic drugs in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Morte, Maria I; Carreira, Bruno P; Falcão, Maria J; Ambrósio, António F; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Araújo, Inês M; Carvalho, Caetana M

    2013-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the neurotoxicity of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), and of its in vivo metabolites eslicarbazepine (S-Lic) and R-licarbazepine (R-Lic), as compared to the structurally-related compounds carbamazepine (CBZ) and oxcarbazepine (OXC), in an in vitro model of cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The non-related antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) lamotrigine (LTG) and sodium valproate (VPA) were also studied. We assessed whether AEDs modulate pro-survival/pro-apoptotic pathways, such as extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt and stress activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK). We found that neither ESL nor its metabolites, CBZ or LTG, up to 0.3mM, for 24h of exposure, decreased cell viability. OXC was the most toxic drug decreasing cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner, leading to activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. VPA caused the appearance of the apoptotic markers, but did not alter cell viability. ESL, S-Lic and OXC decreased the levels of phospho-ERK1/2 and of phospho-Akt, when compared to basal levels, whereas CBZ decreased phospho-SAPK/JNK and phospho-Akt levels. LTG and VPA increased the phosphorylation levels of SAPK/JNK. These results suggest that ESL and its main metabolite S-Lic, as well as CBZ, LTG and VPA, are less toxic to hippocampal neurons than OXC, which was the most toxic agent. PMID:24055897

  18. Ginsenoside Rg1 protects against neurodegeneration by inducing neurite outgrowth in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liang; Liu, Li-feng; Liu, Juan; Dou, Ling; Wang, Ge-ying; Liu, Xiao-qing; Yuan, Qiong-lan

    2016-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) has anti-aging and anti-neurodegenerative effects. However, the mechanisms underlying these actions remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine whether Rg1 affects hippocampal survival and neurite outgrowth in vitro after exposure to amyloid-beta peptide fragment 25–35 (Aβ25–35), and to explore whether the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt signaling pathways are involved in these biological processes. We cultured hippocampal neurons from newborn rats for 24 hours, then added Rg1 to the medium for another 24 hours, with or without pharmacological inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family or Akt signaling pathways for a further 24 hours. We then immunostained the neurons for growth associated protein-43, and measured neurite length. In a separate experiment, we exposed cultured hippocampal neurons to Aβ25–35 for 30 minutes, before adding Rg1 for 48 hours, with or without Akt or MAPK inhibitors, and assessed neuronal survival using Hoechst 33258 staining, and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt by western blot analysis. Rg1 induced neurite outgrowth, and this effect was blocked by API-2 (Akt inhibitor) and PD98059 (MAPK/ERK kinase inhibitor), but not by SP600125 or SB203580 (inhibitors of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 MAPK, respectively). Consistent with this effect, Rg1 upregulated the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2; these effects were reversed by API-2 and PD98059, respectively. In addition, Rg1 significantly reversed Aβ25–35-induced apoptosis; this effect was blocked by API-2 and PD98059, but not by SP600125 or SB203580. Finally, Rg1 significantly reversed the Aβ25–35-induced decrease in Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but API-2 prevented this reversal. Our results indicate that Rg1 enhances neurite outgrowth and protects against Aβ25–35-induced damage, and that its mechanism may involve the activation of Akt and ERK1/2 signaling. PMID:27073387

  19. Ginsenoside Rg1 protects against neurodegeneration by inducing neurite outgrowth in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Liu, Li-Feng; Liu, Juan; Dou, Ling; Wang, Ge-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Yuan, Qiong-Lan

    2016-02-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) has anti-aging and anti-neurodegenerative effects. However, the mechanisms underlying these actions remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine whether Rg1 affects hippocampal survival and neurite outgrowth in vitro after exposure to amyloid-beta peptide fragment 25-35 (Aβ25-35), and to explore whether the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt signaling pathways are involved in these biological processes. We cultured hippocampal neurons from newborn rats for 24 hours, then added Rg1 to the medium for another 24 hours, with or without pharmacological inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family or Akt signaling pathways for a further 24 hours. We then immunostained the neurons for growth associated protein-43, and measured neurite length. In a separate experiment, we exposed cultured hippocampal neurons to Aβ25-35 for 30 minutes, before adding Rg1 for 48 hours, with or without Akt or MAPK inhibitors, and assessed neuronal survival using Hoechst 33258 staining, and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt by western blot analysis. Rg1 induced neurite outgrowth, and this effect was blocked by API-2 (Akt inhibitor) and PD98059 (MAPK/ERK kinase inhibitor), but not by SP600125 or SB203580 (inhibitors of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 MAPK, respectively). Consistent with this effect, Rg1 upregulated the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2; these effects were reversed by API-2 and PD98059, respectively. In addition, Rg1 significantly reversed Aβ25-35-induced apoptosis; this effect was blocked by API-2 and PD98059, but not by SP600125 or SB203580. Finally, Rg1 significantly reversed the Aβ25-35-induced decrease in Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but API-2 prevented this reversal. Our results indicate that Rg1 enhances neurite outgrowth and protects against Aβ25-35-induced damage, and that its mechanism may involve the activation of Akt and ERK1/2 signaling. PMID:27073387

  20. Neurogenic and Neurotrophic Effects of BDNF Peptides in Mouse Hippocampal Primary Neuronal Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria del Carmen; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, is down regulated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), depression, stress, and anxiety; conversely the level of this neurotrophin is increased in autism spectrum disorders. Thus, modulating the level of BDNF can be a potential therapeutic approach for nervous system pathologies. In the present study, we designed five different tetra peptides (peptides B-1 to B-5) corresponding to different active regions of BDNF. These tetra peptides were found to be non-toxic, and they induced the expression of neuronal markers in mouse embryonic day 18 (E18) primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. Additionally, peptide B-5 induced the expression of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB, suggesting a positive feedback mechanism. The BDNF peptides induced only a moderate activation (phosphorylation at Tyr 706) of the TrkB receptor, which could be blocked by the Trk’s inhibitor, K252a. Peptide B-3, when combined with BDNF, potentiated the survival effect of this neurotrophin on H2O2-treated E18 hippocampal cells. Peptides B-3 and B-5 were found to work as partial agonists and as partial antagonists competing with BDNF to activate the TrkB receptor in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that the described BDNF tetra peptides are neurotrophic, can modulate BDNF signaling in a partial agonist/antagonist way, and offer a novel therapeutic approach to neural pathologies where BDNF levels are dysregulated. PMID:23320097

  1. Tributyltin induces oxidative stress and neuronal injury by inhibiting glutathione S-transferase in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Kawami, Tomohito; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) has been used as a heat stabilizer, agricultural pesticide and antifouling agents on ships, boats and fish-farming nets; however, the neurotoxicity of TBT has recently become a concern. TBT is suggested to stimulate the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside cells. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism of neuronal oxidative injury induced by TBT using rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. The treatment of rat hippocampal slices with TBT induced ROS production, lipid peroxidation and cell death. Pretreatment with antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase or trolox, suppressed the above phenomena induced by TBT, indicating that TBT elicits oxidative stress in hippocampal slices, which causes neuronal cell death. TBT dose-dependently inhibited glutathione S-transferase (GST), but not glutathione peroxidase or glutathione reductase in the cytosol of rat hippocampus. The treatment of hippocampal slices with TBT decreased the GST activity. Pretreatment with reduced glutathione attenuated the reduction of GST activity and cell death induced by TBT, indicating that the decrease in GST activity by TBT is involved in hippocampal cell death. When hippocampal slices were treated with sulforaphane, the expression and activity of GST were increased. Notably, TBT-induced oxidative stress and cell death were significantly suppressed by pretreatment with sulforaphane. These results indicate that GST inhibition could contribute, at least in part, to the neuronal cell death induced by TBT in hippocampal slices. This study is the first report to show the link between neuronal oxidative injury and the GST inhibition elicited by TBT. PMID:22449404

  2. Effect of the PGD2-DP signaling pathway on primary cultured rat hippocampal neuron injury caused by aluminum overload

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Qunfang; Wei, Yuling; Yang, Yang; Ji, Chaonan; Hu, Xinyue; Mai, Shaoshan; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Luo, Ying; Liang, Guojuan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the agonists and antagonists of DP receptor were used to examine whether the PGD2-DP signaling pathway affects neuronal function. Primary cultured hippocampal neuron was prepared and treated with aluminum maltolate (100 μM) to establish the neuronal damage model. PGD2 and cAMP content was detected by ELISA. L-PGDS and DPs mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The aluminium-load neuron was treated with the DP1 agonist BW245C, the DP1 antagonist BWA868C, the DP2 agonist DK-PGD2, and the DP2 antagonist CAY10471, respectively. Neuronal pathomorphology was observed using H-E staining. The cell viability and the lactate dehydrogenase leakage rates of neurons were measured with MTT and LDH kit, respectively. Ca2+ level was detected by Fluo-3/AM. In the model group, the MTT values obviously decreased; LDH leakage rates and PGD2 content increased significantly; L-PGDS, DP1 mRNA and protein expressions increased, and DP2 level decreased. BW245C reduced the Ca2+ fluorescence intensity and protected the neurons. DK-PGD2 increased the intensity of Ca2+ fluorescence, while CAY10471 had the opposite effect. In conclusion, contrary to the effect of DP2, the PGD2-DP1 signaling pathway protects against the primary cultured rat hippocampal neuronal injury caused by aluminum overload. PMID:27089935

  3. Nondestructive evaluation of progressive neuronal changes in organotypic rat hippocampal slice cultures using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengqiang; Song, Yu; Dryer, Alexandra; Cogguillo, William; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Three-dimensional tissue cultures have been used as effective models for studying different diseases, including epilepsy. High-throughput, nondestructive techniques are essential for rapid assessment of disease-related processes, such as progressive cell death. An ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy (UHR-OCM) system with ∼1.5  μm axial resolution and ∼2.3  μm transverse resolution was developed to evaluate seizure-induced neuronal injury in organotypic rat hippocampal cultures. The capability of UHR-OCM to visualize cells in neural tissue was confirmed by comparison of UHR-OCM images with confocal immunostained images of the same cultures. In order to evaluate the progression of neuronal injury, UHR-OCM images were obtained from cultures on 7, 14, 21, and 28 days in vitro (DIVs). In comparison to DIV 7, statistically significant reductions in three-dimensional cell count and culture thickness from UHR-OCM images were observed on subsequent time points. In cultures treated with kynurenic acid, significantly less reduction in cell count and culture thickness was observed compared to the control specimens. These results demonstrate the capability of UHR-OCM to perform rapid, label-free, and nondestructive evaluation of neuronal death in organotypic hippocampal cultures. UHR-OCM, in combination with three-dimensional tissue cultures, can potentially prove to be a promising tool for high-throughput screening of drugs targeting various disorders. PMID:25750928

  4. Isolated primary blast alters neuronal function with minimal cell death in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Effgen, Gwen B; Vogel, Edward W; Lynch, Kimberly A; Lobel, Ayelet; Hue, Christopher D; Meaney, David F; Bass, Cameron R Dale; Morrison, Barclay

    2014-07-01

    An increasing number of U.S. soldiers are diagnosed with traumatic brain injury (TBI) subsequent to exposure to blast. In the field, blast injury biomechanics are highly complex and multi-phasic. The pathobiology caused by exposure to some of these phases in isolation, such as penetrating or inertially driven injuries, has been investigated extensively. However, it is unclear whether the primary component of blast, a shock wave, is capable of causing pathology on its own. Previous in vivo studies in the rodent and pig have demonstrated that it is difficult to deliver a primary blast (i.e., shock wave only) without rapid head accelerations and potentially confounding effects of inertially driven TBI. We have previously developed a well-characterized shock tube and custom in vitro receiver for exposing organotypic hippocampal slice cultures to pure primary blast. In this study, isolated primary blast induced minimal hippocampal cell death (on average, below 14% in any region of interest), even for the most severe blasts tested (424 kPa peak pressure, 2.3 ms overpressure duration, and 248 kPa*ms impulse). In contrast, measures of neuronal function were significantly altered at much lower exposures (336 kPa, 0.84 ms, and 86.5 kPa*ms), indicating that functional changes occur at exposures below the threshold for cell death. This is the first study to investigate a tolerance for primary blast-induced brain cell death in response to a range of blast parameters and demonstrate functional deficits at subthreshold exposures for cell death. PMID:24558968

  5. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment preserves and protects primary rat hippocampal neurons and primary human brain cultures against oxidative insults.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Debomoy K; Ray, Balmiki

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by deleterious accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into senile plaque, neurofibrillary tangles formed from hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and loss of cholinergic synapses in the cerebral cortex. The deposition of Aβ-loaded plaques results in microglial activation and subsequent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including free radicals. Neurons in aging and AD brains are particularly vulnerable to ROS and other toxic stimuli. Therefore, agents that decrease the vulnerability of neurons against ROS may provide therapeutic values for the treatment or prevention of AD. In the present study, our goal was to test whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment could preserve as well as protect neurons from oxidative damage. We report that treatment with IVIG protects neuronal viability and synaptic proteins in primary rat hippocampal neurons. Further, we demonstrate the tolerability of IVIG treatment in the primary human fetal mixed brain cultures. Indeed, a high dose (20 mg/ml) of IVIG treatment was well-tolerated by primary human brain cultures that exhibit a normal neuronal phenotype. We also observed a potent neuropreservatory effect of IVIG against ROS-mediated oxidative insults in these human fetal brain cultures. These results indicate that IVIG treatment has great potential to preserve and protect primary human neuronal-enriched cultures and to potentially rescue dying neurons from oxidative insults. Therefore, our findings suggest that IVIG treatment may represent an important therapeutic agent for clinical trials designed to prevent and delay the onset of neurodegeneration as well as AD pathology. PMID:25115544

  6. PYRETHROID MODULATION OF SPONTANEOUS NEURONAL EXCITABILITY AND NEUROTRANSMISSION IN HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS IN CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides have potent actions on voltage-gated sodium channels, inhibiting inactivation and increasing channel open times. These are thought to underlie, at least in part, the clinical symptoms of pyrethroid intoxication. However, disruption of neuronal activity at ...

  7. Reduced Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Contributes to Enhanced Intrinsic Excitability in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons from PrP−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Stemkowski, Patrick L.; Gandini, Maria A.; Black, Stefanie A.; Zhang, Zizhen; Souza, Ivana A.; Chen, Lina; Zamponi, Gerald W.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation of cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been linked to increased neuronal excitability and synaptic activity in the hippocampus. We have previously shown that synaptic activity in hippocampi of PrP-null mice is increased due to enhanced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function. Here, we focused on the effect of PRNP gene knock-out (KO) on intrinsic neuronal excitability, and in particular, the underlying ionic mechanism in hippocampal neurons cultured from P0 mouse pups. We found that the absence of PrPC profoundly affected the firing properties of cultured hippocampal neurons in the presence of synaptic blockers. The membrane impedance was greater in PrP-null neurons, and this difference was abolished by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker ZD7288 (100 μM). HCN channel activity appeared to be functionally regulated by PrPC. The amplitude of voltage sag, a characteristic of activating HCN channel current (Ih), was decreased in null mice. Moreover, Ih peak current was reduced, along with a hyperpolarizing shift in activation gating and slower kinetics. However, neither HCN1 nor HCN2 formed a biochemical complex with PrPC. These results suggest that the absence of PrP downregulates the activity of HCN channels through activation of a cell signaling pathway rather than through direct interactions. This in turn contributes to an increase in membrane impedance to potentiate neuronal excitability. PMID:27047338

  8. Fractal analysis of a voltage-dependent potassium channel from cultured mouse hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Liebovitch, L S; Sullivan, J M

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of ion channels have been widely modeled as a Markov process. In these models it is assumed that the channel protein has a small number of discrete conformational states and the kinetic rate constants connecting these states are constant. In the alternative fractal model the spontaneous fluctuations of the channel protein at many different time scales are represented by a kinetic rate constant k = At1-D, where A is the kinetic setpoint and D the fractal dimension. Single-channel currents were recorded at 146 mM external K+ from an inwardly rectifying, 120 pS, K+ selective, voltage-sensitive channel in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. The kinetics of these channels were found to be statistically self-similar at different time scales as predicted by the fractal model. The fractal dimensions were approximately 2 for the closed times and approximately 1 for the open times and did not depend on voltage. For both the open and closed times the logarithm of the kinetic setpoint was found to be proportional to the applied voltage, which indicates that the gating of this channel involves the net inward movement of approximately one negative charge when this channel opens. Thus, the open and closed times and the voltage dependence of the gating of this channel are well described by the fractal model. PMID:2447974

  9. Fractal analysis of a voltage-dependent potassium channel from cultured mouse hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Liebovitch, L S; Sullivan, J M

    1987-12-01

    The kinetics of ion channels have been widely modeled as a Markov process. In these models it is assumed that the channel protein has a small number of discrete conformational states and the kinetic rate constants connecting these states are constant. In the alternative fractal model the spontaneous fluctuations of the channel protein at many different time scales are represented by a kinetic rate constant k = At1-D, where A is the kinetic setpoint and D the fractal dimension. Single-channel currents were recorded at 146 mM external K+ from an inwardly rectifying, 120 pS, K+ selective, voltage-sensitive channel in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. The kinetics of these channels were found to be statistically self-similar at different time scales as predicted by the fractal model. The fractal dimensions were approximately 2 for the closed times and approximately 1 for the open times and did not depend on voltage. For both the open and closed times the logarithm of the kinetic setpoint was found to be proportional to the applied voltage, which indicates that the gating of this channel involves the net inward movement of approximately one negative charge when this channel opens. Thus, the open and closed times and the voltage dependence of the gating of this channel are well described by the fractal model. PMID:2447974

  10. Dynamic regulation of spine-dendrite coupling in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Korkotian, Eduard; Holcman, David; Segal, Menahem

    2004-11-01

    We investigated the role of dendritic spine morphology in spine-dendrite calcium communication using novel experimental and theoretical approaches. A transient rise in [Ca2+]i was produced in individual spine heads of Fluo-4-loaded cultured hippocampal neurons by flash photolysis of caged calcium. Following flash photolysis in the spine head, a delayed [Ca2+]i transient was detected in the parent dendrites of only short, but not long, spines. Delayed elevated fluorescence in the dendrite of the short spines was also seen with a membrane-bound fluorophore and fluorescence recovery from bleaching of a calcium-bound fluorophore had a much slower kinetics, indicating that the dendritic fluorescence change reflects a genuine diffusion of free [Ca2+]i from the spine head to the parent dendrite. Calcium diffusion between spine head and the parent dendrite was regulated by calcium stores as well as by a Na-Ca exchanger. Spine length varied with the recent history of the [Ca2+]i variations in the spine, such that small numbers of calcium transients resulted in elongation of spines whereas large numbers of calcium transients caused shrinkage of the spines. Consequently, spine elongation resulted in a complete isolation of the spine from the dendrite, while shrinkage caused an enhanced coupling with the parent dendrite. These studies highlight a dynamically regulated coupling between a dendritic spine head and its parent dendrite. PMID:15548208

  11. Effects of Blast Overpressure on Neurons and Glial Cells in Rat Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Anna P.; Shah, Alok S.; Aperi, Brandy V.; Budde, Matthew D.; Pintar, Frank A.; Tarima, Sergey; Kurpad, Shekar N.; Stemper, Brian D.; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Due to recent involvement in military conflicts, and an increase in the use of explosives, there has been an escalation in the incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) among US military personnel. Having a better understanding of the cellular and molecular cascade of events in bTBI is prerequisite for the development of an effective therapy that currently is unavailable. The present study utilized organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) exposed to blast overpressures of 150 kPa (low) and 280 kPa (high) as an in vitro bTBI model. Using this model, we further characterized the cellular effects of the blast injury. Blast-evoked cell death was visualized by a propidium iodide (PI) uptake assay as early as 2 h post-injury. Quantification of PI staining in the cornu Ammonis 1 and 3 (CA1 and CA3) and the dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus at 2, 24, 48, and 72 h following blast exposure revealed significant time dependent effects. OHCs exposed to 150 kPa demonstrated a slow increase in cell death plateauing between 24 and 48 h, while OHCs from the high-blast group exhibited a rapid increase in cell death already at 2 h, peaking at ~24 h post-injury. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase release into the culture medium also revealed a significant increase in cell lysis in both low- and high-blast groups compared to sham controls. OHCs were fixed at 72 h post-injury and immunostained for markers against neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Labeling OHCs with PI, neuronal, and glial markers revealed that the blast-evoked extensive neuronal death and to a lesser extent loss of glial cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated activation of astrocytes and microglial cells in low- and high-blasted OHCs, which reached a statistically significant difference in the high-blast group. These data confirmed that our in vitro bTBI model is a useful tool for studying cellular and molecular changes after blast exposure. PMID:25729377

  12. Effects of rhynchophylline on GluN1 and GluN2B expressions in primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Zeng, Sheng-Ya; Zhou, Shi-Wen; Qian, Gui-Sheng; Peng, Kang; Mo, Zhi-Xian; Zhou, Ji-Yin

    2014-10-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits GluN1 and GluN2B in hippocampal neurons play key roles in anxiety. Our previous studies show that rhynchophylline, an active component of the Uncaria species, down-regulates GluN2B expression in the hippocampal CA1 area of amphetamine-induced rat. The effects of rhynchophylline on expressions of GluN1 and GluN2B in primary hippocampal neurons in neonatal rats in vitro were investigated. Neonatal hippocampal neurons were cultured with neurobasal-A medium. After incubation for 6h or 48 h with rhynchophylline (non-competitive NMDAR antagonist) and MK-801 (non-competitive NMDAR antagonist with anxiolytic effect, as the control drug) from day 6, neuron toxicity, mRNA and protein expressions of GluN1 and GluN2B were analyzed. GluN1 is mainly distributed on neuronal axons and dendritic trunks, cytoplasm and cell membrane near axons and dendrites. GluN2B is mainly distributed on the membrane, dendrites, and axon membranes. GluN1 and GluN2B are codistributed on dendritic trunks and dendritic spines. After 48 h incubation, a lower concentration of rhynchophylline (lower than 400 μmol/L) and MK-801 (lower than 200 μmol/L) have no toxicity on neonatal hippocampal neurons. Rhynchophylline up-regulated GluN1 mRNA expression at 6h and mRNA and protein expressions at 48h, but down-regulated GluN2B mRNA and protein expressions at 48 h. However, GluN1 and GluN2B mRNA expressions were down-regulated at 6h, and mRNA and protein expressions were both up-regulated by MK-801 at 48h. These findings show that rhynchophylline reciprocally regulates GluN1 and GluN2B expressions in hippocampal neurons, indicating a potential anxiolytic property for rhynchophylline. PMID:25110195

  13. Neuroprotective effects of lotus seedpod procyanidins on extremely low frequency electromagnetic field-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chunchun; Luo, Xiaoping; Duan, Yuqing; Duan, Wenyi; Zhang, Haihui; He, Yuanqing; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the protective effects of lotus seedpod procyanidins (LSPCs) on extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF)-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons and the underlying molecular mechanism. The results of MTT, morphological observation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) assays showed that compared with control, incubating neurons under ELF-EMF exposure significantly decreased cell viability and increased the number of apoptotic cells, whereas LSPCs evidently protected the hippocampal neurons against ELF-EMF-induced cell damage. Moreover, a certain concentration of LSPCs inhibited the elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) level, as well as prevented the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by ELF-EMF exposure. In addition, supplementation with LSPCs could alleviate DNA damage, block cell cycle arrest at S phase, and inhibit apoptosis and necrosis of hippocampal neurons under ELF-EMF exposure. Further study demonstrated that LSPCs up-regulated the activations of Bcl-2, Bcl-xl proteins and suppressed the expressions of Bad, Bax proteins caused by ELF-EMF exposure. In conclusion, these findings revealed that LSPCs protected against ELF-EMF-induced neurotoxicity through inhibiting oxidative stress and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:27470406

  14. Soman and glutamate toxicity in cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons: An in vitro model for testing neuroprotective drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S.S.; Filbert, M.G.; Cann, F.J.

    1993-05-13

    An in vitro mammalian model neuronal system to evaluate intrinsic toxicity of soman and other neurotoxicants and the efficacy of potential countermeasures was developed. Primary dissociated cell cultures from rat hippocampus and cerebral neocortex have been established. The link between soman toxicity, glutamate hyperactivity and neuronal death in the central nervous system was investigated. The cytotoxicity was assessed by trypan blue dye exclusion and also from the measurement of LDH released by damaged cells in the extracellular fluid 24 hr after exposure. Cortical or hippocampal cells exposed to glutamate for 15 min caused neuronal death in almost 80 % of the cells examined at 24 hr. when cortical cells were exposed to soman alone for 15 to 120 min, washed to remove excess ChE inhibitor and incubated for 24 hr, no damage was evident as assessed by trypan blue exclusion or LDH assay. Soman does not appear to have direct toxic effect on the cerebral cortical neurons.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of neuronal genes and its effect on neural functions: gene expression in response to static magnetism in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Yoneda, Yukio

    2005-07-01

    We have previously shown a marked but transient increase in DNA binding of the nuclear transcription factor activator protein-1 after brief exposure to static magnetic fields in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, suggesting that exposure to static magnetism would lead to long-term consolidation as well as amplification of different functional alterations through modulation of de novo protein synthesis at the level of gene transcription in the hippocampus. Hippocampal neurons were cultured under sustained exposure to static magnetic fields at 100 mT, followed by extraction of total RNA for differential display (DD) analysis using random primers. The first and the second DD polymerase chain reaction similarly showed the downregulation of particular genes in response to sustained magnetism. Nucleotide sequence analysis followed by BLASTN homology searching revealed high homology of these 2 DD-PCR products to the 3' non-coding regions of the mouse basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor ALF1 and that of histone H3.3A, respectively. On Northern blot analysis using the 2 cloned differentially expressed fragments labeled with [alpha-(32)P]dCTP by the random primer method, a marked decrease was seen in expression of mRNA for ALF1 and histone H3.3A in hippocampal neurons cultured under sustained exposure to static magnetic fields at 100 mT. It thus appears that static magnetism may modulate cellular integrity and functionality through expression of a variety of responsive genes required for gene transcription and translation, proliferation, differentiation, maturation, survival, and so on in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. PMID:16020920

  16. Ginsenoside Rd attenuates Aβ25-35-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan-fang; Yan, Xiao-dong; Qi, Lin-song; Li, Ling; Hu, Geng-yao; Li, Peng; Zhao, Gang

    2015-09-01

    One of the most common pathological changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain is the large number of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides accumulating in lesion areas. Ginsenosides are the most active components extracted from ginseng. Ginsenoside Rd (GRd) is a newly discovered saponin that has a stronger pharmacological activity than other ginsenosides, especially in neuroprotection. Here we examined the neuroprotective effects of GRd against neuronal insults induced by Aβ25-35 in primary cultured hippocampal neurons. A 10μM GRd treatment significantly prevented the loss of hippocampal neurons induced by Aβ25-35. In addition, GRd significantly ameliorated Aβ25-35-induced oxidative stress by decreasing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and malondialdehyde (MDA) level, and increasing the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px); which is similar in treatments with 10μM of probucol (PB) and 100μM of edaravone (EDA). Moreover, our present study demonstrated that GRd significantly enhanced the expression of Bcl-2 mRNA, and decreased the expressions of Bax mRNA and Cyt c mRNA. GRd also downregulated the protein level of cleaved Caspase-3 compared to controls. These results highlighted the neuroprotective effects of GRd against Aβ25-35-induced oxidative stress and neuronal apoptosis, suggesting that this may be a promising therapeutics against AD. PMID:26111763

  17. Glutamate-induced long-term potentiation of the frequency of miniature synaptic currents in cultured hippocampal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaroli, Antonio; Tsien, Richard W.

    1992-05-01

    Glutamate application at synapses between hippocampal neurons in culture produces long-term potentiation of the frequency of spontaneous miniature synaptic currents, together with long-term potentiation of evoked synaptic currents. The mini frequency potentiation is initiated postsynaptically and requires activity of NMDA receptors. Although the frequency of unitary quanta! responses increases strongly, their amplitude remains little changed with potentiation. Tests of postsynaptic responsiveness rule out recruitment of latent glutamate receptor clusters. Thus, postsynaptic induction can lead to enhancement of presynaptic transmitter release. The sustained potentiation of mini frequency is expressed even in the absence of Ca2+ entry into presynaptic terminals.

  18. Direct activation of GABAA receptors by barbiturates in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Rho, J M; Donevan, S D; Rogawski, M A

    1996-01-01

    1. The direct activation of the GABAA receptor by pentobarbitone (PB) and phenobarbitone (PHB) was characterized in cultured rat hippocampal neurons using whole-cell voltage clamp and single channel recording techniques. 2. In whole-cell recordings, PB and PHB produced a concentration-dependent activation of Cl- current (EC50 values, 0.33 and 3.0 mM, respectively). The response to the barbiturates was similar to that produced by GABA, although GABA was more potent (EC50, 5.5 microM). PB and PHB were substantially more potent in enhancing the response to 1 microM GABA (EC50 values, 94 microM and 0.89 mM, respectively). The maximal magnitude of the responses to PB was similar to that of the maximal response to GABA or GABA + PB. PHB appeared to be modestly less efficacious. 3. The mean deactivation time constant for whole-cell Cl- currents evoked by 1 mM PB + 1 microM GABA was significantly longer (480 +/- 34 ms) than for 1 mM PB (170 +/- 9 ms) or 1 microM GABA (180 +/- 14 ms) alone. 4. Whole-cell currents directly activated by 300 microM PB and 1 microM GABA were blocked by the GABA receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin. 5. Unitary GABAA receptor channel currents evoked by 300 microM PB had similar main conductance, mean open time and mean burst duration as those activated by 2 microM GABA alone. Single channel openings and bursts were of shorter mean duration when 100 and 300 microM PHB were used. 6. High concentrations of PB (1-3 mM) and PHB (3-10 mM) produced a rapid block of currents activated by the barbiturate alone or by the barbiturate in the presence of 1 microM GABA. The estimated IC50 values for block of PB- and PHB-potentiated GABA currents were 2.8 and 12.9 mM, respectively. 7. Single channel currents activated by high concentrations of PB and PHB alone or in the presence of GABA demonstrated flickering, probably reflecting fast channel block. 8. We conclude that the gating of the GABAA receptor channel by PHB and PB is functionally similar to

  19. Calcineurin enhances L-type Ca(2+) channel activity in hippocampal neurons: increased effect with age in culture.

    PubMed

    Norris, C M; Blalock, E M; Chen, K-C; Porter, N M; Landfield, P W

    2002-01-01

    The Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, calcineurin, modulates a number of key Ca(2+) signaling pathways in neurons, and has been implicated in Ca(2+)-dependent negative feedback inactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels. In contrast, we report here that three mechanistically disparate calcineurin inhibitors, FK-506, cyclosporin A, and the calcineurin autoinhibitory peptide, inhibited high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channel currents by up to 40% in cultured hippocampal neurons, suggesting that calcineurin acts to enhance Ca(2+) currents. This effect occurred with Ba(2+) or Ca(2+) as charge carrier, and with or without intracellular Ca(2+) buffered by EGTA. Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of Ca(2+) channels was not affected by FK-506. The immunosuppressant, rapamycin, and the protein phosphatase 1/2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, did not decrease Ca(2+) channel current, showing specificity for effects on calcineurin. Blockade of L-type Ca(2+) channels with nimodipine fully negated the effect of FK-506 on Ca(2+) channel current, while blockade of N-, and P-/Q-type Ca(2+) channels enhanced FK-506-mediated inhibition of the remaining L-type-enriched current. FK-506 also inhibited substantially more Ca(2+) channel current in 4-week-old vs. 2-week-old cultures, an effect paralleled by an increase in calcineurin A mRNA levels. These studies provide the first evidence that calcineurin selectively enhances L-type Ca(2+) channel activity in neurons. Moreover, this action appears to be increased concomitantly with the well-characterized increase in L-type Ca(2+) channel availability in hippocampal neurons with age-in-culture. PMID:11958864

  20. Laser-evoked synaptic transmission in cultured hippocampal neurons expressing Channelrhodopsin-2 delivered by adeno-associated virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jennifer; Hasan, Mazahir T.; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for studying synaptic transmission in mass cultures of dissociated hippocampal neurons based on patch clamp recording combined with laser stimulation of neurons expressing Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). Our goal was to use the high spatial resolution of laser illumination to come as close as possible to the ideal of identifying monosynaptically coupled pairs of neurons, which is conventionally done using microisland rather than mass cultures. Using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) to deliver the ChR2 gene, we focused on the time period between 14 and 20 days in vitro, during which expression levels are high, and spontaneous bursting activity has not yet started. Stimulation by wide-field illumination is sufficient to make the majority of ChR2-expressing neurons spike. Stimulation with a laser spot at least 10 μm in diameter also produces action potentials, but in a reduced fraction of neurons. We studied synaptic transmission by voltage-clamping a neuron with low expression of ChR2 and scanning a 40 μm laser spot at surrounding locations. Responses were observed to stimulation at a subset of locations in the culture, indicating spatial localization of stimulation. Pharmacological means were used to identify responses that were synaptic. Many responses were of smaller amplitude than those typically found in microisland cultures. We were unable to find an entirely reliable criterion for distinguishing between monosynaptic and polysynaptic responses. However, we propose that postsynaptic currents with small amplitudes, simple shapes, and latencies not much greater than 8 msec are reasonable candidates for monosynaptic interactions. PMID:19560489

  1. Microlithographic determination of axonal/dendritic polarity in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Stenger, D A; Hickman, J J; Bateman, K E; Ravenscroft, M S; Ma, W; Pancrazio, J J; Shaffer, K; Schaffner, A E; Cribbs, D H; Cotman, C W

    1998-08-01

    High resolution substrates, created using patterned self-assembled monolayers, are shown to direct axonal and dendritic process extension at the level of a single hippocampal neuron. Axons and dendrites were identified using morphological characteristics and immunocytochemical markers. Patterns were formed on glass coverslips from a co-planar monolayer of cell adhesive aminosilanes and non-adhesive fluorinated silanes. On patterned surfaces, the percentage of the total number of cells attached to the 0.71 mm2 substrate field with compliance to the 25-micron diameter 'somal adhesion site' reached 41 +/- 7% (mean +/- S.D., 428 cells counted). A total of 76 +/- 11% of cells that adhered to a somal attachment site developed a lone process > or = 100 microns oriented in the direction of the continuous aminosilane pathway which was shown to express axonal markers. Cells on either the fluorinated silane, which is non-permissive for neurite outgrowth, or localized on an aminosilane region only 5 microns wide failed to extend major processes. This approach is amenable to a variety of industry standard fabrication techniques and may be used to study the role of fine scale spatial cues in neuronal development and synapse formation. PMID:9700689

  2. Modulation of inhibitory glycine receptors in cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons by zinc, thiol containing redox agents and carnosine.

    PubMed

    Thio, L L; Zhang, H X

    2006-01-01

    Modulation of inhibitory glycine receptors by zinc (Zn(2+)) and endogenous redox agents such as glutathione may alter inhibition in the mammalian brain. Despite the abundance of Zn(2+) in the hippocampus and its ability to modulate glycine receptors, few studies have examined Zn(2+) modulation of hippocampal glycine receptors. Whether redox agents modulate hippocampal glycine receptors also remains unknown. This study examined Zn(2+) and redox modulation of glycine receptor-mediated currents in cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons using whole-cell recordings. Zn(2+) concentrations below 10 microM potentiated currents elicited by low glycine, beta-alanine, and taurine concentrations by 300-400%. Zn(2+) concentrations above 300 microM produced nearly complete inhibition. Potentiating Zn(2+) concentrations shifted the dose-response curves for the three agonists to the left and decreased the Hill coefficient for glycine and beta-alanine but not taurine. Inhibiting Zn(2+) concentrations shifted the dose-response curves for glycine and beta-alanine to the right but reduced the maximum taurine response. Histidine residues may participate in potentiation because diethyl pyrocarbonate and pH 5.4 diminished Zn(2+) enhancement of glycine currents. pH 5.4 diminished Zn(2+) block of glycine currents, but diethyl pyrocarbonate did not. These findings indicate that separate sites mediate Zn(2+) potentiation and inhibition. The redox agents glutathione, dithiothreitol, tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) did not alter glycine currents by a redox mechanism. However, glutathione and dithiothreitol interfered with the effects of Zn(2+) on glycine currents by chelating it. Carnosine had similar effects. Thus, Zn(2+) and thiol containing redox agents that chelate Zn(2+) modulate hippocampal glycine receptors with the mechanism of Zn(2+) modulation being agonist dependent. PMID:16515845

  3. Potential Role of KCNQ/M-Channels in Regulating Neuronal Differentiation in Mouse Hippocampal and Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neuronal Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Song, MingKe; Chen, Dongdong; Wei, Ling; Yu, Shan Ping

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ channels are key regulators of neuronal excitability, playing major roles in setting resting membrane potential, repolarizing the cell membrane after action potentials and affecting transmitter release. The M-type channel or M-channel is a unique voltage- and ligand-regulated K+ channel. It is composed of the molecular counterparts KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 (also named Kv7.2 and Kv7.3) channels and expressed in the soma and dendrites of neurons. The present investigation examined the hypothesis that KCNQ2/3 channels played a regulatory role in neuronal differentiation and maturation. In cultured mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells undergoing neuronal differentiation and primary embryonic (E15-17) hippocampal cultures, KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 channels and underlying M-currents were identified. Blocking of KCNQ channels in these cells for 5 days using the specific channel blocker XE991 (10 μM) or linopirdine (30 μM) significantly decreased synaptophysin and syntaxin expression without affecting cell viability. Chronic KCNQ2/3 channel block reduced the expression of vesicular GABA transporter (v-GAT), but not vesicular glutamate transporter (v-GluT). Enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was observed in XE991- and linopirdine-treated neural progenitor cells. In electrophysiological recordings, cells undergoing chronic block of KCNQ2/3 channels showed normal amplitude of mPSCs while the frequency of mPSCs was reduced. On the other hand, KCNQ channel opener N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM, 2 μM) increased mPSC frequency. Fluorescent imaging using fluorescent styryl-dye FM4-64 revealed that chronic blockade of KCNQ2/3 channels decreased endocytosis but facilitated exocytosis. These data indicate that KCNQ2/3 channels participate in regulation of neuronal differentiation and show a tonic regulation on pre-synaptic transmitter release and recycling in developing neuronal cells. PMID:21466805

  4. Network burst activity in hippocampal neuronal cultures: the role of synaptic and intrinsic currents.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Jyothsna; Radojicic, Mihailo; Pesce, Lorenzo L; Bhansali, Anita; Wang, Janice; Tryba, Andrew K; Marks, Jeremy D; van Drongelen, Wim

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this work was to define the contributions of intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms toward spontaneous network-wide bursting activity, observed in dissociated rat hippocampal cell cultures. This network behavior is typically characterized by short-duration bursts, separated by order of magnitude longer interburst intervals. We hypothesize that while short-timescale synaptic processes modulate spectro-temporal intraburst properties and network-wide burst propagation, much longer timescales of intrinsic membrane properties such as persistent sodium (Nap) currents govern burst onset during interburst intervals. To test this, we used synaptic receptor antagonists picrotoxin, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), and 3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonate (CPP) to selectively block GABAA, AMPA, and NMDA receptors and riluzole to selectively block Nap channels. We systematically compared intracellular activity (recorded with patch clamp) and network activity (recorded with multielectrode arrays) in eight different synaptic connectivity conditions: GABAA + NMDA + AMPA, NMDA + AMPA, GABAA + AMPA, GABAA + NMDA, AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, and all receptors blocked. Furthermore, we used mixed-effects modeling to quantify the aforementioned independent and interactive synaptic receptor contributions toward spectro-temporal burst properties including intraburst spike rate, burst activity index, burst duration, power in the local field potential, network connectivity, and transmission delays. We found that blocking intrinsic Nap currents completely abolished bursting activity, demonstrating their critical role in burst onset within the network. On the other hand, blocking different combinations of synaptic receptors revealed that spectro-temporal burst properties are uniquely associated with synaptic functionality and that excitatory connectivity is necessary for the presence of network-wide bursting. In addition to confirming the critical contribution of direct

  5. Effects of Cordycepin on the Microglia-Overactivation-Induced Impairments of Growth and Development of Hippocampal Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jie; Wang, Ping; Ge, Hongshan; Qu, Xianqin; Jin, Xingliang

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells are normally activated in response to brain injury or immunological stimuli to protect central nervous system (CNS). However, over-activation of microglia conversely amplifies the inflammatory effects and mediates cellular degeneration, leading to the death of neurons. Recently, cordycepin, an active component found in Cordyceps militarisa known as a rare Chinese caterpillar fungus, has been reported as an effective drug for treating inflammatory diseases and cancer via unclear mechanisms. In this study, we attempted to identify the anti-inflammatory role of cordycepin and its protective effects on the impairments of neural growth and development induced by microglial over-activation. The results indicate that cordycepin could attenuate the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation, evidenced by the dramatically reduced release of TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as the down-regulation of mRNA levels of iNOS and COX-2 after cordycepin treatment. Besides, cordycepin reversed the LPS-induced activation of NF-κB pathway, resulting in anti-inflammatory effects. Furthermore, by employing the conditioned medium (CM), we found cordycepin was able to recover the impairments of neural growth and development in the primary hippocampal neurons cultured in LPS-CM, including cell viability, growth cone extension, neurite sprouting and outgrowth as well as spinogenesis. This study expands our knowledge of the anti-inflammatory function of cordycepin and paves the way for the biomedical applications of cordycepin in the therapies of neural injuries. PMID:25932642

  6. Activity- and development-dependent down-regulation of TARPγ8 and GluA1 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-gang; Wang, Ya-li; Xu, Fang; Zhao, Jing-xi; Zhou, Si-yuan; Yu, Yi; Chazot, Paul L; Wang, Xiao-fang; Lu, Cheng-biao

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) regulate the trafficking and expression of AMPA receptors that are essential for the fast excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity in the brain. This study aimed to investigate the activity-dependent regulation of TARPγ8 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Methods: Rat hippocampal neurons cultured for 7–8 DIV or 17–18 DIV were exposed to the AMPA receptor agonist AMPA at a non-toxic concentration (100 μmol/L) for 4 h. The protein levels of TARPγ8 and AMPA receptor subunits (GluA1 and GluA2) were measured using Western blotting analysis. AMPA-induced currents were recorded in the neurons using a whole-cell recording method. Results: Four-hour exposure to AMPA significantly decreased the protein levels of TARPγ8 and GluA1 in the neurons at 17–18 DIV, but did not change the protein level of TARPγ8 in the neurons cultured at 7–8 DIV. AMPA-induced down-regulation of TARPγ8 and GluA1 was largely blocked by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin (50 μmol/L), but not affected by the caspase inhibitor zVAD (50 μmol/L). Four-hour exposure to AMPA significantly decreased AMPA-induced currents in the neurons at 17–18 DIV, which was blocked by co-exposure to calpeptin (50 μmol/L). Conclusion: The down-regulation of TARPγ8 and GluA1 protein levels and AMPA-induced currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons is activity- and development-dependent, and mediated by endogenous calpain. PMID:26725511

  7. Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine Alters Ca2+ Dynamics in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons: Mitigation by NMDA Receptor Blockade and GABAA Receptor-Positive Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Pessah, Isaac N.

    2012-01-01

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) is a potent convulsant that is considered a chemical threat agent. We characterized TETS as an activator of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations and electrical burst discharges in mouse hippocampal neuronal cultures at 13–17 days in vitro using FLIPR Fluo-4 fluorescence measurements and extracellular microelectrode array recording. Acute exposure to TETS (≥ 2µM) reversibly altered the pattern of spontaneous neuronal discharges, producing clustered burst firing and an overall increase in discharge frequency. TETS also dramatically affected Ca2+ dynamics causing an immediate but transient elevation of neuronal intracellular Ca2+ followed by decreased frequency of Ca2+ oscillations but greater peak amplitude. The effect on Ca2+ dynamics was similar to that elicited by picrotoxin and bicuculline, supporting the view that TETS acts by inhibiting type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor function. The effect of TETS on Ca2+ dynamics requires activation of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, because the changes induced by TETS were prevented by MK-801 block of NMDA receptors, but not nifedipine block of L-type Ca2+ channels. Pretreatment with the GABAA receptor-positive modulators diazepam and allopregnanolone partially mitigated TETS-induced changes in Ca2+ dynamics. Moreover, low, minimally effective concentrations of diazepam (0.1µM) and allopregnanolone (0.1µM), when administered together, were highly effective in suppressing TETS-induced alterations in Ca2+ dynamics, suggesting that the combination of positive modulators of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors may have therapeutic potential. These rapid throughput in vitro assays may assist in the identification of single agents or combinations that have utility in the treatment of TETS intoxication. PMID:22889812

  8. Cannabinoids and neuronal damage: differential effects of THC, AEA and 2-AG on activated microglial cells and degenerating neurons in excitotoxically lesioned rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Susanne; Koch, Marco; Ghadban, Chalid; Korf, Horst-Werner; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoids (CBs) are attributed neuroprotective effects in vivo. Here, we determined the neuroprotective potential of CBs during neuronal damage in excitotoxically lesioned organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs). OHSCs are the best characterized in vitro model to investigate the function of microglial cells in neuronal damage since blood-borne monocytes and T-lymphocytes are absent and microglial cells represent the only immunocompetent cell type. Excitotoxic neuronal damage was induced by NMDA (50 microM) application for 4 h. Neuroprotective properties of 9-carboxy-11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), N-arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) or 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in different concentrations were determined after co-application with NMDA by counting degenerating neurons identified by propidium iodide labeling (PI(+)) and microglial cells labeled by isolectin B(4) (IB(4)(+)). All three CBs used significantly decreased the number of IB(4)(+) microglial cells in the dentate gyrus but the number of PI(+) neurons was reduced only after 2-AG treatment. Application of AM630, antagonizing CB2 receptors highly expressed by activated microglial cells, did not counteract neuroprotective effects of 2-AG, but affected THC-mediated reduction of IB(4)(+) microglial cells. Our results indicate that (1) only 2-AG exerts neuroprotective effects in OHSCs; (2) reduction of IB(4)(+) microglial cells is not a neuroprotective event per se and involves other CB receptors than the CB2 receptor; (3) the discrepancy in the neuroprotective effects of CBs observed in vivo and in our in vitro model system may underline the functional relevance of invading monocytes and T-lymphocytes that are absent in OHSCs. PMID:17010339

  9. HspB5/αB-crystallin increases dendritic complexity and protects the dendritic arbor during heat shock in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bartelt-Kirbach, Britta; Moron, Margarethe; Glomb, Maximilian; Beck, Clara-Maria; Weller, Marie-Pascale; Golenhofen, Nikola

    2016-10-01

    The small heat shock protein ΗspΒ5 (αB-crystallin) exhibits generally cytoprotective functions and possesses powerful neuroprotective capacity in the brain. However, little is known about the mode of action of ΗspΒ5 or other members of the HspB family particularly in neurons. To get clues of the neuronal function of HspBs, we overexpressed several HspBs in cultured rat hippocampal neurons and investigated their effect on neuronal morphology and stress resistance. Whereas axon length and synapse density were not affected by any HspB, dendritic complexity was enhanced by HspB5 and, to a lesser extent, by HspB6. Furthermore, we could show that this process was dependent on phosphorylation, since a non-phosphorylatable mutant of HspB5 did not show this effect. Rarefaction of the dendritic arbor is one hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases. To investigate if HspB5, which is upregulated at pathophysiological conditions, might be able to protect dendrites during such situations, we exposed HspB5 overexpressing neuronal cultures to heat shock. HspB5 prevented heat shock-induced rarefaction of dendrites. In conclusion, we identified regulation of dendritic complexity as a new function of HspB5 in hippocampal neurons. PMID:27085702

  10. BDNF-induced nitric oxide signals in cultured rat hippocampal neurons: time course, mechanism of generation, and effect on neurotrophin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kolarow, Richard; Kuhlmann, Christoph R. W.; Munsch, Thomas; Zehendner, Christoph; Brigadski, Tanja; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    BDNF and nitric oxide signaling both contribute to plasticity at glutamatergic synapses. However, the role of combined signaling of both pathways at the same synapse is largely unknown. Using NO imaging with diaminofluoresceine in cultured hippocampal neurons we analyzed the time course of neurotrophin-induced NO signals. Application of exogenous BDNF, NT-4, and NT-3 (but not NGF) induced NO signals in the soma and in proximal dendrites of hippocampal neurons that were sensitive to NO synthase activity, TrkB signaling, and intracellular calcium elevation. The effect of NO signaling on neurotrophin secretion was analyzed in BDNF-GFP, and NT-3-GFP transfected hippocampal neurons. Exogenous application of the NO donor sodium-nitroprusside markedly inhibited neurotrophin secretion. However, endogenously generated NO in response to depolarization and neurotrophin stimulation, both did not result in a negative feedback on neurotrophin secretion. These results suggest that a negative feedback of NO signaling on synaptic secretion of neurotrophins operates only at high intracellular levels of nitric oxide that are under physiological conditions not reached by depolarization or BDNF signaling. PMID:25426021

  11. Development of pharmacoresistance to benzodiazepines but not cannabinoids in the hippocampal neuronal culture model of status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; Blair, Robert E.; Nagarkatti, Nisha; Sombati, Sompong; Martin, Billy R.; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening neurological disorder associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. Benzodiazepines are the initial drugs of choice for the treatment of SE. Despite aggressive treatment, over 40% of SE cases are refractory to the initial treatment with two or more medications. It would be a major advance in the clinical management of SE to identify novel anticonvulsant agents that do not lose their ability to treat SE with increasing seizure duration. Cannabinoids have recently been demonstrated to regulate seizure activity in brain. However, it remains to be seen whether they develop pharmacoresistance upon prolonged SE. In this study we used low-Mg2+ to induce SE in hippocampal neuronal cultures and in agreement with animal models and human SE confirm the development of resistance to benzodiazepine with increasing durations of SE. Thus, lorazepam (1 μM) was effective in blocking low-Mg2+ induced high frequency spiking for up to 30-mins into SE. However, by 1-hr and 2-hr of SE onset it was only 10–15% effective in suppressing SE. In contrast, the cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptor agonist, WIN 55,212-2 (1 μM) in a CB1 receptor dependent manner completely abolished SE at all the time points tested even out to 2 hr after SE onset, a condition where resistance developed to lorazepam. Thus, the use of cannabinoids in the treatment of SE may offer a unique approach to controlling SE without the development of pharmacoresistance observed with conventional treatments. PMID:17289026

  12. Protective effects of plant seed extracts against amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yoshinori; Okada, Mizue

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by large deposits of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. Aβ is known to increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in neurons, leading to cell death. In this study, we screened 15 plant seeds’ aqueous extracts (PSAE) for inhibitory effects on Aβ (25-35)-induced cell death using hippocampus neurons (HIPN). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifteen chosen plants were nine medical herbs (Japanese honeywort, luffa, rapeseed, Chinese colza, potherb mustard, Japanese radish, bitter melon, red shiso, corn, and kaiware radish) and six general commercial plants (common bean, komatsuna, Qing geng cai, bell pepper, kale, and lettuce). PSAE were measured for total phenolic content (TPC) with the Folin–Ciocalteu method, and the 2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging effect of each seed extract was measured. To find a protectant against Aβ-induced oxidative stress, we screened 15 PSAE using a 2’, 7’-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay. To further unravel the anti-inflammatory effects of PSAE on Aβ-induced inflammation, PSAE were added to HIPN. The neuroprotective effects of the PSAE were evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, measuring the cell viability in Aβ-induced HIPN. RESULTS: TPC of 15 PSAE was in the range of 0.024-1.96 mg of chlorogenic acid equivalents/gram. The aqueous extracts showed antioxidant activities. Furthermore, intracellular ROS accumulation resulting from Aβ treatment was reduced when cells were treated with some PSAE. Kale, bitter melon, kaiware radish, red shiso, and corn inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion by the Aβ-stimulated neurons and all samples except Japanese honeywort showed enhancement of cell survival. CONCLUSION: From these results, we suggest that some plant seed extracts offer protection against Aβ-mediated cell death. PMID:23833520

  13. Culture of Primary Rat Hippocampal Neurons: Design, Analysis, and Optimization of a Microfluidic Device for Cell Seeding, Coherent Growth, and Solute Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Barbati, A. C.; Fang, C.; Banker, G. A.; Kirby, B. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the design, analysis, construction, and culture results of a microfluidic device for the segregation and chemical stimulation of primary rat hippocampal neurons. Our device is designed to achieve spatio temporal solute delivery to discrete sections of neurons with mitigated mechanical stress. We implement a geometric guidance technique to direct axonal processes of the neurons into specific areas of the device to achieve solute segregation along routed cells. Using physicochemical modeling, we predict flows, concentration profiles, and mechanical stresses within pertiment sections of the device. We demonstrate cell viability and growth within the closed device over a period of 11 days. Additionally, our modeling methodology may be generalized and applied to other device geometries. PMID:22965807

  14. Involvement of cyclin D1/CDK4 and pRb mediated by PI3K/AKT pathway activation in Pb{sup 2+}-induced neuronal death in cultured hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chenchen Xing Tairan Tang Mingliang Yong Wu Yan Dan Deng Hongmin Wang Huili Wang Ming Chen Jutao Ruan Diyun

    2008-06-15

    Lead (Pb) is widely recognized as a neurotoxicant. One of the suggested mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity is apoptotic cell death. And the mechanism by which Pb{sup 2+} causes neuronal death is not well understood. The present study sought to examine the obligate nature of cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), phosphorylation of its substrate retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and its select upstream signal phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway in the death of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons evoked by Pb{sup 2+}. Our data showed that lead treatment of primary hippocampal cultures results in dose-dependent cell death. Inhibition of CDK4 prevented Pb{sup 2+}-induced neuronal death significantly but was incomplete. In addition, we demonstrated that the levels of cyclin D1 and pRb/p107 were increased during Pb{sup 2+} treatment. These elevated expression persisted up to 48 h, returning to control levels after 72 h. We also presented pharmacological and morphological evidences that cyclin D1/CDK4 and pRb/p107 were required for such kind of neuronal death. Addition of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (30 {mu}M) or wortmannin (100 nM) significantly rescued the cultured hippocampal neurons from death caused by Pb{sup 2+}. And that Pb{sup 2+}-elicited phospho-AKT (Ser473) participated in the induction of cyclin D1 and partial pRb/p107 expression. These results provide evidences that cell cycle elements play a required role in the death of neurons evoked by Pb{sup 2+} and suggest that certain signaling elements upstream of cyclin D1/CDK4 are modified and/or required for this form of neuronal death.

  15. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-03-22

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron's tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network's activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits. PMID:26961000

  16. Magnetic stimulation modulates structural synaptic plasticity and regulates BDNF-TrkB signal pathway in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Zhanchi; Su, Yuhong; Kang, Lin; Geng, Dandan; Wang, Yanyong; Luan, Feng; Wang, Mingwei; Cui, Huixian

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a neuropsychiatric tool that can be used to investigate the neurobiology of learning and cognitive function. Few studies have examined the effects of low frequency (⩽1Hz) magnetic stimulation (MS) on structural synaptic plasticity of neurons in vitro, thus, the current study examined its effects on hippocampal neuron and synapse morphology, as well as synaptic protein markers and signaling pathways. Similarly, both intensities of low frequency magnetic stimulation (1Hz) activated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) pathways, including the pathways for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and for phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt). Specifically, low intensity magnetic stimulation (LIMS, 1.14Tesla, 1Hz) promoted more extensive dendritic and axonal arborization, as well as increasing synapses density, thickening PSD (post synaptic density) and upregulation of synaptophysin (SYN), growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) and post synaptic density 95 (PSD95). Conversely, high intensity magnetic stimulation (HIMS, 1.55Tesla, 1Hz) appeared to be detrimental, reducing dendritic and axonal arborization and causing apparent structural damage, including thinning of PSD, less synapses and disordered synaptic structure, as well as upregulation of GAP43 and PSD95, possibly for their ability to mitigate dysfunction. In conclusion, we infers that low frequency magnetic stimulation participates in regulating structural synaptic plasticity of hippocampal neurons via the activation of BDNF-TrkB signaling pathways. PMID:23201339

  17. Conantokins inhibit NMDAR-dependent calcium influx in developing rat hippocampal neurons in primary culture with resulting effects on CREB phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Luoxiu; Balsara, Rashna D.; Sheng, Zhenyu; Castellino, Francis J.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of conantokin (con)-G, con-R[1-17], and con-T on ion flow through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) ion channels were determined in cultured primary rat hippocampal neurons. The potency of con-G diminished, whereas inhibition by con-R[1-17] and con-T did not change, as the neurons matured. Con-G, con-R[1-17], and con-T effectively diminished NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx into the cells. A similar age-dependent decrease in con-G-mediated inhibition of the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) was observed, compared to con-R[1-17] and con-T. The effects of the conantokins on NMDA-induced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in immature (DIV 9) and mature (DIV 16) neurons showed that, at DIV 9, con-G, con-R[1-17], and con-T inhibited NMDA-mediated P-CREB levels, whereas in DIV 16 neurons the conantokins did not inhibit overall levels of NMDA-induced P-CREB. In contrast, P-CREB levels were enhanced through inhibition of the protein phosphatases, PP1 and PP2B (calcineurin). This ability of conantokins to sustain CREB phosphorylation can thus enhance neuronal survival and plasticity. PMID:20600930

  18. Ketamine protects hippocampal neurons from anoxia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rothman, S M; Thurston, J H; Hauhart, R E; Clark, G D; Solomon, J S

    1987-06-01

    Ketamine, a dissociative, general anesthetic, blocks the excitation produced by activating one class of excitatory amino acid receptors, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in the rat. We have found that ketamine can protect hippocampal neurons in culture and slice from anoxia. When added to cultures immediately prior to anoxic exposure, ketamine prevented the neuronal destruction seen after a day of anoxia. Neurons appeared undamaged and had normal resting and action potentials. Adenosine triphosphate levels in ketamine-protected anoxic cultures were approximately two-thirds of normal controls. Ketamine also prevented the irreversible loss of the population spike seen in hippocampal slices after prolonged perfusion with anoxic buffer. These results suggest that ketamine may have therapeutic potential in preventing anoxic damage from stroke in man. PMID:2819768

  19. MicroRNA-132 Interact with p250GAP/Cdc42 Pathway in the Hippocampal Neuronal Culture Model of Acquired Epilepsy and Associated with Epileptogenesis Process.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jinxian; Huang, Hao; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xi; Ou, Shu; Xu, Tao; Li, Ruohan; Ma, Limin; Chen, Yangmei

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that epilepsy is the result of synaptic reorganization and pathological excitatory loop formation in the central nervous system; however, the mechanisms that regulate this process are not well understood. We proposed that microRNA-132 (miR-132) and p250GAP might play important roles in this process by activating the downstream Rho GTPase family. We tested this hypothesis using a magnesium-free medium-induced epileptic model of cultured hippocampal neurons. We investigated whether miR-132 regulates GTPase activity through p250GAP and found that Cdc42 was significantly activated in our experimental model. Silencing miR-132 inhibited the electrical excitability level of cultured epileptic neurons, whereas silencing p250GAP had an opposite effect. In addition, we verified the effect of miR-132 in vivo and found that silencing miR-132 inhibited the aberrant formation of dendritic spines and chronic spontaneous seizure in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced epileptic mouse model. Finally, we confirmed that silencing miR-132 has a neuroprotective effect on cultured epileptic neurons; however, this effect did not occur through the p250GAP pathway. Generally, silencing miR-132 may suppress spontaneous seizure activity through the miR-132/p250GAP/Cdc42 pathway by regulating the morphology and electrophysiology of dendritic spines; therefore, miR-132 may serve as a potential target for the development of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:27579184

  20. MicroRNA-132 Interact with p250GAP/Cdc42 Pathway in the Hippocampal Neuronal Culture Model of Acquired Epilepsy and Associated with Epileptogenesis Process

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xi; Xu, Tao; Ma, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that epilepsy is the result of synaptic reorganization and pathological excitatory loop formation in the central nervous system; however, the mechanisms that regulate this process are not well understood. We proposed that microRNA-132 (miR-132) and p250GAP might play important roles in this process by activating the downstream Rho GTPase family. We tested this hypothesis using a magnesium-free medium-induced epileptic model of cultured hippocampal neurons. We investigated whether miR-132 regulates GTPase activity through p250GAP and found that Cdc42 was significantly activated in our experimental model. Silencing miR-132 inhibited the electrical excitability level of cultured epileptic neurons, whereas silencing p250GAP had an opposite effect. In addition, we verified the effect of miR-132 in vivo and found that silencing miR-132 inhibited the aberrant formation of dendritic spines and chronic spontaneous seizure in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced epileptic mouse model. Finally, we confirmed that silencing miR-132 has a neuroprotective effect on cultured epileptic neurons; however, this effect did not occur through the p250GAP pathway. Generally, silencing miR-132 may suppress spontaneous seizure activity through the miR-132/p250GAP/Cdc42 pathway by regulating the morphology and electrophysiology of dendritic spines; therefore, miR-132 may serve as a potential target for the development of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:27579184

  1. Control of aromatase in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fester, Lars; Brandt, Nicola; Windhorst, Sabine; Pröls, Felicitas; Bläute, Corinna; Rune, Gabriele M

    2016-06-01

    Our knowledge on estradiol-induced modulation of synaptic function in the hippocampus is widely based on results following the application of the steroid hormone to either cell cultures, or after the treatment of gonadectomized animals, thus ignoring local neuronal estrogen synthesis. We and others, however, have shown that hippocampus-derived estradiol also controls synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Estradiol synthesis in the hippocampus is regulated by several mechanisms, which are reviewed in this report. The regulation of the activity of aromatase, the final enzyme of estrogen biosynthesis, by Ca(2+) transients, is of particular interest. Aromatase becomes inactivated as soon as it is phosphorylated by Ca(2+)-dependent kinases upon calcium release from internal stores. Accordingly, thapsigargin dephosphorylates aromatase and stimulates estradiol synthesis by depletion of internal Ca(2+) stores. Vice versa, letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, phosphorylates aromatase and reduces estradiol synthesis. Treatment of the cultures with 17β-estradiol results in phosphorylation of the enzyme and increased aromatase protein expression, which suggests that estradiol synthesis in hippocampal neurons is regulated in an autocrine manner. PMID:26472556

  2. The Contradictory Effects of Neuronal Hyperexcitation on Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, José R.; Encinas, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a highly plastic process that responds swiftly to neuronal activity. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis can be regulated at the level of neural stem cell recruitment and activation, progenitor proliferation, as well as newborn cell survival and differentiation. An “excitation-neurogenesis” rule was proposed after the demonstration of the capability of cultured neural stem and progenitor cells to intrinsically sense neuronal excitatory activity. In vivo, this property has remained elusive although recently the direct response of neural stem cells to GABA in the hippocampus via GABAA receptors has evidenced a mechanism for a direct talk between neurons and neural stem cells. As it is pro-neurogenic, the effect of excitatory neuronal activity has been generally considered beneficial. But what happens in situations of neuronal hyperactivity in which neurogenesis can be dramatically boosted? In animal models, electroconvulsive shock markedly increases neurogenesis. On the contrary, in epilepsy rodent models, seizures induce the generation of misplaced neurons with abnormal morphological and electrophysiological properties, namely aberrant neurogenesis. We will herein discuss what is known about the mechanisms of influence of neurons on neural stem cells, as well as the severe effects of neuronal hyperexcitation on hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:26973452

  3. The Contradictory Effects of Neuronal Hyperexcitation on Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pineda, José R; Encinas, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a highly plastic process that responds swiftly to neuronal activity. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis can be regulated at the level of neural stem cell recruitment and activation, progenitor proliferation, as well as newborn cell survival and differentiation. An "excitation-neurogenesis" rule was proposed after the demonstration of the capability of cultured neural stem and progenitor cells to intrinsically sense neuronal excitatory activity. In vivo, this property has remained elusive although recently the direct response of neural stem cells to GABA in the hippocampus via GABAA receptors has evidenced a mechanism for a direct talk between neurons and neural stem cells. As it is pro-neurogenic, the effect of excitatory neuronal activity has been generally considered beneficial. But what happens in situations of neuronal hyperactivity in which neurogenesis can be dramatically boosted? In animal models, electroconvulsive shock markedly increases neurogenesis. On the contrary, in epilepsy rodent models, seizures induce the generation of misplaced neurons with abnormal morphological and electrophysiological properties, namely aberrant neurogenesis. We will herein discuss what is known about the mechanisms of influence of neurons on neural stem cells, as well as the severe effects of neuronal hyperexcitation on hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:26973452

  4. Kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration and activation of inflammatory processes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures: treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor does not prevent neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Juha T; Ruohonen, Saku; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Plysjuk, Anna; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Holopainen, Irma E

    2011-06-01

    In the postnatal rodent hippocampus status epilepticus (SE) leads to age- and region-specific excitotoxic neuronal damage, the precise mechanisms of which are still incompletely known. Recent studies suggest that the activation of inflammatory responses together with glial cell reactivity highly contribute to excitotoxic neuronal damage. However, pharmacological tools to attenuate their activation in the postnatal brain are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of inflammatory mediators in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal damage in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs). A specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398) was used to study whether or not it could ameliorate neuronal death. Our results show that KA treatment (24 h) resulted in a dose-dependent degeneration of CA3a/b pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, COX-2 immunoreactivity was pronouncedly enhanced particularly in CA3c pyramidal neurons, microglial and astrocyte morphology changed from a resting to active appearance, the expression of the microglial specific protein, Iba1, increased, and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production increased. These indicated the activation of inflammatory processes. However, the expression of neither proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), nor the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 mRNA was significantly altered by KA treatment as studied by real-time PCR. Despite activation of an array of inflammatory processes, neuronal damage could not be rescued either with the combined pre- and co-treatment with a specific COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398. Our results suggest that KA induces activation of a repertoire of inflammatory processes in immature OHCs, and that the timing of anti-inflammatory treatment to achieve neuroprotection is a challenge due to developmental properties and the complexity of inflammatory processes activated by

  5. Hippocampal culture stimulus with 4-megahertz ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; LaManna, Justine K.; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Morrison, Barclay, III

    2012-10-01

    Among current modalities, ultrasound uniquely offers both millisecond and millimeter accuracy in noninvasively stimulating brain tissue. In addition, by sweeping the ultrasound beam within the refractory period of the neuronal tissue, ultrasonic neuromodulation can be adapted to target extended or multiply connected regions with quasi-simultaneity. Towards the development of this safe brain stimulus technique, the response of rat hippocampal cultures to ultrasound was investigated. Hippocampal slices, 0.4-mm thick, were obtained from 8-day old Sprague Dawley rats and cultured for 6 days. The in vitro cultures were exposed to multiple 100-ms 4.04-MHz ultrasound pulses from a 42-mm diameter, 90-mm spherical cap transducer. Peak pressure ranged from 0 through about 77 kPa. Responses in the form of electrical potentials from a sixty channel electrode array were digitized and recorded. The DG and CA1 regions of the hippocampus exhibited similar ultrasonically-evoked field potentials.

  6. Blockade by sigma site ligands of N-methyl-D-aspartate-evoked responses in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, E. J.; Church, J.; Abdel-Hamid, K.; MacDonald, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of a range of structurally-dissimilar compounds which possess affinity for sigma binding sites were examined on the responses of cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones to the excitatory amino acid analogues N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), kainate and (RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). 2. In mouse hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp, the compounds tested reversibly attenuated NMDA-, but not kainate- or AMPA-, evoked currents with a rank order potency (IC50 values in microM): ifenprodil (0.8) > (+)-N-allylnormetazocine (1.1) > dextromethorphan (1.8) = haloperidol (1.9) > (+)-pentazocine (7.2) > 1S,2R-(-)-cis-N-methyl-N-[2-(3, 4-dichlorophenyl) ethyl]-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexylamine (17) = rimcazole (18) > 1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine (37) > opipramol (96) > caramiphen (110) = carbetapentane (112) > > (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine (485). 3. The attenuation of NMDA-evoked responses was not mediated through interactions with the agonist, glycine (except haloperidol) or polyamine (except ifenprodil) binding sites on the NMDA receptor-channel complex but, in the light of the voltage- and, in some cases, use-dependent nature of their antagonism, an interaction with the ion channel appears to be a likely mechanism of action for many of the compounds. 4. Micromolar concentrations of selected sigma site ligands also reduced NMDA-evoked rises in intracellular free calcium concentration in Fura-2-loaded cultured hippocampal neurones of the rat with the same rank order potency as observed in the electrophysiological studies. 5. The data indicate that, at micromolar concentrations, the sigma site ligands tested act as NMDA receptor antagonists, an action which does not appear to be mediated by high-affinity sigma binding site(s). The functional effects of micromolar concentrations of sigma site ligands cannot, therefore, be attributed exclusively to interactions with high-affinity sigma binding sites

  7. Effects of sex steroid hormones and their metabolites on neuronal injury caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Fujitani, Noriko; Sakurai, Hikaru; Takemoto, Takuya; Ikeda-Ishihara, Nami; Mori-Yasumoto, Kanami; Nehira, Tatsuo; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    In this study, protective actions of the sex steroid hormones, progesterone, testosterone, and 17β-estradiol, against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)/reoxygenation-induced neuronal cell death were examined using rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Progesterone, testosterone, and 17β-estradiol significantly attenuated neuronal cell death elicited by OGD/reoxygenation. While the neuroprotection conferred by progesterone was not affected by SU-10603, an inhibitor of cytochrome P45017α, finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor that blocks the conversion of progesterone to allopregnanolone, partially reversed the neuroprotection induced by progesterone. The progesterone metabolite, allopregnanolone attenuated neuronal injury induced by OGD/reoxygenation. Pretreatment with letrozole, a cytochrome P450 aromatase inhibitor or 4-hydroxyphenyl-1-naphthol, a 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 inhibitor showed no effect on testosterone-mediated neuroprotection, while finasteride completely abolished the protective action of testosterone. Treatment with 5α-dihydrotestosterone significantly suppressed neuronal injury. Pretreatment with mifepristone, a progesterone receptor antagonist and hydroxyflutamid, an androgen receptor antagonist significantly diminished the neuroprotective effects of progesterone and testosterone, respectively. ICI182,780, an estrogen receptor antagonist, showed no effect on neuroprotection mediated by 17β-estradiol. Pretreatment with actinomycin D or cycloheximide clearly abolished the neuroprotective effects of progesterone and testosterone, while actinomycin D and cycloheximide did not show any effect on neuroprotection mediated by 17β-estradiol. Taken together, progesterone protects neurons via progesterone receptor-dependent genomic pathway, and allopregnanolone is involved in progesterone-mediated neuroprotection. Testosterone and its metabolite 5α-dihydrotestosterone protect neurons via the genomic pathway of the androgen receptor

  8. Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Promotes Neuronal Viability and Activity of Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alcazar, Marta; Culley, Georgia; Lyckenvik, Tim; Mobarrez, Kristoffer; Bjorefeldt, Andreas; Wasling, Pontus; Seth, Henrik; Asztely, Frederik; Harrer, Andrea; Iglseder, Bernhard; Aigner, Ludwig; Hanse, Eric; Illes, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    For decades it has been hypothesized that molecules within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffuse into the brain parenchyma and influence the function of neurons. However, the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits are largely unexplored and unknown. A major reason for this is the absence of appropriate neuronal in vitro model systems, and it is uncertain if neurons cultured in pure CSF survive and preserve electrophysiological functionality in vitro. In this article, we present an approach to address how human CSF (hCSF) influences neuronal circuits in vitro. We validate our approach by comparing the morphology, viability, and electrophysiological function of single neurons and at the network level in rat organotypic slice and primary neuronal cultures cultivated either in hCSF or in defined standard culture media. Our results demonstrate that rodent hippocampal slices and primary neurons cultured in hCSF maintain neuronal morphology and preserve synaptic transmission. Importantly, we show that hCSF increases neuronal viability and the number of electrophysiologically active neurons in comparison to the culture media. In summary, our data indicate that hCSF represents a physiological environment for neurons in vitro and a superior culture condition compared to the defined standard media. Moreover, this experimental approach paves the way to assess the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits as well as suggesting a novel strategy for central nervous system (CNS) disease modeling. PMID:26973467

  9. Blockade by sigma site ligands of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J.; Fletcher, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of a series of structurally-dissimilar sigma site ligands were examined on high voltage-activated Ca2+ channel activity in two preparations of cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones. 2. In mouse hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp, voltage-activated Ca2+ channel currents carried by barium ions (IBa) were reduced with the rank order (IC50 values in microM): 1S,2R-(-)-cis-N-methyl-N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]- 2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexylamine (7.8) > rimcazole (13) > haloperidol (16) > ifenprodil (18) > opipramol (32) > carbetapentane (40) = 1-benzylspiro[1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-1,4-piperidine] (42) > caramiphen (47) > dextromethorphan (73). At the highest concentrations tested, the compounds almost abolished IBa in the absence of any other pharmacological agent. 3. The current-voltage characteristics of the whole-cell IBa were unaffected by the test compounds. The drug-induced block was rapid in onset and offset, with the exceptions of carbetapentane and caramiphen where full block was achieved only after two to three voltage-activated currents and was associated with an apparent increase in the rate of inactivation of IBa. 4. In rat hippocampal neurones loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye Fura-2, rises in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration evoked by transient exposure to 50 mM K(+)-containing medium, either in the absence or in the presence of 10 microM nifedipine (to block L-type high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels), were also reversibly attenuated by the sigma ligands. The rank order potencies for the compounds in these experimental paradigms were similar to that observed for blockade of IBa in the electrophysiological studies. 5. These results indicate that, at micromolar concentrations, the compounds tested block multiple subtypes of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. These actions, which do not appear to be mediated by high-affinity sigma binding sites, may play a role in some of the functional effects

  10. Dipeptide Piracetam Analogue Noopept Improves Viability of Hippocampal HT-22 Neurons in the Glutamate Toxicity Model.

    PubMed

    Antipova, T A; Nikolaev, S V; Ostrovskaya, P U; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-05-01

    Effect of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-prolylglycine ethyl ester) on viability of neurons exposed to neurotoxic action of glutamic acid (5 mM) was studied in vitro in immortalized mouse hippocampal HT-22 neurons. Noopept added to the medium before or after glutamic acid improved neuronal survival in a concentration range of 10-11-10-5 M. Comparison of the effective noopept concentrations determined in previous studies on cultured cortical and cerebellar neurons showed that hippocampal neurons are more sensitive to the protective effect of noopept. PMID:27265136

  11. Rapid throughput analysis demonstrates that chemicals with distinct seizurogenic mechanisms differentially alter Ca2+ dynamics in networks formed by hippocampal neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhengyu; Zou, Xiaohan; Cui, Yanjun; Hulsizer, Susan; Lein, Pamela J; Wulff, Heike; Pessah, Isaac N

    2015-04-01

    Primary cultured hippocampal neurons (HN) form functional networks displaying synchronous Ca(2+) oscillations (SCOs) whose patterns influence plasticity. Whether chemicals with distinct seizurogenic mechanisms differentially alter SCO patterns was investigated using mouse HN loaded with the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-4-AM. Intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics were recorded from 96 wells simultaneously in real-time using fluorescent imaging plate reader. Although quiescent at 4 days in vitro (DIV), HN acquired distinctive SCO patterns as they matured to form extensive dendritic networks by 16 DIV. Challenge with kainate, a kainate receptor (KAR) agonist, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a K(+) channel blocker, or pilocarpine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, caused distinct changes in SCO dynamics. Kainate at <1 µM produced a rapid rise in baseline Ca(2+) (Phase I response) associated with high-frequency and low-amplitude SCOs (Phase II response), whereas SCOs were completely repressed with >1 µM kainate. KAR competitive antagonist CNQX [6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione] (1-10 µM) normalized Ca(2+) dynamics to the prekainate pattern. Pilocarpine lacked Phase I activity but caused a sevenfold prolongation of Phase II SCOs without altering either their frequency or amplitude, an effect normalized by atropine (0.3-1 µM). 4-AP (1-30 µM) elicited a delayed Phase I response associated with persistent high-frequency, low-amplitude SCOs, and these disturbances were mitigated by pretreatment with the KCa activator SKA-31 [naphtho[1,2-d]thiazol-2-ylamine]. Consistent with its antiepileptic and neuroprotective activities, nonselective voltage-gated Na(+) and Ca(2+) channel blocker lamotrigine partially resolved kainate- and pilocarpine-induced Ca(2+) dysregulation. This rapid throughput approach can discriminate among distinct seizurogenic mechanisms that alter Ca(2+) dynamics in neuronal networks and may be useful in screening antiepileptic drug candidates. PMID:25583085

  12. Brief low [Mg2+]o-induced Ca2+ spikes inhibit subsequent prolonged exposure-induced excitotoxicity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Jung; Yang, Ji Seon

    2016-01-01

    Reducing [Mg2+]o to 0.1 mM can evoke repetitive [Ca2+]i spikes and seizure activity, which induces neuronal cell death in a process called excitotoxicity. We examined the issue of whether cultured rat hippocampal neurons preconditioned by a brief exposure to 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o are rendered resistant to excitotoxicity induced by a subsequent prolonged exposure and whether Ca2+ spikes are involved in this process. Preconditioning by an exposure to 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o for 5 min inhibited significantly subsequent 24 h exposure-induced cell death 24 h later (tolerance). Such tolerance was prevented by both the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 and the L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist nimodipine, which blocked 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o-induced [Ca2+]i spikes. The AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX significantly inhibited both the tolerance and the [Ca2+]i spikes. The intracellular Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM significantly prevented the tolerance. The nonspecific PKC inhibitor staurosporin inhibited the tolerance without affecting the [Ca2+]i spikes. While Gö6976, a specific inhibitor of PKCα had no effect on the tolerance, both the PKCε translocation inhibitor and the PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor significantly inhibited the tolerance without affecting the [Ca2+]i spikes. Furthermore, JAK-2 inhibitor AG490, MAPK kinase inhibitor PD98059, and CaMKII inhibitor KN-62 inhibited the tolerance, but PI-3 kinase inhibitor LY294,002 did not. The protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide significantly inhibited the tolerance. Collectively, these results suggest that low [Mg2+]o preconditioning induced excitotoxic tolerance was directly or indirectly mediated through the [Ca2+]i spike-induced activation of PKCε and PKCξ, JAK-2, MAPK kinase, CaMKII and the de novo synthesis of proteins. PMID:26807029

  13. CRMPs colocalize and interact with cytoskeleton in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuhao; Zhao, Bo; Ji, Zhisheng; Zhang, Guowei; Zhang, Jifeng; Li, Sumei; Guo, Guoqing; Lin, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01

    CRMP family proteins (CRMPs) are widely expressed in the developing neurons, mediating a variety of fundamental functions such as growth cone guidance, neuronal polarity and axon elongation. However, whether all the CRMP proteins interact with cytoskeleton remains unknown. In this study, we found that in cultured hippocampal neurons, CRMPs mainly colocalized with tubulin and actin network in neurites. In growth cones, CRMPs colocalized with tubulinmainly in the central (C-) domain and transition zone (T-zone), less in the peripheral (P-) domain and colocalized with actin in all the C-domain, T-zone and P-domain. The correlation efficiency of CRMPs between actin was significantly higher than that between tubulin, especially in growth cones. We successfully constructed GST-CRMPs plasmids, expressed and purified the GST-CRMP proteins. By GST-pulldown assay, all the CRMP family proteins were found to beinteracted with cytoskeleton proteins. Taken together, we revealed that CRMPs were colocalized with cytoskeleton in hippocampal neurons, especially in growth cones. CRMPs can interact with both tubulin and actin, thus mediating neuronal development. PMID:26885211

  14. Ontogeny of Biochemical, Morphological and Functional Parameters of Synaptogenesis in Primary Cultures of Rat Hippocampal and Cortical Neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    AbstractBackground: Synaptogenesis is a critical neurodevelopmental process whereby pre-and postsynaptic neurons form apposed sites of contact specialized for excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Many neurodevelopmental disorders are thought to reflect altered patterns of...

  15. Lysophosphatidic acid induces necrosis and apoptosis in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Holtsberg, F W; Steiner, M R; Keller, J N; Mark, R J; Mattson, M P; Steiner, S M

    1998-01-01

    A diverse body of evidence indicates a role for the lipid biomediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the CNS. This study identifies and characterizes the induction of neuronal death by LPA. Treatment of cultured hippocampal neurons from embryonic rat brains with 50 microM LPA resulted in neuronal necrosis, as determined morphologically and by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. A concentration of LPA as low as 10 microM led to the release of lactate dehydrogenase. In contrast, treatment of neurons with 0.1 or 1.0 microM LPA resulted in apoptosis, as determined by chromatin condensation. In addition, neuronal death induced by 1 microM LPA was characterized as apoptotic on the basis of terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, externalization of phosphatidylserine, and protection against chromatin condensation, TUNEL staining, and phosphatidylserine externalization by treatment with N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of caspases, i.e., members of the interleukin-1beta converting enzyme family. Studies with antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors did not indicate a significant role for these receptors in apoptosis induced by 1 microM LPA. LPA (1 microM) also induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, pretreatment of neurons with cyclosporin A protected against the LPA-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and neuronal apoptosis. Thus, LPA, at pathophysiological levels, can induce neuronal apoptosis and could thereby participate in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:9422348

  16. Millisecond Timescale Synchrony among Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Amarasingham, Asohan; Mizuseki, Kenji; Buzsáki, György

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons in cortical circuits play critical roles in composing spike timing and oscillatory patterns in neuronal activity. These roles in turn require coherent activation of interneurons at different timescales. To investigate how the local circuitry provides for these activities, we applied resampled cross-correlation analyses to large-scale recordings of neuronal populations in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) and CA3 regions of the hippocampus of freely moving rats. Significant counts in the cross-correlation of cell pairs, relative to jittered surrogate spike-trains, allowed us to identify the effective couplings between neurons in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions on the timescale of milliseconds. In addition to putative excitatory and inhibitory monosynaptic connections, we uncovered prominent millisecond timescale synchrony between cell pairs, observed as peaks in the central 0 ms bin of cross-correlograms. This millisecond timescale synchrony appeared to be independent of network state, excitatory input, and γ oscillations. Moreover, it was frequently observed between cells of differing putative interneuronal type, arguing against gap junctions as the sole underlying source. Our observations corroborate recent in vitro findings suggesting that inhibition alone is sufficient to synchronize interneurons at such fast timescales. Moreover, we show that this synchronous spiking may cause stronger inhibition and rebound spiking in target neurons, pointing toward a potential function for millisecond synchrony of interneurons in shaping and affecting timing in pyramidal populations within and downstream from the circuit. PMID:25378164

  17. A calcium-permeable cGMP-activated cation conductance in hippocampal neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leinders-Zufall, T.; Rosenboom, H.; Barnstable, C. J.; Shepherd, G. M.; Zufall, F.

    1995-01-01

    Whole-cell patch clamp recordings detected a previously unidentified cGMP-activated membrane conductance in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. This conductance is nonselectively permeable for cations and is completely but reversibly blocked by external Cd2+. The Ca2+ permeability of the hippocampal cGMP-activated conductance was examined in detail, indicating that the underlying ion channels display a high relative permeability for Ca2+. The results indicate that hippocampal neurons contain a cGMP-activated membrane conductance that has some properties similar to the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels previously shown in sensory receptor cells and retinal neurons. In hippocampal neurons this conductance similarly could mediate membrane depolarization and Ca2+ fluxes in response to intracellular cGMP elevation.

  18. Hippocampal neuronal subtypes develop abnormal dendritic arbors in the presence of Fragile X astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S; Cheng, C; Doering, L C

    2016-06-01

    Astrocytes are now recognized as key players in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Fragile X syndrome. However, the nature of Fragile X astrocyte-mediated control of dendrite development in subtypes of hippocampal neurons is not yet known. We used a co-culture procedure in which wildtype primary hippocampal neurons were cultured with astrocytes from either a wildtype or Fragile X mouse, for either 7, 14 or 21days. The neurons were processed for immunocytochemistry with the dendritic marker MAP2, classified by morphological criteria into one of five neuronal subtypes, and subjected to Sholl analyses. Both linear and semi-log methods of Sholl analyses were applied to the neurons in order to provide an in depth analysis of the dendritic arborizations. We found that Fragile X astrocytes affect the development of dendritic arborization of all subtypes of wildtype hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we show that hippocampal neurons with spiny stellate neuron morphology exhibit the most pervasive developmental delays, with significant dendritic arbor alterations persisting at 21days in culture. The results further dictate the critical role astrocytes play in governing neuronal morphology including altered dendrite development in Fragile X. PMID:26968765

  19. The Edible Marine Alga Gracilariopsis chorda Alleviates Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Mohibbullah, Md; Hannan, Md Abdul; Choi, Ji-Young; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Maqueshudul Haque; Hong, Yong-Ki; Choi, Jae-Suk; Choi, In Soon; Moon, Il Soo

    2015-09-01

    Age-related neurological disorders are of growing concern among the elderly, and natural products with neuroprotective properties have been attracting increasing attention as candidates for the prevention or treatment of neurological disorders induced by oxidative stress. In an effort to explore natural resources, we collected some common marine seaweed from the Korean peninsula and Indonesia and screened them for neuroprotective activity against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced oxidative stress. Of the 23 seaweeds examined, the ethanol extract of Gracilariopsis chorda (GCE) provided maximum neuroprotection at an optimum concentration of 15 μg/mL, followed by Undaria pinnatifida. GCE increased cell viability after H/R, decreased the formation of reactive oxygen species (measured by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate [DCF-DA] staining), and inhibited the double-stranded DNA breaks (measured by H2AX immunocytochemistry), apoptosis (measured by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining), internucleosomal DNA fragmentation (measured by DNA laddering), and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (measured by JC-1 staining). Using reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, we quantitated the arachidonic acid (AA) in GCE, which provides neuroprotection against H/R-induced oxidative stress. This neuroprotective effect of AA was comparable to that of GCE. These findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of GCE against H/R-induced neuronal death is due, at least in part, to the AA content that suppresses neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26106876

  20. Metformin Alleviated Aβ-Induced Apoptosis via the Suppression of JNK MAPK Signaling Pathway in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Teng, Ying; Zhang, Xingguang; Lv, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Both diabetes and hyperinsulinemia are confirmed risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Some researchers proposed that antidiabetic drugs may be used as disease-modifying therapies, such as metformin and thiazolidinediones, although more evidence was poorly supported. The aim of the current study is to investigate the role of metformin in Aβ-induced cytotoxicity and explore the underlying mechanisms. First, the experimental results show that metformin salvaged the neurons exposed to Aβ in a concentration-dependent manner with MTT and LDH assay. Further, the phosphorylation levels of JNK, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK were measured with western blot analysis. It was investigated that Aβ increased phospho-JNK significantly but had no effect on phospho-p38 MAPK and phospho-ERK1/2. Metformin decreased hyperphosphorylated JNK induced by Aβ; however, the protection of metformin against Aβ was blocked when anisomycin, the activator of JNK, was added to the medium, indicating that metformin performed its protection against Aβ in a JNK-dependent way. In addition, it was observed that metformin protected the neurons via the suppression of apoptosis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that metformin may have a positive effect on Aβ-induced cytotoxicity, which provides a preclinical strategy against AD for elders with diabetes. PMID:27403417

  1. Multisite electrophysiological recordings by self-assembled loose-patch-like junctions between cultured hippocampal neurons and mushroom-shaped microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Shmoel, Nava; Rabieh, Noha; Ojovan, Silviya M.; Erez, Hadas; Maydan, Eilon; Spira, Micha E.

    2016-01-01

    Substrate integrated planar microelectrode arrays is the “gold standard” method for millisecond-resolution, long-term, large-scale, cell-noninvasive electrophysiological recordings from mammalian neuronal networks. Nevertheless, these devices suffer from drawbacks that are solved by spike-detecting, spike-sorting and signal-averaging techniques which rely on estimated parameters that require user supervision to correct errors, merge clusters and remove outliers. Here we show that primary rat hippocampal neurons grown on micrometer sized gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes (gMμE) functionalized simply by poly-ethylene-imine/laminin undergo self-assembly processes to form loose patch-like hybrid structures. More than 90% of the hybrids formed in this way record monophasic positive action potentials (APs). Of these, 34.5% record APs with amplitudes above 300 μV and up to 5,085 μV. This self-assembled neuron-gMμE configuration improves the recording quality as compared to planar MEA. This study characterizes and analyzes the electrophysiological signaling repertoire generated by the neurons-gMμE configuration, and discusses prospects to further improve the technology. PMID:27256971

  2. Multisite electrophysiological recordings by self-assembled loose-patch-like junctions between cultured hippocampal neurons and mushroom-shaped microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Shmoel, Nava; Rabieh, Noha; Ojovan, Silviya M; Erez, Hadas; Maydan, Eilon; Spira, Micha E

    2016-01-01

    Substrate integrated planar microelectrode arrays is the "gold standard" method for millisecond-resolution, long-term, large-scale, cell-noninvasive electrophysiological recordings from mammalian neuronal networks. Nevertheless, these devices suffer from drawbacks that are solved by spike-detecting, spike-sorting and signal-averaging techniques which rely on estimated parameters that require user supervision to correct errors, merge clusters and remove outliers. Here we show that primary rat hippocampal neurons grown on micrometer sized gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes (gMμE) functionalized simply by poly-ethylene-imine/laminin undergo self-assembly processes to form loose patch-like hybrid structures. More than 90% of the hybrids formed in this way record monophasic positive action potentials (APs). Of these, 34.5% record APs with amplitudes above 300 μV and up to 5,085 μV. This self-assembled neuron-gMμE configuration improves the recording quality as compared to planar MEA. This study characterizes and analyzes the electrophysiological signaling repertoire generated by the neurons-gMμE configuration, and discusses prospects to further improve the technology. PMID:27256971

  3. Dopaminergic neurons promote hippocampal reactivation and spatial memory persistence

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Colin G; Tejero-Cantero, Álvaro; Trouche, Stéphanie; Campo-Urriza, Natalia; Dupret, David

    2014-01-01

    Here we found that optogenetic burst stimulation of hippocampal dopaminergic fibers from midbrain neurons in mice exploring novel environments enhanced the reactivation of pyramidal cell assemblies during subsequent sleep/rest. When applied during spatial learning of new goal locations, dopaminergic photostimulation improved the later recall of neural representations of space and stabilized memory performance. These findings reveal that midbrain dopaminergic neurons promote hippocampal network dynamics associated with memory persistence. PMID:25326690

  4. Abnormal alterations in the Ca2+/CaV1.2/calmodulin/caMKII signaling pathway in a tremor rat model and in cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Mg2+-free solution

    PubMed Central

    LV, XINTONG; GUO, FENG; XU, XIAOXUE; CHEN, ZAIXING; SUN, XUEFEI; MIN, DONGYU; CAO, YONGGANG; SHI, XIANBAO; WANG, LEI; CHEN, TIANBAO; SHAW, CHRIS; GAO, HUILING; HAO, LIYING; CAI, JIQUN

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) are key elements in epileptogenesis. There are several binding-sites linked to calmodulin (CaM) and several potential CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated phosphorylation sites in CaV1.2. The tremor rat model (TRM) exhibits absence-like seizures from 8 weeks of age. The present study was performed to detect changes in the Ca2+/CaV1.2/CaM/CaMKII pathway in TRMs and in cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Mg2+-free solution. The expression levels of CaV1.2, CaM and phosphorylated CaMKII (p-CaMKII; Thr-286) in these two models were examined using immunofluorescence and western blotting. Compared with Wistar rats, the expression levels of CaV1.2 and CaM were increased, and the expression of p-CaMKII was decreased in the TRM hippocampus. However, the expression of the targeted proteins was reversed in the TRM temporal cortex. A significant increase in the expression of CaM and decrease in the expression of CaV1.2 were observed in the TRM cerebellum. In the cultured neuron model, p-CaMKII and CaV1.2 were markedly decreased. In addition, neurons exhibiting co-localized expression of CaV1.2 and CaM immunoreactivities were detected. Furthermore, intracellular calcium concentrations were increased in these two models. For the first time, o the best of our knowledge, the data of the present study suggested that abnormal alterations in the Ca2+/CaV1.2/CaM/CaMKII pathway may be involved in epileptogenesis and in the phenotypes of TRMs and cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Mg2+-free solution. PMID:26299765

  5. HDAC6 Regulates Mitochondrial Transport in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sigeng; Owens, Geoffrey C.; Makarenkova, Helen; Edelman, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tubulin is a major substrate of the cytoplasmic class II histone deacetylase HDAC6. Inhibition of HDAC6 results in higher levels of acetylated tubulin and enhanced binding of the motor protein kinesin-1 to tubulin, which promotes transport of cargoes along microtubules. Microtubule-dependent intracellular trafficking may therefore be regulated by modulating the activity of HDAC6. We have shown previously that the neuromodulator serotonin increases mitochondrial movement in hippocampal neurons via the Akt-GSK3β signaling pathway. Here, we demonstrate a role for HDAC6 in this signaling pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that the presence of tubacin, a specific HDAC6 inhibitor, dramatically enhanced mitochondrial movement in hippocampal neurons, whereas niltubacin, an inactive tubacin analog, had no effect. Compared to control cultures, higher levels of acetylated tubulin were found in neurons treated with tubacin, and more kinesin-1 was associated with mitochondria isolated from these neurons. Inhibition of GSK3β decreased cytoplasmic deacetylase activity and increased tubulin acetylation, whereas blockade of Akt, which phosphorylates and down-regulates GSK3β, increased cytoplasmic deacetylase activity and decreased tubulin acetylation. Concordantly, the administration of 5-HT, 8-OH-DPAT (a specific 5-HT1A receptor agonist), or fluoxetine (a 5-HT reuptake inhibitor) increased tubulin acetylation. GSK3β was found to co-localize with HDAC6 in hippocampal neurons, and inhibition of GSK3β resulted in decreased binding of antibody to phosphoserine-22, a potential GSK3β phosphorylation site in HDAC6. GSK3β may therefore regulate HDAC6 activity by phosphorylation. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that HDAC6 plays an important role in the modulation of mitochondrial transport. The link between HDAC6 and GSK3β, established here, has important implications for our understanding of neurodegenerative disorders. In particular

  6. Fluorescent Measurement of Synaptic Activity Using SynaptopHluorin in Isolated Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongmei; Park, Han-A; Jonas, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    This protocol comprises the entire process of fluorescent measurement of vesicle recycling using the probe SynaptopHluorin, a pH-dependent GFP variant whose fluorescence increases at the synapse upon vesicle release due to fluorescence quenching in acidic vesicles. This technique provides a genetic tool to monitor synaptic vesicle recycling in real time in cultured hippocampal neurons.

  7. ACUTE ETHANOL SUPPRESSES GLUTAMATERGIC NEUROTRANSMISSION THROUGH ENDOCANNABINOIDS IN HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S.; Ninan, Ipe; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol exposure during fetal development is a leading cause of long-term cognitive impairments. Studies suggest that ethanol exposure have deleterious effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that is important for learning and memory. Ethanol exerts its effects, in part, via alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is critical for the maturation of neuronal circuits during development. The current literature strongly supports the growing evidence that ethanol inhibits glutamate release in the neonatal CA1 hippocampal region. However, the exact molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is not well understood. In this study, we show that ethanol enhances endocannabinoid (EC) levels in cultured hippocampal neurons, possibly through calcium pathways. Acute ethanol depresses miniature postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequencies without affecting their amplitude. This suggests that ethanol inhibits glutamate release. The CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) present on presynaptic neurons are not altered by acute ethanol. The CB1R antagonist SR 141716A reverses ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. Drugs that are known to enhance the in vivo function of ECs occlude ethanol effects on mEPSC frequency. Chelation of postsynaptic calcium by EGTA antagonizes ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. The activation of CB1R with the selective agonist WIN55,212-2 also suppresses the mEPSC frequency. This WIN55,212-2 effect is similar to the ethanol effects and is reversed by SR141716A. In addition, tetani-induced excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) are depressed by acute ethanol. SR141716A significantly reverses ethanol effects on evoked EPSC amplitude in a dual recording preparation. These observations, taken together, suggest the participation of ECs as retrograde messengers in the ethanol-induced depression of synaptic activities. PMID:18796007

  8. Blockade by ifenprodil of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones: comparison with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist actions.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J; Fletcher, E J; Baxter, K; MacDonald, J F

    1994-01-01

    1. The block by ifenprodil of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels was investigated in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) evoked by 50 mM K+ (high-[K+]o) in Fura-2-loaded rat hippocampal pyramidal neurones in culture and on currents carried by Ba2+ ions (IBa) through Ca2+ channels in mouse cultured hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp. The effects of ifenprodil on voltage-activated Ca2+ channels were compared with its antagonist actions on N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA) evoked responses in the same neuronal preparations. 2. Rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by transient exposure to high-[K+]o in our preparation of rat cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones are mediated predominantly by Ca2+ flux through nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ channels, with smaller contributions from nifedipine-resistant, omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ channels sensitive to crude funnel-web spider venom (Church et al., 1994). Ifenprodil (0.1-200 microM) reversibly attenuated high-[K+]o-evoked rises in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 17 +/- 3 microM, compared with an IC50 value of 0.7 +/- 0.1 microM for the reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by 20 microM NMDA. Tested in the presence of nifedipine 10 microM, ifenprodil (1-50 microM) produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the dihydropyridine-resistant high-[K+]o-evoked rise in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 13 +/- 4 microM. The results suggest that ifenprodil blocks Ca2+ flux through multiple subtypes of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. 3. Application of the polyamine, spermine (0.25-5 mM), produced a concentration-dependent reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by high-[K+]o.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7834201

  9. The Edible Red Alga Porphyra yezoensis Promotes Neuronal Survival and Cytoarchitecture in Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Mohibbullah, Md; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Maqueshudul Haque; Hannan, Md Abdul; Getachew, Paulos; Hong, Yong-Ki; Choi, Jae-Suk; Choi, In Soon; Moon, Il Soo

    2016-07-01

    The edible red alga Porphyra yezoensis is among the most popular marine algae and is of economic and medicinal importance. In the present study, the neurotrophic and neuroprotective activities of the ethanol extract of P. yezoensis (PYE) were investigated in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Results revealed that PYE significantly increased neurite outgrowth at an optimal concentration of 15 µg/mL. PYE dose-dependently increased viable cells, significantly accelerated the rate of neuronal differentiation in cultures, promoted axodendritic arborization, and eventually induced synaptogenesis. In addition to morphological development, PYE also promoted functional maturation as indicated by the staining of live cultures with FM 1-43. Moreover, PYE increased neuronal survivability, which was attributed to reduced apoptosis and its ROS scavenging activity. Taurine, a major organic acid in PYE (2.584/100 mg of dry PYE) promoted neurite outgrowth in a dose-dependent manner, and this promotion was suppressed by the taurine antagonist isethionic acid. The study indicates that PYE and its active component, taurine, facilitate neuronal development and maturation and have a neuroprotective effect. PMID:26259718

  10. VTA neurons coordinate with the hippocampal reactivation of spatial experience

    PubMed Central

    Gomperts, Stephen N; Kloosterman, Fabian; Wilson, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Spatial learning requires the hippocampus, and the replay of spatial sequences during hippocampal sharp wave-ripple (SPW-R) events of quiet wakefulness and sleep is believed to play a crucial role. To test whether the coordination of VTA reward prediction error signals with these replayed spatial sequences could contribute to this process, we recorded from neuronal ensembles of the hippocampus and VTA as rats performed appetitive spatial tasks and subsequently slept. We found that many reward responsive (RR) VTA neurons coordinated with quiet wakefulness-associated hippocampal SPW-R events that replayed recent experience. In contrast, coordination between RR neurons and SPW-R events in subsequent slow wave sleep was diminished. Together, these results indicate distinct contributions of VTA reinforcement activity associated with hippocampal spatial replay to the processing of wake and SWS-associated spatial memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05360.001 PMID:26465113

  11. VTA neurons coordinate with the hippocampal reactivation of spatial experience.

    PubMed

    Gomperts, Stephen N; Kloosterman, Fabian; Wilson, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Spatial learning requires the hippocampus, and the replay of spatial sequences during hippocampal sharp wave-ripple (SPW-R) events of quiet wakefulness and sleep is believed to play a crucial role. To test whether the coordination of VTA reward prediction error signals with these replayed spatial sequences could contribute to this process, we recorded from neuronal ensembles of the hippocampus and VTA as rats performed appetitive spatial tasks and subsequently slept. We found that many reward responsive (RR) VTA neurons coordinated with quiet wakefulness-associated hippocampal SPW-R events that replayed recent experience. In contrast, coordination between RR neurons and SPW-R events in subsequent slow wave sleep was diminished. Together, these results indicate distinct contributions of VTA reinforcement activity associated with hippocampal spatial replay to the processing of wake and SWS-associated spatial memory. PMID:26465113

  12. Functional clustering in hippocampal cultures: relating network structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldt, S.; Wang, J. X.; Shtrahman, E.; Dzakpasu, R.; Olariu, E.; Żochowski, M.

    2010-12-01

    In this work we investigate the relationship between gross anatomic structural network properties, neuronal dynamics and the resultant functional structure in dissociated rat hippocampal cultures. Specifically, we studied cultures as they developed under two conditions: the first supporting glial cell growth (high glial group), and the second one inhibiting it (low glial group). We then compared structural network properties and the spatio-temporal activity patterns of the neurons. Differences in dynamics between the two groups could be linked to the impact of the glial network on the neuronal network as the cultures developed. We also implemented a recently developed algorithm called the functional clustering algorithm (FCA) to obtain the resulting functional network structure. We show that this new algorithm is useful for capturing changes in functional network structure as the networks evolve over time. The FCA detects changes in functional structure that are consistent with expected dynamical differences due to the impact of the glial network. Cultures in the high glial group show an increase in global synchronization as the cultures age, while those in the low glial group remain locally synchronized. We additionally use the FCA to quantify the amount of synchronization present in the cultures and show that the total level of synchronization in the high glial group is stronger than in the low glial group. These results indicate an interdependence between the glial and neuronal networks present in dissociated cultures.

  13. Mitogen and stress response kinase-1 (MSK1) mediates excitotoxic induced death of hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jane P; Staton, Penny C; Wilkinson, Marc G; Strijbos, Paul J L M; Skaper, Stephen D; Arthur, J Simon C; Reith, Alastair D

    2003-07-01

    Activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) signal transduction pathway may mediate excitotoxic neuronal cell death in vitro and during ischemic brain injury in vivo. However, little is known, of the upstream regulation or downstream consequences of ERK activation under these conditions. Magnesium removal has been described to induce hyperexcitability and degeneration in cultured hippocampal neurones. Here, we show that neurotoxicity evoked by Mg2+ removal in primary hippocampal neurones stimulates ERK, but not p38, phosphorylation. Removal of Mg2+ also resulted in induction of the MAPK/ERK substrate mitogen- and stress-response kinase 1 (MSK1) and induced phosphorylation of the MSK1 substrate, the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Neuronal death and phosphorylation of components in this cascade were inhibited by the Raf inhibitor SB-386023, by the MEK inhibitor U0126, or by the MSK1 inhibitors H89 and Ro318220. Importantly, this form of cell death was inhibited in hippocampal neurones cultured from MSK1-/- mice and inhibitors of Raf or MEK had no additive neuroprotective effect. Together, these data indicate that MSK1 is a physiological kinase for CREB and that this activity is an essential component of activity-dependent neuronal cell death. PMID:12807421

  14. Differential Tiam1/Rac1 activation in hippocampal and cortical neurons mediates differential spine shrinkage in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Suárez, Elena; Fiuza, Maria; Liu, Xun; Chakkarapani, Elavazhagan; Hanley, Jonathan G

    2014-01-01

    Distinct neuronal populations show differential sensitivity to global ischemia, with hippocampal CA1 neurons showing greater vulnerability compared to cortical neurons. The mechanisms that underlie differential vulnerability are unclear, and we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in neuronal cell biology are involved. Dendritic spine morphology changes in response to ischemic insults in vivo, but cell type-specific differences and the molecular mechanisms leading to such morphologic changes are unexplored. To directly compare changes in spine size in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) in cortical and hippocampal neurons, we used separate and equivalent cultures of each cell type. We show that cortical neurons exhibit significantly greater spine shrinkage compared to hippocampal neurons. Rac1 is a Rho-family GTPase that regulates the actin cytoskeleton and is involved in spine dynamics. We show that Rac1 and the Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Tiam1 are differentially activated by OGD in hippocampal and cortical neurons. Hippocampal neurons express more Tiam1 than cortical neurons, and reducing Tiam1 expression in hippocampal neurons by shRNA enhances OGD-induced spine shrinkage. Tiam1 knockdown also reduces hippocampal neuronal vulnerability to OGD. This work defines fundamental differences in signalling pathways that regulate spine morphology in distinct neuronal populations that may have a role in the differential vulnerability to ischemia. PMID:25248834

  15. Live imaging of microtubule dynamics in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Schätzle, Philipp; Kapitein, Lukas C; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton plays an active role during different phases of neuronal development and is an essential structure for stable neuronal morphology. MTs determine axon formation, control polarized cargo trafficking, and regulate the dynamics of dendritic spines, the major sites of excitatory synaptic input. Defects in MT function have been linked to various neurological and neurodegenerative diseases and recent studies highlight neuronal MTs as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. Thus, understanding MT dynamics and its regulation is of central importance to study many aspects of neuronal function. The dynamics of MT in neurons can be studied by visualizing fluorescently tagged MT plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs). Tracking of +TIP trajectories allows analyzing the speeds and directionality of MT growth in axons and dendrites. Numerous labs now use +TIP to track growing MTs in dissociated neuron cultures. This chapter provides detailed methods for live imaging of MT dynamics in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. We describe protocols for culturing and transducing organotypic slices and imaging MT dynamics by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:26794510

  16. Qualitative and quantitative estimation of comprehensive synaptic connectivity in short- and long-term cultured rat hippocampal neurons with new analytical methods inspired by Scatchard and Hill plots.

    PubMed

    Tanamoto, Ryo; Shindo, Yutaka; Niwano, Mariko; Matsumoto, Yoshinori; Miki, Norihisa; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-03-18

    To investigate comprehensive synaptic connectivity, we examined Ca(2+) responses with quantitative electric current stimulation by indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass electrode with transparent and high electro-conductivity. The number of neurons with Ca(2+) responses was low during the application of stepwise increase of electric current in short-term cultured neurons (less than 17 days in-vitro (DIV)). The neurons cultured over 17 DIV showed two-type responses: S-shaped (sigmoid) and monotonous saturated responses, and Scatchard plots well illustrated the difference of these two responses. Furthermore, sigmoid like neural network responses over 17 DIV were altered to the monotonous saturated ones by the application of the mixture of AP5 and CNQX, specific blockers of NMDA and AMPA receptors, respectively. This alternation was also characterized by the change of Hill coefficients. These findings indicate that the neural network with sigmoid-like responses has strong synergetic or cooperative synaptic connectivity via excitatory glutamate synapses. PMID:26896767

  17. Dendrosomatic Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Hippocampal Neurons Regulates Axon Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Petralia, Ronald S.; Ott, Carolyn; Wang, Ya-Xian; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and its signaling components in the neurons of the hippocampus raises a question about what role the Shh signaling pathway may play in these neurons. We show here that activation of the Shh signaling pathway stimulates axon elongation in rat hippocampal neurons. This Shh-induced effect depends on the pathway transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli1. The axon itself does not respond directly to Shh; instead, the Shh signal transduction originates from the somatodendritic region of the neurons and occurs in neurons with and without detectable primary cilia. Upon Shh stimulation, Smo localization to dendrites increases significantly. Shh pathway activation results in increased levels of profilin1 (Pfn1), an actin-binding protein. Mutations in Pfn1's actin-binding sites or reduction of Pfn1 eliminate the Shh-induced axon elongation. These findings indicate that Shh can regulate axon growth, which may be critical for development of hippocampal neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although numerous signaling mechanisms have been identified that act directly on axons to regulate their outgrowth, it is not known whether signals transduced in dendrites may also affect axon outgrowth. We describe here a transcellular signaling pathway in embryonic hippocampal neurons in which activation of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptors in dendrites stimulates axon growth. The pathway involves the dendritic-membrane-associated Shh signal transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli, which induces the expression of the gene encoding the actin-binding protein profilin 1. Our findings suggest scenarios in which stimulation of Shh in dendrites results in accelerated outgrowth of the axon, which therefore reaches its presumptive postsynaptic target cell more quickly. By this mechanism, Shh may play critical roles in the development of hippocampal neuronal circuits. PMID:26658865

  18. Aβ25-35 Suppresses Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiguo; Wang, Feng; Guo, Wanqing; Zheng, Xuehua; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Wenguang; Shi, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial content, morphology, and function. Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis has been observed in Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β (Aβ) has been shown to cause mitochondrial dysfunction in cultured neurons, but its role in mitochondrial biogenesis in neurons remains poorly defined. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) are key energy-sensing molecules regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, is a target for SIRT1 deacetylase activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of Aβ25-35 on mitochondrial biogenesis in cultured hippocampal neurons and the underlying mechanisms. In primary hippocampal neurons, we found that 24-h incubation with Aβ25-35 suppressed both phosphorylations of AMPK and SIRT1 expression and increased PGC-1α acetylation expression. In addition, Aβ25-35 also resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number, as well as decreases in the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors (PGC-1α, NRF 1, NRF 2, and Tfam). Taken together, these data show that Aβ25-35 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis in hippocampal neurons. Aβ25-35-induced impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis may be associated with the inhibition of the AMPK-SIRT1-PGC-1α pathway. PMID:26055049

  19. The ROR2 tyrosine kinase receptor regulates dendritic spine morphogenesis in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Iván E; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-07-01

    Wnt signaling regulates synaptic development and function and contributes to the fine-tuning of the molecular and morphological differentiation of synapses. We have shown previously that Wnt5a activates non-canonical Wnt signaling to stimulate postsynaptic differentiation in excitatory hippocampal neurons promoting the clustering of the postsynaptic scaffold protein PSD-95 and the development of dendritic spines. At least three different kinds of Wnt receptors have been associated with Wnt5a signaling: seven trans-membrane Frizzled receptors and the tyrosine kinase receptors Ryk and ROR2. We report here that ROR2 is distributed in the dendrites of hippocampal neurons in close proximity to synaptic contacts and it is contained in dendritic spine protrusions. We demonstrate that ROR2 is necessary to maintain dendritic spine number and morphological distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. ROR2 overexpression increased dendritic spine growth without affecting the density of dendritic spine protrusions in a form dependent on its extracellular Wnt binding cysteine rich domain (CRD) and kinase domain. Overexpression of dominant negative ROR2 lacking the extracellular CRD decreased spine density and the proportion of mushroom like spines, while ROR2 lacking the C-terminal and active kinase domains only affected spine morphology. Our results indicate a crucial role of the ROR2 in the formation and maturation of the postsynaptic dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons. PMID:26003414

  20. Synaptic Structure Quantification in Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Guizzetti, Marina; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral problems (e.g. learning and memory) following developmental exposure to toxicants suggests that dysregulation of the process of synapse formation and function may occur. The ability to assess these changes is thus of value. This protocol describes a method to investigate toxicant-induced changes to synaptic structure formation in primary hippocampal neurons using immunocytochemical labeling of the pre- and post-synaptic markers synaptophysin and PSD-95, confocal imaging, and three-dimensional object analysis. Protocols for the long-term culturing of primary hippocampal neurons and of primary cortical astrocytes, as well as their co-culture are included. While the described methods focus on how astrocytes influence synapse formation and how toxicants may interfere in this process, modifications to the experimental plan can easily be implemented. This would allow for the investigation of the effects of toxicants after treating neurons alone, or both astrocytes and neurons in co-culture. With the common endpoint of synapse structure formation, differences between varying treatment paradigms can expand our understanding of the influence of particular toxicants on these diverse cell types and provide insight into potential mechanisms of effect and the contributions of each to synapse formation. PMID:24865645

  1. Enhancement of Morphological Plasticity in Hippocampal Neurons by a Physically Modified Saline via Phosphatidylinositol-3 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K.; Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2014-01-01

    Increase of the density of dendritic spines and enhancement of synaptic transmission through ionotropic glutamate receptors are important events, leading to synaptic plasticity and eventually hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory formation. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate hippocampal plasticity. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanobubbles that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), PNS60 (saline containing a comparable level of oxygen without the TCP modification), or RNS10.3 (TCP-modified normal saline without excess oxygen), stimulated morphological plasticity and synaptic transmission via NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive calcium influx in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Using mRNA-based targeted gene array, real-time PCR, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses, we further demonstrate that RNS60 stimulated the expression of many plasticity-associated genes in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of type IA, but not type IB, phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase by RNS60 together with abrogation of RNS60-mediated upregulation of plasticity-related proteins (NR2A and GluR1) and increase in spine density, neuronal size, and calcium influx by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3 kinase, suggest that RNS60 upregulates hippocampal plasticity via activation of PI-3 kinase. Finally, in the 5XFAD transgenic model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), RNS60 treatment upregulated expression of plasticity-related proteins PSD95 and NR2A and increased AMPA- and NMDA-dependent hippocampal calcium influx. These results describe a novel property of RNS60 in stimulating hippocampal plasticity, which may help AD and other dementias. PMID:25007337

  2. Enhancement of morphological plasticity in hippocampal neurons by a physically modified saline via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K; Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2014-01-01

    Increase of the density of dendritic spines and enhancement of synaptic transmission through ionotropic glutamate receptors are important events, leading to synaptic plasticity and eventually hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory formation. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate hippocampal plasticity. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanobubbles that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), PNS60 (saline containing a comparable level of oxygen without the TCP modification), or RNS10.3 (TCP-modified normal saline without excess oxygen), stimulated morphological plasticity and synaptic transmission via NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive calcium influx in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Using mRNA-based targeted gene array, real-time PCR, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses, we further demonstrate that RNS60 stimulated the expression of many plasticity-associated genes in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of type IA, but not type IB, phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase by RNS60 together with abrogation of RNS60-mediated upregulation of plasticity-related proteins (NR2A and GluR1) and increase in spine density, neuronal size, and calcium influx by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3 kinase, suggest that RNS60 upregulates hippocampal plasticity via activation of PI-3 kinase. Finally, in the 5XFAD transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), RNS60 treatment upregulated expression of plasticity-related proteins PSD95 and NR2A and increased AMPA- and NMDA-dependent hippocampal calcium influx. These results describe a novel property of RNS60 in stimulating hippocampal plasticity, which may help AD and other dementias. PMID:25007337

  3. In Vitro Ischemia Triggers a Transcriptional Response to Down-Regulate Synaptic Proteins in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Joana; Vieira, Marta; Carreto, Laura; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Duarte, Carlos B.; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Santos, Armanda E.

    2014-01-01

    Transient global cerebral ischemia induces profound changes in the transcriptome of brain cells, which is partially associated with the induction or repression of genes that influence the ischemic response. However, the mechanisms responsible for the selective vulnerability of hippocampal neurons to global ischemia remain to be clarified. To identify molecular changes elicited by ischemic insults, we subjected hippocampal primary cultures to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model for global ischemia that resulted in delayed neuronal death with an excitotoxic component. To investigate changes in the transcriptome of hippocampal neurons submitted to OGD, total RNA was extracted at early (7 h) and delayed (24 h) time points after OGD and used in a whole-genome RNA microarray. We observed that at 7 h after OGD there was a general repression of genes, whereas at 24 h there was a general induction of gene expression. Genes related with functions such as transcription and RNA biosynthesis were highly regulated at both periods of incubation after OGD, confirming that the response to ischemia is a dynamic and coordinated process. Our analysis showed that genes for synaptic proteins, such as those encoding for PICK1, GRIP1, TARPγ3, calsyntenin-2/3, SAPAP2 and SNAP-25, were down-regulated after OGD. Additionally, OGD decreased the mRNA and protein expression levels of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit as well as the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors, but increased the mRNA expression of the GluN3A subunit, thus altering the composition of ionotropic glutamate receptors in hippocampal neurons. Together, our results present the expression profile elicited by in vitro ischemia in hippocampal neurons, and indicate that OGD activates a transcriptional program leading to down-regulation in the expression of genes coding for synaptic proteins, suggesting that the synaptic proteome may change after ischemia. PMID:24960035

  4. Inhibitory neurons modulate spontaneous signaling in cultured cortical neurons: density-dependent regulation of excitatory neuronal signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Michael; Guaraldi, Mary; Shea, Thomas B.

    2010-06-01

    Cortical neuronal activity depends on a balance between excitatory and inhibitory influences. Culturing of neurons on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) has provided insight into the development and maintenance of neuronal networks. Herein, we seeded MEAs with murine embryonic cortical/hippocampal neurons at different densities (<150 or >1000 cells mm-2) and monitored resultant spontaneous signaling. Sparsely seeded cultures displayed a large number of bipolar, rapid, high-amplitude individual signals with no apparent temporal regularity. By contrast, densely seeded cultures instead displayed clusters of signals at regular intervals. These patterns were observed even within thinner and thicker areas of the same culture. GABAergic neurons (25% of total neurons in our cultures) mediated the differential signal patterns observed above, since addition of the inhibitory antagonist bicuculline to dense cultures and hippocampal slice cultures induced the signal pattern characteristic of sparse cultures. Sparsely seeded cultures likely lacked sufficient inhibitory neurons to modulate excitatory activity. Differential seeding of MEAs can provide a unique model for analyses of pertubation in the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory function during aging and neuropathological conditions where dysregulation of GABAergic neurons is a significant component.

  5. Calcium current homeostasis and synaptic deficits in hippocampal neurons from Kelch-like 1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Perissinotti, Paula P.; Ethington, Elizabeth A.; Almazan, Erik; Martínez-Hernández, Elizabeth; Kalil, Jennifer; Koob, Michael D.; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S.

    2015-01-01

    Kelch-like 1 (KLHL1) is a neuronal actin-binding protein that modulates voltage-gated CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) and CaV3.2 (α1H T-type) calcium channels; KLHL1 knockdown experiments (KD) cause down-regulation of both channel types and altered synaptic properties in cultured rat hippocampal neurons (Perissinotti et al., 2014). Here, we studied the effect of ablation of KLHL1 on calcium channel function and synaptic properties in cultured hippocampal neurons from KLHL1 knockout (KO) mice. Western blot data showed the P/Q-type channel α1A subunit was less abundant in KO hippocampus compared to wildtype (WT); and P/Q-type calcium currents were smaller in KO neurons than WT during early days in vitro, although this decrease was compensated for at late stages by increases in L-type calcium current. In contrast, T-type currents did not change in culture. However, biophysical properties and western blot analysis revealed a differential contribution of T-type channel isoforms in the KO, with CaV3.2 α1H subunit being down-regulated and CaV3.1 α1G up-regulated. Synapsin I levels were also reduced in the KO hippocampus and cultured neurons displayed a concomitant reduction in synapsin I puncta and decreased miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequency. In summary, genetic ablation of the calcium channel modulator resulted in compensatory mechanisms to maintain calcium current homeostasis in hippocampal KO neurons; however, synaptic alterations resulted in a reduction of excitatory synapse number, causing an imbalance of the excitatory-inhibitory synaptic input ratio favoring inhibition. PMID:25610372

  6. Fibroblast growth factor 23 signaling in hippocampal cells: impact on neuronal morphology and synaptic density.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Niko; Schön, Anne; Konen, Timo; Lübben, Verena; Förthmann, Benjamin; Baron, Olga; Grothe, Claudia; Leifheit-Nestler, Maren; Claus, Peter; Haffner, Dieter

    2016-06-01

    Endocrine fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is predominantly secreted by osteocytes and facilitates renal phosphate excretion. However, FGF23 is also present in cerebrospinal fluid. In chronic kidney disease, FGF23 serum levels are excessively elevated and associated with learning and memory deficits. Structural plasticity of the hippocampus such as formation of new synapses or an altered dendritic arborization comprises a cellular and morphological correlate of memory formation. Therefore, we hypothesize that FGF23 alters hippocampal neuron morphology and synapses. To address this, we prepared primary murine hippocampal cultures and incubated them with recombinant FGF23 alone or together with a soluble isoform of its co-receptor α-Klotho. Neuronal expression of a fluorescent reporter allowed for a detailed evaluation of the neuronal morphology by Sholl analysis. Additionally, we evaluated synaptic density, identified by stainings, for synaptic markers. We show an enhanced number of primary neurites combined with a reduced arborization, resulting in a less complex morphology of neurons treated with FGF23. Moreover, FGF23 enhances the synaptic density in a FGF-receptor (FGF-R) dependent manner. Finally, we addressed the corresponding signaling events downstream of FGF-R employing a combination of western blots and quantitative immunofluorescence. Interestingly, FGF23 induces phospholipase Cγ activity in primary hippocampal neurons. Co-application of soluble α-Klotho leads to activation of the Akt-pathway and modifies FGF23-impact on neuronal morphology and synaptic density. Compared with other FGFs, this alternative signaling pattern is a possible reason for differential effects of FGF23 on hippocampal neurons and may thereby contribute to learning and memory deficits in chronic kidney disease patients. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor 23 inhibits neuronal ramification and enhances the synaptic density in primary hippocampal cultures

  7. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial–neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, the most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. - Highlights: • DZ and DZO inhibit astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons. • Oxidative stress is involved in inhibition of neuritogenesis by DZ and DZO. • DZ and DZO decrease expression of the neuritogenic

  8. Damage of hippocampal neurons in rats with chronic alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ailin; Jiang, Hongbo; Xu, Lei; An, Na; Liu, Hui; Li, Yinsheng; Zhang, Ruiling

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism can damage the cytoskeleton and aggravate neurological deficits. However, the effect of chronic alcoholism on hippocampal neurons remains unclear. In this study, a model of chronic alcoholism was established in rats that were fed with 6% alcohol for 42 days. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide content and cystathionine-beta-synthase activity in the hippocampus of rats with chronic alcoholism were significantly increased, while F-actin expression was decreased. Hippocampal neurons in rats with chronic alcoholism appeared to have a fuzzy nuclear membrane, mitochondrial edema, and ruptured mitochondrial crista. These findings suggest that chronic alcoholism can cause learning and memory decline in rats, which may be associated with the hydrogen sulfide/cystathionine-beta-synthase system, mitochondrial damage and reduced expression of F-actin. PMID:25368648

  9. Neural depolarization triggers Mg2+ influx in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, R; Shindo, Y; Karube, T; Hotta, K; Suzuki, K; Oka, K

    2015-12-01

    Homeostasis of magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) plays key roles in healthy neuronal functions, and deficiency of Mg(2+) is involved in various neuronal diseases. In neurons, we have reported that excitotoxicity induced by excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate increases intracellular Mg(2+) concentration ([Mg(2+)]i). However, it has not been revealed whether neuronal activity under physiological condition modulates [Mg(2+)]i. The aim of this study is to explore the direct relationship between neural activity and [Mg(2+)]i dynamics. In rat primary-dissociated hippocampal neurons, the [Mg(2+)]i and [Ca(2+)]i dynamics were simultaneously visualized with a highly selective fluorescent Mg(2+) probe, KMG-104, and a fluorescent Ca(2+) probe, Fura Red, respectively. [Mg(2+)]i increase concomitant with neural activity by direct current stimulation was observed in neurons plated on an indium-tin oxide (ITO) glass electrode, which enables fluorescent imaging during neural stimulation. The neural activity-dependent [Mg(2+)]i increase was also detected in neurons whose excitability was enhanced by the treatment of a voltage-gated K(+) channel blocker, tetraethylammonium (TEA) at the timings of spontaneous Ca(2+) increase. Furthermore, the [Mg(2+)]i increase was abolished in Mg(2+)-free extracellular medium, indicating [Mg(2+)]i increase is due to Mg(2+) influx induced by neural activity. The direct neuronal depolarization by veratridine, a Na(+) channel opener, induced [Mg(2+)]i increase, and this [Mg(2+)]i increase was suppressed by the pretreatment of a non-specific Mg(2+) channel inhibitor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Overall, activity-dependent [Mg(2+)]i increase results from Mg(2+) influx through 2-APB-sensitive channels in rat hippocampal neurons. PMID:26455951

  10. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on hippocampal neuronal injury and neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; He, Jing; Huang, Liang; Dou, Ling; Wu, Shuang; Yuan, Qionglan

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rb1 has been reported to exert anti-aging and anti-neurodegenerative effects. In the present study, we investigate whether ginsenoside Rb1 is involved in neurite outgrowth and neuroprotection against damage induced by amyloid beta (25–35) in cultured hippocampal neurons, and explore the underlying mechanisms. Ginsenoside Rb1 significantly increased neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons, and increased the expression of phosphorylated-Akt and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. These effects were abrogated by API-2 and PD98059, inhibitors of the signaling proteins Akt and MEK. Additionally, cultured hippocampal neurons were exposed to amyloid beta (25–35) for 30 minutes; ginsenoside Rb1 prevented apoptosis induced by amyloid beta (25–35), and this effect was blocked by API-2 and PD98059. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rb1 significantly reversed the reduction in phosphorylated-Akt and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 levels induced by amyloid beta (25–35), and API-2 neutralized the effect of ginsenoside Rb1. The present results indicate that ginsenoside Rb1 enhances neurite outgrowth and protects against neurotoxicity induced by amyloid beta (25–35) via a mechanism involving Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling. PMID:25206916

  11. Expression of the endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperone (ORP150) rescues hippocampal neurons from glutamate toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kitao, Yasuko; Ozawa, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Mayuki; Tamatani, Michio; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Yanagi, Hideki; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Stern, David M.; Hori, Osamu; Ogawa, Satoshi

    2001-01-01

    A series of events initiated by glutamate-receptor interaction perturbs cellular homeostasis resulting in elevation of intracellular free calcium and cell death. Cells subject to such environmental change express stress proteins, which contribute importantly to maintenance of metabolic homeostasis and viability. We show that an inducible chaperone present in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the 150-kDa oxygen-regulated protein (ORP150), is expressed both in the human brain after seizure attack and in mouse hippocampus after kainate administration. Using mice heterozygous for ORP150 deficiency, exposure to excitatory stimuli caused hippocampal neurons to display exaggerated elevation of cytosolic calcium accompanied by activation of μ-calpain and cathepsin B, as well as increased vulnerability to glutamate-induced cell death in vitro and decreased survival to kainate in vivo. In contrast, targeted neuronal overexpression of ORP150 suppressed each of these events and enhanced neuronal and animal survival in parallel with diminished seizure intensity. Studies using cultured hippocampal neurons showed that ORP150 regulates cytosolic free calcium and activation of proteolytic pathways causing cell death in neurons subject to excitatory stress. Our data underscore a possible role for ER stress in glutamate toxicity and pinpoint a key ER chaperone, ORP150, which contributes to the stress response critical for neuronal survival. PMID:11714735

  12. Sema3F downregulates p53 expression leading to axonal growth cone collapse in primary hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guanglu; Qu, Xiang; Zhang, Junmei; Zhao, Weidong; Wang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal nerve growth is regulated by the coordinated action of numerous external stimuli, including positively acting neurotrophin-derived growth cues and restrictive semaphorin cues, however the underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unclear. We examined the potential cellular mechanism of Semaphorin3F (Sema3F) in cultured primary hippocampal neurons. We show that Sema3F can down-regulate p53 expression in primary hippocampal neurons, thereby contributing to growth cone collapse. Sema3F suppressed p53-induced pathways, which we show to be required to maintain growth cone structure. Sema3F-induced growth cone collapse was partially reversed by overexpression of p53, which promoted growth cone extension. Inhibition of p53 function by inhibitor, siRNAs, induced axonal growth cone collapse, whereas p53 over-expression led to larger growth cones in cultured primary hippocampal neurons.These data reveal a novel mechanism by which Sema3F can induce hippocampal neuron growth cone collapse and provide evidence for an intracellular mechanism for cross talk between positive and negative axon growth cues. PMID:22977659

  13. BID Mediates Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Neuronal Injury in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures and Modulates Tissue Inflammation in a Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia Model without Changing Lesion Volume

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Nellie Anne; Bonner, Helena; Elkjær, Maria Louise; D’Orsi, Beatrice; Chen, Gang; König, Hans Georg; Svensson, Martina; Deierborg, Tomas; Pfeiffer, Shona; Prehn, Jochen H.; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in death receptor-induced and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Recently, it has also been suggested that BID is involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses in the central nervous system. We found that BID deficiency protected organotypic hippocampal slice cultures in vitro from neuronal injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation. In vivo, BID-knockout (KO) mice and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to 60 min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) to induce focal cerebral ischemia, and allowed to recover for 24 h. Infarct volumes and functional outcome were assessed and the inflammatory response was evaluated using immunofluorescence, Western blotting, quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Mesoscale multiplex analysis. We observed no difference in the infarct volume or neurological outcome between BID-KO and WT mice. The inflammatory response was reduced by BID deficiency as indicated by a change in microglial/leukocyte response. In conclusion, our data suggest that BID deficiency is neuroprotective in an in vitro model and modulates the inflammatory response to focal cerebral ischemia in vivo. However, this is not translated into a robust neuroprotection in vivo. PMID:26869884

  14. Knocking down of the KCC2 in rat hippocampal neurons increases intracellular chloride concentration and compromises neuronal survival

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Christophe; Gubkina, Olena; Schaefer, Michael; Becq, Hélène; Ludwig, Anastasia; Mukhtarov, Marat; Chudotvorova, Ilona; Corby, Severine; Salyha, Yuriy; Salozhin, Sergey; Bregestovski, Piotr; Medina, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Abstract KCC2 is a neuron-specific potassium–chloride co-transporter controlling intracellular chloride homeostasis in mature and developing neurons. It is implicated in the regulation of neuronal migration, dendrites outgrowth and formation of the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic connections. The function of KCC2 is suppressed under several pathological conditions including neuronal trauma, different types of epilepsies, axotomy of motoneurons, neuronal inflammations and ischaemic insults. However, it remains unclear how down-regulation of the KCC2 contributes to neuronal survival during and after toxic stress. Here we show that in primary hippocampal neuronal cultures the suppression of the KCC2 function using two different shRNAs, dominant-negative KCC2 mutant C568A or DIOA inhibitor, increased the intracellular chloride concentration [Cl−]i and enhanced the toxicity induced by lipofectamine-dependent oxidative stress or activation of the NMDA receptors. The rescuing of the KCC2 activity using over-expression of the active form of the KCC2, but not its non-active mutant Y1087D, effectively restored [Cl−]i and enhanced neuronal resistance to excitotoxicity. The reparative effects of KCC2 were mimicked by over-expression of the KCC3, a homologue transporter. These data suggest an important role of KCC2-dependent potassium/chloride homeostasis under neurototoxic conditions and reveal a novel role of endogenous KCC2 as a neuroprotective molecule. PMID:21486764

  15. Extracellular sodium modulates the excitability of cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Xianghong; Foster, Hailey; Su, Lei; Do, Huy; Wain, Andrew J.; Fonteh, Alfred N.; Zhou, Feimeng; Harrington, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated a photophobia mechanism with modulation of nociceptive, cortico-thalamic neurons by retinal ganglion cell projections, however, little is known about how their neuronal homeostasis is disrupted. Since we have found that lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sodium increases during migraine and that cranial sodium increases in a rat migraine model, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of extracellular sodium ([Na+]o) on the intrinsic excitability of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We monitored excitability by whole cell patch using a multiplex micropipette with a common outlet to change artificial CSF (ACSF) [Na+]o at cultured neurons accurately (SD < 7 mM) and rapidly (< 5 s) as determined by a sodium selective micro-electrode of the same size and at the same location as a neuronal soma. Changing [Na+]o in ACSF from 100 to 160 mM, choline-balanced at 310 – 320 mOsm, increased the action potential (AP) amplitude, decreased AP width, and augmented firing rate by 28%. These effects were reversed on returning the ACSF [Na+]o to 100 mM. Testing up to 180 mM [Na+]o required ACSF with higher osmolarity (345 – 355 mOsm), at which the firing rate increased by 36% between 100 to 180 mM [Na +]o, with higher amplitude and narrower APs. In voltage clamp mode, the sodium and potassium currents increased significantly at higher [Na+]o. These results demonstrate that fluctuations in [Na+]o modulate neuronal excitability by a sodium current mechanism, and that excessively altered neuronal excitability may contribute to hypersensitivity symptoms. PMID:21679932

  16. Neuroprotection against excitotoxicity by N-alkylglycines in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Valera, Elvira; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro M; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Messeguer, Angel; Van Den Nest, Wim; Carreño, Cristina; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Merino, Jaime M

    2002-01-01

    Excessive activation of glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype is considered a relevant initial step underlying different neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, with the approval of memantine to treat Alzheimer dementia, NMDA receptors have regained clinical interest. Accordingly, the development and validation of NMDA receptor antagonists is being reconsidered. We recently identified a family of trialkylglycines that act as channel blockers of the NMDAreceptor. Their neuroprotective activity against excitotoxic insults remains elusive. To address this issue, we first characterized the contribution of glutamate receptor subtypes to hippocampal death in culture as a function of days in culture in vitro (DIV). Whereas at 7 DIV neither NMDA nor glutamate produced a significant neuronal death, at 14 and 21 DIV, NMDA produced the death of 40% of the neurons exposed to this receptor agonist that was fully protected by MK-801. Similar results were obtained for L-glutamate at 14 DIV. In contrast, when neurons at 21 DIV were used, glutamate killed 51.1 +/- 4.9% of the neuronal population. This neuronal death was only partially prevented by MK-801, and fully abrogated by a combination of MK-801 and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). Glucose deprivation injured 37.1 +/- 9.2% of the neurons through a mechanism sensitive to MK-801. The family of recently identified N-alkylglycines tested protected neurons against NMDA and glucosedeprivation toxicity, but not against glutamate toxicity. Noteworthy, N-alkylglicines with a moderate protection against NMDA-induced toxicity strongly protected from beta-amyloid toxicity. Collectively, these findings imply both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors in excitotoxicity of hippocampal neurons, and suggest that blockade of NMDA receptors alone may not suffice to efficiently abrogate neurodegeneration. PMID:12622405

  17. Maternal immune activation produces neonatal excitability defects in offspring hippocampal neurons from pregnant rats treated with poly I:C

    PubMed Central

    Patrich, Eti; Piontkewitz, Yael; Peretz, Asher; Weiner, Ina; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) resulting from prenatal exposure to infectious pathogens or inflammatory stimuli is increasingly recognized to play an important etiological role in neuropsychiatric disorders with neurodevelopmental features. MIA in pregnant rodents induced by injection of the synthetic double-stranded RNA, Poly I:C, a mimic of viral infection, leads to a wide spectrum of behavioral abnormalities as well as structural and functional defects in the brain. Previous MIA studies using poly I:C prenatal treatment suggested that neurophysiological alterations occur in the hippocampus. However, these investigations used only juvenile or adult animals. We postulated that MIA-induced alterations could occur earlier at neonatal/early postnatal stages. Here we examined the neurophysiological properties of cultured pyramidal-like hippocampal neurons prepared from neonatal (P0-P2) offspring of pregnant rats injected with poly I:C. Offspring neurons from poly I:C-treated mothers exhibited significantly lower intrinsic excitability and stronger spike frequency adaptation, compared to saline. A similar lower intrinsic excitability was observed in CA1 pyramidal neurons from hippocampal slices of two weeks-old poly I:C offspring. Cultured hippocampal neurons also displayed lower frequency of spontaneous firing, higher charge transfer of IPSCs and larger amplitude of miniature IPSCs. Thus, maternal immune activation leads to strikingly early neurophysiological abnormalities in hippocampal neurons. PMID:26742695

  18. Biomimetic polymer brushes containing tethered acetylcholine analogs for protein and hippocampal neuronal cell patterning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhaoli; Yu, Panpan; Geller, Herbert M; Ober, Christopher K

    2013-02-11

    This paper describes a method to control neuronal cell adhesion and differentiation with both chemical and topographic cues by using a spatially defined polymer brush pattern. First, biomimetic methacrylate polymer brushes containing tethered neurotransmitter acetylcholine functionalities in the form of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate or free hydroxyl-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) units were prepared using the "grown from" method through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization reactions. The surface properties of the resulting brushes were thoroughly characterized with various techniques and hippocampal neuronal cell culture on the brush surfaces exhibit cell viability and differentiation comparable to, or even better than, those on commonly used poly-l-lysine coated glass coverslips. The polymer brushes were then patterned via UV photolithography techniques to provide specially designed surface features with different sizes (varying from 2 to 200 μm) and orientations (horizontal and vertical). Protein absorption experiments and hippocampal neuronal cell culture tests on the brush patterns showed that both protein and neurons can adhere to the patterns and therefore be guided by such patterns. These results also demonstrate that, because of their unique chemical composition and well-defined nature, the developed polymer brushes may find many potential applications in cell-material interactions studies and neural tissue engineering. PMID:23336729

  19. The Edible Red Seaweed Gracilariopsis chorda Promotes Axodendritic Architectural Complexity in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Mohibbullah, Md; Abdul Hannan, Md; Park, In-Sik; Moon, Il Soo; Hong, Yong-Ki

    2016-07-01

    The edible red seaweed Gracilariopsis chorda (Holmes) Ohmi is known for its extensive medicinal benefits and its use as a food ingredient in Korea, Japan, and China. In a previous study, an ethanol extract of G. chorda (GCE) showed potential neuroprotective effects in cultured hippocampal neurons. In this study, we further examined the ability of GCE to promote neurite extension in primary rat hippocampal neurons. Neurons were stained with the lipophilic dye DiO or immunostained to visualize the neuronal morphology. The results indicated that GCE concentration-dependently increased neurite outgrowth, with an optimal concentration of 30 μg/mL. GCE significantly promoted early neuronal differentiation (i.e., polarity and process number) and enhanced axonal and dendritic arborization in a time-responsive manner. In addition, arachidonic acid, which was previously identified and quantified as a major neuroprotective component of GCE, significantly accelerated neurite outgrowth similar to GCE. Our findings suggest that G. chorda and its active component, arachidonic acid, may be useful for developing medicinal food or pharmaceuticals in the prevention and treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:27331292

  20. Hippocampal Somatostatin Interneurons Control the Size of Neuronal Memory Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Stefanelli, Thomas; Bertollini, Cristina; Lüscher, Christian; Muller, Dominique; Mendez, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal neurons activated during encoding drive the recall of contextual fear memory. Little is known about how such ensembles emerge during acquisition and eventually form the cellular engram. Manipulating the activity of granule cells (GCs) of the dentate gyrus (DG), we reveal a mechanism of lateral inhibition that modulates the size of the cellular engram. GCs engage somatostatin-positive interneurons that inhibit the dendrites of surrounding GCs. Our findings reveal a microcircuit within the DG that controls the size of the cellular engram and the stability of contextual fear memory. PMID:26875623

  1. Distinct pathways for rule-based retrieval and spatial mapping of memory representations in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Navawongse, Rapeechai; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons encode events within the context in which they occurred, a fundamental feature of episodic memory. Here we explored the sources of event and context information represented by hippocampal neurons during the retrieval of object associations in rats. Temporary inactivation of the medial prefrontal cortex differentially reduced the selectivity of rule-based object associations represented by hippocampal neuronal firing patterns but did not affect spatial firing patterns. By contrast, inactivation of the medial entorhinal cortex resulted in a pervasive reorganization of hippocampal mappings of spatial context and events. These results suggest distinct and cooperative prefrontal and medial temporal mechanisms in memory representation. PMID:23325238

  2. Repeated Stimulation of Cultured Networks of Rat Cortical Neurons Induces Parallel Memory Traces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    le Feber, Joost; Witteveen, Tim; van Veenendaal, Tamar M.; Dijkstra, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    During systems consolidation, memories are spontaneously replayed favoring information transfer from hippocampus to neocortex. However, at present no empirically supported mechanism to accomplish a transfer of memory from hippocampal to extra-hippocampal sites has been offered. We used cultured neuronal networks on multielectrode arrays and…

  3. The emergence of spontaneous activity in neuronal cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, J. G.; Alvarez-Lacalle, E.; Teller, S.; Soriano, J.; Casademunt, J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro neuronal networks of dissociated hippocampal or cortical tissues are one of the most attractive model systems for the physics and neuroscience communities. Cultured neurons grow and mature, develop axons and dendrites, and quickly connect to their neighbors to establish a spontaneously active network within a week. The resulting neuronal network is characterized by a combination of excitatory and inhibitory neurons coupled through synaptic connections that interact in a highly nonlinear manner. The nonlinear behavior emerges from the dynamics of both the neurons' spiking activity and synaptic transmission, together with biological noise. These ingredients give rise to a rich repertoire of phenomena that are still poorly understood, including the emergence and maintenance of periodic spontaneous activity, avalanches, propagation of fronts and synchronization. In this work we present an overview on the rich activity of cultured neuronal networks, and detail the minimal theoretical considerations needed to describe experimental observations.

  4. Leptin counteracts the hypoxia-induced inhibition of spontaneously firing hippocampal neurons: a microelectrode array study.

    PubMed

    Gavello, Daniela; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Marcantoni, Andrea; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Besides regulating energy balance and reducing body-weight, the adipokine leptin has been recently shown to be neuroprotective and antiapoptotic by promoting neuronal survival after excitotoxic and oxidative insults. Here, we investigated the firing properties of mouse hippocampal neurons and the effects of leptin pretreatment on hypoxic damage (2 hours, 3% O(2)). Experiments were carried out by means of the microelectrode array (MEA) technology, monitoring hippocampal neurons activity from 11 to 18 days in vitro (DIV). Under normoxic conditions, hippocampal neurons were spontaneously firing, either with prevailing isolated and randomly distributed spikes (11 DIV), or with patterns characterized by synchronized bursts (18 DIV). Exposure to hypoxia severely impaired the spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons, reducing their firing frequency by 54% and 69%, at 11 and 18 DIV respectively, and synchronized their firing activity. Pretreatment with 50 nM leptin reduced the firing frequency of normoxic neurons and contrasted the hypoxia-induced depressive action, either by limiting the firing frequency reduction (at both ages) or by increasing it to 126% (in younger neurons). In order to find out whether leptin exerts its effect by activating large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK), as shown on rat hippocampal neurons, we applied the BK channel blocker paxilline (1 µM). Our data show that paxilline reversed the effects of leptin, both on normoxic and hypoxic neurons, suggesting that the adipokine counteracts hypoxia through BK channels activation in mouse hippocampal neurons. PMID:22848520

  5. Leptin Counteracts the Hypoxia-Induced Inhibition of Spontaneously Firing Hippocampal Neurons: A Microelectrode Array Study

    PubMed Central

    Gavello, Daniela; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Marcantoni, Andrea; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Besides regulating energy balance and reducing body-weight, the adipokine leptin has been recently shown to be neuroprotective and antiapoptotic by promoting neuronal survival after excitotoxic and oxidative insults. Here, we investigated the firing properties of mouse hippocampal neurons and the effects of leptin pretreatment on hypoxic damage (2 hours, 3% O2). Experiments were carried out by means of the microelectrode array (MEA) technology, monitoring hippocampal neurons activity from 11 to 18 days in vitro (DIV). Under normoxic conditions, hippocampal neurons were spontaneously firing, either with prevailing isolated and randomly distributed spikes (11 DIV), or with patterns characterized by synchronized bursts (18 DIV). Exposure to hypoxia severely impaired the spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons, reducing their firing frequency by 54% and 69%, at 11 and 18 DIV respectively, and synchronized their firing activity. Pretreatment with 50 nM leptin reduced the firing frequency of normoxic neurons and contrasted the hypoxia-induced depressive action, either by limiting the firing frequency reduction (at both ages) or by increasing it to 126% (in younger neurons). In order to find out whether leptin exerts its effect by activating large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK), as shown on rat hippocampal neurons, we applied the BK channel blocker paxilline (1 µM). Our data show that paxilline reversed the effects of leptin, both on normoxic and hypoxic neurons, suggesting that the adipokine counteracts hypoxia through BK channels activation in mouse hippocampal neurons. PMID:22848520

  6. NMDAR-Mediated Hippocampal Neuronal Death is Exacerbated by Activities of ASIC1a

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Su; Yu, Yang; Ma, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Yong-Li; Wang, Xing-Tao; Wang, Chaoyun; Fan, Wei-Ming; Zheng, Qing-Yin

    2015-01-01

    NMDARs and ASIC1a both exist in central synapses and mediate important physiological and pathological conditions, but the functional relationship between them is unclear. Here we report several novel findings that may shed light on the functional relationship between these two ion channels in the excitatory postsynaptic membrane of mouse hippocampus. Firstly, NMDAR activation induced by either NMDA or OGD led to increased [Ca2+]i and greater apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths in cultured hippocampal neurons; these cell deaths were prevented by application of NMDAR antagonists. Secondly, ASIC1a activation induced by pH 6.0 extracellular solution (ECS) showed similar increases in apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths; these cell deaths were prevented by ASIC1a antagonists, and also by NMDAR antagonists. Since increased [Ca2+]i leads to increased cell deaths and since NMDAR exhibits much greater calcium permeability than ASIC1a, these data suggest that ASIC1a-induced neuronal death is mediated through activation of NMDARs. Thirdly, treatment of hippocampal cultures with both NMDA and acidic ECS induced greater degrees of cell deaths than either NMDA or acidic ECS treatment alone. These results suggest that ASIC1a activation up-regulates NMDAR function. Additional data supporting the functional relationship between ASIC1a and NMDAR are found in our electrophysiology experiments in hippocampal slices, where stimulation of ASIC1a induced a marked increase in NMDAR EPSC amplitude, and inhibition of ASIC1a resulted in a decrease in NMDAR EPSC amplitude. In summary, we present evidence that ASIC1a activity facilitates NMDAR function and exacerbates NMDAR-mediated neuronal death in pathological conditions. These findings are invaluable to the search for novel therapeutic targets in the treatment of brain ischemia. PMID:25947342

  7. GPER1 mediates estrogen-induced neuroprotection against oxygen-glucose deprivation in the primary hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tian-Zhi; Shi, Fei; Hu, Jun; He, Shi-Ming; Ding, Qian; Ma, Lian-Ting

    2016-07-22

    It is well-known that the neuroprotective effects of estrogen have potential in the prevention and amelioration of ischemic and degenerative neurological disorders, while the underlying mechanisms for estrogen actions are undefined. As an important mediator for the non-genomic functions of estrogen, GPER1 (G Protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor 1) has been suggested to involve in the beneficial roles of estrogen in neural cells. Here our studies on primary hippocampal neurons have focused on GPER1 in an in vitro model of ischemia using oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). GPER1 expression in the primary hippocampal neurons was stimulated by the OGD treatments. Both E2 (estradiol) and E2-BSA (membrane impermeable estradiol by covalent conjugation of bovine serum albumin) attenuated OGD-induced cell death in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Importantly, this membrane-mediated estrogen function requires GPER1 protein. Knocking down of GPER1 diminished, while overexpression of GPER1 potentiated, the protective roles of E2/E2-BSA following OGD. Additionally, the downstream mechanisms employed by membrane-associated estrogen signaling were found to include PI3K/Akt-dependent Ask1 inhibition in the primary hippocampal neurons. Overall, these research results could enhance our understanding of the neuroprotective actions for estrogen, and provide a new therapeutic target for improving stroke outcome and ameliorating degenerative neurological diseases. PMID:27113328

  8. Specific responses of human hippocampal neurons are associated with better memory.

    PubMed

    Suthana, Nanthia A; Parikshak, Neelroop N; Ekstrom, Arne D; Ison, Matias J; Knowlton, Barbara J; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Fried, Itzhak

    2015-08-18

    A population of human hippocampal neurons has shown responses to individual concepts (e.g., Jennifer Aniston) that generalize to different instances of the concept. However, recordings from the rodent hippocampus suggest an important function of these neurons is their ability to discriminate overlapping representations, or pattern separate, a process that may facilitate discrimination of similar events for successful memory. In the current study, we explored whether human hippocampal neurons can also demonstrate the ability to discriminate between overlapping representations and whether this selectivity could be directly related to memory performance. We show that among medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurons, certain populations of neurons are selective for a previously studied (target) image in that they show a significant decrease in firing rate to very similar (lure) images. We found that a greater proportion of these neurons can be found in the hippocampus compared with other MTL regions, and that memory for individual items is correlated to the degree of selectivity of hippocampal neurons responsive to those items. Moreover, a greater proportion of hippocampal neurons showed selective firing for target images in good compared with poor performers, with overall memory performance correlated with hippocampal selectivity. In contrast, selectivity in other MTL regions was not associated with memory performance. These findings show that a substantial proportion of human hippocampal neurons encode specific memories that support the discrimination of overlapping representations. These results also provide previously unidentified evidence consistent with a unique role of the human hippocampus in orthogonalization of representations in declarative memory. PMID:26240357

  9. Specific responses of human hippocampal neurons are associated with better memory

    PubMed Central

    Suthana, Nanthia A.; Parikshak, Neelroop N.; Ekstrom, Arne D.; Ison, Matias J.; Knowlton, Barbara J.; Bookheimer, Susan Y.; Fried, Itzhak

    2015-01-01

    A population of human hippocampal neurons has shown responses to individual concepts (e.g., Jennifer Aniston) that generalize to different instances of the concept. However, recordings from the rodent hippocampus suggest an important function of these neurons is their ability to discriminate overlapping representations, or pattern separate, a process that may facilitate discrimination of similar events for successful memory. In the current study, we explored whether human hippocampal neurons can also demonstrate the ability to discriminate between overlapping representations and whether this selectivity could be directly related to memory performance. We show that among medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurons, certain populations of neurons are selective for a previously studied (target) image in that they show a significant decrease in firing rate to very similar (lure) images. We found that a greater proportion of these neurons can be found in the hippocampus compared with other MTL regions, and that memory for individual items is correlated to the degree of selectivity of hippocampal neurons responsive to those items. Moreover, a greater proportion of hippocampal neurons showed selective firing for target images in good compared with poor performers, with overall memory performance correlated with hippocampal selectivity. In contrast, selectivity in other MTL regions was not associated with memory performance. These findings show that a substantial proportion of human hippocampal neurons encode specific memories that support the discrimination of overlapping representations. These results also provide previously unidentified evidence consistent with a unique role of the human hippocampus in orthogonalization of representations in declarative memory. PMID:26240357

  10. Bdnf Overexpression in Hippocampal Neurons Prevents Dendritic Atrophy Caused by Rett-Associated MECP2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Larimore, Jennifer L.; Chapleau, Christopher A.; Kudo, Shinichi; Theibert, Anne; Percy, Alan K.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2008-01-01

    The expression of the methylated DNA-binding protein MeCP2 increases during neuronal development, which suggests that this epigenetic factor is crucial for neuronal terminal differentiation. We evaluated dendritic and axonal development in embryonic day-18 hippocampal neurons in culture by measuring total length and counting branch point numbers at 4 days in vitro, well before synapse formation. Pyramidal neurons transfected with a plasmid encoding a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) to knockdown endogenous Mecp2 had shorter dendrites than control untransfected neurons, without detectable changes in axonal morphology. On the other hand, overexpression of wildtype (wt) human MECP2 increased dendritic branching, in addition to axonal branching and length. Consistent with reduced neuronal growth and complexity in Rett syndrome (RTT) brains, overexpression of human MECP2 carrying missense mutations common in RTT individuals (R106W or T158M) reduced dendritic and axonal length. One of the targets of MeCP2 transcriptional control is the Bdnf gene. Indeed, endogenous Mecp2 knockdown increased the intracellular levels of BDNF protein compared to untransfected neurons, suggesting that MeCP2 represses Bdnf transcription. Surprisingly, overexpression of wt MECP2 also increased BDNF levels, while overexpression of RTT-associated MECP2 mutants failed to affect BDNF levels. The extracellular BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc prevented dendritic overgrowth in wt MECP2-overexpressing neurons, while overexpression of the Bdnf gene reverted the dendritic atrophy caused by Mecp2-knockdown. However, this effect was only partial, since Bdnf increased dendritic length only to control levels in mutant MECP2-overexpressing neurons, but not as much as in Bdnf-transfected cells. Our results demonstrate that MeCP2 plays varied roles in dendritic and axonal development during neuronal terminal differentiation, and that some of these effects are mediated by autocrine actions of BDNF. PMID:19217433

  11. Altered Kv2.1 functioning promotes increased excitability in hippocampal neurons of an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Frazzini, V; Guarnieri, S; Bomba, M; Navarra, R; Morabito, C; Mariggiò, M A; Sensi, S L

    2016-01-01

    Altered neuronal excitability is emerging as an important feature in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Kv2.1 potassium channels are important modulators of neuronal excitability and synaptic activity. We investigated Kv2.1 currents and its relation to the intrinsic synaptic activity of hippocampal neurons from 3xTg-AD (triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease) mice, a widely employed preclinical AD model. Synaptic activity was also investigated by analyzing spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i spikes. Compared with wild-type (Non-Tg (non-transgenic mouse model)) cultures, 3xTg-AD neurons showed enhanced spike frequency and decreased intensity. Compared with Non-Tg cultures, 3xTg-AD hippocampal neurons revealed reduced Kv2.1-dependent Ik current densities as well as normalized conductances. 3xTg-AD cultures also exhibited an overall decrease in the number of functional Kv2.1 channels. Immunofluorescence assay revealed an increase in Kv2.1 channel oligomerization, a condition associated with blockade of channel function. In Non-Tg neurons, pharmacological blockade of Kv2.1 channels reproduced the altered pattern found in the 3xTg-AD cultures. Moreover, compared with untreated sister cultures, pharmacological inhibition of Kv2.1 in 3xTg-AD neurons did not produce any significant modification in Ik current densities. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote Kv2.1 oligomerization, thereby acting as negative modulator of the channel activity. Glutamate receptor activation produced higher ROS levels in hippocampal 3xTg-AD cultures compared with Non-Tg neurons. Antioxidant treatment with N-Acetyl-Cysteine was found to rescue Kv2.1-dependent currents and decreased spontaneous hyperexcitability in 3xTg-AD neurons. Analogous results regarding spontaneous synaptic activity were observed in neuronal cultures treated with the antioxidant 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox). Our study indicates that AD-related mutations may promote enhanced ROS generation, oxidative

  12. Signals mediating Klotho-induced neuroprotection in hippocampal neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Meng-Fu; Chen, Li-Jen; Niu, Ho-Shan; Yang, Ting-Ting; Lin, Kao-Chang; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin (Epo) receptor (EpoR) is expressed in the brain and was shown to have neuroprotective effects against brain damage in animal models. A recent study indicated that EpoR and its activity are the downstream effectors of Klotho for cytoprotection in the kidney. Thus, we propose that Klotho can stimulate the expression of EpoR in neuronal cells to enhance Epo-mediated protection. H19-7 hippocampal neuronal cells were treated with recombinant Klotho. In H19-7 cells, Klotho increased the expression of both the EpoR protein and mRNA. Klotho also enhanced the transcription activity of the EpoR promoter in H19-7 cells. Moreover, Klotho augmented the Epo-triggered phosphorylation of Jak2 and Stat5 and protected H19-7 cells from hydrogen peroxide cytotoxicity. The silencing of EpoR abolished the protective effect of Klotho against peroxide-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, the silencing of GATA1 diminished the Klotho-induced increase in EpoR protein and mRNA expression as well as its promoter activity. In conclusion, Klotho increased EpoR expression in neuronal cells through GATA1, thereby enabling EpoR to function as a cytoprotective protein against oxidative injury. PMID:25856523

  13. Interplay between population firing stability and single neuron dynamics in hippocampal networks.

    PubMed

    Slomowitz, Edden; Styr, Boaz; Vertkin, Irena; Milshtein-Parush, Hila; Nelken, Israel; Slutsky, Michael; Slutsky, Inna

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal circuits' ability to maintain the delicate balance between stability and flexibility in changing environments is critical for normal neuronal functioning. However, to what extent individual neurons and neuronal populations maintain internal firing properties remains largely unknown. In this study, we show that distributions of spontaneous population firing rates and synchrony are subject to accurate homeostatic control following increase of synaptic inhibition in cultured hippocampal networks. Reduction in firing rate triggered synaptic and intrinsic adaptive responses operating as global homeostatic mechanisms to maintain firing macro-stability, without achieving local homeostasis at the single-neuron level. Adaptive mechanisms, while stabilizing population firing properties, reduced short-term facilitation essential for synaptic discrimination of input patterns. Thus, invariant ongoing population dynamics emerge from intrinsically unstable activity patterns of individual neurons and synapses. The observed differences in the precision of homeostatic control at different spatial scales challenge cell-autonomous theory of network homeostasis and suggest the existence of network-wide regulation rules. PMID:25556699

  14. Microglial polarization and plasticity: evidence from organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Ajmone-Cat, Maria Antonietta; Mancini, Melissa; De Simone, Roberta; Cilli, Piera; Minghetti, Luisa

    2013-10-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that "functional plasticity" is not solely a neuronal attribute but a hallmark of microglial cells, the main brain resident macrophage population. Far from being a univocal phenomenon, microglial activation can originate a plethora of functional phenotypes, encompassing the classic M1 proinflammatory and the alternative M2 anti-inflammatory phenotypes. This concept overturns the popular view of microglial activation as a synonym of neurotoxicity and neurogenesis failure in brain disorders. The characterization of the alternative programs is a matter of intense investigation, but still scarce information is available on the course of microglial activation, on the reversibility of the different commitments and on the capability of preserving molecular memory of previous priming stimuli. By using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures as a model, we developed paradigms of stimulation aimed at shedding light on some of these aspects. We show that persistent stimulation of TLR4 signaling promotes an anti-inflammatory response and microglial polarization toward M2-like phenotype. Moreover, acute and chronic preconditioning regimens permanently affect the capability to respond to a later challenge, suggesting the onset of mechanisms of molecular memory. Similar phenomena could occur in the intact brain and differently affect the vulnerability of mature and newborn neurons to noxious signals. PMID:23918452

  15. ACAP3 regulates neurite outgrowth through its GAP activity specific to Arf6 in mouse hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuki; Hongu, Tsunaki; Yamauchi, Yohei; Funakoshi, Yuji; Katagiri, Naohiro; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Kanaho, Yasunori

    2016-09-01

    ACAP3 (ArfGAP with coiled-coil, ankyrin repeat and pleckstrin homology domains 3) belongs to the ACAP family of GAPs (GTPase-activating proteins) for the small GTPase Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor). However, its specificity to Arf isoforms and physiological functions remain unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that ACAP3 plays an important role in neurite outgrowth of mouse hippocampal neurons through its GAP activity specific to Arf6. In primary cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, knockdown of ACAP3 abrogated neurite outgrowth, which was rescued by ectopically expressed wild-type ACAP3, but not by its GAP activity-deficient mutant. Ectopically expressed ACAP3 in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293T cells showed the GAP activity specific to Arf6. In support of this observation, the level of GTP-bound Arf6 was significantly increased by knockdown of ACAP3 in hippocampal neurons. In addition, knockdown and knockout of Arf6 in mouse hippocampal neurons suppressed neurite outgrowth. These results demonstrate that ACAP3 positively regulates neurite outgrowth through its GAP activity specific to Arf6. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth suppressed by ACAP3 knockdown was rescued by expression of a fast cycle mutant of Arf6 that spontaneously exchanges guanine nucleotides on Arf6, but not by that of wild-type, GTP- or GDP-locked mutant Arf6. Thus cycling between active and inactive forms of Arf6, which is precisely regulated by ACAP3 in concert with a guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor(s), seems to be required for neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons. PMID:27330119

  16. Astaxanthin Protects Primary Hippocampal Neurons against Noxious Effects of Aβ-Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Lobos, Pedro; Bruna, Barbara; Cordova, Alex; Barattini, Pablo; Galáz, Jose Luis; Adasme, Tatiana; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Muñoz, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and the ensuing oxidative stress contribute to Alzheimer's disease pathology. We reported previously that amyloid-β peptide oligomers (AβOs) produce aberrant Ca2+ signals at sublethal concentrations and decrease the expression of type-2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2), which are crucial for hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory. Here, we investigated whether the antioxidant agent astaxanthin (ATX) protects neurons from AβOs-induced excessive mitochondrial ROS generation, NFATc4 activation, and RyR2 mRNA downregulation. To determine mitochondrial H2O2 production or NFATc4 nuclear translocation, neurons were transfected with plasmids coding for HyperMito or NFATc4-eGFP, respectively. Primary hippocampal cultures were incubated with 0.1 μM ATX for 1.5 h prior to AβOs addition (500 nM). We found that incubation with ATX (≤10 μM) for ≤24 h was nontoxic to neurons, evaluated by the live/dead assay. Preincubation with 0.1 μM ATX also prevented the neuronal mitochondrial H2O2 generation induced within minutes of AβOs addition. Longer exposures to AβOs (6 h) promoted NFATc4-eGFP nuclear translocation and decreased RyR2 mRNA levels, evaluated by detection of the eGFP-tagged fluorescent plasmid and qPCR, respectively. Preincubation with 0.1 μM ATX prevented both effects. These results indicate that ATX protects neurons from the noxious effects of AβOs on mitochondrial ROS production, NFATc4 activation, and RyR2 gene expression downregulation. PMID:27034843

  17. Generation of functional hippocampal neurons from self-organizing human embryonic stem cell-derived dorsomedial telencephalic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Hideya; Kadoshima, Taisuke; Soen, Mika; Narii, Nobuhiro; Ishida, Yoshihito; Ohgushi, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Jun; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    The developing dorsomedial telencephalon includes the medial pallium, which goes on to form the hippocampus. Generating a reliable source of human hippocampal tissue is an important step for cell-based research into hippocampus-related diseases. Here we show the generation of functional hippocampal granule- and pyramidal-like neurons from self-organizing dorsomedial telencephalic tissue using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). First, we develop a hESC culture method that utilizes bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Wnt signalling to induce choroid plexus, the most dorsomedial portion of the telencephalon. Then, we find that titrating BMP and Wnt exposure allowed the self-organization of medial pallium tissues. Following long-term dissociation culture, these dorsomedial telencephalic tissues give rise to Zbtb20+/Prox1+ granule neurons and Zbtb20+/KA1+ pyramidal neurons, both of which were electrically functional with network formation. Thus, we have developed an in vitro model that recapitulates human hippocampus development, allowing the generation of functional hippocampal granule- and pyramidal-like neurons. PMID:26573335

  18. Mdivi-1 Protects Epileptic Hippocampal Neurons from Apoptosis via Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Xie, Nanchang; Wang, Cui; Wu, Chuanjie; Cheng, Xuan; Gao, Yanlun; Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yi; Lian, Yajun

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 (mdivi-1), a selective inhibitor of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1, has been proposed to have a neuroprotective effect on hippocampal neurons in animal models of epilepsy. However, the effect of mdivi-1 on epileptic neuronal death in vitro remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effect of mdivi-1 and the underlying mechanisms in the hippocampal neuronal culture (HNC) model of acquired epilepsy (AE) in vitro. We found that mitochondrial fission was increased in the HNC model of AE and inhibition of mitochondrial fission by mdivi-1 significantly decreased neuronal apoptosis induced by AE. In addition, mdivi-1 pretreatment significantly attenuated oxidative stress induced by AE characterized by decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and malondialdehyde level and by increase of superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, mdivi-1 pretreatment significantly decreased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers glucose-regulated protein 78, C/EBP homologous protein expression and caspase-3 activation. Altogether, our findings suggest that mdivi-1 protected against AE-induced hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in vitro via decreasing ROS-mediated oxidative stress and ER stress. PMID:26801176

  19. Regulation of dopamine D2 receptor-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling and spine formation by GABAA receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Sehyoun; Kim, Donghoon; Kim, Hyun; Baik, Ja-Hyun

    2015-01-23

    Dopamine (DA) signaling via DA receptors is known to control hippocampal activity that contributes to learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity. In primary hippocampal neuronal culture, we observed that dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) co-localized with certain subtypes of GABAA receptors, namely α1, β3, and γ2 subunits, as revealed by double immunofluorocytochemical analysis. Treatment with the D2R agonist, quinpirole, was shown to elicit an increase in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in hippocampal neurons. This phosphorylation was inhibited by pretreatment with the GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol. Furthermore, treatment of hippocampal neurons with quinpirole increased the dendritic spine density and this regulation was totally blocked by pretreatment with a MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059), D2R antagonist (haloperidol), or by the GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol. These results suggest that D2R-mediated ERK phosphorylation can control spine formation and that the GABAA receptor negatively regulates the D2R-induced spine formation through ERK signaling in hippocampal neurons, thus indicating a potential role of D2R in the control of hippocampal neuronal excitability. PMID:25483619

  20. Visualizing Metal Content and Intracellular Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons with Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that metal dyshomeostasis plays an important role in human neurodegenerative diseases. Although distinctive metal distributions are described for mature hippocampus and cortex, much less is known about metal levels and intracellular distribution in individual hippocampal neuronal somata. To solve this problem, we conducted quantitative metal analyses utilizing synchrotron radiation X-Ray fluorescence on frozen hydrated primary cultured neurons derived from rat embryonic cortex (CTX) and two regions of the hippocampus: dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1. Comparing average metal contents showed that the most abundant metals were calcium, iron, and zinc, whereas metals such as copper and manganese were less than 10% of zinc. Average metal contents were generally similar when compared across neurons cultured from CTX, DG, and CA1, except for manganese that was larger in CA1. However, each metal showed a characteristic spatial distribution in individual neuronal somata. Zinc was uniformly distributed throughout the cytosol, with no evidence for the existence of previously identified zinc-enriched organelles, zincosomes. Calcium showed a peri-nuclear distribution consistent with accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. Iron showed 2–3 distinct highly concentrated puncta only in peri-nuclear locations. Notwithstanding the small sample size, these analyses demonstrate that primary cultured neurons show characteristic metal signatures. The iron puncta probably represent iron-accumulating organelles, siderosomes. Thus, the metal distributions observed in mature brain structures are likely the result of both intrinsic neuronal factors that control cellular metal content and extrinsic factors related to the synaptic organization, function, and contacts formed and maintained in each region. PMID:27434052

  1. Visualizing Metal Content and Intracellular Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons with Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Robert A; Jin, Qiaoling; Lai, Barry; Kiedrowski, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that metal dyshomeostasis plays an important role in human neurodegenerative diseases. Although distinctive metal distributions are described for mature hippocampus and cortex, much less is known about metal levels and intracellular distribution in individual hippocampal neuronal somata. To solve this problem, we conducted quantitative metal analyses utilizing synchrotron radiation X-Ray fluorescence on frozen hydrated primary cultured neurons derived from rat embryonic cortex (CTX) and two regions of the hippocampus: dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1. Comparing average metal contents showed that the most abundant metals were calcium, iron, and zinc, whereas metals such as copper and manganese were less than 10% of zinc. Average metal contents were generally similar when compared across neurons cultured from CTX, DG, and CA1, except for manganese that was larger in CA1. However, each metal showed a characteristic spatial distribution in individual neuronal somata. Zinc was uniformly distributed throughout the cytosol, with no evidence for the existence of previously identified zinc-enriched organelles, zincosomes. Calcium showed a peri-nuclear distribution consistent with accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. Iron showed 2-3 distinct highly concentrated puncta only in peri-nuclear locations. Notwithstanding the small sample size, these analyses demonstrate that primary cultured neurons show characteristic metal signatures. The iron puncta probably represent iron-accumulating organelles, siderosomes. Thus, the metal distributions observed in mature brain structures are likely the result of both intrinsic neuronal factors that control cellular metal content and extrinsic factors related to the synaptic organization, function, and contacts formed and maintained in each region. PMID:27434052

  2. Persistent Gliosis Interferes with Neurogenesis in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Johannes; Donkels, Catharina; Münzner, Gert; Haas, Carola A.

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has become an intensively investigated research topic, as it is essential for proper hippocampal function and considered to bear therapeutic potential for the replacement of pathologically lost neurons. On the other hand, neurogenesis itself is frequently affected by CNS insults. To identify processes leading to the disturbance of neurogenesis, we made use of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC), which, for unknown reasons, lose their neurogenic potential during cultivation. In the present study, we show by BrdU/Prox1 double-immunostaining that the generation of new granule cells drops by 90% during the first week of cultivation. Monitoring neurogenesis dynamically in OHSC from POMC-eGFP mice, in which immature granule cells are endogenously labeled, revealed a gradual decay of the eGFP signal, reaching 10% of initial values within 7 days of cultivation. Accordingly, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed the downregulation of the neurogenesis-related genes doublecortin and Hes5, a crucial target of the stem cell-maintaining Notch signaling pathway. In parallel, we demonstrate a strong and long-lasting activation of astrocytes and microglial cells, both, morphologically and on the level of gene expression. Enhancement of astroglial activation by treating OHSC with ciliary neurotrophic factor accelerated the loss of neurogenesis, whereas treatment with indomethacin or an antagonist of the purinergic P2Y12 receptor exhibited potent protective effects on the neurogenic outcome. Therefore, we conclude that OHSC rapidly lose their neurogenic capacity due to persistent inflammatory processes taking place after the slice preparation. As inflammation is also considered to affect neurogenesis in many CNS pathologies, OHSC appear as a useful tool to study this interplay and its molecular basis. Furthermore, we propose that modification of glial activation might bear the therapeutic potential

  3. Persistent Gliosis Interferes with Neurogenesis in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Johannes; Donkels, Catharina; Münzner, Gert; Haas, Carola A

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has become an intensively investigated research topic, as it is essential for proper hippocampal function and considered to bear therapeutic potential for the replacement of pathologically lost neurons. On the other hand, neurogenesis itself is frequently affected by CNS insults. To identify processes leading to the disturbance of neurogenesis, we made use of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC), which, for unknown reasons, lose their neurogenic potential during cultivation. In the present study, we show by BrdU/Prox1 double-immunostaining that the generation of new granule cells drops by 90% during the first week of cultivation. Monitoring neurogenesis dynamically in OHSC from POMC-eGFP mice, in which immature granule cells are endogenously labeled, revealed a gradual decay of the eGFP signal, reaching 10% of initial values within 7 days of cultivation. Accordingly, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed the downregulation of the neurogenesis-related genes doublecortin and Hes5, a crucial target of the stem cell-maintaining Notch signaling pathway. In parallel, we demonstrate a strong and long-lasting activation of astrocytes and microglial cells, both, morphologically and on the level of gene expression. Enhancement of astroglial activation by treating OHSC with ciliary neurotrophic factor accelerated the loss of neurogenesis, whereas treatment with indomethacin or an antagonist of the purinergic P2Y12 receptor exhibited potent protective effects on the neurogenic outcome. Therefore, we conclude that OHSC rapidly lose their neurogenic capacity due to persistent inflammatory processes taking place after the slice preparation. As inflammation is also considered to affect neurogenesis in many CNS pathologies, OHSC appear as a useful tool to study this interplay and its molecular basis. Furthermore, we propose that modification of glial activation might bear the therapeutic potential

  4. Glutamate-induced metabolic changes influence the cytoplasmic redox state of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Porras, Omar H; Stutzin, Andrés

    2011-07-22

    Brain cell metabolism is intimately associated with intracellular oxidation-reduction (redox) balance. Glutamatergic transmission is accompanied with changes in substrate preference in neurons. Therefore, we studied cytoplasmatic redox changes in hippocampal neurons in culture exposed to glutamate. Neurons were transfected with HyPer, a genetically encoded redox biosensor for hydrogen peroxide which allows real-time imaging of the redox state. The rate of fluorescence decay, corresponding to the reduction of the biosensor was found to be augmented by low doses of glutamate (10 μM) as well as by pharmacological stimulation of NMDA glutamate receptors. Acute chelation of extracellular Ca(2+) abolished the glutamate-induced effect observed on HyPer fluorescence. Additional experiments indicated that mitochondrial function and hence energetic substrate availability commands the redox state of neurons and is required for the glutamate effect observed on the biosensor signal. Furthermore, our results implicated astrocytic metabolism in the changes of neuronal redox state observed with glutamate. PMID:21708127

  5. Neto2 is a KCC2 interacting protein required for neuronal Cl− regulation in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ivakine, Evgueni A.; Acton, Brooke A.; Mahadevan, Vivek; Ormond, Jake; Tang, Man; Pressey, Jessica C.; Huang, Michelle Y.; Ng, David; Delpire, Eric; Salter, Michael W.; Woodin, Melanie A.; McInnes, Roderick R.

    2013-01-01

    KCC2 is a neuron-specific K+–Cl− cotransporter that is essential for Cl− homeostasis and fast inhibitory synaptic transmission in the mature CNS. Despite the critical role of KCC2 in neurons, the mechanisms regulating its function are not understood. Here, we show that KCC2 is critically regulated by the single-pass transmembrane protein neuropilin and tolloid like-2 (Neto2). Neto2 is required to maintain the normal abundance of KCC2 and specifically associates with the active oligomeric form of the transporter. Loss of the Neto2:KCC2 interaction reduced KCC2-mediated Cl− extrusion, resulting in decreased synaptic inhibition in hippocampal neurons. PMID:23401525

  6. Multiplex Networks of Cortical and Hippocampal Neurons Revealed at Different Timescales

    PubMed Central

    Timme, Nicholas; Ito, Shinya; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Hiolski, Emma; Hottowy, Pawel; Beggs, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the importance of multiplex networks – interdependent networks with shared nodes and different types of connections – in systems primarily outside of neuroscience. Though the multiplex properties of networks are frequently not considered, most networks are actually multiplex networks and the multiplex specific features of networks can greatly affect network behavior (e.g. fault tolerance). Thus, the study of networks of neurons could potentially be greatly enhanced using a multiplex perspective. Given the wide range of temporally dependent rhythms and phenomena present in neural systems, we chose to examine multiplex networks of individual neurons with time scale dependent connections. To study these networks, we used transfer entropy – an information theoretic quantity that can be used to measure linear and nonlinear interactions – to systematically measure the connectivity between individual neurons at different time scales in cortical and hippocampal slice cultures. We recorded the spiking activity of almost 12,000 neurons across 60 tissue samples using a 512-electrode array with 60 micrometer inter-electrode spacing and 50 microsecond temporal resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this preparation and recording method represents a superior combination of number of recorded neurons and temporal and spatial recording resolutions to any currently available in vivo system. We found that highly connected neurons (“hubs”) were localized to certain time scales, which, we hypothesize, increases the fault tolerance of the network. Conversely, a large proportion of non-hub neurons were not localized to certain time scales. In addition, we found that long and short time scale connectivity was uncorrelated. Finally, we found that long time scale networks were significantly less modular and more disassortative than short time scale networks in both tissue types. As far as we are aware, this analysis represents the first

  7. Manipulating Kv4.2 identifies a specific component of hippocampal pyramidal neuron A-current that depends upon Kv4.2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Lauver, Aaron; Yuan, Li-Lian; Jeromin, Andreas; Nadin, Brian M.; Rodríguez, José J.; Davies, Heather A.; Stewart, Michael G.; Wu, Gang-Yi; Pfaffinger, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    The somatodendritic A-current, ISA, in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons regulates the processing of synaptic inputs and the amplitude of back propagating action potentials into the dendritic tree, as well as the action potential firing properties at the soma. In this study, we have used RNA interference and over-expression to show that expression of the Kv4.2 gene specifically regulates the ISA component of A-current in these neurons. In dissociated hippocampal pyramidal neuron cultures, or organotypic cultured CA1 pyramidal neurons, the expression level of Kv4.2 is such that the ISA channels are maintained in the population at a peak conductance of approximately 950 pS/pF. Suppression of Kv4.2 transcripts in hippocampal pyramidal neurons using an RNA interference vector suppresses ISA current by 60% in 2 days, similar to the effect of expressing dominant-negative Kv4 channel constructs. Increasing the expression of Kv4.2 in these neurons increases the level of ISA to 170% of the normal set point without altering the biophysical properties. Our results establish a specific role for native Kv4.2 transcripts in forming and maintaining ISA current at characteristic levels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. PMID:17026528

  8. Inhibition of TYRO3/Akt signaling participates in hypoxic injury in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan-zhen; Wang, Wei; Xian, Na; Wu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the TYRO3/Akt signaling pathway in hypoxic injury to hippocampal neurons. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that hypoxia inhibited the proliferation and viability of hippocampal neurons. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated that hypoxia induced neuronal apoptosis in a time-dependent manner, with a greater number of apoptotic cells with longer hypoxic exposure. Immunofluorescence labeling revealed that hypoxia suppressed TYRO3 expression. Western blot assay showed that hypoxia decreased Akt phosphorylation levels in a time-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings suggest that hypoxia inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neurons and promotes apoptosis, and that the inhibition of the TYRO3/Akt signaling pathway plays an important role in hypoxia-induced neuronal injury. PMID:27335558

  9. Seven cDNAs enriched following hippocampal lesion: possible roles in neuronal responses to injury.

    PubMed

    Price, Mitch; Lang, Molly G; Frank, Ami T; Goetting-Minesky, M Paula; Patel, Samip P; Silviera, Matthew L; Krady, J Kyle; Milner, Robert J; Ewing, Andrew G; Day, Jonathan R

    2003-09-10

    Synaptic plasticity is important for formation of long-term memories and in re-establishment of function following injury. Seven cDNAs enriched following lesion in the hippocampus of the rat have been isolated using a PCR-based cDNA suppression subtraction hybridization. Sequence analysis resulted in the identification of two genes with known roles in synaptic development and neuronal activities: astrotactin and calcineurin. These two neuron-specific genes have established roles in development or synaptogenesis. Sequence analysis of the other five additional genes shows that two are likely to be involved in G-protein signaling pathways, one is a WD repeat protein, and the remaining two are entirely novel. All seven candidates are expressed in the hippocampus and, in some cases, cortical layers of adult brains. RT-PCR data show that expression increases following synaptogenic lesion. Immunocytochemical analysis in primary hippocampal neurons showed that Calcineurin immunoreactivity was redistributed in neurons during 2 weeks in culture. This redistribution suggests that Calcineurin's role changes during neurite outgrowth immediately prior to synapse formation in vitro. In addition, inhibiting Calcineurin activity with cyclosporin A enhanced neurite outgrowth, suggesting that Calcineurin has a regulatory role in axon sprouting. The discovery of previously unknown genes involved in the response to neurodegeneration will contribute to our understanding of neural development, responses to CNS trauma, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:14499481

  10. Dietary cholesterol modulates the excitability of rabbit hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Desheng; Schreurs, Bernard G.

    2010-01-01

    Previous work has shown high dietary cholesterol can affect learning and memory including rabbit eyeblink conditioning and this effect may be due to increased membrane cholesterol and enhanced hippocampal amyloid beta production. This study investigated whether dietary cholesterol modulates rabbit hippocampal CA1 neuron membrane properties known to be involved in rabbit eyeblink conditioning. Whole-cell current clamp recordings in hippocampal neurons from rabbits fed 2% cholesterol or normal chow for 8 weeks revealed changes including decreased after-hyperpolarization amplitudes (AHPs) – an index of membrane excitability shown to be important for rabbit eyeblink conditioning. This index was reversed by adding copper to drinking water – a dietary manipulation that can retard rabbit eyeblink conditioning. Evidence of cholesterol effects on membrane excitability was provided by application of methyl-β-cyclodextrin, a compound that reduces membrane cholesterol, which increased the excitability of hippocampal CA1 neurons. PMID:20639007

  11. Volatile anesthetics gate a chloride current in postnatal rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Isenberg, K E; Zorumski, C F

    1992-02-01

    A volatile anesthetic-gated current was characterized in patch-clamped cultured postnatal rat hippocampal neurons. In this preparation, the major volatile anesthetics, isoflurane, halothane, and enflurane, open an anion-selective conductance. This volatile anesthetic-gated current exhibits anion selectivity with a chloride-to-acetate permeability ratio of 15, shows outward rectification well described by the constant field equation, and is activated in a dose-dependent fashion with half-maximal response to isoflurane at 0.8 mM (0.032 atm). The current persists in the absence of external Ca2+ and is not blocked by strychnine, a glycine antagonist. However, the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) antagonists, bicuculline and picrotoxinin, and the nonspecific anion channel blocker, 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), completely block the response. These observations suggest that volatile anesthetics, like several other general anesthetics such as barbiturates, steroids, and etomidate, have a GABA-mimetic effect on vertebrate central neurons in culture. It is not clear whether this GABAA-gating property is a prerequisite for all general anesthetics. However, under normal physiological conditions of low intracellular Cl-, it is likely that drugs with both direct GABA agonist and GABA modulatory properties will produce overall depression of the central nervous system by increasing the normal inhibitory synaptic influence and by directly hyperpolarizing neurons. PMID:1740240

  12. Sex stratified neuronal cultures to study ischemic cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, Stacy L; Vest, Rebekah; Verma, Saurabh; Traystman, Richard J; Herson, Paco S

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in neuronal susceptibility to ischemic injury and neurodegenerative disease have long been observed, but the signaling mechanisms responsible for those differences remain unclear. Primary disassociated embryonic neuronal culture provides a simplified experimental model with which to investigate the neuronal cell signaling involved in cell death as a result of ischemia or disease; however, most neuronal cultures used in research today are mixed sex. Researchers can and do test the effects of sex steroid treatment in mixed sex neuronal cultures in models of neuronal injury and disease, but accumulating evidence suggests that the female brain responds to androgens, estrogens, and progesterone differently than the male brain. Furthermore, neonate male and female rodents respond differently to ischemic injury, with males experiencing greater injury following cerebral ischemia than females. Thus, mixed sex neuronal cultures might obscure and confound the experimental results; important information might be missed. For this reason, the Herson Lab at the University of Colorado School of Medicine routinely prepares sex-stratified primary disassociated embryonic neuronal cultures from both hippocampus and cortex. Embryos are sexed before harvesting of brain tissue and male and female tissue are disassociated separately, plated separately, and maintained separately. Using this method, the Herson Lab has demonstrated a male-specific role for the ion channel TRPM2 in ischemic cell death. In this manuscript, we share and discuss our protocol for sexing embryonic mice and preparing sex-stratified hippocampal primary disassociated neuron cultures. This method can be adapted to prepare sex-stratified cortical cultures and the method for embryo sexing can be used in conjunction with other protocols for any study in which sex is thought to be an important determinant of outcome. PMID:24378980

  13. Impact of nanosecond pulsed electric fields on primary hippocampal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Payne, Jason A.; Kuipers, Marjorie A.; Thompson, Gary L.; Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2012-02-01

    Cellular exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) are believed to cause immediate creation of nanopores in the plasma membrane. These nanopores enable passage of small ions, but remain impermeable to larger molecules like propidium iodide. Previous work has shown that nanopores are stable for minutes after exposure, suggesting that formation of nanopores in excitable cells could lead to prolonged action potential inhibition. Previously, we measured the formation of nanopores in neuroblastoma cells by measuring the influx of extracellular calcium by preloading cells with Calcium Green-AM. In this work, we explored the impact of changing the width of a single nsPEF, at constant amplitude, on uptake of extracellular calcium ions by primary hippocampal neurons (PHN). Calcium Green was again used to measure the influx of extracellular calcium and FM1-43 was used to monitor changes in membrane conformation. The observed thresholds for nanopore formation in PHN by nsPEF were comparable to those measured in neuroblastoma. This work is the first study of nsPEF effects on PHN and strongly suggests that neurological inhibition by nanosecond electrical pulses is highly likely at doses well below irreversible damage.

  14. Rhythmic coordination of hippocampal neurons during associative memory processing

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Lara M; Rueckemann, Jon W; Riviere, Pamela D; Keefe, Katherine R; Porter, Blake S; Heimbuch, Ian S; Budlong, Carl H; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal oscillations are dynamic, with unique oscillatory frequencies present during different behavioral states. To examine the extent to which these oscillations reflect neuron engagement in distinct local circuit processes that are important for memory, we recorded single cell and local field potential activity from the CA1 region of the hippocampus as rats performed a context-guided odor-reward association task. We found that theta (4–12 Hz), beta (15–35 Hz), low gamma (35–55 Hz), and high gamma (65–90 Hz) frequencies exhibited dynamic amplitude profiles as rats sampled odor cues. Interneurons and principal cells exhibited unique engagement in each of the four rhythmic circuits in a manner that related to successful performance of the task. Moreover, principal cells coherent to each rhythm differentially represented task dimensions. These results demonstrate that distinct processing states arise from the engagement of rhythmically identifiable circuits, which have unique roles in organizing task-relevant processing in the hippocampus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09849.001 PMID:26751780

  15. Two Cell Circuits of Oriented Adult Hippocampal Neurons on Self-Assembled Monolayers for Use in the Study of Neuronal Communication in a Defined System

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the directed formation of small circuits of electrically active, synaptically connected neurons derived from the hippocampus of adult rats through the use of engineered chemically modified culture surfaces that orient the polarity of the neuronal processes. Although synaptogenesis, synaptic communication, synaptic plasticity, and brain disease pathophysiology can be studied using brain slice or dissociated embryonic neuronal culture systems, the complex elements found in neuronal synapses makes specific studies difficult in these random cultures. The study of synaptic transmission in mature adult neurons and factors affecting synaptic transmission are generally studied in organotypic cultures, in brain slices, or in vivo. However, engineered neuronal networks would allow these studies to be performed instead on simple functional neuronal circuits derived from adult brain tissue. Photolithographic patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used to create the two-cell “bidirectional polarity” circuit patterns. This pattern consisted of a cell permissive SAM, N-1[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl] diethylenetriamine (DETA), and was composed of two 25 μm somal adhesion sites connected with 5 μm lines acting as surface cues for guided axonal and dendritic regeneration. Surrounding the DETA pattern was a background of a non-cell-permissive poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) SAM. Adult hippocampal neurons were first cultured on coverslips coated with DETA monolayers and were later passaged onto the PEG-DETA bidirectional polarity patterns in serum-free medium. These neurons followed surface cues, attaching and regenerating only along the DETA substrate to form small engineered neuronal circuits. These circuits were stable for more than 21 days in vitro (DIV), during which synaptic connectivity was evaluated using basic electrophysiological methods. PMID:23611164

  16. The Neuropsychiatric Disease-Associated Gene cacna1c Mediates Survival of Young Hippocampal Neurons123

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anni S.; Kabir, Zeeba D.; Knobbe, Whitney; Orr, Madeline; Burgdorf, Caitlin; Huntington, Paula; McDaniel, Latisha; Britt, Jeremiah K.; Hoffmann, Franz; Brat, Daniel J.; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations in CACNA1C, which encodes the Cav1.2 subunit of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), are associated with multiple forms of neuropsychiatric disease that manifest high anxiety in patients. In parallel, mice harboring forebrain-specific conditional knockout of cacna1c (forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO) display unusually high anxiety-like behavior. LTCCs in general, including the Cav1.3 subunit, have been shown to mediate differentiation of neural precursor cells (NPCs). However, it has not previously been determined whether Cav1.2 affects postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo. Here, we show that forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice exhibit enhanced cell death of young hippocampal neurons, with no change in NPC proliferation, hippocampal size, dentate gyrus thickness, or corticosterone levels compared with wild-type littermates. These mice also exhibit deficits in brain levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and Cre recombinase-mediated knockdown of adult hippocampal Cav1.2 recapitulates the deficit in young hippocampal neurons survival. Treatment of forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice with the neuroprotective agent P7C3-A20 restored the net magnitude of postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis to wild-type levels without ameliorating their deficit in BDNF expression. The role of Cav1.2 in young hippocampal neurons survival may provide new approaches for understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease associated with aberrations in CACNA1C. Visual Abstract PMID:27066530

  17. The Neuropsychiatric Disease-Associated Gene cacna1c Mediates Survival of Young Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anni S; De Jesús-Cortés, Héctor; Kabir, Zeeba D; Knobbe, Whitney; Orr, Madeline; Burgdorf, Caitlin; Huntington, Paula; McDaniel, Latisha; Britt, Jeremiah K; Hoffmann, Franz; Brat, Daniel J; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M; Pieper, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations in CACNA1C, which encodes the Cav1.2 subunit of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), are associated with multiple forms of neuropsychiatric disease that manifest high anxiety in patients. In parallel, mice harboring forebrain-specific conditional knockout of cacna1c (forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO) display unusually high anxiety-like behavior. LTCCs in general, including the Cav1.3 subunit, have been shown to mediate differentiation of neural precursor cells (NPCs). However, it has not previously been determined whether Cav1.2 affects postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo. Here, we show that forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice exhibit enhanced cell death of young hippocampal neurons, with no change in NPC proliferation, hippocampal size, dentate gyrus thickness, or corticosterone levels compared with wild-type littermates. These mice also exhibit deficits in brain levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and Cre recombinase-mediated knockdown of adult hippocampal Cav1.2 recapitulates the deficit in young hippocampal neurons survival. Treatment of forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice with the neuroprotective agent P7C3-A20 restored the net magnitude of postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis to wild-type levels without ameliorating their deficit in BDNF expression. The role of Cav1.2 in young hippocampal neurons survival may provide new approaches for understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease associated with aberrations in CACNA1C. Visual Abstract. PMID:27066530

  18. Benzothiazole Amphiphiles Promote the Formation of Dendritic Spines in Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Cifelli, Jessica L; Dozier, Lara; Chung, Tim S; Patrick, Gentry N; Yang, Jerry

    2016-06-01

    The majority of excitatory synapses in the brain exist on dendritic spines. Accordingly, the regulation of dendritic spine density in the hippocampus is thought to play a central role in learning and memory. The development of novel methods to control spine density could, therefore, have important implications for treatment of a host of neurodegenerative and developmental cognitive disorders. Herein, we report the design and evaluation of a new class of benzothiazole amphiphiles that exhibit a dose-dependent response leading to an increase in dendritic spine density in primary hippocampal neurons. Cell exposure studies reveal that the increase in spine density can persist for days in the presence of these compounds, but returns to normal spine density levels within 24 h when the compounds are removed, demonstrating the capability to reversibly control spinogenic activity. Time-lapse imaging of dissociated hippocampal neuronal cultures shows that these compounds promote a net increase in spine density through the formation of new spines. Biochemical studies support that promotion of spine formation by these compounds is accompanied by Ras activation. These spinogenic molecules were also capable of inhibiting a suspected mechanism for dendritic spine loss induced by Alzheimer-related aggregated amyloid-β peptides in primary neurons. Evaluation of this new group of spinogenic agents reveals that they also exhibit relatively low toxicity at concentrations displaying activity. Collectively, these results suggest that small molecules that promote spine formation could be potentially useful for ameliorating cognitive deficiencies associated with spine loss in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, and may also find use as general cognitive enhancers. PMID:27022020

  19. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary. PMID:26389591

  20. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S.; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R.

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary. PMID:26389591

  1. Inhibitory ryanodine prevents ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca²⁺ release without affecting endoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ content in primary hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Adasme, Tatiana; Paula-Lima, Andrea; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-02-27

    Ryanodine is a cell permeant plant alkaloid that binds selectively and with high affinity to ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca(2+) release channels. Sub-micromolar ryanodine concentrations activate RyR channels while micromolar concentrations are inhibitory. Several reports indicate that neuronal synaptic plasticity, learning and memory require RyR-mediated Ca(2+)-release, which is essential for muscle contraction. The use of micromolar (inhibitory) ryanodine represents a common strategy to suppress RyR activity in neuronal cells: however, micromolar ryanodine promotes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) depletion in muscle cells. Information is lacking in this regard in neuronal cells; hence, we examined here if addition of inhibitory ryanodine elicited Ca(2+) release in primary hippocampal neurons, and if prolonged incubation of primary hippocampal cultures with inhibitory ryanodine affected neuronal ER calcium content. Our results indicate that inhibitory ryanodine does not cause Ca(2+) release from the ER in primary hippocampal neurons, even though ryanodine diffusion should produce initially low intracellular concentrations, within the RyR activation range. Moreover, neurons treated for 1 h with inhibitory ryanodine had comparable Ca(2+) levels as control neurons. These combined findings imply that prolonged incubation with inhibitory ryanodine, which effectively abolishes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release, preserves ER Ca(2+) levels and thus constitutes a sound strategy to suppress neuronal RyR function. PMID:25623539

  2. Bisphenol A promotes dendritic morphogenesis of hippocampal neurons through estrogen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohong; Lu, Yang; Zhang, Guangxia; Chen, Lei; Tian, Dong; Shen, Xiuying; Yang, Yanling; Dong, Fanni

    2014-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental endocrine disruptor, has attracted increasing attention to its adverse effects on brain developmental process. The previous study indicated that BPA rapidly increased motility and density of dendritic filopodia and enhanced the phosphorylation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR2B in cultured hippocampal neurons within 30min. The purpose of the present study was further to investigate the effects of BPA for 24h on dendritic morphogenesis and the underlying mechanisms. After cultured for 5d in vitro, the hippocampal neurons from 24h-old rat were infected by AdV-EGFP to indicate time-lapse imaging of living neurons. The results demonstrated that the exposure of the cultured hippocampal neurons to BPA (10, 100nM) or 17β-estradiol (17β-E2, 10nM) for 24h significantly promoted dendritic development, as evidenced by the increased total length of dendrite and the enhanced motility and density of dendritic filopodia. However, these changes were suppressed by an ERs antagonist, ICI182,780, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, and a mitogen-activated ERK1/2-activating kinase (MEK1/2) inhibitor, U0126. Meanwhile, the increased F-actin (filamentous actin) induced by BPA (100nM) was also completely eliminated by these blockers. Furthermore, the result of western blot analyses showed that, the exposure of the cultures to BPA or 17β-E2 for 24h promoted the expression of Rac1/Cdc42 but inhibited that of RhoA, suggesting Rac1 (Ras related C3 botulinum toxinsubstrate 1)/Cdc42 (cell divisioncycle 42) and RhoA (Ras homologous A), the Rho family of small GTPases, were involved in BPA- or 17β-E2-induced changes in the dendritic morphogenesis of neurons. These BPA- or 17β-E2-induced effects were completely blocked by ICI182,780, and were partially suppressed by U0126. These results reveal that, similar to 17β-E2, BPA exerts its effects on dendritic morphogenesis by eliciting both nuclear actions and extranuclear

  3. The RhoG/ELMO1/Dock180 signaling module is required for spine morphogenesis in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Yoon; Oh, Mi Hee; Bernard, Laura P; Macara, Ian G; Zhang, Huaye

    2011-10-28

    Dendritic spines are actin-rich structures, the formation and plasticity of which are regulated by the Rho GTPases in response to synaptic input. Although several guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) have been implicated in spine development and plasticity in hippocampal neurons, it is not known how many different Rho GEFs contribute to spine morphogenesis or how they coordinate the initiation, establishment, and maintenance of spines. In this study, we screened 70 rat Rho GEFs in cultured hippocampal neurons by RNA interference and identified a number of candidates that affected spine morphogenesis. Of these, Dock180, which plays a pivotal role in a variety of cellular processes including cell migration and phagocytosis, was further investigated. We show that depletion of Dock180 inhibits spine morphogenesis, whereas overexpression of Dock180 promotes spine morphogenesis. ELMO1, a protein necessary for in vivo functions of Dock180, functions in a complex with Dock180 in spine morphogenesis through activating the Rac GTPase. Moreover, RhoG, which functions upstream of the ELMO1/Dock180 complex, is also important for spine formation. Together, our findings uncover a role for the RhoG/ELMO1/Dock180 signaling module in spine morphogenesis in hippocampal neurons. PMID:21900250

  4. Selective axonal growth of embryonic hippocampal neurons according to topographic features of various sizes and shapes

    PubMed Central

    Fozdar, David Y; Lee, Jae Y; Schmidt, Christine E; Chen, Shaochen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Understanding how surface features influence the establishment and outgrowth of the axon of developing neurons at the single cell level may aid in designing implantable scaffolds for the regeneration of damaged nerves. Past studies have shown that micropatterned ridge-groove structures not only instigate axon polarization, alignment, and extension, but are also preferred over smooth surfaces and even neurotrophic ligands. Methods Here, we performed axonal-outgrowth competition assays using a proprietary four-quadrant topography grid to determine the capacity of various micropatterned topographies to act as stimuli sequestering axon extension. Each topography in the grid consisted of an array of microscale (approximately 2 μm) or submicroscale (approximately 300 nm) holes or lines with variable dimensions. Individual rat embryonic hippocampal cells were positioned either between two juxtaposing topographies or at the borders of individual topographies juxtaposing unpatterned smooth surface, cultured for 24 hours, and analyzed with respect to axonal selection using conventional imaging techniques. Results Topography was found to influence axon formation and extension relative to smooth surface, and the distance of neurons relative to topography was found to impact whether the topography could serve as an effective cue. Neurons were also found to prefer submicroscale over microscale features and holes over lines for a given feature size. Conclusion The results suggest that implementing physical cues of various shapes and sizes on nerve guidance conduits and other advanced biomaterial scaffolds could help stimulate axon regeneration. PMID:21289981

  5. Hippocampal adaptive response following extensive neuronal loss in an inducible transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Myczek, Kristoffer; Yeung, Stephen T; Castello, Nicholas; Baglietto-Vargas, David; LaFerla, Frank M

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal loss is a common component of a variety of neurodegenerative disorders (including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease) and brain traumas (stroke, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury). One brain region that commonly exhibits neuronal loss in several neurodegenerative disorders is the hippocampus, an area of the brain critical for the formation and retrieval of memories. Long-lasting and sometimes unrecoverable deficits caused by neuronal loss present a unique challenge for clinicians and for researchers who attempt to model these traumas in animals. Can these deficits be recovered, and if so, is the brain capable of regeneration following neuronal loss? To address this significant question, we utilized the innovative CaM/Tet-DT(A) mouse model that selectively induces neuronal ablation. We found that we are able to inflict a consistent and significant lesion to the hippocampus, resulting in hippocampally-dependent behavioral deficits and a long-lasting upregulation in neurogenesis, suggesting that this process might be a critical part of hippocampal recovery. In addition, we provide novel evidence of angiogenic and vasculature changes following hippocampal neuronal loss in CaM/Tet-DTA mice. We posit that angiogenesis may be an important factor that promotes neurogenic upregulation following hippocampal neuronal loss, and both factors, angiogenesis and neurogenesis, can contribute to the adaptive response of the brain for behavioral recovery. PMID:25184527

  6. Cardiac arrest triggers hippocampal neuronal death through autophagic and apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cui, Derong; Shang, Hanbing; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Wei; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of neuronal death induced by ischemic injury remains unknown. We investigated whether autophagy and p53 signaling played a role in the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons following global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, in a rat model of 8-min asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Increased autophagosome numbers, expression of lysosomal cathepsin B, cathepsin D, Beclin-1, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) suggested autophagy in hippocampal cells. The expression of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and its target genes: Bax, p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), and damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM) were upregulated following CA. The p53-specific inhibitor pifithrin-α (PFT-α) significantly reduced the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and PUMA) and autophagic proteins (LC3-II and DRAM) that generally increase following CA. PFT-α also reduced hippocampal neuronal damage following CA. Similarly, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which inhibits autophagy and bafilomycin A1 (BFA), which inhibits lysosomes, significantly inhibited hippocampal neuronal damage after CA. These results indicate that CA affects both autophagy and apoptosis, partially mediated by p53. Autophagy plays a significant role in hippocampal neuronal death induced by cerebral I/R following asphyxial-CA. PMID:27273382

  7. The synchronous activity of lateral habenular neurons is essential for regulating hippocampal theta oscillation.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Hidenori; Yanagihara, Shin; Kobayashi, Megumi; Niisato, Kazue; Takekawa, Takashi; Harukuni, Rie; McHugh, Thomas J; Fukai, Tomoki; Isomura, Yoshikazu; Okamoto, Hitoshi

    2013-05-15

    Lateral habenula (LHb) has attracted growing interest as a regulator of serotonergic and dopaminergic neurons in the CNS. However, it remains unclear how the LHb modulates brain states in animals. To identify the neural substrates that are under the influence of LHb regulation, we examined the effects of rat LHb lesions on the hippocampal oscillatory activity associated with the transition of brain states. Our results showed that the LHb lesion shortened the theta activity duration both in anesthetized and sleeping rats. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of LHb lesion on theta maintenance depended upon an intact serotonergic median raphe, suggesting that LHb activity plays an essential role in maintaining hippocampal theta oscillation via the serotonergic raphe. Multiunit recording of sleeping rats further revealed that firing of LHb neurons showed significant phase-locking activity at each theta oscillation cycle in the hippocampus. LHb neurons showing activity that was coordinated with that of the hippocampal theta were localized in the medial LHb division, which receives afferents from the diagonal band of Broca (DBB), a pacemaker region for the hippocampal theta oscillation. Thus, our findings indicate that the DBB may pace not only the hippocampus, but also the LHb, during rapid eye movement sleep. Since serotonin is known to negatively regulate theta oscillation in the hippocampus, phase-locking activity of the LHb neurons may act, under the influence of the DBB, to maintain the hippocampal theta oscillation by modulating the activity of serotonergic neurons. PMID:23678132

  8. Cardiac arrest triggers hippocampal neuronal death through autophagic and apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Derong; Shang, Hanbing; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Wei; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of neuronal death induced by ischemic injury remains unknown. We investigated whether autophagy and p53 signaling played a role in the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons following global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, in a rat model of 8-min asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Increased autophagosome numbers, expression of lysosomal cathepsin B, cathepsin D, Beclin-1, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) suggested autophagy in hippocampal cells. The expression of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and its target genes: Bax, p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), and damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM) were upregulated following CA. The p53-specific inhibitor pifithrin-α (PFT-α) significantly reduced the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and PUMA) and autophagic proteins (LC3-II and DRAM) that generally increase following CA. PFT-α also reduced hippocampal neuronal damage following CA. Similarly, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which inhibits autophagy and bafilomycin A1 (BFA), which inhibits lysosomes, significantly inhibited hippocampal neuronal damage after CA. These results indicate that CA affects both autophagy and apoptosis, partially mediated by p53. Autophagy plays a significant role in hippocampal neuronal death induced by cerebral I/R following asphyxial-CA. PMID:27273382

  9. Hippocampal neuron populations are reduced in vervet monkeys with fetal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Burke, Mark W; Ptito, Maurice; Ervin, Frank R; Palmour, Roberta M

    2015-05-01

    Prenatal exposure to beverage alcohol is a major cause of mild mental retardation and developmental delay. In nonendangered alcohol-preferring vervet monkeys, we modeled the most common nondysmorphic form of fetal alcohol syndrome disorder with voluntary drinking during the third trimester of pregnancy. Here, we report significant numerical reductions in the principal hippocampal neurons of fetal alcohol-exposed (FAE) offspring, as compared to age-matched, similarly housed conspecifics with isocaloric sucrose exposure. These deficits, particularly marked in CA1 and CA3, are present neonatally and persist through infancy (5 months) and juvenile (2 years) stages. Although the volumes of hippocampal subdivisions in FAE animals are not atypical at birth, by age 2, they are only 65-70% of those estimated in age-matched controls. These data suggest that moderate, naturalistic alcohol consumption during late pregnancy results in a stable loss of hippocampal neurons and a progressive reduction of hippocampal volume. PMID:25913787

  10. Synapse elimination accompanies functional plasticity in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bastrikova, Natalia; Gardner, Gregory A; Reece, Jeff M; Jeromin, Andreas; Dudek, Serena M

    2008-02-26

    A critical component of nervous system development is synapse elimination during early postnatal life, a process known to depend on neuronal activity. Changes in synaptic strength in the form of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) correlate with dendritic spine enlargement or shrinkage, respectively, but whether LTD can lead to an actual separation of the synaptic structures when the spine shrinks or is lost remains unknown. Here, we addressed this issue by using concurrent imaging and electrophysiological recording of live synapses. Slices of rat hippocampus were cultured on multielectrode arrays, and the neurons were labeled with genes encoding red or green fluorescent proteins to visualize presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal processes, respectively. LTD-inducing stimulation led to a reduction in the synaptic green and red colocalization, and, in many cases, it induced a complete separation of the presynaptic bouton from the dendritic spine. This type of synapse loss was associated with smaller initial spine size and greater synaptic depression but not spine shrinkage during LTD. All cases of synapse separation were observed without an accompanying loss of the spine during this period. We suggest that repeated low-frequency stimulation simultaneous with LTD induction is capable of restructuring synaptic contacts. Future work with this model will be able to provide critical insight into the molecular mechanisms of activity- and experience-dependent refinement of brain circuitry during development. PMID:18287055

  11. Imaging dendritic spines of rat primary hippocampal neurons using structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Marijn; De Luca, Giulia M R; Alatriste González, Diana K; de Jong, Babette E; Timmermans, Wendy; Xiong, Hui; Krugers, Harm; Manders, Erik M M; Fitzsimons, Carlos P

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are protrusions emerging from the dendrite of a neuron and represent the primary postsynaptic targets of excitatory inputs in the brain. Technological advances have identified these structures as key elements in neuron connectivity and synaptic plasticity. The quantitative analysis of spine morphology using light microscopy remains an essential problem due to technical limitations associated with light's intrinsic refraction limit. Dendritic spines can be readily identified by confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy. However, measuring subtle changes in the shape and size of spines is difficult because spine dimensions other than length are usually smaller than conventional optical resolution fixed by light microscopy's theoretical resolution limit of 200 nm. Several recently developed super resolution techniques have been used to image cellular structures smaller than the 200 nm, including dendritic spines. These techniques are based on classical far-field operations and therefore allow the use of existing sample preparation methods and to image beyond the surface of a specimen. Described here is a working protocol to apply super resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to the imaging of dendritic spines in primary hippocampal neuron cultures. Possible applications of SIM overlap with those of confocal microscopy. However, the two techniques present different applicability. SIM offers higher effective lateral resolution, while confocal microscopy, due to the usage of a physical pinhole, achieves resolution improvement at the expense of removal of out of focus light. In this protocol, primary neurons are cultured on glass coverslips using a standard protocol, transfected with DNA plasmids encoding fluorescent proteins and imaged using SIM. The whole protocol described herein takes approximately 2 weeks, because dendritic spines are imaged after 16-17 days in vitro, when dendritic development is optimal. After completion of the

  12. Ribosome association contributes to restricting mRNAs to the cell body of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z; McLaren, R S; Winters, C A; Ralston, E

    1998-12-01

    In neurons, mRNAs are differentially sorted to axons, dendrites, and the cell body. Recently, regions of certain mRNAs have been identified that target those mRNAs for translocation to the processes. However, the mechanism by which many, if not most mRNAs are retained in the cell body is not understood. Total inhibition of translation, by puromycin or cycloheximide, results in the mislocalization of cell body mRNAs to dendrites. We have examined the effect of translational inhibitors on the localization of ferritin mRNA, the translation of which can also be inhibited specifically by reducing iron levels. Using nonisotopic in situ hybridization, ferritin mRNA is found restricted to the cell body of cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Following treatment with either puromycin or cycloheximide, it migrates into dendrites. Control experiments reveal that the drugs affect neither the viability of the neuronal cultures, nor the steady-state level of ferritin mRNA. When transcription and protein synthesis are inhibited simultaneously, ferritin mRNA is found in the dendrites of puromycin, but not of cycloheximide-treated neurons. However, the localization of ferritin mRNA is unaffected by changes in iron concentration that regulate its translation rate specifically. We propose a model whereby cell body-restricted mRNAs are maintained in that location by association with ribosomes and with another cell component, which traps mRNAs when they are freed of ribosome association. The release of all mRNA species, as happens after total protein synthesis inhibition, floods the system and allows cell body mRNAs to diffuse into dendrites. In contrast, the partial release of the single ferritin mRNA species does not saturate the trapping system and the mRNA is retained in the cell body. PMID:9888989

  13. Chrysophanol attenuates lead exposure-induced injury to hippocampal neurons in neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji; Yan, Chunlin; Wang, Shu; Hou, Yong; Xue, Guiping; Zhang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that chrysophanol protects against learning and memory impairments in lead-exposed adult mice. In the present study, we investigated whether chrysophanol can alleviate learning and memory dysfunction and hippocampal neuronal injury in lead-exposed neonatal mice. At the end of lactation, chrysophanol (0.1, 1.0, 10.0 mg/kg) was administered to the neonatal mice by intraperitoneal injection for 15 days. Chrysophanol significantly alleviated injury to hippocampal neurons and improved learning and memory abilities in the lead-poisoned neonatal mice. Chrysophanol also significantly decreased lead content in blood, brain, heart, spleen, liver and kidney in the lead-exposed neonatal mice. The levels of malondialdehyde in the brain, liver and kidney were significantly reduced, and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly increased after chrysophanol treatment. Collectively, these findings indicate that chrysophanol can significantly reduce damage to hippocampal neurons in lead-exposed neonatal mice. PMID:25206913

  14. Amentoflavone protects hippocampal neurons: anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Sun, Tao; Niu, Jian-guo; He, Zhen-quan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Amentoflavone is a natural biflavone compound with many biological properties, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and neuroprotective effects. We presumed that amentoflavone exerts a neuroprotective effect in epilepsy models. Prior to model establishment, mice were intragastrically administered 25 mg/kg amentoflavone for 3 consecutive days. Amentoflavone effectively prevented pilocarpine-induced epilepsy in a mouse kindling model, suppressed nuclear factor-κB activation and expression, inhibited excessive discharge of hippocampal neurons resulting in a reduction in epileptic seizures, shortened attack time, and diminished loss and apoptosis of hippocampal neurons. Results suggested that amentoflavone protected hippocampal neurons in epilepsy mice via anti-inflammation, antioxidation, and antiapoptosis, and then effectively prevented the occurrence of seizures. PMID:26330838

  15. Selective neuronal vulnerability of human hippocampal CA1 neurons: lesion evolution, temporal course, and pattern of hippocampal damage in diffusion-weighted MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Thorsten; Döhring, Juliane; Reuter, Sigrid; Finke, Carsten; Rohr, Axel; Brauer, Henriette; Deuschl, Günther; Jansen, Olav

    2015-11-01

    The CA1 (cornu ammonis) region of hippocampus is selectively vulnerable to a variety of metabolic and cytotoxic insults, which is mirrored in a delayed neuronal death of CA1 neurons. The basis and mechanisms of this regional susceptibility of CA1 neurons are poorly understood, and the correlates in human diseases affecting the hippocampus are not clear. Adopting a translational approach, the lesion evolution, temporal course, pattern of diffusion changes, and damage in hippocampal CA1 in acute neurologic disorders were studied using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. In patients with hippocampal ischemia (n=50), limbic encephalitis (n=30), after status epilepticus (n=17), and transient global amnesia (n=53), the CA1 region was selectively affected compared with other CA regions of the hippocampus. CA1 neurons exhibited a maximum decrease of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) 48 to 72 hours after the insult, irrespective of the nature of the insult. Hypoxic-ischemic insults led to a significant lower ADC suggesting that the ischemic insult results in a stronger impairment of cellular metabolism. The evolution of diffusion changes show that CA1 diffusion lesions mirror the delayed time course of the pathophysiologic cascade typically observed in animal models. Studying the imaging correlates of hippocampal damage in humans provides valuable insight into the pathophysiology and neurobiology of the hippocampus. PMID:26082014

  16. Functional consequences of hippocampal neuronal ectopia in the apolipoprotein E receptor-2 knockout mouse

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Kenneth. N.; Krucker, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the impact ectopically located neurons have on the functional connectivity of local circuits. The ApoER2 knockout mouse has subtle cytoarchitectural disruptions, altered prepulse inhibition, and memory abnormalities. We evaluated this mouse mutant as a model to study the role ectopic neurons play in the manifestation of symptoms associated with brain diseases. We found that ectopic CA1 pyramidal and inhibitory neurons in the ApoER2 knockout hippocampus are organized into two distinct stratum pyramidale layers. In vitro analyses found that ApoER2 is not required for neurons to reach maturity in regards to dendritic arborization and synaptic structure density, and electrophysiological testing determined that neurons in both strata pyramidale are integrated into the hippocampal network. However, the presence of these two layers alters the spatiotemporal pattern of hippocampal activity, which may explain why ApoER2 knockout mice have selective cognitive dysfunctions that are revealed only under challenging conditions. PMID:18778775

  17. Effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Haploinsufficiency on Stress-Induced Remodeling of Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Magariños, A.M.; Li, C.J.; Toth, J. Gal; Bath, K.G.; Jing, D.; Lee, F.S.; McEwen, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces the remodeling (i.e., retraction and simplification) of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in rats, suggesting that intrahippocampal connectivity can be affected by a prolonged stressful challenge. Since the structural maintenance of neuronal dendritic arborizations and synaptic connectivity requires neurotrophic support, we investigated the potential role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin enriched in the hippocampus and released from neurons in an activity-dependent manner, as a mediator of the stress-induced dendritic remodeling. The analysis of Golgi-impregnated hippocampal sections revealed that wild type (WT) C57BL/6 male mice showed a similar CA3 apical dendritic remodeling in response to three weeks of CRS to that previously described for rats. Haploinsufficient BDNF mice (BDNF±) did not show such remodeling, but, even without CRS, they presented shorter and simplified CA3 apical dendritic arbors, like those observed in stressed WT mice. Furthermore, unstressed BDNF± mice showed a significant decrease in total hippocampal volume. The dendritic arborization of CA1 pyramidal neurons was not affected by CRS or genotype. However, only in WT mice, CRS induced changes in the density of dendritic spine shape subtypes in both CA1 and CA3 apical dendrites. These results suggest a complex role of BDNF in maintaining the dendritic and spine morphology of hippocampal neurons and the associated volume of the hippocampal formation. The inability of CRS to modify the dendritic structure of CA3 pyramidal neurons in BDNF± mice suggests an indirect, perhaps permissive, role of BDNF in mediating hippocampal dendritic remodeling. PMID:20095008

  18. Synergistic stress exacerbation in hippocampal neurons: Evidence favoring the dual-hit hypothesis of neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Scott D; Posimo, Jessica M; Mason, Daniel M; Hutchison, Daniel F; Leak, Rehana K

    2016-08-01

    The dual-hit hypothesis of neurodegeneration states that severe stress sensitizes vulnerable cells to subsequent challenges so that the two hits are synergistic in their toxic effects. Although the hippocampus is vulnerable to a number of neurodegenerative disorders, there are no models of synergistic cell death in hippocampal neurons in response to combined proteotoxic and oxidative stressors, the two major characteristics of these diseases. Therefore, a relatively high-throughput dual-hit model of stress synergy was developed in primary hippocampal neurons. In order to increase the rigor of the study and strengthen the interpretations, three independent, unbiased viability assays were employed at multiple timepoints. Stress synergy was elicited when hippocampal neurons were treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 followed by exposure to the oxidative toxicant paraquat, but only after 48 h. MG132 and paraquat only elicited additive effects 24 h after the final hit and even loss of heat shock protein 70 activity and glutathione did not promote stress synergy at this early timepoint. Dual hits of MG132 elicited modest glutathione loss and slightly synergistic toxic effects 48 h after the second hit, but only at some concentrations and only according to two viability assays (metabolic fitness and cytoskeletal integrity). The thiol N-acetyl cysteine protected hippocampal neurons against dual MG132/MG132 hits but not dual MG132/paraquat hits. These findings support the view that proteotoxic and oxidative stress propel and propagate each other in hippocampal neurons, leading to synergistically toxic effects, but not as the default response and only after a delay. The neuronal stress synergy observed here lies in contrast to astrocytic responses to dual hits, because astrocytes that survive severe proteotoxic stress resist additional cell loss following second hits. In conclusion, a new model of hippocampal vulnerability was developed for the testing of therapies

  19. Hippocampal Neuron Number Is Unchanged 1 Year After Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation at Middle Age

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Lei Molina, Doris P.; Robbins, Michael E.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hippocampal neurons are lost 12 months after middle-aged rats received a fractionated course of whole-brain irradiation (WBI) that is expected to be biologically equivalent to the regimens used clinically in the treatment of brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Twelve-month-old Fischer 344 X Brown Norway male rats were divided into WBI and control (CON) groups (n = 6 per group). Anesthetized WBI rats received 45 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays delivered as 9 5-Gy fractions twice per week for 4.5 weeks. Control rats were anesthetized but not irradiated. Twelve months after WBI completion, all rats were anesthetized and perfused with paraformaldehyde, and hippocampal sections were immunostained with the neuron-specific antibody NeuN. Using unbiased stereology, total neuron number and the volume of the neuronal and neuropil layers were determined in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1 subregions of hippocampus. Results: No differences in tissue integrity or neuron distribution were observed between the WBI and CON groups. Moreover, quantitative analysis demonstrated that neither total neuron number nor the volume of neuronal or neuropil layers differed between the two groups for any subregion. Conclusions: Impairment on a hippocampal-dependent learning and memory test occurs 1 year after fractionated WBI at middle age. The same WBI regimen, however, does not lead to a loss of neurons or a reduction in the volume of hippocampus.

  20. On the nature and differential distribution of mRNAs in hippocampal neurites: implications for neuronal functioning.

    PubMed Central

    Miyashiro, K; Dichter, M; Eberwine, J

    1994-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with a mosaic of cytoplasmic and membrane proteins differentially distributed in axons, dendrites, and somata. In Drosophila and Xenopus, mRNA localization coupled with local translation is a powerful mechanism by which regionalized domains of surface or cytoplasmic proteins are generated. In neurons, there is substantial ultrastructural evidence positing the presence of protein synthetic machinery in neuronal processes, especially at or near postsynaptic sites. There are, however, remarkably few reports of mRNAs localized to these regions. We now present direct evidence that an unexpectedly large number of mRNAs, including members of the glutamate receptor family, second messenger system, and components of the translational control apparatus, are present in individual processes of hippocampal cells in culture. Images PMID:7971965

  1. Pro-apoptotic Action of Corticosterone in Hippocampal Organotypic Cultures.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Anna; Kucharczyk, Mateusz; Detka, Jan; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Trojan, Ewa; Głombik, Katarzyna; Bojarski, Bartosz; Ludwikowska, Agnieszka; Lasoń, Władysław; Budziszewska, Bogusława

    2016-08-01

    Elevated levels of glucocorticoids exert neurotoxic effects, and the hippocampus is particularly sensitive to the effects of glucocorticoids. Because some data have indicated that an increased action of glucocorticoids in the perinatal period enhances the susceptibility of brain tissue to adverse substances later in life, the main purpose of the present study was to compare necrotic/apoptotic corticosterone action in hippocampal organotypic cultures obtained from control animals with the effect of this steroid in tissue from prenatally stressed rats. Because the adverse effects of glucocorticoid action on nerve cell viability appear to result mainly from an increase in the intensity of the effects of glutamate and changes in growth factor and pro-inflammatory cytokine synthesis, the involvement of these factors in corticosterone action were also determined. In stress-like concentration (1 μM), corticosterone, when added to hippocampal cultures for 1 and 3 days, alone or jointly with glutamate, did not induce necrosis. In contrast, in 3-day cultures, corticosterone (1 μM) increased caspase-3 activity and the mRNA expression of the pro-apoptotic Bax. Moreover, corticosterone's effect on caspase-3 activity was stronger in hippocampal cultures from prenatally stressed compared to control rats. Additionally, 24 h of exposure to corticosterone and glutamate, when applied separately and together, increased Bdnf, Ngf, and Tnf-α expression. In contrast, after 72 h, a strong decrease in the expression of both growth factors was observed, while the expression of TNF-α remained high. The present study showed that in stress-like concentrations, corticosterone exerted pro-apoptotic but not necrotic effects in hippocampal organotypic cultures. Prenatal stress increased the pro-apoptotic effects of corticosterone. Increased synthesis of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α may be connected with the adverse effects of corticosterone on brain cell viability. PMID:27189478

  2. miR-204 downregulates EphB2 in aging mouse hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Danka Mohammed, Chand Parvez; Rhee, Hwanseok; Phee, Bong-Kwan; Kim, Kunhyung; Kim, Hee-Jin; Lee, Hyehyeon; Park, Jung Hoon; Jung, Jung Hee; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Hyoung-Chin; Park, Sang Ki; Nam, Hong Gil; Kim, Keetae

    2016-04-01

    Hippocampal synaptic function and plasticity deteriorate with age, often resulting in learning and memory deficits. As MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of neuronal protein expression, we examined whether miRNAs may contribute to this age-associated decline in hippocampal function. We first compared the small RNA transcriptome of hippocampal tissues from young and old mice. Among 269 hippocampal miRNAs, 80 were differentially expressed (≥ twofold) among the age groups. We focused on 36 miRNAs upregulated in the old mice compared with those in the young mice. The potential targets of these 36 miRNAs included 11 critical Eph/Ephrin synaptic signaling components. The expression levels of several genes in the Eph/Ephrin pathway, including EphB2, were significantly downregulated in the aged hippocampus. EphB2 is a known regulator of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons, in part by regulating the surface expression of the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit. We found that EphB2 is a direct target of miR-204 among miRNAs that were upregulated with age. The transfection of primary hippocampal neurons with a miR-204 mimic suppressed both EphB2 mRNA and protein expression and reduced the surface expression of NR1. Transfection of miR-204 also decreased the total expression of NR1. miR-204 induces senescence-like phenotype in fully matured neurons as evidenced by an increase in p16-positive cells. We suggest that aging is accompanied by the upregulation of miR-204 in the hippocampus, which downregulates EphB2 and results in reduced surface and total NR1 expression. This mechanism may contribute to age-associated decline in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and the related cognitive functions. PMID:26799631

  3. Cellular mechanisms regulating activity-dependent release of native brain-derived neurotrophic factor from hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Katz, David M

    2002-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in activity-dependent modifications of neuronal connectivity and synaptic strength, including establishment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). To shed light on mechanisms underlying BDNF-dependent synaptic plasticity, the present study was undertaken to characterize release of native BDNF from newborn rat hippocampal neurons in response to physiologically relevant patterns of electrical field stimulation in culture, including tonic stimulation at 5 Hz, bursting stimulation at 25 and 100 Hz, and theta-burst stimulation (TBS). Release was measured using the ELISA in situ technique, developed in our laboratory to quantify secretion of native BDNF without the need to first overexpress the protein to nonphysiological levels. Each stimulation protocol resulted in a significant increase in BDNF release that was tetrodotoxin sensitive and occurred in the absence of glutamate receptor activation. However, 100 Hz tetanus and TBS, stimulus patterns that are most effective in inducing hippocampal LTP, were significantly more effective in releasing native BDNF than lower-frequency stimulation. For all stimulation protocols tested, removal of extracellular calcium, or blockade of N-type calcium channels, prevented BDNF release. Similarly, depletion of intracellular calcium stores with thapsigargin and treatment with dantrolene, an inhibitor of calcium release from caffeine-ryanodine-sensitive stores, markedly inhibited activity-dependent BDNF release. Our results indicate that BDNF release can encode temporal features of hippocampal neuronal activity. The dual requirement for calcium influx through N-type calcium channels and calcium mobilization from intracellular stores strongly implicates a role for calcium-induced calcium release in activity-dependent BDNF secretion. PMID:12451139

  4. Study on dynamic characteristics' change of hippocampal neuron reduced models caused by the Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yueping; Wang, Jue; Zheng, Chongxun

    2016-01-01

    In the paper, based on the electrophysiological experimental data, the Hippocampal neuron reduced model under the pathology condition of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been built by modifying parameters' values. The reduced neuron model's dynamic characteristics under effect of AD are comparatively studied. Under direct current stimulation, compared with the normal neuron model, the AD neuron model's dynamic characteristics have obviously been changed. The neuron model under the AD condition undergoes supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation from the rest state to the continuous discharge state. It is different from the neuron model under the normal condition, which undergoes saddle-node bifurcation. So, the neuron model changes into a resonator with monostable state from an integrator with bistable state under AD's action. The research reveals the neuron model's dynamic characteristics' changing under effect of AD, and provides some theoretic basis for AD research by neurodynamics theory. PMID:26998957

  5. Differential effects of cannabis extracts and pure plant cannabinoids on hippocampal neurones and glia.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Duncan; Drysdale, Alison J; Pertwee, Roger G; Platt, Bettina

    2006-11-20

    We have shown previously that the plant cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) elevates intracellular calcium levels in both cultured hippocampal neurones and glia. Here, we investigated whether the main psychotropic constituent of cannabis, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alone or in combination with other cannabis constituents can cause similar responses, and whether THC affects the responses induced by CBD. Our experiments were performed with 1 microM pure THC (pTHC), with 1 microM pure CBD (pCBD), with a high-THC, low CBD cannabis extract (eTHC), with a high-CBD, low THC cannabis extract (eCBD), with a mixture of eTHC and eCBD (THC:CBD=1:1) or with corresponding 'mock extracts' that contained only pTHC and pCBD mixed in the same proportion as in eTHC, eCBD or the 1:1 mixture of eTHC and eCBD. We detected significant differences in neurones both between the effects of pTHC and eTHC and between the effects of pCBD and eCBD. There were also differences between the Ca(2+) responses evoked in both neurones and glia by eTHC and mock eTHC, but not between eCBD and mock eCBD. A particularly striking observation was the much increased response size and maximal responder rates induced by the mixture of eTHC and eCBD than by the corresponding 1:1 mixture of pTHC and pCBD. Our data suggest that THC shares the ability of CBD to elevate Ca(2+) levels in neurones and glia, that THC and CBD interact synergistically and that the cannabis extracts have other constituents yet to be identified that can significantly modulate the ability of THC and CBD to raise Ca(2+) levels. PMID:16997463

  6. Agmatine induces Nrf2 and protects against corticosterone effects in hippocampal neuronal cell line.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Andiara E; Egea, Javier; Buendía, Izaskun; Navarro, Elisa; Rada, Patricia; Cuadrado, Antonio; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; López, Manuela G

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is a common finding in major depression; this may lead to increased levels of cortisol, which are known to cause oxidative stress imbalance and apoptotic neuronal cell death, particularly in the hippocampus, a key region implicated in mood regulation. Agmatine, an endogenous metabolite of L-arginine, has been proposed for the treatment of major depression. Corticosterone induced apoptotic cell death and increased ROS production in cultured hippocampal neuronal cells, effects that were abolished in a concentration- and time-dependent manner by agmatine. Interestingly, the combination of sub-effective concentrations of agmatine with fluoxetine or imipramine afforded synergic protection. The neuroprotective effect of agmatine was abolished by yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist), ketanserin (5-HT2A receptor antagonist), LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor), PD98059 (MEK1/2 inhibitor), SnPP (HO-1 inhibitor), and cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor). Agmatine increased Akt and ERK phosphorylation and induced the transcription factor Nrf2 and the proteins HO-1 and GCLc; induction of these proteins was prevented by yohimbine, ketanserin, LY294002, and PD98059. In conclusion, agmatine affords neuroprotection against corticosterone effects by a mechanism that implicates Nrf2 induction via α2-adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors, Akt and ERK pathways, and HO-1 and GCLc expression. PMID:25084759

  7. Nanomolar ouabain augments Ca2+ signalling in rat hippocampal neurones and glia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong; Thompson, Scott M; Blaustein, Mordecai P

    2013-01-01

    Linkage of certain neurological diseases to Na+ pump mutations and some mood disorders to altered Na+ pump function has renewed interest in brain Na+ pumps. We tested nanomolar ouabain on Ca2+ signalling (fura-2) in rat hippocampal neurone–astrocyte co-cultures. The neurones and astrocytes express Na+ pumps with a high-ouabain-affinity catalytic subunit (α3 and α2, respectively); both also express pumps with a ouabain-resistant α1 subunit. Neurones and astrocytes were identified by immunocytochemistry and by stimulation; 3–4 μm l-glutamate (Glu) and 3 μm carbachol (CCh) evoked rapid Ca2+ transients only in neurones, and small, delayed transients in some astrocytes, whereas 0.5–1 μm ATP evoked Ca2+ transients only in astrocytes. Both cell types responded to 5–10 μm Glu or ATP. The signals evoked by 3–4 μm Glu in neurones were markedly inhibited by 3–10 μm MPEP (blocks metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR5) and 10 μm LY341495 (non-selective mGluR blocker), but not by 80 μm AP5 (NMDA receptor blocker) or by selective block of mGluR1 or mGluR2. Pre-incubation (0.5–10 min) with 1–10 nm ouabain (EC50 < 1 nm) augmented Glu- and CCh-evoked signals in neurones. This augmentation was abolished by a blocker of the Na+–Ca2+ exchanger, SEA0400 (300 nm). Ouabain (3 nm) pre-incubation also augmented 10 μm cyclopiazonic acid plus 10 mm caffeine-evoked release of Ca2+ from the neuronal endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The implication is that nanomolar ouabain inhibits α3 Na+ pumps, increases (local) intracellular Na+, and promotes Na+–Ca2+ exchanger-mediated Ca2+ gain and increased storage in the adjacent ER. Ouabain (3 nm) also increased ER Ca2+ release and enhanced 0.5 μm ATP-evoked transients in astrocytes; these effects were mediated by α2 Na+ pumps. Thus, nanomolar ouabain may strongly influence synaptic transmission in the brain as a result of its actions on the high-ouabain-affinity Na+ pumps in both neurones and astrocytes. The significance of

  8. Exercise preconditioning exhibits neuroprotective effects on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shamsaei, Nabi; Khaksari, Mehdi; Erfani, Sohaila; Rajabi, Hamid; Aboutaleb, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the neuroprotective effects of physical exercise on cerebral ischemic injury. However, the role of physical exercise in cerebral ischemia-induced hippocampal damage remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pre-ischemia treadmill training on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia. Male adult rats were randomly divided into control, ischemia and exercise + ischemia groups. In the exercise + ischemia group, rats were subjected to running on a treadmill in a designated time schedule (5 days per week for 4 weeks). Then rats underwent cerebral ischemia induction through occlusion of common carotids followed by reperfusion. At 4 days after cerebral ischemia, rat learning and memory abilities were evaluated using passive avoidance memory test and rat hippocampal neuronal damage was detected using Nissl and TUNEL staining. Pre-ischemic exercise significantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells and necrotic cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region as compared to the ischemia group. Moreover, pre-ischemic exercise significantly prevented ischemia-induced memory dysfunction. Pre-ischemic exercise mighct prevent memory deficits after cerebral ischemia through rescuing hippocampal CA1 neurons from ischemia-induced degeneration. PMID:26487851

  9. The Role of Gastrodin on Hippocampal Neurons after N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Excitotoxicity and Experimental Temporal Lobe Seizures.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shi-Bing; Hung, Wei-Chen; Min, Ming-Yuan

    2016-06-30

    Tian ma (Gastrodia elata, GE) is an ancient Chinese herbal medicine that has been suggested to be effective as an anticonvulsant and analgesic, and to have sedative effects against vertigo, general paralysis, epilepsy and tetanus. The primary active ingredient isolated from GE is termed gastrodin, which is the glucoside of 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (4-HBA). Gastrodin can abolish hypoxia-, glutamate- and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-induced toxicity in primary culture of rat cortical neurons, and reduces seizure severity in seizure-sensitive gerbils. We evaluated the effect of gastrodin on NMDA excitotoxicity in hippocampal slice cultures (HSCs) with propidium iodide (PI) fluorescence measurement. We also evaluated the effects of gastrodin for treating active in vivo temporal lobe seizures induced by lithium/pilocarpine. Seizure severity, time span to seizure onset, mortality rate and hippocampal histology for survivors were compared. The effect of gastrodin was evaluated for treating in vitro seizures induced by Mg²⁺-free medium in hippocampal slices. Frequencies and amplitudes of epileptiform discharges were compared. The effect of gastrodin on synaptic transmission was evaluated on hippocampal CA1 Schaffer collaterals. Application of 25 μM gastrodin significantly suppressed NMDA excitotoxicity in CA3 but not in CA1 hippocampus and dentate gyrus. Intraventricular gastrodin accelerated seizure onset for 12 min after intraperitoneal pilocarpine injection (P = 0.051). Three of five rats (60%) in the gastrodin group, and three of four (75%) in the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) group died within 3 days after status epilepticus (SE). Gastrodin also failed to inhibit epileptiform discharges in hippocampal slices induced by Mg²⁺-free medium, believed to be NMDA receptor-mediated spontaneous activity. The frequencies of the spontaneous epileptiform discharges were similar under treatments with 25 μM gastrodin, 200 μM gastrodin and DMSO. For the evaluation of

  10. Altered expression of heat shock protein 110 family members in mouse hippocampal neurons following trimethyltin treatment in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Masanori; Iwamoto, Naoko; Nagashima, Reiko; Sugiyama, Chie; Kawada, Koichi; Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Shuto, Makoto; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2008-10-01

    The heat shock protein (Hsp) 110 family is composed of HSP105, APG-1, and APG-2. As the response of these proteins to neuronal damage is not yet fully understood, in the present study, we assessed their expression in mouse hippocampal neurons following trimethyltin chloride (TMT) treatment in vivo and in vitro. Although each of these three Hsps had a distinct regional distribution within the hippocampus, a low level of all of them was observed in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus in naïve animals. TMT was effective in markedly increasing the level of these Hsps in the granule cell layer, at least 16h to 4days after the treatment. In the dentate granule cell layer on day 2 after TMT treatment, HSP105 was expressed mainly in the perikarya of NeuN-positive cells (intact neurons); whereas APG-1 and APG-2 were predominantly found in NeuN-negative cells (damaged neurons as evidenced by signs of cell shrinkage and condensation of chromatin). Assessments using primary cultures of mouse hippocampal neurons exposed to TMT revealed that whereas HSP105 was observed in intact neurons rather than in damaged neurons, APG-1 and APG-2 were detected in both damaged neurons and intact neurons. Taken together, our data suggest that APG-1 and APG-2 may play different roles from HSP105 in neurons damaged by TMT. PMID:18601936

  11. New neurons and new memories: how does adult hippocampal neurogenesis affect learning and memory?

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Aimone, James B.; Gage, Fred H.

    2010-01-01

    The integration of adult-born neurons into the circuitry of the adult hippocampus suggests an important role for adult hippocampal neurogenesis in learning and memory, but its specific function in these processes has remained elusive. In this article, we summarize recent progress in this area, including advances based on behavioural studies and insights provided by computational modelling. Increasingly, evidence suggests that newborn neurons might be involved in hippocampal functions that are particularly dependent on the dentate gyrus, such as pattern separation. Furthermore, newborn neurons at different maturation stages may make distinct contributions to learning and memory. In particular, computational studies suggest that, before newborn neurons are fully mature, they might function as a pattern integrator by introducing a degree of similarity to the encoding of events that occur closely in time. PMID:20354534

  12. Pharmacological characterization of the newly synthesized 5-amino-N-butyl-2-(4-ethoxyphenoxy)-benzamide hydrochloride (BED) as a potent NCX3 inhibitor that worsens anoxic injury in cortical neurons, organotypic hippocampal cultures, and ischemic brain.

    PubMed

    Secondo, Agnese; Pignataro, Giuseppe; Ambrosino, Paolo; Pannaccione, Anna; Molinaro, Pasquale; Boscia, Francesca; Cantile, Maria; Cuomo, Ornella; Esposito, Alba; Sisalli, Maria Josè; Scorziello, Antonella; Guida, Natascia; Anzilotti, Serenella; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Severino, Beatrice; Santagada, Vincenzo; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Di Renzo, Gianfranco; Annunziato, Lucio

    2015-08-19

    The Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), a 10-transmembrane domain protein mainly involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, plays a crucial role in cerebral ischemia. In the present paper, we characterized the effect of the newly synthesized compound 5-amino-N-butyl-2-(4-ethoxyphenoxy)-benzamide hydrochloride (BED) on the activity of the three NCX isoforms and on the evolution of cerebral ischemia. BED inhibited NCX isoform 3 (NCX3) activity (IC50 = 1.9 nM) recorded with the help of single-cell microflorimetry, (45)Ca(2+) radiotracer fluxes, and patch-clamp in whole-cell configuration. Furthermore, this drug displayed negligible effect on NCX2, the other isoform expressed within the CNS, and it failed to modulate the ubiquitously expressed NCX1 isoform. Concerning the molecular site of action, the use of chimera strategy and deletion mutagenesis showed that α1 and α2 repeats of NCX3 represented relevant molecular determinants for BED inhibitory action, whereas the intracellular regulatory f-loop was not involved. At 10 nM, BED worsened the damage induced by oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reoxygenation in cortical neurons through a dysregulation of [Ca(2+)]i. Furthermore, at the same concentration, BED significantly enhanced cell death in CA3 subregion of hippocampal organotypic slices exposed to OGD and aggravated infarct injury after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. These results showed that the newly synthesized 5-amino-N-butyl-2-(4-ethoxyphenoxy)-benzamide hydrochloride is one of the most potent inhibitor of NCX3 so far identified, representing an useful tool to dissect the role played by NCX3 in the control of Ca(2+) homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25942323

  13. Sub-chronic Antipsychotic Drug Administration Reverses the Expression of Neuregulin 1 and ErbB4 in a Cultured MK801-Induced Mouse Primary Hippocampal Neuron or a Neurodevelopmental Schizophrenia Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Cunyan; Tang, Yamei; Yang, Jingjing; Zhang, Xianghui; Liu, Yong; Tang, Aiguo

    2016-08-01

    It has been reported that specific environmental influences during the postpartum period might contribute to the development of schizophrenia (SZ). Administration of MK801 during early development led to persistent brain pathology. Glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD67) and parvalbumin (PV), and neuregulin 1 (NRG1)/ErbB4 signaling were closely associated with SZ pathology. We postulated therefore that NMDA receptor antagonists exposure during the postpartum period may be associated with expression dysregulation of some of the SZ candidate proteins. To test this, we used mouse primary hippocampal neurons and neonatal male mice treated with the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801 at postnatal day 4 (P4) or P7, followed by the treatments of antipsychotic drugs (i.e., olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol). The expressions of GAD67, PV, NRG1, and ErbB4 in in vitro and in vivo SZ models were detected with Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Behavioral tests (locomotion activity, social interaction, novel object recognition and prepulse inhibition) were measured. We found MK801 decreased the expression of GAD67, PV, NRG1 and ErbB4, and induced obvious behavioral alterations, while antipsychotics reversed these alterations. These results suggest that exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist in early development may lead to long-lasting influence on the expression of specific proteins, such as GAD67, PV, NRG1, and ErbB4. Moreover, our results suggest that rescue of the activation of the NRG1/ErbB4 signaling pathway may be one of the mechanisms by which antipsychotic drugs have an antipsychotic effect. PMID:27097547

  14. An Analog of Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone (TRH) is Neuroprotective Against Glutamate-Induced Toxicity In Fetal Rat Hippocampal Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Veronesi, Michael C.; Yard, Michael; Jackson, James; Lahiri, Debomoy K.; Kubek, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    TRH has been found to be efficacious in treating certain neurodegenerative disorders such as epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease, neurotrauma and depression, however, its mechanism of action is poorly understood. Since Glutamate (Glu) toxicity has been implicated in these disorders, we utilized primary enriched cultures of rat fetal (E 17) hippocampal neurons to test the hypothesis that an analog of TRH, 3-Methyl-Histidine TRH (3Me-H TRH), given concurrently with Glu would protect such neurons against cell damage and cell death. Cell viability was assessed via Trypan Blue exclusion cell counts and neuronal damage was determined by assaying lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) released in the conditioned media. Fetal hippocampal neurons were cultured in neurobasal media for 7 days. On day 7, neurons (106/well) were treated with: control media, 10 μM 3Me-H TRH, 500 μM Glu, or 500 μM Glu with either 10, 1, 0.1, 0.01 or 0.001 μM 3Me-H TRH. Both media and neurons were harvested 16 hr after treatment. Prolonged exposure to 10 μM 3Me-H TRH was not toxic to the cells, whereas, neurons exposed to 500 μM Glu resulted in maximal cell death. Notably, 10, 1 and 0.1 μM 3Me-H TRH, when co-treated with 500 μM Glu protected fetal neurons against cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. These results provide support for an important neuroprotective effect of TRH/analogs against glutamate toxicity in primary hippocampal neuronal culture, and implicate a potentially beneficial role of TRH/analogs in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:17125753

  15. Brevican-containing perineuronal nets of extracellular matrix in dissociated hippocampal primary cultures.

    PubMed

    John, Nora; Krügel, Hans; Frischknecht, Renato; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Schultz, Christian; Kreutz, Michael R; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Seidenbecher, Constanze I

    2006-04-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNN) are specialized extracellular matrix structures enwrapping CNS neurons, which are important regulators for neuronal and synaptic functions. Brevican, a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, is an integral component of PNN. Here, we have investigated the appearance of these structures in hippocampal primary cultures. The expression profile of brevican in mixed cultures resembles the in vivo pattern with a strong upregulation of all isoforms during the second and 3rd weeks in culture. Brevican is primarily synthesized by co-cultured glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP-)-positive astrocytes and co-assembles with its interaction partners in PNN-like structures on neuronal somata and neurites as identified by counterstaining with the PNN marker Vicia villosa lectin. Both excitatory and inhibitory synapses are embedded into PNN. Furthermore, axon initial segments are strongly covered by a dense brevican coat. Altogether, we show that mature primary cultures can form PNN, and that basic features of these extracellular matrix structures may be studied in vitro. PMID:16503162

  16. Modulation of Hippocampal Theta Oscillations and Spatial Memory by Relaxin-3 Neurons of the Nucleus Incertus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Sherie; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E.; Hossain, M. Akhter; Lin, Feng; Kuei, Chester; Liu, Changlu; Wade, John D.; Sutton, Steven W.; Nunez, Angel; Gundlach, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01

    Hippocampal theta rhythm is thought to underlie learning and memory, and it is well established that "pacemaker" neurons in medial septum (MS) modulate theta activity. Recent studies in the rat demonstrated that brainstem-generated theta rhythm occurs through a multisynaptic pathway via the nucleus incertus (NI), which is the primary source of the…

  17. A Mechanism for the Formation of Hippocampal Neuronal Firing Patterns that Represent What Happens Where

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tort, Adriano B. L.; Komorowski, Robert; Kopell, Nancy; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2011-01-01

    The association of specific events with the context in which they occur is a fundamental feature of episodic memory. However, the underlying network mechanisms generating what-where associations are poorly understood. Recently we reported that some hippocampal principal neurons develop representations of specific events occurring in particular…

  18. Entorhinal-Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits Bridge Temporally Discontiguous Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitamura, Takashi; Macdonald, Christopher J.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC)-hippocampal (HPC) network plays an essential role for episodic memory, which preserves spatial and temporal information about the occurrence of past events. Although there has been significant progress toward understanding the neural circuits underlying the spatial dimension of episodic memory, the relevant circuits…

  19. Primary Culture of Mouse Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gaven, Florence; Marin, Philippe; Claeysen, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons represent less than 1% of the total number of neurons in the brain. This low amount of neurons regulates important brain functions such as motor control, motivation, and working memory. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). This progressive neuronal loss is unequivocally associated with the motors symptoms of the pathology (bradykinesia, resting tremor, and muscular rigidity). The main agent responsible of dopaminergic neuron degeneration is still unknown. However, these neurons appear to be extremely vulnerable in diverse conditions. Primary cultures constitute one of the most relevant models to investigate properties and characteristics of dopaminergic neurons. These cultures can be submitted to various stress agents that mimic PD pathology and to neuroprotective compounds in order to stop or slow down neuronal degeneration. The numerous transgenic mouse models of PD that have been generated during the last decade further increased the interest of researchers for dopaminergic neuron cultures. Here, the video protocol focuses on the delicate dissection of embryonic mouse brains. Precise excision of ventral mesencephalon is crucial to obtain neuronal cultures sufficiently rich in dopaminergic cells to allow subsequent studies. This protocol can be realized with embryonic transgenic mice and is suitable for immunofluorescence staining, quantitative PCR, second messenger quantification, or neuronal death/survival assessment. PMID:25226064

  20. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH2-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions. PMID:25152393

  1. Flotillin-1 promotes formation of glutamatergic synapses in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Swanwick, Catherine Croft; Shapiro, Marietta E; Vicini, Stefano; Wenthold, Robert J

    2010-11-01

    Synapse malformation underlies numerous neurodevelopmental illnesses, including autism spectrum disorders. Here we identify the lipid raft protein flotillin-1 as a promoter of glutamatergic synapse formation. We cultured neurons from the hippocampus, a brain region important for learning and memory, and examined them at two weeks in vitro, a time period rich with synapse formation. Double-label immunocytochemistry of native flot-1 with glutamatergic and GABAergic synapse markers showed that flot-1 was preferentially colocalized with the glutamatergic presynaptic marker vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), compared to the GABAergic presynaptic marker glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD-65). Triple-label immunocytochemistry of native flot-1, VGLUT1, and NR1, the obligatory subunit of NMDA receptors, indicates that Flot-1 was preferentially localized to synaptic rather than extrasynaptic NR1. Furthermore, electrophysiological results using whole-cell patch clamp showed that Flot-1 increased the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) but not miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), whereas amplitude and decay kinetics of either type of synaptic current was not affected. Corresponding immunocytochemical data confirmed that the number of glutamatergic synapses increased with flot-1 overexpression. Overall, our anatomical and physiological results show that flot-1 enhances the formation of glutamatergic synapses but not GABAergic synapses, suggesting that the role of flot-1 in neurodevelopmental disorders should be explored. PMID:20669324

  2. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Induces Expression of a Novel Intergenic Long Noncoding RNA in Adult rat Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2016-02-01

    Around 90% of the mammalian genome undergoes pervasive transcription into various types of small and long regulatory noncoding RNAs, whereas only ∼ 1.5% codes for proteins. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) constitute diverse classes of sense- and antisense transcripts that are abundantly expressed in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) in cell type- and developmental stage-specific manners. They are implicated in brain development, differentiation, neuronal plasticity, and other cognitive functions. Mammalian brain requires the vitamin A metabolite all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) for its normal development, differentiation, and cell-fate determination. However, its role in adult brain function is less understood. Here, we report atRA-mediated transcriptional upregulation of endogenous expression of a novel long intergenic noncoding RNA-rat brain expressed (LINC-RBE) in cultured primary hippocampal neurons from adult rat. We have previously reported LINC-RBE as an intergenic, simple repeat sequence containing lncRNA highly expressed in the rat brain. This is a first-time report of involvement of atRA in transcriptional upregulation of lncRNA expression in rat hippocampal neurons. Therefore, it may be involved in regulation of brain function and disease. PMID:26572536

  3. Homer proteins accelerate Ca2+ clearance mediated by the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Salm, Elizabeth J; Thayer, Stanley A

    2012-07-20

    The plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA) is responsible for maintaining basal intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and returning small increases in [Ca(2+)](i) back to resting levels. The carboxyl terminus of some PMCA splice variants bind Homer proteins; how binding affects PMCA function is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of altered expression of Homer proteins on PMCA-mediated Ca(2+) clearance from rat hippocampal neurons in culture. The kinetics of PMCA-mediated recovery from the [Ca(2+)](i) increase evoked by a brief train of action potentials was determined in the soma of single neurons using indo-1-based photometry. Exogenous expression of Homer 1a, Homer 1c or Homer 2a did not affect PMCA function. However, shRNA mediated knockdown of Homer 1 slowed PMCA mediated Ca(2+) clearance by 28% relative to cells expressing non-silencing shRNA. The slowed recovery rate in cells expressing Homer 1 shRNA was reversed by expression of a short Homer 2 truncation mutant. These results indicate that constitutively expressed Homer proteins tonically stimulate PMCA function in hippocampal neurons. We propose a model in which binding of short or long Homer proteins to the carboxyl terminus of the PMCA stimulates Ca(2+) clearance rate. PMCA-mediated Ca(2+) clearance may be stimulated following incorporation of the pump into Homer organized signaling domains and following induction of the Homer 1a immediate early gene. PMID:22732411

  4. Correlates of hippocampal neuron number in Alzheimer's disease and ischemic vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Zarow, Chris; Vinters, Harry V; Ellis, William G; Weiner, Michael W; Mungas, Dan; White, Lon; Chui, Helena C

    2005-06-01

    The cornu ammonis 1 region of the hippocampus (CA1) sector of hippocampus is vulnerable to both Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type neurofibrillary degeneration and anoxia-ischemia. The objective of this article is to compare number and size of neurons in CA1 in AD versus ischemic vascular dementia. Unbiased stereological methods were used to estimate the number and volume of neurons in 28 autopsy-derived brain samples. For each case, the entire hippocampus from one cerebral hemisphere was sliced into 5mm slabs (5-7 slabs/case), cut into 50 microm sections, and stained with gallocyanine. Using the optical dissector, we systematically sampled the number and size of neurons throughout the extent of CA1 and CA2. The total number of neurons was significantly less in AD compared with ischemic vascular dementia (p < 0.02), but there was no significant difference in neuron size. The greatest loss of neurons was observed in two cases with combined AD and hippocampal sclerosis. Regardless of causative diagnosis, the number of CA1 neurons correlates with magnetic resonance imaging-derived hippocampal volume (r = 0.72; p < 0.001) and memory score (r = 0.62; p < 0.01). We conclude that although CA1 neuron loss is more consistently observed in AD than ischemic vascular dementia, severity of loss shows the expected correlation with structure and function across causative subtype. Reductions in magnetic resonance imaging-derived hippocampal volume reflect loss, rather than shrinkage, of CA1 neurons. PMID:15929035

  5. Correlates of Hippocampal Neuron Number in Alzheimer’s Disease and Ischemic Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zarow, Chris; Vinters, Harry V.; Ellis, William G.; Weiner, Michael W.; Mungas, Dan; White, Lon; Chui, Helena C.

    2007-01-01

    The cornu ammonis 1 region of the hippocampus (CA1) sector of hippocampus is vulnerable to both Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-type neurofibrillary degeneration and anoxia–ischemia. The objective of this article is to compare number and size of neurons in CA1 in AD versus ischemic vascular dementia. Unbiased stereological methods were used to estimate the number and volume of neurons in 28 autopsy-derived brain samples. For each case, the entire hippocampus from one cerebral hemisphere was sliced into 5mm slabs (5–7 slabs/case), cut into 50μm sections, and stained with gallocyanine. Using the optical dissector, we systematically sampled the number and size of neurons throughout the extent of CA1 and CA2. The total number of neurons was significantly less in AD compared with ischemic vascular dementia (p < 0.02), but there was no significant difference in neuron size. The greatest loss of neurons was observed in two cases with combined AD and hippocampal sclerosis. Regardless of causative diagnosis, the number of CA1 neurons correlates with magnetic resonance imaging–derived hippocampal volume (r = 0.72; p < 0.001) and memory score (r = 0.62; p < 0.01). We conclude that although CA1 neuron loss is more consistently observed in AD than ischemic vascular dementia, severity of loss shows the expected correlation with structure and function across causative subtype. Reductions in magnetic resonance imaging–derived hippocampal volume reflect loss, rather than shrinkage, of CA1 neurons. PMID:15929035

  6. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase contributes to pentylenetetrazole-kindling-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinjian; Dong, Jingde; Shen, Kai; Bai, Ying; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the major nitric oxide synthase isoform in the mammalian brain, is implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurological conditions, including epilepsy. Neurogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) persists throughout life in the adult brain. Alterations in this process occur in many neurological diseases, including epilepsy. Few studies, however, have addressed the role of nNOS in hippocampal DG neurogenesis in epileptic brain. The present study, therefore, investigated the role of nNOS in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindling-induced neurogenesis in hippocampal DG. Our results showed that nNOS expression and enzymatic activity were significantly increased in the hippocampus of PTZ-kindled mice. Meanwhile, these PTZ-kindled mice were characterized by significant enhancement of new born cells proliferation and survival in hippocampal DG, and these survived cells are co-labeled with NeuN and GFAP. Selective inhibition of nNOS by 7-NI, however, suppressed PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal DG new born cells proliferation and survival, suggesting that nNOS contributes to PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:26820711

  7. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • Identification of dystrophin (Dp) shortest isoform, Dp40, is a neuron-type Dp. • Dp40 expression is temporally and differentially regulated in comparison to Dp71. • Somatodendritic and nuclear localization of Dp40. • Dp40 is localized to excitatory postsynapses. • Dp40 might play roles in dendritic and synaptic functions. - Abstract: The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions.

  8. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Juan A.; Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; Díaz-Galarce, Raúl; Rojas, Sebastián; Maturana, Carola J.; Stehberg, Jimmy; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions, we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression. PMID:25883550

  9. Hippocampal cannabinoid transmission modulates dopamine neuron activity: impact on rewarding memory formation and social interaction.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Michael; Renard, Justine; Zunder, Jordan; Laviolette, Steven R

    2015-05-01

    Disturbances in cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R) signaling have been linked to emotional and cognitive deficits characterizing neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Thus, there is growing interest in characterizing the relationship between cannabinoid transmission, emotional processing, and dopamine (DA)-dependent behavioral deficits. The CB1R is highly expressed in the mammalian nervous system, particularly in the hippocampus. Activation of the ventral hippocampal subregion (vHipp) is known to increase both the activity of DAergic neurons located in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and DA levels in reward-related brain regions, particularly the nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, the possible functional relationship between hippocampal CB1R transmission and VTA DA neuronal activity is not currently understood. In this study, using in vivo neuronal recordings in rats, we demonstrate that activation of CB1R in the vHipp strongly increases VTA DA neuronal firing and bursting activity, while simultaneously decreasing the activity of VTA non-DA neurons. Furthermore, using a conditioned place preference procedure and a social interaction test, we report that intra-vHipp CB1R activation potentiates the reward salience of normally sub-threshold conditioning doses of opiates and induces deficits in natural sociability and social recognition behaviors. Finally, these behavioral effects were prevented by directly blocking NAc DAergic transmission. Collectively, these findings identify hippocampal CB1R transmission as a critical modulator of the mesolimbic DA pathway and in the processing of reward and social-related behavioral phenomena. PMID:25510937

  10. Differential regulation of apical-basolateral dendrite outgrowth by activity in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yang; Seong, Eunju; Yuan, Li; Singh, Dipika; Arikkath, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons have characteristic dendrite asymmetry, characterized by structurally and functionally distinct apical and basolateral dendrites. The ability of the neuron to generate and maintain dendrite asymmetry is vital, since synaptic inputs received are critically dependent on dendrite architecture. Little is known about the role of neuronal activity in guiding maintenance of dendrite asymmetry. Our data indicate that dendrite asymmetry is established and maintained early during development. Further, our results indicate that cell intrinsic and global alterations of neuronal activity have differential effects on net extension of apical and basolateral dendrites. Thus, apical and basolateral dendrite extension may be independently regulated by cell intrinsic and network neuronal activity during development, suggesting that individual dendrites may have autonomous control over net extension. We propose that regulated individual dendrite extension in response to cell intrinsic and neuronal network activity may allow temporal control of synapse specificity in the developing hippocampus. PMID:26321915

  11. Genetic manipulation of adult-born hippocampal neurons rescues memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Richetin, Kevin; Leclerc, Clémence; Toni, Nicolas; Gallopin, Thierry; Pech, Stéphane; Roybon, Laurent; Rampon, Claire

    2015-02-01

    In adult mammals, neural progenitors located in the dentate gyrus retain their ability to generate neurons and glia throughout lifetime. In rodents, increased production of new granule neurons is associated with improved memory capacities, while decreased hippocampal neurogenesis results in impaired memory performance in several memory tasks. In mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, neurogenesis is impaired and the granule neurons that are generated fail to integrate existing networks. Thus, enhancing neurogenesis should improve functional plasticity in the hippocampus and restore cognitive deficits in these mice. Here, we performed a screen of transcription factors that could potentially enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We identified Neurod1 as a robust neuronal determinant with the capability to direct hippocampal progenitors towards an exclusive granule neuron fate. Importantly, Neurod1 also accelerated neuronal maturation and functional integration of new neurons during the period of their maturation when they contribute to memory processes. When tested in an APPxPS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, directed expression of Neurod1 in cycling hippocampal progenitors conspicuously reduced dendritic spine density deficits on new hippocampal neurons, to the same level as that observed in healthy age-matched control animals. Remarkably, this population of highly connected new neurons was sufficient to restore spatial memory in these diseased mice. Collectively our findings demonstrate that endogenous neural stem cells of the diseased brain can be manipulated to become new neurons that could allow cognitive improvement. PMID:25518958

  12. LTP Induction Modifies Functional Relationship among Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yun, Sung H.; Lee, Deok S.; Lee, Hyunjung; Baeg, Eun H.; Kim, Yun B.; Jung, Min W.

    2007-01-01

    To obtain evidence linking long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory, we examined whether LTP induction modifies functional relationship among neurons in the rat hippocampus. In contrast to neurons in low-frequency stimulated or AP5-treated slices, LTP induction altered "functional connectivity," as defined by the degree of synchronous firing, among…

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor differentially modulates excitability of two classes of hippocampal output neurons.

    PubMed

    Graves, A R; Moore, S J; Spruston, N; Tryba, A K; Kaczorowski, C C

    2016-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Canonically, this has been ascribed to an enhancing effect on neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region. However, it is the pyramidal neurons in the subiculum that form the primary efferent pathways conveying hippocampal information to other areas of the brain, and yet the effect of BDNF on these neurons has remained unexplored. We present new data that BDNF regulates neuronal excitability and cellular plasticity in a much more complex manner than previously suggested. Subicular pyramidal neurons can be divided into two major classes, which have different electrophysiological and morphological properties, different requirements for the induction of plasticity, and different extrahippocampal projections. We found that BDNF increases excitability in one class of subicular pyramidal neurons yet decreases excitability in the other class. Furthermore, while endogenous BDNF was necessary for the induction of synaptic plasticity in both cell types, BDNF enhanced intrinsic plasticity in one class of pyramidal neurons yet suppressed intrinsic plasticity in the other. Taken together, these data suggest a novel role for BDNF signaling, as it appears to dynamically and bidirectionally regulate the output of hippocampal information to different regions of the brain. PMID:27146982

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor differentially modulates excitability of two classes of hippocampal output neurons

    PubMed Central

    Graves, A. R.; Moore, S. J.; Spruston, N.; Tryba, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Canonically, this has been ascribed to an enhancing effect on neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region. However, it is the pyramidal neurons in the subiculum that form the primary efferent pathways conveying hippocampal information to other areas of the brain, and yet the effect of BDNF on these neurons has remained unexplored. We present new data that BDNF regulates neuronal excitability and cellular plasticity in a much more complex manner than previously suggested. Subicular pyramidal neurons can be divided into two major classes, which have different electrophysiological and morphological properties, different requirements for the induction of plasticity, and different extrahippocampal projections. We found that BDNF increases excitability in one class of subicular pyramidal neurons yet decreases excitability in the other class. Furthermore, while endogenous BDNF was necessary for the induction of synaptic plasticity in both cell types, BDNF enhanced intrinsic plasticity in one class of pyramidal neurons yet suppressed intrinsic plasticity in the other. Taken together, these data suggest a novel role for BDNF signaling, as it appears to dynamically and bidirectionally regulate the output of hippocampal information to different regions of the brain. PMID:27146982

  15. Pretreatment with Apoaequorin Protects Hippocampal CA1 Neurons from Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Detert, Julia A.; Adams, Erin L.; Lescher, Jacob D.; Lyons, Jeri-Anne; Moyer, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke affects ∼795,000 people each year in the U.S., which results in an estimated annual cost of $73.7 billion. Calcium is pivotal in a variety of neuronal signaling cascades, however, during ischemia, excess calcium influx can trigger excitotoxic cell death. Calcium binding proteins help neurons regulate/buffer intracellular calcium levels during ischemia. Aequorin is a calcium binding protein isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, and has been used for years as a calcium indicator, but little is known about its neuroprotective properties. The present study used an in vitro rat brain slice preparation to test the hypothesis that an intra-hippocampal infusion of apoaequorin (the calcium binding component of aequorin) protects neurons from ischemic cell death. Bilaterally cannulated rats received an apoaequorin infusion in one hemisphere and vehicle control in the other. Hippocampal slices were then prepared and subjected to 5 minutes of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), and cell death was assayed by trypan blue exclusion. Apoaequorin dose-dependently protected neurons from OGD – doses of 1% and 4% (but not 0.4%) significantly decreased the number of trypan blue-labeled neurons. This effect was also time dependent, lasting up to 48 hours. This time dependent effect was paralleled by changes in cytokine and chemokine expression, indicating that apoaequorin may protect neurons via a neuroimmunomodulatory mechanism. These data support the hypothesis that pretreatment with apoaequorin protects neurons against ischemic cell death, and may be an effective neurotherapeutic. PMID:24244400

  16. Valproic acid enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy by protecting normal hippocampal neurons and sensitizing malignant glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Thotala, Dinesh; Karvas, Rowan M.; Engelbach, John A.; Garbow, Joel R.; Hallahan, Andrew N.; DeWees, Todd A.; Laszlo, Andrei; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurocognitive deficits are serious sequelae that follow cranial irradiation used to treat patients with medulloblastoma and other brain neoplasms. Cranial irradiation causes apoptosis in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus leading to cognitive deficits. Valproic acid (VPA) treatment protected hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced damage in both cell culture and animal models. Radioprotection was observed in VPA-treated neuronal cells compared to cells treated with radiation alone. This protection is specific to normal neuronal cells and did not extend to cancer cells. In fact, VPA acted as a radiosensitizer in brain cancer cells. VPA treatment induced cell cycle arrest in cancer cells but not in normal neuronal cells. The level of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was increased and the pro-apoptotic protein Bax was reduced in VPA treated normal cells. VPA inhibited the activities of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), the latter of which is only inhibited in normal cells. The combination of VPA and radiation was most effective in inhibiting tumor growth in heterotopic brain tumor models. An intracranial orthotopic glioma tumor model was used to evaluate tumor growth by using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE MRI) and mouse survival following treatment with VPA and radiation. VPA, in combination with radiation, significantly delayed tumor growth and improved mouse survival. Overall, VPA protects normal hippocampal neurons and not cancer cells from radiation-induced cytotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. VPA treatment has the potential for attenuating neurocognitive deficits associated with cranial irradiation while enhancing the efficiency of glioma radiotherapy. PMID:26413814

  17. The neuroprotective action of pyrroloquinoline quinone against glutamate-induced apoptosis in hippocampal neurons is mediated through the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qi; Shen Mi; Ding Mei; Shen Dingding; Ding Fei

    2011-04-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a cofactor in several enzyme-catalyzed redox reactions, possesses a potential capability of scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibiting cell apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the effects of PQQ on glutamate-induced cell death in primary cultured hippocampal neurons and the possible underlying mechanisms. We found that glutamate-induced apoptosis in cultured hippocampal neurons was significantly attenuated by the ensuing PQQ treatment, which also inhibited the glutamate-induced increase in Ca2+ influx, caspase-3 activity, and ROS production, and reversed the glutamate-induced decrease in Bcl-2/Bax ratio. The examination of signaling pathways revealed that PQQ treatment activated the phosphorylation of Akt and suppressed the glutamate-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK). And inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt cascade by LY294002 and wortmannin significantly blocked the protective effects of PQQ, and alleviated the increase in Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Taken together, our results indicated that PQQ could protect primary cultured hippocampal neurons against glutamate-induced cell damage by scavenging ROS, reducing Ca2+ influx, and caspase-3 activity, and suggested that PQQ-activated PI3K/Akt signaling might be responsible for its neuroprotective action through modulation of glutamate-induced imbalance between Bcl-2 and Bax. - Research Highlights: >PQQ attenuated glutamate-induced cell apoptosis of cultured hippocampal neurons. >PQQ inhibited glutamate-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx and caspase-3 activity. >PQQ reduced glutamate-induced increase in ROS production. >PQQ affected phosphorylation of Akt and JNK signalings after glutamate injury. >PI3K/Akt was required for neuroprotection of PQQ by modulating Bcl-2/Bax ratio.

  18. Developmental lead exposure alters gene expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Yan, Chong-Huai; Wu, Sheng-Hu; Yu, Xiao-Dan; Yu, Xiao-Gang; Shen, Xiao-Ming

    2007-02-21

    Exposure to lead in utero and in infancy is associated with a risk of impaired cognitive development. Increasing evidence suggests that the family of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. We determined whether mGluRs subtypes 1, 3, and 7 (mGluR1, mGluR3, and mGluR7) were involved in developmental neurotoxicity due to lead. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons were cultured for 21 days and exposed to lead chloride beginning on the fourth day of incubation. We investigated levels of mGluR1, mGluR3, and mGluR7 mRNA expression by using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with lead exposure at 10 nM, 1 microM, and 100 microM. Lead exposure in vitro downregulated the expression of mGluR1 mRNA and upregulated the expression of mGluR3 and mGluR7 mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. We speculate that mGluRs may be involved in lead neurotoxicity. Pathways that likely contribute to lead neurotoxicity by means of mGluRs are impairment of long-term potentiation, effects on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor functions, and depotentiation. PMID:17267122

  19. Amyloid beta-peptide impairs glucose transport in hippocampal and cortical neurons: involvement of membrane lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Mark, R J; Pang, Z; Geddes, J W; Uchida, K; Mattson, M P

    1997-02-01

    A deficit in glucose uptake and a deposition of amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) each occur in vulnerable brain regions in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is not known whether mechanistic links exist between A beta deposition and impaired glucose transport. We now report that A beta impairs glucose transport in cultured rat hippocampal and cortical neurons by a mechanism involving membrane lipid peroxidation. A beta impaired 3H-deoxy-glucose transport in a concentration-dependent manner and with a time course preceding neurodegeneration. The decrease in glucose transport was followed by a decrease in cellular ATP levels. Impairment of glucose transport, ATP depletion, and cell death were each prevented in cultures pretreated with antioxidants. Exposure to FeSO4, an established inducer of lipid peroxidation, also impaired glucose transport. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses showed that exposure of cultures to A beta induced conjugation of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation, to the neuronal glucose transport protein GLUT3. HNE induced a concentration-dependent impairment of glucose transport and subsequent ATP depletion. Impaired glucose transport was not caused by a decreased energy demand in the neurons, because ouabain, which inhibits Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity and thereby reduces neuronal ATP hydrolysis rate, had little or no effect on glucose transport. Collectively, the data demonstrate that lipid peroxidation mediates A beta-induced impairment of glucose transport in neurons and suggest that this action of A beta may contribute to decreased glucose uptake and neuronal degeneration in AD. PMID:8994059

  20. MeHg Suppressed Neuronal Potency of Hippocampal NSCs Contributing to the Puberal Spatial Memory Deficits.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianying; Luo, Yougen; Chen, Weiwei; Yang, Shengsen; Wang, Hao; Cui, Jing; Lu, Zhiyan; Lin, Yuanye; Bi, Yongyi

    2016-08-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis-related structural damage, particularly that leading to defective adult cognitive function, is considered an important risk factor for neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. Normal differentiation of neurons and glial cells during development is crucial in neurogenesis, which is particularly sensitive to the environmental toxicant methylmercury (MeHg). However, the exact effects of MeHg on hippocampal neural stem cell (hNSC) differentiation during puberty remain unknown. This study investigates whether MeHg exposure induces changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and whether these changes underlie cognitive defects in puberty. A rat model of methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) exposure (0.4 mg/kg/day, PND 5-PND 33, 28 days) was established, and the Morris water maze was used to assess cognitive function. Primary hNSCs from hippocampal tissues of E16-day Sprague-Dawley rats were purified, identified, and cloned. hNSC proliferation and differentiation and the growth and morphology of newly generated neurons were observed by MTT and immunofluorescence assays. MeHg exposure induced defects in spatial learning and memory accompanied by a decrease in number of doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the dentate gyrus (DG). DCX is a surrogate marker for newly generated neurons. Proliferation and differentiation of hNSCs significantly decreased in the MeHg-treated groups. MeHg attenuated microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2) expression in neurons and enhanced the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cell differentiation of hNSCs, thereby inducing degenerative changes in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, MeHg induced deficits in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory during adolescence as a consequence of decreased generation of DG neurons. Our findings suggested that MeHg exposure could be a potential risk factor for psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26743863

  1. Activities of visual cortical and hippocampal neurons co-fluctuate in freely moving rats during spatial behavior

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Daniel Christopher; Ji, Daoyun

    2015-01-01

    Visual cues exert a powerful control over hippocampal place cell activities that encode external spaces. The functional interaction of visual cortical neurons and hippocampal place cells during spatial navigation behavior has yet to be elucidated. Here we show that, like hippocampal place cells, many neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) of freely moving rats selectively fire at specific locations as animals run repeatedly on a track. The V1 location-specific activity leads hippocampal place cell activity both spatially and temporally. The precise activities of individual V1 neurons fluctuate every time the animal travels through the track, in a correlated fashion with those of hippocampal place cells firing at overlapping locations. The results suggest the existence of visual cortical neurons that are functionally coupled with hippocampal place cells for spatial processing during natural behavior. These visual neurons may also participate in the formation and storage of hippocampal-dependent memories. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08902.001 PMID:26349031

  2. Conditioned Medium Reconditions Hippocampal Neurons against Kainic Acid Induced Excitotoxicity: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Bevinahal, Pradeep Kumar K.; Venugopal, Chaitra; Yencharla, Harish Chandra Prasad S.; Chandanala, Shashank; Trichur, Raju R.; Talakad, Sathyaprabha N.; Bhonde, Ramesh R.; Dhanushkodi, Anandh

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is gaining attention as a promising treatment option for neurodegenerative diseases. The functional efficacy of grafted cells is a matter of debate and the recent consensus is that the cellular and functional recoveries might be due to “by-stander” effects of grafted cells. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of conditioned medium (CM) derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells in a kainic acid (KA) induced hippocampal degeneration model system in in vitro condition. Hippocampal cell line was exposed to KA (200 µM) for 24 hrs (lesion group) whereas, in the treatment group, hippocampal cell line was exposed to KA in combination with HEK-CM (KA + HEK-CM). We observed that KA exposure to cells resulted in significant neuronal loss. Interestingly, HEK-CM cotreatment completely attenuated the excitotoxic effects of KA. In HEK-CM cotreatment group, the cell viability was ~85–95% as opposed to 47% in KA alone group. Further investigation demonstrated that treatment with HEK-CM stimulated the endogenous cell survival factors like brain derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) and antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2, revealing the possible mechanism of neuroprotection. Our results suggest that HEK-CM protects hippocampal neurons against excitotoxicity by stimulating the host's endogenous cell survival mechanisms. PMID:25505907

  3. Hippocampal Neuron Populations Are Reduced in Vervet Monkeys With Fetal Alcohol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Mark W; Ptito, Maurice; Ervin, Frank R; Palmour, Roberta M

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to beverage alcohol is a major cause of mild mental retardation and developmental delay. In nonendangered alcohol-preferring vervet monkeys, we modeled the most common nondysmorphic form of fetal alcohol syndrome disorder with voluntary drinking during the third trimester of pregnancy. Here, we report significant numerical reductions in the principal hippocampal neurons of fetal alcohol-exposed (FAE) offspring, as compared to age-matched, similarly housed conspecifics with isocaloric sucrose exposure. These deficits, particularly marked in CA1 and CA3, are present neonatally and persist through infancy (5 months) and juvenile (2 years) stages. Although the volumes of hippocampal subdivisions in FAE animals are not atypical at birth, by age 2, they are only 65–70% of those estimated in age-matched controls. These data suggest that moderate, naturalistic alcohol consumption during late pregnancy results in a stable loss of hippocampal neurons and a progressive reduction of hippocampal volume. © 2015 The Authors. Developmental Psychobiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 57:470–485, 2015. PMID:25913787

  4. Progressive functional impairments of hippocampal neurons in a tauopathy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ciupek, Sarah M; Cheng, Jingheng; Ali, Yousuf O; Lu, Hui-Chen; Ji, Daoyun

    2015-05-27

    The age-dependent progression of tau pathology is a major characteristic of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), and plays an important role in the behavioral phenotypes of AD, including memory deficits. Despite extensive molecular and cellular studies on tau pathology, it remains to be determined how it alters the neural circuit functions underlying learning and memory in vivo. In rTg4510 mice, a Tau-P301L tauopathy model, hippocampal place fields that support spatial memories are abnormal at old age (7-9 months) when tau tangles and neurodegeneration are extensive. However, it is unclear how the abnormality in the hippocampal circuit function arises and progresses with the age-dependent progression of tau pathology. Here we show that in young (2-4 months of age) rTg4510 mice, place fields of hippocampal CA1 cells are largely normal, with only subtle differences from those of age-matched wild-type control mice. Second, high-frequency ripple oscillations of local field potentials in the hippocampal CA1 area are significantly reduced in young rTg4510 mice, and even further deteriorated in old rTg4510 mice. The ripple reduction is associated with less bursty firing and altered synchrony of CA1 cells. Together, the data indicate that deficits in ripples and neuronal synchronization occur before overt deficits in place fields in these mice. The results reveal a tau-pathology-induced progression of hippocampal functional changes in vivo. PMID:26019329

  5. Progressive Functional Impairments of Hippocampal Neurons in a Tauopathy Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ciupek, Sarah M.; Cheng, Jingheng; Ali, Yousuf O.; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2015-01-01

    The age-dependent progression of tau pathology is a major characteristic of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), and plays an important role in the behavioral phenotypes of AD, including memory deficits. Despite extensive molecular and cellular studies on tau pathology, it remains to be determined how it alters the neural circuit functions underlying learning and memory in vivo. In rTg4510 mice, a Tau-P301L tauopathy model, hippocampal place fields that support spatial memories are abnormal at old age (7–9 months) when tau tangles and neurodegeneration are extensive. However, it is unclear how the abnormality in the hippocampal circuit function arises and progresses with the age-dependent progression of tau pathology. Here we show that in young (2–4 months of age) rTg4510 mice, place fields of hippocampal CA1 cells are largely normal, with only subtle differences from those of age-matched wild-type control mice. Second, high-frequency ripple oscillations of local field potentials in the hippocampal CA1 area are significantly reduced in young rTg4510 mice, and even further deteriorated in old rTg4510 mice. The ripple reduction is associated with less bursty firing and altered synchrony of CA1 cells. Together, the data indicate that deficits in ripples and neuronal synchronization occur before overt deficits in place fields in these mice. The results reveal a tau-pathology-induced progression of hippocampal functional changes in vivo. PMID:26019329

  6. An on-line archive of reconstructed hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cannon, R C; Turner, D A; Pyapali, G K; Wheal, H V

    1998-10-01

    We have developed an on-line archive of neuronal geometry to encourage the use of realistic dendritic structures in morphometry and for neuronal modeling, located at web address www.neuro.soton.ac.uk. Initially we have included full three-dimensional representations of 87 neurons from the hippocampus, obtained following intracellular staining with biocytin and reconstruction using Neurolucida. The archive system includes a structure editor for correcting any departures from valid branching geometry and which allows simple errors in the digitisation to be corrected. The editor employs a platform-independent file format which enforces the constraints that there should be no isolated branches and no closed loops. It also incorporates software for interconversion between the archive format and those used by various neuronal reconstruction and modelling packages. The raw data from digitisation software can be included in the archive as well as edited reconstructions and any further information available. Cross-referenced tables and indexes are updated automatically and are sorted according to a number of fields including the cell type, contributor, submission date and published reference. Both the archive and the structure editor should facilitate the quantitative use of full three-dimensional reconstructions of neurons from the hippocampus and other brain regions. PMID:9821633

  7. Correlation of hippocampal theta rhythm with changes in cutaneous temperature. [evoked neuron response in thermoregulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Saleh, M. A.; Karem, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    A possible role for the hippocampus in alerting an animal to changes in cutaneous temperature was examined. Following local warming or cooling of the ears of unanesthetized, loosely restrained rabbits, theta waves (4-7 Hz EEG waves) were recorded from electrodes straddling the hippocampus. The onset of the hippocampal theta rhythm was correlated with changes in cutaneous temperature, an observation consistent with studies indicating that the theta rhythm is a nonspecific response evoked by stimulation of several sensory modalities. Additional data from cats and rabbits were correlated with specific neurons within the hippocampus, namely pyramidal cells. Post stimulus time histograms obtained by excitation of the dorsal fornix were interpreted in terms of excitatory and inhibitory inputs to pyramidal cells. Thus, the theta rhythm, which appears to be evoked by changes in cutaneous temperature, can be related to a specific type of hippocampal neuron which is in turn connected with other areas of the brain involved in temperature regulation.

  8. High-resolution extracellular stimulation of dispersed hippocampal culture with high-density CMOS multielectrode array based on non-Faradaic electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lei, N; Ramakrishnan, S; Shi, P; Orcutt, J S; Yuste, R; Kam, L C; Shepard, K L

    2011-08-01

    We introduce a method to electrically stimulate individual neurons at single-cell resolution in arbitrary spatiotemporal patterns with precise control over stimulation thresholds. By exploiting a custom microelectronic chip, up to 65,000 non-Faradaic electrodes can be uniquely addressed with electrode density exceeding 6500 electrodes mm(-2). We demonstrate extracellular stimulation of dispersed primary hippocampal neuronal cultures using the chip at single-cell resolution. PMID:21725154

  9. Dendritic remodeling of hippocampal neurons is associated with altered NMDA receptor expression in alcohol dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Miranda C.; Kim, Airee; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged alcohol exposure has been previously shown to impair the structure and function of the hippocampus, although the underlying structural and biochemical alterations contributing to these deleterious effects are unclear. Also unclear is whether these changes persist into prolonged periods of abstinence. Previous work from our lab utilizing a clinically relevant rodent model of alcohol consumption demonstrated that alcohol dependence (induced by chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure or CIE) decreases proliferation and survival of neural stem cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone and hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, implicating this region of the cortex as particularly sensitive to the toxic effects of prolonged ethanol exposure. For this study, we investigated seven weeks of CIE-induced morphological changes (dendritic complexity and dendritic spine density) of dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell neurons, CA3, and CA1 pyramidal neurons and the associated alterations in biochemical markers of synaptic plasticity and toxicity (NMDA receptors and PSD-95) in the hippocampus in ethanol-experienced Wistar rats 3h (CIE) and 21 days (protracted abstinence) after the last ethanol vapor exposure. CIE reduced dendritic arborization of DG neurons and this effect persisted into protracted abstinence. CIE enhanced dendritic arborization of pyramidal neurons and this effect did not persist into protracted abstinence. The architectural changes in dendrites did not correlate with alterations in dendritic spine density, however, they were associated with increases in the expression of pNR2B, total NR2B, and total NR2A immediately following CIE with expression levels returning to control levels in prolonged abstinence. Overall, these data provide the evidence that CIE produces profound changes in hippocampal structural plasticity and in molecular tools that maintain hippocampal structural plasticity, and these alterations may underlie cognitive dysfunction

  10. Hippocampal GABAergic interneurons coexpressing alpha7-nicotinic receptors and connexin-36 are able to improve neuronal viability under oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Voytenko, L P; Lushnikova, I V; Savotchenko, A V; Isaeva, E V; Skok, M V; Lykhmus, O Yu; Patseva, M A; Skibo, G G

    2015-08-01

    The hippocampal interneurons are very diverse by chemical profiles and rather inconsistent by sensitivity to CI. Some hippocampal GABAergic interneurons survive certain time after ischemia while ischemia-sensitive interneurons and pyramidal neurons are damaged. GABAergic signaling, nicotinic receptors expressing α7-subunit (α7nAChRs(+)) and connexin-36 (Cx36(+), electrotonic gapjunctions protein) contradictory modulate post-ischemic environment. We hypothesized that hippocampal ischemia-resistant GABAergic interneurons coexpressing glutamate decarboxylase-67 isoform (GAD67(+)), α7nAChRs(+), Cx36(+) are able to enhance neuronal viability. To check this hypothesis the histochemical and electrophysiological investigations have been performed using rat hippocampal organotypic culture in the condition of 30-min oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Post-OGD reoxygenation (4h) revealed in CA1 pyramidal layer numerous damaged cells, decreased population spike amplitude and increased pair-pulse depression. In these conditions GAD67(+) interneurons displayed the OGD-resistance and significant increase of GABA synthesis/metabolism (GAD67-immunofluorescence, mitochondrial activity). The α7nAChRs(+) and Cx36(+) co-localizations were revealed in resistant GAD67(+) interneurons. Under OGD: GABAA-receptors (GABAARs) blockade increased cell damage and exacerbated the pair-pulse depression in CA1 pyramidal layer; α7nAChRs and Cx36-channels separate blockades sufficiently decreased cell damage while interneuronal GAD67-immunofluorescence and mitochondrial activity were similar to the control. Thus, hippocampal GABAergic interneurons co-expressing α7nAChRs and Cx36 remained resistant certain time after OGD and were able to modulate CA1 neuron survival through GABAARs, α7nAChRs and Cx36-channels activity. The enhancements of the neuronal viability together with GABA synthesis/metabolism normalization suggest cooperative neuroprotective mechanism that could be used for increase in

  11. Gastrin-releasing peptide contributes to the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Walton, Noah M; de Koning, Anoek; Xie, Xiuyuan; Shin, Rick; Chen, Qian; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Gross, Adam K; Kogan, Jeffrey H; Heusner, Carrie L; Tamura, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    In the postnatal hippocampus, newly generated neurons contribute to learning and memory. Disruptions in neurogenesis and neuronal development have been linked to cognitive impairment and are implicated in a broad variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. To identify putative factors involved in this process, we examined hippocampal gene expression alterations in mice possessing a heterozygous knockout of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha heterozygous knockout gene (CaMK2α-hKO), an established model of cognitive impairment that also displays altered neurogenesis and neuronal development. Using this approach, we identified gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) as the most dysregulated gene. In wild-type mice, GRP labels NeuN-positive neurons, the lone exception being GRP-positive, NeuN-negative cells in the subgranular zone, suggesting GRP expression may be relevant to neurogenesis and/or neuronal development. Using a model of in vitro hippocampal neurogenesis, we determined that GRP signaling is essential for the continued survival and development of newborn neurons, both of which are blocked by transient knockdown of GRP's cognate receptor (GRPR). Furthermore, GRP appears to negatively regulate neurogenesis-associated proliferation in neural stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GRP resulted in a decrease in immature neuronal markers, increased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and decreased neurogenesis. Despite increased levels of GRP mRNA, CaMK2α-hKO mutant mice expressed reduced levels of GRP peptide. This lack of GRP may contribute to the elevated neurogenesis and impaired neuronal development, which are reversed following exogenous GRP infusion. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that GRP modulates neurogenesis and neuronal development and may contribute to hippocampus-associated cognitive impairment. PMID:24806094

  12. Odours stimulate neuronal activity in the dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation during path integration

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, P. E.; Phillips, J. B.; Gonçalves, A.; Marques, P. A. M.; Nĕmec, P.

    2014-01-01

    The dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation of birds is commonly assumed to play a central role in processing information needed for geographical positioning and homing. Previous work has interpreted odour-induced activity in this region as evidence for an ‘olfactory map’. Here, we show, using c-Fos expression as a marker, that neuronal activation in the dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation of pigeons is primarily a response to odour novelty, not to the spatial distribution of odour sources that would be necessary for an olfactory map. Pigeons exposed to odours had significantly more neurons activated in this area of the brain than pigeons exposed to filtered air with odours removed. This increased activity was observed only in response to unfamiliar odours. No change in activity was observed when pigeons were exposed to home odours. These findings are consistent with non-home odours activating non-olfactory components of the pigeon's navigation system. The pattern of neuronal activation in the triangular and dorsomedial areas of the hippocampal formation was, by contrast, consistent with the possibility that odours play a role in providing spatial information. PMID:24671977

  13. Long-term stimulation of mouse hippocampal slice culture on microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, A; Papanikolaou, T; Schuker, A; Möller, A; Schlosshauer, B

    2003-05-01

    To understand mechanisms of information processing, development and degeneration of the central nervous system, simultaneous multisite recording and stimulation have become extremely helpful. We have further developed the innovative approach to record from intact neural networks using planar microelectrode arrays (MEAs) with 60 substrate-integrated nano-columnar electrodes. To allow for long-term stimulation, mouse hippocampal tissue slices were immobilized onto MEAs and permanently moved between the gas and medium phase in a specifically designed tilting incubator that made it possible to electrically contact up to 90 MEAs with 5400 electrodes. After 2-3 weeks in vitro, histochemical staining, the intracellular microinjection of the fluorescent dye Alexa and the recording of spontaneous activity revealed in vivo-like characteristics of the organotypically cultured tissue. The feasibility of long-term stimulation during culturing was demonstrated with a low frequency paradigm. 0.003 Hz stimulation over a 16 h period resulted in a significant decline of field potentials and population spikes in two identified hippocampal subregions. Control experiments revealed that this effect was not due to tissue detachment or to induced cell death. In summary, the novel technology promises to open a new avenue for analyzing regulatory interactions of neuronal activity, cell differentiation and gene expression during development and in diseases. PMID:12738008

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} is expressed in hippocampal neurons and its activation prevents {beta}-amyloid neurodegeneration: role of Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C. . E-mail: ninestr@genes.bio.puc.cl; Godoy, Juan A.; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A.; Koenig, Cecilia S.; Bronfman, Miguel

    2005-03-10

    The molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves the participation of the amyloid-{beta}-peptide (A{beta}), which plays a critical role in the neurodegeneration that triggers the disease. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors, which are members of the nuclear receptor family. We report here that (1) PPAR{gamma} is present in rat hippocampal neurons in culture. (2) Activation of PPAR{gamma} by troglitazone and rosiglitazone protects rat hippocampal neurons against A{beta}-induced neurodegeneration, as shown by the 3-[4,5 -2yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay, immunofluorescence using an anti-heavy neurofilament antibody, and quantitative electron microscopy. (3) Hippocampal neurons treated with several PPAR{gamma} agonists, including troglitazone, rosiglitazone, and ciglitazone, prevent the excitotoxic A{beta}-induced rise in bulk-free Ca{sup 2+}. (4) PPAR{gamma} activation results in the modulation of Wnt signaling components, including the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and an increase of the cytoplasmic and nuclear {beta}-catenin levels. We conclude that the activation of PPAR{gamma} prevents A{beta}-induced neurodegeneration by a mechanism that may involve a cross talk between neuronal PPAR{gamma} and the Wnt signaling pathway. More important, the fact that the activation of PPAR{gamma} attenuated A{beta}-dependent neurodegeneration opens the possibility to fight AD from a new therapeutic perspective.

  15. Differential regulation of amyloid-. beta. -protein mRNA expression within hippocampal neuronal subpopulations in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, G.A.; Lewis, D.A.; Bahmanyar, S.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Young, W.G.; Morrison, J.H.; Wilson, M.C.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have mapped the neuroanatomical distribution of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA within neuronal subpopulations of the hippocampal formation in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), normal aged human, and patients with Alzheimer disease. Amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA appears to be expressed in all hippocampal neurons, but at different levels of abundance. In the central nervous system of monkey and normal aged human, image analysis shows that neurons of the dentate gyrus and cornu Ammonis fields contain a 2.5-times-greater hybridization signal than is present in neurons of the subiculum and entorhinal cortex. In contrast, in the Alzheimer disease hippocampal formation, the levels of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the cornu Ammonis field 3 and parasubiculum are equivalent. These findings suggest that within certain neuronal subpopulations cell type-specific regulation of amyloid-..beta..-protein gene expression may be altered in Alzheimer disease.

  16. Stochastic fluctuations in gene expression in aging hippocampal neurons could be exacerbated by traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Joseph; Boone, Deborah; Weisz, Harris; Jennings, Kristofer; Uchida, Tatsuo; Parsley, Margaret; DeWitt, Douglas; Prough, Donald; Hellmich, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a risk factor for age-related dementia and development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease that are associated with cognitive decline. The exact mechanism for this risk is unknown but we hypothesized that TBI is exacerbating age-related changes in gene expression. Here, we present evidence in an animal model that experimental TBI increases age-related stochastic gene expression. We compared the variability in expression of several genes associated with cell survival or death, among three groups of laser capture microdissected hippocampal neurons from aging rat brains. TBI increased stochastic fluctuations in gene expression in both dying and surviving neurons compared to the naïve neurons. Increases in random, stochastic fluctuations in prosurvival or prodeath gene expression could potentially alter cell survival or cell death pathways in aging neurons after TBI which may lead to age-related cognitive decline. PMID:26140916

  17. Synaptic Integration of Adult-Born Hippocampal Neurons Is Locally Controlled by Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Sébastien; Li, Liyi; Moss, Jonathan; Petrelli, Francesco; Cassé, Frédéric; Gebara, Elias; Lopatar, Jan; Pfrieger, Frank W; Bezzi, Paola; Bischofberger, Josef; Toni, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Adult neurogenesis is regulated by the neurogenic niche, through mechanisms that remain poorly defined. Here, we investigated whether niche-constituting astrocytes influence the maturation of adult-born hippocampal neurons using two independent transgenic approaches to block vesicular release from astrocytes. In these models, adult-born neurons but not mature neurons showed reduced glutamatergic synaptic input and dendritic spine density that was accompanied with lower functional integration and cell survival. By taking advantage of the mosaic expression of transgenes in astrocytes, we found that spine density was reduced exclusively in segments intersecting blocked astrocytes, revealing an extrinsic, local control of spine formation. Defects in NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated synaptic transmission and dendrite maturation were partially restored by exogenous D-serine, whose extracellular level was decreased in transgenic models. Together, these results reveal a critical role for adult astrocytes in local dendritic spine maturation, which is necessary for the NMDAR-dependent functional integration of newborn neurons. PMID:26606999

  18. Enhanced excitability of hippocampal mossy fibers and CA3 neurons under dietary zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Yamada, Kohei; Minami, Akira; Nagano, Tetsuo; Oku, Naoto

    2005-02-01

    On the basis of the evidence that susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures is enhanced by zinc deficiency and that glutamate concentrations in hippocampal extracellular fluid are excessively increased during seizures, excitability of hippocampal mossy fibers and CA3 neurons was examined using hippocampal slices, which were prepare from mice fed a zinc-deficient diet for 4 weeks. The spatio-temporal dynamics of zinc and calcium was monitored using their indicators, membrane-impermeable ZnAF-2 and membrane-permeable fura-2 AM, respectively. When the molecular layer of dentate gyrus was stimulated with 100mM KCl for 1s, the increased percentages of extracellular zinc in the stratum lucidum and CA3 pyramidal cell layer were higher in zinc-deficient mice than in the control mice, implying that glutamate release from the mossy fibers of the dentate granular cells is enhanced by zinc deficiency. Judging from the increased percentages, however, the amount of zinc released was estimated to be less in zinc-deficient mice. On the other hand, the basal calcium concentrations in the stratum lucidum and CA3 pyramidal cell layer detected with fura-2 were higher in zinc-deficient mice than in the control mice, indicating that hippocampal calcium homeostasis is affected by zinc deficiency. Furthermore, the increased percentage of intracellular calcium in the stratum lucidum by stimulation with high K+ was enhanced by the zinc deficiency. The alteration of hippocampal calcium homeostasis seems to enhance excitability of dentate granular cells in zinc deficiency, following by an enhanced excitability of postsynaptic structures in CA3 neurons. PMID:15716032

  19. Signaling through the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor VEGFR-2 protects hippocampal neurons from mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Tianfeng; Rockwell, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelia growth factor VEGF (VEGF-A or VEGF165) is a potent angiogenic factor that also signals neuroprotection through activation of its cognate receptor VEGFR-2. In this capacity, VEGF signaling can rescue neurons from the damage induced by stressful stimuli many of which elicit oxidative stress. However, the regulatory role that VEGFR-2 plays in providing neuroprotection remains elusive. Therefore, we investigated the effects of VEGFR-2 inhibition on primary cultures of mature hippocampal neurons undergoing nutritional stress. We found that neurons cultured under nutritional stress had increased expression of VEGF and its receptors, VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and NP-1 as well as enhanced levels of VEGFR-2 phosphorylation. These neurons also showed increased activation of the prosurvival pathways for MEK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, enhanced phosphorylation (inactivation) of the pro-apoptotic BAD and higher levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL, all of which were augmented by treatments with exogenous VEGF and blocked by VEGFR-2 inhibition. The blockade of VEGFR-2 function also elicited a cytotoxicity that was accompanied by caspase-3 activation, induction of hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1), oxidative stress and a collapse in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψlm). Knockdown of VEGFR-2 by siRNA generated a similar pattern of redox change and mitochondrial impairment. Pretreatments with VEGF, VEGF-B or the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) rescued SU1498 or siRNA treated neurons from the mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress induced by VEGFR-2 inhibition in a timely fashion. These findings suggested that VEGF or VEGF-B can provide neuroprotection by signaling through an alternate VEGF receptor. Together, our findings suggest that VEGF signaling through VEGFR-2 plays a critical regulatory role in protecting stressed hippocampal neurons from the damaging effects of an oxidative insult. These findings also implicate VEGFR-1 or NP-1 as compensatory receptors

  20. A Vesicle Superpool Spans Multiple Presynaptic Terminals in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Staras, Kevin; Branco, Tiago; Burden, Jemima J.; Pozo, Karine; Darcy, Kevin; Marra, Vincenzo; Ratnayaka, Arjuna; Goda, Yukiko

    2010-01-01

    Summary Synapse-specific vesicle pools have been widely characterized at central terminals. Here, we demonstrate a vesicle pool that is not confined to a synapse but spans multiple terminals. Using fluorescence imaging, correlative electron microscopy, and modeling of vesicle dynamics, we show that some recycling pool vesicles at synapses form part of a larger vesicle “superpool.” The vesicles within this superpool are highly mobile and are rapidly exchanged between terminals (turnover: ∼4% of total pool/min), significantly changing vesicular composition at synapses over time. In acute hippocampal slices we show that the mobile vesicle pool is also a feature of native brain tissue. We also demonstrate that superpool vesicles are available to synapses during stimulation, providing an extension of the classical recycling pool. Experiments using focal BDNF application suggest the involvement of a local TrkB-receptor-dependent mechanism for synapse-specific regulation of presynaptic vesicle pools through control of vesicle release and capture to or from the extrasynaptic pool. PMID:20399727

  1. Delivering drugs, via microdialysis, into the environment of extracellularly recorded hippocampal neurons in behaving primates.

    PubMed

    Ludvig, N; Nguyen, M C; Botero, J M; Tang, H M; Scalia, F; Scharf, B A; Kral, J G

    2000-02-01

    Hippocampal neurons in primates have been extensively studied with electrophysiological and neuroanatomical methods. Much less effort has been devoted to examining these cells with contemporary pharmacological techniques. Therefore, we modified a recently developed integrative technique (N. Ludvig, P.E. Potter, S.E. Fox, Simultaneous single-cell recording and microdialysis within the same brain site in freely behaving rats: a novel neurobiological method, J. Neurosci. Methods 55 (1994) 31-40 [9] ) for cellular neuropharmacological studies in behaving monkeys. A driveable microelectrode-microdialysis probe guide assembly was implanted stereotaxically into the left hippocampus of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) under isoflurane anesthesia. The assembly was covered with a protective cap. After 3 weeks of postsurgical recovery and behavioral training, the experimental subject was seated in a primate chair. For 4-5 h, single-cell recording and microdialysis were simultaneously performed in the hippocampal implantation site. The technique allowed the recording of both complex-spike cells and fast-firing neurons without the use of head restraint. The control microdialysis solution, artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF), was replaced with either 1 M ethanol or 500 microM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) for 10-30 min intervals. The ethanol perfusions principally suppressed the firing of the neurons in the dialysis area. The NMDA perfusions initially increased the firing of local neurons, then caused electrical silence. These drug delivery/cell recording sessions were performed with 1-4 day intersession intervals over a 1-month period. The described method provides a tool to elaborate the pharmacology of primate hippocampal neurons during behavior and without the confounding effects of systemic drug administrations. PMID:10719268

  2. Segmental cable evaluation of somatic transients in hippocampal neurons (CA1, CA3, and dentate).

    PubMed Central

    Turner, D A

    1984-01-01

    This study describes a detailed cable model of neuronal structure, which can predict the effects of discrete transient inputs. Neurons in in vitro hippocampal slices (CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells and dentate granule neurons; n = 4 each) were physiologically characterized and stained with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The HRP morphology was approximated with numerous small segments. The cable model included both these segments and spatially dispersed dendritic spines. The transient response function at the soma of the segmental model was numerically derived, and charging responses to simulated current inputs were computed. These simulations were compared with the physiological charging responses from the somatic penetrations, using an analysis of the charging time constants (tau i) and intercepts. The time constant ratio (tau 0/tau 1) did not significantly differ between the observed and simulated responses. A second index of comparison was the equivalent cylinder electrotonic length (L), which was derived using only the tau i values and their intercepts. The L values also did not differ significantly between the observed and simulated transients and averaged 0.91 length constant. Thus, using criteria based only on analysis of charging responses, the segmental cable model recreated accurately the observed transients at the soma. The equivalent cylinder model (with a lumped soma) could also adequately simulate the observed somatic transients, using the same criteria. However, the hippocampal neurons (particularly the pyramidal cells) did not appear to satisfy the equivalent cylinder assumption anatomically. Thus, the analysis of somatic charging transients alone may not be sufficient to discriminate between the two models of hippocampal neurons. Anatomical evidence indicates that, particularly for discrete dendritic inputs, the detailed segmental model may be more appropriate than the equivalent cylinder model. PMID:6743759

  3. Neurite formation by neurons derived from adult rat hippocampal progenitor cells is susceptible to myelin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mellough, Carla B; Cho, Seongeun; Wood, Andrew; Przyborski, Stefan

    2011-09-01

    Myelin-associated inhibitors expressed following injury to the adult central nervous system (CNS) induce growth cone collapse and retraction of the axonal cytoskeleton. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is a bi-functional molecule that promotes neuritogenesis in some immature neurons during development then becomes inhibitory to neurite outgrowth as neurons mature. Progress is being made towards the elucidation of the downstream events that regulate myelin inhibition of regeneration in neuronal populations. However it is not known how adult-derived neural stem cells or progenitors respond to myelin during neuronal differentiation and neuritogenesis. Here we examine the effect of MAG on neurons derived from an adult rat hippocampal progenitor cell line (AHPCs). We show that, unlike their developmental counterparts, AHPC-derived neurons are susceptible to MAG inhibition of neuritogenesis during differentiation and display a 57% reduction in neurite outgrowth when compared with controls. We demonstrate that this effect can be overcome (by up to 69%) by activation of the neurotrophin, cyclic AMP and protein kinase A pathways or by Rho-kinase suppression. We also demonstrate that combination of these factors enhanced neurite outgrowth from differentiating neurons in the presence of MAG. This work provides important information for the successful generation of new neurons from adult neural stem cell populations within compromised adult circuitry and is thus directly relevant to endogenous repair and regeneration of the adult CNS. PMID:21256909

  4. Brain Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Directs the Transition from Stem Cells to Mature Neurons During Postnatal/Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Estévez, Vanesa; Oueslati-Morales, Carlos O; Li, Lingling; Pickel, James; Morales, Aixa V; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The specific actions of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and the role of brain-derived IGF-I during hippocampal neurogenesis have not been fully defined. To address the influence of IGF-I on the stages of hippocampal neurogenesis, we studied a postnatal/adult global Igf-I knockout (KO) mice (Igf-I(-/-) ) and a nervous system Igf-I conditional KO (Igf-I(Δ/Δ) ). In both KO mice we found an accumulation of Tbr2(+) -intermediate neuronal progenitors, some of which were displaced in the outer granule cell layer (GCL) and the molecular layer (ML) of the dentate gyrus (DG). Similarly, more ectopic Ki67(+) - cycling cells were detected. Thus, the GCL was disorganized with significant numbers of Prox1(+) -granule neurons outside this layer and altered morphology of radial glial cells (RGCs). Dividing progenitors were also generated in greater numbers in clonal hippocampal stem cell (HPSC) cultures from the KO mice. Indeed, higher levels of Hes5 and Ngn2, transcription factors that maintain the stem and progenitor cell state, were expressed in both HPSCs and the GCL-ML from the Igf-I(Δ/Δ) mice. To determine the impact of Igf-I deletion on neuronal generation in vivo, progenitors in Igf-I(-/-) and Igf-I(+/+) mice were labeled with a GFP-expressing vector. This revealed that in the Igf-I(-/-) mice more GFP(+) -immature neurons were formed and they had less complex dendritic trees. These findings indicate that local IGF-I plays critical roles during postnatal/adult hippocampal neurogenesis, regulating the transition from HPSCs and progenitors to mature granule neurons in a cell stage-dependent manner. Stem Cells 2016;34:2194-2209. PMID:27144663

  5. Activation of GABA(A) receptors by taurine and muscimol blocks the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Paula-Lima, Andréa C; De Felice, Fernanda G; Brito-Moreira, Jordano; Ferreira, Sérgio T

    2005-12-01

    The beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) is centrally related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is potently neurotoxic to central nervous system neurons. The neurotoxicity of Abeta has been partially related to the over activation of glutamatergic transmission and excitotoxicity. Taurine is a naturally occurring beta-amino acid present in the mammalian brain. Due to its safety and tolerability, taurine has been clinically used in humans in the treatment of a number of non-neurological disorders. Here, we show that micromolar doses of taurine block the neurotoxicity of Abeta to rat hippocampal and cortical neurons in culture. Moreover, taurine also rescues central neurons from the excitotoxicity induced by high concentrations of extracellular glutamate. Neuroprotection by taurine is abrogated by picrotoxin, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist. GABA and muscimol, an agonist of the GABA(A) receptor, also block neuronal death induced by Abeta in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons. These results suggest that activation of GABA(A) receptors protects neurons against Abeta toxicity in AD-affected regions of the mammalian brain and that taurine should be investigated as a novel therapeutic tool in the treatment of AD and of other neurological disorders in which excitotoxicity plays a relevant role. PMID:16150468

  6. NAAG reduces NMDA receptor current in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons of acute slices and dissociated neurons.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Richard; Coyle, Joseph T; Tsai, Guochan; Greene, Robert W

    2005-01-01

    N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is an abundant neuropeptide in the nervous system, yet its functions are not well understood. Pyramidal neurons of the CA1 sector of acutely prepared hippocampal slices were recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. At low concentrations (20 microM), NAAG reduced isolated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated synaptic currents or NMDA-induced currents. The NAAG-induced change in the NMDA concentration/response curve suggested that the antagonism was not competitive. However, the NAAG-induced change in the concentration/response curve for the NMDAR co-agonist, glycine, indicated that glycine can overcome the NAAG antagonism. The antagonism of the NMDAR induced by NAAG was still observed in the presence of LY-341495, a potent and selective mGluR3 antagonist. Moreover, in dissociated pyramidal neurons of the CA1 region, NAAG also reduced the NMDA current and this effect was reversed by glycine. These results suggest that NAAG reduces the NMDA currents in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:15354184

  7. Amyloid beta oligomers induce neuronal elasticity changes in age-dependent manner: a force spectroscopy study on living hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ungureanu, Andreea-Alexandra; Benilova, Iryna; Krylychkina, Olga; Braeken, Dries; De Strooper, Bart; Van Haesendonck, Chris; Dotti, Carlos G; Bartic, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Small soluble species of amyloid-beta (Aβ) formed during early peptide aggregation stages are responsible for several neurotoxic mechanisms relevant to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), although their interaction with the neuronal membrane is not completely understood. This study quantifies the changes in the neuronal membrane elasticity induced by treatment with the two most common Aβ isoforms found in AD brains: Aβ40 and Aβ42. Using quantitative atomic force microscopy (AFM), we measured for the first time the static elastic modulus of living primary hippocampal neurons treated with pre-aggregated Aβ40 and Aβ42 soluble species. Our AFM results demonstrate changes in the elasticity of young, mature and aged neurons treated for a short time with the two Aβ species pre-aggregated for 2 hours. Neurons aging under stress conditions, showing aging hallmarks, are the most susceptible to amyloid binding and show the largest decrease in membrane stiffness upon Aβ treatment. Membrane stiffness defines the way in which cells respond to mechanical forces in their environment and has been shown to be important for processes such as gene expression, ion-channel gating and neurotransmitter vesicle transport. Thus, one can expect that changes in neuronal membrane elasticity might directly induce functional changes related to neurodegeneration. PMID:27173984

  8. Amyloid beta oligomers induce neuronal elasticity changes in age-dependent manner: a force spectroscopy study on living hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ungureanu, Andreea-Alexandra; Benilova, Iryna; Krylychkina, Olga; Braeken, Dries; De Strooper, Bart; Van Haesendonck, Chris; Dotti, Carlos G.; Bartic, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Small soluble species of amyloid-beta (Aβ) formed during early peptide aggregation stages are responsible for several neurotoxic mechanisms relevant to the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), although their interaction with the neuronal membrane is not completely understood. This study quantifies the changes in the neuronal membrane elasticity induced by treatment with the two most common Aβ isoforms found in AD brains: Aβ40 and Aβ42. Using quantitative atomic force microscopy (AFM), we measured for the first time the static elastic modulus of living primary hippocampal neurons treated with pre-aggregated Aβ40 and Aβ42 soluble species. Our AFM results demonstrate changes in the elasticity of young, mature and aged neurons treated for a short time with the two Aβ species pre-aggregated for 2 hours. Neurons aging under stress conditions, showing aging hallmarks, are the most susceptible to amyloid binding and show the largest decrease in membrane stiffness upon Aβ treatment. Membrane stiffness defines the way in which cells respond to mechanical forces in their environment and has been shown to be important for processes such as gene expression, ion-channel gating and neurotransmitter vesicle transport. Thus, one can expect that changes in neuronal membrane elasticity might directly induce functional changes related to neurodegeneration. PMID:27173984

  9. Dehydroepiandrosterone protects male and female hippocampal neurons and neuroblastoma cells from glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Marques, Claudia; Arbo, Bruno Dutra; Ruiz-Palmero, Isabel; Ortiz-Rodriguez, Ana; Ghorbanpoor, Samar; Kucharski, Luiz Carlos; Arevalo, Maria A; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia M

    2016-08-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) modulates neurogenesis, neuronal function, neuronal survival and metabolism, enhancing mitochondrial oxidative capacity. Glucose deprivation and hypometabolism have been implicated in the mechanisms that mediate neuronal damage in neurological disorders, and some studies have shown that these mechanisms are sexually dimorphic. It was also demonstrated that DHEA is able to attenuate the hypometabolism that is related to some neurodegenerative diseases, eliciting neuroprotective effects in different experimental models of neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DHEA on the viability of male and female hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells exposed to glucose deprivation. It was observed that after 12h of pre-treatment, DHEA was able to protect SH-SY5Y cells from glucose deprivation for 6h (DHEA 10(-12), 10(-8) and 10(-6)M) and 8h (DHEA 10(-8)M). In contrast, DHEA was not neuroprotective against glucose deprivation for 12 or 24h. DHEA (10(-8)M) also protected SH-SY5Y cells when added together or even 1h after the beginning of glucose deprivation (6h). Furthermore, DHEA (10(-8)M) also protected primary neurons from both sexes against glucose deprivation. In summary, our findings indicate that DHEA is neuroprotective against glucose deprivation in human neuroblastoma cells and in male and female mouse hippocampal neurons. These results suggest that DHEA could be a promising candidate to be used in clinical studies aiming to reduce neuronal damage in people from both sexes. PMID:27174000

  10. Epileptiform stimulus increases Homer 1a expression to modulate synapse number and activity in hippocampal cultures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Popko, Jonathan; Krogh, Kelly A.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons adapt to seizure activity structurally and functionally to attenuate hyperactive neural circuits. Homer proteins provide a scaffold in the postsynaptic density (PSD) by binding to ligands through an EVH1 domain and to other Homer proteins by a coiled-coil domain. The short Homer isoform 1a (H1a) has a ligand-binding domain but lacks a coiled-coil domain and thus acts in a dominant-negative manner to uncouple Homer scaffolds. Here, we show that treating rat hippocampal cultures with bicuculline and 4-aminopyridine (Bic+4-AP) evoked epileptiform activity and synchronized Ca2+ spiking, measured with whole cell current-clamp and fura-2-based digital imaging; Bic+4-AP increased H1a mRNA through the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Treatment with Bic+4-AP for 4 h attenuated burst firing and induced synapse loss. Synaptic changes were measured using a confocal imaging-based assay that quantified clusters of PSD-95 fused to green fluorescent protein. Treatment with an mGluR5 antagonist blocked H1a expression, synapse loss, and burst attenuation. Overexpression of H1a inhibited burst firing similar to Bic+4-AP treatment. Furthermore, knockdown of H1a using a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) strategy reduced synapse loss and burst attenuation induced by Bic+4-AP treatment. Thus an epileptiform stimulus applied to hippocampal neurons in culture induced burst firing and H1a expression through the activation of mGluR5; a 4-h exposure to this stimulus resulted in synapse loss and burst attenuation. These results suggest that H1a expression functions in a negative-feedback manner to reduce network excitability by regulating the number of synapses. PMID:23274309